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Sample records for navigational satellites

  1. Fundamentals of satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, A. H.

    The basic operating principles and capabilities of conventional and satellite-based navigation systems for air, sea, and land vehicles are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams. Consideration is given to autonomous onboard systems; systems based on visible or radio beacons; the Transit, Cicada, Navstar-GPS, and Glonass satellite systems; the physical laws and parameters of satellite motion; the definition of time in satellite systems; and the content of the demodulated GPS data signal. The GPS and Glonass data format frames are presented graphically, and tables listing the GPS and Glonass satellites, their technical characteristics, and the (past or scheduled) launch dates are provided.

  2. Automated satellite image navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Robert M.

    1992-12-01

    The automated satellite image navigation method (Auto-Avian) developed and tested by Spaulding (1990) at the Naval Postgraduate School is investigated. The Auto-Avian method replaced the manual procedure of selecting Ground Control Points (GCP's) with an autocorrelation process that utilizes the World Vector Shoreline (WVS) provided by the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) as a string of GCP's to rectify satellite images. The automatic cross-correlation of binary reference (WVS) and search (image) windows eliminated the subjective error associated with the manual selection of GCP's and produced accuracies comparable to the manual method. The scope of Spaulding's (1990) research was expanded. The worldwide application of the Auto-Avian method was demonstrated in three world regions (eastern North Pacific Ocean, eastern North Atlantic Ocean, and Persian Gulf). Using five case studies, the performance of the Auto-Avian method on 'less than optimum' images (i.e., islands, coastlines affected by lateral distortion and/or cloud cover) was investigated.

  3. Introductory Course on Satellite Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giger, Kaspar; Knogl, J. Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Satellite navigation is widely used for personal navigation and more and more in precise and safety-critical applications. Thus, the subject is suited for attracting the interest of young people in science and engineering. The practical applications allow catching the students' attention for the theoretical background. Educational material on the…

  4. Satellite camera image navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Graul, Donald W. (Inventor); Savides, John (Inventor); Hanson, Charles W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Pixels within a satellite camera (1, 2) image are precisely located in terms of latitude and longitude on a celestial body, such as the earth, being imaged. A computer (60) on the earth generates models (40, 50) of the satellite's orbit and attitude, respectively. The orbit model (40) is generated from measurements of stars and landmarks taken by the camera (1, 2), and by range data. The orbit model (40) is an expression of the satellite's latitude and longitude at the subsatellite point, and of the altitude of the satellite, as a function of time, using as coefficients (K) the six Keplerian elements at epoch. The attitude model (50) is based upon star measurements taken by each camera (1, 2). The attitude model (50) is a set of expressions for the deviations in a set of mutually orthogonal reference optical axes (x, y, z) as a function of time, for each camera (1, 2). Measured data is fit into the models (40, 50) using a walking least squares fit algorithm. A transformation computer (66 ) transforms pixel coordinates as telemetered by the camera (1, 2) into earth latitude and longitude coordinates, using the orbit and attitude models (40, 50).

  5. Potential applications of satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaenzer, G.

    The applicability of Navstar GPS to civil air navigation is discussed. The accuracy of current air-navigation systems is reviewed; the basic principle and accuracy of GPS navigation are characterized; the relatively low cost of GPS receiving equipment is pointed out; and particular attention is given to hybrid systems combining GPS with inertial navigation. It is predicted that CAT III landings will be possible using such hybrid systems when the GPS satellites are fully deployed, even without access to the military GPS code. Techniques for GPS-based precision landings, reduced-noise landings, landings on parallel runways, control of taxiing maneuvers, and aircraft-based geodetic measurements are briefly described and illustrated with diagrams.

  6. Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Rodney L.; Born, George H.; Leonard, Jason M.; McGranaghan, Ryan M.; Fujimoto, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    A navigation technology known as LiAISON (Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation) has been known to produce very impressive navigation results for scenarios involving two or more cooperative satellites near the Moon, such that at least one satellite must be in an orbit significantly perturbed by the Earth, such as a lunar halo orbit. The two (or more) satellites track each other using satellite-to-satellite range and/or range-rate measurements. These relative measurements yield absolute orbit navigation when one of the satellites is in a lunar halo orbit, or the like. The geometry between a lunar halo orbiter and a GEO satellite continuously changes, which dramatically improves the information content of a satellite-to-satellite tracking signal. The geometrical variations include significant out-of-plane shifts, as well as inplane shifts. Further, the GEO satellite is almost continuously in view of a lunar halo orbiter. High-fidelity simulations demonstrate that LiAISON technology improves the navigation of GEO orbiters by an order of magnitude, relative to standard ground tracking. If a GEO satellite is navigated using LiAISON- only tracking measurements, its position is typically known to better than 10 meters. If LiAISON measurements are combined with simple radiometric ground observations, then the satellite s position is typically known to better than 3 meters, which is substantially better than the current state of GEO navigation. There are two features of LiAISON that are novel and advantageous compared with conventional satellite navigation. First, ordinary satellite-to-satellite tracking data only provides relative navigation of each satellite. The novelty is the placement of one navigation satellite in an orbit that is significantly perturbed by both the Earth and the Moon. A navigation satellite can track other satellites elsewhere in the Earth-Moon system and acquire knowledge about both satellites absolute positions and velocities

  7. Civil satellite navigation and location systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, W. F.

    1989-05-01

    The use of satellites for civil navigation and location, including satellites not necessarily launched for that purpose, is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to differences between civil and military satellites; civil use of military systems and the associated commercial considerations and regulatory issues; the use of communication satellites; and radiodetermination satellite service based on geostationary satellites. The discussion also covers integration with ground-based radio-navigation systems; existing radio-navigation satellite systems; and the Starfix, Geostar/Locstar, Starfind, Navsat, and Rexstar systems.

  8. Relative Navigation of Formation Flying Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Anne; Kelbel, David; Lee, Taesul; Leung, Dominic; Carpenter, Russell; Gramling, Cheryl; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center (GNCC) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has successfully developed high-accuracy autonomous satellite navigation systems using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) space and ground communications systems and the Global Positioning System (GPS). In addition, an autonomous navigation system that uses celestial object sensor measurements is currently under development and has been successfully tested using real Sun and Earth horizon measurements.The GNCC has developed advanced spacecraft systems that provide autonomous navigation and control of formation flyers in near-Earth, high-Earth, and libration point orbits. To support this effort, the GNCC is assessing the relative navigation accuracy achievable for proposed formations using GPS, intersatellite crosslink, ground-to-satellite Doppler, and celestial object sensor measurements. This paper evaluates the performance of these relative navigation approaches for three proposed missions with two or more vehicles maintaining relatively tight formations. High-fidelity simulations were performed to quantify the absolute and relative navigation accuracy as a function of navigation algorithm and measurement type. Realistically-simulated measurements were processed using the extended Kalman filter implemented in the GPS Enhanced Inboard Navigation System (GEONS) flight software developed by GSFC GNCC. Solutions obtained by simultaneously estimating all satellites in the formation were compared with the results obtained using a simpler approach based on differencing independently estimated state vectors.

  9. Simulation Of Satellite Trajectories And Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sien-Chong; Bertiger, William I.; Border, James S.; Lichten, Stephen M.; Sunseri, Richard F.; Williams, Bobby G.; Wolff, Peter J.; Wu, Jiun-Tsong

    1989-01-01

    Orbit Analysis and Simulation Software, OASIS, is software system developed for covariance and simulation analyses of problems involving Earth satellites, especially Global Positioning System (GPS). Provides flexible, versatile, and efficient software tool for analysis of accuracy in Earth-satellite navigation and GPS-based geodetic studies.

  10. Autonomous satellite navigation methods using the Global Positioning Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, M.; Tapley, B. D.; Schutz, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    This investigation considers the problem of autonomous satellite navigation using the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS). The major topics covered include the design, implementation, and validation of onboard navigation filter algorithms by means of computer simulations. The primary errors that the navigation filter design must minimize are computational effects and modeling inaccuracies due to limited capability of the onboard computer. The minimization of the effect of these errors is attained by applying the sequential extended Kalman filter using a factored covariance implementation with Q-matrix or dynamical model compensations. Peformance evaluation of the navigation filter design is carried out using both the CDC Cyber 170/750 computer and the PDP-11/60 computer. The results are obtained assuming the Phase I GPS constellation, consisting of six satellites, and a Landsat-D type spacecraft as the model for the user satellite orbit.

  11. Uses of navigation satellites by oil explorers

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.G.

    1982-03-01

    The Navy Navigation Satellite System (Transit) was released for civil and commercial use in the late 1960's. Oil explorers use Transit in most offshore exploration operation. Sometimes the Transit position fires are used to confirm other position data, or often it is integrated with other navigation equipment to form a system which maximizes the benefits of all the individual sensors. Differential navigation and positioning is currently in use with Transit and in use with the radionavigation systems Loran C and Omega. Navstar GPS if made available to the oil exploration industry with its full capability, would provide a solution to many of the positioning problems. If there is a cost effective and accurate way to use US government funded navigation satellites within the constraints imposed on the civil community, the oil exploration industry and its supporting manufacturing and service companies will find it. (DP)

  12. Range Filtering For Navigation By Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell

    1989-01-01

    Less processing and storage of data needed. Mathematical basis developed for Kalman filtering of sequential measurements of range from single-channel receiver in Global Positioning System (GPS) to each of several navigation satellites. Range filtering involves separate applications of kinematic Kalman tracking filter to measurements of signal from each satellite in use. State vector consists of pseudorange and time derivatives. Main advantages: simplification of tuning and decreases in required amounts of storage and processing of data for navigation in ships, airplanes, and ground vehicles.

  13. Testing Microwave Landing Systems With Satellite Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiriazes, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Less time and equipment needed to perform tests. Satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measures accuracy of microwave scanning-beam landing system (MSBLS) at airports used to support Shuttle landings. Provides time and three-dimensional information on position and velocity with unprecedented accuracy. Useful for testing other electronic navigation aids like LORAN, TACAN and microwave landing systems (MLS).

  14. Introduction to Global Navigation Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the fundamentals of satellite navigation, and specifically how GPS works. It presents an overview and status of Global Positioning System, for both the current GPS, and plans to modernize it in the future. There is also a overview and status of other Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), specifically GLONASS, Galileo, and QZSS. There is also a review of Satellite based time transfer techniques. The topic is of interest to the Time and Frequency Community, because the Global Positioning system has become the primary system for distributing Time and frequency globally, and because it allows users to synchronize clocks and calibrate and control oscillators in any location that has a GPS antenna.

  15. Dual RF Astrodynamic GPS Orbital Navigator Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanipe, David B.; Provence, Robert Steve; Straube, Timothy M.; Reed, Helen; Bishop, Robert; Lightsey, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Dual RF Astrodynamic GPS Orbital Navigator Satellite (DRAGONSat) will demonstrate autonomous rendezvous and docking (ARD) in low Earth orbit (LEO) and gather flight data with a global positioning system (GPS) receiver strictly designed for space applications. ARD is the capability of two independent spacecraft to rendezvous in orbit and dock without crew intervention. DRAGONSat consists of two picosatellites (one built by the University of Texas and one built by Texas A and M University) and the Space Shuttle Payload Launcher (SSPL); this project will ultimately demonstrate ARD in LEO.

  16. Star sightings by satellite for image navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Ekman, Donald E. (Inventor); Savides, John (Inventor); Zwirn, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Stars are sensed by one or more instruments (1, 2) on board a three-axis stabilized satellite, for purposes of assisting in image navigation. A star acquistion computer (64), which may be located on the earth, commands the instrument mirror (33, 32) to slew just outside the limb of the earth or other celestial body around which the satellite is orbiting, to look for stars that have been cataloged in a star map stored within the computer (64). The instrument (1, 2) is commanded to dwell for a period of time equal to a star search window time, plus the maximum time the instrument (1, 2) takes to complete a current scan, plus the maximum time it takes for the mirror (33, 32) to slew to the star. When the satellite is first placed in orbit, and following first stationkeeping and eclipse, a special operation is performed in which the star-seeking instrument (1, 2) FOV is broadened. The elevation dimension can be broadened by performing repetitive star seeks; the azimuth dimension can be broadened by lengthening the commanded dwell times.

  17. Individual Global Navigation Satellite Systems in the Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Force, Dale A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of individual Global Navigation Satellite Services (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, and Beidou/COMPASS) for the position, navigation, and timing in the Space Service Volume at altitudes of 300 km, 3000 km, 8000 km, 15000 km, 25000 km, 36500km and 70000 km is examined and the percent availability of at least one and at least four satellites is presented.

  18. Timation 3 satellite. [artificial satellite for navigation, space radiation, and time transfer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholomew, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the Timation 3 satellite are discussed. A diagram of the basic structure is provide to show the solar panels, navigation and telemetry antennas, gravity gradient booms, and solar cell experiments. The specific application of the satellite for time management or time transfer for navigation purposes is reported. Various measurements and experiments conducted by the satellite are described.

  19. Determination of the number of navigation satellites within satellite acquisition range

    SciTech Connect

    Kurenkov, Vladimir I. E-mail: ask@ssau.ru; Kucherov, Alexander S. E-mail: ask@ssau.ru; Gordeev, Alexey I.; Shilov, Lev B.

    2014-12-10

    The problem of determination of the number of navigation satellites within acquisition range with regard to antenna systems configuration and stochastic land remote sensing satellite maneuvers is the subject considered in the paper. Distribution function and density function of the number of navigation satellites within acquisition range are obtained.

  20. Clock performance as a critical parameter in navigation satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderle, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The high performance of available oscillators has permitted the development of invaluable navigation and geodetic satellite systems. However, still higher performance oscillators would further improve the accuracy or flexibility of the systems.

  1. Relative Navigation of Formation-Flying Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Anne; Kelbel, David; Lee, Taesul; Leung, Dominic; Carpenter, J. Russell; Grambling, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    This paper compares autonomous relative navigation performance for formations in eccentric, medium and high-altitude Earth orbits using Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Positioning Service (SPS), crosslink, and celestial object measurements. For close formations, the relative navigation accuracy is highly dependent on the magnitude of the uncorrelated measurement errors. A relative navigation position accuracy of better than 10 centimeters root-mean-square (RMS) can be achieved for medium-altitude formations that can continuously track at least one GPS signal. A relative navigation position accuracy of better than 15 meters RMS can be achieved for high-altitude formations that have sparse tracking of the GPS signals. The addition of crosslink measurements can significantly improve relative navigation accuracy for formations that use sparse GPS tracking or celestial object measurements for absolute navigation.

  2. Integration of Omega and satellite navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlachta, Henry B.

    An extensive series of laboratory tests and flight trials has established that the hybrid Omega/VLF/GPS system effectively applies GPS to the enhancement of Omega with a cost-effective operator installation. The accuracy enhancement thus achieved also increases the reliability of navigation and furnishes aviation fuel savings superior to those of Omega, as a result of reduced flight-path wavering. The prospective GPS/GLONASS navigation system currently undergoing definition will be the first certifiable as a sole means on navigation; the Omega/VLF/GPS hybrid can serve as a transitional system.

  3. Autonomous Relative Navigation for Formation-Flying Satellites Using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramling, Cheryl; Carpenter, J. Russell; Long, Anne; Kelbel, David; Lee, Taesul

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center is currently developing advanced spacecraft systems to provide autonomous navigation and control of formation flyers. This paper discusses autonomous relative navigation performance for a formation of four eccentric, medium-altitude Earth-orbiting satellites using Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Positioning Service (SPS) and "GPS-like " intersatellite measurements. The performance of several candidate relative navigation approaches is evaluated. These analyses indicate that an autonomous relative navigation position accuracy of 1meter root-mean-square can be achieved by differencing high-accuracy filtered solutions if only measurements from common GPS space vehicles are used in the independently estimated solutions.

  4. Autonomous satellite navigation by stellar refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gounley, R.; White, R.; Gai, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes an error analysis of an autonomous navigator using refraction measurements of starlight passing through the upper atmosphere. The analysis is based on a discrete linear Kalman filter. The filter generated steady-state values of navigator performance for a variety of test cases. Results of these simulations show that in low-earth orbit position-error standard deviations of less than 0.100 km may be obtained using only 40 star sightings per orbit.

  5. Radio occultation based on BeiDou satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hu; Hu, Haiying; Shen, Xue-min; Gong, Wenbin; Zhang, Yonghe

    2014-11-01

    With the development of GNSS systems, it has become a tendency that radio occultation is used to sense the Earth's atmosphere. By this means, the moisture, temperature, pressure, and total electron content can be derived. Based on the sensing results, more complicated models for atmosphere might come into being. Meteorology well benefits from this technology. As scheduled, the BD satellite navigation system will have a worldwide coverage by the end of 2020. Radio occultation studies in China have been highlighted in the recent decade. More and more feasibilities reports have been published in either domestic or international journals. Herein, some scenarios are proposed to assess the coverage of radio occultation based on two different phases of BD satellite navigation system. Phase one for BD is composed of GEO,IGSO and several MEO satellites. Phase two for BD consists mostly of 24 MEO satellites, some GEO and IGSO satellites. The characteristics of radio occultation based on these two phases are presented respectively.

  6. Feasibility of satellite interferometry for surveillance, navigation, and traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalapillai, S.; Ruck, G. T.; Mourad, A. G.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of using a satellite borne interferometry system for surveillance, navigation, and traffic control applications was investigated. The evaluation was comprised of: (1) a two part systems analysis (software and hardware); (2) a survey of competitive navigation systems (both experimental and planned); (3) a comparison of their characteristics and capabilities with those of an interferometry system; and (4) a limited survey of potential users to determine the variety of possible applications for the interferometry system and the requirements which it would have to meet. Five candidate or "strawman" interferometry systems for various applications with various capabilities were configured (on a preliminary basis) and were evaluated. It is concluded that interferometry in conjunction with a geostationary satellite has an inherent ability to provide both a means for navigation/position location and communication. It offers a very high potential for meeting a large number of user applications and requirements for navigation and related functions.

  7. Navigation Performance of Global Navigation Satellite Systems in the Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Force, Dale A.

    2013-01-01

    GPS has been used for spacecraft navigation for many years center dot In support of this, the US has committed that future GPS satellites will continue to provide signals in the Space Service Volume center dot NASA is working with international agencies to obtain similar commitments from other providers center dot In support of this effort, I simulated multi-constellation navigation in the Space Service Volume In this presentation, I extend the work to examine the navigational benefits and drawbacks of the new constellations center dot A major benefit is the reduced geometric dilution of precision (GDOP). I show that there is a substantial reduction in GDOP by using all of the GNSS constellations center dot The increased number of GNSS satellites broadcasting does produce mutual interference, raising the noise floor. A near/far signal problem can also occur where a nearby satellite drowns out satellites that are far away. - In these simulations, no major effect was observed Typically, the use of multi-constellation GNSS navigation improves GDOP by a factor of two or more over GPS alone center dot In addition, at the higher altitudes, four satellite solutions can be obtained much more often center dot This show the value of having commitments to provide signals in the Space Service Volume Besides a commitment to provide a minimum signal in the Space Service Volume, detailed signal gain information is useful for mission planning center dot Knowledge of group and phase delay over the pattern would also reduce the navigational uncertainty

  8. Satellite Imagery Assisted Road-Based Visual Navigation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, A.; Gibbens, P. W.

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing demand for unmanned aerial systems as autonomous surveillance, exploration and remote sensing solutions. Among the key concerns for robust operation of these systems is the need to reliably navigate the environment without reliance on global navigation satellite system (GNSS). This is of particular concern in Defence circles, but is also a major safety issue for commercial operations. In these circumstances, the aircraft needs to navigate relying only on information from on-board passive sensors such as digital cameras. An autonomous feature-based visual system presented in this work offers a novel integral approach to the modelling and registration of visual features that responds to the specific needs of the navigation system. It detects visual features from Google Earth* build a feature database. The same algorithm then detects features in an on-board cameras video stream. On one level this serves to localise the vehicle relative to the environment using Simultaneous Localisation and Mapping (SLAM). On a second level it correlates them with the database to localise the vehicle with respect to the inertial frame. The performance of the presented visual navigation system was compared using the satellite imagery from different years. Based on comparison results, an analysis of the effects of seasonal, structural and qualitative changes of the imagery source on the performance of the navigation algorithm is presented. * The algorithm is independent of the source of satellite imagery and another provider can be used

  9. Navigation study for low-altitude Earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastor, P. R.; Fang, B. T.; Yee, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    This document describes several navigation studies for low-altitude Earth satellites. The use of Global Positioning System Navigation Package data for LANDSAT-5 orbit determination is evaluated. In addition, a navigation analysis for the proposed Tracking and Data Aquisition System is presented. This analysis, based on simulations employing one-way Doppler data, is used to determine the agreement between the Research and Development Goddard Trajectory Determination System and the Sequential Error Analysis Program results. Properties of several geopotential error models are studied and an exploratory study of orbit smoother process noise is presented.

