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Sample records for natural waters acidic

  1. Adsorption of humic acids and trace metals in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies concerning the interactions between suspended hydrous iron oxide and dissolved humic acids and trace metals are reported. As a major component of dissolved organic matters and its readiness for adsorption at the solid/water interface, humic acids may play a very important role in the organometallic geochemistry of suspended sediments and in determining the fate and distribution of trace metals, pesticides and anions in natural water systems. Most of the solid phases in natural waters contain oxides and hydroxides. The most simple promising theory to describe the interactions of hydrous iron oxide interface is the surface complex formation model. In this model, the adsorptions of humic acids on hydrous iron oxide may be interpreted as complex formation of the organic bases (humic acid oxyanions) with surface Fe ions. Measurements on adsorptions were made in both fresh water and seawater. Attempts have been made to fit our data to Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Adsorption equilibrium constants were determined.

  2. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Stream water pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southwast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site. 10 references, 2 tables.

  3. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream-flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid-forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Streamwater pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by calcium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southeast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site.

  4. Evaluation of the Goulden Large-Sample Extractor for acidic compounds in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Headley, J.V.; Dickson, L.C.; Swyngedouw, C.; Crosley, B.; Whitley, G.

    1996-11-01

    The Goulden Large-Sample Extractor has received extensive use for monitoring and surveillance surveys of natural waters impacted by pulp and paper mills and agricultural runoff water. However, there are concerns about whether this sampler, which was originally developed for extractions of hydrophobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and other organochlorines, is suitable for sampling polar acidic compounds. The sampler was evaluated for recovery of surrogates for resin acids, fatty acids, herbicide acids, and chlorophenols from natural waters. Performance tests conducted in this work indicated that three surrogate compounds with K{sub p} (C{sub DCM}/C{sub water pH 2}) values from 16,700 to 1,260 were extracted from pH 2-adjusted 20-L water samples with an average recovery of 83.6%. The surrogate compounds with K{sub p} values less than 1,000 were extracted with significantly lower recoveries. The variability ranged from 10 to 36% relative standard deviation. Specific performance criteria (percent recoveries {+-} standard deviation, number of determinations in parentheses) observed for the surrogates 2,4,6-tribromophenol, heptadecanoic acid, O-methylpodocarpic acid, dichlorophenylacetic acid, and 4-bromophenol were 89.5 {+-} 24.0 (17), 82.8 {+-} 21.7 (18), 78.4 {+-} 14.8 (18), 41.9 {+-} 8.5 (16), and 22.1 {+-} 8.1 (19), respectively. Low recoveries of the 4-bromophenol surrogate may be due in part to side reactions with diazomethane. As a result, 4-bromophenol is not recommended as a surrogate. These values can be used to provide guidelines for acceptable surrogate recoveries and validation of extractions of polar acidic compounds.

  5. Impacts on water quality and biota from natural acid rock drainage in Colorado's Lake Creek watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, D.A.; Sares, Matthew A.; Policky, Greg A.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Church, Stanley E.

    2006-01-01

    Colorado's Lake Creek watershed hosts natural acid rock drainage that significantly impacts surface water, streambed sediment, and aquatic life. The source of the ARD is a group of iron-rich springs that emerge from intensely hydrothermally altered, unexploited, low-grade porphyry copper mineralization in the Grizzly Peak Caldera. Source water chemistry includes pH of 2.5 and dissolved metal concentrations of up to 277 mg/L aluminum, 498 mg/L iron, and 10 mg/L copper. From the hydrothermally altered area downstream for 27 kilometers to Twin Lakes Reservoir, metal concentrations in streambed sediment are elevated and the watershed experiences locally severe adverse impacts to aquatic life due to the acidic, metal-laden water. The water and sediment quality of Twin Lakes Reservoir is sufficiently improved that the reservoir supports a trout fishery, and remnants of upstream ARD are negligible.

  6. Selective Removal of Lanthanides from Natural Waters, Acidic Streams and Dialysate

    SciTech Connect

    Yantasee, Wassana; Fryxell, Glen E.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Koonsiripaiboon, View; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-09-15

    The increased demand for the lanthanides in commercial products result in increased production of lanthanide containing ores, increasing public exposure to the lanthanides, both from various commercial products and from production wastes/effluents. This work investigates lanthanide (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Lu) binding properties of self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous silica supports (SAMMS®) that were functionalized with diphosphonic acid (DiPhos), acetamide phosphonic acid (AcPhos), propionamide phosphonic acid (ProPhos), and 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO) from natural waters (river, ground, and sea waters), acid solutions (to mimic certain industrial process streams), and dialysate and compares their performance to a high surface area activated carbon. The properties include sorption affinity, capacity, and sorption kinetics. Stability and regenerability of SAMMS materials were also investigated. Going from the acid side over to the alkaline side, the AcPhos- and DiPhos-SAMMS maintain their outstanding affinity for lanthanides, which enable the use of the materials in the systems where the pH may fluctuate. While the activated carbon is as effective as 1,2-HOPO-SAMMS for capturing lanthanides in natural (alkaline) waters, it has no affinity in acid solutions (pH 2.4) and low affinity in carbonate-rich dialysate. Over 99% of 100 ug/L of Gd in dialysate was removed by the ProPhos-SAMMS after ten minutes. SAMMS can be regenerated with an acid wash (0.5 M HCl) without losing the binding properties, for a number of regeneration cycles. In acid solutions, PhoPhos- and 1,2-HOPO-SAMMS have differing affinity along the lanthanide series, suggesting their potential for chromatographic lanthanide separations. Thus, SAMMS materials have a great potential to be used as sorbents in large scale treatment of lanthanides, lanthanide separation prior to analytical instruments, and sorbent dialyzers for lanthanide clearances.

  7. Performance of the Goulden large volume sampler for acidic compounds in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Headley, J.; Dickson, L.; Swyngedouw, C.; Crosley, D.; Whitley, G.

    1995-12-31

    The Goulden large volume sampler (LVX) has received extensive use for monitoring and surveillance surveys of natural waters impacted by pulp and paper mills, and agricultural run-off water. Despite this use, there is a lack of performance criteria for acidic contaminants, There are concerns about whether this sampler which was originally developed for extractions of OCs, PCBs and PAHs, was suitable for sampling polar acidic compounds. Performance tests conducted in this work, indicated that with the exception of 4-bromophenol and dichlorophenylacetic acid, surrogate compounds were recovered from pH 2 adjusted samples (20 1) at approximately 80 {+-} 15--35% recovery. Although these recoveries were comparable to values attainable for neutral pesticides, the standard deviations were up to four times greater than values reported for neutral compounds, for concentrations of analytes at low ppt levels. Specific performance criteria (percent recoveries where the number of determinations are given in parenthesis) observed for the proposed surrogates heptadecanoic acid, dichlorophenylacetic acid, 4-bromophenol, o-methylpodocarpic acid and 2,4,6-tribromophenol were: 86.6(19) {+-} 26.8; 46.1(18) {+-} 14.5; 31.6(19) {+-} 24.1; 78.4(18) {+-} 14.7; and95.2(18) {+-} 33.6 respectively. These values can be used to provide guidelines for acceptable surrogate recoveries, and validation of extractions of acidic polar compounds.

  8. PHOTOLYSIS RATES OF (2,4,5-TRICHLOROPHENOXY)ACETIC ACID AND 4-AMINO-3,5,6-TRICHLOROPICOLINIC ACID IN NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photoreactions of (2,45-trichlorophenoxy) acetic acid (2,4,5-T) and 4-amino-3,5,6-trichloropicolinic acid (picloram) were studied in distilled water, natural water samples, fulvic acid solutions, and solutions containing iron (III) and/or hydrogen peroxide to determine the effect...

  9. To assess of behavior of natural colloid (soil extraction and fractionation of natural water) humus acid in comparison with synthetic humus acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Marina; Shkinev, Valery

    2015-04-01

    To study and predict the fate of natural colloid - nanoparticles in surface water or soil extraction - necessary to understand the features of the migration and physic-chemical activity of biocolloids. Comparison of the behavior of natural biocolloids, such as humus acid extracts of soil or natural water with artificial, synthetic humic acids (introduced into the environment) allows you to explore the mechanism of formation and transformation biocolloids under the influence of a number of parameters. In this work, we studied these interactions in natural surface waters from lakes and soil (Russian Federation, Kola North and Western Siberia) which displaying contrast organic and inorganic compositions. During the study, researches identified zonal features influence on the qualitative and quantitative composition of colloids, their stability and chemical activity. A model approach was also followed with synthetic water of comparable composition in order to better understand the driving mechanisms. We investigated the size, zeta potential and other physical and chemical parameters of the system. Particular attention is given to the process of complexation with heavy metal ions. As humic substances have excellent complexion properties and reduce the toxicity of many metal ions. The study of such non-static natural systems allow studying the features of the existence of natural colloidal components. The use of synthetic humic substances, which were introduced into the natural environment possible to study the standard mechanisms of formation, development and destruction of colloidal polymer systems. The obtained results allowed with used computer programs MatnLab, MathCad, Statistics simulate the processes of formation, development and functioning of natural colloids.

  10. Selective removal of lanthanides from natural waters, acidic streams and dialysate.

    PubMed

    Yantasee, Wassana; Fryxell, Glen E; Addleman, R Shane; Wiacek, Robert J; Koonsiripaiboon, View; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2009-09-15

    The increased demand for the lanthanides in commercial products result in increased production of lanthanide containing ores, which increases public exposure to the lanthanides, both from various commercial products and from production wastes/effluents. This work investigates lanthanide (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd and Lu) binding properties of self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous silica supports (SAMMS), that were functionalized with diphosphonic acid (DiPhos), acetamide phosphonic acid (AcPhos), propionamide phosphonic acid (Prop-Phos), and 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO), from natural waters (river, ground and sea waters), acid solutions (to mimic certain industrial process streams), and dialysate. The affinity, capacity, and kinetics of the lanthanide sorption, as well as regenerability of SAMMS materials were investigated. Going from the acid side over to the alkaline side, the AcPhos- and DiPhos-SAMMS maintain their outstanding affinity for lanthanides, which enable the use of the materials in the systems where the pH may fluctuate. In acid solutions, Prop-Phos- and 1,2-HOPO-SAMMS have differing affinity along the lanthanide series, suggesting their use in chromatographic lanthanide separation. Over 95% of 100 microg/L of Gd in dialysate was removed by the Prop-Phos-SAMMS after 1 min and 99% over 10 min. SAMMS can be regenerated with an acid wash (0.5M HCl) without losing the binding properties. Thus, they have a great potential to be used as in large-scale treatment of lanthanides, lanthanide separation prior to analytical instruments, and in sorbent dialyzers for treatment of acute lanthanide poisoning. PMID:19345006

  11. Selective removal of lanthanides from natural waters, acidic streams and dialysate

    PubMed Central

    Yantasee, Wassana; Fryxell, Glen E.; Addleman, R. Shane; Wiacek, Robert J.; Koonsiripaiboon, View; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    The increased demand for the lanthanides in commercial products result in increased production of lanthanide containing ores, which increases public exposure to the lanthanides, both from various commercial products and from production wastes/effluents. This work investigates lanthanide (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd and Lu) binding properties of self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous silica supports (SAMMS™), that were functionalized with diphosphonic acid (DiPhos), acetamide phosphonic acid (AcPhos), propionamide phosphonic acid (Prop-Phos), and 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO), from natural waters (river, ground and sea waters), acid solutions (to mimic certain industrial process streams), and dialysate. The affinity, capacity, and kinetics of the lanthanide sorption, as well as regenerability of SAMMS materials were investigated. Going from the acid side over to the alkaline side, the AcPhos- and DiPhos-SAMMS maintain their outstanding affinity for lanthanides, which enable the use of the materials in the systems where the pH may fluctuate. In acid solutions, Prop-Phos- and 1,2-HOPO-SAMMS have differing affinity along the lanthanide series, suggesting their use in chromatographic lanthanide separation. Over 95% of 100 µg/L of Gd in dialysate was removed by the Prop-Phos-SAMMS after 1 min and 99% over 10 min. SAMMS can be regenerated with an acid wash (0.5 M HCl) without losing the binding properties. Thus, they have a great potential to be used as in large-scale treatment of lanthanides, lanthanide separation prior to analytical instruments, and in sorbent dialyzers for treatment of acute lanthanide poisoning. PMID:19345006

  12. Toxic diatoms and domoic acid in natural and iron enriched waters of the oceanic Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Mary W.; Bargu, Sibel; Coale, Susan L.; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.; Garcia, Ana C.; Roberts, Kathryn J.; Sekula-Wood, Emily; Bruland, Kenneth W.; Coale, Kenneth H.

    2010-01-01

    Near-surface waters ranging from the Pacific subarctic (58°N) to the Southern Ocean (66°S) contain the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA), associated with the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia. Of the 35 stations sampled, including ones from historic iron fertilization experiments (SOFeX, IronEx II), we found Pseudo-nitzschia at 34 stations and DA measurable at 14 of the 26 stations analyzed for DA. Toxin ranged from 0.3 fg·cell−1 to 2 pg·cell−1, comparable with levels found in similar-sized cells from coastal waters. In the western subarctic, descent of intact Pseudo-nitzschia likely delivered significant amounts of toxin (up to 4 μg of DA·m−2·d−1) to underlying mesopelagic waters (150–500 m). By reexamining phytoplankton samples from SOFeX and IronEx II, we found substantial amounts of DA associated with Pseudo-nitzschia. Indeed, at SOFeX in the Antarctic Pacific, DA reached 220 ng·L−1, levels at which animal mortalities have occurred on continental shelves. Iron ocean fertilization also occurs naturally and may have promoted blooms of these ubiquitous algae over previous glacial cycles during deposition of iron-rich aerosols. Thus, the neurotoxin DA occurs both in coastal and oceanic waters, and its concentration, associated with changes in Pseudo-nitzschia abundance, likely varies naturally with climate cycles, as well as with artificial iron fertilization. Given that iron fertilization in iron-depleted regions of the sea has been proposed to enhance phytoplankton growth and, thereby, both reduce atmospheric CO2 and moderate ocean acidification in surface waters, consideration of the potentially serious ecosystem impacts associated with DA is prudent. PMID:21068374

  13. Determination of phosphate in natural waters by activation analysis of tungstophosphoric acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Herbert E.; Hahn, Richard B.

    1969-01-01

    Activation analysis may be used to determine quantitatively traces of phosphate in natural waters. Methods based on the reaction 31P(n,γ)32P are subject to interference by sulfur and chlorine which give rise to 32P through n,p and n,α reactions. If the ratio of phosphorus to sulfur or chlorine is small, as it is in most natural waters, accurate analyses by these methods are difficult to achieve. In the activation analysis method, molybdate and tungstate ions are added to samples containing phosphate ion to form tungstomolybdophosphoric acid. The complex is extracted with 2,6-dimethyl-4-heptanone. After activation of an aliquot of the organic phase for 1 hour at a flux of 1013 neutrons per cm2, per second, the gamma spectrum is essentially that of tungsten-187. The induced activity is proportional to the concentration of phosphate in the sample. A test of the method showed it to give accurate results at concentrations of 4 to at least 200 p.p.b. of phosphorus when an aliquot of 100 μl. was activated. By suitable reagent purification, counting for longer times, and activation of larger aliquots, the detection limit could be lowered several hundredfold.

  14. Is the habitation of acidic-water sanctuaries by galaxiid fish facilitated by natural organic matter modification of sodium metabolism?

    PubMed

    Glover, Chris N; Donovan, Katherine A; Hill, Jonathan V

    2012-01-01

    Acidic waters of New Zealand's West Coast are hypothesized to be a refuge for native galaxiid fish, allowing them to escape predation from acid-sensitive invasive salmonid species. To determine the mechanisms by which galaxiids tolerate low pH, we investigated sodium metabolism in inanga Galaxias maculatus in response to water pH, short-term acclimation to acidic waters, the presence and source of natural organic matter (NOM), and fish life history. Contrary to expectation, inanga were physiologically sensitive to acid exposure, displaying inhibited sodium influx and exacerbated sodium efflux. Short-term (144 h) acclimation to acid did not modify this effect, and NOM did not exert a protective effect on sodium metabolism at low pH. Inanga sourced from naturally acidic West Coast waters did, however, display a sodium influx capacity (J(max)) that was significantly elevated when compared with that of fish collected from neutral waters. All inanga, independent of source, exhibited exceptionally high sodium uptake affinities (18-40 μM) relative to previously studied freshwater teleosts. Although inanga displayed relatively poor physiological tolerance to acidic waters, their high sodium influx affinity coupled with their occupation of near-coastal waters with elevated sodium levels may permit habitation of low-pH freshwaters. PMID:22902374

  15. Concentration and fractionation of hydrophobic organic acid constituents from natural waters by liquid chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    A scheme is presented which used adsorption chromatography with pH gradient elution and size-exclusion chromatography to concentrate and separate hydrophobic organic acids from water. A review of chromatographic processes involved in the flow scheme is also presented. Organic analytes which appear in each aqueous fraction are quantified by dissolved organic carbon analysis. Hydrophobic organic acids in a water sample are concentrated on a porous acrylic resin. These acids usually constitute approximately 30-50 percent of the dissolved organic carbon in an unpolluted water sample and are eluted with an aqueous eluent (dilute base). The concentrate is then passed through a column of polyacryloylmorpholine gel, which separates the acids into high- and low-molecular-weight fractions. The high- and low-molecular-weight eluates are reconcentrated by adsorption chromatography, then are eluted with a pH gradient into strong acids (predominately carboxylic acids) and weak acids (predominately phenolic compounds). For standard compounds and samples of unpolluted waters, the scheme fractionates humic substances into strong and weak acid fractions that are separated from the low molecular weight acids. A new method utilizing conductivity is also presented to estimate the acidic components in the methanol fraction.

  16. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  17. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  18. Amino-acid uptake by mussels, Mytilus edulis, from natural sea water in a flow-through system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebers, D.; Winkler, A.

    1984-03-01

    Natural Wadden Sea water taken from the North Sea (island of Sylt) was pumped at rates of 150 and 300 l h-1 through a 4 l plexiglass tube mounted on a wooden tripod on the beach. The tube was densely filled with numerous cleaned mussels, Mytilus edulis. HPLC analysis of sea water showed that total dissolved amino acids are patchily distributed, varying by 100 % within 15 min, though proportions of individual amino acids were remarkably constant. Total amino-acid concentrations were 1528±669 nM (N=3) in October 1983 and 1198±597 nM (N=7) in July 1984. Samples taken at the entrance and the outlet of the experimental mussel bed revealed that the mussels had taken up 29 to 66 % of the amino acids dissolved in sea water. Uptake was observed for all amino acids detected in the chromatograms. 78 % of uptake resulted from the 5 most concentrated amino acids: serine, alanine, glycine/threonine, ornithine, aspartic acid. The nutritional profit obtained from uptake of dissolved amino acids amounted to 12 % (N=5, range 5 23 %, flow rate 150 l h-1) and to 24 % (N=3, range 13 38 %, flow rate 300 l h-1) of metabolic rate. The present data suggest that amino-acid concentration predominantly determines the magnitude of the nutritional profit obtained from uptake, and to a smaller extent the flow rate. These findings are in contrast to results of previous studies on Asterias rubens, interacting in small-volume closed systems with the natural bacterial sea water flora (Siebers, 1982). In these experiments, bacteria, due to rapid uptake, outcompeted the sea stars in absorption of dissolved amino acids. The present results suggest that bivalve mussels, can, due to their large gill surface areas and the great amounts of water pumped through their mantle cavity, successfully compete with bacteria in uptake of dissolved organic matter. Mussels, therefore, suggestedly play an important role in cycling dissolved organic matter.

  19. Cold water fish gelatin modification by a natural phenolic cross-linker (ferulic acid and caffeic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Araghi, Maryam; Moslehi, Zeinab; Mohammadi Nafchi, Abdorreza; Mostahsan, Amir; Salamat, Nima; Daraei Garmakhany, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays use of edible films and coatings is increasing due to their biodegradability and environment friendly properties. Fish gelatin obtained from fish skin wastage can be used as an appropriate protein compound for replacing pork gelatin to produce edible film. In this study films were prepared by combination of fish gelatin and different concentration (0%, 1%, 3%, and 5%) of two phenolic compounds (caffeic acid and ferulic acid). The film was prepared at pH > 10 and temperature of 60˚c under continuous injection of O2 and addition of the plasticizer sorbitol/glycerol. Results showed that solubility, oxygen permeability, and water vapor permeability were decreased for caffeic acid and the highest effect was observed at concentration of 5%. Solubility had a linear relationship with concentration of phenolic compound in film containing ferulic acid, however, no significant change was observed in vapor and O2 permeability. A comparison between two phenolic compounds showed that caffeic acid had the highest effect in decreasing solubility, water vapor permeability, and oxygen permeability. Caffeic acid is more effective phenolic compound compared with Ferulic acid that can increase safety of biodegradable packaging by improving their barrier and physicochemical properties. PMID:26405523

  20. PREDICTING THE PRECIPITATION OF ACID AND DIRECT DYES IN NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple screening test was used to determine whether acid and direct dyes precipitate at calcium concentrations typical of hard waters in the Southeastern Piedmont region of the United States. f 52 dyes tested, only three direct dyes (Direct Black 19, Direct Black 22, and Direct...

  1. Acid generation upon thermal concentration of natural water: The critical water content and the effects of ionic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulvirenti, April L.; Needham, Karen M.; Adel-Hadadi, Mohamad A.; Marks, Charles R.; Gorman, Jeffrey A.; Shettel, Donald L.; Barkatt, Aaron

    2009-10-01

    Thermal evaporation of a variety of simulated pore waters from the region of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, produced acidic liquids and gases during the final stages of evaporation. Several simulated pore waters were prepared and then thermally distilled in order to collect and analyze fractions of the evolved vapor. In some cases, distillates collected towards the end of the distillation were highly acidic; in other cases the pH of the distillate remained comparatively unchanged during the course of the distillation. The results suggest that the pH values of the later fractions are determined by the initial composition of the water. Acid production stems from the hydrolysis of magnesium ions, especially at near dryness. Near the end of the distillation, magnesium nitrate and magnesium chloride begin to lose water of hydration, greatly accelerating their thermal decomposition to form acid. Acid formation is promoted further when precipitated calcium carbonate is removed. Specifically, calcium chloride-rich pore waters containing moderate (10-20 ppm) levels of magnesium and nitrate and low levels of bicarbonate produced mixtures of nitric and hydrochloric acid, resulting in a precipitous drop in pH to values of 1 or lower after about 95% of the original volume was distilled. Waters with either low or moderate magnesium content coupled with high levels of bicarbonate produced slightly basic fractions (pH 7-9). If calcium was present in excess of bicarbonate, waters containing moderate levels of magnesium produced acid even in the presence of bicarbonate, due to the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Other salts such as halite and anhydrite promote the segregation of acidic vapors from residual basic solids. The concomitant release of wet acid gas has implications for the integrity of the alloys under consideration for containers at the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Condensed acid gases at very low pH, especially mixtures of nitric and hydrochloric acid, are

  2. Acid generation upon thermal concentration of natural water: the critical water content and the effects of ionic composition.

    PubMed

    Pulvirenti, April L; Needham, Karen M; Adel-Hadadi, Mohamad A; Marks, Charles R; Gorman, Jeffrey A; Shettel, Donald L; Barkatt, Aaron

    2009-10-13

    Thermal evaporation of a variety of simulated pore waters from the region of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, produced acidic liquids and gases during the final stages of evaporation. Several simulated pore waters were prepared and then thermally distilled in order to collect and analyze fractions of the evolved vapor. In some cases, distillates collected towards the end of the distillation were highly acidic; in other cases the pH of the distillate remained comparatively unchanged during the course of the distillation. The results suggest that the pH values of the later fractions are determined by the initial composition of the water. Acid production stems from the hydrolysis of magnesium ions, especially at near dryness. Near the end of the distillation, magnesium nitrate and magnesium chloride begin to lose water of hydration, greatly accelerating their thermal decomposition to form acid. Acid formation is promoted further when precipitated calcium carbonate is removed. Specifically, calcium chloride-rich pore waters containing moderate (10-20 ppm) levels of magnesium and nitrate and low levels of bicarbonate produced mixtures of nitric and hydrochloric acid, resulting in a precipitous drop in pH to values of 1 or lower after about 95% of the original volume was distilled. Waters with either low or moderate magnesium content coupled with high levels of bicarbonate produced slightly basic fractions (pH 7-9). If calcium was present in excess of bicarbonate, waters containing moderate levels of magnesium produced acid even in the presence of bicarbonate, due to the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Other salts such as halite and anhydrite promote the segregation of acidic vapors from residual basic solids. The concomitant release of wet acid gas has implications for the integrity of the alloys under consideration for containers at the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Condensed acid gases at very low pH, especially mixtures of nitric and hydrochloric acid, are

  3. Seasonal variation of fatty acid content in natural microplankton from the Tumpat coastal waters of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Shamsudin, L

    1998-07-01

    In the search for better understanding on the nutritional quality of natural tropical plankton, samples were collected from shallow coastal waters facing the South China Sea during the dry monsoon (May-September) and the wet monsoon (November-April) seasons from March 1993 to July 1994. The total fatty acid content of the predominantly phytoplankton communities (25-200 microns sieve nets) varied four to fivefold with the lowest value occurring during the dry monsoon when blue-green became predominant. Saturated fatty acid content (SAFA), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and total omega 3 (sigma omega 3) showed the same seasonal pattern as the total fatty acid with high values in October to December 1993. When species of the dinoflagellate Peridinium and Ceratium were present in considerable amount, the docosahexaenoic acid DHA content was high, especially from March to May 1993. The maximum content of eicosapentaenoic acid EPA, total omega-3 fatty acid, PUFA and sigma omega 3 in phytoplankton occurred during the pre-monsoon period (October and November 1993) when the diatoms were present in large amounts. The larger fraction sample (> 200 microns sieve nets) which consisted predominantly of zooplankton had high amounts of PUFA from September to November 1993. PMID:10099722

  4. Transport of perfluoroalkyl acids in a water-saturated sediment column investigated under near-natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Vierke, Lena; Möller, Axel; Klitzke, Sondra

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of the transport of C4-10 perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) and C4,6,8 perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSAs) in a water-saturated sediment column representing a riverbank filtration scenario under near-natural conditions. Short-chain PFCAs and PFSAs with up to six C-atoms showed complete tracer-like breakthrough. Longer chain ones were retarded due to sorption to the sediment or due to other processes in the aqueous phase. The study reports the first column derived sediment-water partition coefficients ranging from 0.01 cm(3) g(-1) to 0.41 cm(3) g(-1) for C4,6 PFSAs and from 0.0 cm(3) g(-1) to 6.5 cm(3) g(-1) for C4,5,6,8,9 PFCAs. The results clearly indicate that short-chain PFCAs and PFSAs may pose a problem if contaminated surface waters are used for drinking water production via riverbank filtration. PMID:24333660

  5. Distribution of aquatic animals relative to naturally acidic waters in the Sierra Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, D.F.; Cooper, S.D.; Brown, A.D.; Mahood, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lakes in the Bench Lake/Mount Pinchot area of Kings Canyon National Park were surveyed in summer 1992 and found to range in pH from 5.0 to 9.3. Ten lakes were acidic (pH < 6.0). Thirty three lakes were chosen for detailed analyses of their chemical and biological characteristics, including eight acidic lakes. Unlike typical Ca-Na-HCO3-dominated Sierra lakes, SO4 concentrations are high enough to classify 19 of these lakes with SO4 as the dominant anion. The source of acidity and SO4 is sulfuric acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite found in metamorphic and granitic rocks in the area. Faunal surveys revealed that yellow-legged frog tadpoles (Rana muscosa), limnephilid caddis larvae (Hesperophylax), and large microcrustaceans (Daphnia, Diaptomus) were rare or absent in acidic lakes and common in lakes with a pH > 6.0. Four species of trout were collected, and their presence appeared to be related to historical stocking patterns. Trout appeared to have large effects on the distributions and abundances of larval amphibians and large, mobile invertebrate taxa that were rare or absent in trout lakes, but common in lakes lacking trout.

  6. Defensive strategies in Geranium sylvaticum, Part 2: Roles of water-soluble tannins, flavonoids and phenolic acids against natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Anu

    2013-11-01

    Geranium sylvaticum is a common herbaceous plant in Fennoscandia, which has a unique phenolic composition. Ellagitannins, proanthocyanidins, galloylglucoses, gallotannins, galloyl quinic acids and flavonoids possess variable distribution in its different organs. These phenolic compounds are thought to have an important role in plant-herbivore interactions. The aim of this study was to quantify these different water-soluble phenolic compounds and measure the biological activity of the eight organs of G. sylvaticum. Compounds were characterized and quantified using HPLC-DAD/MS, in addition, total proanthocyanidins were determined by BuOH-HCl assay and total phenolics by the Folin-Ciocalteau method. Two in vitro biological activity measurements were used: the prooxidant activity was measured by the browning assay and antioxidant activity by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. Organ extracts were fractionated using column chromatography on Sephadex LH-20 and the activities of fractions was similarly measured to evaluate which polyphenol groups contributed the most to the biological activity of each organ. The data on the activity of fractions were examined by multivariate data analysis. The water-soluble extracts of leaves and pistils, which contained over 30% of the dry weight as ellagitannins, showed the highest pro-oxidant activity among the organ extracts. Fraction analysis revealed that flavonoids and galloyl quinic acids also exhibited high pro-oxidant activity. In contrast, the most antioxidant active organ extracts were those of the main roots and hairy roots that contained high amounts of proanthocyanidins in addition to ellagitannins. Analysis of the fractions showed that especially ellagitannins and galloyl quinic acids have high antioxidant activity. We conclude that G. sylvaticum allocates a significant amount of tannins in those plant parts that are important to the fitness of the plant and susceptible to natural enemies, i

  7. Highly efficient microextraction of chlorophenoxy acid herbicides in natural waters using a decanoic acid-based nanostructured solvent prior to their quantitation by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moral, Antonia; Caballo, Carmen; Sicilia, María Dolores; Rubio, Soledad

    2012-01-01

    Solvents used in microextraction require high solubilising capability to efficiently extract the target compounds. In this article, nanostructured solvents made up of alkyl carboxylic acids (ACAs) aggregate are proposed for the efficient microextraction of acidic pesticides from natural waters. The target compounds were chlorophenoxy acid herbicides (CPAHs) widely used in agriculture, forestry and gardening (viz. 2,4-D, MCPA, MCPP, 2,4,5-T and MCPB). The supramolecular solvents (SUPRASs) tested were generated from solutions of reverse micelles of octanoic (OcA), decanoic (DeA) and dodecanoic (DoA) acid in THF by the addition of water, which acted as the coacervating agent. The DeA-based SUPRAS was the most efficient extractant for CPAHs; actual concentration factors (ACFs) of 260 for 2,4-D, 290 for MCPA, and 400 for MCPP, 2,4,5-T and MCPB were obtained. The explanation for so high ACFs can be found in the extremely efficient retention mechanisms that the DeA-based SUPRAS provides for CPAHs (i.e. formation of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions), and the high number of binding sites that it contains (i.e. the concentration of biosurfactant in the SUPRAS was 0.56 mg μL(-1)). Both characteristics permitted to effectively extract the target analytes in a low volume of solvent (about 2 μL of solvent per mL of sample). Others assets of the proposed supramolecular solvent-based microextraction (SUSME) approach included recoveries no dependent on matrix composition, rapidity (sample treatment spent about 15 min), use of low volume of sample (63 mL per analysis) and simplicity (no special lab equipments was needed). Combination with liquid chromatography/ion-trap mass spectrometry [LC-(IT)MS] afforded method quantitation limits for CPAHs within the interval 22-30 ng L(-1). The precision of the method, expressed as relative standard deviation (n=11, [CPAH]=200 ng L(-1)), was in the range 2.9-5.8%. The applicability of the method to the analysis of natural waters

  8. The contribution of humic substances to the acidity of colored natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oliver, B.G.; Thurman, E.M.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    An operationally defined carboxyl content of humic substances extracted from rivers, streams, lakes, wetlands, and groundwaters throughout the United States and Canada is reported. Despite the diversity of the samples, only small variations were observed in this humic carboxyl content. The dissociation behavior of two combined fulvic/humic acid extracts was studied and it was found that the dissociation of the humics varied in a predictable manner with pH. Using a carboxyl content of 10 ??eq/ mg humic organic carbon, and mass action quotient calculated from sample pH, the ionic balances of three highly colored Nova Scotia rivers were estimated. ?? 1983.

  9. Effects of water-soluble natural antioxidants on photosensitized oxidation of conjugated linoleic acid in an oil-in-water emulsion system.

    PubMed

    Liu, T-T; Yang, T-S

    2008-05-01

    The effect of photosensitized oxidation of conjugated linoleic acid in an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion system was studied. Water-soluble natural antioxidants, including apple polyphenols from apple extract, green tea extract, 4-hydroxy-2(or 5)-ethyl-5(or2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone(HEMF), 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (HDMF), and ascorbic acid, were tested for antioxidant activity in this system. The green tea extract showed the highest antioxidant activity followed by ascorbic acid. Apple polyphenols did not give significant antioxidant activity. HEMF and HDMF exhibited a prooxidant effect. The antioxidant activity of tea catechins was also investigated. Of them, EGCG and ECG exhibited antioxidant activity at 50 ppm, but the antioxidant activity between them was not significantly different (P < 0.05). Comparatively, EC, EGC, and GCG showed no significant antioxidative effect at 50 ppm. When the concentration increased to 100 ppm, the antioxidant activity of ECG and EGCG significantly increased compared with that at 50 ppm, and EGCG had higher antioxidant activity than ECG. GCG also showed significant antioxidant activity at 100 ppm. EGCG exhibited the highest antioxidant activity among the tea catechins in the emulsion system at 100 ppm. PMID:18460119

  10. The role of natural purified humic acids in modifying mercury accessibility in water and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Cattani, I.; Zhang, H.; Beone, G.M.; Del Re, A.A.M.; Boccelli, R.; Trevisan, M.

    2009-03-15

    We investigated the influence of different humic acids (HAs, extracted from lignite, compost, and forest soil) on mercury mobility and availability both in a model solution and in soil samples from a mercury-polluted region. The technique of diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT), which is capable of measuring: (i) free metal in solution: (ii) dissociated metal complexes previously mobilized by HA; (iii) mobilized metal-HA complexes that liberate metals by dissociation or by exchange reaction between the metal-HA complexes and the chelating groups on the resin-gel, was used in solutions and soils. The DGT measurements in solution, together with ultrafiltration, allowed estimation of the lability of Hg-HA complexes. Ultrafiltration results were also compared with predictions made by the windermere humic-aqueous model (WHAM). According to both these different approaches, Hg{sup 2+} resulted nearly 100% complexed by HAs, whereas results from ultrafiltration showed that 32 to 72% of the CH{sub 4}Hg{sup +} was bound to the HAs, with higher values for compost and lower values for forest and Aldrich HA. The DGT-measured mercury in soils was below 0.20 {mu}g L{sup -1}, irrespective of the extent of the contamination. Addition of HA increased the concentration of DGT-measured mercury in soil solution up to 100-fold in the contaminated soil and up to 30-fold in the control soil. The level of the increase also depended on the HA. The smallest increase (about 10 times) was found for lignite HA in both control and contaminated soils. The addition of forest HA gave the largest increases in DGT-measured mercury, in particular for the contaminated soil. Overall, the results demonstrated that DGT can be used for estimating the lability of mercury complexes in solution and for verifying enhanced mercury mobility when HA is added to contaminated soils.

  11. Stability of uncoated and fulvic acids coated manufactured CeO2 nanoparticles in various conditions: From ultrapure to natural Lake Geneva waters.

    PubMed

    Oriekhova, Olena; Stoll, Serge

    2016-08-15

    Understanding the behavior of engineered nanoparticles in natural water and impact of water composition in changing conditions is of high importance to predict their fate once released into the environment. In this study we investigated the stability of uncoated and Suwannee River fulvic acids coated CeO2 manufactured nanoparticles in various environmental conditions. The effect of pH changes on the nanoparticle and coating stability was first studied in ultrapure water as well as the variation of zeta potentials and sizes with time in presence of fulvic acids at environmental pH. Then the stability of CeO2 in synthetic and natural Lake Geneva waters was investigated as a function of fulvic acids concentration. Our results indicate that the adsorption of environmentally relevant concentrations of Suwannee River fulvic acids promotes CeO2 stabilization in ultrapure water as well as synthetic water and that the coating stability is high upon pH variations. On the other hand in natural Lake Geneva water CeO2 NPs are found in all cases aggregated due to the effect of heterogeneous organic and inorganic compounds. PMID:27100013

  12. Identification of Novel Perfluoroalkyl Ether Carboxylic Acids (PFECAs) and Sulfonic Acids (PFESAs) in Natural Waters Using Accurate Mass Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS).

    PubMed

    Strynar, Mark; Dagnino, Sonia; McMahen, Rebecca; Liang, Shuang; Lindstrom, Andrew; Andersen, Erik; McMillan, Larry; Thurman, Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Ball, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Recent scientific scrutiny and concerns over exposure, toxicity, and risk have led to international regulatory efforts resulting in the reduction or elimination of certain perfluorinated compounds from various products and waste streams. Some manufacturers have started producing shorter chain per- and polyfluorinated compounds to try to reduce the potential for bioaccumulation in humans and wildlife. Some of these new compounds contain central ether oxygens or other minor modifications of traditional perfluorinated structures. At present, there has been very limited information published on these "replacement chemistries" in the peer-reviewed literature. In this study we used a time-of-flight mass spectrometry detector (LC-ESI-TOFMS) to identify fluorinated compounds in natural waters collected from locations with historical perfluorinated compound contamination. Our workflow for discovery of chemicals included sequential sampling of surface water for identification of potential sources, nontargeted TOFMS analysis, molecular feature extraction (MFE) of samples, and evaluation of features unique to the sample with source inputs. Specifically, compounds were tentatively identified by (1) accurate mass determination of parent and/or related adducts and fragments from in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID), (2) in-depth evaluation of in-source adducts formed during analysis, and (3) confirmation with authentic standards when available. We observed groups of compounds in homologous series that differed by multiples of CF2 (m/z 49.9968) or CF2O (m/z 65.9917). Compounds in each series were chromatographically separated and had comparable fragments and adducts produced during analysis. We detected 12 novel perfluoroalkyl ether carboxylic and sulfonic acids in surface water in North Carolina, USA using this approach. A key piece of evidence was the discovery of accurate mass in-source n-mer formation (H(+) and Na(+)) differing by m/z 21.9819, corresponding to the

  13. Naturally acidic surface and ground waters draining porphyry-related mineralized areas of the Southern Rocky Mountains, Colorado and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Bove, D.J.; Plumlee, G.S.; Runkel, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Acidic, metal-rich waters produced by the oxidative weathering and resulting leaching of major and trace elements from pyritic rocks can adversely affect water quality in receiving streams and riparian ecosystems. Five study areas in the southern Rocky Mountains with naturally acidic waters associated with porphyry mineralization were studied to document variations in water chemistry and processes that control the chemical variations. Study areas include the Upper Animas River watershed, East Alpine Gulch, Mount Emmons, and Handcart Gulch in Colorado and the Red River in New Mexico. Although host-rock lithologies in all these areas range from Precambrian gneisses to Cretaceous sedimentary units to Tertiary volcanic complexes, the mineralization is Tertiary in age and associated with intermediate to felsic composition, porphyritic plutons. Pyrite is ubiquitous, ranging from ???1 to >5 vol.%. Springs and headwater streams have pH values as low as 2.6, SO4 up to 3700 mg/L and high dissolved metal concentrations (for example: Fe up to 400 mg/L; Cu up to 3.5 mg/L; and Zn up to 14.4 mg/L). Intensity of hydrothermal alteration and presence of sulfides are the primary controls of water chemistry of these naturally acidic waters. Subbasins underlain by intensely hydrothermally altered lithologies are poorly vegetated and quite susceptible to storm-induced surface runoff. Within the Red River study area, results from a storm runoff study documented downstream changes in river chemistry: pH decreased from 7.80 to 4.83, alkalinity decreased from 49.4 to <1 mg/L, SO4 increased from 162 to 314 mg/L, dissolved Fe increased from to 0.011 to 0.596 mg/L, and dissolved Zn increased from 0.056 to 0.607 mg/L. Compared to mine drainage in the same study areas, the chemistry of naturally acidic waters tends to overlap but not reach the extreme concentrations of metals and acidity as some mine waters. The chemistry of waters draining these mineralized but unmined areas can be used to

  14. Discovery of Cyanuric Acid During an Assessment of Natural Organic Matter in Stormflow Water of the Santa Ana River, Southern California, 2003-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, Jerry A.; Izbicki, John A.; Rostad, Colleen E.; Noyes, Ted I.; Woodside, Greg

    2007-01-01

    A stormflow study of natural organic matter and organic contaminants in the Santa Ana River, the Mill Creek tributary, and an urban drain tributary discovered cyanuric acid in variable concentrations up to 510 ?g/L. Cyanuric acid was isolated with a hydrophilic natural organic matter (NOM) fraction, and its identity was confirmed by a combination of infrared spectrometry, 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) spectrometry, and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. Cyanuric acid concentrations, based upon 13C-NMR spectral quantitation, increased during the peak and recessional flows of the storm hydrographs during three storms at three sites. The greatest fluxes of cyanuric acid were observed in the Santa Ana River during the third storm. The most likely source of cyanuric acid is as a metabolite of triazine herbicides, based on hydrographs, land uses of the drainage basins, and the yearly application rates of triazine herbicides. The daily flux of cyanuric acid in Santa Ana River stormflow during the third storm was calculated to be about 1 percent of the yearly application rate for triazine herbicides. Cyanuric acid was not detected in ground water at wells adjacent to the Santa Ana River.

  15. Application of natural citric acid sources and their role on arsenic removal from drinking water: a green chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Santanu; Nath, Bibhash; Sarkar, Simita; Islam, Sk Mijanul; Bundschuh, Jochen; Chatterjee, Debashis; Hidalgo, Manuela

    2013-11-15

    Solar Oxidation and Removal of Arsenic (SORAS) is a low-cost non-hazardous technique for the removal of arsenic (As) from groundwater. In this study, we tested the efficiency of natural citric acid sources extracted from tomato, lemon and lime to promote SORAS for As removal at the household level. The experiment was conducted in the laboratory using both synthetic solutions and natural groundwater samples collected from As-polluted areas in West Bengal. The role of As/Fe molar ratios and citrate doses on As removal efficiency were checked in synthetic samples. The results demonstrate that tomato juice (as citric acid) was more efficient to remove As from both synthetic (percentage of removal: 78-98%) and natural groundwater (90-97%) samples compared to lemon (61-83% and 79-85%, respectively) and lime (39-69% and 63-70%, respectively) juices. The As/Fe molar ratio and the citrate dose showed an 'optimized central tendency' on As removal. Anti-oxidants, e.g. 'hydroxycinnamates', found in tomato, were shown to have a higher capacity to catalyze SORAS photochemical reactions compared to 'flavanones' found in lemon or lime. The application of this method has several advantages, such as eco- and user- friendliness and affordability at the household level compared to other low-cost techniques. PMID:23122734

  16. Analysis and detection of the herbicides dimethenamid and flufenacet and their sulfonic and oxanilic acid degradates in natural water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, L.R.; Schneider, R.J.; Thurman, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    Dimethenamid [2-chloro-N-(2,4-dimethyl-3-thienyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide] and flufenacet [N-(4-fluorophenyl)-N-(1-methylethyl)-2-(5-(trifluoromethyl)-1,3,4- thiadiazol-2-yl)oxy] were isolated by C-18 solid-phase extraction and separated from their ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OXA) degradates during their elution using ethyl acetate for the parent compound, followed by methanol for the polar degradates. The parent compounds were detected using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in selected-ion mode. The ESA and OXA degradates were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESPMS) in negative-ion mode. The method detection limits for a 123-mL sample ranged from 0.01 to 0.07 ??g/L. These methods are compatible with existing methods and thus allow for analysis of 17 commonly used herbicides and 18 of their degradation compounds with one extraction. In a study of herbicide transport near the mouth of the Mississippi River during 1999 and 2000, dimethenamid and its ESA and OXA degradates were detected in surface water samples during the annual spring flushes. For flufenacet, the only detections at the study site were for the ESA degradates in samples collected at the peak of the herbicide spring flush in 2000. The low frequency of detections in surface water likely is due to dimethenamid and flufenacet being relatively new herbicides. In addition, detectable amounts of the stable degradates have not been detected in ground water.

  17. Investigation of interparticle forces in natural waters: effects of adsorbed humic acids on iron oxide and alumina surface properties.

    PubMed

    Sander, Sylvia; Mosley, Luke M; Hunter, Keith A

    2004-09-15

    The nature of interparticle forces acting on colloid particle surfaces with adsorbed surface films of the internationally used humic acid standard material, Suwannee River Humic Acid (SHA), has been investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Two particle surfaces were used, alumina and a hydrous iron oxide film coated onto silica particles. Adsorbed SHA dominated the interactive forces for both surface types when present. At low ionic strength and pH > 4, the force curves were dominated by electrostatic repulsion of the electrical double layers, with the extent of repulsion decreasing as electrolyte (NaCl) concentration increased, scaling with the Debye length (kappa(-1)) of the electrolyte according to classical theory. At pH approximately 4, electrostatic forces were largely absent, indicating almost complete protonation of carboxylic acid (-COOH) functional groups on the adsorbed SHA. Under these conditions and also at high electrolyte concentration ([NaCl] > 0.1 M), the absence of electrostatic forces allowed observation of repulsion forces arising from steric interaction of adsorbed SHA as the oxide surfaces approached closely to each other (separation < 10 nm). This steric barrier shrank as electrolyte concentration increased, implying tighter coiling of the adsorbed SHA molecules. In addition, adhesive bridging between surfaces was observed only in the presence of SHA films, implying a strong energy barrier to spontaneous detachment of the surfaces from each other once joined. This adhesion was especially strong in the presence of Ca2+ which appears to bridge SHA layers on each surface. Overall, our results show that SHA is a good model for the NOM adsorbed on colloids. PMID:15487789

  18. Preconcentration of submicrogram amounts of metals from natural water for X-ray energy spectrometric determination using pyrrolidinecarbodithioic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tisue, T.; Seils, C.; Keel, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed for the routine determination of several trace metals in natural waters by X-ray energy spectrometry following precipitation with pyrrolidinecarbodithioate. Preoxidation with persulfate eliminates interferences by organic matter. By optimizing carrier ion selection and measurement conditions, one may determine dithioate-reactive elements with Z less than or equal to 50 by means of their K X-rays, and some with Z greater than or equal to 80 by means of their L X-rays. Determinations are feasible for several elements at concentrations down to 250 ng L/sup -1/, or below. Recoveries are generally greater than 90%, although some exceptions are noted. Reproducibility with real samples averaged about 25% relative standard deviation for five representative elements at concentrations above 250 ng L/sup -1/. 24 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Beyond Naphthenic Acids: Environmental Screening of Water from Natural Sources and the Athabasca Oil Sands Industry Using Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, Mark P.; Peru, Kerry M.; Fahlman, Brian; Hewitt, L. Mark; Frank, Richard A.; Headley, John V.

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing need for environmental screening of natural waters in the Athabasca region of Alberta, Canada, particularly in the differentiation between anthropogenic and naturally-derived organic compounds associated with weathered bitumen deposits. Previous research has focused primarily upon characterization of naphthenic acids in water samples by negative-ion electrospray ionization methods. Atmospheric pressure photoionization is a much less widely used ionization method, but one that affords the possibility of observing low polarity compounds that cannot be readily observed by electrospray ionization. This study describes the first usage of atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (in both positive-ion and negative-ion modes) to characterize and compare extracts of oil sands process water, river water, and groundwater samples from areas associated with oil sands mining activities. When comparing mass spectra previously obtained by electrospray ionization and data acquired by atmospheric pressure photoionization, there can be a doubling of the number of components detected. In addition to polar compounds that have previously been observed, low-polarity, sulfur-containing compounds and hydrocarbons that do not incorporate a heteroatom were detected. These latter components, which are not amenable to electrospray ionization, have potential for screening efforts within monitoring programs of the oil sands.

  20. Beyond Naphthenic Acids: Environmental Screening of Water from Natural Sources and the Athabasca Oil Sands Industry Using Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Mark P; Peru, Kerry M; Fahlman, Brian; Hewitt, L Mark; Frank, Richard A; Headley, John V

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing need for environmental screening of natural waters in the Athabasca region of Alberta, Canada, particularly in the differentiation between anthropogenic and naturally-derived organic compounds associated with weathered bitumen deposits. Previous research has focused primarily upon characterization of naphthenic acids in water samples by negative-ion electrospray ionization methods. Atmospheric pressure photoionization is a much less widely used ionization method, but one that affords the possibility of observing low polarity compounds that cannot be readily observed by electrospray ionization. This study describes the first usage of atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (in both positive-ion and negative-ion modes) to characterize and compare extracts of oil sands process water, river water, and groundwater samples from areas associated with oil sands mining activities. When comparing mass spectra previously obtained by electrospray ionization and data acquired by atmospheric pressure photoionization, there can be a doubling of the number of components detected. In addition to polar compounds that have previously been observed, low-polarity, sulfur-containing compounds and hydrocarbons that do not incorporate a heteroatom were detected. These latter components, which are not amenable to electrospray ionization, have potential for screening efforts within monitoring programs of the oil sands. PMID:26115966

  1. Methylgermanium in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Brent L.; Froelich, Philip N.; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    1985-01-01

    Biological methylation of metallic elements1 and the occurrence and cycling of organometals in the environment have been investigated in Japan during the 1950s and 1960s, where the ingestion of fish and shellfish contaminated with methylmercury compounds caused mercury poisoning2,3. Biomethylation ability has been demonstrated in bacteria, fungi and algae for As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Se, Sn, Te and Tl4-7. Naturally-occurring methylated species have been reported in estuaries and seawater for Sb8, As9, Ge10-13 and Sn14, although recent evidence suggests that some reports of methyltin species result from interferences by Ge and volatile sulphur compounds15. With the exception of Sb8, As9,12,16 and Ge11,12, there are no consistent estuarine or oceanic profiles for methylmetal compounds in the literature from which to judge their biogeochemical behaviour. Early investigations17-19 reported that methylgermanium species do not exist in the aquatic environment. Subsequently, we identified monomethylgermanium (MMGe) and dimethylgermanium (DMGe) in estuaries10,12, the Baltic Sea11 and the Bering and Sargasso seas13. We report here recent measurements of methylgermanium compounds in river water, estuaries, seawater and anoxic basins.

  2. Degradation of emerging contaminants from water under natural sunlight: The effect of season, pH, humic acids and nitrate and identification of photodegradation by-products.

    PubMed

    Koumaki, Elena; Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Nika, Maria-Christina; Bletsou, Anna A; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Eftaxias, Alexander; Stratogianni, Georgia

    2015-11-01

    Both photodegradation and hydrolysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) were investigated in order to evaluate their photochemical fate in aquatic environment and to assess the effect of season and specific characteristics of water (pH, humic acids and nitrate concentration) on the removal of target EDCs and NSAIDs through photodegradation. An additional objective was the identification of the photodegradation by-products of specific NSAIDs and their dependence on irradiation time. Selected compounds' transformation was investigated under natural sunlight radiation while control experiments were conducted in the dark. As expected, most of compounds' degradation rate decreased with decreasing light intensity between two different experimental periods. Most of the tested compounds exhibited different rates of degradation during direct and indirect photolysis. The degradation rate of the selected compounds increased in the presence of NO3(-) and the photodegradation rate was higher for some compounds in alkaline than in acidic solution. The effect of humic acids' presence in the water depends on the absorbance spectrum of the compound and the produced photosensitizers. More specifically, humic acids act as inner filter toward most of the selected NSAIDs and as photosensitizers toward most of the EDCs. The results of the irradiation experiments in the presence of both humic acids and NO3(-), indicate that the direct photolysis is much more efficient than indirect photochemical processes. Finally, several degradation by-products of ketoprofen and diclofenac were identified in the samples, exposed to sunlight. The dependence of these by-products on radiation time is also demonstrated. PMID:26246277

  3. Removal of antibiotics from water in the coexistence of suspended particles and natural organic matters using amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants: A combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuying; Yang, Zhen; Ren, Kexin; Tian, Ziqi; Dong, Chang; Ma, Ruixue; Yu, Ge; Yang, Weiben

    2016-11-01

    Contamination of trace antibiotics is widely found in surface water sources. This work delineates removal of trace antibiotics (norfloxacin (NOR), sulfadiazine (SDZ) or tylosin (TYL)) from synthetic surface water by flocculation, in the coexistence of inorganic suspended particles (kaolin) and natural organic matter (humic acid, HA). To avoid extra pollution caused by petrochemical products-based modification reagents, environmental-friendly amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants, Ctrp and Ctyr, with different functional aromatic-rings structures were employed. Jar tests at various pHs exhibited that, Ctyr, owning phenol groups as electron donors, was favored for elimination of cationic NOR (∼50% removal; optimal pH: 6; optimal dosage: 4mg/L) and TYL (∼60% removal; optimal pH: 7; optimal dosage: 7.5mg/L), due to π-π electron donator-acceptor (EDA) effect and unconventional H-bonds. Differently, Ctrp with indole groups as electron acceptor had better removal rate (∼50%) of SDZ anions (electron donator). According to correlation analysis, the coexisted kaolin and HA played positive roles in antibiotics' removal. Detailed pairwise interactions in molecular level among different components were clarified by spectral analysis and theoretical calculations (density functional theory), which are important for both the structural design of new flocculants aiming at targeted contaminants and understanding the environmental behaviors of antibiotics in water. PMID:27348257

  4. The role of ground-water recharge processes in the formation of natural acid-rock drainage in mineralized mountain watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, A. H.; Bove, D. J.; Verplanck, P. L.

    2009-12-01

    An understanding of the natural production of low-pH and metal-rich ground and surface water (acid-rock drainage, or ARD) in mineralized watersheds is important for establishing pre-mining conditions in mined locations and for evaluating the potential environmental impacts of future mining in unmined locations. The significance of hydrothermal alteration type and lithology and in ARD production is well established, but the role played by climatic factors remains poorly understood. Ground-water recharge processes (e.g., water table depth, seasonal recharge fluctuations, and unsaturated zone residence time) could exert a major influence because they control features of the unsaturated zone that should in turn directly control the oxidation of sulfide minerals in the subsurface. We are exploring the relative importance of different aspects of ground-water recharge in ARD production by performing a series of numerical geochemical modeling experiments with PHREEQC and examining recently collected geochemical and hydrologic data from Handcart Gulch, a mineralized mountain watershed in the Colorado Front Range. Preliminary results suggest that ground-water residence time in the unsaturated zone is of primary importance. However, sulfide oxidation is probably oxygen-limited in deeper unsaturated zones under mountain ridges, meaning that ARD production may be commonly limited by rates of downward oxygen diffusion. Results of this study should assist in predicting possible future changes in ARD production in mountain watersheds under anticipated climate change scenarios.

  5. A new twist to a traditional approach to environmental monitoring: differentiation of oil sands process-affected waters and natural systems by comparison of individual organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlett, A.; Lengger, S.; West, C.; Rowland, S.

    2013-12-01

    Review panels of both the Canadian Federal and Alberta Provincial governments have recommended a complete overhaul of existing monitoring programs of the Athabasca oil sands industry and have called for a greater understanding of the potential impacts of mining activities to allow for future sustainable development. Due to the no release policy, it is critical that leakages of oil sands process-affected waters (OSPW) from tailings ponds can be differentiated from natural waters flowing through the McMurray formation into the Athabasca river system. Environmental monitoring of oil contamination usually entails profiling of known compounds, e.g. the US EPA list of priority Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, but until now a similar approach has not been possible for OSPW due to its extreme complexity. It has been estimated that the number of carboxylic acids, historically referred to as ';naphthenic acids' (NA) in OSPW, to be in excess of 10000 compounds. Until recently, individual structures of these NA were unknown but analyses by tandem gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) have now begun to reveal the individual structures of alicyclic, aromatic and sulphur-containing acids within OSPWs stored in tailings ponds. Now that some individual structures present in OSPW are known and standards are available, a methodological approach similar to traditional oil monitoring can be developed using individual diamondoid NA and recently discovered diacids and applied to tailings pond OSPW and environmental waters. One obstacle to understanding whether the NA present in environmental groundwater samples are associated with particular tailings ponds is the lack of knowledge of the variability of OSPW within and between ponds. In the current study, GCxGC-MS analyses have been applied to statistically compare OSPWs of two industries, both temporally and spatially, using specific, known compounds as well as associated isomers. Although variation within individual ponds was

  6. Iron buffer system in the water column and partitioning in the sediments of the naturally acidic Lake Caviahue, Neuquén, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, J. M.; Diaz, M. M.; Schultz, S.; Temporetti, P.; Pedrozo, F.

    2016-05-01

    Sedimentary iron partitioning was studied for five sediment strata (16 cm depth) at three sampling sites of the naturally-occurring acidic Lake Caviahue (Patagonia, Argentina). Additionally, water column iron was modeled based on five-year period input loadings to study a possible iron buffer system. The partition coefficient between the water column and the total iron content of the sediments was also addressed. Sedimentary iron was found to be distributed, on average, in the following forms: exchangeable (6%), iron oxides (4%), pyrite and reactive organic matter (38%) and residual (non-andesitic) materials with a high content of humic acids (52%). Furthermore, we found that the dissolved iron in the lake was nearly constant throughout the five year period we studied. This is consistent with the existence of an iron buffer system in the lake at pH between 2.0 and 3.0, which may cause differential iron precipitation at the delta of the volcanic river with respect to the deeper northern and southern arms. Sedimentary iron measurements taken at the delta further support the existence of a buffer system, where it was found that the iron content in the sub-superficial stratum (2 cm) was double that of the remainder of the vertical profile at the same site.

  7. Photodecomposition of humic acid and natural organic matter in swamp water using a TiO(2)-coated ceramic foam filter: potential for the formation of disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Mase, Akinori; Funatogawa, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Masaru; Aizawa, Kazuhiko; Kato, Shigekazu; Saito, Yoichi; Ito, Tsukasa; Itabashi, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the photodecomposition of aqueous humic acid (HA) by a TiO(2)-coated ceramic foam filter (TCF) reactor and on the potential for the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) upon chlorination of the photocatalytically treated solutions. This photocatalytic reactor can also be applied to the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) in swamp waters. The proposed photocatalytic reaction system was operated as per standardized methodologies. First, the ability of the TCF to decompose HA (a representative compound of NOM) was evaluated from the changes in the total organic carbon (TOC) and UV(254) with the reaction time. Remarkably, TOC removal and UV(254) values ranging from 44% to 61% and from 60% to 83%, respectively, were achieved. The potential for the formation of DBPs (total trihalomethane and total haloacetic acid) by chlorination of the phototreated solution was strongly dependent on the TOC removal and UV(254) values in the solution. The degree of photodecomposition of NOMs in the swamp water samples and the DBP formation potential showed similar trends as in the case of the standard solutions containing HA. The method used in this study could be effectively used to evaluate the efficiency of TCF for reducing HA and NOM, while suppressing the formation of DBP products. PMID:22921646

  8. SINGLET OXYGEN IN NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Singlet oxygen is a reactive, electronically excited form of molecular oxygen that rapidly oxidizes a wide variety of organic substances, such as the polycyclic aromatics in petroleum hydrocarbon and the amino acids, histidine, tryptophan, and methionine. Studies of water samples...

  9. Acid lakes from natural and anthropogenic causes

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, R.; Binetti, V.P.; Halterman, S.G.

    1981-01-30

    Lakes may be acid because of natural ecological conditions or because of anthropogenic activities. Apparently there has been a recent increase in acidity of many lakes in the northeastern United States. Factors that may be contributing to this increase include the use by utilities of precipitators, sulfur scrubbers, and tall stacks; the use of petroleum; and methods of combustion of fossil fuels.

  10. Interfacial action of natural surfactants in oil/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, K.; Onishi, M.

    1981-09-01

    This paper concerns the tendency of a few natural surfactants at the oil/water interface to induce spontaneous emulsification. N-paraffin (n-dodecane), liquid triglycerides (oleic safflower oil and corn oil), and liquid fatty acids (oleic acid and linoleic acid) were used as the oil phase and distilled water was used as the water phase. Natural surfactants such as cholesterol, lecithin, and oleic acid were applied to the systems as the oil-soluble additives. Lecithin was the most strongly effective in reducing the interfacial tension of the oil/water systems, and cholesterol was effective at the second strength. The oil/water interface of the systems containing the oil-soluble additives changed in various ways as observed by microscopy and the unaided eye. The most remarkable change was found in the system of glycerides containing cholesterol in contact with water, in which crystals of cholesterol were formed at the interface. 13 references.

  11. Nature and origins of acidity in bogs

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    To elucidate the causes of acidity in bogs, all of the processes generating and consuming acidity in a small peat bog in northern Minnesota were measured. These processes include ion exchange, plant nutrient uptake, atmospheric deposition, decomposition, organic acid production, sulfate reduction, and denitrification. Organic acid production was found to be the dominant source of acidity, responsible for the low pH of bog waters and the high acidity in the outflow. Net biological uptake (NBU) is the next largest source of acidity. Ion exchange accounts for only about 40% of the NBU-acidity. Plant uptake and ion exchange are much larger sources of acidity on an annual basis, but much of this acidity is neutralized by decomposition. Sulfate reduction and denitrification are quantitatively unimportant at this site because inputs (NO/sub 3//sup -/ and SO/sub 4/=) are low. Bog water samples and peat cores from bogs across northeastern North America were analyzed to determine if geographic trends in the rates of acidity-generating and -consuming processes exist. Rates of organic acid production varied little across the transect. Higher values of NBU-acidity were observed in maritime bogs than in midcontinental bogs. The effects of transformations of sulfur and nitrogen on the hydrogen-ion cycle were examined in detail. Nitrate appears to be taken up by bryophytes and little is lost to denitrification. Alkalinity from nitrate uptake is low. In contrast, there is a dynamic cycle of oxidation and reduction of sulfur within bogs. Inorganic forms of sulfur are not important storage pools in peat; 35% of the total sulfur input is accumulated as organic S.

  12. PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELING APPLIED TO NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study examines the application of modeling photochemical processes in natural water systems. For many photochemical reactions occurring in natural waters, a simple photochemical model describing reaction rate as a function of intensity, radiation attenuation, reactant absorpt...

