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1

The Role of Naturally Occurring Stable Isotopes in Mass Spectrometry, Part II: The Instrumentation  

PubMed Central

In the second instalment of this tutorial, the authors explain the instrumentation for measuring naturally occurring stable isotopes, specifically the magnetic sector mass spectrometer. This type of instrument remains unrivalled in its performance for isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and the reader is reminded of its operation and its technical advantages for isotope measurements. PMID:23772101

Bluck, Les; Volmer, Dietrich A.

2013-01-01

2

Evaluated nuclear data files for the naturally-occurring isotopes of cadmium  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive neutronic evaluated data files for the naturally-occurring isotopes of cadmium are deduced from experimental data and nuclear models, and presented in the ENDF/B-VI formats. Particular attention is given to those processes relevant to fuel-cycle and fission-product applications. Comparisons are made with prior evaluations of the cadmium isotopes, and discrepancies and consistencies cited. Some of the discrepancies are very large 9.9 as much as 100%), and the differences have the potential for a pronounced impact on applications usage. The present files are comprehensive, including may important processes that are not represented in the contemporary ENDF/B-VI system. Recommendations are made for future measurements where appropriate.

McCabe, J. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Nuclear and Energy Engineering; Smith, A.B. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Nuclear and Energy Engineering]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Meadows, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-06-01

3

BIODEGRADATION - MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION (MNA) FOR OXYGENATES: HOW IT EVOLVED, WHY IT OCCURS AND STABLE ISOTOPES  

EPA Science Inventory

The organisms that degrade MtBE under anaerobic conditions are evolved to acquire energy for growth by using molecular hydrogen and carbonate ion to cleave methyl ether bonds. Methyl ether bonds are common in nature and the bond also occurs in MTBE. MTBE in contaminated ground...

4

Compilation of minimum and maximum isotope ratios of selected elements in naturally occurring terrestrial materials and reagents  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Documented variations in the isotopic compositions of some chemical elements are responsible for expanded uncertainties in the standard atomic weights published by the Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. This report summarizes reported variations in the isotopic compositions of 20 elements that are due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay) and their effects on the standard atomic weight uncertainties. For 11 of those elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, copper, and selenium), standard atomic weight uncertainties have been assigned values that are substantially larger than analytical uncertainties because of common isotope abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin. For 2 elements (chromium and thallium), recently reported isotope abundance variations potentially are large enough to result in future expansion of their atomic weight uncertainties. For 7 elements (magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium), documented isotope-abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin are too small to have a significant effect on their standard atomic weight uncertainties. This compilation indicates the extent to which the atomic weight of an element in a given material may differ from the standard atomic weight of the element. For most elements given above, data are graphically illustrated by a diagram in which the materials are specified in the ordinate and the compositional ranges are plotted along the abscissa in scales of (1) atomic weight, (2) mole fraction of a selected isotope, and (3) delta value of a selected isotope ratio. There are no internationally distributed isotopic reference materials for the elements zinc, selenium, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium. Preparation of such materials will help to make isotope ratio measurements among laboratories comparable. The minimum and maximum concentrations of a selected isotope in naturally occurring terrestrial materials for selected chemical elements reviewed in this report are given below: Isotope Minimum mole fraction Maximum mole fraction -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2H 0 .000 0255 0 .000 1838 7Li 0 .9227 0 .9278 11B 0 .7961 0 .8107 13C 0 .009 629 0 .011 466 15N 0 .003 462 0 .004 210 18O 0 .001 875 0 .002 218 26Mg 0 .1099 0 .1103 30Si 0 .030 816 0 .031 023 34S 0 .0398 0 .0473 37Cl 0 .240 77 0 .243 56 44Ca 0 .020 82 0 .020 92 53Cr 0 .095 01 0 .095 53 56Fe 0 .917 42 0 .917 60 65Cu 0 .3066 0 .3102 205Tl 0 .704 72 0 .705 06 The numerical values above have uncertainties that depend upon the uncertainties of the determinations of the absolute isotope-abundance variations of reference materials of the elements. Because reference materials used for absolute isotope-abundance measurements have not been included in relative isotope abundance investigations of zinc, selenium, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium, ranges in isotopic composition are not listed for these elements, although such ranges may be measurable with state-of-the-art mass spectrometry. This report is available at the url: http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/wri014222.

Coplen, T.B.; Hopple, J.A.; Böhlke, J.K.; Peiser, H.S.; Rieder, S.E.; Krouse, H.R.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Ding, T.; Vocke, R.D., Jr.; Revesz, K.M.; Lamberty, A.; Taylor, P.; De Bievre, P.

2002-01-01

5

Analysis of Long-Term Diet Changes in Tropical Seabirds Using Naturally Occurring Stable Isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A clear understanding of ecosystem response to past environmental changes will provide more accurate interpretations of current ecosystem trends. With this mindset, we investigated the effects of the 1976/77 regime shift in the Pacific Ocean on a tropical pelagic community of apex predators. Using study skins from museum collections from 1960 to 2006, we measured stable carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N) isotopes for a suite of ecologically and phylogenetically diverse seabirds from the eastern Pacific warm pool. In this region, seabirds generally forage by depending on subsurface predators to drive prey to the surface or by associating with oceanographic features that increase productivity or aggregate prey in space and time. We found that annual ?15N means from Sooty Terns’ (Onychoprion fuscatus) feathers decreased by 2.98‰, while all other species did not show any significant trends over the study period. Annual ?13C means from feathers of Sooty Terns, Wedge-tailed Shearwaters (Puffinus pacificus), Red-footed Boobies (Sula sula) and Juan Fernandez Petrels (Petrodroma externa) decreased by an average of 1.02‰, at rates between 0.01 and 0.02 ?13C‰ per year-1. Our results do not suggest a response of the seabird community to the 1976/77 regime shift. Instead, they are consistent with a trophic shift and/or change in foraging area for Sooty Terns and a long-term decrease in feather ?13C for the eastern Pacific warm pool seabird community. This long-term decrease in feather ?13C is most likely due to the Suess effect and less likely due to a decline in primary productivity of the system. We hypothesize that a deepening trend in thermocline depth in the eastern Pacific warm pool affected Sooty Terns more than other species in the subsurface predator-dependent guild that depend less on smaller subsurface predators like skipjack tuna.

Vilchis, I.; Ballance, L.

2010-12-01

6

Comment on ``Existence of long-lived isomeric states in naturally-occurring neutron-deficient Th isotopes''  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In their article “Existence of Long-Lived Isomeric States in Naturally-Occuring Neutron-Deficient Th Isotopes” [Phys. Rev. C 76, 021303 (2007)], Marinov fail to demonstrate that basic mass spectrometric protocols, such as abundance sensitivity, linearity, and freedom from possible interferences, have been met. In particular, the claim that four isomeric states of Th have been discovered, using an inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometer (ICP-SFMS), with abundances from (1-10)×10-11 relative to Th232, cannot be accepted, given the known abundance sensitivities of other sector field mass spectrometers. Accelerator mass spectrometry is the only mass spectrometric methodology capable of measuring relative abundances of the magnitude claimed by Marinov

Barber, R. C.; de Laeter, J. R.

2009-04-01

7

Biodegradation ? Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for Oxygenates: How it Evolved, why it Occurs and Using Stable Carbon Isotopes to Predict Plume Behavior  

EPA Science Inventory

The organisms that degrade MtBE under anaerobic conditions are evolved to acquire energy for growth by using molecular hydrogen and carbonate ion to cleave methyl ether bonds. Methyl ether bonds are common in nature and the bond also occurs in MTBE. MTBE in contaminated ground...

8

Leaching of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials.  

PubMed

A form of waste associated with mining activities is related to the type of deposit being mined and to the procedure of exploitation and enrichment adopted. The wastes usually contain relatively large amounts of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM). The TENORM are often stored on the surface. Consequently, they can be leached as a result of interaction with aqueous solutions of different chemical composition. This further leads to pollution of water and soil in the vicinity of the stored wastes. The paper presents the results of laboratory investigation aimed at quantifying the leaching process of samples originating from uranium dumps and storage reservoirs associated with brine pumped from coal mines. The leaching process was investigated with respect to selected elements: uranium isotopes, radium isotopes, iron, barium and sodium. The samples were exposed to aqueous solutions of different chemical composition. The experiments revealed that TENORM in form of sulphate compounds are the most resistant against leaching. The leaching coefficient for radium isotopes varies from a few thousandth percent to a few hundredth percent. On the other hand, for TENORM occurring in sand or sludge, the leaching coefficient for uranium and radium isotopes ranged from a few hundredth percent to a few percent. PMID:17482828

Chau, Nguyen Dinh; Chru?ciel, Edward

2007-08-01

9

?,?-Dehydroamino acids in naturally occurring peptides.  

PubMed

?,?-Dehydroamino acids are naturally occurring non-coded amino acids, found primarily in peptides. The review focuses on the type of ?,?-dehydroamino acids, the structure of dehydropeptides, the source of their origin and bioactivity. Dehydropeptides are isolated primarily from bacteria and less often from fungi, marine invertebrates or even higher plants. They reveal mainly antibiotic, antifungal, antitumour, and phytotoxic activity. More than 60 different structures were classified, which often cover broad families of peptides. 37 different structural units containing the ?,?-dehydroamino acid residues were shown including various side chains, Z and E isomers, and main modifications: methylation of peptide bond as well as the introduction of ester group and heterocycle ring. The collected data show the relation between the structure and bioactivity. This allows the activity of compounds, which were not studied in this field, but which belong to a larger peptide family to be predicted. A few examples show that the type of the geometrical isomer of the ?,?-dehydroamino acid residue can be important or even crucial for biological activity. PMID:25323736

Siod?ak, Dawid

2015-01-01

10

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Cargo at US Borders  

SciTech Connect

In the U.S. and other countries, large numbers of vehicles pass through border crossings each day. The illicit movement of radioactive sources is a concern that has resulted in the installation of radiation detection and identification instruments at border crossing points. This activity is judged to be necessary because of the possibility of an act of terrorism involving a radioactive source that may include any number of dangerous radionuclides. The problem of detecting, identifying, and interdicting illicit radioactive sources is complicated by the fact that many materials present in cargo are somewhat radioactive. Some cargo contains naturally occurring radioactive material or technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material that may trigger radiation portal monitor alarms. Man-made radioactive sources, especially medical isotopes, are also frequently observed and produce alarms. Such nuisance alarms can be an operational limiting factor for screening of cargo at border crossings. Information about the nature of the radioactive materials in cargo that can interfere with the detection of radionuclides of concern is necessary. This paper provides such information for North American cargo, but the information may also be of use to border control officials in other countries. (PIET-43741-TM-361)

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Evans, John C.; Hensley, Walter K.; Lepel, Elwood A.; McDonald, Joseph C.; Schweppe, John E.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Strom, Daniel J.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2006-01-01

11

Naturally occurring graphite cones John A. Jaszczaka,  

E-print Network

, and Yury Gogotsic a Department of Physics and the A. E. Seaman Mineral Museum, Michigan Technological and Sciences, and the A. E. Seaman Mineral Museum, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, 49931.1 to 10 mm in diameter) [18] occur in calcite boudins up to 30 cm across from the Bancroft shear zone [19

Jaszczak, John A.

12

Plant breeding Variation occurring after natural and  

E-print Network

evaluated in Violet de Provence and in some other early cultivars. During micropropagation, the frequency plants are undesirable, the practi- cal use of micropropagation is restricted. Analysis of the nature micropropagation, was ob- served in the Violet de Provence cultivar (Pé- caut, 1985) and was confirmed in other

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

Naturally occurring hepatozoonosis in coyotes from Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Nine of 16 free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) from central Oklahoma (USA) had naturally acquired infections of Hepatozoon americanum. Infections were confirmed by recognition of tissue stages closely resembling H. americanum in skeletal and cardiac muscle. At the time coyotes were collected they were infested with a variety of ticks, including adult Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum). We propose that the high prevalence of H. americanum in this small sample of free-ranging coyotes and the ability of these same animals to harbor adult populations of A. maculatum is an important component of the epizootiology of canine hepatozoonosis in North America. PMID:10073352

Kocan, A A; Breshears, M; Cummings, C; Panciera, R J; Ewing, S A; Barker, R W

1999-01-01

14

Dog Models of Naturally Occurring Cancer  

PubMed Central

Studies using dogs provide an ideal solution to the gap in animal models of natural disease and translational medicine. This is evidenced by approximately 400 inherited disorders being characterized in domesticated dogs, most of which are relevant to humans. There are several hundred isolated populations of dogs (breeds) and each has vastly reduced genetic variation compared to humans; this simplifies disease mapping and pharmacogenomics. Dogs age five to eight-fold faster than humans, share environments with their owners, are usually kept until old age, and receive a high level of health care. Farseeing investigators recognized this potential and, over the last decade, developed the necessary tools and infrastructure to utilize this powerful model of human disease, including the sequencing of the dog genome in 2005. Here we review the nascent convergence of genetic and translational canine models of spontaneous disease, focusing on cancer. PMID:21439907

Rowell, Jennie L.; McCarthy, Donna O.; Alvarez, Carlos E.

2011-01-01

15

Absolute configuration of naturally occurring glabridin.  

PubMed

The title compound {systematic name: 4-[(3R)-8,8-dimethyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrano[2,3-f]chromen-3-yl]benzene-1,3-diol, commonly named glabridin}, C20H20O4, is a species-specific biomarker from the roots Glycyrrhiza glabra L. (European licorice, Fabaceae). In the present study, this prenylated isoflavan has been purified from an enriched CHCl3 fraction of the extract of the root, using three steps of medium-pressure liquid chromatography (MPLC) by employing HW-40F, Sephadex LH-20 and LiChroCN as adsorbents. Pure glabridin was crystallized from an MeOH-H2O mixture (95:5?v/v) to yield colorless crystals containing one molecule per asymmetric unit (Z' = 1) in the space group P212121. Although the crystal structure has been reported before, the determination of the absolute configuration remained uncertain. Stereochemical analysis, including circular dichroism, NMR data and an X-ray diffraction data set with Bijvoet differences, confirms that glabridin, purified from its natural source, is found only in a C3 R configuration. These results can therefore be used as a reference for the assignment of the configuration and enantiopurity of any isolated or synthetic glabridin sample. PMID:24192160

Simmler, Charlotte; Fronczek, Frank R; Pauli, Guido F; Santarsiero, Bernard D

2013-11-01

16

Isotope shifts of natural Sr+ measured by laser fluorescence in a  

E-print Network

Isotope shifts of natural Sr+ measured by laser fluorescence in a sympathetically cooled Coulomb, France Abstract We measured by laser spectroscopy the isotope shifts between naturally-occurring even-isotopes-component Coulomb crystal in a linear Paul trap containing 103­104 laser-cooled Sr+ ions. The isotope shifts

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

17

Stable isotope deltas: Tiny, yet robust signatures in nature  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including 14C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. 13C, 2H, and 18O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as?25 per mil can be written as?25 mUr (or?2.5 cUr or?0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg ‘units’ are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg can be written as+15 ?Ur.

Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.

2012-01-01

18

Stable isotope deltas: tiny, yet robust signatures in nature.  

PubMed

Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including (14)C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. (13)C, (2)H, and (18)O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as-25 per mil can be written as-25 mUr (or-2.5 cUr or-0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg 'units' are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg can be written as+15 ?Ur. PMID:22462621

Brand, Willi A; Coplen, Tyler B

2012-09-01

19

Uranium isotopes in groundwater occurring at Amazonas State, Brazil.  

PubMed

This paper reports the behavior of the dissolved U-isotopes (238)U and (234)U in groundwater providing from 15 cities in Amazonas State, Brazil. The isotope dilution technique accompanied by alpha spectrometry were utilized for acquiring the U content and (234)U/(238)U activity ratio (AR) data, 0.01-1.4µgL(-1) and 1.0-3.5, respectively. These results suggest that the water is circulating in a reducing environment and leaching strata containing minerals with low uranium concentration. A tendency to increasing ARs values following the groundwater flow direction is identified in Manaus city. The AR also increases according to the SW-NE directions: Uarini?Tefé; Manacapuru?Manaus; Presidente Figueiredo?São Sebastião do Uatumã; and Boa Vista do Ramos?Parintins. Such trends are possibly related to several factors, among them the increasing acid character of the waters. The waters analyzed are used for human consumption and the highest dissolved U content is much lower than the maximum established by the World Health Organization. Therefore, in view of this radiological parameter they can be used for drinking purposes. PMID:25528017

da Silva, Márcio Luiz; Bonotto, Daniel Marcos

2015-03-01

20

Synthetic procedures for the preparation of deuterium-labeled analogs of naturally occurring steroids  

SciTech Connect

The object of this article is to review the procedures that have been published concerning the preparation of deuterium-labeled analogs of naturally occurring steroid hormones. In combination with mass spectrometric methods, these stable isotope-labeled compounds should be applicable for human metabolism studies or as internal standards. Deuteration techniques for the elucidation of stereochemical problems, procedures for the preparation of monodeuterated steroids, and synthesis of deuterated analogs of nonbiologic steroids have therefore not been included in this review. 41 refs.

Wudy, S.A. (Universitaetskinderklinik Ulm, Donau (Germany, F.R.))

1990-10-01

21

POPULATION ECOLOGY Comparative Predation on Naturally Occurring Gypsy Moth  

E-print Network

POPULATION ECOLOGY Comparative Predation on Naturally Occurring Gypsy Moth (Lepidoptera(2): 293Ð296 (2006) ABSTRACT Predation is an important factor in the dynamics of gypsy moth (Lymantria. Here we compare predation rates on freeze-dried gypsy moth pupae af�xed with beeswax to pieces

Berkowitz, Alan R.

22

Natural transformation of Campylobacter jejuni occurs beyond limits of growth.  

PubMed

Campylobacter jejuni is a human bacterial pathogen. While poultry is considered to be a major source of food borne campylobacteriosis, C. jejuni is frequently found in the external environment, and water is another well-known source of human infections. Natural transformation is considered to be one of the main mechanisms for mediating transfer of genetic material and evolution of the organism. Given the diverse habitats of C. jejuni we set out to examine how environmental conditions and physiological processes affect natural transformation of C. jejuni. We show that the efficiency of transformation is correlated to the growth conditions, but more importantly that transformation occurs at growth-restrictive conditions as well as in the late stationary phase; hence revealing that growth per se is not required for C. jejuni to be competent. Yet, natural transformation of C. jejuni is an energy dependent process, that occurs in the absence of transcription but requires an active translational machinery. Moreover, we show the ATP dependent ClpP protease to be important for transformation, which possibly could be associated with reduced protein glycosylation in the ClpP mutant. In contrast, competence of C. jejuni was neither found to be involved in DNA repair following DNA damage nor to provide a growth benefit. Kinetic studies revealed that several transformation events occur per cell cycle indicating that natural transformation of C. jejuni is a highly efficient process. Thus, our findings suggest that horizontal gene transfer by natural transformation takes place in various habitats occupied by C. jejuni. PMID:23049803

Vegge, Christina S; Brøndsted, Lone; Ligowska-Marz?ta, Ma?gorzata; Ingmer, Hanne

2012-01-01

23

Arsenic poisoning in dairy cattle from naturally occurring arsenic pyrites.  

PubMed

An outbreak of arsenic poisoning occurred in which most of a 200 cow dairy herd were affected and six died. The source of the arsenic was naturally occurring arsenic pyrites from the Waiotapu Stream, near Rotorua. Arsenic levels in the nearby soil were as high as 6618 ppm. There was little evidence to suggest that treatment affected the course of the disease. Haematology was of little use in diagnosis, post-mortem signs were not always consistent and persistence of the element in the liver appeared short. Control of further outbreaks have been based on practical measures to minimise the intake of contaminated soil and free laying water by the stock. PMID:16031332

Hopkirk, R G

1987-10-01

24

An Update on Antitumor Activity of Naturally Occurring Chalcones  

PubMed Central

Chalcones, which have characteristic 1,3-diaryl-2-propen-1-one skeleton, are mainly produced in roots, rhizomes, heartwood, leaves, and seeds of genera Angelica, Sophora, Glycyrrhiza, Humulus, Scutellaria, Parartocarpus, Ficus, Dorstenia, Morus, Artocarpus, and so forth. They have become of interest in the research and development of natural antitumor agents over the past decades due to their broad range of mechanisms including anti-initiation, induction of apoptosis, antiproliferation, antimetastasis, antiangiogenesis, and so forth. This review summarizes the studies on the antitumor activity of naturally occurring chalcones and their underlying mechanisms in detail during the past decades. PMID:23690855

Zhang, En-Hui; Wang, Ru-Feng; Guo, Shu-Zhen; Liu, Bin

2013-01-01

25

Naturally occurring auto-antibodies in homeostasis and disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antibodies with germline or close to germline configur- ation exist in vertebrates, and these so-called 'naturally occurring auto-antibodies' (NAb) are directed to self and altered self components. Such NAbs have been attract- ing increasing interest because several of them, in- cluding some in their recombinant forms, have therapeutic potential. Whereas a large number of IgM and IgG NAbs have tissue

Hans U. Lutz; Christoph J. Binder; Srini Kaveri

2008-01-01

26

Issues related to regulatory control of naturally occurring radioactive materials  

SciTech Connect

Nearly 80% of human radiation exposure is from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). While exposure from man-made sources of radiation has been well regulated, no consistent regulatory controls exist for NORM. Because elevated radiation levels have resulted from NORM enhancement activities such as occur in the petroleum, fertilizer, mining, and processing industries, some form of regulatory control is in order. In the US, regulation of NORM by federal agencies such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission or the Environmental Protection Agency is not anticipated in the near future because there are no authorizing federal statutes. Important issues for addressing the control of NORM include source characterization and generation, radiation protection concerns, waste management and disposition, and the regulatory framework.

Chen, S.Y.

1997-04-01

27

Thermal resistance of naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores.  

PubMed Central

Simulation of a heat process used in the terminal dry-heat decontamination of the Viking spacecraft is reported. Naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores were collected on Teflon ribbons in selected spacecraft assembly areas and subsequently subjected to dry heat. Thermal inactivation experiments were conducted at 105, 111.7, 120, 125, 130, and 135 degrees C with a moisture level of 1.2 mg of water per liter. Heat survivors were recovered at temperatures of 135 degrees C when a 30-h heating cycle was employed. Survivors were recovered from all cycles studied and randomly selected for identification. The naturally occurring spore population was reduced an average of 2.2 to 4.4 log cycles from 105 to 135 degrees C. Heating cycles of 5 and 15 h at temperature were compared with the standard 30-h cycle at 111.7, 120, and 125 degrees C. No significant differences in inactivation (alpha = 0.05) were observed between 111.7 and 120 degrees C. The 30-h cycle differs from the 5-and 15-h cycles at 125 degrees C. Thus, the heating cycle can be reduced if a small fraction (about 10-3 to 10-4) of very resistant spores can be tolerated. PMID:727780

Puleo, J R; Bergstrom, S L; Peeler, J T; Oxborrow, G S

1978-01-01

28

Naturally Occurring Animal Models of Human Hepatitis E Virus Infection  

PubMed Central

Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus in the family Hepeviridae. Hepatitis E caused by HEV is a clinically important global disease. There are currently four well-characterized genotypes of HEV in mammalian species, although numerous novel strains of HEV likely belonging to either new genotypes or species have recently been identified from several other animal species. HEV genotypes 1 and 2 are limited to infection in humans, whereas genotypes 3 and 4 infect an expanding host range of animal species and are zoonotic to humans. Historical animal models include various species of nonhuman primates, which have been indispensable for the discovery of human HEV and for understanding its pathogenesis and course of infection. With the genetic identification and characterization of animal strains of HEV, a number of naturally occurring animal models such as swine, chicken, and rabbit have recently been developed for various aspects of HEV research, including vaccine trials, pathogenicity, cross-species infection, mechanism of virus replication, and molecular biology studies. Unfortunately, the current available animal models for HEV are still inadequate for certain aspects of HEV research. For instance, an animal model is still lacking to study the underlying mechanism of severe and fulminant hepatitis E during pregnancy. Also, an animal model that can mimic chronic HEV infection is critically needed to study the mechanism leading to chronicity in immunocompromised individuals. Genetic identification of additional novel animal strains of HEV may lead to the development of better naturally occurring animal models for HEV. This article reviews the current understanding of animal models of HEV infection in both natural and experimental infection settings and identifies key research needs and limitations. PMID:24936039

Yugo, Danielle M.; Cossaboom, Caitlin M.; Meng, Xiang-Jin

2014-01-01

29

Cytotoxicity and superoxide anion generation by some naturally occurring quinones.  

PubMed

Four naturally occurring quinones, mansonone-D (MD), mansonone-H (MH), thespone (TP) and thespesone (TPE), extracted from the heartwood of Thespesia populnea have been tested for their cytotoxic action by aerobic incubation with human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells. Toxicity of the quinones follows the order MD > TP > MH approximately TPE. EPR spectrometric and Clark electrode oximetric studies indicate that redox cycling of these quinones produce superoxide anion radical (O2*-) and H2O2 on aerobic incubation with NADH:cytochrome c reductase. Generation of superoxide radical during enzymatic reduction of quinones, was confirmed by EPR spin trapping experiment using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap. Cyclic voltammetric studies show reversible redox couples for MD and TP whereas TPE and MH show irreversible redox couple. The electrochemical results indicate that MH and TPE are more difficult to reduce than TP and MD. PMID:10381175

Johnson Inbaraj, J; Gandhidasan, R; Murugesan, R

1999-05-01

30

Fenugreek: a naturally occurring edible spice as an anticancer agent.  

PubMed

In recent years, various dietary components that can potentially be used for the prevention and treatment of cancer have been identified. In this study, we demonstrate that extract (FE) from the seeds of the plant Trigonella foenum graecum, commonly called fenugreek, are cytotoxic in vitro to a panel of cancer but not normal cells. Treatment with 10-15 ug/mL of FE for 72 h was growth inhibitory to breast, pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines (PCa). When tested at higher doses (15-20 ug/mL), FE continued to be growth inhibitory to PCa cell lines but not to either primary prostate or hTert-immortalized prostate cells. At least part of the growth inhibition is due to induction of cell death, as seen by incorporation of Ethidium Bromide III into cancer cells exposed to FE. Molecular changes induced in PCa cells are: in DU-145 cells: downregulation of mutant p53, and in PC-3 cells upregulation of p21 and inhibition of TGFbeta induced phosphorylation of Akt. The surprising finding of our studies is that death of cancer cells occurs despite growth stimulatory pathways being simultaneously upregulated (phosphorylated) by FE. Thus, these studies add another biologically active agent to our armamentarium of naturally occurring agents with therapeutic potential. PMID:19197146

Shabbeer, Shabana; Sobolewski, Michelle; Anchoori, Ravi Kumar; Kachhap, Sushant; Hidalgo, Manuel; Jimeno, Antonio; Davidson, Nancy; Carducci, Michael A; Khan, Saeed R

2009-02-01

31

Fenugreek: a naturally occurring edible spice as an anticancer agent  

PubMed Central

In recent years, various dietary components that can potentially be used for the prevention and treatment of cancer have been identified. In this study, we demonstrate that extract (FE) from the seeds of the plant Trigonella foenum graecum, commonly called fenugreek, are cytotoxic in vitro to a panel of cancer but not normal cells. Treatment with 10-15 ug/mL of FE for 72h was growth inhibitory to breast, pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines (PCa). When tested at higher doses (15-20 ug/mL), FE continued to be growth inhibitory to PCa cell lines but not to either primary prostate or htert-immortalized prostate cells. At least part of the growth inhibition is due to induction of cell death, as seen by incorporation of Ethidium Bromide III into cancer cells exposed to FE. Molecular changes induced in PCa cells are: in DU-145 cells: down regulation of mutant p53, and in PC-3 cells up regulation of p21 and inhibition of TGF-? induced phosphorylation of Akt. The surprising finding of our studies is that death of cancer cells occurs despite growth stimulatory pathways being simultaneously up regulated (phosphorylated) by FE. Thus, these studies add another biologically active agent to our armamentarium of naturally occurring agents with therapeutic potential. PMID:19197146

Shabbeer, Shabana; Sobolewski, Michelle; Kachhap, Sushant; Davidson, Nancy; Carducci, Michael A.; Khan, Saeed

2011-01-01

32

Explanation for naturally occurring supernumerary limbs in amphibians.  

PubMed

The occasional occurrence of high frequencies of limb abnormalities, including extra limbs, in natural populations of amphibians has long been a puzzle. In this paper we report the discovery of a population in which such limb abnormalities appear to be caused by a parasitic flatworm (trematode) that uses amphibians as intermediate hosts. The cercarial larval stage of the trematode attacks amphibians, penetrating the skin to form cysts (metacercariae). The cysts are preferentially localized in the cloacal region, including the developing hind limb regions in larvae of both frogs (Hyla regilla) and salamanders (Ambystoma macrodactylum). A wide range of limb abnormalities are seen, including duplicated limb structures ranging from extra digits to several extra whole limbs. We hypothesize that these limb abnormalities result from localized regulatory responses of developing and regenerating limb tissues to mechanical disruption caused by the trematode cysts. We have tested this idea by implanting inert resin beads into developing limb buds of frogs and salamanders. Since this treatment can cause supernumerary limb structures, our hypothesis is sufficient to explain the naturally occurring extra limbs. PMID:2348164

Sessions, S K; Ruth, S B

1990-04-01

33

Naturally occurring minichromosome platforms in chromosome engineering: an overview.  

PubMed

Artificially modified chromosome vectors are non-integrating gene delivery platforms that can shuttle very large DNA fragments in various recipient cells: theoretically, no size limit exists for the chromosome segments that an engineered minichromosome can accommodate. Therefore, genetically manipulated chromosomes might be potentially ideal vector systems, especially when the complexity of higher eukaryotic genes is concerned. This review focuses on those chromosome vectors generated using spontaneously occurring small markers as starting material. The definition and manipulation of the centromere domain is one of the main obstacles in chromosome engineering: naturally occurring minichromosomes, due to their inherent small size, were helpful in defining some aspects of centromere function. In addition, several distinctive features of small marker chromosomes, like their appearance as supernumerary elements in otherwise normal karyotypes, have been successfully exploited to use them as gene delivery vectors. The key technologies employed for minichromosome engineering are: size reduction, gene targeting, and vector delivery in various recipient cells. In spite of the significant advances that have been recently achieved in all these fields, several unsolved problems limit the potential of artificially modified chromosomes. Still, these vector systems have been exploited in a number of applications where the investigation of the controlled expression of large DNA segments is needed. A typical example is the analysis of genes whose expression strictly depends on the chromosomal environment in which they are positioned, where engineered chromosomes can be envisaged as epigenetically regulated expression systems. A novel and exciting advance concerns the use of engineered minichromosomes to study the organization and dynamics of local chromatin structures. PMID:21431718

Raimondi, Elena

2011-01-01

34

Forecasting Seizures in Dogs with Naturally Occurring Epilepsy  

PubMed Central

Seizure forecasting has the potential to create new therapeutic strategies for epilepsy, such as providing patient warnings and delivering preemptive therapy. Progress on seizure forecasting, however, has been hindered by lack of sufficient data to rigorously evaluate the hypothesis that seizures are preceded by physiological changes, and are not simply random events. We investigated seizure forecasting in three dogs with naturally occurring focal epilepsy implanted with a device recording continuous intracranial EEG (iEEG). The iEEG spectral power in six frequency bands: delta (0.1–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha (8–12 Hz), beta (12–30 Hz), low-gamma (30–70 Hz), and high-gamma (70–180 Hz), were used as features. Logistic regression classifiers were trained to discriminate labeled pre-ictal and inter-ictal data segments using combinations of the band spectral power features. Performance was assessed on separate test data sets via 10-fold cross-validation. A total of 125 spontaneous seizures were detected in continuous iEEG recordings spanning 6.5 to 15 months from 3 dogs. When considering all seizures, the seizure forecasting algorithm performed significantly better than a Poisson-model chance predictor constrained to have the same time in warning for all 3 dogs over a range of total warning times. Seizure clusters were observed in all 3 dogs, and when the effect of seizure clusters was decreased by considering the subset of seizures separated by at least 4 hours, the forecasting performance remained better than chance for a subset of algorithm parameters. These results demonstrate that seizures in canine epilepsy are not randomly occurring events, and highlight the feasibility of long-term seizure forecasting using iEEG monitoring. PMID:24416133

Stead, S. Matt; Brinkmann, Ben; Vasoli, Vincent; Crepeau, Daniel; Vite, Charles H.; Sturges, Beverly; Ruedebusch, Vanessa; Mavoori, Jaideep; Leyde, Kent; Sheffield, W. Douglas; Litt, Brian; Worrell, Gregory A.

2014-01-01

35

Naturally occurring mastitis disrupts developmental competence of bovine oocytes.  

PubMed

We examined the effects of naturally occurring mastitis on bovine oocyte developmental competence in vitro. Specifically, we investigated the effects of intramammary infection on the ovarian pool of oocytes (i.e., follicle-enclosed oocytes) and their ability to undergo in vitro maturation, fertilization, and further development to the blastocyst stage. Culled Holstein cows (n=50) from 9 commercial dairy farms in Israel were allotted to 3 groups according to somatic cell count (SCC) records of the last 3 monthly milk tests as well as of quarter samples collected before slaughter: (1) low SCC (n=7), (2) medium SCC (n=16), or (3) high SCC (n=27). Means of SCC values differed among low-, medium-, and high-SCC groups: 148,000, 311,000 and 1,813,000 cell/mL milk, respectively. Milk yield and days in milk did not differ among the 3 groups. Bacterial isolates included coagulase-negative staphylococci, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, or no bacteria found. Ovaries were collected at the abattoir and brought to the laboratory. Cumulus oocyte complexes were recovered separately from each cow and subjected individually to in vitro maturation and fertilization, followed by 8d in culture. The number of aspirated oocytes did not differ among groups, with a range of 17 to 21 oocytes per cow. The proportion of oocytes that cleaved into 2- to 4-cell-stage embryos (86.1 ± 3.4%) did not differ among groups. In contrast, mean percentages of embryos developed to the blastocyst stage on d 7 and 8 after fertilization were less in both medium- and-high SCC groups than in the low-SCC group (5.6 ± 2.3 and 4.1 ± 1.8 vs. 18.1 ± 4.6%, respectively). Additional analysis indicated that cleavage and blastocyst-formation rates did not differ among the bacterial types in the low-, medium-, and high-SCC groups. These are the first results to demonstrate that naturally occurring mastitis disrupts the developmental competence of the ovarian pool of oocytes, (i.e., oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage). The disruption was associated with elevation of SCC rather than bacterial type. The results may provide a partial explanation for the low fertility of cows that have contracted mastitic pathogens before insemination. PMID:23957998

Roth, Z; Dvir, A; Kalo, D; Lavon, Y; Krifucks, O; Wolfenson, D; Leitner, G

2013-10-01

36

Natural mercury isotope variation in coal deposits and organic soils  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to distinguish among sources of Hg to the atmosphere in order to more fully understand global Hg pollution. In this study we investigate whether coal deposits within the United States, China, and Russia-Kazakhstan, which are three of the five greatest coal-producing regions, have diagnostic Hg isotopic fingerprints that can be used to discriminate among Hg sources. We also investigate the Hg isotopic composition of modern organic soil horizons developed in areas distant from point sources of Hg in North America. Mercury stored in coal deposits displays a wide range of both mass dependent fractionation and mass independent fractionation. {delta}{sup 202}Hg varies in coals by 3{per_thousand} and {Delta}{sup 201}Hg varies by 0.9{per_thousand}. Combining these two Hg isotope signals results in what may be a unique isotopic 'fingerprint' for many coal deposits. Mass independent fractionation of mercury has been demonstrated to occur during photochemical reactions of mercury. This suggests that Hg found in most coal deposits was subjected to photochemical reduction near the Earth's surface prior to deposition. The similarity in MDF and MIF of modern organic soils and coals from North America suggests that Hg deposition from coal may have imprinted an isotopic signature on soils. This research offers a new tool for characterizing mercury inputs from natural and anthropogenic sources to the atmosphere and provides new insights into the geochemistry of mercury in coal and soils. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Abir, Biswas; Joel D. Blum; Bridget A. Bergquist; Gerald J. Keeler; Zhouqing Xie [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Geological Sciences

2008-11-15

37

Scrap metal management issues associated with naturally occurring radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

Certain industrial processes sometimes generate waste by-products that contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) at elevated concentrations. Some industries, including the water treatment, geothermal energy, and petroleum industries, generate scrap metal that may be contaminated with NORM wastes. Of these three industries, the petroleum industry probably generates the largest quantity of NORM-contaminated equipment, conservatively estimated at 170,000 tons per year. Equipment may become contaminated when NORM-containing scale or sludge accumulates inside water-handling equipment. The primary radionuclides of concern in these NORM wastes are radium-226 and radium-228. NORM-contaminated equipment generated by the petroleum industry currently is managed several ways. Some equipment is routinely decontaminated for reuse; other equipment becomes scrap metal and may be disposed of by burial at a licensed landfill, encapsulation inside the wellbore of an abandoned well, or shipment overseas for smelting. In view of the increased regulatory activities addressing NORM, the economic burden of managing NORM-contaminated wastes, including radioactive scrap metal, is likely to continue to grow. Efforts to develop a cost-effective strategy for managing radioactive scrap metal should focus on identifying the least expensive disposition options that provide adequate protection of human health and the environment. Specifically, efforts should focus on better characterizing the quantity of radioactive scrap available for recycle or reuse, the radioactivity concentration levels, and the potential risks associated with different disposal options.

Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.

1995-08-01

38

Natural occurring epialleles determine vitamin E accumulation in tomato fruits.  

PubMed

Vitamin E (VTE) content is a low heritability nutritional trait for which the genetic determinants are poorly understood. Here, we focus on a previously detected major tomato VTE quantitative trait loci (QTL; mQTL(9-2-6)) and identify the causal gene as one encoding a 2-methyl-6-phytylquinol methyltransferase (namely VTE3(1)) that catalyses one of the final steps in the biosynthesis of ?- and ?-tocopherols, which are the main forms of VTE. By reverse genetic approaches, expression analyses, siRNA profiling and DNA methylation assays, we demonstrate that mQTL(9-2-6) is an expression QTL associated with differential methylation of a SINE retrotransposon located in the promoter region of VTE3(1). Promoter DNA methylation can be spontaneously reverted leading to different epialleles affecting VTE3(1) expression and VTE content in fruits. These findings indicate therefore that naturally occurring epialleles are responsible for regulation of a nutritionally important metabolic QTL and provide direct evidence of a role for epigenetics in the determination of agronomic traits. PMID:24967512

Quadrana, Leandro; Almeida, Juliana; Asís, Ramon; Duffy, Tomás; Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Bermúdez, Luisa; Conti, Gabriela; Corrêa da Silva, Junia V; Peralta, Iris E; Colot, Vincent; Asurmendi, Sebastian; Fernie, Alisdair R; Rossi, Magdalena; Carrari, Fernando

2014-01-01

39

Solution of naturally-occurring glasses in the geological environment  

SciTech Connect

As part of a study to investigate the feasibility of putting nuclear wastes in glass containers and burying them on land or dumping them in the ocean, we have made a study of the amount of solution experienced by naturally occurring glasses from two land sites and thirty-four deep-sea sites. The glasses used in this study are microtektites from three strewn fields (Australasian, Ivory Coast, and North American) and from the Zhamanshin impact crater in southern Siberia. The microtektites range in age from 0.7 to 35 m.y. and they have a wide range in composition. Although several criteria for determining the amount of solution were considered, most of the conclusions are based on two criteria: (1) width of cracks, and (2) elevation of silica-rich inclusions above the adjacent microtektite surface. The amount of solution was determined for about 170 microtektites; and measured amounts of solution range from 0.2 to at least 28 {mu}m, but most are less than 5 {mu}m. There appears to be no systematic relationship between age and amount of solution. 21 refs., 7 tabs.

Glass, B.P.

1982-12-01

40

Naturally occurring phytochemicals for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease increasingly recognized as one of the most important medical problems affecting the elderly. Although a number of drugs, including several cholinesterase inhibitors and an NMDA receptor antagonist, have been approved for use, they have been shown to produce diverse side effects and yield relatively modest benefits. To overcome these limitations of current therapeutics for AD, extensive research and development are underway to identify drugs that are effective and free of undesirable side effects. Certain naturally occurring dietary polyphenolic phytochemicals have received considerable recent attention as alternative candidates for AD therapy. In particular, curcumin, resveratrol, and green tea catechins have been suggested to have the potential to prevent AD because of their anti-amyloidogenic, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory properties. These polyphenolic phytochemicals also activate adaptive cellular stress responses, called 'neurohormesis', and suppress disease processes. In this commentary, we describe the amyloid-beta-induced pathogenesis of AD, and summarize the intracellular and molecular targets of selected dietary phytochemicals that might slow the progression of AD. PMID:20050972

Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won

2010-03-01

41

Analysis of coal slag for naturally occurring radioactive material.  

PubMed

Samples of aerosolized coal slag were collected during an abrasive blasting operation to determine the concentration of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the respirable and nonrespirable fractions. Each slag fraction was analyzed using alpha and gamma spectrometry. Since the slag is insoluble, it was necessary to dissolve samples completely by fusion with potassium fluoride and, after additional transposing and separation, mount the precipitate containing radium (Ra), the main radioactive component in NORM, on a membrane filter for alpha counting. The concentration of 226Ra in coal slag was independent of the particle size fraction and equal to 2.28 picocuries/gram (pCi/g) +/- 0.43 pCi/g, which is approximately twice the typical concentration of NORM in uncontaminated soil. Analysis of NORM by gamma spectrometry identified low concentrations of uranium, thorium, and potassium, all primordial radioactive materials that are commonly encountered in normal background soil. Integral exposure to workers from inhalation of NORM during abrasive blasting with coal slag is extremely low and could be essentially eliminated by use of appropriate respiratory protection. External radiation exposure to workers handling large quantities of NORM-contaminated coal slag during shipping or storage is also low, but would vary depending on the concentration of NORM in the slag. PMID:9697295

Spitz, H B; Rajaretnam, G

1998-07-01

42

Volatile analysis of ground almonds contaminated with naturally occurring fungi.  

PubMed

Aflatoxigenic aspergilli inflict major economic damage to the tree nut industry of California, with the highest negative impact to almonds. Aspergilli and fungi in general are known to emit volatiles in varying quantity and composition dependent upon their growth media. The goal of the study was to determine the volatile emission of whole and blanched almonds that had been picked out and labeled as inedible by processors. The aflatoxin content and number of colony forming units of each sample were also determined. A total of 23 compounds were consistently detected and identified. Several volatiles from the blanched almonds demonstrated significant increases when compared to the emissions of whole almonds. Several of these volatiles are considered fatty acid decomposition products and included hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, 3-octen-2-one, tetramethylpyrazine, and decanal. The almond samples investigated were characteristic of a typical postharvest environment and illustrative of potential contamination within a stockpile or transport container. Volatiles indicative of fatty acid decomposition were predominant in the samples that underwent some form of blanching. The emission amounts of hexanal, heptanal, octanal, and hexanoic acid increased 3-fold in samples contaminated with aflatoxin; however, due to variability between samples they could not be considered as indicator volatiles for aflatoxin content. The emission profile of volatiles from almond kernels contaminated with naturally occurring aspergilli and associated fungi is heretofore unreported. PMID:21528918

Beck, John J; Mahoney, Noreen E; Cook, Daniel; Gee, Wai S

2011-06-01

43

METHAMPHETAMINE-INDUCED NEUROTOXICITY DISRUPTS NATURALLY OCCURRING PHASIC DOPAMINE SIGNALING  

PubMed Central

Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive drug that is also neurotoxic to central dopamine (DA) systems. Although striatal DA depletions induced by METH are associated with behavioral and cognitive impairments, the link between these phenomena remains poorly understood. Previous work in both METH-pretreated animals and the 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinson’s disease suggests that a disruption of phasic DA signaling, which is important for learning and goal-directed behavior, may be such a link. However, prior studies used electrical stimulation to elicit phasic-like DA responses and were also performed under anesthesia, which alters DA neuron activity and presynaptic function. Here we investigated the consequences of METH-induced DA terminal loss on both electrically evoked phasic-like DA signals and so-called “spontaneous” phasic DA transients measured by voltammetry in awake rats. Not ostensibly attributable to discrete stimuli, these sub-second DA changes may play a role in enhancing reward-cue associations. METH-pretreatment reduced tissue DA content in the dorsomedial striatum and nucleus accumbens by ~55%. Analysis of phasic-like DA responses elicited by reinforcing stimulation revealed that METH pretreatment decreased their amplitude and underlying mechanisms for release and uptake to a similar degree as DA content in both striatal subregions. Most importantly, characteristics of DA transients were altered by METH-induced DA terminal loss, with amplitude and frequency decreased and duration increased. These results demonstrate for the first time that denervation of DA neurons alters naturally occurring DA transients and are consistent with diminished phasic DA signaling as a plausible mechanism linking METH-induced striatal DA depletions and cognitive deficits. PMID:23574406

Howard, Christopher D.; Daberkow, David P.; Ramsson, Eric S.; Keefe, Kristen A.; Garris, Paul A.

2013-01-01

44

Naturally occurring antioxidant nutrients reduce inflammatory response in mice.  

PubMed

The effects of mixed dietary coenzyme Q(9), alpha-tocopherol, and beta-carotene on immune cell activity and blood cytokine profile were studied in peritoneal macrophages, spleen lymphocytes, and blood plasma from mice with acute inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The activity of each fat-soluble antioxidant was also investigated separately in several model systems, both in vivo and in vitro. NMRI male mice were fed a diet supplemented with fat-soluble antioxidants for 15 days prior to LPS injection. LPS-induced inflammation resulted in induction of cellular production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-gamma, and also IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, and subsequent accumulation of these cytokines in blood plasma. In animals fed the antioxidant-rich diet, the inflammatory response to LPS injection was significantly reduced. The production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in response to toxic stress and its accumulation in plasma were not modified by the diet. In addition, the expression of the inducible form of heat-shock protein 70 in mice treated with endotoxin was reduced in the animals pretreated with the antioxidant-rich diet. We showed that the diet suppressed phosphorylation of NF-kappaB, I kappaB kinase and SAPK/JNK proteins, thereby preventing the activation of the NF-kappaB kinase and SAPK/JNK signaling pathways in LPS-treated mice. In this report we demonstrate the potential effectiveness of naturally occurring antioxidant nutrients in the reduction of the inflammatory response. Therefore, it may be possible to develop novel therapeutic combinations, containing coenzyme Q(9), alpha-tocopherol, and beta-carotene, which promote immune stimulation. PMID:19463810

Novoselova, Elena G; Lunin, Sergey M; Novoselova, Tatyana V; Khrenov, Maxim O; Glushkova, Olga V; Avkhacheva, Nadezhda V; Safronova, Valentina G; Fesenko, Evgeny E

2009-08-01

45

Committed effective dose from naturally occuring radionuclides in shellfish  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recognizing their importance in the average Malaysian daily diet, the radioactivity concentrations in mollusc- and crustacean-based food have been determined for key naturally occuring radionuclides. Fresh samples collected from various maritime locations around peninsular Malaysia have been processed using standard procedures; the radionuclide concentrations being determined using an HPGe ?-ray spectrometer. For molluscs, assuming secular equilibrium, the range of activities of 238U (226Ra), 232Th (228Ra) and 40K were found to be 3.28±0.35 to 5.34±0.52, 1.20±0.21 to 2.44±0.21 and 118±6 to 281±14 Bq kg-1 dry weight, respectively. The respective values for crustaceans were 3.02±0.57 to 4.70±0.52, 1.38±0.21 to 2.40±0.35 and 216±11 to 316±15 Bq kg-1. The estimated average daily intake of radioactivity from consumption of molluscs are 0.37 Bq kg-1 for 238U (226Ra), 0.16 Bq kg-1 for 232Th (228Ra) and 18 Bq kg-1 for 40K; the respective daily intake values from crustaceans are 0.36 Bq kg-1, 0.16 Bq kg-1 and 23 Bq kg-1. Associated annual committed effective doses from molluscs are estimated to be in the range 21.3 to 34.7 ?Sv for 226Ra, 19.3 to 39.1 ?Sv for 228Ra and 17.0 to 40.4 ?Sv for 40K. For crustaceans, the respective dose ranges are 19.6 to 30.5 ?Sv, 22.0 to 38.4 ?Sv and 31.1 to 45.5 ?Sv, being some several times world average values.

Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Wahib, Norfadira Binti; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Bradley, D. A.

2013-07-01

46

Probabilities of Natural Events Occurring at Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the comprehensive evaluation of probability models of natural events which are applicable to Savannah River Plant. The probability curves selected for these natural events are recommended to be used by all SRP/SRL safety analysts. This will ensure a consistency in analysis methodology for postulated SAR incidents involving natural phenomena.

Huang, J.C.

2001-07-17

47

Manufactured Home Testing in Simulated and Naturally Occurring High Winds  

SciTech Connect

A typical double-wide manufactured home was tested in simulated and naturally occurring high winds to understand structural behavior and improve performance during severe windstorms. Seven (7) lateral load tests were conducted on a double-wide manufactured home at a remote field test site in Wyoming. An extensive instrumentation package monitored the overall behavior of the home and collected data vital to validating computational software for the manufactured housing industry. The tests were designed to approach the design load of the home without causing structural damage, thus allowing the behavior of the home to be accessed when the home was later exposed to high winds (to 80-mph). The data generally show near-linear initial system response with significant non-linear behavior as the applied loads increase. Load transfer across the marriage line is primarily compression. Racking, while present, is very small. Interface slip and shear displacement along the marriage line are nearly insignificant. Horizontal global displacements reached 0.6 inch. These tests were designed primarily to collect data necessary to calibrate a desktop analysis and design software tool, MHTool, under development at the Idaho National Laboratory specifically for manufactured housing. Currently available analysis tools are, for the most part, based on methods developed for “stick built” structures and are inappropriate for manufactured homes. The special materials utilized in manufactured homes, such as rigid adhesives used in the connection of the sheathing materials to the studs, significantly alter the behavior of manufactured homes under lateral loads. Previous full scale tests of laterally loaded manufactured homes confirm the contention that conventional analysis methods are not applicable. System behavior dominates the structural action of manufactured homes and its prediction requires a three dimensional analysis of the complete unit, including tiedowns. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Manufactured Housing Institute. The results of this research can lead to savings in annual losses of life and property by providing validated information to enable the advancement of code requirements and by developing engineering software that can predict and optimize wind resistance.

W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson

2006-08-01

48

The adsorption of hexachlorobenzene on naturally occurring adsorbents in water.  

PubMed

To evaluate the distribution of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) between water and natural adsorbents, laboratory experiments were performed with 14C-labelled HCB, with quartz, kaolinite, illite, bentonite, peat, suspended particulate matter and activated sewage sludge as the natural adsorbents. HCB was bound mainly to organogenic adsorbents with distribution coefficients between 140 (for bentonite) and 28,000 (for activated sewage sludge). Desorption experiments showed that distilled water could remobilize up to 100% HCB from mineral adsorbents, but only 3% from activated sewage sludge. Using these values, basic parameters for the bioavailability of HCB in natural waters were estimated. PMID:3596760

Wilken, R D; Wirth, H

1986-01-01

49

With radiation constantly oc-curring from natural sources  

E-print Network

and 1980 re- spectively. He held positions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 1981 until 1984 and San includes 90 publications, with one in Nature, on fish physiology and migra- tion; comparative aging; and

Ohta, Shigemi

50

Biomimetic Nitration of Conjugated Linoleic Acid: Formation and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Conjugated Nitrodienes  

PubMed Central

Nitro-conjugated linoleic acids (NO2-cLA), endogenous nitrodiene lipids which act as inflammatory signaling mediators, were isolated and single isomers purified from the biomimetic acidic nitration products of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Structures were elucidated by means of detailed NMR and HPLC–MS/MS spectroscopic analysis and the relative double bond configurations assigned. Additional synthetic methods produced useful quantities and similar isomeric distributions of these unusual and reactive compounds for biological studies and isotopic standards, and the potential conversion of nitro-linoleic to nitro-conjugated linoleic acids was explored via a facile base-catalyzed isomerization. This represents one of the few descriptions of naturally occurring conjugated nitro dienes (in particular, 1-nitro 1,3-diene), an unusual and highly reactive motif with few biological examples extant. PMID:24350701

Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Freeman, Bruce A.

2014-01-01

51

The Frequency, Nature, and Effects of Naturally Occurring Appearance-Focused Social Comparisons  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research examined the effects of naturally occurring appearance-focused social comparisons on women's affect, body satisfaction, and weight-related cognitions. During their daily activities, women reporting body dissatisfaction (n = 53) and women reporting body satisfaction (n = 34) recorded their reactions to comparison information.…

Leahey, Tricia M.; Crowther, Janis H.; Mickelson, Kristin D.

2007-01-01

52

Overview of naturally occurring Earth materials and human health concerns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The biosphere and the Earth's critical zone have maintained a dynamic equilibrium for more than 3.5 billion years. Except for solar energy, almost all terrestrial substances necessary for life have been derived from near-surface portions of the land, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. If aggregate biological activities are less than the rate of nutrient supply and/or resource renewal, sustained population growth is possible. Where the replenishment rate of a life-sustaining Earth material is finite, usage may reach a condition of dynamic equilibrium in which biological consumption equals but on average cannot exceed the overall supply. Although large, most natural resources are present in finite abundances; for such commodities, excessive present-day human utilization reduces future availability, and thus the ultimate planetary carrying capacity for civilization. Intensive use of Earth materials has enhanced the quality of life, especially in the developed nations. Still, natural background levels, and Earth processes such as volcanic eruptions, as well as human activities involving agriculture, construction, and the extraction, refining, and transformation of mineral resources have led to harmful side effects involving environmental degradation and public health hazards. Among naturally and anthropogenically induced risks are bioaccessible airborne dusts and gases, soluble pollutants in agricultural, industrial, and residential waters, and toxic chemical species in foods and manufactured products. At appropriate levels of ingestion, many Earth materials are necessary for existence, but underdoses and overdoses have mild to serious consequences for human health and longevity. This overview briefly sketches several natural resource health hazards. Included are volcanic ash + aerosols + gases, mineral dusts, non-volcanic aerosols + nanoparticles, asbestos + fibrous zeolites, arsenic, fluorine, iodine, uranium + thorium + radium + radon + polonium, selenium, mercury, copper, lead, chromium, and cadmium. Also noted are health effects of natural disasters, and an obligatory future sustainable consumption of natural resources. Not treated are the overwhelming adverse effects of malnutrition, lack of potable water, inadequate sanitation, fossil fuel usage, mining, manufacturing, and agricultural pollution, or environmental pathogens, nor are the important impacts of complex mixtures of Earth materials considered. With rise of the worldwide information network, economic globalization, and the industrial thrust of Developing Nations, the achievement of natural resource sustainability has emerged as a strategic imperative. Accompanying increased rates of Earth materials consumption and attendant environmental change, substantially improved, universal public health will require a major global effort, integrating collaborations among geoscientists, medical researchers, and epidemiologists. Governments and NGOs must provide important support of such cooperative efforts, and both health and Earth scientists must cross disciplinary and national boundaries.

Ernst, W. G.

2012-10-01

53

Field evaluation of parvaquone against naturally occurring East Coast fever.  

PubMed

Parvaquone (Clexon Cooper) was clinically tested for efficacy as a treatment for East Coast Fever (Theileria parva parva infection) in naturally infected cattle. The drug showed a suppressive effect on Theileria schizonts and piroplasms. A recovery rate of 79% was recorded. Best results were obtained when Clexon treatment was initiated in the early stage of the disease, before many red blood cells were invaded and before respiratory distress was evident. A carrier state in animals recovered from East Coast Fever is suspected. PMID:3105162

Mbwambo, H A; Mkonyi, P A; Chua, R B

1987-02-01

54

Structures and Properties of Naturally Occurring Polyether Antibiotics  

PubMed Central

Polyether ionophores represent a large group of natural, biologically active substances produced by Streptomyces spp. They are lipid soluble and able to transport metal cations across cell membranes. Several of polyether ionophores are widely used as growth promoters in veterinary. Polyether antibiotics show a broad spectrum of bioactivity ranging from antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, antiviral, and tumour cell cytotoxicity. Recently, it has been shown that some of these compounds are able to selectively kill cancer stem cells and multidrug-resistant cancer cells. Thus, they are recognized as new potential anticancer drugs. The biological activity of polyether ionophores is strictly connected with their molecular structure; therefore, the purpose of this paper is to present an overview of their formula, molecular structure, and properties. PMID:23586016

Rutkowski, Jacek; Brzezinski, Bogumil

2013-01-01

55

Pathology of naturally occurring bovine tuberculosis in England and Wales.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to obtain a contemporary data set of pathology in tuberculin reactor and in-contact cattle in England and Wales. Four hundred animals (200 reactors and 200 in-contacts) from 242 farms located in 14 counties in Western England and Wales were examined. The mean number of lymph nodes (LNs) with tuberculosis (TB)-like lesions per TB-confirmed animal was 1.7 in reactors and 1.5 in in-contact animals. Tuberculous lesions in both reactor and in-contact animals were most commonly observed in the LNs of the thorax, followed by the head and abdomen, particularly the mediastinal, retropharyngeal and tracheobronchial LNs. Twenty-five reactors had macroscopic lesions in the palatine tonsils. Among TB-confirmed cattle, 27% of reactors and 9% of in-contact animals had gross TB-like lesions in the lungs, particularly in the caudal lobes. Gross lesions that were not TB-confirmed were parasitic granulomas (45%), bacterial or mycotic club-forming pyogranulomas (27%) and bacterial abscesses (23%). Diagnostic sensitivity was maximised when bacteriology and histopathology were used concurrently. Stage IV granulomas, alone or in combination with other stages, constituted 63% of lesions, while 16% of lesions were stage I/II granulomas. Caseous necrosis and calcification were common features of the granulomas encountered in natural Mycobacterium bovis infections, even with pathology limited to a small number of sites. Granulomas often covered large areas of histological sections and typically contained only small numbers of acid fast bacilli. PMID:17728162

Liebana, E; Johnson, L; Gough, J; Durr, P; Jahans, K; Clifton-Hadley, R; Spencer, Y; Hewinson, R G; Downs, S H

2008-06-01

56

Naturally occurring and synthetic peptides acting on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.  

