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Sample records for navajo volcanic field

  1. Eruptive conditions and depositional processes of Narbona Pass Maar volcano, Navajo volcanic field, Navajo Nation, New Mexico (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Brittany D.; Clarke, Amanda B.; Semken, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Phreatomagmatic deposits at Narbona Pass, a mid-Tertiary maar in the Navajo volcanic field (NVF), New Mexico (USA), were characterized in order to reconstruct the evolution and dynamic conditions of the eruption. Our findings shed light on the temporal evolution of the eruption, dominant depositional mechanisms, influence of liquid water on deposit characteristics, geometry and evolution of the vent, efficiency of fragmentation, and the relative importance of magmatic and external volatiles. The basal deposits form a thick (5-20 m), massive lapilli tuff to tuff-breccia deposit. This is overlain by alternating bedded sequences of symmetrical to antidune cross-stratified tuff and lapilli tuff; and diffusely-stratified, clast-supported, reversely-graded lapilli tuffs that pinch and swell laterally. This sequence is interpreted to reflect an initial vent-clearing phase that produced concentrated pyroclastic density currents, followed by a pulsating eruption that produced multiple density currents with varying particle concentrations and flow conditions to yield the well-stratified deposits. Only minor localized soft-sediment deformation was observed, no accretionary lapilli were found, and grain accretion occurs on the lee side of dunes. This suggests that little to no liquid water existed in the density currents during deposition. Juvenile material is dominantly present as blocky fine ash and finely vesiculated fine to coarse lapilli pumice. This indicates that phreatomagmatic fragmentation was predominant, but also that the magma was volatile-rich and vesiculating at the time of eruption. This is the first study to document a significant magmatic volatile component in an NVF maar-diatreme eruption. The top of the phreatomagmatic sequence abruptly contacts the overlying minette lava flows, indicating no gradual drying-out period between the explosive and effusive phases. The lithology of the accidental clasts is consistent throughout the vertical pyroclastic

  2. Heteromorphism and crystallization paths of katungites, Navajo volcanic field, Arizona, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.W.; Aldrich, M.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A swarm of thin, isochemical but heteromorphic dikes crops out in the valley of Hasbidito Creek in NE Arizona. The swarm is part of the dominantly potassic, mid-Tertiary Navajo volcanic field of the Colorado Plateau. Whole-rock chemical analyses of five samples from four of the dikes indicate that they are chemically identical to the katungites of Uganda. These dikes show the characteristic seriate-porphyritic texture of lamprophyres. Samples of an olivine-melilitite dike from the same swarm lack this texture and the chemical analysis, while similar to those of the other dikes, shows effects from the incorporation of xenocrystic olivine. Over 20 mineral phases have been identified in the Arizona samples and as many as 18 phases may occur in a single sample. The major phases are phlogopite, olivine, perovskite, opaque oxides, +- melilite and +- clinopyroxene. Based upon the modal mineralogies and textures of ten dike samples, we recognize five general non-equilibrium assemblages. Comparison of these assemblages with recent experimental results shows that they represent various combinations of complete and incomplete reactions. Reaction relations were determined by entering melt and phase compositions into the computer program GENMIX to obtain balanced reactions. By combining petrographic observations with mineral chemical data, balanced reactions from GENMIX, and the recently determined phase diagrams we are able to trace crystallization paths for the katungite magma.

  3. Melding Research on the Navajo Volcanic Field into Undergraduate Curriculum to Promote Scientific Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation highlights the curricular design and preliminary outcomes of undergraduate research in the Department of Geosciences at Fort Lewis College (FLC), supported by an NSF-RUI project on the Navajo volcanic field (NVF). A prime impact of this project was to support the education and career development of undergraduate students by further developing basic knowledge and skills in the context of authentic inquiry on petrologic-based research topics. Integrating research into the curriculum promoted scientific habits of mind by engaging students as "active agents" in discovery, and the creative development and testing of ideas. It also gave students a sense of ownership in the scientific process and knowledge construction. The initial phase of this project was conducted in Igneous Petrology at FLC in 2010. Eleven students were enrolled in this course which allowed them to work as a team in collaboration with the PI, and engage in all aspects of research to further develop and hone their skills in scientific inquiry. This course involved a small component of traditional lecture in which selected topics were discussed to provide students with a foundation to understand magmatic processes. This was complemented by a comprehensive review of the literature in which students read and discussed a spectrum of articles on Tertiary magmatism in the western United States and the NVF. Invited lectures by leading-scientists in geology provided opportunities for discussions and interaction with professional geologists. All of the students in the class engaged in the active collection of petrologic data in the field and laboratory sessions, and were introduced to the use of state-of-the art analytical tools as part of their experiences. Four students were recruited from the course to design, develop, and conduct long-term research projects on selected petrologic topics in the NVF. This research allowed these students to engage in the "messy" process of testing existing

  4. Ship Rock Diatreme: is it a Classical Volcano? New Evidence on Magma Ascent and Emplacement Within the Navajo Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotzien, J. R.; Mayhew, B.; Yospin, S.; Beiki, A.; Tewksbury, C.; Hardman, D.; Bank, C.; Noblett, J.; Semken, S.; Kroeger, G.

    2007-12-01

    The Navajo Volcanic Field (NVF) is an area of late-Tertiary volcanism along the New Mexico-Arizona border near the Four Corners region of the American Southwest. Among the roughly 80 exhumed diatremes that comprise the NVF, Ship Rock and The Thumb are two diatremes that present an interesting problem concerning magma ascent and emplacement within the NVF. Are the diatremes remnants of classical volcanoes with underlying magma chambers, or are the diatremes formed from buds off of upward propagating dike swarms? The 2006 Keck Consortium Geophysics Project collected non-invasive gravity and magnetic data to image the subsurface of Ship Rock and The Thumb to suggest constraints concerning the formation of these diatremes within the Navajo Volcanic Field. At Ship Rock, we collected over 120 gravity points spaced 500 m apart along 10 lines. We also collected about 65,000 magnetic points that cover an area of 1,570,000 square meters surrounding Ship Rock. The gravity data reveal gravity lows several kilometers away from Ship Rock, probably as a result of thick sedimentary units close to the surface. A steep gradient of 5 mGal/km separates the gravity lows from a strong gravity high immediately to the southwest of Ship Rock. We interpret this gravity high to be uneven basement topography or a magma chamber at depth; further studies are required to determine which of the interpretations is more likely. The Ship Rock magnetic data show the prominent west and northeast dikes extend well beyond their surface outcrops while the southern dike extends only to its visible termination. The magnetic data we collected at The Thumb along ~18 km of lines reveal a linear northeast-southwest trending magnetic anomaly about 105 to 360 nT in amplitude that crosses the diatreme. We interpret the anomaly to be a dike beneath The Thumb. Models of the total field magnetic data suggest a dike at shallow depths of about 0.1 to 4.8 m and widths of about 0.25 to 1.5 m with a steep dip to the

  5. Chemical properties of Garnets from Garnet Ridge, Navajo volcanic field in the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, I.; Ogasawara, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Significant amounts of garnet crystals have derived from kimberlitic diatremes at Garnet Ridge in northern Arizona. These garnets are chemically diverse and their origins have been still controversial. The diatremes at Garnet Ridge were dated at 30Ma (Smith et al., 2004). Coesite-bearing lawsonite eclogite reported by Usui et al., (2003) is important evidence for subduction of the Fallaron Plate below the Colorado plateau. This study characterized various kinds of garnets with several origins by petrographical observations and electron microprobe analyses (JXA-8900 WDS mode and JXA-733 EDS mode). On the basis of the chemical compositions and other features, the garnets were classified into the following 8 groups (A to H). Inclusions and exsolved phases were identified by laser Raman spectroscopy. (A) Garnet crystals (5-8 mm) with purple color are called ''Navajo Ruby''. A significant amount of Cr2O3 is a typical feature (up to ~5.9 wt. %). These garnet were rich in pyrope (66-78 mol. %). Olivine, Cpx, and exsolved lamellae of rutile were contained. (B) Reddish brown garnets were Pyp-rich (60-75 mol. %), and contained a minor amount of Cr2O3 (less than ~1 wt. %). The inclusions were rod-shaped rutile , Cpx, Opx, zircon, olivine and exsolved lamellae of apatite. (C) Garnet megacrysts (8-12 cm) were plotted near the center of Prp-Alm-Grs triangle (Pyp30-35 Alm28-33 Grs29-35). Exsolved apatite lamellae were confirmed. (D) Some of reddish brown garnets were plotted on same area as the Type-C. (E) Garnets in eclogite have Alm-rich composition (Pyp6-22 Alm52-65 Grs16-42). They clearly showed prograde chemical zonation; MgO: 1.4 to 5.4 wt. %, CaO: 14.0 to 5.6 wt. % both from core to rim. (F) Garnets in altered or metasomatized eclogite had a wide range of chemical composition (Pyp7-38 Alm52-69 Grs4-31) with similar prograde zonation. The cores were plotted near the rim of Type-E garnet. (G) Garnets in unidentified rock (strongly altered) had Alm-rich composition near Alm

  6. Dikes, sills, and stress-regime evolution during emplacement of the Jagged Rocks Complex, Hopi Buttes Volcanic Field, Navajo Nation, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, Giuseppe; White, J. D. L.; Ort, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    The dikes and related intrusions formed below small volcanoes in volcanic fields are remnants of the simplest volcanic plumbing systems. Their geometry is controlled by interaction of magma-driven cracks with country rock, and reveals regional structural and stress patterns at the time of their emplacement. The shallow stress field, however, may change during the time an intrusion complex is emplaced, in response to addition or removal of magma and country rock during associated surface eruptions. The Jagged Rocks Complex, in the Miocene Hopi Buttes Volcanic Field, Navajo Nation, Arizona, is exposed 300-350 m below the pre-eruptive surface. It comprises a group of generally NW-SE striking dikes, punctuated in places by buds, a saucer-like intrusion, larger pyroclastic massifs and a diatreme. We made measurements of 13 dikes, divided into 172 segments, with thicknesses from 8 to 122 cm (mean 43 cm) and lengths of 60 to 780 m. Several sills and inclined sheets in places are thicker than dikes, having mean thicknesses of 48 cm and 73 cm respectively. Dikes typically show straight, parallel, and en echelon patterns, while sills and inclined sheets are curved. The northwestern dikes differ from the rest in containing large mafic crystals, and are inferred to have been emplaced after the others. We find that the strike of the overall complex (dikes and other sheets, elongate massifs and aligned sub-cylindrical bodies) reflects a crystalline-basement control that is evident throughout Hopi Buttes. Over the period of the complex's emplacement, local stress patterns were not stable. We infer that excavation of deep maar craters, and perhaps the construction of a scoria cone at the surface, modified the local stress patterns to favor emplacement of sills and en echelon dikes later in the complex's evolution, in contrast to simple straight dikes as the complex first formed.

  7. Monogenetic volcanoes fed by interconnected dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Navajo Nation, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, James D.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Re, Giuseppe; White, James D. L.; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-02-01

    Although monogenetic volcanic fields pose hazards to major cities worldwide, their shallow magma feeders (<500 m depth) are rarely exposed and, therefore, poorly understood. Here, we investigate exposures of dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Arizona, to shed light on the nature of its magma feeder system. Shallow exposures reveal a transition zone between intrusion and eruption within 350 m of the syn-eruptive surface. Using a combination of field- and satellite-based observations, we have identified three types of shallow magma systems: (1) dike-dominated, (2) sill-dominated, and (3) interconnected dike-sill networks. Analysis of vent alignments using the pyroclastic massifs and other eruptive centers (e.g., maar-diatremes) shows a NW-SE trend, parallel to that of dikes in the region. We therefore infer that dikes fed many of the eruptions. Dikes are also observed in places transforming to transgressive (ramping) sills. Estimates of the observable volume of dikes (maximum volume of 1.90 × 106 m3) and sills (minimum volume of 8.47 × 105 m3) in this study reveal that sills at Hopi Buttes make up at least 30 % of the shallow intruded volume (˜2.75 × 106 m3 total) within 350 m of the paeosurface. We have also identified saucer-shaped sills, which are not traditionally associated with monogenetic volcanic fields. Our study demonstrates that shallow feeders in monogenetic fields can form geometrically complex networks, particularly those intruding poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. We conclude that the Hopi Buttes eruptions were primarily fed by NW-SE-striking dikes. However, saucer-shaped sills also played an important role in modulating eruptions by transporting magma toward and away from eruptive conduits. Sill development could have been accompanied by surface uplifts on the order of decimeters. We infer that the characteristic feeder systems described here for the Hopi Buttes may underlie monogenetic fields elsewhere, particularly where

  8. Ar-Ar Phlogopite Geochronology of the Navajo Volcanic Field and the Ship Rock Diatreme of Northwest New Mexico Define a 1.4 Ma Pulse of Potassic Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nybo, J. P.; McIntosh, W. C.; Semken, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Newly acquired Ar-Ar phlogopite ages indicate a brief but widespread pulse of magmatism at 25.9 to 24.5 Ma in Navajo Volcanic Field (NVF). Covering approximately 30,000 km2 of the Four Corners region in the southwestern US and including the Ship Rock diatreme, the NVF forms approximately 100 diatremes, plugs, dikes, and occasional sills and maars. Petrographically the field is dominated by minette and serpentinized ultramafic microbreccia though katungite dikes occur in localized areas. Published K-Ar ages from the NVF range from 33.9 to 19.4 Ma1,2. Published Ar-Ar ages are sparse but a 25.05 Ma3 age in the Chuska Mountains and a 6.7 Ma4 age in SW Colorado have been reported. Phlogopite separates of six dikes from the Shiprock diatreme along with two dikes and two plugs from other locations throughout the NVF were analyzed in this study by the Ar-Ar method using CO2 laser and resistance furnace incremental heating. The resulting age spectra were generally flat and a selection of the most precise ages range from 25.9 ± 0.1 Ma at Todilto Park, AZ to 24.4 ± 0.1 Ma at Ship Rock, NM. The selected samples spatially represent the full breadth of the NVF with four pulses of magmatism interpreted at 25.9 Ma, 25.4 Ma, 24.9 Ma, and 24.5 Ma, altogether spanning a range 1.4 Ma. The narrow range of ages found in this study contrasts with the much wider range of published ages implying the bulk of the NVF was emplaced by a short pulse of widespread magmatism rather than series of temporally spaced eruptions. Additional geochronology will assess whether additional eruptive pulses occurred in the NVF. 1Laughlin, AW, et al, EPSL 76, 1986. 2Roden, MF, et al, EPSL 43, 1979. 3Cather, SM, et al, NMGS Guidebook 54, 2003. 4Gonzalez, DA, et al, NMGS Guidbook 61, 2010.

  9. Field manual for the collection of Navajo Nation streamflow-gage data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Robert J.; Fisk, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    The Field Manual for the Collection of Navajo Nation Streamflow-Gage Data (Navajo Field Manual) is based on established (standard) U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging methods and provides guidelines specifically designed for the Navajo Department of Water Resources personnel who establish and maintain streamflow gages. The Navajo Field Manual addresses field visits, including essential field equipment and the selection of and routine visits to streamflow-gaging stations, examines surveying methods for determining peak flows (indirect measurements), discusses safety considerations, and defines basic terms.

  10. Sensitivity to volcanic field boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Melody; Bebbington, Mark; Cronin, Shane; Lindsay, Jan; Rashad Moufti, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic hazard analyses are desirable where there is potential for future volcanic activity to affect a proximal population. This is frequently the case for volcanic fields (regions of distributed volcanism) where low eruption rates, fertile soil, and attractive landscapes draw populations to live close by. Forecasting future activity in volcanic fields almost invariably uses spatial or spatio-temporal point processes with model selection and development based on exploratory analyses of previous eruption data. For identifiability reasons, spatio-temporal processes, and practically also spatial processes, the definition of a spatial region is required to which volcanism is confined. However, due to the complex and predominantly unknown sub-surface processes driving volcanic eruptions, definition of a region based solely on geological information is currently impossible. Thus, the current approach is to fit a shape to the known previous eruption sites. The class of boundary shape is an unavoidable subjective decision taken by the forecaster that is often overlooked during subsequent analysis of results. This study shows the substantial effect that this choice may have on even the simplest exploratory methods for hazard forecasting, illustrated using four commonly used exploratory statistical methods and two very different regions: the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand, and Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. For Harrat Rahat, sensitivity of results to boundary definition is substantial. For the Auckland Volcanic Field, the range of options resulted in similar shapes, nevertheless, some of the statistical tests still showed substantial variation in results. This work highlights the fact that when carrying out any hazard analysis on volcanic fields, it is vital to specify how the volcanic field boundary has been defined, assess the sensitivity of boundary choice, and to carry these assumptions and related uncertainties through to estimates of future activity and

  11. Recurrence rates of volcanism in basaltic volcanic fields: An example from the Springerville volcanic field, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Condit, C.D.; Connor, C.B.

    1996-10-01

    A spatio-temporal near-neighbor model is used to identify and map variations in the recurrence rate of volcanism in the Springerville volcanic field, Arizona, a large field on the Colorado Plateau boundary. Detailed mapping of individual lava flows and their associated vents, together with radiometric and paleomagnetic dating, demonstrates that 366 volcanic events have formed the Springerville volcanic field. A near-neighbor spatio-temporal recurrence-rate model using seven near-neighbor volcanoes and a 0.5 m.y. time window reveals that (1) areas of waxing and waning magmatism in the Springerville volcanic field are much more localized and (2) volcanic activity within these areas is much more intense than implied by field-wide temporal trends. Because volcanic activity is spatially and temporally clustered, forecasting subsequent activity is more successful if the spatio-temporal recurrence-rate model is used, rather than the average recurrence rates. This success indicates that spatio-temporal recurrence-rate models are useful tools for the quantification of long-term volcanic hazards in basaltic volcanic fields. 61 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Reappraisal of the significance of volcanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo

    2016-01-01

    "Volcanic field" is a term commonly used to loosely describe a group of volcanoes. Often, it is implicitly assumed that the volcanoes on a volcanic field are small, monogenetic and dominantly basaltic, but none of those attributes is indispensable on some definitions of the term. Actually, the term "volcanic field" can be used to describe a group of purely monogenetic edifices, a group of mixed monogenetic and polygenetic edifices, or even a group formed only by purely polygenetic edifices. Differences between each of those alternatives might be important, but the extent to which those differences are truly relevant remains still to be explored. Furthermore, there are several limitations on the current knowledge of this type of volcanic activity that explain the lack of a comprehensive effort to study volcanic fields in global contexts. In this work, issues concerning current definitions of a volcanic field are examined, and some criteria that can be used to distinguish volcanic fields from non-field volcanoes are suggested. Special attention is given to the role played by spatial scale on such a distinction. Also, the tectonic implications of their spatial distribution are explored. In particular, it is shown that volcanic fields are an important component of volcanic activity at a global scale that is closely associated to diffuse plate boundaries, and might well be considered the archetypical volcanic form of such tectonic scenarios.

  13. Becoming Navajo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Rolland D.

    1992-01-01

    A 15-year-old Navajo artist, R. D. Lee, tells about his heritage and his painting. To this adolescent, culture means believing in and living the traditions of family. Lee hopes to be known as Navajo to Navajos but still accepted as a person out in the world. (SLD)

  14. Migration of volcanism in the San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, K.L.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Ulrich, G.E.; Wolfe, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    The remanent magnetization of volcanic rocks has been determined at 650 sites in this volcanic field in the S part of the Colorado plateau. The polarity of remanent magnetization, combined with K/Ar age determinations, spatial and petrographic association, stratigraphic relations and state of preservation of the cinder cones, provides a basis of assignment to a known magnetic polarity epoch of 610 mafic vents and >100 intermediate to silicic flows, flow sequences and vents. Basaltic volcanism migrated NE before Matoyama time (2.48-5.0 m.y.) at a rate of approx 1.2 cm/yr and eastward over the past 2.5 m.y. at a rate of 2.9 cm/yr. Total magma production and frequency of basaltic eruption accelerated between 5 and 0.25 m.y. and have decreased thereafter; this evolutionary sequence, coupled with the Sr-isotopic composition of the rocks, can be explained by magmatism caused by shear heating at the base of the lithosphere. The eastward drift of volcanism represents the absolute westward motion of the North America plate.-L.C.H.

  15. THE NAVAJOS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Tribe Public Relations and Information Dept., Window Rock, AZ.

    A STUDY OF NAVAJO AMERICAN INDIANS IS PRESENTED. INCLUDED ARE THE TRIBE'S HISTORY, RESOURCES, ECONOMIC SITUATION, AND WAYS TO IMPROVE IT. THE NAVAJOS ARE DIFFERENT FROM OTHER AMERICAN INDIAN TRIBES IN THAT THEY ARE RAPIDLY INCREASING, THEY HAVE INCREASED THE SIZE OF THEIR RESERVATION, THEY STILL LIVE IN ISOLATION AND IN A PRIMITIVE FASHION, AND…

  16. Navajo Studies at Navajo Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessel, Ruth, Ed.

    The Navajo Studies Program at Navajo Community College consists of 2 major areas of study, the first of which includes courses dealing with the Navajos. This book deals with that portion of the program and provides a picture of selected Navajo Studies courses as taught at Navajo Community College. Contained in the book are the origin myths of the…

  17. Navajo Studies at Navajo Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatathli, Ned

    The document covers the Navajo Studies Program (NSP) at Navajo Community College (NCC). The Navajo Studies Program differs from other Indian Studies Programs in 7 ways, e.g.: (1) it is located on the Navajo Reservation and controlled by the tribe; (2) NCC incorporates Indian studies into every individual program and area of concentration--English…

  18. Navajo Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazzie, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Navajo Nation has eliminated jail time for 79 offenses and required traditional peacemaking in criminal cases, primarily involving family violence. Peacemaking entails examination of the criminal act by all involved, family responsibility for its members, and symbolic restitution. The change promotes prevention and child protection by breaking…

  19. The San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Priest, S.S.; Duffield, W.A.; Malis-Clark, Karen; Hendley, J. W., II; Stauffer, P.H.

    2001-01-01

    Northern Arizona's San Francisco Volcanic Field, much of which lies within Coconino and Kaibab National Forests, is an area of young volcanoes along the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau. During its 6-million-year history, this field has produced more than 600 volcanoes. Their activity has created a topographically varied landscape with forests that extend from the Pi?on-Juniper up to the Bristlecone Pine life zones. The most prominent landmark is San Francisco Mountain, a stratovolcano that rises to 12,633 feet and serves as a scenic backdrop to the city of Flagstaff.

  20. Using Spatial Density to Characterize Volcanic Fields on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Connor, C. B.; Connor, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new tool to planetary geology for quantifying the spatial arrangement of vent fields and volcanic provinces using non parametric kernel density estimation. Unlike parametricmethods where spatial density, and thus the spatial arrangement of volcanic vents, is simplified to fit a standard statistical distribution, non parametric methods offer more objective and data driven techniques to characterize volcanic vent fields. This method is applied to Syria Planum volcanic vent catalog data as well as catalog data for a vent field south of Pavonis Mons. The spatial densities are compared to terrestrial volcanic fields.

  1. Twilight of a Volcanic Field: 11 Million Years of Basaltic Volcanism in the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, F. V.; Valintine, G. A.

    2007-12-01

    Following the end of major caldera-forming silicic volcanism in the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field (SNVF), at least 10 episodes of alkalic basaltic volcanism have occurred over the last ~11 Ma. An understanding of the past behavior of the volcanic field provides insight for forecasting future eruptive behavior for use in hazard assessment for the high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. A program of geophysics, drilling, Ar-Ar dating and geochemistry conducted since 2004 by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the U.S. Geological Survey, combined with previous and ongoing petrogenetic and physical volcanology studies, sheds more light on the early and middle evolution of the volcanic field, much of which has been buried in alluvial basins. Volumes of erupted basalt have drastically declined over the history of the field, from as much as 50 km3 in the Miocene to about 0.5 km3 in the Pleistocene. The volume decrease is accompanied by a drastic decrease in extension rate, suggesting a close link between magmatism and tectonism. Neodymium and strontium isotopic analyses indicate that enriched lithospheric mantle has been the source of basalt throughout the history of the field. Decreasing eruption volumes are accompanied by an approximate doubling of Ce/Yb ratios, indicating that the volume decrease reflects a decrease in degree of partial melting of the lithospheric source. Eruption style has also changed with time, reflecting an increase in magma volatile content, consistent with decreased amounts of partial melting of a volatile-bearing source. These observations are consistent with a model in which the lithospheric mantle source was hottest during the period of major silicic volcanism and the presence of an active subduction system. After the breakdown of subduction, continued thermal input into the lithosphere ceased, and the lithosphere began to conductively cool. Melt accumulation in non-convecting, static lithosphere is probably related to

  2. Spatial distribution and alignments of volcanic centers: Clues to the formation of monogenetic volcanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, Nicolas; Spörli, K. Bernhard; Rowland, Julie; Lindsay, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Monogenetic basaltic volcanic fields occur worldwide in tectonic environments ranging from extensional to convergent. Understanding similarities and differences between these fields may help to characterize key controls on their generation. Such volcanic fields consist of numerous volcanic centers, each of which represents a pathway of magma from its source to the surface. We analyzed the spatial distribution of volcanic centers in 37 monogenetic volcanic fields, and assuming that the distribution of volcanic centers relative to each other is matched by a similar source pattern within the mantle, applied the following methods for each: (1) the Poisson Nearest Neighbor (PNN) analysis, representing the degree to which the distribution of the volcanic centers departs from a predicted Poisson distribution, and (2) a volcanic alignment analysis to ascertain the preferential pathways, if any, used by the magma to reach the surface. This is the first comprehensive global comparison of such analyses. Magma pathways within the brittle upper crust are influenced to various degrees by two end-member situations: (1) formation of new extension fractures perpendicular to the least compressive stress (σ3) and (2) re-activation of pre-existing fractures that are near-parallel to the maximum principal stress (σ1). The results of the PNN analysis show that, independently of the tectonic environment, most volcanic fields display a clustered distribution of their volcanic centers. Alignment analysis shows that either the ambient tectonic environment exerts a strong influence on the preferential orientations of the volcanic alignments, or that it is in competition with other factors (e.g., pre-existing structures, local stress changes due to older intrusions). Overall, these results indicate that the propagation of the magma (and therefore the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers within volcanic fields) is the product of an interplay between deep level influences (i

  3. Paleomagnetic Study of El Pinacate Volcanic Field, Sonora, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Trejo, A.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Paleomagnetism Laboratory, Geophysics Institute, UNAM

    2011-12-01

    This Paleomagnetic study reports the results of 235 cores from 19 sites of different lava flows, reporting results of the magnetic properties such as Susceptibility vs.Temperature, hysteresis, FORC analysis, etc. Results of the desmagnetization process by alternating fields and temperature and the Paleointensity experiments. El Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located on the NNW region of Sonora, Mexico, and it consists on older lava flows, covered and surrounded by some cinder cones and younger lava flows, result of two different volcanic events, the older one, the event Pre Pinacate (Miocene) and the younger one Pinacate (Quaternary). Cinder cones are the most common volcanic structures on the area, there are more than 400 of them, and with all the lava flows, covering a 1,500 km2 area. There are 8 maars, volcanic structures result of phreatomagmatic activity (El Elegante) and a tuff cone (Cerro Colorado). El Pinacate is a monogenetic volcanic field that includes more than 400 volcanic structures and lava flows, dominated principally by basalts. The principal volcanic event Pinacate started its activity from the early Quaternary, untilt 1.1 Ma; and the last volcanic series started at 780 Ka to 32 Ka , the principal volcanic shield, including the principal volcanic structures as cinder cones, maars and lava flows. However, the principal objetive of this work is to calculate tha Paleosecular Variation and the Geomagnetic Paleointensity, based on previous geochronological studies.

  4. Using Spatial Density to Characterize Volcanic Fields on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Connor, C. B.; Connor, L. J.

    2012-03-01

    Kernel density estimation is presented as a new, non-parametric method for quantifying the spatial arrangement of volcanic fields. It is applied to two vent fields in Tharsis Province, Mars, to produce insightful spatial density functions.

  5. Temporal and Spatial Analysis of Monogenetic Volcanic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyosugi, Koji

    Achieving an understanding of the nature of monogenetic volcanic fields depends on identification of the spatial and temporal patterns of volcanism in these fields, and their relationships to structures mapped in the shallow crust and inferred in the deep crust and mantle through interpretation of geochemical, radiometric and geophysical data. We investigate the spatial and temporal distributions of volcanism in the Abu Monogenetic Volcano Group, Southwest Japan. E-W elongated volcano distribution, which is identified by a nonparametric kernel method, is found to be consistent with the spatial extent of P-wave velocity anomalies in the lower crust and upper mantle, supporting the idea that the spatial density map of volcanic vents reflects the geometry of a mantle diapir. Estimated basalt supply to the lower crust is constant. This observation and the spatial distribution of volcanic vents suggest stability of magma productivity and essentially constant two-dimensional size of the source mantle diapir. We mapped conduits, dike segments, and sills in the San Rafael sub-volcanic field, Utah, where the shallowest part of a Pliocene magmatic system is exceptionally well exposed. The distribution of conduits matches the major features of dike distribution, including development of clusters and distribution of outliers. The comparison of San Rafael conduit distribution and the distributions of volcanoes in several recently active volcanic fields supports the use of statistical models, such as nonparametric kernel methods, in probabilistic hazard assessment for distributed volcanism. We developed a new recurrence rate calculation method that uses a Monte Carlo procedure to better reflect and understand the impact of uncertainties of radiometric age determinations on uncertainty of recurrence rate estimates for volcanic activity in the Abu, Yucca Mountain Region, and Izu-Tobu volcanic fields. Results suggest that the recurrence rates of volcanic fields can change by more

  6. Navajo Electrification Demonstraiton Project

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Ahasteen, Project Manager

    2006-07-17

    This is a final technical report required by DOE for the Navajo Electrification Demonstration Program, This report covers the electric line extension project for Navajo families that currently without electric power.

  7. Volcanology, geochemistry and age of the Lausitz Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büchner, J.; Tietz, O.; Viereck, L.; Suhr, P.; Abratis, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Lausitz (Lusatia) Volcanic Field is part of the Central European Volcanic Province, and its magmas represent an alkaline trend from olivine nephelinites and basanites to trachytes and phonolites, typical for intraplate settings. Neighbouring volcanic fields are the České Středohoří Mountains to the south-west and the Fore-Sudetic Basin in Lower Silesia to the east. More than 1000 volcanic structures associated with approximately 500 vents have been located within this volcanic field. Residuals of scoria cones, lava lakes, lava flows and maar-diatreme in filling occur in situ near the level of the original syn-volcanic terrain. In more deeply eroded structures, volcanic relicts outcrop as plugs or feeders. Evolved rocks occur as monogenetic domes or intrusions in diatremes, while their volcaniclastic equivalents are rare. Twenty-three localities were dated using the 40Ar/39Ar method. The ages range from 35 to 27 Ma, with a focus around 32-29 Ma, indicating Late Eocene and mainly Oligocene volcanism for the LVF. Differentiated rocks appear to be slightly younger than less differentiated. No geographical age clusters are apparent.

  8. The Zuni-Bandera Volcanic Field, NM: An Analog for Exploring Planetary Volcanic Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Garry, W. B.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Crumpler, L. S.; Aubele, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, near Grants, New Mexico, is comprised of volcanic deposits from several basaltic eruptions during the last million years. This vent field exhibits a diverse group of coalesced lava flows and displays well-preserved volcanic features including a’a and pahoehoe flows, collapsed lava tubes, cinder cones and low shields. The McCartys flow is a 48-km long inflated basalt flow and is the youngest in the field at around 3000 years old. Over the last three years we have used the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, and the McCartys flow in particular, as a terrestrial analog for exploring planetary volcanic fields, and understanding the role of lava sheet inflation in flow field development. We have conducted three different styles of analog tests, 1) basic field science focused on understanding lava sheet inflation, 2) mission operations tests related to EVA design and real-time modification of traverse plans, and 3) science enabling technology tests. The Zuni-Bandera field is an ideal location for each style of analog test because it provides easy access to a diverse set of volcanic features with variable quality of preservation. However, many limitations must also be considered in order to maximize lessons learned. The McCartys flow displays well-preserved inflation plateaus that rise up to 15 m above the surrounding field. The preservation state enables textures and morphologies indicative of this process to be characterized. However, the pristine nature of the flow does not compare well with the much older and heavily modified inflated flows of Mars and the Moon. Older flows west of McCartys add value to this aspect of analog work because of their degraded surfaces, development of soil horizons, loose float, and limited exposure of outcrops, similar to what might be observed on the Moon or Mars. EVA design tests and science enabling technology tests at the Zuni-Bandera field provide the opportunity to document and interpret the relationships

  9. Navajo Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Community Coll., Tsaile, AZ.

    The objectives of this Special Experimental Demonstration Project in Adult Basic Education for the Navajo were: (1) to raise the educational and social level of Navajo adult students who are unable to read, write, and speak English; (2) to assist the Navajo adult students to take advantage of occupational and vocational training programs; (3) to…

  10. Strong Navajo Marriages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogrand, Linda; Mueller, Mary Lou; Arrington, Rachel; LeBlanc, Heidi; Spotted Elk, Davina; Dayzie, Irene; Rosenbrand, Reva

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study, conducted in two Navajo Nation chapters, was to learn what makes Navajo marriages strong because no research has been done on this topic. Twenty-one Navajo couples (42 individuals) who felt they had strong marriages volunteered to participate in the study. Couples identified the following marital strengths:…

  11. Constraining the onset of flood volcanism in Isle of Skye Lava Field, British Paleogene Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angkasa, Syahreza; Jerram, Dougal. A.; Svensen, Henrik; Millet, John M.; Taylor, Ross; Planke, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    In order to constrain eruption styles at the onset of flood volcanism, field observations were undertaken on basal sections of the Isle of Skye Lava Field, British Paleogene Volcanic Province. This study investigates three specific sections; Camus Ban, Neist Point and Soay Sound which sample a large area about 1500 km2 and can be used to help explain the variability in palaeo-environments at the onset of flood volcanism. Petrological analysis is coupled with petrophysical lab data and photogrammetry data to create detailed facies models for the different styles of initiating flood basalt volcanism. Photogrammetry is used to create Ortho-rectified 3D models which, along with photomontage images, allow detailed geological observations to be mapped spatially. Petrographic analyses are combined with petrophysical lab data to identify key textural variation, mineral compositions and physical properties of the volcanic rocks emplaced during the initial eruptions. Volcanism initiated with effusive eruptions in either subaerial or subaqueous environments resulting in tuff/hyaloclastite materials or lava flow facies lying directly on the older Mesozoic strata. Volcanic facies indicative of lava-water interactions vary significantly in thickness between different sections suggesting a strong accommodation space control on the style of volcanism. Camus Ban shows hyaloclastite deposits with a thickness of 25m, whereas the Soay Sound area has tuffaceous sediments of under 0.1m in thickness. Subaerial lavas overly these variable deposits in all studied areas. The flood basalt eruptions took place in mixed wet and dry environments with some significant locally developed water bodies (e.g. Camus Ban). More explosive eruptions were promoted in some cases by interaction of lavas with these water bodies and possibly by local interaction with water - saturated sediments. We record key examples of how palaeotopography imparts a primary control on the style of volcanism during the

  12. Evolution of volcanic rocks and associated ore deposits in the Marysvale volcanic field, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Charles G.; Steven, Thomas A.; Rowley, Peter D.; Naeser, Charles W.; Mehnert, Harald H.; Hedge, Carl E.; Ludwig, Kenneth R.

    1994-01-01

    A geological account on the igneous activity and associated mineral deposition in the volcanic field of Marysvale in Utah is presented. Three episodes (34-22 Ma, 22-14 Ma and 9-5 Ma) involved in the volcanic rock eruption and associated mineralization are described. The first episode is believed to have occurred during the time of tectonic convergence when two contrasting suites of rocks, Mount Dutton Formation and Bullion Canyon Volcanics, erupted concurrently. Mineralization during this period was sparse. In the second episode, change from intermediate to bimodal volcanism occurred. During the third episode, basaltic compositions did not change. Although major element constituent had rhyolites similar to that of the second episode, rhyolites had a marked radiogenic isotope characteristic difference.