  13. Organic acids emissions from natural-gas-fed engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervas, Efthimios; Tazerout, Mohand

    A natural-gas-fed spark-ignition engine, operating under lean conditions, is used for the study of the organic acids exhaust emissions. These pollutants are collected by passing a sample of exhaust gas into deionised water. The final solution is directly analysed by HPLC/UV at 204 nm. Only formic acid is emitted in detectable concentration under the experimental conditions used. Its concentration decreases with the three engine operating parameters studied: spark advance, volumetric efficiency and fuel/air equivalence ratio. Exhaust formic acid concentration is also linked with exhaust oxygen concentration and exhaust temperature. A comparison with other engines (SI engines fed with gasoline and compression ignition engines) from bibliographic data proves that natural-gas-fed engines emit less organic acids than the other two types of engines.

  14. Simulation of Natural Acid Sulfate Weathering in an Alpine Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, R. L.; Miller, William R.; McHugh, John; Catts, John G.

    1992-09-01

    Streams with acidic sulfate compositions (pH less than 3.5) are naturally generated in the alpine Geneva Creek Basin of the southern Rocky Mountains, an area underlain by Proterozoic metamorphic and igneous rocks that are intruded by Tertiary felsic stocks with associated pyritic alteration. These naturally acidic waters are similar in composition to more familiar man-made acid mine waters or to surface waters acidified by sulfate precipitation. Detailed study of the stream compositions has revealed the principal reactions driving the weathering process and was used to estimate the relative effects of snowpack ionic input versus the solute contribution from acid attack in soil zones and groundwater. In the Geneva Creek Basin, atmospheric sources of solute represent a minor component to the stream water composition, except for chloride, which can be used to determine the fraction of contribution. The weathering process is a balance between oxidation of sulfides, dissolution of silicates, formation of the clay minerals vermiculite, kaolinite, and smectite, carbonate neutralization, and precipitation of ferric and aluminum oxyhydroxides and aluminum sulfate. The chemical analyses of snow samples, multiple samples of water from Geneva Creek and its tributaries, and the composition of primary and secondary minerals identified in the basin serve as input to a mass balance geochemical model, which facilitates the interpretation of the principal geochemical processes.

  15. (Acidic deposition: Its nature and impacts)

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R.B.; Turner, R.S. ); Ryan, P.F. )

    1990-10-18

    The travelers presented papers on various aspects of modeling performed as part of the US National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition: Its Nature and Impacts. The meeting was sponsored by the Royal Society of Edinburgh and was attended by over 800 scientists, primarily from Europe and North America. The conference focused on nine aspects of the nature and impacts of atmospheric pollutants, including ozone: chemistry of atmospheric pollutants; processes controlling the deposition of pollutants; effects of pollutants on soils; physiology of plant responses to pollutants; effects of pollutants in agricultural and natural or seminatural ecosystems; atmospheric pollutants and forests; effects of pollutants on the chemistry of freshwater streams and lakes; effects of pollutants on freshwater plants and animals; and effects of pollutants, indoors and outdoors, on materials and buildings.

  16. Rotational Study of Natural Amino Acid Glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Marcelino; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Recent improvements in laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW) have allowed the investigation of glutamine (COOH-CH(NH2)-CH2-CH2-CONH2), a natural amino acid with a long polar side chain. One dominant structure has been detected in the rotational spectrum. The nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure of two 14N nuclei has been totally resolved allowing the conclusive identification of the observed species.

  17. Continuous elimination of Pb2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, H+ and NH4 + from acidic waters by ionic exchange on natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Benjamin; Canoira, Laureano; Morante, Fernando; Martínez-Bedia, José M; Vinagre, Carlos; García-González, Jerónimo-Emilio; Elsen, Jan; Alcantara, Ramon

    2009-07-30

    A study of breakthrough curves for cations usually found in acid mine drainage (Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and H(+)) and municipal wastewater (NH(4)(+)) have been conducted on some natural zeolitic tuffs. The zeolitic tuffs used in this study are: three zeolitic tuffs from Cayo Formation, Guayaquil (Ecuador), characterized by X-ray diffraction as clinoptilolite (sample CLI-1) and heulandite (samples HEU-1 and HEU-2)-rich tuffs, and two zeolitic tuffs from Parnaiba Basin, Belem do Pará (Brazil), characterized as stilbite-rich tuffs (samples STI-1 and STI-2). The clinoptilolite sample CLI-1 shows an exceedingly good exchange capacities for Pb(2+) and NH(4)(+) as received, and also a very high exchange capacity for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) when conditioned with 2M sodium chloride, with much higher values than those reported in the literature for other clinioptilolite ores. A general order of effective cation exchange capacity could be inferred from breakthrough curves on these zeolitic tuffs: CLI-1 > HEU-2 > HEU-1 > STI-2. Since it is true for most of the cations studied. PMID:19124201

  18. Modeling complexometric titrations of natural water samples.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Robert J M; Rue, Eden L; Bruland, Kenneth W

    2003-04-15

    Complexometric titrations are the primary source of metal speciation data for aquatic systems, yet their interpretation in waters containing humic and fulvic acids remains problematic. In particular, the accuracy of inferred ambient free metal ion concentrations and parameters quantifying metal complexation by natural ligands has been challenged because of the difficulties inherent in calibrating common analytical methods and in modeling the diverse array of ligands present. This work tests and applies a new method of modeling titration data that combines calibration of analytical sensitivity (S) and estimation of concentrations and stability constants for discrete natural ligand classes ([Li]T and Ki) into a single step using nonlinear regression and a new analytical solution to the one-metal/two-ligand equilibrium problem. When applied to jointly model data from multiple titrations conducted at different analytical windows, it yields accurate estimates of S, [Li]T, Ki, and [Cu2+] plus Monte Carlo-based estimates of the uncertainty in [Cu2+]. Jointly modeling titration data at low-and high-analytical windows leads to an efficient adaptation of the recently proposed "overload" approach to calibrating ACSV/CLE measurements. Application of the method to published data sets yields model results with greater accuracy and precision than originally obtained. The discrete ligand-class model is also re-parametrized, using humic and fulvic acids, L1 class (K1 = 10(13) M(-1)), and strong ligands (L(S)) with K(S) > K1 as "natural components". This approach suggests that Cu complexation in NW Mediterranean Sea water can be well represented as 0.8 +/- 0.3/0.2 mg humic equiv/L, 13 +/- 1 nM L1, and 2.5 +/- 0.1 nM L(S) with [CU]T = 3 nM. In coastal seawater from Narragansett Bay, RI, Cu speciation can be modeled as 0.6 +/- 0.1 mg humic equiv/L and 22 +/- 1 nM L1 or approximately 12 nM L1 and approximately 9 nM L(S), with [CU]T = 13 nM. In both waters, the large excess

  19. ACIDIC DEPOSITION AND CISTERN DRINKING WATER SUPPLIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water quality charecteristics, including the trace element Cd, cu, Pb, and Zn, in rainwater cistern supplies representing an area receiving acidic deposition were compared to cistern water chemistry in a control area that does not receive a significant input of acidic deposit...

  20. Sulfuric Acid and Water: Paradoxes of Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    2004-01-01

    On equilibrium properties of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid, Julius Thomsen has marked that the heat evolved on diluting liquid sulfuric acid with water is a continuous function of the water used, and excluded absolutely the acceptance of definite hydrates as existing in the solution. Information about thermochemical measurement, a discussion…

  1. Natural mineral waters, curative-medical waters and their protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, M.

    1993-10-01

    In Europe different types of water are marketed, each strictly defined by EC Directive 80/777 (Natural Mineral Water, Spring and Table Water) or 80/778 (Drinking Water). In Germany, an additional type of water is common in the market: curative/medical water. Product quality and safety, registration as medicine, and pharmaceutical control are defined by the German Federal Medicine Act. A medical water is treated as any other medicine and may be sold only in pharmacies. The use of any water in Germany is controlled and strictly regulated by the Federal Water Act (Fricke 1981). The following requirements are set by the act: (1) No water use without a permit, which is limited in time and quantity. (2) No single or juristic person may own water. (3) Water resources of public interest and their recharge areas are to be protected by the definition of water protection zones. (Natural mineral water is not of public interest and therefore is not required to be protected by the definition of water protection zones, although it represents a market value of more than US2 billion. Medical water is of public interest). The definition of water protection zones impacts private property rights and has to be handled carefully. In order to protect water resources, sometimes the economic basis of a traditional industrial and/or agricultural infrastructure is destroyed. The concerns and needs all citizens, including industry, must be considered in analyzing the adequacy of water protection zones.

  2. Silicone hydrogels grafted with natural amino acids for ophthalmological application.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; He, Ruiyu; Xie, Binbin; Ismail, Muhammad; Yao, Chen; Luan, Jie; Li, Xinsong

    2016-09-01

    In this report, protein repelling silicone hydrogels with improved hydrophilicity were prepared by photo-polymerization of silicone-containing monomer and glycidyl methacrylate followed by grafting zwitterionic amino acids. The grafted silicone hydrogels possessed excellent hydrophilic surfaces due to the enrichment of amino acids, which was confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle, and equilibrium water content measurements. Remarkable resistance to bovine serum albumin and lysozyme fouling was observed for the silicone hydrogels immobilized with neutrally charged amino acids because of the formation of zwitterionic surfaces with pairs of protonated secondary ammonium cations and deprotonated carboxyl anions. Meanwhile, the silicone hydrogels grafted with positively or negatively charged amino acids were able to repulse same charged protein with reduced deposition and attract oppositely charged protein with increased adsorption. Preliminary cytotoxicity test indicated that the zwitterionic silicone hydrogels were non-cytotoxic. Similarly, three types of natural amino acids, including serine, aspartic acid and histidine, modified silicone hydrogel contact lenses exhibited excellent hydrophilicity and non-damage to the rabbit's eyes, but only serine modified zwitterionic contact lens showed superior protein fouling resistance compared with the current commercial hydrogel contact lens, which may have great potential application in ophthalmology. PMID:27297564

  3. Analysis of Natural Buffer Systems and the Impact of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, David C.; Yoder, Claude H.; Higgs, Andrew T.; Obley, Matt L.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Leber, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    The environmental significance of acid rain on water systems of different buffer capacities is discussed. The most prevalent natural buffer system is created by the equilibrium between carbonate ions and carbon dioxide.

  4. Incorporation of stratospheric acids into water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Scott; Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids are absorbed within the water ice lattice at mole fractions maximizing below 0.00001 and 0.0001 in a variety of solid impurity studies. The absorption mechanism may be substitutional or interstitial, leading in either case to a weak permeation of stratospheric ices by the acids at equilibrium. Impurities could also inhabit grain boundaries, and the acid content of atmospheric ice crystals will then depend on details of their surface and internal microstructures. Limited evidence indicates similar properties for the absorption of HNO3. Water ice lattices saturated with acid cannot be a significant local reservoir for HCl in the polar stratosphere.

  5. Concentration of gold in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the amount of gold present in natural waters. One hundred and thirty-two natural water samples were collected from various sources and analyzed for gold by the latest techniques. Background values for gold in natural waters range from <0.001 to 0.005 ppb, and anomalous values range from 0.010 to 2.8 ppb. Waters collected from mineralized areas have a mean gold value of 0.101 ppb, whereas waters collected from unmineralized areas have a mean of 0.002 ppb. Some of the high gold values reported in the earlier literature were probably due to interferences by high salt content in the sample and/or lack of proper filter procedures. ?? 1988.

  6. Acidity of Strong Acids in Water and Dimethyl Sulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Trummal, Aleksander; Lipping, Lauri; Kaljurand, Ivari; Koppel, Ilmar A; Leito, Ivo

    2016-05-26

    Careful analysis and comparison of the available acidity data of HCl, HBr, HI, HClO4, and CF3SO3H in water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and gas-phase has been carried out. The data include experimental and computational pKa and gas-phase acidity data from the literature, as well as high-level computations using different approaches (including the W1 theory) carried out in this work. As a result of the analysis, for every acid in every medium, a recommended acidity value is presented. In some cases, the currently accepted pKa values were revised by more than 10 orders of magnitude. PMID:27115918

  7. On the nature of rate acceleration in the synthesis and fragmentation of triazolines by Brønsted acid: secondary catalysis by water (hydronium triflate).

    PubMed

    Hong, Ki Bum; Donahue, Matthew G; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2008-02-20

    Rate acceleration of the addition of benzyl azide to an electron deficient olefin is characterized using in situ IR spectroscopy. Under strictly anhydrous conditions and at depressed temperature (-20 degrees C), a triazoline intermediate is selectively formed. The stability of this protonated triazoline intermediate at -20 degrees C is indefinite, but warming of the reaction mixture to 0 degrees C or above results in its conversion to the beta-amino oxazolidine dione observed under conditions used in our earlier report. As an alternative to warming, the same conversion can be effected by the addition of a single equivalent of water. Our experiments collectively demonstrate the metastability of the protonated triazoline intermediate and secondary catalysis of triazolinium ring fragmentation by water. This behavior is attributed to the ability of water to transfer a proton from N3 to N1 of the triazoline, thereby allowing ring fragmentation and nitrogen expulsion. PMID:18217758

  8. Degradability of fluorapatite-leucite ceramics in naturally acidic agents.

    PubMed

    Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Hengtrakool, Chanothai; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2010-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the titratable acidity and effect of naturally acidic agents on the surface microhardness, elemental composition, and surface morphology of fluorapatite-leucite ceramics. One hundred and ten ceramic disks (IPS d.SIGN), 12.0 mm in diameter and 2.0 mm in thickness, were fabricated. Before immersion, the baseline data of Vickers microhardness and elemental composition were recorded. Four groups were immersed in acidic agents (citrate buffer solution, green mango juice, and pineapple juice) and deionized water (control) at 37ºC for 168 hours, whereas one group was immersed in 4% acetic acid at 80ºC for 168 hours. After immersion, specimens were evaluated and data were analyzed using one-way repeated ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Microhardness values significantly decreased after immersion (p<0.05). In terms of elemental composition, the weight percentages of silicon, potassium, aluminum, and sodium also decreased after immersion (p<0.05). Results of this study showed that fluorapatite-leucite ceramics were affected by long-term immersion in acidic agents. PMID:20827032

  9. Extraction and HPLC- UV Analysis of C60, C70, and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester in Synthetic and Natural Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have shown that C60 fullerene can form stable colloidal suspensions in water that result in C60 aqueous concentrations many orders of magnitude above C60's aqueous solubility; however, quantitative methods for the analysis of C60 and other fullerenes in environmental medi...

  10. Ultratrace-level determination of glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid and glufosinate in natural waters by solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: performance tuning of derivatization, enrichment and detection.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Irene; Singer, Heinz; Hollender, Juliane

    2008-07-01

    A sensitive and robust analytical method for the quantification of glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and glufosinate in natural water has been developed on the basis of a derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethylchloroformate (FMOC-Cl), solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography followed by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). In order to maximize sensitivity, the derivatization was optimized regarding organic solvent content, amount of FMOC-Cl and reaction time. At an acetonitrile content of 10% a derivatization yield of 100% was reached within two hours in groundwater and surface water samples. After a twofold dilution the low acetonitrile content allowed solid-phase extraction of a sample of originally 80 mL over 200 mg Strata-X cartridges. In order to decrease the load of the LC column and mass spectrometer with derivatization by-products (e.g., 9-fluorenylmethanol FMOC-OH), a rinsing step was performed for the SPE cartridge with dichloromethane. Acidification of the sample and addition of EDTA was used to minimize complexation of the target compounds with metal ions in environmental samples. Due to the large sample volume and the complete FMOC-OH removal, limits of quantification of 0.7 ng/L, 0.8 ng/L and 2.3 ng/L were achieved in surface water for glyphosate, AMPA and glufosinate, respectively. The limits of detection were as low as 0.2 ng/L, 0.2 ng/L and 0.6 ng/L for glyphosate, AMPA and glufosinate, respectively. Surface water and ground water samples spiked at 2 ng/L showed recoveries of 91-107%. PMID:18481049

  11. Simulation of acid water movement in canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Truong, To; Tat Dac, Nguyen; Ngoc Phienc, Huynh

    1996-05-01

    An attempt to tackle the problem of the propagation of acid water in canals is described, and a mathematical model to simulate the acid water movement is developed, in which the jurbanite equilibrium is found to prevail. The processes of settling owing to sedimentation, precipitation and redissolution have been considered in the modelling. Data available from Tan Thanh, in the Plain of Reeds of the Mekong Delta in Viet Nam, are used as a case study.

  12. Going natural: Effective weed control in squash with pelargonic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pelargonic acid, a natural, but not certified organic herbicide, has been shown to be phytotoxic, acting as a contact herbicide, injuring and killing plants through cell membrane disruption. Pelargonic acid, a fatty acid also known as nonanoic acid, is a nine-carbon chained organic compound found in...

  13. Natural radionuclides in ground waters and cores

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Smith, M.R.; Maiti, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations of natural radionuclides of uranium and thorium decay series in site-specific ground waters and cores (water/rock interaction) can provide information on the expected migration behavior of their radioactive waste and analog radionuclides in the unlikely event of radioactive releases from a repository. These data in ground waters can provide in situ retardation and sorption/desorption parameters for transport models and their associated kinetics (residence time). These data in cores can also provide information on migration or leaching up to a period of about one million years. Finally, the natural radionuclide data can provide baseline information for future monitoring of possible radioactive waste releases. The natural radionuclides of interest are {sup 238}U, {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Bi, {sup 210}Po, {sup 232}Th, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th, and {sup 224}Ra. The half-lives of the daughter radionuclides range from 3 days to 2.5 x 10{sup 5} yr. The data discussed are for low ionic strength ground waters from the Hanford (basalt) site and briny ground waters (high ionic strength) and cores from the Deaf Smith salt site. Similar applications of the natural radionuclide data can be extended to the Nevada Tuff repository site and subseabed disposal site. The concentrations of uranium, thorium, radium, lead, and polonium radionuclides are generally very low in ground waters. However, significant differences in disequilibrium exist between basalt and briny ground waters.

  14. Base-acid hybrid water electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-02-21

    A base-acid hybrid electrolytic system with a low onset voltage of 0.78 V for water electrolysis was developed by using a ceramic Li-ion exchange membrane to separate the oxygen-evolving reaction (OER) in a basic electrolyte solution containing the Li-ion and hydrogen-evolving reaction (HER) in an acidic electrolyte solution. PMID:26804323

  15. Electronic coupling through natural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T; Crowley, Michael F

    2015-12-14

    Myriad scientific domains concern themselves with biological electron transfer (ET) events that span across vast scales of rate and efficiency through a remarkably fine-tuned integration of amino acid (AA) sequences, electronic structure, dynamics, and environment interactions. Within this intricate scheme, many questions persist as to how proteins modulate electron-tunneling properties. To help elucidate these principles, we develop a model set of peptides representing the common α-helix and β-strand motifs including all natural AAs within implicit protein-environment solvation. Using an effective Hamiltonian strategy with density functional theory, we characterize the electronic coupling through these peptides, furthermore considering side-chain dynamics. For both motifs, predictions consistently show that backbone-mediated electronic coupling is distinctly sensitive to AA type (aliphatic, polar, aromatic, negatively charged and positively charged), and to side-chain orientation. The unique properties of these residues may be employed to design activated, deactivated, or switch-like superexchange pathways. Electronic structure calculations and Green's function analyses indicate that localized shifts in the electron density along the peptide play a role in modulating these pathways, and further substantiate the experimentally observed behavior of proline residues as superbridges. The distinct sensitivities of tunneling pathways to sequence and conformation revealed in this electronic coupling database help improve our fundamental understanding of the broad diversity of ET reactivity and provide guiding principles for peptide design. PMID:26671404

  16. Electronic coupling through natural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T. E-mail: gregg.beckham@nrel.gov; Crowley, Michael F. E-mail: gregg.beckham@nrel.gov

    2015-12-14

    Myriad scientific domains concern themselves with biological electron transfer (ET) events that span across vast scales of rate and efficiency through a remarkably fine-tuned integration of amino acid (AA) sequences, electronic structure, dynamics, and environment interactions. Within this intricate scheme, many questions persist as to how proteins modulate electron-tunneling properties. To help elucidate these principles, we develop a model set of peptides representing the common α-helix and β-strand motifs including all natural AAs within implicit protein-environment solvation. Using an effective Hamiltonian strategy with density functional theory, we characterize the electronic coupling through these peptides, furthermore considering side-chain dynamics. For both motifs, predictions consistently show that backbone-mediated electronic coupling is distinctly sensitive to AA type (aliphatic, polar, aromatic, negatively charged and positively charged), and to side-chain orientation. The unique properties of these residues may be employed to design activated, deactivated, or switch-like superexchange pathways. Electronic structure calculations and Green’s function analyses indicate that localized shifts in the electron density along the peptide play a role in modulating these pathways, and further substantiate the experimentally observed behavior of proline residues as superbridges. The distinct sensitivities of tunneling pathways to sequence and conformation revealed in this electronic coupling database help improve our fundamental understanding of the broad diversity of ET reactivity and provide guiding principles for peptide design.

  17. Electronic coupling through natural amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2015-12-01

    Myriad scientific domains concern themselves with biological electron transfer (ET) events that span across vast scales of rate and efficiency through a remarkably fine-tuned integration of amino acid (AA) sequences, electronic structure, dynamics, and environment interactions. Within this intricate scheme, many questions persist as to how proteins modulate electron-tunneling properties. To help elucidate these principles, we develop a model set of peptides representing the common α-helix and β-strand motifs including all natural AAs within implicit protein-environment solvation. Using an effective Hamiltonian strategy with density functional theory, we characterize the electronic coupling through these peptides, furthermore considering side-chain dynamics. For both motifs, predictions consistently show that backbone-mediated electronic coupling is distinctly sensitive to AA type (aliphatic, polar, aromatic, negatively charged and positively charged), and to side-chain orientation. The unique properties of these residues may be employed to design activated, deactivated, or switch-like superexchange pathways. Electronic structure calculations and Green's function analyses indicate that localized shifts in the electron density along the peptide play a role in modulating these pathways, and further substantiate the experimentally observed behavior of proline residues as superbridges. The distinct sensitivities of tunneling pathways to sequence and conformation revealed in this electronic coupling database help improve our fundamental understanding of the broad diversity of ET reactivity and provide guiding principles for peptide design.

  18. Nature in the Classroom: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Charles

    1982-01-01

    As a lesson topic, acid rain is defined, its chemistry given, and its development since the 1950s described. The worldwide effects of acid rain are discussed along with the available technology for controlling the problem. (CM)

  19. Bacterial Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase for Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Sujin; Mutlu, Baris R; Aksan, Alptekin; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2015-10-01

    Di- and trichloroisocyanuric acids are widely used as water disinfection agents, but cyanuric acid accumulates with repeated additions and must be removed to maintain free hypochlorite for disinfection. This study describes the development of methods for using a cyanuric acid-degrading enzyme contained within nonliving cells that were encapsulated within a porous silica matrix. Initially, three different bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases were compared: TrzD from Acidovorax citrulli strain 12227, AtzD from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, and CAH from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073. Each enzyme was expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and tested for cyanuric acid hydrolase activity using freely suspended or encapsulated cell formats. Cyanuric acid hydrolase activities differed by only a 2-fold range when comparing across the different enzymes with a given format. A practical water filtration system is most likely to be used with nonviable cells, and all cells were rendered nonviable by heat treatment at 70°C for 1 h. Only the CAH enzyme from the thermophile M. thermoacetica retained significant activity under those conditions, and so it was tested in a flowthrough system simulating a bioreactive pool filter. Starting with a cyanuric acid concentration of 10,000 μM, more than 70% of the cyanuric acid was degraded in 24 h, it was completely removed in 72 h, and a respike of 10,000 μM cyanuric acid a week later showed identical biodegradation kinetics. An experiment conducted with water obtained from municipal swimming pools showed the efficacy of the process, although cyanuric acid degradation rates decreased by 50% in the presence of 4.5 ppm hypochlorite. In total, these experiments demonstrated significant robustness of cyanuric acid hydrolase and the silica bead materials in remediation. PMID:26187963

  20. Bacterial Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase for Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Sujin; Mutlu, Baris R.; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-01-01

    Di- and trichloroisocyanuric acids are widely used as water disinfection agents, but cyanuric acid accumulates with repeated additions and must be removed to maintain free hypochlorite for disinfection. This study describes the development of methods for using a cyanuric acid-degrading enzyme contained within nonliving cells that were encapsulated within a porous silica matrix. Initially, three different bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases were compared: TrzD from Acidovorax citrulli strain 12227, AtzD from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, and CAH from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073. Each enzyme was expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and tested for cyanuric acid hydrolase activity using freely suspended or encapsulated cell formats. Cyanuric acid hydrolase activities differed by only a 2-fold range when comparing across the different enzymes with a given format. A practical water filtration system is most likely to be used with nonviable cells, and all cells were rendered nonviable by heat treatment at 70°C for 1 h. Only the CAH enzyme from the thermophile M. thermoacetica retained significant activity under those conditions, and so it was tested in a flowthrough system simulating a bioreactive pool filter. Starting with a cyanuric acid concentration of 10,000 μM, more than 70% of the cyanuric acid was degraded in 24 h, it was completely removed in 72 h, and a respike of 10,000 μM cyanuric acid a week later showed identical biodegradation kinetics. An experiment conducted with water obtained from municipal swimming pools showed the efficacy of the process, although cyanuric acid degradation rates decreased by 50% in the presence of 4.5 ppm hypochlorite. In total, these experiments demonstrated significant robustness of cyanuric acid hydrolase and the silica bead materials in remediation. PMID:26187963

  1. Natural water purification and water management by artificial groundwater recharge

    PubMed Central

    Balke, Klaus-Dieter; Zhu, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, several regions suffer from water scarcity and contamination. The infiltration and subsurface storage of rain and river water can reduce water stress. Artificial groundwater recharge, possibly combined with bank filtration, plant purification and/or the use of subsurface dams and artificial aquifers, is especially advantageous in areas where layers of gravel and sand exist below the earth’s surface. Artificial infiltration of surface water into the uppermost aquifer has qualitative and quantitative advantages. The contamination of infiltrated river water will be reduced by natural attenuation. Clay minerals, iron hydroxide and humic matter as well as microorganisms located in the subsurface have high decontamination capacities. By this, a final water treatment, if necessary, becomes much easier and cheaper. The quantitative effect concerns the seasonally changing river discharge that influences the possibility of water extraction for drinking water purposes. Such changes can be equalised by seasonally adapted infiltration/extraction of water in/out of the aquifer according to the river discharge and the water need. This method enables a continuous water supply over the whole year. Generally, artificially recharged groundwater is better protected against pollution than surface water, and the delimitation of water protection zones makes it even more save. PMID:18357624

  2. Natural toxins that affect plant amino acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A diverse range of natural compounds interfere with the synthesis and other aspects of amino acid metabolism. Some are amino acid analogues, but most are not. This review covers a number of specific natural phytotoxic compounds by molecular target site. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase is of part...

  3. Solar Hot Water Heating by Natural Convection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which a solar collector is used to heat water for domestic use. The working fluid is moved by natural convection so no pumps are required. Experimental apparatus is simple in design and operation so that data can be collected quickly and easily. (Author/JN)

  4. Naturally occurring fatty acids: source, chemistry and uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural occurring fatty acids are a large and complex class of compounds found in plants and animals. Fatty acids are abundant and of interest because of their renewability, biodegradability, biocompatibility, low cost, and fascinating chemistry. Of the many fatty acids, only 20-25 of them are widel...

  5. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  6. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Ackman, Terry E.; Place, John M.

    1987-01-01

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  7. Metabolic mechanism of phenyllactic acid naturally occurring in Chinese pickles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingfeng; Ning, Yawei; Liu, Dou; Yan, Aihong; Wang, Zhixin; Wang, Shijie; Miao, Ming; Zhu, Hong; Jia, Yingmin

    2015-11-01

    Phenyllactic acid, a phenolic acid phytochemical with the antimicrobial activity, was rarely reported in food besides honey and sourdough. This study evidenced a new food source of phenyllactic acid and elucidated its metabolic mechanism. Phenyllactic acid naturally occurred in Chinese pickles with concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.30 mM in 23 pickle samples including homemade and commercial ones. Then, lactic acid bacteria capable of metabolizing phenyllactic acid were screened from each homemade pickle and a promising strain was characterized as Lactobacillus plantarum. Moreover, the investigation of the metabolic mechanism of phenyllactic acid in pickles suggested that the yield of phenyllactic acid was positively related to the content of phenylalanine in food, and the addition of phenylalanine as precursor substance could significantly promote the production of phenyllactic acid. This investigation could provide some insights into the accumulation of phenyllactic acid in pickle for long storage life. PMID:25976820

  8. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  9. Aqueous trivalent chromium photoproduction in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczynski, S.E.; Kieber, R.J. )

    1993-08-01

    Field studies indicate Cr(III) is photochemically produced at two freshwater lakes in southeastern North Carolina. Results of controlled photolysis experiments with marine and estuarine samples suggest this process may be common to many natural water systems. This photogeneration mechanism sheds new insight into the existence of the thermodynamically unstable Cr(III) ion in oxygenated surface waters. Sixty-eight water samples from seven water bodies in the southeastern United States (fresh, estuarine, and marine) displayed a range of total aqueous inorganic chromium from <0.01 nM to 1.05 nM, with variable amounts of the trivalent and hexavalent species. These are the first Cr(III) and Cr(VI) values reported for all these aqueous systems and some of the first ever for nonmarine environments. 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Determination of benzoic acid, chlorobenzoic acids and chlorendic acid in water

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, E.A.; Cortellucci, N.J.; Singley, K.F. )

    1993-01-01

    To characterize and conduct treatment studies of a landfill leachate an analysis procedure was required to determine concentrations of benzoic acid, the three isomers of chlorobenzoic acid and chlorendic acid. The title compounds were isolated from acidified (pH 1) water by extraction with methyl t-butyl ether. Analytes were concentrated by back-extracting the ether with 0.1 N sodium hydroxide which was separated and acidified. This solution was analyzed by C[sub 18] reversed-phase HPLC with water/acetonitrile/acetic acid eluent and UV detection at 222 nm. The method has detection limits of 200 [mu]g/L for chlorendic acid and 100 [mu]g/L for benzoic acid and each isomer of chlorobenzoic acid. Validation studies with water which was fortified with the analytes at concentrations ranging from one to ten times detection limits resulted in average recoveries of >95%.

  11. In vivo cytogenetic effects of natural humic acid.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, F; Ponzanelli, I; Minunni, M; Falezza, A; Loprieno, N; Barale, R

    1996-09-01

    As humic compounds are naturally widespread in the environment and present in surface water, studies on their genotoxicity are justified. Humic acid (HA) has not been demonstrated to be genotoxic either in vitro or in vivo. In the present paper we investigated its activity both in intestinal and bone marrow cells following a single dose (100 mg/kg b.w. corresponding to 0.5 ml per animal of an aqueous solution of 4 g/l) of HA administered to mice by gastric intubation, to mimic the most likely route of human exposure. HA induced structural and, in particular, numerical chromosome abnormalities in intestinal cells. A marginal, non-significant induction of aneuploidy was also found in bone marrow cells. PMID:8921508

  12. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1990-06-26

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylane glycols (PVB 6/22/90), propylene and and polypropylene (PVB 6/22/90) glycols, P-dioxanone, 1, 5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  13. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1994-11-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer were selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide where the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  14. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1996-10-08

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer is described made from monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  15. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, Patrick V.; Coleman, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  16. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, Patrick V.; Coleman, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  17. Measurement of tritium in natural water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen

    1985-06-01

    A detergent-scintillation liquid mixture applied to measure low specific activity of tritium in natural water was studied. The DYS-1 low level liquid scintillation counter designed and manufactured by our institute was employed. In comparing the Triton X-100 scintillation liquid mixture with the dioxane-based-scintillation liquid, a better formula for Triton X-100 scintillation liquid mixture was determined, the mixture possesses the quality of high water content; high efficiency and low back-ground in measuring tritium in water. Chemiluminescence of the Triton X-100 scintillation liquid mixture can be totally de-excited in short time. It can be employed at ambient temperature 11 28°C. For 20ml sample in quartz vials, counting efficiency is 15% with a background 2.17 cpm, Y=31 TU (t=30 min).

  18. Extremely acid Permian lakes and ground waters in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benison, K.C.; Goldstein, R.H.; Wopenka, B.; Burruss, R.C.; Pasteris, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporites hosted by red beds (red shales and sandstones), some 275-265 million years old, extend over a large area of the North American mid- continent. They were deposited in non-marine saline lakes, pans and mud- flats, settings that are typically assumed to have been alkaline. Here we use laser Raman microprobe analyses of fluid inclusions trapped in halites from these Permian deposits to argue for the existence of highly acidic (pH < 1) lakes and ground waters. These extremely acidic systems may have extended over an area of 200,000 km2. Modern analogues of such systems may be natural acid lake and groundwater systems (pH ~2-4) in southern Australia. Both the ancient and modern acid systems are characterized by closed drainage, arid climate, low acid-neutralizing capacity, and the oxidation of minerals such as pyrite to generate acidity. The discovery of widespread ancient acid lake and groundwater systems demands a re-evaluation of reconstructions of surface conditions of the past, and further investigations of the geochemistry and ecology of acid systems in general.

  19. Distillation of natural fatty acids and their chemical derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Well over 1,000 different fatty acids are known which are natural components of fats, oils (triacylglycerols), and other related compounds. These fatty acids can have different alkyl chain lengths, 0-6 carbon-carbon double bonds possessing cis- or trans-geometry, and can contain a variety of functio...

  20. Arsenic speciation in natural sulfidic geothermal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nicole S.; Stefánsson, Andri; Sigfússon, Bergur

    2014-10-01

    The speciation of arsenic in natural sulfidic geothermal waters was studied using chemical analyses and thermodynamic aqueous speciation calculations. Samples were collected in three geothermal systems in Iceland, having contrasting H2S concentrations in the reservoir (high vs. low). The sampled waters contained 7-116 ppb As and <0.01-77.6 ppm H2S with pH of 8.56-9.60. The analytical setup used for the determination of arsenic species (Ion Chromatography-Hydride Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, IC-HG-AFS) was field-deployed and the samples analyzed within ∼5 min of sampling in order to prevent changes upon storage, which were shown to be considerable regardless of the sample storage method used. Nine aqueous arsenic species were detected, among others arsenite (HnAsO3n-3), thioarsenite (HnAsS3n-3), arsenate (HnAsO4n-3), monothioarsenate (HnAsSO3n-3), dithioarsenate (HnAsS2O2n-3), trithioarsenate (HnAsS3O) and tetrathioarsenate (HnAsS4n-3). The results of the measured aqueous arsenic speciation in the natural geothermal waters and comparison with thermodynamic calculations reveal that the predominant factors determining the species distribution are sulfide concentration and pH. In alkaline waters with low sulfide concentrations the predominant species are AsIII oxyanions. This can be seen in samples from a liquid-only well, tapping water that is H2S-poor and free of oxygen. At intermediate sulfide concentration AsIII and AsV thio species become important and predominate at high sulfide concentration, as seen in two-phase well waters, which have high H2S concentrations in the reservoir. Upon oxidation, for instance due to mixing of the reservoir fluid with oxygenated water upon ascent to the surface, AsV oxyanions form, as well as AsV thio complexes if the sulfide concentration is intermediate to high. This oxidation process can be seen in samples from hot springs in the Geysir geothermal area. While the thermodynamic modeling allows for a first

  1. Solubility of magnesium carbonate in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.C.

    1915-01-01

    (1) Under atmospheric conditions it appears possible to attain practically the same state in a solution saturated with MgCO33H2O, whether one starts with a solution containing an excess of magnesium bicarbonate or with the pure trihydrate and water, but the adjustment occurs very slowly. The solution finally contains 0.36 g. magnesium and 1.01 g. carbon dioxide per liter at 20??. (2) The solubility found for magnesite, however, is much smaller, viz., 0.02 g. magnesium and 0.07 g. carbon dioxide per liter. (3) Certain natural waters, freely exposed to the atmosphere, appear to be supersaturated with respect to magnesite but none approaches very closely to the point of saturation of the trihydrate MgCO3.3H2O.

  2. Thermodynamics of natural and industrial waters

    SciTech Connect

    Pitzer, K.S.

    1991-08-01

    The most effective general formulations of thermodynamic equations for multicomponent aqueous solutions are discussed with respect to various ranges of temperature, pressure and composition with emphasis on solutes important in natural or industrial waters. A familiar equation in molality and in excess Gibbs energy is very successful up to 300{degree}C and ionic strength 6 mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}, and can often be extended to 350{degree}C or above at high pressure and in favorable cases to ionic strength 12 or even 20. Alternate methods valid to higher solute compositions, even to pure fused salts, are described. A more difficult situation arises near the critical point of water where the compressibility becomes infinite and a Helmholtz energy basis must be adopted. Existing equations for this range and still higher temperatures and pressures are considered and possible improvements discussed. 85 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Treatment of Natural Peanut Butter with Phytic Acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut butter may be less allergenic if allergens in the butter exist as insoluble complexes that are not absorbed by the body. We determined that such complexes form in natural peanut butter that is treated with phytic acid. Commercial natural peanut butter (non-hydrogenated, creamy, oil-based, and...

  4. Acidic deposition and surface water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, M. R.

    A pair of back-to-back (morning and afternoon) hydrology sessions, held December 10, 1987, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., covered “Predicting the Effects of Acidic Deposition on Surface Water Chemistry.” The combined sessions included four invited papers, 12 contributed papers, and a panel discussion at its conclusion. The gathering dealt with questions on a variety of aspects of modeling the effects of acidic deposition on surface water chemistry.Contributed papers included discussions on the representation of processes in models as well as limiting assumptions in model application (V. S. Tripathi et al., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., and E. C. Krug, Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign), along with problems in estimating depositional inputs to catchments and thus inputs to be used in the simulation of catchment response (M. M. Reddy et al., U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, Colo.; and E. A. McBean, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada). L. A. Baker et al. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) dealt with the problem of modeling seepage lake systems, an exceedingly important portion of the aquatic resources in Florida and parts of the upper U.S. Midwest. J. A. Hau and Y. Eckstein (Kent State University, Kent, Ohio) considered equilibrium modeling of two northern Ohio watersheds that receive very different loads of acidic deposition but are highly similar in other respects.

  5. Artificial photosynthesis: understanding water splitting in nature.

    PubMed

    Cox, Nicholas; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Neese, Frank; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    In the context of a global artificial photosynthesis (GAP) project, we review our current work on nature's water splitting catalyst. In a recent report (Cox et al. 2014 Science 345, 804-808 (doi:10.1126/science.1254910)), we showed that the catalyst-a Mn4O5Ca cofactor-converts into an 'activated' form immediately prior to the O-O bond formation step. This activated state, which represents an all Mn(IV) complex, is similar to the structure observed by X-ray crystallography but requires the coordination of an additional water molecule. Such a structure locates two oxygens, both derived from water, in close proximity, which probably come together to form the product O2 molecule. We speculate that formation of the activated catalyst state requires inherent structural flexibility. These features represent new design criteria for the development of biomimetic and bioinspired model systems for water splitting catalysts using first-row transition metals with the aim of delivering globally deployable artificial photosynthesis technologies. PMID:26052426

  6. Artificial photosynthesis: understanding water splitting in nature

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Nicholas; Pantazis, Dimitrios A.; Neese, Frank; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In the context of a global artificial photosynthesis (GAP) project, we review our current work on nature's water splitting catalyst. In a recent report (Cox et al. 2014 Science 345, 804–808 (doi:10.1126/science.1254910)), we showed that the catalyst—a Mn4O5Ca cofactor—converts into an ‘activated’ form immediately prior to the O–O bond formation step. This activated state, which represents an all MnIV complex, is similar to the structure observed by X-ray crystallography but requires the coordination of an additional water molecule. Such a structure locates two oxygens, both derived from water, in close proximity, which probably come together to form the product O2 molecule. We speculate that formation of the activated catalyst state requires inherent structural flexibility. These features represent new design criteria for the development of biomimetic and bioinspired model systems for water splitting catalysts using first-row transition metals with the aim of delivering globally deployable artificial photosynthesis technologies. PMID:26052426

  7. Natural cinnamic acids, synthetic derivatives and hybrids with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Juan David

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial natural preparations involving cinnamon, storax and propolis have been long used topically for treating infections. Cinnamic acids and related molecules are partly responsible for the therapeutic effects observed in these preparations. Most of the cinnamic acids, their esters, amides, aldehydes and alcohols, show significant growth inhibition against one or several bacterial and fungal species. Of particular interest is the potent antitubercular activity observed for some of these cinnamic derivatives, which may be amenable as future drugs for treating tuberculosis. This review intends to summarize the literature data on the antimicrobial activity of the natural cinnamic acids and related derivatives. In addition, selected hybrids between cinnamic acids and biologically active scaffolds with antimicrobial activity were also included. A comprehensive literature search was performed collating the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each cinnamic acid or derivative against the reported microorganisms. The MIC data allows the relative comparison between series of molecules and the derivation of structure-activity relationships. PMID:25429559

  8. Factors controlling water movement in acid spoils

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelou, V.P.; Grove, J.H.; Phillips, R.E.

    1982-12-01

    The rate of water movement through toxic spoils plays a major role in reclamation. The toxic chemical constituents found in spoils need to be leached beyond the six inch depth (the usual depth of lime incorporation) since they can easily move upward during periods of high evapotranspiration. The rate of water infiltration plays a role in effective utilization of rain water, and conversely, the amount of surface runoff dictates the degree of surface erosion. Underground water quality may be affected by rates of water movement through a toxic spoil zone. Factors that control water movement through acid spoils were investigated through the use of a column one meter long and 8.0 cm in internal diameter. The maximum hydraulic conductivity was observed in the upper portion of the column where minimum salt buildup occurred. The hydraulic conductivity in this region was 0.5 cm/hr. In the middle portion of the column where a salty (14.0 mmhos/cm) solution was encountered, the hydraulic conductivity was 0.08 cm/hr. In the lower portion of the column where the maximum salt buildup took place (16.8 mmhos/cm), the hydraulic conductivity was found to be 0.03 cm/hr. Similar results were obtained with a small column experiment using calcite and dolomite as different lime sources. The hydraulic conductivity in the dolomitic small column remained relatively unchanged with time and salt depletion.

  9. Chlorination of organophosphorus pesticides in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Acero, Juan L; Benítez, F Javier; Real, Francisco J; González, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    Unknown second-order rate constants for the reactions of three organophosphorus pesticides (chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon) with chlorine were determined in the present study, and the influence of pH and temperature was established. It was found that an increase in the pH provides a negative effect on the pesticides degradation rates. Apparent second-order rate constants at 20 degrees C and pH 7 were determined to be 110.9, 0.004 and 191.6 M(-1) s(-1) for chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinfos and diazinon, respectively. A higher reactivity of chlorine with the phosphorothioate group (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) than with the phosphate moiety (chlorfenvinfos) could explain these results. Intrinsic rate constant for the elementary reactions of chlorine species with chlorpyrifos and diazinon were also calculated, leading to the conclusion that the reaction between hypochlorous acid and the pesticide is predominant at neutral pH. The elimination of these pesticides in surface waters was also investigated. A chlorine dose of 2.5 mg L(-1) was enough to oxidize chlorpyrifos and diazinon almost completely, with a formation of trihalomethanes below the EU standard for drinking water. However, the removal of chlorfenvinfos was not appreciable. Therefore, chlorination is a feasible option for the removal of organophosphorus pesticides with phosphorothioate group during oxidation and disinfection processes, but not for the elimination of pesticides with phosphate moiety. PMID:17904287

  10. Removal of heavy metals from mine waters by natural zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ulla Wingenfelder; Carsten Hansen; Gerhard Furrer; Rainer Schulin

    2005-06-15

    The study investigated the removal of Fe, Pb, Cd, and Zn from synthetic mine waters by a natural zeolite. The emphasis was given to the zeolite's behavior toward a few cations in competition with each other. Pb was removed efficiently from neutral as well as from acidic solutions, whereas the uptake of Zn and Cd decreased with low pH and high iron concentrations. With increasing Ca concentrations in solution, elimination of Zn and Cd became poorer while removal of Pb remained virtually unchanged. The zeolite was stable in acidic solutions. Disintegration was only observed below pH 2.0. Forward- and back-titration of synthetic acidic mine water were carried out in the presence and absence of zeolite to simulate the effects of a pH increase by addition of neutralizing agents and a re-acidification which can be caused by subsequent mixing with acidic water. The pH increase during neutralization causes precipitation of hydrous ferric oxides and decreased dissolved metal concentrations. Zeolite addition further diminished Pb concentrations but did not have an effect on Zn and Cd concentrations in solution. During re-acidification of the solution, remobilization of Pb was weaker in the presence than in the absence of zeolite. No substantial differences were observed for Fe, Cd, and Zn immobilization. The immobilization of the metals during pH increase and the subsequent remobilization caused by re-acidification can be well described by a geochemical equilibrium speciation model that accounts for metal complexation at hydrous ferric oxides, for ion exchange on the zeolite surfaces, as well as for dissolution and precipitation processes. 42 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. State of radionuclides in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kulmatov, R.A.; Rakhmatov, U.; Kist, A.A.; Volkov, A.A.

    1987-03-01

    This work is devoted to a study of the kinetics of attainment of equilibrium between various forms of the radionuclide mercury-203 and to an evaluation of the part played by isotope exchange in this process. The radionuclide mercury-203 was added without a carrier to natural waters of the Syr-Dar'ya and Amu-Dar'ya Rivers and the Aral Sea in the cationic form (3). In order to determine the time of attainment of equilibrium between the forms of the radionuclide mercury-203 and the stable nuclide analogs, they used the methods of sorption on L-36 glass, AV-17 anion-exchanger, KU-2 cation-exchanger, extraction with chloroform plus isobutyl alcohol, and filtration.

  12. PHOTOCHEICAL PRODUCTION OF HYDROXYL RADICAL IN NATURAL WATER - THE ROLE OF IRON AND DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical hydroxyl radical (OH) production was measured in several natural waters to investigate the importance of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and iron-CDOM complexes as sources of OH. High rates of OH photoproduction in highly colored, iron-rich, acidic waters a...

  13. DETOXIFICATION OF OUTFALL WATER USING NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, N.; Looney, B.; Millings, M.; Nichols, R.; Noonkester, J.; Payne, B.

    2010-07-13

    To protect stream organisms in an ephemeral stream at the Savannah River Site, a proposed National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit reduced the copper limit from 25 {micro}g/l to 6 {micro}g/l at Outfall H-12. Efforts to reduce copper in the wastewater and stormwater draining to this outfall did not succeed in bringing copper levels below this limit. Numerous treatment methods were considered, including traditional methods such as ion exchange and natural treatment alternatives such as constructed wetlands and peat beds, all of which act to remove copper. However, the very low target metal concentration and highly variable outfall conditions presented a significant challenge for these treatment technologies. In addition, costs and energy use for most of these alternatives were high and secondary wastes would be generated. The Savannah River National Laboratory developed an entirely new 'detoxification' approach to treat the outfall water. This simple, lower-cost detoxification system amends outfall water with natural organic matter to bind up to 25 {micro}g/l copper rather than remove it, thereby mitigating its toxicity and protecting the sensitive species in the ecosystem. The amendments are OMRI (Organic Materials Review Institute) certified commercial products that are naturally rich in humic acids and are commonly used in organic farming.

  14. Acid gas extraction of pyridine from water

    SciTech Connect

    Laitinen, A.; Kaunisto, J.

    2000-01-01

    Pyridine was extracted from aqueous solutions initially containing 5 or 15 wt % pyridine by using liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide at 10 MPa as a solvent in a mechanically agitated countercurrent extraction column. The lowest pyridine concentration in the raffinate was 0.06 wt %, whereas the pyridine concentration in the extract was 86--94 wt %. From the initial amount of pyridine, 96--99% was transferred from the feed stream to the extract by using relatively small solvent-to-feed ratios of 2.8--4.6 (kg of solvent/kg of feed). The measured distribution coefficients for the water/pyridine/carbon dioxide system ranged from 0.3 to 1 (weight units), depending on the initial pyridine concentration in water. Carbon dioxide is a particularly suitable solvent for the extraction of pyridine from concentrated aqueous solutions. The efficiency may be the result of an acid-base interaction between weakly basic pyridine solute and weakly acidic carbon dioxide solvent in an aqueous environment.

  15. Nature and chlorine reactivity of organic constituents from reclaimed water in groundwater, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Rostad, C.E.; Barber, L.B.; Schroeder, R.A.; Anders, R.; Davisson, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    The nature and chlorine reactivity of organic constituents in reclaimed water (tertiary-treated municipal wastewater) before, during, and after recharge into groundwater at the Montebello Forebay in Los Angeles County, CA, was the focus of this study. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in reclaimed water from this site is primarily a mixture of aromatic sulfonates from anionic surfactant degradation, N-acetyl amino sugars and proteins from bacterial activity, and natural fulvic acid, whereas DOM from native groundwaters in the aquifer to which reclaimed water was recharged consists of natural fulvic acids. The hydrophilic neutral N-acetyl amino sugars that constitute 40% of the DOM in reclaimed water are removed during the first 3 m of vertical infiltration in the recharge basin. Groundwater age dating with 3H and 3He isotopes, and determinations of organic and inorganic C isotopes, enabled clear differentiation of recent recharged water from older native groundwater. Phenol structures in natural fulvic acids in DOM isolated from groundwater produced significant trihalomethanes (THM) and total organic halogen (TOX) yields upon chlorination, and these structures also were responsible for the enhanced SUVA and specific fluorescence characteristics relative to DOM in reclaimed water. Aromatic sulfonates and fulvic acids in reclaimed water DOM produced minimal THM and TOX yields.

  16. A review on usnic acid, an interesting natural compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocchietto, Moreno; Skert, Nicola; Nimis, Pier Luigi; Sava, Gianni

    2002-03-01

    Lichens are a world-widespread consortium of fungal and photosynthetic partners. Usnic acid is one of the most common and abundant lichen metabolites, well known as an antibiotic, but also endowed with several other interesting properties. This review summarises the most relevant studies on usnic acid, focusing on a number of biological activities in different fields. On the basis of the existing literature, usnic acid seems to be an exclusive lichen product. No synthetic derivatives more effective than the natural form are known. Both the (+) and (-) enantiomers of usnic acid are effective against a large variety of Gram-positive (G+) bacterial strains, including strains from clinical isolates, irrespective of their resistant phenotype. Of particular relevance is the inhibition of growth of multi-resistant strains of Streptococcus aureus, enterococci and mycobacteria. The (+)-usnic acid enantiomer appears to be selective against Streptococcus mutans without inducing perturbing side effects on the oral saprophyte flora. On the other hand, the (-)-usnic acid enantiomer is a selective natural herbicide because of its blocking action against a specific key plant enzyme. Other recognised characteristics of usnic acid are ultraviolet absorption and preserving properties. The toxicology, the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects and the mechanism of action of usnic acid need to be investigated in greater detail in order to reach clinical trials and to allow further applications. Furthermore, more research is needed to make possible intensive lichen culture, in order to produce large quantities of lichen substances for pharmaceutical, cosmetic and agricultural purposes. Some biological aspects, i.e. the possible biological roles of usnic acid, are discussed.

  17. Methods of refining and producing isomerized fatty acid esters and fatty acids from natural oil feedstocks

    DOEpatents

    Snead, Thomas E.; Cohen, Steven A.; Gildon, Demond L.; Beltran, Leslie V.; Kunz, Linda A.; Pals, Tessa M.; Quinn, Jordan R; Behrends, Jr., Raymond T.; Bernhardt, Randal J.

    2016-07-05

    Methods are provided for refining natural oil feedstocks and producing isomerized esters and acids. The methods comprise providing a C4-C18 unsaturated fatty ester or acid, and isomerizing the fatty acid ester or acid in the presence of heat or an isomerization catalyst to form an isomerized fatty ester or acid. In some embodiments, the methods comprise forming a dibasic ester or dibasic acid prior to the isomerizing step. In certain embodiments, the methods further comprise hydrolyzing the dibasic ester to form a dibasic acid. In certain embodiments, the olefin is formed by reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst under conditions sufficient to form a metathesized product comprising olefins and esters, separating the olefins from the esters in the metathesized product, and transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product having unsaturated esters.

  18. Covalent interaction of ascorbic acid with natural products

    PubMed Central

    Kesinger, Nicholas G.; Stevens, Jan F.

    2009-01-01

    While ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) is mostly known as a cofactor for proline hydroxylase and as a biological antioxidant, it also forms covalent bonds with natural products which we here refer to as ‘ascorbylation’. A number of natural products containing an ascorbate moiety has been isolated and characterized from a variety of biological sources, ranging from marine algae to flowering plants. Most of these compounds are formed as a result of nucleophilic substitution or addition by ascorbate, e.g. the ascorbigens from Brassica species are ascorbylated indole derivatives. Some ascorbylated tannins appear to be formed from electrophilic addition to dehydroascorbic acid. There are also examples of annulations of ascorbate with dietary polyphenols, e.g., epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and resveratrol derivatives. Herein is a survey of thirty-three ascorbylated natural products and their reported biological activities. PMID:19875138

  19. The nature of water: Thales' arkhe.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Natale G; Bisaccia, Carmela; Bilancio, Giancarlo; Romano, Mercedes; Cirillo, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Thales was born into a noble family of Phoenician origin at the time of the 25th Olympiad (floruit 585 bc; he was 40 in the year of the solar eclipse. He had no teachers but had occasion to learn from Egyptian priests. He developed into a scholar and politician very much appreciated by Heraclitus, Herodotus and Democritus, and was always considered a man of practical wisdom. He was probably the first to speak about the immortality of the soul. He is listed as the first of many unmarried men who paved the road for philosophy. For Diogenes Laertius (Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers), he was the instructor of Anaximander. Thales, the man who first discovered how to draw a right-angle triangle in a circle, was the first philosopher of nature (physis). "Philosophy begins with Thales," pointed out Bertrand Russell in 1961. This honor had been conceded also by Aristotle: "Anaximander, Thales' pupil, founded the Ionian tradition of philosophy." Many explanations may be given for the importance of water, including its importance for living processes, the economic role of the Nile, the importance of the port for Miletus and the fact that Ocean and Thetys were in Homer's tradition progenitors of the world. PMID:20013740

  20. Behavioral responses of western corn rootworm larvae to naturally occurring and synthetic hydroxamic acids.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y; Arnason, J T; Philogéne, B J; Atkinson, J; Morand, P

    1992-07-01

    Hydroxamic acids have been shown to be toxic to many pest insects and pathogens. In this study, the behavioral responses of western corn rootworm larvae to naturally occurring and synthetic hydroxamic acids were investigated. In a choice test between corn roots treated with hydroxamic acids and roots treated with distilled water (control), western corn rootworm larvae chose to burrow into the control roots significantly more often than compoundtreated roots. In addition, when corn roots were treated with different hydroxamic acids in a designed searching-behavior test, neonate larvae of western corn rootworm responded by significantly reducing the number of turns, while the area searched and locomotor rate significantly increased. The responses were dependent on the concentrations of the test compounds. These results suggested that hydroxamic acids were acting as behavior-modifying and possibly feeding-deterrent chemicals. PMID:24254140

  1. TECHNIQUES AND METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF HALOACETIC ACIDS IN POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Haloethanoic (haloacetic) acids (HAAs) are formed as disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during the chlorination of natural water to make it fit for consumption. Sundry analytical techniques have been applied in order to determine the concentrations of the HAAs in potable water suppli...

  2. Isolation of nonvolatile, organic solutes from natural waters by zeotrophic distillation of water from N,N-dimethylformamide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Brown, P.A.; Stiles, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    Nonvolatile, organic solutes that comprise the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in saline waters were isolated by removal of the water by distillation from a N,N-dimethylformamideformic acid-acetonitrile mixture. Salts isolated with the DOC were removed by crystallization of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate from the solvent mixture, removal of silicic acid by acidification and precipitation, removal of boric acid by methylation and volatilization, and removal of phosphate by zinc acetate precipitation. Chemical alteration of the organic solutes was minimized during evaporative concentration steps by careful control of acid concentrations in the solvent mixture and was minimized during drying by conversion of the samples to pyridinium and sodium salts. Recoveries of various hydrophilic organic standards from aqueous salt solutions and recoveries of natural organic solutes from various water samples varied from 60 to 100%. Losses of organic solutes during the isolation procedure were nonselective and related to the number of salt- and precipitate-washing cycles in the procedure.

  3. Monitored Natural Attenuation For Radionuclides In Ground Water - Technical Issues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of ground water contaminated with radionuclides may be achieved using attenuation-based technologies. These technologies may rely on engineered processes (e.g., bioremediation) or natural processes (e.g., monitored natural attentuation) within the subsurface. In gen...

  4. Influence of natural acidity and fisheries management activities upon the status of Adirondack fish populations

    SciTech Connect

    Retzsch, W.C.; Everett, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Acidification and the disappearance of fish from some Adirondack waters does not appear to be caused solely by acid rain. Acidification is a natural process under certain conditions and precipitation acidified by industrial emissions appears to be only one of many possible causes of pond, lake and stream acidification. Factors other than acid precipitation can cause acidification or reduce fish stocks. As a result of glaciation, northern New York State has hundreds of glacial ponds and lakes, most of which are dystrophic or oligotrophic. Many such waters are located in the western and central portions of the Adirondacks, an area frequently cited as exhibiting the most pronounced effects of acid rain. It is widely recognized that natural unpolluted bogs and peat deposits result in low pH environments. Seasonal and weather conditions also appear to have a substantial effect upon the acidity of peat-bog outflows. An evaluation of recent survey data on critically acidified Adirondack waters indicates that of 192 waters with values less than pH 5.0, approximately 61 percent appear to be directly influenced by natural bog conditions and an additional 14 percent are probably influenced. A review of historical and recent survey data suggest that significant factors, such as natural causes of acidification, low oxygen concentrations, high CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S concentrations, and extreme temperatures may have been ignored or underestimated in evaluating the cause of acidification and fish disappearances in some Adirondack waters. Another factor responsible for the current status of fish stocks in the Adirondacks involves past and present fishery resource management activities.

  5. TRACE ANALYSIS FOR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method of trace analysis of volatile aromatic hydrocarbons in natural water is described. The method is based on sparging water samples with nitrogen, adsorption of hydrocarbons on activated charcoal, followed by desorption into carbon disulfide and gas chromatographic analysis...

  6. Isolation of organic acids from large volumes of water by adsorption chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, George R.

    1984-01-01

    The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon from most natural waters ranges from 1 to 20 milligrams carbon per liter, of which approximately 75 percent are organic acids. These acids can be chromatographically fractionated into hydrophobic organic acids, such as humic substances, and hydrophilic organic acids. To effectively study any of these organic acids, they must be isolated from other organic and inorganic species, and concentrated. Usually, large volumes of water must be processed to obtain sufficient quantities of material, and adsorption chromatography on synthetic, macroporous resins has proven to be a particularly effective method for this purpose. The use of the nonionic Amberlite XAD-8 and Amberlite XAD-4 resins and the anion exchange resin Duolite A-7 for isolating and concentrating organic acids from water is presented.

  7. INFLUENCE OF AQUEOUS ALUMINUM AND ORGANIC ACIDS ON MEASUREMENT OF ACID NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) is used to quantify the acid-base status of surface waters. Acidic waters have bean defined as having ANC values less than zero, and acidification is often quantified by decreases in ANC. Measured and calculated values of ANC generally agree, exce...

  8. Calcium and bromide contents of natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.J.; Graf, D.L.; Jones, B.F.

    1966-01-01

    The linear relation observed in a log Ca++ versus log Br - plot for subsurface Cl- waters is attributed to ultrafiltration by shale of sea water and fresh water that have passed through sedimentary rocks since their formation. Reactions between these solutions and sedimentary minerals, particularly dolomitization, must have contributed additional Ca+ + to solution.

  9. Acidity-Facilitated Mobilization of Surface Clay Colloid from Natural Sand Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Wang, C.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2010-12-01

    Colloid mobilization and migration in a soil system has attracted increasing scrutiny for its role in facilitating colloid-borne transport of contaminants in the environments. In many previous studies, pH was evoked as a major factor in mobilizing surface colloids through inducing favorable surface charge and electrostatic conditions. The possible direct role of acidity with H+ as a chemical agent has remained largely obscured behind the indirect role of pH. In this study, we demonstrated through column flow-through tests that cyclical elution of natural sand media with weak acid and base solutions can greatly facilitate detachment and transport of surface clay colloids. We found that while elevating pH to an alkaline condition helped release the loosely-attached surface clays, a pretreatment with H+ could facilitate the mobilization of chemically-bonded clay colloids through lysing of labile Ca and Mg ions. A quantitative relation was observed that 1 mmol H+ could lyse about 0.5 mmol Ca2+ and Mg2+ and subsequently resulted in a release of about 1,200 mg clay during base elution when repulsive force between particles dominated. Natural organic acids such as citric acid and acetic acid in environment-relevant low concentrations (<1mM and pH>5.0) were as effective as HCl with a stronger acidic condition. The small mass ratio of Ca and Mg over colloid released and the nature of weak acid used suggest that the mobilization was less likely due to dissolution of cement casing than lysing of labile interstitial Ca and Mg by H+, which severed Ca and Mg bridging bonds between particles. Natural acidity is generated in abundance from various bio- and geochemical processes; e.g., many plants produce citric acid through citric acid cycle metabolism; biodegradation of dead organic matter forms humic acids. We postulate that natural proton dynamics in tendon with pH oscillation accompanied with various soil biogeochemical processes could play a major role in subsurface clay

  10. Relationships of anion-exchange sorption of boron from natural thermal-spring water

    SciTech Connect

    Meichik, N.R.; Leikin, Yu.A.; Antipov, M.A.; Goryacheva, N.V.; Klimenko, I.S.; Medvedev, S.A.; Galitskaya, N.B.

    1988-02-20

    Boric acid is one of the characteristic components of Kamchatka waters. Extraction of boron from thermal waters for production of potable water is closely linked with current problems of multiproduct utilization of resources and protection of the environment. The authors have investigated the possibilities of using ion exchange for extraction of boron from natural waters, and studied the sorption relationships by a dynamic method. They synthesized a macroporous anion-exchanger based on a copolymer of styrene with divinylbenzene, containing N-methylglucamine groups (ANB-11 resin). ANB-11 resin had high sorption capacity for boron anions during sorption from thermal-spring water. The experimental data were described by Elkins equation.