PubMed

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are pentameric membrane-bound proteins belonging to the large family of ligand-gated ion channels. nAChRs possess various binding sites which interact with compounds of different chemical nature, including peptides. Historically first peptides found to act on nAChR were synthetic fragments of snake alpha-neurotoxins, competitive receptor antagonists. Later it was shown that fragments of glycoprotein from rabies virus, having homology to alpha-neurotoxins, and polypeptide neurotoxins waglerins from the venom of Wagler's pit viper Trimeresurus (Tropidolaemus) wagleri bind in a similar way, waglerins being efficient blockers of muscle-type nAChRs. Neuropeptide substance P appears to interact with the channel moiety of nAChR. beta-Amyloid, a peptide forming senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease, also can bind to nAChR, although the mode of binding is still unclear. However, the most well-studied peptides interacting with the ligand-binding sites of nAChRs are so-called alpha-conotoxins, peptide neurotoxins from marine snails of Conus genus. First alpha-conotoxins were discovered in the late 1970s, and now it is a rapidly growing family due to isolation of peptides from multiple Conus species, as well as to cloning, and chemical synthesis of new analogues. Because of their unique selectivity towards distinct nAChR subtypes, alpha-conotoxins became valuable tools in nAChR research. Recent X-ray structures of alpha-conotoxin complexes with acetylcholine-binding protein, a model of nAChR ligand-binding domains, revealed the details of the nAChR ligand-binding sites and provided the basis for design of novel ligands. PMID:19601841

Kasheverov, Igor E; Utkin, Yuri N; Tsetlin, Victor I

2009-01-01

57

Natural abundances of carbon isotopes in acetate from a coastal marine sediment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements of the natural abundances of carbon isotopes were made in acetate samples isolated from the anoxic marine sediment of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina. The typical value of the total acetate carbon isotope ratio (delta 13C) was -16.1 +/- 0.2 per mil. The methyl and carboxyl groups were determined to be -26.4 +/- 0.3 and -6.0 +/- 0.3 per mil, respectively, for one sample. The isotopic composition of the acetate is thought to have resulted from isotopic discriminations that occurred during the cycling of that molecule. Measurements of this type, which have not been made previously in the natural environment, may provide information about the dominant microbial pathways in anoxic sediments as well as the processes that influence the carbon isotopic composition of biogenic methane from many sources.

Blair, N. E.; Martens, C. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

1987-01-01

58

Mass spectrometry and natural variations of iron isotopes.  

PubMed

Although the processes that govern iron isotope variations in nature are just beginning to be understood, multiple studies attest of the virtue of this system to solve important problems in geosciences and biology. In this article, we review recent advances in the geochemistry, cosmochemistry, and biochemistry of iron isotopes. In Section 2, we briefly address the question of the nucleosynthesis of Fe isotopes. In Section 3, we describe the different methods for purifying Fe and analyzing its isotopic composition. The methods of SIMS, RIMS, and TIMS are presented but more weight is given to measurements by MC-ICPMS. In Section 4, the isotope anomalies measured in extraterrestrial material are briefly discussed. In Section 5, we show how high temperature processes like evaporation, condensation, diffusion, reduction, and phase partitioning can affect Fe isotopic composition. In Section 6, the various low temperature processes causing Fe isotopic fractionation are presented. These involve aqueous and biologic systems. PMID:16463281

Dauphas, Nicolas; Rouxel, Olivier

2006-01-01

59

Measurement of isotope abundance variations in nature by gravimetric spiking isotope dilution analysis (GS-IDA).  

PubMed

Subtle variations in the isotopic composition of elements carry unique information about physical and chemical processes in nature and are now exploited widely in diverse areas of research. Reliable measurement of natural isotope abundance variations is among the biggest challenges in inorganic mass spectrometry as they are highly sensitive to methodological bias. For decades, double spiking of the sample with a mix of two stable isotopes has been considered the reference technique for measuring such variations both by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and multicollector-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS). However, this technique can only be applied to elements having at least four stable isotopes. Here we present a novel approach that requires measurement of three isotope signals only and which is more robust than the conventional double spiking technique. This became possible by gravimetric mixing of the sample with an isotopic spike in different proportions and by applying principles of isotope dilution for data analysis (GS-IDA). The potential and principle use of the technique is demonstrated for Mg in human urine using MC-TIMS for isotopic analysis. Mg is an element inaccessible to double spiking methods as it consists of three stable isotopes only and shows great potential for metabolically induced isotope effects waiting to be explored. PMID:23419016

Chew, Gina; Walczyk, Thomas

2013-04-01

60

Evidence of natural isotopic distribution from single-molecule SERS  

E-print Network

We report on the observation of the natural isotopic spread of carbon from single-molecule Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SM-SERS). By choosing a dye molecule with a very localized Raman active vibration in a cyano bond (C$\\equiv$N triple bond), we observe (in a SERS colloidal liquid) a small fraction of SM-SERS events where the frequency of the cyano mode is softened and in agreement with the effect of substituting $^{12}$C by the next most abundant $^{13}$C isotope. This example adds another demonstration of single molecule sensitivity in SERS through isotopic editing which is done, in this case, not by artificial isotopic editing but rather by nature itself. It also highlights SERS as a unique spectroscopic tool, capable of detecting an isotopic change in one atom of a single molecule.

P. G. Etchegoin; E. C. Le Ru; M. Meyer

2008-11-03

61

INFLUENCE OF EASILY DEGRADABLE NATURALLY OCCURRING CARBON SUBSTRATES ON BIODEGRADATION OF MONOSUBSTITUTED PHENOLS BY AQUATIC BACTERIA  

EPA Science Inventory

The influence of readily degradable, naturally occurring carbon substrates on the biodegradation of several monosubstitued phenols (m-cresol, m-aminophenol, p-chlorophenol) was examined. The natural substrate classes used were amino acids, carbohydrates, and fatty acids. Samples ...

62

Mobilization of arsenic and other naturally occurring contaminants in groundwater of the Main Ethiopian Rift aquifers.  

PubMed

This study investigates the mechanisms of arsenic (As) and other naturally occurring contaminants (F(-), U, V, B, and Mo) mobilization from Quaternary sedimentary aquifers of the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) and their enrichment in the local groundwater. The study is based on systematic measurements of major and trace elements as well as stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in groundwater, coupled with geochemical and mineralogical analyses of the aquifer rocks. The Rift Valley aquifer is composed of rhyolitic volcanics and Quaternary lacustrine sediments. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) results revealed that MER rhyolites (ash, tuff, pumice and ignimbrite) and sediments contain on average 72 wt. % and 65 wt. % SiO2, respectively. Petrographic studies of the rhyolites indicate predominance of volcanic glass, sanidine, pyroxene, Fe-oxides and plagioclase. The As content in the lacustrine sediments (mean = 6.6 mg/kg) was higher than that of the rhyolites (mean: 2.5 mg/kg). The lacustrine aquifers of the Ziway-Shala basin in the northern part of MER were identified as high As risk zones, where mean As concentration in groundwater was 22.4 ± 33.5 (range of 0.60-190 ?g/L) and 54% of samples had As above the WHO drinking water guideline value of 10 ?g/L. Field As speciation measurements showed that most of the groundwater samples contain predominantly (~80%) arsenate-As(V) over arsenite-As(III) species. The As speciation together with field data of redox potential (mean Eh = +73 ± 65 mV) and dissolved-O2 (6.6 ± 2.2 mg/L) suggest that the aquifer is predominantly oxidative. Water-rock interactions, including the dissolution of volcanic glass produces groundwater with near-neutral to alkaline pH (range 6.9-8.9), predominance of Na-HCO3 ions, and high concentration of SiO2 (mean: 85.8 ± 11.3 mg/L). The groundwater data show high positive correlation of As with Na, HCO3, U, B, V, and Mo (R(2) > 0.5; p < 0.001). Chemical modeling of the groundwater indicates that Fe-oxides and oxyhydroxides minerals were saturated in the groundwater, suggesting that the As reactivity is controlled by adsorption/desorption processes with these minerals. The data show that As and other oxyanion-forming elements such as U, B, Mo, and V had typically higher concentrations at pH > ~8, reflecting the pH-dependence of their mobilization. Based on the geochemical and stable isotope variations we have established a conceptual model for the occurrence of naturally occurring contaminants in MER groundwater: 1) regional groundwater recharge from the Highland, along the Rift margins, followed by lateral flow and water-rock interactions with the aquifer rocks resulted in a gradual increase of the salinity and naturally occurring contaminants towards the center of the valley; and (2) local ?(18)O-rich lake water recharge into adjacent shallow aquifers, followed by additional mobilization of As and other oxyanion-forming elements from the aquifer rocks. We posit that the combined physical-chemical conditions of the aquifers such as oxidizing state, Na-HCO3 composition, and pH>~8 lead to enhanced mobilization of oxyanion-forming elements from Fe-oxides and consequently contamination of local groundwater. These geochemical conditions characterize groundwater resources along the Eastern African Rift and thus constitute a potential threat to the quality of groundwater in larger areas of Eastern Africa. PMID:23899878

Rango, Tewodros; Vengosh, Avner; Dwyer, Gary; Bianchini, Gianluca

2013-10-01

63

Copper isotope fractionation during equilibration with natural and synthetic ligands.  

PubMed

As copper (Cu) stable isotopes emerge as a tool for tracing Cu biogeochemical cycling, an understanding of how Cu isotopes fractionate during complexation with soluble organic ligands in natural waters and soil solutions is required. A Donnan dialysis technique was employed to assess the isotopic fractionation of Cu during complexation with the soluble synthetic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and desferrioxamine B (DFOB), as well as with Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). The results indicated enrichment of the heavy isotope ((65)Cu) in the complexes, with ?(65)Cu complex-free values ranging from +0.14 to +0.84‰. A strong linear correlation was found between the logarithms of the stability constants of the Cu complexes and the magnitudes of isotopic fractionation. These results show that complexation of Cu by organic ligands can affect the isotopic signature of the free Cu ion. This free Cu is considered the most bioavailable species, and hence, our results highlight the importance of understanding fractionation processes in the uptake medium when using Cu isotopes to study the uptake mechanisms of organisms. These data contribute a vital piece to the emerging picture of Cu isotope cycling in the natural environment, as organic complexation plays a key role in the Cu cycle. PMID:24992660

Ryan, Brooke M; Kirby, Jason K; Degryse, Fien; Scheiderich, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Mike J

2014-08-01

64

Standards for stable isotope measurements in natural compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

RESEARCH based on stable isotope variations in natural compounds is expanding in scientific fields such as geochemistry, hydrology, environmental studies and biochemistry. However, intercomparison of results obtained in different laboratories is often not fully reliable and therefore to improve the intercalibration of deuterium and 18O measurements in natural waters, two water standards have been distributed by the International Atomic Energy

R. Gonfiantini

1978-01-01

65

Environmental and biomedical applications of natural metal stable isotope variations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

etal stable isotopes are now being used to trace metal contaminants in the environment and as indicators of human systemic function where metals play a role. Stable isotope abundance variations provide information about metal sources and the processes affecting metals in complex natural systems, complementing information gained from surrogate tracers, such as metal abundance ratios or biochemical markers of metal metabolism. The science is still in its infancy, but the results of initial studies confirm that metal stable isotopes can provide a powerful tool for forensic and biomedical investigations.

Bullen, T.D.; Walczyk, T.

2009-01-01

66

Stable isotope tracers: natural and anthropogenic recharge, Orange County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotopic techniques have been utilized to locate occurrences and trace movements of a variety of naturally and anthropogenically recharged waters in aquifers of Orange County, California. This basin is of particular interest not only because it provides the dominant water supply for the two million residents of this well-populated county, but also because it is representative of a common arid environment where natural recharge is dominated by distant, high-elevation precipitation transported by a major river. Such arid basins are particularly sensitive to climatic and anthropogenic disturbance of their recharge and their subsurface hydrology. In order to identify distinctive waters, oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope ratios from Orange County wells have been compared with a regional database including an array of surface water samples representative of watershed runoff. Four distinctive subsurface water types can be resolved. Waters of "local" rainfall and imported, "Colorado" River aqueduct origins are easily distinguished from dominant, "native" Santa Ana river compositions by use of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope analysis. Recent human interference with Santa Ana river flow and recharge is also marginally resolvable by isotopic techniques. Distinguishable isotopic signatures of "recent" Santa Ana recharge appear to be due to evaporative loss, perhaps during storage in the Prado Reservoir or in percolation ponds, prior to recharge into Orange County aquifers. Characterization of traceable isotopic signatures of distinct natural and anthropogenic recharge components provides a major advance towards use of such techniques for developing a well constrained, three-dimensional hydrologic model for this complex basin.

Williams, Alan E.

1997-12-01

67

Uranium pollution in an estuary affected by pyrite acid mine drainage and releases of naturally occurring radioactive materials.  

PubMed

After the termination of phosphogypsum discharges to the Huelva estuary (SW Spain), a unique opportunity was presented to study the response of a contaminated environmental compartment after the cessation of its main source of pollution. The evolution over time of uranium concentrations in the estuary is presented to supply new insights into the decontamination of a scenario affected by Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) discharges. The cleaning of uranium isotopes from the area has not taken place as rapidly as expected due to leaching from phosphogypsum stacks. An in-depth study using various techniques of analysis, including (234)U/(238)U and (230)Th/(232)Th ratios and the decreasing rates of the uranium concentration, enabled a second source of uranium contamination to be discovered. Increased uranium levels due to acid mine drainage from pyrite mines located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain) prevent complete uranium decontamination and, therefore, result in levels nearly twice those of natural background levels. PMID:21529854

Villa, M; Manjón, G; Hurtado, S; García-Tenorio, R

2011-07-01

68

Nature of Isomerism in Exotic Sulfur Isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We clarify the origin of the anomalously hindered E 2 decay from the 41+ level in 44S by performing a novel many-body analysis in the shell model. Within a unified picture about the occurrence of isomerism in neutron-rich sulfur isotopes, the 41+ state is demonstrated to be a K =4 isomer dominated by the two-quasiparticle configuration ? ??=1 /2-?? ??=7 /2- . The 41+ state in 44S is a new type of high-K isomer which has significant triaxiality.

Utsuno, Yutaka; Shimizu, Noritaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Yoshida, Tooru; Tsunoda, Yusuke

2015-01-01

69

DECIPHERING NATURALLY-OCCURRING PB CONTAMINATION IMPACTING DRINKING WATER WELLS: SHAKER VILLAGE CATCHMENT, MAINE.  

EPA Science Inventory

Trace Pb concentrations in groundwater within glacial deposits across Maine fluctuate considerably. Deciphering the distribution and sources of naturally occurring Pb in groundwater with only the use of conventional anomaly identification techniques presents a challenge. In a rep...

70

Inhibition of Gland Development in Insects by a Naturally Occurring Antiallatotropin ("Anti-Hormone")  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The exercise will introduce the students to using chemical surgery as well as demonstrate the function of insect juvenile hormone and naturally occuring compounds in the interaction between insects and host plants.

Dorothy Feir (Saint Louis University;)

1981-06-07

71

Mass transfer and carbon isotope evolution in natural water systems  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This paper presents a theoretical treatment of the evolution of the carbon isotopes C13 and C14 in natural waters and in precipitates which derive from such waters. The effects of an arbitrary number of sources (such as dissolution of carbonate minerals and oxidation of organic material) and sinks (such as mineral precipitation, CO2 degassing and production of methane), and of equilibrium fractionation between solid, gas and aqueous phases are considered. The results are expressed as equations relating changes in isotopic composition to changes in conventional carbonate chemistry. One implication of the equations is that the isotopic composition of an aqueous phase may approach a limiting value whenever there are simultaneous inputs and outputs of carbonate. In order to unambiguously interpret isotopic data from carbonate precipitates and identify reactants and products in reacting natural waters, it is essential that isotopic changes are determined chiefly by reactant and product stoichiometry, independent of reaction path. We demonstrate that this is so by means of quantitative examples. The evolution equations are applied to: 1. (1) carbon-14 dating of groundwaters; 2. (2) interpretation of the isotopic composition of carbonate precipitates, carbonate cements and diagenetically altered carbonates; and 3. (3) the identification of chemical reaction stoichiometry. These applications are illustrated by examples which show the variation of ??C13 in solutions and in precipitates formed under a variety of conditions involving incongruent dissolution, CO2 degassing, methane production and mineral precipitation. ?? 1978.

Wigley, T.M.L.; Plummer, L.N.; Pearson, F.J., Jr.

1978-01-01

72

Naturally Occurring Radionuclides of Uranium and Thorium Series in Nonnuclear Industrial Processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides of the Th and U series in nonnuclear industrial processes is discussed.\\u000a Some parallelism is found between the migration of naturally occurring radionuclides in the geological environment and their\\u000a fate in industrial processes. In both cases, the behavior is governed by well-known laws for phase distribution of microcomponents.\\u000a Differences in the behavior of particular members

S. M. Grashchenko

2005-01-01

73

Survival of naturally occurring Campylobacter in refrigerated and frozen rinsate from a broiler carcass  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The objective of this study was to determine if naturally occurring Campylobacter in a broiler rinsate could survive in cold storage. Ten commercial broiler carcasses were each rinsed with 500 ml of Butterfield’s buffer and all carcasses tested positive for the presence of 104-105/ml naturally occu...

74

Recent Advances in the Chemistry and Biology of Naturally Occurring Antibiotics  

PubMed Central

Lead-in Ever since the world-shaping discovery of penicillin, nature’s molecular diversity has been extensively screened for new medications and lead compounds in drug discovery. The search for anti-infective agents intended to combat infectious diseases has been of particular interest and has enjoyed a high degree of success. Indeed, the history of antibiotics is marked with impressive discoveries and drug development stories, the overwhelming majority of which have their origins in nature. Chemistry, and in particular chemical synthesis, has played a major role in bringing naturally occurring antibiotics and their derivatives to the clinic, and no doubt these disciplines will continue to be key enabling technologies for future developments in the field. In this review article, we highlight a number of recent discoveries and advances in the chemistry, biology, and medicine of naturally occurring antibiotics, with particular emphasis on the total synthesis, analog design, and biological evaluation of molecules with novel mechanisms of action. PMID:19130444

Chen, Jason S.; Edmonds, David J.; Estrada, Anthony A.

2009-01-01

75

Stratigraphic and geochemical controls on naturally occurring arsenic in groundwater, eastern Wisconsin, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High arsenic concentrations (up to 12,000?g/L) have been measured in groundwater from a confined sandstone aquifer in eastern Wisconsin. The main arsenic source is a sulfide-bearing secondary cement horizon (SCH) that has variable thickness, morphology, and arsenic concentrations. Arsenic occurs in pyrite and marcasite as well as in iron oxyhydroxides but not as a separate arsenopyrite phase. Nearly identical sulfur isotopic signatures in pyrite and dissolved sulfate and the correlation between dissolved sulfate, iron, and arsenic concentrations suggest that sulfide oxidation is the dominant process controlling arsenic release to groundwater. However, arsenic-bearing oxyhydroxides can potentially provide another arsenic source if reducing conditions develop or if they are transported as colloids in the aquifer. Analysis of well data indicates that the intersection of the SCH with static water levels measured in residential wells is strongly correlated with high concentrations of arsenic in groundwater. Field and laboratory data suggest that the most severe arsenic contamination is caused by localized borehole interactions of air, water, and sulfides. Although arsenic contamination is caused by oxidation of naturally occurring sulfides, it is influenced by water-level fluctuations caused by municipal well pumping or climate changes, which can shift geographic areas in which contamination occurs. Résumé De fortes concentrations en arsenic, jusqu'à 12000?g/L, ont été mesurées dans l'eau souterraine d'un aquifère gréseux captif, dans l'est du Wisconsin. La principale source d'arsenic est un horizon à cimentation secondaire (SCH) comportant des sulfures, dont l'épaisseur, la morphologie et les concentrations en arsenic sont variables. L'arsenic est présent dans la pyrite et dans la marcassite, de même que dans des oxy-hydroxydes de fer, mais non pas dans une phase séparée d'arsénopyrite. Les signatures isotopiques du soufre presque identiques dans la pyrite et dans les sulfates dissous et la corrélation entre les concentrations en sulfates, en fer et en arsenic dissous laissent penser que l'oxydation des sulfures est le processus dominant contrôlant la libération de l'arsenic dans les eaux souterraines. Cependant, les oxy-hydroxydes contenant de l'arsenic sont susceptibles d'être une autre source d'arsenic si des conditions réductrices apparaissent ou s'ils sont transportés dans l'aquifère sous forme de colloïdes. L'analyse des données provenant de puits montre que l'intersection entre le SCH et les niveaux statiques des puits domestiques est fortement corrélée à de fortes concentrations en arsenic dans les eaux souterraines. Des données de terrain et de laboratoire conduisent à penser que la contamination en arsenic la plus forte est causée par l'interaction localisée aux forages entre l'air, l'eau et les sulfures. Bien que la contamination en arsenic soit causée par l'oxydation de sulfures présents naturellement, elle est influencée par les fluctuations du niveau piézométrique causées par les pompages du captage municipal ou par les variations climatiques, ce qui peut conduire au déplacement des zones géographiques où se produisent les contaminations. Resumen Se han medido concentraciones de arsénico muy altas (de hasta 12000?g/L) en las aguas subterráneas de un acuífero confinado, en areniscas, localizado en la parte oriental de Wisconsin (EEUU). La fuente principal de arsénico es un horizonte de cementación secundaria (SCH) con un alto contenido en sulfuros, y con una gran variabilidad en espesor, morfología y concentraciones de As. El arsénico aparece en piritas y marcasitas, además de en oxihidróxidos de hierro, pero no como una fase independiente de arsenopiritas. El hecho que la marca isotópica de piritas y sulfatos disueltos sea muy similar, y que exista una gran correlación entre las concentraciones de sulfato disuelto, hierro y arsénico sugiere que la oxidación de sulfuros es el proceso que controla la aportación de arsénico al agua subterránea. Sin embargo

Schreiber, M. E.; Simo, J. A.; Freiberg, P. G.

76

Apoptosis and autophagy induction as mechanism of cancer prevention by naturally occurring dietary agents  

PubMed Central

Nontoxic naturally occurring compounds, especially those from dietary sources, are receiving increasing consideration for prevention and treatment of diseases including cancer. There is a growing need for innovative anticancer therapies and therefore search for natural compounds with novel biological activities or antineoplastic potential is currently an important area in drug discovery. Support for this interest also comes from increasing concern over the efficacy and safety of many conventional therapies, especially those that run over a long course of time. Laboratory studies in different in vitro and in vivo systems have shown that many natural compounds possess the capacity to regulate response to oxidative stress and DNA damage, suppress angiogenesis, inhibit cell proliferation and induce autophagy and apoptosis. This review discusses the induction of apoptosis and autophagy as a mechanism of cancer prevention by some of the most studied naturally occurring dietary compounds. PMID:23140293

Mukhtar, Eiman; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Khan, Naghma; Mukhtar, Hasan

2013-01-01

77

Recent progress regarding the bioactivities, biosynthesis and synthesis of naturally occurring resorcinolic macrolides.  

PubMed

Macrolides, which comprise a family of lactones with different ring sizes, belong to the polyketide class of natural products. Resorcinolic macrolides, an important subgroup, possess interesting structures and exhibit a wide variety of bioactivities, such as anti-tumor, anti-bacteria, and anti-malaria activities, etc. This review summarizes progress in isolation, bioactivity studies, biosynthesis, and representative chemical syntheses of this group of macrolides in recent decades, encompassing 63 naturally occurring macrolides published in 120 articles. PMID:24464049

Xu, Jing; Jiang, Cheng-shi; Zhang, Zai-long; Ma, Wen-quan; Guo, Yue-wei

2014-03-01

78

In Vivo and In Vitro Protein Ligation by Naturally Occurring and Engineered Split DnaE Inteins  

PubMed Central

Background Protein trans-splicing by naturally occurring split DnaE inteins is used for protein ligation of foreign peptide fragments. In order to widen biotechnological applications of protein trans-splicing, it is highly desirable to have split inteins with shorter C-terminal fragments, which can be chemically synthesized. Principal Findings We report the identification of new functional split sites in DnaE inteins from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and from Nostoc punctiforme. One of the newly engineered split intein bearing C-terminal 15 residues showed more robust protein trans-splicing activity than naturally occurring split DnaE inteins in a foreign context. During the course of our experiments, we found that protein ligation by protein trans-splicing depended not only on the splicing junction sequences, but also on the foreign extein sequences. Furthermore, we could classify the protein trans-splicing reactions in foreign contexts with a simple kinetic model into three groups according to their kinetic parameters in the presence of various reducing agents. Conclusion The shorter C-intein of the newly engineered split intein could be a useful tool for biotechnological applications including protein modification, incorporation of chemical probes, and segmental isotopic labelling. Based on kinetic analysis of the protein splicing reactions, we propose a general strategy to improve ligation yields by protein trans-splicing, which could significantly enhance the applications of protein ligation by protein trans-splicing. PMID:19365564

Aranko, A. Sesilja; Züger, Sara; Buchinger, Edith; Iwaï, Hideo

2009-01-01

79

NATURALLY OCCURRING SECONDARY NUTRITIONAL HYPERPARATHYROIDISM IN CATTLE EGRETS (BUBULCUS IBIS) FROM CENTRAL TEXAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Naturally occurring secondary nutritional hyperparathyroidism is described in the nestlings of two colonies of cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis) from Central Texas (Bryan and San Antonio, Texas, USA). Nestlings from a third colony (Waco, Texas, USA) were collected in a subsequent year for comparison. Birds from the first two colonies consistently had severe osteo- penia and associated curving deformities and folding

David N. Phalen; Mark L. Drew; Cindy Contreras; Kimberly Roset; Miguel Mora

80

Studying Compliment Responses; A Comparison of DCTs and Recordings of Naturally Occurring talk.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the differences between compliment responses collected with two different data collection procedures: naturally occurring data analyzed through conversation analytic methodology, and elicited data collected via a discourse completion task (DCT). The DCT was designed to evoke the same discourse context and preceding context observed in the…

Golato, Andrea

2003-01-01

81

Unique single?domain antigen binding fragments derived from naturally occurring camel heavy?chain antibodies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The humoral immune response of camels, dromedaries and llamas includes functional antibodies formed by two heavy chains and no light chains. The amino acid sequence of the variable domain of the naturally occurring heavy-chain antibodies reveals the necessary adaptations to compensate for the absence of the light chain. In contrast to the conventional antibodies, a large proportion of the heavy-chain

Serge Muyldermans; Marc Lauwereys

1999-01-01

82

Recovery of naturally occurring Campylobacter from the circulating blood of market age commercial broilers  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Campylobacter species have recently been recovered from several primary and secondary lymphoid tissues and internally from the spleen of poultry. The objective of this study was to determine whether naturally occurring Campylobacter can be recovered from the circulating blood of market age commerci...

83

Naturally Occurring Variants of Human A9 Nicotinic Receptor Differentially Affect Bronchial Cell Proliferation  

E-print Network

Naturally Occurring Variants of Human A9 Nicotinic Receptor Differentially Affect Bronchial Cell affecting protein levels, amino acid sequence and RNA splicing may influence the risk for lung cancer Differentially Affect Bronchial Cell Proliferation and Transformation. PLoS ONE 6(11): e27978. doi:10

Loudon, Catherine

84

Genome-wide architecture of reproductive isolation in a naturally occurring hybrid zone between Mus  

E-print Network

house mouse subspecies (Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus) along with studies using laboratoryGenome-wide architecture of reproductive isolation in a naturally occurring hybrid zone between Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus VA´ CLAV JANOUS EK,* LIUYANG WANG, KEN LUZYNSKI, PETRA DUFKOVA

Dean, Matthew D.

85

Naturally occurring arsenic in the Miocene Hawthorn Group, southwestern Florida: Potential implication  

E-print Network

Naturally occurring arsenic in the Miocene Hawthorn Group, southwestern Florida: Potential, and distribution of arsenic (As) in the Hawthorn Group, the chemical and mineralogical composition of 362 samples, the Hawthorn Group consisted primarily of a basal carbonate unit (the Arcadia For- mation) and an upper

Pichler, Thomas

86

Characterization of a naturally occurring recombinant isolate of Grapevine fanleaf virus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The naturally occurring Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) recombinant isolate A17b was recovered from its grapevine host by sap inoculation and serial passages onto Gomphrena globosa, a pseudo local lesion herbaceous host, and Chenopodium quinoa, a systemic herbaceous host, to characterize some of its biological properties. Sequence analysis of the CP gene, in which a recombinational event was previously detected, demonstrated

E. Vigne; G. Demangeat; V. Komar; M. Fuchs

2005-01-01

87

Lipoprotein lipase S447X - A naturally occurring gain-of-function mutation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lipoprotein lipase ( LPL) hydrolyzes triglycerides in the circulation and promotes the hepatic uptake of remnant lipoproteins. Since the gene was cloned in 1989, more than 100 LPL gene mutations have been identified, the majority of which cause loss of enzymatic function. In contrast to this, the naturally occurring LPLS447X variant is associated with increased lipolytic function and an anti-atherogenic

J. Rip; M. C. Nierman; C. J. Ross; J. W. Jukema; M. R. Hayden; J. J. P. Kastelein; E. S. G. Stroes; J. A. Kuivenhoven

2006-01-01

88

MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry of Naturally-Occurring Mixtures of Mono- and Di-rhamnolipids  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been developed for high-throughput screening of naturally-occurring mixtures of rhamnolipids from Pseudomonas spp. Mono- and di-rhamnolipids are readily distinguished by characteristic molecular adduct i...

89

Subject Reaction to Human-Caused and Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Threat.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While research has shown that people are adversely psychologically affected by knowledge that their communities have been toxically contaminated, it has been suggested that those who see a disaster as naturally occurring tend to be less adversely affected than those who see a disaster as caused by human acts. To examine this issue, questionnaires…

Belford, Susan; Gibbs, Margaret

90

Naturally-occurring osteoarthritis in the domestic rabbit: possible implications for bioengineering research  

PubMed Central

Objective Osteoarthritis affects 1 in 8 American adults over the age of 25 and in the US is a leading cause of chronic disability. Therefore, researchers are pursuing investigations on treating this naturally occurring joint disease. Finding the appropriate animal model for translational purposes is of utmost importance. The aim of the present study is to report the occurrence of naturally-occurring osteoarthritis in the domestic rabbit in the context of an appropriate animal model system. Methods A six-year radiographic retrospective study of domestic rabbits was conducted to assess the presence and severity of naturally occurring osteoarthritis in four major joints: the hip, knee, shoulder, and elbow. Results The rabbit experiences radiographic signs of naturally-occurring osteoarthritis. There was a significant influence of age on the development of the disease. Rabbits begin to have radiographic signs of the disease as early as 1 year of age with older rabbits experiencing over 70% occurrence. The most commonly effected joints were the knee and the hip. In addition, there was certain correlation of weight with the occurrence of osteoarthritis. Conclusion Discovery of new osteoarthritis treatment modalities relies on documenting efficacy in a relevant animal model prior to clinical translation. Despite previous claims on the ability of the rabbit’s cartilage to heal spontaneously and readily repair, we demonstrate that radiographically rabbits demonstrate progressive osteoarthritis. We have found that the rabbit is an excellent spontaneously arising model that may allow a predictable translation of results obtained in bioengineering experiments pertaining to the naturally occurring human disease. PMID:22184086

Arzi, Boaz; Wisner, Erik R.; Huey, Daniel J.; Kass, Philip H.; Hu, Jerry; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

2015-01-01

91

Chapter 5. Conclusion Uranium, a naturally occurring element, contributes to low levels of natural background radiation in the  

E-print Network

5-1 Chapter 5. Conclusion Uranium, a naturally occurring element, contributes to low levels into uranium oxide or other chemical forms usable in industry. Uranium undergoes radioactive decay into a long are extracted from the earth. Protore is mined uranium ore that is not rich enough to meet the market demand

92

Hypotensive action of naturally occurring diterpenes: a therapeutic promise for the treatment of hypertension.  

PubMed

Plants have always been an exemplary source of drugs and many of the currently available medicines have been directly or indirectly derived from them. For this reason, the research, development and use of natural products as therapeutic agents, especially those derived from plants, have been increasing in recent years. A great deal of attention has focused on the naturally occurring antispasmodic phytochemicals as potential drugs for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Arterial hypertension is a common and progressive disorder that poses a major risk for cardiovascular and renal diseases. Recent data have revealed that the global burden of hypertension is an important and increasing public health problem worldwide and that the level of awareness, treatment and control of hypertension varies considerably among countries. The research on naturally occurring blood pressure-lowering agents is rapidly expanding due to the high potential of such molecules as new antihypertensive drugs. Recently, a great number of plant-derived substances, such as diterpenoids, have been evaluated as possible antihypertensive agents. Naturally occurring diterpenes such as forskolin and stevioside, exhibit vasorelaxant action and inhibit vascular contractility by different mechanisms of action. In this review we will discuss the mechanisms underlying the hypotensive action displayed by diterpenes and their potential use in human hypertension. We will also discuss the use of these compounds in the treatment of glaucoma, which is characterized by increased intraocular pressure (IOP). PMID:20685303

Tirapelli, Carlos R; Ambrosio, Sergio R; de Oliveira, Ana M; Tostes, Rita C

2010-10-01

93

Size dependent fluorescence tuning of naturally occurring betacyanin with silver nano particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Light absorption and scattering of metal nano partilces occur in very narrow range of wavelengths. This is also dependent on the geometry and shape of metal nano particles. It is also known that scattering is related to (volume)2 and absorption is related to the volume of the spherical metal nano particles. In our work we show that using this principle metal nano particles enable fluorescence tuning of dyes. In our experiment we show such tuning in naturally occurring betacyanin extracted from red beetroot. We also show that such tuning is dependent on the size variation of the silver nano particles.

Sarkar, Arindam; Thankappan, Aparna; Nampoori, V. P. N.

2014-10-01

94

Structural consequences of chromophore formation and exploration of conserved lid residues amongst naturally occurring fluorescent proteins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computational methods were used to generate the lowest energy conformations of the immature precyclized forms of the 28 naturally occurring GFP-like proteins deposited in the pdb. In all 28 GFP-like proteins, the beta-barrel contracts upon chromophore formation and becomes more rigid. Our prior analysis of over 260 distinct naturally occurring GFP-like proteins revealed that most of the conserved residues are located in the top and bottom of the barrel in the turns between the ?-sheets (Ong et al. 2011) [1]. Structural analyses, molecular dynamics simulations and the Anisotropic Network Model were used to explore the role of these conserved lid residues as possible folding nuclei. Our results are internally consistent and show that the conserved residues in the top and bottom lids undergo relatively less translational movement than other lid residues, and a number of these residues may play an important role as hinges or folding nuclei in the fluorescent proteins.

Zimmer, Matthew H.; Li, Binsen; Shahid, Ramza; Peshkepija, Paola; Zimmer, Marc

2014-01-01

95

Playing 'Tetris' reduces the strength, frequency and vividness of naturally occurring cravings.  

PubMed

Elaborated Intrusion Theory (EI) postulates that imagery is central to craving, therefore a visually based task should decrease craving and craving imagery. This study provides the first laboratory test of this hypothesis in naturally occurring, rather than artificially induced, cravings. Participants reported if they were experiencing a craving and rated the strength, vividness and intrusiveness of their craving. They then either played 'Tetris' or they waited for a computer program to load (they were told it would load, but it was designed not to). Before task completion, craving scores between conditions did not differ; after, however, participants who had played 'Tetris' had significantly lower craving and less vivid craving imagery. The findings support EI theory, showing that a visuospatial working memory load reduces naturally occurring cravings, and that Tetris might be a useful task for tackling cravings outside the laboratory. Methodologically, the findings show that craving can be studied in the laboratory without using craving induction procedures. PMID:24508486

Skorka-Brown, Jessica; Andrade, Jackie; May, Jon

2014-05-01

96

ENVIRONMENTAL ISOTOPES FOR RESOLUTION OF HYDROLOGY PROBLEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

The use of environmental isotopes as tracers in the hydrosphere is increasing as analytical instrumentation improves and more applications are discovered. There exists still misconceptions on the role of isotopes in resolving hydrology problems. Naturally occurring isotopes in th...

97

Optical near-field mapping of excitons and biexcitons in naturally occurring semiconductor quantum dots  

Microsoft Academic Search

We calculate the near-field optical spectra of excitons and biexcitons in semiconductor quantum dots naturally occurring at interface fluctuations in GaAs-based quantum wells, using a nonlocal description of the response function to a spatially modulated electromagnetic field. The relative intensity of the lowest, far-field forbidden excitonic states is predicted; the spatial extension of the ground biexciton state is found, in

Ulrich Hohenester; Guido Goldoni; Elisa Molinari

2004-01-01

98

Naturally occurring H-DNA-forming sequences are mutagenic in mammalian cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Naturally occurring DNA sequences can form noncanonical structures such as H-DNA, which are abundant and regulate the expression of several disease-linked genes. Here, we show that H-DNA-forming sequences are intrinsically mutagenic in mammalian cells. This finding suggests that DNA is a causative factor in mutagenesis and not just the end product. By using the endogenous H-DNA-forming sequence found in the

Guliang Wang; Karen M. Vasquez

2004-01-01

99

Standardisation of HPLC techniques for the determination of naturally-occurring folates in food  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this work was to evaluate current in-house HPLC procedures for the determination of naturally-occurring folates in food, and to identify problem areas for further improvement. Five intercomparison studies were completed over the period 1990–1997 in which nine participants from six countries took part. Through careful validations and detailed discussions held at evaluation meetings, possible biases and sources

Paul M Finglas; Karin Wigertz; Liisa Vahteristo; Cornelia Witthöft; Sue Southon; Isabelle de Froidmont-Görtz

1999-01-01

100

Pyrethroid insecticides: A naturally occurring toxin. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the effects of pyrethrum and pyrethroid insecticides. Topics examine toxicity to fish, worms, flies, mosquitoes, and moths. Chemical residue on crops, the transportation of pyrethrum from soils to crops, and pyrethrum accumulation in ponds and lakes are among the topics discussed. Naturally occurring and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides are included. (Contains a minimum of 173 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01

101

Contribution of synthetic and naturally occurring organobromine compounds to bromine mass in marine organisms.  

PubMed

An extraction, separation, and purification method was developed for the identification and quantification of total bromine (TBr), extractable organobromine (EOBr), and five classes of identified EOBrs. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was utilized to quantify EOBr and TBr. The method was then applied to liver samples of tuna, albatross, and polar bear collected from remote marine locations. Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), bromophenols (BRPs), hydroxylated (OH-) and methoxylated (MeO-) PBDEs were analyzed as identified EOBr. The majority of the bromine in these marine organisms was nonextractable or inorganic, with EOBr accounting for 10-28% of the TBr. Of the identified EOBr, in tuna and albatross, naturally occurring compounds, including MeO-PBDEs, OH-PBDEs, and BPRs, were prevalent. However, the identifiable EOBr in polar bears consisted primarily of synthetic compounds, including PBDEs and PBBs. Overall, 0.08-0.11% and 0.008-0.012% of EOBr and TBr, respectively, were identified. The proportion of EOBr that was identified in marine organisms was relatively small compared to the proportions for organofluorine and organochlorine compounds. This could be related to the great diversity of naturally occurring organobromine compounds in the environment. Naturally occurring brominated fatty acids were estimated to be the predominant compounds in the EOBr fraction. PMID:20704201

Wan, Yi; Jones, Paul D; Wiseman, Steve; Chang, Hong; Chorney, Dave; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Zhang, Kun; Hu, Jian-Ying; Khim, Jong Seong; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Lam, Michael H W; Giesy, John P

2010-08-15

102

Mechanisms and Modifications of Naturally Occurring Host Defense Peptides for Anti-HIV Microbicide Development  

PubMed Central

Despite advances in the treatment of HIV infection, heterosexual transmission of HIV remains high, and vaccines to prevent HIV acquisition have been unfruitful. Vaginal microbicides, on the other hand, have demonstrated considerable potential for HIV prevention, and a variety of compounds have been screened for their activity and safety as anti-HIV microbicides. Among these are the naturally occurring host defense peptides, small peptides from diverse lineages with intrinsic antiviral activity. Naturally occurring host defense peptides with anti-HIV activity are promising candidates for vaginal microbicide development. Their structural variance and accompanying mechanistic diversity provide a wide range of inhibitors whose antiviral activity can be exerted at nearly every stage of the HIV lifecycle. Additionally, peptide modification has been explored as a method for improving the anti-HIV activity of host defense peptides. Structure- and sequence-based alterations have achieved varying success in improving the potency and specificity of anti-HIV peptides. Overall, peptides have been discovered or engineered to inhibit HIV with therapeutic indices of >1000, encouraging their advancement toward clinical trials. Here we review the naturally occurring anti-HIV host defense peptides, demonstrating their breadth of mechanistic diversity, and exploring approaches to enhance and optimize their activity in order to expedite their development as safe and effective anti-HIV vaginal microbicides. PMID:22264047

Eade, Colleen R.; Wood, Matthew P.; Cole, Alexander M.

2014-01-01

103

15 N isotope biogeochemistry and natural denitrification process in groundwater: Application to the chalk aquifer of northern France  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of 15 N natural isotope tracing in an aquifer contained within chalk rocks in northern France indicates that, under certain hydrogeological conditions, major denitrification occurs. At the boundary where the aquifer becomes confined, the nitrate concentrations decrease in the direction of groundwater flow accompanied by an exponential increase in 15 N (expressed in 15 N ) of the

André Mariotti; Alain Landreau; Béatrice Simon

1988-01-01

104

Serum canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity in experimentally induced and naturally occurring canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis).  

PubMed

Ehrlichia canis infection causes multisystemic disease in dogs (canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, CME) which is associated with variable morbidity and mortality. Atypical clinical manifestations, including gastrointestinal signs, may occasionally occur in CME and approximately 10-15% of dogs are presented with historical or clinical evidence of vomiting, diarrhea, and/or abdominal discomfort. The objective of this study was to investigate if there are any alterations in serum canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) in dogs with experimentally induced or naturally occurring monocytic ehrlichiosis. Serum samples from 10 Beagle dogs experimentally infected with E. canis and two healthy uninfected Beagles were serially examined; samples from 20 naturally infected dogs (10 with non-myelosuppressive [NME] and 10 with myelosuppressive [ME] ehrlichiosis) were also examined at a given point in time (cross-sectional sampling). None of the experimentally infected Beagles showed gastrointestinal signs or increased cPLI concentrations prior to or following the artificial infection. Three naturally infected dogs with NME and one with ME demonstrated serum cPLI concentrations in the diagnostic range for pancreatitis (>400 ?g/L) without showing gastrointestinal signs. The results of the present study indicated that 4/20 (20%) of dogs naturally infected with E. canis demonstrated increased serum cPLI concentrations consistent with mild and clinically inapparent pancreatitis. PMID:24530039

Mylonakis, Mathios E; Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Theodorou, Konstantina; Siarkou, Victoria I; Steiner, Jörg M; Harrus, Shimon; Leontides, Leonidas; Rallis, Timoleon; Suchodolski, Jan S; Koutinas, Christos K; Koutinas, Alexander F

2014-03-14

105

Synthesis and Characterization of Arsenolipids: Naturally Occurring Arsenic Compounds in Fish and Algae  

PubMed Central

Arsenic-containing lipids (arsenolipids) are natural products present in fish and algae. Because these compounds occur in foods, there is considerable interest in their human toxicology. We report the synthesis and characterization of seven arsenic-containing lipids, including six natural products. The compounds comprise dimethylarsinyl groups attached to saturated long-chain hydrocarbons (three compounds), saturated long-chain fatty acids (two compounds), and monounsaturated long chain fatty acids (two compounds). The arsenic group was introduced through sodium dimethylarsenide or bis(dimethylarsenic) oxide. The latter route provided higher and more reproducible yields, and consequently, this pathway was followed to synthesize six of the seven compounds. Mass spectral properties are described to assist in the identification of these compounds in natural samples. The pure synthesized arsenolipids will be used for in vitro experiments with human cells to test their uptake, biotransformation, and possible toxic effects. PMID:24683287

2014-01-01

106

Natural Ca Isotope Composition of Urine as a Rapid Measure of Bone Mineral Balance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Naturally occurring stable Ca isotope variations in urine are emerging as a powerful tool to detect changes in bone mineral balance. Bone formation depletes soft tissue of light Ca isotopes while bone resorption releases isotopically light Ca into soft tissue. Previously published work found that variations in Ca isotope composition could be detected at 4 weeks of bed rest in a 90-day bed rest study (data collected at 4, 8 and 12 weeks). A new 30-day bed rest study involved 12 patients on a controlled diet, monitored for 7 days prior to bed rest and 7 days post bed rest. Samples of urine, blood and food were collected throughout the study. Four times daily blood samples and per void urine samples were collected to monitor diurnal or high frequency variations. An improved chemical purification protocol, followed by measurement using multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) allowed accurate and precise determinations of mass-dependent Ca isotope variations in these biological samples to better than ±0.2% (?44/42Ca) on <25 ?g of Ca. Results from this new study show that Ca isotope ratios shift in a direction consistent with net bone loss after just 7 days, long before detectible changes in bone density by X-ray measurements occur. Consistent with this interpretation, the Ca isotope variations track changes observed in N-teleopeptide, a bone resorption biomarker. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, a bone formation biomarker, is unchanged over this period. Ca isotopes can in principle be used to quantify net changes in bone mass. Using a mass-balance model, our results indicate an average loss of 0.62 ± 0.16 % in bone mass over the course of this 30-day study. This is consistent with the rate of bone loss in longer-term studies as seen by X-ray measurements. This Ca isotope technique should accelerate the pace of discovery of new treatments for bone disease and provide novel insights into the dynamics of bone metabolism.

Skulan, J.; Gordon, G. W.; Morgan, J.; Romaniello, S. J.; Smith, S. M.; Anbar, A. D.

2011-12-01

107

Phytohormonal basis for the plant growth promoting action of naturally occurring biostimulators.  

PubMed

There is increasing interest in the use of naturally occurring 'biostimulators' for enhancing the growth of agricultural and horticultural crops. Bacteria, fungi and protozoa, as well as marine algae-based seaweed extracts, can produce or contain biostimulators. The activity of biostimulators to promote plant growth is often attributed to their ability to directly or indirectly provide mineral nutrients (mostly N, but also P, S and other macro- and micro-nutrients) to plants. Alternatively, biostimulators are postulated to increase the plant's ability to assimilate these mineral nutrients, often in return for photo-assimilates (as occurs with certain bacteria and fungi associations). Although optimal growth of plants depends on the availability of adequate mineral nutritients, that growth (and also development, including reproduction) is also regulated by plant hormones (phytohormones), including gibberellins, auxins and cytokinins. This review describes and discusses the evidence that the presence or application of biostimulators also increases plant growth directly via phytohormone action and also influences the plant's ability to control its own hormone biosynthesis and homeostasis. Finally, it discusses the need for a better understanding of the role(s) that are played by the naturally occurring biostimulators associated with the plant in the crop field. It is suggested that better understanding will allow for optimal crop yield returns, since disruptions of phytohormone homeostasis in plant organs and tissues can yield either beneficial or sub-optimal outcomes. PMID:24375470

Kurepin, Leonid V; Zaman, Mohammad; Pharis, Richard P

2014-07-01

108

Naturally occurring arsenic in the groundwater at the Kansas City Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an investigation concerning the presence of arsenic in concentrations exceeding 0.4 mg/L in the groundwater under the Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant (KCP). The study consisted of four distinct phases: a thorough review of the technical literature, a historical survey of arsenic use at the facility, a laboratory study of existing techniques for determining arsenic speciation, and a field program including water, soil, and sediment sampling. The historical survey and literature review demonstrated that plant activities had not released significant quantities of arsenic to the environment but that similar occurrences of arsenic in alluvial groundwater are widespread in the midwestern United States. Laboratory studies showed that a chromatographic separation technique was necessary to accurately determine arsenic speciation for the KCP groundwater samples. Field studies revealed that naturally occurring reducing conditions prevalent in the subsurface are responsible for dissolving arsenic previously sorbed by iron oxides. Indeed, the data demonstrated that the bulk arsenic concentration of site subsoils and sediments is {approximately}7 mg/kg, whereas the arsenic content of iron oxide subsamples is as high as 84 mg/kg. Literature showed that similar concentrations of arsenic in sediments occur naturally and are capable of producing the levels of arsenic found in groundwater monitoring wells at the KCP. The study concludes, therefore, that the arsenic present in the KCP groundwater is the result of natural phenomena. 44 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

Korte, N.E.

1990-12-01

109

Occupational exposure due to naturally occurring radionuclide material in granite quarry industry.  

PubMed

The potential occupational exposure in granite quarry industry due to the presence of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) has been investigated. The activity concentrations of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy method. The annual effective dose of workers through different exposure pathways was determined by model calculations. The total annual effective dose varied from 21.48 to 33.69 ?Sv y(-1). Inhalation dose contributes the highest to the total effective dose. The results obtained were much lower than the intervention exemption levels (1.0 mSv y(-1)) given in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 82. PMID:21447506

Ademola, J A

2012-02-01

110

Characterization of naturally-occurring and modified fullerenes by Fourier transform mass spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) employing both laser desorption/ionization and thermal desorption/electron ionization is useful for the detection and structural characterization of fullerenes and chemically-modified fullerenes. Examination of a carbon-rich shungite rock sample from Russia by transmission electron microscopy and FTMS provided evidence of naturally-occurring fullerenes. Ion-molecule reactions can be studied with FTMS to investigate the electron affinities of modified fullerenes. By monitoring charge exchange reactions, the electron affinities of C60Fx (x=44,46) and C70Fy (y=52,54) were found to be substantially higher than the values for the parent fullerenes.

Hettich, Robert L.; Jin, Changming; Compton, Robert N.; Buseck, Peter R.; Tsipursky, Semeon J.

1993-10-01

111

Activity measurements of technically enhanced naturally occurring radionuclides (TENORM) in phosphogypsum.  

PubMed

Phosphogypsum is a by-product of the phosphoric acid based fertilizer industry; it can be used in agriculture and to make building materials. Phosphogypsum is radioactive due to the presence of technically enhanced naturally occurring radionuclides (TENORM) and its environmental impact is a major concern of the public authorities. The Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory from IFIN-HH participated at the IAEA-CU-2007-06-CCRI(II)-S5 Supplementary Comparison for the Determination of TENORM in phosphogypsum. The measurement procedures and the discussion of results and problems encountered are presented. PMID:19231218

Luca, A; Margineanu, R; Sahagia, M; Wätjen, A C

2009-05-01

112

The new IAEA reference material: IAEA-434 technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) in phosphogypsum.  

PubMed

A reliable determination of Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in phosphogypsum is necessary to comply with radiation protection and environmental regulations. In this respect, a new phosphogypsum reference material was produced and certified to assist in the validation of analytical methods and the quality assurance of produced analytical results. This paper presents the sample preparation methodology, material homogeneity assessment, characterization campaign results and assignment of property values, and associated uncertainties. The reference values and associated uncertainties for Pb-210, Ra-226, Th-230, U-234 and U-238 were established based on consensus values calculated from analytical results reported by three National Metrology Institutes and five expert laboratories. PMID:20869259

Shakhashiro, A; Sansone, U; Wershofen, H; Bollhöfer, A; Kim, C K; Kim, C S; Kis-Benedek, G; Korun, M; Moune, M; Lee, S H; Tarjan, S; Al-Masri, M S

2011-01-01

113

Towards the elusive structure of kotalanol, a naturally occurring glucosidase inhibitor.  

PubMed

This Highlight describes the detailed approach used to determine the absolute stereochemistry of the stereogenic centers in the acyclic side chain of kotalanol, a naturally occurring glucosidase inhibitor isolated from the plant Salacia reticulata. The plant extract itself is used in Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. We highlight the syntheses of proposed candidates based on structure-activity relationships, the total synthesis of kotalanol, and crystallographic studies of kotalanol and its de-O-sulfonated derivative complexed with recombinant human maltase glucoamylase (MGA), a critical intestinal glucosidase involved in the breakdown of glucose oligomers into glucose. PMID:20336233

Mohan, Sankar; Pinto, B Mario

2010-04-01

114

Molecular- and nm-scale Investigation of the Structure and Compositional Heterogeneity of Naturally Occurring Ferrihydrite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ferrihydrite is a hydrated Fe(III) nano-oxide that forms in vast quantities in contaminated acid mine drainage environments. As a result of its high surface area, ferrihydrite is an important environmental sorbent, and plays an essential role in the geochemical cycling of pollutant metal(loid)s in these settings. Despite its environmental relevance, this nanomineral remains one of the least understood environmental solids in terms of its structure (bulk and surface), compositional variations, and the factors affecting its reactivity. Under natural aqueous conditions, ferrihydrite often precipitates in the presence of several inorganic compounds such as aluminum, silica, arsenic, etc., or in the presence of organic matter. These impurities can affect the molecular-level structure of naturally occurring ferrihydrite, thus modifying fundamental properties that are directly correlated with solid-phase stability and surface reactivity. Currently there exists a significant gap in our understanding of the structure of synthetic vs. natural ferrihydrites, due to the inherent difficulties associated to the investigation of these poorly crystalline nanophases. In this study, we combined synchrotron- and laboratory-based techniques to characterize naturally occurring ferrihydrite from an acid mine drainage system situated at the New Idria mercury mine in California. We used high-energy X-ray total scattering and pair distribution function analysis to elucidate quantitative structural details of these samples. We have additionally used scanning transmission X-ray microscopy high resolution imaging (30 nm) to evaluate the spatial relationship of major elements Si, Al, and C within ferrihydrite. Al, Si and C K-edge near- edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to obtain short-range structural information. By combining these techniques we attain the highest level of resolution permitted by current analytical methods to study such naturally occurring nanomaterials, both at the molecular- and nm-scale. This work provides structural information at the short-, medium- and long- range, as well as evidence of compositional heterogeneity, and mineral/organic matter associations.

Cismasu, C.; Michel, F. M.; Stebbins, J. F.; Tcaciuc, A. P.; Brown, G. E.

2008-12-01

115

2-Hydroxy-4-(methylthio) butanoic acid is a naturally occurring methionine precursor in the chick.  

PubMed

The objective of these experiments was to determine the origin of 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio)-butanoic acid (HMB) detected in the liver and excreta of chicks that had never been fed Alimet (an 88% aqueous solution of HMB) or MHA (an 86% calcium salt of HMB). Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry were used to identify HMB in these birds. A normal biochemical pathway of 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA) is proposed as the source of naturally occurring HMB. Studies of conversion of [methyl-14C]MTA to L-methionine by chick liver enzymesØe showed that radiolabeled HMB and 2-oxo-4-(methylthio)butanoic acid (keto-methionine) were synthesized during the reaction. Specific radioactivities of labeled HMB and keto-methionine showed that HMB is not synthesized from keto-methionine. Fractionation studies indicated that radiolabeled HMB formed from [14C]MTA could be used in the synthesis of L-methionine in the presence of peroxisomes and/or mitochondrial enzymes. In this way, HMB synthesized from MTA by chick liver enzymes functions as a precursor of L-methionine and as an intermediate in a naturally occurring pathway for the synthesis of L-methionine in the chick. PMID:2352030

Dibner, J J; Durley, R C; Kostelc, J G; Ivey, F J

1990-06-01

116

Naturally Occurring Human Urinary Peptides for Use in Diagnosis of Chronic Kidney Disease*  

PubMed Central

Because of its availability, ease of collection, and correlation with physiology and pathology, urine is an attractive source for clinical proteomics/peptidomics. However, the lack of comparable data sets from large cohorts has greatly hindered the development of clinical proteomics. Here, we report the establishment of a reproducible, high resolution method for peptidome analysis of naturally occurring human urinary peptides and proteins, ranging from 800 to 17,000 Da, using samples from 3,600 individuals analyzed by capillary electrophoresis coupled to MS. All processed data were deposited in an Structured Query Language (SQL) database. This database currently contains 5,010 relevant unique urinary peptides that serve as a pool of potential classifiers for diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases. As an example, by using this source of information, we were able to define urinary peptide biomarkers for chronic kidney diseases, allowing diagnosis of these diseases with high accuracy. Application of the chronic kidney disease-specific biomarker set to an independent test cohort in the subsequent replication phase resulted in 85.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These results indicate the potential usefulness of capillary electrophoresis coupled to MS for clinical applications in the analysis of naturally occurring urinary peptides. PMID:20616184

Good, David M.; Zürbig, Petra; Argilés, Àngel; Bauer, Hartwig W.; Behrens, Georg; Coon, Joshua J.; Dakna, Mohammed; Decramer, Stéphane; Delles, Christian; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Ehrich, Jochen H. H.; Eitner, Frank; Fliser, Danilo; Frommberger, Moritz; Ganser, Arnold; Girolami, Mark A.; Golovko, Igor; Gwinner, Wilfried; Haubitz, Marion; Herget-Rosenthal, Stefan; Jankowski, Joachim; Jahn, Holger; Jerums, George; Julian, Bruce A.; Kellmann, Markus; Kliem, Volker; Kolch, Walter; Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Luppi, Mario; Massy, Ziad; Melter, Michael; Neusüss, Christian; Novak, Jan; Peter, Karlheinz; Rossing, Kasper; Rupprecht, Harald; Schanstra, Joost P.; Schiffer, Eric; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Tarnow, Lise; Theodorescu, Dan; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Vanholder, Raymond; Weissinger, Eva M.; Mischak, Harald; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

2010-01-01

117

Naturally occurring H-DNA-forming sequences are mutagenic in mammalian cells.  