  10. Autonomous Real-time Relative Navigation for Formation Flying Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Shnhwa; Park, Sang-Young; Choi, Kyu-Hong

    2009-03-01

    Relative navigation system is presented using GPS measurements from a single-channel global positioning system (GPS) simulator. The objective of this study is to provide the real-time inter-satellite relative positions as well as absolute positions for two formation flying satellites in low earth orbit. To improve the navigation performance, the absolute states are estimated using ion-free GRAPHIC (group and phase ionospheric correction) pseudo-ranges and the relative states are determined using double-differential carrier-phase data and singled-differential C/A code data based on the extended Kalman filter and the unscented Kalman filter. Furthermore, pseudo-relative dynamic model and modified relative measurement model are developed. This modified EKF method prevents non-linearity of the measurement model from degrading precision by applying linearization about absolute navigation solutions not about the priori estimates. The LAMBDA method also has been used to improve the relative navigation performance by fixing ambiguities to integers for precise relative navigation. The software-based simulation has been performed and the steady state accuracies of 1 m and 6 mm (1σ of 3-dimensional difference errors) are achieved for the absolute and relative navigation using EKF for a short baseline leader/follower formation. In addition, the navigation performances are compared for the EKF and the UKF for 10 hours simulation, and relative position errors are mm-level for the two filters showing the similar trends.

  11. Autonomous satellite navigation using starlight refraction angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xiaolin; Wang, Longhua; Bai, Xinbei; Fang, Jiancheng

    2013-05-01

    An on-board autonomous navigation capability is required to reduce the operation costs and enhance the navigation performance of future satellites. Autonomous navigation by stellar refraction is a type of autonomous celestial navigation method that uses high-accuracy star sensors instead of Earth sensors to provide information regarding Earth's horizon. In previous studies, the refraction apparent height has typically been used for such navigation. However, the apparent height cannot be measured directly by a star sensor and can only be calculated by the refraction angle and an atmospheric refraction model. Therefore, additional errors are introduced by the uncertainty and nonlinearity of atmospheric refraction models, which result in reduced navigation accuracy and reliability. A new navigation method based on the direct measurement of the refraction angle is proposed to solve this problem. Techniques for the determination of the refraction angle are introduced, and a measurement model for the refraction angle is established. The method is tested and validated by simulations. When the starlight refraction height ranges from 20 to 50 km, a positioning accuracy of better than 100 m can be achieved for a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellite using the refraction angle, while the positioning accuracy of the traditional method using the apparent height is worse than 500 m under the same conditions. Furthermore, an analysis of the factors that affect navigation accuracy, including the measurement accuracy of the refraction angle, the number of visible refracted stars per orbit and the installation azimuth of star sensor, is presented. This method is highly recommended for small satellites in particular, as no additional hardware besides two star sensors is required.

  12. Space-based augmentation for global navigation satellite systems.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Mohinder S

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes space-based augmentation for global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). Space-based augmentations increase the accuracy and integrity of the GNSS, thereby enhancing users' safety. The corrections for ephemeris, ionospheric delay, and clocks are calculated from reference station measurements of GNSS data in wide-area master stations and broadcast via geostationary earth orbit (GEO) satellites. This paper discusses the clock models, satellite orbit determination, ionospheric delay estimation, multipath mitigation, and GEO uplink subsystem (GUS) as used in the Wide Area Augmentation System developed by the FAA. PMID:22481784

  13. Towards navigation based on 120 satellites: Analyzing the new signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are experiencing a new era. The US Global Positioning System (GPS) now serves over 300 million users in a bewildering breadth of applications. The Russian GLONASS is enjoying a startling renaissance based on the recovery of the Russian economy. In addition, the European Union is developing the Galileo system that promises to place 30 more satellites in medium Earth orbit. If that is not enough, China has started their Compass system project that promises a rich combination of satellites in medium and geostationary earth orbit. All of these satellites will broadcast at least three civil signals in a multiplicity of frequency bands. If all of these new satellites are launched, we will have 120 satellites and over 300 signals in space for global navigation by 2020. So far, two test satellites of the European Galileo and one satellite from the Chinese Compass have been launched. The new satellites and new signals create a great opportunity for GNSS receivers to gain more redundancy and accuracy. On the other hand, the new GNSS signals could interfere with each other since their frequency bands overlap. Moreover, when the satellites were put into orbit, the signal specifications were not available to the public. This mystery made it impossible for GNSS receivers to acquire and track the new satellites. It was also impossible to analyze the interference among GNSS satellites. Thus, there was an urgent and great need for discovering the unknown signal characteristics. The contribution of this work is to design algorithms for deciphering all the new test satellite signals from the Galileo and Compass satellite programs. We reveal the spread spectrum codes for all the signals on the prototype satellites listed above. In addition, we derive the underlying code generators based on a modification of the Berlekamp-Massey algorithm for solving systems of equations over finite fields. Several receiver companies, such as Trimble

  14. An alternative ionospheric correction model for global navigation satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoque, M. M.; Jakowski, N.

    2015-04-01

    The ionosphere is recognized as a major error source for single-frequency operations of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). To enhance single-frequency operations the global positioning system (GPS) uses an ionospheric correction algorithm (ICA) driven by 8 coefficients broadcasted in the navigation message every 24 h. Similarly, the global navigation satellite system Galileo uses the electron density NeQuick model for ionospheric correction. The Galileo satellite vehicles (SVs) transmit 3 ionospheric correction coefficients as driver parameters of the NeQuick model. In the present work, we propose an alternative ionospheric correction algorithm called Neustrelitz TEC broadcast model NTCM-BC that is also applicable for global satellite navigation systems. Like the GPS ICA or Galileo NeQuick, the NTCM-BC can be optimized on a daily basis by utilizing GNSS data obtained at the previous day at monitor stations. To drive the NTCM-BC, 9 ionospheric correction coefficients need to be uploaded to the SVs for broadcasting in the navigation message. Our investigation using GPS data of about 200 worldwide ground stations shows that the 24-h-ahead prediction performance of the NTCM-BC is better than the GPS ICA and comparable to the Galileo NeQuick model. We have found that the 95 percentiles of the prediction error are about 16.1, 16.1 and 13.4 TECU for the GPS ICA, Galileo NeQuick and NTCM-BC, respectively, during a selected quiet ionospheric period, whereas the corresponding numbers are found about 40.5, 28.2 and 26.5 TECU during a selected geomagnetic perturbed period. However, in terms of complexity the NTCM-BC is easier to handle than the Galileo NeQuick and in this respect comparable to the GPS ICA.

  15. Autonomous satellite navigation with the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, A. J.; Wooden, W. H., II; Long, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential of using the Global Positioning System (GPS) to provide autonomous navigation capability to NASA satellites in the 1980 era. Some of the driving forces motivating autonomous navigation are presented. These include such factors as advances in attitude control systems, onboard science annotation, and onboard gridding of imaging data. Simulation results which demonstrate baseline orbit determination accuracies using GPS data on Seasat, Landsat-D, and the Solar Maximum Mission are presented. Emphasis is placed on identifying error sources such as GPS time, GPS ephemeris, user timing biases, and user orbit dynamics, and in a parametric sense on evaluating their contribution to the orbit determination accuracies.

  16. Visibility and Geometry of Global Satellite Navigation Systems Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszewski, Jacek

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays (November 2015) there are two global fully operational satellite navigation systems, American GPS and Russian GLONASS. Two next are under construction, Galileo in Europe and BeiDou in China. As the error of observer's position obtained from these systems depends on geometry factor DOP (Dilution Of Precision) among other things the knowledge of the number of satellites visible by this observer above given masking elevation angle Hmin and the distributions of DOP coefficient values, GDOP in particular, is very important. The lowest and the greatest number of satellites visible in open area by the observer at different latitudes for different Hmin, the percentage of satellites visible above angle H (9 intervals, each 10O wide), distributions (in per cent) of satellites azimuths (8 intervals, each 45O wide) and GDOP coefficient values (8 intervals) for Hmin = 5O for all these four systems at different observer's latitudes (9 intervals, each wide 10O wide) are presented in the paper. Additionally the lowest elevation for which the number of satellites visible at different latitudes by the observer in open area above this angle is equal 4 or 3 and the distributions (in per cent) of GDOP coefficient values for different Hmin at observer's latitudes 50-60O for the same four systems are showed. All calculations were made for constellation of GPS 27 satellites, GLONASS 24, Galileo 30 and BeiDou 27 MEO satellites.

  17. Navigation Performance of Global Navigation Satellite Systems in the Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Force, Dale A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the results I reported at this year's ION International Technical Meeting on multi-constellation GNSS coverage by showing how the use of multi-constellation GNSS improves Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP). Originally developed to provide position, navigation, and timing for terrestrial users, GPS has found increasing use for in space for precision orbit determination, precise time synchronization, real-time spacecraft navigation, and three-axis attitude control of Earth orbiting satellites. With additional Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) coming into service (GLONASS, Galileo, and Beidou) and the development of Satellite Based Augmentation Services, it is possible to obtain improved precision by using evolving multi-constellation receiver. The Space Service Volume formally defined as the volume of space between three thousand kilometers altitude and geosynchronous altitude ((is) approximately 36,500 km), with the volume below three thousand kilometers defined as the Terrestrial Service Volume (TSV). The USA has established signal requirements for the Space Service Volume (SSV) as part of the GPS Capability Development Documentation (CDD). Diplomatic efforts are underway to extend Space service Volume commitments to the other Position, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) service providers in an effort to assure that all space users will benefit from the enhanced capabilities of interoperating GNSS services in the space domain.

  18. ATS-1/ATS-3 dual satellite navigation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, W. M.

    1971-01-01

    A study which illustrated the feasibility of implementing an on-board aircraft navigation system based on using the ATS-1 and ATS-3 satellites, the modified Omega Position Location Equipment (OPLE) Control Center, and a suitable aircraft terminal was conducted. The report provides: (1) a consideration of the problems of satellite navigation and an objective definition of the optimum system under the constraints of its specified components, (2) a description of the necessary modifications to the OPLE Control Center, the design of an aircraft terminal, and the design of ground reference terminals, and (3) an outline of an experiment plan and an estimate of the cost to be expected in conducting the program.

  19. Interoperability of satellite-based augmentation systems for aircraft navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Donghai

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is pioneering a transformation of the national airspace system from its present ground based navigation and landing systems to a satellite based system using the Global Positioning System (GPS). To meet the critical safety-of-life aviation positioning requirements, a Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS), the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS), is being implemented to support navigation for all phases of flight, including Category I precision approach. The system is designed to be used as a primary means of navigation, capable of meeting the Required Navigation Performance (RNP), and therefore must satisfy the accuracy, integrity, continuity and availability requirements. In recent years there has been international acceptance of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), spurring widespread growth in the independent development of SBASs. Besides the FAA's WAAS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service System (EGNOS) and the Japan Civil Aviation Bureau's MTSAT-Satellite Augmentation System (MSAS) are also being actively developed. Although all of these SBASs can operate as stand-alone, regional systems, there is increasing interest in linking these SBASs together to reduce costs while improving service coverage. This research investigated the coverage and availability improvements due to cooperative efforts among regional SBAS networks. The primary goal was to identify the optimal interoperation strategies in terms of performance, complexity and practicality. The core algorithms associated with the most promising concepts were developed and demonstrated. Experimental verification of the most promising concepts was conducted using data collected from a joint international test between the National Satellite Test Bed (NSTB) and the EGNOS System Test Bed (ESTB). This research clearly shows that a simple switch between SBASs made by the airborne equipment is the most effective choice for achieving the

  20. System using leo satellites for centimeter-level navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabinowitz, Matthew (Inventor); Parkinson, Bradford W. (Inventor); Cohen, Clark E. (Inventor); Lawrence, David G. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a system for rapidly resolving position with centimeter-level accuracy for a mobile or stationary receiver [4]. This is achieved by estimating a set of parameters that are related to the integer cycle ambiguities which arise in tracking the carrier phase of satellite downlinks [5,6]. In the preferred embodiment, the technique involves a navigation receiver [4] simultaneously tracking transmissions [6] from Low Earth Orbit Satellites (LEOS) [2] together with transmissions [5] from GPS navigation satellites [1]. The rapid change in the line-of-sight vectors from the receiver [4] to the LEO signal sources [2], due to the orbital motion of the LEOS, enables the resolution with integrity of the integer cycle ambiguities of the GPS signals [5] as well as parameters related to the integer cycle ambiguity on the LEOS signals [6]. These parameters, once identified, enable real-time centimeter-level positioning of the receiver [4]. In order to achieve high-precision position estimates without the use of specialized electronics such as atomic clocks, the technique accounts for instabilities in the crystal oscillators driving the satellite transmitters, as well as those in the reference [3] and user [4] receivers. In addition, the algorithm accommodates as well as to LEOS that receive signals from ground-based transmitters, then re-transmit frequency-converted signals to the ground.

  1. Sensing the Earth using Global Navigation Satellite System signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Rizos, Chris; Rius, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    International Workshop on GNSS Remote Sensing for Future Missions and Sciences; Shanghai, China, 7-9 August 2011 The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has been widely used in navigation, positioning, and geoscience applications. Recently, the versatility of GNSS as a new remote sensing tool has been demonstrated with the use of refracted, reflected, and scattered GNSS signals to sound the atmosphere and ionosphere, ocean, land surfaces (including soil moisture), and cryosphere. Existing GPS radio occultation (RO) missions—e.g., the U.S.-Argentina SAC-C, German Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP), U.S.-Germany Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), Taiwan-U.S. Formosa Satellite Mission-3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC) satellites, German TerraSAR-X satellite, and European MetOp—together with groundbased GNSS observations, have provided precise and high-resolution information on tropospheric water vapor, pressure, temperature, tropopause parameters, ionospheric total electron content, and electron density profiles. GNSS signals reflected from the ocean and land surface can determine the ocean height, ocean surface wind speed and wind direction, soil moisture, and ice and snow thickness. With improvement expected due to the next generation of multifrequency GNSS systems and receivers, and new space-based instruments tracking GNSS reflected and refracted signals, new scientific applications of GNSS are expected in the near future across a number of environmental remote sensing fields.

  2. Individual Global Navigation Satellite Systems in the Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Force, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides providing position, navigation, and timing (PNT) to terrestrial users, GPS is currently used to provide for precision orbit determination, precise time synchronization, real-time spacecraft navigation, and three-axis control of Earth orbiting satellites. With additional Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) coming into service (GLONASS, Beidou, and Galileo), it will be possible to provide these services by using other GNSS constellations. The paper, "GPS in the Space Service Volume," presented at the ION GNSS 19th International Technical Meeting in 2006 (Ref. 1), defined the Space Service Volume, and analyzed the performance of GPS out to 70,000 km. This paper will report a similar analysis of the performance of each of the additional GNSS and compare them with GPS alone. The Space Service Volume, defined as the volume between 3,000 km altitude and geosynchronous altitude, as compared with the Terrestrial Service Volume between the surface and 3,000 km. In the Terrestrial Service Volume, GNSS performance will be similar to performance on the Earth's surface. The GPS system has established signal requirements for the Space Service Volume. A separate paper presented at the conference covers the use of multiple GNSS in the Space Service Volume.

  3. Precise Orbit Determination of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lina; Ge, Maorong; Wang, Jiexian; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2013-04-01

    China has been developing its own independent satellite navigation system since decades. Now the COMPASS system, also known as BeiDou, is emerging and gaining more and more interest and attention in the worldwide GNSS communities. The current regional BeiDou system is ready for its operational service around the end of 2012 with a constellation including five Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO), five Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit satellites (IGSO) and four Medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites in operation. Besides the open service with positioning accuracy of around 10m which is free to civilian users, both precise relative positioning, and precise point positioning are demonstrated as well. In order to enhance the BeiDou precise positioning service, Precise Orbit Determination (POD) which is essential of any satellite navigation system has been investigated and studied thoroughly. To further improving the orbits of different types of satellites, we study the impact of network coverage on POD data products by comparing results from tracking networks over the Chinese territory, Asian-Pacific, Asian and of global scale. Furthermore, we concentrate on the improvement of involving MEOs on the orbit quality of GEOs and IGSOs. POD with and without MEOs are undertaken and results are analyzed. Finally, integer ambiguity resolution which brings highly improvement on orbits and positions with GPS data is also carried out and its effect on POD data products is assessed and discussed in detail. Seven weeks of BeiDou data from a ground tracking network, deployed by Wuhan University is employed in this study. The test constellation includes four GEO, five IGSO and two MEO satellites in operation. The three-day solution approach is employed to enhance its strength due to the limited coverage of the tracking network and the small movement of most of the satellites. A number of tracking scenarios and processing schemas are identified and processed and overlapping orbit

  4. Combined Global Navigation Satellite Systems in the Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Force, Dale A.; Miller, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Besides providing position, navigation, and timing (PNT) services to traditional terrestrial and airborne users, GPS is also being increasingly used as a tool to enable precision orbit determination, precise time synchronization, real-time spacecraft navigation, and three-axis attitude control of Earth orbiting satellites. With additional Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) constellations being replenished and coming into service (GLONASS, Beidou, and Galileo), it will become possible to benefit from greater signal availability and robustness by using evolving multi-constellation receivers. The paper, "GPS in the Space Service Volume," presented at the ION GNSS 19th International Technical Meeting in 2006 (Ref. 1), defined the Space Service Volume, and analyzed the performance of GPS out to seventy thousand kilometers. This paper will report a similar analysis of the signal coverage of GPS in the space domain; however, the analyses will also consider signal coverage from each of the additional GNSS constellations noted earlier to specifically demonstrate the expected benefits to be derived from using GPS in conjunction with other foreign systems. The Space Service Volume is formally defined as the volume of space between three thousand kilometers altitude and geosynchronous altitude circa 36,000 km, as compared with the Terrestrial Service Volume between 3,000 km and the surface of the Earth. In the Terrestrial Service Volume, GNSS performance is the same as on or near the Earth's surface due to satellite vehicle availability and geometry similarities. The core GPS system has thereby established signal requirements for the Space Service Volume as part of technical Capability Development Documentation (CDD) that specifies system performance. Besides the technical discussion, we also present diplomatic efforts to extend the GPS Space Service Volume concept to other PNT service providers in an effort to assure that all space users will benefit from the enhanced

  5. Combined Global Navigation Satellite Systems in the Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Force, Dale A.; Miller, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Besides providing position, velocity, and timing (PVT) for terrestrial users, the Global Positioning System (GPS) is also being used to provide PVT information for earth orbiting satellites. In 2006, F. H. Bauer, et. al., defined the Space Service Volume in the paper GPS in the Space Service Volume , presented at ION s 19th international Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division, and looked at GPS coverage for orbiting satellites. With GLONASS already operational, and the first satellites of the Galileo and Beidou/COMPASS constellations already in orbit, it is time to look at the use of the new Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) coming into service to provide PVT information for earth orbiting satellites. This presentation extends GPS in the Space Service Volume by examining the coverage capability of combinations of the new constellations with GPS GPS was first explored as a system for refining the position, velocity, and timing of other spacecraft equipped with GPS receivers in the early eighties. Because of this, a new GPS utility developed beyond the original purpose of providing position, velocity, and timing services for land, maritime, and aerial applications. GPS signals are now received and processed by spacecraft both above and below the GPS constellation, including signals that spill over the limb of the earth. Support of GPS space applications is now part of the system plan for GPS, and support of the Space Service Volume by other GNSS providers has been proposed to the UN International Committee on GNSS (ICG). GPS has been demonstrated to provide decimeter level position accuracy in real-time for satellites in low Earth orbit (centimeter level in non-real-time applications). GPS has been proven useful for satellites in geosynchronous orbit, and also for satellites in highly elliptical orbits. Depending on how many satellites are in view, one can keep time locked to the GNSS standard, and through that to Universal Time as long as at least one

  6. Lunar far side surface navigation using Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation (LiAISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesar, Siamak G.; Parker, Jeffrey S.; Leonard, Jason M.; McGranaghan, Ryan M.; Born, George H.