  11. From natural to bioassisted and biomimetic artificial water channel systems.

    PubMed

    Barboiu, Mihail; Gilles, Arnaud

    2013-12-17

    Within biological systems, natural channels and pores transport metabolites across the cell membranes. Researchers have explored artificial ion-channel architectures as potential mimics of natural ionic conduction. All these synthetic systems have produced an impressive collection of alternative artificial ion-channels. Amazingly, researchers have made far less progress in the area of synthetic water channels. The development of synthetic biomimetic water channels and pores could contribute to a better understanding of the natural function of protein channels and could offer new strategies to generate highly selective, advanced water purification systems. Despite the imaginative work by synthetic chemists to produce sophisticated architectures that confine water clusters, most synthetic water channels have used natural proteins channels as the selectivity components, embedded in the diverse arrays of bioassisted artificial systems. These systems combine natural proteins that present high water conductance states under natural conditions with artificial lipidic or polymeric matrixes. Experimental results have demonstrated that natural biomolecules can be used as bioassisted building blocks for the construction of highly selective water transport through artificial membranes. A next step to further the potential of these systems was the design and construction of simpler compounds that maintain the high conduction activity obtained with natural compounds leading to fully synthetic artificial biomimetic systems. Such studies aim to use constitutional selective artificial superstructures for water/proton transport to select functions similar to the natural structures. Moving to simpler water channel systems offers a chance to better understand mechanistic and structural behaviors and to uncover novel interactive water-channels that might parallel those in biomolecular systems. This Account discusses the incipient development of the first artificial water channels

  12. Natural Versus Anthropogenic Remediation of Streams Impacted by Acid Mine Drainage in Southeast Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, T.; Lopez, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    Three streams that have been affected by acid mine drainage in southeast Ohio have been investigated (Sulphur Run in the Federal Creek watershed, Rock Run in the Monday Creek watershed, and Buffer Run in the Raccoon Creek watershed). Sulphur Run neutralizes acidic inputs naturally due to its strong buffering capacity acquired from water-rock interactions with the abundant carbonate lithology surrounding the stream. Rock Run and Buffer Run have been anthropogenically remediated using successive alkalinity producing wetlands, open limestone channels, and alkaline capping of adjacent coal refuse piles. The objective of this study is to compare the water quality evolution of the three streams. For this purpose, water and sediment samples were collected for chemical analysis and in-situ flow rate, alkalinity, acidity, pH, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity were measured. Preliminary results reveal that the pH of Sulphur Run, which never drops below 6.7, increases steadily along the flow path. Downstream of the remediation sites, the pH of Rock Run and Buffer Run is always below 4 and declines along the flow path, possibly due to a combination of additional acidic inputs downstream from the main source and the oxidation of metals, leading to hydrolysis reactions that produce additional hydrogen protons. The net alkalinity of Sulphur Run increases steadily downstream, reflecting the effectiveness of a continuous supply of alkaline material at neutralizing acidic inputs. Both Buffer Run and Rock Run are net acidic, suggesting that armoring of the open limestone channels by metal precipitates is impeding the recovery of water quality. The early results indicate that remediation schemes that do not mimic nature by providing a long term, steady supply of alkaline material appear to be ineffective.

  13. Biosynthesis of Phosphonic and Phosphinic Acid Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2009-01-01

    Natural products containing carbon-phosphorus bonds (phosphonic and phosphinic acids) have found widespread use in medicine and agriculture. Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the biochemistry and biology of these compounds with the cloning of the biosynthetic gene clusters for several family members. This review discusses the commonalities and differences in the molecular logic that lies behind the biosynthesis of these compounds. The current knowledge regarding the metabolic pathways and enzymes involved in the production of a number of natural products, including the approved antibiotic fosfomycin, the widely used herbicide phosphinothricin, and the clinical candidate for treatment of malaria FR900098, is presented. Many of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of these compounds catalyze chemically and biologically unprecedented transformations and a wealth of new biochemistry has been revealed through their study. These studies have also suggested new strategies for natural product discovery. PMID:19489722

  14. NOVEL NATURAL WATER FILTERS FOR NAGCARLAN, PHILIPPINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We expect to generate a biodegradable water filter containing the appropriate combination of activated carbon, moringa seeds, chitosan, and sand to address the pollutants in Nagcarlan’s water. To ensure sustainability, we intend to instruct the citizens on how to construct th...

  15. Nature: "Water, Water, Everywhere, nor Any Drop to Drink"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinhorst, Sabine; Cannon, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    The difficulties faced by developing countries in obtaining clean water, and its misuse in advanced countries are reported. The new application of zeolites, or molecular synthesis of aluminosilicates in the desalination or purification of water forecasts a brighter future.

  16. The dissolution of natural and artificial dusts in glutamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zhang; Faqin, Dong; Xiaochun, He

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the characteristics of natural dusts, industrial dusts, and artificial dusts, such as mineral phases, chemical components, morphological observation and size. Quartz and calcite are the main phases of natural dusts and industrial dusts with high SiO2 and CaO and low K2O and Na2O in the chemical composition. The dissolution and electrochemical action of dusts in glutamic acid liquor at the simulated human body temperature (37 °C) in 32 h was investigated. The potential harm that the dust could lead to in body glutamic acid acidic environment, namely biological activity, is of great importance for revealing the human toxicological mechanism. The changes of pH values and electric conductivity of suspension of those dusts were similar, increased slowly in the first 8 h, and then the pH values increased rapidly. The total amount of dissolved ions of K, Ca, Na, and Mg was 35.4 to 429 mg/kg, particularly Ca was maximal of 20 to 334 mg/kg. The total amount of dissolved ions of Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, and Ba was 0.18 to 5.59 mg/kg and in Al and Si was 3.0 to 21.7 mg/kg. The relative solubility order of dusts in glutamic acid is wollastonite > serpentine > sepiolite, the cement plant industrial dusts > natural dusts > power plant industrial dusts. The wollastonite and cement plant industrial dusts have the highest solubility, which also have high content of CaO; this shows that there are a poorer corrosion-resisting ability and lower bio-resistibility. Sepiolite and power plant industrial dusts have lowest solubility, which also have high content of SiO2; this shows that there are a higher corrosion-resisting ability and stronger bio-resistibility.

  17. Peracetic acid: A new biocide for industrial water applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.F.

    1997-12-01

    Peracetic acid is rapidly cidal at low concentrations against a broad spectrum of microorganisms, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, molds, and algae under a wide variety of conditions. It is also effective against anaerobic and spore forming bacteria. Peracetic acid is effective at killing biofilm microorganisms at low concentrations and short contact times. Unlike a number of other biocides, the biocidal activity of peracetic acid is not affected by pH or water hardness and biocidal activity is retained even in the presence of organic matter. For these reasons, peracetic acid is well suited as a biocide in industrial cooling water and papermaking systems. Peracetic acid is compatible with additives commonly used in these systems. Although peracetic acid is a potent biocide, it is unique in that it does not produce toxic byproducts and its decomposition products, acetic acid, water and oxygen, are innocuous and environmentally acceptable.

  18. One pot, rapid and efficient synthesis of water dispersible gold nanoparticles using alpha-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangoo, Nishima; Kaur, Sarabjit; Bajaj, Manish; Jain, D. V. S.; Sharma, Rohit K.

    2014-10-01

    A detailed study on the synthesis of spherical and monodispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using all of the 20 naturally occurring α-amino acids has been reported. The synthesized nanoparticles have been further characterized using various techniques such as absorbance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance. Size control of the nanoparticles has been achieved by varying the ratio of the gold ion to the amino acid. These monodispersed water soluble AuNPs synthesized using non-toxic, naturally occurring α-amino acids as reducing and capping/stabilizing agents serve as a remarkable example of green chemistry.

  19. Water ICE: Ion Exclusion Chromatography of Very Weak Acids with a Pure Water Eluent.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hongzhu; Shelor, C Phillip; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2016-05-01

    Separation of ions or ionizable compounds with pure water as eluent and detecting them in a simple fashion has been an elusive goal. It has been known for some time that carbonic acid can be separated from strong acids by ion chromatography in the exclusion mode (ICE) using only water as the eluent. The practice of water ICE was shown feasible for very weak acids like silicate and borate with a dedicated element specific detector like an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS), but this is rarely practical in most laboratories. Direct conductometric detection is possible for H2CO3 but because of its weak nature, not especially sensitive; complex multistep ion exchange methods do not markedly improve this LOD. It will clearly be impractical in acids that are weaker still. By using a permeative amine introduction device (PAID, Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 2198 - 2204 ) as a conductometric developing agent, we demonstrate that a variety of weak acids (silicate, borate, arsenite, cyanide, carbonate, and sulfide) cannot only be separated on an ion exclusion column, they can be sensitively detected (LODs 0.2-0.4 μM). We observe that the elution order is essentially the same as that on a nonfunctionalized poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) column using 1-10% acetonitrile as eluent and follows the reverse order of the polar surface area (PSA) of the analyte molecules. PSA values have been widely used to predict biological transport of pharmaceuticals across a membrane but never to predict chromatographic behavior. We demonstrate the application of the technique by measuring the silicate and borate depth profiles in the Pacific Ocean; the silicate results show an excellent match with results from a reference laboratory. PMID:27075932

  20. OZONATION BYPRODUCTS: IDENTIFICATION OF BROMOHYDRINS FROM THE OZONATION OF NATURAL WATERS WITH ENHANCED BROMIDE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When ozone is used in the treatment of drinking water, it reacts with both inorganic and organic compounds to form byproducts. f bromide is present, it may be oxidized to hydrobromous acid, which may than react with natural organic matter to form brominated organic compounds. he ...

  1. Acoustic properties of organic acid mixtures in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macavei, I.; Petrisor, V.; Auslaender, D.

    1974-01-01

    The variation of the rate of propagation of ultrasounds in organic acid mixtures in water points to structural changes caused by interactions that take place under conditions of thermal agitation, at different acid concentrations. At the same time, a difference is found in the changes in velocity as a function of the length of the carbon chain of the acids in the mixture as a result of their effect on the groups of water molecules associated by hydrogen bonds.

  2. Determination of uranium in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, L.L.; Barker, F.B.

    1957-01-01

    The fluorophotometric determination of uranium was studied to develop a procedure applicable to the routine analysis of waters. Three grams of the high carbonate flux are used in a dilution procedure with spiking. Because of the comparatively high reflectivity of this large disk and the low uranium concentration, a correction for nonquenched light is required. A formula is developed to compensate for the effect, an electrical fusion device is described, and the problem of fixing uranium in waters is discussed.

  3. General Synthesis of Amino Acid Salts from Amino Alcohols and Basic Water Liberating H2.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2016-05-18

    An atom-economical and environmentally friendly method to transform amino alcohols to amino acid salts using just basic water, without the need of pre-protection or added oxidant, catalyzed by a ruthenium pincer complex, is developed. Water is the solvent, the source of the oxygen atom of the carboxylic acid group, and the actual oxidant, with liberation of dihydrogen. Many important and useful natural and unnatural amino acid salts can be produced in excellent yields by applying this new method. PMID:27139983

  4. Effect of Acids on Water Vapor Uptake by Pyrogenic Silica

    PubMed

    Bogdan; Kulmala

    1997-07-01

    Effect of gaseous HCl and HNO3 on the water vapor uptake by pyrogenic silica was studied at different relative humidities (RH) for pure water and different compositions of binary and ternary vapor mixtures. Experiments showed that the ability of silica to uptake water strongly depends on RH and on the type of acids and their concentration in the vapor mixtures. At low acid concentration in the binary mixtures the influence of acids is probably small. Water uptake by silica does not change monotonically with acid concentration: at first it decreases and then starts to grow. However, the presence of acids promotes water uptake, and the effect is very significant at low RH. HCl seems to be more effective acid to enhance water uptake than HNO3 . In the case of ternary mixtures the adsorbed weight of water is a bit larger than that adsorbed from the binary mixtures. Acids are accumulated by silica surface, and the accumulation is larger for nitric acid. PMID:9241208

  5. Natural factors and mining activity bearings on the water quality of the Choapa basin, North Central Chile: insights on the role of mafic volcanic rocks in the buffering of the acid drainage process.

    PubMed

    Parra, Amparo; Oyarzún, Jorge; Maturana, Hugo; Kretschmer, Nicole; Meza, Francisco; Oyarzún, Ricardo

    2011-10-01

    This contribution analyzes water chemical data for the Choapa basin, North Central Chile, for the period 1980-2004. The parameters considered are As, Cu Fe, pH, EC, SO₄⁻², Cl⁻¹, and HCO[Formula: see text], from samples taken in nine monitoring stations throughout the basin. Results show rather moderate contents of As, Cu, and Fe, with the exception of the Cuncumén River and the Aucó creek, explained by the influence of the huge porphyry copper deposit of Los Pelambres and by the presence of mining operations, respectively. When compared against results obtained in previous researches at the neighboring Elqui river basin, which host the El Indio Au-Cu-As district, a much reduced grade of pollution is recognized for the Choapa basin. Considering the effect of acid rock drainage (ARD)-related Cu contents on the fine fraction of the sediments of both river basins, the differences recorded are even more striking. Although the Los Pelambres porphyry copper deposit, on the headwaters of the Choapa river basin, is between one and two orders of magnitude bigger than El Indio, stream water and sediments of the former exhibit significantly lower copper contents than those of the latter. A main factor which may explain these results is the smaller degree of H( + )-metasomatism on the host rocks of the Los Pelambres deposit, where mafic andesitic volcanic rocks presenting propylitic hydrothermal alteration are dominant. This fact contrast with the highly altered host rocks of El Indio district, where most of them have lost their potential to neutralize ARD. PMID:21170583

  6. Occurrence of strontium in natural water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skougstad, M.W.; Horr, C. Albert

    1960-01-01

    The regions where the stable strontium content of surface waters is relatively low (less than 0.50 ppm) include the Pacific Northwest, Northeastern United States, and the Central Lowlands, Particularly the Lower Mississippi basin and the Western Gulf Coast area. Moderate concentrations of strontium (0.50 to 1.5 ppm) are found in streams of Southeastern United States, most of the Great Plains Region, the Western Mountain and Plateau Regions, and California. Relatively high concentrations of strontium occur in the surface waters of an area that includes Northern and Western Texas and Southern New Mexico and Arizona. Exceptions to the above distribution are due to local geologic conditions.

  7. Proton-binding study of standard and reference fulvic acids, humic acids, and natural organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Jason D.; Perdue, E. Michael

    2003-01-01

    The acid-base properties of 14 standard and reference materials from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) were investigated by potentiometric titration. Titrations were conducted in 0.1 M NaCl under a nitrogen atmosphere, averaging 30 min from start to finish. Concentrations of carboxyl groups and phenolic groups were estimated directly from titration curves. Titration data were also fit to a modified Henderson-Hasselbalch model for two classes of proton-binding sites to obtain "best fit" parameters that describe proton-binding curves for the samples. The model was chosen for its simplicity, its ease of implementation in computer spreadsheets, and its excellent ability to describe the shapes of the titration curves. The carboxyl contents of the IHSS samples are in the general order: terrestrial fulvic acids > aquatic fulvic acids > Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM) > aquatic humic acids > terrestrial humic acids. Overall, fulvic acids and humic acids have similar phenolic contents; however, all of the aquatically derived samples have higher phenolic contents than the terrestrially derived samples. The acid-base properties of reference Suwannee River NOM are surprisingly similar to those of standard Suwannee River humic acid. Results from titrations in this study were compared with other published results from both direct and indirect titrations. Typically, carboxyl contents for the IHSS samples were in agreement with the results from both methods of titration. Phenolic contents for the IHSS samples were comparable to those determined by direct titrations, but were significantly less than estimates of phenolic content that were based on indirect titrations with Ba(OH) 2 and Ca(OAc) 2. The average phenolic-to-carboxylic ratio of the IHSS samples is approximately 1:4. Models that assume a 1:2 ratio of phenolic-to-carboxylic groups may overestimate the relative contribution of phenolic groups to the acid-base chemistry of humic substances.

  8. Peracetic acid: A new biocide for industrial water applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    Peracetic acid is rapidly cidal at low concentrations against a broad spectrum of microorganisms, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, molds, and algae under a wide variety of conditions. It is also effective against anaerobic and spore-forming bacteria. Peracetic acid is effective at killing biofilm microorganisms at low concentrations and short contact times. Unlike a number of other biocides, the biocidal activity of peracetic acid is not affected by pH or water hardness and is retained even in the presence of organic matter. For these reasons, peracetic acid is well-suited as a biocide in industrial cooling water and paper-making systems. It is also compatible with additives commonly used in these systems. Although peracetic acid is a potent biocide, it is unique in that it does not produce toxic byproducts and its decomposition products (acetic acid, water, and oxygen) are innocuous and environmentally acceptable.

  9. Silicon Isotope Fractionation During Acid Water-Igneous Rock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boorn, S. H.; van Bergen, M. J.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2007-12-01

    ), the &δ&&30Si value of dissolved silicon in the lake water must be even higher. We infer that progressive cation removal alone is inadequate to describe rock dissolution and silicification by acid fluid. Exchange of silicon between the solution and mineral phases probably accompanied the alteration process. This hypothesis is qualitatively consistent with the idea that elements in solution take part in the formation of altered silica-rich layers at mineral-solution interfaces, as invoked to interpret surface reactions during silicate mineral weathering (e.g., Adriaens et al., 1999; Hellmann et al., 2003). References Adriaens et al., 1999. Surf. Interface Anal., 27: 8-23 Basile-Doelsch et al., 2006. Nature, 433: 399-402. Hellmann et al., 2003. Phys. Chem. Minerals, 30: 192-197.

  10. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  11. Water and formic acid aggregates: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Vardanega, Delphine; Picaud, Sylvain

    2014-09-14

    Water adsorption around a formic acid aggregate has been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations in a large temperature range including tropospheric conditions. Systems of different water contents have been considered and a large number of simulations has allowed us to determine the behavior of the corresponding binary formic acid-water systems as a function of temperature and humidity. The results clearly evidence a threshold temperature below which the system consists of water molecules adsorbed on a large formic acid grain. Above this temperature, formation of liquid-like mixed aggregates is obtained. This threshold temperature depends on the water content and may influence the ability of formic acid grains to act as cloud condensation nuclei in the Troposphere. PMID:25217941

  12. Determination of spectral signatures of substances in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V.; Philpot, W. D.; Davis, G.

    1978-01-01

    Optical remote sensing of water pollution offers the possibility of fast, large scale coverage at a relatively low cost. The possibility of using the spectral characteristics of the upwelling light from water for the purpose of ocean water quality monitoring was explained. The work was broken into several broad tasks as follows: (1) definition of a remotely measured spectral signature of water, (2) collection of field data and testing of the signature analysis, and (3) the possibility of using LANDSAT data for the identification of substances in water. An attempt to extract spectral signatures of acid waste and sediment was successful.

  13. Determination of uranium in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Franklin Butt; Johnson, J.O.; Edwards, K.W.; Robinson, B.P.

    1965-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of very low concentrations of uranium in water. The method is based on the fluorescence of uranium in a pad prepared by fusion of the dried solids from the water sample with a flux of 10 percent NaF 45.5 percent Na2CO3 , and 45.5 percent K2CO3 . This flux permits use of a low fusion temperature and yields pads which are easily removed from the platinum fusion dishes for fluorescence measurements. Uranium concentrations of less than 1 microgram per liter can be determined on a sample of 10 milliliters, or less. The sensitivity and accuracy of the method are dependent primarily on the purity of reagents used, the stability and linearity of the fluorimeter, and the concentration of quenching elements in the water residue. A purification step is recommended when the fluorescence is quenched by more than 30 percent. Equations are given for the calculation of standard deviations of analyses by this method. Graphs of error functions and representative data are also included.

  14. Enzymatic polymerization of natural anacardic acid and antibiofouling effects of polyanacardic acid coatings.

    PubMed

    Chelikani, Rahul; Kim, Yong Hwan; Yoon, Do-Young; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2009-05-01

    Anacardic acid, separated from cashew nut shell liquid, is well known for its strong antibiotic and antioxidant activities. Recent findings indicate that phenolic compounds from plant sources have an effect on Gram-negative bacteria biofilm formation. In this work, a polyphenolic coating was prepared from anacardic acid using enzymatic synthesis and tested for its effects on biofilm formation of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Natural anacardic acid was enzymatically polymerized using soybean peroxidase. Hydrogen peroxide and phenothiazine-10-propionic acid were used as an oxidizing agent and redox mediator, respectively. Nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses showed the formation of oxyphenylene and phenylene units through the phenol rings. No linkage through the alkyl chain was observed, which proved a high chemo-selectivity of the enzyme. Aqueous solvents turned out to play an important role in the polymer production yield and molecular weight. With 2-propanol, the highest production yield (61%) of polymer (molecular weight = 3,900) was observed, and with methanol, higher-molecular-weight polymers (5,000) were produced with lower production yields (43%). The resulting polyanacardic acid was cross-linked on a solid surface to form a permanent natural polymer coating. The FTIR analysis indicates that the cross-linking between the polymers took place through the unsaturated alkyl side chains. The polyanacardic acid coating was then tested for its antibiofouling effect against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and compared with the antibiofouling effects of polycardanol coatings reported in the literature. The polyanacardic acid coating showed more reduction in biofilm formation on its surface than polycardanol coatings in the case of Gram-positive bacteria, while in the case of Gram-negative bacteria, it showed a similar reduction in biofilm formation as polycardanol. PMID:18592408

  15. Water oxidation reaction in natural and artificial photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal

    2013-12-10

    Understanding the structure and mechanism of water oxidation catalysts is an essential component for developing artificial photosynthetic devices. In the natural water oxidation catalyst, the geometric and electronic structure of its inorganic core, the Mn{sub 4}CaO{sub 5} cluster, has been studied by spectroscopic and diffraction measurements. In inorganic systems, metal oxides seem to be good candidates for water oxidation catalysts. Understanding the reaction mechanism in both natural and oxide-based catalysts will helpin further developing efficient and robust water oxidation catalysts.

  16. Environmental monitoring of natural waters in Krasnodar and Stavropol Territories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzina, T. S.; Matugina, E. G.; Bagamaev, B. M.; Tokhov, Yu M.; Kolbysheva, Yu V.; Gorchakov, E. V.; Sotnikova, T. V.; Shilova, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    The environmental monitoring of natural waters in Krasnodar (Uspensky and Novokubansky districts) and Stavropol (Kochubeyevsky District) Territories was conducted. In the course of study, various elements and compounds harmful to animals and humans, which exceed maximum permissible concentrations, were identified.

  17. Mercury Photolytic Transformation Affected by Low-Molecular-Weight Natural Organics in Water

    SciTech Connect

    He, Feng; Zheng, Wang; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms by which dissolved organic matter (DOM) mediates the photochemical reduction of Hg(II) in aquatic ecosystems are not fully understood, owing to the heterogeneous nature and complex structural properties of DOM. In this work, naturally occurring aromatic compounds including salicylic, 4-hydrobenzoic, anthranilic, 4-aminobenzoic, and phthalic acid were systematically studied as surrogates for DOM in order to gain an improved mechanistic understanding of these compounds in the photoreduction of Hg(II) in water. We show that the photoreduction rates of Hg(II) are influenced not only by the substituent functional groups such as OH, NH2 and COOH on the benzene ring, but also the positioning of these functional groups on the ring structure. The Hg(II) photoreduction rate decreases in the order anthranilic acid > salicylic acid > phthalic acid according to the presence of the NH2, OH, COOH functional groups on benzoic acid. The substitution position of the functional groups affects reduction rates in the order anthranilic acid > 4-aminobenzoic acid and salicylic acid > 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. Reduction rates correlate strongly with ultraviolet (UV) absorption of these compounds and their concentrations, suggesting that the formation of organic free radicals during photolysis of these compounds is responsible for Hg(II) photoreduction. These results provide insight into the role of low-molecular-weight organic compounds and possibly DOM in Hg photoredox transformation and may thus have important implications for understanding Hg geochemical cycling in the environment.

  18. Physiological effects of sublethal levels of acid water on three species of fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Pegg, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Static toxicity tests revealed the need to assess the effect of acid mine water using some procedure that would gradually increase the concentration of acidity over a period of time. A relatively long-term (2-5 days) experiment involving the devlopment of a sublethal acid treatment gradient was chosen as potentially being the most representative of natural environments which are periodically subjected to changing inputs from coal mine drainage. Since respiratory change is an indication of physiological stress, the measurement of oxygen consumption rate was chosen as the major variable representing the effect of acid waters on fishes. Bluegill sunfish Lepomes macrochirus Rafinesque, pumpkinseed sunfish, Lepomis gibbosus (Linnaeus), and brown bullhead, Ictalurus nebulosus (LeSueur) were collected from the Monongahela River and backwater areas in the region of Morgantown, West Virginia. The sublethal acid water treatments decreased the oxygen consumption rates for brown bullhead and bluegill sunfish, while increasing the oxygen consumption rate for pumpkinseed sunfish. Further, the rhythms of the oxygen consumption rates were generally modified in both frequency and amplitude as a result of exposure to acid water. Acid water treatments also caused negative phase shifts in oxygen consumption rate for brown bullhead sand bluegill sunfish, while positive phase shifts occurred for pumpkinseed sunfish.

  19. Benzoic Acid and Chlorobenzoic Acids: Thermodynamic Study of the Pure Compounds and Binary Mixtures With Water.

    PubMed

    Reschke, Thomas; Zherikova, Kseniya V; Verevkin, Sergey P; Held, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Benzoic acid is a model compound for drug substances in pharmaceutical research. Process design requires information about thermodynamic phase behavior of benzoic acid and its mixtures with water and organic solvents. This work addresses phase equilibria that determine stability and solubility. In this work, Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT) was used to model the phase behavior of aqueous and organic solutions containing benzoic acid and chlorobenzoic acids. Absolute vapor pressures of benzoic acid and 2-, 3-, and 4-chlorobenzoic acid from literature and from our own measurements were used to determine pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. Two binary interaction parameters between water and/or benzoic acid were used to model vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibria of water and/or benzoic acid between 280 and 413 K. The PC-SAFT parameters and 1 binary interaction parameter were used to model aqueous solubility of the chlorobenzoic acids. Additionally, solubility of benzoic acid in organic solvents was predicted without using binary parameters. All results showed that pure-component parameters for benzoic acid and for the chlorobenzoic acids allowed for satisfying modeling phase equilibria. The modeling approach established in this work is a further step to screen solubility and to predict the whole phase region of mixtures containing pharmaceuticals. PMID:26886302

  20. Photolysis of natural β-triketonic herbicides in water.

    PubMed

    Trivella, Aurélien; Stawinoga, Malgorzata; Dayan, Franck E; Cantrell, Charles L; Mazellier, Patrick; Richard, Claire

    2015-07-01

    The fate of four natural β-triketones (leptospermone, isoleptospermone, grandiflorone and flavesone, pKa = 4.0-4.5) in aqueous solution, in the dark and upon simulated solar light irradiation was investigated. In anionic form, β-triketones undergo slow dark oxidation and photolysis with polychromatic quantum yields varying from 1.2 × 10(-4) to 3.7 × 10(-4). Leptospermone and grandiflorone are the most photolabile compounds. In molecular form, β-triketones are rather volatile. Polychromatic quantum yields between 1.2 × 10(-3) and 1.8 × 10(-3) could be measured for leptospermone and grandiflorone. They are 3-5 times higher than for the anionic forms. Photooxidation on the carbon atom bearing the acidic hydrogen atom is the main oxidation reaction, common to all the β-triketones whatever their ionization state. However, leptospermone shows a special photoreactivity. In molecular form, it mainly undergoes photoisomerization. Based on this work, the half-lives of β-triketones in surface waters should be comprised between 7 and 23 days. PMID:25898250

  1. A comparison of neutralization efficiency of chemicals with respect to acidic Kopili River water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapil, Nibedita; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G.

    2016-02-01

    Among all the renewable sources of energy, hydropower is the most potential source which is economical, non-polluting and eco-friendly. The efficiency of hydropower plant in the long run depends on many factors like water and sediment quality. Erosive and corrosive wear of machine parts like turbine is a complex phenomenon. The problem becomes more acute if the hydroenvironment is acidic in nature. The wear and tear due to corrosion/erosion caused by acid mine drainage (AMD) from coal mines reduces the efficiency and the life of the equipments. In this work, neutralization of the acidic water of the Kopili River, Assam, India was investigated using a number of basic chemicals and quantitatively estimating their effectiveness and actual requirement. The acidic water of the river, used as the cooling water, has been found responsible for damaging the equipments of the Kopili Hydro Electric Power Project (KHEP), Assam/Meghalaya, India by reducing the life of all metallic parts through corrosion. In this work, use is made of a number of basic materials like calcium carbonate, calcium hydroxide, calcium oxide, sodium carbonate, sodium hydroxide, and ammonia to examine their neutralization efficiency with respect to the acidic water and it was found that quick lime or raw lime (CaO) has the highest neutralization capacity. Suggestions have been made for meeting the problem of acidity of the river water.

  2. Biomimetic water-collecting materials inspired by nature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2016-03-11

    Nowadays, water shortage is a severe issue all over the world, especially in some arid and undeveloped areas. Interestingly, a variety of natural creatures can collect water from fog, which can provide a source of inspiration to develop novel and functional water-collecting materials. Recently, as an increasingly hot research topic, bioinspired materials with the water collection ability have captured vast scientific attention in both practical applications and fundamental research studies. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of water collection in various natural creatures and present the fabrications, functions, applications, and new developments of bioinspired materials in recent years. The theoretical basis related to the phenomenon of water collection containing wetting behaviors and water droplet transportations is described in the beginning, i.e., the Young's equation, Wenzel model, Cassie model, surface energy gradient model and Laplace pressure equation. Then, the water collection mechanisms of three typical and widely researched natural animals and plants are discussed and their corresponding bioinspired materials are simultaneously detailed, which are cactus, spider, and desert beetles, respectively. This is followed by introducing another eight animals and plants (butterfly, shore birds, wheat awns, green bristlegrass, the Cotula fallax plant, Namib grass, green tree frogs and Australian desert lizards) that are rarely reported, exhibiting water collection properties or similar water droplet transportation. Finally, conclusions and outlook concerning the future development of bioinspired fog-collecting materials are presented. PMID:26898232

  3. Factors affecting response of surface waters to acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.; Johnson, D.W.; Elwood, J.W.; Van Winkle, W.; Clapp, R.B.; Reuss, J.O.

    1986-04-01

    Knowledge of watershed hydrology and of the biogeochemical reactions and elemental pools and fluxes occurring in watersheds can be used to classify the response of watersheds and surface waters to acidic deposition. A conceptual mosel is presented for classifying watersheds into those for which (1) surface water chemistry will change rapidly with deposition quality (direct response) (2) surface water chemistry will change only slowly over time (delayed response), and (3) surface water chemistry will not change significantly, even with continued acidic deposition (capacity-protected). Techniques and data available for classification of all watersheds in a region into these categories are discussed.

  4. Reduction of Turbidity of Water Using Locally Available Natural Coagulants

    PubMed Central

    Asrafuzzaman, Md.; Fakhruddin, A. N. M.; Hossain, Md. Alamgir

    2011-01-01

    Turbidity imparts a great problem in water treatment. Moringa oleifera, Cicer arietinum, and Dolichos lablab were used as locally available natural coagulants in this study to reduce turbidity of synthetic water. The tests were carried out, using artificial turbid water with conventional jar test apparatus. Optimum mixing intensity and duration were determined. After dosing water-soluble extracts of Moringa oleifera, Cicer arietinum, and Dolichos lablab reduced turbidity to 5.9, 3.9, and 11.1 nephelometric turbidity unit (NTU), respectively, from 100 NTU and 5, 3.3, and 9.5, NTU, respectively, after dosing and filtration. Natural coagulants worked better with high, turbid, water compare to medium, or low, turbid, water. Highest turbidity reduction efficiency (95.89%) was found with Cicer arietinum. About 89 to 96% total coliform reduction were also found with natural coagulant treatment of turbid water. Using locally available natural coagulants, suitable, easier, and environment friendly options for water treatment were observed. PMID:23724307

  5. Natural and pyrogenic humic acids at goethite and natural oxide surfaces interacting with phosphate.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Tjisse; Mia, Shamim; Duhaut, Pierre-Benoît; Molleman, Bastiaan

    2013-08-20

    Fulvic and humic acids have a large variability in binding to metal (hydr) oxide surfaces and interact differently with oxyanions, as examined here experimentally. Pyrogenic humic acid has been included in our study since it will be released to the environment in the case of large-scale application of biochar, potentially creating Darks Earths or Terra Preta soils. A surface complexation approach has been developed that aims to describe the competitive behavior of natural organic matter (NOM) in soil as well as model systems. Modeling points unexpectedly to a strong change of the molecular conformation of humic acid (HA) with a predominant adsorption in the Stern layer domain at low NOM loading. In soil, mineral oxide surfaces remain efficiently loaded by mineral-protected organic carbon (OC), equivalent with a layer thickness of ≥ ~0.5 nm that represents at least 0.1-1.0% OC, while surface-associated OC may be even three times higher. In natural systems, surface complexation modeling should account for this pervasive NOM coverage. With our charge distribution model for NOM (NOM-CD), the pH-dependent oxyanion competition of the organo-mineral oxide fraction can be described. For pyrogenic HA, a more than 10-fold increase in dissolved phosphate is predicted at long-term applications of biochar or black carbon. PMID:23875678

  6. Maleic acid solvation in mixed water-ethanol solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usacheva, T. R.; Kuz'mina, I. A.; Sharnin, V. A.; Tukumova, I. R.

    2012-04-01

    Heat effects of maleic acid dissolution in mixed water-ethanol solvents at 298.15 K are determined by means of calorimetry. A rise in exothermicity of maleic acid solvation is observed upon changes in the solvent copmosition in the direction of H2O → EtOH, the minimum being at ˜0.2 mol fraction of EtOH.

  7. Determination of phosphorus in natural waters: A historical review.

    PubMed

    Worsfold, Paul; McKelvie, Ian; Monbet, Phil

    2016-04-28

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a virtual special issue that reviews the development of analytical approaches to the determination of phosphorus species in natural waters. The focus is on sampling and sample treatment, analytical methods and quality assurance of the data. The export of phosphorus from anthropogenic activities (from diffuse and point sources) can result in increased primary production and eutrophication, and potentially the seasonal development of toxic algal blooms, which can significantly impact on water quality. Therefore the quantification of phosphorus species in natural waters provides important baseline data for studying aquatic phosphorus biogeochemistry, assessing ecosystem health and monitoring compliance with legislation. PMID:27046205

  8. The Nature of Intermolecular Interactions Between Aromatic Amino Acid Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Gervasio, Francesco; Chelli, Riccardo; Procacci, Piero; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2002-05-01

    The nature of intermolecular interactions between aromatic amino acid residues has been investigated by a combination of molecular dynamics and ab initio methods. The potential energy surface of various interacting pairs, including tryptophan, phenilalanine, and tyrosine, was scanned for determining all the relevant local minima by a combined molecular dynamics and conjugate gradient methodology with the AMBER force field. For each of these minima, single-point correlated ab initio calculations of the binding energy were performed. The agreement between empirical force field and ab initio binding energies of the minimum energy structures is excellent. Aromatic-aromatic interactions can be rationalized on the basis of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, whereas charge transfer or polarization phenomena are small for all intermolecular complexes and, particularly, for stacked structures.

  9. Photolytic dehalogenation of disinfection byproducts in water by natural sunlight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Abusallout, Ibrahim; Hua, Guanghui

    2016-09-01

    The aqueous photolysis of halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) by natural sunlight irradiation was studied to determine their photolytic dehalogenation kinetics. Total organic halogen analysis was used to quantify the dehalogenation extents of DBPs during outdoor photolysis experiments. Dichloroacetamide, chloral hydrate, chloroform, dichloroacetonitrile, monochloro-, monobromo-, dichloro-, dibromo-, and trichloroacetic acids were generally resistant to photolytic dehalogenation and showed less than 10% reduction after 6 h sunlight irradiation. Monoiodoacetic acid, tribromoacetic acid, bromoform, dibromoacetonitrile, and trichloronitromethane showed moderate to high dehalogenation degrees with half-lives of 4.0-19.3 h. Diiodoacetic acid, triiodoacetic acid, and iodoform degraded rapidly under the sunlight irradiation and exhibited half-lives of 5.3-10.2 min. In general, the photosensitive cleavage of carbon-halogen bonds of DBPs increased with increasing number of halogens (tri- > di- > mono-halogenated) and size of the substituted halogens (I > Br > Cl). Nitrate, nitrite, and pH had little impact on the photodehalogenation of DBPs under typical levels in surface waters. The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) inhibited the photodehalogenation of DBPs by light screening. The NOM inhibiting effects were more pronounced for the fast degrading iodinated DBPs. The results of this study improve our understanding about the photolytic dehalogenation of wastewater-derived DBPs in surface waters during water reuse. PMID:27289205

  10. Oleic Acid: Natural variation and potential enhancement in oilseed crops.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleic acid is a monounsaturated omega 9 fatty acid (MUFA, C18:1) which can be found in various plant lipids and animal fats. Unlike omega 3 (a-linolenic acid, C18:3) and omega 6 (linoleic acid, C18:2) fatty acids which are essential because they cannot be synthesized by humans and must be obtained f...

  11. A theoretical study on ascorbic acid dissociation in water clusters.

    PubMed

    Demianenko, Eugeniy; Ilchenko, Mykola; Grebenyuk, Anatoliy; Lobanov, Victor; Tsendra, Oksana

    2014-03-01

    Dissociation of ascorbic acid in water has been studied by using a cluster model. It was examined by density functional theory (DFT) with the В3LYP, M06, and wB97XD functionals and a 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of proton transfer from ascorbic acid molecule to water clusters were calculated as well as the equilibrium constants (pK a ) for the related processes. The used functionals in the DFT method together with continuum solvent models provided results close to the experimental data for the dissociation constant of ascorbic acid in aqueous solution. PMID:24567154

  12. Ca(2+) cross-linked alginic acid nanoparticles for solubilization of lipophilic natural colorants.

    PubMed

    Astete, Carlos E; Sabliov, Cristina M; Watanabe, Fumiya; Biris, Alexandru

    2009-08-26

    The increased tendency toward healthy lifestyles has promoted natural food ingredients to the detriment of synthetic components of food products. The trend followed into the colorant arena, with consumers worried about potential health problems associated with synthetic colorants and demanding food products that use natural pigments. The goal of this study was to entrap a lipophilic natural pigment (beta-carotene) in a water-soluble matrix made of Ca(2+) cross-linked alginic acid, to allow its use as a colorant in water-based foods. The effects of different synthesis parameters such as type of solvent, alginic acid concentration, and calcium chloride concentration on nanoparticle characteristics (i.e., size, zeta potential, and morphology) were evaluated. The particle stability was assessed by measuring aggregation against pH, oxidation, and particle precipitation as a function of time. The particle synthesized measured 120-180 nm when formed with chloroform and 500-950 nm when synthesized with ethyl acetate. The particles were negatively charged (-70 to -80 mV zeta potential) and were stable at pH values ranging from 3 to 7. The presence of calcium was prevalent on the particles, indicating that the divalent ions were responsible for cross-linking lecithin with alginic acid and forming the matrix around the beta-carotene pockets. The addition of calcium increased nanoparticle density and improved beta-carotene protection against oxidation. It is concluded that the method proposed herein was capable of forming water-soluble nanoparticles with entrapped beta-carotene of controlled functionality, as a result of the type of solvent and the amounts of alginate and Ca(2+) used. PMID:19645512

  13. A Prebiotic Chemistry Experiment on the Adsorption of Nucleic Acids Bases onto a Natural Zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anizelli, Pedro R.; Baú, João Paulo T.; Gomes, Frederico P.; da Costa, Antonio Carlos S.; Carneiro, Cristine E. A.; Zaia, Cássia Thaïs B. V.; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    2015-09-01

    There are currently few mechanisms that can explain how nucleic acid bases were synthesized, concentrated from dilute solutions, and/or protected against degradation by UV radiation or hydrolysis on the prebiotic Earth. A natural zeolite exhibited the potential to adsorb adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil over a range of pH, with greater adsorption of adenine and cytosine at acidic pH. Adsorption of all nucleic acid bases was decreased in artificial seawater compared to water, likely due to cation complexation. Furthermore, adsorption of adenine appeared to protect natural zeolite from thermal degradation. The C=O groups from thymine, cytosine and uracil appeared to assist the dissolution of the mineral while the NH2 group from adenine had no effect. As shown by FT-IR spectroscopy, adenine interacted with a natural zeolite through the NH2 group, and cytosine through the C=O group. A pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of adenine adsorption, which occurred faster in artificial seawaters.

  14. A Prebiotic Chemistry Experiment on the Adsorption of Nucleic Acids Bases onto a Natural Zeolite.

    PubMed

    Anizelli, Pedro R; Baú, João Paulo T; Gomes, Frederico P; da Costa, Antonio Carlos S; Carneiro, Cristine E A; Zaia, Cássia Thaïs B V; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2015-09-01

    There are currently few mechanisms that can explain how nucleic acid bases were synthesized, concentrated from dilute solutions, and/or protected against degradation by UV radiation or hydrolysis on the prebiotic Earth. A natural zeolite exhibited the potential to adsorb adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil over a range of pH, with greater adsorption of adenine and cytosine at acidic pH. Adsorption of all nucleic acid bases was decreased in artificial seawater compared to water, likely due to cation complexation. Furthermore, adsorption of adenine appeared to protect natural zeolite from thermal degradation. The C=O groups from thymine, cytosine and uracil appeared to assist the dissolution of the mineral while the NH2 group from adenine had no effect. As shown by FT-IR spectroscopy, adenine interacted with a natural zeolite through the NH2 group, and cytosine through the C=O group. A pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of adenine adsorption, which occurred faster in artificial seawaters. PMID:25754589

  15. TAILORING ACTIVATED CARBONS FOR ENHANCED REMOVAL OF NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER FROM NATURAL WATERS. (R828157)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several pathways have been employed to systematically modify two granular activated carbons (GACs), F400 (coal-based) and Macro (wood-based), for examining adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) from natural waters. A total of 24 activated carbons with different ...

  16. NEUROXOTOXICITY PRODUCED BY DIBROMOACETIC ACID IN DRINKING WATER OF RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Safe Drinking Water Act requires that EPA consider noncancer endpoints for the assessment of adverse human health effects of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Dibromoacetic acid (DBA) is one of many DBPs produced by the chlorination of drinking water. Its chlorinated analog, ...

  17. PROBABLE EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION ON PENNSYLVANIA WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project was to search for and identify any trends in water chemistry and fish communities in Pennsylvania waters which would indicate that acid precipitation was affecting them adversely. No new data collection was to be included. Five existing data bases, inc...

  18. EFFECTS OF ACID RAIN ON WATER SUPPLIES IN THE NORTHEAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of the first study concerning the impact of acid precipitation on drinking water are reported in terms of health effects in humans as measured by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels. The study focused on sampling surface water and groundwat...

  19. Pasteurization of naturally contaminated water with solar energy.

    PubMed Central

    Ciochetti, D A; Metcalf, R H

    1984-01-01

    A solar box cooker (SBC) was constructed with a cooking area deep enough to hold several 3.7-liter jugs of water, and this was used to investigate the potential of using solar energy to pasteurize naturally contaminated water. When river water was heated either in the SBC or on a hot plate, coliform bacteria were inactivated at temperatures of 60 degrees C or greater. Heating water in an SBC to at least 65 degrees C ensures that the water will be above the milk pasteurization temperature of 62.8 degrees C for at least an hour, which appears sufficient to pasteurize contaminated water. On clear or partly cloudy days, with the SBC facing magnetic south in Sacramento, bottom water temperatures of at least 65 degrees C could be obtained in 11.1 liters of water during the 6 weeks on either side of the summer solstice, in 7.4 liters of water from mid-March through mid-September, and in 3.7 liters of water an additional 2 to 3 weeks at the beginning and end of the solar season. Periodic repositioning of the SBC towards the sun, adjusting the back reflective lid, and preheating water in a simple reflective device increased final water temperatures. Simultaneous cooking and heating water to pasteurizing temperatures was possible. Additional uses of the SBC to pasteurize soil and to decontaminate hospital materials before disposal in remote areas are suggested. PMID:6712206

  20. Virucidal effect of chlorinated water containing cyanuric acid.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, T.; Sakae, K.; Ishihara, Y.; Isomura, S.; Inoue, H.

    1988-01-01

    The inhibitory influence of cyanuric acid on the virucidal effect of chlorine was studied. The time required for 99.9% inactivation of ten enteroviruses and two adenoviruses by 0.5 mg/l free available chlorine at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C was prolonged approximately 4.8-28.8 times by the addition of 30 mg/l cyanuric acid. Comparative inactivation of poliovirus 1 by free available chlorine with or without cyanuric acid revealed the following. The inactivation rate by 1.5 mg/l free available chlorine with 30 mg/l cyanuric acid or by 0.5 mg/l free available chlorine with 1 mg/l cyanuric acid was slower than by 0.5 mg/l free available chlorine alone. Temperature and pH did not affect the inhibitory influence of cyanuric acid on the disinfectant action of chlorine. In the swimming-pool and tap water, cyanuric acid delayed the virucidal effect of chlorine as much as in the 'clean' condition of chlorine-buffered distilled water. The available chlorine value should be increased to 1.5 mg/l when cyanuric acid is used in swimming-pool water. PMID:2850940

  1. Adsorption of oleic acid at sillimanite/water interface.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T V Vijaya; Prabhakar, S; Raju, G Bhaskar

    2002-03-15

    The interaction of oleic acid at sillimanite-water interface was studied by adsorption, FT-IR, and zeta potential measurements. The isoelectric point (IEP) of sillimanite obtained at pH 8.0 was found to shift in the presence of oleic acid. This shift in IEP was attributed to chemisorption of oleic acid on sillimanite. Adsorption experiments were conducted at pH 8.0, where the sillimanite surface is neutral. The adsorption isotherm exhibited a plateau around 5 micromol/m2 that correspond to a monolayer formation. Adsorption of oleic acid on sillimanite, alumina, and aluminum hydroxide was studied by FT-IR. Chemisorption of oleic acid on the above substrates was confirmed by FT-IR studies. Hydroxylation of mineral surface was found to be essential for the adsorption of oleic acid molecules. These surface hydroxyl sites were observed to facilitate deprotonation of oleic acid and its subsequent adsorption. Thus protons from oleic acid react with surface hydroxyl groups and form water molecules. Based on the experimental results, the mechanism of oleic acid adsorption on mineral substrate was proposed. Free energy of adsorption was estimated using the Stern-Graham equation for a sillimanite-oleate system. PMID:16290466

  2. Natural solar photolysis of total organic chlorine, bromine and iodine in water.

    PubMed

    Abusallout, Ibrahim; Hua, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    Municipal wastewater has been increasingly used to augment drinking water supplies due to the growing water scarcity. Wastewater-derived disinfection byproducts (DBPs) may negatively affect the aquatic ecosystems and human health of downstream communities during water reuse. The objective of this research was to determine the degradation kinetics of total organic chlorine (TOCl), bromine (TOBr) and iodine (TOI) in water by natural sunlight irradiation. Outdoor solar photolysis experiments were performed to investigate photolytic degradation of the total organic halogen (TOX) formed by fulvic acid and real water and wastewater samples. The results showed that TOX degradation by sunlight irradiation followed the first-order kinetics with half-lives in the range of 2.6-10.7 h for different TOX compounds produced by fulvic acid. The TOX degradation rates were generally in the order of TOI > TOBr ≅ TOCl(NH2Cl) > TOCl(Cl2). High molecular weight TOX was more susceptible to solar photolysis than corresponding low molecular weight halogenated compounds. The nitrate and sulfite induced indirect TOX photolysis rates were less than 50% of the direct photolysis rates under the conditions of this study. Fulvic acid and turbidity in water reduced TOX photodegradation. These results contribute to a better understanding of the fate of chlorinated, brominated and iodinated DBPs in surface waters. PMID:26841230

  3. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  4. Acetic acid oxidation and hydrolysis in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.C.; Marrone, P.A.; Tester, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    Acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH) hydrolysis and oxidation in supercritical water were examined from 425--600 C and 246 bar at reactor residence times of 4.4 to 9.8 s. Over the range of conditions studied, acetic acid oxidation was globally 0.72 {+-} 0.15 order in acetic acid and 0.27 {+-} 0.15 order in oxygen to a 95% confidence level, with an activation energy of 168 {+-} 21 kJ/mol, a preexponential factor of 10{sup 9.9{+-}1.7}, and an induction time of about 1.5 s at 525 C. Isothermal kinetic measurements at 550 C over the range 160 to 263 bar indicated that pressure or density did not affect the rate of acetic acid oxidation as much as was previously observed in the oxidation of hydrogen or carbon monoxide in supercritical water. Major products of acetic acid oxidation in supercritical water are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen. Trace amounts of propenoic acid were occasionally detected. Hydrolysis or hydrothermolysis in the absence of oxygen resulted in approximately 35% conversion of acetic acid at 600 C, 246 bar, and 8-s reactor residence time. Regression of the limited hydrolysis runs assuming a reaction rate first-order in organic gave a global rate expression with a preexponential factor of 10{sup 4.4{+-}1.1} and an activation energy of 94 {+-} 17 kJ/mol.

  5. (The fate of nuclides in natural water systems)

    SciTech Connect

    Turekian, K.K. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1989-01-01

    Our research at Yale on the fate of nuclides in natural water systems has three components to it: the study of the atmospheric precipitation of radionuclides and other chemical species; the study of the behavior of natural radionuclides in groundwater and hydrothermal systems; and understanding the controls on the distribution of radionuclides and stable nuclides in the marine realm. In this section a review of our progress in each of these areas is presented.

  6. Is There a Maximum Size of Water Drops in Nature?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    In nature, water drops can have a large variety of sizes and shapes. Small droplets with diameters of the order of 5 to 10 µm are present in fog and clouds. This is not sufficiently large for gravity to dominate their behavior. In contrast, raindrops typically have sizes of the order of 1 mm, with observed maximum sizes in nature of around 5 mm in…

  7. [The use of the natural mineral saponite for water decontamination].

    PubMed

    Hyrin, V M; Boĭko, I I; Rudychenko, V F

    1999-01-01

    Sorption properties were studied of natural and activated specimens of saponite with respect to poliomyelitis virus, Coxsackie B 1 and B 6 viruses as well as to Enterobacteriaceae group bacteria. With the purpose of comparing the processes of sorption of microorganisms, other minerals were also used, such as bentonite, alunite, glauconite, ceolite. The natural saponite adsorptive properties were found out to undergo changes during the process of thermoactivation. Mechanisms are discussed of a decontaminating effect of thermoactivated saponite in water. PMID:10423991

  8. Aluminum in acidic surface waters: chemistry, transport, and effects.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, C T

    1985-01-01

    Ecologically significant concentrations of Al have been reported in surface waters draining "acid-sensitive" watersheds that are receiving elevated inputs of acidic deposition. It has been hypothesized that mineral acids from atmospheric deposition have remobilized Al previously precipitated within the soil during soil development. This Al is then thought to be transported to adjacent surface waters. Dissolved mononuclear Al occurs as aquo Al, as well as OH-, F-, SO4(2-), and organic complexes. Although past investigations have often ignored non-hydroxide complexes of Al, it appears that organic and F complexes are the predominant forms of Al in dilute (low ionic strength) acidic surface waters. The concentration of inorganic forms of Al increases exponentially with decreases in solution pH. This response is similar to the theoretical pH dependent solubility of Al mineral phases. The concentration of organic forms of Al, however, is strongly correlated with variations in organic carbon concentration of surface waters rather than pH. Elevated concentrations of Al in dilute acidic waters are of interest because: Al is an important pH buffer; Al may influence the cycling of important elements like P, organic carbon, and trace metals; and Al is potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. An understanding of the aqueous speciation of Al is essential for an evaluation of these processes. PMID:3935428

  9. Distinguishing natural hydrocarbons from anthropogenic contamination in ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Lesage, S.; Xu, H.; Novakowski, K.S.

    1997-01-01

    Differentiation between natural and anthropogenic sources of ground-water contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons is necessary in areas where natural hydrocarbons may be present in the subsurface. Because of the similarity in composition between natural and refined petroleum, the use of statistical techniques to discern trends is required. In this study, both multivariate plotting techniques and principal component analysis were used to investigate the origin of hydrocarbons from a variety of study sites. Ground-water and gas samples were collected from the Niagara Falls area and from three gasoline stations where leaking underground storage tanks had been found. Although soil gas surveys are used to indicate the presence of hydrocarbons, they were not useful in differentiating between natural and anthropogenic sources of contamination in ground water. Propane and pentene were found to be the most useful chemical parameters in discriminating between the natural and anthropogenic sources. These chemicals are not usually measured in investigations of ground-water contamination, yet analysis can be conducted by most environmental laboratories using conventional methods.

  10. Geochemical processes controlling fate and transport of arsenic in acid mine drainage (AMD) and natural systems.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Yuanan; Luo, Jian; Xu, Bin; Zhao, Jianfu

    2009-06-15

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is often accompanied with elevated concentrations of arsenic, in the forms of arsenite, As(III), and/or arsenate, As(V), due to the high affinity of arsenic for sulfide mineral ores. This review summarizes the major geochemical processes controlling the release, speciation, fate, and distribution of inorganic arsenic in mine drainage and natural systems. Arsenic speciation depends highly on redox potential and pH of the solution, and arsenite can be oxidized to the less toxic arsenate form. Homogeneous oxidation of arsenite occurs rather slowly while its heterogeneous oxidation on mineral surfaces can greatly enhance the reaction rates. Little evidence suggests that precipitation reaction limits the concentrations of arsenic in natural water, while co-precipitation may lead to rapid arsenic removal when large amount of iron hydroxides precipitate out of the aqueous phase upon neutralization of the mine drainage. Both arsenate and arsenite adsorb on common metal oxides and clay minerals through formation of inner-sphere and/or outer-sphere complexes, controlling arsenic concentration in natural water bodies. Arsenite adsorbs less strongly than arsenate in the typical pH range of natural water and is more mobile. Part of the adsorbed arsenic species can be exchanged by common anions (e.g., PO(4)(3-) and SO(4)(2-)), especially phosphate, which leads to their re-mobilization. Understanding the geochemistry of arsenic is helpful for predicting its mobility and fate in AMD and natural systems, and for designing of cost-effective remediation/treatment strategies to reduce the occurrence and risk of arsenic contamination. PMID:19070955

  11. Protecting Consumers from Contaminated Drinking Water during Natural Disasters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural disasters can cause damage and destruction to local water supplies affecting millions of people. Communities should plan for and designate an authorized team to manage and prioritize emergency response in devastated areas. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 describe the Environmental...

  12. The Determination of Anionic Surfactants in Natural and Waste Waters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, P. T.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and results of an experiment suitable for measuring subpart per million concentrations of anionic surfactants in natural waters and waste effluents are provided. The experiment required only a spectrophotometer or filter photometer and has been successfully performed by students in an undergraduate environmental…

  13. Fouling of microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes by natural waters.

    PubMed

    Howe, Kerry J; Clark, Mark M

    2002-08-15

    Membrane filtration (microfiltration and ultrafiltration) has become an accepted process for drinking water treatment, but membrane fouling remains a significant problem. The objective of this study was to systematically investigate the mechanisms and components in natural waters that contribute to fouling. Natural waters from five sources were filtered in a benchtop filtration system. A sequential filtration process was used in most experiments. The first filtration steps removed specific components from the water, and the latter filtration steps investigated membrane fouling by the remaining components. Particulate matter (larger than 0.45 microm) was relatively unimportant in fouling as compared to dissolved matter. Very small colloids, ranging from about 3-20 nm in diameter, appeared to be important membrane foulants based on this experimental protocol. The colloidal foulants included both inorganic and organic matter, but the greatest fraction of material was organic. When the colloidal fraction of material was removed, the remaining dissolved organic matter (DOM), which was smaller than about 3 nm and included about 85-90% of the total DOM, caused very little fouling. Thus, although other studies have identified DOM as a major foulant during filtration of natural waters, this work shows that a small fraction of DOM may be responsible for fouling. Adsorption was demonstrated to be an important mechanism for fouling by colloids. PMID:12214651

  14. Diaromatic sulphur-containing 'naphthenic' acids in process waters.

    PubMed

    West, Charles E; Scarlett, Alan G; Tonkin, Andrew; O'Carroll-Fitzpatrick, Devon; Pureveen, Jos; Tegelaar, Erik; Gieleciak, Rafal; Hager, Darcy; Petersen, Karina; Tollefsen, Knut-Erik; Rowland, Steven J

    2014-03-15

    Polar organic compounds found in industrial process waters, particularly those originating from biodegraded petroleum residues, include 'naphthenic acids' (NA). Some NA have been shown to have acute toxicity to fish and also to produce sub-lethal effects. Whilst some of these toxic effects are produced by identifiable carboxylic acids, acids such as sulphur-containing acids, which have been detected, but not yet identified, may produce others. Therefore, in the present study, the sulphur-containing acids in oil sands process water were studied. A fraction (ca 12% by weight of the total NA containing ca 1.5% weight sulphur) was obtained by elution of methylated NA through an argentation solid phase extraction column with diethyl ether. This was examined by multidimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) in both nominal and high resolution mass accuracy modes and by GCxGC-sulphur chemiluminescence detection (GCxGC-SCD). Interpretation of the mass spectra and retention behaviour of methyl esters of several synthesised sulphur acids and the unknowns allowed delimitation of the structures, but not complete identification. Diaromatic sulphur-containing alkanoic acids were suggested. Computer modelling of the toxicities of some of the possible acids suggested they would have similar toxicities to one another and to dehydroabietic acid. However, the sulphur-rich fraction was not toxic or estrogenic to trout hepatocytes, suggesting the concentrations of sulphur acids in this sample were too low to produce any such effects in vitro. Further samples should probably be examined for these compounds. PMID:24252453

  15. An empirical NaKCa geothermometer for natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1973-01-01

    An empirical method of estimating the last temperature of water-rock interaction has been devised. It is based upon molar Na, K and Ca concentrations in natural waters from temperature environments ranging from 4 to 340??C. The data for most geothermal waters cluster near a straight line when plotted as the function log ( Na K) + ?? log [ ??? (Ca) Na] vs reciprocal of absolute temperature, where ?? is either 1 3 or 4 3 depending upon whether the water equilibrated above or below 100??C. For most waters tested, the method gives better results than the Na K methods suggested by other workers. The ratio Na K should not be used to estimate temperature if ??? ( MCa) MNa is greater than 1. The Na K values of such waters generally yield calculated temperatures much higher than the actual temperature at which water interacted with the rock. A comparison of the composition of boiling hot-spring water with that obtained from a nearby well (170??C) in Yellowstone Park shows that continued water-rock reactions may occur during ascent of water even though that ascent is so rapid that little or no heat is lost to the country rock, i.e. the water cools adiabatically. As a result of such continued reaction, waters which dissolve additional Ca as they ascend from the aquifer to the surface will yield estimated aquifer temperatures that are too low. On the other hand, waters initially having enough Ca to deposit calcium carbonate during ascent may yield estimated aquifer temperatures that are too high if aqueous Na and K are prevented from further reaction with country rock owing to armoring by calcite or silica minerals. The Na-K-Ca geothermometer is of particular interest to those prospecting for geothermal energy. The method also may be of use in interpreting compositions of fluid inclusions. ?? 1973.

  16. Chemical reactions and gas transfer in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, D.J. |

    1998-02-01

    Many chemical reactions of environmental significance involve reactants or end products that exchange with the atmosphere. The transferable constituents are the atmospheric gases--oxygen, carbon dioxide, and, to a more limited degree, nitrogen--and volatile substances that are not usually present in the atmosphere, such as ammonia, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. Reactions of this type have many applications in natural water systems, as well as water and waste treatment processes. It is the general purpose of this paper to present a mathematical approach to the analysis of these reactions and to demonstrate the application to various environmental problems. Both variable and constant pH conditions are addressed. The latter frequently characterizes laboratory experiments in batch reactions, in which a constant pH is maintained. The former is commonly present in natural waters, in which the pH changes through the course of the chemical reaction.

  17. Water and acid soluble trace metals in atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, S. E.; Harriss, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Continental aerosols are collected above a deciduous forest in eastern Tennessee and subjected to selective extractions to determine the water-soluble and acid-leachable concentrations of Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn. The combined contributions of these metals to the total aerosol mass is 0.5 percent, with approximately 70 percent of this attributable to Pb alone. A substantial fraction (approximately 50 percent or more) of the acid-leachable metals is soluble in distilled water. In general, this water-soluble fraction increases with decreasing particle size and with increasing frequency of atmospheric water vapor saturation during the sampling period. The pattern of relative solubilities (Zn being greater than Mn, which is approximately equal to Cd, which is greater than Pb) is found to be similar to the general order of the thermodynamic solubilities of the most probable salts of these elements in continental aerosols with mixed fossil fuel and soil sources.

  18. NEUTRALIZATION OF ACIDIC GROUND WATER NEAR GLOBE, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eychaner, James H.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.

    1985-01-01

    Highly acidic contaminated water is moving through a shallow aquifer and interacting with streams near Globe, Arizona. Dissolved concentrations reach 3,000 mg/L iron, 150 mg/L copper, and 16,400 mg/L total dissloved solids; pH is as low as 3. 6. Samples from 16 PVC-cased observation wells include uncontaminated, contaminated, transition, and neutralized waters. Chemical reaction with sediments and mixing with uncontaminated water neutralizes the acidic water. The reactions form a transition zone where gypsum replaces calcite and most metals precipitate. Ferric hydroxide also precipitates if sufficient oxygen is available. Abundant gypsum crystals and ferric hydroxide coatings have been recovered from well cuttings. Large sulfate concentrations produce sulfate complexes with many metals that inhibit removal of metals from solution.