PubMed

Naturally occurring DNA sequences can form noncanonical structures such as H-DNA, which are abundant and regulate the expression of several disease-linked genes. Here, we show that H-DNA-forming sequences are intrinsically mutagenic in mammalian cells. This finding suggests that DNA is a causative factor in mutagenesis and not just the end product. By using the endogenous H-DNA-forming sequence found in the human c-myc promoter, mutation frequencies in a reporter gene were increased approximately 20-fold over background in COS-7 cells. H-DNA-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) were detected near the H-DNA locus. The structures of the mutants revealed microhomologies at the breakpoints, consistent with a nonhomologous end-joining repair of the DSBs. These results implicate H-DNA-induced DSBs in c-myc gene translocations in diseases such as Burkitt's lymphoma and t(12;15) BALB/c plasmacytomas, where most breakpoints are found near the H-DNA-forming site. Thus, our findings suggest that H-DNA is a source of genetic instability resulting from DSBs and demonstrate that naturally occurring DNA sequences are mutagenic in mammals, perhaps contributing to genetic evolution and disease. PMID:15342911

Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M

2004-09-14

118

Naturally occurring H-DNA-forming sequences are mutagenic in mammalian cells  

PubMed Central

Naturally occurring DNA sequences can form noncanonical structures such as H-DNA, which are abundant and regulate the expression of several disease-linked genes. Here, we show that H-DNA-forming sequences are intrinsically mutagenic in mammalian cells. This finding suggests that DNA is a causative factor in mutagenesis and not just the end product. By using the endogenous H-DNA-forming sequence found in the human c-myc promoter, mutation frequencies in a reporter gene were increased ?20-fold over background in COS-7 cells. H-DNA-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) were detected near the H-DNA locus. The structures of the mutants revealed microhomologies at the breakpoints, consistent with a nonhomologous end-joining repair of the DSBs. These results implicate H-DNA-induced DSBs in c-myc gene translocations in diseases such as Burkitt's lymphoma and t(12;15) BALB/c plasmacytomas, where most breakpoints are found near the H-DNA-forming site. Thus, our findings suggest that H-DNA is a source of genetic instability resulting from DSBs and demonstrate that naturally occurring DNA sequences are mutagenic in mammals, perhaps contributing to genetic evolution and disease. PMID:15342911

Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M.

2004-01-01

119

AAV-mediated cone rescue in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3-achromatopsia.  

PubMed

Achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which shows color blindness, severely impaired visual acuity, and extreme sensitivity to bright light. Mutations in the alpha subunits of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGA3) are responsible for about 1/4 of achromatopsia in the U.S. and Europe. Here, we test whether gene replacement therapy using an AAV5 vector could restore cone-mediated function and arrest cone degeneration in the cpfl5 mouse, a naturally occurring mouse model of achromatopsia with a CNGA3 mutation. We show that gene therapy leads to significant rescue of cone-mediated ERGs, normal visual acuities and contrast sensitivities. Normal expression and outer segment localization of both M- and S-opsins were maintained in treated retinas. The therapeutic effect of treatment lasted for at least 5 months post-injection. This study is the first demonstration of substantial, relatively long-term restoration of cone-mediated light responsiveness and visual behavior in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3 achromatopsia. The results provide the foundation for development of an AAV5-based gene therapy trial for human CNGA3 achromatopsia. PMID:22509403

Pang, Ji-jing; Deng, Wen-Tao; Dai, Xufeng; Lei, Bo; Everhart, Drew; Umino, Yumiko; Li, Jie; Zhang, Keqing; Mao, Song; Boye, Sanford L; Liu, Li; Chiodo, Vince A; Liu, Xuan; Shi, Wei; Tao, Ye; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W

2012-01-01

120

Thermal resistance of naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores. [Viking spacecraft dry heat decontamination simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simulation of a heat process used in the terminal dry-heat decontamination of the Viking spacecraft is reported. Naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores were collected on Teflon ribbons in selected spacecraft assembly areas and subsequently subjected to dry heat. Thermal inactivation experiments were conducted at 105, 111.7, 120, 125, 130, and 135 C with a moisture level of 1.2 mg of water per liter. Heat survivors were recovered at temperatures of 135 C when a 30-h heating cycle was employed. Survivors were recovered from all cycles studied and randomly selected for identification. The naturally occurring spore population was reduced an average of 2.2 to 4.4 log cycles from 105 to 135 C. Heating cycles of 5 and 15 h at temperature were compared with the standard 30-h cycle at 111.7, 120, and 125 C. No significant differences in inactivation (alpha = 0.05) were observed between 111.7 and 120 C. The 30-h cycle differs from the 5- and 15-h cycles at 125 C. Thus, the heating cycle can be reduced if a small fraction (about 0.001 to 0.0001) of very resistant spores can be tolerated.

Puleo, J. R.; Bergstrom, S. L.; Peeler, J. T.; Oxborrow, G. S.

1978-01-01

121

Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase by kaempferol and related naturally occurring flavonoids  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose: Recent studies have demonstrated that the naturally occurring isoflavone compounds genistein and daidzein inhibit the hydrolysis of anandamide by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in the low micromolar concentration range. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether this property is shared by flavonoids. Experimental approach: The hydrolysis of anandamide in homogenates and intact cells was measured using the substrate labelled in the ethanolamine part of the molecule. Key results: Twenty compounds were tested. Among the commonly occurring flavonoids, kaempferol was the most potent, inhibiting FAAH in a competitive manner with a Ki value of 5??M. Among flavonoids with a more restricted distribution in nature, the two most active toward FAAH were 7-hydroxyflavone (IC50 value of 0.5–1??M depending on the solvent used) and 3,7-dihydroxyflavone (IC50 value 2.2??M). All three compounds reduced the FAAH-dependent uptake of anandamide and its metabolism by intact RBL2H3 basophilic leukaemia cells. Conclusions and implications: Inhibition of FAAH is an additional in vitro biochemical property of flavonoids. Kaempferol, 7-hydroxyflavone and 3,7-dihydroxyflavone may be useful as templates for the synthesis of novel compounds, which target several systems that are involved in the control of inflammation and cancer. PMID:18552875

Thors, L; Belghiti, M; Fowler, C J

2008-01-01

122

High Diversity of the Fungal Community Structure in Naturally-Occurring Ophiocordyceps sinensis  

PubMed Central

Background Ophiocordyceps sinensis (syn. Cordyceps sinensis), which is a parasite of caterpillars and is endemic to alpine regions on the Tibetan Plateau, is one of the most valuable medicinal fungi in the world. “Natural O. sinensis specimens” harbor various other fungi. Several of these other fungi that have been isolated from natural O. sinensis specimens have similar chemical components and/or pharmaceutical effects as O. sinensis. Nevertheless, the mycobiota of natural O. sinensis specimens has not been investigated in detail. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on the technique of PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), the mycobiota of three different sections (stromata, sclerotia, and mycelial cortices) from natural O. sinensis specimens were investigated using both culture-dependent and -independent methods. For the culture-dependent method, 572 fungal strains were isolated, and 92 putative operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified from 226 sequenced strains with the threshold of 97%. For the culture-independent method, 490 fungal clones were identified from about 3000 clones of ITS fragments from the whole-community DNA; based on PCR-SSCP analyses, 266 of these clones were selected to be sequenced, and 118 putative OTUs were detected. The overwhelming majority of isolates/clones and OTUs were detected from mycelial cortices; only a few were detected from stromata and sclerotia. The most common OTUs detected with both methods belonged to Ascomycota; however, only 13 OTUs were detected simultaneously by both methods. Potential novel lineages were detected by each of the two methods. Conclusions/Significance A great number of fungal species present in the mycobiota of naturally-occurring O. sinensis specimens were detected, and many of them may represent undescribed lineages. That only a few of the same OTUs were detected by both methods indicated that different methods should be used. This study increased our understanding about the fungal community structure of this valuable medicinal herb. PMID:21179540

Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Mu; Bai, Fengyan; Liu, Xingzhong

2010-01-01

123

Reactive neurogenesis in response to naturally occurring apoptosis in an adult brain.  

PubMed

Neuronal birth and death are tightly coordinated to establish and maintain properly functioning neural circuits. Disruption of the equilibrium between neuronal birth and death following brain injury or pharmacological insult often induces reactive, and in some cases regenerative, neurogenesis. Many neurodegenerative disorders are not injury-induced, however, so it is critical to determine if and how reactive neurogenesis occurs under noninjury-induced neurodegenerative conditions. Here, we used a model of naturally occurring neural degradation in a neural circuit that controls song behavior in Gambel's white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii) and examined the temporal dynamics between neuronal birth and death. We found that during seasonal-like regression of the song, control nucleus HVC (proper name), caspase-mediated apoptosis increased within 2 d following transition from breeding to nonbreeding conditions and neural stem-cell proliferation in the nearby ventricular zone (VZ) increased shortly thereafter. We show that inhibiting caspase-mediated apoptosis in HVC decreased neural stem-cell proliferation in the VZ. In baseline conditions the extent of neural stem-cell proliferation correlated positively with the number of dying cells in HVC. We demonstrate that as apoptosis increased and the number of both recently born and pre-existing neurons in HVC decreased, the structure of song, a learned sensorimotor behavior, degraded. Our data illustrate that reactive neurogenesis is not limited to injury-induced neuronal death, but also can result from normally occurring degradation of a telencephalic neural circuit. PMID:25253853

Larson, Tracy A; Thatra, Nivretta M; Lee, Brian H; Brenowitz, Eliot A

2014-09-24

124

Solubilisation of some naturally occurring metal-bearing minerals, limescale and lead phosphate by Aspergillus niger.  

PubMed

The ability of the soil fungus Aspergillus niger to tolerate and solubilise seven naturally occurring metal-bearing minerals, limescale and lead phosphate was investigated. A. niger was able to solubilise four of the test insoluble compounds when incorporated into solid medium: cuprite (CuO2), galena (PbS), rhodochrosite (Mn(CO3)x) and limescale (CaCO3). A. niger was able to grow on all concentrations of all the test compounds, whether solubilisation occurred or not, with no reduction in growth rate from the control. In some cases, stimulation of growth occurred, most marked with the phosphate-containing mineral, apatite. Precipitation of insoluble copper and manganese oxalate crystals under colonies growing on agar amended with cuprite and rhodochrosite was observed after 1-2 days growth at 25 degrees C. This process of oxalate formation represents a reduction in bioavailability of toxic cations, and could represent an important means of toxic metal immobilisation of physiological and environmental significance. PMID:9297818

Sayer, J A; Kierans, M; Gadd, G M

1997-09-01

125

2005 Nature Publishing Group In situ Os isotopes in abyssal peridotites bridge the  

E-print Network

© 2005 Nature Publishing Group In situ Os isotopes in abyssal peridotites bridge the isotopic gap Abyssal peridotites are assumed to represent the mantle residue of mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORBs). However, the osmium isotopic compositions of abyssal peridotites and MORB do not appear

Demouchy, Sylvie

126

Naturally occurring and experimentally transmitted Hepatozoon americanum in coyotes from Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Twenty free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) in Oklahoma (USA) were examined for the presence of naturally occurring infections with Hepatozoon americanum and to determine if bone lesions attributable to H. americanum were present. Although eight of the 20 free-ranging coyotes were found to be naturally infected with H. americanum, no bone lesions were detected. In addition, two coyote pups were exposed to H. americanum oocysts collected from experimentally infected ticks and the course of the resulting infection was followed. Both experimentally infected coyotes developed hepatozoonosis detectable by specific muscle lesions beginning 4 wk after exposure. Bone lesions were detected grossly and histologically at necropsy. Histologic evidence of periosteal bone proliferation ranged from segmental areas of plump hypercellularity and thickening of the periosteum, with minor degrees of osteogenesis, to extensive proliferation of woven bone and periosteal hypercellularity and thickening. Nymphal Amblyomma maculatum that fed on one of the experimentally infected coyote pups became infected and mature H. americanum oocysts were recovered when the ticks molted to adults. These results demonstrate that coyotes in some parts of Oklahoma are naturally infected with H. americanum, that experimentally infected coyotes can develop clinical disease, including characteristic bone lesions, and that A. maculatum nymphs can acquire infections by feeding on them. PMID:10682757

Kocan, A A; Cummings, C A; Panciera, R J; Mathew, J S; Ewing, S A; Barker, R W

2000-01-01

127

Background in the context of land contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material.  

PubMed

The financial implications of choosing a particular threshold for clearance of radioactively contaminated land are substantial, particularly when one considers the volume of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) created each year by the production and combustion of fossil fuels and the exploitation of industrial minerals. Inevitably, a compromise needs to be reached between the level of environmental protection sought and the finite resources available for remediation. In the case of natural series radionuclides, any anthropogenic input is always superimposed on the inventory already present in the soil; this 'background' inventory is conventionally disregarded when assessing remediation targets. Unfortunately, the term is not well defined and the concept of 'background dose' is open to alternative interpretations. In this paper, we address the issue of natural background from a geochemical rather than from a solely radiological perspective, illustrating this with an example from the china clay industry. We propose a simple procedure for decision making based on activity concentrations of primordial radionuclides and their progeny. Subsequent calculations of dose need to take into account the mineralogical and chemical characteristics of the contamination, which in the case of NORM are invariably reflected in uranium series disequilibrium. PMID:23519083

Read, D; Read, G D; Thorne, M C

2013-06-01

128

Potential health risk in areas with high naturally-occurring cadmium background in southwestern China.  

PubMed

In various parts of the world, high cadmium (Cd) concentrations in environment are not related to anthropogenic contamination but have natural origins. Less is known about health risks that arise under these conditions. This study aimed to discuss the pollution of Cd with natural sources, and to investigate the concentration of Cd in food crops and the urine of inhabitants in an area of southwestern China. The results showed that the arable soils are moderately contaminated by Cd (Igeo=1.51) relative to the local background, with a high ecological risk (Er=218). The chemical fractions of Cd in soils with natural sources are probably controlled by parent materials and mostly in residual phase. The average Cd concentrations were 0.68mgkg(-1) (fresh weight) in local vegetables, 0.04mgkg(-1) in rice, and 0.14?gL(-1) in water. Leafy vegetable tends to accumulate more Cd than the other crops. The calculated Target Hazard Quotient (THQ) had a much higher value (4.33) for Cd, suggesting that Cd represents a significant potential risk to the local population. The urinary Cd concentrations (mean at 3.92?gL(-1) for male and 4.85?gL(-1) for female) of inhabitants in the study area were significantly higher (p<0.05) than those from the control area (mean at 0.8?gL(-1) for male and 0.42?gL(-1) for female). Male and female test subjects had similar urinary Cd levels (p>0.05), but age seemed to lead to an increase in Cd in the urine. These findings show that naturally-occurring Cd in local soils is taken up appreciably by local food crops, and that dietary exposure of Cd through vegetable ingestion is a major exposure pathway for local populations, and a potential risk to public health in the study area. PMID:25463862

Liu, Yizhang; Xiao, Tangfu; Baveye, Philippe C; Zhu, Jianming; Ning, Zengping; Li, Huajun

2015-02-01

129

Natural thorium isotopes in marine sediment core off Labuan port  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sediment core was collected from Labuan port and analyzed to determine the radioactivity of thorium (Th) isotopes. The objectives of this study are to determine the possible sources of Th isotopes at Labuan port and estimates the sedimentation rate based on 228Th/232Th model. The results suggest the 230Th and 232Th might be originated from terrestrial sedimentary rock while 228Th originated by authigenic origin. High ratio value of 230Th/232Th detected at the top surface sediment indicates the increasing of 230Th at the recent years which might be contributed from the anthropogenic sources. The sedimentation rate of core sediment from Labuan Port was successfully estimated by using 228Th/232Th model. The result show high sedimentation rate with 4.67 cm/year indicates rapid deposition occurred at this study area due to the high physical activity at the Labuan port. By assume the constant sedimentation rate at this area; we estimated the age of 142 cm core sediment obtained from Labuan port is 32 years started from 1981 to 2012. This chronology will be used in forthcoming research to investigate the historical profile of anthropogenic activities affecting the Labuan port.

Hafidz, B. Y.; Asnor, A. S.; Terence, R. C.; Mohamed, C. A. R.

2014-02-01

130

Natural thorium isotopes in marine sediment core off Labuan port  

SciTech Connect

Sediment core was collected from Labuan port and analyzed to determine the radioactivity of thorium (Th) isotopes. The objectives of this study are to determine the possible sources of Th isotopes at Labuan port and estimates the sedimentation rate based on {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The results suggest the {sup 230}Th and {sup 232}Th might be originated from terrestrial sedimentary rock while {sup 228}Th originated by authigenic origin. High ratio value of {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th detected at the top surface sediment indicates the increasing of {sup 230}Th at the recent years which might be contributed from the anthropogenic sources. The sedimentation rate of core sediment from Labuan Port was successfully estimated by using {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The result show high sedimentation rate with 4.67 cm/year indicates rapid deposition occurred at this study area due to the high physical activity at the Labuan port. By assume the constant sedimentation rate at this area; we estimated the age of 142 cm core sediment obtained from Labuan port is 32 years started from 1981 to 2012. This chronology will be used in forthcoming research to investigate the historical profile of anthropogenic activities affecting the Labuan port.

Hafidz, B. Y.; Asnor, A. S.; Terence, R. C.; Mohamed, C. A. R. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12

131

Beneficial Effects of Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Naturally Occurring Tendinopathy  

PubMed Central

Tendon injuries are a common age-related degenerative condition where current treatment strategies fail to restore functionality and normal quality of life. This disease also occurs naturally in horses, with many similarities to human tendinopathy making it an ideal large animal model for human disease. Regenerative approaches are increasingly used to improve outcome involving mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), supported by clinical data where injection of autologous bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) suspended in marrow supernatant into injured tendons has halved the re-injury rate in racehorses. We hypothesized that stem cell therapy induces a matrix more closely resembling normal tendon than the fibrous scar tissue formed by natural repair. Twelve horses with career-ending naturally-occurring superficial digital flexor tendon injury were allocated randomly to treatment and control groups. 1X107 autologous BM-MSCs suspended in 2 ml of marrow supernatant were implanted into the damaged tendon of the treated group. The control group received the same volume of saline. Following a 6 month exercise programme horses were euthanized and tendons assessed for structural stiffness by non-destructive mechanical testing and for morphological and molecular composition. BM-MSC treated tendons exhibited statistically significant improvements in key parameters compared to saline-injected control tendons towards that of normal tendons and those in the contralateral limbs. Specifically, treated tendons had lower structural stiffness (p<0.05) although no significant difference in calculated modulus of elasticity, lower (improved) histological scoring of organisation (p<0.003) and crimp pattern (p<0.05), lower cellularity (p<0.007), DNA content (p<0.05), vascularity (p<0.03), water content (p<0.05), GAG content (p<0.05), and MMP-13 activity (p<0.02). Treatment with autologous MSCs in marrow supernatant therefore provides significant benefits compared to untreated tendon repair in enhancing normalisation of biomechanical, morphological, and compositional parameters. These data in natural disease, with no adverse findings, support the use of this treatment for human tendon injuries. PMID:24086616

Smith, Roger Kenneth Whealands; Werling, Natalie Jayne; Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Alam, Rafiqul; Goodship, Allen E.; Dudhia, Jayesh

2013-01-01

132

Naturally occurring Parelaphostrongylus tenuis-associated choriomeningitis in a guinea pig with neurologic signs.  

PubMed

An adult male guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) with a 1-month history of hind limb paresis, torticollis, and seizures was euthanized and submitted for necropsy. Gross examination was unremarkable, but histologic examination revealed multifocal eosinophilic and lymphoplasmacytic choriomeningitis and cross sections of nematode parasites within the leptomeninges of the midbrain and diencephalon. Morphologic features of the nematode were consistent with a metastrongyle, and the parasite was identified as Parelaphostrongylus tenuis by polymerase chain reaction testing and nucleotide sequencing. Further questioning of the owner revealed that the guinea pig was fed grass from a yard often grazed by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a naturally occurring P. tenuis infection in a guinea pig. PMID:23238578

Southard, T; Bender, H; Wade, S E; Grunenwald, C; Gerhold, R W

2013-05-01

133

Using ²²²Rn as a naturally occurring tracer to estimate NAPL contamination in an aquifer.  

PubMed

The naturally occurring radioisotope (222)Rn was used as a partitioning tracer to evaluate the presence and amount of a non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in an aquifer. The batch experiment results of a diesel contaminated soil showed that the emanation rate of (222)Rn decreased to 31%, relative to a background rate. Batch experiment results of water contaminated by gasoline, diesel, PCE and TCE were similar. A field study to examine TCE contamination was conducted using 54 groundwater samples in Wonju city, Republic of Korea. Estimates of TCE contamination ranged from <0.001 mg/L to 14.3mg/L, and (222)Rn concentrations ranged from 1.89 Bq/L to 444. Results of (222)Rn analysis showed that TCE contamination was mainly restricted to an asphalt laboratory area and that the (222)Rn values of a NAPL-contaminated aquifer were correlated with TCE analytical results. PMID:23602707

Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Koh, Dong Chan; Lee, Kil Yong; Cho, Soo Young; Yang, Jae Ha; Lee, Kang Kun

2013-11-01

134

Review: The history and role of naturally occurring mouse models with Pde6b mutations  

PubMed Central

Mouse models are useful tools for developing potential therapies for human inherited retinal diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), since more strains are being identified with the same mutant genes and phenotypes as humans with corresponding retinal degenerative diseases. Mutations in the beta subunit of the human rod phosphodiesterase (PDE6B) gene are a common cause of autosomal recessive RP (arRP). This article focuses on two well-established naturally occurring mouse models of arRP caused by spontaneous mutations in Pde6b, their discovery, phenotype, mechanism of degeneration, strengths and limitations, and therapeutic approaches to restore vision and delay disease progression. Viral vector, especially adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) -mediated gene replacement therapy, pharmacological treatment, cell-based therapy and other approaches that extend the therapeutic window of treatment, is a potentially promising strategy for improving photoreceptor function and significantly slowing the process of retinal degeneration. PMID:24367157

Han, Juanjuan; Dinculescu, Astra; Dai, Xufeng; Du, Wei; Smith, W. Clay

2013-01-01

135

Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies  

DOEpatents

Some or all of the needs above can be addressed by embodiments of the invention. According to embodiments of the invention, systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies can be implemented. In one embodiment, a method for storing hydrogen can be provided. The method can include providing diatoms comprising diatomaceous earth or diatoms from a predefined culture. In addition, the method can include heating the diatoms in a sealed environment in the presence of at least one of titanium, a transition metal, or a noble metal to provide a porous hydrogen storage medium. Furthermore, the method can include exposing the porous hydrogen storage medium to hydrogen. In addition, the method can include storing at least a portion of the hydrogen in the porous hydrogen storage medium.

Fliermans; , Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

2012-08-07

136

The effect of various naturally occurring metal-binding compounds on the electrochemical behavior of aluminum  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring biological molecules are of considerable interest as possible corrosion inhibitors because of increased attention on the development of environmentally compatible, nonpolluting corrosion inhibitors. A hydroxamate yeast siderophore (rhodotorulic acid), a catecholate bacterial siderophore (parabactin), an adhesive protein from the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, and two metal-binding compounds isolated from the tomato and sunflower roots, namely, chlorogenic and caffeic acid, respectively, were adsorbed from solution onto pure aluminum (99.9995%) and their effect on the critical pitting potential and polarization resistance in deaerated 0.1 M NaCl was measured. These measurements were made using anodic polarization and ac impedance spectroscopy. The catechol-containing siderophore has an inhibitive effect on the critical pitting potential of aluminum in 0.1 M NaCl and increases the polarization resistance of the metal over time. The adhesive protein from the blue mussel is also effective in inhibiting the pitting of aluminum.

Hansen, D.C.; McCafferty, E. [Naval Research lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-01-01

137

Ultra-trace Measurements of 210Pb in natural occurring radioactive materials by ICP-MS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Collision cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CC-ICP-MS) was investigated as a possible alternative to nuclear analytical techniques for the determination of 210Pb. The formation of isobaric and polyatomic interferences was studied. Following the acid digestion, extraction chromatography was tested to assess their usefulness in reducing its interferences. A 210Pb pre-concentration of >300-fold and recoveries of 63-73% were obtained using a combined extraction chromatography and pre-concentration by evaporation protocol. Improvement in sensitivity of 210Pb was found by optimization of the collision cell parameters using krypton as a collision gas. The detection limit was improved by a factor of 300 for 210Pb. A detection limit of 0.214 ppt (0.698 Bq/mL) was obtained. The method was applied to determine 210Pb in samples of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM).

Amr, M. A.; Al-Saad, K. A.; Helal, A. I.

2010-04-01

138

Healthy Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities: A Low-Cost Approach to Facilitating Healthy Aging  

PubMed Central

Naturally occurring retirement communities (NORCs) are broadly defined as communities where individuals either remain or move when they retire. Using the determinants of health model as a base, we hypothesize that some environmental determinants have a different impact on people at different ages. Health benefits to living within NORCs have been observed and likely vary depending upon where the specific NORC exists on the NORC to healthy-NORC spectrum. Some NORC environments are healthier than others for seniors, because the NORC environment has characteristics associated with better health for seniors. Health benefits within healthy NORCs are higher where physical and social environments facilitate greater activity and promote feelings of well-being. Compared to the provision of additional medical or social services, healthy NORCs are a low-cost community-level approach to facilitating healthy aging. Municipal governments should pursue policies that stimulate and support the development of healthy NORCs. PMID:16735634

Masotti, Paul J.; Fick, Robert; Johnson-Masotti, Ana; MacLeod, Stuart

2006-01-01

139

Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) from a former phosphoric acid processing plant.  

PubMed

In recent years there has been an increasing awareness of the radiological impact of non-nuclear industries that extract and/or process ores and minerals containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). These industrial activities may result in significant radioactive contamination of (by-) products, wastes and plant installations. In this study, scale samples were collected from a decommissioned phosphoric acid processing plant. To determine the nature and concentration of NORM retained in pipe-work and associated process plant, four main areas of the site were investigated: (1) the 'Green Acid Plant', where crude acid was concentrated; (2) the green acid storage tanks; (3) the Purified White Acid (PWA) plant, where inorganic impurities were removed; and (4) the solid waste, disposed of on-site as landfill. The scale samples predominantly comprise the following: fluorides (e.g. ralstonite); calcium sulphate (e.g. gypsum); and an assemblage of mixed fluorides and phosphates (e.g. iron fluoride hydrate, calcium phosphate), respectively. The radioactive inventory is dominated by 238U and its decay chain products, and significant fractionation along the series occurs. Compared to the feedstock ore, elevated concentrations (< or =8.8 Bq/g) of 238U were found to be retained in installations where the process stream was rich in fluorides and phosphates. In addition, enriched levels (< or =11 Bq/g) of 226Ra were found in association with precipitates of calcium sulphate. Water extraction tests indicate that many of the scales and waste contain significantly soluble materials and readily release radioactivity into solution. PMID:16303218

Beddow, H; Black, S; Read, D

2006-01-01

140

Analysis of naturally-occurring radionuclides in coal combustion fly ash, gypsum, and scrubber residue samples.  

PubMed

Coal combustion residues from coal-fired power plants can be advantageous for use in building and construction materials. These by-products contain trace quantities of naturally occurring radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series, as well as other naturally occurring radionuclides such as K. Analysis was performed on samples of coal fly ash, flue gas desulfurization, gypsum and scrubber sludges, fixated scrubber sludges, and waste water filter cakes sampled from multiple coal-fired power plants in the United States. The radioactive content of U and Th decay series nuclides was determined using gamma photopeaks from progeny Pb at 352 keV and Tl at 583 keV, respectively; K specific activities were determined using the 1,461 keV photopeak. The samples were hermetically sealed to allow for secular equilibrium between the radium parents and the radon and subsequent progeny. Samples were analyzed in a common geometry using two high purity germanium photon detectors with low energy detection capabilities. The specific activities (Bq kg) were compared to results from literature studies including different building materials and fly ash specific activities. Fly ash from bituminous and subbituminous coals had U specific activities varying from 30-217 Bq kg (mean + 1 s.d. 119 ± 45 Bq kg) and 72-209 Bq kg (115 ± 40 Bq kg), respectively; Th specific activities from 10-120 Bq kg (73 ± 26 Bq kg) and 53-110 Bq kg (81 ± 18 Bq kg), respectively; and K specific activities from 177 to 928 Bq kg (569 ± 184 Bq kg) and 87-303 Bq kg (171 ± 69 Bq kg), respectively. Gypsum samples had U, Th, and K specific activities approximately one order of magnitude less than measured for fly ash samples. PMID:23361421

Roper, Angela R; Stabin, Michael G; Delapp, Rossane C; Kosson, David S

2013-03-01

141

Controls on chemistry and diagenesis of naturally occurring iron-oxide phases  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of this study were to (i) document chemical and mineralogical compositions in two naturally acidic drainages over a 1 m soil profile, (ii) document organic and inorganic signatures representative of past chemical or biological processes in the soils, and (iii) determine whether mineralogical and chemical differences are a consequence of differences in original composition, depositional conditions, or diagenesis. Two sites were studied: Paymaster Creek in the Heddleston Mining District near Lincoln, Montana and the New World Mining District near Cooke City, Montana. The oldest deposits at both naturally acidic sites pre-date human mining activity by several thousand years, although there is recent human activity at both sites. Both sites have streams with high dissolved Fe and moderately low pH and actively accumulate schwertmannite on streambeds. Soil deposits away from the streambed at Paymaster Creek contained goethite with adsorbed sulfate, but no schwertmannite, suggesting either that the original conditions precluded schwertmannite precipitation or that diagenesis occurred rapidly converting the schwertmannite to goethite. The New World Mining District site showed the expected profile, which is a gradual transition from schwertmannite- and goethite-bearing soils to goethite-only soils. Concentrations of Cr, As and other trace elements shown to retard diagenesis were higher at the New World site than at the Paymaster site.

Nancy W. Hinman; J. Michelle Kotler; Beizhan Yan; Aaron Tenesch; Richard V. Morris; Daphne L. Stoner; Jill R. Scott

2009-07-01

142

Acoustic surface perception from naturally occurring step sounds of a dexterous hexapod robot  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Legged robots that exhibit dynamic dexterity naturally interact with the surface to generate complex acoustic signals carrying rich information on the surface as well as the robot platform itself. However, the nature of a legged robot, which is a complex, hybrid dynamic system, renders the more common approach of model-based system identification impractical. The present paper focuses on acoustic surface identification and proposes a non-model-based analysis and classification approach adopted from the speech processing literature. A novel feature set composed of spectral band energies augmented by their vector time derivatives and time-domain averaged zero crossing rate is proposed. Using a multi-dimensional vector classifier, these features carry enough information to accurately classify a range of commonly occurring indoor and outdoor surfaces without using of any mechanical system model. A comparative experimental study is carried out and classification performance and computational complexity are characterized. Different feature combinations, classifiers and changes in critical design parameters are investigated. A realistic and representative acoustic data set is collected with the robot moving at different speeds on a number of surfaces. The study demonstrates promising performance of this non-model-based approach, even in an acoustically uncontrolled environment. The approach also has good chance of performing in real-time.

Cuneyitoglu Ozkul, Mine; Saranli, Afsar; Yazicioglu, Yigit

2013-10-01

143

In vitro Conversion of Vinyl to Formyl Groups in Naturally Occurring Chlorophylls  

PubMed Central

The chemical structural differences distinguishing chlorophylls in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms are either formyl substitution (chlorophyll b, d, and f) or the degree of unsaturation (8-vinyl chlorophyll a and b) of a side chain of the macrocycle compared with chlorophyll a. We conducted an investigation of the conversion of vinyl to formyl groups among naturally occurring chlorophylls. We demonstrated the in vitro oxidative cleavage of vinyl side groups to yield formyl groups through the aid of a thiol-containing compound in aqueous reaction mixture at room temperature. Heme is required as a catalyst in aqueous solution but is not required in methanolic reaction mixture. The conversion of vinyl- to formyl- groups is independent of their position on the macrocycle, as we observed oxidative cleavages of both 3-vinyl and 8-vinyl side chains to yield formyl groups. Three new chlorophyll derivatives were synthesised using 8-vinyl chlorophyll a as substrate: 8-vinyl chlorophyll d, [8-formyl]-chlorophyll a, and [3,8-diformyl]-chlorophyll a. The structural and spectral properties will provide a signature that may aid in identification of the novel chlorophyll derivatives in natural systems. The ease of conversion of vinyl- to formyl- in chlorophylls demonstrated here has implications regarding the biosynthetic mechanism of chlorophyll d in vivo. PMID:25119484

Loughlin, Patrick C.; Willows, Robert D.; Chen, Min

2014-01-01

144

Investigation into the possible natural occurence of semicarbazide in Macrobrachium rosenbergii prawns.  

PubMed

In the past year there has been an increased incidence in Belgium of cases of positive semicarbazide (SEM) tests in imported freshwater Macrobrachium rosenbergii prawns, seemingly indicating the possible abuse of nitrofurazone, a banned antimicrobial agent. This was in contrast to all other European countries where no significant increase in SEM-positive samples was detected. A possible explanation for this discrepancy between Belgium and the other European Union member states could be the fact that only in Belgium were whole prawns (meat + shell) analyzed for the presence of tissue-bound metabolites of nitrofurans, whereas in the other countries only the edible part (meat) of these prawns was analyzed. To investigate the possible natural occurrence of SEM in freshwater prawns, an animal trial was set up. In this experiment two groups of 10 juvenile M. rosenbergii, previously raised under standardized laboratory conditions, were stocked into two separate aquaria, a control group under reference conditions (no addition of nitrofurazone) and a group exposed to a daily dose of 50 mg of nitrofurazone L(-1) of culture water. Results of this animal trial proved that SEM naturally occurs in M. rosenbergii prawns but that at the current minimum required performance limit (MRPL) no tissue-bound SEM can be found in the meat of nontreated animals. In addition to this animal trial, commercial samples of other crustacean species, the shell and meat of which were analyzed separately, were also analyzed for the presence of SEM. PMID:21299238

Van Poucke, Christof; Detavernier, Christ'l; Wille, Mathieu; Kwakman, Jan; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Van Peteghem, Carlos

2011-03-01

145

Isotopic analysis of uranium in natural waters by alpha spectrometry  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A method is described for the determination of U234/U238 activity ratios for uranium present in natural waters. The uranium is coprecipitated from solution with aluminum phosphate, extracted into ethyl acetate, further purified by ion exchange, and finally electroplated on a titanium disc for counting. The individual isotopes are determined by measurement of the alpha-particle energy spectrum using a high resolution low-background alpha spectrometer. Overall chemical recovery of about 90 percent and a counting efficiency of 25 percent allow analyses of water samples containing as little as 0.10 ?g/l of uranium. The accuracy of the method is limited, on most samples, primarily by counting statistics.

Edwards, K.W.

1968-01-01

146

Cox-2 inhibitory effects of naturally occurring and modified fatty acids.  

PubMed

In the search for new cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective inhibitors, the inhibitory effects of naturally occurring fatty acids and some of their structural derivatives on COX-2-catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis were investigated. Among these fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA), alpha-linolenic acid (alpha-LNA), myristic acid, and palmitic acid were isolated from a CH(2)Cl(2) extract of the plant Plantago major by bioassay-guided fractionation. Inhibitory effects of other natural, structurally related fatty acids were also investigated: stearic acid, oleic acid, pentadecanoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Further, the inhibitory effects of these compounds on COX-2- and COX-1-catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis was compared with the inhibition of some synthesized analogues of EPA and DHA with ether or thioether functions. The most potent COX-2-catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis inhibitor was all-(Z)-5-thia-8,11,14,17-eicosatetraenoic acid (2), followed by EPA, DHA, alpha-LNA, LA, (7E,11Z,14Z,17Z)-5-thiaeicosa-7,11,14,17-tetraenoic acid, all-(Z)-3-thia-6,9,12,15-octadecatetraenoic acid, and (5E,9Z,12Z,15Z,18Z)-3-oxaheneicosa-5,9,12,15,18-pentaenoic acid, with IC(50) values ranging from 3.9 to180 microM. The modified compound 2 and alpha-LNA were most selective toward COX-2, with COX-2/COX-1 ratios of 0.2 and 0.1, respectively. This study shows that several of the natural fatty acids as well as all of the semisynthetic thioether-containing fatty acids inhibited COX-2-catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis, where alpha-LNA and compound 2 showed selectivity toward COX-2. PMID:11421736

Ringbom, T; Huss, U; Stenholm, A; Flock, S; Skattebøl, L; Perera, P; Bohlin, L

2001-06-01

147

Stable isotopes as one of nature's ecological recorders  

E-print Network

and spatial analysis with those in isotope analyses and modeling sophistication opens the door to an exciting], to reconstructing climate from tree rings [3], stable isotope analyses are an important part of the ecologist]; and hydrogen (d2 H) and oxygen isotope ratios (d18 O) record water-related dynamics in plants and animals [9

Ehleringer, Jim

148

Multi-Isotope Analysis as a Natural Reaction Probe of Biodegradation Mechanisms of 1,2- Dichloroethane  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), a chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon, is an EPA priority pollutant and a widespread groundwater contaminant. Stable isotope fractionation during biodegradation of 1,2-DCA occurs due to differences in the reaction rates of heavy versus light atoms present at a reacting bond in the 1,2-DCA molecule. In general, light isotopic bonds react more quickly, producing a relative enrichment in the heavy isotope in the remaining contaminant pool. Compound specific isotope analysis has the potential to demonstrate the occurrence and extent of biodegradation at chlorinated solvent contaminated groundwater sites. In this study, stable carbon isotope fractionation was used as a novel reaction probe to provide information about the mechanism of 1,2-DCA biodegradation. Isotopic fractionation was measured during 1,2-DCA degradation by a microbial culture capable of degrading 1,2-DCA under O2-reducing and NO3-reducing conditions. The microbial culture produced isotopic enrichment values that are not only large and reproducible, but are the same whether O2 or NO3 was used as an electron acceptor. The mean isotopic enrichment value of -25.8 permil measured for the microbial culture during 1,2-DCA degradation under both O2 and NO3- reducing conditions can be converted into a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value to relate the observed isotopic fractionation to the mechanism of degradation. This KIE value (1.05) is consistent with degradation via a hydrolysis (SN2) reaction under both electron-accepting conditions. Isotope analysis was able to provide a first line of evidence for the reaction mechanism of 1,2-DCA biodegradation by the microbial culture. Using a multi-isotope approach incorporating both carbon and hydrogen isotopic data, compound specific isotope analysis also has the potential to determine degradation mechanisms for 1,2-DCA under aerobic conditions where 1,2-DCA is known to be degraded by two distinct enzymatic pathways. Biodegradation of 1,2-DCA via a hydrolysis (SN2) reaction produces a large carbon isotope enrichment (isotopic enrichment factor = -29.2 permil) while oxidation of 1,2-DCA via a monooxygenase enzyme produces a small carbon isotope enrichment (isotopic enrichment factor = -3.9 permil). Conversely, because a hydrogen bond is not broken in the hydrolysis (SN2) reaction, only a small secondary hydrogen isotope enrichment is expected, while a large hydrogen isotope enrichment is expected during oxidation of 1,2-DCA via a monooxygenase enzyme. The complementary information of both carbon and hydrogen isotopic data may be instrumental in identifying the mechanism of biodegradation in the subsurface, and illustrates the potential of compound specific isotope analysis as a natural reaction probe to provide insight into the enzymatic mechanism of subsurface contaminant degradation.

Hirschorn, S. K.; Dinglasan-Panlilio, M.; Edwards, E. A.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

2006-12-01

149

Lesions of bone and bone marrow in myeloid leukosis occurring naturally in adult broiler breeders.  

PubMed

Lesions of bone and bone marrow in myeloid leukosis (ML) occurring naturally in adult broiler breeders were investigated pathologically. During gross examination, nodules and protrusions were commonly observed on the surface of the sternum, ribs, vertebrae, and synsacrum. The bone marrow of all the bones of the body was pale in color. Histologically, granulated myelocytes proliferated in the bone marrow of various bones and in the periosteum of the sternum, ribs, vertebrae, and synsacrum. The first proliferation of tumor cells occurred in the bone marrow of epiphysis. The myelocytes invaded through haversian and Volkmann's canals from the bone marrow to periosteal areas. Hematopoiesis was suppressed by marked proliferation of tumor cells in the bone marrow of the whole bone. Atrophy was also seen in the bones, including medullary bones of the chickens suffering from ML. Proliferation of myelocytes was seen in the bone marrow and periosteum of ossified cartilaginous rings of the trachea and larynx. Marked proliferation of myelocytes was seen in the dura mater of spinal cords, and it subsequently depressed the spinal cords. Bone formation with cartilage was seen in the periosteum of the sternum having marked proliferation of myelocytes in the bone marrow and periosteum. Ultrastructurally, tumor cells showed large nuclei and cytoplasm with large round electron-dense lysosomes. The virus particles were rarely detected in the cytoplasm of tumor cells. The polymerase chain reaction test of tumor samples showed positive for subgroup J avian leukosis virus. This study indicates that the myelocytes can invade through the compact bones to the periosteum in the sternum, ribs, vertebrae, synsarcum, and ossified cartilage of trachea and larynx having thinner compact bones. In addition, the periosteal osteogenesis with cartilage in the sternum may be reactive change against the bone atrophy because of the marked proliferation of myelocytes. PMID:10737666

Nakamura, K; Ogiso, M; Tsukamoto, K; Hamazaki, N; Hihara, H; Yuasa, N

2000-01-01

150

Naturally Occurring Variants of Human ?9 Nicotinic Receptor Differentially Affect Bronchial Cell Proliferation and Transformation  

PubMed Central

Isolation of polyadenilated mRNA from human immortalized bronchial epithelial cell line BEP2D revealed the presence of multiple isoforms of RNA coded by the CHRNA9 gene for ?9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). BEP2D cells were homozygous for the rs10009228 polymorphism encoding for N442S amino acid substitution, and also contained mRNA coding for several truncated isoforms of ?9 protein. To elucidate the biologic significance of the naturally occurring variants of ?9 nAChR, we compared the biologic effects of overexpression of full-length ?9 N442 and S442 proteins, and the truncated ?9 variant occurring due to a loss of the exon 4 sequence that causes frame shift and early termination of the translation. These as well as control vector were overexpressed in the BEP2D cells that were used in the assays of proliferation rate, spontaneous vs. tobacco nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)-induced cellular transformation, and tumorigenicity in cell culture and mice. Overexpression of the S442 variant significantly increased cellular proliferation, and spontaneous and NNK-induced transformation. The N442 variant significantly decreased cellular transformation, without affecting proliferation rate. Overexpression of the truncated ?9 significantly decreased proliferation and suppressed cellular transformation. These results suggested that ?9 nAChR plays important roles in regulation of bronchial cell growth by endogenous acetylcholine and exogenous nicotine, and susceptibility to NNK-induced carcinogenic transformation. The biologic activities of ?9 nAChR may be regulated at the splicing level, and genetic polymorphisms in CHRNA9 affecting protein levels, amino acid sequence and RNA splicing may influence the risk for lung cancer. PMID:22125646

Chikova, Anna; Grando, Sergei A.

2011-01-01

151

Bordetella pertussis naturally occurring isolates with altered lipooligosaccharide structure fail to fully mature human dendritic cells.  

PubMed

Bordetella pertussis is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of whooping cough. Despite high vaccination coverage, outbreaks are being increasingly reported worldwide. Possible explanations include adaptation of this pathogen, which may interfere with recognition by the innate immune system. Here, we describe innate immune recognition and responses to different B. pertussis clinical isolates. By using HEK-Blue cells transfected with different pattern recognition receptors, we found that 3 out of 19 clinical isolates failed to activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). These findings were confirmed by using the monocytic MM6 cell line. Although incubation with high concentrations of these 3 strains resulted in significant activation of the MM6 cells, it was found to occur mainly through interaction with TLR2 and not through TLR4. When using live bacteria, these 3 strains also failed to activate TLR4 on HEK-Blue cells, and activation of MM6 cells or human monocyte-derived dendritic cells was significantly lower than activation induced by the other 16 strains. Mass spectrum analysis of the lipid A moieties from these 3 strains indicated an altered structure of this molecule. Gene sequence analysis revealed mutations in genes involved in lipid A synthesis. Findings from this study indicate that B. pertussis isolates that do not activate TLR4 occur naturally and that this phenotype may give this bacterium an advantage in tempering the innate immune response and establishing infection. Knowledge on the strategies used by this pathogen in evading the host immune response is essential for the improvement of current vaccines or for the development of new ones. PMID:25348634

Brummelman, Jolanda; Veerman, Rosanne E; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; Deuss, Anna J M; Schuijt, Tim J; Sloots, Arjen; Kuipers, Betsy; van Els, Cécile A C M; van der Ley, Peter; Mooi, Frits R; Han, Wanda G H; Pinelli, Elena

2015-01-01

152

Naturally Occurring Structural Isomers in Serum IgA1 O-Glycosylation  

PubMed Central

IgA is the most abundantly produced antibody and plays an important role in the mucosal immune system. Human IgA is represented by two isotypes, IgA1 and IgA2. The major structural difference between these two subclasses is the presence of nine potential sites of O-glycosylation in the hinge region between the first and second constant region domains of the heavy chain. Thr225, Thr228, Ser230, Ser232 and Thr236 have been identified as the predominant sites of O-glycan attachment. The range and distribution of O-glycan chains at each site within the context of adjacent sites in this clustered region create a complex heterogeneity of surface epitopes that is incompletely defined. We previously described the analysis of IgA1 O-glycan heterogeneity by use of high resolution LC/MS and electron capture dissociation tandem MS to unambiguously localize all amino acid attachment sites in IgA1 (Ale) myeloma protein. Here, we report the identification and elucidation of IgA1 O-glycopeptide structural isomers that occur based on amino acid position of the attached glycans (positional isomers) and the structure of the O-glycan chains at individual sites (glycan isomers). These isomers are present in a model IgA1 (Mce1) myeloma protein and occur naturally in normal human serum IgA1. Variable O-glycan chains attached to Ser230, Thr233 or Thr236 produce the predominant positional isomers, including O-glycans composed of a single GalNAc residue. These findings represent the first definitive identification of structural isomeric IgA1 O-glycoforms, define the single-site heterogeneity for all O-glycan sites in a single sample, and have implications for defining epitopes based on clustered O-glycan variability. PMID:22067045

Takahashi, Kazuo; Smith, Archer D.; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens; Julian, Bruce A.; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan; Renfrow, Matthew B.

2013-01-01

153

Molecular characterization of a naturally occurring intraspecific recombinant begomovirus with close relatives widespread in southern Arabia  

PubMed Central

Background Tomato leaf curl Sudan virus (ToLCSDV) is a single-stranded DNA begomovirus of tomato that causes downward leaf curl, yellowing, and stunting. Leaf curl disease results in significant yield reduction in tomato crops in the Nile Basin. ToLCSDV symptoms resemble those caused by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus, a distinct and widespread begomovirus originating in the Middle East. In this study, tomato samples exhibiting leaf curl symptoms were collected from Gezira, Sudan. The associated viral genome was molecularly characterized, analyzed phylogenetically, and an infectious clone for one isolate was constructed. Findings The complete genomes for five newly discovered variants of ToLCSDV, ranging in size from 2765 to 2767-bp, were cloned and sequenced, and subjected to pairwise and phylogenetic analyses. Pairwise analysis indicated that the five Gezira isolates shared 97-100% nucleotide identity with each other. Further, these variants of ToLCSDV shared their highest nucleotide identity at 96-98%, 91-95%, 91-92%, and 91-92% with the Shambat, Gezira, Oman and Yemen strains of ToLCSDV, respectively. Based on the high maximum nucleotide identities shared between these ToLCSDV variants from Gezira and other previously recognized members of this taxonomic group, they are considered isolates of the Shambat strain of ToLCSDV. Analysis of the complete genome sequence for these new variants revealed that they were naturally occurring recombinants between two previously reported strains of ToLCSDV. Finally, a dimeric clone constructed from one representative ToLCSV genome from Gezira was shown to be infectious following inoculation to tomato and N. benthamiana plants. Conclusion Five new, naturally occurring recombinant begomovirus variants (>96% shared nt identity) were identified in tomato plants from Gezira in Sudan, and shown to be isolates of the Shambat strain of ToLCSDV. The cloned viral genome was infectious in N. benthamiana and tomato plants, and symptoms in tomato closely resembled those observed in field infected tomato plants, indicating the virus is the causal agent of the leaf curl disease. The symptoms that developed in tomato seedlings closely resembled those observed in field infected tomato plants, indicating that ToLCSDV is the causal agent of the leaf curl disease in Gezira. PMID:24890736

2014-01-01

154

Effects of Naturally Occurring Coumarins on Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzymes in Mice  

PubMed Central

Cytochromes P450 (P450s) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute two important enzyme families involved in carcinogen metabolism. Generally, P450s play activation or detoxifying roles while GSTs act primarily as detoxifying enzymes. We previously demonstrated that oral administration of the linear furanocoumarins, isopimpinellin and imperatorin, modulated P450 and GST activities in various tissues of mice. The purpose of the present study was to compare a broader range of naturally occurring coumarins (simple coumarins, and furanocoumarins of the linear and angular type) for their abilities to modulate hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes when administered orally to mice. We now report that all of the different coumarins tested (coumarin, limettin, auraptene, angelicin, bergamottin, imperatorin and isopimpinellin) induced hepatic GST activities, whereas the linear furanocoumarins possessed the greatest abilities to induce hepatic P450 activities, in particular P450 2B and 3A. In both cases, this corresponded to an increase in protein expression of the enzymes. Induction of P4502B10, 3A11, and 2C9 by xenobiotics often are a result of activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Using a pregnane X receptor reporter system, our results demonstrated that isopimpinellin activated both PXR and its human ortholog SXR by recruiting coactivator SRC-1 in transfected cells. In CAR transfection assays, isopimpinellin counteracted the inhibitory effect of androstanol on full length mCAR, a Gal4-mCAR ligand binding domain fusion, and restored coactivator binding. Orally administered isopimpinellin induced hepatic mRNA expression of Cyp2b10,Cyp3a1, GSTa in CAR(+/+) wild-type mice. In contrast, the induction of Cyp2b10 mRNA by isopimpinellin was attenuated in the CAR(?/?) mice, suggesting that isopimpinellin induces Cyp2b10 via the CAR receptor. Overall, the current data indicate that naturally occurring coumarins have diverse activities in terms of inducing various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes based on their chemical structure. PMID:18692084

Kleiner, Heather E.; Xia, Xiojun; Sonoda, Junichiro; Zhang, Jun; Pontius, Elizabeth; Abey, Jane; Evans, Ronald M.; Moore, David D.; DiGiovanni., John

2008-01-01

155

Effects of naturally occurring coumarins on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes in mice.  

PubMed

Cytochromes P450 (P450s) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute two important enzyme families involved in carcinogen metabolism. Generally, P450s play activation or detoxifying roles while GSTs act primarily as detoxifying enzymes. We previously demonstrated that oral administration of the linear furanocoumarins, isopimpinellin and imperatorin, modulated P450 and GST activities in various tissues of mice. The purpose of the present study was to compare a broader range of naturally occurring coumarins (simple coumarins, and furanocoumarins of the linear and angular type) for their abilities to modulate hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes when administered orally to mice. We now report that all of the different coumarins tested (coumarin, limettin, auraptene, angelicin, bergamottin, imperatorin and isopimpinellin) induced hepatic GST activities, whereas the linear furanocoumarins possessed the greatest abilities to induce hepatic P450 activities, in particular P450 2B and 3A. In both cases, this corresponded to an increase in protein expression of the enzymes. Induction of P4502B10, 3A11, and 2C9 by xenobiotics often is a result of activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Using a pregnane X receptor reporter system, our results demonstrated that isopimpinellin activated both PXR and its human ortholog SXR by recruiting coactivator SRC-1 in transfected cells. In CAR transfection assays, isopimpinellin counteracted the inhibitory effect of androstanol on full-length mCAR, a Gal4-mCAR ligand-binding domain fusion, and restored coactivator binding. Orally administered isopimpinellin induced hepatic mRNA expression of Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, and GSTain CAR(+/+) wild-type mice. In contrast, the induction of Cyp2b10 mRNA by isopimpinellin was attenuated in the CAR(-/-) mice, suggesting that isopimpinellin induces Cyp2b10 via the CAR receptor. Overall, the current data indicate that naturally occurring coumarins have diverse activities in terms of inducing various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes based on their chemical structure. PMID:18692084

Kleiner, Heather E; Xia, Xiaojun; Sonoda, Junichiro; Zhang, Jun; Pontius, Elizabeth; Abey, Jane; Evans, Ronald M; Moore, David D; DiGiovanni, John

2008-10-15

156

Characterization of naturally occurring radioactive materials in Libyan oil pipe scale using a germanium detector and Monte Carlo simulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radioactive scale formation in various oil production facilities is acknowledged to pose a potential significant health and environmental issue. The presence of such an issue in Libyan oil fields was recognized as early as 1998. The naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) involved in this matter are radium isotopes (226Ra and 228Ra) and their decay products, precipitating into scales formed on the surfaces of production equipment. A field trip to a number of onshore Libyan oil fields has indicated the existence of elevated levels of specific activity in a number of locations in some of the more mature oil fields. In this study, oil scale samples collected from different parts of Libya have been characterized using gamma spectroscopy through use of a well shielded HPGe spectrometer. To avoid potential alpha-bearing dust inhalation and in accord with safe working practices at this University, the samples, contained in plastic bags and existing in different geometries, are not permitted to be opened. MCNP, a Monte Carlo simulation code, is being used to simulate the spectrometer and the scale samples in order to obtain the system absolute efficiency and then to calculate sample specific activities. The samples are assumed to have uniform densities and homogeneously distributed activity. Present results are compared to two extreme situations that were assumed in a previous study: (i) with the entire activity concentrated at a point on the sample surface proximal to the detector, simulating the sample lowest activity, and; (ii) with the entire activity concentrated at a point on the sample surface distal to the detector, simulating the sample highest activity.

Habib, A. S.; Shutt, A. L.; Regan, P. H.; Matthews, M. C.; Alsulaiti, H.; Bradley, D. A.

2014-02-01

157

Stable isotopes of nitrate reflect natural attenuation of propellant residues on military training ranges.  

PubMed

Nitroglycerin (NG) and nitrocellulose (NC) are constituents of double-base propellants used notably for firing antitank ammunitions. Nitroglycerin was detected in soil and water samples from the unsaturated zone (pore water) at an active antitank firing position, where the presence of high nitrate (NO3(-)) concentrations suggests that natural attenuation of NG is occurring. However, concentrations alone cannot assess if NG is the source of NO3(-), nor can they determine which degradation processes are involved. To address this issue, isotopic ratios (?(15)N, ?(18)O) were measured for NO3(-) produced from NG and NC through various controlled degradation processes and compared with ratios measured in field pore water samples. Results indicate that propellant combustion and degradation mediated by soil organic carbon produced the observed NO3(-) in pore water at this site. Moreover, isotopic results are presented for NO3(-) produced through photolysis of propellant constituents, which could be a dominant process at other sites. The isotopic data presented here constitute novel information regarding a source of NO3(-) that was practically not documented before and a basis to study the contamination by energetic materials in different contexts. PMID:23815525

Bordeleau, Geneviève; Savard, Martine M; Martel, Richard; Smirnoff, Anna; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

2013-08-01

158

Pennsylvania's Technologically Enhanced, Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material Experiences and Studies of the Oil and Gas Industry.  