    2015-12-01

    We study the application of Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation (LiAISON) to track vehicles on the far side of the lunar surface. The LiAISON architecture is demonstrated to achieve accurate orbit determination solutions for various mission scenarios in the Earth-Moon system. Given the proper description of the force field, LiAISON is capable of producing absolute orbit determination solutions using relative satellite-to-satellite tracking observations alone. The lack of direct communication between Earth-based tracking stations and the far side of the Moon provides an ideal opportunity for implementing LiAISON. This paper presents a novel approach to use the LiAISON architecture to perform autonomous navigation of assets on the lunar far side surface. Relative measurements between a spacecraft placed in an EML-2 halo orbit and lunar surface asset(s) are simulated and processed. Comprehensive simulation results show that absolute states of the surface assets are observable with an achieved accuracy of the position estimate on the order of tens of meters.

  7. The ESA contribution to the European Satellite Navigation Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, R.; Lo Galbo, P.; de Mateo, M. L.; Steciw, A.; Ashford, E.

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes the ESA ARTES-9 programme on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). This programme will be the ESA contribution to the wider European Satellite Navigation Programme which is to be implemented as a joint effort of the European Union, Eurocontrol and ESA with the support of other European bodies such as telecommunication operators, national civil aviation authorities, national space agencies, industry, universities and R&D institutes in general. In fact, in view of the geographical area concerned, the large number of parties interested, the experience required and the global nature of GNSS, the proposed initiative can only be successful if based on a strong cooperation at a European and international scale. The ESA ARTES-9 programme will consist on one side, of the design, development and validation of the European complement to the GPS and GLONASS systems (GNSS1), and on the other side of the study, design and pre-development of the European contribution to follow-on systems: GNSS2.

  8. The NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS): Mission Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruf, C. S.; Ridley, A. J.; Gleason, S.; Rose, R.; Scherrer, J.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is a confirmed spaceborne mission scheduled for launch in October 2016 that is specifically designed to study the surface wind structure in and near the inner core of tropical cyclones (TC). CYGNSS consists of a constellation of eight small observatories carried into orbit on a single launch vehicle. Each observatory carries a 4-channel bistatic radar receiver tuned to receive GPS navigation signals scattered from the ocean surface. The eight satellites are spaced approximately twelve minutes apart in the same circular, low inclination orbit plane in order to provide frequent temporal sampling in the tropics. CYGNSS is expected to provide unprecedented temporal resolution and spatial coverage, under all precipitating conditions, and over the full dynamic range of wind speeds experienced in a TC. Mission simulations predict a median(mean) revisit time of 3(7) hours at all locations between 35o N and 35o S latitude.. The CYGNSS mission is currently in Phase D assembly, integration and test of the 8 Observatories and Deployment Module. An update on the status of the mission will be presented, including the latest hardware developments, the science algorithms planned for ground processing, and simulations of the expected impact on tropical cyclone forecast skill due to the CYGNSS measurements.

  9. Navigation and attitude reference for autonomous satellite launch and orbital operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kau, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    The navigation and attitude reference performance of a strapdown system are investigated for applications to autonomous satellite launch and orbital operations. It is assumed that satellite payloads are integrated into existing missile systems and that the boost, orbit insertion, and in-orbit operation of the satellite are performed autonomously without relying on external support facilities. Autonomous and long term accurate navigation and attitude reference are provided by a strapdown inertial navigation system aided by a star sensor and earth landmark sensor. Sensor measurement geometry and navigation and attitude update mechanizations are discussed. Performance analysis data are presented for following functional elements: (1) prelaunch alignment; (2) boost navigation and attitude reference; (3) post boost stellar attitude and navigation updates; (4) orbital navigation update using sensor landmark measurements; and (5) in-orbit stellar attitude update and gyro calibration. The system performances are shown to satisfy the requirements of a large class of satellite payload applications.

  10. The changing world of global navigation satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, John M.; Neilan, Ruth E.; Higgins, Matt; Arias, Felicitas

    The world of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) has been changing very rapidly during the last years. New constellations are being developed in Europe (Galileo), India (IRNSS), Japan (QZNSS) and China (Compass), while both the US GPS and the Russian GLONASS programmes are engaged in very significant mediumto long-term improvements, which will make them even more valuable in the coming years to an ever wider range of civilian users. In addition, powerful regional augmentation systems are becoming (or have already become) operational, providing users with important real time information concerning the integrity of the signals being broadcast by those two systems: these include the US WAAS, the European EGNOS, the Japanese MSAS, the Indian GAGAN and others. Following a number of United Nations sponsored regional workshops, a report by an ad hoc UN "GNSS Action Team" and several preparatory meetings, the International Committee on GNSS (ICG) was established in December 2005 in Vienna, Austria. The ICG is an informal body with the main objective of promoting cooperation on matters of mutual interest related to civil satellite-based positioning, navigation, timing, and value-added services, as well as compatibility and interoperability among the GNSS systems. A further important objective is to encourage the use of GNSS to support sustainable development, particularly in the developing countries. The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) plays a key role in facilitating the work of the ICG. The members of the Committee are GNSS system providers, while international organisations representing users of GNSS can qualify for participation in the work of the Committee as associate members or observers. The interests of the space geodetic, mapping and timing communities are represented in particular through ICG associate membership of the IGS, IAG, FIG, IERS, while BIPM is an ICG observer. This paper will highlight the background of these developments

  11. 77 FR 42419 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International, Inc. Global Navigation Satellite Sensor Units

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not... International, Inc. Global Navigation Satellite Sensor Units AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... augmentation system (WAAS) global navigation satellite sensor units (GNSSU). This AD requires you cease...

  12. Design and performances of laser retro-reflector arrays for Beidou navigation satellites and SLR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhong-Ping; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Chen, Wan-Zhen; Li, Pu; Meng, Wen-Dong; Wang, Yuan-Ming; Wang, Jie; Hu, Wei; Yang, Fu-Min

    2014-09-01

    Beidou is the regional satellite navigation system in China, consisting of three kinds of orbiting satellites, MEO, GEO and IGSO, with the orbital altitudes of 21500-36000 km. For improving the accuracy of satellites orbit determination, calibrating microwave measuring techniques and providing better navigation service, all Beidou satellites are equipped with laser retro-reflector arrays (LRAs) to implement high precision laser ranging. The paper presents the design of LRAs for Beidou navigation satellites and the method of inclined installation of LRAs for GEO satellites to increase the effective reflective areas for the regional ground stations. By using the SLR system, the observations for Beidou satellites demonstrated a precision of centimeters. The performances of these LRAs on Beidou satellites are very excellent.

  13. Impact of space weather events on satellite-based navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, B.; DasGupta, A.; Paul, A.

    2013-12-01

    effects of the equatorial ionospheric irregularities on satellite-based communication and navigation systems have been studied over the past few decades as space weather events have the potential to seriously disturb the technological infrastructure of modern society. The present paper tries to understand operational compliance of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards under scintillation conditions by recording the received phase of the L1(1575.42 MHz) signal from two stations, namely Calcutta situated near the northern crest of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly and Siliguri, situated beyond the northern crest, at a subionospheric latitude separation of 4° along the same meridian. A causative approach is adopted whereby GPS phase scintillations have been monitored and receiver performance prior to loss of lock and cycle slips have been analyzed during August-October 2011 at Calcutta and September 2011 at Siliguri. The received phase at GPS-L1 frequency has often been found to fluctuate at kilohertz, often megahertz rates, thereby causing carrier-tracking loop malfunctions. It should be borne in mind that normal GPS receivers' carrier-tracking loops have a typical dynamic range of 14-18 Hz. Cycle slips have been observed with durations far exceeding ICAO specified levels for high dynamic platforms like aircrafts. Differences in cycle slips between Calcutta and Siliguri indicate possible evolution of irregularity structures even across small subionospheric swath. Significant improvement in present understanding of GPS phase scintillations should be developed and implemented in receiver designs prior to application of Satellite Based Augmentation System services for civil aviation, particularly in the geophysically sensitive equatorial region.

  14. The Availability of Space Service for Inter-Satellite Links in Navigation Constellations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yinyin; Wang, Yueke; Chen, Jianyun

    2016-01-01

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are widely used in low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite navigation; however, their availability is poor for users in medium Earth orbits (MEO), and high Earth orbits (HEO). With the increasing demand for navigation from MEO and HEO users, the inadequate coverage of GNSS has emerged. Inter-satellite links (ISLs) are used for ranging and communication between navigation satellites and can also serve space users that are outside the navigation constellation. This paper aims to summarize their application method and analyze their service performance. The mathematical model of visibility is proposed and then the availability of time division ISLs is analyzed based on global grid points. The BeiDou navigation constellation is used as an example for numerical simulation. Simulation results show that the availability can be enhanced by scheduling more satellites and larger beams, while the presence of more users lowers the availability. The availability of navigation signals will be strengthened when combined with the signals from the ISLs. ISLs can improve the space service volume (SSV) of navigation constellations, and are therefore a promising method for navigation in MEO/HEO spacecraft. PMID:27548181

  15. Civil air navigation using GNSS enhanced by wide area satellite based augmentation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dautermann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Advancement in augmented satellite navigation enables a new class of instrument approach procedures for aircraft. These approaches are based on regional augmentation systems which broadcast corrections via a geostationary satellite. The enhanced GNSS navigation solution using the corrections from the satellite provides the necessary accuracy and integrity to perform approaches with vertical and lateral angular guidance to a given runway threshold. This enables cost effective and simple procedure generation with low descent minima even for small airports. Moreover, it supports high precision en-route navigation and future high precision flight guidance applications.

  16. The impact of navigation satellite ephemeris error on common-view time transfer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongwei; Yuan, Haibo; Zhang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    The impact of navigation satellite ephemeris error on satellite common-view time transfer was analyzed. The impact varies depending on the angle in view of a satellite relative to a user (elevation) and the baseline distance between 2 users. Some extents of the impact were figured out for several elevations and different baseline. As an example, results from several common-view time transfer links in China via Compass satellite were given. PMID:20040439

  17. Combined processing of observations from different Global Navigation Satellite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, T.; Dow, J.; Sanchez, J. F.; Romero, I.

    2007-12-01

    The upcoming the Galileo GNSS and the modernisation of the GPS and Glonass systems offers many exciting opportunities and challenges in the field of geosciences in the next decade. However, in order to obtain any positive effects on our geodetic and geophysical estimates the different GNSS systems will have to be observed by multi system receivers that track all systems on all available frequencies. Furthermore, these receivers should not introduce any biases between the tracked GNSS observations. In addition to this we need analysis software that can efficiently handle these multi-system and multi-frequency observations in one single estimation process. Over the last two years ESOC has put a significant effort into its Napeos processing software. This software is now capable of combined processing of SLR, DORIS, GPS, GLONASS, and GIOVE-A data. It is routinely used for a large number of tasks within ESOC, e.g., Envisat POD, GIOVE-A orbit predictions for SLR, and for the ESOC contributions to the Galileo Geodetic Service Provider. Furthermore, it will soon officially be used for generating all the ESOC products for the International GNSS Service (IGS). In our presentation we will show results from our combined GNSS analysis, both the combination of GPS and GLONASS as well as the combination of GPS and GIOVE-A. We will focus on the challenges and we were, and in part still are, faced with when combining the data of different GNSS. We will demonstrate that at present both GLONASS and GIOVE-A do not offer any benefits for our estimates. We will conclude our contribution with a discussion on the requirements which need to be fulfilled to be able to really benefit from a combined processing of multi Global Navigation Satellite Systems.

  18. Observation of Wetland Dynamics with Global Navigation Satellite Signals Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuffada, C.; Shah, R.; Nghiem, S. V.; Cardellach, E.; Chew, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland dynamics is crucial to changes in both atmospheric methane and terrestrial water storage. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC AR5) highlights the role of wetlands as a key driver of methane (CH4) emission, which is more than one order of magnitude stronger than carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the centennial time scale. Among the multitude of methane emission sources (hydrates, livestock, rice cultivation, freshwaters, landfills and waste, fossil fuels, biomass burning, termites, geological sources, and soil oxidation), wetlands constitute the largest contributor with the widest uncertainty range of 177-284 Tg(CH4) yr-1 according to the IPCC estimate. Wetlands are highly susceptible to climate change that might lead to wetland collapse. Such wetland destruction would decrease the terrestrial water storage capacity and thus contribute to sea level rise, consequently exacerbating coastal flooding problems. For both methane change and water storage change, wetland dynamics is a crucial factor with the largest uncertainty. Nevertheless, a complete and consistent map of global wetlands still needs to be obtained as the Ramsar Convention calls for a wetlands inventory and impact assessment. We develop a new method for observations of wetland change using Global Navigation Satellite Signals Reflectometry (GNSS-R) signatures for global wetland mapping in synergy with the existing capability, not only as a static inventory but also as a temporal dataset, to advance the capability for monitoring the dynamics of wetland extent relevant to addressing the science issues of CH4 emission change and terrestrial water storage change. We will demonstrate the capability of the new GNSS-R method over a rice field in the Ebro Delta wetland in Spain.

  19. Real-Time Orbit Determination for Future Korean Regional Navigation Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Kihae; Oh, Hyungjik; Park, Sang-Young; Park, Chandeok

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for Real-Time Orbit Determination (RTOD) of navigation satellites for the Korean Regional Navigation Satellite System (KRNSS), when the navigation satellites generate ephemeris by themselves in abnormal situations. The KRNSS is an independent Regional Navigation Satellite System (RNSS) that is currently within the basic/preliminary research phase, which is intended to provide a satellite navigation service for South Korea and neighboring countries. Its candidate constellation comprises three geostationary and four elliptical inclined geosynchronous orbit satellites. Relative distance ranging between the KRNSS satellites based on Inter-Satellite Ranging (ISR) is adopted as the observation model. The extended Kalman filter is used for real-time estimation, which includes fine-tuning the covariance, measurement noise, and process noise matrices. Simulation results show that ISR precision of 0.3-0.7 m, ranging capability of 65,000 km, and observation intervals of less than 20 min are required to accomplish RTOD accuracy to within 1 m. Furthermore, close correlation is confirmed between the dilution of precision and RTOD accuracy.

  20. Ionospheric monitoring by the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jihye

    The ionosphere reacts to geophysical events, such as earthquakes, tsunamis, surface explosions, underground nuclear explosions (UNE), etc. The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) remote sensing (RS) enables monitoring of the ionospheric disturbances excited by these events. The purpose of this dissertation is to use GNSS RS to detect, discriminate, model and monitor ionospheric disturbances induced by earthquakes and UNEs. Ionospheric delay, which can be derived from dual frequency GNSS signals, is converted to the total electron contents (TEC) along the signal path. After eliminating the main trend of TEC by taking the numerical third order horizontal 3-point derivatives, the traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are isolated. Since a TID can be generated due to various events, the source of TID must be verified. In this dissertation, the characteristics of the TID waves induced by an earthquake and an UNE are examined. The case studies are: (1) M9.0 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake, (2) 2006 North Korean UNE, and (3) 2009 North Korean UNE. From these experiments, the TIDs resulting from different types of events were characterized and discriminated due to the different waveform properties. In addition, the epicenter of the point source can be determined by TID observations. In experiment (2), the 2009 North Korean UNE was examined, using data from eleven nearby GNSS stations. Within a few hours from the explosion, the GNSS stations detected the TIDs, whose arrival time for each station formulated the linear model with respect to the distance to the station. TIDs were observed to propagate with speeds of roughly 150 - 400 m/s at stations about 365 km to 1330 km from the explosion site. Considering the wind effect, the wind-adjusted TIDs located the UNE to within about 2.7 km of its seismically determined epicenter. Through the case studies, the distinctive signatures of different events were demonstrated, which suggests the uniqueness of TIDs excited by

  1. Evaluation of Relative Navigation Algorithms for Formation-Flying Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelbel, David; Lee, Taesul; Long, Anne; Carpenter, J. Russell; Gramling, Cheryl

    2001-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center is currently developing advanced spacecraft systems to provide autonomous navigation and control of formation flyers. This paper discusses autonomous relative navigation performance for formations in eccentric, medium, and high-altitude Earth orbits using Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Positioning Service (SPS) and intersatellite range measurements. The performance of several candidate relative navigation approaches is evaluated. These analyses indicate that the relative navigation accuracy is primarily a function of the frequency of acquisition and tracking of the GPS signals. A relative navigation position accuracy of 0.5 meters root-mean-square (RMS) can be achieved for formations in medium-attitude eccentric orbits that can continuously track at least one GPS signal. A relative navigation position accuracy of better than 75 meters RMS can be achieved for formations in high-altitude eccentric orbits that have sparse tracking of the GPS signals. The addition of round-trip intersatellite range measurements can significantly improve relative navigation accuracy for formations with sparse tracking of the GPS signals.

  2. An Autonomous Navigation Algorithm for High Orbit Satellite Using Star Sensor and Ultraviolet Earth Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Baohua, Li; Wenjie, Lai; Yun, Chen; Zongming, Liu

    2013-01-01

    An autonomous navigation algorithm using the sensor that integrated the star sensor (FOV1) and ultraviolet earth sensor (FOV2) is presented. The star images are sampled by FOV1, and the ultraviolet earth images are sampled by the FOV2. The star identification algorithm and star tracking algorithm are executed at FOV1. Then, the optical axis direction of FOV1 at J2000.0 coordinate system is calculated. The ultraviolet image of earth is sampled by FOV2. The center vector of earth at FOV2 coordinate system is calculated with the coordinates of ultraviolet earth. The autonomous navigation data of satellite are calculated by integrated sensor with the optical axis direction of FOV1 and the center vector of earth from FOV2. The position accuracy of the autonomous navigation for satellite is improved from 1000 meters to 300 meters. And the velocity accuracy of the autonomous navigation for satellite is improved from 100 m/s to 20 m/s. At the same time, the period sine errors of the autonomous navigation for satellite are eliminated. The autonomous navigation for satellite with a sensor that integrated ultraviolet earth sensor and star sensor is well robust. PMID:24250261

  3. Solution to the problem of the close integration of satellite and inertial platform navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, V. A.; Sokolov, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    The problem of the close integration of a satellite and inertial navigation system (NA) constructed on the basis of a gyro-stabilized platform is solved. The features of the synthesis of an algorithm for nonlinear estimation of the NS state vector in view of the continuous character for the autonomous measurements and the discrete character for satellite measurements are studied. The developed algorithm for solving the navigation problem on the basis of the integrated NS allows one to provide a stable high-precision estimation of the parameters of motion for a movable object, including in the absence of satellite signals.

  4. Satellite Navigation Systems in the Transport, Today and in the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszewski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Operational status and practical exploitation (October 2010) of Satellite Navigation Systems (SNS), as GPS and GLONASS, and Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS), as EGNOS are presented in this paper. Other SNS are under development as Galileo and Compass, other SBAS in various part of the world are already available (WAAS, MSAS) or under development as GAGAN or SDCM. The receivers of these systems are now found in every mode of transportation - air, maritime and land. Additionally SNS markets and applications in the transport and the most significant events in the satellite navigation systems in the nearest years and SNS markets and applications are described also.

  5. An autonomous navigation scheme based on geomagnetic and starlight for small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinlong, Wang; Bin, Wang; Hengnian, Li

    2012-12-01

    According to the characteristics of celestial navigation system (CNS) and geomagnetic navigation system (GNS), a fully autonomous geomagnetic/celestial integrated navigation scheme (GNS/CNS) is proposed for small satellites. By using a large-view-field star sensor to obtain the starlight vectors of multi-stars, CNS can make up the shortcoming of navigation accuracy of GNS. The system model of GNS/CNS is deduced and established in detail, and UKF (unscented Kalman filter) algorithm is used to estimate and obtain high precision navigation parameters. Simulation results show that superior position, velocity and attitude accuracy of small satellites can be obtained by GNS/CNS, and the filter has stronger filtering adaptability and stability, which demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of this scheme.