  19. Sublimation of natural amino acids and induction of asymmetry by meteoritic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    It is believed that the homochirality of building blocks of life like amino acids (AAs) and sugars is a prerequisite requirement for the origin and evolution of life. Among different mechanisms that might have triggered the initial disparity in the enantiomeric ratio on the primitive Earth, the key roles were assigned to: (i) local chiral symmetry breaking and (ii) the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (eg the carbonaceous meteorites containing non-racemic AAs). Recently it has been revealed that sublimation, a subject almost completely neglected for a long time, gives a pathway to enantioenrichment of natural AAs (1,2 and references herein). Sublimation is however one of the key physical processes that occur on comets. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure AA, a partial sublimation gives an important enrichment of the sublimate (1,2). The resulted disparity in the ratio between enantiomers of a partial sublimate is determined by the crystalline nature of the starting mixture: we observed a drastic difference in the behavior of (i) mixtures based on true racemic compounds and (ii) mechanical mixtures of two enantiopure solid phases. On the other hand, combination of crystallization and sublimation can lead to segregation of enantioenriched fractions starting from racemic composition of sublimable aliphatic AAs (Ala, Leu, Pro, Val) in mixtures with non-volatile enantiopure ones (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) (3). The resulted sense of chirality correlates with the handedness of the non-volatile AAs: the observed changes in enantiomeric ratios clearly demonstrate the preferential homochiral interactions and a tendency of natural amino acids to homochiral self-organization. It is noteworthy that just these 5 (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) out of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to local symmetry breaking. On the other hand, recent data on the enantiomeric composition of the Tagish Lake, a C2-type carbonaceous meteorite, revealed a large L

  20. Occurrence of perfluoroalkyl acids in environmental waters in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Duong, Hanh Thi; Kadokami, Kiwao; Shirasaka, Hanako; Hidaka, Rento; Chau, Hong Thi Cam; Kong, Lingxiao; Nguyen, Trung Quang; Nguyen, Thao Thanh

    2015-03-01

    This is the first nationwide study of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in environmental waters in Vietnam. Twenty-eight river water and 22 groundwater samples collected in four major cities and 14 river water samples from the Red River were screened to investigate the occurrence and sources of 16 PFAAs. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) were the most prevalent of 11 detected PFAAs with maximum concentrations in urban river water of 5.3, 18 and 0.93ngL(-1), respectively, and in groundwater of 8.2, 4.5 and 0.45ngL(-1), respectively. PFAAs in the Red River water were detected at low levels. PFAA concentrations in river water were higher in the rainy season than in the dry season, possibly due to storm water runoff, a common phenomenon in Southeast Asian countries. The highest concentrations of PFAAs in river water were observed in samples from highly populated and industrialized areas, perhaps sourced from sewage. The PFAA concentrations observed were similar to those in other Southeast Asian countries, but lower than in developed nations. From the composition profiles of PFAAs, industrial products containing PFAAs imported from China and Japan might be one of the major sources of PFAAs in the Vietnamese aquatic environment. According to the health-based values and advisory issued by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the concentrations of detected PFAAs in this study do not pose an immediate health risk to humans and aquatic organisms. PMID:25496738

  1. Characteristics of natural organic matter degradation in water by UV/H2O2 treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, G S; Liao, C H; Chen, H W; Yang, H C

    2006-03-01

    This study evaluated the UV/H2O2 system for degradation of natural organic matter in water. The photolysis experiments were conducted in a 10-l batch reactor using a 450-watt high-pressure mercury vapor lamp as the light source. The addition of H2O2 in water greatly improved the rate of humic acid degradation by UV light and 90% of the humic acid was removed within 30 min of photolysis. Kinetic data showed that the first-order reaction could be used to describe the kinetics of both humic acid oxidation and H2O2 decomposition, and the optimum H2O2 dose was 0.01%-0.05% for humic acid oxidation. It was also observed that the absorption of UVC (UV with wavelength between 200 and 280 nm) is responsible for the dissociation of H2O2 to generate the reactive hydroxyl radicals. Depending on the initial dosages, the H2O2 added to the system can be completely decomposed by UV within 50 to 90 minutes. Upon UV irradiation, the humic intermediates with smaller molecular sizes increase as a result of the degradation of larger humic substances. Photolysis of surface water also shows that the UV/H2O2 was effective in reducing trihalomethanes (THMs) formation in treating surface water with high contents of organic precursors. The distribution of THMs shifted from chlorine-THMs to bromine-THMs after UV/H2O2 treatments when bromide was present in water. However, higher H2O2 dosages would be necessary for the photolysis of surface water containing high concentrations of organic THM precursors. As observed from the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, the functional groups of treated humic acids were destructed significantly, including -OH (from -COOH and -COH), aromatic -C=C, and -C=O conjugated with aromatic rings. PMID:16548208

  2. Copper complexation and toxicity to Daphnia in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Borgmann, U.; Charlton, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    Toxicity of copper to Daphnia magna in artificial medium, artificial medium plus algae, and natural water from Hamilton Harbour and Lake Ontario was determined, with and without added Tris, in order to test the assumption that free cupric ion concentrations are the same in equivalently toxic media even when total copper concentrations vary. Free cupric ion concentrations were calculated from the increase in the total copper concentration tolerated after Tris addition and from cupric ion electrode measurements. Copper toxicity was greatest in inorganic medium, lowest in inorganic medium plus algae and in Hamilton Harbour water, and intermediate in lake water. However, after Tris addition, toxicity was greatest in lake water and lowest in inorganic medium and inorganic medium plus algae. Both the bioassay and electrode data indicate that free cupric ion concentrations differ in different test waters when toxicity is the same. Free metal concentrations do not, therefore, provide a good measure of copper toxicity for Daphnia in natural waters. 12 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  3. Activity of Microorganisms in Acid Mine Water I. Influence of Acid Water on Aerobic Heterotrophs of a Normal Stream

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Jon H.; Randles, C. I.; Dugan, P. R.

    1968-01-01

    Comparison of microbial content of acid-contaminated and nonacid-contaminated streams from the same geographical area indicated that nonacid streams contained relatively low numbers of acid-tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms. The acid-tolerant aerobes survived when acid entered the stream and actually increased in number to about 2 × 103 per ml until the pH approached 3.0. The organisms then represented the heterotrophic aerobic microflora of the streams comprised of a mixture of mine drainage and nonacid water. A stream which was entirely acid drainage did not have a similar microflora. Most gram-positive aerobic and anaerobic bacteria died out very rapidly in acidic water, and they comprised a very small percentage of the microbial population of the streams examined. Iron- and sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic bacteria were present wherever mine water entered a stream system. The sulfur-oxidizing bacteria predominated over iron oxidizers. Ecological data from the field were verified by laboratory experiments designed to simulate stream conditions. PMID:5650063

  4. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-22

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  5. Limitations in the use of commercial humic acids in water and soil research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.; MacCarthy, P.

    1986-01-01

    Seven samples of commercial "humic acids", purchased from five different suppliers, were studied, and their characteristics were compared with humic and fulvic acids isolated from streams, soils, peat, leonardite, and a dopplerite sample. Cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning 13C NMR spectroscopy clearly shows pronounced differences between the commercial materials and all other samples. Elemental and infrared spectroscopic data do not show such clear-cut differences but can be used as supportive evidence, with the 13C NMR data, to substantiate the above distinctions. As a result of these differences and due to the general lack of information relating to the source, method of isolation, or other pretreatment of the commercial materials, these commercial products are not considered to be appropriate for use as analogues of true soil and water humic substances, in experiments designed to evaluate the nature and reactivity of humic substances in natural waters and soils.

  6. Limitations in the use of commercial humic acids in water and soil research

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm, R.L.; MacCarthy, P.

    1986-09-01

    Seven samples of commercial humic acids, purchased from five different suppliers, were studied, and their characteristics were compared with humic and fulvic acids isolated from streams, soils, peat, leonardite, and a dopplerite sample. Cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy clearly shows pronounced differences between the commercial materials and all other samples. Elemental and infrared spectroscopic data do not show such clear-cut differences but can be used as supportive evidence, with the /sup 13/C NMR data, to substantiate the above distinctions. As a result of these differences and due to the general lack of information relating to the source, method of isolation, or other pretreatment of the commercial materials, these commercial products are not considered to be appropriate for use as analogues of true soil and water humic substances, in experiments designed to evaluate the nature and reactivity of humic substances in natural waters and soils.

  7. The evolution of a mining lake - From acidity to natural neutralization.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, Elwira; Gąsiorowski, Michał

    2016-07-01

    Along the border of Poland and Germany (central Europe), many of the post-mining lakes have formed "an anthropogenic lake district". This study presents the evolution of a mining lake ecosystem (TR-33) based on subfossil phyto- and zooplankton, isotopic data (δ(13)C, δ(15)N), elemental analyses of organic carbon and nitrogen (C/N ratio and TOC) and sedimentological analyses. Recently, lake TR-33 became completely neutralized from acidification and an increase in eutrophication began a few years ago. However, the lake has never been neutralized by humans; only natural processes have influenced the present water quality. From the beginning of the existence of the lake (1920s) to the present, we can distinguish four stages of lake development: 1) very shallow reservoir without typical lake sediments but with a sand layer containing fine lignite particles and very poor diatom and cladoceran communities; 2) very acidic, deeper water body with increasing frequencies of phyto- and zooplankton; 3) transitional period (rebuilding communities of diatoms and Cladocera), meaning a deep lake with benthic and planktonic fauna and flora with wide ecological tolerances; and 4) a shift to circumneutral conditions with an essential increase in planktonic taxa that prefer more fertile waters (eutrophication). In the case of lake TR-33, this process of natural neutralization lasted approximately 23years. PMID:27016682

  8. Water-lactose behavior as a function of concentration and presence of lactic acid in lactose model systems.

    PubMed

    Wijayasinghe, Rangani; Vasiljevic, Todor; Chandrapala, Jayani

    2015-12-01

    The presence of high amounts of lactic acid in acid whey restricts its ability to be further processed because lactose appears to remain in its amorphous form. A systematic study is lacking in this regard especially during the concentration step. Hence, the main aim of the study was to establish the structure and behavior of water molecules surrounding lactose in the presence of 1% (wt/wt) lactic acid at a concentration up to 50% (wt/wt). Furthermore, the crystallization nature of freeze-dried lactose with or without lactic acid was established using differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Two mechanisms were proposed to describe the behavior of water molecules around lactose molecules during the concentration of pure lactose and lactose solutions with lactic acid. Pure lactose solution exhibited a water evaporation enthalpy of ~679 J·g(-1), whereas lactose+ lactic acid solution resulted in ~965 J·g(-1) at a 50% (wt/wt) concentration. This indicates a greater energy requirement for water removal around lactose in the presence of lactic acid. Higher crystallization temperatures were observed with the presence of lactic acid, indicating a delay in crystallization. Furthermore, less crystalline lactose (~12%) was obtained in the presence of lactic acid, indicating high amorphous nature compared with pure lactose where ~50% crystallinity was obtained. The Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed that the strong hydration layer consisting lactic acid and H3O(+) ions surrounded lactose molecules via strong H bonds, which restricted water mobility, induced a change in structure of lactose, or both, creating unfavorable conditions for lactose crystallization. Thus, partial or complete removal of lactic acid from acid whey may be the first step toward improving the ability of acid whey to be processed. PMID:26476948

  9. Degradation of caffeic acid in subcritical water and online HPLC-DPPH assay of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Khuwijitjaru, Pramote; Suaylam, Boonyanuch; Adachi, Shuji

    2014-02-26

    Caffeic acid was subjected to degradation under subcritical water conditions within 160-240 °C and at a constant pressure of 5 MPa in a continuous tubular reactor. Caffeic acid degraded quickly at these temperatures; the main products identified by liquid chromatography-diode array detection/mass spectrometry were hydroxytyrosol, protocatechuic aldehyde, and 4-vinylcatechol. The reaction rates for the degradation of caffeic acid and the formation of products were evaluated. Online high-performance liquid chromatography/2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl assay was used to determine the antioxidant activity of each product in the solution. It was found that the overall antioxidant activity of the treated solution did not change during the degradation process. This study showed a potential of formation of antioxidants from natural phenolic compounds under these subcritical water conditions, and this may lead to a discovering of novel antioxidants compounds during the extraction by this technique. PMID:24483598

  10. Transformation of acidic poorly water soluble drugs into ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Balk, Anja; Wiest, Johannes; Widmer, Toni; Galli, Bruno; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Meinel, Lorenz

    2015-08-01

    Poor water solubility of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) is a major challenge in drug development impairing bioavailability and therapeutic benefit. This study is addressing the possibility to tailor pharmaceutical and physical properties of APIs by transforming these into tetrabutylphosphonium (TBP) salts, including the generation of ionic liquids (IL). Therefore, poorly water soluble acidic APIs (Diclofenac, Ibuprofen, Ketoprofen, Naproxen, Sulfadiazine, Sulfamethoxazole, and Tolbutamide) were converted into TBP ILs or low melting salts and compared to the corresponding sodium salts. Free acids and TBP salts were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy, DSC and XRPD, DVS and dissolution rate measurements, release profiles, and saturation concentration measurements. TBP salts had lower melting points and glass transition temperatures and dissolution rates were improved up to a factor of 1000 as compared to the corresponding free acid. An increase in dissolution rates was at the expense of increased hygroscopicity. In conclusion, the creation of TBP ionic liquids or solid salts from APIs is a valuable concept addressing dissolution and solubility challenges of poorly water soluble acidic compounds. The data suggested that tailor-made counterions may substantially expand the formulation scientist's armamentarium to meet challenges of poorly water soluble drugs. PMID:25976317

  11. Disinfection of water in recirculating aquaculture systems with peracetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) has become a favoured alternative to chlorination in the disinfection of municipal waste water in recent years. It is also commonly used in the food industry as a disinfectant. Based on PAA concentration, the disulfide linkage in enzymes and proteins of microorganisms can be bro...

  12. Biodegradable water absorbent synthesized from bacterial poly(amino acid)s.

    PubMed

    Kunioka, Masao

    2004-03-15

    Biodegradable hydrogels prepared by gamma-irradiation from microbial poly(amino acid)s have been studied. pH-Sensitive hydrogels were prepared by the gamma-irradiation of poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (PGA) produced by Bacillus subtilis and poly(epsilon-lysine) (PL) produced by Streptomyces albulus in aqueous solutions. When the gamma-irradiation dose was 19 kGy or more, and the concentration of PGA in water was 2 wt.-% or more, transparent hydrogels could be produced. For the 19 kGy dose, the produced hydrogel was very weak, however, the specific water content (wt. of absorbed water/wt. of dry hydrogel) of this PGA hydrogel was approximately 3,500. The specific water content decreased to 200, increasing when the gamma-irradiation dose was over 100 kGy. Under acid conditions or upon the addition of electrolytes, the PGA hydrogels shrunk. The PGA hydrogel was pH-sensitive and the change in the volume of the hydrogel depended on the pH value outside the hydrogel in the swelling medium. This PGA hydrogel was hydrodegradable and biodegradable. A new novel purifier reagent (coagulant), made from the PGA hydrogels, for contaminated turbid water has been found and developed by Japanese companies. A very small amount of this coagulant (only 2 ppm in turbid water) with poly(aluminum chloride) can be used for the purification of turbid water. A PL aqueous solution also can change into a hydrogel by gamma-irradiation. The specific water content of the PL hydrogel ranged from 20 to 160 depending on the preparation conditions. Under acid conditions, the PL hydrogel swelled because of the ionic repulsion of the protonated amino groups in the PL molecules. The rate of enzymatic degradation of the respective PL hydrogels by a neutral protease was much faster than the rate of simple hydrolytic degradation. PMID:15468223

  13. Transport, metabolism, and effect of chronic feeding of lagodeoxycholic acid. A new, natural bile acid.

    PubMed

    Schmassmann, A; Angellotti, M A; Clerici, C; Hofmann, A F; Ton-Nu, H T; Schteingart, C D; Marcus, S N; Hagey, L R; Rossi, S S; Aigner, A

    1990-10-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid, the 7 beta-hydroxy epimer of chenodeoxycholic acid, is more hydrophilic and less hepatotoxic than chenodeoxycholic acid. Because "lagodeoxycholic acid," the 12 beta-hydroxy epimer of deoxycholic acid, is also more hydrophilic than deoxycholic acid, it was hypothesized that it should also be less hepatotoxic than deoxycholic acid. To test this, lagodeoxycholic acid was synthesized, and its transport and metabolism were examined in the rat, rabbit, and hamster. The taurine conjugate of lagodeoxycholic acid was moderately well transported by the perfused rat ileum (Tmax = 2 mumol/min.kg). In rats and hamsters with biliary fistulas, the taurine conjugate of lagodeoxycholic acid was well transported by the liver with a Tmax greater than 20 mumol/min.kg; for the taurine conjugate of deoxycholic acid, doses infused at a rate greater than 2.5 mumol/min.kg are known to cause cholestasis and death. Hepatic biotransformation of lagodeoxycholic acid in the rabbit was limited to conjugation with glycine; in the hamster, lagodeoxycholic acid was conjugated with glycine or taurine; in addition, 7-hydroxylation occurred to a slight extent (approximately 10%). When lagodeoxycholic acid was instilled in the rabbit colon, it was absorbed as such although within hours it was progressively epimerized by bacteria to deoxycholic acid. When injected intravenously and allowed to circulate enterohepatically, lagodeoxycholic acid was largely epimerized to deoxycholic acid in 24 hours. Surgical creation of a distal ileostomy abolished epimerization in the rabbit, indicating that exposure to colonic bacterial enzymes was required for the epimerization. Lagodeoxycholic acid was administered for 3 weeks at a dose of 180 mumol/day (0.1% by weight of a chow diet; 2-4 times the endogenous bile acid synthesis rate); other groups received identical doses of deoxycholic acid (hamster) or cholyltaurine, a known precursor of deoxycholic acid (rabbit). After 3 weeks of

  14. Photodegradation of triazine herbicides in aqueous solutions and natural waters.

    PubMed

    Evgenidou, E; Fytianos, K

    2002-10-23

    The photodegradation of three triazines, atrazine, simazine, and prometryn, in aqueous solutions and natural waters using UV radiation (lambda > 290 nm) has been studied. Experimental results showed that the dark reactions were negligible. The rate of photodecomposition in aqueous solutions depends on the nature of the triazines and follows first-order kinetics. In the case of the use of hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation, a synergistic effect was observed. The number of photodegradation products detected, using FIA/MS and FIA/MS/MS techniques, suggests the existence of various degradation routes resulting in complex and interconnected pathways. PMID:12381128

  15. Water Resources and Natural Gas Production from the Marcellus Shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soeder, Daniel J.; Kappel, William M.

    2009-01-01

    The Marcellus Shale is a sedimentary rock formation deposited over 350 million years ago in a shallow inland sea located in the eastern United States where the present-day Appalachian Mountains now stand (de Witt and others, 1993). This shale contains significant quantities of natural gas. New developments in drilling technology, along with higher wellhead prices, have made the Marcellus Shale an important natural gas resource. The Marcellus Shale extends from southern New York across Pennsylvania, and into western Maryland, West Virginia, and eastern Ohio (fig. 1). The production of commercial quantities of gas from this shale requires large volumes of water to drill and hydraulically fracture the rock. This water must be recovered from the well and disposed of before the gas can flow. Concerns about the availability of water supplies needed for gas production, and questions about wastewater disposal have been raised by water-resource agencies and citizens throughout the Marcellus Shale gas development region. This Fact Sheet explains the basics of Marcellus Shale gas production, with the intent of helping the reader better understand the framework of the water-resource questions and concerns.

  16. Using naturally occurring radionuclides to determine drinking water age in a community water system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Waples, James T.; Bordewyk, Jason K.; Knesting, Kristina M.; Orlandini, Kent A.

    2015-07-22

    Drinking water quality in a community water system is closely linked to the age of water from initial treatment to time of delivery. However, water age is difficult to measure with conventional chemical tracers; particularly in stagnant water, where the relationship between disinfectant decay, microbial growth, and water age is poorly understood. Using radionuclides that were naturally present in source water, we found that measured activity ratios of 90Y/90Sr and 234Th/238U in discrete drinking water samples of known age accurately estimated water age up to 9 days old (σest: ± 3.8 h, P < 0.0001, r2 = 0.998, n =more » 11) and 25 days old (σest: ± 13.3 h, P < 0.0001, r2 = 0.996, n = 12), respectively. Moreover, 90Y-derived water ages in a community water system (6.8 × 104 m3 d–1 capacity) were generally consistent with water ages derived from an extended period simulation model. Radionuclides differ from conventional chemical tracers in that they are ubiquitous in distribution mains and connected premise plumbing. The ability to measure both water age and an analyte (e.g., chemical or microbe) in any water sample at any time allows for new insight into factors that control drinking water quality.« less

  17. The optical nature of methylsuccinic acid in human urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitman, B.; Lawless, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    Methylsuccinic acid was isolated from human urine, derivatized as the di-S-(+)-2-butyl ester, and analyzed using a gas chromatographic system capable of separating the enantiomers of the derivative. The R-(+)-isomer was found to be present. Methylsuccinic acid is potentially important as a criterion for abiogenicity, having been obtained as a racemic mixture from sources known to be abiotic.

  18. The Role of Organic Acids in the Acid-Base Status of Surface Waters at Bickford Watershed, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshleman, K. N.; Hemond, H. F.

    1985-10-01

    An experimental field study of the alkalinity and major ion budgets of Bickford watershed in central Massachusetts indicates that organic acid production by the ecosystem contributes measurably to surface water acidification. Applying the concepts of alkalinity, electroneutrality of solutions, and mass balance, organic acids were found to comprise 20% of all strong acid sources on one subcatchment annually, a value half as large as the measured bulk mineral acid deposition. Inorganic cation to anion ratios in Provencial Brook varied between 1.0 in winter and 1.6 during summer, suggesting the presence of up to 100 μeq/L of unmeasured charge from organic anions during the growing season. Base titrations and ultraviolet photooxidation experiments confirmed the existence of low pKa (3.5-5.0) acidic functional groups. A positive linear relationship between dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and anion deficit for a group of surface and groundwater samples indicates the DOC contains about 7.5 meq carboxylic groups per gram C. Biological factors related to both upland and wetland carbon metabolism apparently control this natural acidification phenomenon, which has not been documented on other watersheds in the northeastern United States for which annual alkalinity budgets have been determined.

  19. Nature and Stability of the Martian Seasonal Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M. I.; Wilson, R. J.

    2001-12-01

    Which components control the contemporary water cycle and what is the nature of the control mechanisms? These questions are at the heart of understanding how the Martian exchangeable water budget adjusts to perturbations and changes in the climate system. Analysis of a water cycle model embedded in the GFDL Mars GCM provides a paradigm for the water cycle as a feedback system, providing information on the important control points and response times. Much information on this system derives from monitoring the evolution towards steady state--one that resembles the observed water vapour and ice cloud distributions. The most important exchange balance in the system is that between the northern polar atmosphere and the rest of the planet. As the major net source for water, the northern residual water ice cap is active during summer, in the window of time between the sublimation and recondensation of the seasonal CO2 cap. At this time, water is exported from the northern polar atmosphere at a rate determined by the mixing capacity of the atmosphere and the amount of water held in the polar atmosphere. The latter is determined by the cap surface temperature. During the remainder of the year, water is returned to the pole. This return flux is determined by the atmospheric mixing capacity and the amount of water vapour held in the tropical and winter extratropical atmosphere. Steady-state is achieved when these fluxes balance. For a given climate state (and a roughly repeatable annual cycle of mixing), the outflux and influx of polar water are controlled by separate variables. Holding the cap temperature constant, the outflux will remain constant. Any perturbation to the global water budget will result in a change in the return flux that tends to oppose the sense of the perturbation--the perturbation will be damped. In the same way, a change in cap temperature (e.g. associated with a change in albedo) will result in changed water outflow. Again, this will tend to change the

  20. Fabrication and Mechanical Characterization of Water-Soluble Resin-Coated Natural Fiber Green Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Ken-Ichi; Hayakawa, Tomoyuki

    In this study, water-soluble biodegradable resin was introduced as a coating agent to improve the interfacial strength and then to fabricate a high-performance green composite with polylactic acid (PLA) and hemp yarn. Dip coating was carried out for hemp yarn and the green composites were fabricated by hot processing. The coated green composite achieves a high tensile strength of 117 MPa even though the fiber volume fraction is less than 30%. Interfacial shear strength (IFSS) was measured by a single fiber pull-out test, and the effect of water-soluble resin on the tensile properties of the composites was evaluated. As a result, when using coated natural bundles, the IFSS value is smaller than when using noncoated natural bundles. On the basis of observations of the fractured surface of composites and initial yarns using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the effect of the impregnation of water-soluble resin into the natural bundles on the tensile strength is discussed in detail. It is found that water-soluble resin is effective in improving the mechanical properties of the composite, although the interfacial strength between PLA and water-soluble resin was decreased, and as a result, the tensile strength of green composites increases by almost 20%.

  1. Removal of arsenic from water using Fe-exchanged natural zeolite.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohui; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Jiang, Wei-Teh; Chang, Po-Hsiang; Chen, Chun-Jung; Liao, Libing

    2011-03-15

    An elevated arsenic (As) content in groundwater imposes a great threat to people worldwide. Thus, developing new and cost-effective methods to remove As from groundwater and drinking water becomes a priority. Using iron/aluminum hydroxide to remove As from water is a proven technology. However, separation of As-bearing fine particles from treated water presented a challenge. An alternative method was to use coarse-grained sorbents to increase the flow rate and throughput. In this research, a natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) was exchanged with iron(III) to enhance its As removal. Batch test results showed a Fe(III) sorption capacity of 144 mmol/kg on the zeolite. The As sorption on the Fe-exchanged zeolite (Fe-eZ) could reach up to 100mg/kg. Columns packed with Fe-eZ were tested for As removal from water collected from acid mine drainage (AMD) and groundwater containing high natural organic matter and high As(III). With an initial concentration of 147 μg/L in the AMD water, a complete As removal was achieved up to 40 pore volumes. However, the Fe-eZ was not effective to remove As from Chia-Nan Plain groundwater due to its high initial As concentration (511 μg/L), high amounts of natural organic matter, as well as its low oxidation-reduction potential, under which the As was in reduced As(III) form. PMID:21315510

  2. A new method of calculating electrical conductivity with applications to natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Ryan, Joseph N.; Ball, James W.

    2012-01-01

    A new method is presented for calculating the electrical conductivity of natural waters that is accurate over a large range of effective ionic strength (0.0004-0.7 mol kg-1), temperature (0-95 °C), pH (1-10), and conductivity (30-70,000 μS cm-1). The method incorporates a reliable set of equations to calculate the ionic molal conductivities of cations and anions (H+, Li+, Na+, K+, Cs+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, F-, Cl-, Br-, SO42-, HCO3-, CO32-, NO3-, and OH-), environmentally important trace metals (Al3+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, Mn2+, and Zn2+), and ion pairs (HSO4-, NaSO4-, NaCO3-, and KSO4-). These equations are based on new electrical conductivity measurements for electrolytes found in a wide range of natural waters. In addition, the method is coupled to a geochemical speciation model that is used to calculate the speciated concentrations required for accurate conductivity calculations. The method was thoroughly tested by calculating the conductivities of 1593 natural water samples and the mean difference between the calculated and measured conductivities was -0.7 ± 5%. Many of the samples tested were selected to determine the limits of the method and include acid mine waters, geothermal waters, seawater, dilute mountain waters, and river water impacted by municipal waste water. Transport numbers were calculated and H+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+, K+, Cl-, SO42-, HCO3-, CO32-, F-, Al3+, Fe2+, NO3-, and HSO4-substantially contributed (>10%) to the conductivity of at least one of the samples. Conductivity imbalance in conjunction with charge imbalance can be used to identify whether a cation or an anion measurement is likely in error, thereby providing an additional quality assurance/quality control constraint on water analyses.

  3. A new method of calculating electrical conductivity with applications to natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Ryan, Joseph N.; Ball, James W.

    2012-01-01

    A new method is presented for calculating the electrical conductivity of natural waters that is accurate over a large range of effective ionic strength (0.0004–0.7 mol kg-1), temperature (0–95 °C), pH (1–10), and conductivity (30–70,000 μS cm-1). The method incorporates a reliable set of equations to calculate the ionic molal conductivities of cations and anions (H+, Li+, Na+, K+, Cs+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, F-, Cl-, Br-, SO42-, HCO3-, CO32-, NO3-, and OH-), environmentally important trace metals (Al3+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, Mn2+, and Zn2+), and ion pairs (HSO4-, NaSO4-, NaCO3-, and KSO4-). These equations are based on new electrical conductivity measurements for electrolytes found in a wide range of natural waters. In addition, the method is coupled to a geochemical speciation model that is used to calculate the speciated concentrations required for accurate conductivity calculations. The method was thoroughly tested by calculating the conductivities of 1593 natural water samples and the mean difference between the calculated and measured conductivities was -0.7 ± 5%. Many of the samples tested were selected to determine the limits of the method and include acid mine waters, geothermal waters, seawater, dilute mountain waters, and river water impacted by municipal waste water. Transport numbers were calculated and H+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+, K+, Cl-, SO42-, HCO3-, CO32-, F-, Al3+, Fe2+, NO3-, and HSO4- substantially contributed (>10%) to the conductivity of at least one of the samples. Conductivity imbalance in conjunction with charge imbalance can be used to identify whether a cation or an anion measurement is likely in error, thereby providing an additional quality assurance/quality control constraint on water analyses.

  4. Evaluation of the natural product antifoulant, zosteric acid, for preventing the attachment of quagga mussels--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ram, Jeffrey L; Purohit, Sonal; Newby, Bi-Min Zhang; Cutright, Teresa J

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of zosteric acid, a natural antifoulant from the marine seagrass Zostera marina, in preventing the attachment of quagga mussels, a biofouling bivalve, was investigated. Animals were exposed to water containing zosteric acid ranging from 0 to 1000 ppm, and their attachment to the container glass walls was tracked with time. 500 ppm zosteric acid was not effective at detaching animals that had already attached, but was able to prevent the attachment of most unattached animals for two days. The anti-fouling effect increased with higher concentration. Low concentrations (250 ppm and below) were not effective at preventing attachment; however, 1000 ppm zosteric acid prevented attachment of mussels for the first three days of zosteric acid exposure, and only 20% of the mussels were attached by day 4. In contrast, animals in control (no zosteric acid) solutions began to attach within one day. In conclusion, zosteric acid is an effective natural product deterrent of attachment of a biofouling bivalve. PMID:21861646

  5. Simulated solar light irradiation of mesotrione in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Ter Halle, Alexandra; Richard, Claire

    2006-06-15

    Photolysis is expected to be a major degradation process for pollutants in surface waters. We report here the first photodegradation study on mesotrione, a new triketone herbicide for use in maize. In a first step, we investigated the direct photolysis of mesotrione at 365 nm from a kinetic and analytical point of view. Mesotrione sensitizes its own oxidation through singlet oxygen formation and sensitizes the oxidation of H-donors through electron or H-atom transfer. In a second step, irradiation experiments were performed under conditions prevalent in the aqueous environment. Mesotrione in submicromolar concentrations was exposed to simulated sunlight, in addition to Suwannee River natural organic matter and/or nitrates. Suwannee River natural organic matter sensitizes the oxidation of mesotrione through the intermediacy of singlet oxygen, and the rate of mesotrione transformation is significantly enhanced for Suwannee River natural organic matter concentrations equal to or above 10 mg/L. Nitrates played a negligible role in SRNOM solutions. PMID:16830551

  6. Binding of water, oil, and bile acids to dietary fibers of the cellan type.

    PubMed

    Dongowski, G; Ehwald, R

    1999-01-01

    Dietary fibers (DF) of the "cellan" type (consisting mainly or exclusively of undestroyed cells) were prepared as ethanol-dried materials from apple, cabbage, sugar-beet, soybean hulls, wheat bran, and suspension cultures of Chenopodium album L. and investigated with respect to their interactions with water, water-oil dispersions, bile acids, and oil. Water binding and retention capacities were found to be especially high in cellans obtained from thin-walled raw material. Water damp sorption by dry cellans, when analyzed according to the GAB and BET equations, shows a considerable fraction of monolayer water. At a water activity of 0.98, the cell and capillary spaces outside the walls remained in the air-filled state but the cell wall pores are filled with water. When the water content of a concentrated aqueous cellan suspension was equal to or below the water binding capacity, its rheological behavior was found to be of pseudoplastic nature. At a given dry weight concentration, yield stress and viscosity of such concentrated suspensions were highest for cellans with the highest water binding capacity. Dry cellan particles absorbed fatty oils without swelling but swell in a detergent-stabilized oil/water emulsion with a similar liquid absorption capacity as in water. In contrast to the dry or alkane-saturated cell wall, the hydrated wall is not permeable to oils in the absence of a detergent. Oil droplets may be entrapped within the cells, yielding a stable dispersion of oil in water. As DF of the cellan type absorb bile acids, preferentially glycoconjugates, from diluted solutions, they may have a potential to decrease the serum cholesterol level. PMID:10194401

  7. Using AVIRIS In The NASA BAA Project To Evaluate The Impact Of Natural Acid Drainage On Colorado Watersheds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauff, Phoebe L.; Coulter, David W.; Peters, Douglas C.; Sares, Matthew A.; Prosh, Eric C.; Henderson, Frederick B., III; Bird, David

    2004-01-01

    The Colorado Geological Survey and the co-authors of this paper were awarded one of 15 NASA Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) grants in 2001. The project focuses on the use of hyperspectral remote sensing to map acid-generating minerals that affect water quality within a watershed, and to identify the relative contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources to that drainage. A further objective is to define the most cost-effective remote sensing instrument configuration for this application.

  8. Innovative Treatment Technologies for Natural Waters and Wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, Amy E.

    2011-07-01

    The research described in this report focused on the development of novel membrane contactor processes (in particular, forward osmosis (FO), pressure retarded osmosis (PRO), and membrane distillation (MD)) in low energy desalination and wastewater treatment applications and in renewable energy generation. FO and MD are recently gaining national and international attention as viable, economic alternatives for removal of both established and emerging contaminants from natural and process waters; PRO is gaining worldwide attention as a viable source of renewable energy. The interrelationship of energy and water are at the core of this study. Energy and water are inextricably bound; energy usage and production must be considered when evaluating any water treatment process for practical application. Both FO and MD offer the potential for substantial energy and resource savings over conventional treatment processes and PRO offers the potential for renewable energy or energy offsets in desalination. Combination of these novel technologies with each other, with existing technologies (e.g., reverse osmosis (RO)), and with existing renewable energy sources (e.g., salinity gradient solar ponds) may enable much less expensive water production and also potable water production in remote or distributed locations. Two inter-related projects were carried out in this investigation. One focused on membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment and PRO for renewable energy generation; the other focused on MD driven by a salinity gradient solar pond.

  9. Troubled skies, troubled waters: the story of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Luoma, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Ecosystems of the canoe waters and wilderness in the northern border of Minnesota and Ontario appear, despite their seeming isolation, to be affected by industrial pollution and acid rain. This book describes the history and ecology of the area, the efforts by the author and local residents to halt destructive development, and evidence from air pollution studies that pollution is taking its toll in an area of particular sensitivity to acid precipitation. The author traces the evolution of awareness about the problem to the political response of concerned environmental groups. A highly personal account, the book begins and ends with observations and impressions during the author's canoe trips.

  10. Screening of Natural Waters for Viruses Which Infect Chlorella Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takashi; Higashiyama, Takanobu; Fukuda, Takao

    1991-01-01

    By using a plaque assay with the unicellular green alga Chlorella sp. strain NC64A as a host, viruses were screened from natural pond waters collected in Kyoto and Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan. From some samples tested, two kinds of plaques, large (φ = 6 to 10 mm) and small (φ = 2 to 3 mm), were detected with various frequencies. The frequency of plaques in each of the water sources was seasonal; generally, it reached a peak value (8,000 PFU/ml) in May and gradually decreased to the limit of detection (<1) in November before increasing again in early spring. Electron microscopy revealed that the purified and negatively stained viruses were very large (125 to 200 nm) icosahedral particles. The genome isolated from these particles was always a linear double-stranded DNA of 340 to 370 kbp. Electrophoresis patterns of the DNA fragments produced by digestion with restriction enzymes differed considerably from plaque to plaque, even for plaques from the same water source. However, Southern hybridization showed strong homology among all of the virus DNAs tested, indicating relatedness of those viruses. A possible use of the Chlorella virus assay system to monitor the natural population of algal cells and water quality is discussed. Images PMID:16348596

  11. Mitigation of acid deposition: Liming of surface waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoshesky, J.; Price, R.; DeMuro, J.

    1989-05-01

    In recent years acid deposition has become a serious concern internationally. Scientific literature has documented the acidification of numerous lakes and streams in North America and Scandinavia resulting in the depletion or total loss of fisheries and other aquatic biota. Liming represents the only common corrective practice aimed specifically at remediating an affected acid receptor. This report reviews a range of liming technologies and liming materials, as well as the effect of surface-water liming on water quality and aquatic biota. As background to the liming discussion, the hydrologic cycle and the factors that make surface waters sensitive to acid deposition are also discussed. Finally, a brief review of some of the liming projects that have been conducted, or are currently in operation is presented, giving special emphasis to mitigation efforts in Maryland. Liming has been effectively used to counteract surface-water acidification in parts of Scandinavia, Canada, and the U.S. To date, liming has generally been shown to improve physical and chemical conditions and enhance the biological recovery of aquatic ecosystems affected by acidification.

  12. Corrected fluorescence spectra of fulvic acids isolated from soil and water

    SciTech Connect

    Ewald, M.; Belin, C.; Berger, P.; Weber, J.H.

    1983-08-01

    The fluorescence of humic matter is a ubiquitous phenomenon that occurs for isolated soil and aquatic matter and for natural water samples. This property is used to compare humic substances, but uncorrected emission spectra can be especially misleading for spectra taken on different instruments. This paper details the corrections of emission fluorescence spectra of well-characterized fulvic acids isolated from soil and a fresh-water river. The corrections significantly modify the uncorrected spectra. This effect demonstrates the need for emission spectra corrections before comparing the fluorescence properties of diverse humic matter samples.

  13. Sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases: natural functions and applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of negatively charged monosaccharides which are commonly presented as the terminal residues in glycans of the glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface or as components of capsular polysaccharides or lipooligosaccharides of some pathogenic bacteria. Due to their important biological and pathological functions, the biosynthesis, activation, transfer, breaking down, and recycle of sialic acids are attracting increasing attention. The understanding of the sialic acid metabolism in eukaryotes and bacteria leads to the development of metabolic engineering approaches for elucidating the important functions of sialic acid in mammalian systems and for large-scale production of sialosides using engineered bacterial cells. As the key enzymes in biosynthesis of sialylated structures, sialyltransferases have been continuously identified from various sources and characterized. Protein crystal structures of seven sialyltransferases have been reported. Wild-type sialyltransferases and their mutants have been applied with or without other sialoside biosynthetic enzymes for producing complex sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. This mini-review focuses on current understanding and applications of sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases. PMID:22526796

  14. Groundwater surface water interaction study using natural isotopes tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Kim, Yong Chul; Cho, Soo Young; Lee, Kil Yong

    2015-04-01

    Tritium and stable isotopes are a component of the water molecule, they are the most conservative tracer for groundwater study. And also, radon is natural radioactive nuclide and well dissolved in groundwater. Therefore, these isotopes are used natural tracer for the study of surface water and groundwater interaction of water curtain greenhouse area. The study area used groundwater as a water curtain for warming tool of greenhouse during the winter, and is associated with issues of groundwater shortage while being subject to groundwater-river water interaction. During the winter time, these interactions were studied by using Rn-222, stable isotopes and H-3. These interaction was monitored in multi depth well and linear direction well of groundwater flow. And dam effect was also compared. Samples were collected monthly from October 2013 to April 2014. Radon and tritium were analyzed using Quantulus low background liquid scintillation counter and stable isotopes were analyzed using an IRIS (Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectroscopy ; L2120-i, Picarro). During the winter time, radon concentration was varied from 0.07 Bq/L to 8.9 Bq/L and different interaction was showed between dam. Surface water intrusion was severe at February and restored April when greenhouse warming was ended. The stable isotope results showed different trend with depth and ranged from -9.16 ‰ to -7.24 ‰ for δ 18O value, while the δD value was ranged from -57.86 ‰ to -50.98 ‰. The groundwater age as dated by H-3 was ranged 0.23 Bq/L - 0.59 Bq/L with an average value of 0.37 Bq/L.

  15. A study of amino acid modifiers in guayule natural rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber from the Hevea tree is a critical agricultural material vital to United States industry, medicine, and defense, yet the country is dependent on imports to meet domestic needs. Guayule, a desert shrub indigenous to the US, is under development as an alternative source of natural rubber...

  16. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: IV Acid-sulfate waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirk, Nordstrom D.; Blaine, McCleskey R.; Ball, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Many waters sampled in Yellowstone National Park, both high-temperature (30-94 ??C) and low-temperature (0-30 ??C), are acid-sulfate type with pH values of 1-5. Sulfuric acid is the dominant component, especially as pH values decrease below 3, and it forms from the oxidation of elemental S whose origin is H2S in hot gases derived from boiling of hydrothermal waters at depth. Four determinations of pH were obtained: (1) field pH at field temperature, (2) laboratory pH at laboratory temperature, (3) pH based on acidity titration, and (4) pH based on charge imbalance (at both laboratory and field temperatures). Laboratory pH, charge imbalance pH (at laboratory temperature), and acidity pH were in close agreement for pH ??10%, a selection process was used to compare acidity, laboratory, and charge balance pH to arrive at the best estimate. Differences between laboratory and field pH can be explained based on Fe oxidation, H2S or S2O3 oxidation, CO2 degassing, and the temperature-dependence of pK2 for H2SO4. Charge imbalances are shown to be dependent on a speciation model for pH values 350 mg/L Cl) decrease as the Cl- concentration increases from boiling which appears inconsistent with the hypothesis of H2S oxidation as a source of hydrothermal SO4. This trend is consistent with the alternate hypothesis of anhydrite solubility equilibrium. Acid-sulfate water analyses are occasionally high in As, Hg, and NH3 concentrations but in contrast to acid mine waters they are low to below detection in Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations. Even concentrations of SO4, Fe, and Al are much lower in thermal waters than acid mine waters of the same pH. This difference in water chemistry may explain why certain species of fly larvae live comfortably in Yellowstone's acid waters but have not been observed in acid rock drainage of the same pH.

  17. Coupling reverse osmosis with electrodialysis to isolate natural organic matter from fresh waters.

    PubMed

    Koprivnjak, J F; Perdue, E M; Pfromm, P H

    2006-10-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) has proven to be an effective method for the concentration of natural organic matter (NOM) from fresh waters, but an undesirable consequence of this process is the co-concentration of some inorganic solutes. Accordingly, current practice yields solutions of NOM that, upon desalting and freeze-drying, are converted into dry solids containing finely dispersed sulfuric acid and silicic acid (H(4)SiO(4)). These acids will contribute to the apparent carboxylic and phenolic contents of NOM, leading to an overestimation of both. NOM may also be chemically altered by sulfuric acid, which reacts strongly with many classes of organic compounds. The sulfur content and ash content of NOM will be elevated in the presence of sulfuric acid and H(4)SiO(4). The goal of this study is to develop and test a method in which the removal of water by RO is coupled with the removal of salts by electrodialysis (ED). Like RO, ED is a relatively mild treatment that enables the desalting of NOM solutions without subjecting those samples to conditions of extremely high or low pH. The end product of the coupled process is a desalted, concentrated liquid sample from which low-ash NOM can be obtained as a freeze-dried solid material. In this study, the efficacy of ED for desalting NOM is evaluated using concentrated synthetic river waters and actual concentrated (by RO) river waters. Under optimal operating conditions, both sulfate and silica can be largely removed from RO-concentrated solutions of riverine NOM with only an average loss of 3% of total organic carbon. PMID:16952387

  18. The determination of specific forms of aluminum in natural water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for analysis and pretreatment of natural-water samples to determine very low concentrations of Al is described which distinguishes the rapidly reacting equilibrium species from the metastable or slowly reacting macro ions and colloidal suspended material. Aluminum is complexed with 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine), pH is adjusted to 8.3 to minimize interferences, and the aluminum oxinate is extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) prior to analysis by atomic absorption. To determine equilibrium species only, the contact time between sample and 8-hydroxyquinoline is minimized. The Al may be extracted at the sample site with a minimum of equipment and the MIBK extract stored for several weeks prior to atomic absorption analysis. Data obtained from analyses of 39 natural groundwater samples indicate that filtration through a 0.1-??m pore size filter is not an adequate means of removing all insoluble and metastable Al species present, and extraction of Al immediately after collection is necessary if only dissolved and readily reactive species are to be determined. An average of 63% of the Al present in natural waters that had been filtered through 0.1-??m pore size filters was in the form of monomeric ions. The total Al concentration, which includes all forms that passed through a 0.1-??m pore size filter, ranged 2-70 ??g/l. The concentration of Al in the form of monomeric ions ranged from below detection to 57 ??g/l. Most of the natural water samples used in this study were collected from thermal springs and oil wells. ?? 1975.

  19. Liquid structure of acetic acid-water and trifluoroacetic acid-water mixtures studied by large-angle X-ray scattering and NMR.

    PubMed

    Takamuku, Toshiyuki; Kyoshoin, Yasuhiro; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kusano, Shoji; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2007-08-01

    The structures of acetic acid (AA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), and their aqueous mixtures over the entire range of acid mole fraction xA have been investigated by using large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and NMR techniques. The results from the LAXS experiments have shown that acetic acid molecules mainly form a chain structure via hydrogen bonding in the pure liquid. In acetic acid-water mixtures hydrogen bonds of acetic acid-water and water-water gradually increase with decreasing xA, while the chain structure of acetic acid molecules is moderately ruptured. Hydrogen bonds among water molecules are remarkably formed in acetic acid-water mixtures at xAwater clusters eventually predominate in the mixtures at xAwater mixtures O...O hydrogen bonds among water molecules gradually increase when xA decreases, and hydrogen bonds among water molecules are significantly formed in the mixtures at xAacid and TFA molecules for acetic acid-water and TFA-water mixtures have indicated strong relationships between a structural change of the mixtures and the acid mole fraction. On the basis of both LAXS and NMR results, the structural changes of acetic acid-water and TFA-water mixtures with decreasing acid mole fraction and the effects of fluorination of the methyl group on the structure are discussed at the molecular level. PMID:17628099

  20. Enhancing the natural removal of As in a reactive fluvial confluence receiving acid drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarca, M. I.; Arce, G.; Montecinos, M.; Guerra, P. A.; Pasten, P.

    2014-12-01

    Fluvial confluences are natural reactors that can determine the fate of contaminants in watersheds receiving acid drainage. Hydrological, hydrodynamic and chemical factors determine distinct conditions for the formation of suspended particles of iron and aluminum oxyhydroxides. The chemical and physical properties of these particle assemblages (e.g. particle size, chemical composition) can vary according to inflow mixing ratios, hydrodynamic velocity profiles, and chemical composition of the flows mixing at the confluence. Due to their capacity to sorb metals, it is important to identify the optimal conditions for removing metals from the aqueous phase, particularly arsenic, a contaminant frequently found in acid drainage. We studied a river confluence in the Lluta watershed, located in the arid Chilean Altiplano. We performed field measurements and laboratory studies to find optimal mixing ratio for arsenic sorption onto oxyhydroxide particles at the confluence between the Azufre (pH=2, As=2 mg/L) and the Caracarani river (pH=8, As<0.1 mg/L). As the contribution of the acidic stream increased, the concentration of Fe and Al in the solid phase reached a peak at different pHs. Although the optimal pH for As sorption was ~3, the overall maximum removal of As at the confluence, ocurred for pH~4. This is produced because optimal As sorption does not occur necessarily for the highest concentrations of particles being formed. We propose that fluvial confluences could be engineered to enhance the natural attenuation of contaminants. An analogy between confluences and coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation drinking water plants could be used to engineer such intervention.Acknowledgements: Proyecto Fondecyt 1130936 and Proyecto CONICYT FONDAP 15110020

  1. Advances in the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology of acid mine waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2000-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a plethora of research related to the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology of acid mine waters and associated tailings and waste-rock waters. Numerous books, reviews, technical papers, and proceedings have been published that examine the complex bio-geochemical process of sulfide mineral oxidation, develop and apply geochemical models to site characterization, and characterize the microbial ecology of these environments. This review summarizes many of these recent works, and provides references for those investigating this field. Comparisons of measured versus calculated Eh and measured versus calculated pH for water samples from several field sites demonstrate the reliability of some current geochemical models for aqueous speciation and mass balances. Geochemical models are not, however, used to predict accurately time-dependent processes but to improve our understanding of these systems and to constrain possible processes that contribute to actual or potential water quality issues. Microbiological studies are demonstrating that there is much we have yet to learn about the types of different microorganisms and their function and ecology in mine-waste environments. A broad diversity of green algae, bacteria, archaea, yeasts, and fungi are encountered in acid mine waters, and a better understanding of their ecology and function may potentially enhance remediation possibilities as well as our understanding of the evolution of life.

  2. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DBPS IN U. S. CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodo-acids were recently identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, (Z)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, and (E)-2-iodo-3...

  3. Leveraging abscisic acid receptors for efficient water use in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jinghui; Tischer, Stefanie V.; Christmann, Alexander; Windisch, Wilhelm; Schnyder, Hans; Grill, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth requires the influx of atmospheric CO2 through stomatal pores, and this carbon uptake for photosynthesis is inherently associated with a large efflux of water vapor. Under water deficit, plants reduce transpiration and are able to improve carbon for water exchange leading to higher water use efficiency (WUE). Whether increased WUE can be achieved without trade-offs in plant growth is debated. The signals mediating the WUE response under water deficit are not fully elucidated but involve the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is perceived by a family of related receptors known to mediate acclimation responses and to reduce transpiration. We now show that enhanced stimulation of ABA signaling via distinct ABA receptors can result in plants constitutively growing at high WUE in the model species Arabidopsis. WUE was assessed by three independent approaches involving gravimetric analyses, 13C discrimination studies of shoots and derived cellulose fractions, and by gas exchange measurements of whole plants and individual leaves. Plants expressing the ABA receptors RCAR6/PYL12 combined up to 40% increased WUE with high growth rates, i.e., are water productive. Water productivity was associated with maintenance of net carbon assimilation by compensatory increases of leaf CO2 gradients, thereby sustaining biomass acquisition. Leaf surface temperatures and growth potentials of plants growing under well-watered conditions were found to be reliable indicators for water productivity. The study shows that ABA receptors can be explored to generate more plant biomass per water transpired, which is a prime goal for a more sustainable water use in agriculture. PMID:27247417

  4. Leveraging abscisic acid receptors for efficient water use in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jinghui; Tischer, Stefanie V; Christmann, Alexander; Windisch, Wilhelm; Schnyder, Hans; Grill, Erwin

    2016-06-14

    Plant growth requires the influx of atmospheric CO2 through stomatal pores, and this carbon uptake for photosynthesis is inherently associated with a large efflux of water vapor. Under water deficit, plants reduce transpiration and are able to improve carbon for water exchange leading to higher water use efficiency (WUE). Whether increased WUE can be achieved without trade-offs in plant growth is debated. The signals mediating the WUE response under water deficit are not fully elucidated but involve the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is perceived by a family of related receptors known to mediate acclimation responses and to reduce transpiration. We now show that enhanced stimulation of ABA signaling via distinct ABA receptors can result in plants constitutively growing at high WUE in the model species Arabidopsis WUE was assessed by three independent approaches involving gravimetric analyses, (13)C discrimination studies of shoots and derived cellulose fractions, and by gas exchange measurements of whole plants and individual leaves. Plants expressing the ABA receptors RCAR6/PYL12 combined up to 40% increased WUE with high growth rates, i.e., are water productive. Water productivity was associated with maintenance of net carbon assimilation by compensatory increases of leaf CO2 gradients, thereby sustaining biomass acquisition. Leaf surface temperatures and growth potentials of plants growing under well-watered conditions were found to be reliable indicators for water productivity. The study shows that ABA receptors can be explored to generate more plant biomass per water transpired, which is a prime goal for a more sustainable water use in agriculture. PMID:27247417

  5. Evaluation of water treatment sludge for ameliorating acid mine waste.

    PubMed

    Van Rensburg, L; Morgenthal, T L

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the liming effect of water treatment sludge on acid mine spoils. The study was conducted with sludge from a water purification plant along the Vaal River catchments in South Africa. The optimum application rate for liming acid spoils and the speed and depth with which the sludge reacted with the mine waste were investigated. Chemical analysis indicated that the sludge is suitable as a liming agent because of its alkaline pH (8.08), high bicarbonate concentration (183.03 mg L(-1)), and low salinity (electrical conductivity = 76 mS m(-1)). The high cation exchange capacity of 15.47 cmol(c) kg(-1) and elevated nitrate concentration (73.16 mg L(-1)) also increase its value as an ameliorative material. The soluble concentrations for manganese, aluminum, lead, and selenium were high at a pH of 5 although only selenium (0.83 mg L(-1)) warranted some concern. According to experimental results, the application of 10 Mg ha(-1) of sludge to acid gold tailings increased the leach water pH from 4.5 to more than 7.5 and also increased the medium pH from 2.4 to 7.5. The addition of sludge further reduced the solubility of iron, manganese, copper, and zinc in the ameliorated gold tailings, but increased the electrical conductivity. The liming tempo was highest in the coal discard profile that had a coarse particle size distribution and took the longest to move through the gold tailings that had a fine particle size distribution. Results from this study indicate that the water treatment sludge investigated is suitable as a liming agent for rehabilitation of acid mine waste. PMID:14535306

  6. Removal of coagulant aluminum from water treatment residuals by acid.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Tetsuji; Nishijima, Wataru; Sugimoto, Mayo; Saka, Naoyuki; Nakai, Satoshi; Tanabe, Kazuyasu; Ito, Junki; Takenaka, Kenji; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2014-09-01

    Sediment sludge during coagulation and sedimentation in drinking water treatment is called "water treatment residuals (WTR)". Polyaluminum chloride (PAC) is mainly used as a coagulant in Japan. The recycling of WTR has been desired; one method for its reuse is as plowed soil. However, WTR reuse in this way is inhibited by the aluminum from the added PAC, because of its high adsorption capacity for phosphate and other fertilizer components. The removal of such aluminum from WTR would therefore be advantageous for its reuse as plowed soil; this research clarified the effect of acid washing on aluminum removal from WTR and on plant growth in the treated soil. The percentage of aluminum removal from raw WTR by sulphuric acid solution was around 90% at pH 3, the percentage decreasing to 40% in the case of a sun-dried sample. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity was decreased and the available phosphorus was increased by acid washing, with 90% of aluminum removal. The enhancement of Japanese mustard spinach growth and the increased in plant uptake of phosphates following acid washing were observed. PMID:24835954

  7. Palmitoleic acid calcium salt: a lubricant and bactericidal powder from natural lipids.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Kawamura, Yuki; Yamazaki, Yuki; Kijima, Tatsuro; Morikawa, Toshiya; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2015-01-01

    Palmitoleic acid is a promising bactericidal agent for cleansing products with alternative bactericidal abilities. In this study, we focus on the physical and biological activity of palmitoleic acid calcium salt (C16:1 fatty acid Ca salt) because it forms via an ion-exchange reaction between palmitoleic acid and Ca ions in tap water, and remains on the skin surface during the cleansing process. Here, we prepared C16:1 fatty acid Ca salt to investigate its crystal structure and physical and bactericidal properties. The Ca salt was a plate-shaped lamellar crystalline powder with a particle diameter of several micrometers to several tens of micrometers; it exhibited significant lubricity and alternative bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes). We also examined other fatty acid Ca salts prepared from lauric acid (C12:0 fatty acid), palmitic acid (C16:0 fatty acid), and oleic acid (C18:1 fatty acid). The bactericidal activities and lubricity of the fatty acid Ca salts changed with the alkyl chain length and the degree of unsaturation. The C16:1 fatty acid Ca salt exhibited the strongest selective bactericidal ability among the four investigated fatty acid Ca salts. These findings suggest that C16:1 fatty acid and its Ca salt have potential applications in cleansing and cosmetic products. PMID:25757432

  8. Emergency Response Planning to Reduce the Impact of Contaminated Drinking Water during Natural Disasters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural disasters can be devastating to local water supplies affecting millions of people. Disaster recovery plans and water industry collaboration during emergencies protect consumers from contaminated drinking water supplies and help facilitate the repair of public water system...

  9. Ground-water quality, water year 1995, and statistical analysis of ground-water-quality data, water years 1994-95, at the Chromic Acid Pit site, US Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Roybal, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    The Chromic Acid Pit site is an inactive waste disposal site that is regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976. The 2.2-cubic-yard cement-lined pit was operated from 1980 to 1983 by a contractor to the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss. The pit, located on the Fort Bliss military reservation in El Paso, Texas, was used for disposal and evaporation of chromic acid waste generated from chrome plating operations. The site was closed in 1989, and the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission issued permit number HW-50296 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency number TX4213720101), which approved and implemented post-closure care for the Chromic Acid Pit site. In accordance with an approved post-closure plan, the U.S. Geological Survey is cooperating with the U.S. Army in monitoring and evaluating ground-water quality at the site. One upgradient ground-water monitoring well (MW1) and two downgradient ground-water monitoring wells (MW2 and MW3), installed adjacent to the chromic acid pit, are monitored on a quarterly basis. Ground-water sampling of these wells by the U.S. Geological Survey began in December 1993. The ground-water level, measured in a production well located approximately 1,700 feet southeast of the Chromic Acid Pit site, has declined about 29.43 feet from 1982 to 1995. Depth to water at the Chromic Acid Pit site in September 1995 was 284.2 to 286.5 feet below land surface; ground-water flow at the water table is assumed to be toward the southeast. Ground-water samples collected from monitoring wells at the Chromic Acid Pit site during water year 1995 contained dissolved- solids concentrations of 481 to 516 milligrams per liter. Total chromium concentrations detected above the laboratory reporting limit ranged from 0.0061 to 0.030 milligram per liter; dissolved chromium concentrations ranged from 0.0040 to 0.010 milligram per liter. Nitrate as nitrogen concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 2.8 milligrams per

  10. Impact of pulsed ultrasound on bacteria reduction of natural waters.

    PubMed

    Al-Juboori, Raed A; Aravinthan, Vasantha; Yusaf, Talal

    2015-11-01

    There is a limited work on the use of pulsed ultrasound for water disinfection particularly the case of natural water. Hence, pulsed ultrasound disinfection of natural water was thoroughly investigated in this study along with continuous ultrasound as a standard for comparison. Total coliform measurements were applied to evaluate treatment efficiency. Factorial design of 2(3) for the tested experimental factors such as power, treatment time and operational mode was applied. Two levels of power with 40% and 70% amplitudes, treatment time of 5 and 15 min and operational modes of continuous and pulsed with On to Off ratio (R) of 0.1:0.6 s were investigated. Results showed that increasing power and treatment time or both increases total coliform reduction, whereas switching from continuous to pulsed mode in combination with power and treatment time has negative effect on total coliform reduction. A regression model for predicting total coliform reduction under different operating conditions was developed and validated. Energy and cost analyses applying electrical and calorimetric powers were conducted to serve as selection guidelines for the choosing optimum parameters of ultrasound disinfection. The outcome of these analyses indicated that low power level, short treatment time, and high R ratios are the most effective operating parameters. PMID:26186830

  11. Study of natural wetlands associated with acid mine drainage. Final research report Jul 87-Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, L.R.

    1990-12-01

    Thirty-five natural wetlands impacted by acid mine drainage (mostly in western PA) were surveyed for abiotic and biotic parameters in relation to water quality. Using treatment efficiency and area-adjusted mass retention as wetland performance indices, correlation analyses and multiple regression techniques were employed to evaluate the influence of the wetland parameters on the mitigation of pH, Fe, Mn, and Al. Elevation of pH was correlated with large, broad, low-flow wetlands with shallow, non-channelized surface water, inlet alkalinity, and dense populations of vascular plants and bryophytes. Moderate and high iron concentrations interfered with the mitigation of pH. High Fe treatment efficiencies were correlated to low flows, large areas, broad shapes, non-channelized flows, exposed locations, a diverse and dense vegetative cover, and inlet alkalinity. Large wetlands having lush vascular plant cover and receiving alkaline waters low in total iron concentrations were implicated in significant Mn treatment. Outlet Fe concentrations were usually in compliance in wetlands that significantly lowered Mn concentrations. Algae tolerate manganese but probably do not play an active role in its elimination. Reliable indices of wetland performance include area-adjusted mass retention (for pH) and treatment efficiency (for metals).

  12. Water and Carbon as Creators of Imbalances in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlafman, L. M.; Kontar, V. A.

    2012-12-01

    very important role as the accelerator of the glaciers melting. The "black carbon" is one of the most important creators of the imbalance of water in Nature. More than a billion people of the world population are seriously dependent from the imbalances which create a "black carbon". There are many other processes of interaction between water and carbon, which creates imbalances of various types. We see that the imbalance of water and the imbalance of carbon sometimes can be controlled or at least, we would be prepared for unintended consequences.