PubMed

This presentation provides an overview of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's experiences and ongoing studies related to technologically enhanced, naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) in the oil and gas industry. It has been known for many years that Pennsylvania's geology is unique, with several areas having relatively high levels of natural uranium and thorium. In the 1950s, a few areas of the state were evaluated for commercial uranium production. In the late 1970s, scoping studies of radon in homes prompted the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Bureau of Radiation Protection (BRP) to begin planning for a larger state-wide radon study. The BRP and Oil and Gas Bureau also performed a TENORM study of produced water in the early 1990s for a number of conventional oil and gas wells. More recently, BRP and the Bureau of Solid Waste developed radiation monitoring regulations for all Pennsylvania solid waste disposal facilities. These were implemented in 2001, prompting another evaluation of oil and gas operations and sludge generated from the treatment of conventionally produced water and brine but mainly focused on the disposal of TENORM solid waste in the state's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D landfills. However, since 2008, the increase in volumes of gas well wastewater and levels of Ra observed in the unconventional shale gas well flow-back fracking water has compelled DEP to fully re-examine these oil and gas operations. Specifically, with BRP in the lead, a new TENORM study of oil and gas operations and related wastewater treatment operations has been initiated (), supported by an American National Standards Institute standard on TENORM () and a U.S. Government Accountability Office report on shale resource development and risks (). This study began in early 2013 and will examine the potential public and worker radiation exposure and environmental impact as well as re-evaluate TENORM waste disposal. This presentation summarizes conventional and unconventional oil and gas well operations, geology and respective uranium/thorium content, radium content in oil and gas wastewater, treatment solids, radon in natural gas, the scope of other TENORM issues in the state, regulatory framework, national regulations and guidance. It also provides an overview of past and the status of ongoing TENORM studies in the Commonwealth (; Rowan and Kraemer 2012; ). PMID:25551500

Allard, David J

2015-02-01

159

Speech versus Song: Multiple Pitch-Sensitive Areas Revealed by a Naturally Occurring Musical Illusion  

PubMed Central

It is normally obvious to listeners whether a human vocalization is intended to be heard as speech or song. However, the 2 signals are remarkably similar acoustically. A naturally occurring boundary case between speech and song has been discovered where a spoken phrase sounds as if it were sung when isolated and repeated. In the present study, an extensive search of audiobooks uncovered additional similar examples, which were contrasted with samples from the same corpus that do not sound like song, despite containing clear prosodic pitch contours. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that hearing these 2 closely matched stimuli is not associated with differences in response of early auditory areas. Rather, we find that a network of 8 regions, including the anterior superior temporal gyrus (STG) just anterior to Heschl's gyrus and the right midposterior STG, respond more strongly to speech perceived as song than to mere speech. This network overlaps a number of areas previously associated with pitch extraction and song production, confirming that phrases originally intended to be heard as speech can, under certain circumstances, be heard as song. Our results suggest that song processing compared with speech processing makes increased demands on pitch processing and auditory–motor integration. PMID:22314043

Dick, Fred; Deutsch, Diana; Sereno, Marty

2013-01-01

160

Repair of naturally occurring mismatches can induce mutations in flanking DNA  

PubMed Central

‘Normal’ genomic DNA contains hundreds of mismatches that are generated daily by the spontaneous deamination of C (U/G) and methyl-C (T/G). Thus, a mutagenic effect of their repair could constitute a serious genetic burden. We show here that while mismatches introduced into human cells on an SV40-based episome were invariably repaired, this process induced mutations in flanking DNA at a significantly higher rate than no mismatch controls. Most mutations involved the C of TpC, the substrate of some single strand-specific APOBEC cytidine deaminases, similar to the mutations that can typify the ‘mutator phenotype’ of numerous tumors. siRNA knockdowns and chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that TpC preferring APOBECs mediate the mutagenesis, and siRNA knockdowns showed that both the base excision and mismatch repair pathways are involved. That naturally occurring mispairs can be converted to mutators, represents an heretofore unsuspected source of genetic changes that could underlie disease, aging, and evolutionary change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02001.001 PMID:24843013

Chen, Jia; Miller, Brendan F; Furano, Anthony V

2014-01-01

161

Characterization of naturally occurring atrazine-resistant isolates of the purple non-sulfur bacteria.  

PubMed

Six isolates of the purple non-sulfur bacteria, which upon primary isolation were naturally resistant to the herbicide atrazine, were characterized with respect to their taxonomic identity and the mechanism of their resistance. On the basis of electron microscopy, photopigment analysis, and other criteria, they were identified as strains of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, or Rhodocyclus gelatinosus. These isolates exhibited degrees of atrazine resistance which ranged from 1.5 to about 4 times greater than that of cognate reference strains (American Type Culture Collection) tested. Furthermore, all of the reference strains tested were more intrinsically resistant to atrazine than was Rhodobacter sphaeroides. No unique plasmids which might encode for herbicide degradation or inactivation were found in these isolates. Resistance to the herbicide in these isolates was not the result of diminished binding of the herbicide to the L subunit of the bacterial reaction center. Differences in herbicide resistance among the various species of this group may be the result of compositional and chemical differences in the individual reaction centers. However, the increase in atrazine resistance for the isolates characterized in this study probably occurs by undefined mechanisms and not necessarily by changes in the binding of the herbicide to the L subunit of the photosynthetic reaction center. PMID:16348126

Brown, A E; Luttrell, R; Highfill, C T; Rushing, A E

1990-02-01

162

SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON Technically enhanced naturally occurring radionuclides (TENORM) in phosphogypsum: Comparison CCRI(II)-S5  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the frame of mutual cooperation between the IAEA and the BIPM, the Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation Section II—Measurement of Radionuclides accepted an IAEA-organized interlaboratory comparison in 2008 on the determination of technically enhanced naturally occurring radionuclides in phosphogypsum. The study was piloted by the Chemistry Unit at the IAEA's Laboratories in Seibersdorf (Austria). This report presents the methodology applied in conducting this comparison and the results. Activity results for Pb-210, Ra-226, Th-230, U-234, U-235 and U-238 were reported by three national metrology institutes (NMI) and five other expert laboratories or designated institutes. Four different approaches were used to calculate the nominal value of the reported results and associated uncertainties, and the results from each individual participant were evaluated and compared with this nominal reference value. The reported evaluation of the measurement results demonstrated agreement amongst the participating laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI Section II, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

Shakhashiro, A.; Sansone, U.; Wershofen, H.; Bollhöfer, A.; Kim, C. K.; Kim, C. S.; Korun, M.; Moune, M.; Lee, S. H.; Tarjan, S.

2010-01-01

163

Investigation of the activity level and radiological impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides in blast furnace slag.  

PubMed

The activity level and possible radiological impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides on the health of workers and members of the public, as a result of utilisation of blast furnace slag (BFS) samples as a substitute for aggregate in road construction were investigated by using a gamma-ray spectrometer and potential exposure scenarios given in Radiation Protection 122. The mean activity concentrations of the (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in BFS samples were found to be 152.4, 54.9 and 183.1 Bq kg(-1), respectively. These values are compared with typical values measured in BFS samples from the European Union countries, which are 270, 70 and 240 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The values of radium equivalent activity index calculated for BFS samples were within the recommended safety limits. The highest total annual effective doses evaluated as 0.9 and 0.4 mSv y(-1) for members of the public and workers, respectively, were lower than the annual limit of 1 mSv y(-1). PMID:22826355

U?ur, F A; Turhan, S; Sahan, H; Sahan, M; Gören, E; Gezer, F; Ye?ingil, Z

2013-01-01

164

Using naturally occurring polysaccharides to align molecules with nonlinear optical activity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Biophysics and Advanced Materials Branch of the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating polymers with the potential for nonlinear optical (NLO) applications for a number of years. Some of the potential applications for NLO materials include optical communications, computing, and switching. To this point the branch's research has involved polydiacetylenes, phthalocyanins, and other synthetic polymers which have inherent NLO properties. The aim of the present research is to investigate the possibility of using naturally occurring polymers such as polysaccharides or proteins to trap and align small organic molecules with useful NLO properties. Ordering molecules with NLO properties enhances 3rd order nonlinear effects and is required for 2nd order nonlinear effects. Potential advantages of such a system are the flexibility to use different small molecules with varying chemical and optical properties, the stability and cost of the polymers, and the ability to form thin, optically transparent films. Since the quality of any polymer films depends on optimizing ordering and minimizing defects, this work is particularly well suited for microgravity experiments. Polysaccharide and protein polymers form microscopic crystallites which must align to form ordered arrays. The ordered association of crystallites is disrupted by gravity effects and NASA research on protein crystal growth has demonstrated that low gravity conditions can improve crystal quality.

Prasthofer, Thomas

1996-01-01

165

Naturally occurring autoantibodies in mediating clearance of senescent red blood cells.  

PubMed

Germline-encoded naturally occurring autoantibodies (NAbs) developed about 400 to 450 million years ago to provide specificity for clearance ofbody waste in animals with 3 germ layers. Such NAbs became a necessity to selectively clear aged red blood cells (RBC) surviving 60 to 120 d in higher vertebrates. IgG NAbs to senescent RBC are directed to the most abundant integral membrane protein, the anion-transport protein or band 3 protein, but only bind firmly upon its oligomerization, which facilitates bivalent binding. The main constituent of RBC, the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin, is susceptible to oxidative damage. Oxidized hemoglobin forms hemichromes (a form of aggregates) that bind to the cytoplasmic portion of band 3 protein, induces their clustering on the cytoplasmic, as well as the exoplasmic side and thereby provides the prerequisites for the low affinity IgG anti-band 3 NAbs to bind bivalently. Bound anti-band 3 NAbs overcome their low numbers per RBC by stimulating complement amplification. An affinity for C3 outside the antigen binding region is responsible for a preferential formation of C3b(2)-IgG complexes from anti-band 3 NAbs. These complexes first bind oligomeric properdin, which enhances their affinity for factor B in assembling an alternative C3 convertase. PMID:22903667

Lutz, Hans U

2012-01-01

166

Regulatory Initiatives for Control and Release of Technologically Enhanced Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Materials  

SciTech Connect

Current drafts of proposed standards and suggested State regulations for control and release of technologically-enhanced naturally-occurring radioactive material (TENORM), and standards for release of volumetrically-contaminated material in the US are reviewed. These are compared to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Safety Series and the European Commission (EC) proposals. Past regulatory efforts with respect to TENORM in the US dealt primarily with oil-field related wastes. Currently, nine states (AK, GA, LA, MS, NM, OH, OR SC, TX) have specific regulations pertaining to TENORM, mostly based on uranium mill tailings cleanup criteria. The new US proposals are dose- or risk-based, as are the IAEA and EC recommendations, and are grounded in the linear no threshold hypothesis (LNT). TENORM wastes involve extremely large volumes, particularly scrap metal and mine wastes. Costs to control and dispose of these wastes can be considerable. The current debate over the validity of LNT at low doses and low dose rates is particularly germane to this discussion. Most standards setting organizations and regulatory agencies base their recommendations on the LNT. The US Environmental Protection Agency has released a draft Federal Guidance Report that recommends calculating health risks from low-level exposure to radionuclides based on the LNT. However, some scientific and professional organizations are openly questioning the validity of LNT and its basis for regulations, practices, and costs to society in general. It is not clear at this time how a non-linear regulatory scheme would be implemented.

Egidi, P.V.

1999-03-02

167

Myricetin and Quercetin Are Naturally-Occurring Co-substrates of Cyclooxygenases In Vivo1  

PubMed Central

Bioflavonoids are ubiquitously present in the plant kingdom, and some of them are presently being sold as healthy dietary supplements around the world. Recently, it was shown that some of the dietary polyphenols were strong stimulators of the catalytic activity of cyclooxygenase I and II, resulting in increased formation of certain prostaglandin (PG) products in vitro and also in intact cells in culture. In the present study, we investigated the effect of two representative dietary compounds, quercetin and myricetin, on plasma and tissue levels of several PG products in normal Sprague-Dawley rats. We found that these two dietary bioflavonoids could strongly stimulate the formation of PG products in vivo in a time-dependent manner, and the stimulatory effect of these two bioflavonoids was dose-dependent with a unique biphasic pattern. At lower doses (<0.3 mg/kg b.w.), they strongly stimulated the formation of PGE2, but at higher doses (>0.3 mg/kg b.w.), there was a dose-dependent reduction of the stimulatory effect. These results provide support for the hypothesis that some of the bioflavonoids are naturally-occurring physiological co-substrates for the cyclooxygenases in vivo. PMID:19897347

Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Zhu, Bao T.

2009-01-01

168

Characterization of Naturally Occurring Atrazine-Resistant Isolates of the Purple Non-Sulfur Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Six isolates of the purple non-sulfur bacteria, which upon primary isolation were naturally resistant to the herbicide atrazine, were characterized with respect to their taxonomic identity and the mechanism of their resistance. On the basis of electron microscopy, photopigment analysis, and other criteria, they were identified as strains of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, or Rhodocyclus gelatinosus. These isolates exhibited degrees of atrazine resistance which ranged from 1.5 to about 4 times greater than that of cognate reference strains (American Type Culture Collection) tested. Furthermore, all of the reference strains tested were more intrinsically resistant to atrazine than was Rhodobacter sphaeroides. No unique plasmids which might encode for herbicide degradation or inactivation were found in these isolates. Resistance to the herbicide in these isolates was not the result of diminished binding of the herbicide to the L subunit of the bacterial reaction center. Differences in herbicide resistance among the various species of this group may be the result of compositional and chemical differences in the individual reaction centers. However, the increase in atrazine resistance for the isolates characterized in this study probably occurs by undefined mechanisms and not necessarily by changes in the binding of the herbicide to the L subunit of the photosynthetic reaction center. Images PMID:16348126

Brown, Alfred E.; Luttrell, Robin; Highfill, Claudia T.; Rushing, Ann E.

1990-01-01

169

A quantitative analysis of microbially-induced calcite precipitation employing artificial and naturally-occurring sediments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbially-induced calcite precipitation is a strong candidate for the production of sustainable construction materials. The process employs the microbe Sporosarcina pasteurii as an agent to microbially mediate the precipitation of calcium carbonate to bind unconsolidated sediment. As this process can be achieved under ambient temperature conditions and can utilise a wide variety of easily-available sediments, potentially including waste materials, it is envisioned that this procedure could significantly reduce carbon-dioxide emissions in the construction industry. This study describes and quantifies the precipitation of calcite cement in a range of naturally-occurring sediments compared with a control matrix. The study establishes the optimum treatment time for effective cement precipitation in order to produce a material that meets the standards required for construction whilst keeping economic and environmental outlays at a minimum. The 'control sediment' employed industrial-grade glass beads with a grain size range of 595-1180 microns (16-30 US mesh). Sporosarcina pasteurii were mixed in a solution of urea and calcium chloride and then inoculated into the control sediment. The microbes attach to the surface of the sediment grains and employ urea as a source of energy to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide. By so doing, they increase the pH of the solution allowing calcium carbonate to precipitate at the cell walls to act as nucleation points facilitating the precipitation of cements as a grain-coating and biocementing the unconsolidated sediment. The solution treatment was repeated at eight hour intervals with samples removed for detailed analysis after each every five consecutive treatments (i.e. 40 hours). The process was repeated to produce 20 samples with treatment times between 40 and 800 hours. Cemented samples were impregnated with blue epoxy and examined petrographically to monitor cement development. Modal analysis was undertaken on each cemented sample to establish the abundance and natures of precipitated cements. Samples were also examined via SEM to monitor cement distribution and quantify the thickness of cements on grain surfaces and at grain-on-grain contacts. Analysis established that precipitation of calcite continues until 400 hours (50 treatments) after which time there is only an insignificant precipitation of new calcite cement. This is inferred to result from the occlusion of porosity (from 40% to 10%) and observed calcite precipitation at grain-on-grain contacts, both factors reduce the permeability of the samples and, thus, inhibit the flow of solution through the medium. The precipitated calcite cement was found to be dominantly grain-rimming with a consistent thickness averaging 11 microns. A range of naturally-occurring sediments were collected from surface locations throughout the United Arab Emirates. Samples were submitted to a range of petrographic and geochemical analysis in order to quantify grain-size distribution, grain composition and bulk total carbonate content (7.5-94 wt%). Sub-samples of these sediments were established by sieving and the cementation potential of different size fractions was established. Following treatment, these samples were submitted to the same analysis as those employed for the control sediment. A relationship between both sediment grain-size characteristics and sediment grain composition to cement precipitation was established and is discussed.

Lokier, Stephen; Krieg Dosier, Ginger

2013-04-01

170

Sensitive Species and Natural Communities Known to Occur on the Picket Wire Canyonlands, Comanche  

E-print Network

Natural Resources Ft. Collins, CO 80523 #12;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Colorado Natural Heritage Program (CNHP (Figure 1 and Table 3). Of these, 8 support natural heritage resources (rare or imperiled species the Natural Heritage Program developed preliminary conservation planning boundaries. In developing

171

Managing for Successful Control of Naturally Occurring Asbestos During Large Scale Grading  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pacific Gas and Electric Company recently completed environmental remediation and civil grading of a 35-acre site in San Francisco Bay Area, and the project became recognized with local agencies as having excellent controls systems for naturally-occurring asbestos (NOA). The project began in 2010 and was completed in 2012, and involved excavating and grading over 100,000 tons of soil containing NOA. The work was subject to requirements by state, local and regional agencies, including an asbestos dust mitigation plan for the Bay Area Air Quality Management District. Effective control of NOA is attributed to management approaches combined with effective monitoring and state-of-the-art controls. Management Planning. The contract for construction specified NOA compliance management and controls, including having a NOA-control "czar" ultimately responsible for effective mitigation. An important element was daily pre-planning for excavation/grading that involved both the NOA mitigation experts and construction staff. Personnel Planning and Training. All construction personnel were trained before work regarding NOA hazards and mitigations. Daily tailboards with all construction personnel included discussions of the NOA controls integral to the daily work. Supervision. A NOA mitigation compliance leader was assigned to each excavation operation, responsible for continuously monitoring wind direction and work to ensure mitigation met requirements, and that disturbed areas were hydrosealed or covered. Adaptive Management - Daily and weekly debriefs occurred with those responsible for NOA controls to evaluate effectiveness, and identify improvements needed. If a monitoring result exceeded the project trigger level, work shut down and a root-cause analysis was performed to determine appropriate corrective actions. Deviations of results from background were researched as to cause, and any adjustments identified. Nearby non-project activities were monitored, as they occasionally caused trigger level exceedences in perimeter monitors, including from off-site vehicles, nearby construction, and mechanical vegetation management (e.g. weed whacking). Regulatory and Owner Oversight. Monitoring results were reported daily to agencies, agencies made frequent inspections, and owner's independent compliance representatives observed the NOA mitigation and provided real-time feedback to the construction team. NOA Controls. NOA emissions were controlled site-wide and for each work activity. Site systems included misting, water trucks on roads, temporary covers and soil sealants. Work activity controls for excavation/grading included both source and perimeter controls. Water application technologies specially designed for NOA fiber mitigation, and not just dust mitigation, were effective without adding excessive water to work areas. These activities collectively created a management structure that facilitated successful implementation of NOA control technologies.

Saur, R.; Harnish, D.; Cavanaugh, J.; Kendall, K.; Virdee, A.; Ludlam, D.

2012-12-01

172

Acute Toxicological Responses of Fischer Rats to Naturally Occurring Asbestos from theUnited States and Canada  

EPA Science Inventory

This study was designed to provide understanding of the toxicity of naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) including Libby amphibole (LA), Sumas Mountain chrysotile (SM), EI Dorado Hills tremolite (ED) and Ontario actinolite/ferroactinolite cleavage fragments (ON). Ratrespirable fra...

173

Demonstration of significant abiotic iron isotope fractionation in nature  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field and laboratory studies reveal that the mineral ferrihydrite, formed as a result of abiotic oxidation of aqueous ferrous to ferric Fe, contains Fe that is isotopically heavy relative to coexisting aqueous Fe. Because the electron transfer step of the oxidation process at pH >5 is essentially irreversible and should favor the lighter Fe isotopes in the ferric iron product, this result suggests that relatively heavy Fe isotopes are preferentially partitioned into the readily oxidized Fe(II)(OH)x(aq) species or their transition complexes prior to oxidation. The apparent Fe isotope fractionation factor, ??ferrihydrite-water, depends primarily on the relative abundances of the Fe(II)(aq) species. This study demonstrates that abiotic processes can fractionate the Fe isotopes to the same extent as biotic processes, and thus Fe isotopes on their own do not provide an effective biosignature.

Bullen, T.D.; White, A.F.; Childs, C.W.; Vivit, D.V.; Schultz, M.S.

2001-01-01

174

Naturally occurring secondary nutritional hyperparathyroidism in cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis) from central Texas.  

PubMed

Naturally occurring secondary nutritional hyperparathyroidism is described in the nestlings of two colonies of cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis) from Central Texas (Bryan and San Antonio, Texas, USA). Nestlings from a third colony (Waco, Texas, USA) were collected in a subsequent year for comparison. Birds from the first two colonies consistently had severe osteopenia and associated curving deformities and folding fractures of their long bones. These birds also had reduced bone ash, increased osteoclasia, a marked decrease in osteoblast activity, variable lengthening and shortening of the hypertrophic zone of the epiphyseal cartilage, decreased and disorganized formation of new bone, and a marked hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the parathyroid glands as compared to birds collected from the third colony. Fibrous osteodystrophy was found in all of the birds from San Antonio and Bryan. Evidence of moderate to severe calcium deficiency was also identified in 33% of the cattle egrets collected from Waco. Gut contents of affected chicks contained predominately grasshoppers and crickets; vertebrate prey items were absent from the Bryan birds. Grasshoppers and crickets collected from fields frequented by the adult egrets in 1994 had 0.12-0.28% calcium and 0.76-0.81% phosphorus. Pooled grasshoppers and crickets collected during a subsequent wet early spring averaged 0.24% calcium and 0.65% phosphorus. Although the phosphorus content of the insect prey was adequate for growth, calcium was approximately one-third the minimum calcium requirement needed for growth for other species of birds. It was postulated that cattle egrets breeding in Central Texas have expanded their range into habitat that contains less vertebrate prey, and as a result, many nestling egrets are being fed diets that contain suboptimal calcium. Therefore, in years where vertebrate prey is scarce and forage for insect prey is reduced in calcium, nestling egrets are at risk for developing secondary nutritional hyperparathyroidism. PMID:16107676

Phalen, David N; Drew, Mark L; Contreras, Cindy; Roset, Kimberly; Mora, Miguel

2005-04-01

175

Staphylococcal Phenotypes Induced by Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Membrane-Interactive Polyphenolic ?-Lactam Resistance Modifiers  

PubMed Central

Galloyl catechins, in particular (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECg), have the capacity to abrogate ?-lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); they also prevent biofilm formation, reduce the secretion of a large proportion of the exoproteome and induce profound changes to cell morphology. Current evidence suggests that these reversible phenotypic traits result from their intercalation into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. We have endeavoured to potentiate the capacity of ECg to modify the MRSA phenotype by stepwise removal of hydroxyl groups from the B-ring pharmacophore and the A:C fused ring system of the naturally occurring molecule. ECg binds rapidly to the membrane, inducing up-regulation of genes responsible for protection against cell wall stress and maintenance of membrane integrity and function. Studies with artificial membranes modelled on the lipid composition of the staphylococcal bilayer indicated that ECg adopts a position deep within the lipid palisade, eliciting major alterations in the thermotropic behaviour of the bilayer. The non-galloylated homolog (-)-epicatechin enhanced ECg-mediated effects by facilitating entry of ECg molecules into the membrane. ECg analogs with unnatural B-ring hydroxylation patterns induced higher levels of gene expression and more profound changes to MRSA membrane fluidity than ECg but adopted a more superficial location within the bilayer. ECg possessed a high affinity for the positively charged staphylococcal membrane and induced changes to the biophysical properties of the bilayer that are likely to account for its capacity to disperse the cell wall biosynthetic machinery responsible for ?-lactam resistance. The ability to enhance these properties by chemical modification of ECg raises the possibility that more potent analogs could be developed for clinical evaluation. PMID:24699700

Palacios, Lucia; Rosado, Helena; Micol, Vicente; Rosato, Adriana E.; Bernal, Patricia; Arroyo, Raquel; Grounds, Helen; Anderson, James C.; Stabler, Richard A.; Taylor, Peter W.

2014-01-01

176

Effects of naturally occurring arginine 14 deletion on phospholamban conformational dynamics and membrane interactions.  

PubMed

Phospholamban (PLN) is a single-pass membrane protein that regulates the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA). Phosphorylation of PLN at Ser16 reverses its inhibitory function under ?-adrenergic stimulation, augmenting Ca(2+) uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and muscle contractility. PLN exists in two conformations; a T state, where the cytoplasmic domain is helical and adsorbed on the membrane surface, and an R state, where the cytoplasmic domain is unfolded and membrane detached. Previous studies have shown that the PLN conformational equilibrium is crucial to SERCA regulation. Here, we used a combination of solution and solid-state NMR to compare the structural topology and conformational dynamics of monomeric PLN (PLN(AFA)) with that of the PLN(R14del), a naturally occurring deletion mutant that is linked to the progression of dilated cardiomyopathy. We found that the behavior of the inhibitory transmembrane domain of PLN(R14del) is similar to that of the native sequence. Conversely, the conformational dynamics of R14del both in micelles and lipid membranes are enhanced. We conclude that the deletion of Arg14 in the cytoplasmic region weakens the interactions with the membrane and shifts the conformational equilibrium of PLN toward the disordered R state. This conformational transition is correlated with the loss-of-function character of this mutant and is corroborated by SERCA's activity assays. These findings support our hypothesis that SERCA function is fine-tuned by PLN conformational dynamics and begin to explain the aberrant regulation of SERCA by the R14del mutant. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: NMR Spectroscopy for Atomistic Views of Biomembranes and Cell Surfaces. Guest Editors: Lynette Cegelski and David P. Weliky. PMID:25251363

Vostrikov, Vitaly V; Soller, Kailey J; Ha, Kim N; Gopinath, T; Veglia, Gianluigi

2015-01-01

177

Estimated trichloroethene transformation rates due to naturally occurring biodegradation in a fractured-rock aquifer  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rates of trichloroethene (TCE) mass transformed by naturally occurring biodegradation processes in a fractured rock aquifer underlying a former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) site in West Trenton, New Jersey, were estimated. The methodology included (1) dividing the site into eight elements of equal size and vertically integrating observed concentrations of two daughter products of TCE biodegradation–cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and chloride–using water chemistry data from a network of 88 observation wells; (2) summing the molar mass of cis-DCE, the first biodegradation product of TCE, to provide a probable underestimate of reductive biodegradation of TCE, (3) summing the molar mass of chloride, the final product of chlorinated ethene degradation, to provide a probable overestimate of overall biodegradation. Finally, lower and higher estimates of aquifer porosities and groundwater residence times were used to estimate a range of overall transformation rates. The highest TCE transformation rates estimated using this procedure for the combined overburden and bedrock aquifers was 945 kg/yr, and the lowest was 37 kg/yr. However, hydrologic considerations suggest that approximately 100 to 500 kg/yr is the probable range for overall TCE transformation rates in this system. Estimated rates of TCE transformation were much higher in shallow overburden sediments (approximately 100 to 500 kg/yr) than in the deeper bedrock aquifer (approximately 20 to 0.15 kg/yr), which reflects the higher porosity and higher contaminant mass present in the overburden. By way of comparison, pump-and-treat operations at the NAWC site are estimated to have removed between 1,073 and 1,565 kg/yr of TCE between 1996 and 2009.

Chapelle, Francis H.; Lacombe, Pierre J.; Bradley, Paul M.

2012-01-01

178

Efficacy of enrofloxacin in the treatment of naturally occurring acute clinical Escherichia coli mastitis.  

PubMed

The efficacy of the combination of systemic enrofloxacin (5mg/kg twice with a 24-h interval, first dose i.v., second dose s.c.) and the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agent ketoprofen (3mg/kg i.m. or 4 mg/kg per os daily for 1 to 3 d) treatment was compared with antiinflammatory treatment only in dairy cows with naturally occurring acute clinical Escherichia coli mastitis. A total of 132 cows with acute clinical mastitis and with confirmed growth of E. coli in a pretreatment milk sample were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups. Response to treatment was evaluated clinically and by bacteriological culturing and determination of N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase (NAGase) activity on d 2 and 21 posttreatment. Enrofloxacin treatment did not increase bacteriological (90.5% of treated vs. 86.8% of nontreated cured) or clinical cure (46.7% of treated vs. 57.1% of nontreated cured), cow survival (95.3% of treated vs. 92.7% of nontreated), or quarter milk production assessed 21 d posttreatment (21.8 vs. 29.3% return to preinfection level for nontreated cows), nor did it decrease mammary gland tissue damage estimated using determination of milk NAGase activity (24.0+/-0.3 vs. 18.3+/-1.3 pmol of 4-methylumbelliferone per min per microL for nontreated cows). Treatment did not influence the number of study cows remaining in the herd after 6 mo (71.9% of treated vs. 80.6% of nontreated). The only significant effects of enrofloxacin were enhancing the bacteriological cure (odds ratio=3.32 for treated cows) and decreasing the clinical cure (odds ratio=0.05 for treated cows) on d 2 posttreatment. Our results did not support the use of enrofloxacin to treat acute clinical E. coli mastitis. PMID:20412909

Suojala, L; Simojoki, H; Mustonen, K; Kaartinen, L; Pyörälä, S

2010-05-01

179

Diversity of opines and opine-catabolizing bacteria isolated from naturally occurring crown gall tumors.  

PubMed

The diversity of opines from 43 naturally occurring crown gall tumors on several plant species was analyzed for the presence of agropine, chrysopine, iminodiacid, an unidentified leucinopine-like iminodiacid (IDA-B), mannopine, octopine, nopaline, DL- and LL-succinamopine, leucinopine and heliopine. Opine utilization patterns of agrobacteria and fluorescent pseudomonads resident in a tumor were then analyzed and compared for agreement with the opine isolated from that tumor. Nopaline was the most common opine found and was detected in tumors from cherry, blackberry, grape, and plum. Octopine was not found, although octopine-catabolizing bacteria were isolated from several tumors. A new, previously undescribed iminodiacid of the succinamopine-leucinopine type (provisionally designated IDA-B) was isolated from tumors of wild blackberry. Field tumors from apple, blueberry and grape yielded no detectable opines, even though opine-utilizing bacteria were present. Bacterial isolates from plum and cherry showed the best correspondence between the opine in tumors (nopaline) and the presence of bacteria that catabolized that opine. However, several unusual opine catabolic combinations were identified, including isolates that catabolized a variety of opines but were nonpathogenic. More variability was observed among isolates from field tumors on the remaining plant species. We isolated novel mannopine-nopaline type agrobacteria from field tumors of cherry, plum and blackberry that induced tumors containing either mannopine (plus agropine) or nopaline, but not both. Epidemiologically, the galled plants from an area were not of clonal origin (same Ti plasmid), indicating that the field tumors from a small area were incited by more than one type of Ti plasmid. PMID:16535484

Moore, L W; Chilton, W S; Canfield, M L

1997-01-01

180

Effect of leachability on environmental risk assessment for naturally occurring radioactive materials in petroleum oil fields.  

PubMed

Elevated concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), including 238U, 232Th, and their progeny found in underground geologic deposits, are often encountered during crude oil recovery. Radium, the predominant radionuclide brought to the surface with the crude oil and produced water, co-precipitates with barium in the form of complex compounds of sulfates, carbonates, and silicates found in sludge and scale. These NORM deposits are highly stable and very insoluble under ambient conditions at the earth's surface. However, the co-precipitated radium matrix is not thermodynamically stable at reducing conditions which may enable a fraction of the radium to eventually be released to the environment. Although the fate of radium in uranium mill tailings has been studied extensively, the leachability of radium from crude oil NORM deposits exposed to acid-rain and other aging processes is generally unknown. The leachability of radium from NORM contaminated soil collected at a contaminated oil field in eastern Kentucky was determined using extraction fluids having wide range of pH reflecting different extreme environmental conditions. The average 226Ra concentration in the samples of soil subjected to leachability testing was 32.56 Bq g(-1) +/- 0.34 Bq g(-1). The average leaching potential of 226Ra observed in these NORM contaminated soil samples was 1.3% +/- 0.46% and was independent of the extraction fluid. Risk assessment calculations using the family farm scenario show that the annual dose to a person living and working on this NORM contaminated soil is mainly due to external gamma exposure and radon inhalation. However, waterborne pathways make a non-negligible contribution to the dose for the actual resident families living on farmland with the type of residual NORM contamination due to crude oil recovery operations. PMID:10647985

Rajaretnam, G; Spitz, H B

2000-02-01

181

Naturally occurring dominant resistance mutations to HCV protease and polymerase inhibitors in treatment-naïve patients  

PubMed Central

Resistance mutations to HCV NS3 protease inhibitors in <1% of the viral quasispecies may still allow >1000-fold viral load reductions upon treatment, consistent with their reported reduced replicative fitness in vitro. Recently, however, an R155K protease mutation was reported as the dominant quasispecies in a treatment-naïve individual, raising concerns about possible full drug resistance. To investigate the prevalence of dominant STAT-C resistance mutations in the population we analyzed HCV genome sequences from 507 treatment-naïve HCV genotype 1 infected patients from the US, Germany and Switzerland. Phylogenetic sequence analysis and viral load data were used to identify the possible spread of replication competent, drug resistant viral strains in the population and to infer the consequences of these mutations upon viral replication in vivo. Mutations described to confer resistance to the protease inhibitors Telaprevir, BILN2061, ITMN-191, SCH6 and Boceprevir, the NS5B polymerase inhibitor AG-021541, and to the NS4A antagonist ACH-806 were observed mostly as sporadic, unrelated cases, at frequencies between 0.3% and 2.8% in the population, including two patients with possible multi-drug resistance. Collectively, however, 8.6% of the genotype 1a and 1.4% of the genotype 1b infected patients carried at least one dominant resistance mutation. Viral loads were high in the majority of these patients, suggesting that drug resistant viral strains might achieve replication levels comparable to non-resistant viruses in vivo. Conclusion: Naturally occurring dominant STAT-C resistance mutations are common in HCV genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients. Their influence on treatment outcome should further be characterized to evaluate possible benefits of drug resistance testing for individual tailoring of drug combinations when treatment options are limited due to previous non-response to peginterferon and ribavirin. PMID:19026009

Kuntzen, Thomas; Timm, Joerg; Berical, Andrew; Lennon, Niall; Berlin, Aaron M.; Young, Sarah K.; Lee, Bongshin; Heckerman, David; Carlson, Jonathan; Reyor, Laura L.; Kleyman, Marianna; McMahon, Cory M.; Birch, Christopher; Wiesch, Julian Schulze zur; Ledlie, Timothy; Koehrsen, Michael; Kodira, Chinnappa; Roberts, Andrew D.; Lauer, Georg M.; Rosen, Hugo R.; Bihl, Florian; Cerny, Andreas; Spengler, Ulrich; Liu, Zhimin; Kim, Arthur Y.; Xing, Yanming; Schneidewind, Arne; Madey, Margaret A.; Fleckenstein, Jaquelyn F.; Park, Vicki M.; Galagan, James E.; Nusbaum, Chad; Walker, Bruce D.; Lake-Bakaar, Gerond V.; Daar, Eric S.; Jacobson, Ira M.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Edlin, Brian R.; Donfield, Sharyne M.; Chung, Raymond T.; Talal, Andrew H.; Marion, Tony; Birren, Bruce W.; Henn, Matthew R.; Allen, Todd M.

2008-01-01

182

Zinc isotope variations in natural and cultured marine phytoplankton.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Zn is an essential micronutrient for marine phytoplankton. Zn distribution in the ocean is largely controlled by biological uptake, being drawn down from several nanomolar concentrations in the deep ocean to picomolar concentrations in the surface ocean. Zn isotopes may record this biological activity based on the preferential uptake of lighter Zn isotopes by phytoplankton. Marechal et. al. (2000) attribute a seasonal cycle in the Zn isotope composition of sediment trap material and global variations in the Zn isotope composition of manganese nodules to this biological fractionation. To better understand the processes controlling the distribution of Zn isotopes in the ocean, the isotopic composition of phytoplankton was investigated. In-situ plankton were collected by trace metal clean plankton tows from both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. In a region close to a continental source of Zn, approximately 300 km off the coast of Brazil (7.4 S, 31.4 W), the isotope composition of the plankton tow material closely resembles that of continental material. The isotopic composition of plankton tows from more remote locations in the open ocean may better record the effects of biological cycling. Additional samples from the Atlantic, as well as samples from the central Pacific near Hawaii and the North Pacific are being processed. This data may be used to better understand how biological processes control the global distribution of Zn isotopes in the oceans.

John, S. G.; Bergquist, B. A.; Boyle, E. A.

2004-12-01

183

Nitrate dynamics in natural plants: insights based on the concentration and natural isotope abundances of tissue nitrate  

PubMed Central

The dynamics of nitrate (NO?3), a major nitrogen (N) source for natural plants, has been studied mostly through experimental N addition, enzymatic assay, isotope labeling, and genetic expression. However, artificial N supply may not reasonably reflect the N strategies in natural plants because NO?3 uptake and reduction may vary with external N availability. Due to abrupt application and short operation time, field N addition, and isotopic labeling hinder the elucidation of in situ NO?3-use mechanisms. The concentration and natural isotopes of tissue NO?3 can offer insights into the plant NO?3 sources and dynamics in a natural context. Furthermore, they facilitate the exploration of plant NO?3 utilization and its interaction with N pollution and ecosystem N cycles without disturbing the N pools. The present study was conducted to review the application of the denitrifier method for concentration and isotope analyses of NO?3 in plants. Moreover, this study highlights the utility and advantages of these parameters in interpreting NO?3 sources and dynamics in natural plants. We summarize the major sources and reduction processes of NO?3 in plants, and discuss the implications of NO?3 concentration in plant tissues based on existing data. Particular emphasis was laid on the regulation of soil NO?3 and plant ecophysiological functions in interspecific and intra-plant NO?3 variations. We introduce N and O isotope systematics of NO?3 in plants and discuss the principles and feasibilities of using isotopic enrichment and fractionation factors; the correlation between concentration and isotopes (N and O isotopes: ?18O and ?17O); and isotope mass-balance calculations to constrain sources and reduction of NO?3 in possible scenarios for natural plants are deliberated. Finally, we offer a preliminary framework of intraplant ?18O-NO?3 variation, and summarize the uncertainties in using tissue NO?3 parameters to interpret plant NO?3 utilization. PMID:25101106

Liu, Xue-Yan; Koba, Keisuke; Makabe, Akiko; Liu, Cong-Qiang

2014-01-01

184

Nitrate dynamics in natural plants: insights based on the concentration and natural isotope abundances of tissue nitrate.  

PubMed

The dynamics of nitrate (NO(-) 3), a major nitrogen (N) source for natural plants, has been studied mostly through experimental N addition, enzymatic assay, isotope labeling, and genetic expression. However, artificial N supply may not reasonably reflect the N strategies in natural plants because NO(-) 3 uptake and reduction may vary with external N availability. Due to abrupt application and short operation time, field N addition, and isotopic labeling hinder the elucidation of in situ NO(-) 3-use mechanisms. The concentration and natural isotopes of tissue NO(-) 3 can offer insights into the plant NO(-) 3 sources and dynamics in a natural context. Furthermore, they facilitate the exploration of plant NO(-) 3 utilization and its interaction with N pollution and ecosystem N cycles without disturbing the N pools. The present study was conducted to review the application of the denitrifier method for concentration and isotope analyses of NO(-) 3 in plants. Moreover, this study highlights the utility and advantages of these parameters in interpreting NO(-) 3 sources and dynamics in natural plants. We summarize the major sources and reduction processes of NO(-) 3 in plants, and discuss the implications of NO(-) 3 concentration in plant tissues based on existing data. Particular emphasis was laid on the regulation of soil NO(-) 3 and plant ecophysiological functions in interspecific and intra-plant NO(-) 3 variations. We introduce N and O isotope systematics of NO(-) 3 in plants and discuss the principles and feasibilities of using isotopic enrichment and fractionation factors; the correlation between concentration and isotopes (N and O isotopes: ?(18)O and ?(17)O); and isotope mass-balance calculations to constrain sources and reduction of NO(-) 3 in possible scenarios for natural plants are deliberated. Finally, we offer a preliminary framework of intraplant ?(18)O-NO(-) 3 variation, and summarize the uncertainties in using tissue NO(-) 3 parameters to interpret plant NO(-) 3 utilization. PMID:25101106

Liu, Xue-Yan; Koba, Keisuke; Makabe, Akiko; Liu, Cong-Qiang

2014-01-01

185

Determination of lithium isotopes at natural abundance levels by atomic absorption spectrometry  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The relationships of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li hollow cathode lamp emissions are used to determine lithium isotopic composition in the natural abundance range of geologic materials. Absorption was found to have a nonlinear dependence upon total lithium concentration and isotopic composition. A method using nonlinear equations to describe the relationship of the absorption of 6Li and 7Li lamp radiation is proposed as a means of calculating isotopic composition that is independent of total lithium concentration.

Meier, A.L.

1982-01-01

186

AcuteToxicological Responses of Fischer Rats to Naturally Occurring Asbestos Samples from the United States and Canada  

EPA Science Inventory

The potential public health issues related to exposure to natural asbestos deposits (commonly termed naturally occurring asbestos, NO A) has gained the regulatory and media spotlight in recent years. Arguably the most well known example is Libby, Montana, the site of the largest ...

187

Impacts of naturally-occurring soil fungi on seeds of meadow plants Michelle Schafer and Peter M. Kotanen*  

E-print Network

Impacts of naturally-occurring soil fungi on seeds of meadow plants Michelle Schafer and Peter M, Plant disease, Seed banks, Soil fungi Abstract Although soil fungi may represent an ecologically of fungi colonizing seeds in natural habitats. In response, we con- ducted a series of experiments

188

Increased carbon uptake in marine sediment enabled by naturally occurring electrical conductors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reduction-oxidation (redox) gradients are common across marine sediment-water interfaces and result from microbially-mediated reactions such as the oxidation of organic matter coupled to reduction of electron acceptors. Most microbes living in sediments do not have direct access to oxygen in their immediate environment, however it has recently been shown that sulfide-oxidizing microbes may employ extracellular electron transfer (EET) to couple the oxidation of sulfide in the anoxic zone to reduction of oxygen at the sediment-water interface located several centimeters away. However, no mechanisms for this observed phenomenon have been validated. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that conductive minerals in marine sediment (specifically pyrite) can couple spatially separated redox reactions such as anaerobic respiration and oxygen reduction. Marine sediment was amended with naturally occurring pyrite in varying concentrations (0, 2, 10 and 50 weight-percent) and then incubated with 10 ?M 13C-labeled acetate. After six hours, the treatments with the greatest amount of added pyrite showed the greatest incorporation of acetate from the labeled pool. The fraction of labeled acetate incorporation more than doubled in the 10 and 50 weight-percent treatments compared to the control sediment. We also designed a circuit to investigate the electrical conductivity of the sediment treatments as a function of added pyrite. A potentiostat was used to establish a known voltage across a sediment column and current was measured. Resistance (the inverse of conductance) was calculated from a linear fit of current data over a range of voltages ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 V. The treatments with added pyrite had lower resistance than background sediment, with the lowest resistance corresponding to the 50% pyrite treatment. We also examined the effect of varying pyrite content on microbial community composition using massively parallel 16S rRNA sequencing. Microbial community analyses reveal that the majority of microbes in the sediment belong to the deltaproteobacteria or gammaproteobacteria classes, which have been previously implicated in EET in laboratory and field-based bioelectrochemical studies. These data force us to reconsider the role of EET and conductive minerals in organic carbon cycling -particularly in metaliferous sediments- and suggest that EET-enabled anaerobic metabolism may represent a significant contribution to marine carbon cycling.

Nielsen, M. E.; Cahoon, D. P.; Girguis, P. R.

2011-12-01

189

Manufactured Home Testing in Simulated and Naturally Occurring High Winds for WCTE Conference  

SciTech Connect

A typical double-wide manufactured home was tested in simulated and naturally occurring high winds to understand structural behavior and improve performance during severe windstorms. Seven (7) lateral load tests were conducted on a double-wide manufactured home at a remote field test site in Wyoming. An extensive instrumentation package monitored the overall behavior of the home and collected data vital to validating computational software for the manufactured housing industry. The tests were designed to approach the design load of the home without causing structural damage, thus allowing the behavior of the home to be accessed when the home was later exposed to high winds (to 80-mph). The data generally show near-linear initial system response with significant non-linear behavior as the applied loads increase. Load transfer across the marriage line is primarily compression. Racking, while present, is very small. Interface slip and shear displacement along the marriage line are nearly insignificant. Horizontal global displacements reached 0.6 inch. These tests were designed primarily to collect data necessary to calibrate a desktop analysis and design software tool, MHTool, under development at the Idaho National Laboratory specifically for manufactured housing. Currently available analysis tools are, for the most part, based on methods developed for "stick built" structures and are inappropriate for manufactured homes. The special materials utilized in manufactured homes, such as rigid adhesives used in the connection of the sheathing materials to the studs, significantly alter the behavior of manufactured homes under lateral loads. Previous full scale tests of laterally loaded manufactured homes confirm the contention that conventional analysis methods are not applicable. System behavior dominates the structural action of manufactured homes and its prediction requires a three dimensional analysis of the complete unit, including tie-downs. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Manufactured Housing Institute. The results of this research can lead to savings in annual losses of life and property by providing validated information to enable the advancement of code requirements and by developing engineering software that can predict and optimize wind resistance.

William D. Richins; Thomas K. Larson; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Ryan G. Kobbe

2006-08-01

190

Novel psbA1 Gene from a Naturally Occurring Atrazine-Resistant Cyanobacterial Isolate  

PubMed Central

A naturally occurring atrazine-resistant cyanobacterial isolate, strain SG2, was isolated from an atrazine-containing wastewater treatment system at the Syngenta atrazine production facility in St. Gabriel, La. Strain SG2 was resistant to 1,000 ?g of atrazine per ml but showed relatively low resistance to diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea]. Analyses of 16S ribosomal DNA indicated that strain SG2 falls into the Synechocystis/Pleurocapsa/Microcystis group. Photosynthetically driven oxygen evolution in strain SG2 was only slightly inhibited (about 10%) by 2,000 ?g of atrazine per ml, whereas in the control strain Synechocystis 6803, oxygen evolution was inhibited 90% by 1,000 ?g of atrazine per ml. No atrazine accretion, mineralization, or metabolites were detected when strain SG2 was grown with [14C]atrazine. Strain SG2 contained three copies of the psbA gene, which encodes the D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction center. Nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that the psbA2 and psbA3 genes encoded predicted proteins with the same amino acid sequence. However, the psbA1 gene product contained five extra amino acids, which were not found in PsbA proteins from five other cyanobacteria. Moreover, the PsbA1 protein from strain SG2 had an additional 13 amino acid changes compared to the PsbA2/PsbA3 proteins and contained 10 amino acid alterations compared to conserved residues found in other cyanobacteria. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis indicated that the psbA1 gene and the psbA2/psbA3 gene(s) were expressed in photosynthetically grown cells in the presence of atrazine. These results suggest that strong selection pressure conferred by the continual input of atrazine has contributed to the evolution of a herbicide-resistant, yet photosynthetically efficient, psbA gene in a cyanobacterium. PMID:11872488

Sajjaphan, Kannika; Shapir, Nir; Judd, Adam K.; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

2002-01-01

191

The effect of colloid formulation on colloid osmotic pressure in horses with naturally occurring gastrointestinal disease  

PubMed Central

Background Naturally occurring gastrointestinal disease is an important cause of acute hypoproteinemia in adult horses and hydroxyethyl starch colloid fluid treatment is a component of supportive care in these cases to improve plasma volume and maintain colloid osmotic pressure (COP). The objectives of the present study were to compare 2 formulations of high molecular weight hydroxyethyl starch and their relative effect on COP, acid-base status, and survival of horses with acute hypoproteinemia secondary to gastrointestinal disease. Methods Twenty adult horses, ? 1 year of age, were prospectively enrolled, with informed client consent, if they developed acute hypoproteinemia, defined as a plasma total protein <5.0 g/dL or albumin <2.2 g/dL during hospitalization while undergoing treatment for gastrointestinal disease. Horses were randomly assigned to receive a rapid infusion of either 6% hydroxyethyl starch in 0.9% saline or 6% hydroxyethyl starch in lactated ringers solution at a dose of 10ml/kg. Venous blood gas analysis, COP, and PCV were evaluated before and after colloid administration. Results For both groups, average COP prior to treatment was 11.0 mmHg (9.7 – 12.2 mmHg) and post colloid treatment was 13.2 mmHg (12.0 -14.7 mmHg) [Normal range 18 – 22 mmHg]. COP was significantly increased with colloid treatment (p<0.001) but this increase was not significantly different between treatment groups. Venous pH did not change significantly with treatment. Twelve horses survived to hospital discharge and survival did not differ significantly between treatment groups. Conclusions Post-treatment COP improved approximately 20% regardless of the formulation used, however, values did not reach the normal range of COP observed in healthy horses. Acid-base parameters were not significantly impacted by either treatment. Further study is needed to determine how these two products compare with regards to other outcome measures. Evaluation of the relative effects of colloid formulation in horses with clinical disease is a future area of interest. PMID:25237987

2014-01-01

192

Naturally Occurring Differences in CENH3 Affect Chromosome Segregation in Zygotic Mitosis of Hybrids  

PubMed Central

The point of attachment of spindle microtubules to metaphase chromosomes is known as the centromere. Plant and animal centromeres are epigenetically specified by a centromere-specific variant of Histone H3, CENH3 (a.k.a. CENP-A). Unlike canonical histones that are invariant, CENH3 proteins are accumulating substitutions at an accelerated rate. This diversification of CENH3 is a conundrum since its role as the key determinant of centromere identity remains a constant across species. Here, we ask whether naturally occurring divergence in CENH3 has functional consequences. We performed functional complementation assays on cenh3-1, a null mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana, using untagged CENH3s from increasingly distant relatives. Contrary to previous results using GFP-tagged CENH3, we find that the essential functions of CENH3 are conserved across a broad evolutionary landscape. CENH3 from a species as distant as the monocot Zea mays can functionally replace A. thaliana CENH3. Plants expressing variant CENH3s that are fertile when selfed show dramatic segregation errors when crossed to a wild-type individual. The progeny of this cross include hybrid diploids, aneuploids with novel genetic rearrangements and haploids that inherit only the genome of the wild-type parent. Importantly, it is always chromosomes from the plant expressing the divergent CENH3 that missegregate. Using chimeras, we show that it is divergence in the fast-evolving N-terminal tail of CENH3 that is causing segregation errors and genome elimination. Furthermore, we analyzed N-terminal tail sequences from plant CENH3s and discovered a modular pattern of sequence conservation. From this we hypothesize that while the essential functions of CENH3 are largely conserved, the N-terminal tail is evolving to adapt to lineage-specific centromeric constraints. Our results demonstrate that this lineage-specific evolution of CENH3 causes inviability and sterility of progeny in crosses, at the same time producing karyotypic variation. Thus, CENH3 evolution can contribute to postzygotic reproductive barriers. PMID:25622028

Maheshwari, Shamoni; Tan, Ek Han; West, Allan; Franklin, F. Chris H.; Comai, Luca

2015-01-01

193

Naturally occurring heavy radioactive elements in the geothermal microcosm of the Los Azufres (Mexico) volcanic complex.  

PubMed

The Los Azufres geothermal complex of central Mexico is characterized by fumaroles and boiling hot-springs. The fumaroles form habitats for extremophilic mosses and ferns. Physico-chemical measurements of two relatively pristine fumarolic microcosms point to their resemblance with the paleo-environment of earth during the Ordovician and Devonian periods. These geothermal habitats were analysed for the distribution of elemental mass fractions in the rhizospheric soil (RS), the native volcanic substrate (VS) and the sediments (S), using the new high-sensitivity technique of polarized x-ray energy dispersive fluorescence spectrometry (PEDXRF) as well as instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) for selected elements. This work presents the results for the naturally occurring heavy radioactive elements (NOHRE) Bi, Th and U but principally the latter two. For the RS, the density was found to be the least and the total organic matter content the most. Bi was found to be negligibly present in all substrate types. The average Th and U mass fractions in the RS were higher than in the VS and about equal to their average mass fractions in the S. The VS mass fraction of Th was higher, and of U lower, than the mass fractions in the earth's crust. In fact for the fumaroles of one site, the average RS mass fractions of these elements were higher than the averaged values for S (without considering the statistical dispersion). The immobilization of the NOHRE in the RS is brought about by the bio-geochemical processes specific to these extremophiles. Its effectiveness is such that despite the small masses of these plants, it compares with, or may sometimes exceed, the immobilization of the NOHRE in the S by the abiotic and aggressive chemical action of the hot-springs. These results indicate that the fumarolic plants are able to transform the volcanic substrate to soil and to affect the NOHRE mass fractions even though these elements are not plant nutrients. Mirrored back to the paleo times when such plant types were ubiquitous, it would mean that the first plants contributed significantly to pedogenesis and the biogeochemical recycling of even the heaviest and radioactive elements. Such plants may potentially be useful for the phytostabilisation of soil moderately contaminated by the NOHRE. Furthermore where applicable, geochronology may require taking into account the influence of the early plants on the NOHRE distributions. PMID:25464039

Abuhani, W A; Dasgupta-Schubert, N; Villaseñor, L M; García Avila, D; Suárez, L; Johnston, C; Borjas, S E; Alexander, S A; Landsberger, S; Suárez, M C

2015-01-01

194

Naturally Occurring Differences in CENH3 Affect Chromosome Segregation in Zygotic Mitosis of Hybrids.  

PubMed

The point of attachment of spindle microtubules to metaphase chromosomes is known as the centromere. Plant and animal centromeres are epigenetically specified by a centromere-specific variant of Histone H3, CENH3 (a.k.a. CENP-A). Unlike canonical histones that are invariant, CENH3 proteins are accumulating substitutions at an accelerated rate. This diversification of CENH3 is a conundrum since its role as the key determinant of centromere identity remains a constant across species. Here, we ask whether naturally occurring divergence in CENH3 has functional consequences. We performed functional complementation assays on cenh3-1, a null mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana, using untagged CENH3s from increasingly distant relatives. Contrary to previous results using GFP-tagged CENH3, we find that the essential functions of CENH3 are conserved across a broad evolutionary landscape. CENH3 from a species as distant as the monocot Zea mays can functionally replace A. thaliana CENH3. Plants expressing variant CENH3s that are fertile when selfed show dramatic segregation errors when crossed to a wild-type individual. The progeny of this cross include hybrid diploids, aneuploids with novel genetic rearrangements and haploids that inherit only the genome of the wild-type parent. Importantly, it is always chromosomes from the plant expressing the divergent CENH3 that missegregate. Using chimeras, we show that it is divergence in the fast-evolving N-terminal tail of CENH3 that is causing segregation errors and genome elimination. Furthermore, we analyzed N-terminal tail sequences from plant CENH3s and discovered a modular pattern of sequence conservation. From this we hypothesize that while the essential functions of CENH3 are largely conserved, the N-terminal tail is evolving to adapt to lineage-specific centromeric constraints. Our results demonstrate that this lineage-specific evolution of CENH3 causes inviability and sterility of progeny in crosses, at the same time producing karyotypic variation. Thus, CENH3 evolution can contribute to postzygotic reproductive barriers. PMID:25622028

Maheshwari, Shamoni; Tan, Ek Han; West, Allan; Franklin, F Chris H; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon W L

2015-02-01

195

Elevated Bacterial Abundance in Laboratory-Grown and Naturally Occurring Frost Flowers Under Late Winter Conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sea ice has been identified as an important microbial habitat, with bacteria and other microbes concentrated in the brine inclusions between ice crystals. Frost flowers, thought to draw brine from underlying sea ice, have not been characterized from a microbial standpoint. To test whether frost flowers serve as an upward vector of bacteria contained within sea ice brines we grew frost flowers in a freezer laboratory (air temperature of -21°C) from saline water spiked with the mesophilic (and thus passive under experimental conditions) bacterium Halomonas pacifica. Salinity of melted samples was measured and bacterial abundance determined by epifluorescent microscopy. Bacterial counts scaled to ice-melt volume averaged 2.82 x 106 ml-1 for frost flowers, compared to 9.47 x 105 ml-1 for underlying ice (3 x higher). Bacterial counts also correlated significantly with salinity (maximum value of 62.5 psu) for frost flowers, brine skim, and ice (df = 17, r = 0.59, p < 0.0001). Segregation coefficients were calculated to describe the efficiency of transport of both cells and salt from the starting solution into frost flowers. From these coefficients an enrichment index was calculated to test for bacterial concentration into frost flowers at a different rate than salt. Analysis with a Student’s T-test (df = 24, t = 0.306, p = .76) indicated that cells and salt were not transported into frost flowers with a significantly different efficiency. To test these findings in the field we then collected frost flowers (and related samples) from new sea ice near Barrow, Alaska in April 2009. Bacterial counts were significantly elevated (again, a 3-fold increase) in natural frost flowers (mean = 2.73 x 105 ml-1) compared to underlying sea ice (mean = 8.46 x 104 cells ml-1). For all field samples collected (frost flowers, underlying brine skim and sea ice, as well as snow), bacterial abundance correlated significantly with salinity (maximum value 124 psu, df = 40, r = 0.60, p < 0.0001). The presence of elevated numbers of bacteria in frost flowers may have implications for the previously observed chemical reactions that take place in them, especially if microbial activity can be shown to occur in this unique low temperature, low water activity microbial habitat.

Bowman, J. S.; Deming, J. W.

2009-12-01

196

Mortality of one-week-old chickens during naturally occurring Marek's disease virus infection  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Marek’s disease (MD) is a serious economic disease of chickens which occurs worldwide. MD can present as one of several forms, with the most commonly occurring forms being the lymphoproliferative diseases. Under experimental conditions, an early mortality syndrome has been recognized following infec...