  6. GPS Cycle Slip Detection Considering Satellite Geometry Based on TDCP/INS Integrated Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Younsil; Song, Junesol; Kee, Changdon; Park, Byungwoon

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a means of carrier phase cycle slip detection for an inertial-aided global positioning system (GPS), which is based on consideration of the satellite geometry. An integrated navigation solution incorporating a tightly coupled time differenced carrier phase (TDCP) and inertial navigation system (INS) is used to detect cycle slips. Cycle-slips are detected by comparing the satellite-difference (SD) and time-difference (TD) carrier phase measurements obtained from the GPS satellites with the range estimated by the integrated navigation solution. Additionally the satellite geometry information effectively improves the range estimation performance without a hardware upgrade. And the covariance obtained from the TDCP/INS filter is used to compute the threshold for determining cycle slip occurrence. A simulation and the results of a vehicle-based experiment verify the cycle slip detection performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26437412

  7. GPS Cycle Slip Detection Considering Satellite Geometry Based on TDCP/INS Integrated Navigation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younsil; Song, Junesol; Kee, Changdon; Park, Byungwoon

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a means of carrier phase cycle slip detection for an inertial-aided global positioning system (GPS), which is based on consideration of the satellite geometry. An integrated navigation solution incorporating a tightly coupled time differenced carrier phase (TDCP) and inertial navigation system (INS) is used to detect cycle slips. Cycle-slips are detected by comparing the satellite-difference (SD) and time-difference (TD) carrier phase measurements obtained from the GPS satellites with the range estimated by the integrated navigation solution. Additionally the satellite geometry information effectively improves the range estimation performance without a hardware upgrade. And the covariance obtained from the TDCP/INS filter is used to compute the threshold for determining cycle slip occurrence. A simulation and the results of a vehicle-based experiment verify the cycle slip detection performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26437412

  8. Disposal strategy for the geosynchronous orbits of the Beidou Navigation Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingshi; Liu, Lin

    Beidou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) is China's navigation satelite system. It is now operational for navigation service in China and Asia-Pacific region and is due to be fully operational as a global navigation system by 2020. Unlike other navigation satellite systems, BDS consists of both 12-hour medium Earth orbit and 24-hour geosynchronous orbit. To sustain a safe environment for the navigation satellites, the end-of-life satellites must be disposed appropriately so they do not pose potential dangers to the operational satellites. There are currently two strategies for the disposal orbit. One is to put the disposed satellite in a graveyard orbit that has a safe distance from the operational satellites. It is often applied in geosynchronous orbits and such graveyard orbit can always maintain a safe distance even for a few centuries. This strategy is also currently adopted by GPS, yet recent researches show a re-entry orbit can sometimes be a better alternative. The interaction of Earth oblateness and lunisolar gravitation can lead to a rapid increase in the orbit eccentricity such that by proper design the disposed GPS satellite can be cleared out by re-entry into the atmosphere. In this work we focus on the disposal strategy for BDS geosynchronous orbit, which consists of the equatorial stationary orbit (GEO) and the inclined orbit (IGSO). We show that these two orbits are essentially in two different dynamical environments and evolve quite distinctly over a long period of time. Taking advantage of the dynamic nature, we apply the graveyard orbit and the re-entry orbit to GEO and IGSO respectively and propose appropriate disposal strategies accordingly.

  9. Inter-satellite ranging and inter-satellite communication links for enhancing GNSS satellite broadcast navigation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Francisco Amarillo

    2011-03-01

    Recently the European Space Agency (ESA) has initiated a number of exploratory Projects, within the General Studies Programme (GSP), to analyze what potential improvements on a GNSS system navigation determination and dissemination performance could be brought by introducing inter-satellite ranging & inter-satellite communication-links. The key improvements targeted by these Projects are the enhancement of the orbit and clock prediction accuracy and the reduction of the dependency from ground infrastructure. Both projects adopted the Galileo system architecture as the initial working point.The first exploratory Project, which was labelled as GNSS+ (Amarillo and Gerner, 2007; Amarillo et al., 2008), indicated the practical difficulty to implement these new on-board functionalities except at the price of a visible increase of the payload mass and power (e.g. relative to mass and power of the Galileo IOV navigation payload) (Sánchez and Pulido, 2008); it allowed to define a preliminary system architecture, and it also allowed to identify the technological problems that in practise would likely be encountered.A second exploratory Project, which was labelled as ADVISE, continued the research, targeting a visible simplification of the GNSS+ architecture and an overall consolidation of the design of the most demanding constituents from technology perspective.This article describes the results of the GNSS+ Project as well as the improvements proposed in the frame of the ADVISE Project. As result of the ADVISE Project it has been possible to low very visibly the payload maximum RF power, and to keep the orbit and clock estimation accuracy, which was already on the few cm level.

  10. Prospects for Navsat - A future worldwide civil navigation-satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosetti, C.

    1982-05-01

    Air navigational problems which inhibit flying optimal routes and which could be aided by a worldwide navigational satellite system (Navsat) are examined. Satellite systems are noted to alleviate ground- and air-based equipment constraints for the airlines, developing nations in need of mapping assistance, offshore oil drilling operations, and geodetic surveys. A Navsat system, following the design adopted by military GPS operations, involves a receiver capable of detecting time-lapsed signals from well-positioned satellites. The transmission is broadcast in terms of a lock-on signal and a signal carrying tens of bits/sec of information regarding ephemerides. Either mobile or fixed receivers can gain precise location data by tuning in to two or three satellites simultaneously. A potential system involving 24 satellites is described, which would offer 95.6% availability from anywhere on earth.

  11. Preface: International Reference Ionosphere and Global Navigation Satellite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Reinisch, Bodo

    2015-04-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) is a joint undertaking by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) with the goal of developing and improving an international standard for the specification of Earth's ionosphere. This endeavor was originally triggered by the need for an ionosphere model for the satellite/experiment design and satellite data analysis (COSPAR) and for radio propagation studies (URSI) but has meanwhile found a much broader range of users with space weather concerns.

  12. Navigation solution for a multiple satellite and multiple ground architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Abraham M.

    This research presents the phased development of an algorithm to plan impulsive orbital maneuvers based on the relative motion between multiple satellites and multiple ground locations. The algorithm leverages the state transition matrix derived from the equations of motion and the equations of variation for the non-spherical Earth and air drag effects. The algorithm determines the impulsive maneuver to achieve the user-defined terminal conditions. The first phase solves for the first burn of an orbital transfer between user-defined altitudes. The optimum trajectory is determined and compared to the first burn in a Hohmann Transfer. The results are expanded to include varying the inclination and eccentricity of the initial orbit. The second phase solves for the minimum time trajectory resulting from a fixed fuel maneuver to transfer a satellite between user-defined altitudes. The results include the transfer time and transfer angle for the minimum time trajectory. The third phase places a satellite within a sphere, of user-defined radius, centered on a non-maneuvering satellite within a constrained time. The results are presented for prograde orbits. An empirical method to determine the optimum DeltaV is provided. The fourth phase places a satellite within the overlapping spheres, of user-defined radii, centered on multiple non-maneuvering satellites, within a constrained time. Empirical methods are presented to determine the separation distance and optimum DeltaV. The final phase culminates by delivering a satellite within the overlapping spheres, centered on multiple non-maneuvering satellites and ground locations, constrained by range and elevation angle, within a constrained time. An empirical model to calculate the optimum DeltaV is shown. All results illustrate mission design trade-offs including ballistic coefficient, orbit inclinations, eccentricity and orbit sizes.

  13. The influence of different types of satellite exiting in system RAIM performance in BeiDou Satellite Navigation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-tai; Peng, Jun-huan

    2015-12-01

    The space constellation of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System(BDS)has three main components, Geostationary Earth Orbits (GEOs), Medium Earth Orbits (MEOs) and Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbits(IGSOs).This paper selected 6 satellite respectively in three types to simulate their exiting service, and used the statistical methods to assess receiver autonomous integrity monitoring RAIM availability and fault detection FD capability of BeiDou14 Phase with 14 satellites under the circumstances. This paper assessed RAIM availability performance from satellites and constellation geometry configuration by the number of visible satellites (NVS, NVS>~5) and position dilution of precision (PDOP, PDOP<=6) together. The FD capability of RAIM is assessed by the maximum minimal detectable bias (MDB) and the maximum minimal detectable effect (MDE). The analyses of simulation results testify that the exiting of single MEO or IGSO satellite have no obvious effect on RAIM availability and error detection ability. However GEO satellite's exiting can make the number of points in where the constellation geometry is not available and maximum minimum detectable deviation and maximum minimum detectable influence significantly increase. Relative to other two satellites, GEO satellites' health have a significant impact on the RAIM performance of BDS.

  14. A simplified satellite navigation system for an autonomous Mars roving vehicle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janosko, R. E.; Shen, C. N.

    1972-01-01

    The use of a retroflecting satellite and a laser rangefinder to navigate a Martian roving vehicle is considered in this paper. It is shown that a simple system can be employed to perform this task. An error analysis is performed on the navigation equations and it is shown that the error inherent in the scheme proposed can be minimized by the proper choice of measurement geometry. A nonlinear programming approach is used to minimize the navigation error subject to constraints that are due to geometric and laser requirements. The problem is solved for a particular set of laser parameters and the optimal solution is presented.

  15. GPS/Magnetometer Based Satellite Navigation and Attitude Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack; Harman, Rick; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In recent years algorithms were developed for orbit, attitude and angular-rate determination of Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites. Those algorithms rely on measurements of magnetometers, which are standard, relatively inexpensive, sensors that are normally installed on every LEO satellite. Although magnetometers alone are sufficient for obtaining the desired information, the convergence of the algorithms to the correct values of the satellite orbital parameters, position, attitude and angular velocity is very slow. The addition of sun sensors reduces the convergence time considerably. However, for many LEO satellites the sun data is not available during portions of the orbit when the spacecraft (SC) is in the earth shadow. It is here where the GPS space vehicles (SV) can provide valuable support. This is clearly demonstrated in the present paper. Although GPS measurements alone can be used to obtain SC position, velocity, attitude and angular-rate, the use of magnetometers improve the results due to the synergistic effect of sensor fusion. Moreover, it is possible to obtain these results with less than three SVs. In this paper we introduce an estimation algorithm, which is a combination of an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and a Pseudo Linear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA).

  16. A comparison of filtering algorithms for GPS satellite navigation application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Peters, J. G.; Schutz, B. E.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison of three square root filter formulations with the standard extended Kalman filter is described. The characteristics of the algorithms were compared by simulating the application of a phase one GPS system to the determination of a LANDSAT-D Satellite.

  17. Satellite images for land cover monitoring - Navigating through the maze

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Künzer, Claudia; Fosnight, Gene

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this publication is satellite systems for land cover monitoring. On the reverse is a table that compares a selection of these systems, whose data are globally available in a form suitable for land cover analysis. We hope the information presented will help you assess the utility of remotely sensed image to meet your needs.

  18. Navigation using local position determination from a mobile satellite terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Steven M.; Marquart, Robert C.

    The authors describe the implementation and performance evaluation of a location-determination system which uses a mobile satellite transmitter for one-way communications of position data for vehicle tracking. Field results have demonstrated that a mobile satellite terminal can provide reliable messaging and position reporting for many over-the-road applications. With installation techniques suitable for nontechnical personnel using a minimum of test equipment, the mobile terminal can provide proximity reporting adequate for most fleet dispatch requirements. Position data with one-way or two-way communications can improve the logistics and management of service fleets by eliminating deadhead mileage, maximizing route efficiencies, and heading off problems with up-to-date status information of transported loads.

  19. a European Global Navigation Satellite System — the German Market and Value Adding Chain Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollerthun, A.; Wieser, M.

    2002-03-01

    Since Europe is considering to establish a "market-driven" European Global Navigation Satellite System, the German Center of Aerospace initiated a market research to justify a German investment in such a European project. The market research performed included the following market segments: aviation, railway, road traffic, shipping, surveying, farming, military, space applications, leisure, and sport. In these market segments, the forementioned inputs were determined for satellite navigation hardware (receivers) as well as satellite navigation services. The forecast period was from year 2007 to 2017. For the considered period, the market amounts to a total of DM 83.0 billion (approx. US $50 billion), whereas the satellite navigation equipment market makes up DM 39.8 billion, and charges for value-added-services amount to DM 43.2 billion. On closer examination road traffic can be identified as the dominant market share, both in the receiver-market and service-market. With a share of 96% for receivers and 73% for services the significance of the road traffic segment becomes obvious. The second part of this paper investigates the effects the market potential has on the Value-Adding-Chain. Therefore, all participants in the Value-Adding-Chain are identified, using industrial cost structure models the employment effect is analyzed, and possible tax revenues for the state are examined.

  20. Precise Point Positioning with the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Qu, Lizhong; Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Su, Xing; Li, Xiaotao

    2014-01-01

    By the end of 2012, China had launched 16 BeiDou-2 navigation satellites that include six GEOs, five IGSOs and five MEOs. This has provided initial navigation and precise pointing services ability in the Asia-Pacific regions. In order to assess the navigation and positioning performance of the BeiDou-2 system, Wuhan University has built up a network of BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) around the World. The Position and Navigation Data Analyst (PANDA) software was modified to determine the orbits of BeiDou satellites and provide precise orbit and satellite clock bias products from the BeiDou satellite system for user applications. This article uses the BeiDou/GPS observations of the BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations to realize the BeiDou and BeiDou/GPS static and kinematic precise point positioning (PPP). The result indicates that the precision of BeiDou static and kinematic PPP reaches centimeter level. The precision of BeiDou/GPS kinematic PPP solutions is improved significantly compared to that of BeiDou-only or GPS-only kinematic PPP solutions. The PPP convergence time also decreases with the use of combined BeiDou/GPS systems. PMID:24406856

  1. Auxiliary subprograms for calculating the navigational parameters of artificial Earth satellites. FORTRAN IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokhorenko, V. I.

    1981-01-01

    Subprograms for transforming coordinates and time, for determining the position of the Moon and Sun, and for calculating the atmosphere and disturbances, which are specified by anomalies of the Earth's gravitational field are described. The subprograms are written in FORTRAN IV and form a major part of the package of applied programs for calculating the navigational parameters of artificial Earth satellites.

  2. Navigation system for visual impaired persons based on satellital location.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ponce, H; Hernandez-Rodriguez, P R

    2004-01-01

    A system designed to assist visual impaired persons to travel in a city without external help using GPS navigation system has been developed. With the use of a BIuetooth hands-free, the user only has to give spoken commands to receive spoken directions to get to his/her destination. The directions received from the system will help him/her to walk parallel to the tangent of the walk-side and to walk through the most convenient route. This means that the route calculated to arrive to the destination point not only will be the shortest, but also the least risky one. The system can also be personalized by the user, entering his/her own waypoints. PMID:17271383

  3. Autonomous Rubidium Clock Weak Frequency Jump Detector for Onboard Navigation Satellite System.

    PubMed

    Khare, Akshay; Arora, Rajat; Banik, Alak; Mehta, Sanjay D

    2016-02-01

    Frequency jumps are common in rubidium frequency sources. They affect the estimation of user position in navigational satellite systems. These jumps must be detected and corrected immediately as they have direct impact on the navigation system integrity. A novel weak frequency jump detector is proposed based on a Kalman filter with a multi-interval approach. This detector can be applied for both "sudden" and "slow" frequency transitions. In this detection method, noises of clock data are reduced by Kalman filtering, for accurate estimation of jump size with less latency. Analysis on in-orbit rubidium atomic frequency standard (RAFS) phase telemetry data shows that the detector can be used for fast detection and correction of weak frequency jumps. Furthermore, performance comparison of different existing frequency jump detection techniques with the proposed detector is discussed. A multialgorithm-based strategy is proposed depending on the jump size and latency for onboard navigation satellites having RAFS as the primary frequency source. PMID:26685233

  4. Improved GPS-based Satellite Relative Navigation Using Femtosecond Laser Relative Distance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyungjik; Park, Han-Earl; Lee, Kwangwon; Park, Sang-Young; Park, Chandeok

    2016-03-01

    This study developed an approach for improving Carrier-phase Differential Global Positioning System (CDGPS) based realtime satellite relative navigation by applying laser baseline measurement data. The robustness against the space operational environment was considered, and a Synthetic Wavelength Interferometer (SWI) algorithm based on a femtosecond laser measurement model was developed. The phase differences between two laser wavelengths were combined to measure precise distance. Generated laser data were used to improve estimation accuracy for the float ambiguity of CDGPS data. Relative navigation simulations in real-time were performed using the extended Kalman filter algorithm. The GPS and laser-combined relative navigation accuracy was compared with GPS-only relative navigation solutions to determine the impact of laser data on relative navigation. In numerical simulations, the success rate of integer ambiguity resolution increased when laser data was added to GPS data. The relative navigational errors also improved five-fold and two-fold, relative to the GPS-only error, for 250 m and 5 km initial relative distances, respectively. The methodology developed in this study is suitable for application to future satellite formation-flying missions.

  5. GPS inferred geocentric reference frame for satellite positioning and navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malla, Rajendra P.; Wu, Sien-Chong

    1989-01-01

    Accurate geocentric three-dimensional positioning is of great importance for various geodetic and oceanographic applications. While relative positioning accuracy of a few centimeters has become a reality using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), the uncertainty in the offset of the adopted coordinate system origin from the geocenter is still believed to be of the order of one meter. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is capable of determining this offset to better than 10 cm, though, because of the limited number of satellites, this requires a long arc of data. The Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements provide a powerful alternative for an accurate determination of this origin offset in relatively short period of time. Two strategies are discussed, the first utilizes the precise relative positions predetermined by VLBI, whereas the second establishes a reference frame by holding only one of the tracking sites longitude fixed. Covariance analysis studies indicate that geocentric positioning to an accuracy of a few centimeters can be achieved with just one day of precise GPS pseudorange and carrier phase data.

  6. Deriving a geocentric reference frame for satellite positioning and navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malla, R. P.; Wu, S.-C.

    1988-01-01

    With the advent of Earth-orbiting geodetic satellites, nongeocentric datums or reference frames have become things of the past. Accurate geocentric three-dimensional positioning is now possible and is of great importance for various geodetic and oceanographic applications. While relative positioning accuracy of a few centimeters has become a reality using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), the uncertainty in the offset of the adopted coordinate system origin from the geocenter is still believed to be on the order of 1 meter. Satellite laser ranging (SLR), however, is capable of determining this offset to better than 10 cm, but this is possible only after years of measurements. Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements provide a powerful tool for an accurate determination of this origin offset. Two strategies are discussed. The first strategy utilizes the precise relative positions that were predetermined by VLBI to fix the frame orientation and the absolute scaling, while the offset from the geocenter is determined from GPS measurements. Three different cases are presented under this strategy. The reference frame thus adopted will be consistent with the VLBI coordinate system. The second strategy establishes a reference frame by holding only the longitude of one of the tracking sites fixed. The absolute scaling is determined by the adopted gravitational constant (GM) of the Earth; and the latitude is inferred from the time signature of the Earth rotation in the GPS measurements. The coordinate system thus defined will be a geocentric Earth-fixed coordinate system.