  13. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones. PMID:26656109

  14. Phenomenon of organic carbon change in natural waters (system "catchment - Lake") of Russian Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Marina; Tatyana, Moiseenko; Tatyana, Kremleva; Natalia, Gashkina

    2015-04-01

    In the last two decades in the Russian Federation was found significant increase in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon in many aqueous systems. Most obviously, these changes may be related to global warming. It is known that increasing the temperature dominate during dry periods and increases the concentration of nutrients, primary production increases, leading to an increase of the dissolved organic matter. At the same time, it is known that some of the increase in DOC may be largely due to a decrease of anthropogenic sulfur deposition and increasing organic matter in the soil. The European Russia (ER) is a region with substantial industrial emissions of sulphur. In the central part of ER are concentrated metallurgical productions. This has resulted in high concentrations of anthropogenic sulphate and an increase in the prevalence of acidification as well as a rise in metal concentrations in the lakes of North Kola. However, over the last 30 years, sulfur emissions in ?ola North have decreased substantially. The aim of this work was to explain the mechanisms to improve the content of natural organic matter and to assess its role in the processes of acidification and recovery of water quality while reducing the deposition of technogenic acid. The increasing of organic matter content in lake waters is being also observed for the totality of lakes in the Kola North. This conforms to the data reported by Skjelkvale et al. (2001a) which demonstrates the significant increase of DOC. Some authors explain the increased DOC levels by reduction in strong acid flow and return of water chemistry to its natural parameters of specifying organic matter concentrations in water. It is known that DOC level has a direct relationship with water color. In analyzing long-term study data with regard to the group of 75 lakes (obtained during 1990-2010) DOC is increased year-over-year, but the color decreased. The following chemical processes developing in water can explain

  15. Ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry performance evaluation for analysis of antibiotics in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Tamtam, Fatima; Mercier, Fabien; Eurin, Joëlle; Chevreuil, Marc; Le Bot, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of 17 antibiotics in natural waters in one single extraction and chromatographic procedure. Gradient separation conditions were optimised for 17 compounds belonging to five different antibiotic groups: quinolones (oxolinic acid, nalidixic acid, pipemidic acid, flumequine), fluoroquinolones (enoxacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, enrofloxacin, sarafloxacin, danofloxacin, difloxacin, lomefloxacin), sulphonamides (sulphamethoxazole, sulphamethazine), nitro-imidazole (ornidazole) and diaminopyrimidine (trimethoprim). The separation of all compounds, obtained using a 1.7 microm particle size column (100 mm x 2.1 mm), was achieved within 10 min time. Water samples were adjusted to pH 7 and extracted using Oasis hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) solid phase extraction cartridges. After elution with methanol and concentration, extracts were injected in a C18 column (Acquity UPLC BEH C18) and detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Average recovery from 100 ng L(-1) fortified samples was higher than 70% for most of the compounds, with relative standard deviations below 20%. Performances of the method (recoveries, detection limit, quantification limit and relative standard deviation) and matrix effects were studied, and results obtained showed that method was suitable for routine analysis of antibiotics in surface water. Samples analysis from Seine River (France) confirmed the interest of antibiotic contamination evaluation in that area. PMID:19148627

  16. What is the Imbalance of Water in Nature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, V. A.

    2011-12-01

    Look at any lake. Water comes into the lake from the atmosphere, from surface and groundwater sources. Water leaves the lake to the atmosphere, surface and underground drains, as well as for consumption by human society, wild plants and animals if they are within the boundaries of the lake's system. If quantity of water coming into the lake is equally of the quantity of water which flow from the lake, so the lake level has not changed and we have a state of equilibration or balance. The bookkeeper's book also has name "balance". But this is just a play on words. If the water is coming into the lake more than the water is coming away from lake, therefore the lake level will increase and we have a state of the imbalance of the increase type. If the water is coming into the lake less than the water is coming away from lake, therefore the lake level will decrease and we have a state of the imbalance of the decrease type. Everyone knows that the lake level rises or falls, for example during the year. Sometimes it is happened some balance. But the state of balance is rare and in of the short duration. The lake is of most the time in the conditions of the imbalance increases or the imbalance decreases type. The balance as a state of equilibrium, in the language of mathematics, is the point of the extremum between the periods of rise and fall. The balance is a special condition, which is existing very rare and a very short period of time. The people sometimes to do the great efforts for maintain the constant level of the lakes. But these facts don't change the situation. On the contrary, the human's struggle for maintain the lake in constant level just shows how difficult and expensive to go against the natural laws of Nature. When water was plentiful, these facts could be ignored. But now when the global water shortage is quickly growing, many previously ignored details are becoming crucial. There are very important to do the correct definitions of the borders and

  17. Using naturally occurring radionuclides to determine drinking water age in a community water system

    SciTech Connect

    Waples, James T.; Bordewyk, Jason K.; Knesting, Kristina M.; Orlandini, Kent A.

    2015-07-22

    Drinking water quality in a community water system is closely linked to the age of water from initial treatment to time of delivery. However, water age is difficult to measure with conventional chemical tracers; particularly in stagnant water, where the relationship between disinfectant decay, microbial growth, and water age is poorly understood. Using radionuclides that were naturally present in source water, we found that measured activity ratios of 90Y/90Sr and 234Th/238U in discrete drinking water samples of known age accurately estimated water age up to 9 days old (σest: ± 3.8 h, P < 0.0001, r2 = 0.998, n = 11) and 25 days old (σest: ± 13.3 h, P < 0.0001, r2 = 0.996, n = 12), respectively. Moreover, 90Y-derived water ages in a community water system (6.8 × 104 m3 d–1 capacity) were generally consistent with water ages derived from an extended period simulation model. Radionuclides differ from conventional chemical tracers in that they are ubiquitous in distribution mains and connected premise plumbing. The ability to measure both water age and an analyte (e.g., chemical or microbe) in any water sample at any time allows for new insight into factors that control drinking water quality.

  18. Evaluation of acute copper toxicity to juvenile freshwater mussels (fatmucket, lampsilis siliquoidea) in natural and reconstituted waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Mebane, C.A.; Kunz, J.L.; Ingersoll, C.G.; May, T.W.; Arnold, W.R.; Santore, R.C.; Augspurger, T.; Dwyer, F.J.; Barniiart, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and water composition on the toxicity of copper to juvenile freshwater mussels (fatmucket, Lampsilis siliquoidea) were evaluated in natural and reconstituted waters. Acute 96-h copper toxicity tests were conducted at four nominal DOC concentrations (0, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/L as carbon [C]) in dilutions of natural waters and in American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) reconstituted hard water. Toxicity tests also were conducted in ASTM soft, moderately hard, hard, and very hard reconstituted waters (nominal hardness 45-300 mg/L as CaCO3). Three natural surface waters (9.5-11 mg/L DOC) were diluted to obtain a series of DOC concentrations with diluted well water, and an extract of natural organic matter and commercial humic acid was mixed with ASTM hard water to prepare a series of DOC concentrations for toxicity testing. Median effective concentrations (EC50s) for dissolved copper varied >40-fold (9.9 to >396 ??g Cu/L) over all 21 treatments in various DOC waters. Within a particular type of DOC water, EC50s increased 5- to 12-fold across DOC concentrations of 0.3 to up to 11 mg C/L. However, EC50s increased by only a factor of 1.4 (21 30 ??g Cu/L) in the four ASTM waters with wide range of water hardness (52-300 mg CaCO 3/L). Predictions from the biotic ligand model (BLM) for copper explained nearly 90% of the variability in EC50s. Nearly 70% of BLM-normalized EC50s for fatmucket tested in natural waters were below the final acute value used to derive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency acute water quality criterion for copper, indicating that the criterion might not be protective of fatmucket and perhaps other mussel species. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  19. Isotopic analysis of uranium in natural waters by alpha spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, K.W.

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of U234/U238 activity ratios for uranium present in natural waters. The uranium is coprecipitated from solution with aluminum phosphate, extracted into ethyl acetate, further purified by ion exchange, and finally electroplated on a titanium disc for counting. The individual isotopes are determined by measurement of the alpha-particle energy spectrum using a high resolution low-background alpha spectrometer. Overall chemical recovery of about 90 percent and a counting efficiency of 25 percent allow analyses of water samples containing as little as 0.10 ?g/l of uranium. The accuracy of the method is limited, on most samples, primarily by counting statistics.

  20. The quality of Albanian natural waters and the human impact.

    PubMed

    Cullaj, Alqiviadh; Hasko, Agim; Miho, Aleko; Schanz, Ferdinand; Brandl, Helmut; Bachofen, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    Albania possesses a wealth of aquatic ecosystems, many of enormous natural and biological value, such as the Lakes Ohrid, Prespa and Shkodra, glacial lakes, river valleys, and coastal lagoons. Although many habitats are highly polluted by inorganic and organic wastes, detailed knowledge on the water quality is still lacking. For the first time, an environmental assessment of the water quality is presented and the main polluting sources identified. As a consequence, a systematic control and the establishment of routine monitoring of surface and groundwater is proposed, which elucidates the present environmental state and helps to develop new strategies of waste and wastewater management. It would help allow Albania to reach an international standard in environmental protection, as a part of UNECE Convention, the Mediterranean Action Plan, the MAP/UNEP Medpol Program and the Basel Convention. PMID:15607787

  1. Use of Natural Bodies of Water for IR Calibration Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.J.

    2001-04-17

    Natural bodies of water have several advantages as IR calibration targets in remote sensing. Among these are availability, homogeneity, and accurate knowledge of emissivity. A portable, low-cost, floating apparatus is described for calibration of remote IR sensors to within 0.15 C. The apparatus measures the surface and bulk water temperature as well as the wind speed, direction, temperature, and relative humidity. The apparatus collects data automatically and can be deployed for up to 24 hours. The sources of uncertainty, including the effects of skin temperature and waves are discussed. Data from several field campaigns to calibrate IR bands of DOE's Multi-Spectral Thermal Imager are described along with estimates of error.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon removal from water by natural fiber sorption.

    PubMed

    Khan, Eakalak; Khaodhir, Sutha; Rotwiron, Paritta

    2007-08-01

    The use of two natural sorbents, kapok and cattail fibers, were investigated for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) removal from water. Naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and fluoranthene were the PAHs studied. For comparative purposes, a commercial polyester fiber sorbent was included in the investigation. The PAH sorption and retention capabilities of the three fibers were determined through batch and continuous-flow experiments under non-competitive and competitive conditions. In the batch experiments, cattail fiber was the most effective sorbent. Kapok fiber provided the lowest PAH retention, while cattail fiber had slightly less PAH retention than polyester fiber. When two PAHs were present in the same system, a competitive effect on the much less hydrophobic PAH was observed. Similar results were obtained in the column experiments, except that polyester fiber performed much poorer on naphthalene. Cattail fiber is a promising sorbent for treating PAH-contaminated water, such as urban runoff. PMID:17824537

  3. Investigation of natural radioactivity levels in water around Kadugli, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Osman, Alfatih A A; Salih, Isam; Shaddad, Ibrahim A; El Din, Saif; Siddeeg, M B; Eltayeb, Hatem; Idriss, Hajo; Hamza, Walid; Yousif, E H

    2008-11-01

    Surface water from Miri Lake and groundwater from around Kadugli (West-Central Sudan) obtained by means of hand-pumps was analysed for (238)U, (226)Ra, (222)Rn, and (232)Th activity concentrations. The surface water showed very low levels of radionuclide concentrations: <1.0-7.5, 8.5-16.5, <1.6, and <0.1-0.39 mBq L(-1) for (238)U, (226)Ra, (222)Rn, and (232)Th, respectively. Groundwater revealed a significant amount of natural radioactivity (16.1-1720, 7.7-14.3, 3000-139,000, <0.1-39 mBq L(-1)) respectively. The overall annual effective dose was below the WHO reference dose level of 0.1 mSv yr(-1) except in one groundwater sample with an associated dose of 0.7 mSv yr(-1). PMID:18513978

  4. Water: Challenges at the Intersection of Human and Natural Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Futrell, J.H.; Gephart, R. E.; Kabat-Lensch, E.; McKnight, D. M.; Pyrtle, A.; Schimel, J. P.; Smyth, R. L.; Skole, D. L. Wilson, J. L.; Gephart, J. M.

    2005-09-01

    There is a growing recognition about the critical role water plays in sustaining people and society. This workshop established dialog between disciplinary scientists and program managers from diverse backgrounds in order to share perspectives and broaden community understanding of ongoing fundamental and applied research on water as a complex environmental problem. Three major scientific themes emerged: (1) coupling of cycles and process, with emphasis on the role of interfaces; (2) coupling of human and natural systems across spatial and temporal scales; and (3) prediction in the face of uncertainty. In addition, the need for observation systems, sensors, and infrastructure; and the need for data management and synthesis were addressed. Current barriers to progress were noted as educational and institutional barriers and the integration of science and policy.

  5. Respiration of aquatic insect larvae (ephemeroptera, plecoptera) in acid mine water

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, F.G.; Hummon, W.D.

    1980-09-01

    Ecotoxicology (Truhaut 1975) is the study of the harmful effects of natural substances and artificial pollutants experienced by organisms in the environment. The degree of response exhibited by an organism toward the presence of noxious substances can often be determined by monitoring a physiological parameter. One such parameter is respiration. The majority of studies dealing with the biological impact of acid mine drainage have been ecological surveys. No studies have been reported which deal with the physiological response of an organism to acid mine water other than acute toxicities of the various components expected in an effluent stream (Bell and Nebeker 1969; Kimmel and Hales 1973; Warnick and Bell 1969). These studies did not consider possible synergistic effects between individual components of acid mine water or the mode of action of pollutants involved. The work we report was undertaken to determine whether the toxic mode of action of an acid water effluent involves any aspect of the respiratory processes in three species of aquatic insect larvae. Although respirometry can be valuable in detecting signs of metabolic involvement, one must be aware that it is not a technique for the identification of specific toxic mechanisms.

  6. Transient natural convection of cold water in a vertical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Ryoichi

    2016-05-01

    The two-dimensional differential transform method (DTM) is applied to analyse the transient natural convection of cold water in a vertical channel. The cold water gives rise to a density variation with temperature that may not be linearized. The vertical channel is composed of doubly infinite parallel plates, one of which has a constant prescribed temperature and the other of which is insulated. Considering the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of the water, approximate analytical (series) solutions for the temperature and flow velocity are derived. The transformed functions included in the solutions are obtained through a simple recursive procedure. Numerical computation is performed for the entire range of water temperature conditions around the temperature at the density extremum point, i.e. 4°C. Numerical results illustrate the effects of the temperature-dependent properties on the transient temperature and flow velocity profiles, volumetric flow rate, and skin friction. The DTM is a powerful tool for solving nonlinear transient problems as well as steady problems.

  7. Water O-H stretching Raman signature for strong acid monitoring via multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Casella, Amanda J; Levitskaia, Tatiana G; Peterson, James M; Bryan, Samuel A

    2013-04-16

    A distinct need exists for real time information on an acid concentration of industrial aqueous streams. Acid strength affects efficiency and selectivity of many separation processes, including nuclear fuel reprocessing. Despite the seeming simplicity of the problem, no practical solution has been offered yet, particularly for the large-scale schemes involving toxic streams such as highly radioactive nuclear wastes. The classic potentiometric technique is not amiable for online measurements due to the requirements of frequent calibration/maintenance and poor long-term stability in aggressive chemical and radiation environments. Therefore, an alternative analytical method is needed. In this work, the potential of using Raman spectroscopic measurements for online monitoring of strong acid concentration in solutions relevant to dissolved used nuclear fuel was investigated. The Raman water signature was monitored for solution systems containing nitric and hydrochloric acids and their sodium salts of systematically varied composition, ionic strength, and temperature. The trivalent neodymium ion simulated the presence of multivalent f metals. The gaussian deconvolution analysis was used to interpret observed effects of the solution nature on the Raman water O-H stretching spectrum. The generated Raman spectroscopic database was used to develop predictive multivariate regression models for the quantification of the acid and other solution components, as well as selected physicochemical properties. This method was validated using independent experiments conducted in a flow solvent extraction system. PMID:23472939

  8. Amino acids and proteins at ZnO-water interfaces in molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Nawrocki, Grzegorz; Cieplak, Marek

    2013-08-28

    We determine potentials of the mean force for interactions of amino acids with four common surfaces of ZnO in aqueous solutions. The method involves all-atom molecular dynamics simulations combined with the umbrella sampling technique. The profiled nature of the density of water with the strongly adsorbed first layer affects the approach of amino acids to the surface and generates either repulsion or weak binding. The largest binding energy is found for tyrosine interacting with the surface in which the Zn ions are at the top. It is equal to 7 kJ mol(-1) which is comparable to that of the hydrogen bonds in a protein. This makes the adsorption of amino acids onto the ZnO surface much weaker than onto the well studied surface of gold. Under vacuum, binding energies are more than 40 times stronger (for one of the surfaces). The precise manner in which water molecules interact with a given surface influences the binding energies in a way that depends on the surface. Among the four considered surfaces the one with Zn at the top is recognized as binding almost all amino acids with an average binding energy of 2.60 kJ mol(-1). Another (O at the top) is non-binding for most amino acids. For binding situations the average energy is 0.66 kJ mol(-1). The remaining two surfaces bind nearly as many amino acids as they do not and the average binding energies are 1.46 and 1.22 kJ mol(-1). For all of the surfaces the binding energies vary between amino acids significantly: the dispersion in the range of 68-154% of the mean. A small protein is shown to adsorb onto ZnO only intermittently and with only a small deformation. Various adsorption events lead to different patterns in mobilities of amino acids within the protein. PMID:23836065

  9. Faecal bile acids are natural ligands of the mouse accessory olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Wayne I; Dinser, Jordan A; Cansler, Hillary L; Zhang, Xingjian; Dinh, Daniel D; Browder, Natasha S; Riddington, Ian M; Meeks, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    The accessory olfactory system (AOS) guides behaviours that are important for survival and reproduction, but understanding of AOS function is limited by a lack of identified natural ligands. Here we report that mouse faeces are a robust source of AOS chemosignals and identify bile acids as a class of natural AOS ligands. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings from accessory olfactory bulb neurons in ex vivo preparations show that AOS neurons are strongly and selectively activated by peripheral stimulation with mouse faecal extracts. Faecal extracts contain several unconjugated bile acids that cause concentration-dependent neuronal activity in the AOS. Many AOS neurons respond selectively to bile acids that are variably excreted in male and female mouse faeces, and others respond to bile acids absent in mouse faeces. These results identify faeces as a natural source of AOS information, and suggest that bile acids may be mammalian pheromones and kairomones. PMID:27324439

  10. Faecal bile acids are natural ligands of the mouse accessory olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Wayne I.; Dinser, Jordan A.; Cansler, Hillary L.; Zhang, Xingjian; Dinh, Daniel D.; Browder, Natasha S.; Riddington, Ian M.; Meeks, Julian P.

    2016-01-01

    The accessory olfactory system (AOS) guides behaviours that are important for survival and reproduction, but understanding of AOS function is limited by a lack of identified natural ligands. Here we report that mouse faeces are a robust source of AOS chemosignals and identify bile acids as a class of natural AOS ligands. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings from accessory olfactory bulb neurons in ex vivo preparations show that AOS neurons are strongly and selectively activated by peripheral stimulation with mouse faecal extracts. Faecal extracts contain several unconjugated bile acids that cause concentration-dependent neuronal activity in the AOS. Many AOS neurons respond selectively to bile acids that are variably excreted in male and female mouse faeces, and others respond to bile acids absent in mouse faeces. These results identify faeces as a natural source of AOS information, and suggest that bile acids may be mammalian pheromones and kairomones. PMID:27324439

  11. Action of Natural Abscisic Acid Precursors and Catabolites on Abscisic Acid Receptor Complexes1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kepka, Michal; Benson, Chantel L.; Gonugunta, Vijay K.; Nelson, Ken M.; Christmann, Alexander; Grill, Erwin; Abrams, Suzanne R.

    2011-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates stress responses and controls numerous aspects of plant growth and development. Biosynthetic precursors and catabolites of ABA have been shown to trigger ABA responses in physiological assays, but it is not clear whether these are intrinsically active or whether they are converted into ABA in planta. In this study, we analyzed the effect of ABA precursors, conjugates, and catabolites on hormone signaling in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The compounds were also tested in vitro for their ability to regulate the phosphatase moiety of ABA receptor complexes consisting of the protein phosphatase 2C ABI2 and the coreceptors RCAR1/PYL9, RCAR3/PYL8, and RCAR11/PYR1. Using mutants defective in ABA biosynthesis, we show that the physiological activity associated with ABA precursors derives predominantly from their bioconversion to ABA. The ABA glucose ester conjugate, which is the most widespread storage form of ABA, showed weak ABA-like activity in germination assays and in triggering ABA signaling in protoplasts. The ABA conjugate and precursors showed negligible activity as a regulatory ligand of the ABI2/RCAR receptor complexes. The majority of ABA catabolites were inactive in our assays. To analyze the chemically unstable 8′- and 9′-hydroxylated ABA catabolites, we used stable tetralone derivatives of these compounds, which did trigger selective ABA responses. ABA synthetic analogs exhibited differential activity as regulatory ligands of different ABA receptor complexes in vitro. The data show that ABA precursors, catabolites, and conjugates have limited intrinsic bioactivity and that both natural and synthetic ABA-related compounds can be used to probe the structural requirements of ABA ligand-receptor interactions. PMID:21976481

  12. Student Knowledge of Scientific and Natural Resource Concepts Concerning Acidic Deposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed is the level of scientific and natural resource knowledge possessed by fourth-, eighth- and eleventh-grade students. Misconceptions are noted. Discussed are implications for teaching about acidic deposition. (CW)

  13. Cyclic Sulfamidate Enabled Syntheses of Amino Acids, Peptides, Carbohydrates, and Natural Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article reviews the emergence of cyclic sulfamidates as versatile intermediatesfor the synthesis of unnatural amino acids, chalcogen peptides, modified sugars, drugs and drug candidates, and important natural products.

  14. Ascorbic Acid Determination in Natural Orange Juice: As a Teaching Tool of Coulometry and Polarography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertotti, Mauro; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to determine ascorbic acid concentrations in natural orange juice. The experiment is used with undergraduate pharmacy students to allow understanding of the principles of operation of the coulometer and polarograph. (DDR)

  15. Perfluorooctane sulphonate and perfluorooctanoic acid in drinking and environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Rumsby, Paul C; McLaughlin, Clare L; Hall, Tom

    2009-10-13

    Perfluorooctane sulphonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are chemicals that have been used for many years as surfactants in a variety of industrial and consumer products. Owing to their persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) characteristics, PFOS has been phased out by its principal producer and the use of PFOA has been reduced. This PBT potential and a number of pollution incidents have led in recent years to an increase in studies surveying the concentrations of PFOS and PFOA in environmental waters worldwide. This paper reviews the results of these studies, as well as the monitoring that was conducted after the pollution incidents. The results of surveys suggest that PFOS and PFOA are found in environmental waters worldwide at low levels. In general, these levels are below health-based values set by international authoritative bodies for drinking water. There have been limited measurements of these chemicals in drinking water, but again these are below health-based values, except in some cases following pollution incidents. Monitoring studies suggested that where PFOS and PFOA were detected, they were at similar levels in both source and drinking water, suggesting that drinking water treatment does not remove these chemicals. However, new data show that PFOS and PFOA are effectively removed by granular activated carbon absorbers in practice. Further research is required on the newer perfluorinated chemicals that appear to be safer, but their degradation products have not as yet been fully studied. PMID:19736236

  16. Use of natural and applied tracers to guide targeted remediation efforts in an acid mine drainage system, Colorado Rockies, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cowie, Rory; Williams, Mark W.; Wireman, Mike; Runkel, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Stream water quality in areas of the western United States continues to be degraded by acid mine drainage (AMD), a legacy of hard-rock mining. The Rico-Argentine Mine in southwestern Colorado consists of complex multiple-level mine workings connected to a drainage tunnel discharging AMD to passive treatment ponds that discharge to the Dolores River. The mine workings are excavated into the hillslope on either side of a tributary stream with workings passing directly under the stream channel. There is a need to define hydrologic connections between surface water, groundwater, and mine workings to understand the source of both water and contaminants in the drainage tunnel discharge. Source identification will allow targeted remediation strategies to be developed. To identify hydrologic connections we employed a combination of natural and applied tracers including isotopes, ionic tracers, and fluorescent dyes. Stable water isotopes (δ18O/δD) show a well-mixed hydrological system, while tritium levels in mine waters indicate a fast flow-through system with mean residence times of years not decades or longer. Addition of multiple independent tracers indicated that water is traveling through mine workings with minimal obstructions. The results from a simultaneous salt and dye tracer application demonstrated that both tracer types can be successfully used in acidic mine water conditions.

  17. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda < 510nm is negligible for the whole water column, and this percentage increases with depth at /lambda > 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to

  18. Phase and extraction equilibria in water-polyethyleneglycol ethers of monoethanolamides of synthetic fatty acid-ammonium chloride systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnov, A. E.; Golovkina, A. V.; Kudryashova, O. S.; Denisova, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    Phase equilibria in layering systems of water, polyethyleneglycol ethers of monoethanolamides of synthetic fatty acids (SFAs) (synthamide-5), and ammonium chloride are studied. The possibility of using such systems for the liquid extraction of metal ions is evaluated. The effect the nature of salting-out agents has on the processes of segregation of the systems has been considered.

  19. Vapor-liquid equilibria for nitric acid-water and plutonium nitrate-nitric acid-water solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    The liquid-vapor equilibrium data for nitric acid and nitric acid-plutnonium nitrate-water solutions were examined to develop correlations covering the range of conditions encountered in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The scanty available data for plutonium nitrate solutions are of poor quality but allow an order of magnitude estimate to be made. A formal thermodynamic analysis was attempted initially but was not successful due to the poor quality of the data as well as the complex chemical equilibria involved in the nitric acid and in the plutonium nitrate solutions. Thus, while there was no difficulty in correlating activity coefficients for nitric acid solutions over relatively narrow temperature ranges, attempts to extend the correlations over the range 25/sup 0/C to the boiling point were not successful. The available data were then analyzed using empirical correlations from which normal boiling points and relative volatilities can be obtained over the concentration ranges 0 to 700 g/l Pu, 0 to 13 M nitric acid. Activity coefficients are required, however, if estimates of individual component vapor pressures are needed. The required ternary activity coefficients can be approximated from the correlations.

  20. Computed phase diagrams for the system: Sodium hydroxide-uric acid-hydrochloric acid-water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. E.; Gregory, T. M.; Füredi-Milhofer, H.

    1987-07-01

    Renal stone formation is made complex by the variety of solid phases that are formed, by the number of components in the aqueous phase, and by the multiplicity of ionic dissociation and association processes that are involved. In the present work we apply phase diagrams calculated by the use of equilibrium constants from the ternary system sodium hydroxide-uric acid-water to simplify and make more rigorous the understanding of the factors governing dissolution and precipitation of uric acid (anhydrous and dihydrate) and sodium urate monohydrate. The system is then examined in terms of four components. Finally, procedures are described for fluids containing more than four components. The isotherms, singular points, and fields of supersaturation and undersaturation are shown in various forms of phase diagrams. This system has two notable features: (1) in the coordinates -log[H 2U] versus -log[NaOH], the solubility isotherms for anhydrous uric acid and uric acid dihydrate approximate straight lines with slopes equal to +1 over a wide range of concentrations. As a result, substantial quantities of sodium acid urate monohydrate can precipitate from solution or dissolve without changing the degree of saturation of uric acid significantly. (2) The solubility isotherm for NaHU·H 2O has a deltoid shape with the low-pH branch having a slope of infinity. As a result of the vertical slope of this isotherm, substantial quantities of uric acid can dissolve or precipitate without changing the degree of saturation of sodium acid urate monohydrate significantly. The H 2U-NaOH singular point has a pH of 6.87 at 310 K in the ternary system.

  1. Assessing the Natural Values of Fresh Waters: Science or Art?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, C. M.; Boon, P. J.

    2005-05-01

    If conservation is to be effective, there needs to be agreement on how priorities are assessed - especially among scientists, resource managers, and policy-makers. Although tensions remain between some sectors, considerable progress has been made. In the UK, for example, the recent implementation of the EC Water Framework Directive has brought the aspirations of 'freshwater management' and 'freshwater conservation' closer, although there are still legitimate differences between the two. Effective conservation also requires robust and objective methods of assigning 'value' to fresh waters. To compare approaches used in the UK and the US, a survey was conducted among selected individuals, classified within three broad affiliations: universities and research institutes, conservation bodies, and resource managers. Respondents assigned scores to reflect the importance attached to each of 27 features, grouped within broad conservation criteria. Naturalness and rarity were ranked the highest both in the UK and the US, with representativeness and diversity rated significantly lower. The naturalness of channels and banks, and littoral and shoreline zones, respectively, were considered the most important features for rivers and lakes. Results indicate much common ground between the two countries, suggesting that some 'core' features are essential components in determinations of freshwater conservation value.

  2. Microwave-enhanced pyrolysis of natural algae from water blooms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Linling; Tong, Dongmei; Hu, Changwei

    2016-07-01

    Microwave-enhanced pyrolysis (MEP) of natural algae under different reaction conditions was carried out. The optimal conditions for bio-oil production were the following: algae particle size of 20-5 mesh, microwave power of 600W, and 10% of activated carbon as microwave absorber and catalyst. The maximum liquid yield obtained under N2, 10% H2/Ar, and CO2 atmosphere was 49.1%, 51.7%, and 54.3% respectively. The energy yield of bio-products was 216.7%, 236.9% and 208.7% respectively. More long chain fatty acids were converted into hydrocarbons by hydrodeoxygenation under 10% H2/Ar atmosphere assisted by microwave over activated carbon containing small amounts of metals. Under CO2 atmosphere, carboxylic acids (66.6%) were the main products in bio-oil because the existence of CO2 vastly inhibited the decarboxylation. The MEP of algae was quick and efficient for bio-oil production, which provided a way to not only ameliorate the environment but also obtain fuel or chemicals at the same time. PMID:27128164

  3. What do we really know about the health effects of natural sources of trans fatty acids?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the food industry remains actively engaged in the development of alternatives for partially hydrogenated vegetable oils in order to reduce intake of trans fatty acids, intake of these fatty acids from natural sources remains as a small part of our diet. The question remains, are there differ...

  4. Determination of Se(IV) in natural waters by adsorptive stripping voltammetry of 5-nitropiazselenol.

    PubMed

    Ashournia, Mehdi; Aliakbar, Alireza

    2010-02-15

    The high tendency of 5-nitropiazselenol for self-accumulation on thin mercury film electrode was used innovatively for determination of Se(IV) in natural waters. 5-Nitropiazselenol was formed by reaction between Se(IV) and 4-nitro-1,2-phenylenediamine in acidic solution and self-accumulation process was carried out directly from reaction media. The adsorbed 5-nitropiazselenol was stripped in HCl solution by DP cathodic potential scan. All parameters influencing the measurement were optimized and evaluated. Detection limit of this method is 0.06 ng mL(-1). Interferences of various cations and anions were studied. The adsorption tendency of some other piazselenols made by some aromatic ortho-diamines was also investigated. The problems arising from applying potential during accumulation process in natural waters analysis were discussed. This method was applied for determination of Se(IV) in natural waters collected from some internationally registrated lagoons south of Caspian Sea. The obtained results were compared with the results of ICP-AES and DPCSV after electrochemical preconcentration. PMID:19864058

  5. Effects of iron on arsenic speciation and redox chemistry in acid mine water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bednar, A.J.; Garbarino, J.R.; Ranville, J.F.; Wildeman, T.R.

    2005-01-01

    Concern about arsenic is increasing throughout the world, including areas of the United States. Elevated levels of arsenic above current drinking-water regulations in ground and surface water can be the result of purely natural phenomena, but often are due to anthropogenic activities, such as mining and agriculture. The current study correlates arsenic speciation in acid mine drainage and mining-influenced water with the important water-chemistry properties Eh, pH, and iron(III) concentration. The results show that arsenic speciation is generally in equilibrium with iron chemistry in low pH AMD, which is often not the case in other natural-water matrices. High pH mine waters and groundwater do not always hold to the redox predictions as well as low pH AMD samples. The oxidation and precipitation of oxyhydroxides deplete iron from some systems, and also affect arsenite and arsenate concentrations through sorption processes. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mammalian Cell Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of the Haloacetic Acids, A Major Class of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products (DBPs) that are formed during the disinfection of drinking water, wastewaters and recreational pool waters. Currently, five HAAs [bromoacetic acid (BAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), chloroacetic acid (CAA), dichloroacetic ac...

  7. Water Reserves Program. An adaptation strategy to prevent imbalance of water in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas-Rodriguez, S. A.; López Pérez, M.; Barrios Ordóñez, J.; Wickel, B.; Villón Bracamonte, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Freshwater ecosystems occupy approximately 1% of the earth's surface yet possess about 12% of all known animal species. By virtue of their position in the landscape they connect terrestrial and coastal marine biomes and provide and sustain ecosystem services vital to the health and persistence of human communities. These services include the supply of water for food production, urban and industrial consumption, among others. Over the past century many freshwater ecosystems around the world have been heavily modified or lost due to the alteration of flow regimes (e.g. damming, canalization, diversion, over-abstraction). The synergistic impacts of land use change, changes in flows, chemical deterioration, and climate change have left many systems and their species very little room to adjust to change, while future projections indicate a steady increase imbalance in water demand for food and energy production and water supply to suit the needs of a growing world population. In Mexico, the focus has been to secure water for human development and maximize economic growth, which has resulted in allocation of water beyond available amounts, and that in many river basins has led imbalance of water in nature. As a consequence episodic water scarcity severely constrains freshwater ecosystems and the services they provide. Climatic change and variability are presenting serious challenges to a country that already is experiencing serious strain on its water resources. However, freshwater ecosystems are recognized by law as legitimate user of water, and mandate a flow allocation for the environment ('water reserve' or 'environmental flows'). Based on this legal provision the Mexican government through the National Water Commission (Conagua), with support of the Alliance WWF - Fundación Gonzalo Río Arronte, and the Interamerican Development Bank, has launched a national program to identify and implement 'water reserves': basins where environmental flows will be secured and

  8. Tribromopyrrole, brominated acids, and other disinfection byproducts produced by disinfection of drinking water rich in bromide.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Susan D; Thruston, Alfred D; Rav-Acha, Chaim; Groisman, Ludmila; Popilevsky, Inna; Juraev, Olga; Glezer, Victor; McKague, A Bruce; Plewa, Michael J; Wagner, Elizabeth D

    2003-09-01

    Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), we investigated the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from high bromide waters (2 mg/L) treated with chlorine or chlorine dioxide used in combination with chlorine and chloramines. This study represents the first comprehensive investigation of DBPs formed by chlorine dioxide under high bromide conditions. Drinking water from full-scale treatment plants in Israel was studied, along with source water (Sea of Galilee) treated under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. Select DBPs (trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, aldehydes, chlorite, chlorate, and bromate) were quantified. Many of the DBPs identified have not been previously reported, and several of the identifications were confirmed through the analysis of authentic standards. Elevated bromide levels in the source water caused a significant shift in speciation to bromine-containing DBPs; bromoform and dibromoacetic acid were the dominant DBPs observed, with very few chlorine-containing compounds found. Iodo-trihalomethanes were also identified, as well as a number of new brominated carboxylic acids and 2,3,5-tribromopyrrole, which represents the first time a halogenated pyrrole has been reported as a DBP. Most of the bromine-containing DBPs were formed during pre-chlorination at the initial reservoir, and were not formed by chlorine dioxide itself. An exception wasthe iodo-THMs, which appeared to be formed by a combination of chlorine dioxide with chloramines or chlorine (either added deliberately or as an impurity in the chlorine dioxide). A separate laboratory study was also conducted to quantitatively determine the contribution of fulvic acids and humic acids (from isolated natural organic matter in the Sea of Galilee) as precursor material to several of the DBPs identified. Results showed that fulvic acid plays a greater role in the formation of THMs, haloacetic acids, and aldehydes, but 2,3,5-tribromopyrrole was produced primarily from humic

  9. Naturally occurring lactic Acid bacteria isolated from tomato pomace silage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing-Jing; Du, Rui-Ping; Gao, Min; Sui, Yao-Qiang; Xiu, Lei; Wang, Xiao

    2014-05-01

    Silage making has become a significant method of forage conservation worldwide. To determine how tomato pomace (TP) may be used effectively as animal feed, it was ensilaged for 90 days and microbiology counts, fermentation characteristics and chemical composition of tomato pomace silage (TPS) were evaluated at the 30th, 60th, and 90th days, respectively. In addition, 103 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from TPS. Based on the phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S rDNA sequence and carbohydrate fermentation tests, the isolates were identified as 17 species namely: Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens (0.97%), Lactobacillus pontis (0.97%), Lactobacillus hilgardii (0.97%), Lactobacillus pantheris (0.97%), Lactobacillus amylovorus (1.9%), Lactobacillus panis (1.9%), Lactobacillus vaginalis (1.9%), Lactobacillus rapi (1.9%), Lactobacillus buchneri (2.9%), Lactobacillus parafarraginis (2.9%), Lactobacillus helveticus (3.9%), Lactobacillus camelliae (3.9%), Lactobacillus fermentum (5.8%), Lactobacillus manihotivorans (6.8%), Lactobacillus plantarum (10.7%), Lactobacillus harbinensis (16.5%) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (35.0%). This study has shown that TP can be well preserved for 90 days by ensilaging and that TPS is not only rich in essential nutrients, but that physiological and biochemical properties of the isolates could provide a platform for future design of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants aimed at improving the fermentation quality of silage. PMID:25049999

  10. Naturally Occurring Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Tomato Pomace Silage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing-jing; Du, Rui-ping; Gao, Min; Sui, Yao-qiang; Xiu, Lei; Wang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Silage making has become a significant method of forage conservation worldwide. To determine how tomato pomace (TP) may be used effectively as animal feed, it was ensilaged for 90 days and microbiology counts, fermentation characteristics and chemical composition of tomato pomace silage (TPS) were evaluated at the 30th, 60th, and 90th days, respectively. In addition, 103 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from TPS. Based on the phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S rDNA sequence and carbohydrate fermentation tests, the isolates were identified as 17 species namely: Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens (0.97%), Lactobacillus pontis (0.97%), Lactobacillus hilgardii (0.97%), Lactobacillus pantheris (0.97%), Lactobacillus amylovorus (1.9%), Lactobacillus panis (1.9%), Lactobacillus vaginalis (1.9%), Lactobacillus rapi (1.9%), Lactobacillus buchneri (2.9%), Lactobacillus parafarraginis (2.9%), Lactobacillus helveticus (3.9%), Lactobacillus camelliae (3.9%), Lactobacillus fermentum (5.8%), Lactobacillus manihotivorans (6.8%), Lactobacillus plantarum (10.7%), Lactobacillus harbinensis (16.5%) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (35.0%). This study has shown that TP can be well preserved for 90 days by ensilaging and that TPS is not only rich in essential nutrients, but that physiological and biochemical properties of the isolates could provide a platform for future design of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants aimed at improving the fermentation quality of silage. PMID:25049999

  11. DC diaphragm discharge in water solutions of selected organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhnankova, Edita J.; Hammer, Malte U.; Reuter, Stephan; Krcma, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Effect of four simple organic acids water solution on a DC diaphragm discharge was studied. Efficiency of the discharge was quantified by the hydrogen peroxide production determined by UV-VIS spectrometry of a H2O2 complex formed with specific titanium reagent. Automatic titration was used to study the pH behaviour after the plasma treatment. Optical emission spectroscopy overview spectra were recorded and detailed spectra of OH band and Hβ line were used to calculate the rotational temperature and comparison of the line profile (reflecting electron concentration) in the acid solutions. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  12. [Contribution of natural mineral water to the iodine supply of the population].

    PubMed

    Kirchner, S; Stelz, A; Muskat, E

    1996-10-01

    Most parts of Germany are iodine deficiency areas. Daily iodine intake may be increased by food with high iodine content. Therefore determination of iodine in different foodstuffs is of importance. Aim of our work was to develop a method for mineral waters. Besides, we wanted to find out to what extent natural mineral waters can contribute to the iodine supply of the population. The method is based on the reaction of the halogenids iodide and bromide with ethylene oxide in a sulfuric acid medium while converting into 2-iodo- and 2-bromoethanol. After extraction, the reaction products are determined by capillary gas chromatography with an electron capture detector. The method was modified for mineral waters. Single results were confirmed by ICP-MS. For mineral waters the limits of determination are 3 micrograms/L for iodide and 42 micrograms/L for bromide. The investigation of mineral waters from Hessen showed, that only few sources contain iodide in remarkable amounts. Therefore a considerable improvement of iodide intake is possible only with single mineral waters. PMID:9123969

  13. Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elizabeth C. Chapman,† Rosemary C. Capo,† Brian W. Stewart,*,† Carl S. Kirby,‡ Richard W. Hammack,§ Karl T. Schroeder,§ and Harry M. Edenborn

    2012-02-24

    Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ∼375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (εSr SW = +13.8 to +41.6, where εSr SW is the deviation of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 104); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

  14. Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2012-03-20

    Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (ε{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ε{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

  15. Removal of natural organic matter from water using ion-exchange resins and cyclodextrin polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkambule, T. I.; Krause, R. W.; Mamba, B. B.; Haarhoff, J.

    Natural organic matter (NOM) consists of a complex mixture of naturally occurring organic compounds. Although it is not considered toxic by itself, NOM present during water disinfection may result in the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), many of which are either carcinogenic or mutagenic. Although it is difficult to completely characterize NOM due to its complex and large structure, a consideration of its structure is necessary for a better understanding of the mechanism of NOM removal from water. In this study, water from the Vaalkop water treatment plant was characterized for its NOM composition by fractionation over ion-exchange resins. Fractionation at different pH with different resins resulted in the isolation of the neutral, basic and acidic fractions of both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic NOM. The hydrophilic basic fraction was found to be the most abundant fraction in the source water. Each of the isolated NOM fractions were percolated through cyclodextrin (CD) polyurethanes, resulting in an adsorption efficiency of between 6% and 33%. The acidic fractions were the most adsorbed fractions by the CD polyurethanes, while the neutral fractions being the least adsorbed. The water samples were then subjected to an ozonation regime at the treatment plant and then fractionated as before. As expected there were decreases of the neutral and basic fractions after ozonation. The application of CD polyurethanes to the fractions after ozonation resulted in a removal efficiency of up to 59%, nearly double that of the non-treated sample. Also, in the case of the ozone pre-treated samples, it was mainly the hydrophilic basic fraction which was removed. All the fractions were subjected to a chlorination test to determine the trihalomethane (THM) formation potential. All six NOM fractions resulted in THM formation, but the hydrophilic basic fraction was found to be the most reactive and formed the highest THM concentration. The effect of the combination of

  16. Mechanism of the toxicity induced by natural humic acid on human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Yusuke; Yustiawati; Tanaka, Masato; Gumiri, Sulmin; Ardianor; Hosokawa, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Shunitz; Saito, Takeshi; Kurasaki, Masaaki

    2014-08-01

    Humic acid (HA), a group of high-molecular weight organic compounds characterized by an ability to bind heavy metals, is normally found in natural water. Although the impairment of vascular endothelial cells in the presence of humic substances has been reported to be involved in some diseases, the mechanisms responsible for this involvement remain unclear. In this study, we examined the cytotoxicity of HA obtained from peatland in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, to human vascular endothelial cells, as well as the mechanisms behind these effects. It was found that 50 mg/L HA showed cytotoxicity, which we considered to be mediated by apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway because of an increase in the expression of caspases 6 and 9 in response to HA administration. In addition, this cytotoxicity was enhanced when cells in this experimental system were exposed to oxidative stress, while it was decreased by the addition of vitamin C. Thus, we conclude that the apoptosis induced by HA depends upon oxidative stress. Furthermore, an iron chelator, DFO, showed a tendency to decrease HA-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting that iron may potentially mediate HA-induced oxidative stress. In conclusion, long-term consumption of HA-rich water obtained from our study area may cause damage to endothelial cells and subsequent chronic health problems. PMID:23042718

  17. Carbon isotope ratios in crassulacean Acid metabolism plants: seasonal patterns from plants in natural stands.

    PubMed

    Szarek, S R

    1976-09-01

    A year round study of photosynthesis and carbon isotope fractionation was conducted with plants of Opuntia phaeacantha Engelm. and Yucca baccata Torr. occurring in natural stands at elevations of 525, 970, 1450 and 1900 m. Plant water potentials and the daytime pattern of (14)CO(2) photosynthesis were similar for all cacti along the elevational gradient, despite significant differences in temperature regime and soil water status. Carbon isotope ratios of total tissue and soluble extract fractions were relatively constant throughtout the entire year. Additionally, the sigma(13)C values were similar in all plants of the same species along the elevational gradient, i.e. -12.5 +/- 0.86 per thousand for O. phaeacantha and -15.7 +/- 0.95 per thousand for Y. baccata. The results of this study indicate Crassulacean acid metabolism predominates as the major carbon pathway of these plants, which do not facultatively utilize the reductive pentose phosphate cycle of photosynthesis as the primary carboxylation reaction. PMID:16659680

  18. Effect of natural dissolved organic carbon on phosphate removal by ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate treatment of wetland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qualls, Robert G.; Sherwood, Lindsay J.; Richardson, Curtis J.

    2009-09-01

    The use of wetlands for the removal of excess N and P has become widespread. Some sensitive P-limited ecosystems, however, may require additional reductions in the concentration of P entering the system. It has been proposed that the treatment of wetlands through addition of ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate can augment the natural P removal mechanisms. However, high concentrations of natural dissolved organic matter may interfere with the removal of P by metal addition. We evaluated the doses of ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate necessary to reduce total P concentrations below 0.32 μM (10 μg/L) in water from the Northern Everglades, and we determined the effect of various concentrations (21, 38, and 60 mg/L) of natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the removal of PO4 and total P. High concentrations of natural DOC inhibited both the short-term removal of PO4 and the longer-term removal of total P from the water column. Similar results were observed using 15 μM citric acid in an experiment to determine whether citric acid could effectively mimic the inhibition of phosphorus removal associated with natural DOC. Stoichiometry of these experiments indicates that the mechanism of natural DOC interference was not complexation of the metal ions by the DOC; we hypothesize that it could be adsorption to the terminal hydroxyl groups on a polynuclear Fe or Al colloid, effectively blocking the adsorption sites from a phosphate molecule. Also, the ability of citric acid to mimic the inhibitory effects also suggests that the results of the study are broadly applicable to wetland and other waters with high natural organic acid concentrations.

  19. The effect of zeolite treatment by acids on sodium adsorption ratio of coal seam gas water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Ozdemir, Orhan; Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V; Do, Duong D

    2012-10-15

    Many coal seam gas (CSG) waters contain a sodium ion concentration which is too high relative to calcium and magnesium ions for environment acceptance. Natural zeolites can be used as a cheap and effective method to control sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, which is a measure of the relative preponderance of sodium to calcium and magnesium) due to its high cation exchange capacity. In this study, a natural zeolite from Queensland was examined for its potential to treat CSG water to remove sodium ions to lower SAR and reduce the pH value. The results demonstrate that acid activated zeolite at 30%wt solid ratio can reduce the sodium content from 563.0 to 182.7 ppm; the pH from 8.74 to 6.95; and SAR from 70.3 to 18.5. Based on the results of the batch experiments, the sodium adsorption capacity of the acid-treated zeolite is three times greater than that of the untreated zeolite. Both the untreated and acid-treated zeolite samples were characterized using zeta potential, surface characterization, DTA/TG and particle size distribution in order to explain their adsorption behaviours. PMID:22841594

  20. Natural chlorine and fluorine in the atmosphere, water and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The geochemical cycles of chlorine and fluorine are surveyed and summarized as framework for the understanding of the global natural abundances of these species in the atmosphere, water, and precipitation. In the cycles the fluxes into and out of the atmosphere can be balanced within the limits of our knowledge of the natural sources and sinks. Sea salt from the ocean surfaces represent the predominant portion of the source of chlorine. It is also an important source of atmospheric fluorine, but volcanoes are likely to be more important fluorine sources. Dry deposition of sea salt returns about 85 percent of the salt released there. Precipitation removes the remainder. Most of the sea salt materials are considered to be cyclic, moving through sea spray over the oceans and either directly back to the oceans or deposited dry and in precipitation on land, whence it runs off into rivers and streams and returns to the oceans. Most of the natural chlorine in the atmosphere is in the form of particulate chloride ion with lesser amounts as gaseous inorganic chloride and methyl chloride vapor. Fluorine is emitted from volcanoes primarily as HF. It is possible that HF may be released directly form the ocean surface but this has not been confirmed by observation. HCl and most likely HF gases are released into the atmosphere by sea salt aerosols. The mechanism for the release is likely to be the provision of protons from the so-called excess sulfate and HNO3. Sea salt aerosol contains fluorine as F(-), MgF(+), CaF(+), and NaF. The concentrations of the various species of chlorine and fluorine that characterize primarily natural, unpolluted atmospheres are summarized in tables and are discussed in relation to their fluxes through the geochemical cycle.

  1. Water transport in water-in-oil-in-water liquid emulsion membrane system for the separation of lactic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Y.S.; Lee, W.K. )

    1994-03-01

    Liquid emulsion membranes (LEMs) were applied to the separation of lactic acid from an aqueous feed phase, and water transport (swelling) was investigated during the separation. Considering that as lactic acid was extracted into the internal stripping phase, osmotic pressure difference across the membrane was varied, the water transfer coefficient was evaluated. The water transfer coefficient was larger at higher carrier concentration and initial lactic acid concentration, which means that emulsion swelling can also be mediated by solute/carrier complexes although it is, in general, osmotically induced. The appropriate LEM formulation was given for separation and concentration of lactic acid. If both separation and concentration are desired, evidently emulsion swelling should be considered in conjunction with the transport rate of lactic acid. It was observed that the separated solute concentration in the internal phase was lowered due to swelling during the operation. Nevertheless, lactic acid could be concentrated in the internal phase more than 6 times in specific conditions, indicating that as the volume ratio of external phase to internal phase is increased, a still higher concentration in the internal phase can be obtained. 22 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. The nature of the CO2 (-) radical anion in water.

    PubMed

    Janik, Ireneusz; Tripathi, G N R

    2016-04-21

    The reductive conversion of CO2 into industrial products (e.g., oxalic acid, formic acid, methanol) can occur via aqueous CO2 (-) as a transient intermediate. While the formation, structure, and reaction pathways of this radical anion have been modelled for decades using various spectroscopic and theoretical approaches, we present here, for the first time, a vibrational spectroscopic investigation in liquid water, using pulse radiolysis time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy for its preparation and observation. Excitation of the radical in resonance with its 235 nm absorption displays a transient Raman band at 1298 cm(-1), attributed to the symmetric CO stretch, which is at ∼45 cm(-1) higher frequency than in inert matrices. Isotopic substitution at C ((13)CO2 (-)) shifts the frequency downwards by 22 cm(-1), which confirms its origin and the assignment. A Raman band of moderate intensity compared to the stronger 1298 cm(-1) band also appears at 742 cm(-1) and is assignable to the OCO bending mode. A reasonable resonance enhancement of this mode is possible only in a bent CO2 (-)(C2v/Cs) geometry. These resonance Raman features suggest a strong solute-solvent interaction, the water molecules acting as constituents of the radical structure, rather than exerting a minor solvent perturbation. However, there is no evidence of the non-equivalence (Cs) of the two CO bonds. A surprising resonance Raman feature is the lack of overtones of the symmetric CO stretch, which we interpret due to the detachment of the electron from the CO2 (-) moiety towards the solvation shell. Electron detachment occurs at the energies of 0.28 ± 0.03 eV or higher with respect to the zero point energy of the ground electronic state. The issue of acid-base equilibrium of the radical, which has been in contention for decades, as reflected in a wide variation in the reported pKa (-0.2 to 3.9), has been resolved. A value of 3.4 ± 0.2 measured in this work is consistent with the vibrational

  3. The nature of the CO2- radical anion in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Ireneusz; Tripathi, G. N. R.

    2016-04-01

    The reductive conversion of CO2 into industrial products (e.g., oxalic acid, formic acid, methanol) can occur via aqueous CO2- as a transient intermediate. While the formation, structure, and reaction pathways of this radical anion have been modelled for decades using various spectroscopic and theoretical approaches, we present here, for the first time, a vibrational spectroscopic investigation in liquid water, using pulse radiolysis time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy for its preparation and observation. Excitation of the radical in resonance with its 235 nm absorption displays a transient Raman band at 1298 cm-1, attributed to the symmetric CO stretch, which is at ˜45 cm-1 higher frequency than in inert matrices. Isotopic substitution at C (13CO2-) shifts the frequency downwards by 22 cm-1, which confirms its origin and the assignment. A Raman band of moderate intensity compared to the stronger 1298 cm-1 band also appears at 742 cm-1 and is assignable to the OCO bending mode. A reasonable resonance enhancement of this mode is possible only in a bent CO2-(C2v/Cs) geometry. These resonance Raman features suggest a strong solute-solvent interaction, the water molecules acting as constituents of the radical structure, rather than exerting a minor solvent perturbation. However, there is no evidence of the non-equivalence (Cs) of the two CO bonds. A surprising resonance Raman feature is the lack of overtones of the symmetric CO stretch, which we interpret due to the detachment of the electron from the CO2- moiety towards the solvation shell. Electron detachment occurs at the energies of 0.28 ± 0.03 eV or higher with respect to the zero point energy of the ground electronic state. The issue of acid-base equilibrium of the radical, which has been in contention for decades, as reflected in a wide variation in the reported pKa (-0.2 to 3.9), has been resolved. A value of 3.4 ± 0.2 measured in this work is consistent with the vibrational properties, bond structure

  4. Determination of formate in natural waters by a coupled enzymatic/high-performance liquid chromatographic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kieber, D.J.; Vaughan, G.M.; Mopper, K.

    1988-09-01

    An enzymatic method was developed to quantify formic acid in natural water samples at submicromolar concentrations. The method is based on the oxidation of formate by formate dehydrogenase with corresponding reduction of ..beta..-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (..beta..-NAD/sup +/) to reduced ..beta..-NAD/sup +/ (..beta..-NADH); ..beta..-NADH is quantified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection. An important feature of this method is that the enzymatic reaction occurs directly in aqueous media, even sea water, and does not require sample pretreatment other than sample filtration. The reaction proceeds at room temperature at a slightly alkaline pH (7.5 - 8.5) and is specific for formate with a detection limit of 0.5 ..mu..M (S/N = 4) for a 200-..mu..L injection. The precision of the method was 4.6% relative standard deviation (n = 6) for a 0.6 ..mu..M standard addition of formate to Sargasso sea water. Average recoveries of 2 ..mu..M additions of formate to sea water, pore water, or rain were 103, 103, and 87%, respectively. Intercalibration with a Dionex ion chromatographic system showed an excellent agreement of 98%. Concentrations of formate present in natural samples ranged from 0.2 to 0.8 ..mu..M for Biscayne Bay sea water, 0.4 to 10.0 ..mu..M for Miami rain, and 0.9 to 8.4 ..mu..M for Biscayne Bay sediment pore water.

  5. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts. PMID:26762189

  6. Terpolymers of ethyl acrylate/methacrylic acid/unsaturated acid ester of alcohols and acids as anti-settling agents in coal water slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Savoly, A.; Villa, J.L.; Grinstein, R.H.; Nachfolger, S.J.

    1988-05-17

    This patent describes a pumpable stabilized coal water slurry, having a coal content of at least about 50% by weight wherein at least 80% of the coal particles are about 200 mesh or finer, containing from about 0.01% to about 1% by weight of the slurry of a water soluble terpolymer of ethylacrylate (A), metacrylic acid (B) and a third monomer (C) selected from the group consisting of an unsaturated carboxylic acid ester of an alcohol and an ethoxylated carboxylic acid. The unsaturated carboxylic acid is a mono- or di- basic unsaturated carboxylic acid of 3 to 10 carbon atoms selected from the group consisting of acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, itaconic acid, fumaric acid, and maleic acid.

  7. Heavy metals: confounding factors in the response of New Zealand freshwater fish assemblages to natural and anthropogenic acidity.

    PubMed

    Greig, Hamish S; Niyogi, Dev K; Hogsden, Kristy L; Jellyman, Phillip G; Harding, Jon S

    2010-07-15

    Acidification of freshwaters is a global phenomenon, occurring both through natural leaching of organic acids and through human activities from industrial emissions and mining. The West Coast of the South Island, New Zealand, has both naturally acidic and acid mine drainage (AMD) streams enabling us to investigate the response of fish communities to a gradient of acidity in the presence and absence of additional stressors such as elevated concentrations of heavy metals. We surveyed a total of 42 streams ranging from highly acidic (pH 3.1) and high in heavy metals (10 mg L(-)(1) Fe; 38 mg L(-)(1) Al) to circum-neutral (pH 8.1) and low in metals (0.02 mg L(-)(1) Fe; 0.05 mg L(-)(1) Al). Marked differences in pH and metal tolerances were observed among the 15 species that we recorded. Five Galaxias species, Anguilla dieffenbachii and Anguillaaustralis were found in more acidic waters (pH<5), while bluegill bullies (Gobiomorphus hubbsi) and torrentfish (Cheimarrichthys fosteri) were least tolerant of low pH (minimum pH 6.2 and 5.5, respectively). Surprisingly, the strongest physicochemical predictor of fish diversity, density and biomass was dissolved metal concentrations (Fe, Al, Zn, Mn and Ni) rather than pH. No fish were detected in streams with dissolved metal concentrations >2.7 mg L(-)(1) and nine taxa were only found in streams with metal concentrations <1 mg L(-)(1). The importance of heavy metals as critical drivers of fish communities has not been previously reported in New Zealand, although the mechanism of the metal effects warrants further study. Our findings indicate that any remediation of AMD streams which seeks to enable fish recolonisation should aim to improve water quality by raising pH above approximately 4.5 and reducing concentrations of dissolved Al and Fe to <1.0 mg L(-)(1). PMID:20478612

  8. Thermal properties of phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole membranes in water and methanol-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nores-Pondal, Federico J.; Buera, M. Pilar; Corti, Horacio R.

    The thermal properties of phosphoric acid-doped poly[2-2‧-(m-phenylene)-5-5‧ bi-benzimidazole] (PBI) and poly[2,5-benzimidazole] (ABPBI) membranes, ionomeric materials with promising properties to be used as electrolytes in direct methanol and in high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique in the temperature range from -145 °C to 200 °C. The DSC scans of samples equilibrated in water at different relative humidities (RH) and in liquid water-methanol mixtures were analyzed in relation to glass transition, water crystallization/melting and solvent desorption in different temperature regions. The thermal relaxation observed in the very low temperature region could be ascribed to the glass transition of the H 3PO 4-H 2O mixture confined in the polymeric matrix. After cooling the samples up to -145 °C, frozen water was detected in PBI and ABPBI at different RH, although at 100% RH less amount of water had crystallized than that observed in Nafion membranes under the same conditions. Even more important is the fact that the freezing degree of water is much lower in ABPBI membranes equilibrated in liquid water-methanol mixtures than that observed for PBI and, in a previous study, for Nafion. Thus, apart from other well known properties, acid-doped ABPBI emerges as an excellent ionomer for applications in direct methanol fuel cells working in cold environments.

  9. Natural radioactivity in ground water near the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Price, V. Jr. ); Michel, J. )

    1990-08-01

    A study of natural radioactivity in groundwater on and adjacent to the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken (SC) was conducted to determine the spatial and temporal variations in the concentration of specific radionuclides. All available measurements for gross alpha particle activity, gross beta activity, uranium, Ra-226, Ra-228, and radon were collated. Relatively few radionuclide-specific results were found. Twenty samples from drinking water supplies in the area were collected in October 1987 and analyzed for U-238, U-234, Ra-226, Ra-228, and Rn-222. The aquifer type for each public water supply system was determined, and statistical analyses were conducted to detect differences among aquifer types and geographic areas defined at the country level. For samples from the public water wells and distribution systems on and adjacent to the site, most of the gross alpha particle activity could be attributed to Ra-226. Aquifer type was an important factor in determining the level of radioactivity in groundwater. The distribution and geochemical factors affecting the distribution of each radionuclide for the different aquifer types are discussed in detail. Statistical analyses were also run to test for aerial differences, among counties and the site. For all types of measurements, there were no differences in the distribution of radioactivity among the ten counties in the vicinity of the site or the site itself. The mean value for the plant was the lowest of all geographic areas for gross alpha particle activity and radon, intermediate for gross beta activity, and in the upper ranks for Ra-226 and Ra-228. It is concluded that the drinking water quality onsite is comparable with that in the vicinity. 19 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Inactivation of H1N1 viruses exposed to acidic ozone water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Lee, Kwang H.; Seong, Baik L.

    2009-10-01

    The inactivation of H1N1 viruses upon exposure to acidic ozone water was investigated using chicken allantoic fluids of different dilutions, pH values, and initial ozone concentrations. The inactivation effect of the acidic ozone water was found to be stronger than the inactivation effect of the ozone water combined with the degree of acidity, indicating a synergic effect of acidity on ozone decay in water. It is also shown that acidic ozone water with a pH value of 4 or less is very effective means of virus inactivation if provided in conjunction with an ozone concentration of 20 mg/l or higher.

  11. Water dispersible polytetrafluoroethylene microparticles prepared by grafting of poly(acrylic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changqiao; Xu, Lu; Zeng, Hongyan; Tang, Zhongfeng; Zhong, Lei; Wu, Guozhong

    2014-10-01

    Due to the hydrophobic nature and high gravimetric density, it is very difficult to obtain water dispersible polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) powder. In this work, hydrophilic PTFE microparticles were successfully prepared by grafting of poly(acrylic acid) onto PTFE micropowder via a pre-irradiation method. The as-obtained hydrophilic PTFE microparticles were analyzed by FT-IR, 1H NMR, CA, SEM and TGA. After neutralization by sodium hydroxide, the water contact angle decreased from 145.69° for pristine PTFE to 63.38° for PTFE-g-NaAA. The obtained micropowder can be easily dispersed in water to form a dispersion with very high stability. Furthermore, the presence of grafted PAA shows no obvious influence on degradation temperature of PTFE backbones.

  12. Isolation of anacardic acid from natural cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Philip, Joseph Y N; Da Cruz Francisco, José; Dey, Estera S; Buchweishaija, Joseph; Mkayula, Lupituko L; Ye, Lei

    2008-10-22

    Solvent extracted cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), conventionally known as natural CNSL, is a mixture of several alkenyl phenols. One of these alkenyl phenols is anacardic acid, which is present at the highest concentration. In view of anticipated industrial applications of anacardic acid, the objective of this work was to isolate anacardic acid from natural CNSL by supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO 2). In this study, the solubility data for natural CNSL in scCO 2 under a range of operating conditions of pressure (100, 200, and 300 bar), temperature (40 and 50 degrees C), and CO 2 flow rate (5, 10, and 15 g min (-1)) were established. The best scCO 2 working conditions were found to be 50 degrees C and 300 bar at a flow rate of 5 g min (-1) CO 2. Using 3 g of sample (CNSL/solid adsorbent = 1/2) under these scCO 2 conditions, it was possible to quantitatively isolate high purity anacardic acid from crude natural CNSL (82% of total anacardic acid) within 150 min. The anacardic acid isolated by scCO 2 was analyzed by different spectroscopic techniques (UV-vis, FT-IR, and (1)H NMR) and HPLC analysis, indicating that the anacardic acid isolated by scCO 2 has better quality than that obtained through a conventional method involving several chemical conversion steps. PMID:18811166

  13. The geochemical behavior of natural radionuclides in coastal waters: A modeling study for the Huelva estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periáñez, Raúl; Hierro, Almudena; Bolívar, Juan Pedro; Vaca, Federico

    2013-10-01

    A numerical model to study the behavior and distribution of natural radionuclides in sediments of an estuary (Odiel and Tinto rivers, SW Spain) affected by acid mine drainage and industrial activities has been developed. The model solves water circulation due to tides and river stream flows. The dispersion model includes uptake/release reactions of radionuclides between the dissolved phase and bed sediments in a dynamic way, using kinetic transfer coefficients. Seasonal pH and chlorinity distributions are simulated, and a formulation has been developed to consider these seasonal variations on kinetic coefficients. Calculated concentrations of 226Ra and 238U in sediments have been compared with measurements from four seasonal sampling campaigns. Numerical experiments have been carried out to study the relative significance of the different radionuclides sources into the estuary as well as the effect of the two components of water circulation (tides are river flows) on radionuclide dispersion patterns.

  14. Comparison of Three Solid Phase Materials for the Extraction of Carboxylic Acids from River Water Followed by 2D GC × GC-TOFMS Determination

    PubMed Central

    Bosire, G. O.; Ngila, J. C.; Parshotam, H.