197

Deep-Sea Research I 51 (2004) 11591168 Global distribution of naturally occurring marine  

E-print Network

and bathyal sea floor, where dissolved oxygen is o0.5 ml lÃ?1 ; over half (59%) occurs in the northern Indian conditions. r 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Dissolved oxygen; Oxygen minimum zone; OMZ and is decomposed in mid- water, consuming dissolved oxygen. When high oxygen demand occurs in combination

Levin, Lisa

198

Investigating Tungsten Concentrations and Isotopic Compositions of Natural Water Samples from the Carson River Basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent studies have shown that W-isotopes may fractionate in nature1; however, the magnitude and cause of the isotopic variations are largely unknown and unconstrained. In this study, the isotopic compositions of the NIST 3163 W standard, W ore minerals, and 15 natural surface waters from Nevada's Carson River Basin were analyzed by MC-ICP-MS using external bracketing with NIST 3163 and the IUPAC 184W/183W for mass bias correction. Chemical separation procedures were developed to purify W from natural matrices and tested to assure fractionation was not introduced during column chemistry. The W isotopic compositions of these samples were measured and compared to the accepted IUPAC composition of natural W. Samples of wolframite (Fe, MnWO4) and hubnerite (MnWO4) have compositions similar to the IUPAC value but vary from the isotopic composition of NIST 3163 - particularly in 182W/183W. The isotopic compositions of the natural waters, except for an extremely evaporated sample from Soda Lake, are similar to the NIST standard. This evaporative lake, formed by a maar, has a unique chemical composition compared to other surface waters with high W (800 ± 20 ng/g) and As (1665 ± 17 ng/g) concentrations; and relatively low Fe (5.00 ± 0.13 ng/g) and Mn (0.52 ± 0.07 ng/g). These results support recent observations of natural W isotopic variation and imply that W-isotope compositions may be useful for environmental applications of stable isotope geochemistry. 1. Irisawa, K. and Hirata, T. (2006) Tungsten isotopic analysis on six geochemical reference materials using multiple collector-ICP-mass spectrometry coupled with a rhenium-external correction technique. Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry 21, 1387-1395.

Wasserman, N. L.; Williams, R. W.; Kayzar, T. M.; Schorzman, K. C.

2012-12-01

199

Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir-kuh Granites  

SciTech Connect

One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact, in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides, existing in Shir-kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides, it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

Mazarei, Mohammad Mehdi; Zarei, Mojtaba [Department of Science, Bushehr Branch, Islamic Azad University, City of Aalishahr, Bushehr Province, Iran P.O.Box: 7519619555 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-12-26

200

Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural carbonates  

E-print Network

Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural method for lithium isotope ratio (7 Li/6 Li) determinations with low total lithium consumption ( lithium from all matrix elements using small volume resin (2 ml/3.4 meq AG 50W-X8) and low volume elution

Weston, Ken

201

Concentration and natural stable isotope profiles of nitrogen species in the Clara A. Fuchsman a,  

E-print Network

: Nitrogen cycle Nitrogen isotopes Anoxic basin Denitrification Anammox Nitrogen fixation Regional indexConcentration and natural stable isotope profiles of nitrogen species in the Black Sea Clara A particulate organic nitrogen (PON) and total organic nitrogen (TON) concentrations and nitrogen stable

Murray, James W.

202

Serological evidence for naturally occurring transmission of Neospora caninum among foxes ( Vulpes vulpes)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study describes the time course of the Neospora caninum-specific antibody response in experimentally infected foxes, in naturally N. caninum-seropositive vixens and their litters. An immunofluorescence test, a tachyzoite surface antigen based ELISA and an immunoblot assay were established for this purpose. The immunoblot patterns of naturally seropositive and experimentally infected foxes revealed a high degree of similarity and resembled

G. Schares; U. Wenzel; T. Müller; F. J. Conraths

2001-01-01

203

Introduction to Chemistry and Applications in Nature of Mass Independent Isotope Effects Special Feature  

PubMed Central

Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented. PMID:24167299

Thiemens, Mark H.

2013-01-01

204

Naturally-Occurring Radionuclides In Drinking Water From Surface And Groundwater Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Radioactivity in water for human consumption is under closer scrutiny than ever before and many countries adopted guideline values based on total alpha and total beta activity measurements. Although most waters from surface circulation meet these guidelines, it is frequently found that groundwater exceed guideline values. Results of water analyses by alpha spectrometry clarified that the main radionuclides present are from the uranium decay series, such as uranium isotopes, radium ({sup 226}Ra), radon ({sup 222}Rn), and also {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po. Occasionally, groundwater displayed {sup 226}Ra concentrations higher than 1 Bq L{sup -1} and {sup 222}Rn concentrations above 1000 Bq L{sup -1}. Nevertheless, lack of conformity of these waters with guidelines adopted, generally, is not due to anthropogenic inputs.

Carvalho, F. P.; Madruga, M. J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Lopes, I.; Ferrador, G.; Sequeira, M. M. [Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) Department of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

2008-08-07

205

Using Natural Stable Calcium Isotopes to Rapidly Assess Changes in Bone Mineral Balance Using a Bed Rest Model to Induce Bone Loss  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Metabolic bone diseases like osteoporosis result from the disruption of normal bone mineral balance (BMB) resulting in bone loss. During spaceflight astronauts lose substantial bone. Bed rest provides an analog to simulate some of the effects of spaceflight; including bone and calcium loss and provides the opportunity to evaluate new methods to monitor BMB in healthy individuals undergoing environmentally induced-bone loss. Previous research showed that natural variations in the Ca isotope ratio occur because bone formation depletes soft tissue of light Ca isotopes while bone resorption releases that isotopically light Ca back into soft tissue (Skulan et al, 2007). Using a bed rest model, we demonstrate that the Ca isotope ratio of urine shifts in a direction consistent with bone loss after just 7 days of bed rest, long before detectable changes in bone mineral density (BMD) occur. The Ca isotope variations tracks changes observed in urinary N-teleopeptide, a bone resorption biomarker. Bone specific alkaline phosphatase, a bone formation biomarker, is unchanged. The established relationship between Ca isotopes and BMB can be used to quantitatively translate the changes in the Ca isotope ratio to changes in BMD using a simple mathematical model. This model predicts that subjects lost 0.25 0.07% ( SD) of their bone mass from day 7 to day 30 of bed rest. Given the rapid signal observed using Ca isotope measurements and the potential to quantitatively assess bone loss; this technique is well suited to study the short-term dynamics of bone metabolism.

Morgan, J. L. L.; Skulan, J. L.; Gordon, G. E.; Smith, Scott M.; Romaniello, S. J.; Anbar, A. D.

2012-01-01

206

Characterization of calcium isotopes in natural and synthetic barite  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The mineral barite (BaSO4) accommodates calcium in its crystal lattice, providing an archive of Ca-isotopes in the highly stable sulfate mineral. Holocene marine (pelagic) barite samples from the major ocean basins are isotopically indistinguishable from each other (??44/40Ca = -2.01 ?? 0.15???) but are different from hydrothermal and cold seep barite samples (??44/40Ca = -4.13 to -2.72???). Laboratory precipitated (synthetic) barite samples are more depleted in the heavy Ca-isotopes than pelagic marine barite and span a range of Ca-isotope compositions, ??44/40Ca = -3.42 to -2.40???. Temperature, saturation state, a Ba2 + / a SO42 -, and aCa2+/aBa2+ each influence the fractionation of Ca-isotopes in synthetic barite; however, the fractionation in marine barite samples is not strongly related to any measured environmental parameter. First-principles lattice dynamical modeling predicts that at equilibrium Ca-substituted barite will have much lower 44Ca/40Ca than calcite, by -9??? at 0 ??C and -8??? at 25 ??C. Based on this model, none of the measured barite samples appear to be in isotopic equilibrium with their parent solutions, although as predicted they do record lower ??44/40Ca values than seawater and calcite. Kinetic fractionation processes therefore most likely control the extent of isotopic fractionation exhibited in barite. Potential fractionation mechanisms include factors influencing Ca2+ substitution for Ba2+ in barite (e.g. ionic strength and trace element concentration of the solution, competing complexation reactions, precipitation or growth rate, temperature, pressure, and saturation state) as well as nucleation and crystal growth rates. These factors should be considered when investigating controls on isotopic fractionation of Ca2+ and other elements in inorganic and biogenic minerals. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

Griffith, E.M.; Schauble, E.A.; Bullen, T.D.; Paytan, A.

2008-01-01

207

Fate and bioaccumulation of soil-associated low-level naturally occurring radioactivity following disposal into a marine ecosystem. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The fate of radium (Ra) and other naturally occurring uranium-series isotopes associated with soils disposed in seawater was examined using the Marine Ecosystem Research Laboratory (MERL) controlled marine ecosystems. Thirty-seven kilograms of a soil containing approximately 400 pCi Ra-226/g from an inactive uranium ore processing plant site in Middlesex, New Jersey, were added to each of two mesocosms over five days in mid-September 1984. Radionuclide activity in these and two control mesocosms was observed for three months after the soil additions. Radioactivity in the soil appeared to be confined to discrete soil particles rather than being distributed equally on the soil particles, suggesting the source of the radioactivity was remnant ore particles.

Hunt, C.D.

1986-10-01

208

APPLICATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ISOTOPES FOR WATERSHED INVESTIGATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental isotopes include naturally-occurring nuclides that can be applied as tracers within watersheds (Sidle, 1998). Recent advances in mass spectroscopy may supplant many traditional and costly hydrometric techniques. It is now possible, for example, to utilize isotopes a...

209

Food safety and risk assessment: naturally occurring potential toxicants and anti-nutritive compounds in plant foods.  

PubMed

The centralisation and globalisation of the world food supply presents opportunities for massive epidemics of food borne illness. Food processing generally decreases exposure to naturally occurring toxicants. A significant number of deaths are caused in both developed and developing countries from the consumption of naturally occurring toxicants and this exceeds the numbers attributable to artificial food contaminants and pollutants. The risk posed by naturally occurring toxicants is greater in developing countries where food choice and facilities for food processing are limited. The main risk in developed countries is from food important from areas where food safety controls are inadequate. Toxins derived from marine algae present a specific threat to health especially as seafood is being traded from areas where poisoning by algal toxins is known to occur. A systematic approach to food safety using HACCP methodology and identity preservation of the food are crucial in the prevention of food related illness. There is also a need for international agreed standards for tolerable levels of naturally occurring toxicants in foodstuffs but these should derived not be set unreasonably low as this would threaten food security in developing countries. The occurrence of a number of fatalities in developing countries among people consuming herbal teas and dietary supplements underscores the need to assess the safety of these products before they are placed on the market. PMID:15806954

Sanders, Thomas A B

2003-01-01

210

Hidden localization motifs: naturally occurring peroxisomal targeting signals in non-peroxisomal proteins  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Can sequence segments coding for subcellular targeting or for posttranslational modifications occur in proteins that are not substrates in either of these processes? Although considerable effort has been invested in achieving low false-positive prediction rates, even accurate sequence-analysis tools for the recognition of these motifs generate a small but noticeable number of protein hits that lack the appropriate biological

Georg Neuberger; Markus Kunze; Frank Eisenhaber; Johannes Berger; Andreas Hartig; Cecile Brocard

2004-01-01

211

RESTORATION OF MUNICIPAL DRINKING WATER SUPPLY WELLS IMPACTED BY NATURALLY OCCURRING ARSENIC  

EPA Science Inventory

Studies have indicated that arsenic concentrations greater than the newly proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter (ug/L) occur in specific parts of numerous aquifers around the United States. One such aquifer...

212

Rapidly Assessing Changes in Bone Mineral Balance Using Natural Stable Calcium Isotopes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We demonstrate that variations in the Ca isotope ratios in urine rapidly and quantitatively reflect changes in bone mineral balance. This variation occurs because bone formation depletes soft tissue of light Ca isotopes, while bone resorption releases that isotopically light Ca back into soft tissue. In a study of 12 individuals confined to bed rest, a condition known to induce bone resorption, we show that Ca isotope ratios shift in a direction consistent with net bone loss after just 7 days, long before detectible changes in bone density occur. Consistent with this interpretation, the Ca isotope variations track changes observed in N-teleopeptide, a bone resorption biomarker, while bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, a bone formation biomarker, is unchanged. Ca isotopes can in principle be used to quantify net changes in bone mass. Ca isotopes indicate an average loss of 0.62 +/- 0.16 % in bone mass over the course of this 30-day study. The Ca isotope technique should accelerate the pace of discovery of new treatments for bone disease and provide novel insights into the dynamics of bone metabolism.

Morgan, J. L. L.; Gordon, G. W.; Romaniello, S. J.; Skulan, J. L.; Smith, S. M.; Anbar, A. D.

2011-01-01

213

Evaluation of the age of landfill gas methane in landfill gas-natural gas mixtures using co-occurring constituents.  

PubMed

At a municipal solid waste landfill in southern California (USA) overlying a natural gas reservoir, methane was detected at concentrations of up to 40% (by volume) in perimeter soil gas probes. Stable isotope and (14)C values of methane together with gas composition (major components and volatile organic compounds) data were evaluated to assess the relative contributions of landfill gas and natural gas to the measured methane concentrations. The data was further used to estimate the residence time of the landfill gas in the probes. Results showed that up to 37% of the measured methane was derived from landfill gas. In addition, the landfill gas in the probe samples has undergone extensive alteration due to dissolution of carbon dioxide in pore water. Data further indicates that the measured methane was released from the waste approximately 1.2 to 9.4 years ago, rather than representing evidence of an ongoing release. PMID:23660592

Kerfoot, Henry B; Hagedorn, Benjamin; Verwiel, Mark

2013-06-01

214

The nitrogen cycle in cryoconites: naturally occurring nitrification-denitrification granules on a glacier.  

PubMed

Cryoconites are microbial aggregates commonly found on glacier surfaces where they tend to take spherical, granular forms. While it has been postulated that the microbes in cryoconite granules play an important role in glacier ecosystems, information on their community structure is still limited, and their functions remain unclear. Here, we present evidence for the occurrence of nitrogen cycling in cryoconite granules on a glacier in Central Asia. We detected marker genes for nitrogen fixation, nitrification and denitrification in cryoconite granules by digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR), while digital reverse transcription PCR analysis revealed that only marker genes for nitrification and denitrification were abundantly transcribed. Analysis of isotope ratios also indicated the occurrence of nitrification; nitrate in the meltwater on the glacier surface was of biological origin, while nitrate in the snow was of atmospheric origin. The predominant nitrifiers on this glacier belonged to the order Nitrosomonadales, as suggested by amoA sequences and 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing analysis. Our results suggest that the intense carbon and nitrogen cycles by nitrifiers, denitrifiers and cyanobacteria support abundant and active microbes on the Asian glacier. PMID:24946985

Segawa, Takahiro; Ishii, Satoshi; Ohte, Nobuhito; Akiyoshi, Ayumi; Yamada, Akinori; Maruyama, Fumito; Li, Zhongqin; Hongoh, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Nozomu

2014-10-01

215

NATURAL OCCURANCE OF XYLELLA FASTIDIOSA IN A COMMERCIAL NURSERY IN MARYLAND  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Since Xylella fastidiosa is an important plant pathogen in the landscape nursery trade, a survey was conducted in 2003 and 2004 in a commercial wholesale and production nursery in Maryland to determine the natural occurrence of X. fastidiosa in nursery plants and surrounding vegetation using enzyme-...

216

OXA-134, a naturally occurring carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D beta-lactamase from Acinetobacter lwoffii.  

PubMed

Acinetobacter lwoffii, a species whose natural habitat is the human skin, intrinsically possesses a chromosomal gene encoding a carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D ?-lactamase, OXA-134. This species may therefore constitute a reservoir for carbapenemase genes that may spread among other Acinetobacter species. PMID:20837764

Figueiredo, Samy; Poirel, Laurent; Seifert, Harald; Mugnier, Pauline; Benhamou, Dan; Nordmann, Patrice

2010-12-01

217

The element arsenic occurs naturally in dif-ferent forms, which may be classified  

E-print Network

or alkalinity of the water (pH) · amount of iron in the water · amount of metal sulfide and sulfide in the water by human activities. Natural concen- trations of arsenic in soil typically range from 0.1 to 40 parts per · Decreased production of red and white blood cells · Abnormal heart rhythms · Damage to blood vessels

218

Naturally occurring tetracycline-like fluorescence in sections of femur from jackals in Zimbabwe  

Microsoft Academic Search

In assessing the potential of the tetracycline compounds as biomarkers in oral rabies vaccination campaigns in jackals in Zimbabwe, the natural prevalence of fluorescent compounds in bone tissue from jackals was investigated. Femur samples were taken from unbaited jackals received for routine rabies diagnosis, and thin undecalcified sections were cut and viewed under an ultraviolet microscope. Of 131 femur samples

J Bingham; R Matema; A Kappeler; FW Hill

1994-01-01

219

Blimp1?exon7: A naturally occurring Blimp1 deletion mutant with auto-regulatory potential  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blimp-1 is a master regulator of terminal B cell differentiation and plays a pivotal role in various developmental processes. In addition to full length Blimp-1, a Blimp-1 mRNA lacking exon 7 (Blimp-1?7) has been described to occur in murine B cells. The activity and function of the mutant mRNA-encoded protein (Blimp-1?7), lacking three crucial zinc fingers necessary for DNA interaction,

Doris Schmidt; Arnab Nayak; Julia E. Schumann; Anneliese Schimpl; Ingolf Berberich; Friederike Berberich-Siebelt

2008-01-01

220

Habitat Selection and Movement of Naturally Occurring Pallid Sturgeon in the Mississippi River  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus is a U.S. federally endangered species that occurs in the 320-km middle Mississippi River (MMR). Historic in-channel island habitat has vanished, and the extent of the population's range within the MMR is unknown. We surgically implanted ultrasonic transmitters in 88 adult pallid sturgeon (>600 mm fork length; mean = 791 mm) during 2002–2005 and used

Brian Koch; Ronald C. Brooks; Amanda Oliver; David Herzog; James E. Garvey; Robert Hrabik; Robert Colombo; Quinton Phelps; Timothy Spier

2012-01-01

221

A convenient and biogenetic type synthesis of few naturally occurring chromeno dihydrochalcones and their in vitro antileishmanial activity.  

PubMed

2',2'-Dimethyl chromeno dihydrochalcones are very rare in nature as plant secondary metabolites. Recently we have reported three such compounds from the plant Crotalaria ramosissima. Chromeno dihydrochalcones contain a 2',2'-dimethyl benzopyran system, which are frequently encountered in many natural products and exhibit a variety of biological activities. We here report the strategy to conveniently synthesize naturally occurring chromeno dihydrochalcones by biogenetic type pyridine or Amberlyst-15 catalyzed chromenylation of dihydrochalcones and in vitro antileishmanial activity of chromeno dihydrochalcones and their intermediates. PMID:15225696

Narender, Tadigoppula; Shweta; Gupta, Suman

2004-08-01

222

Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo.  

PubMed

The energy production in Kosovo depends primarily on lignite-fired power plants. During coal combustion, huge amounts of fly ash and bottom ash are generated, which may result in enriched natural radionuclides; therefore, these radionuclides need to be investigated to identify the possible processes that may lead to the radiological exposure of workers and the local population. Lignite samples and NORMs of fly ash and bottom ash generated in lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo are analyzed using a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the activity concentration of natural radionuclides. The average activity concentrations of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th in lignite are found to be 36 ± 8 Bq kg(-1), 9 ± 1 Bq kg(-1) and 9 ± 3 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Indications on the occurrence and geochemical behavior of uranium in the lignite matrix are suggested. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in fly ash and bottom ash samples are found to be concentrated from 3 to 5 times that of the feeding lignite. The external gamma-ray absorbed dose rate and the activity concentration index are calculated to assess the radiological hazard arising from ash disposal and recycling in the cement industry. PMID:25233215

Hasani, F; Shala, F; Xhixha, G; Xhixha, M K; Hodolli, G; Kadiri, S; Bylyku, E; Cfarku, F

2014-12-01

223

Solubilization of manganese dioxide-bound copper by naturally occurring organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

Sorption of metals onto manganese oxides is an important mechanism for retarding migration in soils and sediments. Subsequent influx of natural organic compounds can bring about metal release, thereby increasing metal mobility and bioavailability. This paper examines the release of Cu from a synthetic MnO[sub 2] phase. When natural organic compounds possessing only reductant characteristics (e.g., hydroquinone and pyruvate) are introduced, Cu release is linked to the progress of the MnO[sub 2] reductive dissolution reaction: Mn[sup II] generated in the reduction step competes effectively with Cu for a diminishing number of sorption sites. Organic compounds capable of forming stable Cu complexes in solution (e.g., oxalate and citrate) cause additional Cu release that can surpass release by reduction processes alone. Additional experiments are described in which the reductant and complexant properties of natural organic matter samples are evaluated as they pertain to the release of MnO[sub 2]-bound Cu. 61 refs., 8 figs.

Godtfredsen, K.L.; Stone, A.T. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States))

1994-08-01

224

Adjuvant Activity of Naturally Occurring Monophosphoryl Lipopolysaccharide Preparations from Mucosa-Associated Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Natural heterogeneity in the structure of the lipid A portion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produces differential effects on the innate immune response. Gram-negative bacterial species produce LPS structures that differ from the classic endotoxic LPS structures. These differences include hypoacylation and hypophosphorylation of the diglucosamine backbone, both differences known to decrease LPS toxicity. The effect of decreased toxicity on the adjuvant properties of many of these LPS structures has not been fully explored. Here we demonstrate that two naturally produced forms of monophosphorylated LPS, from the mucosa-associated bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Prevotella intermedia, function as immunological adjuvants for antigen-specific immune responses. Each form of mucosal LPS increased vaccination-initiated antigen-specific antibody titers in both quantity and quality when given simultaneously with vaccine antigen preparations. Interestingly, adjuvant effects on initial T cell clonal expansion were selective for CD4 T cells. No significant increase in CD8 T cell expansion was detected. MyD88/Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TRIF/TLR4 signaling pathways showed equally decreased signaling with the LPS forms studied here as with endotoxic LPS or detoxified monophosphorylated lipid A (MPLA). Natural monophosphorylated LPS from mucosa-associated bacteria functions as a weak but effective adjuvant for specific immune responses, with preferential effects on antibody and CD4 T cell responses over CD8 T cell responses. PMID:23798540

Chilton, Paula M.; Hadel, Diana M.; To, Thao T.

2013-01-01

225

Functional Characterization of Naturally Occurring Variants of Human Hepatitis B Virus Containing the Core Internal Deletion Mutation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Naturally occurring variants of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) containing the core internal deletion (CID) mutation have been found frequently in HBV carriers worldwide. Despite numerous sequence analysis reports of CID variants in patients, in the past decade, CID variants have not been characterized functionally, and thus their biological significance to HBV infection remains unclear. We report here two different

THOMAS TA-TUNG YUAN; MIN-HUI LIN; SUI MIN QIU; CHIAHO SHIH

1998-01-01

226

A novel Arometic compound acts synergistically with a naturally occurring monoterpene to elicit strong behavioral responses in Asian citrus psyllid  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Inscent, Inc. has developed methodologies for rapidly screening potential ligands of chemosensory proteins (CSPs) isolated from the antennae of target insects. These novel ligands, referred to as Arometics, mimic naturally-occurring odorants and may function as super-stimuli because of their strong ...

227

Elevated Appraisals of the Negative Impact of Naturally Occurring Life Events: A Risk Factor for Depressive and Anxiety Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The tendency to appraise naturally occurring life events (LEs) as having high negative impact may be a predisposing factor for the development of depression and anxiety disorders. In the current study, appraisals of the negative impact of recent LEs were examined in relationship to depressive and anxiety disorders in a sample of 653 adolescents…

Espejo, Emmanuel Peter; Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A.

2012-01-01

228

Interactions between natural-occurring landscape conditions and land use influencing the abundance of riverine smallmouth bass, micropterus dolomieu  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study examined how interactions between natural landscape features and land use influenced the abundance of smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu, in Missouri, USA, streams. Stream segments were placed into one of four groups based on natural-occurring watershed characteristics (soil texture and soil permeability) predicted to relate to smallmouth bass abundance. Within each group, stream segments were assigned forest (n = 3), pasture (n = 3), or urban (n = 3) designations based on the percentages of land use within each watershed. Analyses of variance indicated smallmouth bass densities differed between land use and natural conditions. Decision tree models indicated abundance was highest in forested stream segments and lowest in urban stream segments, regardless of group designation. Land use explained the most variation in decision tree models, but in-channel features of temperature, flow, and sediment also contributed significantly. These results are unique and indicate the importance of natural-occurring watershed conditions in defining the potential of populations and how finer-scale filters interact with land use to further alter population potential. Smallmouth bass has differing vulnerabilities to land-use attributes, and the better the natural watershed conditions are for population success, the more resilient these populations will be when land conversion occurs.

Brewer, S.K.; Rabeni, C.F.

2011-01-01

229

Naturally occurring and melengestrol acetate-associated reproductive tract lesions in zoo canids.  

PubMed

As husbandry practices have improved, safe and effective contraception for captive wildlife management has become a necessity. Melengestrol acetate (MGA), a synthetic progestin, is highly effective and has been used in many zoo species. Long-term use of MGA has been associated with uterine lesions in zoo felids, but effects in zoo canids have not been evaluated. This retrospective study documented spontaneously occurring lesions and investigated the impact of MGA on the reproductive health of zoo canids. Reproductive tracts from adult females were submitted by US zoos to the Association of Zoos & Aquariums' Wildlife Contraception Center Health Surveillance Program. Reproductive tracts were sampled and processed for histopathologic examination following standard protocols. Microscopic evaluations were performed without prior knowledge of MGA treatment status. Prevalence of uterine lesions was evaluated and compared between MGA-treated animals (n = 20) and control (untreated) animals (n = 61). Common lesions within the study population as a whole included endometrial hyperplasia (predominantly cystic) (53%), hydrometra (33%), and adenomyosis (25%). Treatment with MGA was a risk factor for endometrial hyperplasia, hydrometra, fibrosis, and adenomyosis. Uterine mineralization occurred exclusively in MGA-treated animals. Results indicate that MGA contraception can lead to lesions that may permanently impair the fertility of females. Therefore, if long-term contraception of zoo canids is necessary, the use of alternate methods of reproductive control such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs or GnRH vaccines that reduce gonadal hormone exposure should be pursued. PMID:19605907

Moresco, A; Munson, L; Gardner, I A

2009-11-01

230

Genetic background and GxE interactions modulate the penetrance of a naturally occurring wing mutation in Drosophila melanogaster.  

PubMed

Many genes involved in producing complex traits are incompletely penetrant. One such example is vesiculated, an X-linked gene in Drosophila melanogaster that results in wing defects. To examine the genetic architecture of a complex trait (wings containing vesicles), we placed a naturally occurring variant into multiple autosomal backgrounds and quantified penetrance and expressivity at a range of developmental temperatures. We found significant epistasis, genotype-by-environment interactions, and maternal effects. Sex and temperature effects were modulated by genetic background. The severity of wing phenotypes also varied across different genetic backgrounds, and expressivity was positively correlated with penetrance. We also found evidence of naturally segregating suppressors of vesiculated. These suppressors were present on both the second and third chromosomes, and complex interactions were observed. Taken together, these findings indicate that multiple genetic and environmental factors modulate the phenotypic effects of a naturally occurring vesiculated allele. PMID:24002866

Lachance, Joseph; Jung, Lawrence; True, John R

2013-11-01

231

Genetic Background and GxE Interactions Modulate the Penetrance of a Naturally Occurring Wing Mutation in Drosophila melanogaster  

PubMed Central

Many genes involved in producing complex traits are incompletely penetrant. One such example is vesiculated, an X-linked gene in Drosophila melanogaster that results in wing defects. To examine the genetic architecture of a complex trait (wings containing vesicles), we placed a naturally occurring variant into multiple autosomal backgrounds and quantified penetrance and expressivity at a range of developmental temperatures. We found significant epistasis, genotype-by-environment interactions, and maternal effects. Sex and temperature effects were modulated by genetic background. The severity of wing phenotypes also varied across different genetic backgrounds, and expressivity was positively correlated with penetrance. We also found evidence of naturally segregating suppressors of vesiculated. These suppressors were present on both the second and third chromosomes, and complex interactions were observed. Taken together, these findings indicate that multiple genetic and environmental factors modulate the phenotypic effects of a naturally occurring vesiculated allele. PMID:24002866

Lachance, Joseph; Jung, Lawrence; True, John R.

2013-01-01

232

When a natural disaster occurs: lessons learned in meeting students' needs.  

PubMed

Across the nation, weather-related natural disasters-tropical storms, floods, tornadoes, and earthquakes-struck even areas where weather concerns are not paramount on the minds of most people. These natural disasters heightened awareness that all geographic areas are susceptible to aberrant weather conditions. The purpose of this article was to relate the lessons learned by one academic health center in meeting students' emergency preparedness and disaster recovery needs following a major hurricane in fall 2008. To gauge students' storm-related needs, a Hurricane Needs Survey (HNS) was conducted in spring 2009, 7 months after the hurricane. Students responded to 26 structured response items and 3 open-ended questions. Five hundred fifteen surveys were completed, constituting a response rate of 37.2%. Data were analyzed by creating frequencies to profile students' hurricane experiences. Results indicated that all students left the island under mandatory evacuation orders; most stayed with their families, and most experienced moderate material losses. For some students, the evacuation process and life after the storm contributed to ongoing problems, worries, and academic performance issues. Qualitative content analysis was used to derive themes from the students' narrative responses to the HNS open-ended questions about their perceptions of the extent to which the University of Texas Medical Branch met their needs. When students' hurricane response comments were analyzed, three major themes emerged: being prepared, needing to be connected, and returning to normalcy. The major lessons learned are that the emergency preparation of students requires greater specificity and that discussion about poststorm recovery expectations is essential. Following a natural disaster, students experience more distress than may be readily apparent. PMID:22142912

Watson, Pamela G; Loffredo, Vincent J; McKee, John C

2011-01-01

233

ANALYTICAL CAPABILITY - ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY LABORATORY (WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT BRANCH, WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION, NRMRL)  

EPA Science Inventory

The mission of NRMRL's Water Supply and Water Resources Division's Isotope Hydrology Laboratory is to resolve environmental hydrology problems through research and application of naturally occurring isotopes. Analytical capabilities at IHL include light stable isotope radio mass...

234

The source of naturally occurring arsenic in a coastal sand aquifer of eastern Australia.  

PubMed

The discovery of dissolved arsenic in a coastal aquifer used extensively for human consumption has led to widespread concern for its potential occurrence in other sandy coastal environments in eastern Australia. The development of an aquifer specific geomorphic model (herein) suggests that arsenic is regionally derived from erosion of arsenic-rich stibnite (Sb(2)S(3)) mineralisation present in the hinterland. Fluvial processes have transported the eroded material over time to deposit an aquifer lithology elevated in arsenic. Minor arsenic contribution to groundwater is derived from mineralised bedrock below the unconsolidated aquifer. An association with arsenic and pyrite has been observed in the aquifer in small discrete arsenian pyrite clusters rather than actual acid sulfate soil horizons. This association is likely to influence arsenic distribution in the aquifer, but is not the dominant control on arsenic occurrence. Arsenic association with marine clays is considered a function of their increased adsorptive capacity for arsenic and not solely on the influence of sea level inundation of the aquifer sediments during the Quaternary Period. These findings have implications for, but are not limited to, coastal aquifers. Rather, any aquifer containing sediments derived from mineralised provenances may be at risk of natural arsenic contamination. Groundwater resource surveys should thus incorporate a review of the aquifer source provenance when assessing the likely risk of natural arsenic occurrence in an aquifer. PMID:17184824

O'Shea, Bethany; Jankowski, Jerzy; Sammut, Jesmond

2007-07-01

235

Naturally occurring bacteraemia in American lobsters, Homarus americanus Milne-Edwards, in Long Island Sound.  

PubMed

The health status of the American lobster, Homarus americanus Milne-Edwards, in Long Island Sound (LIS) has been in decline, with seasonal mortality events occurring since 1998. In order to assess the potential effects of environmental conditions on lobster health via haemolymph analysis, lobsters collected from various sites in LIS were examined and sampled while concurrent environmental data (water temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen) were recorded. The pH of the haemolymph of each lobster was tested, followed by a collection of haemolymph for serum biochemistry analysis and bacterial culture. This report focuses on the results of the bacterial sampling. The majority of bacteria cultured were opportunistic pathogens commonly found in the environment, including some that are associated with sewage and pollution. The prevalence of bacteraemia was correlated with the site of collection, the month in which the lobsters were sampled, and water temperature. PMID:18086031

Bartlett, S L; Wooster, G A; Sokolowski, M S; Dove, A D M; Bowser, P R

2008-01-01

236

Naturally occurring mutations to HCV protease inhibitors in treatment-naïve patients  

PubMed Central

Background Protease inhibitors (PIs) to treat hepatitis C (HCV) virus infection have been approved and others are under development. Results The aims of this study were to illustrate natural polymorphisms in the HCV protease and measure the frequency of PI resistance mutations in different HCV genotypes from PI-naïve patients. Direct sequencing of HCV NS3/4A protease was performed in 156 HCV patients naïve to PIs who were infected with genotype 1a (n?=?31), 1b (n?=?39), 2 (n?=?30), 3 (n?=?33) and 4 (n?=?23). Amino acid (aa) substitutions associated with HCV PI resistance were found in 17/156 (10.8%) sequences. Mutations V36L, T54S, V55A/I, and Q80K/L were observed in 29% of patients with genotype 1a, and V55F, Q80L/N and M175L in 10% of patients with genotype 1b. The mutation V158M was found in 3% of patients with genotype 2, D168Q was present in 100% of patients with genotype 3 and D168E was observed in 13% of patients with genotype 4. In addition, multiple aa polymorphisms not associated with PI resistance were detected in patients with genotypes 1a, 1b and 4. Conclusions Although major PI resistance mutations were not detected, other resistance mutations conferring low level resistance to PIs together with a number of natural polymorphisms were observed in proteases of PI naïve HCV patients. A more extensive analysis is needed to better evaluate the impact of baseline resistance and compensatory mutations in the efficacy of HCV PI treatment. PMID:23095680

2012-01-01

237

Diagnostic features in 10 naturally occurring cases of acute fatal canine leptospirosis.  

PubMed

The current report describes the diagnostic features in 10 cases of acute fatal canine leptospirosis with minimal renal and hepatic changes that may present a diagnostic challenge for the pathologist. Most affected dogs were less than 6 months of age and had a biochemical profile consistent with hepatorenal dysfunction. Clinical signs consisted of vomiting, depression, icterus, dehydration, diarrhea, and anorexia. All dogs died or were humanely euthanized within 3-7 days after the onset of clinical disease. Necropsy findings included pulmonary edema with hemorrhages, icterus, renal and hepatic pallor and swelling, and gastric edema with hemorrhage. Despite severe azotemia, histological changes in the kidneys were subtle in all dogs, and included mild renal tubular simplification, with single-cell necrosis and attenuation, along with minimal interstitial lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, edema, and hemorrhage. Hepatic lesions included scattered hepatocellular single-cell necrosis and hepatocellular dissociation. Prominent extrarenal lesions typically associated with uremia including vascular fibrinoid necrosis in multiple organs, pulmonary mineralization with occasional fibrinosuppurative exudation, and gastric mineralization were also present. Postmortem diagnostic confirmation was based on the detection of leptospiral antigen on fresh renal samples by fluorescent antibody test and on the demonstration of intact spirochetes in sections of kidneys using immunohistochemical staining. Acute fatal canine leptospirosis occurred as a fulminant hepatorenal disease affecting mainly young dogs, and the diagnosis was dependent on the recognition of the subtle renal changes with confirmation via fluorescent antibody testing or immunohistochemical staining. PMID:25274745

Rissi, Daniel R; Brown, Cathy A

2014-11-01

238

Sporadic naturally occurring melanoma in dogs as a preclinical model for human melanoma.  

PubMed

Melanoma represents a significant malignancy in humans and dogs. Different from genetically engineered models, sporadic canine melanocytic neoplasms share several characteristics with human disease that could make dogs a more relevant preclinical model. Canine melanomas rarely arise in sun-exposed sites. Most occur in the oral cavity, with a subset having intra-epithelial malignant melanocytes mimicking the in situ component of human mucosal melanoma. The spectrum of canine melanocytic neoplasia includes benign lesions with some analogy to nevi, as well as invasive primary melanoma, and widespread metastasis. Growing evidence of distinct subtypes in humans, differing in somatic and predisposing germ-line genetic alterations, cell of origin, epidemiology, relationship to ultraviolet radiation and progression from benign to malignant tumors, may also exist in dogs. Canine and human mucosal melanomas appear to harbor BRAF, NRAS, and c-kit mutations uncommonly, compared with human cutaneous melanomas, although both species share AKT and MAPK signaling activation. We conclude that there is significant overlap in the clinical and histopathological features of canine and human mucosal melanomas. This represents opportunity to explore canine oral cavity melanoma as a preclinical model. PMID:24128326

Simpson, R Mark; Bastian, Boris C; Michael, Helen T; Webster, Joshua D; Prasad, Manju L; Conway, Catherine M; Prieto, Victor M; Gary, Joy M; Goldschmidt, Michael H; Esplin, D Glen; Smedley, Rebecca C; Piris, Adriano; Meuten, Donald J; Kiupel, Matti; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Ward, Jerrold M; Dwyer, Jennifer E; Davis, Barbara J; Anver, Miriam R; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Hoover, Shelley B; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Hewitt, Stephen M

2014-01-01

239

Phylogeny and Virulence of Naturally Occurring Type III Secretion System-Deficient Pectobacterium Strains?  

PubMed Central

Pectobacterium species are enterobacterial plant-pathogenic bacteria that cause soft rot disease in diverse plant species. Previous epidemiological studies of Pectobacterium species have suffered from an inability to identify most isolates to the species or subspecies level. We used three previously described DNA-based methods, 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, to examine isolates from diseased stems and tubers and found that MLSA provided the most reliable classification of isolates. We found that strains belonging to at least two Pectobacterium clades were present in each field examined, although representatives of only three of five Pectobacterium clades were isolated. Hypersensitive response and DNA hybridization assays revealed that strains of both Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pectobacterium wasabiae lack a type III secretion system (T3SS). Two of the T3SS-deficient strains assayed lack genes adjacent to the T3SS gene cluster, suggesting that multiple deletions occurred in Pectobacterium strains in this locus, and all strains appear to have only six rRNA operons instead of the seven operons typically found in Pectobacterium strains. The virulence of most of the T3SS-deficient strains was similar to that of T3SS-encoding strains in stems and tubers. PMID:19411432

Kim, Hye-Sook; Ma, Bing; Perna, Nicole T.; Charkowski, Amy O.

2009-01-01

240

Natural gas constituent and carbon isotopic composition in petroliferous basins, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are abundant gas resources in petroliferous basins of China. Large to midsize gas fields are found in Eastern, central and Western of China. However, origin, constituents and isotopic composition of natural gas in different gas fields are varied distinctly, and some present strong chemical secondary alteration and show variation both in age and space. Based on the systematic analysis of constituents and carbon isotope of a large number of gas samples, combined with the geological characteristics, this paper classifies the origins of the gases, explores the gas isotope characteristics and evolutionary regulation with the variation time and space, and further discusses the distinctive geochemistry of the gases in China. These gases are dominated by dry gas, its methane carbon isotope values range from -10‰ to -70‰, ethane from -16‰ to -52‰, propane from -13‰ to -43‰, and butane from -18‰ to -34‰. The carbon isotopes of most gases show the characteristics of humic-derived gas and crude oil cracked gas. In addition, large primary biogenic gas fields have been discovered in the Qaidam basin; inorganic-derived alkane gases have been discovered in deep of the Songliao Basin. Half of these gas fields are characterized by the alkane carbon isotope reversal in different degrees. Research indicates there are several reasons can result in carbon isotope reversal. Firstly, gas charge of different genetic types or different source in one gas reservoir may cause carbon isotope reversal. Besides, high-over mature evolution of gas can also lead to the carbon isotopic reversal of alkanes. Thirdly, secondary alteration of hydrocarbons may also result in abnormal distribution of carbon isotope, isotope transforms to unusual light and heavy.

Zhu, Guangyou; Wang, Zhengjun; Dai, Jinxing; Su, Jing

2014-02-01

241

Sulphoraphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting heat shock proteins  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HSPs (27, 70 and 90) and HSF1 are overexpressed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate inhibited HSPs and HSF1 expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of HSPs and HSF1 lead to regulation of apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins activate of caspases particularly caspase 3 and 9 leading to induction of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins induce caspases leading to induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in protein folding, aggregation, transport and/or stabilization by acting as a molecular chaperone, leading to inhibition of apoptosis by both caspase dependent and/or independent pathways. HSPs are overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers and are implicated in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. HSPs particularly 27, 70, 90 and the transcription factor heat shock factor1 (HSF1) play key roles in the etiology of breast cancer and can be considered as potential therapeutic target. The present study was designed to investigate the role of sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate on HSPs (27, 70, 90) and HSF1 in two different breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells expressing wild type and mutated p53 respectively, vis-a-vis in normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-12F. It was furthermore investigated whether modulation of HSPs and HSF1 could induce apoptosis in these cells by altering the expressions of p53, p21 and some apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, Bax, Bid, Bad, Apaf-1 and AIF. Sulphoraphane was found to down-regulate the expressions of HSP70, 90 and HSF1, though the effect on HSP27 was not pronounced. Consequences of HSP inhibition was upregulation of p21 irrespective of p53 status. Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, AIF were upregulated followed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and this effect was prominent in MCF-7 than in MDA-MB-231. However, very little change in the expression of Bid was observed. Alteration in Bcl-2 Bax ratio resulted in the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and activation of caspases 3 and 9 which are in agreement with apoptotic index values. Sulphoraphane therefore can be regarded as a potent inducer of apoptosis due to HSP modulation in breast cancer cells.

Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Sutapa [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)] [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India); Biswas, Jaydip [Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)] [Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India); Roy, Madhumita, E-mail: mitacnci@yahoo.co.in [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)] [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)

2012-10-12

242

Stimulation effect of wide type CFTR chloride channel by the naturally occurring flavonoid tangeretin.  

PubMed

Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-activated chloride channel expressed in the apical membrane of serous epithelial cells. Both deficiency and overactivation of CFTR may cause fluid and salt secretion related diseases. In the present study, we identified tangeretin from Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae Viride as a CFTR activator using high-throughput screening based on FRT cell-based fluorescence assay. The activation effect of tangeretin on CFTR chloride channel and the possible underlying mechanisms were investigated. Fluorescence quenching tests showed that tangeretin dose- and time-dependently activated CFTR chloride channel, the activity had rapid and reversible characteristics and the activation effect could be completely reversed by the CFTR specific blocker CFTRinh-172. Primary mechanism studies indicated that the activation effect of tangeretin on CFTR chloride channel was FSK dependent as well as had additional effect with FSK and IBMX suggesting that tangeretin activates CFTR by direct interacting with the protein. Ex-vivo tests revealed that tangeretin could accelerate the speed of the submucosal gland fluid secretion. Short-circuit current measurement demonstrated that tangeretin activated rat colonic mucosa chloride current. Thus, CFTR Cl(-) channel is a molecular target of natural compound tangeretin. Tangeretin may have potential use for the treatment of CFTR-related diseases like cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis and habitual constipation. PMID:25451794

Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Wang, Xue; Sui, Yujie; Zhang, Yaofang; Yang, Shuang; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

2014-12-01

243

Cancer chemopreventive and antioxidant activities of pterostilbene, a naturally occurring analogue of resveratrol.  

PubMed

Pterostilbene, a natural methoxylated analogue of resveratrol, was evaluated for antioxidative potential. The peroxyl-radical scavenging activity of pterostilbene was the same as that of resveratrol, having total reactive antioxidant potentials of 237 +/- 58 and 253 +/- 53 microM, respectively. Both compounds were found to be more effective than Trolox as free radical scavengers. Using a plant system, pterostilbene also was shown to be as effective as resveratrol in inhibiting electrolyte leakage caused by herbicide-induced oxidative damage, and both compounds had the same activity as alpha-tocopherol. Pterostilbene showed moderate inhibition (IC50 = 19.8 microM) of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, and was weakly active (IC50 = 83.9 microM) against COX-2, whereas resveratrol strongly inhibited both isoforms of the enzyme with IC50 values of approximately 1 microM. Using a mouse mammary organ culture model, carcinogen-induced preneoplastic lesions were, similarly to resveratrol, significantly inhibited by pterostilbene (ED50 = 4.8 microM), suggesting antioxidant activity plays an important role in this process. PMID:12033810

Rimando, Agnes M; Cuendet, Muriel; Desmarchelier, Cristian; Mehta, Rajendra G; Pezzuto, John M; Duke, Stephen O

2002-06-01

244

Synthesis and insecticidal activity of novel hydrazone compounds derived from a naturally occurring lignan podophyllotoxin against Mythimna separata (Walker).  

PubMed

In continuation of our program aimed at the discovery and development of natural-product-based insecticidal agents, a series of novel hydrazone derivatives of podophyllotoxin, which is a naturally occurring aryltetralin lignan and isolated as the main secondary metabolite from the roots and rhizomes of Podophyllum species, were synthesized and evaluated as insecticidal agents against the pre-third-instar larvae of oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Walker) in vivo at 1mg/mL. Especially compounds 8i, 8j, 8t, and 8u showed the more potent insecticidal activity with the final mortality rates greater than 60%. PMID:24810569

Wang, Yi; Yu, Xiang; Zhi, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Xiao; Yang, Chun; Xu, Hui

2014-06-15

245

Determination of naturally-occurring actinides and their progeny in fresh water using ICP-MS and batch separation  

SciTech Connect

The determination of naturally-occurring actinides (including progeny such as {sup 230}Th) in fresh water is of significance in limnology, hydrology, and environmental monitoring. In many instances, these determinations require multiple analyses and a combination of radiometric and elemental measurement techniques (e.g., alpha spectrometry and thermal ionization mass spectrometry). In this work, we will describe the use of a single technique, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), for these determinations. We will also describe the batch separation chemistry used to facilitate these determinations in ground and surface water, where natural analyte concentrations run between 1 {mu}g/L and 1 {mu}g/L.

Crain, J.S.; Alvarado, J.A.; Kiely, J.T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

1995-12-01

246

Overexpression of programmed death ligands in naturally occurring postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome.  

PubMed

Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) is regarded as an immunosuppressive disease in pigs caused by porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2). Immune inhibitory receptors, particularly programmed death 1/programmed death-ligands (PD-1/PD-Ls) are presumably involved in the immunopathogenesis of PMWS. The aim of this investigation was to examine the relationship of immune inhibitory receptors and immunocompromised by PMWS. Nine 45-day-old conventional pigs were selected from a farm where pigs exhibited typical signs of PMWS (wasting and respiratory disorders) and tested positive for PCV2 infection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Six pigs were selected as controls due to their notably healthy state and absence of PCV2 infection. Heparinized blood samples were taken from each pig for pathogen detection and isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), from which mRNA expression of immunomodulatory molecule (PD-1, PD-L1, PD-L2, PTEN, CTLA-4, LAG-3, and Foxp3) and cytokines (IL-10, IL-2, and IFN-?) was determined. Proliferation of PBMCs was also assessed by flow cytometry utilizing cellular labeling dilutions for detection. The mRNA levels of PD-L1 (p<0.01), PD-L2 (p<0.05), and PTEN (p<0.01) were remarkably increased in the PBMCs of diseased pigs compared to healthy pigs, whereas no change was observed for PD-1, CTLA-4, LAG-3, and Foxp3 expression. Cytokine IL-10 mRNA levels were significantly elevated (p<0.01), while IL-2 and IFN-? mRNA levels tended to be only slightly increased in the PBMCs of affected pigs compared to healthy controls. The proliferation of PBMCs was also decreased in diseased pigs. These data suggest that overexpression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 mRNA is one mechanism by which immunosupression of PMWS pigs occurs, supporting a new therapeutic strategy focused on PD-Ls for pigs suffering from PMWS. PMID:25594677

Yue, Feng; Cheng, Anchun; Zhu, Yanping; Li, Peng; Zhang, Yanfang; Sun, Guopeng; Wang, Mingshu; Wang, Xuannian

2015-03-01

247

Contrasts in growth and water sources in co-occurring Mediterranean riparian tree species: Evidence from tree ring isotopes and dendrochronology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Riparian trees have growth responses to varying water sources that are more subtle than those of their upland counterparts, but differences in water use between co-occurring riparian species are not easily discerned by conventional dendrochronology. While tree ring isotopes have been developed as a useful tool for understanding past climate (temperature and precipitation) at the growth limits for particular species, relatively little research has investigated responses in tree growth in water-rich environments, where co-occurring tree species may express differential adaptation to water availability and shifting water sources. Better understanding of such subtle adaptations will improve predictions of the response of lowland riparian forests to climate changes that manifest as shifts in: regional ground water tables; the spatial/temporal distribution of precipitation; or volumes and timing of streamflow. We use an approach that combines dendrochronology and tree ring isotopes (?18O) to discern the relationships between tree growth and water sources for two contrasting, co-occurring Mediterranean riparian species-- Fraxinus excelsior and Populus nigra. We developed growth time series via two methods (one de-trended for climate) and extracted alpha-cellulose from tree rings to assess relative responses to water stress via ?18O, and we analyzed these data alongside streamflow and precipitation data for the Ain River basin in France. We find that both species exhibit decreased growth during drought years, but F. excelsior demonstrates more consistent annual growth than P. nigra. In contrast, oxygen isotopic values in P. nigra have low interannual variability compared with ?18O in F. excelsior. These differences suggest contrasting patterns of water use by these co-occurring species, wherein F. excelsior functions as an opportunist, scavenging water from the vadose zone where and when it cannot access groundwater. In contrast, the P. nigra demonstrates consistent groundwater usage (consistent with its moniker-obligate phreatophyte) and tends to struggle in drought years. These observations are consistent with ancillary data on rooting depths which show that F. excelsior maintains its roots above the gravel layer, where it can extract soil water from precipitation or overbank flooding. In contrast, P. nigra roots deeply into the phreatic zone without maintaining significant vadose zone roots, and is therefore less adaptable to rapid declines in the water table. These factors suggest, in contrast to prior work, that poplars may be more sensitive to drought than ash trees. Such dynamics in water use between such co-occurring, yet contrasting riparian trees within a riparian floodplain may indicate the response in succession and stand composition to climate changes or major anthropogenic impacts.

Singer, M. B.; Dufour, S.; Stella, J. C.; Piégay, H.; Johnstone, L.; Wilson, R.

2011-12-01

248

Naturally occurring and stress induced tubular structures from mammalian cells, a survival mechanism  

PubMed Central

Background Tubular shaped mammalian cells in response to dehydration have not been previously reported. This may be due to the invisibility of these cells in aqueous solution, and because sugars and salts added to the cell culture for manipulation of the osmotic conditions inhibit transformation of normal cells into tubular shaped structures. Results We report the transformation of normal spherical mammalian cells into tubular shaped structures in response to stress. We have termed these transformed structures 'straw cells' which we have associated with a variety of human tissue types, including fresh, post mortem and frozen lung, liver, skin, and heart. We have also documented the presence of straw cells in bovine brain and prostate tissues of mice. The number of straw cells in heart, lung tissues, and collapsed straw cells in urine increases with the age of the mammal. Straw cells were also reproduced in vitro from human cancer cells (THP1, CACO2, and MCF7) and mouse stem cells (D1 and adipose D1) by dehydrating cultured cells. The tubular center of the straw cells is much smaller than the original cell; houses condensed organelles and have filamentous extensions that are covered with microscopic hair-like structures and circular openings. When rehydrated, the filaments uptake water rapidly. The straw cell walls, have a range of 120 nm to 200 nm and are composed of sulfated-glucose polymers and glycosylated acidic proteins. The transformation from normal cell to straw cells takes 5 to 8 hr in open-air. This process is characterized by an increase in metabolic activity. When rehydrated, the straw cells regain their normal spherical shape and begin to divide in 10 to 15 days. Like various types of microbial spores, straw cells are resistant to harsh environmental conditions such as UV-C radiation. Conclusion Straw cells are specialized cellular structures and not artifacts from spontaneous polymerization, which are generated in response to stress conditions, like dehydration. The disintegrative, mobile, disruptive and ubiquitous nature of straw cells makes this a possible physiological process that may be involved in human health, longevity, and various types of diseases such as cancer. PMID:17705822

Wu, Yonnie; Laughlin, Richard C; Henry, David C; Krueger, Darryl E; Hudson, JoAn S; Kuan, Cheng-Yi; He, Jian; Reppert, Jason; Tomkins, Jeffrey P

2007-01-01

249

Nuclear genomic control of naturally occurring variation in mitochondrial function in Drosophila melanogaster  

PubMed Central

Background Mitochondria are organelles found in nearly all eukaryotic cells that play a crucial role in cellular survival and function. Mitochondrial function is under the control of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. While the latter has been the focus of most genetic research, we remain largely ignorant about the nuclear-encoded genomic control of inter-individual variability in mitochondrial function. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster as our model organism to address this question. Results We quantified mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration rates and P:O ratio in mitochondria isolated from the thoraces of 40 sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel. We found significant within-population genetic variability for all mitochondrial traits. Hence, we performed genome-wide association mapping and identified 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in mitochondrial respiration and efficiency (P ?1?×?10-5). Gene-centered regression models showed that 2–3 SNPs can explain 31, 13, and 18% of the phenotypic variation in state 3, state 4, and P:O ratio, respectively. Most of the genes tagged by the SNPs are involved in organ development, second messenger-mediated signaling pathways, and cytoskeleton remodeling. One of these genes, sallimus (sls), encodes a component of the muscle sarcomere. We confirmed the direct effect of sls on mitochondrial respiration using two viable mutants and their coisogenic wild-type strain. Furthermore, correlation network analysis revealed that sls functions as a transcriptional hub in a co-regulated module associated with mitochondrial respiration and is connected to CG7834, which is predicted to encode a protein with mitochondrial electron transfer flavoprotein activity. This latter finding was also verified in the sls mutants. Conclusions Our results provide novel insights into the genetic factors regulating natural variation in mitochondrial function in D. melanogaster. The integrative genomic approach used in our study allowed us to identify sls as a novel hub gene responsible for the regulation of mitochondrial respiration in muscle sarcomere and to provide evidence that sls might act via the electron transfer flavoprotein/ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex. PMID:23171078

2012-01-01

250

Physiological quantities of naturally occurring steroid hormones (androgens and progestogens), precursors and metabolites in beef of differing sexual origin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present investigation gives a comprehensive overview of the naturally occurring steroid hormones, their precursors and\\u000a metabolites in the food-stuff beef. Thus, comparison values have been established using modern analytical techniques for the\\u000a evaluation of the alimentary administration of hormones via beef and for the evaluation of detected residues. The utilization\\u000a of hormone patterns in meat samples enables the sexual

Mathias Hartwig; Sonja Hartmann; Hans Steinhart

1997-01-01

251

Naturally Occurring Hydroxy Napthoquinones and Their Iron Complexes as Modulators of Radiation Induced Lipid Peroxidation in Synaptosomes  

PubMed Central

The modulation of radiation induced lipid peroxidation in synaptosomes by iron (II) and iron (III) complexes of two naturally occurring and therapeutically relevant naphthoquinones viz. 5,hydroxy-1,4 naphthoquinone; juglone and 2,hydroxy-1,4 naphthoquinone; lawsone, have been studied. At lower concentrations the complexes enhance lipid peroxidation predominantly through redox cycling as observed for Fe(II)- juglonate while at higher concentrations the complexes tend to limit lipid peroxidation through fast recombinations. PMID:18475800

Kumbhar, A. S.; Jitender; Kale, R. K.

1997-01-01

252

Cellular targets and mechanistic strategies of remyelination-promoting IgMs as part of the naturally occurring autoantibody repertoire.  

PubMed

Immunoglobulins with germline sequences occur in invertebrates and vertebrates and are named naturally occurring autoantibodies (NAbs). NAbs may target foreign antigens, self- or altered self-components and are part of the normal immunoglobulin repertoire. Accumulating evidence indicates that naturally occurring antibodies can act as systemic surveillance molecules, which tag, damaged or stressed cells, invading pathogens and toxic cellular debris for elimination by the immune system. In addition to acting as detecting molecules, certain types of NAbs actively signal in different cell types with a broad range of responses from induction of apoptosis in cancer cells to stimulation of remyelination in glial cells. This review emphasizes functions and characteristics of NAbs with focus on remyelination-promoting mouse and human antibodies. Human remyelination-promoting NAbs are potential therapeutics to combat a wide spectrum of disease processes including demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis. We will highlight the identified glycosphingolipid (SL) antigens of polyreactive remyelination-promoting antibodies and their proposed mechanism(s) of action. The nature of the identified antigens suggests a lipid raft-based mechanism for remyelination-promoting antibodies with SLs as most essential raft components. However, accumulating evidence also suggests involvement of other antigens in stimulation of remyelination, which will be discussed in the text. PMID:24053345

Watzlawik, Jens O; Wootla, Bharath; Painter, Meghan M; Warrington, Arthur E; Rodriguez, Moses

2013-09-01

253

Laccase?catalysed oxidations of naturally occurring phenols: from in vivo biosynthetic pathways to green synthetic applications  

PubMed Central

Summary Laccases are oxidases that contain several copper atoms, and catalyse single?electron oxidations of phenolic compounds with concomitant reduction of oxygen to water. The enzymes are particularly widespread in ligninolytic basidiomycetes, but also occur in certain prokaryotes, insects and plants. Depending on the species, laccases are involved in various biosynthetic processes contributing to carbon recycling in land ecosystems and the morphogenesis of biomatrices, wherein low?molecular?weight naturally occurring phenols serve as key enzyme substrates. Studies of these in vivo synthetic pathways have afforded new insights into fungal laccase applicability in green synthetic chemistry. Thus, we here review fungal laccase?catalysed oxidations of naturally occurring phenols that are particularly relevant to the synthesis of fine organic chemicals, and we discuss how the discovered synthetic strategies mimic laccase?involved in vivo pathways, thus enhancing the green nature of such reactions. Laccase?catalysed in vivo processes yield several types of biopolymers, including those of cuticles, lignin, polyflavonoids, humus and the melanin pigments, using natural mono? or poly?phenols as building blocks. The in vivo synthetic pathways involve either phenoxyl radical?mediated coupling or cross?linking reactions, and can be adapted to the design of in vitro oxidative processes involving fungal laccases in organic synthesis; the laccase substrates and the synthetic mechanisms reflect in vivo processes. Notably, such in vitro synthetic pathways can also reproduce physicochemical properties (e.g. those of chromophores, and radical?scavenging, hydration and antimicrobial activities) found in natural biomaterials. Careful study of laccase?associated in vivo metabolic pathways has been rewarded by the discovery of novel green applications for fungal laccases. This review comprehensively summarizes the available data on laccase?catalysed biosynthetic pathways and associated applications in fine chemical syntheses. PMID:21791030

Jeon, Jong?Rok; Baldrian, Petr; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Chang, Yoon?Seok

2012-01-01

254

Isotopes of Pennies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lab activity from Science Netlinks is designed to explain the weighted averages that are used in average atomic mass calculations. Students can be expected to learn that isotopes of an element have different masses; that isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons; and that atomic mass is the weighted average of the naturally occurring isotopes of an element.