  13. Field measurement and analysis of climatic factors affecting dune mobility near Grand Falls on the Navajo Nation, southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bogle, Rian C.; Redsteer, Margaret Hiza; Vogel, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Aeolian sand covers extensive areas of the Navajo Nation in the southwestern United States. Much of this sand is currently stabilized by vegetation, although many drier parts of these Native lands also have active and partly active dunes. Current prolonged drought conditions that started in the mid-1990s are producing significant changes in dune mobility. Reactivation of regional aeolian deposits due to drought or increasing aridity from rising temperatures resulting from climate change could have serious consequences for human and animal populations, agriculture, grazing, and infrastructure. To understand and document the current and future potential for mobility, seasonally repeated surveys were used to track the location of multiple active barchan dunes. By utilizing Real-Time Kinematic GPS field surveys and simultaneously collecting in-situ meteorological data, it is possible to examine climatic parameters and seasonal variations that affect dune mobility and their relative influences. Through analysis of the recorded data, we examined the fit of various climate parameters, and demonstrate that under the current prolonged drought, wind power is the dominant factor controlling dune mobility.

  14. Isotopic evidence for the origin of Cenozoic volcanic rocks in the Pinacate volcanic field, northwestern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, D. J.; Musselman, T. E.; Gutmann, J. T.; Patchett, P. J.

    1993-02-01

    Six volcanic rocks, reconnaissance samples representing most of the temporal and compositional variation in the Pinacate volcanic field of Sonora and Arizona, are characterized for major element and NdSr isotopic compositions. The samples consist of basanite through trachyte of an early shield volcano, and alkali basalts and a tholeiite from later craters and cinder cones. With the exception of the trachyte sample, which has increased 87Sr/ 86Sr due to crustal effects, all 87Sr/ 86Sr values fall between 0.70312 and 0.70342, while ɛNd values are all between + 5.0 and + 5.7. Clinopyroxene in a rare spinel-lherzolite nodule derived from the uppermost mantle beneath the field has 87Sr/ 86Sr of 0.70320 but ɛNd of + 8.8, three ɛNd units higher than the volcanic rocks. Both the volcanic rocks and the nodule record the presence of asthenospheric, rather than enriched lithospheric mantle beneath Pinacate. This is consistent with one or both of (a) proximity of Pinacate to the Gulf of California spreading center and (b) presence of similar asthenospheric mantle signatures in volcanic rocks over a wide contiguous area of the southwestern USA. We consider the comparison to other southwestern USA magma sources as the more relevant alternative, although a definite conclusion is not possible at this stage.

  15. Geophysical expression of caldera related volcanism, structures and mineralization in the McDermitt volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rytuba, J. J.; Blakely, R. J.; Moring, B.; Miller, R.

    2013-12-01

    The High Rock, Lake Owyhee, and McDermitt volcanic fields, consisting of regionally extensive ash flow tuffs and associated calderas, developed in NW Nevada and SE Oregon following eruption of the ca. 16.7 Ma Steens flood basalt. The first ash flow, the Tuff of Oregon Canyon, erupted from the McDermitt volcanic field at 16.5Ma. It is chemically zoned from peralkaline rhyolite to dacite with trace element ratios that distinguish it from other ash flow tuffs. The source caldera, based on tuff distribution, thickness, and size of lithic fragments, is in the area in which the McDermitt caldera (16.3 Ma) subsequently formed. Gravity and magnetic anomalies are associated with some but not all of the calderas. The White Horse caldera (15.6 Ma), the youngest caldera in the McDermitt volcanic field has the best geophysical expression, with both aeromagnetic and gravity lows coinciding with the caldera. Detailed aeromagnetic and gravity surveys of the McDermitt caldera, combined with geology and radiometric surveys, provides insight into the complexities of caldera collapse, resurgence, post collapse volcanism, and hydrothermal mineralization. The McDermitt caldera is among the most mineralized calderas in the world, whereas other calderas in these three Mid Miocene volcanic fields do not contain important hydrothermal ore deposits, despite having similar age and chemistry. The McDermitt caldera is host to Hg, U, and Li deposits and potentially significant resources of Ga, Sb, and REE. The geophysical data indicate that post-caldera collapse intrusions were important in formation of the hydrothermal systems. An aeromagnetic low along the E caldera margin reflects an intrusion at a depth of 2 km associated with the near-surface McDermitt-hot-spring-type Hg-Sb deposit, and the deeper level, high-sulfidation Ga-REE occurrence. The Li deposits on the W side of the caldera are associated with a series of low amplitude, small diameter aeromagnetic anomalies that form a continuous

  16. Neogene rhyolites of the northern Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, B.M.; Vaniman, D.T.; Baldridge, W.S.; Shafiqullah, M.

    1988-06-10

    Volcanic centers previously mapped as the 20 Ma El Rechuelos Rhyolite in the northern Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico, include three distinct episodes of rhyolitic volcanism. An early (7.5 Ma) extrusive dome of flow-banded biotite rhyolite and an intermediate (5.8 Ma) rhyolite, possibly a volcanic neck, correspond in age to rhyolites of the Keres Group in the southern Jemez volcanic field. Three other extrusive domes of aphyric, pumiceous rhyolite and obsidian comprise a late volcanic episode, dated at 2.0 Ma. We retain the name El Rechuelos Rhyolite only for these late centers. Another center, farther north than the others but previously mapped with the El Rechuelos Rhyolite, is a dacite pumice ring whose age (5.2 Ma), petrography, major- and trace-element chemistry, and Sr initial ratio all suggest it should be included with rocks of the Tschicoma Formation. Nd and Sr isotopic ratios of the Neogene rhyolites of the northern Jemez volcanic field suggest that these rhyolites were not produced by partial melting of either upper or lower crust. Rather, they may have been generated from a mantle-derived mafic magma, such as the nearby Lobato Basalt, by fractional crystallization with concomitant assimilation of small amounts (<6%) of lower crust. If the El Rechuelos is derived from a lower crust magma chamber, as seems likely, then it is not related to the bandelier magma system, even though it is part of a continuum of rhyolite volcanism ranging from 3.6 Ma to 130,000 years ago that includes the Bandelier and precursor rhyolitic units. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  17. The Valle de Bravo Volcanic Field. A monogenetic field in the central front of the Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Jaimes-Viera, M. D.; Nieto-Obreg¢n, J.; Lozano-Santacruz, R.

    2003-12-01

    The Valle de Bravo volcanic field, VBVF, is located in the central-southern front of the Mexican Volcanic Belt just to the southwest of Nevado de Toluca volcano. The VBVF covers 3,703 square Km and includes at least 122 cinder cones, 1 shield volcano, several domes, and the 2 volcanic complexes of Zitacuaro and Villa de Allende. Morphometric parameters calibrated with isotopic ages of the volcanic products indicate four groups or units for the VBVF, Pliocene domes and lava flows, undifferentiated Pleistocene lava flows,> 40 Ka cones and lavas, 40 to 25 Ka cones and lavas, 25 to 10 Ka cones and lavas, and < 10 Ka cones and lavas. Whole-rock chemistry shows that all products of the VBVF range from basaltic andesites to dacites. No basalts were found, in spite of many units are olivine-rich and large some with large weight percent contents of MgO, 1 to 9. There is the possibility that some or all of the olivines in some samples could be xenocrysts. Some andesites are high in Sr, 1000 to 1800 ppm, that correlates with relatively high values of Ba, Cr, Ni, Cu, CaO and MgO. Y and Nb have the typical low values for orogenic rocks. The only shield volcano of the VBVF has a base of 9 Km, and its composition is practically the average composition of the whole field. Stratigraphycally, it is one of the earlier events of the VBVF. Compared with other volcanic fields of the Mexican Volcanic Belt, it lacks basalts and alkalic rocks. All volcanism of this field is calcalkaline

  18. Our Friends -- The Navajos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Community Coll. Press, Tsaile, AZ.

    Papers in this collection reflect the academic and on-reservation learning experiences of institute participants exposed to: Indian arts and crafts; the Navajo language; the Navajo people in their own homes, schools, and communities; basic knowledge of Indians; ceremonies, community meetings, and neighboring reservations; and major problems and…

  19. Navajo Biographies. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Virginia

    The life stories of eight Navajo ("Dine", their term for themselves) leaders are presented in volume one of this collection of biographies. Interspersed with portraits, drawings, and maps, the narrative chronologically covers the time period from 1766 when the Navajos lived on land under the rule of Spain into the twentieth century and dealings…

  20. The Navajo Yearbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert W., Comp.

    The Navajo Yearbook began as an annual report to relate progress in carrying out provisions of the Navajo-Hopi Long Range Rehabilitation Act (P.L. 474 - 81st Congress), but the scope has been expanded to include all programs conducted on the reservation. This volume, the eighth in the series, is designed to reflect changing problems, changing…

  1. Navajo Wisdom and Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazzie, Ethelou

    The oral literature of the Navajo people generally falls into two categories: the sacred stories and the folk tales, which often, but not always, point a moral. Sacred stories relate the Navajo's emergence history. These stories tell how the universe holds two kinds of people: the "Earth Surface People" (both living and dead) and the "Holy People"…

  2. Spatio-volumetric hazard estimation in the Auckland volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark S.

    2015-05-01

    The idea of a volcanic field `boundary' is prevalent in the literature, but ill-defined at best. We use the elliptically constrained vents in the Auckland Volcanic Field to examine how spatial intensity models can be tested to assess whether they are consistent with such features. A means of modifying the anisotropic Gaussian kernel density estimate to reflect the existence of a `hard' boundary is then suggested, and the result shown to reproduce the observed elliptical distribution. A new idea, that of a spatio-volumetric model, is introduced as being more relevant to hazard in a monogenetic volcanic field than the spatiotemporal hazard model due to the low temporal rates in volcanic fields. Significant dependencies between the locations and erupted volumes of the observed centres are deduced, and expressed in the form of a spatially-varying probability density. In the future, larger volumes are to be expected in the `gaps' between existing centres, with the location of the greatest forecast volume lying in the shipping channel between Rangitoto and Castor Bay. The results argue for tectonic control over location and magmatic control over erupted volume. The spatio-volumetric model is consistent with the hypothesis of a flat elliptical area in the mantle where tensional stresses, related to the local tectonics and geology, allow decompressional melting.

  3. What controls the distribution of volcanoes within monogenetic volcanic fields: Insights from spatial distribution and alignments of volcanic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, N.; Sporli, K. B.; Rowland, J. V.; Lindsay, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Basaltic volcanic fields are distributed worldwide in tectonic environments ranging from extensional to convergent. Understanding similarities and differences between these fields may help us to characterize key controls on their generation. Basaltic volcanic fields are composed of numerous volcanic centers which represent the end point of the pathway of magma from its source to the surface. We analyzed the spatial distribution of volcanic centers of 37 different monogenetic volcanic fields using similar analyses for each volcanic field: 1) the Poisson Nearest Neighbor (PNN) analysis representing the degree to which an observation (i.e., the distribution of the volcanic centers) departs from a predicted Poisson distribution; here we assume that the distribution of volcanic centers relative to each other is representative of the source behavior within the mantle, and 2) a volcanic alignment analysis to ascertain the preferential pathways, if any, used by the magma to reach the surface. We consider the end-member geometries for magma pathways within the brittle upper crust to be representative of: 1) newly formed extension fractures perpendicular to the least compressive stress (σ3), or 2) pre-existing fractures that are near-parallel to the maximum principal stress (σ1). Although these methods have been used to characterize monogenetic volcanic fields elsewhere, this is the first comprehensive global comparison of the resulting data using these methods. The results of the PNN analysis show that most volcanic fields display a clustered distribution of their volcanic centers, which is independent of the tectonic environment. The results of the volcanic alignment analyses show either that the tectonic environment may exert a strong influence on the preferential orientations of the volcanic alignments, or be in competition with other factors (e.g., pre-existing structures, local stress changes due to older intrusions). The combination of these results emphasises the

  4. Explosive Volcanic Activity at Extreme Depths: Evidence from the Charles Darwin Volcanic Field, Cape Verdes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Devey, C. W.; Hansteen, T. H.; Freundt, A.; Kutterolf, S.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions on the deep sea floor have traditionally been assumed to be non-explosive as the high-pressure environment should greatly inhibit steam-driven explosions. Nevertheless, occasional evidence both from (generally slow-) spreading axes and intraplate seamounts has hinted at explosive activity at large water depths. Here we present evidence from a submarine field of volcanic cones and pit craters called Charles Darwin Volcanic Field located at about 3600 m depth on the lower southwestern slope of the Cape Verdean Island of Santo Antão. We examined two of these submarine volcanic edifices (Tambor and Kolá), each featuring a pit crater of 1 km diameter, using photogrammetric reconstructions derived from ROV-based imaging followed by 3D quantification using a novel remote sensing workflow, aided by sampling. The measured and calculated parameters of physical volcanology derived from the 3D model allow us, for the first time, to make quantitative statements about volcanic processes on the deep seafloor similar to those generated from land-based field observations. Tambor cone, which is 2500 m wide and 250 m high, consists of dense, probably monogenetic medium to coarse-grained volcaniclastic and pyroclastic rocks that are highly fragmented, probably as a result of thermal and viscous granulation upon contact with seawater during several consecutive cycles of activity. Tangential joints in the outcrops indicate subsidence of the crater floor after primary emplacement. Kolá crater, which is 1000 m wide and 160 m deep, appears to have been excavated in the surrounding seafloor and shows stepwise sagging features interpreted as ring fractures on the inner flanks. Lithologically, it is made up of a complicated succession of highly fragmented deposits, including spheroidal juvenile lapilli, likely formed by spray granulation. It resembles a maar-type deposit found on land. The eruption apparently entrained blocks of MORB-type gabbroic country rocks with

  5. Navajo-ABLE: Replication Model Navajo Assistive Technology Loan Program. Final Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Katie Jebb

    This final report discusses the activities and outcomes of the Navajo Assistive Bank of Loanable Equipment (Navajo-ABLE), a federally funded program designed to provide assistive technology (AT) devices, services, technical information, funding information, and training for Navajo children and youth with disabilities. The program was operated and…

  6. NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Terry W. Battiest

    2008-06-11

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

  7. Geologic Map of the Central Marysvale Volcanic Field, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowley, Peter D.; Cunningham, Charles G.; Steven, Thomas A.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Anderson, John J.; Theissen, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    The geologic map of the central Marysvale volcanic field, southwestern Utah, shows the geology at 1:100,000 scale of the heart of one of the largest Cenozoic volcanic fields in the Western United States. The map shows the area of 38 degrees 15' to 38 degrees 42'30' N., and 112 degrees to 112 degrees 37'30' W. The Marysvale field occurs mostly in the High Plateaus, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau and structurally a transition zone between the complexly deformed Great Basin to the west and the stable, little-deformed main part of the Colorado Plateau to the east. The western part of the field is in the Great Basin proper. The volcanic rocks and their source intrusions in the volcanic field range in age from about 31 Ma (Oligocene) to about 0.5 Ma (Pleistocene). These rocks overlie sedimentary rocks exposed in the mapped area that range in age from Ordovician to early Cenozoic. The area has been deformed by thrust faults and folds formed during the late Mesozoic to early Cenozoic Sevier deformational event, and later by mostly normal faults and folds of the Miocene to Quaternary basin-range episode. The map revises and updates knowledge gained during a long-term U.S. Geological Survey investigation of the volcanic field, done in part because of its extensive history of mining. The investigation also was done to provide framework geologic knowledge suitable for defining geologic and hydrologic hazards, for locating hydrologic and mineral resources, and for an understanding of geologic processes in the area. A previous geologic map (Cunningham and others, 1983, U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series I-1430-A) covered the same area as this map but was published at 1:50,000 scale and is obsolete due to new data. This new geologic map of the central Marysvale field, here published as U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Investigations Series I-2645-A, is accompanied by gravity and aeromagnetic maps of the same area and the same scale (Campbell and

  8. Tectonic implications of space-time patterns of Cenozoic volcanism in the Palo Verde Mountain volcanic field, southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.S.

    1981-01-01

    Variations in Cenozoic volcanism in the western United States are believed to correlate closely with changes in tectonic setting. A transition in volcanic association from calc-alkaline to fundamentally basaltic volcanism and subsequent crustal extension, appears to have coincided temporally with the initial collision of the East Pacific Rise with the continental margin trench off western North America, between 28 and 25 Ma. The volcanic stratigraphy of the Palo Verde Mountain volcanic field is broadly similar to other volcanic centers in southeastern California and can be divided into tripartite regional stratigraphy. A basal sequence of andesitic to rhyolitic lava flows, plugs, domes, and extensive pyroclastic deposits rests unconformably on pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. The basal sequence is intruded by cogenetic Cenozoic plutonic rocks and overlain by basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows, dikes, and a second widespread assemblage of pyroclastic deposits, cumulatively referred to as the silicic sequence. The youngest volcanic rocks of the field include olivine basalt flows and breccia which occur at scattered localities in the Palo Verde Mountains. The age, stratigraphy, and chemistry of the intermediate and basaltic composition volcanic rocks broadly supports previously cited volcanic-tectonic models, if modified to incorporate modern plate reconstruction theory. This modification results in a southeast migration of the transition to basaltic volcanism to southeastern California occurring significantly later in time than the previously cited ages of transition. Moreover, this southeast migration of the volcanic transition is coincident with the inception of Basin and Range faulting and the initiation of movement on the San Andreas fault south of the Transverse Ranges, corresponding to the southward migration of the Pacific-Cocos Ridge.

  9. Optimal likelihood-based matching of volcanic sources and deposits in the Auckland Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Emily; Bebbington, Mark S.; Cronin, Shane J.; Wang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    In monogenetic volcanic fields, where each eruption forms a new volcano, focusing and migration of activity over time is a very real possibility. In order for hazard estimates to reflect future, rather than past, behavior, it is vital to assemble as much reliable age data as possible on past eruptions. Multiple swamp/lake records have been extracted from the Auckland Volcanic Field, underlying the 1.4 million-population city of Auckland. We examine here the problem of matching these dated deposits to the volcanoes that produced them. The simplest issue is separation in time, which is handled by simulating prior volcano age sequences from direct dates where known, thinned via ordering constraints between the volcanoes. The subproblem of varying deposition thicknesses (which may be zero) at five locations of known distance and azimuth is quantified using a statistical attenuation model for the volcanic ash thickness. These elements are combined with other constraints, from widespread fingerprinted ash layers that separate eruptions and time-censoring of the records, into a likelihood that was optimized via linear programming. A second linear program was used to optimize over the Monte-Carlo simulated set of prior age profiles to determine the best overall match and consequent volcano age assignments. Considering all 20 matches, and the multiple factors of age, direction, and size/distance simultaneously, results in some non-intuitive assignments which would not be produced by single factor analyses. Compared with earlier work, the results provide better age control on a number of smaller centers such as Little Rangitoto, Otuataua, Taylors Hill, Wiri Mountain, Green Hill, Otara Hill, Hampton Park and Mt Cambria. Spatio-temporal hazard estimates are updated on the basis of the new ordering, which suggest that the scale of the 'flare-up' around 30 ka, while still highly significant, was less than previously thought.

  10. Area Health Education Center of the Navajo Health Authority to Establish the Navajo Center for Health Professions Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Health Authority, Window Rock, AZ.

    The Area Health Education Center (AHEC) is designed to provide educational opportunities in health and allied fields and to improve health care for the Navajo people and other Indians in the region that includes and immediately surrounds the Navajo Indian Reservation. As prime contractor, the University of New Meixco School of Medicine will…

  11. Soil CO2 flux baseline in an urban monogenetic volcanic field: the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazot, Agnès; Smid, Elaine R.; Schwendenmann, Luitgard; Delgado-Granados, Hugo; Lindsay, Jan

    2013-11-01

    The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) is a dormant monogenetic basaltic field located in Auckland, New Zealand. Though soil gas CO2 fluxes are routinely used to monitor volcanic regions, there have been no published studies of soil CO2 flux or soil gas CO2 concentrations in the AVF to date or many other monogenetic fields worldwide. We measured soil gas CO2 fluxes and soil gas CO2 concentrations in 2010 and 2012 in varying settings, seasons, and times of day to establish a baseline soil CO2 flux and to determine the major sources of and controlling influences on Auckland's soil CO2 flux. Soil CO2 flux measurements varied from 0 to 203 g m-2 day-1, with an average of 27.1 g m-2 day-1. Higher fluxes were attributed to varying land use properties (e.g., landfill). Using a graphical statistical approach, two populations of CO2 fluxes were identified. Isotope analyses of δ13CO2 confirmed that the source of CO2 in the AVF is biogenic with no volcanic component. These data may be used to assist with eruption forecasting in the event of precursory activity in the AVF, and highlight the importance of knowing land use history when assessing soil gas CO2 fluxes in urban environments.

  12. Shield fields: Concentrations of small volcanic edifices on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubele, J. C.; Crumpler, L. S.

    1992-01-01

    Pre-Magellan analysis of the Venera 15/16 data indicated the existence of abundant small volcanic edifices, each less than or equal to 20 km diameter, interpreted to be predominantly shield volcanoes and occurring throughout the plains terrain, most common in equidimensional clusters. With the analysis of Magellan data, these clusters of greater than average concentration of small volcanic edifices have been called 'shield fields'. Although individual small shields can and do occur almost everywhere on the plains terrain of Venus, they most commonly occur in fields that are well-defined, predominantly equant, clusters of edifices. Major questions include why the edifices are concentrated in this way, how they relate to the source of the eruptive material, and what the possible relationship of shield fields to plains terrain is. There are three possible models for the origin of fields and small shields: (1) a field represents an 'island' of higher topography subsequently surrounded by later plains material; and (2) a field represents the area of magma reservoir.

  13. Contemporary Navajo Affairs: Navajo History Volume III, Part B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eck, Norman K.

    Written specifically for Navajo junior high through college students, but also serving those interested in modern reservation developments and processs, the third volume of a curricular series on Navajo history provides a synthesis of data and pictorial records on current events in the areas of Navajo government, economic development, and health.…

  14. Geology and geochemistry of volcanic centers within the eastern half of the Sonoma volcanic field, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Rytuba, James J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The volcanic fields in the California Coast Ranges north of San Francisco Bay are temporally and spatially associated with the northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction and the transition from subduction and associated arc volcanism to a slab window tectonic environment. Our geochemical analyses from the Sonoma volcanic field highlight the geochemical diversity of these volcanic rocks, allowing us to clearly distinguish these volcanic rocks from those of the roughly coeval ancestral Cascades magmatic arc to the west, and also to compare rocks of the Sonoma volcanic field to rocks from other slab window settings.

  15. Audiomagnetotelluric data, Taos Plateau Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ailes, Chad E.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin as part of the Geologic framework of the Rio Grande Basins project. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, audiomagnetotelluric surveys, and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifers. This report describes a regional east-west audiomagnetotelluric sounding profile acquired in late July 2009 across the Taos Plateau Volcanic Field. No interpretation of the data is included.

  16. 1992-93 Results of geomorphological and field studies Volcanic Studies Program, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.

    1993-10-01

    Field mapping and stratigraphic studies were completed of the Black Tank volcanic center, which represents the southwestern most eruptive center in the Cima volcanic field of California. The results of this mapping are presented. Contacts between volcanic units and geomorphic features were field checked, incorporating data from eight field trenches as well as several exposures along Black Tank Wash. Within each of the eight trenches, logs were measured and stratigraphic sections were described. These data indicate that three, temporally separate volcanic eruptions occurred at the Black Tank center. The field evidence for significant time breaks between each stratigraphic unit is the presence of soil and pavement-bounded unconformities.

  17. Petrogenesis of Cenozoic volcanic rocks in the NW sector of the Gharyan volcanic field, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustrino, Michele; Cucciniello, Ciro; Melluso, Leone; Tassinari, Colombo C. G.; dè Gennaro, Roberto; Serracino, Marcello

    2012-12-01

    The north-western sector of the Gharyan volcanic field (northern Libya) consists of trachytic-phonolitic domes emplaced between ~ 41 and 38 Ma, and small-volume mafic alkaline volcanic centres (basanites, tephrites, alkali basalts, hawaiites and rare benmoreites) of Middle Miocene-Pliocene age (~ 12-2 Ma). Two types of trachytes and phonolites have been recognized on the basis of petrography, mineralogy and geochemistry. Type-1 trachytes and phonolites display a smooth spoon-shaped REE pattern without negative Europium anomalies. Type-2 trachytes and phonolites show a remarkable Eu negative anomaly, higher concentration in HFSE (Nbsbnd Tasbnd Zrsbnd Hf), REE and Ti than Type-1 rocks. The origin of Type-1 trachytes and phonolites is compatible with removal of clinopyroxene, plagioclase, alkali feldspar, amphibole, magnetite and titanite starting from benmoreitic magmas, found in the same outcrops. Type-2 trachytes and phonolites could be the result of extensive fractional crystallization starting from mafic alkaline magma, without removal of titanite. In primitive mantle-normalized diagrams, the mafic rocks (Mg# = 62-68, Cr up to 514 ppm, Ni up to 425 ppm) show peaks at Nb and Ta and troughs at K. These characteristics, coupled with low 87Sr/86Sr(i) (0.7033-0.7038) and positive ɛNd (from + 4.2 to + 5.3) features typical of the mafic anorogenic magmas of the northern African plate and of HIMU-OIB-like magma in general. The origin of the mafic rocks is compatible from a derivation from low degree partial melting (3-9%) shallow mantle sources in the spinel/garnet facies, placed just below the rigid plate in the uppermost low-velocity zone. The origin of the igneous activity is considered linked to passive lithospheric thinning related to the development of continental rifts like those of Sicily Channel (e.g., Pantelleria and Linosa) and Sardinia (e.g., Campidano Graben) in the Central-Western Mediterranean Sea.

  18. Walking in Navajo Footprints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Katie B.

    This module presents a guide for the study of the Navajo Indians' life and customs as they existed about thirty years ago. The length of time necessary to complete the activities, which are designed for use in kindergarten through third grades, may vary from one to two weeks. The module includes language, science, mathematics, art, music, dramatic…

  19. Sills of the San Rafael Volcanic Field, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, E.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Richardson, J. A.; Wetmore, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Substantial populations, such as Mexico City, Auckland, and Portland, are built within or near monogenetic fields, so it is important to understand both eruption precursors and magma plumbing systems in such areas. Directly observing the plumbing systems of this rarely witnessed eruption style provides valuable insight into the nature of magmatic transport and storage within the shallow crust, as well as the associated monogenetic eruptive processes. Within the San Rafael Desert of Central Utah is an exposed Pliocene complex of approximately 2000 mapped dikes, 12 sills, and 60 conduits eroded to a depth of 800 m below the paleosurface. A combination of airborne LiDAR (ALS), provided by NCALM, and terrestrial LiDAR (TLS) surveys are used to map the dip of 5 major sills within a 35 sq km area. The ALS provides a 1 m aerial resolution of exposed volcanic features and the TLS gives vertical measurements to cm accuracy. From these data we determine that the 5-25 m thick sills in this area dip approximately 1 to 6 degrees. Field observations show that steps in sills and related fabrics indicate flow direction in sills during emplacement and that sills normally propagate down dip in the Entrada sandstone host rock away from apparent feeder dikes and conduits. Some sills have foundered roofs, especially near conduits, suggesting that nearly neutrally buoyant magmas emplaced into sills along bed partings in the Entrada, differentiated, and in some cases flowed back into conduits. By volume, at 800 m depth in the San Rafael, nearly all igneous rock (approximately 90 percent) is located in sills rather than in dikes or conduits. These observations are consistent with geochemical models that suggest differentiation in shallow sills explains geochemical trends observed in single monogenetic volcanoes in some active fields. Deformation associated with sill inflation and deflation may be a significant precursor to eruptive activity in monogenetic volcanic fields.

  20. Field guide to sedimentary structures in the Navajo and Entrada sandstones in southern Utah and northern Arizona: Chapter in Field-trip guidebook, 100th annual meeting, The Geological Society of America, Phoenix, Arizona, October 26-29, 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, David M.; Hunter, Ralph E.

    1987-01-01

    This field-trip guide describes the common sedimentary structures that occur in eolian sands. The outcrops that are described occur in the Navajo and Entiaia Sandstones between the areas of Page, Arizona and St. George, Utah (figure I), but the sedimentary structures of these two sandstones are typical of most eolian deposits. The main part of the guide discusses the geologic setting and the origin of the various structures, and the road log discusses which structures are best displayed at selected outcrops.

  1. Space Radar Image of Pinacate Volcanic Field, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image shows the Pinacate Volcanic Field in the state of Sonora, Mexico, about 150 kilometers (93 miles) southeast of Yuma, Arizona. The United States/Mexico border runs across the upper right corner of the image. More than 300 volcanic vents occur in the Pinacate field, including cinder cones that experienced small eruptions as recently as 1934. The larger circular craters seen in the image are a type of volcano known as a 'maar', which erupts violently when rising magma encounters groundwater, producing highly pressurized steam that powers explosive eruptions. The highest elevations in the volcanic field, about 1200 meters (4000 feet), occur in the 'shield volcano' structure shown in bright white, occupying most of the left half of the image. Numerous cinder cones dot the flanks of the shield. The yellow patches to the right of center are newer, rough-textured lava flows that strongly reflect the long wavelength radar signals. Along the left edge of the image are sand dunes of the Gran Desierto. The dark areas are smooth sand and the brighter brown and purple areas have vegetation on the surface. Radar data provide a unique means to study the different types of lava flows and wind-blown sands. This image was acquired by Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 18, 1994. The image is 57 kilometers by 48 kilometers (35 miles by 30 miles) and is centered at 31.7 degrees north latitude, 113.4 degrees West longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  2. Volcanism-sedimentation interaction in the Campo de Calatrava Volcanic Field (Spain): a magnetostratigraphic and geochronological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Hernández, Antonio; López-Moro, Francisco Javier; Gallardo-Millán, José Luis; Martín-Serrano, Ángel; Gómez-Fernández, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the influence of Cenozoic volcanism of the Campo de Calatrava volcanic field on the sedimentation of two small continental basins in Spain (Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins). The volcanism in this area was mainly monogenetic, according to the small-volume volcanic edifices of scoria cones that were generated and the occurrence of tuff rings and maars. A sedimentological analysis of the volcaniclastic deposits led to the identification of facies close to the vents, low-density (dilute) pyroclastic surges, secondary volcanic deposits and typical maar deposits. Whole-rock K/Ar dating, together with palaeomagnetic constraints, yielded an age of 3.11-3.22 Ma for the onset of maar formation, the deposition finished in the Late Gauss-Early Matuyana. Using both techniques and previous paleontological data allowed it to be inferred that the maar formation and the re-sedimentation stage that occurred in Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins were roughly coeval. The occurrence of syn-eruption volcaniclastic deposits with small thicknesses that were separated by longer inter-eruption periods, where fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation was prevalent, together with the presence of small-volume volcanic edifices indicated that there were short periods of volcanic activity in this area. The volcanic activity was strongly controlled by previous basement faults that favoured magma feeding, and the faults also controlled the location of volcanoes themselves. The occurrence of the volcanoes in the continental basins led to the creation of shallow lakes that were related to the maar formation and the modification of sedimentological intra-basinal features, specifically, valley slope and sediment load.

  3. Magmatic Evolution in the Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Magma evolution within the Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field (LTVF) is poorly understood. The LTVF is a basaltic, monogenetic field in Veracruz, Mexico, that contains approximately 400 vents and has been active for the last 7 Ma, including a sub-Plinian eruption in 1793. The field is structurally controlled, with cones forming NW-SE lines consistent with local extension. By understanding magmatic evolution through ascent, storage, and mixing, it is possible to more accurately predict future trends in the system. Samples from two alignments of cinder cones located between San Martin Tuxtlas volcano and Laguna Catemaco were analyzed petrographically and geochemically. Geochemical data were plotted in Fenner and Harker diagrams to identify trends, including fractional crystallization and magma recharge. Mineral modes were calculated via point counting in thin sections, and micro-textural variations were noted. Cone morphometry was used as a rough proxy for age along with field relationships to develop an approximate order of events along the alignments. Preliminary data suggest that the aligned vents are part of a linked magmatic plumbing system undergoing periodic recharge.

  4. The Satah Mountain and Baldface Mountain volcanic fields: Pleistocene hot spot volcanism in the Anahim Volcanic Belt, west-central British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Christian; Guest, Bernard; Russell, James K.; Benowitz, Jeff A.

    2015-03-01

    The Satah Mountain and Baldface Mountain volcanic fields (SMVF, BMVF) comprise more than three dozen small volcanic centers and erosional remnants thereof. These fields are located in the Chilcotin Highland of west-central British Columbia, Canada, and are spatially associated with the Anahim Volcanic Belt (AVB), a linear feature of alkaline to peralkaline plutonic and volcanic centers of Miocene to Holocene ages. The AVB has been postulated to be the track of a hot spot passing beneath the westward moving Cordilleran lithosphere. We test the AVB hot spot model by applying whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar geochronology ( n = 24) and geochemistry. Whole-rock chemical compositions of volcanic rock samples ( n = 59) from these two fields suggest a strong geochemical affinity with the nearby Itcha Range shield volcano; however, SMVF and BMVF centers are mostly small in volume (<1 km3) and differ in composition from one another, even where they are in close spatial proximity. Trace element and REE patterns of mafic AVB lavas are similar to ocean island basalts (OIB), suggesting a mantle source for these lavas. The age ranges for the SMVF ( n = 11; ~2.21 to ~1.43 Ma) and BMVF ( n = 7; ~3.91 to ~0.91 Ma) are largely coeval with the Itcha Range. The distribution of volcanoes in these two volcanic fields is potentially consistent with the postulated AVB hot spot track. Eruption rates in the SMVF were high enough to build an elongated ridge that deviates from the E-W trend of the AVB by almost 90°. This deviation might reflect the mechanisms and processes facilitating magma generation and ascent through the lithosphere in this tectonically complex region and may also indicate interaction of the potential hot spot with (pre)existing fracture systems in vicinity of the Itcha Range.

  5. The Story of Three Navajo Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Beth; Barry, Tom

    1978-01-01

    The place of Navajo women on the reservation (as breadwinners, caretakers, and leaders) has suffered from a century of Anglo control. Three Navajo women tell how Navajos can effect change through the strength of their women. (Author/AM)

  6. Sedimentation architecture of the volcanically-dammed Alf valley in the West Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Luise; Lange, Thomas; Engelhardt, Jörn; Polom, Ulrich; Pirrung, Michael; Büchel, Georg

    2015-04-01

    In the southeastern part of the Quaternary West Eifel Volcanic Field, the Alf valley with its morphologically wide (~ 500 m) and flat valley bottom is visibly outstanding. This flat valley bottom was formed during the Marine Isotope Stage 2 due to fluviolacustrine sediments which deposited upstream of a natural volcanic dam. The dam consisted of lava and scoria breccia from the Wartgesberg Volcano complex (Cipa 1958, Hemfler et al. 1991) that erupted ~ 31 BP (40Ar/ 39Ar dating on glass shards, Mertz, pers. communication 2014). Due to this impoundment, the Alf creek turned into a dendritic lake, trapping the catchment sediments. The overall aim is to create the sedimentation architecture of the Alf valley. In comparison to maar archives like Holzmaar or Meerfelder Maar in the vicinity, the fluviolacustrine sediments of the Alf valley show clay-silt lamination despite the water percolation. This archive covers the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to Early Holocene (Pirrung et al. 2007). Focus of this study is the creation of a 3D model by applying the program ESRI ArcGIS 10.2 to reconstruct the pre-volcanic Alf valley. Moreover, the sedimentation architecture is reconstructed and the sediment fill quantified. Therefore, the digital elevation model with 5 m resolution from the State Survey and Geobasis Information of Rhineland-Palatinate, polreduced magnetic data measured on top of the Strohn lava stream, shear seismic data and core stratigraphies were utilized. Summarizing previous results, Lake Alf had a catchment area of ~ 55 km² (Meerfelder Maar: 1.27 km²) and a surface area of 8.2 km² (Meerfelder Maar: 0.24 km²) considering a maximum lake water level of 410 m a.s.l.. In the deepest parts (~ 50 m) of Lake Alf, lake sediments are laminated, up to 21 m thick and show a very high sedimentation rate ~ 3 mm a-1 (Dehner Maar ~ 1.5 mm a-1, (Sirocko et al. 2013)). The sediments become coarser upstream und stratigraphically above the fine-grained lake sediments

  7. Geothermal Fields on the Volcanic Axis of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mercado, S.; Gonzalez, A.