    2016-01-01

    The extraction and determination of aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids as well as their influence on the aromaticity and molecularity relationship of natural organic matter (NOM) in water are reported in this study. Three solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents were used and their extraction efficiencies evaluated after chromatographic determinations (using gas chromatography with a time of flight mass spectrometer (GC × GC-TOFMS) and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detector (LC-OCD)). More than 42 carboxylic acids were identified in raw water from the Vaal River, which feeds the Lethabo Power Generation Station, South Africa, with cooling water. The aromatic carboxylic acid efficiency (28%) was achieved by using Strata™ X SPE while the highest aliphatic carboxylic acid efficiency (92.08%) was achieved by silica SPE. The hydrophobic nature of NOM in water depends on the nature of organic compounds in water, whether aromatic or aliphatic. The LC-OCD was used to assess the hydrophobicity levels of NOM as a function of these carboxylic acids in cooling water. The LC-OCD results showed that the aromatic nature of NOM in SPE filtered water followed the order Silica>Strata X>C-18. From the results, the hydrophobicity degree of the samples depended on the type and number of carboxylic acids that were removed by the SPE cartridges. PMID:27274730

  15. Comparison of Three Solid Phase Materials for the Extraction of Carboxylic Acids from River Water Followed by 2D GC × GC-TOFMS Determination.

    PubMed

    Bosire, G O; Ngila, J C; Parshotam, H

    2016-01-01

    The extraction and determination of aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids as well as their influence on the aromaticity and molecularity relationship of natural organic matter (NOM) in water are reported in this study. Three solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents were used and their extraction efficiencies evaluated after chromatographic determinations (using gas chromatography with a time of flight mass spectrometer (GC × GC-TOFMS) and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detector (LC-OCD)). More than 42 carboxylic acids were identified in raw water from the Vaal River, which feeds the Lethabo Power Generation Station, South Africa, with cooling water. The aromatic carboxylic acid efficiency (28%) was achieved by using Strata™ X SPE while the highest aliphatic carboxylic acid efficiency (92.08%) was achieved by silica SPE. The hydrophobic nature of NOM in water depends on the nature of organic compounds in water, whether aromatic or aliphatic. The LC-OCD was used to assess the hydrophobicity levels of NOM as a function of these carboxylic acids in cooling water. The LC-OCD results showed that the aromatic nature of NOM in SPE filtered water followed the order Silica>Strata X>C-18. From the results, the hydrophobicity degree of the samples depended on the type and number of carboxylic acids that were removed by the SPE cartridges. PMID:27274730

  16. Emissions of the natural acidic substance in the acid rain region: Dimethyl sulfide and hydrogen sulfide in the region of Xiamen, China

    SciTech Connect

    Yubao Wang; Miaoqin Lu

    1996-12-31

    The global anthropogenic emissions of sulfur, mainly SO2, are relatively well studied for most of the industrialized world, and relatively little is known to date about natural sulfur emission sources, such as, coastal waters and wetland. The most important atmospheric sulfur compounds originating from biogeochemical sources are DMS and H{sub 2}S. Previous studies suggest that biogenic DMS is mainly emitted from oceanic phytoplankton species. The global emission of sulfur by this process was estimated to be 40 Tg S/year. Major sources of biogenic H{sub 2}S in the atmosphere are believed to be bacterial sulfate reduction in anoxic soils and degradation of organic matter. The mentioned reduced sulfur compounds are partially oxidation in the troposphere to SO{sub 2} and further to sulfur acid, another strong acid produced from DMS oxidation is methane sulphonic acid (CH{sub 3}S(O{sub 2})OH). These compounds are strong acid and will influence the pH of precipitation and will be the important impact in acid rain phenomena.

  17. Biosignatures in Fe- and As-rich acidic water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casiot, C.; Bruneel, O.; Donard, O.; Morin, G.; Leblanc, M.; Personné, C.; Elbaz-Poulichet, F.

    2003-04-01

    The acid waters (pH 2.5-3.5) originating from the Carnoulès mine tailings contain elevated dissolved concentrations of arsenite (As(III)) (50-350 mg.l-1) and ferrous iron (Fe(II)) (˜2000 mg.l-1). In such extreme conditions, a number of microorganisms mainly bacteria can grow and influence water chemistry. In the acidic creek of Carnoulès, twenty to sixty percent of the arsenite initially present in water is removed from the aqueous phase within the first 30 m of the creek, as a result of its precipitation with iron. The precipitates contain 20% As around bacteria-made structures. Isotopic measurements revealed an important isotopic fractionation of iron in the stromatolites, which are enriched in 54Fe compared to the primary ore material. This enrichment may be related to the biologically-mediated oxidation of Fe(II) and subsequent immobilisation of Fe(III) by the bacteria of the Carnoulès creek. XANES analysis of sediments and stromatolite samples showed the formation of As(III)-rich compounds, tooeleite, a rare ferric arsenite sulfate oxy-hydroxide mineral and amorphous mixed As(III)/As(V)-Fe(III) oxyhydroxide compounds. These As(III)-rich compounds are dominant during the wet season; ex-situ experiments showed that the formation of these compounds may be related to the activity of bacterial strains of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans that oxidize Fe(II) but not As(III). In contrast, amorphous As(V)-Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides dominate in the sediments during the dry season; they originate from both biotic and abiotic oxidation of As(III). Different strains of As-oxidizing bacteria were isolated from the Carnoulès creek water and identified as strains of the genus Thiomonas.

  18. 75 FR 9921 - San Diego County Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service San Diego County Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program... Diego County Water Authority (Water Authority/ Applicant) has applied to us, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife... the Draft Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation Plan...

  19. Flavin-sensitized photooxidation of substituted phenols in natural water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Kenji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Wada, Shinji

    1992-01-01

    Photooxidation of substituted phenols in the presence of flavins as sensitizers was investigated under aerobic conditions to determine the fate of synthetic chemicals in the environment. Riboflavin was easily decomposed: lumichrome formed after several minutes of illumination with simulated sunlight. In contrast, lumichrome was extremely stable toward sunlight, and was found to be a major flavin component in natural water. From the result of the lumichrome-sensitized photodecomposition of substituted phenols, the order of photolysis rate is p- methoxyphenol > p- chlorophenol > phenol > p- nitrophenol. A decrease in total organic carbon (TOC) from the reaction solutions of all phenols except for p- nitrophenol was observed, and the carbon released was found to mainly originate from phenols. The compound p- chlorophenol has been shown to degrade readily by lumichrome-sensitized photooxidation, but the transformation occurs only by dechlorination. Polychlorophenols were completely dechlorinated in ˜ 1 hr after lumichrome-sensitized photolysis, and the rate increased with chlorine content on the aromatic ring.

  20. Uranium determination in natural water by the fissiontrack technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.

    1975-01-01

    The fission track technique, utilizing the neutron-induced fission of uranium-235, provides a versatile analytical method for the routine analysis of uranium in liquid samples of natural water. A detector is immersed in the sample and both are irradiated. The fission track density observed in the detector is directly proportional to the uranium concentration. The specific advantages of this technique are: (1) only a small quantity of sample, typically 0.1-1 ml, is needed; (2) no sample concentration is necessary; (3) it is capable of providing analyses with a lower reporting limit of 1 ??g per liter; and (4) the actual time spent on an analysis can be only a few minutes. This paper discusses and describes the method. ?? 1975.

  1. Focussing the view on Nature's water-splitting catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Messinger, Johannes; Yano, Junko

    2008-01-01

    About 3 billion years ago Nature invented a catalyst that splits water with highefficiency into molecular oxygen and hydrogen equivalents (protons and electrons). This reaction is energetically driven by sun light and the active centre contains relatively cheap and abundant metals: manganese and calcium. This biological system therefore forms the paradigm for all man made attempts for direct solar fuel production and several studies are underway to determine the electronic and geometric structures of this catalyst. In this report we briefly summarize the problems and the current status of these efforts, and propose a DFT-based strategy for obtaining a reliable high resolution structure of this unique catalyst that includes both the inorganic core and the first ligand sphere.

  2. Natural radioactivity in the scale of water well pipes.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, A; Al-Jarallah, M; Al-Haddad, M N

    2002-01-01

    The natural radioactivity of 226Ra and 228Ra in scale samples taken from pipes used in several local water wells was investigated. The results showed 226Ra activities to be varying from 1284 to 3613 Bq/kg whereas, the 228Ra concentrations did not show any significant variation, all being low, below 30 Bq/kg. The 222Rn exhalations from these scale samples were also measured and compared with the 226Ra contents. The average ratio of 222Rn/226Ra was 31%. Chemical analyses showed that the main constituent of the scale samples was iron. The radiation dose rates from the pipes and scale were up to 100nSv/h. Although not a major hazard this could present a long-term risk if the scale materials were handled indiscriminately. PMID:12113504

  3. Keto-Enol Tautomerizations Catalyzed by Water and Carboxylic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, G.

    2009-12-01

    The ability of weakly-bound complexes to influence the kinetics of gas phase reactions, particularly in atmospheric chemistry, has long been speculated. This study uses quantum chemistry and statistical reaction rate theory to identify that bound water molecules can significantly reduce barriers to intramolecular hydrogen shift reactions, via a double-hydrogen-shift mechanism. The bound water molecule directly participates in the hydrogen shift reaction, exchanging a H atom with its counterpart. For the vinyl alcohol to acetaldehyde keto-enol tautomerization this mechanism cuts the reaction barrier approximately in half, reducing it by over 30 kcal mol-1. In contrast, while a non-participatory ‘bystander’ water molecule also reduces the hydrogen shift barrier, it is only by around 3 kcal/mol. When a carboxylic acid replaces water in the double-hydrogen-shift mechanism the barrier to keto-enol tautomerization is decimated, reduced to less than 6 kcal/mol (around 15 kcal/mol in the reverse direction). This results from reduced strain in the hydrogen shift transition state, and achieves enol lifetimes in the troposphere that become short on relevant timescales. Rapid enol to ketone isomerizations are currently required to explain the oxidation products of isoprene. The wider significance of rapid hydrogen shift reactions in atmospherically relevant molecules and radicals is also explored.

  4. Migration of humus substances from soil to water and the main chemical reaction (in different natural zone of Russian Federation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Marina; Moiseenko, Tatiana; Gashkina, Natalia; Kremleva, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    recommendations ICP-Water report 105/2010, 2010. We researched HS from more then 10 soil sites in difference natural zone. The some lakes are characterized more than 100 water color ºPt-Co-scale and low pH waters (<4.5). These data are particularly important in evaluating the composition changing of HS in the water. Our experimental research has shown the changes in the qualitative composition of the HS and a ratio of their fractions by lowering the pH, especially, increasing the share of fulvic acids (Kola Peninsula territory). Change in the qualitative composition of HS is accompanied by a decrease in the molecular weight, the formation of additional free functional groups. This fact is crucial to the domination of the individual metals in natural waters of various natural zones. To study the complexation of HS in natural waters/soils we used «in situ» measurements and research process by chemical experiment. Most metals form in waters are more resistant as complexes with low molecular weight HS and in soil - vice versa. We discuses depending on the zonal specifics of HS mechanisms of complexation of each metal vary greatly. We show that the acidification processes in natural waters and soils contribute to the destruction of HS and consequently change the metals form.

  5. Mechanistic basis of adaptive maternal effects: egg jelly water balance mediates embryonic adaptation to acidity in Rana arvalis.

    PubMed

    Shu, Longfei; Suter, Marc J-F; Laurila, Anssi; Räsänen, Katja

    2015-11-01

    Environmental stress, such as acidification, can challenge persistence of natural populations and act as a powerful evolutionary force at ecological time scales. The ecological and evolutionary responses of natural populations to environmental stress at early life-stages are often mediated via maternal effects. During early life-stages, maternal effects commonly arise from egg coats (the extracellular structures surrounding the embryo), but the role of egg coats has rarely been studied in the context of adaptation to environmental stress. Previous studies on the moor frog Rana arvalis found that the egg coat mediated adaptive divergence along an acidification gradient in embryonic acid stress tolerance. However, the exact mechanisms underlying these adaptive maternal effects remain unknown. Here, we investigated the role of water balance and charge state (zeta potential) of egg jelly coats in embryonic adaptation to acid stress in three populations of R. arvalis. We found that acidic pH causes severe water loss in the egg jelly coat, but that jelly coats from an acid-adapted population retained more water than jelly coats from populations not adapted to acidity. Moreover, embryonic acid tolerance (survival at pH 4.0) correlated with both water loss and charge state of the jelly, indicating that negatively charged glycans influence jelly water balance and contribute to embryonic adaptation to acidity. These results indicate that egg coats can harbor extensive intra-specific variation, probably facilitated in part via strong selection on water balance and glycosylation status of egg jelly coats. These findings shed light on the molecular mechanisms of environmental stress tolerance and adaptive maternal effects. PMID:25983113

  6. Characterization and disinfection by-product formation potential of natural organic matter in surface and ground waters from Northern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; Katz, B.; Martin, B.S.; Noyes, T.I.

    2000-01-01

    Streamwaters in northern Florida have large concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM), and commonly flow directly into the ground water system through karst features, such as sinkholes. In this study NOM from northern Florida stream and ground waters was fractionated, the fractions characterized by infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and then chlorinated to investigate their disinfection by-product (DBP) formation potential (FP). As the NOM character changed (as quantified by changes in NOM distribution in various fractions, such as hydrophilic acids or hydrophobic neutrals) due to migration through the aquifer, the total organic halide (TOX)-FP and trihalomethane (THM)-FP yield of each of these fractions varied also. In surface waters, the greatest DBP yields were produced by the colloid fraction. In ground waters, DBP yield of the hydrophobic acid fraction (the greatest in terms of mass) decreased during infiltration.

  7. Molecularly imprinted polymer dedicated to the extraction of glyphosate in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Puzio, K; Claude, B; Amalric, L; Berho, C; Grellet, E; Bayoudh, S; Nehmé, R; Morin, Ph

    2014-09-26

    Three molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been synthesized in order to bind efficiently glyphosate (GLY) in natural waters (mineral and underground). Since the target analyte is polar and hydrophilic, electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds have been favored with two templates (phenylphosphonic acid and diethyl(α-aminobenzyl)-phosphonic acid) and two functional monomers (1-allyl-2-thiourea and methacrylic acid). MIPs have been assessed by comparison of the recoveries obtained with MIP and NIP (non imprinted polymer) by solid-phase extraction (SPE). The selectivity of MIP versus NIP was satisfactory for the three imprinted polymers with a very straightforward protocol: conditioning of 250 mg of MIP or NIP packed in 3-mL polypropylene cartridges with 3 mL Milli-Q water, loading of Milli-Q water (15 mL) spiked with 5 mg L(-1) of GLY and its metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and elution by 3 mL NH4OH (10mM) or 3 mL HCl (100mM). SPE fractions were directly analyzed by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Thus, the recoveries of both analytes were greater than 80% for all MIPs and less than 25% for most NIPs. Moreover, the MIP prepared with 1-allyl-2-thiourea as functional monomer and phenylphosphonic acid as template displayed a capacity of 0.033 μmol/mg for GLY. However, the substitution of Milli-Q water by mineral water caused the decrease of MIP recoveries, for that, a pretreatment of the sample by ionic exchange resins was set up and succeeded in improving recoveries (about 50% for GLY and 25% for AMPA). Then, groundwaters were spiked with low concentrations of GLY and AMPA (0.5 μgL(-1)) and directly percolated through MIP cartridges. The extractions were carried out by triplicate and the elution fractions were analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS. The results showed no retention of AMPA but a total retention of GLY by MIP. PMID:25152490

  8. Water Reserves Program. An adaptation strategy to balance water in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Perez, M.; Barrios, E.; Salinas-Rodriguez, S.; Wickel, B.; Villon, R. A.

    2013-05-01

    -allocation takes place. The strategy is to identify and protect basins with an availability of water that is close to their natural flow regime and that also have a high conservation value (based on prior national conservation priority definitions such as protected areas, and biodiversity conservation gap analyses) in order to implement legal restrictions on water resource development. With such protection, these systems will be best positioned to adjust and respond to water shortages, and regime shifts. To date, 189 basins around the country were identified as potential water reserves. The next step will be the nomination of these water reserves to be integrated in the National Water Reserves Program. This program forms the core of the official Mexican government adaptation strategy towards climate prepared water management, which recognizes that water reserves are the buffer society needs to face uncertainty, and reduce water scarcity risk. The development of activities that alter the natural flow regime such as dams and levees are closely examined, and would potentially be restricted.

  9. Production and Scavenging Mechanism of OH Radical in Atmospheric Water Droplets and Natural Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakugawa, H.; Arakaki, T.; Takeda, K.; Nakatani, N.; Miyake, T.; Takedoi, H.; Masuda, N.; Hashimoto, N.

    2001-12-01

    Photochemical production rate of liquid phase OH radical was measured by irradiation of artificial sunlight to water samples and then trapping of generated OH radical to benzene followed by HPLC determination of phenol, which was generated by the reaction of OH radical with benzene. Scavenging rate was also determined by similar manner through the reaction of benzene with the radical. Analytical instrument, which automatically determines the production or scavenging rate of liquid phase OH radical, was developed in this study. Four water samples per hour can be subject to the analysis using this analyzer. Using the auto analyzer of OH radical, we determined production and scavenging rates of OH radical in rain, dew, drinking water and river waters in Hiroshima Prefecture and the Seto Inland Sea waters, western Japan. Photochemical production rate of OH radical was 1 nM/h to hundreds nM/h (for summer time noon condition at 34 \\deg N) for rain, dew (formed on Teflon sheet), drinking water (natural mineral water) and seawater, whereas the rate was μ M/h levels for dew (formed on pine tree needles), river and drinking water (tap water). Major producer of aqueous OH radical was found to be fluorescent organic matter, nitrite, nitrate, and hypochlorite. Fluorescent organic matter that is composed of yet uncharacterized number of organic compounds contributed to most of OH production in rain, river and seawaters studied whereas nitrite, nitrate and hypochlorite were major contributors (ave. 99, 83 and 99%) for the radical production in dew, natural mineral water and tap water, respectively. Scavenging rate constant of OH radical in rain and dew was also estimated to be the order of 105/s and thus the lifetime of OH radical was in the order of microseconds. Assuming all the OH radicals were generated by aqueous photochemical reactions, the steady state concentration of OH radical in rain and dew was about 1\\times10-15M for both rain and dew waters. Major sink of OH

  10. Interparticle collision of natural sediment grains in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmeeckle, M.W.; Nelson, J.M.; Pitlick, J.; Bennett, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic theory and measurements of particle impacts on an inclined glass plane in water are used to investigate the mechanics of interparticle collisions in sediment-transporting flows. A collision Stokes number is proposed as a measure of the momentum of an interparticle collision versus the viscous pressure force in the interstitial gap between colliding particles. The viscous pressure force opposes motion of the particles on approach and rebound. A Stokes number of between 39 and 105 is estimated as the critical range below which particle impacts are completely viscously damped and above which impacts are partially elastic. The critical Stokes number is shown to roughly coincide with the Bagnold number transition between macroviscous and grain inertial debris flows and the transition between damped and partially elastic bed load transport saltation impacts. The nonspherical nature of natural particles significantly alters the motion of the center of mass after a partially elastic collision. The normal to the point of contact between the particles does not necessarily go through the center of mass. Thus normal rebound of the center of mass may not occur. A model of particle motion after rebound for particles of arbitrary shape, conserving both linear and angular momentum, is proposed.

  11. Superheated water extraction of glycyrrhizic acid from licorice root.

    PubMed

    Shabkhiz, Mohammad A; Eikani, Mohammad H; Bashiri Sadr, Zeinolabedin; Golmohammad, Fereshteh

    2016-11-01

    Superheated water extraction (SWE) has become an interesting green extraction method for different classes of compounds. In this study, SWE was used to extract glycyrrhizic acid (GA) from licorice root. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to evaluate and optimize the extraction conditions. The influence of operating conditions such as water temperature (100, 120 and 140°C) and solvent flow rates (1, 3 and 5mL/min) were investigated at 0.5mm mean particle size and 20bar pressure. Separation and identification of the glycyrrhizic acid, as the main component, was carried out by the RP-HPLC method. The best operating conditions for the SWE of licorice were determined to be 100°C temperature,15mL/min flow rate and 120min extraction time. The results showed that the amount of the obtained GA was relatively higher using SWE (54.760mg/g) than the Soxhlet method (28.760mg/g) and ultrasonic extraction (18.240mg/g). PMID:27211663

  12. Organic acids in cloud water and rainwater at a mountain site in acid rain areas of South China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Wang, Yan; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Xueqiao; Sun, Lei; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the chemical characteristics of organic acids and to identify their source, cloud water and rainwater samples were collected at Mount Lu, a mountain site located in the acid rain-affected area of south China, from August to September of 2011 and March to May of 2012. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentration of organic acids in cloud water was 38.42 μeq/L, ranging from 7.45 to 111.46 μeq/L, contributing to 2.50 % of acidity. In rainwater samples, organic acid concentrations varied from 12.39 to 68.97 μeq/L (VWM of 33.39 μeq/L). Organic acids contributed significant acidity to rainwater, with a value of 17.66 %. Formic acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid were the most common organic acids in both cloud water and rainwater. Organic acids had an obviously higher concentration in summer than in spring in cloud water, whereas there was much less discrimination in rainwater between the two seasons. The contribution of organic acids to acidity was lower during summer than during spring in both cloud water (2.20 % in summer vs 2.83 % in spring) and rainwater (12.24 % in summer vs 19.89 % in spring). The formic-to-acetic acid ratio (F/A) showed that organic acids were dominated by primary emissions in 71.31 % of the cloud water samples and whole rainwater samples. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis determined four factors as the sources of organic acids in cloud water, including biogenic emissions (61.8 %), anthropogenic emissions (15.28 %), marine emissions (15.07 %) and soil emissions (7.85 %). The findings from this study imply an indispensable role of organic acids in wet deposition, but organic acids may have a limited capacity to increase ecological risks in local environments. PMID:26841776

  13. Determination of humic substances in natural waters by cathodic stripping voltammetry of their complexes with iron.

    PubMed

    Laglera, Luis M; Battaglia, Gianluca; van den Berg, Constant M G

    2007-09-01

    A new voltammetric method is presented for the measurement of humic substances (HS) in natural waters. The method is based on catalytic cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) and makes use of adsorptive properties of iron-HS complexes on the mercury drop electrode at natural pH. A fulvic acid standard (IHSS) was used to confirm the voltammetric response (peak potential and sensitivity) for the HS for natural water samples. Optimized conditions included the linear-sweep mode, deposition at -0.1 V, pH buffered at 8 and a scan rate of 50 mV s(-1). At a deposition time of 240 s in the presence of 10 nM iron and 30 mM bromate, the detection limit was 5 microg L(-1) HS in seawater, which could be lowered further by an increase in the bromate concentration, or in the adsorption time. The method was used to determine HS in the Irish Sea which were found to occur at levels between 60 and 600 microg L(-1). The new method is sufficiently sensitive to detect the low HS content in oceanic samples and has implications to the study of iron speciation. PMID:17765064

  14. Tracking the morphology of fulvic acids during water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenay, Veronika; Krepelova, Adela; Rudich, Yinon; Huthwelker, Thomas; Ammann, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric humic like substances (HULIS) denote a range of oxidized, polyfunctional organic aerosol components widespread in the atmosphere, which show similar extraction behaviour on exchange columns as humic substances. Stemming from oxidation of primary gas phase and particulate organics, from e.g. biomass burning events, the HULIS constitute to a major fraction of the water soluble organic aerosol components in the atmosphere. Highly oxidized organic compounds play an important role in atmospheric processes like cloud formation or modification. Important factors therein are their hygroscopic properties and their microstructure, which influences their optical properties. HULIS somewhat resemble humic substances from terrestrial and aquatic sources, which consist mainly of carboxylic, aromatic and phenolic moieties assembled into hydrogen and van der Waals bonded supermolecular structures. Hence, the Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA), a chemically well characterized fulvic acid obtained from the International Humic Substances Society, was used to obtain combined data on hygroscopic properties and microstructural evolution during water uptake. The measurements were performed using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS, near edge x-ray absorption fine structure) in combination with an x-ray microscope (STXM, scanning x-ray transmission microscope) with a spatial resolution of about 30 nm. The measurements were performed at the PolLux beamline (SLS, Paul Scherrer Institut). The NEXAFS spectroscopy provides the possibility to map important chemical functional groups of carbon (as the one mentioned above) and oxygen atoms, and also to quantify the amount of carbon and oxygen atoms. To follow the submicron structure during water uptake a new device - a microreactor - was developed for the STXM. Using this reactor, the samples could be kept in a microenvironment with controlled temperature and humidity from 0 to 95 %. The samples were deposited either as droplets with

  15. Physical and chemical effects of biochar on natural and artificial water repellent soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallin, Ingrid; Douglas, Peter; Doerr, Stefan H.; Bryant, Rob; Matthews, Ian; Charbonneau, Cecile

    2014-05-01

    Water repellency (WR) affects soils worldwide. Hydrophobic compounds accumulate in soil through organic matter decomposition, microbial activity, condensation of organic compounds during vegetation fires, or through anthropogenic impacts such as oil spills. WR hinders vegetation establishment, which can lead to soil erosion and increased runoff. Biochar is currently being evaluated for its potential to increase soil carbon and as a soil amendment. To date, the effect of biochar on water repellent soils has remained largely undetermined. This study considered the potential of biochar as both a physical and chemical amendment for water repellent soils by asking two questions: does adding biochar reduce the observed degree of soil water repellency; and does biochar remove hydrophobic compounds from soil? The potential of biochar as a physical amendment to water repellent soils was evaluated by mixing 5, 10, 25 and 40% (by weight) each of coarse and fine ground biochar with two naturally water repellent soils and measuring the water drop penetration time (WDPT) for each mixture. Biochar particles beyond the range of existing soil particle diameters increased WDPT variability, which could be explained by increased surface roughness and the resulting enhancement of water repellency effects through Cassie-Baxter interactions. Overall, fine biochar was more effective at reducing water repellency: 25% w/w rendered both soils studied wettable. Removal of hydrophobic compounds by biochar was tested by mixing 1, 5, 10, 25 and 40% biochar with acid washed sand (AWS) coated with 1.2x10-5 mol octadecane and octadecanoic acid (per gram AWS, which corresponds to approximately 50 monolayers hydrophobic compound per gram AWS). Each mix stood for 1 to 30 days in a solution of pH 3, 6 or 9 before the AWS was extracted and the quantity of hydrophobic compound remaining determined by infrared spectroscopy and/or gas chromatography. Biochar successfully removed the hydrophobic compounds

  16. Microbial Dissimilatory Sulfur Cycle in Acid Mine Water

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Jon H.; Dugan, Patrick R.; Macmillan, Carol B.; Randles, Chester I.

    1969-01-01

    Ferric, sulfate, and hydrogen ions are produced from pyritic minerals associated with coal as a result of autotrophic bacterial metabolism. Water carrying these ions accumulated behind a porous dam composed of wood dust originating at a log-cutting mill. As water seeped through the porous dam, it was enriched in organic nutrients which then supported growth and metabolism of heterotrophic bacteria in the water downstream from the dam. The heterotrophic microflora within and below the sawdust dam included dissimilatory sulfate-reducing anaerobic bacteria which reduce sulfate to sulfide. The sulfide produced caused the chemical reduction of ferric to ferrous ion, and black FeS precipitate was deposited on the pond bottom. A net increase in the pH of the lower pond water was observed when compared to the upper pond water. Microbial activity in the wood dust was demonstrated, and a sequence of cellulose degradation processes was inferred on the basis of sugar accumulation in mixed cultures in the laboratory, ultimately yielding fermentation products which serve as nutrients for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Some of the microorganisms were isolated and characterized. The biochemical and growth characteristics of pure culture isolates were generally consistent with observed reactions in the acidic environment, with the exception of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Mixed cultures which contained sulfate-reducing bacteria reduced sulfate at pH 3.0 in the laboratory with sawdust as the only nutrient. Pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria isolated from the mixed cultures did not reduce sulfate below pH 5.5. PMID:5773013

  17. Solar Inactivation of Enterococci and Escherichia coli in Natural Waters: Effects of Water Absorbance and Depth.

    PubMed

    Maraccini, Peter A; Mattioli, Mia Catharine M; Sassoubre, Lauren M; Cao, Yiping; Griffith, John F; Ervin, Jared S; Van De Werfhorst, Laurie C; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2016-05-17

    The decay of sewage-sourced Escherichia coli and enterococci was measured at multiple depths in a freshwater marsh, a brackish water lagoon, and a marine site, all located in California. The marine site had very clear water, while the waters from the marsh and lagoon contained colored dissolved organic matter that not only blocked light but also produced reactive oxygen species. First order decay rate constants of both enterococci and E. coli were between 1 and 2 d(-1) under low light conditions and as high as 6 d(-1) under high light conditions. First order decay rate constants were well correlated to the daily average UVB light intensity corrected for light screening incorporating water absorbance and depth, suggesting endogenous photoinactivation is a major pathway for bacterial decay. Additional laboratory experiments demonstrated the presence of colored dissolved organic matter in marsh water enhanced photoinactivation of a laboratory strain of Enterococcus faecalis, but depressed photoinactivation of sewage-sourced enterococci and E. coli after correcting for UVB light screening, suggesting that although the exogenous indirect photoinactivation mechanism may be active against Ent. faecalis, it is not for the sewage-source organisms. A simple linear regression model based on UVB light intensity appears to be a useful tool for predicting inactivation rate constants in natural waters of any depth and absorbance. PMID:27119980

  18. Theoretical considerations and a simple method for measuring alkalinity and acidity in low-pH waters by gran titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, J.L.; Johnsson, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Titrations for alkalinity and acidity using the technique described by Gran (1952, Determination of the equivalence point in potentiometric titrations, Part II: The Analyst, v. 77, p. 661-671) have been employed in the analysis of low-pH natural waters. This report includes a synopsis of the theory and calculations associated with Gran's technique and presents a simple and inexpensive method for performing alkalinity and acidity determinations. However, potential sources of error introduced by the chemical character of some waters may limit the utility of Gran's technique. Therefore, the cost- and time-efficient method for performing alkalinity and acidity determinations described in this report is useful for exploring the suitability of Gran's technique in studies of water chemistry.

  19. Monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products inhibit follicle growth and steroidogenesis in mouse ovarian antral follicles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Clara H; Gao, Liying; Dettro, Tyler; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Ricke, William A; Plewa, Michael J; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-07-01

    Water disinfection greatly reduced the incidence of waterborne diseases, but the reaction between disinfectants and natural organic matter in water leads to the formation of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). DBPs have been shown to be toxic, but their effects on the ovary are not well defined. This study tested the hypothesis that monohalogenated DBPs (chloroacetic acid, CAA; bromoacetic acid, BAA; iodoacetic acid, IAA) inhibit antral follicle growth and steroidogenesis in mouse ovarian follicles. Antral follicles were isolated and cultured with either vehicle or DBPs (0.25-1.00mM of CAA; 2-15μM of BAA or IAA) for 48 and 96h. Follicle growth was measured every 24h and the media were analyzed for estradiol levels at 96h. Exposure to DBPs significantly inhibited antral follicle growth and reduced estradiol levels compared to controls. These data demonstrate that DBP exposure caused ovarian toxicity in vitro. PMID:27151372

  20. Arachidonic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Metabolism in Juvenile Atlantic Salmon as Affected by Water Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Norambuena, Fernando; Morais, Sofia; Emery, James A.; Turchini, Giovanni M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmons raised in aquaculture farms around the world are increasingly subjected to sub-optimal environmental conditions, such as high water temperatures during summer seasons. Aerobic scope increases and lipid metabolism changes are known plasticity responses of fish for a better acclimation to high water temperature. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of high water temperature on the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic salmon fed different dietary ARA/EPA ratios (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6/ eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3), with particular focus on apparent in vivo enzyme activities and gene expression of lipid metabolism pathways. Three experimental diets were formulated to be identical, except for the ratio EPA/ARA, and fed to triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) kept either at 10°C or 20°C. Results showed that fatty acid metabolic utilisation, and likely also their dietary requirements for optimal performance, can be affected by changes in their relative levels and by environmental temperature in Atlantic salmon. Thus, the increase in temperature, independently from dietary treatment, had a significant effect on the β-oxidation of a fatty acid including EPA, as observed by the apparent in vivo enzyme activity and mRNA expression of pparα -transcription factor in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation genes- and cpt1 -key enzyme responsible for the movement of LC-PUFA from the cytosol into the mitochondria for β-oxidation-, were both increased at the higher water temperature. An interesting interaction was observed in the transcription and in vivo enzyme activity of Δ5fad–time-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of EPA and ARA. Such, at lower temperature, the highest mRNA expression and enzyme activity was recorded in fish with limited supply of dietary EPA, whereas at higher temperature these were recorded in fish with limited ARA supply. In consideration that fish at higher water temperature

  1. Feeding natural hydrophilic bile acids inhibits intestinal cholesterol absorption: studies in the gallstone-susceptible mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, David Q-H; Tazuma, Susumu; Cohen, David E; Carey, Martin C

    2003-09-01

    We explored the influence of the hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of a series of natural bile acids on cholesterol absorption in the mouse. Male C57L/J mice were fed standard chow or chow supplemented with 0.5% cholic; chenodeoxycholic; deoxycholic; dehydrocholic; hyocholic; hyodeoxycholic; alpha-, beta-, or omega-muricholic; ursocholic; or ursodeoxycholic acids for 7 days. Biliary bile salts were measured by reverse-phase HPLC, and hydrophobicity indices were estimated by Heuman's method. Cholesterol absorption efficiency was determined by a plasma dual-isotope ratio method. In mice fed chow, natural proportions of tauro-beta-muricholate (42 +/- 6%) and taurocholate (50 +/- 7%) with a hydrophobicity index of -0.35 +/- 0.04 produced cholesterol absorption of 37 +/- 5%. Because bacterial and especially hepatic biotransformations of specific bile acids occurred, hydrophobicity indices of the resultant bile salt pools differed from fed bile acids. We observed a significant positive correlation between hydrophobicity indices of the bile salt pool and percent cholesterol absorption. The principal mechanism whereby hydrophilic bile acids inhibit cholesterol absorption appears to be diminution of intraluminal micellar cholesterol solubilization. Gene expression of intestinal sterol efflux transporters Abcg5 and Abcg8 was upregulated by feeding cholic acid but not by hydrophilic beta-muricholic acid nor by hydrophobic deoxycholic acid. We conclude that the hydrophobicity of the bile salt pool predicts the effects of individual fed bile acids on intestinal cholesterol absorption. Natural alpha- and beta-muricholic acids are the most powerful inhibitors of cholesterol absorption in mice and might act as potent cholesterol-lowering agents for prevention of cholesterol deposition diseases in humans. PMID:12748061

  2. Continuous microcellular foaming of polylactic acid/natural fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Acosta, Carlos A.

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA), a biodegradable thermoplastic derived from renewable resources, stands out as a substitute to petroleum-based plastics. In spite of its excellent properties, commercial applications are limited because PLA is more expensive and more brittle than traditional petroleum-based resins. PLA can be blended with cellulosic fibers to reduce material cost. However, the lowered cost comes at the expense of flexibility and impact strength, which can be enhanced through the production of microcellular structures in the composite. Microcellular foaming uses inert gases (e.g., carbon dioxide) as physical blowing agents to make cellular structures with bubble sizes of less than 10 microm and cell-population densities (number of bubbles per unit volume) greater than 109 cells/cm³. These unique characteristics result in a significant increase in toughness and elongation at break (ductility) compared with unfoamed parts because the presence of small bubbles can blunt the crack-tips increasing the energy needed to propagate the crack. Microcellular foams have been produced through a two step batch process. First, large amounts of gas are dissolved in the solid plastic under high pressure (sorption process) to form a single-phase solution. Second, a thermodynamic instability (sudden drop in solubility) triggers cell nucleation and growth as the gas diffuses out of the plastic. Batch production of microcellular PLA has addressed some of the drawbacks of PLA. Unfortunately, the batch foaming process is not likely to be implemented in the industrial production of foams because it is not cost-effective. This study investigated the continuous microcellular foaming process of PLA and PLA/wood-fiber composites. The effects of the processing temperature and material compositions on the melt viscosity, pressure drop rate, and cell-population density were examined in order to understand the nucleation mechanisms in neat and filled PLA foams. The results indicated that

  3. The Imbalance of Water in Nature as System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, V. A.; Imbalance of Water in Nature

    2011-12-01

    will not be obtained any reliable results. For example, the real water arrival occurs in the modes of imbalances such as increasing or decreasing. Water departure also is some set of the several imbalance increase and decrease types. The processes with various orientations interact between each other and reinforce or depress the conjoint effect. This creates some unstable situation, which are not visible by the balanced approach. Therefore some natural disasters actually are coming as unexpected. But in really there are some consequences of the methodological blindness. The Nature is unstable. The imbalance is the main state of the Nature. But mankind does not yet have adequate tools to describing imbalance as it is. In generally now is used more or less successful extrapolation and interpolation of the balance logic. But this is not enough now. So we tried to sharpen here the importance of the works with the imbalance directly.

  4. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound. PMID:27226531

  5. Naturally occurring amino acid derivatives with herbicidal, fungicidal or insecticidal activity.

    PubMed

    Lamberth, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    Several naturally occurring amino acid derivatives display significant activities against weeds, fungi and insects: some of them have been even commercialized and are applied as crop protection agents. The 53 most important amino acid natural products with such efficacy are presented in this review together with their natural source, mode of action and biological activity. The diversity of the manifold bacterial, fungal and plantal sources of these compounds is impressive as well as their completely different structural scaffolds, ranging from cyclopeptides via unique non-proteinogenic amino acids to peptidyl nucleosides, the broad range of target enzymes from several different biochemical pathways, which they inhibit and also the plethora of different weeds, fungi and insects they are able to control. PMID:26801938

  6. Biodecontamination of water from bisphenol A using ligninolytic fungi and the modulation role of humic acids.

    PubMed

    Loffredo, Elisabetta; Traversa, Andreina; Senesi, Nicola

    2012-05-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) of xenobiotic origin occurring in natural waters and wastewaters, especially in the most industrialized and urbanized areas. Recent investigations report the use of ligninolytic fungi for the removal of aromatic contaminants, including some EDCs, from different matrices. Humic acids (HA) are widely spread in all natural systems and their presence is ascertained to interfere with microbial growth and activity. The objective of this study was to assess the capacity of three ligninolytic fungi, Trametes versicolor, Stereum hirsutum and Pleurotus ostreatus, to remove BPA at the concentration of 4.6 mg L(-1) from water. Fungal growth on potato dextrose agar (PDA), in the absence and in the presence of a leonardite HA or a green compost HA, was evaluated during the biodecontamination process. The methodological approach adopted in this study excluded the presence of the mycelium in the contaminated water. Results obtained evidenced a relevant removal of BPA by any fungus when PDA only was used as growing medium. The addition of leonardite HA and compost HA stimulated the mycelial growth of any fungus, especially T. versicolor, and significantly enhanced the removal of the contaminant from water by, respectively, T. versicolor only and T. versicolor and S. hirsutum. PMID:22305120

  7. Effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, E.; Daase, M.; Schulz, K. G.; Stuhr, A.; Riebesell, U.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community in the Arctic was studied in a large-scale mesocosm experiment, carried out in Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway) at 79° N. Nine mesocosms of ~50 cbm each were exposed to different pCO2 levels (from natural background conditions to ~1420 μatm), yielding pH values (on the total scale) from ~8.3 to 7.5. Inorganic nutrients were added on day 13. The phytoplankton development during this 30 days experiment passed three distinct phases: (1) prior to the addition of inorganic nutrients, (2) first bloom after nutrient addition, and (3) second bloom after nutrient addition. The fatty acid composition of the natural plankton community was analysed and showed, in general, high percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): 44-60% of total fatty acids. Positive correlations with pCO2 were found for most PUFAs during phases 2 and/or 3, with the exception of 20:5n3 (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA), an important diatom marker. There are strong indications for these correlations being mediated indirectly through taxonomic changes and the natural development of the communities in the mesocosms exposed to different pCO2 levels. While diatoms increased during phase 3 mainly in the low and intermediate pCO2 treatments, dinoflagellates were favoured by high CO2 concentrations during the same time period. This is reflected in the development of group-specific fatty acid trophic markers. No indications were found for a generally detrimental effect of ocean acidification on the planktonic food quality in terms of essential fatty acids. The significant positive correlations between most PUFAs and pCO2 reflected treatment-dependent differences in the community composition between the mesocosms rather than a direct positive effect of pCO2 on specific fatty acids.

  8. Effects of acid precipitation and natural processes on cation leaching from four diverse forest ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Van Miegroet, H.; Cole, D.W.; Richter, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Four forest ecosystems (two in eastern Tennessee and two in western Washington) with a history of intensive nutrient cycling research were selected for studies on the effects of acid precipitation and natural acid production processes on cation leaching rates. At the Tennessee sites, atmospheric acid input in bulk precipitation equaled or exceeded natural leaching by carbonic acid. At the less polluted Washington sites, natural leaching by carbonic acid was slightly larger than atmospheric acid input in the Douglas-fir soil. In the red alder soil, natural nitric acid formation far exceeded atmospheric acid inputs and appeared to have caused significant acidification of both soil and soil solution. The mobility of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ in these four soils was a major factor in their relative susceptibilities to leaching by H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and HNO/sub 3/ entering from the atmosphere. In two of the sites (chestnut oak in Tennessee and red alder in Washington), SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ adsorption reduced the potential for sulfate-mediated leaching by H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ by as much as one-half. Biological immobilization of NO/sub 3//sup -/ prevented leaching in all but the N-fixing red alder site. Both field and laboratory soil column studies involving artificial additions of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ verified the concept that cation leaching is controlled by the mobility of the associated anion.

  9. Chemical speciation and adsorption behavior of plutonium in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    Dissolved Pu profiles in two partially anoxic basins--Saanich Inlet, an intermittently anoxic marine fiord in Vancouver Island, British Columbia, and Soap Lake, a saline, alkaline lake in eastern Washington state, revealed minimum concentrations at the O/sub 2//H/sub 2/S interface. The Pu concentrations in the anoxic waters of Saanich Inlet were less than the surface concentrations; however, in Soap Lake, a 15- to 50-fold increase in Pu concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion correlated with large increases in the major ions, total alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon. Laboratory experiments were designed to investigate the effects of pH, ionic strength, dissolved organic carbon, and carbonate ions on the adsorption of tracer amounts of Pu IV and Pu V. The Pu-goethite adsorption system provided the data base for developing a thermodynamic model of Pu interaction with an oxide surface and with dissolved ligands, using the MINEQL computer program. Pu IV and Pu V interacted very differently with goethite, which is consistent with their different hydrolytic character. A reduction of Pu V to Pu IV occurred on the goethite surface and also on montmorillonite and silica gel, suggesting that redox transformations are an important aspect of Pu adsorption. Increases in ionic strength (up to 3 M NaCl or NaNO/sub 3/) did not affect Pu IV or V adsorption. In the presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Pu V reduction to Pu IV occurred in solution. Pu IV adsorption on goethite decreased only 30% in the presence of 240 ppm of natural DOC from Soap Lake; however, carbonate anions inhibited Pu IV adsorption on goethite at the alkalinity levels (1500 meq/L total alkalinity, 0.57 M CO/sub 3/=) measured for Soap Lake monimolimnion waters.

  10. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo- prope...

  11. OCCURRENCE AND TOXICITY OF IODO-ACID DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo...

  12. OCCURRENCE AND TOXICITY OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DBPS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  13. Effects of natural phenolic compounds on the antioxidant activity of lactoferrin in liposomes and oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Medina, Isabel; Tombo, Isabel; Satué-Gracia, M Teresa; German, J Bruce; Frankel, Edwin N

    2002-04-10

    The effect of natural phenolic compounds on the antioxidant and prooxidant activity of lactoferrin was studied in liposomes and oil-in-water emulsions containing iron. The antioxidants tested with lactoferrin were alpha-tocopherol, ferulic acid, coumaric acid, tyrosol, and natural phenolic extracts obtained from three different extra-virgin olive oils and olive mill wastewater. The natural extracts of olive oils and mill wastewaters were composed mainly of polyphenols and simple phenolics, respectively. Lipid oxidation at 30 degrees C was determined by the formation of hydroperoxides and fluorescent compounds resulting from oxidized lipid interactions. All phenolic compounds showed synergistic properties in reinforcing the antioxidant activity of lactoferrin in lipid systems containing iron. The highest synergistic effects were observed for the phenolic extracts rich in polyphenols of extra-virgin olive oils and lactoferrin. This synergistic effect was higher in liposomes than in emulsions. PMID:11929302

  14. Shear rigidity of spread stearic acid monolayers on water

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.; Ketterson, J.B.; Miyano, K.; Kueny, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of Al/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and of pH on the two-dimensional shear modulus of stearic acid spread on a water substrate was determined. A large shear modulus was displayed by the films when the subphase contained Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ ions at the self buffered pH. With Fe/sup 3 +/ dissolved in the subphase, the film displayed a viscous relaxation when strained but no residual stress was observed. No effect was observed with the Ca/sup 2 +/ or Mg/sup 2 +/. Reducing the pH value in the subphase with the trivalent ions caused the shear modulus to disappear. The observations are interpreted in terms of hydrogen bonding.

  15. [Study advance on haloacetic acids in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Ye, Bi-Xiong; Wang, Wu-Yi; Yang, Lin-Sheng; Wang, Yong-Hua

    2006-05-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) in drinking water have attracted more and more attention of researchers due to their higher potential combination of chlorine, their carcinogenic and mutagenic effects and higher carcinogenic. The formation mechanism, analytical methods, the effects of many factors on HAAs formation such as precursor types, chlorine doses, pH, temperature, bromide, reaction time and seasonal change, toxicological character and the minimizing technology of HAAs in resent studies about HAAs are discussed in details in this paper. Further researches are still needed to clarify the formation mechanism of HAAs and find a feasible minimizing technology. New concerns including toxicological characters that correlate with human and other HAAs exposure routes besides oral ingestion (i.e., inhalation and dermal adsorption) should be put forward. PMID:16921773

  16. Engineering crassulacean acid metabolism to improve water-use efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Anne M.; Hartwell, James; Weston, David J.; Schlauch, Karen A.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Climatic extremes threaten agricultural sustainability worldwide. One approach to increase plant water-use efficiency is to introduce crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) into C3 crops. Such a task requires comprehensive systems-level understanding of the enzymatic and regulatory pathways underpinning this temporal CO2 pump. Here, we review the progress that has been made in achieving this goal. Given that CAM arose through multiple independent evolutionary origins, comparative transcriptomics and genomics of taxonomically diverse CAM species are being used to define the genetic ‘parts list’ required to operate the core CAM functional modules of nocturnal carboxylation, daytime decarboxylation, and inverse stomatal regulation. Engineered CAM offers the potential to sustain plant productivity for food, feed, fiber, and biofuel production in hotter and drier climates. PMID:24559590

  17. Engineering crassulacean acid metabolism to improve water-use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Borland, Anne M; Hartwell, James; Weston, David J; Schlauch, Karen A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C

    2014-05-01

    Climatic extremes threaten agricultural sustainability worldwide. One approach to increase plant water-use efficiency (WUE) is to introduce crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) into C3 crops. Such a task requires comprehensive systems-level understanding of the enzymatic and regulatory pathways underpinning this temporal CO2 pump. Here we review the progress that has been made in achieving this goal. Given that CAM arose through multiple independent evolutionary origins, comparative transcriptomics and genomics of taxonomically diverse CAM species are being used to define the genetic 'parts list' required to operate the core CAM functional modules of nocturnal carboxylation, diurnal decarboxylation, and inverse stomatal regulation. Engineered CAM offers the potential to sustain plant productivity for food, feed, fiber, and biofuel production in hotter and drier climates. PMID:24559590

  18. Study on the kinetics and transformation products of salicylic acid in water via ozonation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruikang; Zhang, Lifeng; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-06-01

    As salicylic acid is one of widely used pharmaceuticals, its residue has been found in various environmental water systems e.g. wastewater, surface water, treated water and drinking water. It has been reported that salicylic acid can be efficiently removed by advanced oxidation processes, but there are few studies on its transformation products and ozonation mechanisms during ozonation process. The objective of this study is to characterize the transformation products, investigate the degradation mechanisms at different pH, and propose the ozonation pathways of salicylic acid. The results showed that the rate of degradation was about 10 times higher at acidic condition than that at alkaline condition in the first 1 min when 1 mg L(-1) of ozone solution was added into 1 mg L(-1) of salicylic acid solution. It was proposed that ozone direct oxidation mechanism dominates at acidic condition, while indirect OH radical mechanism dominates at alkaline condition. A two stages pseudo-first order reaction was proposed at different pH conditions. Various hydroxylation products, carbonyl compounds and carboxylic acids, such as 2,5-dihydroxylbenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxylbenzoic acid, catechol, formaldehyde, glyoxal, acetaldehyde, maleic acid, acetic acid and oxalic acid etc. were identified as ozonation transformation products. In addition, acrylic acid was identified, for the first time, as ozonation transformation products through high resolution liquid chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometer. The information demonstrated in this study will help us to better understand the possible effects of ozonation products on the water quality. The degradation pathways of salicylic acid by ozonation in water sample were proposed. As both O3 and OH radical were important in the reactions, the degradation pathways of salicylic acid by ozonation in water sample were proposed at acidic and basic conditions. To our knowledge, there was no integrated study reported on the ozonation of

  19. Methods of refining and producing dibasic esters and acids from natural oil feedstocks

    DOEpatents

    Snead, Thomas E.; Cohen, Steven A.; Gildon, Demond L.

    2016-06-14

    Methods and systems for making dibasic esters and/or dibasic acids using metathesis are generally disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods comprise reacting a terminal olefin ester with an internal olefin ester in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a dibasic ester and/or dibasic acid. In some embodiments, the terminal olefin ester or the internal olefin ester are derived from a renewable feedstock, such as a natural oil feedstock. In some such embodiments, the natural oil feedstock, or a transesterified derivative thereof, is metathesized to make the terminal olefin ester or the internal olefin ester.

  20. Proton and aluminum binding properties of organic acids in surface waters of the northeastern U.S.

    PubMed

    Fakhraei, Habibollah; Driscoll, Charles T

    2015-03-01

    A variety of mathematical estimators have been used to quantify the degree of protonation of naturally occurring organic acids. These estimators range from monoprotic, diprotic, and triprotic analog models to the discrete and continuous (Gaussian) distributions of a single proton binding-dissociation. Natural water samples from two long-term monitoring programs in the northeastern U.S. were used to quantify proton- and aluminum-binding properties of naturally occurring organic matter. Water chemistry observations were clustered into 0.05 pH intervals (over 3.75-7.35 pH range) and fit to a triprotic analog model. The model optimization indicates that about 5% of dissolved organic carbon participates in ion binding, and organic acids are composed of both strong and weak acids (i.e., pKa1 = 2.54, pKa2 = 6.19, and pKa3 = 7.52 for Adirondack samples). Binding between organic acids and aluminum can substantially influence the acid behavior of dissolved organic matter and the availability of the toxic form of aluminum (i.e., inorganic monomeric aluminum). PMID:25625501

  1. Alicyclobacillus fodiniaquatilis sp. nov., isolated from acid mine water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wu, Yu-Fan; Song, Jin-Long; Huang, Zhong-Sheng; Wang, Bao-Jun; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Jiang, Cheng-Ying

    2015-12-01

    Two novel, Gram-stain-variable, moderately thermophilic, acidophilic, rod-shaped, endospore-forming bacteria, G45-16T and G45-17, were isolated from acid mine water of Zijin copper mine in Fujian Province, China. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that they were closely related to Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris ATCC 49025T with sequence similarities of 96.8 %. Cells grew aerobically at 20-45 °C (optimum, 40 °C), at pH 2.5-5.5(optimum, pH 3.5) and in the presence of 0-4.0 % (w/v) NaCl. Strains contained MK-7 as the major menaquinone and the major cellular fatty acids were ω-cyclohexane C19 : 0 and ω-cyclohexane C17 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 51.3 and 49.8 mol% (Tm) for G45-16T and G45-17, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic comparisons with their relatives and DNA-DNA relatedness values, it is concluded that strains G45-16T and G45-17 represent a novel species within the genus Alicyclobacillus, for which the name Alicyclobacillus fodiniaquatilis sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is G45-16T(=CGMCC 1.15049T=NBRC 111483T). PMID:26476812

  2. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids: A new class of organic micropollutants in the water cycle.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Daniel; Frömel, Tobias; Knepper, Thomas P

    2016-09-15

    Mobile and persistent organic micropollutants may impact raw and drinking waters and are thus of concern for human health. To identify such possible substances of concern nineteen water samples from five European countries (France, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Spain and Germany) and different compartments of the water cycle (urban effluent, surface water, ground water and drinking water) were enriched with mixed-mode solid phase extraction. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry non-target screening of these samples led to the detection and structural elucidation of seven novel organic micropollutants. One structure could already be confirmed by a reference standard (trifluoromethanesulfonic acid) and six were tentatively identified based on experimental evidence (chloromethanesulfonic acid, dichloromethanesulfonic acid, trichloromethanesulfonic acid, bromomethanesulfonic acid, dibromomethanesulfonic acid and bromochloromethanesulfonic acid). Approximated concentrations for these substances show that trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, a chemical registered under the European Union regulation REACH with a production volume of more than 100 t/a, is able to spread along the water cycle and may be present in concentrations up to the μg/L range. Chlorinated and brominated methanesulfonic acids were predominantly detected together which indicates a common source and first experimental evidence points towards water disinfection as a potential origin. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids were detected in drinking waters and thus may be new substances of concern. PMID:27267477

  3. Stability of fluoride complex with silica and its distribution in natural water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberson, C.E.; Barnes, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoride reacts with silicic acid to form SiF2-6. A fluoride electrode was used to obtain an equilibrium constant of 1030.18 for the reaction:Si(OH) 0 6 + 6F-+4H+ = SiF 2- 6 + 4H2O at 25??C. Although there may be some experimental evidence for existence of traces of species containing less than six F- ions per silicon (n = 6), the species SiF2-6 predominates for n values from about 0.1 to 6. Silicic-acid complexing with fluoride is important only in solutions which have rather low pH and low concentrations of other cations which compete with silicon for fluoride. Computations for cold volcanic condensates from Hawaii indicate that for some samples much of the silicon is complexed by fluoride as SiF2-6. However, in most cooled acidic natural water samples Al and Fe are more important than Si in complexing fluoride. ?? 1978.

  4. The coagulation characteristics of humic acid by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and chitosan coagulant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Wu, Chung-Yu; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a potential substitute for traditional aluminium salts in water treatment systems. This study compared the characteristics of humic acid (HA) removal by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and coagulant mixtures of chitosan with aluminium sulphate (alum) or polyaluminium chloride (PACl). In addition, we evaluated their respective coagulation efficiencies at various coagulant concentrations, pH values, turbidities, and hardness levels. Furthermore, we determined the size and settling velocity of flocs formed by these coagulants to identify the major factors affecting HA coagulation. The coagulation efficiency of acid- and water-soluble chitosan for 15 mg/l of HA was 74.4% and 87.5%, respectively. The optimal coagulation range of water-soluble chitosan (9-20 mg/l) was broader than that of acid-soluble chitosan (4-8 mg/l). Notably, acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum coagulant mixtures exhibited a higher coagulation efficiency for HA than for PACl or alum alone. Furthermore, these coagulant mixtures yielded an acceptable floc settling velocity and savings in both installation and operational expenses. Based on these results, we confidently assert that coagulant mixtures with a 1:1 mass ratio of acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum provide a substantially more cost-effective alternative to using chitosan alone for removing HA from water. PMID:25362971

  5. Natural ligand binding and transfer from liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) to membranes.

    PubMed

    De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Hagan, Robert M; Wilton, David C; Córsico, Betina

    2010-09-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is distinctive among fatty acid-binding proteins because it binds more than one molecule of long-chain fatty acid and a variety of diverse ligands. Also, the transfer of fluorescent fatty acid analogues to model membranes under physiological ionic strength follows a different mechanism compared to most of the members of this family of intracellular lipid binding proteins. Tryptophan insertion mutants sensitive to ligand binding have allowed us to directly measure the binding affinity, ligand partitioning and transfer to model membranes of natural ligands. Binding of fatty acids shows a cooperative mechanism, while acyl-CoAs binding presents a hyperbolic behavior. Saturated fatty acids seem to have a stronger partition to protein vs. membranes, compared to unsaturated fatty acids. Natural ligand transfer rates are more than 200-fold higher compared to fluorescently-labeled analogues. Interestingly, oleoyl-CoA presents a markedly different transfer behavior compared to the rest of the ligands tested, probably indicating the possibility of specific targeting of ligands to different metabolic fates. PMID:20541621

  6. Amino Acid and Protein Metabolism in Bermuda Grass During Water Stress 12

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, N. M.; Naylor, A. W.

    1966-01-01

    The ability of Arizona Common and Coastal Bermuda grass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] to synthesize amino acids and proteins during water stress was investigated. Amino acids were continually synthesized during the water stress treatments, but protein synthesis was inhibited and protein levels decreased. Water stress induced a 10- to 100-fold accumulation of free proline in shoots and a 2- to 6-fold accumulation of free asparagine, both of which are characteristic responses of water-stressed plants. Valine levels increased, and glutamic acid and alanine levels decreased. 14C labeling experiments showed that free proline turns over more slowly than any other free amino acid during water stress. This proline is readily synthesized and accumulated from glutamic acid. It is suggested that during water stress free proline functions as a storage compound. No significant differences were found in the amino acid and protein metabolism of the 2 varieties of Bermuda grass. PMID:16656387

  7. Encapsulation of ω-3 fatty acids in nanoemulsion-based delivery systems fabricated from natural emulsifiers: Sunflower phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Komaiko, Jennifer; Sastrosubroto, Ashtri; McClements, David Julian

    2016-07-15

    Nanoemulsions have considerable potential for encapsulating and delivering ω-3 fatty acids, but they are typically fabricated from synthetic surfactants. This study shows that fish oil-in-water nanoemulsions can be formed from sunflower phospholipids, which have advantages for food applications because they have low allergenicity and do not come from genetically modified organisms. Nanoemulsions containing small droplets (d<150 nm) could be produced using microfluidization, by optimizing phospholipid type and concentration, with the smallest droplets being formed at high phosphatidylcholine levels and at surfactant-to-oil ratios exceeding unity. The physical stability of the nanoemulsions was mainly attributed to electrostatic repulsion, with droplet aggregation occurring at low pH values (low charge magnitude) and at high ionic strengths (electrostatic screening). These results suggest that sunflower phospholipids may be a viable natural emulsifier to deliver ω-3 fatty acids into food and beverage products. PMID:26948622

  8. Water-enhanced solubility of carboxylic acids in organic solvents and its applications to extraction processes

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, J.N.; King, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    The solubilities of carboxylic acids in certain organic solvents increase remarkably with an increasing amount of water in the organic phase. This phenomenon leads to a novel extract regeneration process in which the co-extracted water is selectively removed from an extract, and the carboxylic acid precipitates. This approach is potentially advantageous compared to other regeneration processes because it removes a minor component of the extract in order to achieve a large recovery of acid from the extract. Carboxylic acids of interest include adipic acid, fumaric acid, and succinic acid because of their low to moderate solubilities in organic solvents. Solvents were screened for an increase in acid solubility with increased water concentration in the organic phase. Most Lewis-base solvents were found to exhibit this increased solubility phenomena. Solvents that have a carbonyl functional group showed a very large increase in acid solubility. 71 refs., 52 figs., 38 tabs.

  9. Miniaturized and direct spectrophotometric multi-sample analysis of trace metals in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Albendín, Gemma; López-López, José A; Pinto, Juan J

    2016-03-15

    Trends in the analysis of trace metals in natural waters are mainly based on the development of sample treatment methods to isolate and pre-concentrate the metal from the matrix in a simpler extract for further instrumental analysis. However, direct analysis is often possible using more accessible techniques such as spectrophotometry. In this case a proper ligand is required to form a complex that absorbs radiation in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrum. In this sense, the hydrazone derivative, di-2-pyridylketone benzoylhydrazone (dPKBH), forms complexes with copper (Cu) and vanadium (V) that absorb light at 370 and 395 nm, respectively. Although spectrophotometric methods are considered as time- and reagent-consuming, this work focused on its miniaturization by reducing the volume of sample as well as time and cost of analysis. In both methods, a micro-amount of sample is placed into a microplate reader with a capacity for 96 samples, which can be analyzed in times ranging from 5 to 10 min. The proposed methods have been optimized using a Box-Behnken design of experiments. For Cu determination, concentration of phosphate buffer solution at pH 8.33, masking agents (ammonium fluoride and sodium citrate), and dPKBH were optimized. For V analysis, sample (pH 4.5) was obtained using acetic acid/sodium acetate buffer, and masking agents were ammonium fluoride and 1,2-cyclohexanediaminetetraacetic acid. Under optimal conditions, both methods were applied to the analysis of certified reference materials TMDA-62 (lake water), LGC-6016 (estuarine water), and LGC-6019 (river water). In all cases, results proved the accuracy of the method. PMID:26723494

  10. Organic nature of colloidal actinides transported in surface water environments.

    PubMed

    Santschi, Peter H; Roberts, Kimberly A; Guo, Laodong

    2002-09-01

    Elevated levels of (239,240)Pu and 241Am have been present in surficial soils of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), CO, since the 1960s, when soils were locally contaminated in the 1960s by leaking drums stored on the 903 Pad. Further dispersion of contaminated soil particles was by wind and water. From 1998 until 2001, we examined actinide ((239,240)Pu and 241Am) concentrations and phase speciation in the surface environment at RFETS through field studies and laboratory experiments. Measurements of total (239,240)Pu and 241Am concentrations in storm runoff and pond discharge samples, collected during spring and summer times in 1998-2000, demonstrate that most of the (239,240)Pu and 241Am transported from contaminated soils to streams occurred in the particulate (> or = 0.45 microm; 40-90%) and colloidal (approximately 2 nm or 3 kDa to 0.45 microm; 10-60%) phases. Controlled laboratory investigations of soil resuspension, which simulated storm and erosion events, confirmed that most of the Pu in the 0.45 microm filter-passing phase was in the colloidal phase (> or = 80%) and that remobilization of colloid-bound Pu during soil erosion events can be greatly enhanced by humic and fulvic acids present in these soils. Most importantly, isoelectric focusing experiments of radiolabeled colloidal matter extracted from RFETS soils revealed that colloidal Pu is in the four-valent state and is mostly associated with a negatively charged organic macromolecule with a pH(IEP) of 3.1 and a molecular weight of 10-15 kDa, rather than with the more abundant inorganic (iron oxide and clay) colloids. This finding has important ramifications for possible remediation, erosion controls, and land-management strategies. PMID:12322742

  11. Decontamination of polluted water by treatment with a crude humic acid blend

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, L.M. III; Wandruszka, R. von )

    1999-06-15

    The use of humic acid for contaminant extraction from environmental matrices is an attractive concept because of the natural origin of the material and its low pollution potential. The problem of availability and the need for alkaline extraction were circumvented by the use of an unrefined leonardite humic acid (LHA) material used as received. This mined product has a high humic acid content, is inexpensive, and is available in bulk. LHA, applied without alkaline extraction, was used in the decontamination of water containing organic and inorganic test pollutants. The former included pyrene, difenzoquat, and rhodamine B base, while the latter were comprised of Pb[sup 2+], Zn[sup 2+], Ni[sup 2+], Cu[sup 2+], Sr[sup 2+], Cd[sup 2+], As[sup 3+], Ag[sup +], and Mg[sup 2+]. Simulated acidic waste solutions were treated by both batch precipitation and column extraction, with the pollutants applied singly and as mixtures. In the precipitation procedure, commercial lime was used as the coagulant, and virtually complete removal of the metals was achieved. Pyrene and difenzoquat were also removed, but rhodamine B base was not. With LHA column elution, all three organic compounds were fully extracted from waste solutions, including those containing mixed contaminants. Removal of metals by column treatment gave encouraging results, with Pb[sup 2+], Cu[sup 2+], and Sr[sup 2+] being extracted most effectively.