Netlinks, Science; Science, American A.

255

Carbon13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylations of lactic acid containing 13 C at the natural abundance level  

Microsoft Academic Search

The13C kinetic isotope fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition by sulfuric acid has been studied in the temperature range of 20–80°C. The13C(1) isotope separation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid by concentrated sulfuric acid depends strongly on the temperature above 40°C. Below this temperature the13C isotope effect in the decarbonylation of lactic acid by concentrated

M. Zielinski; G. Czarnota; H. Papiernik-Zielinska

1992-01-01

256

Natural variation of magnesium isotopes in mammal bones and teeth from two South African trophic chains  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Isotopic fractionations accompanying element transfer through terrestrial ecosystems have the potential to shed light on ecological interactions between primary producers and consumers, but with the exception of carbon and nitrogen this potential has barely been exploited. Here, the magnesium stable isotope composition of bones and teeth of extant mammals from Kruger National Park (KNP) and Western Cape (WC), South Africa was measured for the first time. The nature of the geological substrate proves to be a major determinant of the ecosystem isotope baseline, as indicated by the lighter magnesium isotope ratios measured in WC mammals (ranging from -1.58‰ to -0.79‰) compared to those from KNP mammals (ranging from -1.01‰ to -0.04‰). Therefore, comparisons between the isotope signatures of taxa must be restricted to a pre-defined geographic area with a homogeneous substrate. In both parks, Mg shows slight enrichment in heavier isotopes from herbivores to carnivores. Plant remains trapped in the dentition of herbivores provide direct evidence of dietary source and, when available, were measured. In KNP only, ?26Mg of plant remains is systematically lighter than the values for herbivore teeth. These results invite further exploration of the variability of Mg isotopes in vertebrate ecosystems in order to test whether magnesium, a bio-essential element present in relatively large proportions in bone and teeth apatite, may serve as an additional trophic tracer to nitrogen, which is a constituent of collagen that rapidly degrades after burial.

Martin, Jeremy E.; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

2014-04-01

257

Upper limits for the existence of long-lived isotopes of roentgenium in natural gold  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A sensitive search for isotopes of a superheavy element (SHE) in natural gold materials has been performed with accelerator mass spectrometry at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, which is based on a 3-MV tandem accelerator. Because the most likely SHE in gold is roentgenium (Rg, Z = 111), the search concentrated on Rg isotopes. Two different mass regions were explored: (i) For the neutron-deficient isotopes Rg261 and Rg265, abundance limits in gold of 3×10-16 were reached (no events observed). This is in stark contrast to the findings of Marinov [Int. J. Mod. Phys. EIMPEER0218-301310.1142/S021830130901280X 18, 621 (2009)], who reported positive identification of these isotopes with inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry in the (1-10)×10-10 abundance range. (ii) Theoretical models of SHEs predict a region of increased stability around the proton and neutron shell closures of Z = 114 and N = 184. We therefore investigated eight heavy Rg isotopes, ARg, A = 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, and 296. For six isotopes no events were observed, setting limits also in the 10-16 abundance range. For Rg291 and Rg294 we observed two and nine events, respectively, which results in an abundance in the 10-15 range. However, pileup of a particularly strong background in these cases makes a positive identification as Rg isotopes—even after pileup correction—unlikely.

Dellinger, F.; Kutschera, W.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Wallner, A.; Winkler, G.

2011-01-01

258

Water quality in the vicinity of Mosquito Creek Lake, Trumbull County, Ohio, in relation to the chemistry of locally occurring oil, natural gas, and brine  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Environmental samples collected in the Mosquito Creek Lake area were used to characterize water quality in relation to the chemistry of locally occurring oil, natural gas, and brine and to establish baseline water quality. Mosquito Creek Lake (a manmade reservoir) and the shallow bedrock aquifers near the lake are major sources of potable water in central Trumbull County. The city of Warren relies on the lake as a sole source of potable water. Some of the lake bottom may be in direct hydraulic connection with the underlying aquifers. The city of Cortland, along the southeastern shore of the lake, relies on the Cussewago Sandstone aquifer as a sole source of potable water. This aquifer subcrops beneath the glacio-fluvial sediments that underlie the lake. Nearly all residential homes around the lake, with the exception of homes in the city of Cortland, rely on domestic supply wells as a source of potable water. Oil and natural gas exploration and production have been ongoing in the Mosquito Creek Lakearea since the discovery of the historic Mecca Oil Pool in the Mississippian Berea and Cussewago Sandstones in 1860. Since the late 1970' s, the major drilling objective and zone of production is the Lower Silurian Clinton sandstone. The oil and natural gas resources of the Mosquito Creek Lake area, including reservoir pressure, production history, and engineering and abandonment practices are described in this report. The chemical and isotopic characteristics of the historic Mecca oil and natural gas are very different than those of the Clinton sandstone oil and natural gas. Gas chromatograms show that Mecca oil samples are extensively altered by biodegradation, whereas Clinton sandstone oils are not. Extensive alteration of Mecca oil is consistent with their occurrence at very shallow depths (less than 100 ft below land surface) where microbial activity can affect their composition. Also, the carbon-isotope composition of dissolved methane gas from Berea and Cussewago Sandstone water samples indicates that the gas is microbially generated, whereas the Clinton sandstone gases are thermogenically generated. Methane gas, in addition to crude oil, occurs naturally in the shallow Berea and Cussewago Sandstone aquifers in the Mosquito Creek Lake area and concentrations of dissolved methane are significant in the city of Cortland public-supply wells and in the domestic-supply wells near the southern shore of the lake. Water associated with oil and gas in the Clinton sandstone is a brine with high concentrations of chloride. Water from the Berea and Cussewago Sandstones, however, is fresh and potable. The contrasting geochemical characteristics are important for addressing water-quality issues that relate to oil and natural gas development in the Mosquito Creek area. A reexamination of the geologic framework and results of a subsurface-gas survey show that crude oil in the historic Mecca Oil Pool probably does not seep into Mosquito Creek Lake. Environmental samples show no evidence of any measurable release of oil, gas, or brine from the deeper Clinton sandstone oil and gas wells to the shallow aquifers, the lake, or lake tributaries. Brine is not associated with the hydrocarbons in the shallow Berea-Cussewago aquifer system and therefore cannot be a source of brine contamination. A mixing diagram constructed for dissolved bromide and chloride in surface water and water-supply wells shows no demonstrable mixing of these water resources with brine from the Clinton sandstone. There is some notable salinity in surface waters; however, the water is bromide poor, and a mixing diagram indicates that some local ground waters are influenced by halite solutions, presumably derived from leaching of road salt or from septic effluent.

Barton, G.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Ryder, R.T.

1998-01-01

259

Nature and nurture: Environmental isotope story of the River Rhine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The total dissolved load of the Rhine river increases downstream due to the combined impact of natural and pollution loads. The natural background, controlled by geology, is soon swamped by pollution, particularly from salt and coal mining activities in Alsace and the Ruhr area. The Rhine is also a net source of CO2 from oxidation of excess organic productivity that

D. Buhl; R. D. Neuser; D. K. Richter; D. Riedel; B. Roberts; H. Strauss; J. Veizer

1991-01-01

260

MNA for Chlorinated Solvents and Fuel Oxygenates: Why It Occurs, How It Evolved, and Using Stable Carbon Isotopes to Predict Plume Behavior  

EPA Science Inventory

The organisms that degrade MtBE under anaerobic conditions are evolved to acquire energy for growth by using molecular hydrogen and carbonate ion to cleave methyl ether bonds. Methyl ether bonds are common in nature and the bond also occurs in MTBE. MTBE in contaminated ground...

261

MNA of Chlorinated Solvents and Fuel Oxygenates: Why it occurs, how it evolved, and using stable carbon isotopes to predict plume behavior  

EPA Science Inventory

The organisms that degrade MTBE under anaerobic conditions are evolved to acquire energy for growth by using molecular hydrogen and carbonate ion to cleave methyl ether bonds. Methyl ether bonds are common in nature and the bond also occurs in MTBE. MTBE in contaminated ground...

262

Iron isotopes in the Seine River (France): Natural versus anthropogenic sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The determination of fluxes and isotope compositions of Fe transported from continents to the ocean is essential for understanding global surface Fe cycle and its effect on oceanic biological productivity. Contrasting to non-polluted rivers, Fe isotope composition in rivers strongly affected by human activities is poorly constrained. In this contribution, we present the first Fe isotope data in suspended particulate matter (SPM) and dissolved load of the human-impacted Seine River (France). Iron concentrations and isotope compositions, together with major and trace element concentrations, were measured for two sample sets: (1) a geographic transect along the river from headwater to estuary, and (2) a temporal series of samples collected in Paris from 2004 to 2007. In the Seine River, Fe is mostly carried by SPM (average 99% of the total Fe) rather than dissolved load. The high Fe enrichment factor (1.40, relative to natural fluvial pre-historical and headwater sediments) and strong correlation between SPM Fe and Zn concentrations (r2 = 0.70, n = 30) demonstrate a strong anthropogenic Fe input. The Fe isotope compositions in SPM show a very small range (?56Fe from -0.05‰ to 0.09‰) in spite of the large variations of Fe concentrations (from 1.78 to 4.17 wt.%) and are comparable to anthropogenic samples, suggesting that anthropogenic sources have similar Fe isotope composition to that of the natural background. In contrast, larger variations of Fe isotope compositions observed in the dissolved load (from -0.60‰ to 0.06‰) than that of SPM may provide a more promising means for tracing anthropogenic contributions to natural river systems. The ?56Fe and ?66Zn values of the dissolved loads are positively correlated (r2 = 0.62, n = 8), indicating a mixing between anthropogenic and natural end-members, enriched in light and heavy Fe isotopes respectively. Correlation between dissolved ?56Fe and DOC/Fe ratio (i.e. dissolved organic carbon/dissolved Fe concentrations) suggests that dissolved Fe of natural origin is mainly associated with organic colloids. The Fe compounds with low DOC/Fe ratio and ?56Fe values may correspond to anthropogenically-derived Fe-oxyhydroxide or sulfide colloids. Our study clearly demonstrates that polluted rivers transport an anthropogenic surplus flux of Fe that can be traced by coupling Fe and Zn isotopes. This surplus flux will fertilize the ocean and increase the primary productivity of phytoplankton, and thus may ultimately impact the global carbon cycle.

Chen, Jiu-Bin; Busigny, Vincent; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Louvat, Pascale; Wang, Yi-Na

2014-03-01

263

A naturally occurring single amino Acid replacement in multiple gene regulator of group a streptococcus significantly increases virulence.  

PubMed

Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common source of genetic variation within a species; however, few investigations demonstrate how naturally occurring SNPs may increase strain virulence. We recently used group A Streptococcus as a model pathogen to study bacteria strain genotype-patient disease phenotype relationships. Whole-genome sequencing of approximately 800 serotype M59 group A Streptococcus strains, recovered during an outbreak of severe invasive infections across North America, identified a disproportionate number of SNPs in the gene encoding multiple gene regulator of group A Streptococcus (mga). Herein, we report results of studies designed to test the hypothesis that the most commonly occurring SNP, encoding a replacement of arginine for histidine at codon 201 of Mga (H201R), significantly increases virulence. Whole transcriptome analysis revealed that the H201R replacement significantly increased expression of mga and 54 other genes, including many proven virulence factors. Compared to the wild-type strain, a H201R isogenic mutant strain caused significantly larger skin lesions in mice. Serial quantitative bacterial culture and noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging also demonstrated that the isogenic H201R strain was significantly more virulent in a nonhuman primate model of joint infection. These findings show that the H201R replacement in Mga increases the virulence of M59 group A Streptococcus and provide new insight to how a naturally occurring SNP in bacteria contributes to human disease phenotypes. PMID:25476528

Sanson, Misu; O'Neill, Brian E; Kachroo, Priyanka; Anderson, Jeff R; Flores, Anthony R; Valson, Chandni; Cantu, Concepcion C; Makthal, Nishanth; Karmonik, Christof; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Musser, James M; Olsen, Randall J

2015-02-01

264

Total synthesis of isotopically enriched Si-29 silica NPs as potential spikes for isotope dilution quantification of natural silica NPs.  

PubMed

A new method was developed for the preparation of highly monodisperse isotopically enriched Si-29 silica nanoparticles ((29)Si-silica NPs) with the purpose of using them as spikes for isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) quantification of silica NPs with natural isotopic distribution. Si-29 tetraethyl orthosilicate ((29)Si-TEOS), the silica precursor was prepared in two steps starting from elementary silicon-29 pellets. In the first step Si-29 silicon tetrachloride ((29)SiCl4) was prepared by heating elementary silicon-29 in chlorine gas stream. By using a multistep cooling system and the dilution of the volatile and moisture-sensitive (29)SiCl4 in carbon tetrachloride as inert medium we managed to reduce product loss caused by evaporation. (29)Si-TEOS was obtained by treating (29)SiCl4 with absolute ethanol. Structural characterisation of (29)Si-TEOS was performed by using (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. For the NP preparation, a basic amino acid catalysis route was used and the resulting NPs were analysed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. Finally, the feasibility of using enriched NPs for on-line field-flow fractionation coupled with multi-angle light scattering and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FFF/MALS/ICP-MS) has been demonstrated. PMID:25617615

Pálmai, Marcell; Szalay, Roland; Bartczak, Dorota; Varga, Zoltán; Nagy, Lívia Naszályi; Gollwitzer, Christian; Krumrey, Michael; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

2015-05-01

265

Analysis of the 13C natural abundance of CO2 gas from sparkling drinks by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

A simple and rapid method to measure naturally occurring delta(13)C values of headspace CO(2) of sparkling drinks has been set up, using direct injections on a gas chromatograph coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer, through a combustion interface (GC/C/IRMS). We tested the method on CO(2) gas from several origins. No significant isotopic fractionation was observed nor influences by secondary compounds eventually present in the gas phase. Standard deviation for these measurements was found to be <0.1 per thousand. PMID:15702486

Calderone, Giovanni; Naulet, Norbert; Guillou, Claude; Reniero, Fabiano; Cortes, Ana Isabel Blanch

2005-01-01

266

Use of Sulphur and Boron Isotopes to Identify Natural Gas Processing Emissions Sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Natural gas processing results in the emission of large amounts of gaseous pollutants as a result of planned and / or emergency flaring, sulphur incineration, and in the course of normal operation. Since many gas plants often contribute to the same air shed, it is not possible to conclusively determine the sources, amounts, and characteristics of pollution from a particular processing facility using traditional methods. However, sulphur isotopes have proven useful in the apportionment of sources of atmospheric sulphate (Norman et al., 1999), and boron isotopes have been shown to be of use in tracing coal contamination through groundwater (Davidson and Bassett, 1993). In this study, both sulphur and boron isotopes have been measured at source, receptor, and control sites, and, if emissions prove to be sufficiently distinct isotopically, they will be used to identify and apportion emissions downwind. Sulphur is present in natural gas as hydrogen sulphide (H2S), which is combusted to sulphur dioxide (SO2) prior to its release to the atmosphere, while boron is present both in hydrocarbon deposits as well as in any water used in the process. Little is known about the isotopic abundance variations of boron in hydrocarbon reservoirs, but Krouse (1991) has shown that the sulphur isotope composition of H2S in reservoirs varies according to both the concentration and the method of formation of H2S. As a result, gas plants processing gas from different reservoirs are expected to produce emissions with unique isotopic compositions. Samples were collected using a high-volume air sampler placed directly downwind of several gas plants, as well as at a receptor site and a control site. Aerosol sulphate and boron were collected on quartz fibre filters, while SO2 was collected on potassium hydroxide-impregnated cellulose filters. Solid sulphur samples were taken from those plants that process sulphur in order to compare the isotopic composition with atmospheric measurements. A method was developed to extract and concentrate boron for isotope analysis. Isotopic composition and concentrations of both sulphur and boron were measured in order to determine whether emissions have distinct sulphur and/or boron isotopic compositions. Preliminary results of SO2 and solid sulphur analysis show values that range from +3 to +30 \\permil.

Bradley, C. E.; Norman, A.; Wieser, M. E.

2003-12-01

267

Ultrastructural aspects of naturally occurring wound in the tunic of two ascidians: Ciona intestinalis and Styela plicata (Tunicata).  

PubMed

Efficient wound healing is essential for all animals from insects to mammals. Ciona intestinalis and Styela plicata are solitary ascidians belonging to urochordates, a subphylum that occupies a key phylogenetic position as it includes the closest relative to vertebrates. Urochordate first physical barrier against invaders is the tunic, an extracellular matrix that is constantly exposed to all kinds of insults. Thus, when damage occurs, an innate immune response is triggered to eliminate impaired tissue and potentially pathogenic microbes, and restore tissue functionality. Ultrastructural aspects of the tunic in the wound healing process of two ascidians are described. In the injured areas, we evidenced thinning of the tunic and areas of low fibre density, dense intratunic bacterial and protozoan population, and inflammatory aspects such as the increase in tunic cells, their aggregates, and phagocytosis. This is the first report on tunic physical wounding occurring in the natural habitat. PMID:25437850

Di Bella, Maria Antonietta; Carbone, Maria Carmela; De Leo, Giacomo

2015-02-01

268

Distribution of the PBC-specific- (M2) and the naturally-occurring mitochondrial antigen- (NOMAg) systems in plants.  

PubMed Central

In previous studies it was demonstrated that antibodies in sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and their relatives can recognize two different antigen systems in the ATPase fraction prepared from beef heart mitochondria, namely the PBC-related M2- and the naturally occurring mitochondrial antigen (NOMAg)-related epitopes. Since separation of these two antigen systems could not be achieved using mammalian mitochondria, mitochondria from a wide spectrum of plants were analysed with respect to the presence of mitochondrial antigens. Mitochondria from 29 species of plants were prepared and tested by ELISA and Western blot using marker sera from patients with PBC reacting in the Western blot with M2a,b,c,d (alpha-ketoacid-dehydrogenase complex) and NOMAg-specific sera recognizing the three major epitopes epsilon, zeta, and eta at 65, 61 and 58 kD. Naturally occurring mitochondrial antibody (NOMA)-positive marker sera reacted in the ELISA with mitochondria from all plants, and the zeta/eta positive sera gave also a positive reaction at 61/58 kD in the Western blot while the epsilon epitope could not be visualized by this method. In contrast, the M2 antigen was detected preferentially in lower plants such as algae, fungi, and ferns. Analysing these data with respect to the evolution of proteins one would have to assume that the M2 antigen was lost in most higher plants or underwent some structural alterations. Furthermore, considering the fact that the M2- and the NOMAg-related epitopes could be only partially separated, i.e. there were no plant mitochondria showing only M2 but no NOMAg, one could speculate that anti-M2 antibodies are derived from the pool of naturally occurring antibodies. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1281057

Lang, P; Klein, R; Becker, E W; Berg, P A

1992-01-01

269

Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of sterols in natural marine brown and red macroalgae and associated shellfish  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon (?13C) and hydrogen isotopic compositions (?D) of sterols in natural marine brown (Sargassum filicinum and Undaria pinnatifida), red macroalgae (Binghamia californica and Gelidium japonica), and in shellfish (Binghamia californica, Haliotis discus and Omphalius pfeifferi) feeding on the brown algae have been investigated as a first attempt to understand the isotopic compositions of sterols in natural algae and heterotrophs. Brown

Yoshito Chikaraishi

2006-01-01

270

The isotopic compositions of molecular nitrogen: implications on their origins in natural gas accumulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The isotopic compositions of N2 (?15N, ‰, atm) imply the geochemical origins of molecular nitrogen in natural gas accumulations, but the irregular variation of ?15NN2 for most petroliferous basins puzzles scientists. We believe that this is due to multiple origins of N2 which are often mixed together and leads to the irregularities in gas pools. The four petroliferous basins, the

Yuenian Zhu; Buqing Shi; Chaobin Fang

2000-01-01

271

Lead isotopes in sediments of the Loire River (France): natural versus anthropogenic origin  

E-print Network

Lead isotopes in sediments of the Loire River (France): natural versus anthropogenic origin Philippe Négrel Emmanuelle Petelet-Giraud BRGM, Orléans, France Sediments along the Loire River (central), in present-day suspended matter in Loire River water, and in sediment from the Loire estuary. Fe-Mn oxides

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

272

Geochemical and strontium isotope characterization of produced waters from Marcellus Shale natural gas extraction.  

PubMed

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ~375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?(Sr)(SW) = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?(Sr) (SW) is the deviation of the (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10(4)); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters. PMID:22360406

Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C; Stewart, Brian W; Kirby, Carl S; Hammack, Richard W; Schroeder, Karl T; Edenborn, Harry M

2012-03-20

273

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

2012-03-20

274

Naturally occurring rhodopsin mutation in the dog causes retinal dysfunction and degeneration mimicking human dominant retinitis pigmentosa  

PubMed Central

Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by light and initiates the transduction cascade leading to night (rod) vision. Naturally occurring pathogenic rhodopsin (RHO) mutations have been previously identified only in humans and are a common cause of dominantly inherited blindness from retinal degeneration. We identified English Mastiff dogs with a naturally occurring dominant retinal degeneration and determined the cause to be a point mutation in the RHO gene (Thr4Arg). Dogs with this mutant allele manifest a retinal phenotype that closely mimics that in humans with RHO mutations. The phenotypic features shared by dog and man include a dramatically slowed time course of recovery of rod photoreceptor function after light exposure and a distinctive topographic pattern to the retinal degeneration. The canine disease offers opportunities to explore the basis of prolonged photoreceptor recovery after light in RHO mutations and determine whether there are links between the dysfunction and apoptotic retinal cell death. The RHO mutant dog also becomes the large animal needed for preclinical trials of therapies for a major subset of human retinopathies. PMID:11972042

Kijas, James W.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Pianta, Michael J.; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Miller, Brian J.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Acland, Gregory M.

2002-01-01

275

Molecular imprint of exposure to naturally occurring genetic variants of human cytomegalovirus on the T cell repertoire.  

PubMed

Exposure to naturally occurring variants of herpesviruses in clinical settings can have a dramatic impact on anti-viral immunity. Here we have evaluated the molecular imprint of variant peptide-MHC complexes on the T-cell repertoire during human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and demonstrate that primary co-infection with genetic variants of CMV was coincident with development of strain-specific T-cell immunity followed by emergence of cross-reactive virus-specific T-cells. Cross-reactive CMV-specific T cells exhibited a highly conserved public T cell repertoire, while T cells directed towards specific genetic variants displayed oligoclonal repertoires, unique to each individual. T cell recognition foot-print and pMHC-I structural analyses revealed that the cross-reactive T cells accommodate alterations in the pMHC complex with a broader foot-print focussing on the core of the peptide epitope. These findings provide novel molecular insight into how infection with naturally occurring genetic variants of persistent human herpesviruses imprints on the evolution of the anti-viral T-cell repertoire. PMID:24509977

Smith, Corey; Gras, Stephanie; Brennan, Rebekah M; Bird, Nicola L; Valkenburg, Sophie A; Twist, Kelly-Anne; Burrows, Jacqueline M; Miles, John J; Chambers, Daniel; Bell, Scott; Campbell, Scott; Kedzierska, Katherine; Burrows, Scott R; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv

2014-01-01

276

Naturally occurring phenolic acids modulate TPA-induced activation of EGFR, AP-1, and STATs in mouse epidermis.  

PubMed

Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in epithelial carcinogenesis and appears to be involved in STATs activation. In this study we investigated the possible interference of naturally occurring phenolic acids with EGFR, activator protein-1 (AP-1), and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) pathways activated by topical application of tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in Balb/c mice epidermis. Pretreatment with tannic or chlorogenic acid resulted in a significant decrease in the phosphorylation of EGFR Y-1068 and Y-1173 tyrosine residues, which was accompanied by reduced activation of AP-1. Tannic acid decreased also the c-Jun AP-1 subunit level and binding to TPA response element (TRE) (3- and 2-fold in comparison with TPA-treated group respectively). Simultaneous reduction of JNK activity might be responsible for reduced activation of AP-1. In contrast to these more complex phenolics, protocatechuic acid increased the activity of JNK and was also the most efficient inhibitor of STATs activation. These results indicate that naturally occurring phenolic acids, by decreasing EGFR, AP-1, and STATs activation, may modulate other elements both upstream and downstream in these pathways and thus inhibit the tumor development. Although more complex phenolics affect mainly the EGFR/AP-1 pathway, STATs seem to be the most important targets for simple compounds, such as protocatechuic acid. PMID:24380573

Cichocki, Micha?; Da?ek, Mi?osz; Szama?ek, Mateusz; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

2014-01-01

277

Association of naturally occurring radionuclides in sludges from Drinking Water Treatment Plants previously optimized for their removal.  

PubMed

The raw water used in Drinking Water Treatment Plants (DWTPs) can present high values of naturally occurring radionuclides. In order to reduce this content, the routine working conditions of DWTPs were successfully modified. This meant that those radionuclides were accumulated in the sludges generated, whose radioactive content was frequently above the exemption levels. It therefore becomes necessary to assess the association of naturally occurring radionuclides in the sludges for their potential use as agricultural fertilizers. Two approaches were studied: (a) the effect of different sequential extraction methods applied to a selected sludge; and (b) the effect of the different contents of inorganic complexes dissolved in the input water on the composition of the sludges generated by two DWTPs with different origins of their input water. Uranium and radium were mainly associated with the carbonated and reducible fractions, while (210)Po and (228)Th were associated with the residual fraction. There were differences between the two speciation methods, but the order of bioavailable radionuclides was roughly the same: (226)Ra?(234,238)U>(228)Th>(210)Po. The major inorganic complexes content, mainly carbonate, in the raw water affected the radionuclide association. The greater the carbonate content in the raw water, the greater was the association of uranium and radium with the carbonated and easily reducible fractions. PMID:24238776

Baeza, A; Salas, A; Guillén, J; Muñoz-Serrano, A

2014-02-01

278

Antimony Isotope Variations in Natural Systems Determined by MC-ICP-MS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sb has two stable isotopes of mass 121 and 123 with average abundance of 57.362% and 42.638% respectively and to date no geochemical or cosmochemical investigations of the variations of these isotopes have been attempted. In fact, the development of Sb isotope measurements for biogeochemical studies is challenging as Sb isotopes have a low percentage mass differences (1.6%) precluding large mass fractionation and Sb is a trace element below 100 ng/g for most geological samples and below 100 ng/l for seawater. However, it is anticipated that the redox changes of Sb(V) and Sb(III) species as well as biological activity and Sb volatilization or transport in hydrothermal systems can produce significant isotope fractionation in natural systems. The isotopic analyses of Sb have been performed using a continuous flow hydride generation system coupled to a Micromass MC-ICP-MS and the instrumental mass fractionation is corrected using a standard-sample bracketing approach. Total Sb, as well as Sb(III) and Sb(V) aqueous species are chemically purified prior to HG-MC-ICP-MS analysis. Using this analytical scheme, the minimum Sb required per analysis is 10 ng and the estimated external precision of the 123Sb/121Sb isotope ratio is 0.4 ? -units (2? ). The data are reported relative to our internal standards (MERCK elemental standard solution). The isotopic fractionation factors between the coexisting species Sb(III) and Sb(V) have been investigated both on-line and after chemical separation. For the kinetic reduction experiment of Sb(V), the reducing agent used was KI as classically used for Sb(V) reduction and we obtained an instantaneous fractionation factor of 8.6 ? -units. For off-line experiments, we separated Sb(III) from a partially oxidized Sb solution and obtained a fractionation factor ranging from 5 to 6 ? -units. Preliminary results on Sb isotopic composition of selected terrestrial materials including seawater, soils, sediments and hydrothermal sulfides have been determined and show a variation of 20 ? -units, which is 50 times higher than the analytical precision. This demonstrates the existence of natural variations of the Sb isotopic composition, which can be analyzed at the ng level by MC-ICP-MS. For seawater and Mn-nodules, we obtained negative Sb isotopic composition between -2 and 0 ? -units which contrast with the composition of continental sediments, ranging from 1 to 4.8 ? -units. Highly fractionated Sb isotopes (between -2.5 to 13.5 ? -units) characterise seafloor hydrothermal sulfides and in particular the alteration products of black smokers as well as low temperature sulfides in near vent locations. This suggests that redox change from reduced environment in hydrothermal fluid to oxidized environment in seawater and subsequent Sb redox change is the major parameter controlling the Sb isotopes signatures. Possible scavenging of Sb from seawater in hydrothermal deposits may also combine to produce such variations. The natural variations of Sb isotopes obtained in this study highlight the potential use of this element as a tracer in hydrothermal and environmental systems and probably also in other fields of cosmochemistry and biogeochemistry.

Ludden, J.; Rouxel, O.; Fouquet, Y.

2001-12-01

279

ISOTOPES  

E-print Network

over ammonia-hydrogen exchange include higher separationAmmonia-hydrogen Exchange This reaction has both a larger separationammonia) fraction with which it is in isotopic equilibrium, necessitating the separation

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01

280

Evaluation of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) in inorganic and organic oilfield scales from the Middle East.  

PubMed

The distribution of natural nuclide gamma-ray activities and their respective annual effective dose rates, produced by potassium-40 (??K), uranium-238 (²³?U), thorium-232 (²³²Th), and radium-226 (²²?Ra), were determined for 14 oilfield scale samples from the Middle East. Accumulated radioactive materials concentrate in tubing and surface equipment, and workers at equipment-cleaning facilities and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) disposal facilities are the population most at risk for exposure to NORM radiation. Gamma-spectra analysis indicated that photo-gamma lines represent the parents of 10 radioactive nuclides: ²³?Th, plutonium-239, actinium-228, ²²?Ra, lead-212 (²¹²Pb), ²¹?Pb, thallium-238 (²??Tl), bismuth-212 (²¹²Bi), ²¹?Bi, and ??K. These nuclides represent the daughters of the natural radioactive series ²³?U and ²³²Th with ??K as well. The mean activity concentration of ²³?U, ²³²Th, and ??K were found to be 25.8 ± 11.6, 18.3 ± 8.1, and 4487.2 ± 2.5% Bq kg?¹ (average values for 14 samples), respectively. The annual effective dose rates and the absorbed doses in air, both indoor and outdoor, for the samples were obtained as well. The results can be used to assess the respective hazard on workers in the field and represent a basis for revisiting current engineering practices. PMID:21892762

Bassioni, Ghada; Abdulla, Fareed; Morsy, Zeinab; El-Faramawy, Nabil

2012-04-01

281

Characterization of Contaminant Transport using Naturally-Occurring U-Series Disequilibria - Final Report - 05/01/1997 - 04/30/2001  

SciTech Connect

The interactions of mixed wastes containing radionuclides with solid rock surface and the mobility of the radionuclides in aquifer systems depend not only on the chemistry of the nuclides and the physico-chemical effects of radioactive decay, but also on the site-specific hydrogeology. Thus, to characterize contaminant transport, it is best to cross-check figures derived from any small-scale laboratory experiments over limited times with that obtained from field-oriented, natural analog studies. We propose such a study using the naturally-occurring U and Th decay-series disequilibria. The work of ours and other researchers have shown that the parent/daughter disequilibrium patterns existing in groundwater systems can be modeled in terms of local nuclide mass balance to arrive at such information as the rock-water contact time (fluid flow) and rates of contaminant transport, taking into account the retardation effect due to nuclide/rock interaction contaminants at INEL by grouping them into three categories, represented by isotopes of (1) Th and Pa, (2) U and (3) Ra. Mass spectrometric measurements of these elements will be emphasized in order to minimize sample size requirements and to maximize precision. Results will form the data base for a model code for computing: (1) Fluid residence time (transport rates) in the basalt aquifers at various locations, (2) The in-situ adsorption and desorption rate constants, as well as the retardation factors, of various radionuclide wastes, and (3) Rock dissolution rate and its relation to preferential flow and contamination transport in the fractured rock.

Murrell, Michael T.; Ku, Teh-Lung

2001-04-30

282

Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436  

SciTech Connect

Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim [Geo-Environment and Resources Research Centre (CIGAR), Porto University, Faculty of Engineering - FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)] [Geo-Environment and Resources Research Centre (CIGAR), Porto University, Faculty of Engineering - FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Meira Castro, Ana Cristina [School of Engineering Polytechnic of Porto - ISEP, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072, Porto (Portugal)] [School of Engineering Polytechnic of Porto - ISEP, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072, Porto (Portugal)

2013-07-01

283

Progress in isotope tracer hydrology in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview of current research in isotope hydrology, focusing on recent Canadian contributions, is discussed under the headings: precipitation networks, hydrograph separation and groundwater studies, river basin hydrology, lake and catchment water balance, and isotope palaeohydrology from lake sediment records. Tracer-based techniques, relying primarily on the naturally occurring environmental isotopes, have been integrated into a range of hydrological and biogeochemical

J. J. Gibson; T. W. D. Edwards; S. J. Birks; N. A. St Amour; W. M. Buhay; P. McEachern; B. B. Wolfe; D. L. Peters

2005-01-01

284

Investigation of the environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides in the processing of sulfide ores for gold using gamma spectrometry.  

PubMed

The possible environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides on workers and a critical community, as a result of milling and processing sulfide ores for gold by a mining company at Bogoso in the western region of Ghana, have been investigated using gamma spectroscopy. Indicative doses for the workers during sulfide ore processing were calculated from the activity concentrations measured at both physical and chemical processing stages. The dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent, radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices, and radioactivity level index for tailings, for the de-silted sediments of run-off from the vicinity of the tailings dam through the critical community, and for the soils of the critical community's basic schools were calculated and found to be lower than their respective permissible limits. The environmental impact of the radionuclides is therefore expected to be low in this mining environment. PMID:21865616

Gbadago, J K; Faanhof, A; Darko, E O; Schandorf, C

2011-09-01

285

Polarization dependent two-photon absorption spectroscopy on a naturally occurring biomarker (curcumin) in solution: A theoretical-experimental study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the theoretical-experimental analysis of the two-photon absorption (TPA) and two-photon circular-linear dichroism (TPCLD) spectra of (1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione (curcumin) in Tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution. The measurement of the full TPA spectrum of this molecule reveals a maximum TPA cross-section at 740 nm, i.e. more than 10 times larger than the maximum reported in the literature at 800 nm for the application of curcumin in bioimaging. The TPCLD spectrum exposes the symmetry of the main excited-states involved in the two-photon excitation process. TD-DFT calculations support the experimental results. These outcomes are expected to expand the application of natural-occurring dyes in bioimaging.

Tiburcio-Moreno, Jose A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Diaz, Carlos; Echevarria, Lorenzo; Hernández, Florencio E.

2013-09-01

286

A method for the determination of vanadium and iron oxidation states in naturally occurring oxides and silicates  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A valence-specific analytical method for determining V3+ in ore minerals has been developed that involves two steps: dissolution of a mineral sample without disturbing the V3+/Vtot ratio, followed by determination of V3+ in the presence of V4+. The samples are dissolved in a mixture of hydrofluoric and sulphuric acids at 100?? in Teflon-lined reaction vessels. Tervalent vanadium is then determined colorimetrically by formation of a V3+-thiocyanate complex in aqueous-acetone medium. Fe3+ is measured semi-quantitatively in the same solution. The method has been tested with two naturally occurring samples containing vanadium and iron. The results obtained were supported by those obtained by other methods, including electron spin resonance spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. ?? 1985.

Wanty, R.B.; Goldhaber, M.B.

1985-01-01

287

Trihalomethanes formed from natural organic matter isolates: Using isotopic and compositional data to help understand sources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Over 20 million people drink water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta despite problematic levels of natural organic matter (NOM) and bromide in Delta water, which can form trihalomethanes (THMs) during the treatment process. It is widely believed that NOM released from Delta peat islands is a substantial contributor to the pool of THM precursors present in Delta waters. Dissolved NOM was isolated from samples collected at five channel sites within the Sacramento-San Joaquin Rivers and Delta, California, USA, and from a peat island agricultural drain. To help understand the sources of THM precursors, samples were analyzed to determine their chemical and isotopic composition, their propensity to form THMs, and the isotopic composition of the THMs. The chemical composition of the isolates was quite variable, as indicated by significant differences in carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and carbon-to-nitrogen concentration ratios. The lowest propensity to form THMs per unit of dissolved organic carbon was observed in the peat island agricultural drain isolate, even though it possessed the highest fraction of aromatic material and the highest specific ultraviolet absorbance. Changes in the chemical and isotopic composition of the isolates and the isotopic composition of the THMs suggest that the source of the THMs precursors was different between samples and between isolates. The pattern of variability in compositional and isotopic data for these samples was not consistent with simple mixing of river- and peat-derived organic material.

Bergamaschi, B.A.; Fram, M.S.; Fujii, R.; Aiken, G.R.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S.R.

2000-01-01

288

Fate of the naturally occurring radioactive materials during treatment of acid mine drainage with coal fly ash and aluminium hydroxide.  

PubMed

Mining of coal is very extensive and coal is mainly used to produce electricity. Coal power stations generate huge amounts of coal fly ash of which a small amount is used in the construction industry. Mining exposes pyrite containing rocks to H2O and O2. This results in the oxidation of FeS2 to form H2SO4. The acidic water, often termed acid mine drainage (AMD), causes dissolution of potentially toxic elements such as, Fe, Al, Mn and naturally occurring radioactive materials such as U and Th from the associated bedrock. This results in an outflow of AMD with high concentrations of sulphate ions, Fe, Al, Mn and naturally occurring radioactive materials. Treatment of AMD with coal fly ash has shown that good quality water can be produced which is suitable for irrigation purposes. Most of the potentially toxic elements (Fe, Al, Mn, etc) and substantial amounts of sulphate ions are removed during treatment with coal fly ash. This research endeavours to establish the fate of the radioactive materials in mine water with coal fly ash containing radioactive materials. It was established that coal fly ash treatment method was capable of removing radioactive materials from mine water to within the target water quality range for drinking water standards. The alpha and beta radioactivity of the mine water was reduced by 88% and 75% respectively. The reduced radioactivity in the mine water was due to greater than 90% removal of U and Th radioactive materials from the mine water after treatment with coal fly ash as ThO2 and UO2. No radioisotopes were found to leach from the coal fly ash into the mine water. PMID:24355687

Madzivire, Godfrey; Maleka, Peane P; Vadapalli, Viswanath R K; Gitari, Wilson M; Lindsay, Robert; Petrik, Leslie F

2014-01-15

289

Naturally-occurring altered peptide ligands control Salmonella-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation, IFN-? production, and protective potency  

PubMed Central

T cell activation required for host defense against infection is an intricately regulated and precisely controlled process. Although in vitro studies indicate three distinct stimulatory signals are required for T cell activation, the precise contribution of each signal in regulating T cell proliferation and differentiation after in vivo infection is unknown. In this study, altered peptide ligands (APLs) derived from the protective Salmonella-specific FliC antigen and CD4+ T cells specific for the immune-dominant FliC431–439 peptide within this antigen were used to determine how changes in TCR stimulation impact CD4+ T cell proliferation, differentiation, and protective potency. To explore the prevalence and potential use of altered TCR stimulation by bacterial pathogens, naturally-occurring APLs containing single amino acid substitutions in putative TCR contact residues within the FliC431–439 peptide were identified and used for stimulation under both non-infection and infection conditions. Based on this analysis, naturally-occurring APLs that prime proliferation of FliC-specific CD4+ T cells either more potently or less potently compared with the wild-type FliC431–439 peptide were identified. Remarkably, despite these differences in proliferation, all APLs primed reduced IFN-? production by FliC431–439-specific CD4+ T cells after stimulation in vivo. Moreover, after expression of the parental FliC431–439 peptide or each APL in recombinant Listeria monocytogenes, only CD4+ T cells stimulated with the wild-type FliC431–439 peptide conferred significant protection against challenge with virulent Salmonella. These results reveal important and unanticipated roles for TCR stimulation in controlling pathogen-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation, differentiation, and protective potency. PMID:20026741

Johanns, Tanner M.; Ertelt, James M.; Lai, Joseph C.; Rowe, Jared H.; Avant, Ross A.; Way, Sing Sing

2010-01-01

290

The Effect of Naturally Occurring Chronic Kidney Disease on the Micro-Structural and Mechanical Properties of Bone  

PubMed Central

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing public health concern worldwide, and is associated with marked increase of bone fragility. Previous studies assessing the effect of CKD on bone quality were based on biopsies from human patients or on laboratory animal models. Such studies provide information of limited relevance due to the small size of the samples (biopsies) or the non-physiologic CKD syndrome studied (rodent models with artificially induced CKD). Furthermore, the type, architecture, structure and biology of the bone of rodents are remarkably different from human bones; therefore similar clinicopathologic circumstances may affect their bones differently. We describe the effects of naturally occurring CKD with features resembling human CKD on the skeleton of cats, whose bone biology, structure and composition are remarkably similar to those of humans. We show that CKD causes significant increase of resorption cavity density compared with healthy controls, as well as significantly lower cortical mineral density, cortical cross-sectional area and cortical cross-sectional thickness. Young's modulus, yield stress, and ultimate stress of the cortical bone material were all significantly decreased in the skeleton of CKD cats. Cancellous bone was also affected, having significantly lower trabecular thickness and bone volume over total volume in CKD cats compared with controls. This study shows that naturally occurring CKD has deleterious effects on bone quality and strength. Since many similarities exist between human and feline CKD patients, including the clinicopathologic features of the syndrome and bone microarchitecture and biology, these results contribute to better understanding of bone abnormalities associated with CKD. PMID:25333360

Meltzer, Hagar; Milrad, Moran; Brenner, Ori; Atkins, Ayelet; Shahar, Ron

2014-01-01

291

Functional characterization of naturally occurring melittin peptide isoforms in two honey bee species, Apis mellifera and Apis cerana.  

PubMed

Insect-derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have diverse effects on antimicrobial properties and pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammation and anticancer properties. Naturally occurring genetic polymorphism have a direct and/or indirect influence on pharmacological effect of AMPs, therefore information on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) occurring in natural AMPs provides an important clue to therapeutic applications. Here we identified nucleotide polymorphisms in melittin gene of honey bee populations, which is one of the potent AMP in bee venoms. We found that the novel SNP of melittin gene exists in these two honey bee species, Apis mellifera and Apis cerana. Nine polymorphisms were identified within the coding region of the melittin gene, of which one polymorphism that resulted in serine (Ser) to asparagine (Asp) substitution that can potentially effect on biological activities of melittin peptide. Serine-substituted melittin (Mel-S) showed more cytotoxic effect than asparagine-substituted melittin (Mel-N) against E. coli. Also, Mel-N and Mel-S had different inhibitory effects on the production of inflammatory factors such as IL-6 and TNF-? in BV-2 cells. Moreover, Mel-S showed stronger cytotoxic activities than Mel-N peptide against two human ovarian cancer cell lines. Using carbon nanotube-based transistor, we here characterized that Mel-S interacted with small unilamellar liposomes more strongly than Mel-N. Taken together, our present study demonstrates that there exist different characteristics of the gene frequency and the biological activities of the melittin peptide in two honey bee species, Apis mellifera and A. cerana. PMID:24512991

Park, Doori; Jung, Je Won; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Si Young; Kim, Boyun; Jin, Hye Jun; Kim, Jiyoung; Ahn, Young-Joon; Lee, Ki Won; Song, Yong Sang; Hong, Seunghun; Womack, James E; Kwon, Hyung Wook

2014-03-01

292

Naturally occurring hypothermia is more advantageous than fever in severe forms of lipopolysaccharide- and Escherichia coli-induced systemic inflammation  

PubMed Central

The natural switch from fever to hypothermia observed in the most severe cases of systemic inflammation is a phenomenon that continues to puzzle clinicians and scientists. The present study was the first to evaluate in direct experiments how the development of hypothermia vs. fever during severe forms of systemic inflammation impacts the pathophysiology of this malady and mortality rates in rats. Following administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 5 or 18 mg/kg) or of a clinical Escherichia coli isolate (5 × 109 or 1 × 1010 CFU/kg), hypothermia developed in rats exposed to a mildly cool environment, but not in rats exposed to a warm environment; only fever was revealed in the warm environment. Development of hypothermia instead of fever suppressed endotoxemia in E. coli-infected rats, but not in LPS-injected rats. The infiltration of the lungs by neutrophils was similarly suppressed in E. coli-infected rats of the hypothermic group. These potentially beneficial effects came with costs, as hypothermia increased bacterial burden in the liver. Furthermore, the hypotensive responses to LPS or E. coli were exaggerated in rats of the hypothermic group. This exaggeration, however, occurred independently of changes in inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins. Despite possible costs, development of hypothermia lessened abdominal organ dysfunction and reduced overall mortality rates in both the E. coli and LPS models. By demonstrating that naturally occurring hypothermia is more advantageous than fever in severe forms of aseptic (LPS-induced) or septic (E. coli-induced) systemic inflammation, this study provides new grounds for the management of this deadly condition. PMID:22513748

Liu, Elaine; Lewis, Kevin; Al-Saffar, Hiba; Krall, Catherine M.; Singh, Anju; Kulchitsky, Vladimir A.; Corrigan, Joshua J.; Simons, Christopher T.; Petersen, Scott R.; Musteata, Florin M.; Bakshi, Chandra S.; Romanovsky, Andrej A.; Sellati, Timothy J.

2012-01-01

293

What do N isotopes tell us about the biogeochemistry of natural gradients? (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The two stable isotopes of nitrogen (N) hold great promise for biogeochemistry. Many processes prefer the lighter (14N) over the heavier (15N) isotope (they 'fractionate'), so the ratios of the two isotopes often differ within and across ecosystems. Our instruments are sufficiently awesome that we can observe these slight variations with great accuracy and precision, and these observations have revealed striking patterns along a number of natural environmental gradients. Because N isotopes integrate processes across time and space, there has been much hope that N isotopic patterns can unlock a mechanistic understanding of N dynamics, particularly at scales that are beyond the reach of experimentation. Is this a realistic hope? Certain patterns have clear, theory-based mechanistic implications. For example, the equilibrium (synonymous here with 'steady-state') isotopic signature of bulk soil N relative to net ecosystem N inputs indicates the degree of isotopic fractionation during ecosystem N losses. However, the nitrogen cycle is sufficiently complex that a given pattern could be produced from a variety of mechanisms, and in such cases it would be easy to infer a mechanism incorrectly. To expand our ability to make mechanistic inferences from N isotopic patterns, I extended a mathematical model of ecosystem N biogeochemistry to include explicit representations of the two N isotopes, constrained the theory with fractionation data, and analyzed the model using analytical approximations and numerical simulations. In this talk I will confine discussion to the submodel that studies ammonium and nitrate. The first three results I will discuss concern transient (non-equilibrium) dynamics, and serve as cautions for equilibrium-based interpretations. First, the time it takes to approach equilibrium is longer for N isotopic ratios than for the corresponding N pools, often by many fold, so isotopic ratios might be far from equilibrium even if pools are close. Second, the approach to equilibrium is often slower from above than below, so the average of measurements through time can be biased relative to the equilibrium. Third, the time it takes to approach equilibrium is shorter when N limits the processes of interest, often by an order of magnitude. In each of these cases, equilibrium-based inferences could be biased, but these results give guidance on the degree of bias and the circumstances under which is it expected, and thus give the ability to adjust equilibrium-based inferences accordingly. With these potential biases in mind, equilibrium results from the model yield mechanistic insights. For example, if some fractionation factors are known, data on N isotopic ratios in ammonium and nitrate allow estimates of the relative strengths of denitrification versus hydrologic nitrate loss. As another example, nitrification can be estimated from data on N isotopic ratios in ammonium and bulk soil N along with some fractionation factors. In this talk I will discuss these insights as they relate to N dynamics along natural environmental gradients.

Menge, D.

2013-12-01

294

Survey of Natural Cadmium Isotope Fractionation by Double Spike Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wombacher et al. (2003) have shown recently that natural Cd isotope fractionations in terrestrial materials are extremely limited (~100 ppm/amu or less). Thus, excellent external precision is absolutely paramount if Cd isotope fractionations are to be adequately quantified. Here we present a new high-precision double spike (DS) technique for Cd isotopes in which the Cd is measured by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS, ThermoElectron Triton), which draws on the pioneering work of Rosman et al. (1980). We observe pronounced anomalous odd-even isotope mass bias during TIMS measurement of Cd with silica gel activator, and avoid such effects by utilizing even isotopes of Cd only. The double spike and its composition were carefully optimized (cf. Galer, 1999), and the "natural" Cd isotope fractionation is expressed as the relative deviations in ^{112}Cd/^{110}Cd (in parts per 104) from our JMC Cd shelf standard. The external reproducibility for 100 ng loads of double-spiked JMC Cd shelf is ± 0.14 ?^{112/110}Cd (2SD, N=57) -- i.e. ±7 ppm/amu -- which is a factor of 4 to 10 times better than that reported in published studies using MC-ICP-MS techniques (e.g. Wombacher et al., 2003; Cloquet et al., 2005). The DS-TIMS method offers further benefits in terms of superior sensitivity, while Cd abundances are obtained as a biproduct by isotope dilution. We have analyzed ?^{112/110}Cd in over sixty samples from different terrestrial reservoirs and environments in order to delimit the extent of natural isotope fractionation of Cd. Most samples were duplicated or triplicated. To facilitate inter-lab comparison, our measured ?^{112/110}Cd for the standards "Münster Cd" and BAM-1012 averaged +21.46 and -7.42, respectively. On the whole, our study confirms the conclusions of Wombacher et al. (2003) that Cd isotope variations in terrestrial materials are limited -- nearly all samples fall within the range -1.0 to +1.0 in ?^{112/110}Cd. Nevertheless, we are able for the first time to resolve clearly differences far outside of analytical error. Analyses of 31 hydrogenous Fe-Mn deposits (and phosphorites) worldwide range from -0.6 to +2.0; those from the Indian and Circum- Antarctic Oceans lie at ~0, whíle Pacific and Atlantic samples generally having positive values. We suggest these differences reflect different rates of vertical inorganic scavenging and remineralization. Oceanic basalts (MORB, Hawaii) and continental loess samples generally have negative ?^{112/110}Cd (-1.2 to -0.5) which may imply that the bulk silicate Earth has a mildly negative value relative to our Cd standard. Major sphalerite deposits worldwide are clustered between -1.0 and 0 suggesting that the mechanisms of ore deposit formation do not result in large isotopic fractionations of Cd. Ocean floor hydrothermal sulphide and Fe-Mn deposits mostly cluster around -0.5, but a few of the sulphides exhibit large variations -- as fractionated as -3.0 to +1.0. Overall, natural variations in ?^{112/110}Cd appear to be quite limited -- and are now resolvable -- but are dwarfed by the extreme Cd isotope fractionations found in meteorites (Rosman et al., 1980; Wombacher et al., 2003) and anthropogenic Cd (Cloquet et al., 2005). References: Cloquet C. et al. (2005), Geostand. Geoanal. Res. 1, 95-106; Galer S.J.G. (1999), Chem. Geol. 157, 255-274; Rosman K.J.R. et al. (1980), Geochem. J. 14, 269-277; Wombacher F. et al. (2003), Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 67, 4639-4654.

Schmitt, A.; Galer, S. J.; Abouchami, W.

2006-12-01

295

Ecological Physiology of Synechococcus sp. Strain SH-94-5, a Naturally Occurring Cyanobacterium Deficient in Nitrate Assimilation  

PubMed Central

Synechococcus sp. strain SH-94-5 is a nitrate assimilation-deficient cyanobacterium which was isolated from an ammonium-replete hot spring in central Oregon. While this clone could grow on ammonium and some forms of organic nitrogen as sole nitrogen sources, it could not grow on either nitrate or nitrite, even under conditions favoring passive diffusion. It was determined that this clone does not express functional nitrate reductase or nitrite reductase and that the lack of activity of either enzyme is not due to inactivation of the cyanobacterial nitrogen control protein NtcA. A few other naturally occurring cyanobacterial strains are also nitrate assimilation deficient, and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the ability to utilize nitrate has been independently lost at least four times during the evolutionary history of the cyanobacteria. This phenotype is associated with the presence of environmental ammonium, a negative regulator of nitrate assimilation gene expression, which may indicate that natural selection to maintain functional copies of nitrate assimilation genes has been relaxed in these habitats. These results suggest how the evolutionary fates of conditionally expressed genes might differ between environments and thereby effect ecological divergence and biogeographical structure in the microbial world. PMID:11425713

Miller, Scott R.; Castenholz, Richard W.

2001-01-01

296

Enhanced dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by Geobacter sulfurreducens in the presence of naturally occurring quinones and ferrihydrite.  

PubMed

The effect of naturally occurring quinones including lawsone (LQ), ubiquinone (UQ), juglone (JQ), and 1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ) on the biotransformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) in the presence of Geobacter sulfurreducens and ferrihydrite was investigated. AQDS was used as the model compound for comparison. The reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite by G. sulfurreducens was enhanced by AQDS, NQ, and LQ. However, addition of UQ and JQ had little enhancement effect on Fe(II) production. The bioreduction efficiency and rate of ferrihydrite was highly dependent on the natural property and concentration of quinone compounds and the addition of low concentrations of LQ and NQ significantly accelerated the biotransformation rate of CT. The pseudo-first-order rate constants for CT dechlorination (kobsCT) in AQDS-, LQ- and NQ-amended batches were 5.4-5.8, 4.6-7.4 and 2.4-5.8 times, respectively, higher than those in the absence of quinone. A good relationship between kobsCT for CT dechlorination and bioreduction ratio of ferrihydrite was observed, indicating the important role of biogenic Fe(II) in dechlorination of CT under iron-reducing conditions. Spectroscopic analysis showed that AQDS and NQ could be reduced to semiquinones and hydroquinones, while only hydroquinones were generated in LQ-amended batches. PMID:24290294

Doong, Ruey-an; Lee, Chun-chi; Lien, Chia-min

2014-02-01

297

Thermoluminescence (TL) Analysis and Fading Studies of Naturally Occurring Salt Irradiated by 500 mGy Gamma Rays  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the naturally occurring salt for the dosimetry purposes, using TL. The fine powder samples (20 mg) were irradiated by {gamma}- rays from 500 mGy to 2500 mGy by using Theratron-780C Cobalt-60 source, however, this paper discusses about 500 mGy only. The TL glow curve peak parameters were studied by using Chen's peak shape equation. TL glow curves were compared with fitted curves using glow curve deconvolution (GCD) method by using Kitis expression. The kinetic parameter values (E, b and s) so calculated, are in good agreement with those available in literature. The calculated energy values were also verified by using various heating rate (VHR) method. {chi}{sup 2} test and figure of merit (FOM) calculation was done to accept the goodness of fit between the curves. Fading studies of the sample showed a good fitting between the curves. The analysis suggests that natural salt should be considered for dosimetry purposes.

Tiwari, Ramesh Chandra; Pau, Kham Suan [Department of Physics, Mizoram University: Tanhril Campus, Aizawl-796004, Mizoram (India)

2011-10-20

298

The effect of weathering on ecopersistence, reactivity, and potential toxicity of naturally occurring asbestos and asbestiform minerals.  