  7. Innovative use of global navigation satellite systems for flight inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eui-Ho

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) mandates flight inspection in every country to provide safety during flight operations. Among many criteria of flight inspection, airborne inspection of Instrument Landing Systems (ILS) is very important because the ILS is the primary landing guidance system worldwide. During flight inspection of the ILS, accuracy in ILS landing guidance is checked by using a Flight Inspection System (FIS). Therefore, a flight inspection system must have high accuracy in its positioning capability to detect any deviation so that accurate guidance of the ILS can be maintained. Currently, there are two Automated Flight Inspection Systems (AFIS). One is called Inertial-based AFIS, and the other one is called Differential GPS-based (DGPS-based) AFIS. The Inertial-based AFIS enables efficient flight inspection procedures, but its drawback is high cost because it requires a navigation-grade Inertial Navigation System (INS). On the other hand, the DGPS-based AFIS has relatively low cost, but flight inspection procedures require landing and setting up a reference receiver. Most countries use either one of the systems based on their own preferences. There are around 1200 ILS in the U.S., and each ILS must be inspected every 6 to 9 months. Therefore, it is important to manage the airborne inspection of the ILS in a very efficient manner. For this reason, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) mainly uses the Inertial-based AFIS, which has better efficiency than the DGPS-based AFIS in spite of its high cost. Obviously, the FAA spends tremendous resources on flight inspection. This thesis investigates the value of GPS and the FAA's augmentation to GPS for civil aviation called the Wide Area Augmentation System (or WAAS) for flight inspection. Because standard GPS or WAAS position outputs cannot meet the required accuracy for flight inspection, in this thesis, various algorithms are developed to improve the positioning ability of Flight

  8. Design and Development of the WVU Advanced Technology Satellite for Optical Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Miranda

    In order to meet the demands of future space missions, it is beneficial for spacecraft to have the capability to support autonomous navigation. This is true for both crewed and uncrewed vehicles. For crewed vehicles, autonomous navigation would allow the crew to safely navigate home in the event of a communication system failure. For uncrewed missions, autonomous navigation reduces the demand on ground-based infrastructure and could allow for more flexible operation. One promising technique for achieving these goals is through optical navigation. To this end, the present work considers how camera images of the Earth's surface could enable autonomous navigation of a satellite in low Earth orbit. Specifically, this study will investigate the use of coastlines and other natural land-water boundaries for navigation. Observed coastlines can be matched to a pre-existing coastline database in order to determine the location of the spacecraft. This paper examines how such measurements may be processed in an on-board extended Kalman filter (EKF) to provide completely autonomous estimates of the spacecraft state throughout the duration of the mission. In addition, future work includes implementing this work on a CubeSat mission within the WVU Applied Space Exploration Lab (ASEL). The mission titled WVU Advanced Technology Satellite for Optical Navigation (WATSON) will provide students with an opportunity to experience the life cycle of a spacecraft from design through operation while hopefully meeting the primary and secondary goals defined for mission success. The spacecraft design process, although simplified by CubeSat standards, will be discussed in this thesis as well as the current results of laboratory testing with the CubeSat model in the ASEL.

  9. Fundamental components of the parameters of the Earth's rotation in forming high-precision satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Yu. G.; Mikhaylov, M. V.; Lar'kov, I. I.; Rozhkov, S. N.; Krylov, S. S.; Perepelkin, V. V.; Pochukaev, V. N.

    2015-03-01

    The fundamental components of the Earth's rotation parameters play an important role in solving the problems of navigation and control of spacecraft motion. Mathematical models of the Earth's pole motion and dUT1 mismatch of the UT1 and UTC time scales adequate to the observation and measurement data of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service are considered. It is shown that the proposed models provide sufficient autonomy to form parameters of the Earth's rotation onboard the spacecraft. It is necessary to account for these parameters in real time onboard the spacecraft to solve problems of navigational support. The graphs of the daily forecast errors of the GLONASS navigation satellite orbits that are caused by the pole displacement, are presented. A comparative analysis of the graphs shows that disturbances of navigation satellite orbits are comparable with the gravitational influence of the Moon and the Sun and disturbances caused by the anomalous part of the Earth's gravitational field. It is found that a significant increase in forecast accuracy for satellite ephemerides is achieved taking into account of the Earth's rotational and vibrational motion in equations of spacecraft motion.

  10. Organization of space navigation system based on use of geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullayev, V. E.

    1985-09-01

    The modern navigation problem is inseparably related to the need for constant and operational support of the navigational personnel with meteorological, navigational and other types of information which could not possibly be provided without use of radio communications. The determination of a ship's position by such fundamental methods as observation of celestial bodies, the use of every possible radioelectronic and radar apparatus, is well known and has been developed in the form of an independent science called marine astronomy. However, with the appearance of present-day requirements, taking into account the high speeds of modern ships when there is a need at all times for reliable information on their position with an accuracy to a meter, all known marine astronomy methods are becoming greatly outmoded. Space navigation systems based on the Doppler method for determining the position of a ship by satellites moving in different circular orbits have good accuracy characteristics. However, a shortcoming of such systems is that the navigationl devices of a ship provide a correction of its position only in the period of presence of the transiting satellite in the zone of radiovisibility. For example, for the American Transit navigational system the mean time between observations at the equator is approximately 1.2 hours.

  11. Insect-Inspired Navigation Algorithm for an Aerial Agent Using Satellite Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Gaffin, Douglas D.; Dewar, Alexander; Graham, Paul; Philippides, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Humans have long marveled at the ability of animals to navigate swiftly, accurately, and across long distances. Many mechanisms have been proposed for how animals acquire, store, and retrace learned routes, yet many of these hypotheses appear incongruent with behavioral observations and the animals’ neural constraints. The “Navigation by Scene Familiarity Hypothesis” proposed originally for insect navigation offers an elegantly simple solution for retracing previously experienced routes without the need for complex neural architectures and memory retrieval mechanisms. This hypothesis proposes that an animal can return to a target location by simply moving toward the most familiar scene at any given point. Proof of concept simulations have used computer-generated ant’s-eye views of the world, but here we test the ability of scene familiarity algorithms to navigate training routes across satellite images extracted from Google Maps. We find that Google satellite images are so rich in visual information that familiarity algorithms can be used to retrace even tortuous routes with low-resolution sensors. We discuss the implications of these findings not only for animal navigation but also for the potential development of visual augmentation systems and robot guidance algorithms. PMID:25874764

  12. Long-term evolution of the inclined geosynchronous orbit in Beidou Navigation Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingshi; Hou, Xiyun; Liu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    China's Beidou Navigation Satellite System (BDS), unlike other navigation satellite systems, uses several inclined geosynchronous orbits (IGSO) to enhance the accuracy of regional or global navigation. In order to maintain a safe space environment in the vicinity of its operational orbit, it is necessary that the decommissioned satellites be well disposed of. Following up the study on the specific BDS IGSO satellites in the previous COSPAR Scientific Assembly, we now extend the study to understand the underlying dynamics and discuss the long-term evolution of such orbits from a more general perspective. In this paper, we first theoretically analyze the problem using simplified models of 1 and 2 degrees of freedoms (1-/2-dof). Then we extensively investigate the numerically propagated orbits for 200 and 1000 years, applying the results from these simplified models and seeking proper explanations for the underlying dynamics. We especially focus on the eccentricity evolution, which is a major concern regarding the collision hazard. We expect to understand the underlying dynamics governing the long-term evolution of BDS IGSO and gain helpful insight into future disposal strategies.

  13. Global Navigation Satellite System Multipath Mitigation Using a Wave-Absorbing Shield.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiyan; Yang, Xuhai; Sun, Baoqi; Su, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Code multipath is an unmanaged error source in precise global navigation satellite system (GNSS) observation processing that limits GNSS positioning accuracy. A new technique for mitigating multipath by installing a wave-absorbing shield is presented in this paper. The wave-absorbing shield was designed according to a GNSS requirement of received signals and collected measurements to achieve good performance. The wave-absorbing shield was installed at the KUN1 and SHA1 sites of the international GNSS Monitoring and Assessment System (iGMAS). Code and carrier phase measurements of three constellations were collected on the dates of the respective installations plus and minus one week. Experiments were performed in which the multipath of the measurements obtained at different elevations was mitigated to different extents after applying the wave-absorbing shield. The results of an analysis and comparison show that the multipath was mitigated by approximately 17%-36% on all available frequencies of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS), Global Positioning System (GPS), and Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) satellites. The three-dimensional accuracies of BDS, GPS, and GLONASS single-point positioning (SPP) were, respectively, improved by 1.07, 0.63 and 0.49 m for the KUN1 site, and by 0.72, 0.79 and 0.73 m for the SHA1 site. Results indicate that the multipath of the original observations was mitigated by using the wave-absorbing shield. PMID:27556466

  14. Continuing evolution of satellite-based geodetic positioning and survey navigation capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Stansell, T.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The paper reviews progress in the TRANSIT Navigation Satellite System for Offshore oil exploration and land geodetic survey, and examines trends affecting future developments. This report covers three major areas. The first is the field of land geodetic survey. The second area focuses on the evolution of integrated navigation systems for offshore oil exploration. The objective is to show how these systems have matured. Trends affecting the direction of future developments are discussed. Finally, this paper evaluates the coming impact of NAVSTAR, the Global Positioning System. 14 refs.

  15. A LEO Satellite Navigation Algorithm Based on GPS and Magnetometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack; Harman, Rick; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has become a standard method for low cost onboard satellite orbit determination. The use of a GPS receiver as an attitude and rate sensor has also been developed in the recent past. Additionally, focus has been given to attitude and orbit estimation using the magnetometer, a low cost, reliable sensor. Combining measurements from both GPS and a magnetometer can provide a robust navigation system that takes advantage of the estimation qualities of both measurements. Ultimately a low cost, accurate navigation system can result, potentially eliminating the need for more costly sensors, including gyroscopes.

  16. Multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver and its advantages in high-precision positioning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Danan; Chen, Wen; Cai, Miaomiao; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Minghua; Yu, Chao; Zheng, Zhengqi; Wang, Yuanfei

    2016-02-01

    The multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver is a high precision, low cost, and widely used emerging receiver. Using this type of receiver, the satellite and receiver clock errors can be eliminated simultaneously by forming between antenna single-differences, which is equivalent to the conventional double-difference model. However, current multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver products have not fully realized their potential to achieve better accuracy, efficiency, and broader applications. This paper introduces the conceptual design and derivable products of multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receivers involving the aspects of attitude determination, multipath effect mitigation, phase center variation correction, and ground-based carrier phase windup calibration. Through case studies, the advantages of multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receivers in high-precision positioning applications are demonstrated.

  17. Geometrical-Based Navigation System Performance Assessment in the Space Service Volume Using a Multiglobal Navigation Satellite System Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan W.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is participating in the International Committee on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) (ICG)'s efforts towards demonstrating the benefits to the space user in the Space Service Volume (SSV) when a multi-GNSS solution space approach is utilized. The ICG Working Group: Enhancement of GNSS Performance, New Services and Capabilities has started a three phase analysis initiative as an outcome of recommendations at the ICG-10 meeting, in preparation for the ICG-11 meeting. The first phase of that increasing complexity and fidelity analysis initiative is based on a pure geometrically-derived access technique. The first phase of analysis has been completed, and the results are documented in this paper.

  18. A Leo Satellite Navigation Algorithm Based on GPS and Magnetometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Harman, Rick; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack

    2001-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has become a standard method for low cost onboard satellite orbit determination. The use of a GPS receiver as an attitude and rate sensor has also been developed in the recent past. Additionally, focus has been given to attitude and orbit estimation using the magnetometer, a low cost, reliable sensor. Combining measurements from both GPS and a magnetometer can provide a robust navigation system that takes advantage of the estimation qualities of both measurements. Ultimately, a low cost, accurate navigation system can result, potentially eliminating the need for more costly sensors, including gyroscopes. This work presents the development of a technique to eliminate numerical differentiation of the GPS phase measurements and also compares the use of one versus two GPS satellites.

  19. Positioning performance improvements with European multiple-frequency satellite navigation - Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shengyue

    2008-10-01

    The rapid development of Global Positioning System has demonstrated the advantages of satellite based navigation systems. In near future, there will be a number of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) available, i.e. modernized GPS, Galileo, restored GLONASS, BeiDou and many other regional GNSS augmentation systems. Undoubtedly, the new GNSS systems will significantly improve navigation performance over current GPS, with a better satellite coverage and multiple satellite signal bands. In this dissertation, the positioning performance improvement of new GNSS has been investigated based on both theoretical analysis and numerical study. First of all, the navigation performance of new GNSS systems has been analyzed, particularly for urban applications. The study has demonstrated that Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) performance can be significantly improved with multiple satellite constellations, although the position accuracy improvement is limited. Based on a three-dimensional urban building model in Hong Kong streets, it is found that positioning availability is still very low in high-rising urban areas, even with three GNSS systems. On the other hand, the discontinuity of navigation solutions is significantly reduced with the combined constellations. Therefore, it is possible to use cheap DR systems to bridge the gaps of GNSS positioning, with high accuracy. Secondly, the ambiguity resolution performance has been investigated with Galileo multiple frequency band signals. The ambiguity resolution performance of three different algorithms is compared, including CAR, ILS and improved CAR methods (a new method proposed in this study). For short baselines, with four frequency Galileo data, it is highly possible to achieve reliable single epoch ambiguity resolution, when the carrier phase noise level is reasonably low (i.e. less than 6mm). For long baselines (up to 800 km), the integer ambiguity can be determined within 1 min on average. Ambiguity

  20. Evolving earth-based and in-situ satellite network architectures for Mars communications and navigation support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastrup, Rolf; Weinberg, Aaron; Mcomber, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Results of on-going studies to develop navigation/telecommunications network concepts to support future robotic and human missions to Mars are presented. The performance and connectivity improvements provided by the relay network will permit use of simpler, lower performance, and less costly telecom subsystems for the in-situ mission exploration elements. Orbiting relay satellites can serve as effective navigation aids by supporting earth-based tracking as well as providing Mars-centered radiometric data for mission elements approaching, in orbit, or on the surface of Mars. The relay satellite orbits may be selected to optimize navigation aid support and communication coverage for specific mission sets.

  1. Experimental study on the precise orbit determination of the BeiDou navigation satellite system.

    PubMed

    He, Lina; Ge, Maorong; Wang, Jiexian; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2013-01-01

    The regional service of the Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system is now in operation with a constellation including five Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO), five Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Besides the standard positioning service with positioning accuracy of about 10 m, both precise relative positioning and precise point positioning are already demonstrated. As is well known, precise orbit and clock determination is essential in enhancing precise positioning services. To improve the satellite orbits of the BeiDou regional system, we concentrate on the impact of the tracking geometry and the involvement of MEOs, and on the effect of integer ambiguity resolution as well. About seven weeks of data collected at the BeiDou Experimental Test Service (BETS) network is employed in this experimental study. Several tracking scenarios are defined, various processing schemata are designed and carried out; and then, the estimates are compared and analyzed in detail. The results show that GEO orbits, especially the along-track component, can be significantly improved by extending the tracking network in China along longitude direction, whereas IGSOs gain more improvement if the tracking network extends in latitude. The involvement of MEOs and ambiguity-fixing also make the orbits better. PMID:23529116

  2. Experimental Study on the Precise Orbit Determination of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    PubMed Central

    He, Lina; Ge, Maorong; Wang, Jiexian; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2013-01-01

    The regional service of the Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system is now in operation with a constellation including five Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO), five Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Besides the standard positioning service with positioning accuracy of about 10 m, both precise relative positioning and precise point positioning are already demonstrated. As is well known, precise orbit and clock determination is essential in enhancing precise positioning services. To improve the satellite orbits of the BeiDou regional system, we concentrate on the impact of the tracking geometry and the involvement of MEOs, and on the effect of integer ambiguity resolution as well. About seven weeks of data collected at the BeiDou Experimental Test Service (BETS) network is employed in this experimental study. Several tracking scenarios are defined, various processing schemata are designed and carried out; and then, the estimates are compared and analyzed in detail. The results show that GEO orbits, especially the along-track component, can be significantly improved by extending the tracking network in China along longitude direction, whereas IGSOs gain more improvement if the tracking network extends in latitude. The involvement of MEOs and ambiguity-fixing also make the orbits better. PMID:23529116

  3. Fundamental earth orientation parameters in determining the accuracy of the long-term ephemeris-time corrections in satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Yu. G.; Perepelkin, V. V.; Chazov, V. V.; Shemyakov, A. O.

    2015-12-01

    A few-parameter numerical-analytical model for the rotational-oscillatory motions of the Earth is used on long time intervals in the processing of the highly accurate measurements of the topocentric distances to the Etalon-1 and Etalon-2 artificial Earth satellites. A proposed model can be used in satellite navigation algorithms.

  4. Long-term evolution of navigation satellite orbits: GPS/GLONASS/GALILEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, C.; Gick, R.

    Earlier studies conducted a The Aerospace Corporation discovered that the GPSt Block II satellites placed in disposal orbits can eventually, perhaps in 20 to 40 years, reenter into the operating constellation. This is because the disposal orbits, while circular initially, evolve int o orbits with significant eccentricity mostly as the result of sun-moon gravitational perturbations. Options of minimizing the eccentricity growth include reducing initial eccentricity of the disposal orbit and inserting into an orbit with a favorable argument of perigee. A recent study was performed to examine whether the same long-term eccentricity evolution exists for the disposal orbits of other navigation satellite systems such as GLONASS and GALILEO. The non-operational GPS Block I satellites are included in the study as well, because the orbits are at 63.4 deg inclination, which is different from that of the GPS Block II satellites. Similar to the earlier studies, long-term perturbations and stability of these orbits were understood through analytical and numerical investigations. Two-hundred-year semi-analytic integration revealed interesting facts about the orbit stability. Initially near circular, these types of orbits may evolve into orbits with large eccentricity (as much as 0.7 over 150 years). Analytical approximations through doubly-averaged equations reveal that the cause is due to the resonance induced by Sun/moon and J2 secular perturbations. A total of 113 non-operational GLONASS satellites and upper stages and 10 GPS/Block I satellites were propagated for 200 years using a high-precision semi-analytical propagator (MEANPROP). Results show that the GLONASS satellites will start to enter the operating GPS constellation after 40 years. The uncovered resonance effect is strongly dependent on o bit inclination and altitude. The effect becomes morer pronounced for GALILEO orbits due to a higher altitude, 3000 km above GPS. Strategies to minimize the significant

  5. The open service signal in space navigation data comparison of the Global Positioning System and the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System.

    PubMed

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Tao, An-Lin

    2014-01-01

    More and more Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) have been developed and are in operation. Before integrating information on various GNSSs, the differences between the various systems must be studied first. This research focuses on analyzing the navigation data differences between the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) and the United States' Global Positioning System (GPS). In addition to explaining the impact caused by these two different coordinate and time systems, this research uses an actual open service signal in space (SIS) for both GPS and BDS to analyze their current system performance. Five data quality analysis (DQA) mechanisms are proposed in this research to validate both systems' SIS navigation data. These five DQAs evaluate the differences in ephemeris and almanac messages from both systems for stability and accuracy. After all of the DQAs, the different issues related to GPS and BDS satellite information are presented. Finally, based on these DQA results, this research provides suggested resolutions for the combined use of GPS and BDS for navigation and guidance. PMID:25195848

  6. The Open Service Signal in Space Navigation Data Comparison of the Global Positioning System and the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Tao, An-Lin

    2014-01-01

    More and more Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) have been developed and are in operation. Before integrating information on various GNSSs, the differences between the various systems must be studied first. This research focuses on analyzing the navigation data differences between the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) and the United States' Global Positioning System (GPS). In addition to explaining the impact caused by these two different coordinate and time systems, this research uses an actual open service signal in space (SIS) for both GPS and BDS to analyze their current system performance. Five data quality analysis (DQA) mechanisms are proposed in this research to validate both systems' SIS navigation data. These five DQAs evaluate the differences in ephemeris and almanac messages from both systems for stability and accuracy. After all of the DQAs, the different issues related to GPS and BDS satellite information are presented. Finally, based on these DQA results, this research provides suggested resolutions for the combined use of GPS and BDS for navigation and guidance. PMID:25195848

  7. The effect of different Global Navigation Satellite System methods on positioning accuracy in elite alpine skiing.

    PubMed

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Limpach, Philippe; Geiger, Alain; Müller, Erich

    2014-01-01

    In sport science, Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are frequently applied to capture athletes' position, velocity and acceleration. Application of GNSS includes a large range of different GNSS technologies and methods. To date no study has comprehensively compared the different GNSS methods applied. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of differential and non-differential solutions, different satellite systems and different GNSS signal frequencies on position accuracy. Twelve alpine ski racers were equipped with high-end GNSS devices while performing runs on a giant slalom course. The skiers' GNSS antenna positions were calculated in three satellite signal obstruction conditions using five different GNSS methods. The GNSS antenna positions were compared to a video-based photogrammetric reference system over one turn and against the most valid GNSS method over the entire run. Furthermore, the time for acquisitioning differential GNSS solutions was assessed for four differential methods. The only GNSS method that consistently yielded sub-decimetre position accuracy in typical alpine skiing conditions was a differential method using American (GPS) and Russian (GLONASS) satellite systems and the satellite signal frequencies L1 and L2. Under conditions of minimal satellite signal obstruction, valid results were also achieved when either the satellite system GLONASS or the frequency L2 was dropped from the best configuration. All other methods failed to fulfill the accuracy requirements needed to detect relevant differences in the kinematics of alpine skiers, even in conditions favorable for GNSS measurements. The methods with good positioning accuracy had also the shortest times to compute differential solutions. This paper highlights the importance to choose appropriate methods to meet the accuracy requirements for sport applications. PMID:25285461

  8. The Effect of Different Global Navigation Satellite System Methods on Positioning Accuracy in Elite Alpine Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Limpach, Philippe; Geiger, Alain; Müller, Erich

    2014-01-01

    In sport science, Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are frequently applied to capture athletes' position, velocity and acceleration. Application of GNSS includes a large range of different GNSS technologies and methods. To date no study has comprehensively compared the different GNSS methods applied. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of differential and non-differential solutions, different satellite systems and different GNSS signal frequencies on position accuracy. Twelve alpine ski racers were equipped with high-end GNSS devices while performing runs on a giant slalom course. The skiers' GNSS antenna positions were calculated in three satellite signal obstruction conditions using five different GNSS methods. The GNSS antenna positions were compared to a video-based photogrammetric reference system over one turn and against the most valid GNSS method over the entire run. Furthermore, the time for acquisitioning differential GNSS solutions was assessed for four differential methods. The only GNSS method that consistently yielded sub-decimetre position accuracy in typical alpine skiing conditions was a differential method using American (GPS) and Russian (GLONASS) satellite systems and the satellite signal frequencies L1 and L2. Under conditions of minimal satellite signal obstruction, valid results were also achieved when either the satellite system GLONASS or the frequency L2 was dropped from the best configuration. All other methods failed to fulfill the accuracy requirements needed to detect relevant differences in the kinematics of alpine skiers, even in conditions favorable for GNSS measurements. The methods with good positioning accuracy had also the shortest times to compute differential solutions. This paper highlights the importance to choose appropriate methods to meet the accuracy requirements for sport applications. PMID:25285461

  9. A study of autonomous satellite navigation methods using the global positioning satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.