  12. Morphology of nitric acid and water ice films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, Leon F.; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1993-01-01

    Ice films have been used to simulate stratospheric cloud surfaces in order to obtain laboratory data on solubilities and heterogeneous reaction rates. In the present study, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) is used to study thin films of both water ice and nitric acid ice near the composition of the trihydrate. The ices are formed by vapor deposition onto aluminum or borosilicate-glass substrates cooled to about 200 K. Micrographs are recorded during the deposition process and during subsequent annealing at higher temperatures. The results show that the ice films are composed of loosely consolidated granules, which range from about 1 to 20 microns in size at temperatures between 197 and 235 K. Cubic water ice is sometimes observed at 200 K, which converts to the hexagonal form at slightly higher temperatures. The loose packing of the granules confirms the high porosities of these films obtained from separate bulk porosity measurements. Average surface areas calculated from the observed granule sizes range from about 0.2 to 1 sq m/g and agree with surface areas obtained by gas-adsorption (BET) analysis of annealed ice films. For unannealed films, the BET areas are about an order of magnitude higher than the ESEM results, implying that the unannealed ices contain microporosity which is lost during the annealing process.

  13. The nature of nonfreezing water in carbohydrate polymers.

    PubMed

    Kocherbitov, Vitaly

    2016-10-01

    In an aqueous environment, carbohydrate polymers are surrounded by hydration shells consisting of water molecules that are sometimes called "bound". When polymer solutions are subjected to low temperatures, a part of water turns into ice, another part remains in the biopolymer phase and is called "nonfreezing water". Thermodynamic analysis of water freezing shows that the amount of non-freezing water does not reflect the amount of bound water, neither can it be used as a measure of strength of polymer-water interactions. Upon deep cooling, crystallization of water should desiccate polymers more than is observed in experiment. The reason for existence of non-freezing water is an interplay between the crystallization of water and the glass transition in biopolymers that prevents dehydration. PMID:27312645

  14. Natural fatty acid synthase inhibitors as potent therapeutic agents for cancers: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Sui; Lei, Jie-Ping; Wei, Guo-Qing; Chen, Hui; Ma, Chao-Ying; Jiang, He-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Context Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is the only mammalian enzyme to catalyse the synthesis of fatty acid. The expression level of FAS is related to cancer progression, aggressiveness and metastasis. In recent years, research on natural FAS inhibitors with significant bioactivities and low side effects has increasingly become a new trend. Herein, we present recent research progress on natural fatty acid synthase inhibitors as potent therapeutic agents. Objective This paper is a mini overview of the typical natural FAS inhibitors and their possible mechanism of action in the past 10 years (2004-2014). Method The information was collected and compiled through major databases including Web of Science, PubMed, and CNKI. Results Many natural products induce cancer cells apoptosis by inhibiting FAS expression, with fewer side effects than synthetic inhibitors. Conclusion Natural FAS inhibitors are widely distributed in plants (especially in herbs and foods). Some natural products (mainly phenolics) possessing potent biological activities and stable structures are available as lead compounds to synthesise promising FAS inhibitors. PMID:26864638

  15. Do acid volatile sulfides (AVS) influence the accumulation of sediment-bound metals to benthic invertebrates under natural field conditions?

    PubMed

    De Jonge, Maarten; Dreesen, Freja; De Paepe, Josefina; Blust, Ronny; Bervoets, Lieven

    2009-06-15

    The present study evaluates the influence of acid volatile sulfides (AVS) on accumulation of sediment-bound metals in benthic invertebrates under natural field conditions. Natural sediments, pore water, surface water, and two species of widespread benthic invertebrates (Chironomus gr. thummi and Tubifex tubifex) were collected from 17 historical polluted Flemish lowland rivers and measured for metal concentrations. Different sediment characteristics were determined (AVS, organic matter, clay content) and multiple regression was used to study their relationship with accumulated metals in the invertebrates. Physical and chemical analysis of the field samples indicated low metal concentrations in the water and pore water, but very high metal concentrations in the sediment and the invertebrates, especially for Pb (5.99 micromol/ g). In general, metal accumulation in chironomids and tubificid worms was most strongly correlated with total metal concentrations in the sediment and sediment metal concentrations normalized for organic matter and clay content. Following the results of the linear regression model, AVS did not turn out to be a significant variable in describing variation in metal accumulation. Our study clearly demonstrates that, in addition to the results gained from experiments under lab conditions, benthic invertebrates can accumulate metals from unspiked field sediments even when there's an excess of AVS. PMID:19603670

  16. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment. PMID:26624519

  17. Selective removal of copper (II) from natural waters by nanoporous sorbents functionalized with chelating diamines

    SciTech Connect

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Shin, Yongsoon; Davidson, Joseph D.; Samuels, William D.; LaFemina, Nikki H.; Rutledge, Ryan D.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Yantasee, Wassana

    2010-04-13

    The essential trace metal copper has been identified as a pollutant of concern by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) because of its widespread occurrence in the environment, often being found in concentrations capable of causing problems in organisms in that ecosystem. In this work, three different nanoporous sorbents containing chelating diamine functionalities were evaluated for Cu2+ adsorption in natural waters; these sorbents are ethylenediamine functionalized self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (EDA-SAMMS®, SAMMS is a registered trademark of Steward Advanced Materials), ethylenediamine functionalized activated carbon (AC-CH2-EDA), and 1,10-Phenanthroline functionalized mesoporous carbon (Phen-FMC). The pH dependence of Cu2+ sorption and the Cu2+ sorption capacities of sorbents were determined. The Cu2+ adsorption rates and metal ion selectivity of these sorbents were compared to those of commercial sorbents (Chelex-100 ion exchange resin and Darco KB-B activated carbon). All three chelating diamine sorbents showed the excellent Cu2+ removal (~ 95-99%) from river water and sea water over the pH range of 6.0-8.0. Even under acidic conditions (e.g. pH of 3), AC-CH2-EDA and Phen-FMC were able to remove approximately ~49-58% of Cu2+ in sea water. EDA-SAMMS and AC-CH2-EDA demonstrated rapid Cu2+ sorption kinetics (reaching equilibrium within 5 min) and large adsorption capacities (26 and 17 mg Cu/g sorbent, respectively) in sea water. They also showed good selectivity for Cu2+ over other metal ions (e.g. Ca2+, Fe2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+) in sea water.

  18. Refuges from ocean acidification: determining tolerances of coralline algae to naturally low-pH water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, H.; Paytan, A.; Potts, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide dissolving into the world's oceans is causing a profound and rapid shift in ocean chemistry referred to as ocean acidification (OA) that causes carbonate structures to dissolve more readily in seawater with negative effects for organisms relying on calcified skeletons or shells (e.g. corals, mollusks, coralline algae). Crustose coralline algae (CCA) are ubiquitous and essential on coral reefs, providing both ecological and structural benefits to the reefs. However, CCA are adversely affected by low pH water, with severe reductions in recruitment, survival, growth and productivity. The ability of different species of CCA to adapt to low pH waters was tested using a system of natural submarine springs (called "ojos") near Puerto Morelos on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. These ojos continuously discharge groundwater that is close to seawater salinity but more acidic (pH 6.70-7.30) and under saturated (0.3 Ω to 0.97 Ω) than the ambient seawater (pH 8.03, 3.60 Ω ). Both corals and coralline algae grow in the water from these springs, suggesting that some calcifying species differ in their tolerance to low pH waters. Corallines were sampled along a pH gradient at five springs in December 2013 using underwater transects. Differences in percent cover, species abundance and diversity of CCA by pH levels will be discussed. This work utilizes a unique natural laboratory for studying properties of calcifying biota along pH gradients and provides insight into the ability of CCA to tolerate or adapt to future conditions.

  19. Ion exchange separation of chromium from natural water matrix for stable isotope mass spectrometric analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Bassett, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for separating the Cr dissolved in natural water from matrix elements and determination of its stable isotope ratios using solid-source thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). The separation method takes advantage of the existence of the oxidized form of Cr as an oxyanion to separate it from interfering cations using anion-exchange chromatography, and of the reduced form of Cr as a positively charged ion to separate it from interfering anions such as sulfate. Subsequent processing of the separated sample eliminates residual organic material for application to a solid source filament. Ratios for 53Cr/52Cr for National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 979 can be measured using the silica gel-boric acid technique with a filament-to-filament standard deviation in the mean 53Cr/52Cr ratio for 50 replicates of 0.00005 or less. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Copper corrosion in potable water systems: Impacts of natural organic matter and water treatment processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rehring, J.P.; Edwards, M.

    1996-04-01

    Copper corrosion was examined in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and in situations where NOM was altered by drinking water treatment. Corrosion rates (i{sub corr}) increased with higher NOM concentration at pH 6, whereas insignificant effects were observed at pH 7.5 and 9.0. Corrosion byproduct release was affected adversely by 4 mg/L NOM at pH 6.0, 7.5 and 9.0, with soluble copper increasing by 0.6 mg/L to 0.7 mg/L when compared to solutions without NOM. Alum-coagulated waters had higher i{sub corr} than untreated waters, but ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O)-coagulated waters exhibited reduced i{sub corr}. This difference was attributed to the relative effects of added sulfate via alum coagulation vs added chloride via FeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O coagulation. The effect of combined treatment (alum coagulation, ozonation, and granular activated carbon) was similar to that using alum coagulation alone.

  1. Monitored Natural Attenuation For Inorganic Contaminants In Ground Water - Technical Issues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of ground water contaminated with radionuclides may be achieved using attenuation-based technologies. These technologies may rely on engineered processes (e.g., bioremediation) or natural processes (e.g., monitored natural attenuation) within the subsurface. In gene...

  2. Field measurements of the spectral response of natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolucci, L. A.; Robinson, B. F.; Silva, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral response (air-water interface reflectance and water-volume scattering) of turbid river water (99 mg/liter suspended solids) and relatively clear lake water (10 mg/liter suspended solids) was measured in situ with a field spectroradiometer. The influence of the river bottom on the spectral response of the water also was determined by using a modified Secchi disc approach. The results indicated that turbid river water had a higher spectral response than clear lake water (about 6 percent) in the red (0.6-0.7 micron) and near-infrared (0.7-0.9 micron) portions of the spectrum. Also, the reflectance characteristics of the river bottom did not influence the spectral response of the turbid river water when the water was deeper than 30 cm

  3. Formulation of poultry feed with polyunsaturated fatty acids and natural antioxidants to improve meat quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Formulation of poultry feed with polyunsaturated fatty acids and natural antioxidants to improve meat quality Ronald Alan Holser* and Arthur Hinton, Jr Russell Research Center, USDA-ARS, 950 College Station Road, Athens, Georgia, 30605 USA *Corresponding author: Tel. +1 706-546-3361; Fax +1 706-546-...

  4. Relationship between molecular descriptors and the enthalpies of sublimation of natural amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelin, V. G.; Tyunina, V. V.; Girichev, G. V.; Tyunina, E. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    A multiparameter correlation between the enthalpies of sublimation and molecular descriptors of natural amino acids is proposed, based on generalized experimental and literature data on the heat effects of sublimation. The contributions from Van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bond formation, and electrostatic effects into enthalpy of sublimation has been evaluated using regression coefficients.

  5. Effect of microfluidized and stearic acid modified soy protein in natural rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microfluidized and stearic acid modified soy protein aggregates were used to reinforced natural rubber. The size of soy protein particles was reduced with a microfluidizing and ball milling process. Filler size reduction with longer ball milling time tends to increase tensile strength of the rubber ...

  6. [Studies of the fundamental nature of catalytic acidity, sites and intermediates]: Final performance (technical progress) report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This project was concerned with the fundamental nature of catalyst acidity in the H-zeolites and silica/alumina cracking catalysts. This report summarizes the progress on this project over the past five years. The titles of the twelve papers generated by this research are provided in the attached bibliography in chronological order.

  7. [Conjugated linolenic acids (CLnA, super CLA)--natural sources and biological activity].

    PubMed

    Białek, Agnieszka; Teryks, Marta; Tokarz, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have a wide range of biological activity. Among them conjugated fatty acids are of great interest. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), which exert a multidirectional health-benefiting influence, and conjugated linolenic acids (CLnA, super CLA) are examples of this group of fatty acids. CLnA are a group of positional and geometric isomers of octadecatrienoic acid (C18:3), which possess double bonds at positions 9, 11, 13 or 8, 10, 12 of their chain. Some vegetable oils are rich sources of CLnA, e.g. bitter melon oil (from Momordica charantia seeds) and pomegranate oil (from Punica granatum seeds). The aim of this paper was to present information concerning natural sources and health-promoting activities of conjugated linolenic acids. The presented data reveal that conjugated linolenic acids may be very useful in prevention and treatment of many diseases, especially diabetes, arteriosclerosis , obesity and cancers (mammary, prostate and colon cancer). Among many potential mechanisms of their action, the fact that some CLnA are converted by oxidoreductases into CLA is very important. It seems to be very reasonable to conduct research concerning the possibility of CLnA use in prevention of many diseases. PMID:25380206

  8. Field and laboratory arsenic speciation methods and their application to natural-water analysis.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J; Garbarino, J R; Burkhardt, M R; Ranville, J F; Wildeman, T R

    2004-01-01

    The toxic and carcinogenic properties of inorganic and organic arsenic species make their determination in natural water vitally important. Determination of individual inorganic and organic arsenic species is critical because the toxicology, mobility, and adsorptivity vary substantially. Several methods for the speciation of arsenic in groundwater, surface-water, and acid mine drainage sample matrices using field and laboratory techniques are presented. The methods provide quantitative determination of arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonate (MMA), dimethylarsinate (DMA), and roxarsone in 2-8 min at detection limits of less than 1 microg arsenic per liter (microg As L(-1)). All the methods use anion exchange chromatography to separate the arsenic species and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as an arsenic-specific detector. Different methods were needed because some sample matrices did not have all arsenic species present or were incompatible with particular high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) mobile phases. The bias and variability of the methods were evaluated using total arsenic, As(III), As(V), DMA, and MMA results from more than 100 surface-water, groundwater, and acid mine drainage samples, and reference materials. Concentrations in test samples were as much as 13,000 microg As L(-1) for As(III) and 3700 microg As L(-1) for As(V). Methylated arsenic species were less than 100 microg As L(-1) and were found only in certain surface-water samples, and roxarsone was not detected in any of the water samples tested. The distribution of inorganic arsenic species in the test samples ranged from 0% to 90% As(III). Laboratory-speciation method variability for As(III), As(V), MMA, and DMA in reagent water at 0.5 microg As L(-1) was 8-13% (n=7). Field-speciation method variability for As(III) and As(V) at 1 microg As L(-1) in reagent water was 3-4% (n=3). PMID:14675647

  9. Natural recharge and localization of fresh ground water in Kuwait

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstrom, R.E.; Aten, R.E.

    1965-01-01

    Fresh ground water (200 parts per million total dissolved solids and upwards) occurs in portions of Pleistocene sandstone aquifers beneath basins and wadis in north Kuwait where the mean rainfall is about five inches per year. The fresh water is surrounded and underlain by brackish water (> 4000 ppm TDS). Drilling and testing show that fresh water saturation is restricted to wadis and basin areas; in Rawdatain basin it attains a maximum thickness of about 110 feet and a lateral extent of about seven miles. The fresh ground water represents recharge localized, during infrequent, torrential rain storms, in areas of concentrated runoff where sediments in the vadose zone are moderately permeable and depth to the water table is generally less than a hundred feet. Concentration of runoff appears to be the primary control in the localization of recharge. The fresh water percolates downward to the ground-water reservoir following rare storms, then flows in the direction of hydraulic gradient and gradually becomes brackish. Theoretical delineation of the recharge area and ground-water flow pattern in Rawdatain was confirmed by tritium and C14 dating of the water. Brackish ground-water conditions prevail from water table downward in areas where rainfall infiltrates essentially where it falls, permeability of sediments in the vadose zone is low, or the water table is several hundred feet below land surface. In these areas, rainfall is retained and lost within the soil zone or becomes mineralized during deep percolation. ?? 1964.

  10. Evaluation of a chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip under experimental and natural exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, P A; Wildman, E E; Pankey, J W

    1990-08-01

    A postmilking teat dip containing chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide was evaluated by experimental challenge and in two herds under natural exposure. The test product had an efficacy of 78.9% against Staphylococcus aureus and 52.5% against Streptococcus agalactiae in the experimental challenge trial. The product was compared with a 1% iodine product in a 15-mo natural exposure study. Post-dipping with chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide reduced incidence of udder infection by major mastitis pathogens 36.1% when data were combined from the two herds. The 1% iodine and the chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide products were not equivalent for major mastitis pathogens; the test product was more effective. Incidence of udder infection by environmental mastitis pathogens was reduced 36.8% in both herds combined. Efficacy of the two teat dips was equivalent for environmental pathogens. PMID:2229601

  11. ASSESSING THE ROLE OF NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR INORGANIC CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has been applied as a knowledge-based remediation technology for organic contaminants in ground water. The application of this technology is being considered for remediation of inorganic contaminants in ground water at hazardous waste sites. ...

  12. Determination of microamounts of lead in natural waters by laser-enhanced ionization spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Marunkov, A.G.; Reutova, T.V.; Chekalin, N.V.

    1986-10-10

    The authors have investigated the possibility of a two-step technique using UV excitation for the determination of lead in natural waters. The subjects for analysis were waters from mountain rivers in the North Caucuses.

  13. Structure-thermodynamics-antioxidant activity relationships of selected natural phenolic acids and derivatives: an experimental and theoretical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuzhen; Xiao, Huizhi; Zheng, Jie; Liang, Guizhao

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic acids and derivatives have potential biological functions, however, little is known about the structure-activity relationships and the underlying action mechanisms of these phenolic acids to date. Herein we investigate the structure-thermodynamics-antioxidant relationships of 20 natural phenolic acids and derivatives using DPPH• scavenging assay, density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) levels of theory, and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling. Three main working mechanisms (HAT, SETPT and SPLET) are explored in four micro-environments (gas-phase, benzene, water and ethanol). Computed thermodynamics parameters (BDE, IP, PDE, PA and ETE) are compared with the experimental radical scavenging activities against DPPH•. Available theoretical and experimental investigations have demonstrated that the extended delocalization and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds are the two main contributions to the stability of the radicals. The C = O or C = C in COOH, COOR, C = CCOOH and C = CCOOR groups, and orthodiphenolic functionalities are shown to favorably stabilize the specific radical species to enhance the radical scavenging activities, while the presence of the single OH in the ortho position of the COOH group disfavors the activities. HAT is the thermodynamically preferred mechanism in the gas phase and benzene, whereas SPLET in water and ethanol. Furthermore, our QSAR models robustly represent the structure-activity relationships of these explored compounds in polar media. PMID:25803685

  14. Structure-Thermodynamics-Antioxidant Activity Relationships of Selected Natural Phenolic Acids and Derivatives: An Experimental and Theoretical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Liang, Guizhao

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic acids and derivatives have potential biological functions, however, little is known about the structure-activity relationships and the underlying action mechanisms of these phenolic acids to date. Herein we investigate the structure-thermodynamics-antioxidant relationships of 20 natural phenolic acids and derivatives using DPPH• scavenging assay, density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) levels of theory, and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling. Three main working mechanisms (HAT, SETPT and SPLET) are explored in four micro-environments (gas-phase, benzene, water and ethanol). Computed thermodynamics parameters (BDE, IP, PDE, PA and ETE) are compared with the experimental radical scavenging activities against DPPH•. Available theoretical and experimental investigations have demonstrated that the extended delocalization and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds are the two main contributions to the stability of the radicals. The C = O or C = C in COOH, COOR, C = CCOOH and C = CCOOR groups, and orthodiphenolic functionalities are shown to favorably stabilize the specific radical species to enhance the radical scavenging activities, while the presence of the single OH in the ortho position of the COOH group disfavors the activities. HAT is the thermodynamically preferred mechanism in the gas phase and benzene, whereas SPLET in water and ethanol. Furthermore, our QSAR models robustly represent the structure-activity relationships of these explored compounds in polar media. PMID:25803685

  15. Influence of natural humic acids and synthetic phenolic polymers on fibrinolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klöcking, Hans-Peter

    The influence of synthetic and natural phenolic polymers on the release of plasminogen activator was studied in an isolated, perfused, vascular preparation (pig ear). Of the tested synthetic phenolic polymers, the oxidation products of caffeic acid (KOP) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4-DHPOP), at a concentration of 50 µg/ml perfusate, were able to increase the plasminogen activator activity by 70%. The oxidation products of chlorogenic acid (CHOP), hydrocaffeic acid (HYKOP), pyrogallol (PYROP) and gallic acid (GALOP), at the same concentration, exerted no influence on the release of plasminogen activator. Of the naturally occurring humic acids, the influence of sodium humate was within the same order of magnitude as KOP and 3,4-DHPOP. Ammonium humate was able to increase the plasminogen activator release only at a concentration of 100 µg/ml perfusate. In rats, the t-PA activity increased after i.v. application of 10 mg/kg of KOP, Na-HS or NH4-HS.

  16. Effect of natural organic matter on aggregation behavior of C60 fullerene in water.

    PubMed

    Mashayekhi, Hamid; Ghosh, Saikat; Du, Peng; Xing, Baoshan

    2012-05-15

    The stability of C(60) fullerene particles in water affects its mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity to organisms. Natural organic matters (NOMs) have pronounced effects on the aggregation behavior of C(60) fullerene. This study was to examine the effects of NOM structural properties on the aggregation behavior of fullerene water suspension (FWS). Fulvic acid (FA), tannic acid (TA), and two structurally different humic acids (HA1 and HA7) were studied. HA1 and HA7 were sequentially extracted HAs, where HA7 was more hydrophobic than HA1 and had a higher molecular weight. Aggregation was induced by addition of varying amounts of Ca(2+) to the FWS with 2 mg/L of each NOM. The absolute value of zeta potential |ζ| of pure FWS increased after addition of any type of NOM. Addition of Ca(2+) to the FWS+NOM system decreased |ζ| of fullerene almost uniformly for all types of NOM. FWS critical coagulation concentration (CCC) was equal to 14.5, 6.5, 5.4, and 3.7 mM Ca(2+) for HA7, HA1, FA, and TA, respectively. The order of increasing CCCs was positively correlated to the NOMs molecular weight and negatively to their polarity. A nearly constant ζ for FWS+NOM system at a wide range of Ca(2+) concentrations suggested the steric stability rather than electrostatic one. This study highlighted the role of NOM in the fate of manufactured nanoparticles in the environment and linked the structural properties of NOM to their interaction with manufactured nanoparticles. PMID:22365633

  17. Temperature dependence of hydrogen-bond dynamics in acetic acid-water solutions.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Francesco; Bencivenga, Filippo; Gessini, Alessandro; Masciovecchio, Claudio

    2010-08-19

    An inelastic UV scattering experiment has been carried out on acetic acid-water solutions as a function of temperature and concentration. The analysis of experimental data indicates the presence of a crossover temperature (T(c) approximately 325 +/- 10 K). Above T(c), the energy of hydrogen bonds responsible for water-acetic acid and acetic acid-acetic acid interactions is strongly reduced. This leads to a reduction in the average number of water molecule interacting with acetic acid, as well as to a lower number of acetic acid clusters. The latter behavior can be mainly ascribed to a temperature change in the activation energy of carboxylic groups of acetic acid. These results may be also relevant to better understand the folding mechanism in protein-water solutions. PMID:20701390

  18. Luteolin, ellagic acid and punicic acid are natural products that inhibit prostate cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Li, Wenfang; Lin, Muqing; Garcia, Monika; Mulholland, David; Lilly, Michael; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second cause of cancer deaths in men in the USA. When the cancer recurs, early stages can be controlled with hormone ablation therapy to delay the rate of cancer progression but, over time, the cancer overcomes its hormone dependence, becomes highly aggressive and metastasizes. Clinical trials have shown that pomegranate juice (PJ) inhibits PCa progression. We have previously shown that the PJ components luteolin (L), ellagic acid (E) and punicic acid (P) together inhibit growth of hormone-dependent and -independent PCa cells and inhibit their migration and chemotaxis towards CXCL12, a chemokine that is important in PCa metastasis. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesized that L+E+P inhibit PCa metastasis in vivo. To test this possibility, we used a severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model in which luciferase-expressing human PCa cells were injected subcutaneously near the prostate. Tumor progression was monitored with bioluminescence imaging weekly. We found that L+E+P inhibits PC-3M-luc primary tumor growth, inhibits the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis for metastasis and none of the tumors metastasized. In addition, L+E+P significantly inhibits growth and metastasis of highly invasive Pten (-/-) ;K-ras (G12D) prostate tumors. Furthermore, L+E+P inhibits angiogenesis in vivo, prevents human endothelial cell (EC) tube formation in culture and disrupts preformed EC tubes, indicating inhibition of EC adhesion to each other. L+E+P also inhibits the angiogenic factors interleukin-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor as well as their induced signaling pathways in ECs. In conclusion, these results show that L+E+P inhibits PCa progression and metastasis. PMID:25023990

  19. Analysis of fluorotelomer alcohols, fluorotelomer acids, and short- and long-chain perfluorinated acids in water and biota.

    PubMed

    Taniyasu, Sachi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; So, Man Ka; Gulkowska, Anna; Sinclair, Ewan; Okazawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi

    2005-11-01

    Fluorotelomer alcohols and fluorotelomer acids have been proposed as a source of the perfluorinated carboxylic acids found in remote marine locations. To examine the sources and fate of perfluorinated acids in the environment, a method to determine a wide range of poly- and perfluorinated acids in environmental and biological matrices is needed. In this study, a method has been developed to measure a suite of neutral and acidic fluorochemicals including, fluorotelomer alcohols, fluorotelomer acids, and short- and long-chain perfluorinated acids, in water and biological samples. The method involves solid-phase extraction with weak anion exchange (WAX) cartridges, followed by sequential elution with sodium acetate buffer, methanol, and 0.1% NH4OH in methanol. For biological samples, prior to solid-phase extraction, tissues are digested in 0.5N potassium hydroxide/methanol, diluted in water, and passed through the WAX cartridge. Neutral compounds and telomer alcohols are separated from other poly- and perfluorinated acids. The method is robust (i.e., capable of measuring neutral and acidic compounds), and can be applied for the analysis of a range of poly- and perfluorinated acids, including telomer alcohols, telomer acids, perfluoroalkylcarboxylates, and perfluoroalkylsulfonates in water and biota. With the use of high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), a method detection limit in the range of several tens to hundreds of parts-per-quadrillion (pg/L) in water and at a few tens to hundreds of parts-per-trillion (pg/g) levels in biological matrices can be achieved. PMID:16233874

  20. Natural wetlands are efficient at providing long-term metal remediation of freshwater systems polluted by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Dean, Andrew P; Lynch, Sarah; Rowland, Paul; Toft, Benjamin D; Pittman, Jon K; White, Keith N

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the first long-term (14-year) evaluation of the efficacy of an established (>100 years) natural wetland to remediate highly acidic mine drainage (AMD). Although natural wetlands are highly valued for their biodiversity, this study demonstrates that they also provide important ecosystem service functions through their ability to consistently and reliably improve water quality by mitigating AMD. The Afon Goch river flows from Parys Mountain copper mine via a natural wetland, and was the major source of Zn and Cu contamination to the Irish Sea. Prior to 2003 the wetland received severe acidic metal contamination and retained a large proportion of the contamination (55, 64, and 37% in dissolved Fe, Zn, and Cu) leading to a greatly reduced metal flow to the Irish Sea. Reduced wetland loadings midway through the sampling period led to a reduction of metals by 83-94% and a pH increase from 2.7 to 5.5, resulting in long-term improvements in the downstream benthic invertebrate community. High root metal accumulation by the dominant wetland plant species and the association of acidophilic bacteria in the wetland rhizosphere indicate that multiple interacting processes provide an efficient and self-sustaining system to remediate AMD. PMID:24088022

  1. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of naturally occurring D-amino acids in sake.

    PubMed

    Gogami, Yoshitaka; Okada, Kaori; Oikawa, Tadao

    2011-11-01

    We measured all of the D- and L-amino acids in 141 bottles of sakes using HPLC. We used two precolumn derivatization methods of amino acid enantiomer detection with o-phthalaldehyde and N-acetyl-L-cysteine, as well as (+)-1-(9-fluorenyl)ethyl chloroformate/1-aminoadamantane and one postcolumn derivatization method with o-phthalaldehyde and N-acetyl-L-cysteine. We found that the sakes contained the D-amino acids forms of Ala, Asn, Asp, Arg, Glu, Gln, His, Ile, Leu, Lys, Ser, Tyr, Val, Phe, and Pro. We were not able to detect D-Met, D-Thr D-Trp in any of the sakes analyzed. The most abundant D-Ala, D-Asp, and D-Glu ranged from 66.9 to 524.3 μM corresponding to relative 34.4, 12.0, and 14.6% D-enantiomer. The basic parameters that generally determine the taste of sake such as the sake meter value (SMV; "Nihonshudo"), acidity ("Sando"), amino acid value ("Aminosando"), alcohol content by volume, and rice species of raw material show no significant relationship to the D-amino acid content of sake. The brewing water ("Shikomimizu") and brewing process had effects on the D-amino acid content of the sakes: the D-amino acid contents of the sakes brewed with deep-sea water "Kaiyoushinosousui", "Kimoto yeast starter", "Yamahaimoto", and the long aging process "Choukijukusei" are high compared with those of other sakes analyzed. Additionally, the D-amino acid content of sakes that were brewed with the adenine auxotroph of sake yeast ("Sekishoku seishu kobo", Saccharomyces cerevisiae) without pasteurization ("Hiire") increased after storage at 25 °C for three months. PMID:21555255

  2. Effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, E.; Daase, M.; Schulz, K. G.; Stuhr, A.; Riebesell, U.

    2013-02-01

    The effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community in the Arctic was studied in a large-scale mesocosm experiment, carried out in Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway) at 79° N. Nine mesocosms of ~50 m3 each were exposed to 8 different pCO2 levels (from natural background conditions to ~1420 μatm), yielding pH values (on the total scale) from ~8.3 to 7.5. Inorganic nutrients were added on day 13. The phytoplankton development during this 30-day experiment passed three distinct phases: (1) prior to the addition of inorganic nutrients, (2) first bloom after nutrient addition, and (3) second bloom after nutrient addition. The fatty acid composition of the natural plankton community was analysed and showed, in general, high percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): 44-60% of total fatty acids. Positive correlations with pCO2 were found for most PUFAs during phases 2 and/or 3, with the exception of 20:5n3 (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA), an important diatom marker. These correlations are probably linked to changes in taxonomic composition in response to pCO2. While diatoms (together with prasinophytes and haptophytes) increased during phase 3 mainly in the low and intermediate pCO2 treatments, dinoflagellates were favoured by high CO2 concentrations during the same time period. This is reflected in the development of group-specific fatty acid trophic markers. No indications were found for a generally detrimental effect of ocean acidification on the planktonic food quality in terms of essential fatty acids.

  3. Identification of the subsurface sulfide bodies responsible for acidity in Río Tinto source water, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ortiz, David; Fernández-Remolar, David C.; Granda, Ángel; Quesada, Cecilio; Granda, Teresa; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Molina, Antonio; Amils, Ricardo

    2014-04-01

    The acidic waters of the Río Tinto rise from several acidic springs that emerge in the area surrounding Peña de Hierro (Fernández-Remolar et al., 2005). These springs are located above minor normal faults that act as natural conduits for the water from the underlying deep aquifer. Although it has been suggested that the acidity of the river originates from the biooxidation of massive and stockwork sulfides (Fernández-Remolar et al., 2008a), the location of the source for these acidic solutions has not previously been established. This lack of evidence has been used to suggest that the acidity of the Río Tinto may be the product of the most conspicuous of the possible source, the extensive mining of the area over approximately the last 5000 years (Davis et al., 2000). In this paper, we report resistivity and time-domain electromagnetic sounding data from the Río Tinto aquifer to a depth of ∼600 m, revealing the locations for the acidic sources. Both types of data support the presence of two distinct geological units that we interpret as thrust sheets emplaced onto each other during the Variscan orogeny of the Carboniferous. These units, both of which contain massive and stockwork sulfides, act as the aquifer for the acidic waters of the Río Tinto. Under this scenario, which is in agreement with the geological record of the Río Tinto fluvial system for the past 6 Ma (Moreno et al., 2003), our results imply that mining activity had little influence on the generation of the acidic river waters.

  4. Potential beneficial uses of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) water.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K J; Whitman, Ashley J; Kniss, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    The CBNG well water is typically managed by discharging into nearby disposal ponds. The CBNG well water could potentially be very useful in the water-limited regions (e.g., arid and semi-arid), but beneficial uses may be hindered by water quality problems. Objectives of this research were to: (1) examine trend analysis of nine years of CBNG well water at discharge (outfall) points and in corresponding disposal ponds, (2) evaluate geochemical processes, (3) identify potential water quality issues, and (4) find potential beneficial uses. The CBNG well water at discharge points and in corresponding disposal ponds was measured on-site for pH and electrical conductivity (EC). These water samples were also analyzed in the laboratory for calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), copper (Cu), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), and barium (Ba). Total dissolved solids (TDS) were calculated from EC measurements. The sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) was calculated from Na, Ca, and Mg concentrations. Trend analyses of outfalls and disposal ponds were conducted separately so that the differences in trends could be compared. Trends in CBNG well water at discharge points are not always the same as trends in CBNG disposal ponds: environmental and geochemical processes play an important role in the water quality of these well waters. Overall trend analyses suggest that CBNG well water at discharge points in all basins of the Powder River Basin meets beneficial use criteria, except for SAR and to some extent EC, for aquatic life, livestock and wildlife watering, and irrigation. The CBNG well water in disposal ponds across all basins meets criteria for all beneficial uses except for As, pH, SAR, and to some extent EC for irrigation, aquatic life, and livestock and wildlife watering. PMID:24280972

  5. Inactivation of bacteria on surfaces by sprayed slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water: in vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Hakimullah; Alam, Md Shahin; Sangsriratanakul, Natthanan; Nakajima, Katsuhiro; Kitazawa, Minori; Ota, Mari; Toyofuku, Chiharu; Yamada, Masashi; Thammakarn, Chanathip; Shoham, Dany; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2016-08-01

    The capacity of slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water (SAHW), in both liquid and spray form, to inactivate bacteria was evaluated as a potential candidate for biosecurity enhancement in poultry production. SAHW (containing 50 or 100 ppm chlorine, pH 6) was able to inactivate Escherichia coli and Salmonella Infantis in liquid to below detectable levels (≤2.6 log10 CFU/ml) within 5 sec of exposure. In addition, SAHW antibacterial capacity was evaluated by spraying it using a nebulizer into a box containing these bacteria, which were present on the surfaces of glass plates and rayon sheets. SAHW was able to inactivate both bacterial species on the glass plates (dry condition) and rayon sheets within 5 min spraying and 5 min contact times, with the exception of 50 ppm SAHW on the rayon sheets. Furthermore, a corrosivity test determined that SAHW does not corrode metallic objects, even at the longest exposure times (83 days). Our findings demonstrate that SAHW is a good candidate for biosecurity enhancement in the poultry industry. Spraying it on the surfaces of objects, eggshells, egg incubators and transport cages could reduce the chances of contamination and disease transmission. These results augment previous findings demonstrating the competence of SAHW as an anti-viral disinfectant. PMID:27052464

  6. Inactivation of bacteria on surfaces by sprayed slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water: in vitro experiments

    PubMed Central

    HAKIM, Hakimullah; ALAM, Md. Shahin; SANGSRIRATANAKUL, Natthanan; NAKAJIMA, Katsuhiro; KITAZAWA, Minori; OTA, Mari; TOYOFUKU, Chiharu; YAMADA, Masashi; THAMMAKARN, Chanathip; SHOHAM, Dany; TAKEHARA, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water (SAHW), in both liquid and spray form, to inactivate bacteria was evaluated as a potential candidate for biosecurity enhancement in poultry production. SAHW (containing 50 or 100 ppm chlorine, pH 6) was able to inactivate Escherichia coli and Salmonella Infantis in liquid to below detectable levels (≤2.6 log10 CFU/ml) within 5 sec of exposure. In addition, SAHW antibacterial capacity was evaluated by spraying it using a nebulizer into a box containing these bacteria, which were present on the surfaces of glass plates and rayon sheets. SAHW was able to inactivate both bacterial species on the glass plates (dry condition) and rayon sheets within 5 min spraying and 5 min contact times, with the exception of 50 ppm SAHW on the rayon sheets. Furthermore, a corrosivity test determined that SAHW does not corrode metallic objects, even at the longest exposure times (83 days). Our findings demonstrate that SAHW is a good candidate for biosecurity enhancement in the poultry industry. Spraying it on the surfaces of objects, eggshells, egg incubators and transport cages could reduce the chances of contamination and disease transmission. These results augment previous findings demonstrating the competence of SAHW as an anti-viral disinfectant. PMID:27052464

  7. Biomimetic Nitration of Conjugated Linoleic Acid: Formation and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Conjugated Nitrodienes

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Nitro-conjugated linoleic acids (NO2-cLA), endogenous nitrodiene lipids which act as inflammatory signaling mediators, were isolated and single isomers purified from the biomimetic acidic nitration products of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Structures were elucidated by means of detailed NMR and HPLC–MS/MS spectroscopic analysis and the relative double bond configurations assigned. Additional synthetic methods produced useful quantities and similar isomeric distributions of these unusual and reactive compounds for biological studies and isotopic standards, and the potential conversion of nitro-linoleic to nitro-conjugated linoleic acids was explored via a facile base-catalyzed isomerization. This represents one of the few descriptions of naturally occurring conjugated nitro dienes (in particular, 1-nitro 1,3-diene), an unusual and highly reactive motif with few biological examples extant. PMID:24350701

  8. Determination of ten haloacetic acids in drinking water using high-performance and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yang; Chang, Shueh-Ni; Wang, Gen-Shuh

    2009-01-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are a class of byproducts resulting from the reaction of chlorinated disinfectants with natural organic matter. These chemicals have been found in animal studies to possibly influence hepatic, reproductive, and developmental functions, and they may be mutagenic and carcinogenic. Because HAAs are hydrophilic and strongly acidic, it is a challenge to measure them at low levels. In this study, nine traditional HAAs and monoiodoacetic acid, an emerging disinfection byproduct, are analyzed in water directly. HAAs were separated on a BetaMax Acid column or a HILIC UPLC column, and they were detected by negative electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Although the on-column limits of detection of HAAs were lower when using an HILIC UPLC column (0.08-2.73 microg/L) than when using a BetaMax Acid column (0.18 to 71.5 microg/L), to use an HILIC UPLC column, it was required to dissolve water samples in 90% acetonitrile before injection and result in sample dilution. BetaMax Acid column was found to be more suitable for the analysis of HAAs in drinking water because there was no need of sample preparation. Major species of HAAs, such as dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid, and other primary species (e.g., dibromoacetic acid, bromochloroacetic acid and bromodichloroacetic acid) can be detected using the BetaMax Acid column at concentrations higher than 1-3 microg/L. PMID:19161659

  9. Naturally Occurring Arsenic in Ground Water, Norman, Oklahoma, 2004, and Remediation Options for Produced Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Christenson, Scott

    2005-01-01

    can be used to bring some of Norman?s high-arsenic wells into compliance with the new arsenic standard, the EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) initiated a three-year research project in 2003 with participation from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Oklahoma State University, and the City of Norman. The primary objectives of the project are to: (1) determine where naturally occurring arsenic is entering wells by collecting water samples at different depths, (2) investigate the utility of new methods for collecting water-quality data in a pumping well, (3) better understand the stratigraphy and composition of aquifer rocks, (4) assess 10 wells for the possibility of arsenic remediation by well modification, and (5) evaluate the effectiveness of well modification in bringing marginal wells into compliance with the new arsenic MCL. The purpose of this report is to describe the occurrence of arsenic in ground water near Norman, Oklahoma, and available options for reducing arsenic concentrations in produced ground water.

  10. Assessing accumulation and biliary excretion of naphthenic acids in yellow perch exposed to oil sands-affected waters.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Michael R; Hogan, Natacha S; MacDonald, Gillian Z; Berrue, Fabrice; Young, Rozlyn F; Arens, Collin J; Kerr, Russell G; Fedorak, Phillip M

    2014-01-01

    Naphthenic acids are known to be the most prevalent group of organic compounds in oil sands tailings-associated waters. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were exposed for four months to oil sands-influenced waters in two experimental systems located on an oil sands lease 30 km north of Fort McMurray Alberta: the Demonstration Pond, containing oil sands tailings capped with natural surface water, and the South Bison Pond, integrating lean oil sands. Yellow perch were also sampled from three lakes: Mildred Lake that receives water from the Athabasca River, Sucker Lake, at the edge of oil sands extraction activity, and Kimowin Lake, a distant reference site. Naphthenic acids were measured in perch muscle tissue using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Bile metabolites were measured by GC-MS techniques and by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection at phenanthrene wavelengths. A method was developed using liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) to evaluate naphthenic acids in bile. Tissue analysis did not show a pattern of naphthenic acids accumulation in muscle tissue consistent with known concentrations in exposed waters. Bile fluorescence and LC-HRMS methods were capable of statistically distinguishing samples originating from oil sands-influenced waters versus reference lakes. Although the GC-MS and HPLC fluorescence methods were correlated, there were no significant correlations of these methods and the LC-HRMS method. In yellow perch, naphthenic acids from oil sands sources do not concentrate in tissue at a measurable amount and are excreted through a biliary route. LC-HRMS was shown to be a highly sensitive, selective and promising technique as an indicator of exposure of biota to oil sands-derived naphthenic acids. PMID:24182406

  11. The features of element concentration in natural waters of the Kola North in conditions of environmental contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazova, Mariya; Moiseenko, Tatyana

    2016-04-01

    The intensive use of fossil fuels and industrial development in last century led to the formation of acid rain and water acidification. The problem of water acidification greatly was denoted in the middle of last century in North America and in Europe as a result of air emissions of acid gases, primarily sulfur dioxide. The process of water acidification due to the interaction of two factors: 1) the high deposition of acidifying substances, taking into account the duration of exposure; 2) the sensitivity of the natural catchment area of geological, landscape, geographic and climatic characteristics (Moiseenko, 2005). The effects of acid rains on metal migration and cycling were discussed in a number of previous studies (Jeffries, 1997; Moiseenko, 1999; Manio, 2001; Moiseenko, Gashkina, 2007). The distribution of elements in water lakes has been mixed and due to the change of geochemical cycles of elements occurring in the catchment area and in water. On the Kola Peninsula as a result of long-term operation of the copper-nickel smelter was the anthropogenic acidification and water pollution metals. Increased contents of elements due to the combined effect of three factors: 1) landscape-geochemical characteristics of watersheds; 2) dispersion with flue emissions; 3) leaching elements and bonding of metals with organic matter, especially in forested watersheds and wetlands. This region is subject to long-term effects of mining and smelting industries, and therefore difficult to find of water bodies, which can serve as a background lakes. It is proved that manmade acid rain lead to leach into the water of a large group of elements entering the water as a result of man-made streams, as well as the elements that consist of the rocks forming the watersheds. In order to identify the relationships between the components of the elemental composition of the water in the lake was made a factor analysis using a computer program «STATISTICA 10". Factor analysis revealed the

  12. Photo-Fenton treatment of water containing natural phenolic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Gernjak, Wolfgang; Krutzler, Thomas; Glaser, Andreas; Malato, Sixto; Caceres, Julia; Bauer, Rupert; Fernández-Alba, A R

    2003-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are known to be present in high concentrations in various types of agro-industrial wastes. As they are highly biorecalcitrant, the possibility of treatment by advanced oxidation processes should be investigated. In this work, six model phenolic compounds (vanillin, protocatechuic acid, syringic acid, p-coumaric acid, gallic acid and L-tyrosine) were chosen for a demonstration of degradation by photo-Fenton reaction, under artificial light in laboratory experiments in Vienna and under sunlight in pilot-plant experiments at the Plataforma Solar de Almería in Spain. All compounds were completely mineralised. No non-degradable intermediates were produced, either in experiments with single substances or in a more complex matrix of a mixture of phenolic compounds. The expected selectivity of the photo-Fenton reaction for aromatic compounds was proven by comparison of the decrease in total organic carbon with the removal of total phenolic content. PMID:12656231

  13. Rhodium(I)-catalyzed regiospecific dimerization of aromatic acids: two direct C-H bond activations in water.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hang; Zeng, Huiying; Zhou, Feng; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-05-01

    2,2'-Diaryl acids are key building blocks for some of the most important and high-performance polymers such as polyesters and polyamides (imides), as well as structural motifs of MOFs (metal-organic frameworks) and biological compounds. In this study, a direct, regiospecific and practical dimerization of simple aromatic acids to generate 2,2'-diaryl acids has been discovered, which proceeds through two rhodium-catalyzed C-H activations in water. This reaction can be easily scaled up to gram level by using only 0.4-0.6 mol % of the rhodium catalyst. As a proof-of-concept, the natural product ellagic acid was synthesized in two steps by this method. PMID:25765625

  14. Multipolar Electrostatic Energy Prediction for all 20 Natural Amino Acids Using Kriging Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Timothy L; Popelier, Paul L A

    2016-06-14

    A machine learning method called kriging is applied to the set of all 20 naturally occurring amino acids. Kriging models are built that predict electrostatic multipole moments for all topological atoms in any amino acid based on molecular geometry only. These models then predict molecular electrostatic interaction energies. On the basis of 200 unseen test geometries for each amino acid, no amino acid shows a mean prediction error above 5.3 kJ mol(-1), while the lowest error observed is 2.8 kJ mol(-1). The mean error across the entire set is only 4.2 kJ mol(-1) (or 1 kcal mol(-1)). Charged systems are created by protonating or deprotonating selected amino acids, and these show no significant deviation in prediction error over their neutral counterparts. Similarly, the proposed methodology can also handle amino acids with aromatic side chains, without the need for modification. Thus, we present a generic method capable of accurately capturing multipolar polarizable electrostatics in amino acids. PMID:27224739

  15. Adsorption of clofibric acid and ketoprofen onto powdered activated carbon: effect of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yaohuan; Deshusses, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption of two acidic pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), clofibric acid and ketoprofen, onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated with a particular focus on the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of the PhACs. Suwannee River humic acids (SRHAs) were used as a substitute for NOM. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to obtain adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms with and without SRHAs in the system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption ofclofibric acid was not significantly affected by the presence of SRHAs at a concentration of 5 mg (as carbon) L(-1). An adsorption capacity of 70 to 140 mg g(-1) was observed and equilibrium was reached within 48 h. In contrast, the adsorption of ketoprofen was markedly decreased (from about 120 mg g(-1) to 70-100 mg g(-1)) in the presence of SRHAs. Higher initial concentrations of clofibric acid than ketoprofen during testing may explain the different behaviours that were observed. Also, the more hydrophobic ketoprofen molecules may have less affinity for PAC when humic acids (which are hydrophilic) are present. The possible intermolecular forces that could account for the different behaviour of clofibric acid and ketoprofen adsorption onto PAC are discussed. In particular, the relevance of electrostatic forces, electron donor-acceptor interaction, hydrogen bonding and London dispersion forces are discussed PMID:22439557

  16. Isotopic geochemistry of acid thermal waters and volcanic gases from Zaō volcano in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyosu, Yasuhiro; Kurahashi, Makoto

    1984-08-01

    The chemical composition and D/H, {18O }/{16O } and {34S }/{32S } ratios have been determined for the acid hot waters and volcanic gases discharging from Zaō volcano in Japan. The thermal springs in Zaō volcano issue acid sulfate-chloride type waters (Zaō) and acid sulfate type waters (Kamoshika). Gases emitted at Kamoshika fumaroles are rich in CO 2, SO 2 and N 2, exclusive of H 2O. Chloride concentrations and oxygen isotope data indicate that the Zaō thermal waters issue a fluid mixture from an acid thermal reservoir and meteoric waters from shallow aquifers. The waters in the Zaō volcanic system have slight isotopic shifts from the respective local meteoric values. The isotopic evidence indicates that most of the water in the system is meteoric in origin. Sulfates in Zaō acid sulfate-chloride waters with δ34S values of around +15‰, are enriched in 34S compared to Zaō H 2S, while the acid sulfate waters at Kamoshika contain supergene light sulfate ( δ 34S = ˜ + 4‰ ) derived from volcanic sulfur dioxide from the volcanic exhalations. The sulfur species in Zaō acid waters are lighter in δ34S than those of other volcanic areas, reflecting the difference in total pressure.

  17. The geochemical model of neutral and acidic thermal water in the Tatun Volcano Group, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Y.; Kuo, C.; Liu, C.

    2013-12-01

    The geochemical model can provide a quantitative method for water-rock interaction and understand the processes of neutralization of initially acidic water. The Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) is one of the Quaternary volcanoes of northern Taiwan. In the Southern Sulfur River of the TVG, it has neutral and acidic thermal water that can provide good materials for modeling the flow path of acidic and neutral thermal water. This study collects 7 thermal springs and identifies into two types, which are neutral and acidic thermal water. The host rock of neutral thermal water has fresh andesitic rock and is weak fumaroles, and the field observations of acidic thermal waters have been alternated andesitic rock and strong degassing fumaroles. The Geochemist's Workbench software (GWB) can model the processes of neutralization of initially acidic water. Furthermore, this study will collect the meteoric water, thermal springs, and country rock along the Southern Sulfur River and use the GWB software to model the processes of neutralization of initially acidic water in the Southern Sulfur River in the future.

  18. Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This program was conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of existing water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks for electric utility and on-site applications. The goals for the electric utility stack technology were a power density of at least 175 watts per square foot over a 40,000-hour useful life and a projected one-of-a-kind, full-scale manufactured cost of less than $400 per kilowatt. The program adapted the existing on-site Configuration-B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduced additional new design features. Task 1 consisted of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. The conceptual design was updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments in Tasks 2 and 3, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Tasks 2 and 3 developed the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objectives. The design of the small area and 10-ft{sup 2} stacks was conducted in Task 4. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks were conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests were conducted in Task 6. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provided DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that was conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

  19. Monitoring of ppm level humic acid in surface water using ZnO-chitosan nano-composite as fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basumallick, Srijita; Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2015-05-01

    Surface water contains natural pollutants humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid at ppm level which form carcinogenic chloro-compounds during chlorination in water treatment plants. We report here synthesis of ZnO-chitosan (CS) nano-composites by simple hydrothermal technique and examined their application potential as fluorescent probe for monitoring ppm level HA. These ZnO-CS composites have been characterized by HRTEM, EDX, FTIR, AFM and Fluorescence Spectra. HRTEM images show the formation of ZnO-CS nano-composites of average diameter of 50-250 nm. Aqueous dispersions of these nano-composites show fluorescence emission at 395 nm when excited at 300 nm which is strongly quenched by ppm level HA indicating their possible use in monitoring ppm level HA present in surface water.

  20. Reactivity of Biliatresone, a Natural Biliary Toxin, with Glutathione, Histamine, and Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Koo, Kyung A; Waisbourd-Zinman, Orith; Wells, Rebecca G; Pack, Michael; Porter, John R

    2016-02-15

    In our previous work, we identified a natural toxin, biliatresone, from Dysphania glomulifera and D. littoralis, endemic plants associated with outbreaks of biliary atresia in Australian neonatal livestock. Biliatresone is a very rare isoflavonoid with an α-methylene ketone between two phenyls, 1,2-diaryl-2-propenone, along with methylenedioxy, dimethoxyl, and hydroxyl functional groups, that causes extrahepatic biliary toxicity in zebrafish. The toxic core of biliatresone is a methylene in the α-position relative to the ketone of 1,2-diaryl-2-propenone that serves as an electrophilic Michael acceptor. The α-methylene of biliatresone spontaneously conjugated with water and methanol (MeOH), respectively, via Michael addition in a reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analysis. We here report the reactivity of biliatresone toward glutathione (GSH), several amino acids, and other thiol- or imidazole-containing biomolecules. LC-MS and HPLC analysis of the conjugation reaction showed the reactivity of biliatresone to be in the order histidine > N-acetyl-d-cysteine (D-NAC) = N-acetyl-l-cysteine (L-NAC) > histamine > glutathione ≥ cysteine ≫ glycine > glutamate > phenylalanine, while serine and adenine had no reactivity due to intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the protic solvents. The reactivity of ethyl vinyl ketone (EVK, 1-penten-3-one), an example of a highly reactive α,ß-unsaturated ketone, toward GSH gave a 6.7-fold lower reaction rate constant than that of biliatresone. The reaction rate constant of synthetic 1,2-diaryl-2-propen-1-one (DP), a core structure of the toxic molecule, was 10-fold and 1.5-fold weaker in potency compared to the reaction rate constants of biliatresone and EVK, respectively. These results demostrated that the methylenedioxy, dimethoxyl, and hydroxyl functional groups of biliatresone contribute to the stronger reactivity of the Michael acceptor α-methylene ketone toward nucleophiles compared to that of DP

  1. Treatability and characterization of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in South African waters using newly developed methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkambule, T. I.; Krause, R. W. M.; Haarhoff, J.; Mamba, B. B.

    Managing the removal of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) or problematic components from water has become increasingly important. NOM is a heterogeneous mixture of organic compounds of human origin and derived from plant and microbial residues. The inadequate removal of NOM has a bearing on the capacity of the other treatment processes to remove organic micro-pollutants or inorganic species that may be present in the water. In addition the action of certain disinfection processes has been shown to lead to the formation of harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs). Owing to the complexity, in composition and structure, of NOM, the techniques currently employed for its characterization have a number of limitations, both in terms of quantification and removal of the NOM within short periods of time. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and Fluorescence Emission Excitation Matrices (FEEM) were used to characterize NOM from various water samples collected around South Africa. Characterization results gave an indication of the character of NOM present in all the water samples. FEEM and UV-Vis results indicated that most of the water samples were aromatic in nature, since they had high hydrophobic and humic acid-like materials content. Generally, the characterization data indicated a varying composition of NOM amongst the various sampling points. The polarity rapid assessment method (PRAM) was then employed as a rapid NOM characterization tool. The characterization under PRAM is based on preferential adsorption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions onto solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents. The PRAM also allows the separation of DOM into fractions by polarity, hence reducing the molecular heterogeneity of NOM and thus aiding the removal of specific NOM fractions from water. The PRAM provided a quick characterization of the NOM character. However, DOC quantification by the PRAM analysis was hindered by excessive carbon leaching

  2. Integrated treatment process using a natural Wyoming clinoptilolite for remediating produced waters from coalbed natural gas operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, H.; Vance, G.F.; Urynowicz, M.A.; Gregory, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) development in western U.S. states has resulted in an increase in an essential energy resource, but has also resulted in environmental impacts and additional regulatory needs. A concern associated with CBNG development relates to the production of the copious quantities of potentially saline-sodic groundwater required to recover the natural gas, hereafter referred to as CBNG water. Management of CBNG water is a major environmental challenge because of its quantity and quality. In this study, a locally available Na-rich natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) from Wyoming (WY) was examined for its potential to treat CBNG water to remove Na+ and lower the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, mmol1/2 L- 1/2). The zeolite material was Ca-modified before being used in column experiments. Column breakthrough studies indicated that a metric tonne (1000??kg) of Ca-WY-zeolite could be used to treat 60,000??L of CBNG water in order to lower SAR of the CBNG water from 30 to an acceptable level of 10??mmol1/2 L- 1/2. An integrated treatment process using Na-WY-zeolite for alternately treating hard water and CBNG water was also examined for its potential to treat problematic waters in the region. Based on the results of this study, use of WY-zeolite appears to be a cost-effective water treatment technology for maximizing the beneficial use of poor-quality CBNG water. Ongoing studies are evaluating water treatment techniques involving infiltration ponds lined with zeolite. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Extraction of amino acids from soils and sediments with superheated water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C. N.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1974-01-01

    A method of extraction for amino acids from soils and sediments involving superheated water has been investigated. About 75-97 per cent of the amino acids contained in four soils of a soil profile from Illinois were extracted by this method. Deep penetration of water into soil aggregates and partial hydrolysis of peptide bonds during this extraction by water at high temperature are likely mechanisms responsible for the release of amino acids from samples. This extraction method does not require subsequent desalting treatments when analyses are carried out with an ion-exchange amino acid analyzer.

  4. Methods of refining and producing dibasic esters and acids from natural oil feedstocks

    DOEpatents

    Snead, Thomas E.; Cohen, Steven A.; Gildon, Demond L.

    2016-03-15

    Methods are provided for refining natural oil feedstocks and producing dibasic esters and/or dibasic acids. The methods comprise reacting a terminal olefin with an internal olefin in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a dibasic ester and/or dibasic acid. In certain embodiments, the olefin esters are formed by reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst under conditions sufficient to form a metathesized product comprising olefins and esters, separating the olefins from the esters in the metathesized product, and transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product having olefin esters.

  5. Methods of refining and producing dibasic esters and acids from natural oil feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Thomas E; Cohen, Steven A; Gildon, Demond L

    2015-04-07

    Methods are provided for refining natural oil feedstocks and producing dibasic esters and/or dibasic acids. The methods comprise reacting a terminal olefin with an internal olefin in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a dibasic ester and/or dibasic acid. In certain embodiments, the olefin esters are formed by reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst under conditions sufficient to form a metathesized product comprising olefins and esters, separating the olefins from the esters in the metathesized product, and transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product having olefin esters.

  6. A convenient model and program for the assessment of abiotic degradation of chemicals in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, R.; Kloepffer, W.

    1989-06-01

    A convenient model for the estimation and comparison of rates of various degradation processes of chemicals in natural waters is described. The estimates are determined by combining physicochemical properties of the chemicals with properties of natural waters and solar photon irradiancies.

  7. TOXICOLOGY OF NATURAL AND MAN-MADE TOXICANTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking Water obtained from surface sources contains a very large variety of organic chemicals. The total organic carbon present in the source water is made up of both natural and man-made chemicals. In most instances natural organic material predominates and is largely made up ...

  8. DO AUTOCHTHONOUS BACTERIA AFFECT GIARDIA CYST SURVIVAL IN NATURAL WATERS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Giardia lamblia survives in and is transmitted to susceptible human and animal populations via water, where it is present in an environmentally resistant cyst form. Previous research has highlighted the importance of water temperature in cyst survival, and has also suggested the ...

  9. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  10. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  11. 27 CFR 24.182 - Use of acid to correct natural deficiencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Tartaric acid or malic acid, or a combination of tartaric acid and malic acid, may be added prior to or... acid, fumaric acid, malic acid, lactic acid or tartaric acid, or a combination of two or more of these... citric acid may be added to citrus fruit, juice or wine, only malic acid may......

  12. 27 CFR 24.182 - Use of acid to correct natural deficiencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Tartaric acid or malic acid, or a combination of tartaric acid and malic acid, may be added prior to or... acid, fumaric acid, malic acid, lactic acid or tartaric acid, or a combination of two or more of these... citric acid may be added to citrus fruit, juice or wine, only malic acid may......

  13. Plutonium - its behavior in natural-water systems and assimilation by man

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.P.; Nelson, D.M.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Oldham, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    There are a number of factors which must be considered in establishing whether or not the inadvertent intrusion of a sizable amount of plutonium-bearing material into a natural-water system may have a significant impact on the health of those individuals who use that system as a drinking-water resource. These factors include the chemical form(s) and solubility of plutonium in natural waters, its behavior in relation to natural processes (geochemical and biological), its fate in water-treatment systems, and its uptake by man from drinking water. From the results obtained of the behavior in natural-water systems, it appears that (1) the chemical forms of plutonium dissolved in natural waters are Pu(IV) and Pu(V), (2) the soluble plutonium in many waters is bound to the organic constituents which probably enhance plutonium solubility, (3) the natural process responsible for the removal of plutonium from water is adsorption onto sediments, and (4) in water-treatment systems, soluble plutonium is oxidized to the VI state and this form is not removed. From investigations of gastrointestinal absorption, it appears that the value for f/sub 1/, the fraction transferred from the gut to blood, is greater than 1 x 10/sup -3/ and may be as high as 2 x 10/sup -1/.

  14. [Influence of the ozonation on the elimination of arsenic from natural mineral water intended for bottling].