    1980-12-16

    At present in Mexico, geothermal energy is receiving a great impulse due to the excellent results obtained in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, in which a geothermoelectric plant is operated. This plant has four units of 37.5 MW each, with a total capacity of 150 MW, and under program 470 MW more by 1984. The Government Institution, Comisi6n Federal de Electricidad, is in charge of the exploration and exploitation of geothermal fields as well as construction and operation of power plants in Mexico. By this time CFE has an extensive program of exploration in the central part of Mexico, in the Eje Neovolcdnico. In this area, several fields with hydrothermal alteration are under exploration, like the Michoac6n geothermal area, where Los Azufres geothermal field is being developed. Seventeen wells have been drilled and twelve of them presented excellent results, including two dry steam wells. In other areas, such as Arar6, Cuitzeo, San Agustln del Maiz,Ixtldn de Los Hervores and Los Negritos, geological, geophysical and geochemical explorations have been accomplished, including shallow well drilling with good results. Another main geothermal area is in the State of Jalisco with an extension of 5,000 m2, where La Primavera geothermal field shows a lot of volcanic domes and has an intensive hydrothermal activity. Deep wells have been drilled, one of them with a bottom temperature of 29OOC. Other fields in this area, like San Narcos, Hervores de La Vega, La Soledad, Villa Corona, etc., have a good geothermal potential. A new geothermal area has been explored recently in the eastern part of the country named Los Humeros, Puebla. In this area studies are being made and there are plans for well drilling exploration by the beginning of 1981. Like this one, there are many other areas in the country in which 300 hydrothermal alteration zones are been classified and 100 of them are considered economically exploitable.

  8. Wave field decomposition of volcanic tremor at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, F.; Waite, G. P.; Kenyon, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    A dense, small-aperture array of 12 short-period seismometers was deployed on the west flank of Pacaya volcano (Guatemala) and operated for 14 days in January 2011. The data were used to investigate the properties of the volcanic tremor wave field at the volcano. Volcanic tremor has been proven to be a powerful tool for eruption forecasting, therefore, identifying its source locations may shed new light on the dynamics of the volcano system. A preliminary spectral analysis highlights that most of the seismic energy is associated with six narrow spectral peaks between 1 and 6 Hz. After taking topography into account, we performed frequency-slowness analyses using the MUSIC algorithm and the semblance technique with the aim to define and locate the different components contributing to the wave field. Results show a complex wave field, with possibly multiple sources. We identify peaks at frequencies < 2 Hz as being related to anthropogenic sources coming from the N- NW direction where the geothermal plant and San Vincente Pacaya village are located. Azimuth measurements indicate that the 3 Hz signal propagates from the SE direction and it has been attributed to the new vent on the southeast flank of Pacaya Volcano. However, the presence of secondary peaks with azimuths of ˜ 200°, 150° and 70° seems to suggest either nonvolcanic sources or perhaps the presence of structural heterogeneities that produce strong scattered waves. At higher frequencies, results show effects of array aliasing, and therefore have not been considered in this study. The dispersive properties of the wave field have been investigated using the Spatial Auto-Correlation Method (SPAC). The dispersion characteristics of Rayleigh waves have been then inverted to find a shallow velocity model beneath the array, which shows a range of velocities from about 0.3 km/s to 2 km/s, in agreement with slowness values of the frequency bands considered. In detail, apparent velocities of 1-2 km/s dominate at

  9. Geochemistry of high-potassium rocks from the mid-Tertiary Guffey volcanic center, Thirtynine Mile volcanic field, central Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Wobus, R.A.; Mochel, D.W. ); Mertzman, S.A.; Eide, E.A.; Rothwarf, M.T. ); Loeffler, B.M.; Johnson, D.A. ); Keating, G.N.; Sultz, K. ); Benjamin, A.E. ); Venzke, E.A. ); Filson, T. )

    1990-07-01

    The Guffey volcanic center is the largest within the 2000 km{sup 2} mid-Tertiary Thirtynine Mile volcanic field of central Colorado. This study is the first to provide extensive chemical data for these alkalic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, which present the eroded remnants of a large stratovolcano of Oligocene age. Formation of early domes and flows of latite and trachyte within the Guffey center was followed by extrusion of a thick series of basalt, trachybasalt, and shoshonite flows and lahars. Plugs, dikes, and vents ranging from basalt to rhyolite cut the thick mafic deposits, and felsic tuffs breccias chemically identical to the small rhyolitic plutons are locally preserved. Whole-rack major and trace element analyses of 80 samples, ranging almost continuously from 47% to 78% SiO{sub 2}, indicate that the rocks of the Guffey center are among the most highly enriched in K{sub 2}O (up to 6%) and rare earth elements (typically 200-300 ppm) of any volcanic rocks in Colorado. These observations, along with the relatively high concentrations of Ba and Rb and the depletion of Cr and Ni, suggest an appreciable contribution of lower crustal material to the magmas that produced the Thirtynine Mile volcanic rocks.

  10. Fissural volcanism, polygenetic volcanic fields, and crustal thickness in the Payen Volcanic Complex on the central Andes foreland (Mendoza, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarini, F.; Fornaciai, A.; Bistacchi, A.; Pasquarè, F. A.

    2008-09-01

    Shield volcanoes, caldera-bearing stratovolcanoes, and monogenetic cones compose the large fissural Payen Volcanic Complex, located in the Andes foreland between latitude 35°S and 38°S. The late Pliocene-Pleistocene and recent volcanic activity along E-W trending eruptive fissures produced basaltic lavas showing a within-plate geochemical signature. The spatial distribution of fractures and monogenetic vents is characterized by self-similar clustering with well defined power law distributions. Vents have average spacing of 1.27 km and fractal exponent D = 1.33 defined in the range 0.7-49.3 km. The fractal exponent of fractures is 1.62 in the range 1.5-48.1 km. The upper cutoffs of fractures and vent fractal distributions (about 48-49 km) scale to the crustal thickness in the area, as derived from geophysical data. This analysis determines fractured media (crust) thickness associated with basaltic retroarc eruptions. We propose that the Payen Volcanic Complex was and is still active under an E-W crustal shortening regime.

  11. Stress fields of the overriding plate at convergent margins and beneath active volcanic arcs.

    PubMed

    Apperson, K D

    1991-11-01

    Tectonic stress fields in the overriding plate at convergent plate margins are complex and vary on local to regional scales. Volcanic arcs are a common element of overriding plates. Stress fields in the volcanic arc region are related to deformation generated by subduction and to magma generation and ascent processes. Analysis of moment tensors of shallow and intermediate depth earthquakes in volcanic arcs indicates that the seismic strain field in the arc region of many convergent margins is subhorizontal extension oriented nearly perpendicular to the arc. A process capable of generating such a globally consistent strain field is induced asthenospheric corner flow below the arc region. PMID:17774792

  12. NAVAJO NATION HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This point coverage represents the locations of hazardous waste sites on the Navajo Nation Indian Reservation. The point locations were delineated on 1:24,000 scale US Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps by staff from the Navajo Nation EPA, Resource Conservation & Reco...

  13. Navajo Nation Educational Hearings, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Tribe, Window Rock, AZ.

    Part of an effort by the Navajo Division of Education to formulate a comprehensive educational plan, this document includes testimony by people representing the five agency divisions on the Reservation (Shiprock, Crownpoint, Chinle, Tuba City, and Fort Defiance) and the public school districts serving Navajos. Also included is a synthesis of the…

  14. Towards a Navajo Indian Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinxten, Rik; And Others

    This book examines the Navajo system of spatial knowledge and describes a culture-based curriculum for the development of an intuitive geometry based on the child's experience of the physical world. Aspects of the Navajo cosmology relevant to spatial knowledge are discussed: the structure of the world; the dynamic nature of the universe;…

  15. Piagetian Conservation in Navajo Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odell, Sandra J.; Ferraro, Douglas P.

    In order to determine the cognitive development of Navajo children in terms of Piagetian conservation of number, mass, and continuous quantity, 168 Navajo children at seven different age levels from 5 to adult were presented with a series of three conservation tasks. The tasks consisted of a standard object and an equivalent object that could be…

  16. Petrogenesis of Late Cenozoic volcanic rocks from the Raton-Clayton volcanic field, northeastern New Mexico and southeastern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Stormer, J.C.; Wright, J.E. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); Middlefeldt, D.D. )

    1993-04-01

    The Raton-Clayton volcanic field, located in the eastern flank of the Rio Grande rift on the Great Plains, is at the northeastern end of the Jemez lineament. A broad variety of late Cenozoic volcanic rocks ranging from rhyodacites through basalts to basanites and nephelinites, with well established ages, provides a good probe of magma sources at different depths down to the mantle. New Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic data on late Cenozoic volcanic rocks from the Raton-Clayton volcanic field yield significant variations. [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios vary from 0.70397--0.70499, [var epsilon][sub Nd] values range from [minus]3.7--2.4, [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb ratios are in the range of 17.43--18.48, [sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb from 15.45--15.54 and [sup 208]Pb/[sup 204]Pb from 37.27--38.05. The mafic feldspathoidal rocks, believed to be derived from the enriched mantle reservoir with little crustal contamination, show relatively homogeneous [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr (ca. 0.7041) and [var epsilon][sub Nd] (ca. 2). A positive trend of Pb isotopic ratios, however, suggests possible mantle heterogeneity in Pb isotopic composition beneath the continent. Isotopic data from basaltic lavas display well defined variation trends, bringing to light the role of crustal components in the magmatic process. A strong signature of upper crustal involvement is indicated in the formation of tholeiitic basalts with dicktytaxitic texture, while isotope data from alkali olivine basalts and Capulin trachybasalts suggest lower crust contaminations of these rocks. An apparent isotopic variation trend of the dicktytaxitic basalts is well correlated with geographic location from south to north. Significant discrepancies in isotopic compositions of more silicic rocks compared with those of similar rocks from the Taos Plateau volcanic field to the west, may indicate either large differences in lower crustal composition or different mechanisms in generating these magmas.

  17. Magnetotelluric data, Taos Plateau Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ailes, Chad E.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    The population of the San Luis Basin region of northern New Mexico is growing. Water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region's groundwater resources. An important issue in managing the groundwater resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift, which contain the principal groundwater aquifers. The shallow unconfined aquifer and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifer in the San Luis Basin are the main sources of municipal water for the region. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, an electromagnetic survey called magnetotellurics (MT), and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifers. This report describes a regional east-west MT sounding profile acquired in late July 2009 across the Taos Plateau Volcanic Field where drillhole data are sparse. Resistivity modeling of the MT data can be used to help map changes in electrical resistivity with depths that are related to differences in rock types. These various rock types help control the properties of aquifers. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data collected along the east-west profile. No interpretation of the data is included.

  18. Ancient Mudflows in the Tuxtla Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Godinez, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is a basaltic volcanic enclave in eastern Mexico at the margin of the Gulf of Mexico. Due to the high rates of precipitation floods and mudflows are common. Resulting from a systematic study of geologic hazard in the TVF we found several mudflow deposits that impacted pre-Columbian settlements. Sections of the deposits were observed in detail and sampled for granulometric studies. The deposits contained materials suitable for dating: ceramic shards and some of them charcoal fragments. Shards from the interior of the deposit were collected and placed in black bags to prevent the action of light and to be analyzed by thermoluminiscense (TL), the charcoal samples were dated using standard radiocarbon methods (C-14). The sites were dubbed La Mojarra (18°37.711', 95°18.860'), Revolución (18° 35.848', 95°11.412'), Pisatal (18°36.618', 95°10.634'), and Toro Prieto (18°38.229, 95°12.037'). These places were named after the nearby villages the first two, lake Pisatal the third and Toro Prieto creek the fourth. All the deposits occur close to the margins of riverbeds or lakes. Samples of these sites yielded ages of 1176±100 (TL), 1385±70 (C-14), 1157±105 (TL), 2050+245-235 (C-14), respectively. These locations have undergone recurrent floods in the last decades, showing that these phenomena impact the same areas over centuries. The dates mentioned are important because, no vestiges of human settlements had been reported in the area, which in the past was covered by a dense forest. The settlements must have been very small and depended of such cities as nearby Matacapan an important city with strong ties to Teotihuacán in central Mexico. The ages agree with the findings of archeologic studies in Matacapan, which indicate that the population became increasingly ruralized since the late classic period (≈ 600-800 AD).

  19. Oxygen Isotope Character of the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Strickland, A.; Valley, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen isotope analyses of zircons from lavas and tuffs from the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) of east central Oregon unequivocally demonstrate the presence of mid-Miocene low-δ18O magmas (δ18Ozrc<4.7 ‰). Despite the growing data set of low-δ18O melts within, and proximal to, the Snake River Plain (SRP) Large Igneous Province, debate persists regarding both the mechanisms for low-δ18O magma petrogenesis, and their relative influence in the SRP. The LOVF is associated with widespread silicic volcanism roughly concurrent with the eruption of the Steens-Columbia River Basalt Group between ~17-15Ma. Silicic activity in the LOVF is limited to 16-15Ma, when an estimated 1100km3 of weakly peralkaline to metaluminous rhyolitic lavas and ignimbrites erupted from a series of fissures and calderas. Geographically, the LOVF overlaps the Oregon-Idaho Graben (OIG), and straddles the 87Sr/86Sr= 0.704 line which, together with the 0.706 line to the east, delineate the regional transition from the North American Precambrian continental crust to the east to younger Phanerozoic accreted terranes to the west. Here we report high accuracy ion microprobe analyses of δ18O in zircons using a 10-15μm spot, with average spot-to-spot precision ±0.28‰ (2SD), to investigate intra-grain and intra-unit δ18Ozrc trends for LOVF rhyolites. Due to its high closure temperature, chemical and physical resistance, and slow oxygen diffusion rates, zircon offers a robust record of magmatic oxygen isotope ratios during crystallization and provides constraints on the petrogenesis of Snake River Plain (SRP) low-δ18O melts. Individual zircons from LOVF rhyolites show no evidence of core-rim δ18O zoning, and populations exhibit ≤0.42‰ (2SD) intra-unit variability. Unit averages range from 2.2 to 4.3‰, with the lowest values in caldera-forming ignimbrites, but all units show evidence of crystallization from low-δ18O melts. Quartz and feldspar analyses by laser fluorination (precision

  20. To Be A Navajo. Second Edition, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begay, Shirley M., Ed.

    Designed to provide culturally relevant and interesting reading material in Navajo for Navajo speaking children, this booklet presents 20 short stories written and illustrated by students at Rough Rock Demonstration School. Intended to encourage Navajo speaking children, and others, to read and to instill pride in being a Navajo, the stories…

  1. Navajo Coal: Demands, Attitudes, and Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, James M.

    The operation of several coal mines with vast proven reserves on the Navajo reservation is a manifestation of conflict between: a power hungry external world; the preservationist attitudes of traditional Navajo culture; the disadvantaged socio-economic status of the average Navajo wage earner; and the Navajo Nation's long term needs for internal…

  2. A History of Navajo Clans. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Regina H.; And Others

    Pen and ink drawings illustrate characterizations of 29 Navajo clans in this book, which is intended to acquaint young Navajo people and others with Navajo history and culture. The introduction discusses the significance of the Navajo clan system and the relationship among family bonds, self-esteem, and cultural values. The illustrated text tells…

  3. A new approach for dating Quaternary volcanism by TL: The example of the Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoeller, Ludwig; Richter, Daniel; Klinger, Philip; van den Bogaard, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Middle to Upper Pleistocene and Holocene volcanic eruptions are difficult to date by Ar/Ar techniques when K-rich minerals such as sanidines are not present, as is the case in mafic and some intermediate rocks. However, these may contain phlogopite crystals suitable for Ar/Ar dating. Direct luminescence dating of volcanic feldspar is hampered by a poorly understood phenomenon of long-term signal instability called "anomalous fading" which, however, is apparently not present in quartz. To circumvent the fading problem involved in luminescence dating of volcanic rocks lacking quartz we sampled quartz-bearing crustal xenoliths from the Quaternary West and the East Eifel Volcanic Fields. Sufficient heating for zeroing of the acquired geological TL during eruption is sometimes but not always visible in the field and among others depends on the size of the xenolith. Quartz grains were extracted from the xenoliths by crushing, density separation and etching in HF or H2SiF6. The orange-red TL emission from quartz is known to have a very high saturation dose and was therefore employed using a new "lexsyg" luminescence reader equipped with a special detection unit for measuring this orange-red TL emission. Additionally, the existing data base of Ar/Ar dating results is increased by a series of new laser ablation step heating Ar/Ar dating results from samples extracted from identical volcanic eruptions. These can serve as verification of the luminescence dating attempts. Some first preliminary TL dating results in the range up to ca. 500 ka will be presented and discussed. Apparently, some TL ages from quartz extracts underestimate the Ar/Ar ages significantly. Possible explanations of age underestimates will be presented for discussion.

  4. Timing and development of the Heise volcanic field, Snake River Plain, Idaho, western USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, L.A.; McIntosh, W.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Snake River Plain (SRP) developed over the last 16 Ma as a bimodal volcanic province in response to the southwest movement of the North American plate over a fixed melting anomaly. Volcanism along the SRP is dominated by eruptions of explosive high-silica rhyolites and represents some of the largest eruptions known. Basaltic eruptions represent the final stages of volcanism, forming a thin cap above voluminous rhyolitic deposits. Volcanism progressed, generally from west to east, along the plain episodically in successive volcanic fields comprised of nested caldera complexes with major caldera-forming eruptions within a particular field separated by ca. 0.5-1 Ma, similar to, and in continuation with, the present-day Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field. Passage of the North American plate over the melting anomaly at a particular point in time and space was accompanied by uplift, regional tectonism, massive explosive eruptions, and caldera subsidence, and followed by basaltic volcanism and general subsidence. The Heise volcan ic field in the eastern SRP, Idaho, represents an adjacent and slightly older field immediately to the southwest of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field. Five large-volume (>0.5 km3) rhyolitic ignimbrites constitute a time-stratigraphic framework of late Miocene to early Pliocene volcanism for the study region. Field relations and high-precision 40Ar/39Ar age determinations establish that four of these regional ignimbrites were erupted from the Heise volcanic field and form the framework of the Heise Group. These are the Blacktail Creek Tuff (6.62 ?? 0.03 Ma), Walcott Tuff (6.27 ?? 0.04 Ma), Conant Creek Tuff (5.51 ?? 0.13 Ma), and Kilgore Tuff (4.45 ?? 0.05 Ma; all errors reported at ?? 2??). The fifth widespread ignimbrite in the regions is the Arbon Valley Tuff Member of the Starlight Formation (10.21 ?? 0.03 Ma), which erupted from a caldera source outside of the Heise volcanic field. These results establish the Conant Creek Tuff as a

  5. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Woolford, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ˜1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ˜17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ˜17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ˜35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  6. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Woolford, Jeff M

    2015-01-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ∼1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ∼17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ∼17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ∼35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  7. Morphological Study of Jaraguay and San Borja Volcanic Fields, Baja California, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrete-Aranda, R.; Canon-Tapia, E.

    2005-12-01

    Volcanism younger than 12.5 Ma has occurred mainly as monogenetic volcanic fields along the Baja California Peninsula, but until now very little attention has been given to the morphological description of this type of volcanism. In this study we present the preliminary results of the first stage of elaboration of a Geographical Information System (GIS) of the northernmost volcanic fields of the Peninsula; Jaraguay and San Borja, which are among the less studied fields in the region. The present status of the GIS includes the main morphological characteristics and localization of over 350 eruptive centers identified in both volcanic fields. Our data show that over 90% of the eruptive centers are cinder cones, whereas the rest of volcanic structures include some stratovolcanos, shield volcanoes and calderas. Detailed analysis of digital elevation models and 14 m resolution Landsat TM images show a remarkable diversity of the size of reported eruptive centers: the average height lies around 720 m with peaks that reaches 1,412 m asl. Preliminary graphic analyses show local concentrations of the biggest volcanic structures in some areas in both fields. This spatial distribution is more evident at the San Borja volcanic field where the biggest volcanic centers are systematically located in its south and north-western boundaries. A similar concentration of bigger volcanic structures is found at the western edge of Jaraguay volcanic field where cinder cones are largely confined to its eastern most edge. The observed morphological changes of volcanic structures occur in both cases within a distance of less than 100 km. We interpret such variations as the result of heterogeneities of the low velocity zone below this particular area of the Baja California Peninsula, although the final evaluation of the distribution of the regional stress field and its relationship with the actual spatial distribution of eruptive centers must wait until more information becomes available. In

  8. Lessons from the Navajo: Assistance with Environmental Data Collection Ensures Cultural Humility and Data Relevance

    PubMed Central

    deLemos, Jamie; Rock, Tommy; Brugge, Doug; Slagowski, Naomi; Manning, Thomas; Lewis, Johnnye

    2008-01-01

    Background The Navajo Nation suffers from a legacy of environmental pollution from historical uranium mining activities, resulting in adverse public health outcomes and continuous exposure. Objective Partner with a Navajo graduate student and community members in a field campaign to characterize the spatial distribution and geochemistry of uranium for a multipathway uranium exposure assessment under development by the Dine Network for Environmental Health (DiNEH) project. Methods Attend community meetings, acquire Navajo language skills, and integrate local knowledge into sampling approach of sediment, water, and vegetation. Results Navajo participation (1) helped to foster trust in research efforts during community interactions, (2) taught aspects of Navajo culture and language to maintain positive and respectful relations, and (3) conveyed information on Navajo culture that would impact sampling strategies. Conclusions Community engagement helps to sustain equitable partnerships and aids in culturally appropriate, relevant data collection. PMID:19655034

  9. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-01-01

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  10. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-04-01

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  11. Quantifying the morphometric variability of monogenetic cones in volcanic fields: the Virunga Volcanic Province, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Sam; Grosse, Pablo; Barette, Florian; Smets, Benoît; Albino, Fabien; Kervyn, François; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic cone fields are generally made up of tens to hundreds of monogenetic cones, sometimes related to larger polygenetic edifices, which can exhibit a wide range of morphologies and degrees of preservation. The Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP) developed itself in a transfer zone which separates two rift segments (i.e. Edward and Kivu rift) within the western branch of the East-African Rift. As the result of volcanic activity related to this tectonic regime of continental extension, the VVP hosts eight large polygenetic volcanoes, surrounded by over 500 monogenetic cones and eruptive fissures, scattered over the vast VVP lava flow fields. Some cones lack any obvious geo-structural link to a specific Virunga volcano. Using recent high-resolution satellite images (SPOT, Pléiades) and a newly created 5-m-resolution digital elevation model (TanDEM-X), we have mapped and classified all monogenetic cones and eruptive fissures of the VVP. We analysed the orientation of all mapped eruptive fissures and, using the MORVOLC program, we calculated a set of morphometric parameters to highlight systematic spatial variations in size or morphometric ratios of the cones. Based upon morphological indicators, we classified the satellite cones into 4 categories: 1. Simple cones with one closed-rim crater; 2. Breached cones with one open-rim crater; 3. Complex cones with two or more interconnected craters and overlapping cones; 4. Other edifices without a distinguishable crater or cone shape (e.g. spatter mounds and levees along eruptive fissures). The results show that cones are distributed in clusters and along alignments, in some cases parallel with the regional tectonic orientations. Contrasts in the volumes of cones positioned on the rift shoulders compared to those located on the rift valley floor can possibly be attributed to contrasts in continental crust thickness. Furthermore, higher average cone slopes in the East-VVP (Bufumbira zone) and central-VVP cone clusters suggest

  12. Rapid uplift during 2007-2012 at Laguna del Maule volcanic field, Andean Southern Volcanic Zone, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mevel, H.; Feigl, K.; Ali, T.; Cordova V., M. L.; DeMets, C.; Singer, B. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field includes an unusual concentration of post-glacial rhyolitic lava coulees and domes, dated between 24 to 2 thousand years old that cover more than 100 square kilometers and erupted from 24 vents that encircle a 20-km-diameter lake basin on the range crest. The recent concentration of rhyolite is unparalleled in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes. Moreover, the western portion of the LdM volcanic field has experienced rapid uplift since 2007, leading to questions about the current configuration of the magmatic system and processes that drive the ongoing inflation. We aim to quantify the active deformation of the LdM volcanic field and its evolution with time. To do so, we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired by three satellite missions: Envisat in 2003 and 2004, ALOS between 2007 and 2010, and TerraSAR-X in 2012. An interferogram spanning March 2003 to February 2004 "shows no deformation" (Fournier et al., 2010). From 2007 through 2012, however, the shortening of the satellite-to-ground distance revealed a range change rate of greater than 200 mm/yr along the radar line of sight. The deformation includes a circular area 20 km in diameter centered on the western portion of the circle of young rhyolite domes. To analyze the InSAR results, we employ the General Inversion for Phase Technique (GIPhT; Feigl and Thurber, 2009; Ali and Feigl, 2012). We have considered several hypotheses to interpret this deformation. Artefacts such as orbital errors, atmospheric perturbations or topographic contribution cannot account for the observed signal. We also reject the hypothesis of uplift due to gravitational unloading of the crust based on our modeling of independently measured lake level variations over the observed time interval. We thus attribute the deformation to the intrusion of magma into the upper crust below the southwest region of the LdM volcanic field. The best fit to the InSAR data is

  13. A newly discovered Pliocene volcanic field on the western Sardinia continental margin (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti, Alessandro; Budillon, Francesca; Tonielli, Renato; De Falco, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    A previously unknown submerged volcanic field offshore western Sardinia (western Mediterranean Sea), has been identified based on swath bathymetric data collected in 2009, 2010 and 2013, and high-resolution seismic profiles collected in 2011 and 2013. About 40 conical-shaped volcanic edifices (maximum width of about 1600 m and maximum height of about 180 m) and several lava outcrops (up to 1,200 m wide) were recognized at 20 to 150 m water depth over an area of 800 km2. The volcanic edifices are mainly eruptive monogenic vents, mostly isolated with a rather distinct shape, or grouped to form a coalescent volcanic body in which single elements are often still recognizable. High-resolution seismics enabled identifying relationships between the volcanic bodies and continental margin successions. The edifices overlie a major erosional surface related to the margin exposure following the Messinian salinity crisis, and are overlain by or interbedded with an early Pliocene marine unit. This seismo-stratigraphic pattern dates the volcanic activity to the early Pliocene, in agreement with the radiometric age of the Catalano island lavas (4.7 Ma) reported in earlier studies. The morphometry of the volcanic bodies suggests that cone erosion was higher at shallow water depths. Indeed, most of the shallow edifices are strongly eroded and flattened at 125 to 130 m water depth, plausibly explained by recurrent sub-aerial exposure during Pleistocene sea-level lowstands, whereas cones in deeper water are much better preserved. Volcanic vents and lava deposits, hereafter named the Catalano volcanic field (CVF), are emplaced along lineaments corresponding to the main directions of the normal fault system, which lowered the Sinis Basin and the western Sardinia continental margin. The CVF represents a volumetrically relevant phase of the late Miocene - Quaternary anorogenic volcanic cycle of Sardinia, which is related to the first stage of the extensional tectonics affecting the island

  14. The structural architecture of the Los Humeros volcanic complex and geothermal field, Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Sulpizio, Roberto; Carrasco Núñez, Gerardo; Davila Harris, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    The development of geothermal energy in Mexico is a very important goal, given the presence of a large heat anomaly, associated with the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, the renewability of the resource and the low environmental impact. The Quaternary Los Humeros volcanic complex is an important geothermal target, whose evolution involved at least two caldera events, that alternated with other explosive and effusive activity. The first caldera forming event was the 460 ka eruption that produced the Xaltipan ignimbrite and formed a 15-20 km wide caldera. The second collapse event occurred 100 ka with the formation of the Zaragoza ignimbrite and a nested 8-10 km wide caldera. The whole volcano structure, the style of the collapses and the exact location of the calderas scarps and ring faults are still a matter of debate. The Los Humeros volcano hosts the productive Los Humeros Geothermal Field, with an installed capacity of 40 MW and additional 75 MW power plants under construction. Recent models of the geothermal reservoir predict the existence of at least two reservoirs in the geothermal system, separated by impermeable rock units. Hydraulic connectivity and hydrothermal fluids circulation occurs through faults and fractures, allowing deep steam to ascend while condensate flows descend. As a consequence, the plans for the exploration and exploitation of the geothermal reservoir have been based on the identification of the main channels for the circulation of hydrothermal fluids, constituted by faults, so that the full comprehension of the structural architecture of the caldera is crucial to improve the efficiency and minimize the costs of the geothermal field operation. In this study, we present an analysis of the Los Humeros volcanic complex focused on the Quaternary tectonic and volcanotectonics features, like fault scarps and aligned/elongated monogenetic volcanic centres. Morphostructural analysis and field mapping reveal the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of

  15. Development of a risk assessment tool for volcanic urban environments: RiskScape and the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, N. I.; Leonard, G.; King, A.; Wilson, G.; Wilson, T.; Lindsay, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Auckland city, home to a third of New Zealand's population, is situated on top of the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), which last erupted roughly 500 years ago. Since 2008, the Determining Volcanic Risk in Auckland (DEVORA) program has investigated the geologic context of the AVF, improved timing constraints of past eruptions, explored possible tempo-spatial-volume eruption trends, and identified likely styles and hazards of future eruptions. DEVORA is now moving into development of risk and societal models for Auckland. The volcanic module of RiskScape, a multi-hazard risk assessment tool developed by Crown Research Institutes GNS Science and NIWA, will be expanded and used to model risk and impact to the built environment and population caused by a future AVF eruption. RiskScape models casualties, damage and disruption caused by various hazards, the resulting reduced functionality of assets, and associated clean up costs. A strength of RiskScape is that the effect of various mitigation strategies can be explored by strengthening asset attributes and examining resulting changes in the output risk evaluation. We present our framework for building a volcano hazard exposure module for RiskScape along with our approach for assessing asset vulnerability through the development of fragility functions. We also present the framework for engagement with regional Auckland stakeholders, including representatives of local and regional governments and utility companies, to identify complementary needs to ensure that final risk products are relevant and useable by end users.

  16. A quaternary monogenetic volcanic field in the Xalapa region, eastern Trans-Mexican volcanic belt: Geology, distribution and morphology of the volcanic vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, S. R.; Morales-Barrera, W.; Layer, P.; González-Mercado, E.

    2010-11-01

    The most abundant volcanic manifestations along the east-west trending Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) are the scoria cones. These have been grouped by other authors in extended monogenetic volcanic fields such as Michoacán-Guanajuato, Chichinautzin, Apan and Los Tuxtlas. Here we present geological and morphological data of a relatively unknown group of monogenetic volcanoes located on the east flank of the Cofre de Perote volcano (CP), around the city of Xalapa in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Within an area of about 2400 km 2, the "Xalapa Monogenetic Volcanic Field" (XMVF) contains over 50 late Quaternary volcanoes. Most of them are scoria cones, but small shield volcanoes and tuff rings also occur. The lava flows produced by these volcanoes are constrained by an abrupt topography and cover a great percentage of the surface on the eastern and northeastern flanks of CP, between 3000 and 500 m a.s.l. The representative rocks of the different volcanic centers include olivine basalt, basaltic andesite with phenocrysts of plagioclase, pyroxene and minor olivine, and andesite with phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene. SiO 2 and Al 2O 3 contents of the rocks vary between 45 and 62 wt% and 15 to 18 wt%, respectively. Most of the basaltic rocks have MgO contents between 4.2 and 9 wt%, Ni and Cr concentrations between 23 and 180 and 10 to 380 ppm, respectively, with a typical calc-alkaline behavior. Trace elements suggest two types of magmas; the most abundant are characterized by an enrichment of LILE and LREE with negative anomalies of Nb and Ti, which denote a calc-alkaline affinity. Others are LILE depleted and show high concentrations of MgO, Cr, and Ni, which is typical of primary calc-alkaline magmas. The mean scoria cone morphological values are: cone height (Hco) = 90.8 m, cone diameter (Wco) = 686.38 m, crater diameter (Wcr) = 208.49 m and 0.12 km 3 for the cone volume. We dated twelve different scoria cones using the 40Ar/ 39Ar method; for the other

  17. Multiplet earthquake relocations and stacked waveform inversions in the Yellowstone volcanic field and implications for volcanic-tectonic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massin, F.; Farrell, J.; Smith, R. B.; Shelly, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Abnormally high earthquake rates and episodic crustal deformation suggest that the Yellowstone hotspot affects the tectonics of the western United States. However the relationship between the Yellowstone volcanic system and the surrounding tectonic regime remains poorly known. We study the structure and stress field for quantitative modeling of volcano-tectonic interactions using multiplet analysis. Our analysis shows that earthquake rates of Yellowstone are coincident with the uplift and subsidence episodes of the 0.64 Ma Yellowstone caldera: a relative decrease of multiplet activity accompanies each subsidence episode between 1997 and 2010. Our research focuses on the determination of crustal seismogenic structures and related stress perturbations that are responsible for the abnormally intense and cyclic earthquake activity. We consider each multiplet as a homogenous set of earthquakes produced by the same seismic source or fault. We integrate results from double-difference hypocenter relocations and source mechanism determinations to evaluate active fault properties. Hypocenters are constrained by a median of 50 P-wave and 12 S-wave differential arrival times (up to 4062 P-waves and 1187 S-waves). Composite focal mechanism solutions are determined for multiplets with 64 P-wave polarity observations or more. We compare multilinear regression planes of hypocenters of large multiplets and their composite focal mechanisms to choose fault planes and slip directions. We then develop detailed analysis of the largest earthquake swarms in Yellowstone, e.g. the Autumn 1985, the 2008 Yellowstone Lake and the 2010 Madison Plateau earthquake swarms to examine if swarm earthquakes occur on one continuous fault plane or on a network of independent segments with variable orientations. To independently confirm the interpreted fault plane we also invert for the moment tensors of the largest multiplets with a cumulative seismic moment over Mw3. The moment tensors are decomposed

  18. Patterns of volcanism along the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau - The Springerville field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condit, Christopher D.; Crumpler, L. S.; Aubele, Jayne C.; Elston, Wolfgang E.

    1989-01-01

    Results from studies of the 2.1- to 0.3-my-old Springerville volcanic field are summarized, including research on geologic mapping, volume, age, chemical characterization, composition, temporal variations, and effusion and migration rates. It is found that the rocks of the field are predominantly alkali olivine and transitional basalts, with subordinate proportions of hawaiite and tholeiite. The evolution of the field is described as an early pulse of tholeiitic volcanism followed by a peak in alkali olivine basalt production in the middle of the field's eruptive history, and a late peak in evolved alkalic rock production about 0.5 my after the alkali olivine basalt peak.

  19. A 3D model of crustal magnetization at the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Abdeslem, Juan; Calmus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located near the western border of the southern Basin and Range province, in the State of Sonora NW Mexico, and within the Gulf of California Extensional Province. This volcanic field contains the shield volcano Santa Clara, which mainly consists of basaltic to trachytic volcanic rocks, and reaches an altitude of ~ 1200 m. The PVF disrupts a series of discontinuous ranges of low topographic relief aligned in a NW direction, which consist mainly of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and Proterozoic through Paleogene granitoids. The PVF covers an area of approximately 60 by 55 km, and includes more than 400 well-preserved cinder cones and vents and eight maar craters. It was active from about 1.7 Ma until about 13 ka. We have used the ages and magnetic polarities of the volcanic rocks, along with mapped magnetic anomalies and their inverse modeling to determine that the Pinacate Volcanic Field was formed during two volcanic episodes. The oldest one built the Santa Clara shield volcano of basaltic and trachytic composition, and occurred during the geomagnetic Matuyama Chron of reverse polarity, which also includes the normal polarity Jaramillo and Olduvai Subchrons, thus imprinting both normal and reverse magnetization in the volcanic products. The younger Pinacate series of basaltic composition represents monogenetic volcanic activity that extends all around the PVF and occurred during the subsequent geomagnetic Brunhes Chron of normal polarity. Magnetic anomalies toward the north of the Santa Clara volcano are the most intense in the PVF, and their inverse modeling indicates the presence of a large subsurface body magnetized in the present direction of the geomagnetic field. This suggests that the magma chambers at depth cooled below the Curie temperature during the Brunhes Chron.

  20. Preliminary bedrock and surficial geologic map of the west half of the Sanders 30' x 60' quadrangle, Navajo and Apache Counties, northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amoroso, Lee; Priest, Susan S.; Hiza-Redsteer, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The bedrock and surficial geologic map of the west half of the Sanders 30' x 60' quadrangle was completed in a cooperative effort of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Navajo Nation to provide regional geologic information for management and planning officials. This report provides baseline geologic information that will be useful in future studies of groundwater and surface water resources, geologic hazards, and the distribution of soils and plants. The west half of the Sanders quadrangle encompasses approximately 2,509 km2 (980 mi2) within Navajo and Apache Counties of northern Arizona and is bounded by lat 35°30' to 35° N., long 109°30' to 110° W. The majority of the land within the map area lies within the Navajo Nation. South of the Navajo Nation, private and State lands form a checkerboard pattern east and west of Petrified Forest National Park. In the west half of the Sanders quadrangle, Mesozoic bedrock is nearly flat lying except near folds. A shallow Cenozoic erosional basin that developed about 20 Ma in the western part of the map area cut across late Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks that were subsequently filled with flat-lying Miocene and Pliocene mudstone and argillaceous sandstone and fluvial sediments of the Bidahochi Formation and associated volcanic rocks of the Hopi Buttes volcanic field. The Bidahochi rocks are capped by Pliocene(?) and Pleistocene fluvial sediments and Quaternary eolian and alluvial deposits. Erosion along northeast-southwest-oriented drainages have exposed elongated ridges of Bidahochi Formation and basin-fill deposits that are exposed through shallow eolian cover of similarly oriented longitudinal dunes. Stokes (1964) concluded that the accumulation of longitudinal sand bodies and the development of confined parallel drainages are simultaneous processes resulting in parallel sets of drainages and ridges oriented along the prevailing southwest wind direction on the southern Colorado Plateau.