PubMed

The mechanisms underlying asbestos toxicity mainly rely on experiments performed on "laboratory" fibers, but little data is available on naturally occurring asbestos (NOA). Human exposure to NOA is subject to their ecopersistence and the modulation of their potential toxicity following weathering. The effect of weathering on three fibrous minerals from the Italian Western Alps, chrysotile, tremolite, and balangeroite-a Fe-rich asbestiform mineral-was investigated by mimicking more than 100 yr of physical (freezing-thawing/wetting-drying cycles in a climatic chamber) and biochemical forces (incubation with oxalic acid). Ion release, evaluated by means of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and variation in chemical composition, evaluated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), indicated that weathering modified the fibers in the series: chrysotile > balangeroite > tremolite. Kinetics of ion release from the fibers (Mg, Fe, and Si) revealed different ion removal pathways. Tremolite was poorly affected. Chrysotile preferentially released cations up to a plateau, with physical and biochemical forces acting competitively. Conversely, for balangeroite, upon which weathering forces acted synergistically, the initial loss of ions facilitated further dissolution and more Si than Mg was released, suggesting an ongoing collapse of the crystal structure. Depletion of redox-reactive ions produced a significant reduction in fiber-derived *OH radicals (EPR, spin-trapping technique), but the fibrous nature was always retained. Despite weathered fibers appearing less toxic than "stored/laboratory" ones, NOA is to be considered far from safe because of fibrous nature and residual surface reactivity. Risk assessment needs to consider the effect of weathering on exposures. Both tremolite and balangeroite may contaminate, in some areas, chrysotile asbestos. However, in contrast to tremolite, balangeroite exhibits a low ecopersistence, similar to chrysotile behavior. Any contribution of balangeroite to chrysotile toxicity will thus be related to its quantitative occurrence and not to higher structural stability. PMID:19184746

Enrico Favero-Longo, Sergio; Turci, Francesco; Tomatis, Maura; Compagnoni, Roberto; Piervittori, Rosanna; Fubini, Bice

2009-01-01

299

A systematic review of the efficacy of prophylactic control measures for naturally-occurring canine leishmaniosis, part I: vaccinations.  

PubMed

Canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is an important zoonotic disease; however, the efficacy of available vaccines for the prevention of naturally-occurring Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) infection in dogs remains unclear. The objective of this review was to determine the efficacy of currently available vaccines to prevent naturally-occurring L. infantum infection in dogs. Four bibliographic databases (CAB Direct 2011, Web of Science 2011, U.S. National Library of Medicine 2011 and Literatura Latino Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde) were searched along with eight sets of conference proceedings and the International Veterinary Information Service (IVIS) database, from 1980 to November 2012. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised clinical trials (NRCTs), cohort studies and case-control studies that investigated vaccine efficacy for natural L. infantum infection in dogs were eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed each study against the inclusion criteria, independently extracted relevant data from all included studies and assessed the risk of methodological shortcomings in each individual study. The odds ratio (OR) and absolute risk reduction (ARR) for dichotomous outcomes and mean difference for continuous outcomes were calculated. Meta-analysis was not performed due to heterogeneity of the studies identified. The search was conducted for all mitigations for CanL and yielded the title and abstract of 937 articles, from which 84 articles were screened based on full text. Twelve studies on vaccinations (five RCTs, seven NRCTs) were identified. Ten studies were at a high risk of methodological shortcomings, whilst two were at an unclear risk. The use of 200 ?g ALM protein, Leishmune(®), CaniLeish(®), LiESAp with MDP, and ALM with BCG tended to significantly reduce the proportion of dogs infected with L. infantum based on either parasitological or serological evidence. The use of lyophilized protein vaccine significantly increased the proportion of dogs infected with L. infantum based on either parasitological or serological evidence. There is peer-reviewed evidence that control measures are effective in preventing CanL with the results suggesting that between 6 and 54% of infections could be prevented with vaccination. However, this evidence is based on a small number of RCTs, all of which are either at high or unclear risk of methodological shortcomings. Well-designed, adequately powered and properly reported randomised clinical trials are needed to clearly establish efficacy of vaccines as CanL control measures. PMID:25074635

Wylie, C E; Carbonell-Antoñanzas, M; Aiassa, E; Dhollander, S; Zagmutt, F J; Brodbelt, D C; Solano-Gallego, L

2014-11-01

300

Analysis of reserve pit sludge from unconventional natural gas hydraulic fracturing and drilling operations for the presence of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM).  

PubMed

Soil and water (sludge) obtained from reserve pits used in unconventional natural gas mining was analyzed for the presence of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM). Samples were analyzed for total gamma, alpha, and beta radiation, and specific radionuclides: beryllium, potassium, scandium, cobalt, cesium, thallium, lead-210 and -214, bismuth-212 and -214, radium-226 and -228, thorium, uranium, and strontium-89 and -90. Laboratory analysis confirmed elevated beta readings recorded at 1329 ± 311 pCi/g. Specific radionuclides present in an active reserve pit and the soil of a leveled, vacated reserve pit included 232Thorium decay series (228Ra, 228Th, 208Tl), and 226Radium decay series (214Pb, 214Bi, 210Pb) radionuclides. The potential for impact of TENORM to the environment, occupational workers, and the general public is presented with potential health effects of individual radionuclides. Current oversight, exemption of TENORM in federal and state regulations, and complexity in reporting are discussed. PMID:23552651

Rich, Alisa L; Crosby, Ernest C

2013-01-01

301

A Transient Model of Induced Natural Circulation Thermal Cycling for Hydrogen Isotope Separation  

SciTech Connect

The property of selective temperature dependence of adsorption and desorption of hydrogen isotopes by palladium is used for isotope separation. A proposal to use natural circulation of nitrogen to alternately heat and cool a packed bed of palladium coated beads is under active investigation, and a device consisting of two interlocking natural convection loops is being designed. A transient numerical model of the device has been developed to aid the design process. It is a one-dimensional finite-difference model, using the Boussinesq approximation. The thermal inertia of the pipe walls and other heat structures as well as the heater control logic is included in the model. Two system configurations were modeled and results are compared.

SHADDAY, MARTIN

2005-07-12

302

Radiocarbon and Stable Carbon Isotope Analysis to Confirm Petroleum Natural Attenuation in the Vadose Zone  

Microsoft Academic Search

CO2 and CH4 radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope ratios were used to assess natural attenuation at a fuel-contaminated soil site at the Norfolk Navy Base, Norfolk, VA (USA). Soil gas samples were collected spatially over a monitoring network in October 2002 and in March 2003. CO2 and CH4 from regions with high petroleum concentrations were C-depleted relative to uncontaminated areas.

Richard B. Coffin; John W. Pohlman; Kenneth S. Grabowski; David. L. Knies; Rebecca E. Plummer; Robert W. Magee; Thomas J. Boyd

2008-01-01

303

Compound-Specific Stable Carbon Isotope Analysis of Low-Concentration Complex Hydrocarbon Mixtures from Natural Gas Hydrate Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system has been developed to measure the stable carbon isotope (delta13C) composition of dissolved methane, ethane, and propane from natural sediment samples with headspace concentrations as low as 1 ppm using a modified Thermo Electron Trace gas chromatograph (GC) connected to a Finnigan Delta Plus XP isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). A cryofocusing inlet was connected to the GC

R. E. Plummer; J. W. Pohlman; R. B. Coffin

2005-01-01

304

Lithium isotopes in large rivers reveal the cannibalistic nature of modern continental weathering and erosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The erosion of major mountain ranges is thought to be largely cannibalistic, recycling sediments that were deposited in the ocean or on the continents prior to mountain uplift. Despite this recognition, it has not yet been possible to quantify the amount of recycled material that is presently transported by rivers to the ocean. Here, we have analyzed the Li content and isotope composition (?Li7) of suspended sediments sampled along river depth profiles and bed sands in three of the largest Earth's river systems (Amazon, Mackenzie and Ganga-Brahmaputra rivers). The ?Li7 values of river-sediments transported by these rivers range from +5.3 to -3.6‰ and decrease with sediment grain size. We interpret these variations as reflecting a mixture of unweathered rock fragments (preferentially transported at depth in the coarse fraction) and present-day weathering products (preferentially transported at the surface in the finest fraction). Only the finest surface sediments contain the complementary reservoir of Li solubilized by water-rock interactions within the watersheds. Li isotopes also show that river bed sands can be interpreted as a mixture between unweathered fragments of igneous and sedimentary rocks. A mass budget approach, based on Li isotopes, Li/Al and Na/Al ratios, solved by an inverse method allows us to estimate that, for the large rivers analyzed here, the part of solid weathering products formed by present-day weathering reactions and transported to the ocean do not exceed 35%. Li isotopes also show that the sediments transported by the Amazon, Mackenzie and Ganga-Brahmaputra river systems are mostly sourced from sedimentary rocks (>60%) rather than igneous rocks. This study shows that Li isotopes in the river particulate load are a good proxy for quantifying both the erosional rock sources and the fingerprint of present-day weathering processes. Overall, Li isotopes in river sediments confirm the cannibalistic nature of erosion and weathering.

Dellinger, Mathieu; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Bouchez, Julien; Calmels, Damien; Galy, Valier; Hilton, Robert G.; Louvat, Pascale; France-Lanord, Christian

2014-09-01

305

Coupled sulfur and oxygen isotope insight into bacterial sulfate reduction in the natural environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present new sulfur and oxygen isotope data in sulfate (?34SSO4 and ?18OSO4, respectively), from globally distributed marine and estuary pore fluids. We use this data with a model of the biochemical steps involved in bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) to explore how the slope on a ?18OSO4 vs. ?34SSO4 plot relates to the net sulfate reduction rate (nSRR) across a diverse range of natural environments. Our data demonstrate a correlation between the nSRR and the slope of the relative evolution of oxygen and sulfur isotopes (?18OSO4 vs. ?34SSO4) in the residual sulfate pool, such that higher nSRR results in a lower slope (sulfur isotopes increase faster relative to oxygen isotopes). We combine these results with previously published literature data to show that this correlation scales over many orders of magnitude of nSRR. Our model of the mechanism of BSR indicates that the critical parameter for the relative evolution of oxygen and sulfur isotopes in sulfate during BSR in natural environments is the rate of intracellular sulfite oxidation. In environments where sulfate reduction is fast, such as estuaries and marginal marine environments, this sulfite reoxidation is minimal, and the ?18OSO4 increases more slowly relative to the ?34SSO4. In contrast, in environments where sulfate reduction is very slow, such as deep sea sediments, our model suggests sulfite reoxidation is far more extensive, with as much as 99% of the sulfate being thus recycled; in these environments the ?18OSO4 increases much more rapidly relative to the ?34SSO4. We speculate that the recycling of sulfite plays a physiological role during BSR, helping maintain microbial activity where the availability of the electron donor (e.g. available organic matter) is low.

Antler, Gilad; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Rennie, Victoria; Herut, Barak; Sivan, Orit

2013-10-01

306

Influence of Asellus aquaticus on Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Campylobacter jejuni and naturally occurring heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water.  

PubMed

Water lice, Asellus aquaticus (isopoda), frequently occur in drinking water distribution systems where they are a nuisance to consumers and water utilities. Whether they are solely an aesthetic problem or also affect the microbial water quality is a matter of interest. We studied the influence of A. aquaticus on microbial water quality in non-chlorinated drinking water in controlled laboratory experiments. Pure cultures of the indicator organisms Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and the pathogen Campylobacter jejuni as well as naturally occurring heterotrophic drinking water bacteria (measured as heterotrophic plate counts, HPC) were investigated in microcosms at 7 °C, containing non-sterilised drinking water, drinking water sediment and A. aquaticus collected from a non-chlorinated ground water based drinking water supply system. Concentrations of E. coli, K. pneumoniae and C. jejuni decreased over time, following a first order decay with half lives of 5.3, 18.4 and 1.3 days, respectively. A. aquaticus did not affect survival of indicators and pathogens substantially whereas HPC were influenced by presence of dead A. aquaticus. Growth rates increased with an average of 48% for bacteria grown on R-2A agar and an average of 83% for bacteria grown on yeast extract agar when dead A. aquaticus were present compared to no and living A. aquaticus present. A. aquaticus associated E. coli, K. pneumoniae and C. jejuni were measured (up to 25 per living and 500 per dead A. aquaticus) and so were A. aquaticus associated heterotrophic bacteria (>1.8*10(4) CFU per living and >6*10(4) CFU per dead A. aquaticus). A. aquaticus did not serve as an optimised habitat that increased survival of indicators and pathogens, since A. aquaticus associated E. coli, K. pneumoniae and C. jejuni were only measured as long as the bacteria were also present in the water and sediment. PMID:22884244

Christensen, Sarah C B; Nissen, Erling; Arvin, Erik; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

2012-10-15

307

The Inactivation of Human CYP2E1 by Phenethyl Isothiocyanate, a Naturally Occurring Chemopreventive Agent, and Its Oxidative Bioactivation  

PubMed Central

Phenethylisothiocyanate (PEITC), a naturally occurring isothiocyanate and potent cancer chemopreventive agent, works by multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, such as CYP2E1, that are involved in the bioactivation of carcinogens. PEITC has been reported to be a mechanism-based inactivator of some P450s. We describe here the possible mechanism for the inactivation of human CYP2E1 by PEITC, as well as the putative intermediate that might be involved in the bioactivation of PEITC. PEITC inactivated recombinant CYP2E1 with a partition ratio of 12, and the inactivation was not inhibited in the presence of glutathione (GSH) and not fully recovered by dialysis. The inactivation of CYP2E1 by PEITC is due to both heme destruction and protein modification, with the latter being the major pathway for inactivation. GSH-adducts of phenethyl isocyanate (PIC) and phenethylamine were detected during the metabolism by CYP2E1, indicating formation of PIC as a reactive intermediate following P450-catalyzed desulfurization of PEITC. Surprisingly, PIC bound covalently to CYP2E1 to form protein adducts but did not inactivate the enzyme. Liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy analysis of the inactivated CYP2E1 apo-protein suggests that a reactive sulfur atom generated during desulfurization of PEITC is involved in the inactivation of CYP2E1. Our data suggest that the metabolism of PEITC by CYP2E1 that results in the inactivation of CYP2E1 may occur by a mechanism similar to that observed with other sulfur-containing compounds, such as parathion. Digestion of the inactivated enzyme and analysis by SEQUEST showed that Cys 268 may be the residue modified by PIC. PMID:23371965

Yoshigae, Yasushi; Sridar, Chitra; Kent, Ute M.

2013-01-01

308

Effects of a naturally occurring neurosteroid on GABAA IPSCs during development in rat hippocampal or cerebellar slices  

PubMed Central

The effects of the naturally occurring neurosteroid tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC) on GABAA receptor-mediated miniature, spontaneous and evoked IPSCs was tested using patch-clamp techniques in slices of hippocampus and cerebellum from rats at two developmental stages (?10 and ?20 days postnatal). The cells studied were hippocampal granule cells and cerebellar Purkinje and granule cells. Most miniature GABAergic currents (mIPSCs) decayed with two exponentials and neurosteroids caused a ?4-fold increase in the decay time constant of the second exponential at the highest concentration used (2 ?m). Similar effects were seen at high concentrations of THDOC (1-2 ?m) in all cell groups tested. No effects were seen on amplitude or rise time of mIPSCs. The effects of THDOC (1 ?m) were shown to be stereoselective and rapidly reversible, indicating that the neurosteroid binds to the GABAA receptor, rather than acting genomically. At concentrations of THDOC likely to occur physiologically (50–100 nm), the decay time of IPSCs was also enhanced (25–50 %) in all cerebellar cell groups tested. In contrast, at 100 nm THDOC, seven of 11 hippocampal granule cells were sensitive from the 10 day group but the 20 day hippocampal granule cells showed no significant enhancement in the presence of these lower concentrations of THDOC. The differences in sensitivity of hippocampal and cerebellar cells to THDOC are compared to data reported in the literature on regional development of expression of different receptor subunits in the brain and it is suggested that the progressive relative insensitivity of the 20 day hippocampal cells may depend on increasing expression of the ? subunit of the GABAA receptor and possibly an increase in the ?4 subunit. PMID:10581314

Cooper, Elizabeth J; Johnston, Graham A R; Edwards, Frances A

1999-01-01

309

Naturally occurring Influenza A virus subtype H1N2 infection in a Midwest United States mink (Mustela vison) ranch.  

PubMed

Influenza A virus (FLUAV) causes acute respiratory disease in humans and a variety of animal species. The virus tends to remain within the species of origin; nonetheless, naturally occurring cross-species transmission of FLUAV has been periodically documented. Multiple cross-species transmissions of FLUAV have been reported from companion animals and captive wild animals, neither of which is historically considered as natural hosts of FLUAV. In the fall of 2010, mink (Mustela vison) inhabiting a 15,000-head mink farm in the Midwest United States experienced persistent severe respiratory distress and nose and/or mouth bleeding. Mink losses averaged approximately 10 animals per day. Six dead mink at 6 months of age were submitted to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for diagnostic investigation. Gross and microscopic examinations revealed that all 6 mink had hemorrhagic bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Hemolytic Escherichia coli was isolated from lungs, probably accounting for hemorrhagic pneumonia. All animals tested negative for Canine distemper virus and Aleutian mink disease virus. Interestingly, FLUAV of H1N2 subtype, which contained the matrix gene of swine lineage, was detected in the lungs. Serological follow-up on mink that remained in the ranch until pelting also confirmed that the ranch had been exposed to FLUAV of H1 subtype (? clade). The case study suggests that FLUAV should be included in the differential diagnosis when mink experience epidemics of respiratory disease. Since the source of FLUAV appeared to be uncooked turkey meat, feeding animals fully cooked ration should be considered as a preventive measure. PMID:22362526

Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Schwartz, Kent; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Jianqiang; Hildebrandt, Hugh

2012-03-01

310

Naturally Occurring Peer Support through Social Media: The Experiences of Individuals with Severe Mental Illness Using YouTube  

PubMed Central

Increasingly, people with diverse health conditions turn to social media to share their illness experiences or seek advice from others with similar health concerns. This unstructured medium may represent a platform on which individuals with severe mental illness naturally provide and receive peer support. Peer support includes a system of mutual giving and receiving where individuals with severe mental illness can offer hope, companionship, and encouragement to others facing similar challenges. In this study we explore the phenomenon of individuals with severe mental illness uploading videos to YouTube, and posting and responding to comments as a form of naturally occurring peer support. We also consider the potential risks and benefits of self-disclosure and interacting with others on YouTube. To address these questions, we used qualitative inquiry informed by emerging techniques in online ethnography. We analyzed n?=?3,044 comments posted to 19 videos uploaded by individuals who self-identified as having schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder. We found peer support across four themes: minimizing a sense of isolation and providing hope; finding support through peer exchange and reciprocity; sharing strategies for coping with day-to-day challenges of severe mental illness; and learning from shared experiences of medication use and seeking mental health care. These broad themes are consistent with accepted notions of peer support in severe mental illness as a voluntary process aimed at inclusion and mutual advancement through shared experience and developing a sense of community. Our data suggest that the lack of anonymity and associated risks of being identified as an individual with severe mental illness on YouTube seem to be overlooked by those who posted comments or uploaded videos. Whether or not this platform can provide benefits for a wider community of individuals with severe mental illness remains uncertain. PMID:25333470

Naslund, John A.; Grande, Stuart W.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Elwyn, Glyn

2014-01-01

311

Naturally Occurring Incompatibilities between Different Culex pipiens pallens Populations as the Basis of Potential Mosquito Control Measures  

PubMed Central

Background Vector-borne diseases remain a threat to public health, especially in tropical countries. The incompatible insect technique has been explored as a potential control strategy for several important insect vectors. However, this strategy has not been tested in Culex pipiens pallens, the most prevalent mosquito species in China. Previous works used introgression to generate new strains that matched the genetic backgrounds of target populations while harboring a new Wolbachia endosymbiont, resulting in mating competitiveness and cytoplasmic incompatibility. The generation of these incompatible insects is often time-consuming, and the long-term stability of the newly created insect-Wolbachia symbiosis is uncertain. Considering the wide distribution of Cx. pipiens pallens and hence possible isolation of different populations, we sought to test for incompatibilities between natural populations and the possibility of exploiting these incompatibilities as a control strategy. Methodology/Principal Findings Three field populations were collected from three geographic locations in eastern China. Reciprocal cross results showed that bi-directional patterns of incompatibility existed between some populations. Mating competition experiments indicated that incompatible males could compete with cognate males in mating with females, leading to reduced overall fecundity. F1 offspring from incompatible crosses maintained their maternal crossing types. All three populations tested positive for Wolbachia. Removal of Wolbachia by tetracycline rendered matings between these populations fully compatible. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that naturally occurring patterns of cytoplasmic incompatibility between Cx. pipiens pallens populations can be the basis of a control strategy for this important vector species. The observed incompatibilities are caused by Wolbachia. More tests including field trials are warranted to evaluate the feasibility of this strategy as a supplement to other control measures. PMID:23383354

Chen, Lin; Zhu, Changliang; Zhang, Donghui

2013-01-01

312

Modeling the effects of naturally occurring organic carbon on chlorinated ethene transport to a public supply well.  

PubMed

The vulnerability of public supply wells to chlorinated ethene (CE) contamination in part depends on the availability of naturally occurring organic carbon to consume dissolved oxygen (DO) and initiate reductive dechlorination. This was quantified by building a mass balance model of the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer, which is widely used for public water supply in New Jersey. This model was built by telescoping a calibrated regional three-dimensional (3D) MODFLOW model to the approximate capture zone of a single public supply well that has a history of CE contamination. This local model was then used to compute a mass balance between dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), and adsorbed organic carbon (AOC) that act as electron donors and DO, CEs, ferric iron, and sulfate that act as electron acceptors (EAs) using the Sequential Electron Acceptor Model in three dimensions (SEAM3D) code. SEAM3D was constrained by varying concentrations of DO and DOC entering the aquifer via recharge, varying the bioavailable fraction of POC in aquifer sediments, and comparing observed and simulated vertical concentration profiles of DO and DOC. This procedure suggests that approximately 15% of the POC present in aquifer materials is readily bioavailable. Model simulations indicate that transport of perchloroethene (PCE) and its daughter products trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC) to the public supply well is highly sensitive to the assumed bioavailable fraction of POC, concentrations of DO entering the aquifer with recharge, and the position of simulated PCE source areas in the flow field. The results are less sensitive to assumed concentrations of DOC in aquifer recharge. The mass balance approach used in this study also indicates that hydrodynamic processes such as advective mixing, dispersion, and sorption account for a significant amount of the observed natural attenuation in this system. PMID:24372440

Chapelle, Francis H; Kauffman, Leon J; Widdowson, Mark A

2014-09-01

313

Naturally occurring radioactive material from the aluminium industry--a case study: the Egyptian Aluminium Company, Nag Hammady, Egypt.  

PubMed

The activity concentrations and the gamma-absorbed dose rates of the terrestrial naturally occurring radionuclides (226)Ra and (232)Th were determined in samples of bauxite, alumina and aluminium dross tailings industrial waste (used to produce two types of alums) using high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma ray spectrometry. The bauxite and alumina are imported by Egyptalum (The Egyptian Aluminium Company, Nag Hammady, Egypt) from Guinea and India. The activity concentrations in the bauxite range from 29 +/- 1 to 112 +/- 6 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, and 151 +/- 8 to 525 +/- 12 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th, with mean values of 62 +/- 8 and 378 +/- 50 Bq kg(-1), respectively. With respect to alumina and tail, the mean values are 5.7 +/- 1.1 and 8.4 +/- 0.8 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra and 7.2 +/- 1.6 and 10.7 +/- 1.2 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th. Potassium-40 was not detected in any of the studied samples. The measured activity concentrations of (226)Ra and (232)Th in bauxite are higher than the world average while in alumina and tail they are lower. As a measure of radiation hazard to the occupational workers and members of the public, the Ra equivalent activities and external gamma dose rates due to natural radionuclides at 1 m above the ground surface were calculated. The external gamma-radiation doses received by the Egyptalum workers are 97, 409, 8.5 and 12.7 microSv y(-1) for the Guinean and Indian bauxite, the alumina and tail, respectively, which is well below the recommended allowed dose of 1 mSv y(-1) for non-exposed workers. PMID:17146126

Abbady, Adel G E; El-Arabi, A M

2006-12-01

314

Modeling the Effects of Naturally Occurring Organic Carbon on Chlorinated Ethene Transport to a Public Supply Well†  

PubMed Central

The vulnerability of public supply wells to chlorinated ethene (CE) contamination in part depends on the availability of naturally occurring organic carbon to consume dissolved oxygen (DO) and initiate reductive dechlorination. This was quantified by building a mass balance model of the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer, which is widely used for public water supply in New Jersey. This model was built by telescoping a calibrated regional three-dimensional (3D) MODFLOW model to the approximate capture zone of a single public supply well that has a history of CE contamination. This local model was then used to compute a mass balance between dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), and adsorbed organic carbon (AOC) that act as electron donors and DO, CEs, ferric iron, and sulfate that act as electron acceptors (EAs) using the Sequential Electron Acceptor Model in three dimensions (SEAM3D) code. SEAM3D was constrained by varying concentrations of DO and DOC entering the aquifer via recharge, varying the bioavailable fraction of POC in aquifer sediments, and comparing observed and simulated vertical concentration profiles of DO and DOC. This procedure suggests that approximately 15% of the POC present in aquifer materials is readily bioavailable. Model simulations indicate that transport of perchloroethene (PCE) and its daughter products trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC) to the public supply well is highly sensitive to the assumed bioavailable fraction of POC, concentrations of DO entering the aquifer with recharge, and the position of simulated PCE source areas in the flow field. The results are less sensitive to assumed concentrations of DOC in aquifer recharge. The mass balance approach used in this study also indicates that hydrodynamic processes such as advective mixing, dispersion, and sorption account for a significant amount of the observed natural attenuation in this system. PMID:24372440

Chapelle, Francis H; Kauffman, Leon J; Widdowson, Mark A

2014-01-01

315

Alpha-keto acid metabolites of naturally occurring organoselenium compounds as inhibitors of histone deacetylase in human prostate cancer cells.  

PubMed

Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are gaining interest as cancer therapeutic agents. We tested the hypothesis that natural organoselenium compounds might be metabolized to HDAC inhibitors in human prostate cancer cells. Se-Methyl-L-selenocysteine (MSC) and selenomethionine are amino acid components of selenium-enriched yeast. In a cell-free system, glutamine transaminase K (GTK) and L-amino acid oxidase convert MSC to the corresponding alpha-keto acid, beta-methylselenopyruvate (MSP), and L-amino acid oxidase converts selenomethionine to its corresponding alpha-keto acid, alpha-keto-gamma-methylselenobutyrate (KMSB). Although methionine (sulfur analogue of selenomethionine) is an excellent substrate for GTK, selenomethionine is poorly metabolized. Structurally, MSP and KMSB resemble the known HDAC inhibitor butyrate. We examined androgen-responsive LNCaP cells and androgen-independent LNCaP C4-2, PC-3, and DU145 cells and found that these human prostate cancer cells exhibit endogenous GTK activities. In the corresponding cytosolic extracts, the metabolism of MSC was accompanied by the concomitant formation of MSP. In MSP-treated and KMSB-treated prostate cancer cell lines, acetylated histone 3 levels increased within 5 hours, and returned to essentially baseline levels by 24 hours, suggesting a rapid, transient induction of histone acetylation. In an in vitro HDAC activity assay, the selenoamino acids, MSC and selenomethionine, had no effect at concentrations up to 2.5 mmol/L, whereas MSP and KMSB both inhibited HDAC activity. We conclude that, in addition to targeting redox-sensitive signaling proteins and transcription factors, alpha-keto acid metabolites of MSC and selenomethionine can alter HDAC activity and histone acetylation status. These findings provide a potential new paradigm by which naturally occurring organoselenium might prevent the progression of human prostate cancer. PMID:19584079

Lee, Jeong-In; Nian, Hui; Cooper, Arthur J L; Sinha, Raghu; Dai, Jenny; Bisson, William H; Dashwood, Roderick H; Pinto, John T

2009-07-01

316

Evolution of isotopic composition of reprocessed uranium during the multiple recycling in light water reactors with natural uranium feed  

SciTech Connect

A complex approach based on the consistent modeling of neutron-physics processes and processes of cascade separation of isotopes is applied for analyzing physical problems of the multiple usage of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle of light water reactors. A number of scenarios of multiple recycling of reprocessed uranium in light water reactors are considered. In the process, an excess absorption of neutrons by the {sup 236}U isotope is compensated by re-enrichment in the {sup 235}U isotope. Specific consumptions of natural uranium for re-enrichment of the reprocessed uranium depending on the content of the {sup 232}U isotope are obtained.

Smirnov, A. Yu., E-mail: a.y.smirnoff@rambler.ru; Sulaberidze, G. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alekseev, P. N.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: neva@dhtp.kiae.ru; Proselkov, V. N.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15

317

Acetylation and glycation of fibrinogen in vitro occur at specific lysine residues in a concentration dependent manner: A mass spectrometric and isotope labeling study  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fibrinogen was incubated in vitro with glucose or aspirin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylations and glycations were found at twelve lysine sites by mass spectrometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The labeling by aspirin and glucose occurred dose-dependently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No competition between glucose and aspirin for binding to fibrinogen was found. -- Abstract: Aspirin may exert part of its antithrombotic effects through platelet-independent mechanisms. Diabetes is a condition in which the beneficial effects of aspirin are less prominent or absent - a phenomenon called 'aspirin resistance'. We investigated whether acetylation and glycation occur at specific sites in fibrinogen and if competition between glucose and aspirin in binding to fibrinogen occurs. Our hypothesis was that such competition might be one explanation to 'aspirin resistance' in diabetes. After incubation of fibrinogen in vitro with aspirin (0.8 mM, 24 h) or glucose (100 mM, 5-10 days), we found 12 modified sites with mass spectrometric techniques. Acetylations in the {alpha}-chain: {alpha}K191, {alpha}K208, {alpha}K224, {alpha}K429, {alpha}K457, {alpha}K539, {alpha}K562, in the {beta}-chain: {beta}K233, and in the {gamma}-chain: {gamma}K170 and {gamma}K273. Glycations were found at {beta}K133 and {gamma}K75, alternatively {gamma}K85. Notably, the lysine 539 is a site involved in FXIII-mediated cross-linking of fibrin. With isotope labeling in vitro, using [{sup 14}C-acetyl]salicylic acid and [{sup 14}C]glucose, a labeling of 0.013-0.084 and 0.12-0.5 mol of acetylated and glycated adduct/mol fibrinogen, respectively, was found for clinically (12.9-100 {mu}M aspirin) and physiologically (2-8 mM glucose) relevant plasma concentrations. No competition between acetylation and glycation could be demonstrated. Thus, fibrinogen is acetylated at several lysine residues, some of which are involved in the cross-linking of fibrinogen. This may mechanistically explain why aspirin facilitates fibrin degradation. We find no support for the idea that glycation of fibrin(ogen) interferes with acetylation of fibrinogen.

Svensson, Jan, E-mail: jan.svensson@ki.se [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden) [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden); Bergman, Ann-Charlotte [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Adamson, Ulf [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden); Blombaeck, Margareta [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Wallen, Hakan; Joerneskog, Gun [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden)

2012-05-04

318

Carbon and nitrogen natural stable isotopes in Slovene honey: adulteration and botanical and geographical aspects.  

PubMed

Isotope parameters (?(13)C(honey), ?(13)C(protein), ?(15)N) were determined for 271 honey samples of 7 types (black locust, multifloral, lime, chestnut, forest, spruce, and fir honeys) from 4 natural geographical regions of Slovenia. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were measured to elucidate the applicability of this method in the identification of the botanical and geographical origin of honey and in honey adulteration. Only 2.2% of the samples were adulterated according to the internal standard carbon isotope ratio analysis method. Botanical origin did not have any major influence on the honey isotope profiles; only black locust honey showed higher ?(13)C values. Some differences were seen across different production years, indicating that the influence of season should be further tested. Statistical and multivariate analyses demonstrated differences among honeys of various geographical origins. Those from the Alpine region had low ?(13)C (-26.0‰) and ?(15)N values (1.1‰); those from the Mediterranean region, high ?(13)C (-24.6‰) and medium ?(15)N values (2.2‰); those from the Pannonian region, medium ?(13)C (-25.6‰) and high ?(15)N value (3.0‰); and those from the Dinaric region, medium ?(13)C (-25.7‰) and low ?(15)N values (1.4‰). PMID:21087042

Kropf, Urška; Golob, Terezija; Ne?emer, Marijan; Kump, Peter; Korošec, Mojca; Bertoncelj, Jasna; Ogrinc, Nives

2010-12-22

319

Tracing natural and anthropogenic Pb in sediments along the Mediterranean Coast of Israel using Pb isotopes.  

PubMed

The natural and anthropogenic sources of Pb in surface sediments offshore the Israeli Mediterranean coast were studied using the isotopic composition of Pb in diluted acid sediment extracts. Surface sediments were collected at the lower reaches of coastal streams, along a south-north offshore transect and at selected monitoring stations of the Dan Region Wastewater Plant (DRWP) outfall pipe. The background values of the Pb isotopic composition were determined from the deepest part of two representative cores collected offshore and were found to have a narrow range dominated mainly by clays derived from both inland soils and the Nilotic cell and to a lesser extent from the Saharan dust. The impact of the DRWP activated sludge can be traced to a distance of ca. 2 km from the outfall pipe. Enrichment factors of Zn, Cu, and Pb were up to 25 and are strongly correlated with each other and with the Pb isotopic composition, thus demonstrating the sludge to be their common source. The isotopic compositions of Pb in stream sediments have the widest range of values and indicate a strong anthropogenic contribution, probably from both post-1992 aerosols and point sources. However the impact of stream sediments on marine sediments could not be clearly detected. PMID:20690597

Harlavan, Yehudit; Almogi-Labin, Ahuva; Herut, Barak

2010-09-01

320

Emodin, a naturally occurring anthraquinone derivative, suppresses IgE-mediated anaphylactic reaction and mast cell activation.  

PubMed

The high-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc?RI)-mediated activation of mast cells plays an important role in allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. Emodin, a naturally occurring anthraquinone derivative in oriental herbal medicines, has several beneficial pharmacologic effects, such as anti-cancer and anti-diabetic activities. However, the anti-allergic effect of emodin has not yet been investigated. To assess the anti-allergic activity of emodin, in vivo passive anaphylaxis animal model and in vitro mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells were used to investigate the mechanism of its action on mast cells. Our results showed that emodin inhibited degranulation, generation of eicosanoids (prostaglandin D(2) and leukotriene C(4)), and secretion of cytokines (TNF-? and IL-6) in a dose-dependent manner in IgE/Ag-stimulated mast cells. Biochemical analysis of the Fc?RI-mediated signaling pathways demonstrated that emodin inhibited the phosphorylation of Syk and multiple downstream signaling processes including mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) and activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and NF-?B pathways. When administered orally, emodin attenuated the mast cell-dependent passive anaphylactic reaction in IgE-sensitized mice. Thus, emodin inhibits mast cell activation and thereby the anaphylactic reaction through suppression of the receptor-proximal Syk-dependent signaling pathways. Therefore, emodin might provide a basis for development of a novel anti-allergic drug. PMID:21907188

Lu, Yue; Yang, Ju Hye; Li, Xian; Hwangbo, Kyoung; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Murakami, Makoto; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Son, Jong-Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

2011-12-01

321

Naturally occurring anti-band-3 antibodies and complement together mediate phagocytosis of oxidatively stressed human erythrocytes  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of erythrocytes with the thiol-specific oxidant azodicarboxylic acid bis(dimethylamide) (diamide) enhances their phagocytosis by adherent monocytes. Phagocytosis of diamide-treated erythrocytes required that the cells were opsonized with whole serum, since complement inactivation abolished phagocytosis. Opsonization with whole serum containing 20-100 times the physiological concentration of naturally occurring anti-band-3- antibodies enhanced phagocytosis of diamide-treated erythrocytes. High inputs of anti-band-3 also restored phagocytosis of erythrocytes that had been incubated with complement-inactivated serum. Elevated concentrations of anti-spectrin antibodies were ineffective in whole and complement-inactivated serum. Specific recognition of diamide-treated erythrocytes by anti-band-3 antibodies may be due to generation of anti-band-3 reactive protein oligomers on intact diamide-treated erythrocytes. Generation of such oligomers was dose-dependent with respect to diamide. Bound anti-band-3 alone was not sufficient to mediate phagocytosis. It resulted in deposition of complement component C3b on the cells through activation of the alternative complement pathway in amounts exceeding that of bound antibodies by two orders of magnitude. Thus, anti-band-3 and complement together mediate phagocytosis of oxidatively stressed erythrocytes, which simulate senescent erythrocytes with respect to bound antibody and complement.

Lutz, H.U.; Bussolino, F.; Flepp, R.; Fasler, S.; Stammler, P.; Kazatchkine, M.D.; Arese, P.

1987-11-01

322

Naturally occurring autologous anti-idiotypic antibodies. Participation in immune complex formation in selective IgA deficiency  

PubMed Central

50% of individuals of selective IgA deficiency have high serum titers of antibody to bovine proteins, and high levels of circulating immune complexes that contain bovine antigens. Because in animal studies, immunization with antigen-antibody complexes is a very effective means of producing anti-idiotypic antibodies, we sought such autoantibodies in two sera known to have large amounts of anticasein. After IgG isolation and two-stage affinity chromatography, IgG-like material (molecular weights of H and L chains on SDS-PAGE), with binding activity for the F(ab')2 of anticasein were isolated from both sera. Pooled human gamma globulin or IgG myeloma proteins did not inhibit binding of specific anti-anticaseins to the corresponding anticasein, but sodium caseinate did block this binding (by 80 and 95%) indicating that most of these autoantibodies have affinity for the casein-binding site. Naturally occurring anti-idiotypic antibodies have been difficult to conclusively demonstrate in human sera; consequently, these experiments provide evidence of a unique model which may be used to explore the network theory of immunoglobulin regulation in humans. PMID:6977608

1982-01-01

323

Naturally Occurring Anti-Band 3 Antibodies in Clearance of Senescent and Oxidatively Stressed Human Red Blood Cells  

PubMed Central

Summary Naturally occurring anti-band 3 antibodies (anti-band 3 NAbs) are directed against the 55-kDa chymotryptic fragment of the anion transport protein (band 3) of red blood cells (RBCs). They bind to senescent and oxidatively stressed RBCs and induce their selective clearance. These IgG NAbs exist at low concentrations, and have a weak affinity that prevents them from actively recruiting second binding sites. Cellular senescence or oxidative damage induces a cascade of biochemical events that results in the detachment of band 3 from the cytoskeleton and in clustering of band 3 protein by bound hemichromes and Syk kinase. Clustered band 3 proteins allow bivalent binding of anti-band 3 NAbs. Bivalently bound anti-band 3 NAbs have the unique capacity to stimulate C3b deposition by preferentially generating C3b2-IgG complexes, which act as potent C3 convertase precursors of the alternative complement pathway. Antibody binding not only to clustered, but also to oligomerized band 3 protein further increases if the human plasma also contains induced anti-lactoferrin antibodies. These bind to the polylactosaminyl oligosaccharide, a carbohydrate that exists in lactoferrin and in the 38-kDa fragment of band 3 protein. Anti-lactoferrin antibodies are found primarily in plasma of patients with autoimmune diseases and who have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). PMID:23801923

Lutz, Hans U.

2012-01-01

324

HLA Antigens Shed from the Surface of Synthetic or Naturally Occurred Platelet-Derived Microparticles During Storage of Platelet Concentrate.  

PubMed

The demand for standard platelet concentrates (PCs) has continued to increase in the recent years. Infusible platelet membranes (IPM) prepared from new or outdated human platelets have been developed as an alternative to standard PCs, with the additional advantage of long shelf life and increased viral safety. Reduction of HLA antigens on the IPM has been assigned as one of the probable advantages of this product. In re-examining this issue, we studied the existence of HLA class I on the surface of IPM microparticles. In comparison we also surveyed HLA expression on the surface of the naturally occurred platelet-derived microparticles (nPMPs) during 7 days storage. Intended for producing IPM, PCs obtained from Iranian blood transfusion organization were lysed; virally inactivated with wet heat in the presence of a heat stabilizer and then sonicated. IPMs were separated using centrifugation and liquid-stored in 4°C. The expression of HLA class I antigens was surveyed using flow cytometry technique. HLA molecules were present on the microparticles. Shedding of HLA antigens was demonstrated from the surface of the both liquid-stored IPM and nPMPs during storage. Storage of IPM in 4°C was accompanied with significant reduction of HLA molecules. It seemed that achievement of HLA-free IPM could be impossible unless chloroquine treated platelets were used to prepare these microvesicles. PMID:23997451

Yari, Fatemeh; Ahmadzadeh, Noushin; Azadpour, Shima; Vaeli, Shahram

2012-09-01

325

Isolation of naturally occurring aluminium ligands using immobilized metal affinity chromatography for analysis by ESI-MS.  

PubMed

Aluminium (iii) is one of the most abundant metal ions found in soil. Typically, Al(+3) is bound to minerals, but its bioavailability and toxicity toward vascular plants increases with increasing soil acidity. Ectomycorrhizal fungi, which live symbiotically on the roots of numerous woody plants, often confer Al(+3) resistance to host plants by reducing metal availability to the plant by unknown mechanisms. A potential mechanism of detoxification is binding of the Al(+3) by organic compounds that are exuded by the fungi into the surrounding soil and solution. A novel method has been developed to purify and characterize Al(+3) binding ligands from Pisolithus tinctorius exudate solutions using Al(+3) immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC), reversed phase chromatography, and mass spectrometry. Fungal exudates produced by P. tinctorius exhibit a strong binding capacity for Al(+3), allowing their selective enrichment and collection using this IMAC method. Elution of the ligands requires the use of high pH. RP-HPLC separation and elemental analysis of the IMAC elutent indicates that the Al(+3) and the exudate ligands both elute from the column but are not bound in a complex. Thus, reversed phase HPLC at pH 10 is used for separation of the ligands and Al(+3) prior to MS analysis. The strongest binding IMAC fraction is analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in positive and negative ion modes. This report provides new methods for the direct purification and analysis of naturally occurring ligands that bind hard metal ions. PMID:15724160

Baldwin, Carson; Cumming, Jonathan; Timperman, Aaron T

2005-03-01

326

A computer aided thermodynamic approach for predicting the formation of Z-DNA in naturally occurring sequences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ease with which a particular DNA segment adopts the left-handed Z-conformation depends largely on the sequence and on the degree of negative supercoiling to which it is subjected. We describe a computer program (Z-hunt) that is designed to search long sequences of naturally occurring DNA and retrieve those nucleotide combinations of up to 24 bp in length which show a strong propensity for Z-DNA formation. Incorporated into Z-hunt is a statistical mechanical model based on empirically determined energetic parameters for the B to Z transition accumulated to date. The Z-forming potential of a sequence is assessed by ranking its behavior as a function of negative superhelicity relative to the behavior of similar sized randomly generated nucleotide sequences assembled from over 80,000 combinations. The program makes it possible to compare directly the Z-forming potential of sequences with different base compositions and different sequence lengths. Using Z-hunt, we have analyzed the DNA sequences of the bacteriophage phi X174, plasmid pBR322, the animal virus SV40 and the replicative form of the eukaryotic adenovirus-2. The results are compared with those previously obtained by others from experiments designed to locate Z-DNA forming regions in these sequences using probes which show specificity for the left-handed DNA conformation.

Ho, P. S.; Ellison, M. J.; Quigley, G. J.; Rich, A.

1986-01-01

327

The influence of naturally occurring heterophilic anti-immunoglobulin antibodies on direct measurement of serum proteins using sandwich ELISAs.  

PubMed

Sandwich ELISAs have become a widely used method for the quantitative detection of serum proteins. However, they can be biased by a variety of interfering substances. As reported recently, we observed false-positive levels of interferon (IFN)-alpha and -beta in up to 27% of sera from healthy blood donors using commercial ELISAs. We now demonstrate that two different groups of naturally occurring heterophilic antibodies (IgG-type) are responsible for these titers. Group I (representing 85% of positive samples) binds to the Fab region of IgG from goat, mouse, rat, horse, and bovidae (but not rabbit). Group II (15%) recognizes an epitope in the Fc region of mouse, horse, bovine, and rabbit (but not goat or rat) immunoglobulins. The antibodies did not crossreact with human IgG subclasses but contributed to false-positive IgG rheumatoid factor levels obtained using a commercially available ELISA. To investigate the susceptibility of assays to these artifacts, various combinations of capture and detection antibodies have been tested. On this basis, we defined the relative risks that standard ELISAs might be influenced by heterophilic anti-immunoglobulin antibodies. In general, assays that use monoclonal antibodies for both capture and detection are less susceptible than others which include at least one polyclonal antiserum. However, only systems utilizing rabbit F(ab')(2) fragments have been found to be immune to this interference. PMID:10675759

Hennig, C; Rink, L; Fagin, U; Jabs, W J; Kirchner, H

2000-02-21

328

Activation of naturally occurring lung CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells requires CD8 and MHC I interaction  

PubMed Central

Naturally occurring Foxp3+CD4+CD25+ T cells (nTregs) isolated from lungs of naive mice regulate allergic airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation. Here, we demonstrate the critical requirement for engagement of MHC class I on CD4+CD25+ T cells by CD8 for the functional activation of these nTregs. Suppression of allergen-induced AHR and inflammation by nTregs was abolished in mice treated with anti-CD8. Correspondingly, decreased levels of IL-10 and TGF-? and increased levels of Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage were detected in these treated mice. Similarly, nTregs isolated from ?2m?/? mice or from mice treated with anti-MHC I antibody in vitro before intratracheal transfer failed to modulate AHR or inflammation. Coculture of nTregs with CD8+ T cells increased IL-10 and TGF-?. Addition of anti-MHC I or anti-CD8 reduced IL-10 and TGF-?. These results demonstrate that functional activation of nTregs requires the interaction between MHC I on CD4+CD25+ T cells and CD8. PMID:17855564

Joetham, Anthony; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Koya, Toshiyuki; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Gelfand, Erwin W.

2007-01-01

329

Synthesis of selenium analogues of the naturally occurring glycosidase inhibitor salacinol and their evaluation as glycosidase inhibitors.  

PubMed

The syntheses of two selenium analogues (10 and 11) of the naturally occurring sulfonium ion, salacinol (3), are described. Salacinol is one of the active principles in the aqueous extracts of Salacia reticulata that are traditionally used in Sri Lanka and India for the treatment of diabetes. The synthetic strategy relies on the nucleophilic attack of a 2,3,5-tri-O-benzyl-1,4-anhydro-4-seleno-D-arabinitol at the least hindered carbon of benzyl- or benzylidene-protected D- or L-erythritol-1,3-cyclic sulfate. The use of 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol as a solvent in the coupling reaction proves to be beneficial. Enzyme inhibition assays indicate that 10 is a better inhibitor (K(i) = 0.72 mM) of glucoamylase than 3, which has a K(i) value of 1.7 mM. In contrast, 11 showed no significant inhibition of glucoamylase. Compounds 10 and 11 showed no significant inhibition of barley-alpha-amylase or porcine pancreatic-alpha-amylase. PMID:12105902

Johnston, Blair D; Ghavami, Ahmad; Jensen, Morten T; Svensson, Birte; Pinto, B Mario

2002-07-17

330

Measurements of CO2 Carbon Stable Isotopes at Artificial and Natural Analog Sites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon storage in geologic formations is one method to prevent carbon dioxide (CO2), produced by fossil fuel combustion, from entering the Earth's atmosphere. The monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) of geologically sequestered CO2 is critical to the operation of a geologic storage site. Surface MVA techniques need to identify seepage from the sequestration reservoir at or below ambient CO2 concentrations. The CO2 carbon stable isotope ratio of is a sensitive diagnostic signature that can distinguish between anthropogenic and natural sources of CO2. Frequency Modulated spectroscopy (FMS) is an ultra-sensitive version of absorption spectroscopy that is capable of detecting the CO2 carbon stable isotope ratios. The technique involves phase modulation of the laser such that two side bands, spaced wider than the absorption feature of interest (in this case +/-2 GHz) are created. The signal is mixed with the local oscillator yielding a signal proportional to the species concentration. This FMS signature is recorded at multiple wavelengths to obtain the CO2 carbon isotope ratio.Two instruments using the FMS technique have been built and tested at LANL. One instrument draws ambient air into a multi-pass cell for a measurement, point source measurements. The other instrument uses an open-air path, tested up to 160 m (round trip), to measure the CO2 carbon isotopic ratio along the beam path, column average measurements. In this paper, results from multiple field deployments of one or both of the instruments will be presented. The Zero Emissions Research & Technology (ZERT) group at Montana State University established a field test site where controlled amounts of CO2 are released to test the performance of CO2 detection instruments and measurement techniques. The field site allows a controlled flow rate of CO2 to be released into the near surface through a 100 m long horizontal pipe. In July of 2009, a release was conducted, with a uniform flow rate of 0.2 tons per day, as the subsequent seepage was measured. There was a similar release, but at a flow rate of 0.15 tons/day, in July 2010. Stable isotope measurements have also been made at several natural analog sites. Two places of interest are the Valles Caldera National Preserve in NM and Soda Springs, ID. The Valle traps CO2 at night and can have very large swings in concentrations that test the instrument range. Soda Springs, ID has many carbonated natural springs and carbon isotope information from this site can provide information regarding CO2 from the deep subsurface, useful for future MVA work.

Humphries, S. D.; Clegg, S. M.; Rahn, T.; Fessenden, J. E.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.; McLing, T. L.

2010-12-01

331

High Precision and High Sensitivity Measurements of Osmium Isotopes in Natural Waters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Direct measurements of Os in water are critical in understanding the geochemical cycle of Os in the environment. However, measurements of Os isotopes in natural waters are challenging due to a) low concentrations (~10 fg/g or less; 1 fg/g = 10-15 g/g) and b) the differences in oxidation states of naturally occurring and tracer Os that prevent accurate determination of Os concentration by isotope dilution [Sharma et al., GCA 61:5411, 1997]. It has been recognized for more than a decade that the best way to chemically separate and purify Os and at the same time achieve tracer-sample equilibration is to oxidize Os in sample-tracer mixture to OsO4. Three techniques have been developed: 1) heating of sample-tracer mixture with Br2 and Cr6+ in Teflon bombs at 90°C and solvent-extraction of OsO4 with Br2 [Levasseur et al., Science 282:272, 1998]; 2) heating to 180°C with Cr6+ in sealed glass (carius) tubes and its extraction by distillation [Sharma et al., GCA 63:4005, 1999]; 3) heating of water in the presence of H2O2 and H2SO4 and distillation of OsO4 [Woodhouse et al., EPSL 173:223, 1999]. The blanks for these techniques are [Os] = 22 fg 187Os/188Os = 0.47, [Os] = 19 fg 187Os/188Os = 0.27, and [Os] = 120 fg 187Os/188Os = 0.31, respectively. We have modified the carius tube technique by using a High Pressure Asher at 300°C and a confining pressure of 100 bars. This method is an improvement over previous techniques because the time required to achieve complete oxidation is much shorter due to the increased temperature of reaction and the blanks are significantly lower ([Os] = 2.2 fg, 187Os/188Os = 0.18) due to smaller amounts of reagents used. Additionally, we have modified the mass spectrometry associated with measuring low level Os samples. Typically, Os is measured on a single Pt filament as OsO3-, but we have modified the technique to include a double filament geometry. We use Ta for the ionization filament and Pt for the evaporation filament. The double filament geometry allows us to run samples at a lower temperature, thus reducing the blank contribution from the Pt filament. Not only do we find total Re counts to be reduced, but organic interferences on mass 233 (185Re.16O4-) are no longer present, allowing for more accurate Re correction. Repeated measurements of a 200 fg standard gives 2? uncertainty of 1.38% for 187Os/188Os and 0.32% for 190Os/188Os. The improvements in chemistry and mass spectrometry allow the analysis of low level water samples such as snow from Antarctica and to understand the transport of Os from atmosphere to the oceans. We have applied this technique to surface and deep seawater samples collected from the Atlantic Ocean through GEOTRACES (Summer '08) and find that the surface seawater has been impacted by inputs of anthropogenic Os.

Chen, C.; Sharma, M.

2008-12-01

332

Cr Stable Isotopes in Snake River Plain Aquifer Groundwater: Evidence for Natural Reduction of Dissolved Cr(VI)  

SciTech Connect

At Idaho National Laboratory, Cr(VI) concentrations in a groundwater plume once exceeded regulatory limits in some monitoring wells but have generally decreased over time. This study used Cr stable isotope measurements to determine if part of this decrease resulted from removal of Cr(VI) via reduction to insoluble Cr(III). Although waters in the study area contain dissolved oxygen, the basalt host rock contains abundant Fe(II) and may contain reducing microenvironments or aerobic microbes that reduce Cr(VI). Insomecontaminated locations, 53Cr/52Cr ratios are close to that of the contaminant source, indicating a lack of Cr(VI) reduction. In other locations, ratios are elevated. Part of this shift may be caused by mixing with natural background Cr(VI), which is present at low concentrations but insomelocations has elevated 53Cr/52Cr.Somecontaminated wells have 53Cr/52Cr ratios greater than the maximum attainable by mixing between the inferred contaminant and the range of natural background observed in several uncontaminated wells, suggesting that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred. Definitive proof of reduction would require additional evidence. Depth profiles of 53Cr/52Cr suggest that reduction occurs immediately below the water table, where basalts are likely least weathered and most reactive, and is weak or nonexistent at greater depth.

Amanda L. Raddatz; Thomas M. Johnson; Travis L. McLing

2011-01-01

333

A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory.  

PubMed

Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly #2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra. PMID:20471726

Frostick, A; Bollhöfer, A; Parry, D

2011-10-01

334

Naturally occurring mastitis effects on timing of ovulation, steroid and gonadotrophic hormone concentrations, and follicular and luteal growth in cows.  

PubMed

The effects of naturally occurring subclinical chronic or clinical short-term mastitis on time of ovulation, plasma steroid and gonadotropin concentrations, and follicular and luteal dynamics were examined in 73 lactating Holstein cows. Cows were sorted by milk somatic cell count and bacteriological examination into an uninfected group (n=22), a clinical mastitis group (n=9; events occurring 20+/-7 d before the study), and a subclinical chronic mastitis group (n=42). In addition, uninfected and mastitic cows were further sorted by their estrus to ovulation (E-O) interval. About 30% of mastitic cows (mainly subclinical) manifested an extended E-O interval of 56+/-9.2h compared with 28+/-0.8h in uninfected cows and 29+/-0.5h in the other 70% of mastitic cows. In mastitic cows with extended E-O interval, the concentration of plasma estradiol at onset of estrus was lower than that of uninfected cows or mastitic cows that exhibited normal E-O intervals (3.1+/-0.4, 5.8+/-0.5, and 5.5+/-0.5 pg/mL, respectively). The disruptive effect of mastitis on follicular estradiol probably does not involve alterations in gonadotropin secretion because any depressive effects of mastitis on pulsatile LH concentrations were not detected. Cortisol concentrations did not differ among groups. The preovulatory LH surge in mastitic cows with delayed ovulation varied among individuals, being lower, delayed, or with no surge noted compared with the normal LH surge exhibited by uninfected cows or mastitic cows with normal E-O interval (6.8+/-0.7 ng/mL). The diameter of the second-wave dominant follicle was larger and the number of medium follicles was smaller in uninfected and subclinical cows with normal intervals compared with subclinical cows with extended intervals (13.4+/-0.5 vs. 10.9+/-0.9mm, and 3.8+/-0.2 vs. 6.7+/-0.14 follicles, respectively). Mid-luteal progesterone concentrations were similar in uninfected and mastitic cows. These results indicate for the first time that around 30% of cows with subclinical chronic mastitis exhibit delayed ovulation that is associated with low plasma concentrations of estradiol and a low or delayed preovulatory LH surge. PMID:20172211

Lavon, Y; Leitner, G; Voet, H; Wolfenson, D

2010-03-01

335

Natural variations of copper and sulfur stable isotopes in blood of hepatocellular carcinoma patients  

PubMed Central

The widespread hypoxic conditions of the tumor microenvironment can impair the metabolism of bioessential elements such as copper and sulfur, notably by changing their redox state and, as a consequence, their ability to bind specific molecules. Because competing redox state is known to drive isotopic fractionation, we have used here the stable isotope compositions of copper (65Cu/63Cu) and sulfur (34S/32S) in the blood of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a tool to explore the cancer-driven copper and sulfur imbalances. We report that copper is 63Cu-enriched by ?0.4‰ and sulfur is 32S-enriched by ?1.5‰ in the blood of patients compared with that of control subjects. As expected, HCC patients have more copper in red blood cells and serum compared with control subjects. However, the isotopic signature of this blood extra copper burden is not in favor of a dietary origin but rather suggests a reallocation in the body of copper bound to cysteine-rich proteins such as metallothioneins. The magnitude of the sulfur isotope effect is similar in red blood cells and serum of HCC patients, implying that sulfur fractionation is systemic. The 32S-enrichment of sulfur in the blood of HCC patients is compatible with the notion that sulfur partly originates from tumor-derived sulfides. The measurement of natural variations of stable isotope compositions, using techniques developed in the field of Earth sciences, can provide new means to detect and quantify cancer metabolic changes and provide insights into underlying mechanisms. PMID:25583489

Balter, Vincent; Nogueira da Costa, Andre; Bondanese, Victor Paky; Jaouen, Klervia; Lamboux, Aline; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Vincent, Nicolas; Fourel, François; Télouk, Philippe; Gigou, Michelle; Lécuyer, Christophe; Srivatanakul, Petcharin; Bréchot, Christian; Albarède, Francis; Hainaut, Pierre

2015-01-01

336

Influence of Naturally Occurring Simian Foamy Viruses (SFVs) on SIV Disease Progression in the Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Model  

PubMed Central

We have investigated the influence of naturally occurring simian foamy viruses (SFVs) on simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection and disease in Indian rhesus macaques. Animals were divided into two groups based upon presence or absence of SFV; in each group, eight monkeys were injected with SIVmac239 virus obtained from a molecular clone and four were injected with medium. Blood was collected every two weeks for evaluation of SIV infection based upon T cell-subsets, plasma viral load, development and persistence of virus-specific antibodies, and clinical changes by physical examination and hematology. Comparative analysis of SFV+/SIV+ and SFV?/SIV+ monkey groups indicated statistically significant differences in the plasma viral load between 6–28 weeks, particularly after reaching plateau at 20–28 weeks, in the CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell numbers over the entire study period (2–43 weeks), and in the survival rates evaluated at 49 weeks. There was an increase in the plasma viral load, a decreasing trend in the CD4+ T cells, and a greater number of animal deaths in the SFV+/SIV+ group. The results, although based upon a small number of animals, indicated that pre-existing SFV infection can influence SIV infection and disease outcome in the rhesus macaque model. The study highlights consideration of the SFV status in evaluating results from SIV pathogenesis and vaccine challenge studies in monkeys and indicates the potential use of the SFV/SIV monkey model to study the dynamics of SFV and HIV-1 dual infections, recently reported in humans. PMID:23744104

Choudhary, Anil; Galvin, Teresa A.; Williams, Dhanya K.; Beren, Joel; Bryant, Mark A.; Khan, Arifa S.