    PubMed

    Drobnik, Michał; Latour, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Mineral water--hydrogen carbonat-calcium naturally sparkling water--containing arsenic in concentration above 0.01 mg/dm3 was ozonated. There was experimentally determined the optimal ozonation parameters: ozone dose, a duration of the process and of the contact between ozone and water, concentration of dissolved ozon in water. There was, moreover, determined an exceeding of ozone residual permissible in the obligatory regulations for bottled mineral waters. PMID:17193745

  15. Discovery of phosphonic acid natural products by mining the genomes of 10,000 actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Ju, Kou-San; Gao, Jiangtao; Doroghazi, James R; Wang, Kwo-Kwang A; Thibodeaux, Christopher J; Li, Steven; Metzger, Emily; Fudala, John; Su, Joleen; Zhang, Jun Kai; Lee, Jaeheon; Cioni, Joel P; Evans, Bradley S; Hirota, Ryuichi; Labeda, David P; van der Donk, Wilfred A; Metcalf, William W

    2015-09-29

    Although natural products have been a particularly rich source of human medicines, activity-based screening results in a very high rate of rediscovery of known molecules. Based on the large number of natural product biosynthetic genes in microbial genomes, many have proposed "genome mining" as an alternative approach for discovery efforts; however, this idea has yet to be performed experimentally on a large scale. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of large-scale, high-throughput genome mining by screening a collection of over 10,000 actinomycetes for the genetic potential to make phosphonic acids, a class of natural products with diverse and useful bioactivities. Genome sequencing identified a diverse collection of phosphonate biosynthetic gene clusters within 278 strains. These clusters were classified into 64 distinct groups, of which 55 are likely to direct the synthesis of unknown compounds. Characterization of strains within five of these groups resulted in the discovery of a new archetypical pathway for phosphonate biosynthesis, the first (to our knowledge) dedicated pathway for H-phosphinates, and 11 previously undescribed phosphonic acid natural products. Among these compounds are argolaphos, a broad-spectrum antibacterial phosphonopeptide composed of aminomethylphosphonate in peptide linkage to a rare amino acid N(5)-hydroxyarginine; valinophos, an N-acetyl l-Val ester of 2,3-dihydroxypropylphosphonate; and phosphonocystoximate, an unusual thiohydroximate-containing molecule representing a new chemotype of sulfur-containing phosphonate natural products. Analysis of the genome sequences from the remaining strains suggests that the majority of the phosphonate biosynthetic repertoire of Actinobacteria has been captured at the gene level. This dereplicated strain collection now provides a reservoir of numerous, as yet undiscovered, phosphonate natural products. PMID:26324907

  16. Discovery of phosphonic acid natural products by mining the genomes of 10,000 actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Kou-San; Gao, Jiangtao; Doroghazi, James R.; Wang, Kwo-Kwang A.; Thibodeaux, Christopher J.; Li, Steven; Metzger, Emily; Fudala, John; Su, Joleen; Zhang, Jun Kai; Lee, Jaeheon; Cioni, Joel P.; Evans, Bradley S.; Hirota, Ryuichi; Labeda, David P.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Metcalf, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Although natural products have been a particularly rich source of human medicines, activity-based screening results in a very high rate of rediscovery of known molecules. Based on the large number of natural product biosynthetic genes in microbial genomes, many have proposed “genome mining” as an alternative approach for discovery efforts; however, this idea has yet to be performed experimentally on a large scale. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of large-scale, high-throughput genome mining by screening a collection of over 10,000 actinomycetes for the genetic potential to make phosphonic acids, a class of natural products with diverse and useful bioactivities. Genome sequencing identified a diverse collection of phosphonate biosynthetic gene clusters within 278 strains. These clusters were classified into 64 distinct groups, of which 55 are likely to direct the synthesis of unknown compounds. Characterization of strains within five of these groups resulted in the discovery of a new archetypical pathway for phosphonate biosynthesis, the first (to our knowledge) dedicated pathway for H-phosphinates, and 11 previously undescribed phosphonic acid natural products. Among these compounds are argolaphos, a broad-spectrum antibacterial phosphonopeptide composed of aminomethylphosphonate in peptide linkage to a rare amino acid N5-hydroxyarginine; valinophos, an N-acetyl l-Val ester of 2,3-dihydroxypropylphosphonate; and phosphonocystoximate, an unusual thiohydroximate-containing molecule representing a new chemotype of sulfur-containing phosphonate natural products. Analysis of the genome sequences from the remaining strains suggests that the majority of the phosphonate biosynthetic repertoire of Actinobacteria has been captured at the gene level. This dereplicated strain collection now provides a reservoir of numerous, as yet undiscovered, phosphonate natural products. PMID:26324907

  17. Effects of heavy metals in combination with NTA, humic acid, and suspended sediment on natural phytoplankton photosynthesis. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Hongve, D.; Skogheim, O.K.; Hindar, A.; Abrahamsen, H.

    1980-10-01

    In studies of effects of heavy metals on phytoplankton most experiments are conducted with monocultures in artificial or natural media. The response is measured in growth or in the intensity of biochemical processes. We have adopted the method described by GAECHTER using natural phytoplankton communities and measuring the response of heavy metal addition in photosynthesis. Our aim was to evaluate the acute effects of the metals Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, and Hg separately and in combination on a natural phytoplankton community under different experimental circumstances. These circumstances are thought to simulate various conditions which may occur in a lake. Addition of a dilute suspension of sediment corresponds to resuspension of sediment in shore-near areas during periods of heavy wave action. Addition of bog water increases the content of natural chelators (humic acid). Additions of NTA simulate a situation which may occur if this synthesic chelator is used as a substitute for phosphorus in detergents. The reported experiment was conducted in coordination with a research program on the eutrophication and contamination of Lake Tyrifjord, Norway. Lake data: Volume 13.8 x 10/sup 9/ m/sup 3/, area 136 km/sup 2/, maximum depth 296 m. The lake is still oligotrophic but significant signs of eutrophication have recently been identified. Until 1970 the lake was seriously contaminated by mercury from wood products industry.

  18. Lipase-catalyzed acidolysis of menhaden oil with conjugated linoleic acid: effect of water content.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos F; Hill, Charles G

    2002-06-01

    The effect of the water content on the lipase-catalyzed (Candida rugosa) interesterification (acidolysis) of menhaden oil with conjugated linoleic acid was studied for amounts of added water ranging from 0-4% (w/w). The rate of the acidolysis reaction increased with increasing water content, but the corresponding percentage of n-3 fatty acids liberated also increased. The implications of water content for minimization of the release of n-3 fatty acid residues while maximizing incorporation of CLA are discussed. PMID:12115120

  19. PERFORMANCE MONITORING FOR NATURAL ATTENUATION REMEDIES IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental monitoring is the major component of any remedy that relies on natural attenuation processes. The objective of this document is to identify data needs and evaluation methods useful for designing monitoring networks and determining remedy effectiveness. Effective mon...

  20. Estimation of Molecular Acidity via Electrostatic Potential at the Nucleus and Valence Natural Atomic Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shubin; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2009-01-01

    An effective approach of estimating molecular pKa values from simple density functional calculations is proposed in this work. Both the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) at the nucleus of the acidic atom and the sum of valence natural atomic orbitals are employed for three categories of compounds, amines and anilines, carbonyl acids and alcohols, and sulfonic acids and thiols. A strong correlation between experimental pKa values and each of these two quantities for each of the three categories has been discovered. Moreover, if the MEP is subtracted by the isolated atomic MEP for each category of compounds, we observe a single unique linear relationship between the resultant MEP difference and experimental pKa data of amines, anilines, carbonyl acids, alcohols, sulfonic acids, thiols, and their substituents. These results can generally be utilized to simultaneously estimate pKa values at multiple sites with a single calculation for either relatively small molecules in drug design or amino acids in proteins and macromolecules. PMID:19317439

  1. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2-0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology. PMID:26439402

  2. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-10-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2-0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology.

  3. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2−0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology. PMID:26439402

  4. [Investigation of the distribution of water clusters in vegetables, fruits, and natural waters by flicker noise spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zubov, A V; Zubov, K V; Zubov, V A

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of water clusters in fresh rain water and in rain water that was aged for 30 days (North Germany, 53 degrees 33' N, 12 degrees 47' E, 293 K, rain on 25.06.06) as well as in fresh vegetables and fruits was studied by flicker noise spectroscopy. In addition, the development of water clusters in apples and potatoes during ripening in 2006 was investigated. A different distribution of water clusters in irrigation water (river and rain) and in the biomatrix of vegetables (potatoes, onions, tomatoes, red beets) and fruits (apples, bananas) was observed. It was concluded that the cluster structure of irrigation water differs from that of water of the biomatrix of vegetables and fruits and depends on drought and the biomatrix nature. Water clusters in plants are more stable and reproducible than water clusters in natural water. The main characteristics of cluster formation in materials studied were given. The oscillation frequencies of water clusters in plants (biofield) are given at which they interact with water clusters of the Earth hydrosphere. A model of series of clusters 16(H2O)100 <--> 4(H2O)402 <--> 2(H2O)903 <--> (H2O)1889 in the biomatrix of vegetables and fruits was discussed. PMID:17907398

  5. Study of an Acid-Free Technique for the Preparation of Glycyrrhetinic Acid from Ammonium Glycyrrhizinate in Subcritical Water.

    PubMed

    Lekar, Anna V; Borisenko, Sergey N; Vetrova, Elena V; Filonova, Olga V; Maksimenko, Elena V; Borisenko, Nikolai I; Minkin, Vladimir I

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study an application of a previously developed expedient acid-free technique for the preparation of glycyrrhetinic acid from ammonium glycyrrhizinate that requires no use of acids and toxic organic solvents. Subcritical water that serves as a reactant and a solvent was used in order to obtain glycyrrhetinic acid in good yields starting from ammonium glycyrrhizinate. It has been shown that variation of only one parameter of the process (temperature) allows alteration to thecomposition of the hydrolysis products. A new method was used for the synthesis of glycyrrhetinic acid (glycyrrhizic acid aglycone) and its monoglycoside. HPLC combined with mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy were used to determine the quantitative and qualitative compositions of the obtained products. The method developed for the production of glycyrrhetinic acid in subcritical water is environmentally friendly and faster than conventional hydrolysis methods that use acids and-expensive and toxic organic solvents. The proposed technique has a potential for the future development of inexpensive and environmentally friendly technologies for production of new pharmaceutical plant-based substances. PMID:26749800

  6. Evaluation of circulating levels and renal clearance of natural amino acids in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, A; Pivonello, R; Melis, D; Alfieri, R; Filippella, M; Spagnuolo, G; Salvatore, F; Lombardi, G; Colao, A

    2002-02-01

    Although the hypercortisolism-induced impairment of protein homeostasis is object of several studies, a detailed evaluation of the complete amino acid profile of patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) has never been performed. The aim of the current open transversal controlled study was to evaluate serum and urinary concentrations as well as renal clearance of the complete series of natural amino acids and their relationship with glucose tolerance in patients with Cushing's disease (CD). Twenty patients with CD (10 active and 10 cured) and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy controls entered the study. Measurement of serum and urinary levels of the complete series of natural amino acids was performed in all patients analyzed by cationic exchange high performance liquid cromatography (HPLC) after 2 weeks of a standardized protein intake regimen. The renal clearance (renal excretion rate) of each amino acid was calculated on the basis of the serum and urinary concentrations of creatinine and the specific amino acid. Fasting glucose and insulin levels, glucose and insulin response to standard glucose load, insulinogenic and homeostasis model insulin resistance (Homa-R) indexes were also evaluated and correlated to the circulating levels and renal clearances of each amino acid. Significantly higher serum (p<0.01) and urinary (p<0.05) levels of alanine and cystine, lower serum and higher urinary levels of leucine, isoleucine and valine (p<0.05) and higher renal excretion rates of leucine, isoleucine and valine (p<0.01) were found in patients with active CD than in patients cured from the disease and in controls. No difference was found between cured patients and controls. Creatinine clearance was similar in active and cured patients and in controls. In patients with active CD, urinary cortisol levels were significantly correlated to urinary cystine levels (r=0.85; p<0.01) and renal excretion rate of leucine (r=-0.76; p<0.05), isoleucine (r=-0.76; p<0.05) and valine (r=-0

  7. Rapid determination of filterable residue in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Herbert E.; Bacon, Charles W.

    1969-01-01

    The most widely used procedures for determining filterable residue (total dissolved solids) in water are macromethods given in Standard Methods. Although macromethods give good results, they require large amounts of water and long drying times. This report describes a microtechnique for determining filterable residue that requires only 0.05 ml of water and 15 min/sample drying time. The sensitivity of the method is within the range (4 mg/l or 5 per cent) given in Standard Methods and that reported by Sokoloff.

  8. Experimental remote sensing of subsurface temperature in natural ocean water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.; Caputo, B.; Johnson, R. L.; Hoge, F. E.

    1977-01-01

    The first successful depth-resolved remote sensing measurements of subsurface ocean water temperature were obtained by spectral analysis of the 3400 per cm O-H stretching Raman band of liquid water. Raman spectral data were obtained from a research vessel at various depths from the surface to 10 meters below the surface in a tidal estuary. The temperature inferred from the spectra was consistent with ground truth temperature to within the shot noise limited accuracy of plus or minus 2 C. The performance of a future fully developed airborne laser Raman water temperature measurement system is estimated on the basis of these first tests.

  9. Geochemical Signature of Natural Water Recharge in the Jungar Basin and Its Response to Climate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bingqi; Yu, Jingjie; Rioual, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzed the physico-chemical characteristics of natural waters in a drainage system of the Jungar Basin, northwestern China to identify chemical evolution and recharge mechanisms of natural waters in an arid environment. The waters studied are different in mineralization, but are typically carbonate rivers and alkaline in nature. No Cl-dominated water type occurs, indicating an early stage of water evolution. Regolith and geomorphological parameters controlling ground-surface temperature may play a large role in the geological evolution of the water. Three main morphological and hydrological units are reflected in water physico-chemistry. Climate influences the salinization of natural waters substantially. Direct recharge from seasonal snow and ice-melt water and infiltration of rain to the ground are significant recharge processes for natural waters, but recharge from potential deep groundwater may be less important. The enrichment of ions in lakes has been mainly caused by evaporation rather than through the quality change of the recharged water. PMID:26803030

  10. γ Actinorhodin a natural and attorney source for synthetic dye to detect acid production of fungi

    PubMed Central

    Manikprabhu, Deene; Lingappa, K.

    2013-01-01

    Colors from natural sources are gaining popularity because synthetic colors are carcinogenic. Natural colors are obtained from plants or microorganisms. Pigments produced by microorganisms have advantages over plant pigments, due to their ease of use and reliability. In the present study, a blue pigment producing actinomycete klmp33 was isolated from the Gulbarga region in India. The isolate was identified based on morphologic, microscopic, and biochemical characterization, and 16S rRNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the isolates showed a close relationship with Streptomyces coelicolor. Pigment produced by the isolate was analyzed using UV–visible spectroscopy, thin-layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared and liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis, and was identified as γ actinorhodin. γ-Actinorhodin is used as a pH indicator which deviates from acid to non-acid. Moreover, it subrogates synthetic dye. PMID:23961232

  11. Biological Properties of Acidic Cosmetic Water from Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei-Ting; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Pan, Jian-Liang; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chen, Bing-Hung; Chen, Shi-Hui; Liu, Po-Len; Wang, Hui-Chun; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Hui-Min; Hsiao, Shu-Wen

    2012-01-01

    This current work was to investigate the biological effects of acidic cosmetic water (ACW) on various biological assays. ACW was isolated from seawater and demonstrated several bio-functions at various concentration ranges. ACW showed a satisfactory effect against Staphylococcus aureus, which reduced 90% of bacterial growth after a 5-second exposure. We used cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to test the properties of ACW in inflammatory cytokine release, and it did not induce inflammatory cytokine release from un-stimulated, normal PBMCs. However, ACW was able to inhibit bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine TNF-α released from PBMCs, showing an anti-inflammation potential. Furthermore, ACW did not stimulate the rat basophilic leukemia cell (RBL-2H3) related allergy response on de-granulation. Our data presented ACW with a strong anti-oxidative ability in a superoxide anion radical scavenging assay. In mass spectrometry information, magnesium and zinc ions demonstrated bio-functional detections for anti-inflammation as well as other metal ions such as potassium and calcium were observed. ACW also had minor tyrosinase and melanin decreasing activities in human epidermal melanocytes (HEMn-MP) without apparent cytotoxicity. In addition, the cell proliferation assay illustrated anti-growth and anti-migration effects of ACW on human skin melanoma cells (A375.S2) indicating that it exerted the anti-cancer potential against skin cancer. The results obtained from biological assays showed that ACW possessed multiple bioactivities, including anti-microorganism, anti-inflammation, allergy-free, antioxidant, anti-melanin and anticancer properties. To our knowledge, this was the first report presenting these bioactivities on ACW. PMID:22754342

  12. Gold in natural water: A method of determination by solvent extraction and electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A method has been developed using electrothermal atomization to effectively determine the amount of gold in natural water within the nanogram range. The method has four basic steps: (1) evaporating a 1-L sample; (2) putting it in hydrobromic acid-bromine solution; (3) extracting the sample with methyl-isobutyl-ketone; and (4) determining the amount of gold using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The limit of detection is 0.001 ??g gold per liter. Results from three studies indicate, respectively, that the method is precise, effective, and free of interference. Specifically, a precision study indicates that the method has a relative standard deviation of 16-18%; a recovery study indicates that the method recovers gold at an average of 93%; and an interference study indicates that the interference effects are eliminated with solvent extraction and background correction techniques. Application of the method to water samples collected from 41 sites throughout the Western United States and Alaska shows a gold concentration range of < 0.001 to 0.036 ??g gold per liter, with an average of 0.005 ??g/L. ?? 1984.

  13. Redox potential tuning by redox-inactive cations in nature's water oxidizing catalyst and synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Krewald, Vera; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-04-20

    The redox potential of synthetic oligonuclear transition metal complexes has been shown to correlate with the Lewis acidity of a redox-inactive cation connected to the redox-active transition metals of the cluster via oxo or hydroxo bridges. Such heterometallic clusters are important cofactors in many metalloenzymes, where it is speculated that the redox-inactive constituent ion of the cluster serves to optimize its redox potential for electron transfer or catalysis. A principal example is the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of natural photosynthesis, a Mn4CaO5 cofactor that oxidizes water into dioxygen, protons and electrons. Calcium is critical for catalytic function, but its precise role is not yet established. In analogy to synthetic complexes it has been suggested that Ca(2+) fine-tunes the redox potential of the manganese cluster. Here we evaluate this hypothesis by computing the relative redox potentials of substituted derivatives of the oxygen-evolving complex with the cations Sr(2+), Gd(3+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Sc(3+), Na(+) and Y(3+) for two sequential transitions of its catalytic cycle. The theoretical approach is validated with a series of experimentally well-characterized Mn3AO4 cubane complexes that are structural mimics of the enzymatic cluster. Our results reproduce perfectly the experimentally observed correlation between the redox potential and the Lewis acidities of redox-inactive cations for the synthetic complexes. However, it is conclusively demonstrated that this correlation does not hold for the oxygen evolving complex. In the enzyme the redox potential of the cluster only responds to the charge of the redox-inactive cations and remains otherwise insensitive to their precise identity, precluding redox-tuning of the metal cluster as a primary role for Ca(2+) in biological water oxidation. PMID:26762578

  14. Crystallization and sublimation of non-racemic mixtures of natural amino acids: a path towards homochirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2012-07-01

    Homochirality of biologically important molecules such as amino acids and sugars is a prerequisite for the origin of life. There are different forces or mechanisms in the Universe to trigger off the primary imbalance in the enantiomeric ratio. Very likely the initial bias of one type of enantiomers over the other on Earth was arisen from the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (carbonaceous meteorites). The phase transitions (crystallization, sublimation) of non-racemic mixtures of enantiomers are ones of the most probable mechanisms for the homochirogenesis[1]. The sublimation, almost uninvestigated subject and forgotten for 30 years, revealed recently a pathway to the enantioenrichment of natural amino acids[2]. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure amino acid a partial sublimation gives a considerable enrichment. In our further experiments we combined two first-order phase transitions of amino acid(s) mixtures: crystallization and sublimation. The results show the possibility of the transfer of enantiopurity between different amino acids[3]. Subliming a crystallized mixture of racemic amino acids with an enantiopure one we found that the sublimate is a non-racemic mixture of the same handedness for all components. The significance of the studies can be realized taking into account that just 5 of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to homochiral self-organization. The relevance of these studies to the Prebiotic Earth and to the evolution of the single handedness of biological molecules will be discussed. [1] Blackmond, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 2011, 366, 2878. [2] Guillemin et al., Chem. Commun. 2010 , 46, 1482. [3] Tarasevych, Guillemin et al., submitted.

  15. Comparison of natural (olive mill wastewater) and synthetic surfactant for soil water repellency mitigation in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantis, Vasileios; Pagorogon, Lorvi; Gazani, Eleutheria; Gkiougkis, Ioannis; Pliakas, Fotios

    2010-05-01

    This study explores, for the first time, the potential effectiveness of olive mill wastewater (OMW) as an alternative to industrial surfactants in decreasing soil water repellency. The OMW was characterized by high concentrations of short-chain fatty acids, mainly butyric, propionic and acetic, which contributed approximately to 1/3 of the organic load. It was applied diluted (1:1 with freshwater) in an agricultural field in NE Greece affected by water repellency, at a rate of ~ 4.3 L/m2. For comparison, a commercial soil surfactant was used according to the instructions of the manufacturer (0.8 mL/m2). The use of commercial surfactant was very efficient in decreasing water repellency immediately after application. The number of wettable samples (WDPT < 5 s) increased to ~ 50% (compared to 13% for the control soil) seven (7) days after treatment application. Diluted olive mill wastewater (50%) did not show any improvement in soil wettability immediately after application, but gradually was comparable effective to the surfactant treatment. The number of wettable samples showed a continuous increase from 13 to 25 and 54% after 7, 22 and 37 days from OMW application. In conclusion, OMW was found to be effective in decreasing soil water repellency. This suggests the potential of OMW as a natural surfactant. Its longer-term effects, however, have yet to be established. It is demonstrated that the short-chain fatty acids present in OMW play a critical role towards its surface-active properties. Keywords: Olive mill wastewater; short-chain fatty acids; biosurfactant; natural surfactant; water repellency mitigation.

  16. New Umami Amides: Structure-Taste Relationship Studies of Cinnamic Acid Derived Amides and the Natural Occurrence of an Intense Umami Amide in Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    PubMed

    Frerot, Eric; Neirynck, Nathalie; Cayeux, Isabelle; Yuan, Yoyo Hui-Juan; Yuan, Yong-Ming

    2015-08-19

    A series of aromatic amides were synthesized from various acids and amines selected from naturally occurring structural frameworks. These synthetic amides were evaluated for umami taste in comparison with monosodium glutamate. The effect of the substitution pattern of both the acid and the amine parts on umami taste was investigated. The only intensely umami-tasting amides were those made from 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid. The amine part was more tolerant to structural changes. Amides bearing an alkyl- or alkoxy-substituted phenylethylamine residue displayed a clean umami taste as 20 ppm solutions in water. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with a high quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (UPLC/MS) was subsequently used to show the natural occurrence of these amides. (E)-3-(3,4-Dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(4-methoxyphenethyl)acrylamide was shown to occur in the roots and stems of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant of the family Rutaceae growing in Korea, Japan, and China. PMID:26230212

  17. Removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage (AMD) using coal fly ash, natural clinker and synthetic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ríos, C A; Williams, C D; Roberts, C L

    2008-08-15

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a widespread environmental problem associated with both working and abandoned mining operations, resulting from the microbial oxidation of pyrite in presence of water and air, affording an acidic solution that contains toxic metal ions. The generation of AMD and release of dissolved heavy metals is an important concern facing the mining industry. The present study aimed at evaluating the use of low-cost sorbents like coal fly ash, natural clinker and synthetic zeolites to clean-up AMD generated at the Parys Mountain copper-lead-zinc deposit, Anglesey (North Wales), and to remove heavy metals and ammonium from AMD. pH played a very important role in the sorption/removal of the contaminants and a higher adsorbent ratio in the treatment of AMD promoted the increase of the pH, particularly using natural clinker-based faujasite (7.70-9.43) and the reduction of metal concentration. Na-phillipsite showed a lower efficiency as compared to that of faujasite. Selectivity of faujasite for metal removal was, in decreasing order, Fe>As>Pb>Zn>Cu>Ni>Cr. Based on these results, the use of these materials has the potential to provide improved methods for the treatment of AMD. PMID:18221835

  18. Semisynthetic and Natural Garcinoic Acid Isoforms as New mPGES-1 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Alsabil, Khaled; Suor-Cherer, Sorphon; Koeberle, Andreas; Viault, Guillaume; Lavaud, Alexis; Temml, Veronika; Waltenberger, Birgit; Schuster, Daniela; Litaudon, Marc; Lorkowski, Stefan; de Vaumas, René; Helesbeux, Jean-Jacques; Guilet, David; Stuppner, Hermann; Werz, Oliver; Seraphin, Denis; Richomme, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Over the last twenty years, tocotrienol analogues raised great interest because of their higher level and larger domain of biological activities when compared with tocopherols. Amongst the most promising therapeutic application, anti-inflammatory potency has been evaluated through the inhibition of various mediators of inflammation. Here, we worked on the isolation of two natural isoforms of garcinoic acid (i.e., δ and γ) from two different sources, respectively, Garcinia kola seeds and Garcinia amplexicaulis bark. We also developed semisynthetic strategies to access the other two non-natural α- and β-garcinoic acid isoforms. In the next stage of our work, microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase was defined as a target to evaluate the anti-inflammatory potential of the four garcinoic acid isomers. Both dimethylated isoforms, β- and γ-garcinoic acid, exhibited the lowest IC50, 2.8 µM and 2.0 µM, respectively. These results showed that the affinity of tocotrienol analogues to microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 most probably contributes to the anti-inflammatory potential of this class of derivatives. PMID:27286327

  19. Discovery of a novel amino acid racemase through exploration of natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Strauch, Renee C.; Svedin, Elisabeth; Dilkes, Brian; Chapple, Clint; Li, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce diverse low-molecular-weight compounds via specialized metabolism. Discovery of the pathways underlying production of these metabolites is an important challenge for harnessing the huge chemical diversity and catalytic potential in the plant kingdom for human uses, but this effort is often encumbered by the necessity to initially identify compounds of interest or purify a catalyst involved in their synthesis. As an alternative approach, we have performed untargeted metabolite profiling and genome-wide association analysis on 440 natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana. This approach allowed us to establish genetic linkages between metabolites and genes. Investigation of one of the metabolite–gene associations led to the identification of N-malonyl-d-allo-isoleucine, and the discovery of a novel amino acid racemase involved in its biosynthesis. This finding provides, to our knowledge, the first functional characterization of a eukaryotic member of a large and widely conserved phenazine biosynthesis protein PhzF-like protein family. Unlike most of known eukaryotic amino acid racemases, the newly discovered enzyme does not require pyridoxal 5′-phosphate for its activity. This study thus identifies a new d-amino acid racemase gene family and advances our knowledge of plant d-amino acid metabolism that is currently largely unexplored. It also demonstrates that exploitation of natural metabolic variation by integrating metabolomics with genome-wide association is a powerful approach for functional genomics study of specialized metabolism. PMID:26324904

  20. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodo-acids were recently identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, (Z)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, and (E)-2-iodo-3...

  1. Phase equilibria and distribution constants of metal ions in diantipyryl alkane-organic acid-hydrochloric acid-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtev, M. I.; Popova, O. N.; Yuminova, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    The ability of antipyrine and its derivatives (diantipyryl alkanes) to form separating systems in the presence of salicylic (sulfosalicylic) acid and hydrochloric acid and water is studied. The optimum volume of the organic phase, the composition of complexes, and the mechanism for the distribution of metal ions are determined, depending on the concentrations of the main components and the salting-out agent. The complex distribution and extraction constants are calculated.

  2. Separation of phenolic acids from natural plant extracts using molecularly imprinted anion-exchange polymer confined ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wentao; Tian, Minglei; Row, Kyung Ho

    2012-04-01

    Polymer-confined ionic liquids were used for the separation of phenolic acids from natural plant extract by utilizing an anion-exchange mechanism. They were synthesized using molecular imprinting technique to reduce non-directional ion-ion interactions during anion-exchange and other interactions with interference substances that could decrease selectivity. A suitable sorbent for phenolic acid separation could be identified based on the adsorption behaviors of phenolic acids on different polymer-confined ionic liquids. Thus, the developed ionic liquid-based molecularly imprinted anion-exchange polymer (IMAP) achieved high recovery rates by solid-phase extraction of phenolic acids from Salicornia herbacea L. extract: 90.1% for protocatechuic acid, 95.5% for ferulic acid and 96.6% for caffeic acid. Moreover, the phenolic acids were separable from each other by repeated solid phase extraction cycles. The proposed method could be used to separate other phenolic acids or organic acids from complex samples. PMID:21903215

  3. Emergency response planning to reduce the impact of contaminated drinking water during natural disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Craig L.; Adams, Jeffrey Q.

    2011-12-01

    Natural disasters can be devastating to local water supplies affecting millions of people. Disaster recovery plans and water industry collaboration during emergencies protect consumers from contaminated drinking water supplies and help facilitate the repair of public water systems. Prior to an event, utilities and municipalities can use "What if"? scenarios to develop emergency operation, response, and recovery plans designed to reduce the severity of damage and destruction. Government agencies including the EPA are planning ahead to provide temporary supplies of potable water and small drinking water treatment technologies to communities as an integral part of emergency response activities that will ensure clean and safe drinking water.

  4. Processes Driving Natural Acidification of Western Pacific Coral Reef Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamberger, K. E.; Cohen, A. L.; Golbuu, Y.; McCorkle, D. C.; Lentz, S. J.; Barkley, H. C.

    2013-12-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are acidifying the oceans, reducing seawater pH, aragonite saturation state (Ωar) and the availability of carbonate ions (CO32-) that calcifying organisms use to build coral reefs. Today's most extensive reef ecosystems are located where open ocean CO32- concentration ([CO32-]) and Ωar exceed 200 μmol kg-1 and 3.3, respectively. However, high rates of biogeochemical cycling and long residence times of water can result in carbonate chemistry conditions within coral reef systems that differ greatly from those of nearby open ocean waters. In the Palauan archipelago, water moving across the reef platform is altered by both biological and hydrographic processes that combine to produce seawater pH, Ωar, [CO32-] significantly lower than that of open ocean source water. Just inshore of the barrier reefs, average Ωar values are 0.2 to 0.3 and pH values are 0.02 to 0.03 lower than they are offshore, declining further as water moves across the back reef, lagoon and into the meandering bays and inlets that characterize the Rock Islands. In the Rock Island bays, coral communities inhabit seawater with average Ωar values of 2.7 or less, and as low as 1.9. Levels of Ωar as low as these are not predicted to occur in the western tropical Pacific open ocean until near the end of the century. Calcification by coral reef organisms is the principal biological process responsible for lowering Ωar and pH, accounting for 68 - 99 % of the difference in Ωar between offshore source water and reef water at our sites. However, in the Rock Island bays where Ωar is lowest, CO2 production by net respiration contributes between 17 - 30 % of the difference in Ωar between offshore source water and reef water. Furthermore, the residence time of seawater in the Rock Island bays is much longer than at the well flushed exposed sites, enabling calcification and respiration to drive Ωar to very low levels despite lower net ecosystem

  5. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A; López-Climent, María F; Casaretto, José A; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  6. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A.; López-Climent, María F.; Casaretto, José A.; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  7. Acid deposition and the acidification of soils and waters

    SciTech Connect

    Reuss, J.O.; Johnson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    A conceptual model of acid deposition is presented consistent with established physicochemical principles and the bulk of available information. The authors seek to provide insight into probable long-term effects of acid deposition; a testable hypotheses; plus design and interpretation of the research. (PSB)

  8. EVALUATING CAPACITIES OF GAC PRELOADED WITH NATURAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption studies are conducted to determine how preloading a natural groundwater onto GAC affects the adsorption of cis-1,2-dichloroexthene in small-scale and pilot-scale columns. Capacities are determined from batch-isotherm tests, microcolumns, and pilot columns, which are p...

  9. Photolysis of natural B-triketonic herbicides in water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate of four natural triketones (leptospermone, isoleptospermone, grandiflorone and flavesone, pKa=4.0 to 4.5) in aqueous solution, in the dark and upon simulated solar light irradiation was investigated. In anionic form, triketones undergo oxidation in the dark, however, photolysis is much fast...

  10. Matrix Isolation IR Spectroscopy of 1:1 Complexes of Acetic Acid and Trihaloacetic Acids with Water and Benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Pujarini; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2015-06-01

    A comparative study of infrared spectral effects for 1:1 complex formation of acetic acid (AA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TFAA) with water and benzene has been carried out under a matrix isolation environment. Despite the large difference in aqueous phase acidities of the three acids, the measured νb{OH}stretching frequencies of the monomers of the three molecules are found to be almost same, and in agreement with gas phase electronic structure calculations. Intrinsic acidities are expressed only in the presence of the proton acceptors, water or benzene. Although electronic structure calculations predict distinct νb{OH} red-shifts for all three acids, the measured spectral features for TCAA and TFAA in this range do not allow unambiguous assignments for the 1:1 complex. On the other hand, the spectral changes in the νb{C=O} region are more systematic, and the observed changes are consistent with predictions of theory. Components of overall binding energy of each complex have been obtained from energy decomposition analysis, which allows determination of the relative contributions of various physical forces towards overall stability of the complexes, and the details will be discussed in the talk.

  11. Natural derivatives of diphenolic acid as substitutes for bisphenol-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertl, Johanna; Cerri, Elisa; Rizzuto, Matteo; Caretti, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    Diphenolic acid had been originally used in the first epoxy resins and was later on forgotten as it was substituted by the cheaper bisphenol A. But in the recent years major health concerns have been raised as bisphenol A has a pseudo-hormonal effect on the body, playing the role of estrogen it can cause a severe impact on the organism, especially in males. Moreover it is produced from acetone and phenol, both from fossil, and thus limited resources. On the contrary, diphenolic acid is synthesized from levulinic acid and phenol. Levulinic acid being directly produced by hydrolysis of biomass. By substituting the fossil phenol with natural phenols from lignin or plant extraction we are able to synthesize a fully renewable substitute for bisphenol A. The reactions to yield an epoxy resin have been examined and the reactivity with epichlorohydrin is satisfying. Moreover, some of the derivatives of diphenolic acid have interesting curing properties and preliminary results show excellent properties of the cured resin, including thermal stability and pencil hardness.

  12. A comparative study of surface acid-base characteristics of natural illites from different origins

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Sun, Z.; Forsling, W.; Du, Q.; Tang, H.

    1999-11-01

    The acid-base characteristics of naturally occurring illites, collected from different locations, were investigated by potentiometeric titrations. The experimental data were interpreted using the constant capacitance surface complexation model. Considerable release of Al and Si from illite samples and subsequent complexation or precipitation of hydroxyl aluminosilicates generated during the acidimetric forward titration and the alkalimetric back titration, respectively, were observed. In order to describe the acid-base chemistry of aqueous illite surfaces, two surface proton-reaction models, introducing the corresponding reactions between the dissolved aluminum species and silicic acid, as well as a surface Al-Si complex on homogeneous illite surface sites, were proposed. Optimization results indicated that both models could provide a good description of the titration behavior for all aqueous illite systems in this study. The intrinsic acidity constants for the different illites were similar in Model 1, showing some generalities in their acid-base properties. Model 1 may be considered as a simplification of Model 2, evident in the similarities between the corresponding constants. In addition, the formation constant for surface Al-Si species (complexes or precipitates) is relatively stable in this study.

  13. Preparation of sulfonic acid-containing rubbers from natural rubber vulcanizates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonsawat, Worapong; Poompradub, Sirilux; Ngamcharussrivichai, Chawalit

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a series of sulfonic acid-containing rubbers were prepared by aqueous phase oxidation of natural rubber vulcanizates in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and formic acid (HCOOH). The starting vulcanizates were neatly prepared via an efficient vulcanization (EV) system by varying mass ratio of N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfonamide (CBS), as an accelerator, to sulfur. The oxidation conditions were controlled at the molar ratio of H2O2: HCOOH = 1:1, the concentration of H2O2 = 15 wt.%, the temperature = 50 °C, and the reaction time = 3 h. The rubber materials before and after the oxidation were characterized for their physicochemical properties by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, bomb calorimetry, acid-base titration and swelling measurements. The results indicated the presence of sulfonic acid group in the oxidized rubbers, generated by the oxidative cleaves of sulfide crosslinks in the rubber vulcanizates. The oxidation decreased the sulfur content of the rubber in which the level of sulfur loss was determined by the CBS/sulfur ratio. Moreover, the acidity of the oxidized products was correlated with the amount of sulfur remaining.

  14. Iodine Systematics in the Ground Water of a Natural Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, R.; Clark, I. D.; Kotzer, T.; Bottomley, D.

    2001-12-01

    The transport and partitioning of 129I has been examined for a shallowly circulating ground water system at Sturgeon Falls in eastern Ontario. Vertical recharge occurs in a sandy aquifer with a seasonally inundated boreal forest. Concentrations of stable iodine, 129I, and tritium were measured on samples of ground water, precipitation, and soil litter. The present-day tritium profile delineates the position of the early 1960's thermonuclear bomb-pulse at a depth approximately 12 m. The concentrations of stable iodine for ground waters above, near and below the present-day bomb pulse were largely invariant, at approximately 0.5 ppb, whereas 129I concentrations decreased from 1.9 x 106 atoms/L at 9 m, to approximately 1.9 x 105 atoms/L on tritium-depleted waters occurring below the present-day location of the recharging thermonuclear bomb-test peak at 35 m. No substantial increases in the levels of 129I were evident in waters sampled near the present-day location of the thermonuclear bomb peak. Along a 30 cm soil profile, the concentrations of 129I ranged from approximately 4.3 x 108 atoms/g in the uppermost soil litter layer to 5.6 x 107 atoms/g in the siltier bottom soil horizons. Over that same profile, stable iodine varied from 4.7 ppm in the upper layers to 3.9 ppm in the lower layers. Rao and Fehn, 1999, measured iodine and 129I levels in surface waters and soils in western New York. They found 129I concentrations ranging from 3.5 x 108 atoms/g to 7.1 x 1010 atoms/g in the upper most layers of their soil cores, depending on the site's proximity to a former nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Similarly, they noticed that the lower layers of their soil cores had 129I concentrations of at least an order of magnitude lower than the upper layers. It is proposed here that the levels of 129I in the deepest, tritium-depleted ground waters reflect the concentrations of 129I during the pre-thermonuclear testing period. However, the lower concentrations of 129I at Sturgeon

  15. Oxidation reaction of high molecular weight carboxylic acids in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fangming; Moriya, Takehiko; Enomoto, Heiji

    2003-07-15

    Stearic acid, being a model compound of high molecular weight carboxylic acids, was oxidized in a batch reactor by changing the oxygen supply with an insufficient oxygen supply at a constant reaction time at 420 degrees C. On the basis of the intermediate products identified by GC/MS, NMR, and HPLC analyses and the free-radical reaction mechanism, the oxidation pathways of high molecular weight carboxylic acids in supercritical water are discussed. The reaction of carboxylic acids in supercritical water proceeds with the consecutive oxidation of higher molecular weight carboxylic acids to lower molecular weight carboxylic acids through several major pathways. The attack of the hydroxyl radical occurs not only at the carbons in alpha-, beta-, gamma-positions to a --COOH group but also at the carbons ((omega-1)-carbon and/or omega-carbon) far in the alkyl chain from a --COOH group, which may lead to the formation of dicarboxylic acids. PMID:12901673

  16. Corrosion of 85-5-5-5 bronze in natural and synthetic acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morselli, L.; Bernardi, E.; Chiavari, C.; Brunoro, G.

    In order to investigate the decay of bronzes exposed to acid wet depositions, a comparative study has been performed by following the corrosion behaviour of different sets of bronze specimens exposed either to natural rain or to a similar solution, without organic compounds, artificially reproduced in laboratory. The as cast G85 bronze specimens were exposed to aggressive solutions for different periods through a wet-dry technique. The pH trend of the solutions and the amount of metals transferred into the solutions were periodically monitored. OM, SEM, XRD, RAMAN analyses and ac electrochemical measurements were performed on the artificially weathered specimens. Preliminary results, showing the difference between the ageing in natural and synthetic rain, suggest the influence of the organic components on the corrosion process. In particular, the growth of a more uniform protective layer of corrosion products on the metal surface exposed to the natural rain could be attributed to these components.

  17. ANALYSIS OF SUPERSATUATED AIR IN NATURAL WATERS AND RESERVOIRS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides a state of the art summary and evaluation of the methods for the determination of total gas in water samples. The hollow fiber, the hollow tube, and the flat membrane probes were evaluated. A flat surface probe was developed that has a low dead space, high pe...

  18. TBA IN GROUND WATER FROM THE NATURAL BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    At many UST spills, the concentrations of TBA in ground water are much higher than would be expected from the presence of TBA in the gasoline originally spilled. The ratio of concentrations of TBA to concentrations of MTBE in monitoring wells at gasoline spill sites was compared ...

  19. DDQ-promoted dehydrogenation from natural rigid polycyclic acids or flexible alkyl acids to generate lactones by a radical ion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ye; Huang, Zhangjian; Yin, Jian; Lai, Yisheng; Zhang, Shibo; Zhang, Zhiguo; Fang, Lei; Peng, Sixun; Zhang, Yihua

    2011-09-01

    A novel and facile DDQ-mediated dehydrogenation from natural rigid polycyclic acids or flexible alkyl acids to generate lactones is described. The formation of lactones proceeds by a radical ion mechanism, which has been established by DPPH˙-mediated chemical identification, ESR spectroscopy and an enol intermediate trapping. PMID:21766102

  20. Nature's Starships: Amino Acid Synthesis, Frequency, and Delivery to Earth via Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Alyssa; Pudritz, Ralph

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the origin of organic molecules on Earth is vital to our understanding of the origins of life. One proposed mechanism for the introduction of organic material to our planet is via meteorite impacts. Meteoritic parent bodies contain organic material and water ice, which, given radionuclide decay in their interiors, cause the ice to melt and the parent bodies to undergo a process called aqueous alteration. An example of this internal chemistry is Strecker synthesis, a process resulting in the production of various amino acids. Our work summarizes recent discoveries regarding amino acid synthesis and concentration data. We present the amino acid concentrations collated from a variety of meteorites (~20) covering a range of meteorite classes. We can use the dependence of amino acid frequency on variables such as temperature and pressure to model Strecker synthesis inside a theoretical parent body. Our modeling software takes a set of chemical species and outputs their relative frequencies based on a minimization of their Gibbs free energies. The goal of this work is to predict and quantify the presence of amino acids on a foreign landscape using thermodynamic principles.

  1. Ca and S K-edge XANES studies of calcite-acid mine water interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, S.C.B.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1997-04-01

    Heavy metal-rich acidic waters (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, AsO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, Fe{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}) and related ochreous coatings are common around abandoned sulfide and coal mine sites. This is mainly caused by the natural weathering of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), arsenopyrite (FeAsS), and other metal sulfide containing shales. Acid generation in the case of pyrite can be explained by a general reaction: FeS{sub 2} + 3.5 O{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O {leftrightarrow} Fe{sup 2+} + SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} + 2H{sup +}. Also, these low pH waters interact with the soils, and mobilize their soluble elements. One of the common remediation strategies is to allow these acid waters to react with limestone (CaCO{sub 3}-rich rock) and neutralize the pH and precipitate out soluble metals. Yet, the associated problem is the precipitation of Fe and Al oxides and hydroxy sulfate coatings on limestone surfaces, which block calcite reactive sites, and make them ineffective a few hours after initiation of treatment. The main objectives of this research are to examine: (1) the chemistry of limestone surface coatings, and (2) their toxic metal uptake and the conditions that inhibit their formation. Previous molecular studies using X-ray diffraction, and vibrational spectroscopy on limestone surface coatings (sampled from Athens, OH) indicate that the surface-most layer (the layer in contact with water) is composed of schwertmannite (Fe(III)-hydroxy sulfate) like phases. However, white, X-ray amorphous; Al-, sulfate- and carbonate-rich; and Ca-poor phases appeared at the interface between the limestone and the iron oxide coatings. The structure, morphology, and coordination chemistry of component major and trace elements of these white precipitate phases have not previously been examined.

  2. Transport of the two natural auxins, indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-acetic acid, in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, Aaron M.; Poupart, Julie; Waddell, Candace S.; Muday, Gloria K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Polar transport of the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is important in a number of plant developmental processes. However, few studies have investigated the polar transport of other endogenous auxins, such as indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), in Arabidopsis. This study details the similarities and differences between IBA and IAA transport in several tissues of Arabidopsis. In the inflorescence axis, no significant IBA movement was detected, whereas IAA is transported in a basipetal direction from the meristem tip. In young seedlings, both IBA and IAA were transported only in a basipetal direction in the hypocotyl. In roots, both auxins moved in two distinct polarities and in specific tissues. The kinetics of IBA and IAA transport appear similar, with transport rates of 8 to 10 mm per hour. In addition, IBA transport, like IAA transport, is saturable at high concentrations of auxin, suggesting that IBA transport is protein mediated. Interestingly, IAA efflux inhibitors and mutations in genes encoding putative IAA transport proteins reduce IAA transport but do not alter IBA movement, suggesting that different auxin transport protein complexes are likely to mediate IBA and IAA transport. Finally, the physiological effects of IBA and IAA on hypocotyl elongation under several light conditions were examined and analyzed in the context of the differences in IBA and IAA transport. Together, these results present a detailed picture of IBA transport and provide the basis for a better understanding of the transport of these two endogenous auxins.

  3. Formation of aldehydes and carboxylic acids in ozonated surface water and wastewater: a clear relationship with fluorescence changes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Tang, Xiangyu; Kim, Jaeshin; Korshin, Gregory V

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the formation of aldehydes and carboxylic acids in ozonated surface water and municipal wastewater secondary effluent and addressed correlations between the generation of these compounds and concurrent changes of the fluorescence of natural/effluent organic matter (NOM/EfOM) substrates. Ozonation was effective in removing fluorophores in all excitation/emission matrix (EEM) regions, with those operationally assigned to humic- and protein-like species showing relatively higher reactivity than fulvic-like species. Examination of HO exposures and attendant changes of fluorescence-based parameters allows establishing strong linear relationships between formation of the aldehydes and carboxylic acids and the relative changes of integrated fluorescence (ΔIF/IF0). This demonstrates the feasibility of surrogate monitoring of the formation of biodegradable ozonation by-products via online measurements of water/wastewater EEM fluorescence. PMID:25576127

  4. Enhancement of the water solubility of organic pollutants such as pyrene and atrazine by dissolved humic and fulvic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, H.H.; MacDonald, B.; Fang, F.

    1995-12-31

    Many factors determine the fate and transport of an organic pollutant in the environment but water solubility is certainly one of the most important. Among the environmental factors that alter the solubility of a molecule are naturally occurring humic and fulvic acids. We have hypothesized that the humic/fulvic acids from different sources within a watershed have different binding affinities for pollutants such as pyrene and atrazine. This could lead to different rates of transport or bioavailability within the watershed. Humic/fulvic acids were isolated from a stream, adjacent wetland and nearby wooded upland sites. A fluorescence quenching method was developed to quantify the binding coefficient of the pollutants with the dissolved organic carbon. From these results a model was constructed to determine the sites with the greatest potential to modify pollutant contamination in the environment.

  5. Assessment of nanofiltration and reverse osmosis potentialities to recover metals, sulfuric acid, and recycled water from acid gold mining effluent.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Bárbara C; Ferreira, Carolina D; Marques, Larissa S; Martins, Sofia S; Amaral, Míriam C S

    2016-01-01

    This work assessed the potential of nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) to treat acid streams contaminated with metals, such as effluent from the pressure oxidation process (POX) used in refractory gold ore processing. NF and RO were evaluated in terms of rejections of sulfuric acid and metals. Regarding NF, high sulfuric acid permeation (∼100%), was observed, while metals were retained with high efficiencies (∼90%), whereas RO led to high acid rejections (<88%) when conducted in pH values higher than 1. Thus, sequential use of NF and RO was proved to be a promising treatment for sulfuric acid solutions contaminated by metals, such as POX effluent. In this context, a purified acid stream could be recovered in NF permeate, which could be further concentrated in RO. Recovered acid stream could be reused in the gold ore processing or commercialized. A metal-enriched stream could be also recovered in NF retentate and transferred to a subsequent metal recovery stage. In addition, considering the high acid rejection obtained through the proposed system, RO permeate could be used as recycling water. PMID:27438241

  6. Effect of Lactic Acid Etching on Bonding Effectiveness of Orthodontic Bracket after Water Storage

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Fahad F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of lactic acid at various concentrations on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with the resin adhesive system before and after water storage. Materials and Methods. Hundred extracted human premolars were divided into 5 treatment groups and etched for 30 seconds with one of the following agents: lactic acid solution with (A) 10%, (B) 20%, (C) 30%, and (D) 50%; group E, 37% phosphoric acid (control). Metal brackets were bonded using a Transbond XT. Bonding effectiveness was assessed by shear bond strength after 24 hours and 6 months of water storage at 37°C. The data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (α = .001). Results. Lactic acid concentration and water storage resulted in significant differences for brackets bond strength (P < .001). 20% lactic acid had significantly higher mean bond strength values (SD) for all conditions: 24 hours [12.2 (.7) MPa] and 6 months [10.1 (.6) MPa] of water storage. 37% phosphoric acid had intermediate bond strength values for all conditions: 24 hours [8.2 (.6) MPa] and 6 months [6.2 (.6) MPa] of water storage. Also, there were differences in bond strength between storage time, with a reduction in values from 24 hours and 6 months for all experimental groups (P < .001). Conclusion. Lactic acid could be used in place of phosphoric acid as an enamel etchant for bonding of orthodontic brackets. PMID:25006465

  7. Zeolite - A Natural Filter Material for Lead Polluted Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neamţu, Corina Ioana; Pică, Elena Maria; Rusu, Tiberiu

    2014-11-01

    Reducing the concentration of lead ions in a wastewater using zeolite has proven to be a successful water treatement method, all over the world. Putting the two media (solid and liquid) in contact in static conditions had good results regarding the concentration of the filtered solution, the pH and the electric conductivity, depending on the values of certain parameters such as the amount of the zeolite, volume of the solution or interaction time. The present study highlights the zeolite ability to retain the lead ions from a solution, in dynamic interaction conditions between the two environments, in a short interaction time. The results confirmed the effectiveness of ion exchange water treatment method in the conditions set, emphasizing once again the properties of the filter material - the zeolite

  8. Water's dual nature and its continuously changing hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Henchman, Richard H

    2016-09-28

    A model is proposed for liquid water that is a continuum between the ordered state with predominantly tetrahedral coordination, linear hydrogen bonds and activated dynamics and a disordered state with a continuous distribution of multiple coordinations, multiple types of hydrogen bond, and diffusive dynamics, similar to that of normal liquids. Central to water's heterogeneous structure is the ability of hydrogen to donate to either one acceptor in a conventional linear hydrogen bond or to multiple acceptors as a furcated hydrogen. Linear hydrogen bonds are marked by slow, activated kinetics for hydrogen-bond switching to more crowded acceptors and sharp first peaks in the hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. Furcated hydrogens, equivalent to free, broken, dangling or distorted hydrogens, have barrierless, rapid kinetics and poorly defined first peaks in their hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. They involve the weakest donor in a local excess of donors, such that barrierless whole-molecule vibration rapidly swaps them between the linear and furcated forms. Despite the low number of furcated hydrogens and their transient existence, they are readily created in a single hydrogen-bond switch and free up the dynamics of numerous surrounding molecules, bringing about the disordered state. Hydrogens in the ordered state switch with activated dynamics to make the non-tetrahedral coordinations of the disordered state, which can also combine to make the ordered state. Consequently, the ordered and disordered states are both connected by diffusive dynamics and differentiated by activated dynamics, bringing about water's continuous heterogeneity. PMID:27447299

  9. On the nature of a supposed water model

    SciTech Connect

    Heckmann, Lotta Drossel, Barbara

    2014-08-15

    A cell model that has been proposed by Stanley and Franzese in 2002 for modeling water is based on Potts variables that represent the possible orientations of bonds between water molecules. We show that in the liquid phase, where all cells are occupied by a molecule, the Hamiltonian of the cell model can be rewritten as a Hamiltonian of a conventional Potts model, albeit with two types of coupling constants. We argue that such a model, while having a first-order phase transition, cannot display the critical end point that is postulated for the phase transition between a high- and low-density liquid. A closer look at the mean-field calculations that claim to find such an end point in the cell model reveals that the mean-field theory is constructed such that the symmetry constraints on the order parameter are violated. This is equivalent to introducing an external field. The introduction of such a field can be given a physical justification due to the fact that water does not have the type of long-range order occurring in the Potts model.

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of the pressure dependence of the water-acid gas interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2009-10-29

    We report two-phase Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the binary water-acid gas mixtures at high temperature and high pressure. Simulations are performed in the Np(N)AT ensemble in order to reproduce the pressure dependence of the interfacial tensions of the water-CO(2) and water-H(2)S mixtures. The interfacial tension of the binary water-CO(2) mixture is determined from 5 to 45 MPa along the isotherm T = 383 K. Water-H(2)S interfacial tensions are computed along one supercritical isotherm (T = 393 K) in a pressure range of 1-15 MPa. The temperature and pressure conditions investigated here by the MC simulations are typical of the geological storage conditions of these acid gases. The coexisting densities and the compositions of the water-rich and acid-gas-rich phases are compared with experiments and with data calculated from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) simulations. PMID:19803493

  11. Solar photocatalytic degradation of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Leshuk, Tim; Wong, Timothy; Linley, Stuart; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V; Gu, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Bitumen mining in the Canadian oil sands creates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), the toxicity of which is due in part to naphthenic acids (NAs) and other acid extractable organics (AEO). The objective of this work was to evaluate the potential of solar photocatalysis over TiO2 to remove AEO from OSPW. One day of photocatalytic treatment under natural sunlight (25 MJ/m(2) over ∼14 h daylight) eradicated AEO from raw OSPW, and acute toxicity of the OSPW toward Vibrio fischeri was eliminated. Nearly complete mineralization of organic carbon was achieved within 1-7 day equivalents of sunlight exposure, and degradation was shown to proceed through a superoxide-mediated oxidation pathway. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) analysis of oxidized intermediate compounds indicated preferential degradation of the heavier and more cyclic NAs (higher number of double bond equivalents), which are the most environmentally persistent fractions. The photocatalyst was shown to be recyclable for multiple uses, and thus solar photocatalysis may be a promising "green" advanced oxidation process (AOP) for OSPW treatment. PMID:26539710

  12. The impact of the hydroxyl radical photochemical sources on the rivastigmine drug transformation in mimic and natural waters.

    PubMed

    Passananti, Monica; Temussi, Fabio; Iesce, Maria Rosaria; Mailhot, Gilles; Brigante, Marcello

    2013-09-15

    In this paper we investigated the degradation of the rivastigmine drug induced by hydroxyl radical in synthetic and natural waters focusing on both reactivity and photoproducts identification. The hydroxyl radical formation rate was quantified by using terephthalic acid as trapping molecule and it was related with the rivastigmine degradation rate. The second order rate constant between hydroxyl radical and rivastigmine was estimated to be ≈ 5.8 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). Irradiation of rivastigmine in three natural waters (rain, lake and river) and comparison with degradation rates observed in synthetic solutions using nitrite, nitrate and hydrogen peroxide suggest that, in addition to hydroxyl radical, also nitroderived radicals (NO/NO2) are responsible for the pollutant degradation in natural media. In fact, the evaluated degradation rates in three natural waters are greatly higher than those estimated considering only the reactivity with photogenerated hydroxyl radical. Using nitrites and nitrates as photochemical OH source, the rivastigmine degradation cannot be described considering only the hydroxyl radical reactivity suggesting that NO and NO2 radicals could play a key role during indirect degradation. Moreover main degradation products have been identified by means of HPLC-MS. Hydroxylation of the aromatic ring as well as carbamate and amino chain oxidation were suggested as main reaction mechanisms, but also nitroderived compounds were characterized. Finally polychromatic irradiations of three rivastigmine doped natural waters (rain, river and lake) underlined the role of the indirect degradation that needs to be considered when direct degradation of selected pollutants is negligible under environmental-like conditions. PMID:23863380

  13. Investigating the significance of zero-point motion in small molecular clusters of sulphuric acid and water

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson, Jake L. Ford, Ian J.; Kathmann, Shawn M.

    2014-01-14

    The nucleation of particles from trace gases in the atmosphere is an important source of cloud condensation nuclei, and these are vital for the formation of clouds in view of the high supersaturations required for homogeneous water droplet nucleation. The methods of quantum chemistry have increasingly been employed to model nucleation due to their high accuracy and efficiency in calculating configurational energies; and nucleation rates can be obtained from the associated free energies of particle formation. However, even in such advanced approaches, it is typically assumed that the nuclei have a classical nature, which is questionable for some systems. The importance of zero-point motion (also known as quantum nuclear dynamics) in modelling small clusters of sulphuric acid and water is tested here using the path integral molecular dynamics method at the density functional level of theory. The general effect of zero-point motion is to distort the mean structure slightly, and to promote the extent of proton transfer with respect to classical behaviour. In a particular configuration of one sulphuric acid molecule with three waters, the range of positions explored by a proton between a sulphuric acid and a water molecule at 300 K (a broad range in contrast to the confinement suggested by geometry optimisation at 0 K) is clearly affected by the inclusion of zero point motion, and similar effects are observed for other configurations.

  14. Method validation for norovirus detection in naturally contaminated irrigation water and fresh produce.

    PubMed

    El-Senousy, Waled Morsy; Costafreda, M Isabel; Pintó, Rosa M; Bosch, Albert

    2013-10-01

    Human enteric viruses are shed in extremely high numbers in the feces of infected individuals, becoming environmental contaminants and eventually leading to contamination of a variety of foodstuffs at the pre-harvest stage. Among these foods at risk is fresh produce and irrigation water is a major vehicle for crop contamination. In the present study, a standardized molecular method for quantitative virus assay has been evaluated in different types of fresh produce and in irrigation water for human norovirus (NoV) detection. Two different virus concentration procedures, polyethylene-glycol precipitation (PEG) and organic flocculation (OF), were employed. The procedures were initially assayed in spiked samples and later validated on naturally contaminated samples from the Nile Delta in Egypt. Overall, PEG provided significantly (p<0.05) better virus recoveries than OF for both irrigation water and salad vegetable virus analysis. NoV GI and GII recoveries in spiked irrigation water ranged from 22.0% to 43.3% and from 12.6% to 16.4% with the PEG and OF methods, respectively. In experimentally contaminated salad vegetables, virus recoveries ranged from 28.0% to 48.0% and from 14.0% to 18.8% by PEG precipitation and OF, respectively. Using PEG precipitation, NoV was found in 31.9% of naturally contaminated irrigation water samples. Both NoV GI and GII were detected in these samples with genome copy numbers of around 10(2) per liter. Virus analyses performed in naturally contaminated fresh produce that included green onion, watercress, radish, leek, and lettuce show that NoV GI was present in 20.8%-34.0% of the samples with genome copy numbers of around 10(2) per gram. When OF was employed, NoV was found in 25.0% of the irrigation water samples. Both genogroups could be found in these samples with genome copy numbers of around 10 per liter. In fresh produce, GI was present in 16.0%-25.7% of the samples with genome copy numbers per gram of around 10. Surprisingly, NoV GII

  15. An evaluation of water quality in private drinking water wells near natural gas extraction sites in the Barnett Shale formation.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Brian E; Hunt, Laura R; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Oka, Hyppolite; Walton, Jayme L; Hopkins, Dan; Osorio, Alexandra; Bjorndal, Bryan; Hu, Qinhong H; Schug, Kevin A

    2013-09-01

    Natural gas has become a leading source of alternative energy with the advent of techniques to economically extract gas reserves from deep shale formations. Here, we present an assessment of private well water quality in aquifers overlying the Barnett Shale formation of North Texas. We evaluated samples from 100 private drinking water wells using analytical chemistry techniques. Analyses revealed that arsenic, selenium, strontium and total dissolved solids (TDS) exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency's Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Limit (MCL) in some samples from private water wells located within 3 km of active natural gas wells. Lower levels of arsenic, selenium, strontium, and barium were detected at reference sites outside the Barnett Shale region as well as sites within the Barnett Shale region located more than 3 km from active natural gas wells. Methanol and ethanol were also detected in 29% of samples. Samples exceeding MCL levels were randomly distributed within areas of active natural gas extraction, and the spatial patterns in our data suggest that elevated constituent levels could be due to a variety of factors including mobilization of natural constituents, hydrogeochemical changes from lowering of the water table, or industrial accidents such as faulty gas well casings. PMID:23885945

  16. Dissolved and acid available particulate beryllium in eastern UK surface waters.

    PubMed

    Neal, Colin

    2003-10-01

    , particulate nitrogen, particulate phosphorus, and the AAP for several transition metals (Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni and Y), and the lanthanides. This reflects the nature of the catchment sources of particulate material (soil erosion and pollutant sources) and the hydrogeochemistry of Be with the high potential for hydrolysis and hydrogen bonding due to its small atomic size and high surface charge density. The acid available particulate flux averages approximately 0.42 gha(-1) year(-1) with a range in mean across the sites of 0.14-1.2 gha(-1) year(-1). The highest flux occurs for a river with a flood plain contaminated by spoil from historic mining of lead-zinc deposits, but there is no clear separation between the rural and the industrial/urban impacted catchments. The results indicate a potential and most unexpected dissolved Be stress to lowland aquatic environments, a stress that might well increase over time for the UK given the increasing climate instability within the country. The findings are linked to other information on Be in surface waters for other UK surface waters, including previously unpublished data, to allow a broader perspective for UK riverine environments. Information is provided on Be levels in acidic upland streams in mid Wales (upper River Severn), other eastern UK rivers (collected towards the end of the LOIS initiative) and drainage waters from a disused tin wine in Cornwall (Wheal Jane Mine). PMID:14499533

  17. Compensating for diminishing natural water: Predicting the impacts of water development on summer habitat of desert bighorn sheep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longshore, K.M.; Lowrey, C.; Thompson, D.B.

    2009-01-01

    Artificial water sources have been used for decades to enhance and restore wildlife habitat but the benefits of their use have been subject to debate. During the past century, the number of natural springs in Joshua Tree National Park, California, USA, has declined. In response to concerns about the viability of the bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) population, a number of water developments were constructed throughout the park. We modeled potential historical and present-day summer habitat of female bighorn sheep to evaluate the effectiveness of the artificial and remaining natural water sources in maintaining habitat and to determine how loss of artificial sources might affect future habitat availability. Prior to 1950, 583.5 km2 of summer habitat was potentially available. Presently, only 170.6 km2 of habitat is available around natural water sources and 153.5 km2 is available around guzzlers. When all perennial water sources are included in the habitat model (minus overlap), 302.3 km2 of summer habitat is potentially available. This repre