  1. Contemporaneous trachyandesitic and calc-alkaline volcanism of the Huerto Andesite, San Juan Volcanic Field, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parat, F.; Dungan, M.A.; Lipman, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    Locally, voluminous andesitic volcanism both preceded and followed large eruptions of silicic ash-flow tuff from many calderas in the San Juan volcanic field. The most voluminous post-collapse lava suite of the central San Juan caldera cluster is the 28 Ma Huerto Andesite, a diverse assemblage erupted from at least 5-6 volcanic centres that were active around the southern margins of the La Garita caldera shortly after eruption of the Fish Canyon Tuff. These andesitic centres are inferred, in part, to represent eruptions of magma that ponded and differentiated within the crust below the La Garita caldera, thereby providing the thermal energy necessary for rejuvenation and remobilization of the Fish Canyon magma body. The multiple Huerto eruptive centres produced two magmatic series that differ in phenocryst mineralogy (hydrous vs anhydrous assemblages), whole-rock major and trace element chemistry and isotopic compositions. Hornblende-bearing lavas from three volcanic centres located close to the southeastern margin of the La Garita caldera (Eagle Mountain - Fourmile Creek, West Fork of the San Juan River, Table Mountain) define a high-K calc-alkaline series (57-65 wt % SiO2) that is oxidized, hydrous and sulphur rich. Trachyandesitic lavas from widely separated centres at Baldy Mountain-Red Lake (western margin), Sugarloaf Mountain (southern margin) and Ribbon Mesa (20 km east of the La Garita caldera) are mutually indistinguishable (55-61 wt % SiO2); they are characterized by higher and more variable concentrations of alkalis and many incompatible trace elements (e.g. Zr, Nb, heavy rare earth elements), and they contain anhydrous phenocryst assemblages (including olivine). These mildly alkaline magmas were less water rich and oxidized than the hornblende-bearing calc-alkaline suite. The same distinctions characterize the voluminous precaldera andesitic lavas of the Conejos Formation, indicating that these contrasting suites are long-term manifestations of San Juan

  2. Analytical Bibliography of Navajo Reading Materials. Navajo Reading Study, Progress Report No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spolsky, Bernard; And Others

    English and Navajo language materials are described in this bibliography of reading materials primarily for elementary school students. The English language materials were developed to teach Navajo children about their own culture and could be used to form the base for a curriculum in English for Navajo students. The Navajo language materials were…

  3. Advances in Navajo Bilingual Education 1969-72. Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spolsky, Bernard, Ed.

    Advances in Navajo Bilingual Education are described in this progress report, in which bilingual education is presented as an element in aiding the community to be involved in and to control the Navajo education system. Also, the reports of 3 meetings concerning Navajo education are included. The report of a Navajo bilingual-bicultural materials…

  4. Navajo-Speaking Parents' Perceptions of Reasons for Navajo Language Attrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons-Yazzie, Evangeline

    1995-01-01

    Case studies of 10 Navajo families and their children revealed several factors as to why the children did not speak Navajo, including the amount of exposure the child had to Navajo speakers, the importance of Native language within the family, and lack of parental encouragement for learning Navajo. Includes recommendations of parents for…

  5. Paleomagnetism of the Pleistocene Tequila Volcanic Field (Western Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Ceja, M.; Goguitchaichvili, A.; Calvo-Rathert, M.; Morales-Contreras, J.; Alva-Valdivia, L.; Rosas Elguera, J.; Urrutia Fucugauchi, J.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents new paleomagnetic results from 24 independent cooling units in Tequila area (western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt). These units were recently dated by means of state-of-the-art 40Ar-39Ar method (Lewis-Kenedy et al., 2005) and span from 1130 to 150 ka. The characteristic paleodirections are successfully isolated for 20 cooling units. The mean paleodirection, discarding intermediate polarity sites, is I = 29.6°, D = 359.2°, k = 26, α95 = 7.1°, n = 17, which corresponds to the mean paleomagnetic pole position Plat = 85.8°, Plong = 84.3°, K = 27.5, A95 = 6.9°. These directions are practically undistinguishable from the expected Plestocene paleodirections, as derived from reference poles for the North American polar wander curve and in agreement with previously reported directions from western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This suggests that no major tectonic deformation occurred in studied area since early-middle Plestocene to present. The paleosecular variation is estimated trough the study of the scatter of virtual geomagnetic poles giving SF = 15.4 with SU = 19.9 and SL = 12.5 (upper and lower limits respectively). These values are consistent with those predicted by the latitude-dependent variation model of McFadden et al. (1991) for the last 5 Myr. The interesting feature of the paleomagnetic record obtained here is the occurrence of an intermediate polarity at 671± 13 ka which may correspond the worldwide observed Delta excursion at about 680-690 ka. This gives the volcanic evidence of this event. Two independent lava flows dated as 362± 13 and 354± 5 ka respectively, yield transitional paleodirections as well, probably corresponding to the Levantine excursion.

  6. Database compilation for the geologic map of the San Francisco volcanic field, north-central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bard, Joseph A.; Ramsey, David W.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Ulrich, George E.; Newhall, Christopher G.; Moore, Richard B.; Bailey, Norman G.; Holm, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    The orignial geologic maps were prepared under the Geothermal Research Program of the U.S. Geological Survey as a basis for interpreting the history of magmatic activity in the volcanic field. The San Francisco field, which is largely Pleistocene in age, is in northern Arizona, just north of the broad transition zone between the Colorado Plateau and the Basin and Range province. It is one of several dominantly basaltic volcanic fields of the late Cenozoic age situated near the margin of the Colorado Plateau. The volcanic field contains rocks ranging in composition from basalt to rhyolite—the products of eruption through Precambrian basement rocks and approximately a kilometer of overlying, nearly horizontal, Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. About 500 km3 of erupted rocks cover about 5,000 km2 of predominantly Permian and locally preserved Triassic sedimentary rocks that form the erosionally stripped surface of the Colorado Plateau in Northern Arizona.

  7. Navajo Opposition to the Indian New Deal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinde, Donald A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Examines how the livestock reduction plan enforced by the Federal government in the 1930s resulted in drastically negative ecological, economic, and health consequences for the Navajo people. Describes manifestations of Navajo criticism and resistance. (GC)

  8. Aeromagnetic and Gravity Maps of the Central Marysvale Volcanic Field, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, David L.; Steven, Thomas A.; Cunningham, Charles G.; Rowley, Peter D.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity and aeromagnetic features in the Marysvale volcanic field result from the composite effects of many factors, including rock composition, style of magmatic emplacement, type and intensity of rock alteration, and effects of structural evolution. Densities and magnetic properties measured on a suite of rock samples from the Marysvale volcanic field differ in systematic ways. Generally, the measured densities, magnetic susceptibilities, and natural remanent magnetizations all increase with mafic index, but decrease with degree of alteration, and for tuffs, with degree of welding. Koenigsberger Q indices show no such systematic trends. The study area is divided into three geophysical domains. The northern domain is dominated by aeromagnetic lows that probably reflect reversed-polarity volcanic flows. There are no intermediate-sized magnetic highs in the northern domain that might reflect plutons. The northern domain has a decreasing-to-the-south gravity gradient that reflects the Pavant Range homocline. The central domain has gravity lows that reflect altered rocks in calderas and low-density plutons of the Marysvale volcanic field. Its aeromagnetic signatures consist of rounded highs that reflect plutons and birdseye patterns that reflect volcanic flows. In many places the birdseyes are attenuated, indicating that the flows there have been hydrothermally altered. We interpret the central domain to reflect an east-trending locus of plutons in the Marysvale volcanic field. The southern domain has intermediate gravity fields, indicating somewhat denser rocks there than in the central domain, and high-amplitude aeromagnetic birdseyes that reflect unaltered volcanic units. The southern domain contains no magnetic signatures that we interpret to reflect plutons. Basin-and-range tectonism has overprinted additional gravity features on the three domains. A deep gravity low follows the Sevier and Marysvale Valleys, reflecting grabens there. The gravity gradient in the

  9. Origin of north Queensland Cenozoic volcanism: Relationships to long lava flow basaltic fields, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, F. L.

    1998-11-01

    A plume model proposed for north Queensland late Cenozoic volcanism and long lava flow distribution combines basalt ages with recent seismic studies of Australia's mantle, regional stress fields, and plate motion. Several basalt fields overlie mantle "thermal" anomalies, and other fields outside these anomalies can be traced to them through past lithospheric motion. Elsewhere, anomalies close to Australia's eastern rift margin show little volcanism, probably due to gravity-enhanced compression. Since final collision of north Queensland with New Guinea, areas of basaltic volcanism have developed over 10 Myr, and episodes appear to migrate southward from 15° to 20°S. Long lava flows increase southward as area/volume of fields increases, but topography, vent distributions, and uplifts play a role. This is attributed to magmatic plume activation within a tensional zone, as lithosphere moves over mantle thermal anomalies. The plume model predicts peak magmatism under the McBride field, coincident with the Undara long lava flow and that long lava flow fields will erupt for another 5-10 Myr. Queensland's movement over a major N-S thermal system imparts a consistent isotopic signature to its northern younger basalts, distinct to basalts from older or more southern thermal systems. Australia's motion toward this northern thermal system will give north Queensland fields continued vigorous volcanism, in contrast to the Victorian field which is leaving its southern thermal system.

  10. The Origins of Navajo Youth Gangs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Eric; Kunitz, Stephen J.; Levy, Jerrold E.

    1999-01-01

    Extended interviews with 50 Navajo men, aged 21 to 45, provided information on peer relationships and gang formation among male Navajo youth in the 1960s through the 1980s. Results suggest that gangs are an extreme example of traditional hell-raising among young Navajo men and that most gang members "age out" of their gangs. Suggestions for gang…

  11. Navajo Pawn: A Misunderstood Traditional Trading Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiser, William S.

    2012-01-01

    Navajo trading has been a crucial component of that tribe's localized economy for generations and has been the subject of much scholarship over the years. The role of the Navajo trader in influencing the types and styles of crafts that Navajos created as well as providing tribal members with an outlet for those items remains important to their…

  12. Navajo History: The Land and the People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acrey, Bill P.

    This textbook for high school, college, or adult readers covers the history and culture of the Navajo People from their own perspective from the coming of American control in 1846 until 1978. Topics include the last Navajo war, the Long Walk, the impact of Navajo agents on policy, early traders and flourishing of crafts, settlement of reservation…

  13. A Bibliographic Essay Pertaining to Navajo Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Scott

    Introduced by a discussion of the fact that most of the works cited describe Navajos as they "used to be" and an admonition against the common practice of placing all Navajos, or all Indians, under one stereotype, this bibliographic essay traces the history of Navajo contact with the white man and emphasizes efforts at educational development. Six…

  14. A Utah Navajo History = Dineji Nakee' Naahane'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benally, Clyde; And Others

    This book presents Navajo history in two aspects--traditional stories that describe the ancestors of the Navajo and explain how the Earth-Surface World was changed from monster-filled chaos into the well-ordered world of today, and historical events from 1525 to today after the Navajos had settled in the Southwest. Events described include…

  15. Volcanic field elongation, vent distribution and tectonic evolution of continental rift: The Main Ethiopian Rift example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarini, Francesco; Le Corvec, Nicolas; Isola, Ilaria; Favalli, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    Magmatism and faulting operate in continental rifts and interact at a variety of scales, however their relationship is complex. The African rift, being the best example for both active continental rifting and magmatism, provides the ideal location to study the interplay between the two mechanisms. The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), which connects the Afar depression in the north with the Turkana depression and Kenya Rift to the south, consists of two distinct systems of normal faults and its floor is scattered with volcanic fields formed by tens to several hundreds monogenetic, generally basaltic, small volcanoes and composite volcanoes and small calderas. The distribution of vents defines the overall shape of the volcanic field. Previous work has shown that the distribution of volcanic vents and the shape of a field are linked to its tectonic environment and its magmatic system. In order to distinguish the impact of each mechanism, we analyzed four volcanic fields located at the boundary between the central and northern MER, three of them (Debre Zeyit, Wonji and Kone) grew in the rift valley and one (Akaki) on the western rift shoulder. The elongation and shape of the fields were analyzed based on their vent distribution using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), the Vent-to-Vent Distance (VVD), and the two dimensional symmetric Gaussian kernel density estimate methods. We extracted from these methods several parameters characterizing the spatial distribution of points (e.g., eccentricity (e), eigenvector index (evi), angular dispersion (Da)). These parameters allow to define at least three types of shape for volcanic fields: strong elongate (line and ellipse), bimodal/medium elongate (ellipse) and dispersed (circle) shapes. Applied to the natural example, these methods well differentiate each volcanic field. For example, the elongation of the field increases from shoulder to rift axis inversely to the angular dispersion. In addition, the results show that none of

  16. The role of phreatomagmatism in a Plio-Pleistocene high-density scoria cone field: Llancanelo Volcanic Field (Mendoza), Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risso, Corina; Németh, Károly; Combina, Ana María; Nullo, Francisco; Drosina, Marina

    2008-01-01

    The Plio-Pleistocene Llancanelo Volcanic Field, together with the nearby Payun Matru Field, comprises at least 800 scoria cones and voluminous lava fields that cover an extensive area behind the Andean volcanic arc. Beside the scoria cones in the Llancanelo Field, at least six volcanoes show evidence for explosive eruptions involving magma-water interaction. These are unusual in the context of the semi-arid climate of the eastern Andean ranges. The volcanic structures consist of phreatomagmatic-derived tuff rings and tuff cones of olivine basalt composition. Malacara and Jarilloso tuff cones were produced by fallout of a range of dry to wet tephra. The Malacara cone shows more evidence for a predominance of wet-emplaced units, with a steep slump-slope characterized by many soft-sediment deformation structures, such as: undulating bedding planes, truncated beds and water escape features. The Piedras Blancas and Carapacho tuff rings resulted from explosive eruptions with deeper explosion loci. These cones are hence dominated by lapilli tuff and tuff units, emplaced mainly by wet and/or dry pyroclastic surges. Carapacho is the only centre that appears to have started with phreatomagmatic eruptions, with lowermost tephra being rich in non-volcanic country rocks. The presence of deformed beds with impact sags, slumping textures, asymmetrical ripples, dunes, cross- and planar lamination, syn-volcanic faulting and accretionary lapilli beds indicate an eruption scenario dominated by excessive water in the transportational and depositional regime. This subordinate phreatomagmatism in the Llancanelo Volcanic Field suggests presence of ground and/or shallow surface water during some of the eruptions. Each of the tuff rings and cones are underlain by thick, fractured multiple older lava units. These broken basalts are inferred to be the horizons where rising magma interacted with groundwater. The strong palagonitization at each of the phreatomagmatic cones formed hard beds

  17. Stratigraphy, geomorphology, geochemistry and hazard implications of the Nejapa Volcanic Field, western Managua, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avellán, Denis Ramón; Macías, José Luis; Pardo, Natalia; Scolamacchia, Teresa; Rodriguez, Dionisio

    2012-02-01

    The Nejapa Volcanic Field (NVF) is located on the western outskirts of Managua, Nicaragua. It consists of at least 30 volcanic structures emplaced along the N-S Nejapa fault, which represents the western active edge of the Managua Graben. The study area covers the central and southern parts of the volcanic field. We document the basic geomorphology, stratigraphy, chemistry and evolution of 17 monogenetic volcanic structures: Ticomo (A, B, C, D and E); Altos de Ticomo; Nejapa; San Patricio; Nejapa-Norte; Motastepe; El Hormigón; La Embajada; Asososca; Satélite; Refinería; and Cuesta El Plomo (A and B). Stratigraphy aided by radiocarbon dating suggests that 23 eruptions have occurred in the area during the past ~ 34,000 years. Fifteen of these eruptions originated in the volcanic field between ~ 28,500 and 2,130 yr BP with recurrence intervals varying from 400 to 7,000 yr. Most of these eruptions were phreatomagmatic with minor strombolian and fissural lava flow events. A future eruption along the fault might be of a phreatomagmatic type posing a serious threat to the more than 500,000 inhabitants in western Managua.

  18. Social services: the Navajo way.

    PubMed

    Belone, Cecilia; Gonzalez-Santin, Edwin; Gustavsson, Nora; MacEachron, Ann E; Perry, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    The development of child welfare services in Indian Country followed enactment of the 1975 Indian Education and Self-Determination Act and the 1978 Indian Child Welfare Act. These acts allow tribal contracting with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) to provide social services. Because the BIA model has not fit well with Navajo needs, the Navajo Nation Division of Social Services is creating a more holistic case management paradigm for child and family services, which is more congruent with its culture and its rural, sparsely populated land. PMID:12380626

  19. The Quaternary and Pliocene Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field of Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    This region of Yellowstone National Park has been the active focus of one of the Earth's largest magmatic systems for more than 2 million years. The resulting volcanism has been characterized by the eruption of voluminous rhyolites and subordinate basalts but virtually no lavas of intermediate composition. The magmatic system at depth remains active and drives the massive hydrothermal circulation for which the park is widely known. Studies of the volcanic field using geologic mapping and petrology have defined three major cycles of rhyolitic volcanism, each climaxed by the eruption of a rhyolitic ash-flow sheet having a volume of hundreds of thousands of cubic kilometers. The field also has been analyzed in terms of its magmatic and tectonic evolution, including its regional relation to the Snake River plain and to basin-range tectonic extension.

  20. Eruptive and sedimentary evolution of the Pliocene Grad Volcanic Field, North-east Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Polona

    2011-04-01

    Middle to Upper Pliocene (~ 3 Ma) Grad Volcanic Field (SW Pannonian basin system) encompasses an area of about 3 km 2, of which some 1.7 km 2 belong to the outcropping volcanics. Pyroclastic and syn-eruptively reworked volcaniclastic deposits are the most widespread in occurrence. Remains of an autobrecciated lava flow, a residual neck and their peperites are partially reworked by a large debris flow. Volcanic activity occurred in a continental depositional environment dominated by alluvial fan and braided river systems. Streams draining from the north-west to the south-east were infilling a rapidly subsiding Radgona Depression. The style of volcanic activity was mainly explosive and was reinforced by hydrovolcanic processes. Three volcanic centres probably existed, and they migrated spatially and temporally from the north to the south over a distance of some 5.6 km. The rocks of the northernmost volcanic centre are fairly eroded and contain abundant, up to 10 cm sized lherzolite xenoliths. The largest crater developed about 2.5 km to the south. From an early maar stage, a tuff-cone, and subsequently, a tuff-ring evolved. The crater was filled with eroded pyroclastic material and stream load. A new vent became active some 500 m to the south. Initial stage was mainly magmatic and produced pyroclastic flow and fall deposits. Late-stage eruptions were predominantly hydrovolcanic (phreatomagmatic and phreatic), and built up a small tuff-cone having some 300 m in diameter. Trachybasaltic and subordinate basanitic magmas erupting in the Grad Volcanic Field are geochemically distinguishable from the neighbouring occurrences in the South Styrian Basin and the South Burgenland Swell. Relatively lower abundance of TiO 2, MgO, Sc, V and Cu, and higher abundance of MnO, P 2O 5, Zn, Sr, Zr, Hf, Nb, Ba, Ta and U indicate somewhat different source and/or evolutionary pattern.

  1. Paleomagnetic evidence bearing on the structural development of the Latir volcanic field near Questa, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Lipman, P.W.; Elston, D.P.

    1982-09-10

    The mid-Tertiary Latir volcanic field in northern New Mexico comprises intermediate-composition volcanics overlain by a regional ash flow sheet and associated lavas of rhyolitic composition that are all cut by silicic-alkalic grantic intrusives. Deeply exposed along the eastern flank of the Rio Grande rift, the silicic extrusive and intrusive rocks all yield radiometric ages of about 23 m.y., within analytical uncertainties. Flow banding and eutaxitic structures within the extrusive units indicate intense structural deformation, which for the most part increases toward the Questa caldera. Paleomagnetic study was undertaken to obtain information on the orientation of the eruptive and intrusive units and to employ the magnetic directions for an evaluation of the tectonic and igneous history of the caldera and enclosing volcanic field. Radiometric ages and the paleomagnetic data indicate that an episode of pronounced extension coincided with a major pulse of igneous activity in the region 23 m.y. ago. Eastward tilting of the volcanic units appears to have been closely followed by caldera collapse and then by resurgent doming of the caldera. Welded tuff units within the caldera were turned on end and together with older volcanic units were incorporated in a collapse megabreccia. The megabreccia and other nearby units were partially or entirely overprinted by a thermochemical aureole associated with the resurgent doming and attendant hydrothermal circulation. The stocks of the resurgent dome appear to have undergone no significant later tilting.

  2. Postsecondary Transitions among Navajo Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Smith, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A study examining postsecondary transition experiences interviewed 22 Navajos who were recent high school graduates. Prominent themes included family influence and pressures, discrepancy between high school and college learning environments, student-faculty relationships, vague educational and career plans, misconceptions about postsecondary…

  3. Memo to Navajo Community Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, George P.

    This handbook contains general resource information for program planning in Navajo education. Contained are listings on: 1) Key Questions; 2) Community Education and Local Control; 3) Education Laboratories; 4) Steps in Starting A Community College; 5) Recommended Books; 6) Bibliography of Instructional Resources; 7) Program Planning and Proposal…

  4. Navajos and National Nuclear Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Tom

    1979-01-01

    Describes the history of nuclear development in New Mexico, notes the cumulative detrimental effect on the Navajo Nation, and emphasizes federal inaction regarding health and safety standards and regulation in the nuclear power industry. Journal availability: see RC 503 522. (SB)

  5. Dinetah: Navajo History. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessel, Robert A., Jr.

    Using archaeological data, written chronicles of Spanish explorers and missionaries, and oral narratives and legends, the book traces the history of the Navajo people to their original homeland, Dinetah, located primarily off the present reservation in an area south and east of Farmington, New Mexico. The book discusses various theories on Navajo…

  6. So Many Kinds of Navajos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underhill, Ruth

    Written for both American Indian and non-Indian school children, the purpose of this book is to present a picture of the varied ways of life on the Navajo Reservation in 1970. Facts relating to health, education, employment, and living conditions are presented from the viewpoint of Denny Lincoln, a 12 year old orphan who is placed in a Navajo…

  7. Volcanic ash layers in blue ice fields (Beardmore Glacier Area, Antarctica): Iridium enrichments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeberl, Christian

    1988-01-01

    Dust bands on blue ice fields in Antarctica have been studied and have been identified to originate from two main sources: bedrock debris scraped up from the ground by the glacial movement (these bands are found predominantly at fractures and shear zones in the ice near moraines), and volcanic debris deposited on and incorporated in the ice by large-scale eruptions of Antarctic (or sub-Antractic) volcanoes. Ice core studies have revealed that most of the dust layers in the ice cores are volcanic (tephra) deposits which may be related to some specific volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have to be related to some specific volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have to be relatively recent (a few thousand years old) since ice cores usually incorporate younger ice. In contrast, dust bands on bare blue ice fields are much older, up to a few hundred thousand years, which may be inferred from the rather high terrestrial age of meteorites found on the ice and from dating the ice using the uranium series method. Also for the volcanic ash layers found on blue ice fields correlations between some specific volcanoes (late Cenozoic) and the volcanic debris have been inferred, mainly using chemical arguments. During a recent field expedition samples of several dust bands found on blue ice fields at the Lewis Cliff Ice Tongue were taken. These dust band samples were divided for age determination using the uranium series method, and chemical investigations to determine the source and origin of the dust bands. The investigations have shown that most of the dust bands found at the Ice Tongue are of volcanic origin and, for chemical and petrological reasons, may be correlated with Cenozoic volcanoes in the Melbourne volcanic province, Northern Victoria Land, which is at least 1500 km away. Major and trace element data have been obtained and have been used for identification and correlation purposes. Recently, some additional trace elements were determined in some of the dust band

  8. Tectonic controls on the Pleistocene-Holocene Wudalianchi volcanic field (northeastern China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Hongzhou

    2005-01-01

    The Wudalianchi volcanic field developed during the Pleistocene-Holocene but is dormant at present. Its latest eruption occurred in 1719-1721 AD. The volcanic rocks are high-potassium alkaline basalts derived from the upper mantle (c. 100-120 km depth) as indicated by geochemical data. The field is located in an old tectonic transition zone surrounded by four regional normal faults. The volcanic craters are aligned along NE-NNE-striking fractures and faults, although a NNW-striking sub-surface fracture zone probably controlled the eruptions beginning at 1.33±0.08 Ma. Beneath the volcanic field, the Moho interface lies at a depth of 33.5-35 km. Eruptions evolved from fissure type to central type eruptions. The field is characterized by an intraplate tectonic setting in a non-orogenic compressional regime which resulted from the subduction of the West Pacific plate beneath the eastern Asian continental margin starting 3-2 Ma ago.

  9. Geochemistry of Spencer-High Point Volcanic Field Lava Flows, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahashi, G. S.; Hughes, S. S.

    2007-12-01

    Lava flows in Spencer-High Point (SHP) volcanic field, an ~1700 sq km mafic volcanic rift zone located near Yellowstone in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), have been compared physically and chemically to other ESRP olivine tholeiites. Overall, SHP lavas are geochemically similar to other ESRP olivine tholeiites but their geomorphology is entirely different. The structural alignment of vents and fissures in an east-west direction in the Spencer-High Point region contrasts with most of the ESRP volcanic features aligned northwest-southeast. Numerous cinder cones at SHP, features that characterize Craters of the Moon volcanic field, are unusual on most of the eastern Snake River Plain. This study agrees with preliminary geochemical data by Leeman (1982) and Kuntz et al. (1992) suggesting that SHP lavas are typical ESRP basalts. However, a broad range of geochemical compositions exists in the SHP field that is similar to the entire range of ESRP olivine tholeiites. A few of the samples are actually closer in composition to lavas present at Craters of the Moon but only a limited number of samples from vents with physically higher relief, in the central and eastern portions of the field show these evolved chemical compositions. Typically Ta ranges 0.5-4.5ppm, La 20-90ppm, Ba 200-1100ppm and Cr 7-550ppm. Some lava flows in the central and eastern sections of SHP volcanic field also contain crustal xenoliths, implying a prolonged crustal history. These results although preliminary, suggest that the SHP system represents a possible petrologic transition between the dominant ESRP tholeiites and the evolved compositions found at Craters of the Moon.

  10. Uranium geochemistry of selected rock units from the Marysvale Volcanic Field, Piute County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Marysvale Volcanic Field is an area rich in uranium. This study was undertaken to determine if the uranium deposits might be of volcanogenic origin. This geochemical study consisted of determining the major, minor and trace element concentrations of the major volcanic units, and the relationships of the rock chemistry to uranium mineralization. The units in the Marysvale Volcanic Field, consist of ash-flow tuffs, intermediate lava flows, and associated intrusives of the Bullion Canyon volcanics and ash-flow tuffs, volcaniclastic deposits, domes and stocks of the Mount Belknap volcanics. When compared to overlaying welded tuff or rhyolitic units, the vitrophyric samples from the Mount Belknap volcanic units, are all enriched in F, Cs, and U, and that 50% of the vitrophyres are enriched in Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Zr, Pb, Sr, V, and Zn. Overlying untis have been devitrified and have released U as well as other trace elements into the volcanogenic system. This study has reevaluated the Marysvale Central Mining District and has proposed another theory as to the origin of the uranium deposits in that area. This hypothesis places a previously unidentified caldera around the area, and this author has named it the Marysvale caldera. Evidence for this caldera includes: arcurate faults which surround the region; alteration patterns which appear to form a circular pattern along the boundary of the proposed caldera; the presence of small monzonite intrusive bodies appear to ring the caldera; the presence of ash-flow tuffs which thicken appreciably along the northeast boundary of the caldera; and the central intrusive which may represent a resurgent phase of the proposed caldera. This seems to be a viable alternative to the magmatic hydrothermal origin for the uranium deposits presently proposed for the Central Mining District.

  11. Measurements and Slope Analyses of Quaternary Cinder Cones, Camargo Volcanic Field, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos, M. I.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Camargo volcanic field (CVF) covers ~3000 km2 and is located in the southeast part of the state of Chihuahua, within the Basin and Range province. The CVF represents the largest mafic alkali volcanic field in northern Mexico. Over a 300 cinder cones have been recognized in the Camargo volcanic field. Volcanic activity ranges from 4.7 to 0.09 Ma revealed by 40Ar/39Ar dating methods. Previous studies say that there is a close relationship between the cinder cone slope angle, due to mechanical weathering, and age. This technique is considered a reliable age indicator, especially in arid climates, such as occur in the CVF. Data were acquired with digital topographic maps (DRG) and digital elevation models (DEM) overlapped in the Global Mapper software. For each cone, the average radius (r) was calculated from six measurements, the height (h) is the difference between peak elevation and the altitude of the contour used to close the radius, and the slope angle was calculated using the equation Θ = tan-1(h/r). The slope angles of 30 cinder cones were calculated showing angles ranging from 4 to 15 degrees. A diffusion model, displayed by an exponential relationship between slope angle and age, places the ages of these 30 cones from 215 to 82 ka, within the range marked by radiometric methods. Future work include the analysis of more cinder cones to cover the whole CVF, and contribute to the validation of this technique.

  12. Pleistocene Volcanic Fields in the Anahim Volcanic Belt: What, why, how? - Chilcotin Highland, West-Central British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Christian; Guest, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    A large number of volcanic features, including stratovolcanoes, cinder cones, domes, flows and erosional remnants of these exist in the eastern part of the Anahim Volcanic Belt (AVB) around Satah Mountain and Baldface Mountain. These two fields (abbreviated SMVF and BMVF below) are located south and east of the Itcha Ranges in the Chilcotin Highland of west-central British Columbia. Petrographic, geochemical and geochronological studies are hoped to clarify the volcano-tectonic association of these fields and if/how they relate to the nearby AVB. The studies might also provide corroboration of the hot-spot that has been proposed as the source of magmatism in the area, ranging from mid-Miocene ages in the western part of the AVB to Holocene ages at its eastern end at Nazko Cone. During two field campaigns, 20 centres in the SMVF aligned on a NNW-SSE trending topographic high and seven centres in the BMVF were studied with a focus on geochemistry and ages of the erupted lavas. With the exception of Satah Mountain, the most prominent and best-preserved edifice, individual centres are generally small in elevation (200-300 m) and volume. At almost all edifices, there is evidence for glacial modification, which likely removed most of the once-existing (?) pyroclastic material; water-magma interaction could be observed at one centre as well. Extensive coverage by glacial till limits outcrops to cliffs on the edifices' flanks or to local "windows" in the Quaternary deposits. This makes stratigraphic relationships, both within the fields and the surrounding volcanic rocks of the AVB and Chilcotin Flood Basalts (CFB), unclear. Preliminary XRF results indicate a high variability of the lavas, even between centres close to each other. Erupted lavas range from undersaturated basanites (44 wt% SiO2), trachybasalts and trachytes to high-alkali phonolites (14 wt% Na2O+K2O). In general, larger structures in the SMVF appear to have erupted more evolved rocks whereas smaller centres

  13. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Neogene-Quaternary Harrat Al-Madinah intercontinental volcanic field, Saudi Arabia: Implications for duration and migration of volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moufti, M. R.; Moghazi, A. M.; Ali, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar ages, based on incremental heating techniques for groundmass separates of 25 samples, are presented for the Harrat Al-Madinah volcanic field, part of Harrat Rahat in the north western part of the Arabian plate. This area is an active volcanic field characterized by the occurrence of two historical eruptions approximately in 641 and 1256 AD. Field investigations of the main volcanic landforms indicate dominantly monogenetic strombolian eruptions, in addition to local more explosive eruptions. The lavas consist mainly of olivine basalt and hawaiite flows with minor evolved rocks of mugearite, benmoreite, and trachyte that occur mainly as domes, tuff cones and occasionally as lava flows. Previous K/Ar dating shows that the Harrat Al-Madinah lava flows and associated domes comprise seven units spanning an age range of ca. 1.7 Ma-Recent. The new 40Ar/39Ar age determinations confirm, to a great extent, the previously obtained K/Ar ages in the sense that no major systematic biases were found in the general stratigraphy of the different flow units. However, the 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages show that volcanism in this area began in the Neogene (˜10 Ma) and continued to Recent, with the most voluminous eruptions occurring in the Quaternary. Neogene volcanism occurred in at least three pulses around 10, 5 and 2 Ma, whereas Quaternary volcanism produced at least seven units reflecting lava flow emplacement in the time period of 1.90 Ma-Recent. Thus, the whole duration of volcanic activity in the Harrat Al-Madinah (10 Ma-Recent) appears much longer than that previously identified. The longevity of volcanism in the same part of the moving Arabian plate and absence of evidence for uni-directional migration of volcanic activity indicate that there is no fixed plume beneath this region. The NNW-trending distribution of the volcanic vents is parallel to the Red Sea, and suggests their origin is related to periodic extensional episodes along the reactivated Red Sea fault

  14. The Carrán-Los Venados volcanic field and its relationship with coeval and nearby polygenetic volcanism in an intra-arc setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucchi, Francisco; Lara, Luis E.; Gutiérrez, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between monogenetic and polygenetic volcanism has been a long-standing goal in volcanology, especially in cases where these two styles of volcanism are coeval and geographically adjacent. We studied the Carrán-Los Venados (CLV) volcanic field and made comparisons with published data on CLV's polygenetic neighbor Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (PCC) in the Southern Andean arc, using quantitative tools and recent numerical simulations of magma reservoir formation. CLV is a basaltic to basaltic andesitic volcanic field composed of 65 post-glacial scoria cones and maars and a 1-km-high Pleistocene stratovolcano, whereas PCC is a basaltic to rhyolitic composite volcano. Our results point to three main differences between CLV and PCC: (1) the CLV magmas differentiate at low-crustal reservoirs, followed by rapid ascent to the surface, while the PCC magmas stagnate and differentiate in lower- and upper-crustal reservoirs; (2) CLV is elongated in the NE direction while PCC is elongated in the NW direction. Under the current stress field (N60°E σHmax), these two volcanic alignments correspond, respectively, to local extensional and compressive deformation zones within the arc; and (3), the post-glacial CLV magma flux was estimated to be 3.1 ± 1.0 km3/ky, which is similar to the average magma flux estimated for PCC; however, the PCC magma flux is estimated at approximately twice this value during peak eruptive periods (5.5 ± 1.1 km3/ky). Based on numerical simulations, CLV is in a limit situation to create and sustain a mush-type upper-crustal reservoir containing highly crystalline magma, which is however not eruptible. The PCC volcanic system would have been able to create a stable reservoir containing eruptible silicic magma during periods of peak magma flux. We postulate that monogenetic volcanism occurs at CLV due to both low magma flux and an extensional/transtensional regime that favors rapid magma rise without storage and differentiation in

  15. Internal architecture of the Tuxtla volcanic field, Veracruz, Mexico, inferred from gravity and magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola, Juan Manuel; Lopez-Loera, Hector; Mena, Manuel; Zamora-Camacho, Araceli

    2016-09-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is a basaltic volcanic field emerging from the plains of the western margin of the Gulf of Mexico in the Mexican State of Veracruz. Separated by hundreds of kilometers from the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the NW and the Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc to the SE, it stands detached not only in location but also in the composition of its rocks, which are predominantly alkaline. These characteristics make its origin somewhat puzzling. Furthermore, one of the large volcanoes of the field, San Martin Tuxtla, underwent an eruptive period in historical times (CE 1793). Such volcanic activity conveys particular importance to the study of the TVF from the perspective of volcanology and hazard assessment. Despite the above circumstances, few investigations about its internal structure have been reported. In this work, we present analyses of gravity and aeromagnetic data obtained from different sources. We present the complete Bouguer anomaly of the area and its separation into regional and residual components. The aeromagnetic data were processed to yield the reduction to the pole, the analytic signal, and the upward continuation to complete the interpretation of the gravity analyses. Three-dimensional density models of the regional and residual anomalies were obtained by inversion of the gravity signal adding the response of rectangular prisms at the nodes of a regular grid. We obtained a body with a somewhat flattened top at 16 km below sea level from the inversion of the regional. Three separate slender bodies with tops 6 km deep were obtained from the inversion of the residual. The gravity and magnetic anomalies, as well as the inferred source bodies that produce those geophysical anomalies, lie between the Sontecomapan and Catemaco faults, which are proposed as flower structures associated with an inferred deep-seated fault termed the Veracruz Fault. These fault systems along with magma intrusion at the lower crust are necessary features to

  16. Regional orientation of tectonic stress and the stress expressed by post-subduction high-magnesium volcanism in northern Baja California, Mexico: Tectonics and volcanism of San Borja volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrete-Aranda, Raquel; Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo; Brandle, Jose Luis; Ortega-Rivera, M. Amabel; Lee, James K. W.; Spelz, Ronald M.; Hinojosa-Corona, Alejandro

    2010-04-01

    Because of its long-lived (Late Miocene to Pleistocene) post-subduction volcanic activity and location, the San Borja volcanic field (SBVF) is a key area for understanding the physical mechanisms controlling the spatial distribution of post-subduction volcanism on the Peninsula of Baja California. In this paper, we study the distribution and general characteristics of individual eruptive centers in the SBVF, aiming to provide insight into the changing physical nature of post-subduction magmatism and the control on vent location in a very unique tectonic setting. Volcanic activity has built more than 227 high-magnesium andesites (HMA) monogenetic scoria cones and thick lava flows capping large mesas during the last 12.5 Ma. The average (mean) eruptive center in the SBVF has a height of 85 m, a basal diameter of 452 m and a slope angle of 30°. Our volcanic alignment analysis of this field is based on field data, satellite images, and a quantitative method for detecting volcanic center alignments. The morphologic data, together with new 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology data have been used to refine our alignment analysis and to better delineate the temporal evolution of post-subduction volcanic activity in this field. The available ages vary from 3.53 ± 0.18 to 10 ± 0.23 Ma suggesting that the long-lived HMA volcanism occurred almost continuously (with some concentration of pulses) throughout Late Miocene and extending to the Pleistocene and even into the Quaternary, replacing the arc-related activity of the Comondú arc which vanished in this area around 12.5 Ma. Alignment analysis confirms a NW-SE direction as the preferred orientation of volcanic alignments and shows that vent elongations do not display a strong parallelism in any particular direction, marking the absence of matches between lineaments defined by multiple vents and orientations of vent elongation. The results of the volcanic alignment analysis allowed us to infer the direction of the maximum

  17. Traders on the Navajo Reservation. A Report on the Economic Bondage of the Navajo People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Indian Development, Inc., Window Rock, AZ.