    1980-01-01

    Special orbit determination algorithms were developed to accommodate the size and speed limitations of on-board computer systems of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System. The algorithms use square root sequential filtering methods. A new method for the time update of the square root covariance matrix was also developed. In addition, the time update method was compared with another square root convariance propagation method to determine relative performance characteristics. Comparisions were based on the results of computer simulations of the LANDSAT-D satellite processing pseudo range and pseudo range-rate measurements from the phase one GPS. A summary of the comparison results is presented.

  10. T and F comparisons via broadcasting satellite and navigation technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saburi, Y.; Yasuda, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Sato, T.

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary time/frequency dissemination experiments were made using the BSE. In order to establish the technique of the doppler shift canceling, the phase control servo including the satellite link and the precompensating frequency control using the measured values or using the orbital data of the satellite are tested. The amount of the residual doppler shift at the control station can be reduced to the order of 1 part in 10 to the 12th power or less by use of the first and the second methods. The method using the orbit data is expected to give a control capability of a few parts in 10 to 11th power. Thus, the maximum value of the doppler shift at the farther most place of the country is estimated to be + or - 2 x 10 to the -10 power without any correction. The experiment of the international time comparison via the NTS 1 was made for about one year since October 1978. The data of time difference between UTC(USNO) and UTC(RRL) are in good agreement with those via the portable clock of the USNO. By applying the correction for ionospheric delay the standard deviation of the data can be reduced to about one-half.

  11. Analysis on coverage ability of BeiDou navigation satellite system for manned spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sihao; Yao, Zheng; Zhuang, Xuebin; Lu, Mingquan

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the service ability of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) for manned spacecraft, both the current regional and the future-planned global constellations of BDS are introduced and simulated. The orbital parameters of the International Space Station and China's Tiangong-1 spacelab are used to create the simulation scenario and evaluate the performance of the BDS constellations. The number of visible satellites and the position dilution (PDOP) of precision at the spacecraft-based receiver are evaluated. Simulation and analysis show quantitative results on the coverage ability and time percentages of both the current BDS regional and future global constellations for manned-space orbits which can be a guideline to the applications and mission design of BDS receivers on manned spacecraft.

  12. Improving capabilities of broadband differential satellite navigation systems via radio occultation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myslivtsev, T. O.; Nikiforov, S. V.; Pogoreltsev, A. I.; Savochkin, P. V.; Sakhno, I. V.; Semenov, A. A.; Troitsky, B. V.

    2016-07-01

    The existent satellite system for radio occultation monitoring the Earth's neutral atmosphere and ionosphere (COSMIC) provides data to consumers in the regions with limited possibilities of constructing dense measurement networks (e.g., in the World Ocean area). A forthcoming increase of LEO small spacecrafts and the deployment of new satellite radio navigation systems will result in a pronounced increase in the efficiency of radio occultation method and its space resolution. As a result, the Space-Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS) broadband differential system will become global, or the quality of corrections delivered to single-frequency consumers of individual systems, e.g., the Augmentation and Monitoring System, will be improved. Therefore, the methods for processing and analyzing obtained radio occultation data should be improved. A simple method to reconstruct the electron density profile at radio occultation points, based on the total electron content measurement on the satellite-satellite path and the IRI-type ionospheric model has been proposed. The method needs initial information, it does not require refraction measurements, and it is free of the assumption that the ionosphere is spherically stratified in the occultation region. Verification of the proposed method based on data for 121 radio occultation cases across Europe in May 2013 demonstrated good agreement with the vertical sounding data.

  13. Testing General Relativity with the Galileo 5 and 6 navigation satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmerzahl, Claus

    2016-07-01

    Einstein's theory of general relativity leads to various predictions that have already been verified by experiments with high precision, such as the perihelion shift of Mercury or the gravitational redshift. The best measurement of the gravitational redshift has been achieved with the Gravity Probe A experiment in 1976 with an uncertainty of 1.4 times 10^{-4}. Today, two of the Galileo navigation satellites provide us with an excellent opportunity to improve this uncertainty. GSAT0201 and GSAT0202 have accidentally been injected onto an eccentric orbit, so that the accurate, stable atomic clocks onboard experience a daily modulation of the gravitational potential resulting in a measurable dilation of time. Through an analysis of the data obtained by the satellites and by employing a sophisticated model for the influence of solar radiation pressure on the satellites' orbits we aim to determine the time dilation to an improved accuracy. We are also investigating if further effects on the clocks of the satellites might be in the range of detection. This project is supported by the German Space Agency DLR with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) under grant number DLR 50 WM 1548.

  14. Establishment criteria, routing algorithms and probability of use of inter-satellite links in mixed navigation constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Songhui; Gui, Qingming; Li, Jianwen

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, the establishment criteria, routing algorithm and the probability of use of ISLs (inter-satellite links) in the mixed navigation constellation of GEO satellites, IGSO satellites and MEO satellites are analyzed. Firstly, the general criteria of ISL establishment in mixed navigation constellation are proposed from the perspective of geometry, and the influences of these criteria on routing algorithms and the probability of use of ISLs are discussed. Then, from the perspective of autonomous orbit determination, the routing algorithm in mixed navigation constellation is designed. Thirdly, a stochastic study of ISLs load in mixed navigation constellation is proposed, and the formulae of probability of use of ISLs are given. Finally, in the simulation, the establishment criteria, routing algorithm and the probability of use of ISLs in a specific mixed navigation constellation of 3GEO + 3IGSO + 24MEO are discussed in detail. The findings of this paper provide a basis for the ISL establishment and routing algorithm, and offer the quantitative indicators for the use of ISL in the mixed navigation constellation.

  15. Precise positioning with current multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems: GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ren, Xiaodong; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The world of satellite navigation is undergoing dramatic changes with the rapid development of multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs). At the moment more than 70 satellites are already in view, and about 120 satellites will be available once all four systems (BeiDou + Galileo + GLONASS + GPS) are fully deployed in the next few years. This will bring great opportunities and challenges for both scientific and engineering applications. In this paper we develop a four-system positioning model to make full use of all available observations from different GNSSs. The significant improvement of satellite visibility, spatial geometry, dilution of precision, convergence, accuracy, continuity and reliability that a combining utilization of multi-GNSS brings to precise positioning are carefully analyzed and evaluated, especially in constrained environments. PMID:25659949

  16. Precise positioning with current multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems: GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ren, Xiaodong; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The world of satellite navigation is undergoing dramatic changes with the rapid development of multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs). At the moment more than 70 satellites are already in view, and about 120 satellites will be available once all four systems (BeiDou + Galileo + GLONASS + GPS) are fully deployed in the next few years. This will bring great opportunities and challenges for both scientific and engineering applications. In this paper we develop a four-system positioning model to make full use of all available observations from different GNSSs. The significant improvement of satellite visibility, spatial geometry, dilution of precision, convergence, accuracy, continuity and reliability that a combining utilization of multi-GNSS brings to precise positioning are carefully analyzed and evaluated, especially in constrained environments. PMID:25659949

  17. CPM Signals for Satellite Navigation in the S and C Bands

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Rui; Sun, Yanbo; Zhao, Danfeng

    2015-01-01

    Frequency allocations in the L band suitable for global navigation satellite system (GNSS) services are getting crowded and system providers face an ever tougher job when they try to bring in new signals and services while maintaining radio frequency compatibility. With the successive opening of the S and C bands to GNSS service, the multi-band combined navigation is predicted to become a key technology for future high-precision positioning navigation systems, and a single modulation scheme satisfying the requirements in each band is a promising solution for reducing user terminal complexity. A universal modulation scheme based on the continuous phase modulation (CPM) family suitable for the above bands’ demands is proposed. Moreover, this paper has put forward two specific CPM signals for the S and C bands, respectively. Then the proposed modulation schemes, together with existing candidates, are comprehensively evaluated. Simulation results show that the proposed CPM signals can not only satisfy the constraint condition of compatibility in different bands well and reduce user terminal complexity, but also provide superior performance in terms of tracking accuracy, multi-path mitigation and anti-jamming compared to other candidate modulation schemes. PMID:26057035

  18. The International GNSS Service in a changing landscape of Global Navigation Satellite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, John M.; Neilan, R. E.; Rizos, C.

    2009-03-01

    The International GNSS Service (IGS) is an international activity involving more than 200 participating organisations in over 80 countries with a track record of one and a half decades of successful operations. The IGS is a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG). It primarily supports scientific research based on highly precise and accurate Earth observations using the technologies of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), primarily the US Global Positioning System (GPS). The mission of the IGS is “to provide the highest-quality GNSS data and products in support of the terrestrial reference frame, Earth rotation, Earth observation and research, positioning, navigation and timing and other applications that benefit society”. The IGS will continue to support the IAG’s initiative to coordinate cross-technique global geodesy for the next decade, via the development of the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), which focuses on the needs of global geodesy at the mm-level. IGS activities are fundamental to scientific disciplines related to climate, weather, sea level change, and space weather. The IGS also supports many other applications, including precise navigation, machine automation, and surveying and mapping. This article discusses the IGS Strategic Plan and future directions of the globally-coordinated ~400 station IGS network, tracking data and information products, and outlines the scope of a few of its numerous working groups and pilot projects as the world anticipates a truly multi-system GNSS in the coming decade.

  19. CPM Signals for Satellite Navigation in the S and C Bands.

    PubMed

    Xue, Rui; Sun, Yanbo; Zhao, Danfeng

    2015-01-01

    Frequency allocations in the L band suitable for global navigation satellite system (GNSS) services are getting crowded and system providers face an ever tougher job when they try to bring in new signals and services while maintaining radio frequency compatibility. With the successive opening of the S and C bands to GNSS service, the multi-band combined navigation is predicted to become a key technology for future high-precision positioning navigation systems, and a single modulation scheme satisfying the requirements in each band is a promising solution for reducing user terminal complexity. A universal modulation scheme based on the continuous phase modulation (CPM) family suitable for the above bands' demands is proposed. Moreover, this paper has put forward two specific CPM signals for the S and C bands, respectively. Then the proposed modulation schemes, together with existing candidates, are comprehensively evaluated. Simulation results show that the proposed CPM signals can not only satisfy the constraint condition of compatibility in different bands well and reduce user terminal complexity, but also provide superior performance in terms of tracking accuracy, multi-path mitigation and anti-jamming compared to other candidate modulation schemes. PMID:26057035

  20. The onset of dynamical instability and chaos in navigation satellite orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengren, Aaron Jay; Daquin, Jérôme; Alessi, Elisa Maria; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.; Rossi, Alessandro; Deleflie, Florent

    2015-05-01

    Orbital resonances are ubiquitous in the Solar System and are harbingers for the onset of dynamical instability and chaos. It has long been suspected that the Global Navigation Satellite Systems exist in a background of complex resonances and chaotic motion; yet, the precise dynamical character of these phenomena remains elusive. Here we will show that the same underlying physical mechanism, the overlapping of secular resonances, responsible for the eventual destabilization of Mercury and recently proposed to explain the orbital architecture of extrasolar planetary systems (Lithwick Y., Wu Y., 2014, PNAS; Batygin K., Morbidelli A., Holman M.J., 2015, ApJ) is at the heart of the orbital instabilities of seemingly more mundane celestial bodies---the Earth's navigation satellites. We will demonstrate that the occurrence and nature of the secular resonances driving these dynamics depend chiefly on one aspect of the Moon's perturbed motion, the regression of the line of nodes. This talk will present analytical models that accurately reflect the true nature of the resonant interactions, and will show how chaotic diffusion is mediated by the web-like structure of secular resonances. We will also present an atlas of FLI stability maps, showing the extent of the chaotic regions of the phase space, computed through a hierarchy of more realistic, and more complicated, models, and compare the chaotic zones in these charts with the analytical estimation of the width of the chaotic layers from the heuristic Chirikov resonance-overlap criterion. The obtained results have remarkable practical applications for space debris mitigation and for satellite technology, and are both of essential dynamical and theoretical importance, with broad implications for planetary science.

  1. GPS-Based Navigation and Orbit Determination for the AMSAT Phase 3D Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, George; Carpenter, Russell; Moreau, Michael; Bauer, Frank H.; Long, Anne; Kelbel, David; Martin, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of processing GPS data from the AMSAT Phase 3D (AP3) satellite for real-time navigation and post-processed orbit determination experiments. AP3 was launched into a geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) on November 16, 2000 from Kourou, French Guiana, and then was maneuvered into its HEO over the next several months. It carries two Trimble TANS Vector GPS receivers for signal reception at apogee and at perigee. Its spin stabilization mode currently makes it favorable to track GPS satellites from the backside of the constellation while at perigee, and to track GPS satellites from below while at perigee. To date, the experiment has demonstrated that it is feasible to use GPS for navigation and orbit determination in HEO, which will be of great benefit to planned and proposed missions that will utilize such orbits for science observations. It has also shown that there are many important operational considerations to take into account. For example, GPS signals can be tracked above the constellation at altitudes as high as 58000 km, but sufficient amplification of those weak signals is needed. Moreover, GPS receivers can track up to 4 GPS satellites at perigee while moving as fast as 9.8 km/sec, but unless the receiver can maintain lock on the signals long enough, point solutions will be difficult to generate. The spin stabilization of AP3, for example, appears to cause signal levels to fluctuate as other antennas on the satellite block the signals. As a result, its TANS Vectors have been unable to lock on to the GPS signals long enough to down load the broadcast ephemeris and then generate position and velocity solutions. AP3 is currently in its eclipse season, and thus most of the spacecraft subsystems have been powered off. In Spring 2002, they will again be powered up and AP3 will be placed into a three-axis stabilization mode. This will significantly enhance the likelihood that point solutions can be generated, and perhaps more

  2. Ionosphere Delay Calibration and Calibration Errors for Satellite Navigation of Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Ian; Manucci, Anthony; Iijima, Byron; Lindqwister, Ulf; Muna, Demitri; Pi, Xiaoqing; Wilson, Brian

    2000-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is implementing a satellite-based navigation system for aircraft using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Positioning accuracy of a few meters will be achieved by broadcasting corrections to the direct GPS signal. These corrections are derived using the wide-area augmentation system (WAAS), which includes a ground network of at least 24 GPS receivers across the Continental US (CONUS). WAAS will provide real-time total electron content (TEC) measurements that can be mapped to fixed grid points using a real-time mapping algorithm. These TECs will be converted into vertical delay corrections for the GPS L1 frequency and broadcast to users every five minutes via geosynchronous satellite. Users will convert these delays to slant calibrations along their own lines-of-sight (LOS) to GPS satellites. Uncertainties in the delay calibrations will also be broadcast, allowing users to estimate the uncertainty of their position. To maintain user safety without reverting to excessive safety margins an empirical model of user calibration errors has been developed. WAAS performance depends on factors that include geographic location (errors increase near WAAS borders), and ionospheric conditions, such as the enhanced spatial electron density gradients found during ionospheric storms.

  3. Chaos in navigation satellite orbits caused by the perturbed motion of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengren, Aaron J.; Alessi, Elisa Maria; Rossi, Alessandro; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.

    2015-06-01

    Numerical simulations carried out over the past decade suggest that the orbits of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems are unstable, resulting in an apparent chaotic growth of the eccentricity. Here, we show that the irregular and haphazard character of these orbits reflects a similar irregularity in the orbits of many celestial bodies in our Solar system. We find that secular resonances, involving linear combinations of the frequencies of nodal and apsidal precession and the rate of regression of lunar nodes, occur in profusion so that the phase space is threaded by a devious stochastic web. As in all cases in the Solar system, chaos ensues where resonances overlap. These results may be significant for the analysis of disposal strategies for the four constellations in this precarious region of space.

  4. Use of global navigation satellite systems for monitoring deformations of water-development works

    SciTech Connect

    Kaftan, V. I.; Ustinov, A. V.

    2013-05-15

    The feasibility of using global radio-navigation satellite systems (GNSS) to improve functional safety of high-liability water-development works - dams at hydroelectric power plants, and, consequently, the safety of the population in the surrounding areas is examined on the basis of analysis of modern publications. Characteristics for determination of displacements and deformations with use of GNSS, and also in a complex with other types of measurements, are compared. It is demonstrated that combined monitoring of deformations of the ground surface of the region, and engineering and technical structures is required to ensure the functional safety of HPP, and reliable metrologic assurance of measurements is also required to obtain actual characteristics of the accuracy and effectiveness of GNSS observations.