2013-01-01

337

Identification of the naturally occurring genes encoding carbapenem-hydrolysing oxacillinases from Acinetobacter haemolyticus, Acinetobacter johnsonii, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.  

PubMed

Carbapenem resistance is increasingly being reported among Acinetobacter species, and results mostly from the expression of acquired carbapenem-hydrolysing oxacillinases (CHDLs). Several Acinetobacter species intrinsically possess chromosomal CHDL genes: Acinetobacter baumannii (bla(OXA-51) ), Acinetobacter radioresistens (bla(OXA-23) ), and Acinetobacter lwoffii (bla(OXA-134) ). We aimed to identify the progenitors of novel CHDL-encoding genes for identification of potential reservoirs. We performed PCR screening using degenerated internal primers designed from a sequence alignment of the known CHDLs (OXA-23, OXA-40, OXA-51, OXA-58, OXA-134, and OXA-143) applied to a collection of 50 Acinetobacter strains belonging to 23 different species. Two strains of Acinetobacter johnsonii, one strain of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and two strains of Acinetobacter haemolyticus were found to harbour, respectively, the totally novel bla(OXA-211) -like, bla(OXA-213) -like and bla(OXA-214) -like genes. In addition, the complete genomes of those three species available in GenBank, i.e. one A. johnsonii genome, four A. calcoaceticus genomes, and one A. haemolyticus genome, were analysed and found to be positive for the presence of bla(OXA211) -like, bla(OXA-213) -like and bla(OXA-214) -like genes, respectively. The ?-lactamases OXA-211, OXA-213 and OXA-214 are diverse, with amino acid identities ranging from 53% to 76%, as compared with the naturally occurring OXA-51-like CHDL from A. baumannii. These ?-lactamases showed a peculiar hydrolysis profile, including mostly penicillins and carbapenems. Regarding bla(OXA-23) in A. radioresistens and bla(OXA-134) in A. lwoffii, these genes were not expressed (or expressed at a non-significant level) in their host. Detection of these ?-lactamase genes might be used as a useful tool for accurate identification of these Acinetobacter species. PMID:22128805

Figueiredo, S; Bonnin, R A; Poirel, L; Duranteau, J; Nordmann, P

2012-09-01

338

Exposure to Low Dose of Cinnabar (a Naturally Occurring Mercuric Sulfide (HgS)) Caused Neurotoxicological Effects in Offspring Mice  

PubMed Central

Cinnabar, a naturally occurring mercuric sulfide (HgS), has long been used in Chinese mineral medicine for more than 2000 years. Although mercury is well-known for its toxicity, whether cinnabar induces neurotoxicity, especially in infants and children, is unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore the neurotoxic effects of low-dose of cinnabar (10?mg/kg/day) on developing mice. The results revealed neurobehavioral defects in F1-C-Cin group, which were associated with Hg accumulation, increased NOx levels in whole blood, and Na+/K+-ATPase activities in brain tissues. F1- and F2-Cin-V groups were found to increase brain Hg contents and prominent neurobehavioral defects compared with F1-C-V group, suggesting that the fetal brain was more susceptible to irreversible effects for cinnabar-induced damage. Moreover, F1- and F2-Cin-Cin groups had severely neurobehavioral dysfunctions, closely correlated with the further alteration of NOx levels and Na+/K+-ATPase activities than F1- and F2-C-Cin groups. Effects in F2-Cin-Cin group were more significant than those in F1-Cin-Cin group. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that exposure to low-dose of cinnabar during the perinatal and developmental stages results in irreversible and severe injuries of the neurotoxicity in offspring, and NOx and Na+/K+-ATPase activities may exist potential and useful biomarkers for neurotoxicity-induced by low-doses of mercuric compounds. PMID:22888198

Huang, Chun-Fa; Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lin-Shiau, Shoei-Yn

2012-01-01

339

Tissue-specific gene silencing mediated by a naturally occurring chalcone synthase gene cluster in Glycine max.  

PubMed

Chalcone synthase, a key regulatory enzyme in the flavonoid pathway, constitutes an eight-member gene family in Glycine max (soybean). Three of the chalcone synthase (CHS) gene family members are arranged as inverted repeats in a 10-kb region, corresponding to the I locus (inhibitor). Spontaneous mutations of a dominant allele (I or i(i)) to a recessive allele (i) have been shown to delete promoter sequences, paradoxically increasing total CHS transcript levels and resulting in black seed coats. However, it is not known which of the gene family members contribute toward pigmentation and how this locus affects CHS expression in other tissues. We investigated the unusual nature of the I locus using four pairs of isogenic lines differing with respect to alleles of the I locus. RNA gel blots using a generic open reading frame CHS probe detected similar CHS transcript levels in stems, roots, leaves, young pods, and cotyledons of the yellow and black isolines but not in the seed coats, which is consistent with the dominant I and i(i) alleles mediating CHS gene silencing in a tissue-specific manner. Using real-time RT-PCR, a variable pattern of expression of CHS genes in different tissues was demonstrated. However, increase in pigmentation in the black seed coats was associated with release of the silencing effect specifically on CHS7/CHS8, which occurred at all stages of seed coat development. These expression changes were linked to structural changes taking place at the I locus, shown to encompass a much wider region of at least 27 kb, comprising two identical 10.91-kb stretches of CHS gene duplications. The suppressive effect of this 27-kb I locus in a specific tissue of the G. max plant represents a unique endogenous gene silencing mechanism. PMID:15064367

Tuteja, Jigyasa H; Clough, Steven J; Chan, Wan-Ching; Vodkin, Lila O

2004-04-01

340

Membrane disruption and enzyme inhibition by naturally-occurring and modified chacotriose-containing Solanum steroidal glycoalkaloids.  

PubMed

Naturally-occurring 3beta-O-chacotriosides of solasodine (solamargine), of its 22S, 25S isomer tomatidenol (beta-solamarine), and of solanidine (chaconine), as well as ring E- and F-modified derivatives of solamargine were prepared and assayed in order to assess the relevance of aglycone structural features to membrane-disruption and enzyme-inhibitory activities of the related glycoalkaloids. A ring E-opened dihydro-derivative of solasodine (the chacotrioside of dihydrosolasodine A) did not bind to cholesterol, stigmasterol or ergosterol in vitro, disrupt PC/cholesterol liposomes or mammalian erythrocytes. or inhibit acetylcholinesterase in vitro. It did not synergise with the solatrioside of dihydrosolasodine A or solasonine (nor did solamargine with dihydrosolasodine A solatrioside) in haemolysis tests. The ring F modified derivative, N-nitrososolamargine, did not inhibit acetylcholinesterase in vitro, but lysed liposomes at > or = 150 microM and pH 7. Increasing the pH to 8 (but not 9) further enhanced disruption. The combination of N-nitrososolamargine and solasonine did not cause any disruption of liposomes. Beta-solamarine showed no anti-acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro at up to 100 microM, but disrupted liposomes at 75 and 150 microM, although not to the extent caused by solamargine or chaconine. In combination with both the (inactive) solatriosides, solasonine and solanine, 75 microM beta-solamarine produced synergistic effects, with liposome disruption greater than 150 microM beta-solamarine alone. Beta-solamarine, solamargine and chaconine showed similar haemolytic activity. Beta-solamarine synergised with the solatriosides solasonine and solanine in disrupting erythrocytes. Preliminary structure-activity relationships were evaluated for the active chacotriosides in an attempt to define the scope and limitations of this model study. PMID:11281138

Roddick, J G; Weissenberg, M; Leonard, A L

2001-03-01

341

Inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity through an innate mechanism involving naturally occurring IgM anti-leukocyte autoantibodies.  

PubMed

In prior studies, we show that naturally occurring IgM anti-leukocyte autoantibodies (IgM-ALA) bind to CD3, CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 receptors. These observations prompted us to determine whether IgM-ALA have a role in inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity by inhibiting viral entry into cells. We show that purified IgM, but not IgG, from individual sera of both normal and HIV-1 infected individuals is highly inhibitory (>95%) to HIV-1 viral infectivity both in vitro using PHA plus IL-2 activated PBL and in vivo using the human PBL-SCID mouse. Inhibition was observed with physiological doses of purified serum IgM and even after IgM was added 3 days postinfection in the in vitro assays. Absorbing purified serum IgM either with leukocytes or immobilized recombinant CD4 significantly decreased (>80%) the inhibitory effect on HIV-1 infectivity. IgM inhibited by >90% syncytia formation with the X4-IIIB infected SupT-1 cells indicating therefore that IgM inhibits viral attachment to core-receptors. IgM mediated anti-HIV-1 activity was highly specific as only certain IgM-ALA, obtained from human B cell clones inhibited HIV-1. IgM from certain HIV-1 infected individuals were not inhibitory to some R5-HIV-1 viral strains indicating that certain HIV-IgM may lack Abs reactive to strain specific coreceptor epitopes. These data indicate that an innate immune mechanism which is present from birth i.e., IgM-ALA, has a role in inhibiting HIV-1 viral entry into cells. Validation of this data with other in vivo models will be needed to determine whether in vivo administration or enhancement of IgM-ALA, e.g., through a vaccine, could prolong the asymptomatic state in HIV-1 infected individuals. PMID:18209074

Lobo, Peter I; Schlegel, Kailo H; Yuan, Wen; Townsend, Gregory C; White, Jennifer A

2008-02-01

342

Repellency of naturally occurring volatile alcohols to fungus gnat Bradysia sp. nr. coprophila (Diptera: Sciaridae) adults under laboratory conditions.  

PubMed

This study, conducted under laboratory conditions, was designed to determine the repellent activity of 10 naturally occurring volatile alcohol constituents against adults of the fungus gnat, Bradysia sp. nr. coprophila (Lintner) (Diptera: Sciaridae). The essential oil constituents were octanoic acid, furfural, acetophenone, benzaldehyde, dimethoxybenzene, borneol, menthol, 1-octen-3-ol, and 7-hydroxycitronellol, and alpha-terpineol. alpha-Terpineol, octanoic acid and furfural were tested at several concentrations, whereas the remaining seven were tested at only one concentration. The essential oil constituents' menthol, 1-octen-3-ol, and borneol displayed the most repellent activity. The mean percentage of fungus gnat adults recovered from the test compound petri dishes associated with the three essential oil constituents was between 6 and 15% compared with between 36 and 50% for the petri dishes with distilled water. The mean +/- SEM number of fungus gnat adults present in the sample compartments associated with menthol (10.4 +/- 2.6), 1-octen-3-ol (18.8 +/- 2.4), and borneol (23.4 +/- 5.6) was statistically lower than those in the petri dishes containing distilled water (60.9 +/- 7.4, 49.8 +/- 4.0, and 79.7 +/- 13.5), respectively. Only the highest concentration of alpha-terpineol (8.0 micromol) displayed significant repellent activity against fungus gnat adults. The other essential constituents tested, including octanoic acid (all three concentrations), furfural (both concentrations), acetophenone, dimethoxybenzene, and 7-hydroxycitronellol, were not statistically different from the distilled water control. The results of this study indicate that certain essential oil constituents repel fungus gnat adults, which may be useful, from a practical standpoint, in deterring adults from laying eggs into growing media. PMID:22066193

Cloyd, Raymond A; Marley, Karen A; Larson, Richard A; Dickinson, Amy; Arieli, Bari

2011-10-01

343

Isotopical changes induced by ultrasounds in iron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of a series of experiments based on the application of ultrasound to structural materials and metal alloys, a sample of alpha iron (Ferrite) was subjected to ultrasounds in order to investigate the possible emission of nuclear particles and the possible formation of new isotopes. The sample was subsequently subjected to Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) to highlight the possible transformations that occurred, or the formation of new natural isotopes or the variation of the natural isotopic composition of the material.

Cardone, Fabio; Petrucci, Andrea; Rosada, Alberto

2014-05-01

344

Ra and Rn isotopes as natural tracers of submarine groundwater discharge in Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A suite of naturally occurring radionuclides in the U/Th decay series (222Rn, 223,224,226,228Ra) were studied during wet and dry conditions in Tampa Bay, Florida, to evaluate their utility as groundwater discharge tracers, both within the bay proper and within the Alafia River/estuary — a prominent free-flowing river that empties into the bay. In Tampa Bay, almost 30% of the combined riverine inputs still remain ungauged. Consequently, groundwater/surface water (hyporheic) exchange in the discharging coastal rivers, as well as submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) within the bay, are still unresolved components of this system's water and material budgets. Based on known inputs and sinks, there exists an excess of 226Ra in the water column of Tampa Bay, which can be evaluated in terms of a submarine groundwater contribution to the bay proper. Submarine groundwater discharge rates calculated using a mass balance of excess 226Ra ranged from 2.2 to 14.5 L m? 2 day? 1, depending on whether the estuarine residence time was calculated using 224Ra/xs228Ra isotope ratios, or whether a long term, averaged model-derived estuarine residence time was used. When extrapolated to the total shoreline length of the bay, such SGD rates ranged from 1.6 to 10.3 m3 m? 1 day? 1. Activities of 222Rn were also elevated in surface water and shallow groundwater of the bay, as well as in the Alafia River estuary, where upstream activities as high as 250 dpm L? 1 indicate enhanced groundwater/surface water exchange, facilitated by an active spring vent. From average nutrient concentrations of 39 shallow, brackish, groundwater samples, rates of nutrient loading into Tampa Bay by SGD rates were estimated, and these ranged from 0.2 to 1.4 × 105 mol day? 1 (PO43?), 0.9–6.2 × 105 mol day? 1 (SiO4?), 0.7–5.0 × 105 mol day? 1 (dissolved organic nitrogen, DON), and 0.2–1.4 × 106 mol day? 1 (total dissolved nitrogen, TDN). Such nutrient loading estimates, when compared to average river discharge estimates (e.g., TDN = 6.9 × 105 mol day? 1), suggest that SGD-derived nutrient fluxes to Tampa Bay are indeed important components to the overall nutrient economy of these coastal waters.

Swarzenski, P.W.; Reich, C.; Kroeger, K.D.; Baskaran, M.

2007-01-01

345

Naturally occurring IgG antibody levels to the Staphylococcus aureus protein IsdB in humans.  

PubMed

Staphylococcus aureus is a well-recognized, clinically important cause of nosocomial infections, and as such, a vaccine to prevent S. aureus infections would be an important achievement. A Phase IIB/III study of V710, a vaccine containing iron-regulated surface determinant B (IsdB), demonstrated significant sero-conversion rates in cardiovascular surgery patients following a single pre-surgery immunization. However, the vaccine was not efficacious in preventing bacteremia or deep sternal wound infection post-surgery, thus raising the possibility that IsdB might not be available for immune recognition during infection. The purpose of the work described herein was to evaluate and quantify the naturally occurring anti-IsdB levels at baseline and over time during infection, to understand whether IsdB is expressed during a S. aureus infection in hospitalized non-vaccinated patients. We evaluated baseline and follow-up titers in 3 populations: (1) healthy subjects, (2) hospitalized patients with non-S. aureus infections, and (3) hospitalized patients with S. aureus infections. Baseline anti-IsdB levels generally overlapped between the 3 groups, but were highly variable within each group. In healthy subjects, baseline and follow-up levels were highly correlated (Spearman's rho = 0.93), and the geometric mean fold-rise (GMFR) in anti-IsdB levels between study entry and last value was 0.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8 to 1.0 ; p = 0.09), showing no trend over time. The convalescent GMFR in anti-IsdB levels from baseline was 1.7-fold (95% CI: 1.3 to 2.2, p = 0.0008) during S. aureus infection, significantly different from the 1.0-fold GMFR (95% CI: 0.9-1.2, p = 0.60) in non-S. aureus infection, p = 0.005. Additionally, S. aureus isolates (51) obtained from the hospitalized patient group expressed the IsdB protein in vitro. Collectively, these data suggest that IsdB expression levels rise substantially following infection with S. aureus, but not with other pathogens, and IsdB is likely well-conserved across S. aureus strains. PMID:23778314

Zorman, Julie K; Esser, Mark; Raedler, Michael; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer A A; Kartsonis, Nicholas; Smugar, Steven S; Anderson, Annaliesa S; McNeely, Tessie; Arduino, Jean Marie

2013-09-01

346

Characterization of the National Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) Site for Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material(NORM)  

SciTech Connect

The National Petroleum Reserve No. 3 site (NPR-3) near Casper, Wyoming is being prepared for transfer to private industry. Remediation of the NPR-3 site has already begun in anticipation of this transfer. This document describes the characterization of the NPR-3 site for Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Data generated on radionuclide concentrations and radon emanation may be used to determine disposal options and the need for remediation at this site. A preliminary gamma survey of the NPR-3 site was conducted to identify areas of potential NORM contamination. Based on these gamma surveys, two general areas of NORM contamination were found: the North Water Flood area and the BTP-10 produced water discharge steam. A maximum surface exposure rate of 120 {micro}R h{sup -1} was observed in the North Water Flood area, with the highest readings found along the drainage channel from the area. Exposure rates dropped to background quickly with increasing distance from the center of the drainage. The maximum observed exposure rate in the BTP-10 produced water drainage was 40 {micro}R h{sup -1}. Soil and sediment sampling were concentrated in these two areas. All samples were analyzed for concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 40}K. Maximum {sup 226}Ra concentrations observed in the samples collected were 46 pCi g{sup -1} for soil and 78 pCi g{sup -1} for sediment. Concentrations in most samples were considerably lower than these values. Radon emanation fraction was also measured for a randomly selected fraction of the samples. The mean Rn emanation fraction measured was 0.10, indicating that on average only 10 percent of the Rn produced is released from the medium. Based on the results of these analyses, NORM contamination at the NPR-3 site is minimal, and appears to be restricted to the two general areas sampled. Concentrations of NORM radionuclides found soils and sediments in these two locations do not justify remedial actions at present. However, continued discharge of NORM-contaminated produced waters from the BTP-10 area will likely result in the continued accumulation of NORM in sediment. It is therefore recommended that the sediments in the BTP-10 discharge stream be monitored periodically for NORM.

White, G.J; Rood, A.S.

1999-01-21

347

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41329 between Joint Oceanographic Institutions and DOE-NETL was divided into two phases based on successive proposals and negotiated statements of work pertaining to activities to sample and characterize methane hydrates on ODP Leg 204 (Phase 1) and on IODP Expedition 311 (Phase 2). The Phase 1 Final Report was submitted to DOE-NETL in April 2004. This report is the Phase 2 Final Report to DOE-NETL. The primary objectives of Phase 2 were to sample and characterize methane hydrates using the systems and capabilities of the D/V JOIDES Resolution during IODP Expedition 311, to enable scientists the opportunity to establish the mass and distribution of naturally occurring gas and gas hydrate at all relevant spatial and temporal scales, and to contribute to the DOE methane hydrate research and development effort. The goal of the work was to provide expanded measurement capabilities on the JOIDES Resolution for a dedicated hydrate cruise to the Cascadia continental margin off Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (IODP Expedition 311) so that hydrate deposits in this region would be well characterized and technology development continued for hydrate research. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. The statement of work for this project included three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd.; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). Additional small tasks that arose during the course of the research were included under these three primary tasks in consultation with the DOE-NETL Program Manager. All tasks outlined in the original statement of work were accomplished except for the deployment and use of the X-ray CT system under Subtask 2-2. This reduction in scope provided resources that were applied to other activities to support the overall project. Post-expedition analysis of results and report writing will continue beyond this reporting period, however, all field deployments associated with this project have been successfully concluded as of this writing.

Frank R. Rack

2006-09-20

348

An investigation of nuclear properties of even-even natural 92-100Mo isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we have calculated the basic nuclear properties such as binding energies, root mean square (rms) charge radii, and neutron and proton densities of the even-even natural 92-100Mo isotopes. Investigations were performed using the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) method with different Skyrme-like forces. Separation energies, which have an important role in nuclear structure, of neutron, proton, deuteron, triton, helium-3 and alpha were also investigated with TALYS 1.4 code. The calculated results were discussed and compared with experimental results.

Artun, Ozan; Aytekin, Ça?lar; Aytekin, Hüseyin

2014-12-01

349

Using stable isotopes of water and strontium to investigate the hydrology of a natural and a constructed wetland  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Wetlands cannot exist without water, but wetland hydrology is difficult to characterize. As a result, compensatory wetland mitigation often only assumes the proper hydrology has been created. In this study, water sources and mass transfer processes in a natural and constructed wetland complex were investigated using isotopes of water and strontium. Water isotope profiles in the saturated zone revealed that the natural wetland and one site in the constructed wetland were primarily fed by ground water; profiles in another constructed wetland site showed recent rain was the predominant source of water in the root zone. Water isotopes in the capillary fringe indicated that the residence time for rain is less in the natural wetland than in the constructed wetland, thus transpiration (an important water sink) was greater in the natural wetland. Strontium isotopes showed a systematic difference between the natural and constructed wetlands that we attribute to the presence or absence of peat. In the peat-rich natural wetland, ??87Sr in the pore water increased along the flowline due to preferential weathering of minerals containing radiogenic Sr in response to elevated Fe concentrations in the water. In the constructed wetland, where peat thickness was thin and Fe concentrations in water were negligible, ??87Sr did not increase along the flowline. The source of the peat (on-site or off-site derived) applied in the constructed wetland controlled the ??87Sr at the top of the profile, but the effects were restricted by strong cation exchange in the underlying fluvial sediments. Based on the results of this study, neither constructed wetland site duplicated the water source and weathering environment of the adjoining natural wetland. Moreover, stable isotopes were shown to be effective tools for investigating wetlands and gaining insight not easily obtained using non-isotopic techniques. These tools have potential widespread application to wetlands that have distinct isotopic endmember sources.

Hunt, R.J.; Bullen, T.D.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Kendall, C.

1998-01-01

350

Amino-group-specific natural abundance nitrogen isotope ratio analysis in amino acids.  

PubMed

Amino acid (AA) nitrogen (N) stable isotope ratio analysis has found a wide variety of important applications including indication of the trophic level of an organism, tracing N transfer within food webs, and monitoring of AA resynthesis during heterotrophic microbial reworking of organic matter. Despite its utility, the current methodology is difficult to employ consistently for natural abundance level precision. Here, we report a new and robust method for high-precision N-compound-specific isotope analysis (N-PCIA) for single-N-containing AAs and N-position-specific isotope analysis (N-PSIA) for poly-N AAs. First the amino-N in AAs was liberated and oxidized to NO2(-) by hypochlorite at high pH. The NO2(-) produced was then quantified colorimetrically with excess hypochlorite quenched using arsenite. Subsequently, buffered azide was used to reduce NO2(-) to N2O for isotope ratio analysis using a purge-and-trap isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In the case of glycine delta15N, the average precision was SD = 0.3 per thousand. Reaction yields and labeling experiments show that this oxidation reaction is highly specific, targeting the alpha-amino group (peptide-N) of most poly-N AAs. This permits specific determination of the delta15N of peptide-N in arginine, tryptophan, and histidine. In the case of lysine, however, the side-chain amino group was found to be partially labile to hypochlorite oxidation. Using isotope fractionation factors estimated from single-N analogues of lysine, the intramolecular delta15N of lysine was calculated by mass balance, and this generally agreed with results for the same sample material analyzed by a previously published enzymatic method. Our method has the advantages of being relatively rapid, robust, and applicable to all poly-N AAs. We have also found it to work well for determining total delta15N of amino-N in complex sample matrices that have not been susceptible to previous approaches. PMID:18231965

Zhang, Lin; Altabet, Mark A

2008-01-01

351

Hydrochemistry and boron isotopes as natural tracers in the study of groundwaters from North Chianan Plain, Taiwan.  

PubMed

In this paper, hydrochemistry and boron isotopes are successfully applied to elucidate hydrogeological processes by the use of natural tracers. The hydrochemical analysis identifies four end-members in the hydrochemical evolution of groundwater from the North Chianan plain groundwater district. A few groundwater contain extraordinary chlorine concentrations of up to 48,000 mg l(-1). However, the hydrochemistry of groundwater only reveals that high saline water is a dominant factor in groundwater hydrochemistry. It is thought that these groundwater experienced precipitation of carbonates during seawater evaporation that did not involve the precipitation of gypsum. Boron isotopes are very efficient tracers in determining the source of salinisation. The boron isotopes reveal the results of mixing of evaporated seawater and water-sediment interaction. In general, the boron isotope ratio of the groundwater is controlled by a two-end-member mixing system, which is composed of evaporated seawater (isotopically heavy) and fresh surface water (isotopically light). Due to a long lagoonal period in the coastal plain, the groundwaters in the downstream area generally have high Cl/B ratios and relatively heavy boron isotope ratios while those in the upstream area are composed of low Cl/B and light boron isotopes. However, there is not a resolvable mixing trend between the Cl/B ratio and the isotopic composition of boron. It is probably obscured by a highly variable boron isotope ratio in fresh surface water and through fractionation associated with water-rock interaction. Both factors would decrease the boron isotope ratio but one effect cannot be distinguished from the other. PMID:23998391

Lu, Hsueh-Yu

2014-01-01

352

Stable N isotope values of black spruce ecosystem components integrate source N isotope values, soil fertility, and microbial biomass: a natural and experimental study from Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The productivity and ecosystem dynamics of many northern ecosystems are limited by nitrogen (N) availability. Understanding N dynamics is especially important in boreal forests where slight changes in N availability can have profound effects on ecosystem productivity and diversity of plants and microbes. However, because N cycling processes vary profoundly in time and space, assessing ecosystem N supply and cycling pathways are difficult even with frequent measurements. Recent soil, plant, and fungal meta-analyses have indicated that stable isotopes of N may provide just such an integrative measure of N cycling by recording pathways of N flux through ecosystems. Here we present N stable isotope patterns across 30 plots varying in natural fertility and in 4 blocks of 16 experimentally fertilized plots of mature black spruce forest in central Alaska. We measured soil N isotope ratios of NO3, NH4, and salt extracted dissolved organic N (DON) using persulfate oxidation coupled to the bacterial denitrifier technique. The soil N isotope values varied from 15 to -26‰ across the landscape and were a poor predictor of the variability in plant N isotope values ranging from 5-11‰. Instead a combination of fungal biomass (PLFA 18:2?6,9), fungal ingrowth, cation exchange capacity, and resin extractable phosphate (P) were better explanatory variables in a multiple regression context. This suggests that plant N isotope ratios are a product of numerous soil and microbial processes and not simply a direct reflection of source N pools. Denitrification in soils and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) assimilation and delivery of N were also likely causal as each influence pathways of N cycling that can alter the N isotope values of source and receiving pools. In contrast with the very low N environment present in our natural gradient, we found that N fertilization, both singly and in conjunction with P, caused the N isotope values of foliage, fine roots, soil N, and fungal fruiting bodies to approach that of the source N isotope values. This suggested black spruce switched from fungal delivered N to direct uptake of fertilizer. This was corroborated by the observation that N fertilization alone also suppressed the biomass of standing and actively growing fungi in soils. Surprisingly, P fertilization stimulated resin exchangeable pools of soil NO3 and led to significant enrichment of the residual soil NO3-N isotope pool by 18‰ relative to the control. Fractionation against 15N during denitrification of the increased NO3 concentrations could account for the isotopic enrichment. Combined, our natural gradient and experimental approach illustrated that measuring numerous ecosystem components, including source N isotope values, are necessary to understand the isotopic variability in a landscape dominated by a single species of tree. It also illustrated how the biomass, and presumed activity, of ECM fungi fluctuates across the landscape in response to shifting soil fertility.

Mayor, J. R.; Schuur, T.; Mack, M. C.; Nettelton Hollingsworth, T.; Bååth, E.

2009-12-01

353

IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the preparation of tools and measurement systems for deployment, testing and use on ODP Leg 204, which will study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon. Additional accomplishments were related to the postcruise evaluation of tools and measurements systems used on ODP Leg 201 along the Peru margin from January through March, 2002. The operational results from the use of the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) tool and the PCS Gas Manifold on ODP Leg 201 are evaluated in this progress report in order to prepare for the upcoming deployments on ODP Leg 204 in July, 2002. The PCS was deployed 17 times during ODP Leg 201 and successfully retrieved cores from a broad range of lithologies and sediment depths along the Peru margin. Eleven deployments were entirely successful, collecting between 0.5 and 1.0 meters of sediment at greater than 75% of hydrostatic pressure. The PCS gas manifold was used in conjunction with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) throughout ODP Leg 201 to measure the total volume and composition of gases recovered in sediment cores associated with methane gas hydrates. The FUGRO Pressure Corer (FPC), one of the HYACE/HYACINTH pressure coring tools, was also deployed on the D/V JOIDES Resolution during ODP Legs 201 to field-test this coring system at three shallow-water sites located offshore Peru. The field-testing of these tools provides a corollary benefit to DOE/NETL at no cost to this project. The testing of these tools on the D/V JOIDES Resolution was negotiated as part of a cooperative agreement between JOI/ODP and the HYACINTH partners. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively during ODP Leg 201. The data obtained from the successful deployments of these tools is still being evaluated by the scientists and engineers involved in this testing; however, preliminary results are presented in this report. An infrared-thermal imaging system (IR-TIS) was deployed for the first time on ODP Leg 201. This system was used to identify methane hydrate intervals in the recovered cores. Initial discussions of these experiments are provided in this report. This report is an overview of the field measurements made on recovered sediment cores and the downhole measurements made during ODP Leg 201. These results are currently being used to incorporate the ''lessons learned'' from these deployments to prepare for a dedicated ODP leg to study the characteristics of naturally-occurring hydrates in the subsurface environment of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon during ODP Leg 204, which will take place from July through September, 2002.

Dr. Frank R. Rack; Dr. Gerald Dickens; Kathryn Ford; Derryl Schroeder; Michael Storms; ODP Leg 201 Shipboard Scientific Party

2002-08-01

354

Methane-producing bacteria - Natural fractionations of the stable carbon isotopes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Procedures for determining the C-13/C-12 fractionation factors for methane-producing bacteria are described, and the fractionation factors (CO2/CH4) for the reduction of CO2 to CH4 by pure cultures are 1.045 for Methanosarcina barkeri at 40 C, 1.061 for Methanobacterium strain M.o.H. at 40 C, and 1.025 for Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum at 65 C. The data are consistent with the field determinations if fractionation by acetate dissimilation approximates fractionations observed in natural environments. In other words, the acetic acid used by acetate dissimilating bacteria, if they play an important role in natural methane production, must have an intramolecular isotopic fractionation (CO2H/CH3) approximating the observed CO2/CH4 fractionation.

Games, L. M.; Hayes, J. M.; Gunsalus, R. P.

1978-01-01

355

Sulfur Isotope Analysis of Minerals and Fluids in a Natural CO2 Reservoir, Green River, Utah  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Predicting the security of geological CO2 storage sites requires an understanding of the geochemical behavior of the stored CO2, especially of fluid-rock reactions in reservoirs, caprocks and fault zones. Factors that may influence geochemical behavior include co-injection of sulfur gases along with the CO2, either in acid-gas disposal or as contaminants in CO2 storage sites, and microbial activity, such as bacterial sulfate reduction. The latter may play an important role in buffering the redox chemistry of subsurface fluids, which could affect toxic trace metal mobilization and transport in acidic CO2-rich fluids. These processes involving sulfur are poorly understood. Natural CO2-reservoirs provide natural laboratories, where the flow and reactions of the CO2-charged fluids and the activity of microbial communities are integrated over sufficient time-scales to aid prediction of long-term CO2 storage. This study reports on sulfur isotope analyses of sulfate and sulfide minerals in rock core and in CO2-charged fluids collected from a stacked sequence of natural CO2 reservoirs at Green River, Utah. Scientific drilling adjacent to a CO2-degassing normal fault to a depth of 325m retrieved core and fluid samples from two CO2 reservoirs in the Entrada and Navajo Sandstones and from the intervening Carmel Formation caprock. Fluid samples were collected from CO2-charged springs that discharge through the faults. Sulfur exists as sulfate in the fluids, as sedimentary gypsum beds in the Carmel Formation, as remobilized gypsum veins within a fault damage zone in the Carmel Fm. and in the Entrada Sandstone, and as disseminated pyrite and pyrite-mineralized open fractures throughout the cored interval. We use the stable sulfur (?34S) and oxygen (?18OSO4) isotopes of the sulfate, gypsum, and pyrite to understand the source of sulfur in the reservoir as well as the timing of gypsum vein and pyrite formation. The hydration water of the gypsum is also reported to explore the different timing of gypsum vein formation. Macroscopic and microscopic gradients in the sulfur isotope composition of pyrite throughout the core and at discernible redox-reaction fronts were examined in detail to assess the role of bacteria in mediating sulfate reduction, sulfide mineralization and buffering of groundwater redox chemistry. The CO2 charged fluids and gypsum veins within the Entrada Sandstone have a narrow and very similar range in both ?34SSO4 and ?18OSO4, suggesting that the fluids (9.1-10.7‰) are the most likely source of the sulfate in the veins (11.4-12.8‰) and that the veins formed during recent fluid flow through the Entrada, with sulfate coming from remobilized gypsum beds in the Carmel. The Carmel also contains two isotopically distinct types of gypsum veins: one with ?34SSO4 values similar to the Entrada veins and one with much higher ?34SSO4 values (15.1-16.1‰). The latter are likely primary gypsum, while the former are likely secondary gypsum. Sulfur isotope fractionation between pyrite (-16.5‰ to -35.7‰) at the Carmel-Navajo interface and reservoir fluids (9.1-10.7‰) suggest that sulfur reducing bacteria play a role in producing the deposited sulfide. This data demonstrates active sulfur cycling in CO2 reservoirs with many different sulfur species cycled among various pools creating the wide isotope dispersion we observe.

Chen, F.; Kampman, N.; Bickle, M. J.; Busch, A.; Turchyn, A. V.

2013-12-01

356

HYDROGEN ISOTOPE PROFILE OF METHYL GROUPS IN MILIACIN (OLEAN-18-EN-3OL ME) BY NATURAL ABUNDANCE DEUTERIUM 2D-NMR  

E-print Network

.lesot@u-psud.fr; jeremy.jacob@univ-orleans.fr Compound-specific hydrogen isotope analyses are gaining increasing interestHYDROGEN ISOTOPE PROFILE OF METHYL GROUPS IN MILIACIN (OLEAN- 18-EN-3OL ME) BY NATURAL ABUNDANCE to which extent these modifications can be accompanied by a hydrogen isotope fractionation process

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

357

Application of Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios to Recognize Natural Biodegradation of MTBE  

EPA Science Inventory

The organisms that degrade MTBE under anaerobic conditions are evolved to acquire energy for growth by using molecular hydrogen and carbonate ion to cleave methyl ether bonds. Methyl ether bonds are common in nature and the bond also occurs in MTBE. MTBE in contaminated ground...

358

A deuterium-labelling mass spectrometry–tandem diode-array detector screening method for rapid discovery of naturally occurring electrophiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because electrophiles regulate many signalling pathways in cells, by modifying cysteine residues in proteins, they have a\\u000a wide range of biological activity. In this study, a deuterium-labelling mass spectrometry–tandem diode-array detector (MS–DAD)\\u000a screening method was established for rapid discovery of naturally occurring electrophiles. Glutathione (GSH) was used as a\\u000a probe and incubated with natural product extracts. To distinguish different types

Xiaoyu Zhang; Liping Luo; Zhongjun Ma

359

responses to environmental changes that are significantly more abrupt than those that would occur in nature. A  

E-print Network

to a different growth chamber after every five weeks, and the appropriate [CO2] was re-set. Plants were watered the soil with silica sand, adding this mix to a new eight-inch pot, planting a new seedling of B. inermis in nature. A Methods Each experimental unit consisted of a single plant growing in an eight-inch pot

Kaspari, Mike

360

Insights from Stable Isotopes on the Role of Terrestrial Ecosystems in the Global Carbon Cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of isotopic tracers in organic matter, water, and atmospheric gases has become an important component of the study of ecology and global change. Physiological and physical processes discriminate against heavy isotopes in predictable ways, so that measurements of isotopes at natural abundance, i.e., naturally occurring concentrations as opposed to artificial labeling experiments, can provide useful information about biological

Diane E. Pataki; Chun-Ta Lai; Charles D. Keeling; James R. Ehleringer

361

Analysis of a naturally occurring K99+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain that fails to produce K99.  

PubMed Central

A spontaneously occurring field isolate of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that was genotypically K99+ but phenotypically K99- was analyzed for the reason that it did not express K99. The defect, which was cis active, was located within an area 5' to the first gene required for K99 biogenesis and was the result of the deletion of a single base pair. Images PMID:7927743

Isaacson, R E; Patterson, S

1994-01-01

362

Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

2011-12-01

363

Fluorochrome-based definition of naturally occurring Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells of intra- and extrathymic origin.  

PubMed

Under physiological conditions, studies on the biology of naturally induced Foxp3(+) Treg cells of intra- and extrathymic origin have been hampered by the lack of unambiguous markers to discriminate the mature progeny of such developmental Treg-cell sublineages. Here, we report on experiments in double-transgenic mice, in which red fluorescent protein (RFP) is expressed in all Foxp3(+) Treg cells, whereas Foxp3-dependent GFP expression is exclusively confined to intrathymically induced Foxp3(+) Treg cells. This novel molecular genetic tool enabled us to faithfully track and characterize naturally induced Treg cells of intrathymic (RFP(+) GFP(+) ) and extrathymic (RFP(+) GFP(-) ) origin in otherwise unmanipulated mice. These experiments directly demonstrate that extrathymically induced Treg cells substantially contribute to the overall pool of mature Foxp3(+) Treg cells residing in peripheral lymphoid tissues of steady-state mice. Furthermore, we provide evidence that intra- and extrathymically induced Foxp3(+) Treg cells represent distinct phenotypic and functional sublineages. PMID:25159127

Petzold, Cathleen; Steinbronn, Nadine; Gereke, Marcus; Strasser, Ruth H; Sparwasser, Tim; Bruder, Dunja; Geffers, Robert; Schallenberg, Sonja; Kretschmer, Karsten

2014-12-01

364

Age and nature of the basement in northeastern Washington and northern Idaho: isotopic evidence from Mesozoic and Cenozoic granitoids  

USGS Publications Warehouse

K-feldspar Pb and whole rock Nd isotopic analyses from 25 Mesozoic and Cenozoic plutonic rocks and two gneisses from NE Washington and northern Idaho are used to elucidate the age and nature of the concealed cratonic basement. The plutons form two highly distinct isotopic groups: Group I have isotopic compositions suggesting derivation from rocks of the Belt Supergroup or their metamorphosed equivalents, Group II have highly retarded Pb isotopic compositions relative to the present day crustal average and require a source region with long-term U depletion, characteristic of cratonic lower crust. A U-Pb zircon upper intercept age of c2600 Ma obtained from one of the Group II samples, together with Sm-Nd data from the gneisses, indicates possible late-Archean crust at depth, which acted as a source region for Eocene extension-related plutonism. -from Authors

Whitehouse, M.J.; Stacey, J.S.; Miller, F.K.

1992-01-01

365

Synthesis and Antialgal Activity of Dihydrophenanthrenes and Phenanthrenes II: Mimics of Naturally Occurring Compounds in Juncus effusus  

Microsoft Academic Search

9,10-Dihydrophenanthrenes and phenanthrenes, mimics of natural compounds with strong antialgal activity, have been synthesized through cross-coupling by zerovalent Ni of 1-(2-iodo-5-methoxy)-phenylethanol or 2-iodo-5-methoxyacetophenone with iodoxylenes. The synthetic compounds had a hydroxyl or a methoxyl group at C-2 and two methyls in the C ring. Assays on the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum showed that all the compounds, except 2-methoxy-5,7-dimethylphenanthrene, caused strong

M. Dellagreca; A. Fiorentino; P. Monaco; G. Pinto; L. Previtera; A. Zarrelli

2001-01-01

366

Natural scrapie in a closed flock of Cheviot sheep occurs only in specific PrP genotypes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Natural scrapie in a closed flock of South Country Cheviot sheep has resulted in 45 deaths between 1986 and 1995. Of these cases, 35 sheep have been analysed for disease-linked PrP gene polymorphisms and all encode valine at codon 136 on at least one allele with 77% homozygous (VV136) and 23% valine\\/alanine heterozygotes (VA136). Mean survival time was 907

N. Hunter; J. D. Foster; W. Goldmann; M. J. Stear; J. Hope; C. Bostock

1996-01-01

367

Naturally occurring Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection in two prosimian primate species: ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) and ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata).  

PubMed

A naturally occurring infection of Ehrlichia chaffeensis in lemurs is described. DNA of Ehrlichia chaffeensis was identified by polymerase chain reaction in peripheral blood from six of eight clinically ill lemurs. Organisms were cultured from the blood of one lemur exhibiting clinical and hematologic abnormalities similar to those of humans infected with E. chaffeensis. PMID:12498671

Williams, Cathy V; Van Steenhouse, Jan L; Bradley, Julie M; Hancock, Susan I; Hegarty, Barbara C; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

2002-12-01

368

Naturally Occurring Ehrlichia chaffeensis Infection in Two Prosimian Primate Species: Ring-tailed Lemurs (Lemur catta) and Ruffed Lemurs (Varecia variegata)  

PubMed Central

A naturally occurring infection of Ehrlichia chaffeensis in lemurs is described. DNA of Ehrlichia chaffeensis was identified by polymerase chain reaction in peripheral blood from six of eight clinically ill lemurs. Organisms were cultured from the blood of one lemur exhibiting clinical and hematologic abnormalities similar to those of humans infected with E. chaffeensis. PMID:12498671

Van Steenhouse, Jan L.; Bradley, Julie M.; Hancock, Susan I.; Hegarty, Barbara C.; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.

2002-01-01

369

Modeling of the initiation and evolution of a laser-ionized column in the lower atmosphere - 314.5 nm wavelength resonant multiphoton ionization of naturally occurring argon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 3+1 resonant multiphoton ionization process in naturally occurring argon is studied at 314.5 nm as a candidate for providing a long ionized channel through the atmosphere. Results are presented which indicate peak electron densities up to 10 exp 8/cu cm can be created using laser intensities on the order of 10 exp 8 W/sq cm.

Fetzer, G. J.; Stockley, J. E.

1992-01-01

370

Airborne simultaneous spectroscopic detection of laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence from chlorophyll a and other naturally occurring pigments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The airborne laser-induced spectral emission bands obtained simultaneously from water Raman backscatter and the fluorescence of chlorophyll and other naturally occuring waterborne pigments are reported here for the first time. The importance of this type data lies not only in its single-shot multispectral character but also in the application of the Raman line for correction or calibration of the spatial

F. E. Hoge; R. N. Swift

1981-01-01

371

Oxygen and chlorine isotopic fractionation during perchlorate biodegradation: laboratory results and implications for forensics and natural attenuation studies.  

PubMed

Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant having both anthropogenic and natural sources. Stable isotope ratios of O and Cl in a given sample of perchlorate may be used to distinguish its source(s). Isotopic ratios may also be useful for identifying the extent of biodegradation of perchlorate, which is critical for assessing natural attenuation of this contaminant in groundwater. For this approach to be useful, however, the kinetic isotopic fractionations of O and Cl during perchlorate biodegradation must first be determined as a function of environmental variables such as temperature and bacterial species. A laboratory study was performed in which the O and Cl isotope ratios of perchlorate were monitored as a function of degradation by two separate bacterial strains (Azospira suillum JPLRND and Dechlorospirillum sp. FBR2) at both 10 degrees C and 22 degrees C with acetate as the electron donor. Perchlorate was completely reduced by both strains within 280 h at 22 degrees C and 615 h at 10 degrees C. Measured values of isotopic fractionation factors were epsilon(18)O = -36.6 to -29.0% per hundred and epsilon(37)Cl = -14.5 to -11.5% per hundred, and these showed no apparent systematic variation with either temperature or bacterial strain. An experiment using (18)O-enriched water (delta(18)O = +198% per hundred) gave results indistinguishable from those observed in the isotopically normal water (delta(18)O = -8.1% per hundred) used in the other experiments, indicating negligible isotope exchange between perchlorate and water during biodegradation. The fractionation factor ratio epsilon(18)O/epsilon(37)Cl was nearly invariant in all experiments at 2.50 +/- 0.04. These data indicate that isotope ratio analysis will be useful for documenting perchlorate biodegradation in soils and groundwater. The establishment of a microbial fractionation factor ratio (epsilon(18)O/ epsilon(37)Cl) also has significant implications for forensic studies. PMID:17533841

Sturchio, Neil C; Böhlke, John Karl; Beloso, Abelardo D; Streger, Sheryl H; Heraty, Linnea J; Hatzinger, Paul B

2007-04-15

372

Oxygen and chlorine isotopic fractionation during perchlorate biodegradation: Laboratory results and implications for forensics and natural attenuation studies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant having both anthropogenic and natural sources. Stable isotope ratios of O and Cl in a given sample of perchlorate may be used to distinguish its source(s). Isotopic ratios may also be useful for identifying the extent of biodegradation of perchlorate, which is critical for assessing natural attenuation of this contaminant in groundwater. For this approach to be useful, however, the kinetic isotopic fractionations of O and Cl during perchlorate biodegradation must first be determined as a function of environmental variables such as temperature and bacterial species. A laboratory study was performed in which the O and Cl isotope ratios of perchlorate were monitored as a function of degradation by two separate bacterial strains (Azospira suillum JPLRND and Dechlorospirillum sp. FBR2) at both 10??C and 22??C with acetate as the electron donor. Perchlorate was completely reduced by both strains within 280 h at 22??C and 615 h at 10??C. Measured values of isotopic fractionation factors were ??18O = -36.6 to -29.0??? and ??37Cl = -14.5 to -11.5???, and these showed no apparent systematic variation with either temperature or bacterial strain. An experiment using 18O-enriched water (??18O = +198???) gave results indistinguishable from those observed in the isotopically normal water (??18O = -8.1???) used in the other experiments, indicating negligible isotope exchange between perchlorate and water during biodegradation. The fractionation factor ratio ??18O/??37Cl was nearly invariant in all experiments at 2.50 ?? 0.04. These data indicate that isotope ratio analysis will be useful for documenting perchlorate biodegradation in soils and groundwater. The establishment of a microbial fractionation factor ratio (??18O/??37Cl) also has significant implications for forensic studies. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

Sturchio, N.C.; Böhlke, J.K.; Beloso, A.D., Jr.; Streger, S.H.; Heraty, L.J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

2007-01-01

373

Tolerance of salinized floodplain conditions in a naturally occurring Eucalyptus hybrid related to lowered plant water potential.  

PubMed

Rising saline groundwater and reduced flooding frequency are causing dieback of Eucalyptus largiflorens F. Muell. along the Murray River in Australia. A green-leaved variant of E. largiflorens, which is probably a hybrid with a local mallee species (E. gracilis F. Muell.), tolerates saline conditions better than the more common grey-leaved variant. The green variant exhibited more negative water potentials than the grey variant, and comparison with soil water potential profiles indicated that the green variant extracted water from slightly higher up the soil profile where the salt content was lower but the soil was drier. However, the stable isotopes of water (2H and 18O) in the xylem did not differ significantly between paired green and grey trees, suggesting that both variants used the same water source. The green variant may be able to extract water for a longer period from a given point in the soil profile and tolerate a higher salt concentration around its roots than the grey variant. Predawn leaf water potentials of both variants decreased with increasing salinity of groundwater and decreasing depth to the groundwater, probably because the roots were being progressively confined to soil with lower matric potential as groundwater discharge through transpiration progressively salinized soil up the profile. The green variant had a lower assimilation rate and stomatal conductance than the grey variant, although the differences were not statistically significant during most of the year. Discrimination of 13C indicated that the green variant had a higher leaf internal CO2 concentration than the grey variant, indicative of a greater biochemical limitation on photosynthesis, perhaps resulting from the effects of operating at lower water potentials. The green variant had significantly lower stem hydraulic conductivity than the grey variant, probably because of its smaller xylem vessel diameter and higher degree of embolism. The more conservative water use of the green variant and its ability to operate at lower water potential than the grey variant appear to underlie its ability to tolerate conditions of reduced useable water above the saline groundwater. This advantage appears to outweigh the costs of increased xylem embolism and reduced assimilation. PMID:11303570

Zubrinich, T M; Loveys, B; Gallasch, S; Seekamp, J V; Tyerman, S D

2000-08-01

374

Protein Retention Assessment of Four Levels of Poultry By-Product Substitution of Fishmeal in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Diets Using Stable Isotopes of Nitrogen (?15N) as Natural Tracers  

PubMed Central

This is second part from an experiment where the nitrogen retention of poultry by-product meal (PBM) compared to fishmeal (FM) was evaluated using traditional indices. Here a quantitative method using stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (?15N values) as natural tracers of nitrogen incorporation into fish biomass is assessed. Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were fed for 80 days on isotopically distinct diets in which 0, 33, 66 and 100% of FM as main protein source was replaced by PBM. The diets were isonitrogenous, isolipidic and similar in gross energy content. Fish in all treatments reached isotopic equilibrium by the end of the experiment. Two-source isotope mixing models that incorporated the isotopic composition of FM and PBM as well as that of formulated feeds, empirically derived trophic discrimination factors and the isotopic composition of fish that had reached isotopic equilibrium to the diets were used to obtain a quantitative estimate of the retention of each source of nitrogen. Fish fed the diets with 33 and 66% replacement of FM by PBM retained poultry by-product meal roughly in proportion to its level of inclusion in the diets, whereas no differences were detected in the protein efficiency ratio. Coupled with the similar biomass gain of fishes fed the different diets, our results support the inclusion of PBM as replacement for fishmeal in aquaculture feeds. A re-feeding experiment in which all fish were fed a diet of 100% FM for 28 days indicated isotopic turnover occurred very fast, providing further support for the potential of isotopic ratios as tracers of the retention of specific protein sources into fish tissues. Stable isotope analysis is a useful tool for studies that seek to obtain quantitative estimates of the retention of different protein sources. PMID:25226392

Badillo, Daniel; Herzka, Sharon Z.; Viana, Maria Teresa

2014-01-01

375

HCNMBC - A pulse sequence for H-(C)-N Multiple Bond Correlations at natural isotopic abundance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a pulse sequence, HCNMBC for multiple-bond H-(C)-N correlation experiments via one-bond 1J(C,H) and one- or multiple bond nJ(N,C) coupling constants (typically n = 1-3) at the natural isotopic abundance. A new adiabatic refocussing sequence is introduced to provide accurate and robust refocussing of both chemical shift and J-evolution over wide ranges of C-13 and N-15 frequencies. It is demonstrated that the proposed pulse sequence provides high quality spectra even for sub-milligram samples. We show that when a 1.7 mm cryoprobe is available as little as 10 ?g of glycine in D2O is sufficient to obtain the HCNMBC spectrum in ca. 12 h. The preliminary results indicate that the pulse sequence has a great potential in the structure determination of nitrogen heterocycles especially in cases where synthesis produces regioisomers.

Cheatham, Steve; Gierth, Peter; Bermel, Wolfgang; Kup?e, ?riks

2014-10-01

376

A deuterium-labelling mass spectrometry-tandem diode-array detector screening method for rapid discovery of naturally occurring electrophiles.  

PubMed

Because electrophiles regulate many signalling pathways in cells, by modifying cysteine residues in proteins, they have a wide range of biological activity. In this study, a deuterium-labelling mass spectrometry-tandem diode-array detector (MS-DAD) screening method was established for rapid discovery of naturally occurring electrophiles. Glutathione (GSH) was used as a probe and incubated with natural product extracts. To distinguish different types of electrophile, incubation was performed in two reaction solvents, H(2)O and D(2)O. Ten types of naturally occurring electrophile were chosen, on the basis of their properties, to undergo the screening assay. By using this screening method, we successfully discovered the bioactive electrophile 4-hydroxyderricin in an ethanol extract of Angelica keiskei. This electrophile had potent NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)-inducing activity at a concentration of 20 ?mol L(-1). PMID:21544543

Zhang, Xiaoyu; Luo, Liping; Ma, Zhongjun

2011-07-01

377

Diindolylmethane, a naturally occurring compound, induces CYP3A4 and MDR1 gene expression by activating human PXR.  

PubMed

Activation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR)-regulated expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) plays an important role in mediating adverse drug interactions. Given the common use of natural products as part of adjunct human health behavior, there is a growing concern about natural products for their potential to induce undesired drug interactions through the activation of hPXR-regulated CYP3A4 and MDR1. Here, we studied whether 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), a natural health supplement, could induce hPXR-mediated regulation of CYP3A4 and MDR1 in human hepatocytes and intestinal cells. DIM, at its physiologically relevant concentrations, not only induced hPXR transactivation of CYP3A4 promoter activity but also induced gene expression of CYP3A4 and MDR1. DIM decreased intracellular accumulation of MDR1 substrate rhodamine 123, suggesting that DIM induces the functional expression of MDR1. Pharmacologic inhibition or genetic knockdown of hPXR resulted in attenuation of DIM induced CYP3A4 and MDR1 gene expression, suggesting that DIM induces CYP3A4 and MDR1 in an hPXR-dependent manner. Together, these results support our conclusion that DIM induces hPXR-regulated CYP3A4 and MDR1 gene expression. The inductive effects of DIM on CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression caution the use of DIM in conjunction with other medications metabolized and transported via CYP3A4 and MDR1, respectively. PMID:25542144

Pondugula, Satyanarayana R; Flannery, Patrick C; Abbott, Kodye L; Coleman, Elaine S; Mani, Sridhar; Samuel, Temesgen; Xie, Wen

2015-02-01

378

Raman spectroscopic study of mellite--a naturally occurring aluminium benzenehexacarboxylate from lignite--Claystone series of the tertiary age.  

PubMed

Raman spectra have been obtained for crystals of the organic mineral mellite, from three different sites. Mellite occurs in the frame of the Tertiary series including lignite and coaly slates at Artern (Thuringia), Tula (Russia) and Bílina (Northern Bohemia). Mellite, Al(2)C(6)(COO)(6) x 16H(2)O, can be considered as evidence of previous biological activity in the geological record, similar to other salts of carboxylic acids such as whewellite and weddellite. Assignments of the major Raman features of mellite are proposed on the basis of comparison with the parent, mellitic acid, C(6)(COOH)(6). During diagenesis and epigenesis, mellite is formed from the reaction between organic carbon rich solutions with aluminosilicates, hence, with the current interest in the adoption of Raman spectroscopy for incorporation into robotic instrumentation for space mission landers, it is important that organic minerals be included into a spectroscopic database for the recognition of biomolecular signatures for remote life-detection experiments. PMID:16503193

Jehlicka, J; Edwards, H G M; Jorge Villar, S E

2006-09-01

379

Synthesis and antialgal activity of dihydrophenanthrenes and phenanthrenes II: mimics of naturally occurring compounds in Juncus effusus.  

PubMed

9,10-Dihydrophenanthrenes and phenanthrenes, mimics of natural compounds with strong antialgal activity, have been synthesized through cross-coupling by zerovalent Ni of 1-(2-iodo-5-methoxy)-phenylethanol or 2-iodo-5-methoxyacetophenone with iodoxylenes. The synthetic compounds had a hydroxyl or a methoxyl group at C-2 and two methyls in the C ring. Assays on the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum showed that all the compounds, except 2-methoxy-5,7-dimethylphenanthrene, caused strong inhibition of algal growth at 10(-4) M. 2-Hydroxy-7,8-dimethyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene and 2-methoxy-5,6-dimethylphenanthrene fully inhibited growth at 10(-5) M. PMID:14768814

Dellagreca, M; Fiorentino, L A; Monaco, P; Pinto, G; Previtera, L; Zarrelli, A

2001-02-01

380

Analysis of Naturally Occurring Avian Bornavirus Infection and Transmission during an Outbreak of Proventricular Dilatation Disease among Captive Psittacine Birds ? † ¶  

PubMed Central

A proventricular dilatation disease (PDD) outbreak provided the opportunity to investigate the transmissibility of avian Bornavirus (ABV) and its linkage to PDD under natural conditions. Upon exposure to a bird with a fatal case of PDD, 10 birds became symptomatic and died. ABV2 RNA was recovered from available tissues. Further screening revealed that 12/46 exposed birds were ABV2+. Three chicks boarded at this aviary developed PDD. They harbored the same ABV2 isolate and transmitted it to five of eight chicks in their home aviary. These findings demonstrate that ABV infection precedes the development of PDD. ABV-specific Western blotting and reverse transcription-PCR indicate that ABV2 is not strictly neurotropic. PMID:19955301

Kistler, Amy L.; Smith, Jeanne M.; Greninger, Alexander L.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Ganem, Don

2010-01-01