    Conducted in 1969 by 8 Navajo students, this study investigates the Anglo trader in terms of his socioeconomic influence on the American Indians of the Navajo Reservation. Limited to 30 randomly selected trading posts located in the central and eastern portions of the Navajo Reservation, this study reflects findings derived from personal…

  18. The Situation of Navajo Literacy Projects. Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spolsky, Bernard

    The Navajo Reading Study has been prepared for a volume describing literacy projects in the indigenous languages of the Americas. In 1969-70, 2 surveys were made to determine the present language situation of 6-year-old Navajo children. For each survey, a simple questionnaire was sent to all teachers with Navajo 6-year-olds in their classes.…

  19. Transforming Biology Curriculum at Navajo Community College to Include Navajo and Western Cultural Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Edward R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes how a college teacher used Navajo traditional knowledge to rethink the teaching of college biology. Suggests that teachers intimidated by the intricate Dine Philosophy of Education may integrate Navajo knowledge into their courses through focused research guided by Navajo consultants. Includes five examples of redesigned curricula for…

  20. Spurious behavior in volcanic records of geomagnetic field reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlut, Julie; Vella, Jerome; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Soler, Vicente; Legoff, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Very large directional variations of magnetization have been reported in several lava flows recording a geomagnetic reversal. Such behavior could reflect real geomagnetic changes or be caused by artifacts due to post-emplacement alteration and/or non-ideal magnetic behavior. More recently, a high resolution paleomagnetic record from sediments pleads also for an extremely rapid reversal process during the last reversal. Assuming that the geomagnetic field would have moved by tens of degrees during cooling of moderate thickness lava flows implies brief episodes of rapid changes by a few degrees per day that are difficult to reconcile with the rate of liquid motions at the core surface. Systematical mineralogical bias is a most likely explanation to promote such behavior as recently reconsidered by Coe et al., 2014 for the rapid field changes recorded at Steens Mountain. We resampled three lava flows at La Palma island (Canarias) that are sandwiched between reverse polarity and normal polarity flows associated with the last reversal. The results show an evolution of the magnetization direction from top to bottom. Thermal demagnetization experiments were conducted using different heating and cooling rates. Similarly, continuous demagnetization and measurements. In both cases, we did not notice any remagnetization associated with mineralogical transformations during the experiments. Magnetic grain sizes do not show any correlation with the amplitude of the deviations. Microscopic observations indicate poor exsolution, which could suggests post-cooling thermochemical remagnetization processes.

  1. Catastrophic volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  2. Salinity increases in the navajo aquifer in southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; Spangler, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    Salinity increases in water in some parts of the Navajo aquifer in southeastern Utah have been documented previously. The purpose of this paper is to use bromide, iodide, and chloride concentrations and del oxygen-18 and deuterium values in water from the study area to determine if oil-field brines (OFB) could be the source of increased salinity. Mixing-model results indicate that the bromide-to-chloride X 10,000 weight ratio characteristic of OFB in and outside the study area could not be causing the bromide depletion with increasing salinity in the Navajo aquifer. Mixing-model results indicate that a mixture of one percent OFB with 99 percent Navajo aquifer water would more than double the bromide-to-chloride weight ratio, instead of the observed decrease in the weight ratio with increasing chloride concentration. The trend of the mixing line representing the isotopically enriched samples from the Navajo aquifer does not indicate OFB as the source of isotopically enriched water; however, the simulated isotopic composition of injection water could be a salinity source. The lighter isotopic composition of OFB samples from the Aneth, Ratherford, White Mesa Unit, and McElmo Creek injection sites relative to the Ismay site is a result of continued recycling of injection water mixed with various proportions of isotopically lighter make-up water from the alluvial aquifer along the San Juan River. A mixing model using the isotopic composition of the simulated injection water suggests that enriched samples from the Navajo aquifer are composed of 36 to 75 percent of the simulated injection water. However, chloride concentrations predicted by the isotopic mixing model are up to 13.4 times larger than the measured chloride concentrations in isotopically enriched samples from the Navajo aquifer, indicating that injection water is not the source of increased salinity. Geochemical data consistently show that OFB and associated injection water from the Greater Aneth Oil Field

  3. Mortality among Navajo uranium miners.

    PubMed Central

    Roscoe, R J; Deddens, J A; Salvan, A; Schnorr, T M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. To update mortality risks for Navajo uranium miners, a retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted of 757 Navajos from the cohort of Colorado Plateau uranium miners. METHODS. Vital status was followed from 1960 to 1990. Standardized mortality ratios were estimated, with combined New Mexico and Arizona non-White mortality rates used for comparison. Cox regression models were used to evaluate exposure-response relationships. RESULTS. Elevated standardized mortality ratios were found for lung cancer (3.3), tuberculosis (2.6), and pneumoconioses and other respiratory diseases (2.6). Lowered ratios were found for heart disease (0.6), circulatory disease (0.4), and liver cirrhosis (0.5). The estimated relative risk for a 5-year duration of exposure vs none was 3.7 for lung cancer, 2.1 for pneumoconioses and other respiratory diseases, and 2.0 for tuberculosis. The relative risk for lung cancer was 6.9 for the midrange of cumulative exposure to radon progeny compared with the least exposed. CONCLUSIONS. Findings were consistent with those from previous studies. Twenty-three years after their last exposure to radon progeny, these light-smoking Navajo miners continue to face excess mortality risks from lung cancer and pneumoconioses and other respiratory diseases. PMID:7702118

  4. Origin of metaluminous and alkaline volcanic rocks of the Latir volcanic field, northern Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.M.; Lipman, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    Volcanic rocks of the Latir volcanic field evolved in an open system by crystal fractionation, magma mixing, and crustal assimilation. Early high-SiO2 rhyolites (28.5 Ma) fractionated from intermediate compositionmagmas that did not reach the surface. Most precaldera lavas have intermediate-compositions, from olivine basaltic-andesite (53% SiO2) to quartz latite (67% SiO2). The precaldera intermediate-composition lavas have anomalously high Ni and MgO contents and reversely zoned hornblende and augite phenocrysts, indicating mixing between primitive basalts and fractionated magmas. Isotopic data indicate that all of the intermediate-composition rocks studied contain large crustal components, although xenocrysts are found only in one unit. Inception of alkaline magmatism (alkalic dacite to high-SiO2 peralkaline rhyolite) correlates with, initiation of regional extension approximately 26 Ma ago. The Questa caldera formed 26.5 Ma ago upon eruption of the >500 km3 high-SiO2 peralkaline Amalia Tuff. Phenocryst compositions preserved in the cogenetic peralkaline granite suggest that the Amalia Tuff magma initially formed from a trace element-enriched, high-alkali metaluminous magma; isotopic data suggest that the parental magmas contain a large crustal component. Degassing of water- and halogen-rich alkali basalts may have provided sufficient volatile transport of alkalis and other elements into the overlying silicic magma chamber to drive the Amalia Tuff magma to peralkaline compositions. Trace element variations within the Amalia Tuff itself may be explained solely by 75% crystal fractionation of the observed phenocrysts. Crystal settling, however, is inconsistent with mineralogical variations in the tuff, and crystallization is thought to have occurred at a level below that tapped by the eruption. Spatially associated Miocene (15-11 Ma) lavas did not assimilate large amounts of crust or mix with primitive basaltic magmas. Both mixing and crustal assimilation processes

  5. Origin of metaluminous and alkaline volcanic rocks of the Latir volcanic field, northern Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Clark M.; Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-09-01

    Volcanic rocks of the Latir volcanic field evolved in an open system by crystal fractionation, magma mixing, and crustal assimilation. Early high-SiO2 rhyolites (28.5 Ma) fractionated from intermediate compositionmagmas that did not reach the surface. Most precaldera lavas have intermediate-compositions, from olivine basaltic-andesite (53% SiO2) to quartz latite (67% SiO2). The precaldera intermediate-composition lavas have anomalously high Ni and MgO contents and reversely zoned hornblende and augite phenocrysts, indicating mixing between primitive basalts and fractionated magmas. Isotopic data indicate that all of the intermediate-composition rocks studied contain large crustal components, although xenocrysts are found only in one unit. Inception of alkaline magmatism (alkalic dacite to high-SiO2 peralkaline rhyolite) correlates with, initiation of regional extension approximately 26 Ma ago. The Questa caldera formed 26.5 Ma ago upon eruption of the >500 km3 high-SiO2 peralkaline Amalia Tuff. Phenocryst compositions preserved in the cogenetic peralkaline granite suggest that the Amalia Tuff magma initially formed from a trace element-enriched, high-alkali metaluminous magma; isotopic data suggest that the parental magmas contain a large crustal component. Degassing of water- and halogen-rich alkali basalts may have provided sufficient volatile transport of alkalis and other elements into the overlying silicic magma chamber to drive the Amalia Tuff magma to peralkaline compositions. Trace element variations within the Amalia Tuff itself may be explained solely by 75% crystal fractionation of the observed phenocrysts. Crystal settling, however, is inconsistent with mineralogical variations in the tuff, and crystallization is thought to have occurred at a level below that tapped by the eruption. Spatially associated Miocene (15-11 Ma) lavas did not assimilate large amounts of crust or mix with primitive basaltic magmas. Both mixing and crustal assimilation processes

  6. An integrated model for the deep structure of the Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, O.; Ritter, J. R. R.; Altherr, R.; Garasic, V.; Volker, F.; Kluge, C.; Kaspar, T.; Byrne, G. F.; Sobolev, S. V.; Fuchs, K.

    1997-09-01

    The Chyulu Hills, a 1.4 Ma B.P. to Holocene volcanic field located about 150 km to the east of the Kenya rift, is one of the few locations on Earth for which detailed geochemical (volcanic rocks), thermobarometric (xenoliths), seismological and gravity data are available. This paper combines these data to achieve an integrated seismic-petrological model for the deep structure of this volcanic field. Results of a wide-angle reflection and refraction experiment reveal an average crustal thickness of 40 km and a thickness of 20 km for the lower crust. Beneath the volcanic field, the crust thickens to about 44 km. In this region a low-velocity body (LVZ) is modelled which extends from about 30 ± 5 km depth to the Moho. The LVZ is characterised by an increased vP/ vS-ratio ranging from 1.81 to 1.93 depending on the possible extents of this body. This is in contrast to the surrounding crust where a ratio of only about 1.76 is observed. In the same area, the results of a teleseismic tomography study show a P-wave low-velocity anomaly of -3%. The seismic data can be explained by either an anorthositic body directly above the Moho in the region of the Chyulu Hills or by the presence of partial melt. Directly beneath the Chyulu Hills, a P-wave velocity of 7.9 km/s is determined for the uppermost mantle; this velocity is 0.2-0.3 km/s lower than that of the surrounding mantle region. The teleseismic tomography model suggests a P-wave low-velocity anomaly of -2.5 to -3.5% in the uppermost mantle (<70 km depth). Widespread garnet-bearing pyroxenitic and lherzolitic mantle xenoliths are mostly well equilibrated and suggest an apparent lithospheric thickness of about 105 km. Most garnet-free spinel harzburgitic xenoliths and some garnet pyroxenitic xenoliths were significantly heated before they were sampled and erupted by the host magmas. Heating events lasted for less than 210 ka as indicated by chemical diffusion profiles observed in orthopyroxene grains. It is suggested that

  7. Navajo Changes--A History of the Navajo People = Dinetahgi Lahgo Ahoodzaa--Dine Bahane. Fifth-Eighth Grade Navajo Bilingual Bicultural Social Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Stephen; And Others

    The Navajo bilingual-bicultural social studies curriculum for grades 5-8 contains six chapters of Navajo history. The chapters trace Navajo history beginning with legends of the first Navajos and life in Dinetah and continuing through early contact with the Spaniards, conflict and defeat at the hands of the United States government, and the…

  8. Isotopic and chemical constraints on the petrogenesis of Blackburn Hills volcanic field, western Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Moll-Stalcup, E.J.; Arth, J.G. )

    1991-12-01

    The Blackburn Hills volcanic field is one of several Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary (75-50 Ma) volcanic fields in western Alaska that comprise a vast magmatic province extending from the Arctic Circle to Bristol Bay. It consists of andesite flows, rhyolite domes, a central granodiorite to quartz monzonite pluton, and small intrusive rhyolite porphyries, overlain by basalt and alkali-rhyolites. Most of the field consists of andesite flows which can be divided into two groups on the basis of elemental and isotopic composition: a group having lower ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr){sub i}, higher ({sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd){sub i}, and moderate LREE and HREE contents (group 1), and a group having higher ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr){sub i}, lower ({sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd){sub i}, and lower HREE contents. Basalts are restricted to the top of the stratigraphic section, comprise the most primitive part of group 1 (({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr){sub i} = 0.7033; ({sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd){sub i} = 0.5129), and have trace-element ratios that are similar to those of oceanic island basalts (OIBs). Although some workers have suggested that the volcanic field is underlain by old continental crust, none of the data require the presence of Paleozoic or Precambrian continental middle or upper crust under this part of the volcanic field. However, the ultimate source of some of the rocks in the Yukon-Koyukuk province that have high {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and low {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratios may be old sub-continental mantle and/or lower crust, which was previously subducted beneath the Yukon-Koyukuk province during Early Cretaceous arc-continent collision.

  9. Exploitation of oil in a volcanic cone by horizontal drilling in the Elaine field, south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, P.A.; Kushner, P.L.; Harbaugh, J.W.

    1991-03-01

    The Uvalde volcanic field west and southwest of San Antonio contains many buried volcanic cones that offer attractive places to exploit with horizontal drilling. These buried cones were formed by eruption of basaltic flows and cinders during the Cretaceous when the Austin Chalk and immediately overlying strate were deposited. The cones vary in size, some being as much as 2 mi in diameter and 1000 ft in vertical dimension. During eruptions, flows and ejecta reacted with sea water, producing intermixtures of basaltic material and limestone. These cones provide attractive targets for oil exploration. The Elaine field about 90 mi southwest of San Antonio is associated with a buried volcanic cone that is now being exploited with horizontal drilling. Horizontal Drilling and Production, Inc., ('HDP') drilled the Autumn 1 as the initial horizontal well at Elaine. A vertical hole was drilled through the cone and underlying Austin Chalk, reconfirming the presence of the oil zone at the contact between volcanics and chalk. Moving back up the hole, a cement plug was set within the volcanics, and a horizontal hole was directed on a N 70W azimuth. The inclined hole's vertical angle had progressively decreased with distance to about 30{degree} from the horizontal when the oil zone was reentered. The hole's inclination continued to decrease within the oil zone, becoming horizontal after about 600 ft. With further distance, the hole passed beneath the oil zone, where its inclination was then reversed so that it climbed gradually and reentered the oil zone before reaching its terminal distance of 1500 horizontal feet. The well was completed on August 17, 1990, with an indicated initial production of 1609 BOPD.

  10. Stratigraphic relations and lithologic variations in the Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.N.; Goff, F.; Garcia, S.; Hagan, R.C.

    1986-02-10

    Over 100 radiometric dates and recent detailed geologic mapping allow some refinements of the stratigraphic relations of major units and generalization of temporal lithologic variations in the Jemez volcanic field. Volcanism had begun in the area by about 16.5 Ma with episodic eruptions of alkaline basalts. By 13 Ma, alkaline volcanism had been replaced with eruptions of more voluminous olivine tholeiite. High-silica rhyolite, derived from melts of lower crust, also was erupting by about 13 Ma. Basalt and high-silica rhyolite continued to be erupted until about 7 and 6 Ma, respectively, but effusions of dominantly andesitic differentiates of basalt that began as early as about 12 Ma volumetrically overshadowed all other eruptive products between 10 and 7 Ma. From 7 to 13 the dominant erupted lithology was dacite, which appears to have been generated by mixing of magmas whose compositions are approximated by earlier andesites and high-silica rhyolites. Less than 4--3 Ma volcanism was dominated by eruption of rhyolitic tuffs.

  11. Lithologic, age group, magnetopolarity, and geochemical maps of the Springerville Volcanic Field, east-central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condit, Christopher D.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Aubele, Jayne C.

    1999-01-01

    The Springerville volcanic field is one of the many late Pliocene to Holocene, mostly basaltic, volcanic fields present near the Colorado Plateau margin (fig. 1, in pamphlet). The field overlies the lithospheric transition zone between the Colorado Plateau and the Basin and Range Province (Condit and others, 1989b). Establishing relations in time, space, and composition of the rocks of these plateau-margin fields offers the possibility to integrate more fully into a regional synthesis the detailed geochemistry of these fields now being examined (for example, Perry and others, 1987; Fitton and others, 1988; Menzies and others, 1991). The work also provides baseline information for understanding mantle properties and processes at different depths and locations. Because the Springerville field is the southernmost of the plateau-margin fields, and because it contains both tholeiitic and alkalic rocks (tables 1 and 2, in pamphlet), it is a particularly important location for establishing these patterns in time, space, and composition. Our four thematic maps of the Springerville field were compiled by using digital mapping techniques so that associated petrologic and chemical data could be conveniently included in a geographic information system for one of the plateau-margin fields. Parts of these maps have been included in Condit (1995), a stand-alone Macintosh2 computer program that takes advantage of their digital format.

  12. Contributions to Astrogeology: Geology of the lunar crater volcanic field, Nye County, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. H.; Trask, N. J.

    1971-01-01

    The Lunar Crater volcanic field in east-central Nevada includes cinder cones, maars, and basalt flows of probably Quaternary age that individually and as a group resemble some features on the moon. Three episodes of volcanism are separated by intervals of relative dormancy and erosion. Changes in morphology of cinder cones, degree of weathering, and superposition of associated basalt flows provide a basis for determining the relative ages of the cones. A method has been devised whereby cone heights, base radii, and angles of slope are used to determine semiquantitatively the age relationships of some cinder cones. Structural studies show that cone and crater chains and their associated lava flows developed along fissures and normal faults produced by tensional stress. The petrography of the basalts and pyroclastics suggests magmatic differentiation at depth which produced interbedded subalkaline basalts, alkali-olivine basalts, and basanitoids. The youngest flows in the field are basanitoids.

  13. Hydrogen chloride 37Cl/35Cl isotopic ratio field analyzer for the investigation of volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amato, Francesco; Burton, Mike; Chiarugi, Antonio; Viciani, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    We present a new analyzer for the in-field measurement of the isotopic ratio 37Cl/35Cl in the hydrogen chloride emitted by volcanoes, developed within the frame of the ERC Project CO2Volc (Grant 279802). The Project aims to the measurement of several molecular species in the volcanic plumes. The analyzer is based on molecular spectroscopy. The volcanic plume interacts in a multipass cell with two laser beams at suitable wavelengths. From the absorptions of the two beams by the two isotopologues the isotopic ratio is retrieved. We report here the results of the laboratory checks of the instrument, and the results of a measurement campaign carried out on Etna and Vulcano. The campaign aimed to verify not only the in-field performances of the analyzer but also to assess its robustness in such a hostile environment.

  14. Rocky 7 prototype Mars rover field geology experiments 1. Lavic Lake and sunshine volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arvidson, R. E.; Acton, C.; Blaney, D.; Bowman, J.; Kim, S.; Klingelhofer, G.; Marshall, J.; Niebur, C.; Plescia, J.; Saunders, R.S.; Ulmer, C.T.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments with the Rocky 7 rover were performed in the Mojave Desert to better understand how to conduct rover-based, long-distance (kilometers) geological traverses on Mars. The rover was equipped with stereo imaging systems for remote sensing science and hazard avoidance and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers for in situ determination of mineralogy of unprepared rock and soil surfaces. Laboratory data were also obtained using the spectrometers and an X ray diffraction (XRD)/XRF instrument for unprepared samples collected from the rover sites. Simulated orbital and descent image data assembled for the test sites were found to be critical for assessing the geologic setting, formulating hypotheses to be tested with rover observations, planning traverses, locating the rover, and providing a regional context for interpretation of rover-based observations. Analyses of remote sensing and in situ observations acquired by the rover confirmed inferences made from orbital and simulated descent images that the Sunshine Volcanic Field is composed of basalt flows. Rover data confirmed the idea that Lavic Lake is a recharge playa and that an alluvial fan composed of sediments with felsic compositions has prograded onto the playa. Rover-based discoveries include the inference that the basalt flows are mantled with aeolian sediment and covered with a dense pavement of varnished basalt cobbles. Results demonstrate that the combination of rover remote sensing and in situ analytical observations will significantly increase our understanding of Mars and provide key connecting links between orbital and descent data and analyses of returned samples. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Role of crustal assimilation and basement compositions in the petrogenesis of differentiated intraplate volcanic rocks: a case study from the Siebengebirge Volcanic Field, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, K. P.; Kirchenbaur, M.; Fonseca, R. O. C.; Kasper, H. U.; Münker, C.; Froitzheim, N.

    2016-06-01

    The Siebengebirge Volcanic Field (SVF) in western Germany is part of the Cenozoic Central European Volcanic Province. Amongst these volcanic fields, the relatively small SVF comprises the entire range from silica-undersaturated mafic lavas to both silica-undersaturated and silica-saturated differentiated lavas. Owing to this circumstance, the SVF represents a valuable study area representative of intraplate volcanism in Europe. Compositions of the felsic lavas can shed some new light on differentiation of intraplate magmas and on the extent and composition of potential crustal assimilation processes. In this study, we provide detailed petrographic and geochemical data for various differentiated SVF lavas, including major and trace element concentrations as well as Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope compositions. Samples include tephriphonolites, latites, and trachytes with SiO2 contents ranging between 53 and 66 wt%. If compared to previously published compositions of mafic SVF lavas, relatively unradiogenic 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf coupled with radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb lead to the interpretation that the differentiated volcanic rocks have assimilated significant amounts of lower crustal mafic granulites like the ones found as xenoliths in the nearby Eifel volcanic field. These crustal contaminants should possess unradiogenic 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf, radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr, and highly radiogenic 207Pb/204Pb compositions requiring the presence of ancient components in the central European lower crust that are not sampled on the surface. Using energy-constrained assimilation-fractional crystallisation (EC-AFC) model calculations, differentiation of the SVF lithologies can be modelled by approximately 39-47 % fractional crystallisation and 6-15 % crustal assimilation. Notably, the transition from silica-undersaturated to silica-saturated compositions of many felsic lavas in the SVF that is difficult to account for in closed-system models is also well explained by

  16. Magma evolution and ascent at the Craters of the Moon and neighboring volcanic fields, southern Idaho, USA: implications for the evolution of polygenetic and monogenetic volcanic fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Putirka, Keith D.; Kuntz, Mel A.; Unruh, Daniel M.; Vaid, Nitin

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of polygenetic and monogenetic volcanic fields must reflect differences in magma processing during ascent. To assess their evolution we use thermobarometry and geochemistry to evaluate ascent paths for neighboring, nearly coeval volcanic fields in the Snake River Plain, in south-central Idaho, derived from (1) dominantly Holocene polygenetic evolved lavas from the Craters of the Moon lava field (COME) and (2) Quaternary non-evolved, olivine tholeiites (NEOT) from nearby monogenetic volcanic fields. These data show that NEOT have high magmatic temperatures (1205 + or - 27 degrees C) and a narrow temperature range (50 degrees C). Prolonged storage of COME magmas allows them to evolve to higher 87Sr/86Sr and SiO2, and lower MgO and 143Nd/144Nd. Most importantly, ascent paths control evolution: NEOT often erupt near the axis of the plain where high-flux (Yellowstone-related), pre-Holocene magmatic activity replaces granitic middle crust with basaltic sills, resulting in a net increase in NEOT magma buoyancy. COME flows erupt off-axis, where felsic crustal lithologies sometimes remain intact, providing a barrier to ascent and a source for crustal contamination. A three-stage ascent process explains the entire range of erupted compositions. Stage 1 (40-20 km): picrites are transported to the middle crust, undergoing partial crystallization of olivine + or - clinopyroxene. COME magmas pass through unarmored conduits and assimilate 1% or less of ancient gabbroic crust having high Sr and 87Sr/86Sr and low SiO2. Stage 2 (20-10 km): magmas are stored within the middle crust, and evolve to moderate MgO (10%). NEOT magmas, reaching 10% MgO, are positively buoyant and migrate through the middle crust. COME magmas remain negatively buoyant and so crystallize further and assimilate middle crust. Stage 3 (15-0 km): final ascent and eruption occurs when volatile contents, increased by differentiation, are sufficient (1-2 wt % H2O) to provide magma buoyancy through the

  17. Geology, geochronology, and paleogeography of the southern Sonoma volcanic field and adjacent areas, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Clahan, K.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Allen, J.R.; Deino, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping in the northern San Francisco Bay region (California, USA) supported by radiometric dating and tephrochronologic correlations, provides insights into the framework geology, stratigraphy, tectonic evolution, and geologic history of this part of the San Andreas transform plate boundary. There are 25 new and existing radiometric dates that define three temporally distinct volcanic packages along the north margin of San Pablo Bay, i.e., the Burdell Mountain Volcanics (11.1 Ma), the Tolay Volcanics (ca. 10-8 Ma), and the Sonoma Volcanics (ca. 8-2.5 Ma). The Burdell Mountain and the Tolay Volcanics are allochthonous, having been displaced from the Quien Sabe Volcanics and the Berkeley Hills Volcanics, respectively. Two samples from a core of the Tolay Volcanics taken from the Murphy #1 well in the Petaluma oilfield yielded ages of 8.99 ?? 0.06 and 9.13 ?? 0.06 Ma, demonstrating that volcanic rocks exposed along Tolay Creek near Sears Point previously thought to be a separate unit, the Donnell Ranch volcanics, are part of the Tolay Volcanics. Other new dates reported herein show that volcanic rocks in the Meacham Hill area and extending southwest to the Burdell Mountain fault are also part of the Tolay Volcanics. In the Sonoma volcanic field, strongly bimodal volcanic sequences are intercalated with sediments. In the Mayacmas Mountains a belt of eruptive centers youngs to the north. The youngest of these volcanic centers at Sugarloaf Ridge, which lithologically, chemically, and temporally matches the Napa Valley eruptive center, was apparently displaced 30 km to the northwest by movement along the Carneros and West Napa faults. The older parts of the Sonoma Volcanics have been displaced at least 28 km along the RodgersCreek fault since ca. 7 Ma. The Petaluma Formation also youngs to the north along the Rodgers Creek-Hayward fault and the Bennett Valley fault. The Petaluma basin formed as part of the Contra Costa basin in the Late Miocene and was

  18. Records of magmatic change as preserved in zircon: examples from the Yellowstone Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Zircon crystals have been used as proxies for their host magmatic composition and as records of the evolution and differentiation of silicic magma systems through the use of integrated techniques such as cathodoluminescence imaging, LA-ICPMS trace element analysis, thermometry, and high-precision CA-IDTIMS U/Pb dating. This petrochronologic approach can aid in identifying crystal populations arising from discrete pulses of magmatism, reconstructing the growth histories of those populations, quantifying the chemical evolution of the host magma, and determining the timing and tempo of that chemical evolution. The Yellowstone Volcanic Field hosts both large and small volume silicic eruptions whose zircon records can provide insights to magmatic processes using a petrochronologic approach. Morphological and thermochemical trends preserved in zircon grains extracted from the three Yellowstone super-eruptions and a small volume precursory eruption indicate that magmatism in the volcanic field is punctuated, characterized by numerous pulses of melting, differentiation, and solidification occurring prior to eruption. U/Pb zircon dating constrains magma assembly to geologically short timescales, with populations of earlier solidified zircon incorporated into the nascent magma just prior to eruption. This requires punctuated intervals of high magmatic flux be superimposed on longer durations of a much lower background flux. Thus super-eruptions within the Yellowstone Volcanic Field result from rapid production and evolution of magma, and preceded by periods of smaller volume magma production that undergo similar differentiation processes over comparable timescales.

  19. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Forman, S.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part describes the status of continuing field studies for the volcanic center for this area south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The second part presents an overview of the preliminary results of ongoing chronology studies and their constraints on the age and stratigraphy of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Along with the chronology data, the assumptions, strengths, and limitations of each methods are discussed.

  20. A first hazard analysis of the Quaternary Harrat Al-Madinah volcanic field, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Difrawy, M. A.; Runge, M. G.; Moufti, M. R.; Cronin, S. J.; Bebbington, M.

    2013-11-01

    The northern portion of the 20,000 km2 Harrat Rahat basaltic field in NW Saudi Arabia (Harrat Al-Madinah) has hosted some of the most recent volcanic eruptions in the country. Rapid growth of the city of Al-Madinah has spread out onto the lava flows and scoria cones of the Harrat, increasing exposure to any potential renewed volcanism. We present here a first-order probabilistic hazard analysis related to new vent formation and subsequent lava flow from this volcanic field. The 501 visible eruption vent sites were integrated with aeromagnetic survey data (as representative of potential regions of buried volcanic vents) to develop a probability density function for new eruption sites using Gaussian kernel smoothing. This revealed a NNW striking zone of high spatial hazard terminating < 10 km south of the city. Using the properties of the AD1256 eruption lava flows and the spatial PDF, an analysis of lava hazard was carried out. Assuming a future lava-producing eruption, around 25% of the city of Al-Madinah is exposed to a probability of 0.001 to 0.005 of lava inundation. The temporal eruption recurrence rate is estimated at approximately one vent per 3300 years, but the temporal record of the field is so poorly constrained that the lower and upper bounds for the recurrence interval are 13,300 yrs and 70 yrs, respectively. Applying a Poisson temporal model, this results in a worst-case lava inundation recurrence interval of approximately 14,300 years.

  1. Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

    1981-05-01

    A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

  2. Eifel maars: Quantitative shape characterization of juvenile ash particles (Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, Juanita; Grobéty, Bernard; Vonlanthen, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The Eifel region in western central Germany is the type locality for maar volcanism, which is classically interpreted to be the result of explosive eruptions due to shallow interaction between magma and external water (i.e. phreatomagmatic eruptions). Sedimentary structures, deposit features and particle morphology found in many maar deposits of the West Eifel Volcanic Field (WEVF), in contrast to deposits in the East Eifel Volcanic Field (EEVF), lack the diagnostic criteria of typical phreatomagmatic deposits. The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively the shape of WEVF and EEVF maar ash particles in order to infer the governing eruption style in Eifel maar volcanoes. The quantitative shape characterization was done by analyzing fractal dimensions of particle contours (125-250 μm sieve fraction) obtained from Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM micro-computed tomography (SEM micro-CT) images. The fractal analysis (dilation method) and the fractal spectrum technique confirmed that the WEVF and EEVF maar particles have contrasting multifractal shapes. Whereas the low small-scale dimensions of EEVF particles (Eppelsberg Green Unit) coincide with previously published values for phreatomagmatic particles, the WEVF particles (Meerfelder Maar, Pulvermaar and Ulmener Maar) have larger values indicating more complex small-scale features, which are characteristic for magmatic particles. These quantitative results are strengthening the qualitative microscopic observations, that the studied WEVF maar eruptions are rather dominated by magmatic processes. The different eruption styles in the two volcanic fields can be explained by the different geological and hydrological settings found in both regions and the different chemical compositions of the magmas.

  3. An investigation into the utilization of HCMM thermal data for the descrimination of volcanic and Eolian geological units. [Craters of the Moon volcanic field, Idaho; San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona; High Desert, California; and the Cascade Range, California and Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W., III (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of HCMM data shows that the resolution provided by the thermal data is inadequate to permit the identification of individual lava flows within the volcanic test sites. Thermal data of southern California reveals that dune complexes at Kelso and Algodomes are found to be too small to permit adequate investigation of their structure. As part of the study of the San Francisco volcanic field, marked variations in the thermal properties of the region between Flagstaff and the Utah State border were observed. Several well-defined units within the Grand Canyon and the Colorado Plateau were recognized and appear to be very suitable for analysis with HCMM, SEASAT and LANDSAT images. Although individual volcanic constructs within the Cascade Range are too small to permit detailed characterization with the thermal data, the regional volcano/tectonic setting offers a good opportunity for comparing the possible thermal distinction between this area and sedimentary fold belts such as those found in the eastern United States. Strong intra-regional variations in vegetation cover were also tentatively identified for the Oregon test site.

  4. Changing eruptive styles in basaltic explosive volcanism: Examples from Croscat complex scoria cone, Garrotxa Volcanic Field (NE Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Traglia, F.; Cimarelli, C.; de Rita, D.; Gimeno Torrente, D.

    2009-03-01

    The Croscat pyroclastic succession has been analysed to investigate the transition between different eruptive styles in basaltic monogenetic volcanoes, with particular emphasis on the role of phreatomagmatism in triggering Violent Strombolian eruptions. Croscat volcano, an 11 ka basaltic complex scoria cone in the Quaternary Garrotxa Volcanic Field (GVF) shows pyroclastic deposits related both to magmatic and phreatomagmatic explosions. Lithofacies analysis, grain size distribution, chemical composition, glass shard morphologies, vesicularity, bubble-number density and crystallinity of the Croscat pyroclastic succession have been used to characterize the different eruptive styles. Eruptions at Croscat began with fissural Hawaiian-type fountaining that rapidly changed to eruption types transitional between Hawaiian and Strombolian from a central vent. A first phreatomagmatic phase occurred by the interaction between magma and water from a shallow aquifer system at the waning of the Hawaiian- and Strombolian-types stage. A Violent Strombolian explosion then occurred, producing a widespread (8 km 2), voluminous tephra blanket. The related deposits are characterized by the presence of wood-shaped, highly vesicular scoriae. Glass-bearing xenoliths (buchites) are also present within the deposit. At the waning of the Violent Strombolian phase a second phreatomagmatic phase occurred, producing a second voluminous deposit dispersed over 8.4 km 2. The eruption ended with a lava flow emission and consequent breaching of the western-side of the volcano. Our data suggest that the Croscat Violent Strombolian phase was related to the ascent of deeper, crystal-poor, highly vesicular magma under fast decompression rate. Particles and vesicles elongation and brittle failure observed in the wood-shaped clasts indicate that fragmentation during Violent Strombolian phase was enhanced by high strain-rate of the magma within the conduit.