  5. Sensor integration for satellite-based vehicular navigation using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Rashad; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2007-03-01

    Land vehicles rely mainly on global positioning system (GPS) to provide their position with consistent accuracy. However, GPS receivers may encounter frequent GPS outages within urban areas where satellite signals are blocked. In order to overcome this problem, GPS is usually combined with inertial sensors mounted inside the vehicle to obtain a reliable navigation solution, especially during GPS outages. This letter proposes a data fusion technique based on radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) that integrates GPS with inertial sensors in real time. A field test data was used to examine the performance of the proposed data fusion module and the results discuss the merits and the limitations of the proposed technique. PMID:17385643

  6. Estimating zenith tropospheric delays from BeiDou navigation satellite system observations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aigong; Xu, Zongqiu; Ge, Maorong; Xu, Xinchao; Zhu, Huizhong; Sui, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The GNSS derived Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) plays today a very critical role in meteorological study and weather forecasts, as ZTDs of thousands of GNSS stations are operationally assimilated into numerical weather prediction models. Recently, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) was officially announced to provide operational services around China and its neighborhood and it was demonstrated to be very promising for precise navigation and positioning. In this contribution, we concentrate on estimating ZTD using BDS observations to assess its capacity for troposphere remote sensing. A local network which is about 250 km from Beijing and comprised of six stations equipped with GPS- and BDS-capable receivers is utilized. Data from 5 to 8 November 2012 collected on the network is processed in network mode using precise orbits and in Precise Point Positioning mode using precise orbits and clocks. The precise orbits and clocks are generated from a tracking network with most of the stations in China and several stations around the world. The derived ZTDs are compared with that estimated from GPS data using the final products of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The comparison shows that the bias and the standard deviation of the ZTD differences are about 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, which are very close to the differences of GPS ZTD estimated using different software packages. PMID:23552104

  7. Comparison of Global Navigation Satellite System Devices on Speed Tracking in Road (Tran)SPORT Applications.

    PubMed

    Supej, Matej; Cuk, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are, in addition to being most widely used vehicle navigation method, becoming popular in sport-related tests. There is a lack of knowledge regarding tracking speed using GNSS, therefore the aims of this study were to examine under dynamic conditions: (1) how accurate technologically different GNSS measure speed and (2) how large is latency in speed measurements in real time applications. Five GNSSs were tested. They were fixed to a car's roof-rack: a  smart phone, a wrist watch, a handheld device, a professional system for testing vehicles and a high-end Real Time Kinematics (RTK) GNSS. The speed data were recorded and analyzed during rapid acceleration and deceleration as well as at steady speed. The study produced four main findings. Higher frequency and high quality GNSS receivers track speed at least at comparable accuracy to a vehicle speedometer. All GNSS systems measured maximum speed and movement at a constant speed well. Acceleration and deceleration have different level of error at different speeds. Low cost GNSS receivers operating at 1 Hz sampling rate had high latency (up to 2.16 s) and are not appropriate for tracking speed in real time, especially during dynamic movements. PMID:25494349

  8. Estimating Zenith Tropospheric Delays from BeiDou Navigation Satellite System Observations

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Aigong; Xu, Zongqiu; Ge, Maorong; Xu, Xinchao; Zhu, Huizhong; Sui, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The GNSS derived Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) plays today a very critical role in meteorological study and weather forecasts, as ZTDs of thousands of GNSS stations are operationally assimilated into numerical weather prediction models. Recently, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) was officially announced to provide operational services around China and its neighborhood and it was demonstrated to be very promising for precise navigation and positioning. In this contribution, we concentrate on estimating ZTD using BDS observations to assess its capacity for troposphere remote sensing. A local network which is about 250 km from Beijing and comprised of six stations equipped with GPS- and BDS-capable receivers is utilized. Data from 5 to 8 November 2012 collected on the network is processed in network mode using precise orbits and in Precise Point Positioning mode using precise orbits and clocks. The precise orbits and clocks are generated from a tracking network with most of the stations in China and several stations around the world. The derived ZTDs are compared with that estimated from GPS data using the final products of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The comparison shows that the bias and the standard deviation of the ZTD differences are about 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, which are very close to the differences of GPS ZTD estimated using different software packages. PMID:23552104

  9. Safety Cases for Global Navigation Satellite Systems' Safety of Life(SOL) Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. W.; Yepez, Amaya Atencia

    2010-09-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems(GNSS) have recently been enhanced to provide additional guarantees for the accuracy, integrity, reliability and coverage of their services. These infrastructures are intended to be robust against jamming. They support real-time self-diagnostic error detection and provide end-users with detailed information about precision and integrity. In consequence, they are gradually being introduced into safety-related applications. This paper argues that greater attention needs to be paid to the ways in which these navigation infrastructures are being integrated into the safety cases that support Safety of Life(SoL) applications. In particular, we contrast the significant investments that have been made in analysing the safety of GNSS aviation applications, such as en-route operations and non-precision approaches, with the relative lack of progress in other industries. There is also a need for greater consistency between the safety arguments that support similar GNSS applications. This helps to ensure that safety managers and regulators consider a similar set of hazards when seeking to integrate these new navigation infrastructures into SoL systems. While international aviation organisations have taken important steps to establish communication mechanisms within their industry, the same cannot be said for other industries. The ad hoc nature of the safety arguments supporting many recent proposals creates a danger that technological innovation will outstrip our commitment to mitigate or avoid future hazards. Unless these issues are addressed then accidents involving the first wave of SoL applications will further jeopardise the development of GNSS infrastructures.

  10. Design and realization of the baseband processor in satellite navigation and positioning receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dawei; Hu, Xiulin; Li, Chen

    2007-11-01

    The content of this paper is focused on the Design and realization of the baseband processor in satellite navigation and positioning receiver. Baseband processor is the most important part of the satellite positioning receiver. The design covers baseband processor's main functions include multi-channel digital signal DDC, acquisition, code tracking, carrier tracking, demodulation, etc. The realization is based on an Altera's FPGA device, that makes the system can be improved and upgraded without modifying the hardware. It embodies the theory of software defined radio (SDR), and puts the theory of the spread spectrum into practice. This paper puts emphasis on the realization of baseband processor in FPGA. In the order of choosing chips, design entry, debugging and synthesis, the flow is presented detailedly. Additionally the paper detailed realization of Digital PLL in order to explain a method of reducing the consumption of FPGA. Finally, the paper presents the result of Synthesis. This design has been used in BD-1, BD-2 and GPS.

  11. Doppler utilised Kalman estimation (DUKE) of ionospheric delay for satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Rajat

    2013-06-01

    The ionospheric delay experienced by the satellite navigation signals depends upon the Total Electron Content (TEC) and needs to be corrected. While the single frequency receivers always use parametric models to correct this delay, dual frequency receivers, when suffers a loss of lock of one of its signal, also has to resort to these models. Here, an alternative method, based on Doppler, surrogated by range rate variation, has been attempted to estimate the ionospheric delay using a Kalman filter. GPS data have been used for all visible satellites over four days selected around the equinox and solstice with nominal geomagnetic conditions and estimations done in continuous and calibrated modes. Results of continuous estimation, obtained for a mid latitude station, showed moderate accuracy while it was significantly better for the calibrated mode with no seasonal dependence. Estimations done for station within the extent of equatorial anomaly, has not only resulted in relative deterioration in performance, but also shown seasonal dependence. Compared with estimates of Klobuchar model, the Calibrated estimation showed superior performance, conspicuously in the mid latitude station. However, for the continuous mode, performance was at par with the model at higher latitudes but inferior to it in regions within the extent of the equatorial anomaly.

  12. Comprehensive Comparisons of Satellite Data, Signals, and Measurements between the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System and the Global Positioning System.

    PubMed

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Tao, An-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) aims to provide global positioning service by 2020. The combined use of BDS and Global Positioning System (GPS) is proposed to provide navigation service with more stringent requirements. Actual satellite data, signals and measurements were collected for more than one month to analyze the positioning service qualities from both BDS and GPS. In addition to the conversions of coordinate and timing system, five data quality analysis (DQA) methods, three signal quality analysis (SQA) methods, and four measurement quality analysis (MQA) methods are proposed in this paper to improve the integrated positioning performance of BDS and GPS. As shown in the experiment results, issues related to BDS and GPS are resolved by the above proposed quality analysis methods. Thus, the anomalies in satellite data, signals and measurements can be detected by following the suggested resolutions to enhance the positioning performance of the combined use of BDS and GPS in the Asia Pacific region. PMID:27187403

  13. Comprehensive Comparisons of Satellite Data, Signals, and Measurements between the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System and the Global Positioning System †

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Tao, An-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) aims to provide global positioning service by 2020. The combined use of BDS and Global Positioning System (GPS) is proposed to provide navigation service with more stringent requirements. Actual satellite data, signals and measurements were collected for more than one month to analyze the positioning service qualities from both BDS and GPS. In addition to the conversions of coordinate and timing system, five data quality analysis (DQA) methods, three signal quality analysis (SQA) methods, and four measurement quality analysis (MQA) methods are proposed in this paper to improve the integrated positioning performance of BDS and GPS. As shown in the experiment results, issues related to BDS and GPS are resolved by the above proposed quality analysis methods. Thus, the anomalies in satellite data, signals and measurements can be detected by following the suggested resolutions to enhance the positioning performance of the combined use of BDS and GPS in the Asia Pacific region. PMID:27187403

  14. A New Time Measurement Method Using a High-End Global Navigation Satellite System to Analyze Alpine Skiing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supej, Matej; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2011-01-01

    Accurate time measurement is essential to temporal analysis in sport. This study aimed to (a) develop a new method for time computation from surveyed trajectories using a high-end global navigation satellite system (GNSS), (b) validate its precision by comparing GNSS with photocells, and (c) examine whether gate-to-gate times can provide more…

  15. The applications of satellites to communications, navigation and surveillance for aircraft operating over the contiguous United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craigie, J. H.; Otten, D. D.; Garabedian, A.; Morrison, D. D.; MALLINCKRODT; ZIPPER

    1970-01-01

    The objective was to determine on a priority basis the satellite applications to communications, navigation, and surveillance requirements for aircraft operating beyond 1975 over the contiguous United States and adjacent oceanic transition regions, and to determine if and how satellite technology can meet these requirements in a reliable, efficient, and economical manner. Major results and conclusions are as follows: (1) The satellite applications of greatest importance are surveillance and rapid collision warning communications; and (2) The necessary technology is available as demonstrated by an attractive system concept.

  16. Ionospheric TEC Estimations with the Signals of Various Geostationary Navigational Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatov, G. A.; Padokhin, A. M.; Kunitsyn, V.; Yasyukevich, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The development of GNSS and SBAS systems provides the possibility to retrieve ionospheric TEC from the dual frequency observations from a number of geostationary satellites using the same approach as for dual frequency GPS/GLONASS observations. In this connection, the quality of geostationary data, first of all the level of noise in TEC estimations is of great interest and importance. In this work we present the results of the comparison of the noise patterns in TEC estimations using signals of geostationary satellites of augumentation systems - indian GAGAN, european EGNOS and american WAAS, as well as the signals of chinees COMPASS/Beidou navigational system. We show that among above mentioned systems geostationary COMPASS/Beidou satellites provide best noise level in TEC estimations (RMS~0.1TECU), which corresponds to those of GPS/GLONASS, while GAGAN and WAAS TEC RMS could reach up to 1.5 TECU with typical values of 0.25-0.5 TECU which is up to one order greater than for common GPS/GLONASS observations. EGNOS TEC estimations being even more noisy (TEC RMS up to 10TECU) than WAAS and GAGAN ones at present time are not suitable for ionospheric studies. We also present geostationary TEC response to increasing solar X-Ray and EUV ionizing radiation during several recent X-class flares. Good correlation was found between TEC and EUV flux for the stations at the sunlit hemisphere. We also present geostationary TEC response to geomagnetic field variations during strong and moderate geomagnetic storms (including G4 St. Patricks Day Storm of 2015) showing examples of both positive and negative TEC anomalies of order of tens of TECU during main storm phase. Our results show the capability of geostationary GNSS and SBAS observations for continuous monitoring of ionospheric TEC. Intensively growing networks of dedicated receivers (for example MGEX network) and increasing number of dual-frequency geostationary satellites in SBAS and GNSS constellations potentially make it a

  17. Verifying the Accuracy of Geostationary Weather Satellite Image Navigation and Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. L.; Herndon, D.; Reehl, S.

    2012-12-01

    The next generation GOES-R geostationary weather satellites will provide imagery products with improved spatial and temporal resolutions and with more spectral bands than previous systems. Image Navigation and Registration (INR), which enables users to accurately pinpoint severe weather and stabilizes movie loops, will also improve. As INR performance improves, so must the technology for measuring INR performance. We describe our Product Monitoring (PM) system being deployed with the GOES-R ground system. It automatically measures INR performance using landmarks that are positioned with respect to a digital map created from the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM). Performance testing with Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) proxy data is part of the verification of the PM system, which is the main focus of this paper. A legacy system ironically called the Replacement Product Monitor (RPM) is in operational use on the GOES-NOP program. It is generally assumed that this system is capable of measuring the absolute position of landmark features relative to their mapped locations with an accuracy of about 0.5 pixels. This is plausible given that observed INR navigation error is about 1 pixel at the finest GOES-NOP resolution. However, a few landmark sites are observed to have biases possibly related to mapping error in the legacy digital map (not SRTM). Because the GOES-R system has finer spatial resolution than the GOES-NOP system and more stringent INR requirements, errors at the GOES-NOP pixel level are quite important. Our verification work with the GOES-R PM seeks to systematically characterize the measurement errors in a controlled test environment to demonstrate its suitability for a GOES-R mission with finer spatial resolution and more stringent INR requirements in comparison with GOES-NOP.

  18. A LEO Satellite Navigation Algorithm Based on GPS and Magnetometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Rick

    2000-01-01

    The Global Position System (GPS) has become a standard method for low cost onboard satellite orbit determination. The use of GPS as an attitude and rate sensor has also been developed in the recent past. Additionally, focus has been given to attitude and orbit estimation using the magnetometer, a low cost, reliable sensor. Combining measurements from both GPS and a magnetometer can provide a robust navigation system which takes advantage of the estimation qualities of both measurements. Ultimately a low cost, accurate navigation system can result, potentially eliminating the need for more costly sensors, including gyroscopes. This work presents the development and preliminary testing of a unified navigation algorithm which produces estimates of attitude, angular rate, position, and velocity for a low earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft. The system relies on GPS phase, range, and range rate data as well as magnetometer data. The algorithm used is an extended Kalman filter (EKF) developed to provide LEO attitude, orbit, and rate estimates using magnetometer and sun sensor data. Incorporating sun sensor data into the EKF improved the attitude and rate estimates. For many LEO spacecraft the sun data is available during only a portion of the orbit. However, GPS data is available continuously throughout the orbit. GPS can produce accurate orbit estimates and combining GPS and magnetometer data improves the attitude and rate estimates. The magnetometer based EKF can converge from large initial errors in position, velocity, and 3 attitude . Combining the magnetometer and GPS data into a single EKF will provide a more robust and accurate system. The EKF is based on an existing EKF. The GPS measurement models for phase, range, and range rate are incorporated into the existing structure of the filter. The original EKF produced the orbit estimates in terms of Keplerian elements. Due to the nature of the GPS measurements and ease of computation, the orbit estimates are converted to

  19. Eliminating diffraction effects during multi-frequency correction in global navigation satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinin, M. V.

    2015-05-01

    In the geometrical optics approximation, the ionospheric part of error in measuring phase and code delays of the satellite signal may be represented as a rapidly decreasing series in inverse power of frequency. Such a simple frequency dependence allows us to use multi-frequency measurements for eliminating the error in such multi-frequency Global Navigation Satellite Systems as GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou, and Galileo. However, the elimination of errors is handicapped by diffraction effects during signal propagation through turbulent ionospheric plasma. The numerical simulation has shown that when using the spatial processing in the form of Fresnel inversion the transition from dual-frequency to triple-frequency measurements reduces the average error of measurement. Yet fluctuations of the error diminish only if the inner scale exceeds the Fresnel radius. In the opposite case of excess of the Fresnel radius over the inner scale, the random component of the residual error is growing during the transition to triple-frequency measurements. The numerical simulation results also suggest that the Fresnel spatial processing in dual-frequency measurements at the optimal distance to the virtual screen can reduce the average error from centimeter to submillimeter level, which renders the transition to triple-frequency measurements unnecessary. The study of the residual error dependence on the distance from the virtual screen to the observer has revealed that the optimum value of this distance may be found from the minimum condition of amplitude scintillation index of the processed signal. The signal thus processed may be utilized both in geodetic precise measurements and in diagnostics of the lower atmosphere.

  20. GLONASS-R: GNSS reflectometry with a Frequency Division Multiple Access-based satellite navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobiger, T.; Haas, R.; Löfgren, J. S.

    2014-04-01

    The information from reflected Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals can become a valuable data source, from which geophysical properties can be deduced. This approach, called GNSS Reflectometry (GNSS-R), can be used to develop instruments that act like an altimeter when arrival times of direct and reflected signals are compared. Current GNSS-R systems usually entirely rely on signals from the Global Positioning Service (GPS), and field experiments could demonstrate that information from such systems can measure sea level with an accuracy of a few centimeters. However, the usage of the Russian GLONASS system has the potential to simplify the processing scheme and to allow handling of direct and reflected signals like a bistatic radar. Thus, such a system has been developed and deployed for test purposes at the Onsala Space Observatory, Sweden, that has an operational GPS-based GNSS-R system. Over a period of 2 weeks in October 2013, GPS-based GNSS-R sea level monitoring and measurements with the newly developed GLONASS-R system were carried out in parallel. In addition, data from colocated tide gauge measurements were available for comparison. It can be shown that precision and accuracy of the GLONASS-based GNSS-R system is comparable to, or even better than, conventional GPS-based GNSS-R solutions. Moreover, the simplicity of the newly developed GLONASS-R system allows to make it a cheap and valuable tool for various remote sensing applications.

  1. Sounding of HF heating-induced artificial ionospheric disturbances by navigational satellite radio transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, V. E.; Andreeva, E. S.; Frolov, V. L.; Komrakov, G. P.; Nazarenko, M. O.; Padokhin, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    During experiments carried out in 2009-2011 the midlatitude ionosphere was modified by powerful HF pulses from the Sura heating facility located near Nizhny Novgorod (Russia) and operated by the Radio Physical Research Institute. GPS/GLONASS and Parus/Tsikada satellite radio transmissions responding to the heating-induced disturbances in electron density were analyzed. The variations in the total electron content (TEC), which are proportional to the reduced phase of navigational signals, were studied for various schemes of radiation of the heating wave. The variations in TEC (their amplitudes and temporal behavior) caused by HF heating are identified in several examples. The TEC spectra contain frequency components corresponding to the modulation periods of the heating wave. For the first time, the spatial structure of the wave disturbances generated in the ionosphere by high-power radio waves radiated by the Sura heating facility with a square wave modulation of the effective radiated power at a frequency lower than or of the order of the Brunt-Vaisala frequency of the neutral atmosphere is imaged using the method of low-orbital radio tomography and GPS/GLONASS data.

  2. Determination of external forces in alpine skiing using a differential global navigation satellite system.

    PubMed

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Chardonnens, Julien; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2013-01-01

    In alpine ski racing the relationships between skier kinetics and kinematics and their effect on performance and injury-related aspects are not well understood. There is currently no validated system to determine all external forces simultaneously acting on skiers, particularly under race conditions and throughout entire races. To address the problem, this study proposes and assesses a method for determining skier kinetics with a single lightweight differential global navigation satellite system (dGNSS). The dGNSS kinetic method was compared to a reference system for six skiers and two turns each. The pattern differences obtained between the measurement systems (offset ± SD) were -26 ± 152 N for the ground reaction force, 1 ± 96 N for ski friction and -6 ± 6 N for the air drag force. The differences between turn means were small. The error pattern within the dGNSS kinetic method was highly repeatable and precision was therefore good (SD within system: 63 N ground reaction force, 42 N friction force and 7 N air drag force) allowing instantaneous relative comparisons and identification of discriminative meaningful changes. The method is therefore highly valid in assessing relative differences between skiers in the same turn, as well as turn means between different turns. The system is suitable to measure large capture volumes under race conditions. PMID:23917257

  3. Determination of the centre of mass kinematics in alpine skiing using differential global navigation satellite systems.

    PubMed

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Chardonnens, Julien; Kröll, Josef; Limpach, Philippe; Müller, Erich

    2015-01-01

    In the sport of alpine skiing, knowledge about the centre of mass (CoM) kinematics (i.e. position, velocity and acceleration) is essential to better understand both performance and injury. This study proposes a global navigation satellite system (GNSS)-based method to measure CoM kinematics without restriction of capture volume and with reasonable set-up and processing requirements. It combines the GNSS antenna position, terrain data and the accelerations acting on the skier in order to approximate the CoM location, velocity and acceleration. The validity of the method was assessed against a reference system (video-based 3D kinematics) over 12 turn cycles on a giant slalom skiing course. The mean (± s) position, velocity and acceleration differences between the CoM obtained from the GNSS and the reference system were 9 ± 12 cm, 0.08 ± 0.19 m · s(-1) and 0.22 ± 1.28 m · s(-2), respectively. The velocity and acceleration differences obtained were smaller than typical differences between the measures of several skiers on the same course observed in the literature, while the position differences were slightly larger than its discriminative meaningful change. The proposed method can therefore be interpreted to be technically valid and adequate for a variety of biomechanical research questions in the field of alpine skiing with certain limitations regarding position. PMID:25565042

  4. Public road infrastructure inventory in degraded global navigation satellite system signal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, N.; Morrison, A.; Haakonsen, T. A.

    2015-04-01

    Recent advancement of land-based mobile mapping enables rapid and cost-effective collection of highquality road related spatial information. Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS) can provide spatial information with subdecimeter accuracy in nominal operation environments. However, performance in challenging environments such as tunnels is not well characterized. The Norwegian Public Roads Administration (NPRA) manages the country's public road network and its infrastructure, a large segment of which is represented by road tunnels (there are about 1 000 road tunnels in Norway with a combined length of 800 km). In order to adopt mobile mapping technology for streamlining road network and infrastructure management and maintenance tasks, it is important to ensure that the technology is mature enough to meet existing requirements for object positioning accuracy in all types of environments, and provide homogeneous accuracy over the mapping perimeter. This paper presents results of a testing campaign performed within a project funded by the NPRA as a part of SMarter road traffic with Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) (SMITS) program. The testing campaign objective was performance evaluation of high end commercial MMSs for inventory of public areas, focusing on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal degraded environments.