  5. Navajo generating plant and Grand Canyon haze

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.E.

    1991-01-15

    This article examines the question of whether the Navajo generating plant pollution is contributing to pollution of the air in the Grand Canyon region. The topics include the regulatory context of the plant, the experiment known as the Winter Haze Intensive Tracer Experiment (WHITEX), the National Research Council evaluation of the WHITEX, and The Navajo Generating Station Visibility Study.

  6. An Ethnography of the Navajo Reproductive Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Anne

    1982-01-01

    Describes the reproductive cycle (menarche, menstrual cycle, fertility and contraceptive use, and menopause) as experienced by two groups of contemporary Navajo women. Eighty Navajo women, 40 traditional and 40 acculturated, participated in the 1978 research project which focused on influences of menopause. (ERB)

  7. SURVEY REPORT--NAVAJO COMMUNITY COLLEGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASHE, ROBERT W.

    THIS PLAN FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A NAVAJO JUNIOR COLLEGE GOES INTO ALL ASPECTS OF ITS ORGANIZATION. IT DESCRIBES THE PRESENT NAVAJO SCHOOL SYSTEM, WHICH IS A COMBINATION OF MISSION, PUBLIC, AND BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS OPERATIONS. FINANCIAL HELP TO STUDENTS WANTING MORE THAN A HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION IS PRESENTLY INADEQUATE, THROUGH INCREASING. IF…

  8. Entrepreneurship and Economic Development: The Navajo Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, J. Stuart; Carlin, William B.

    The Navajo Nation, in the summer of 1987, sponsored the Special Pre-Business Introduction for Navajo Students (SPINS) program through the business colleges at three universities: (1) University of Arizona; (2) University of New Mexico; and (3) New Mexico State University. SPINS provided entrepreneurial training, through entrepreneurship workshops,…

  9. "1970" Inter-Agency Health Meeting (Navajo).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    An inter-agency health meeting regarding health services for Navajo Indians is reported on in this document. The meeting, sponsored by the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, involved agencies such as the U.S. Public Health Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Navajo Tribe. Included in the proceedings are reports and remarks by…

  10. Defining Student Success through Navajo Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Colleen Wilma

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine the definition of student success as defined by the Navajo people. The data collection method used was the focus group. The data were collected from two geographical settings from two public schools located within the boundaries of the Navajo Indian Reservation. The focus group participants…

  11. Sovereignty: The Navajo Nation and Taxation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Michael

    Contending that it is wrong for the Navajo Government to continue to neglect its citizens by not implementing a taxation program, this monograph is written to generate interest in and discussion of a taxation program and the Navajo Tax Commission, created in 1974. Specifically, this booklet presents basic information re: the financing of the…

  12. Navajo Art--A Way of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Faith

    This curriculum unit on Navajo art consists of three lessons, each of which can stand alone or be used in conjunction with the others. Teacher and students will explore Navajo traditions in the unit and use the insight gained to create artworks that connect people to their community and natural environment. The key artworks provide the foundation…

  13. Navajo Health Authority: Accomplishments--Future Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Health Authority, Window Rock, AZ.

    Accomplishments of the Navajo Health Authority (NHA) since it began in 1972 are presented in synopsis form in a report of programs underway at Window Rock and Shiprock, along with NHA goals: to promote development of Navajo Health manpower, preventive medicine, health education, and native healing sciences. After a brief review of executive and…

  14. Spatial and Alignment Analyses for a field of Small Volcanic Vents South of Pavonis Mons Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Glaze, L. S.; Greeley, R.; Hauber, E.; Baloga, S. M.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Williams, D. A.; Glotch, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    The Tharsis province of Mars displays a variety of small volcanic vent (10s krn in diameter) morphologies. These features were identified in Mariner and Viking images [1-4], and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data show them to be more abundant than originally observed [5,6]. Recent studies are classifying their diverse morphologies [7-9]. Building on this work, we are mapping the location of small volcanic vents (small-vents) in the Tharsis province using MOLA, Thermal Emission Imaging System, and High Resolution Stereo Camera data [10]. Here we report on a preliminary study of the spatial and alignment relationships between small-vents south of Pavonis Mons, as determined by nearest neighbor and two-point azimuth statistical analyses. Terrestrial monogenetic volcanic fields display four fundamental characteristics: 1) recurrence rates of eruptions,2 ) vent abundance, 3) vent distribution, and 4) tectonic relationships [11]. While understanding recurrence rates typically requires field measurements, insight into vent abundance, distribution, and tectonic relationships can be established by mapping of remotely sensed data, and subsequent application of spatial statistical studies [11,12], the goal of which is to link the distribution of vents to causal processes.

  15. Paleomagnetism and tectonic interpretations of the Taos Plateau volcanic field, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Laurie L.; Caffall, Nancy M.; Golombek, Matthew P.

    1993-01-01

    The tectonic response of the Taos Plateau volcanic field in the southern San Luis basin to late stage extensional environment of the Rio Grande rift was investigate using paleomagnetic techniques. Sixty-two sites (533 samples) of Pliocene volcanic units were collected covering four major rock types with ages of 4.7 to 1.8 Ma. Twenty-two of these sites were from stratigraphic sections of the lower, middle and upper Servilleta Basalt collected in the Rio Grande gorge at two locations 19 km apart. Flows from the lower and middle members in the southern gorge record reversed polarities, while those in Garapata Canyon are normal with an excursion event in the middle of the sequence. The uppermost flows of the upper member at both sites display normal directions. Although these sections correlate chemically, they seem to represent different magnetic time periods during the Gilbert Reversed-Polarity Chron. The data suggest the Taos Plateau volcanic field, showing no rotation and some flattening in the south and east, has acted as a stable buttress and has been downwarped by overriding of the southeastern end of the plateau by the Picuris Mountains, which make up the northern corner of the counter-clockwise rotating Espanola block.

  16. Shallow magma chamber under the Wudalianchi Volcanic Field unveiled by seismic imaging with dense array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiwei; Ni, Sidao; Zhang, Baolong; Bao, Feng; Zhang, Senqi; Deng, Yang; Yuen, David A.

    2016-05-01

    The Wudalianchi Volcano Field (WDF) is a typical intraplate volcano in northeast China with generation mechanism not yet well understood. As its last eruption was around 300 years ago, the present risk for volcano eruption is of particular public interest. We have carried out a high-resolution ambient noise tomography to investigate the location of magma chambers beneath the volcanic cones with a dense seismic array of 43 seismometers and ~ 6 km spatial interval. Significant low-velocity anomalies up to 10% are found at 7-13 km depth under the Weishan volcano, consistent with the pronounced high electrical-conductivity anomalies from previous magnetotelluric survey. We propose these extremely low velocity anomalies can be interpreted as partial melting in a shallow magma chamber with volume at least 200 km3 which may be responsible for most of the recent volcanic eruptions in WDF. Therefore, this magma chamber may pose a serious hazard for northeast China.

  17. Improved Constraints on the Eruptive History of Northern Harrat Rahat Volcanic Field, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelten, M. E.; Downs, D. T.; Calvert, A. T.; Sherrod, D. R.; Hassan, K. H.; Muquyyim, F. A.; Ashur, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Harrat Rahat is a large (~20,000 km2) alkalic volcanic field located in central western Saudi Arabia. A variety of eruptive products ranging from alkali basalt to trachyte have erupted at Harrat Rahat over the past ~10 m.y., with the most recent eruptions occurring at 641 CE (uncertain) and 1256 CE in the northern part of the volcanic field. Despite the field's young age and its close proximity to two major city centers, the eruptive history of Harrat Rahat remains poorly constrained. Previous researchers grouped the volcanic strata of northern Harrat Rahat into seven subunits based on limited K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating, and on the degree of erosion displayed by the eruptive products. The youngest eruptive products (subunits Qm7 - Qm4) are thought to be ≤600 ka, whereas the older lavas (Qm3 - Qm1) are thought to be >600 ka. However, due to the sparse geochronologic control on the ages of the eruptive units, it remains unclear if the currently defined subunits accurately reflect the age distribution of lavas in northern Harrat Rahat. Additionally, the temporal relation between basaltic magmatism and the more evolved eruptive products has yet to be examined. To better constrain the eruptive history of Harrat Rahat we measured >50 new 40Ar/39Ar eruption ages for Qm1 through Qm5 lavas in northern Harrat Rahat. These new 40Ar/39Ar ages suggest that the majority of volcanism in the region occurred ≤400 ka and is significantly younger than previously thought, indicating that the magmatic system at Harrat Rahat has been more active over the past 400 kyr then previously recognized. Additionally, these new age data suggest that nearly all trachytic magmatism occurred <125 ka and was preceded by a pulse of more mafic magmatism. It is likely the magmatic system at Harrat Rahat reached an evolved state late in the history of the volcanic field due to increased and/or prolonged input of basaltic magmas into the crust.

  18. Geomorphometric analysis of the scoria cones of the San Francisco Volcanic Field using polar coordinate transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vörös, Fanni; Koma, Zsófia; Karátson, Dávid; Székely, Balázs

    2016-04-01

    Scoria cones are often studied using geomorphometric and traditional GIS methods, e.g. aspect, slope histograms, area, cone height/width ratio. In order to enhance the non-symmetric shape components in contrast to the conical forms, we used a new approach in our research: the polar coordinate transformation (PCT) introduced by Székely & Karátson (2004). The study area is the classic cluster of scoria cones at the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) encompassing roughly 600 scoria cones as well as the San Francisco stratovolcano. Our goal is to analyse the even slight asymmetric shape of the scoria cones, and to generalize our findings. The area is a well-studied volcanic field, with a great number of available geological and geomorphological information, so comparing our PCT results with the data in literature is feasible. Polar coordinate transformation, being a one-to-one transformation, maps the original Cartesian coordinates (X, Y in meters) to radial distance (m) and azimuth (°) values. Our inputs were digitized polygons. We created images in the transformed coordinate system that clearly show the asymmetrical shape of the scoria cones. This asymmetry is found to be related to some extent to denudation, and to the age of the volcanic edifice that correlates with differential erosion. However, original asymmetries related to formation (e.g. rifting, emplacement on slope, eruption variations etc.) are also reasonable. The applied technique allows to define new derivatives of volcano-geomorphological parameters. The resultant scoria cone patterns have been manually categorized, however, the results are suitable for automated classification which is our next purpose. BSz contributed as an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow. Székely, B. & Karátson, D. (2004): DEM-based morphometry as a tool for reconstructing primary volcanic landforms: examples from the Börzsöny Mountains, Hungary, Geomorphology 63:25-37.

  19. Mechanisms of low-flux intraplate volcanic fields - Basin and Range and Northwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, G.; Hirano, N.

    2009-05-01

    Many fields of small-volume, scattered volcanoes that typically have alkaline affinities occur in intraplate settings. The underlying mechanisms of these intraplate volcanoes are enigmatic; they often do not correlate with anomalous heat sources or upwelling mantle (as in hot spots, mid-ocean ridges, and active continental rifts), or with fluids introduced by actively-subducting lithosphere. We compare the characteristics of two low volume-flux intraplate volcanic fields, one in a continental setting that is characterized by slow extension (western U.S.A.), and the other on the floor of the northwest Pacific Ocean in a region of plate flexure. The comparison supports an interpretation that the fundamental driving mechanism for low magma-flux volcanic fields, which episodically erupt scattered, small-volume volcanoes over millions of years, is regional-scale deformation of compositionally-heterogeneous upper mantle. Deformation serves to mechanically focus partial melts that might be present due to locally-depressed solidus temperatures caused by slightly higher volatile contents, creating sufficient melt buoyancy to trigger magma ascent via magma-driven fractures (dikes). The key role of deformation in collecting magmas and triggering dike ascent and eruption, without influx of new material or heat into the source region, supports the definition of such systems as tectonically-controlled, and is likely applicable at other low-flux, diffuse volcanic fields. Differences in the degree of fractionation and wall-rock contamination in the two fields is related to vertical variations in principal-stress orientation that may cause stalling of ascending dikes.

  20. The Auckland volcanic field, New Zealand: Geophysical evidence for structural and spatio-temporal relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, John; Locke, Corinne A.

    2010-08-01

    Geophysical data from the monogenetic Auckland volcanic field reveal complex structural and spatio-temporal relationships at different scales. The volcanic field is coincident with regional magnetic and gravity anomalies that mark a major crustal suture and with a discontinuity marking a significant structural asperity. Here, the linear regional magnetic anomaly splays into a wide band of NNW-trending lineaments, arising from serpentinised shear zones in the upper crust, that matches the extent of the volcanic field and that may reflect a region of crustal weakness creating preferential permeability. However, there appears to be no simple correlation between the locations of individual vents and these lineaments that might delineate more shallow structural controls with this orientation, probably as a consequence of other structural influences. High-resolution aeromagnetic data over the volcanic field show that the volcanoes have a wide range of magnetic signatures indicating a variability of subsurface structure. Scoria cone volcanoes typically have strong anomalies (up to several 100 nT) whilst tuff-ring volcanoes typically have weak anomalies (less than 50 nT), though the surface geology is not always an indicator of the nature and extent of the subsurface deposits. Both cone and tuff-ring volcanoes in the Auckland field appear to be underlain by subsurface bowl-shaped bodies of basalt, implying that their eruption histories commonly involve lava ponding into early excavated craters. The present geophysical data give no evidence for subsurface dyke-like structures or for substantial near-surface volumes of basaltic rocks where there are no known eruption centres or buried flows. Aeromagnetic and palaeomagnetic data suggest that a number of adjacent vents with an implied structural linkage may be contemporaneous, though other examples occur where vents of clearly different ages exploit the same apparent structure. A unique feature of the Auckland field is that at

  1. Navajo History to 1846: The Land and the People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acrey, Bill P.

    This textbook for high school, college, or adult readers covers major areas of Navajo history from prehistoric times to 1846 from the Navajo point of view. A brief description of pre-Navajo cultures including the Hohokam, Mogollon, and Anasazi precedes the more detailed history of the arrival of the Navajo and contact with the Pueblo peoples.…

  2. Some Remarks on Navajo Geometry and Piagetian Genetic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinxten, Rik

    1991-01-01

    Examines aspects of Navajo cosmology relevant to understanding Navajo spatial representations. Compares Navajo children's spatial knowledge with Piaget's findings about the development of geometric concepts in Swiss children. Describes classroom activities whereby Navajo children explore the geometry inherent in their cultural and physical…

  3. When Navajos Had Too Many Sheep: the 1940's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, George A.

    The book is the story of the Navajos during the decade of forced stock reduction on the Navajo Reservation. This decade was marked by confusion, frustration, and bitterness on the part of the Navajo Nation. It is of the 1940's, during which the Navajos faced their greatest crisis since their removal to military confinement from 1864 to 1868, that…

  4. Evolution of a magmatic system during continental extension: The Mount Taylor volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, F.V. ); Baldridge, W.S. ); DePaolo, D.J. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA ); Shafiqullah, M. )

    1990-11-10

    In this paper the authors present geologic mapping, K-Ar chronology, major and trace element data, mineral chemistry, and Nd, Sr, and O isotopic data for volcanic rocks of the Mount Taylor volcanic field (MTVF). The MTVF lies on the tectonic boundary between the Basin and Range province and the southeastern Colorado Plateau and is dominated by Mount Taylor, a composite volcano active from {approx}3 to 1.5 m.y. ago. Growth of the volcano began with eruption of rhyolite, followed by quartz latite and finally latite. Basalts erupted throughout the lifetime of the volcano. Rare mixing of evolved hy-hawaiite and rhyolite produced a few intermediate magmas, primarily in the early history of the field. Mixing may have occurred when rhyolite magmas in the lower crust ascended to upper crustal levels and were injected into the bases of mafic magma chambers. Small amounts of crustal assimilation accompanied fractional crystallization and affected all the evolved MTVF rocks. Assimilation/fractional crystallization occurred primarily in the lower crust as hy-hawaiite differentiated to mugearite or latite. Early in the history of the field, evolved lower crustal magmas ascended into the upper crust, where density filtering and a reduced tensional stress field inhibited further ascent until magmas evolved to rhyolite or quartz latite. Later in the history of the field, latite magmas ascended directly from the lower crust and erupted without further significant differentiation because of increased crustal extension.

  5. Assessments of aquifer sensitivity on Navajo Nation and adjacent lands and ground-water vulnerability to pesticide contamination on the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    or intermediate potential for contamination. About 6 percent of the study area was assessed to have the least potential for contamination, mostly in areas where the slope of the land surface is more than 12 percent. Nearly all fields on the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project were assessed to have the most potential for contamination. The assessment of ground-water vulnerability to pesticide contamination on the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project was based on pesticide application to various crops on part of the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project during 1997-99. The assessment indicated that ground water underlying fields of beans, wheat, barley, and alfalfa was most vulnerable to pesticide contamination; ground water underlying fields of corn and potatoes was intermediately vulnerable to pesticide contamination; and ground water underlying fields of hay was least vulnerable to pesticide contamination.

  6. Potential field and bathymetric investigation of the Monowai volcanic centre, Kermadec Arc: implications for caldera formation and volcanic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulatto, M.; Watts, A. B.; Peirce, C.

    2014-06-01

    The Monowai volcanic centre, located on the Tonga-Kermadec Arc, consists of a basaltic-andesitic submarine stratovolcano and adjacent caldera. Recent surveys have shown that it is active, but little is known about its structure and evolution. Here we present a combined analysis of swath bathymetry and potential field data from Monowai, acquired during cruise SO215 on the R/V Sonne, in 2011 April-June. The Monowai caldera is associated with a 20-25 mGal Bouguer gravity anomaly high and a broad positive magnetic anomaly. Short-wavelength magnetic anomalies of up to +1400 and -800 nT are observed along the caldera rim and on the summit of the stratovolcano. Inversion of the Bouguer gravity anomaly data shows that the caldera high is caused by a buried dense body consisting of a main unit extending from 3 to 6 km depth, and a shallower ring structure that underlies the rim of Monowai caldera and extends from the seafloor to the top of the main unit. We estimate the average density contrast to be about +450 kg m-3, corresponding to a density of 2650-2850 kg m-3, suggesting a mafic composition. The ring structure is interpreted as set of ring dykes and the main unit as a solidified or partly solidified magma chamber system (the Monowai pluton). The volume of the main unit is estimated to be 200-300 km3. The observed magnetic anomalies are consistent with magmatic intrusion within the Bruhnes magnetic polarity. Analysis of the swath bathymetry data shows that Monowai is located inside a 20-km-wide graben, part of an en-echelon, left-stepping horst and graben system that spans the length of the arc and backarc. The Monowai caldera is elongated perpendicular to the direction of rifting, suggesting that it is affected by the regional stress regime. Geomorphological analysis suggests that the caldera consists of a single collapse structure and that its complex shape and multiple ring faults can be attributed to prolonged activity and multiple collapse episodes. It remains

  7. Seismic and GPS constraints on the dynamics and kinematics of the Yellowstone volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. B.; Farrell, J.; Jordan, M.; Puskas, C.; Waite, G. P.

    2007-12-01

    The seismically and volcanically Yellowstone hotspot resulted from interaction of a mantle plume with the overriding North America plate. This feature and related processes have modified continental lithosphere producing the Yellowstone-Snake River Plain-Newberry silicic volcanic field (YSRPN) system, with its NE volcanically active Yellowstone volcanic field. The size and accessibility of the Yellowstone area has allowed a range of geophysical experiments including earthquake monitoring and seismic and GPS imaging of this system. Seismicity is dominated by small-magnitude normal- to oblique-slip faulting earthquake swarms with shallow focal depths, maximum of ~5 km, restricted by high temperatures and a weak elastic layer. There is developing evidence of non-double couple events. Outside the caldera, earthquakes are deeper, ~20 km, and capable of M 7+ earthquakes. We integrate the results from a multi-institution experiment that recorded data from 110 seismic stations and 180 GPS stations for 1999-2004. The tomographic images confirm the existence of a low Vp-body beneath the Yellowstone caldera at depths greater than 8 km, possibly representing hot, crystallizing magma. A key result of our study is a volume of anomalously low Vp and Vp/Vs in the northwestern part of the volcanic field at shallow depths of <2.0 km. Theoretical calculations of changes in P- to S-wave velocity ratios indicate that these anomalies can be interpreted as porous, gas-filled rock. GPS-measured episodes of caldera kinematics reveals uplift and subsidence of the caldera at decadal scales with average rates of ~20 mm/yr but much higher short-term rates of up to 70 mm/yr of accelerated uplift, 2004-2007. The stress field inverted from seismic and GPS data is dominated by regional SW extension with superimposed volumetric expansion and uplift from local volcanic sources. Mantle tomography derived from integrated inversion of teleseismic and local earthquake data constrained by geoid, crustal

  8. Navajo Leadership and Government: A History. Sixth-Ninth Grade Navajo Bilingual-Bicultural Social Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, T. L.; Wallace, Stephen

    This history of Navajo leadership and government, part of the sixth-ninth grade Navajo bilingual-bicultural social studies curriculum from the Navajo Curriculum Centers, covers types of government from the animal leaders of Navajo legend to modern times. The text is divided into five chapters: "The First Leaders,""New Neighbors--New…

  9. Paleomagnetism and Tectonic Interpretations of the Taos Plateau Volcanic Field, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Laurie L.; Caffall, Nancy M.; Golombek, Matthew P.

    1993-01-01

    The tectonic response of the Taos Plateau volcanic field in the southern San Luis basin to the late stage extensional environment of the Rio Grande rift was investigated using paleomagnetic techniques. Sixty-two sites (533 samples) of Pliocene volcanic units were collected covering four major rock types with ages of 4.7 to 1.8 Ma. Twenty-two of these sites were from stratigraphic sections of the lower, middle and upper Servilleta Basalt collected in the Rio Grande gorge at two locations 19 km apart. Flows from the lower and middle members in the southern gorge record reversed polarities, while those in Garapata Canyon are normal with an excursion event in the middle of the sequence. The uppermost flows of the upper member at both sites display normal directions. Although these sections correlate chemically, they seem to represent different magnetic time periods during the Gilbert Reversed-Polarity Chiron. Alternating field demagnetization, aided by principal component analysis, yields 55 sites with stable directions representing both normal and reversed polarities, and five sites indicating transitional fields. Mean direction of the normal and inverted reversed sites is I=49.3 deg. and D=356.7 deg. (alpha(sub 95)=3.6 deg). Angular dispersion of the virtual geomagnetic poles is 16.3 deg, which is consistent with paleosecular variation model G, fit to data from the past 5 m.y. Comparison with the expected direction indicates no azimuthal rotation of the Taos Plateau volcanic field; inclination flattening for the southern part of the plateau is 8.3 deg +/- 5.3 deg. Previous paleomagnelic data indicate 10 deg- 15 deg counterclockwise rotation of die Espanola block to the south over the past 5 m.y. The data suggest the Taos Plateau volcanic field, showing no rotation and some flattening in the south and east, has acted as a stable buttress and has been downwarped by overriding of the southeastern end of the plateau by the Picuris Mountains, which make up the northern

  10. The Maars of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field: the Example of 'laguna Pizatal'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Hernandez-Cardona, A.; Alvarez del Castillo, E.; Godinez, M.

    2013-12-01

    Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field (TVF), also known as Los Tuxtlas massif, is a structure of volcanic rocks rising conspicuously in the south-central part of the coastal plains of eastern Mexico. The TVF seems related to the upper cretaceous magmatism of the NW part of the Gulf's margin (e.g. San Carlos and Sierra de Tamaulipas alkaline complexes) rather than to the nearby Mexican Volcanic Belt. The volcanism in this field began in late Miocene and has continued in historical times, The TVF is composed of 4 large volcanoes (San Martin Tuxtla, San Martin Pajapan, Santa Marta, Cerro El Vigia), at least 365 volcanic cones and 43 maars. In this poster we present the distribution of the maars, their size and depths. These maars span from a few hundred km to almost 1 km in average diameter, and a few meters to several tens of meters in depth; most of them filled with lakes. As an example on the nature of these structures we present our results of the ongoing study of 'Laguna Pizatal or Pisatal' (18° 33'N, 95° 16.4'W, 428 masl) located some 3 km from the village of Reforma, on the western side of San Martin Tuxtla volcano. Laguna Pisatal is a maar some 500 meters in radius and a depth about 40 meters from the surrounding ground level. It is covered by a lake 200 m2 in extent fed by a spring discharging on its western side. We examined a succession of 15 layers on the margins of the maar, these layers are blast deposits of different sizes interbedded by surge deposits. Most of the contacts between layers are irregular; which suggests scouring during deposition of the upper beds. This in turn suggests that the layers were deposited in a rapid series of explosions, which mixed juvenile material with fragments of the preexisting bedrock. We were unable to find the extent of these deposits since the surrounding areas are nowadays sugar cane plantations and the lake has overspilled in several occassions.

  11. Final Report - Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project - FY2004

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth L. Craig, Interim General Manager

    2007-03-31

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year projects which addresses the needs of unserved Navajo Nation residents without basic electricity services. The Navajo Nation is the United States' largest tribe, in terms of population and land. An estimated 18,000 Navajo Nation homes do not have basic grid-tied electricity--and this third year of funding, known as NEDP-3, provided 351 power line extensions to Navajo families.

  12. Cross-arc geochemical variations in volcanic fields in Honduras C.A.: progressive changes in source with distance from the volcanic front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patino, Lina C.; Carr, Michael J.; Feigenson, Mark D.

    A geochemical traverse across Honduras reveals the heterogeneity of the mantle underneath Central America. Alkali basalts from Lake Yojoa (170km behind the front) have low 87Sr/86Sr but high La/Yb, and elevated incompatible trace element abundances, consistent with derivation from a normal mid-ocean ridge basalt source mantle via low degrees of melting. These lavas lack evidence for an enriched source thought to be intermingled with normal mid-ocean ridge basalt source mantle beneath most of Central America. The amplitude of the subducted slab signature decreases smoothly with distance from the volcanic front. Lavas from Zacate Grande, the area nearest to the volcanic front (17 km behind the arc), display large ion lithophile element enrichment and high field strength element depletion indicating the involvement of subducted material in magma genesis. Components of subducted material are not evident in lavas from Lake Yojoa, the area furthest from the arc. Basalts and basaltic andesites from Tegucigalpa, 102 km behind the volcanic front, are geochemically intermediate between those of Lake Yojoa and Zacate Grande. The lavas from Tegucigalpa show a decreased influence of the subduction component, and are affected by assimilation-fractional crystallization processes at shallow depths. The gradual decrease in the subducted component from the volcanic front to Zacate Grande, Tegucigalpa and finally Lake Yojoa contrasts with the abrupt decrease documented for southeast Guatemala, the only other area in Central America where a cross-arc transect has been studied.

  13. Mafic monogenetic vents at the Descabezado Grande volcanic field (35.5°S-70.8°W): the northernmost evidence of regional primitive volcanism in the Southern Volcanic Zone of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Pablo A.; Rabbia, Osvaldo M.; Hernández, Laura B.; Ruprecht, Philipp

    2016-06-01

    In the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), the broad distribution of mafic compositions along the recent volcanic arc occurs mainly south of 37°S, above a comparatively thin continental crust (≤~35 km) and mostly associated with the dextral strike-slip regime of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ). North of 36°S, mafic compositions are scarce. This would be in part related to the effect resulting from protracted periods of trapping of less evolved ascending magmas beneath a thick Meso-Cenozoic volcano-sedimentary cover that lead to more evolved compositions in volcanic rocks erupted at the surface. Here, we present whole-rock and olivine mineral chemistry data for mafic rocks from four monogenetic vents developed above a SVZ segment of thick crust (~45 km) in the Descabezado Grande volcanic field (~35.5°S). Whole-rock chemistry (MgO > 8 wt%) and compositional variations in olivine (92 ≥ Fo ≥ 88 and Ni up to ~3650 ppm) indicate that some of the basaltic products erupted through these vents (e.g., Los Hornitos monogenetic cones) represent primitive arc magmas reaching high crustal levels. The combined use of satellite images, regional data analysis and field observations allow to recognize at least 38 mafic monogenetic volcanoes dispersed over an area of about 5000 km2 between 35.5° and 36.5°S. A link between ancient structures inherited from pre-Andean tectonics and the emplacement and distribution of this mafic volcanism is suggested as a first-order structural control that may explain the widespread occurrence of mafic volcanism in this Andean arc segment with thick crust.

  14. Possible earthquake precursor and drumbeat signal detected at the Nirano Mud Volcanic Field, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Matteo; Suski Ricci, Barbara; Kenkel, Johannes; Ricci, Tullio; Fuchs, Florian; Miller, Stephen A.; Kemna, Andreas; Conventi, Marzia

    2016-04-01

    We used the Nirano mud volcanic field as a natural laboratory to test pre- and post-seismic effects generated by distant earthquakes. Mud volcanoes are geological systems often characterized by elevated fluid pressures at depth deviating from hydrostatic conditions. This near-critical state makes mud volcanoes particularly sensitive to external forcing induced by natural or man-made perturbations. We first characterized the subsurface structure of the Nirano mud volcanic field with a geoelectrical study. Next, we deployed a broad-band seismic station to understand the typical seismic signal generated at depth. Seismic records show a background noise below 2 s, sometimes interrupted by pulses of drumbeat-like high-frequency signals lasting from several minutes to hours. Drumbeat signal was previously discovered in geysers and at magmatic volcanoes. To date this is the first observation of drumbeat signal observed in mud volcanoes. In 2013 June we recorded a M4.7 earthquake, that occurred approximately 60 km far from our seismic station. According to empirical estimations the Nirano mud volcanic field should not have been affected by the M4.7 earthquake. Yet, before the seismic event we recorded an increasing amplitude of the signal in the 10-20 Hz frequency band. The signal emerged approximately two hours before the earthquake and lasted for about three hours. We performed an analysis of the 95th percentile of the root mean square amplitude of the waveforms for the day of the earthquake. This statistical analysis suggests the presence of a possible precursory signal about 10 minutes before the earthquake indicating the occurrence of enhanced fluid flow in the subsurface that may be related to pressure build up in the preparation zone of the earthquake.

  15. Earth's Largest Terrestrial Landslide (The Markagunt Gravity Slide of Southwest Utah): Insights from the Catastrophic Collapse of a Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, D. B.; Biek, R. F.; Rowley, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    The newly discovered Miocene Markagunt gravity slide (MGS; Utah, USA) represents the largest volcanic landslide structure on Earth. Recent geologic mapping of the MGS indicates that it was a large contiguous volcanic sheet of allochthonous andesitic mudflow breccias and lava flows, volcaniclastic rocks, and intertonguing regional ash-flow tuffs that blanketed an area of at least 5000 km2 with an estimated volume of ~3000 km3. From its breakaway zone in the Tushar and Mineral Mountains to its southern limits, the MGS is over 95 km long and at least 65 km wide. The MGS consists of four distinct structural segments: 1) a high-angle breakaway segment, 2) a bedding-plane segment, ~60 km long and ~65 km wide, typically located within the volcaniclastic Eocene-Oligocene Brian Head Formation, 3) a ramp segment ~1-2 km wide where the slide cuts upsection, and 4) a former land surface segment where the upper-plate moved at least 35 km over the Miocene landscape. The presence of basal and lateral cataclastic breccias, clastic dikes, jigsaw puzzle fracturing, internal shears, pseudotachylytes, and the overall geometry of the MGS show that it represents a single catastrophic emplacement event. The MGS represents gravitationally induced collapse of the southwest sector of the Oligocene to Miocene Marysvale volcanic field. We suggest that continuous growth of the Marysvale volcanic field, loading more volcanic rocks on a structurally weak Brian Head basement, created conditions necessary for gravity sliding. In addition, inflation of the volcanic pile due to multiple magmatic intrusions tilted the strata gently southward, inducing lateral spreading of the sub-volcanic rocks prior to failure. Although similar smaller-scale failures have been recognized from individual volcanoes, the MGS represents a new class of low frequency but high impact hazards associated with catastrophic sector collapse of large volcanic fields containing multiple volcanoes. The relationship of the MGS to

  16. Scaling laws of the size-distribution of monogenetic volcanoes within the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-López, R.; Legrand, D.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Rodríguez-Pascua, M. A.; Giner-Robles, J. L.

    2011-04-01

    The Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field displays about 1040 monogenetic volcanoes mainly composed of basaltic cinder cones. This monogenetic volcanic field is the consequence of a dextral transtensive tectonic regime within the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), the largest intra continental volcanic arc around the world, related to the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates underneath the North American Plate. We performed a statistical analysis for the size-distribution of the basal diameter (Wco) for cinder cones. Dataset used here was compiled by Hasenaka and Carmichael (1985). Monogenetic volcanoes obey a power-law very similar to the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes, with respect to their size-distribution: log 10 ( N >= Wco ) = α - β log10( Wco), with β = 5.01 and α = 2.98. Therefore, the monogenetic volcanoes exhibit a (Wco) size-distribution empirical power-law, suggesting a self-organized criticality phenomenon.

  17. The Satah Mountain and Baldface Mountain Volcanic Fields, Chilcotin Highland, West-Central British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, C.; Guest, B.

    2012-12-01

    A large number of volcanic features, including stratovolcanoes, cinder cones, domes, flows and erosional remnants of these exist in the Satah Mountain Volcanic Field (SMVF) and Baldface Mountain Volcanic Fields (BMVF), located near the Itcha Ranges in the Chilcotin Highland of west-central British Columbia. Petrographical, geochemical and geochronological studies are hoped to clarify the volcano-tectonic association of these fields and their relation with the nearby Anahim Volcanic Belt (AVB) and possibly provide a confirmation for the hot-spot that has been proposed as the source of magmatism in the area from the mid-Miocene to the Holocene. During field work, 20 centres in the SMVF aligned on a NNW-SSE trending topographic high and seven centres in the BMVF were studied with a focus on geochemistry and ages of the lavas erupted. With the exception of Satah Mountain, the most prominent and best-preserved edifice, individual centres are generally small in height (200-300 m) and volume. There is clear evidence for glacial modification of edifices, which likely removed most of the once-existing pyroclastic material, and water-magma interaction could be observed at one centre as well. Extensive coverage by glacial till limits outcrops to cliffs on the edifices' flanks or to local "windows" in the Quaternary deposits. This makes stratigraphic relationships, both within the fields and the surrounding volcanic rocks of the Anahim Volcanic Belt (AVB) and Chilcotin Flood Basalts (CFB), unclear. Preliminary XRF results indicate a high variability of the lavas, even between centres close to each other. Erupted lavas range from undersaturated basanites (44 wt% SiO2), trachybasalts and trachytes to high-alkali phonolites (14 wt% Na2O+K2O). In general, larger structures in the SMVF appear to have erupted more evolved rocks whereas smaller centres, often just remnants of plugs and necks, and centres in the BMVF erupted more primitive rocks. In addition, whole-rock ages were

  18. Geologic map of the Simcoe Mountains Volcanic Field, Main Central Segment, Yakama Nation, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Lava compositions other than various types of basalt are uncommon here. Andesite is abundant on and around Mount Adams but is very rare east of the Klickitat River. The only important nonbasaltic composition in the map area is rhyolite, which crops out in several patches around the central highland of the volcanic field, mainly in the upper canyons of Satus and Kusshi Creeks and Wilson Charley canyon. Because the rhyolites were some of the earliest lavas erupted here, they are widely concealed by later basalts and therefore crop out only in local windows eroded by canyons that cut through the overlying basalts.

  19. Raton-Clayton Volcanic Field magmatism in the context of the Jemez Lineament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Pontbriand, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Raton-Clayton Volcanic Field (RCVF) was active from 9 Ma to approximately 50 Ka and stretches from Raton, New Mexico in the west to Clayton, New Mexico in the east. The field occurs in the Great Plains at the northeastern end of the Jemez Lineament, a major crustal feature and focus of volcanism that extends southwest to the Colorado Plateau in Arizona and encompasses five other major volcanic fields. Jemez Lineament magmatism is temporally related to Rio Grande Rift magmatism, though it extends NE and SW from the rift itself, and it has been suggested that it represents an ancient crustal suture that serves as a conduit for magmatism occurring beneath the larger region of north and central New Mexico (Magnani et al., 2004, GEOL SOC AM BULL, 116:7/8, pp. 1-6). This study extends our work into the RCVF from prior and ongoing work in the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, where we identified different mantle sources with varying degrees of subduction alteration and we determined some of the crustal processes that contribute to the diversity of magma chemistry and eruptive styles there (e.g., AGU Fall Meeting, abst. #V43D-2884 and #V43D-2883). In the RCVF, we are analyzing multiple phases by electron microprobe and plagioclase phenocrysts and glomerocrysts by LA-ICPMS for Sr isotopes and trace elements. We are undertaking this investigation with the following goals: (1) to evaluate previous magma mixing and crustal assimilation models for Sierra Grande andesites (Zhu, 1995, unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Rice University; Hesse, 1999, unpublished M.S. thesis, Northern Arizona University); (2) to evaluate subduction-modified mantle as the source for RCVF basanites (specifically those at Little Grande); and (3) to assess the possible role of deep crustal cumulates in buffering transitional basalts. In the larger context, these data will be used to evaluate the varying degree of subduction-modification and the effect of crustal thickness on magmatism along the Jemez

  20. Combined absolute and relative gravity measurement for microgravity monitoring in Aso volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofyan, Yayan; Nishijima, Jun; Yoshikawa, Shin; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro; Kagiyama, Tsuneomi; Fukuda, Yoichi

    2014-05-01

    Absolute measurement with a portable A10-017 absolute gravimeter at some benchmarks in the Aso volcanic field are valuable for reducing uncertainties of regional gravity variations and will be useful for delineating the long term trends of gravity changes. A10 absolute gravimeter is a new generation of portable absolute instrument and has accuracy 10 microGal. To further the development of a high precision gravity data, we also conducted measurement using two relative gravimeter (Scintrex CG-5 [549] and LaCoste type G-1016) to be combined with an A10 absolute gravimeter. The using absolute gravimeter along with relative gravimeter can reduce drift correction factor and improve the result of gravity change data in microgravity monitoring. Microgravity monitoring is a valued tool for mapping the redistribution of subsurface mass and for assessing changes in the fluid as a dynamic process in volcanic field. Gravity changes enable the characterization of subsurface processes: i.e., the mass of the intrusion or hydrothermal flow. A key assumption behind gravity monitoring is that changes in earth's gravity reflect mass-transport processes at depth [1]. The absolute gravity network was installed at seven benchmarks using on May 2010, which re-occupied in October 2010, and June 2011. The relative gravity measurements were performed at 28 benchmarks in one month before the eruption on May 2011 and then followed by series of gravity monitoring after the eruption in every three to five months. Gravity measurements covered the area more than 60 km2 in the west side of Aso caldera. Some gravity benchmarks were measured using both absolute and relative gravimeter and is used as the reference benchmarks. In longer time period, the combined gravity method will improve the result of gravity change data for monitoring in the Aso volcanic field. As a result, the gravity changes detected the hydrothermal flow in the subsurface which has a correlation to water level fluctuation in the

  1. Geochemical and Isotopic Evidences of the Magmatic Sources in the Eastern Sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt: Xihuingo-Chichicuautla Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadez, S.; Martinez-serrano, R.; Juarez-Lopez, K.; Solis-Pichardo, G.; Perez-Arvizu, O.

    2011-12-01

    The study of magmatism in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) has great importance due to several features such as its obliquity with respect to the Middle American Trench and its petrological and geochemical variability, which are not common in most typical volcanic arcs. Although several papers have contributed significantly to the understanding of most important magmatic processes in this province, there are still several questions such as the characterization of magmatic sources. In the present work, we provide new stratigraphic, petrographic, geochemical and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic data as well as some K-Ar age determinations from the Xihuingo-Chichicuautla volcanic field (XCVF), located at the eastern part of the TMVB, with the aim to identify the magmatic sources that produced the main volcanic rocks. The volcanic structures in the XCVF are divided in two main groups according to the petrographic and geochemical compositions: 1) dacitic domes, andesitic lava flows and some dacitic-rhyolitic ignimbrites and 2) scoria cones, shield volcanoes and associated lava flows of basalt to basaltic-andesite composition. Distribution of most volcanic structures is probably controlled by NE-SW fault and fractures system. This fault system was studied by other authors who established that volcanic activity started ca. 13.5 Ma ago, followed by a volcanic hiatus of ca. 10 Ma, and the late volcanic activity began ca. 3 to 1 Ma. In this work we dated 2 rock samples by K-Ar method, which yielded ages of 402 and 871 Ka, which correspond to the most recent volcanic activity in this study area. The volcanic rocks of the XCVF display compositions from basalts to rhyolites but in general all rocks show trace element patterns typical of magmatic arcs. However, we can identify two main magmatic sources: a depleted magmatic source represented by dacitic-andesitic rocks which present a LILE enrichment with respect to HFSE indicating that a magmatic source was modified by fluids

  2. Final Report Navajo Transmission Project (NTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Bennie Hoisington; Steven Begay

    2006-09-14

    The Diné Power Authority is developing the Navajo Transmission Project (NTP) to relieve the constraints on the transmission of electricity west of the Four Corners area and to improve the operation flexibility and reliability of the extra-high-voltage transmission system in the region. The NTP creates the wholesale transmission capacity for more economical power transfers, sales, and purchases in the region. It will facilitate the development of Navajo energy resources, improve economic conditions on the Navajo Nation as well as allow DPA to participate in the western electrical utility industry.

  3. The Puelche volcanic field: Extensive Pleistocene rhyolite lava flows in the Andes of central Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, W.; Fierstein, J.; Godoy, E.; Drake, Robert E.; Singer, B.

    1999-01-01

    A remote volcanic field in the rugged headwaters of the Rio Puelche and Rio Invernada (35.8??S) constitutes the largest cluster of Quaternary rhyolite lava flows yet identified in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone. The Puelche Volcanic Field belongs to an intra-arc belt of silicic magmatic centers that extends, at least, 140 km north-south and lies well east of the volcanic front but nonetheless considerably west of the intraplate extensional fields of basaltic and alkaline centers of pampean Argentina. The authors' mapping has distinguished one shallow intrusive mass of early Pleistocene biotite rhyodacite (70.5% SiO2), 11 eruptive units of mid-Pleistocene high-K biotite-rhyolite lava (71.3-75.6% SiO2), and 4 eruptive units of basaltic andesite (53.95-4.9% SiO2), the conduits of which cut some of the rhyolites. Basal contacts of the rhyolite lava flows (and subjacent pyroclastic precursors) are generally scree covered, but glacial erosion has exposed internal flow structures and lithologic zonation superbly. Thicknesses of individual rhyolite lava flows range from 75 m to 400 m. Feeders for several units are well exposed. Cliff-draping unconformities and intracanyon relationships among the 11 rhyolite units show that the eruptive sequence spanned at least one glacial episode that accentuated the local relief. Lack of ice-contact features suggests, however, that all or most eruptions took place during non-glacial intervals probably between 400 ka and 100 ka. Post-eruptive glacial erosion reduced the rhyolites to several non-contiguous remnants that altogether cover 83 km2 and represent a surviving volume of about 21 km3. Consideration of slopes, lava thicknesses, and paleotopography suggest that the original area and volume were each about three times greater. Phenocryst content of the rhyolites ranges from 1 to 12%, with plagioclase>>biotite>FeTi oxides in all units and amphibole conspicuous in the least silicic. The chemically varied basaltic andesites range from

  4. Preliminary isostatic gravity map of the Sonoma volcanic field and vicinity, Sonoma and Napa Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Roberts, C.W.; McCabe, C.A.; McPhee, D.K.; Tilden, J.E.; Jachens, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    This isostatic residual gravity map is part of a three-dimensional mapping effort focused on the subsurface distribution of rocks of the Sonoma volcanic field in Napa and Sonoma counties, northern California. This map will serve as a basis for modeling the shapes of basins beneath the Santa Rosa Plain and Napa and Sonoma Valleys, and for determining the location and geometry of faults within the area. Local spatial variations in the Earth's gravity field (after accounting for variations caused by elevation, terrain, and deep crustal structure explained below) reflect the distribution of densities in the mid to upper crust. Densities often can be related to rock type, and abrupt spatial changes in density commonly mark lithologic boundaries. High-density basement rocks exposed within the northern San Francisco Bay area include those of the Mesozoic Franciscan Complex and Great Valley Sequence present in the mountainous areas of the quadrangle. Alluvial sediment and Tertiary sedimentary rocks are characterized by low densities. However, with increasing depth of burial and age, the densities of these rocks may become indistinguishable from those of basement rocks. Tertiary volcanic rocks are characterized by a wide range in densities, but, on average, are less dense than the Mesozoic basement rocks. Isostatic residual gravity values within the map area range from about -41 mGal over San Pablo Bay to about 11 mGal near Greeg Mountain 10 km east of St. Helena. Steep linear gravity gradients are coincident with the traces of several Quaternary strike-slip faults, most notably along the West Napa fault bounding the west side of Napa Valley, the projection of the Hayward fault in San Pablo Bay, the Maacama Fault, and the Rodgers Creek fault in the vicinity of Santa Rosa. These gradients result from juxtaposing dense basement rocks against thick Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks.

  5. First-order estimate of the Canary Islands plate-scale stress field: Implications for volcanic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, A.; Martí, J.; Villaseñor, A.

    2016-06-01

    In volcanic areas, the existing stress field is a key parameter controlling magma generation, location and geometry of the magmatic plumbing systems and the distribution of the resulting volcanism at surface. Therefore, knowing the stress configuration in the lithosphere at any scale (i.e. local, regional and plate-scale) is fundamental to understand the distribution of volcanism and, subsequently, to interpret volcanic unrest and potential tectonic controls of future eruptions. The objective of the present work is to provide a first-order estimate of the plate-scale tectonic stresses acting on the Canary Islands, one of the largest active intraplate volcanic regions of the World. In order to obtain the orientation of the minimum and maximum horizontal compressive stresses, we perform a series of 2D finite element models of plate scale kinematics assuming plane stress approximation. Results obtained are used to develop a regional model, which takes into account recognized archipelago-scale structural discontinuities. Maximum horizontal compressive stress directions obtained are compared with available stress, geological and geodynamic data. The methodology used may be easily applied to other active volcanic regions, where a first order approach of their plate/regional stresses can be essential information to be used as input data for volcanic hazard assessment models.

  6. Short-time electrical effects during volcanic eruption: Experiments and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Ralf; Zimanowski, Bernd; Röder, Helmut

    2000-02-01

    Laboratory experiments on the fragmentation and expansion of magmatic melt have been performed using remelted volcanic rock at magmatic temperatures as magma simulant. A specially designed dc amplifier in combination with high speed data recording was used to detect short-time electrostatic field effects related to the fragmentation and expansion history of the experimental system, as documented by simultaneous force and pressure recording, as well as by high-speed cinematography. It was found that (1) the voltage-time ratio of electrostatic field gradients (100 to 104 V/s) reflects different physical mechanisms of fragmentation and expansion and (2) the maximum voltage measured in 1 m distance (-0.1 to -180 V) can be correlated with the intensity of the respective processes. Based on these experimental results, a field method was developed and tested at Stromboli volcano in Italy. A 0.8 m rod antenna was used to detect the dc voltage against local ground (i.e., the electrostatic field gradient), at a distance of 60 to 260 m from the respective vent. Upwind position of the detection site was chosen to prevent interference caused by contact of charged ash particles with the antenna. A standard 8 Hz geophone was used to detect the accompanying seismicity. Three types of volcanic activity occurred during the surveillance operation; two of these could be clearly related to specific electrical and seismical signals. A typical delay time was found between the electrical and the seismical signal, corresponding to the seismic velocity within the crater deposits. Using a simple first-order electrostatic model, the field measurements were recalibrated to the laboratory scale. Comparison of field and laboratory data at first approximation revealed striking similarities, thus encouraging the further development of this technique for real-time surveillance operation at active volcanoes.

  7. Morphometric and morphological development of Holocene cinder cones: A field and remote sensing study in the Tolbachik volcanic field, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbar, Moshe; Gilichinsky, Michael; Melekestsev, Ivan; Melnikov, Dmitry; Zaretskaya, Natasha

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of landscape over time is a central aspect of geological, paleogeographical and geomorphological studies. Volcanic features like cinder cones offer the opportunity to monitor the processes and development of the landscape. Cinder cones are perhaps the simplest and most common volcanic landforms in the world. Morphological and morphometric study of cinder cones has proven an efficient tool for determining their relative dates, and the erosional processes affecting them. The extensive Kamchatka volcanic province (Russian Far East), with its large Tolbachik cinder cone field, is an excellent case study for spatial and temporal classification and calibration of changes in morphometric values with time. We show how the morphological and morphometric values of the monogenetic cinder cones, measured in the field and by digital elevation models, can be used to validate their age and erosional processes. Field data were GPS measurements of cinder cones formed at the Tolbachik 1975-1976 eruption and of Holocene cinder cones; erosion processes on the cinder cones and lava flows were identified and evaluated. For every studied cinder cone morphometric parameters were assessed on the basis of remotely sensed data and digital elevation model. Morphometric measurements were taken of cone height and slope and average axis diameter and the height-width ratio was obtained. The comparison of morphometric parameters calculated from ASTER DEM and topographic map clearly supports the concept of relative morphometric dating as the most recent cinder cones are always associated with the highest slopes and h/W ratio. The measured morphometric values of the recent Tolbachik cinder cones are valuable benchmark data for determining erosion rates, such as the measured values for the Paricutin cone in Mexico after the 1943 eruption. The variability of the morphometric values of the recent cinder cones is due to their lithological coarse composition. A comparison with the older

  8. The `Strawberry Volcanic Field' of Northeastern Oregon: Another Piece of the CRB Puzzle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Mid to Late Miocene Strawberry Volcanics field (SVF) located along the southern margin of the John Day valley of NE Oregon, comprise a diverse group of volcanic rocks ranging from basalt to rhyolite. The main outcrop area of the SVF (3,400 km2) is bordered by units from the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), with the main CRB units to the north, the Picture Gorge Basalt to the east and Steens Basalt to the south. The geographic position and age of the Strawberry Volcanics make a genetic relationship to CRB volcanism likely, yet little is known about this diverse volcanic field. This research aims at refining the stratigraphic and age relationships as well as the petrology and geochemistry of magmas associated with the SVF. Previous investigations (e.g. Robyn, 1977) found that the SVF was active between 20 to 10 Ma with the main pulse largely being coeval with the 15 Ma CRBG eruptions. Lavas and tuffs from the SVF are calc-alkaline with low FeO*/MgO (~ 2.56 wt. %), high Al2O3 (~ 16.4 wt. %), low TiO2 (~ 1.12 wt.%), and span the entire compositional range from basalt to rhyolite (47-78 wt. % SiO2) with andesite as the dominant lithology. Basaltic lavas from the SVF have compositional affinities to earlier Steens Basalt, and some trace element concentrations and ratios are indistinguishable from those of CRBG lavas (e.g. Zr, Ba, Sr, and Ce/Y). Andesites are calc-alkaline, but contrary to typical arc (orogenic) andesites, SVF andesites are exceedingly phenocryst poor (<3% phenocrysts with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and lesser pyroxene which occasionally occur in crystal clots instead of single crystals). In addition, some lavas (basaltic-intermediate) are phenocryst-rich (~25%), containing plagioclase, olivine, opx, and cpx. However, phenocrysts in these lavas are strongly zoned and resorbed, and in general, these lavas are volumetrically insignificant compared with the phenocrysts poor andesites. Rhyolitic lavas are also phenocryst poor (< 3%) and appear to

  9. Analysis of the Magmatic - Hydrothermal volcanic field of Tacora Volcano, northern Chile, using passive seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavez Orrego, Claudia; Comte, Diana; Gutierrez, Francisco; Gaytan, Diego

    2016-04-01

    The results of a passive seismic tomography developed in the Tacora Volcano, northern Chile, are presented. In this area, the main thermal manifestations are fumarolic fields mainly distributed in the western flank of the volcano. Around the volcanic area were installed 17 short period seismic stations, between August and December, 2014. Using the P and S wave arrival times of the seismicity record, a 3D velocity model was determined through a passive seismic tomography. For a better visualization of low and high velocity anomalies, the Leapfrog Viewer Software has been used. The areas of high Vp /Vs values, located directly under the volcanic chain, are interpreted as fluid-saturated areas, corresponding to the recharge zone of the hydrothermal system. Meanwhile, low Vp /Vs values represent the location of a magmatic reservoir and circulation networks of magmatic-hydrothermal fluids. The final model it was contrasted with available geochemical information showing a match between the low Vp/Vs areas (magma reservoirs / hydrothermal fluids), fumarolic fields and surface hydrothermal alteration. Finally, we present a cluster analysis using the percentage variation of %dVp, with which we have found a method for the identification of clay level areas related with the intermediate values of Vp/Vs (1.70 - 1.75) and the degassification zones.

  10. Sediment-enriched adakitic magmas from the Daisen volcanic field, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feineman, Maureen; Moriguti, Takuya; Yokoyama, Tetsuya; Terui, Sakiko; Nakamura, Eizo

    2013-08-01

    The Quaternary Southwest Japan Arc is a product of subduction of the hot, young Philippine Sea Plate beneath the Eurasian Continental Plate. The magmas erupted from the Southwest Japan Arc belong to a category of magmas commonly referred to as "adakites" or "adakitic magmas". These magmas show trace element evidence for interaction with garnet at depth, and may be associated with partial melting of subducted altered oceanic crust. Also found throughout the southern Sea of Japan region are alkali basalts with little apparent connection to the subduction zone. We have determined major element, trace element, and Sr, Nd, Pb, and U-Th isotopic compositions for a bimodal suite of lavas erupted at the Daisen volcanic field in the Southwest Japan Arc. These magmas consist of mildly alkaline basalts and a calcalkaline intermediate suite, separated by a ˜10 wt.% silica gap. The intermediate magmas show trace element and isotopic evidence for interaction with garnet, consistent with partial melting of the hot, young (˜20 Ma) Philippine Sea Plate. The Daisen intermediate magmas are distinct from other adakitic magmas in their radiogenic isotopic characteristics, consistent with a significant contribution (˜25%) from subducted Nankai Trough sediments. Our data suggest that the basalts erupted at the Daisen volcanic field are not parental to the intermediate magmas, and contain a small contribution of EM1-like mantle common in Sea of Japan alkali basalts but not apparent in the Daisen intermediate magmas.

  11. Kinaalda: The Pathway to Navajo Womanhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Danita Begay

    1988-01-01

    Presents a personal account of the Navajo ceremony of Kinaalda, performed when a girl reaches puberty. Describes ceremonial running, corn grinding, and grooming, and admonitions and blessings received from grandmother, elderly women of the tribe, and medicine man. (SV)

  12. Multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity and epithermal mineralization in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and their relations to magmatic activity, volcanism and regional extension

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Jackson, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic rocks of middle Miocene age and underlying pre-Mesozoic sedimentary rocks host widely distributed zones of hydrothermal alteration and epithermal precious metal, fluorite and mercury deposits within and peripheral to major volcanic and intrusive centers of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF) in southern Nevada, near the southwestern margin of the Great Basin of the western United States. Radiometric ages indicate that episodes of hydrothermal activity mainly coincided with and closely followed major magmatic pulses during the development of the field and together spanned more than 4.5 m.y. Rocks of the SWNVF consist largely of rhyolitic ash-flow sheets and intercalated silicic lava domes, flows and near-vent pyroclastic deposits erupted between 15.2 and 10 Ma from vent areas in the vicinity of the Timber Mountain calderas, and between about 9.5 and 7 Ma from the outlying Black Mountain and Stonewall Mountain centers. Three magmatic stages can be recognized: the main magmatic stage, Mountain magmatic stage (11.7 to 10.0 Ma), and the late magmatic stage (9.4 to 7.5 Ma).

  13. Post-eruptive sediment transport and surface processes on unvegetated volcanic hillslopes - A case study of Black Tank scoria cone, Cima Volcanic Field, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly

    2016-08-01

    Conical volcanic edifices that are made up from lapilli to block/bomb pyroclastic successions, such as scoria cones, are widespread in terrestrial and extraterrestrial settings. Eruptive processes responsible for establishing the final facies architecture of a scoria cone are not well linked to numerical simulations of their post-eruptive sediment transport. Using sedimentological, geomorphic and 2D fragment morphology data from a 15-ky-old scoria cone from the Cima Volcanic Field, California, this study provides field evidence of the various post-eruptive sediment transport and degradation processes of scoria cones located in arid to semi-arid environments. This study has revealed that pyroclast morphologies vary downslope due to syn-eruptive granular flows, along with post-eruptive modification by rolling, bouncing and sliding of individual particles down a slope, and overland flow processes. The variability of sediment transport rates on hillslopes are not directly controlled by local slope angle variability and the flank length but rather by grain size, and morphological characteristics of particles, such as shape irregularity of pyroclast fragments and block/lapilli ratio. Due to the abundance of hillslopes degrading in unvegetated regions, such as those found in the Southwestern USA, granulometric influences should be accounted for in the formulation of sediment transport laws for geomorphic modification of volcanic terrains over long geologic time.

  14. Late Quaternary history of the Vakinankaratra volcanic field (central Madagascar): insights from luminescence dating of phreatomagmatic eruption deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufer, Daniel; Preusser, Frank; Schreurs, Guido; Gnos, Edwin; Berger, Alfons

    2014-05-01

    The Quaternary Vakinankaratra volcanic field in the central Madagascar highlands consists of scoria cones, lava flows, tuff rings, and maars. These volcanic landforms are the result of processes triggered by intracontinental rifting and overlie Precambrian basement or Neogene volcanic rocks. Infrared-stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating was applied to 13 samples taken from phreatomagmatic eruption deposits in the Antsirabe-Betafo region with the aim of constraining the chronology of the volcanic activity. Establishing such a chronology is important for evaluating volcanic hazards in this densely populated area. Stratigraphic correlations of eruption deposits and IRSL ages suggest at least five phreatomagmatic eruption events in Late Pleistocene times. In the Lake Andraikiba region, two such eruption layers can be clearly distinguished. The older one yields ages between 109 ± 15 and 90 ± 11 ka and is possibly related to an eruption at the Amboniloha volcanic complex to the north. The younger one gives ages between 58 ± 4 and 47 ± 7 ka and is clearly related to the phreatomagmatic eruption that formed Lake Andraikiba. IRSL ages of a similar eruption deposit directly overlying basement laterite in the vicinity of the Fizinana and Ampasamihaiky volcanic complexes yield coherent ages of 68 ± 7 and 65 ± 8 ka. These ages provide the upper age limit for the subsequently developed Iavoko, Antsifotra, and Fizinana scoria cones and their associated lava flows. Two phreatomagmatic deposits, identified near Lake Tritrivakely, yield the youngest IRSL ages in the region, with respective ages of 32 ± 3 and 19 ± 2 ka. The reported K-feldspar IRSL ages are the first recorded numerical ages of phreatomagmatic eruption deposits in Madagascar, and our results confirm the huge potential of this dating approach for reconstructing the volcanic activity of Late Pleistocene to Holocene volcanic provinces.

  15. The eruption history of the quaternary Eifel volcanic fields: Implications from the ELSA - Tephra - Stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Michael; Sirocko, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Numerous tephra layers occur in maar sediments in the quaternary Eifel volcanic fields. The sediments were systematically drilled and cored since 1998 by the Eifel Laminated Sediment Archive project (ELSA) (Sirocko et al. 2013). These maar sediments are laminated and the tephra is easily recognizeable by a coarser grain size. Additionaly, tephra layers appear dark grey to black in color. The ashes were sieved to a fraction of 250 - 100 µm and sorted into grains of: reddish and greyish sandstone, quartz, amphibole, pyroxene, scoria and pumice, sanidine, leucite and biotite. A minimum of 100 grains for each tephra layer were used for a sediment petrographic tephra characterisation (SPTC). The grain counts resemble the vol. -% of each grain species. Three types of tephra could be identified by their distinctive grain pattern: (1) phreatomagmatic tephra, rich in basement rocks like greyish/reddish sandstone and quartz. (2) Strombolian tephra, rich in scoria and mafic minerals like pyroxene. (3) evolved tephra, rich in sanidine and pumice. 16 drill-cores, covering the last 500 000 years have been examined. Younger cores were dated by 14C ages and older cores by optical stimulated luminescence. Independently from this datings, the drill-cores were cross-correlated by pollen and the occurences of specific marker-tephra layers, comprising characteristic grain-types. These marker-tephra layers are especially thick and of evolved composition with a significant abundance of sanidine and pumice. The most prominent tephra layers of this type are the Laacher See tephra, dated to 12 900 b2k by Zolitschka (1998), the 40Ar/39Ar dated tephra layers of Dümpelmaar, Glees and Hüttenberg, dated to 116 000 b2k, 151 000 b2k and 215 000 b2k by van den Bogaard & Schmincke (1990), van den Bogaard et al. (1989). These datings set the time-frame for the eruption-phases of the quaternary Eifel Volcanic Fields. Our study refines these findings and shows that phases of activity are very

  16. Further constraints for the Plio-Pleistocene geomagnetic field strength: New results from the Los Tuxtlas volcanic field (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Goguitchaichvili, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2001-09-01

    A rock-magnetic, paleomagnetic and paleointensity study was carried out on 13 Plio-Pleistocene volcanic flows from the Los Tuxtlas volcanic field (Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt) in order to obtain some decisive constraints for the geomagnetic field strength during the Plio-Pleistocene time. The age of the volcanic units, which yielded reliable paleointensity estimates, lies between 2.2 and 0.8 Ma according to the available K/Ar radiometric data. Thermomagnetic investigations reveal that remanence is carried in most cases by Ti-poor titanomagnetite, resulting from oxy-exsolution that probably occurred during the initial flow cooling. Unblocking temperature spectra and relatively high coercivity point to 'small' pseudo-single domain magnetic grains for these (titano)magnetites. Single-component, linear demagnetization plots were observed in most cases. Six flows yield reverse polarity magnetization, five flows are normally magnetized, and one flow shows intermediate polarity magnetization. Evidence of a strong lightning-produced magnetization overprint was detected for one site. The mean pole position obtained in this study is Plat = 83.7°, Plong = 178.1°, K = 36, A95 = 8.1°, N =10 and the corresponding mean paleodirection is I = 31.3°, D = 352°, k = 37, a95 = 8.2°, which is not significantly different from the expected direction estimated from the North American apparent polar wander path. Thirty-nine samples were pre-selected for Thellier palaeointensity experiments because of their stable remanent magnetization and relatively weak-within-site dispersion. Only 21 samples, coming from four individual basaltic lava flows, yielded reliable paleointensity estimates with the flow-mean virtual dipole moments (VDM) ranging from 6.4 to 9.1 × 1022 Am2. Combining the coeval Mexican data with the available comparable quality Pliocene paleointensity results yield a mean VDM of 6.4 × 1022 Am2, which is almost 80% of the present geomagnetic axial dipole. Reliable

  17. Evolution of Rhyolite at Laguna del Maule, a Rapidly Inflating Volcanic Field in the Southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, N. L.; Singer, B. S.; Jicha, B. R.; Hildreth, E. W.; Fierstein, J.; Rogers, N. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field (LdM) is host to both the foremost example of post-glacial rhyolitic volcanism in the southern Andes and rapid, ongoing crustal deformation. The flare-up of high-silica eruptions was coeval with deglaciation at 24 ka. Rhyolite and rhyodacite domes and coulees totaling 6.5 km3 form a 20 km ring around the central lake basin. This spatial and temporal concentration of rhyolite is unprecedented in the history of the volcanic field. Colinear major and trace element variation suggests these lavas share a common evolutionary history (Hildreth et al., 2010). Moreover, geodetic observations (InSAR & GPS) have identified rapid inflation centered in the western side of the rhyolite dome ring at a rate of 17 cm/year for five years, which has accelerated to 30 cm/yr since April 2012. The best fit to the geodetic data is an expanding magma body located at 5 km depth (Fournier et al., 2010; Le Mevel, 2012). The distribution of high-silica volcanism, most notably geochemically similar high-silica rhyolite lavas erupted 12 km apart of opposite sides of the lake within a few kyr of each other, raises the possibility that the shallow magma intrusion represents only a portion of a larger rhyolitic body, potentially of caldera forming dimensions. We aim to combine petrologic models with a precise geochronology to formulate a model of the evolution of the LdM magma system to its current state. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations show rhyolitic volcanism beginning at 23 ka with the eruption of the Espejos rhyolite, followed by the Cari Launa Rhyolite at 14.5 ka, two flows of the Barrancas complex at 6.4 and 3.9 ka, and the Divisoria rhyolite at 2.2 ka. In contrast, significant andesitic and dacitic volcanism is largely absent from the central basin of LdM since the early post-glacial period suggesting a coincident basin-wide evolution from andesite to dacite to rhyolite and is consistent with a shallow body of low-density rhyolite blocking the eruption

  18. Differentiation of cinder cone magmas from the Michoacan-Guanajuato Volcanic Field, central Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenaka, T.

    1985-01-01

    The Michoacan-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (area:40,000 km/sup 2/) contains various small volcanic centers of 3 Ma to Recent age, including 900 cinder and lava cones, and contrast to other portions of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) with large composite volcanoes. Among 224 scoria and lava samples studied for chemistry and mineralogy, 165 samples are calc-alkaline (basalt, andesite, and dacite), 21 are alkaline (mainly basalt), and 38 are transitional between the two (mainly basalt). The majority of rocks are 01 basalt and 01 andesite with pyroxene and hornblende andesites being subordinate. Their MgO content is relatively high compared with lavas from composite volcanoes in the MVB, and indicate an earlier stage of differentiation. Four samples have Mg-number >70 and Ni content >235 ppm, a criteria of magmas equilibrated with mantle olivine. They include all the rock groups but phenocryst assemblage is always 01+Cpx+Pl. Other samples are plotted between this and 1-atmosphere Ol-Cpx-Pl cotectic. Ol-liquid, two pyroxenes, and magnetite-ilmenite temperatures decrease from 1200/sup 0/C to 900/sup 0/C with increasing FeO*/MgO ratio which also corresponds to the changing mineral assemblages. Calculated oxygen fugacities are on or slightly above Ni-NiO buffer line. Calc-alkaline and alkaline basalts are not related; both are parental. Less differentiated character of cinder cone magmas may result from their transportation under local extensional stress and absence of long-lived shallow magma reservoirs is common in composite volcanoes.

  19. The Navajo Culture Center: Purpose and Plans. A Shrine and Living Symbol for the Navajo Nation to Be Located at Navajo Community College, Tsaile, Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Community Coll., Tsaile, AZ.

    Presenting its past, present, and future expectations, the Navajo Junior College anc the forthcoming Navajo Culture Center are described in detail in this publication. College information relative to the following is presented: (1) History and Origin; (2) Philosophy; (3) Objectives; (4) Purpose of the Navajo College (to serve the Navajo…

  20. The Lathrop Wells Volcanic Center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. It has long been recognized as the youngest basalt center in the region. However, determination of the age and eruptive history of the center has proven problematic. The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results.

  1. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Forman, S.

    1993-03-01

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. It has long been recognized as the youngest basalt center in the region. However, determination of the age and eruptive history of the center has proven problematic. The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results.

  2. Magmatic inclusions in rhyolites, contaminated basalts, and compositional zonation beneath the Coso volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Metz, J.

    1984-01-01

    Basaltic lava flows and high-silica rhyolite domes form the Pleistocene part of the Coso volcanic field in southeastern California. The distribution of vents maps the areal zonation inferred for the upper parts of the Coso magmatic system. Subalkalic basalts (<50% SiO2) were erupted well away from the rhyolite field at any given time. Compositional variation among these basalts can be ascribed to crystal fractionation. Erupted volumes of these basalts decrease with increasing differentiation. Mafic lavas containing up to 58% SiO2, erupted adjacent to the rhyolite field, formed by mixing of basaltic and silicic magma. Basaltic magma interacted with crustal rocks to form other SiO2-rich mafic lavas erupted near the Sierra Nevada fault zone. Several rhyolite domes in the Coso volcanic field contain sparse andesitic inclusions (55-61% SiO2). Pillow-like forms, intricate commingling and local diffusive mixing of andesite and rhyolite at contacts, concentric vesicle distribution, and crystal morphologies indicative of undercooling show that inclusions were incorporated in their rhyolitic hosts as blobs of magma. Inclusions were probably dispersed throughout small volumes of rhyolitic magma by convective (mechanical) mixing. Inclusion magma was formed by mixing (hybridization) at the interface between basaltic and rhyolitic magmas that coexisted in vertically zoned igneous systems. Relict phenocrysts and the bulk compositions of inclusions suggest that silicic endmembers were less differentiated than erupted high-silica rhyolite. Changes in inferred endmembers of magma mixtures with time suggest that the steepness of chemical gradients near the silicic/mafic interface in the zoned reservoir may have decreased as the system matured, although a high-silica rhyolitic cap persisted. The Coso example is an extreme case of large thermal and compositional contrast between inclusion and host magmas; lesser differences between intermediate composition magmas and inclusions lead to

  3. Geology of the Mid-Miocene Rooster Comb Caldera and Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field, eastern Oregon: Silicic volcanism associated with Grande Ronde flood basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Thomas R.; Mahood, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    The Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) of eastern Oregon consists of rhyolitic caldera centers and lava fields contemporaneous with and spatially related to Mid-Miocene Columbia River flood basalt volcanism. Previous studies delineated two calderas in the southeastern part of LOVF near Owyhee Reservoir, the result of eruptions of two ignimbrites, the Tuff of Leslie Gulch and the Tuff of Spring Creek. Our new interpretation is that these two map units are differentially altered parts of a single ignimbrite produced in a major phreatomagmatic eruption at ~ 15.8 Ma. Areas previously mapped as Tuff of Spring Creek are locations where the ignimbrite contains abundant clinoptilolite ± mordenite, which made it susceptible to erosion. The resistant intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch has an alteration assemblage of albite ± quartz, indicative of low-temperature hydrothermal alteration. Our new mapping of caldera lake sediments and pre- and post-caldera rhyolitic lavas and intrusions that are chemically similar to intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch point to a single ~ 20 × 25 km caldera, which we name the Rooster Comb Caldera. Erosion of the resurgently uplifted southern half of the caldera created dramatic exposures of intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch cut by post-caldera rhyolite dikes and intrusions that are the deeper-level equivalents of lava domes and flows that erupted into the caldera lake preserved in exposures to the northeast. The Rooster Comb Caldera has features in common with more southerly Mid-Miocene calderas of the McDermitt Volcanic Field and High Rock Caldera Complex, including formation in a basinal setting shortly after flood basalt eruptions ceased in the region, and forming on eruption of peralkaline ignimbrite. The volcanism at Rooster Comb Caldera postdates the main activity at McDermitt and High Rock, but, like it, begins ~ 300 ky after flood basalt volcanism begins in the area, and while flood basalts don't erupt through the silicic focus, are

  4. Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakkas, V.; Meju, M. A.; Khan, M. A.; Haak, V.; Simpson, F.

    2002-03-01

    Electromagnetic experiments were conducted in 1995 as part of a multidisciplinary research project to investigate the deep structure of the Chyulu Hills volcanic chain on the eastern flank of the Kenya Rift in East Africa. Transient electromagnetic (TEM) and broadband (120-0.0001 Hz) magnetotelluric (MT) soundings were made at eight stations along a seismic survey line and the data were processed using standard techniques. The TEM data provided effective correction for static shifts in MT data. The MT data were inverted for the structure in the upper 20 km of the crust using a 2-D inversion scheme and a variety of starting models. The resulting 2-D models show interesting features but the wide spacing between the MT stations limited model resolution to a large extent. These models suggest that there are significant differences in the physical state of the crust between the northern and southern parts of the Chyulu Hills volcanic field. North of the Chyulu Hills, the resistivity structure consists of a 10-12-km-thick resistive (up to 4000 Ω m) upper crustal layer, ca. 10-km-thick mid-crustal layer of moderate resistivity (˜50 Ω m), and a conductive substratum. The resistive upper crustal unit is considerably thinner over the main ridge (where it is ca. 2 km thick) and further south (where it may be up to 5 km thick). Below this cover unit, steep zones of low resistivity (0.01-10 Ω m) occur underneath the main ridge and at its NW and SE margins (near survey positions 100 and 150-210 km on seismic line F of Novak et al. [Novak, O., Prodehl, C., Jacob, A.W.B., Okoth, W., 1997. Crustal structure of the southern flank of the Kenya Rift deduced from wide-angle P-wave data. In: Fuchs, K., Altherr, R., Muller, B., Prodehl, C. (Eds.), Structure and Dynamic Processes in the Lithosphere of the Afro-Arabian Rift System. Tectonophysics, vol. 278, 171-186]). These conductors appear to be best developed in upper crustal (1-8 km) and middle crustal (9-18 km) zones in the areas

  5. Navajo Language Bibliography. Preliminary Edition, September 1973. Navajo Reading Study Progress Report No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kari, James

    Over the years the Navajo language has received more attention than any other American Indian language. The grammatical work represents all traditions in American Indian linguistic research, from the earliest descriptivism to the latest generative grammar. In addition, there exists a large amount of material written in Navajo and a plethora of…

  6. 40 CFR 49.5513 - Federal Implementation Plan Provisions for Navajo Generating Station, Navajo Nation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Federal Implementation Plan Provisions for Navajo Generating Station, Navajo Nation. 49.5513 Section 49.5513 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE INDIAN COUNTRY: AIR QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT Implementation Plans...

  7. Dual Language = Saad Ahaah Sinil. A Navajo-English Dictionary. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Martha, Ed.; Lynch, Regina, Ed.

    A dual-language Navajo-English dictionary provides a chart of the Navajo kinship system, a two-page map of the Navajo Nation, and English equivalents for Navajo words in 46 linguistic and cultural categories. Included are words for: races (Indian and other ethnic groups); Navajo clans; age groups; Navajo ceremonies; body parts; sickness; clothing;…

  8. Some field observations and experimental insights on volcanic ash aggregates (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Del Bello, E.; Scarlato, P.

    2013-12-01

    The aggregation of ash- to dust-sized pyroclasts is a well-documented process that deeply impacts the internal dynamics and atmospheric dispersal of volcanic plumes, the geometry of the resulting fallout deposits, and the nature and occurrence of associated hazards. As such, studies of the aggregation processes have been actively promoted since decades, with an escalation after the civil aviation crisis from the 2010 Ejyafiallajokull eruption. Here we illustrate the potential of high-speed imaging in the study of ash aggregation and aggregates settling both in laboratory experiments and directly in the field. Under weak eruption plumes from the Ejyafiallajokull (Iceland), Yasur (Vanuatu), and Sakurajima (Japan) volcanoes, high-speed imaging systems captured the settling of ash-sized pyroclasts, both as individual particles and as aggregates. Relevant parameters such as the size and the settling velocity of the particles and aggregates are derived directly by image analysis, within the system spatial resolution limits. Field sampling and laboratory analyses of the imaged particles is then used to investigate their overall size distribution and textural-chemical features. In addition, the same high-speed imaging system is used to record the individual volcanic explosion, if discrete, or volcanic episode, for ongoing activity, from which the settling particles originated, potentially illuminating the sources of the ash and other relevant processes (e.g., eruption style, plume rise dynamics, electrification). In order to better constrain the observed phenomena, we are currently performing two sets of laboratory experiments. The first set of experiments aims to characterize the settling properties of individual particles, in order to allow distinguishing them from the aggregates in the field-based images. Such experiments, consisting in the imaging of free-falling individual particles, will also be used in the future to assess the simultaneous settling of large numbers

  9. Temporal relations of volcanism and hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Goff, F. )

    1989-11-01

    Two hydrothermal alteration events (8.07 Ma, one sample; 6.51-5.60 Ma, six samples) related to the waning stages of late Miocene volcanism ({ge} 13 to {le} 5.8 Ma) are recognized at the Cochiti district (southeast Jemez Mountains). Most of the K/Ar dates (0.83 {plus minus} 0.11-0.66 {plus minus} 0.21 Ma, four samples) in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A at Sulfur Springs, Valles caldera, indicate post-Valles caldera hydrothermal alteration. A sample from acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole was too young to be dated by the K/Ar method and is possibly associated with current hot-spring activity and the youngest pulses of volcanism. Oxygen-isotope data from illite/smectite clays in the Cochiti district are zonally distributed and range from {minus}2.15{per thousand} to {plus}7.97{per thousand} (SMOW), depending upon temperature, extent of rock-fluid interaction, and composition. The samples from VC-2A get lighter with depth ({minus}0.20{per thousand} to {plus}1.62{per thousand}). The K/Ar and oxygen-isotope data provide strong evidence that the epithermal quartz-vein-hosted gold-silver mineralization at Cochiti and the sub-ore grade molybdenite at VC-2A were deposited in the late Miocene (5.99-5.60 Ma) and mid-Quaternary ({approximately}0.66 Ma), respectively, by hydrothermal fluids composed primarily of meteoric water.

  10. The eruptive history of the Tequila volcanic field, western Mexico: ages, volumes, and relative proportions of lava types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis-Kenedi, Catherine B.; Lange, Rebecca A.; Hall, Chris M.; Delgado-Granados, Hugo

    2005-06-01

    The eruptive history of the Tequila volcanic field (1600 km2) in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt is based on 40Ar/39Ar chronology and volume estimates for eruptive units younger than 1 Ma. Ages are reported for 49 volcanic units, including Volcán Tequila (an andesitic stratovolcano) and peripheral domes, flows, and scoria cones. Volumes of volcanic units ≤1 Ma were obtained with the aid of field mapping, ortho aerial photographs, digital elevation models (DEMs), and ArcGIS software. Between 1120 and 200 kyrs ago, a bimodal distribution of rhyolite (~35 km3) and high-Ti basalt (~39 km3) dominated the volcanic field. Between 685 and 225 kyrs ago, less than 3 km3 of andesite and dacite erupted from more than 15 isolated vents; these lavas are crystal-poor and show little evidence of storage in an upper crustal chamber. Approximately 200 kyr ago, ~31 km3 of andesite erupted to form the stratocone of Volcán Tequila. The phenocryst assemblage of these lavas suggests storage within a chamber at ~2 3 km depth. After a hiatus of ~110 kyrs, ~15 km3 of andesite erupted along the W and SE flanks of Volcán Tequila at ~90 ka, most likely from a second, discrete magma chamber located at ~5 6 km depth. The youngest volcanic feature (~60 ka) is the small andesitic volcano Cerro Tomasillo (~2 km3). Over the last 1 Myr, a total of 128±22 km3 of lava erupted in the Tequila volcanic field, leading to an average eruption rate of ~0.13 km3/kyr. This volume erupted over ~1600 km2, leading to an average lava accumulation rate of ~8 cm/kyr. The relative proportions of lava types are ~22 43% basalt, ~0.4 1% basaltic andesite, ~29 54% andesite, ~2 3% dacite, and ~18 40% rhyolite. On the basis of eruptive sequence, proportions of lava types, phenocryst assemblages, textures, and chemical composition, the lavas do not reflect the differentiation of a single (or only a few) parental liquids in a long-lived magma chamber. The rhyolites are geochemically diverse and were likely

  11. Isotopic and chemical constraints on the petrogenesis of Blackburn Hills volcanic field, western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moll-Stalcup, E. J.; Arth, Joseph G.

    1991-01-01

    The Blackburn Hills volcanic field is one of several Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary (75-50 Ma) volcanic fields in western Alaska that comprise a vast magmatic province extending from the Arctic Circle to Bristol Bay. It consists of andesite flows, rhyolite domes, a central granodiorite to quartz monzonite pluton, and small intrusive rhyolite porphyries, overlain by basalt and alkali-rhyolites. Most of the field consists of andesite flows which can be divided into two groups on the basis of elemental and isotopic composition: a group having lower ( 87Sr 86Sr)i, higher ( 143Nd 144Nd)i, and moderate LREE and HREE contents (group 1), and a group having higher ( 87Sr 86Sr)i, lower ( 143Sr 144Sr)i, and lower HREE contents. Basalts are restricted to the top of the stratigraphic section, comprise the most primitive part of group 1 [( 87Sr 86Sr)i = 0.7033; ( 143Nd 144Nd)i = 0.5129], and have trace-element ratios that are similar to those of oceanic island basalts (OIBs). In contrast to the basalts, group 1 andesites have higher ( 87Sr 86Sr)i and lower ( 143Nd 144Nd)i, and represent interaction of mantle-derived magmas with the lower crust of Koyukuk terrane. Group 2 andesites have ( 87Sr 86Sr)i and ( 143Nd 144Nd)i that are near bulk-earth values and probably formed by partial melting of the lower crust of Koyukuk terrane. The central pluton and rhyolite porphyries are isotopically uniform ( 87Sr 86Sr)i ??? 0.704, ( 143Nd 144Nd)i ??? 0.51275, and are interpreted to have formed by melting of young mafic to intermediate crustal rocks or by fractionation of group 1 andesites. The rhyolite domes have an isotopic range similar to that of the basalts and andesites [( 87Sr 86Sr)i = 0.70355-0.70499; ( 143Nd 144Nd)i = 0.51263-0.51292], which suggests they formed by fractionation of the and site and basalt magmas. Although some workers have suggested that the volcanic field is underlain by old continental crust, none of the data require the presence of Paleozoic or Precambrian

  12. STEM Summer Academy on the Navajo Reservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The US Rosetta Project is the NASA contribution to the International Rosetta Mission, an ESA cornerstone mission to comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. While the project's outreach efforts span multi-media, and a variety of age and ethnic groups, a special emphasis has been made to find a way to provide meaningful outreach to the reservation communities. Because language preservation is an issue of urgent concern to the reservation communities, and because Rosetta, uniquely among NASA missions, has been named after the notion that keys to missing understanding of elements of the ancient past were found in the language on the original Rosetta stone, the US Rosetta Project has embarked upon outreach with a focus on STEM vocabulary in ancient US languages of the Navajo, Hopi, Ojibwe, and other tribal communities as the project expands. NASA image and science are used and described in the native language, alongside lay English and scientific English curriculum elements. Additionally, science (geology/chemistry/botany/physics) elements drawn from the reservation environment, including geomorphology, geochemistry, soil physics, are included and discussed in the native language as much as possible — with their analogs in other planetary environments (such as Mars). In this paper we will report on the most recent Summer Science Academy [2012], a four week summer course for middle school children, created in collaboration with teachers and administrators in the Chinle Unified School District. The concept of the Academy was initiated in 2011, and the first Academy was conducted shortly thereafter, in June 2011 with 14 children, 3 instructors, and a NASA teacher workshop. The community requested three topics: geology, astronomy, and botany. The 2012 Academy built on the curriculum already developed with more robust field trips, addressed to specific science topics, additional quantitative measurements and activities, with more written material for the cultural components from

  13. Further paleomagnetic results for the San Juan volcanic field of southern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beck, M.E., Jr.; Sheriff, S.D.; Diehl, J.F.; Hailwood, E.A.; Lipman, P.W.

    1977-01-01

    Combining paleomagnetic data for 17 new sites from the northwest portion of the (Oligocene) San Juan volcanic field of southern Colorado with data for 29 sites previously published yields a paleomagnetic pole at 85??N, 114??E (with a 95% confidence circle of 7.5?? radius). A further combination of the San Juan data with the results of other studies on rocks of Oligocene age from tectonically stable parts of North America gives a mid-Tertiary reference pole located at 81??N, 132.5??E, with a confidence circle of approximately 4??. Mid-Tertiary paleomagnetic poles for the western edge of the continent diverge markedly from this reference pole. ?? 1977.

  14. Primitive magmas at five Cascade volcanic fields: Melts from hot, heterogeneous sub-arc mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Bruggman, P.E.; Christiansen, R.L.; Clynne, M.A.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hildreth, W.

    1997-01-01

    Major and trace element concentrations, including REE by isotope dilution, and Sr, Nd, Pb, and O isotope ratios have been determined for 38 mafic lavas from the Mount Adams, Crater Lake, Mount Shasta, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic fields, in the Cascade arc, northwestern part of the United States. Many of the samples have a high Mg# [100Mg/(Mg + FeT) > 60] and Ni content (>140 ppm) such that we consider them to be primitive. We recognize three end-member primitive magma groups in the Cascades, characterized mainly by their trace-element and alkali-metal abundances: (1) High-alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) has trace element abundances similar to N-MORB, except for slightly elevated LILE, and has Eu/Eu* > 1. (2) Arc basalt and basaltic andesite have notably higher LILE contents, generally have higher SiO2 contents, are more oxidized, and have higher Cr for a given Ni abundance than HAOT. These lavas show relative depletion in HFSE, have lower HREE and higher LREE than HAOT, and have smaller Eu/Eu* (0.94-1.06). (3) Alkali basalt from the Simcoe volcanic field east of Mount Adams represents the third end-member, which contributes an intraplate geochemical signature to magma compositions. Notable geochemical features among the volcanic fields are: (1) Mount Adams rocks are richest in Fe and most incompatible elements including HFSE; (2) the most incompatible-element depleted lavas occur at Medicine Lake; (3) all centers have relatively primitive lavas with high LILE/HFSE ratios but only the Mount Adams, Lassen, and Medicine Lake volcanic fields also have relatively primitive rocks with an intraplate geochemical signature; (4) there is a tendency for increasing 87Sr/86Sr, 207Pb/204Pb, and ??18O and decreasing 206Pb/204Pb and 143Nd/144Nd from north to south. The three end-member Cascade magma types reflect contributions from three mantle components: depleted sub-arc mantle modestly enriched in LILE during ancient subduction; a modern, hydrous subduction component

  15. Eruption style and flow emplacement in the Submarine North Arch Volcanic Field, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, David A.; Uto, Kozo; Satake, Kenji; Davis, Alicé S.

    The North Arch Volcanic Field covers about 24,000 km2 of seafloor north of Oahu and has an estimated volume between 1,000 and 1,250 km3. The field straddles the Hawaiian flexural arch about 250 km north of the axis of the island chain and surrounds numerous Cretaceous volcanic ridges, circular flat-topped volcanoes, and low-relief regions of sediment-covered seafloor. New SeaBeam bathymetric maps that cover about 1/3 of the flow field reveal nearly 100 volcanic structures ranging from low shields to steep cones. One shield is modified by a pit crater, approximately 1.1×1.25 km and 300 m deep. A lava flow in the SE part of the volcanic field covers about 3,600 km2, has an estimated volume of 36-72 km3, and apparently erupted from a 75-km-long NNW-trending fissure system. A 108-km-long flow advanced north in a graben parallel to the Cretaceous mid-ocean ridge that formed the crust; its surface gradient is 1.9 m/km (slope of 0.1°). Shinkai 6500 submersible dive 502 explored one of the composite volcanoes and observed and collected dense alkalic basalt sheet flows erupted after vesicular basanite pillow basalts and fragmental hyaloclastite that make up the steep-sided cone. Dive 503 collected alkalic basalt sheet flows and pillow basalt from the top 122 m of the southern wall of a pit crater that formed by collapse caused by a decrease in magma volume from a shallow storage chamber located 1-2 km below the surface. The volume change may have been caused by loss of gas bubbles from the stored magma when replenishment ceased at the end of the eruption. The surficial drapery-folded sheet flow is covered by only a few cm of sediment, indicating that it is younger than the 0.5-1.5 Ma ages previously estimated for North Arch flows and vents. The near-vent constructs and flow characteristics indicate that vigorous eruption of highly vesicular lava constructed steep-sided cones of pillow basalt and hyaloclastite whereas steady eruption of dense lava that had lost its bubbles

  16. Experimental study of near-field air entrainment by subsonic volcanic jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The flow structure in the developing region of a turbulent jet has been examined using particle image velocimetry methods, considering the flow at steady state conditions. The velocity fields were integrated to determine the ratio of the entrained air speed to the jet speed, which was approximately 0.03 for a range of Mach numbers up to 0.89 and. Reynolds numbers up to 217,000. This range of experimental Mach and Reynolds numbers is higher than previously considered for high-accuracy entrainment measures, particularly in the near-vent region. The entrainment values are below those commonly used for geophysical analyses of volcanic plumes, suggesting that existing 1-D models are likely to understate the tendency for column collapse. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Lead and strontium isotopes in rocks of the Absaroka volcanic field, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Z.E.; Doe, B.R.; Prostka, H.J.

    1970-01-01

    The Absaroka volcanic field is comprised of predominant andesitic volcaniclastic rocks and less abundant potassium-rich mafic lavas (shoshonites and absarokites). Strontium and lead isotopic variations preclude a simple derivation from an isotopically uniform source: Sr87/Sr86, 0.7042 to 0.7090; Pb206/Pb204, 16.31 to 17.30; Pb208/Pb204, 36.82 to 37.64. We postulate that these rocks were derived from a lower crust or upper mantle which underwent a preferential loss of uranium relative to lead approximately 2800??200 m.y. ago. Variations in lead and strontium isotopic compositions are thought to reflect small inhomogeneities in U/Pb and Rb/Sr ratios in the source. ?? 1970 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Pliocene to late Pleistocene magmatism in the Aurora Volcanic Field, Nevada and California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingdon, S.; Cousens, B.; John, D. A.; du Bray, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The 3.9- 0.1 Ma Aurora Volcanic Field (AVF) covers 325 km2 east and southeast of the Bodie Hills, north of Mono Lake, California, USA. The AVF is located immediately northwest of the Long Valley magmatic system and adjacent and overlapping the Miocene Bodie Hills Volcanic Field (BHVF). Rock types range from trachybasalt to trachydacite, and high-silica rhyolite. The trachybasalts to trachydacites are weakly to moderately porphyritic (1-30%) with variable phenocryst assemblages that are some combination of plagioclase, hornblende, clinopyroxene, and lesser orthopyroxene, olivine, and/or biotite. Microphenocrysts are dominated by plagioclase, and include opaque oxides, clinopyroxene, and apatite. These rocks are weakly to strongly devitrified. The high-silica rhyolites are sparsely porphyritic with trace to 10% phenocrysts of quartz, sanidine, plagioclase, biotite, (+/- hornblende), accessory opaque oxide minerals, titanite, allanite, (+/-apatite, zircon), and have glassy groundmasses. Rocks in the AVF are less strongly porphyritic than those of BHVF. Plagioclase phenocrysts are often oscillatory zoned and many have sieve texture. Amphiboles have distinct black opaque rims. Xenocrystic quartz and plagioclase are rare. AVF lavas have bimodal SiO2 compositions, ranging from 49 to 78 wt%, with a gap between 65 and 75 wt%. They are high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic in composition, and are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous. They are enriched in rare earth elements (REE), especially light REEs, compared to the Miocene BHVF rocks. Primordial mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns show arc- or subduction-related signatures, with enrichment in Ba and Pb, and depletion in Nb and Ta. Enrichment in K and Sr and depletion in Ti are less pronounced than in the BHVF rocks. There is no correlation between lead isotope ratios and silica (initial 206Pb/204Pb ratios range from 18.974 to 19.151). Neodymium isotope ratios show a moderate negative correlation with silica

  19. Studying monogenetic volcanoes with a terrestrial laser scanner: case study at Croscat volcano (Garrotxa Volcanic Field, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, A.; García-Sellés, D.; Pedrazzi, D.; Barde-Cabusson, S.; Marti, J.; Muñoz, J. A.

    2015-03-01

    Erosional processes (natural or anthropogenic) may partly destroy the relatively small-sized volcanic edifices characteristic of monogenetic volcanic zones, leaving their internal structure well exposed. Nevertheless, the study of these outcrops may be extremely challenging due to restricted accessibility or safety issues. Digital representations of the outcrop surface have been lately used to overcome such difficulties. Data acquired with terrestrial laser scanning instruments using Light Detection and Ranging technology enables the construction of such digital outcrops. The obtained high-precision 3-D terrain models are of greater coverage and accuracy than conventional methods and, when taken at different times, allow description of geological processes in time and space. Despite its intrinsic advantages and the proven satisfactory results, this technique has been little applied in volcanology-related studies. Here, we want to introduce it to the volcanological community together with a new and user-friendly digital outcrop analysis methodology for inexperienced users. This tool may be useful, not only for volcano monitoring purposes, but also to describe the internal structure of exposed volcanic edifices or to estimate outcrop erosion rates that may be helpful in terms of hazard assessment or preservation of volcanic landscapes. We apply it to the Croscat volcano, a monogenetic cone in the La Garrotxa Volcanic Field (Catalan Volcanic Zone, NE Spain), quarrying of which leads to a perfect view of its interior but restricts access to its uppermost parts. Croscat is additionally one of the most emblematic symbols of the La Garrotxa Volcanic Field Natural Park, and its preservation is a main target of the park administration.

  20. Monogenetic volcanic fields and their geoheritage values of western Saudi Arabia and their implication to holistic geoeducation projects locally and globally (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemeth, K.; Moufti, R.

    2013-12-01

    Monogeneitc volcanic fields are the most common manifestation of volcanism on Earth and other planets. They composed of small volume and short lived volcanoes each of them with a relatively simple eruption history. In spite of recent researches demonstrated complex, repeated and geochemically distinct eruption histories commonly associated with te formation of small-volume volcanoes, they are still considerred as volcanoes that are in human-scale and therefore ideal to use them as educational tools or part of volcanic geoheritage projects including geopark developments. In the western margin of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia there are at least 9 intracontinental volcanic fields subparalell with the Red Sea Rift ranging from alkaline basaltic to basalt-trachyte bimodal dispersed volcanic systems. Among these volcanic fields the geoheritage value of three fields were recently evaluated and proposed that they are suitable for further development to establish the first volcanic geoparks in the Arabian Peninsula in the area of 1) Al Madinah (AMVF) 2) Kishb (KVF) and 3) Hutaymah Volcanic Fields (HVF). The AMVF offers a natural concept based on specific volcanic precinct ordering of its volcanic geoheritages from the most accessable and most common volcanism that is historically significant (eg. scoria and lava spatter cones with extensive lava fields) toward a more adventure geotourism style approach in remote, less common but more destructive type of volcanism (eg. trachytic explosion craters). In the contrary, the KVF is a perfect site where phreatomagmatic volcanism and their consequences were identified as a major driving force for further geopark developments. The HVF with its rich archaeological and cultural sites and superbly exposed variously eroded tuff rings and maars offer a good location to develop geoeducation programs to highlight short- and long-term climatic and hydrologic changes in an area a volcanic field evolved. The three Saudi projects also demonstrate

  1. CCP Receiver-Function Imaging of the Moho beneath Volcanic Fields in Western Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchette, A. R.; Mooney, W. D.; Klemperer, S. L.; Zahran, H. M.; El-Hadidy, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    We are searching for structural complexity in the crust and upper mantle beneath the Neogene volcanic fields ('harrats') of western Saudi Arabia. We determined P-wave seismic receiver functions for 50 broadband seismographic stations located within or adjacent to three volcanic fields: Harrats Lunayyir, Rahat, and Khaybar. There are 18 seismographic stations within Lunayyir, 11 in Khaybar, and 15 in Rahat with average interstation spacing of 10 km, 30km, and 50 km. For each station we calculated 300 to 600 receiver functions with an iterative time-domain deconvolution; noisy receiver functions (outliers) were rejected by cross correlating each receiver function with a station stack; we only accepted those with a cross correlation coefficient ≥ 0.6. We used these receiver functions to create a common-conversion point (CCP) image of the crust and upper mantle. The Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) are clearly imaged, particularly beneath Lunayyir, and have average depths of about 38 km and 60 km. We do not find any evidence for structural disruption of the Moho within our ~70 km x 70 km image of the Moho beneath Lunayyir. We image a clear crust-mantle boundary beneath Rahat and Khaybar also at ~38 km, 2-3 km deeper than anticipated from prior receiver function results outside of the harrats. Mid-crustal low velocity zones seen locally beneath all three harrats, most commonly at 10-15 km or 15-20 km in depth, may more likely represent silicic Precambrian basement than accumulations of magma. Estimates of up to ~0.5 km3 of magma erupted during each eruptive episode are consistent with the lack of a disrupted Moho. However, the total erupted volume of magma, e.g. > 1000 km3 at Rahat, together with associated intrusions from the mantle, is consistent with crustal thickening of ~2 km beneath the harrats.

  2. Group II Xenoliths from Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, Central Nevada: Evidence for a Kinked Geotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, M.; Mosely, J.; Norris, J.

    2015-12-01

    Group II xenoliths associated with the 140 Ka Easy Chair Crater, Lunar Crater volcanic field, NV, consist of amphibole rich-inclusions including amphibolites, pyroxenites, and gabbros. Abundant minerals in these inclusions are kaersutite, aluminous (7.3-9.7 wt% Al2O3), calcic clinopyroxene, primarily diopside, and olivine (Mg# 69-73) with accessory spinel, sulfide and apatite. Although most apatites are fluor-hydroxyapatite solid solutions, one xenolith contains Cl- and OH-rich apatite suggesting that Cl may have been an important constituent in the parent magma(s) . The xenoliths show abundant evidence for equilibration at relatively low temperatures including amphibole and orthopyroxene exsolution in clinopyroxene, and granules of magnetite in hercynite hosts. If latter texture is due to exsolution, then this particular Group II xenolith equilibrated at temperatures near or below 500oC or at a depth of about 15 km along a conductive geotherm. It may be that all the Group II xenoliths equilibrated at low temperatures given the abundant exsolution textures although Fe-Mg exchange relations suggest equilibration at temperatures in excess of 800oC. Low equilibration temperatures are in conflict with the unusually high equilibration temperatures, >1200oC (Smith, 2000) displayed by Group I xenoliths from this same volcanic field. Taken at face value, the geothermometric results indicate unusually high temperatures in the upper mantle, normal temperatures in the crust and the possibility of a kinked geotherm in the region. Curiously the LCVF lies in an area of "normal" heat flow, south of the Battle Mountain area of high heat flow but the number of heat flow measurements in the Lunar Crater area is very low (Humphreys et al., 2003; Sass, 2005). References: Humphreys et al., 2003, Int. Geol. Rev. 45: 575; Sass et al., 2005, http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1207/; Smith, 2000, JGR 105: 16769.

  3. Parallel simulation of particle transport in an advection field applied to volcanic explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künzli, Pierre; Tsunematsu, Kae; Albuquerque, Paul; Falcone, Jean-Luc; Chopard, Bastien; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersal models typically describe particle motion via a turbulent velocity field. Particles are advected inside this field from the moment they leave the vent of the volcano until they deposit on the ground. Several techniques exist to simulate particles in an advection field such as finite difference Eulerian, Lagrangian-puff or pure Lagrangian techniques. In this paper, we present a new flexible simulation tool called TETRAS (TEphra TRAnsport Simulator) based on a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian model. This scheme offers the advantages of being numerically stable with no numerical diffusion and easily parallelizable. It also allows us to output particle atmospheric concentration or ground mass load at any given time. The model is validated using the advection-diffusion analytical equation. We also obtained a good agreement with field observations of the tephra deposit associated with the 2450 BP Pululagua (Ecuador) and the 1996 Ruapehu (New Zealand) eruptions. As this kind of model can lead to computationally intensive simulations, a parallelization on a distributed memory architecture was developed. A related performance model, taking into account load imbalance, is proposed and its accuracy tested.

  4. Gold-silver mining districts, alteration zones, and paleolandforms in the Miocene Bodie Hills Volcanic Field, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vikre, Peter G.; John, David A.; du Bray, Edward A.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

      Based on volcanic stratigraphy, geochronology, remnant paleosurfaces, and paleopotentiometric surfaces in mining districts and alteration zones, present landforms in the Bodie Hills volcanic field reflect incremental construction of stratovolcanoes and large- to small-volume flow-domes, magmatic inflation, and fault displacements. Landform evolution began with construction of the 15–13 Ma Masonic and 13–12 Ma Aurora volcanic centers in the northwestern and northeastern parts of the field, respectively. Smaller volcanoes erupted at ~11–10 Ma in, between, and south of these centers as erosional detritus accumulated north of the field in Fletcher Valley. Distally sourced, 9.7–9.3 Ma Eureka Valley Tuff filled drainages and depressions among older volcanoes and was partly covered by nearly synchronous eruptives during construction of four large 10–8 Ma volcanoes, in the southern part of the field. The lack of significant internal fault displacement, distribution of Eureka Valley Tuff, and elevation estimates derived from floras, suggest that the Bodie Hills volcanic field attained present elevations mostly through volcano construction and magmatic inflation, and that maximum paleoelevations (>8,500 ft) at the end of large volume eruptions at ~8 Ma are similar to present elevations.

  5. Application of a diffusion model to simulate erosion of scoria cones in the San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F. )

    1992-01-01

    A computer model for simulating the erosion of scoria (cinder) cones by diffusive processes is being formulated to investigate their long-term degradation. The model uses a two-dimensional diffusion algorithm expressed in finite-difference form to operate upon a three-dimensional scoria cone input as a matrix of elevation values (essentially a DTM). The computer simulation exhibits degradation from an initial conical form, through crater infilling, and finally into a low-relief, shield-like hill. This preliminary and simplest version of the model successfully mimicked the degradation pattern observed in degraded cones of the San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona. The scoria cones in this volcanic field range in age from Early Pliocene to Holocene and demonstrate a decrease in cone height/width ratio and slope with an increase in age. Morphometric relationships offer an opportunity to establish a relative age scheme and to loosely date cones of unknown age in a given volcanic field. The systematic decrease with time of scoria cone height, height/width ratio, and slope is the basis for a relative dating scheme. Morphometry is derived from 1:24,000-scale, 20-ft.-contour topographic maps and from calibrated field photographs. Morphometric parameters obtained from computer simulations and from actual degraded cones are calibrated by a least-squares technique with cones that have been dated by radiometric or other absolute age-dating methods. Comparative morphology of scoria cones is a potentially useful age-dating tool for mapping volcanic fields.

  6. Occurrence of an unknown Atlantic eruption in the Chaîne des Puys volcanic field (Massif Central, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouannic, G.; Walter-Simonnet, A. V.; Bossuet, G.; Cubizolle, H.; Boivin, P.; Devidal, J. L.; Oberlin, C.

    2014-08-01

    A volcanic ash layer, called MF1, was recently identified in Holocene sediments from the Gourgon and Molhiac peat bogs (Monts du Forez, French Massif Central). This ash layer consists of colorless shards with a heterogeneous trachytic to rhyolitic composition. The trace elements analyzed by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) attest to a local origin. Radiocarbon dating of peat samples taken within and below the ash layer indicates the best age at 6339 ± 61 cal yr BP, i.e. an age contemporaneous with the volcanic activity of Montchal, Montcineyre and Pavin volcanoes from the Chaîne des Puys volcanic field. These volcanoes are characterized by basaltic and trachytic products, thus the rhyolitic composition of MF1 tephra suggests that it is likely originated from an unknown eruption. These results again confirm the interest of studying the distal volcanic ash fallouts in order to establish or specify records of past eruptions of volcanic fields. Identification of this new tephra layer also provides an additional tephrochronological marker for Eastern French Massif Central.

  7. On the Trail of Missing Heat: Forward Gravity Modeling of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Northern Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, B. N.; Morgan, P.

    2003-12-01

    The San Francisco volcanic field is a Quaternary field in northern Arizona, the age and size of which suggests there is a high possibility for an associated exploitable high temperature geothermal resource. Sunset Crater, the youngest dated feature in the field, erupted less than 1000 years ago. The youngest felsic volcanism in the area, located near Strawberry Crater, has been dated at about 51,000 years b.p. Felsic magmas are viscous, and therefore felsic magmatism is generally associated with upper crustal plutons, whereas mafic magmas commonly form surface flows. Heat from felsic magmatism tends to remain near subsurface ponds of the magma. Felsic magmatic systems can sustain substantial geothermal heat for tens to hundreds of thousands of years after emplacement. Knowledge of the quantity and distribution of felsic magmatism is therefore paramount to understanding the geothermal potential of the field. Surface heat flow in the study area ranges from ˜20 to ˜50 mW/m2, anomalously low for the region. Hydrological characteristics of the San Francisco volcanic field are thought to mask increased surface heat flow from the magmatic system. The deep water table (>300m) and a 2-level hydraulic system prevent characteristic surface manifestations of hydrothermal potential, such as hot springs and elevated surface heat flow. Lack of these thermal features at the surface precludes analysis of the resource based solely on surficial mapping and measurements. Forward modeling of the gravity field of a 50 km x 45 km area covering the eastern San Francisco volcanic field has been completed. Results suggest that a large felsic body ( ˜-0.15 g/cc contrast) trends northeastward under the Sugarloaf Mountain-O'Leary Peak-Strawberry Crater magmatic trend. This trend parallels a regional basement fabric, likely of early- to middle-Proterozoic origin. These results are being correlated with new surface geologic mapping and radiometric dating of young felsic volcanic rocks to

  8. Geochemistry of intrusive rocks associated with the Latir volcanic field, New Mexico, and contrasts between evolution of plutonic and volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.M.; Czamanske, G.K.; Lipman, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonic rocks associated with the Latir volcanic field comprise three groups: 1) ???25 Ma high-level resurgent plutons composed of monzogranite and silicic metaluminous and peralkaline granite, 2) 23-25 Ma syenogranite, and alkali-feldspar granite intrusions emplaced along the southern caldera margin, and 3) 19-23 Ma granodiorite and granite plutons emplaced south of the caldera. Major-element compositions of both extrusive and intrusive suites in the Latir field are broadly similar; both suites include high-SiO2 rocks with low Ba and Sr, and high Rb, Nb, Th, and U contents. Moreover, both intermediateto siliciccomposition volcanic and plutonic rocks contain abundant accessory sphene and apatite, rich in rare-earth elements (REE), as well as phases in which REE's are essential components. Strong depletion in Y and REE contents, with increasing SiO2 content, in the plutonic rocks indicate a major role for accessory mineral fractionation that is not observed in volcanic rocks of equivalent composition. Considerations of the rheology of granitic magma suggest that accessory-mineral fractionation may occur primarily by filter-pressing evolved magmas from crystal-rich melts. More limited accessory-mineral crystallization and fractionation during evolution of the volcanic magmas may have resulted from markedly lower diffusivities of essential trace elements than major elements. Accessory-mineral fractionation probably becomes most significant at high crystallinities. The contrast in crystallization environments postulated for the extrusive and intrusive rocks may be common to other magmatic systems; the effects are particularly pronounced in highly evolved rocks of the Latir field. High-SiO2 peralkaline porphyry emplaced during resurgence of the Questa caldera represents non-erupted portions of the magma that produced the Amalia Tuff during caldera-forming eruption. The peralkaline porphyry continues compositional and mineralogical trends found in the tuff. Amphibole

  9. Diagnosis and distress in Navajo healing.

    PubMed

    Csordas, Thomas J; Storck, Michael J; Strauss, Milton

    2008-08-01

    In contemporary Navajo society, traditional Navajo ceremonies, Native American Church prayer meetings, and Navajo Christian faith healing are all highly sought-after resources in the everyday pursuit of health and well-being. What is the nature of affliction among patients who turn to such forms of religious healing? Are these patients typically afflicted with psychiatric disorder? In this article we discuss 84 Navajo patients who participated in the Navajo Healing Project during a period in which they consulted one of these forms of healing. We present diagnostic results obtained from the Structured Clinical Interview for DSMIV (SCID) administered to these patients. We then present an ethnographically augmented analysis comparing the research diagnosis obtained via the SCID with a clinical diagnosis, with the diagnosis given by religious healers, and with the understanding of their own distress on the part of patients. These analyses demonstrate how a cultural approach contributes to the basic science and clinical understandings of affliction as well as to discussion of the advantages and limitations of DSM categories as descriptors of distress and disorder. PMID:18974670

  10. Review of magnetic field monitoring near active faults and volcanic calderas in California: 1974-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, R.J.; Johnston, M.J.S.

    1998-01-01

    Differential magnetic fields have been monitored along the San Andreas fault and the Long Valley caldera since 1974. At each monitoring location, proton precession magnetometers sample total magnetic field intensity at a resolution of 0.1 nT or 0.25 nT. Every 10 min, data samples are transmitted via satellite telemetry to Menlo Park, CA for processing and analysis. The number of active magnetometer sites has varied during the past 21 years from 6 to 25, with 12 sites currently operational. We use this network to identify magnetic field changes generated by earthquake and volcanic processes. During the two decades of monitoring, five moderate earthquakes (M5.9 to M7.3) have occurred within 20 km of magnetometer sites located along the San Andreas fault and only one preseismic signal of 1.5 nT has been observed. During moderate earthquakes, coseismic magnetic signals, with amplitudes from 0.7 nT to 1.3 nT, have been identified for 3 of the 5 events. These observations are generally consistent with those calculated from simple seismomagnetic models of these earthquakes and near-fault coseismic magnetic field disturbances rarely exceed one nanotesla. These data are consistent with the concept of low shear stress and relatively uniform displacement of the San Andreas fault system as expected due to high pore fluid pressure on the fault. A systematic decrease of 0.8-1 nT/year in magnetic field has occurred in the Long Valley caldera since 1989. These magnetic field data are similar in form to observed geodetically measured displacements from inflation of the resurgent dome. A simple volcanomagnetic model involving pressure increase of 50 MPa/a at a depth of 7 km under the resurgent dome can replicate these magnetic field observations. This model is derived from the intrusion model that best fits the surface deformation data. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.