  5. Comparison of Global Navigation Satellite System Devices on Speed Tracking in Road (Tran)SPORT Applications

    PubMed Central

    Supej, Matej; Čuk, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Global Naavigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are, in addition to being most widely used vehicle navigation method, becoming popular in sport-related tests. There is a lack of knowledge regarding tracking speed using GNSS, therefore the aims of this study were to examine under dynamic conditions: (1) how accurate technologically different GNSS measure speed and (2) how large is latency in speed measurements in real time applications. Five GNSSs were tested. They were fixed to a car's roof-rack: a smart phone, a wrist watch, a handheld device, a professional system for testing vehicles and a high-end Real Time Kinematics (RTK) GNSS. The speed data were recorded and analyzed during rapid acceleration and deceleration as well as at steady speed. The study produced four main findings. Higher frequency and high quality GNSS receivers track speed at least at comparable accuracy to a vehicle speedometer. All GNSS systems measured maximum speed and movement at a constant speed well. Acceleration and deceleration have different level of error at different speeds. Low cost GNSS receivers operating at 1 Hz sampling rate had high latency (up to 2.16 s) and are not appropriate for tracking speed in real time, especially during dynamic movements. PMID:25494349

  6. The usefulness of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) in the analysis of precipitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the use of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), both with ground-based and Low Earth Orbit (LEO) receivers, allows retrieving atmospheric parameters in all the weather conditions. Ground-based GNSS technique provides the integrated precipitable water vapour (IPWV) with temporal continuity at a specific receiver station, while the GNSS LEO technique allows for Radio Occultation (RO) observations of the atmosphere, providing a detailed atmospheric profiling but without temporal continuity at a specific site. In this work, several precipitation events that occurred in Italy were analysed exploiting the potential of the two GNSS techniques (i.e. ground-based and space-based GNSS receivers). From ground-based receivers, time series of IPWV were produced at specific locations with the purpose of analysing the water vapour behaviour during precipitation events. From LEO receivers, the profiling potential was exploited to retrieve the cloud top altitude of convective events, taking into account that although GNSS RO could capture the dynamics of the atmosphere with high vertical resolution, the temporal resolution is not enough to continuously monitor such an event in a local area. Therefore, the GNSS technique can be considered as a supplemental meteorological system useful in studying precipitation events, but with very different spatial and temporal features depending on the receiver positioning.

  7. Can global navigation satellite system signals reveal the ecological attributes of forests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingbin; Hyyppä, Juha; Yu, Xiaowei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Liang, Xinlian; Kaartinen, Harri; Kukko, Antero; Zhu, Lingli; Wang, Yunsheng; Hyyppä, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Forests have important impacts on the global carbon cycle and climate, and they are also related to a wide range of industrial sectors. Currently, one of the biggest challenges in forestry research is effectively and accurately measuring and monitoring forest variables, as the exploitation potential of forest inventory products largely depends on the accuracy of estimates and on the cost of data collection. A low-cost crowdsourcing solution is needed for forest inventory to collect forest variables. Here, we propose global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signals as a novel type of observables for predicting forest attributes and show the feasibility of utilizing GNSS signals for estimating important attributes of forest plots, including mean tree height, mean diameter at breast height, basal area, stem volume and tree biomass. The prediction accuracies of the proposed technique were better in boreal forest conditions than those of the conventional techniques of 2D remote sensing. More importantly, this technique provides a novel, cost-effective way of collecting large-scale forest measurements in the crowdsourcing context. This technique can be applied by, for example, harvesters or persons hiking or working in forests because GNSS devices are widely used, and the field operation of this technique is simple and does not require professional forestry skills.

  8. Online service for monitoring the ionosphere based on data from the global navigation satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, I. M.; Alpatov, V. V.; Vasil'ev, A. E.; Burguchev, S. S.; Kholodkov, K. I.; Budnikov, P. A.; Molodtsov, D. A.; Koryagin, V. N.; Perederin, F. V.

    2014-07-01

    A service is described that makes possible the effective construction of a three-dimensional ionospheric model based on the data of ground receivers of signals from global navigation satellite positioning systems (GNSS). The obtained image has a high resolution, mainly because data from the IPG GNSS network of the Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring (Rosgidromet) are used. A specially developed format and its implementation in the form of SQL structures are used to collect, transmit, and store data. The method of high-altitude radio tomography is used to construct the three-dimensional model. The operation of all system components (from registration point organization to the procedure for constructing the electron density three-dimensional distribution and publication of the total electron content map on the Internet) has been described in detail. The three-dimensional image of the ionosphere, obtained automatically, is compared with the ionosonde measurements, calculated using the two-dimensional low-altitude tomography method and averaged by the ionospheric model.

  9. Determination of External Forces in Alpine Skiing Using a Differential Global Navigation Satellite System

    PubMed Central

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Chardonnens, Julien; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2013-01-01

    In alpine ski racing the relationships between skier kinetics and kinematics and their effect on performance and injury-related aspects are not well understood. There is currently no validated system to determine all external forces simultaneously acting on skiers, particularly under race conditions and throughout entire races. To address the problem, this study proposes and assesses a method for determining skier kinetics with a single lightweight differential global navigation satellite system (dGNSS). The dGNSS kinetic method was compared to a reference system for six skiers and two turns each. The pattern differences obtained between the measurement systems (offset ± SD) were −26 ± 152 N for the ground reaction force, 1 ± 96 N for ski friction and −6 ± 6 N for the air drag force. The differences between turn means were small. The error pattern within the dGNSS kinetic method was highly repeatable and precision was therefore good (SD within system: 63 N ground reaction force, 42 N friction force and 7 N air drag force) allowing instantaneous relative comparisons and identification of discriminative meaningful changes. The method is therefore highly valid in assessing relative differences between skiers in the same turn, as well as turn means between different turns. The system is suitable to measure large capture volumes under race conditions. PMID:23917257

  10. Avionics of the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) microsat constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, John R.; Alvarez, Jennifer L.; Rose, Randall J.; Ruf, Christopher S.; Walls, Buddy J.

    The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS), which was recently selected as the Earth Venture-2 investigation by NASA's Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) Program, measures the ocean surface wind field with unprecedented temporal resolution and spatial coverage, under all precipitating conditions, and over the full dynamic range of wind speeds experienced in a tropical cyclone (TC). The CYGNSS flight segment consists of 8 microsatellite-class observatories, which represent SwRI's first spacecraft bus design, installed on a Deployment Module for launch. They are identical in design but provide their own individual contribution to the CYGNSS science data set. Subsystems include the Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS), the Communication and Data Subsystem (CDS), the Electrical Power Supply (EPS), and the Structure, Mechanisms, and Thermal Subsystem (SMT). This paper will present an overview of the mission and the avionics, including the ADCS, CDS, and EPS, in detail. Specifically, we will detail how off-the-shelf components can be utilized to do ADCS and will highlight how SwRI's existing avionics solutions will be adapted to meet the requirements and cost constraints of microsat applications. Avionics electronics provided by SwRI include a command and data handling computer, a transceiver radio, a low voltage power supply (LVPS), and a peak power tracker (PPT).

  11. TRAN*STAR 2 evaluation for NOAA data buoy office, part A. [utilizing the US Navy Navigation Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The capability of the TRAN*STAR 2 receiver equipment utilizing the U.S. Navy Navigation Satellite System to provide reliable position locations with reasonable accuracy and frequency was evaluated. Two receivers, an antenna, and a test set were procured, and position fix data collected at NSTL from a fixed known location during the months of May and June. The data were processed through a computer program and analyzed. The results of the evaluation are summarized.

  12. Geometrically constrained kinematic global navigation satellite systems positioning: Implementation and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Jamal; Mohammadloo, Tannaz H.; Amiri-Simkooei, Ali Reza

    2015-09-01

    GNSS kinematic techniques are capable of providing precise coordinates in extremely short observation time-span. These methods usually determine the coordinates of an unknown station with respect to a reference one. To enhance the precision, accuracy, reliability and integrity of the estimated unknown parameters, GNSS kinematic equations are to be augmented by possible constraints. Such constraints could be derived from the geometric relation of the receiver positions in motion. This contribution presents the formulation of the constrained kinematic global navigation satellite systems positioning. Constraints effectively restrict the definition domain of the unknown parameters from the three-dimensional space to a subspace defined by the equation of motion. To test the concept of the constrained kinematic positioning method, the equation of a circle is employed as a constraint. A device capable of moving on a circle was made and the observations from 11 positions on the circle were analyzed. Relative positioning was conducted by considering the center of the circle as the reference station. The equation of the receiver's motion was rewritten in the ECEF coordinates system. A special attention is drawn onto how a constraint is applied to kinematic positioning. Implementing the constraint in the positioning process provides much more precise results compared to the unconstrained case. This has been verified based on the results obtained from the covariance matrix of the estimated parameters and the empirical results using kinematic positioning samples as well. The theoretical standard deviations of the horizontal components are reduced by a factor ranging from 1.24 to 2.64. The improvement on the empirical standard deviation of the horizontal components ranges from 1.08 to 2.2.

  13. Implementation of a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Augmentation to Tsunami Early Warning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBrecque, John

    2016-04-01

    The Global Geodetic Observing System has issued a Call for Participation to research scientists, geodetic research groups and national agencies in support of the implementation of the IUGG recommendation for a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Augmentation to Tsunami Early Warning Systems. The call seeks to establish a working group to be a catalyst and motivating force for the definition of requirements, identification of resources, and for the encouragement of international cooperation in the establishment, advancement, and utilization of GNSS for Tsunami Early Warning. During the past fifteen years the populations of the Indo-Pacific region experienced a series of mega-thrust earthquakes followed by devastating tsunamis that claimed nearly 300,000 lives. The future resiliency of the region will depend upon improvements to infrastructure and emergency response that will require very significant investments from the Indo-Pacific economies. The estimation of earthquake moment magnitude, source mechanism and the distribution of crustal deformation are critical to rapid tsunami warning. Geodetic research groups have demonstrated the use of GNSS data to estimate earthquake moment magnitude, source mechanism and the distribution of crustal deformation sufficient for the accurate and timely prediction of tsunamis generated by mega-thrust earthquakes. GNSS data have also been used to measure the formation and propagation of tsunamis via ionospheric disturbances acoustically coupled to the propagating surface waves; thereby providing a new technique to track tsunami propagation across ocean basins, opening the way for improving tsunami propagation models, and providing accurate warning to communities in the far field. These two new advancements can deliver timely and accurate tsunami warnings to coastal communities in the near and far field of mega-thrust earthquakes. This presentation will present the justification for and the details of the GGOS Call for

  14. Orbit determination and time synchronization for a GEO/IGSO satellite navigation constellation with regional tracking network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, ShanShi; Hu, XiaoGong; Wu, Bin; Liu, Li; Qu, WeiJing; Guo, Rui; He, Feng; Cao, YueLing; Wu, XiaoLi; Zhu, LingFeng; Shi, Xin; Tan, HongLi

    2011-06-01

    Aiming at regional services, the space segment of COMPASS (Phase I) satellite navigation system is a constellation of Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), Inclined Geostationary Earth Orbit (IGSO) and Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Precise orbit determination (POD) for the satellites is limited by the geographic distribution of regional tracking stations. Independent time synchronization (TS) system is developed to supplement the regional tracking network, and satellite clock errors and orbit data may be obtained by simultaneously processing both tracking data and TS data. Consequently, inconsistency between tracking system and TS system caused by remaining instrumental errors not calibrated may decrease navigation accuracy. On the other hand, POD for the mixed constellation of GEO/IGSO/MEO with the regional tracking network leads to parameter estimations that are highly correlated. Notorious example of correlation is found between GEO's orbital elements and its clock errors. We estimate orbital elements and clock errors for a 3GEO+2IGSO constellation in this study using a multi-satellite precise orbit determination (MPOD) strategy, with which clock error elimination algorithm is applied to separate orbital and clock estimates to improve numerical efficiency. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data are used to evaluate User Ranging Error (URE), which is the orbital error projected on a receiver's line-of-sight direction. Two-way radio-wave time transfer measurements are used to evaluate clock errors. Experimenting with data from the regional tracking network, we conclude that the fitting of code data is better than 1 m in terms of Root-Mean-Square (RMS), and fitting of carrier phase is better than 1 cm. For orbital evaluation, difference between computed receiver-satellite ranging based on estimated orbits and SLR measurements is better than 1 m (RMS). For clock estimates evaluation, 2-hour linear-fitting shows that the satellite clock rates are about 1.E-10 s

  15. Sub-daily periodicities in the results of local monitoring using global navigation satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaftan, Vladimir; Ustinov, Alexander

    Nowadays the more attention is focused on the continuous monitoring by using of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) in the study and control of stability of engineering structures and natural objects. The diurnal and semi-diurnal oscillations take place in high frequency GNSS observation. These waves are caused by the presence of the high frequency periodicities in changes of all geospheres, but also in systematic errors of GNSS techniques. Thus the diurnal variations are already found in the coordinates of global and regional networks of CORS stations. They are often related with the influence of Earth's diurnal tides. The purpose of this study is to examine the periodic variations in coordinate increments of local monitoring networks of engineering structures and the earth's surface. But in this case the tidal changes have a small influence because of the relative proximity of the network control points. Results of static GNSS observations in the local network with the control vectors baselines from 170 m to 4.3 km of length were used for the analysis of periodicities. The hourly time series of baseline components of the length of two months were analyzed. Three qualitatively different methods were applied: wavelet transformation (Morlet wavelet function), fast Fourier transformation (FFT), and sequential analysis of the dominant harmonics (dominant analysis) for the more sure detection of hidden periodicities. The results of determination of oscillation spectrum were obtained by the three methods mentioned above. For all baselines their good mutual agreement were obtained. Diurnal and semi-diurnal waves are mainly and the most vividly appeared in the horizontal components, in the height’s component there are also other periodicity of the high and low frequencies. The oscillation’s amplitude reaches 4 mm. It is necessary to clarify the nature of the observed oscillations, which will be the main subject of the following more detailed studies. It is

  16. The course correction implementation of the inertial navigation system based on the information from the aircraft satellite navigation system before take-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelov, V.; Shukalov, A.; Zharinov, I.; Kostishin, M.; Kniga, I.

    2016-04-01

    The use of the correction course option before aircraft take-off after inertial navigation system (INS) inaccurate alignment based on the platform attitude-and-heading reference system in azimuth is considered in the paper. A course correction is performed based on the track angle defined by the information received from the satellite navigation system (SNS). The course correction includes a calculated track error definition during ground taxiing along straight sections before take-off with its input in the onboard digital computational system like amendment for using in the current flight. The track error calculation is performed by the statistical evaluation of the track angle comparison defined by the SNS information with the current course measured by INS for a given number of measurements on the realizable time interval. The course correction testing results and recommendation application are given in the paper. The course correction based on the information from SNS can be used for improving accuracy characteristics for determining an aircraft path after making accelerated INS preparation concerning inaccurate initial azimuth alignment.

  17. Lightning-Generated Whistler Waves Observed by Probes On The Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System Satellite at Low Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, R. H.; McCarthy, M. P.; Pfaff, R. F.; Jacobson, A. R.; Willcockson, W. L.; Rowland, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    Direct evidence is presented for a causal relationship between lightning and strong electric field transients inside equatorial ionospheric density depletions. In fact, these whistler mode plasma waves may be the dominant electric field signal within such depletions. Optical lightning data from the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite and global lightning location information from the World Wide Lightning Location Network are presented as independent verification that these electric field transients are caused by lightning. The electric field instrument on C/NOFS routinely measures lightning ]related electric field wave packets or sferics, associated with simultaneous measurements of optical flashes at all altitudes encountered by the satellite (401.867 km). Lightning ]generated whistler waves have abundant access to the topside ionosphere, even close to the magnetic equator.

  18. The Fixed-bias Langmuir Probe on the Communication-navigation Outage Forecast System Satellite: Calibration and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenzing, Jeffrey H.; Rowland, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    A fixed-bias spherical Langmuir probe is included as part of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite on the Communication Navigation Outage Forecast System (CNOFS) satellite.CNOFS gathers data in the equatorial ionosphere between 400 and 860 km, where the primary constituent ions are H+ and O+. The ion current collected by the probe surface per unit plasmadensity is found to be a strong function of ion composition. The calibration of the collected current to an absolute density is discussed, and the performance of the spherical probe is compared to other in situ instruments on board the CNOFS satellite. The application of the calibration is discussed with respect to future xed-bias probes; in particular, it is demonstrated that some density fluctuations will be suppressed in the collected current if the plasma composition rapidly changes along with density. This is illustrated in the observation of plasma density enhancements on CNOFS.

  19. The Fixed-Bias Langmuir Probe on the Communication-Navigation Outage Forecast System Satellite: Calibration and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.

    2012-01-01

    A fixed-bias spherical Langmuir probe is included as part of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite on the Communication Navigation Outage Forecast System (CNOFS) satellite.CNOFS gathers data in the equatorial ionosphere between 400 and 860 km, where the primary constituent ions are H+ and O+. The ion current collected by the probe surface per unit plasma density is found to be a strong function of ion composition. The calibration of the collected current to an absolute density is discussed, and the performance of the spherical probe is compared to other in situ instruments on board the CNOFS satellite. The application of the calibration is discussed with respect to future fixed-bias probes; in particular, it is demonstrated that some density fluctuations will be suppressed in the collected current if the plasma composition rapidly changes along with density. This is illustrated in the observation of plasma density enhancements on CNOFS.

  20. Simplified Orbit Determination Algorithm for Low Earth Orbit Satellites Using Spaceborne Gps Navigation Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukaram Aghav, Sandip; Achyut Gangal, Shashikala

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the main work is focused on designing and simplifying the orbit determination algorithm which will be used for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) navigation. The various data processing algorithms, state estimation algorithms and modeling forces were studied in detail, and simplified algorithm is selected to reduce hardware burden and computational cost. This is done by using raw navigation solution provided by GPS Navigation sensor. A fixed step-size Runge-Kutta 4th order numerical integration method is selected for orbit propagation. Both, the least square and Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) orbit estimation algorithms are developed and the results of the same are compared with each other. EKF algorithm converges faster than least square algorithm. EKF algorithm satisfies the criterions of low computation burden which is required for autonomous orbit determination. Simple static force models also feasible to reduce the hardware burden and computational cost.

  1. Compact and broadband circularly polarized ring antenna with wide beam-width for multiple global navigation satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Lin; Hu, Bin-Jie; Zhang, Xiu-Yin

    2012-02-01

    A compact and broadband circularly polarized (CP) annular ring antenna with wide beam-width is proposed for multiple global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) in the L1 band. The annular ring is excited by two modified L-probes with quadrature phase difference. It has a 36.3% 10-dB return loss bandwidth and a 13% 3-dB axial ratio bandwidth, because of the orthogonal L-probes with 90° phase difference. The measured peak gain of the antenna is 3.9 dBic. It can detect the satellites at lower elevation as its half power beam-width (HPBW) is 113° in both the x—z and y—z planes, achieving a cross-polarization level of larger than 25 dB. Noticeably, the antenna achieves 89% size reduction compared with the conventional half wavelength patch antennas. It can be used in hand-held navigation devices of multiple GNSS such as COMPASS, Galileo, GPS and GLONASS.

  2. Analytical method for calculation of navigational data for the position of a satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, P.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for calculating the position of a satellite at the instants when measurements are made on board. The initial conditions used were the mean orbital elements of the satellite and their time derivatives in one orbit. The results of the calculation are compared with those obtained by numerical integration, and it is found that results are identical at the beginning of an orbit, but change as the orbit progresses. The advantages and disadvantages of the analytical method are presented.

  3. Relative navigation for autonomous formation flying satellites using the state-dependent Riccati equation filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Han-Earl; Kim, Young-Rok

    2016-01-01

    A relative navigation method for autonomous formation flying using the state-dependent Riccati equation filter (SDREF) is presented. In the SDREF, nonlinear relative dynamics, including J2 perturbation, are parameterized into a state-dependent coefficient (SDC) form without any loss of nonlinearity. The relative navigation algorithm is established based on the carrier-phase differential GPS (CDGPS) and single-frequency GPS data, in which the SDREF is used as a nonlinear estimator. To evaluate the SDREF performance, two different extended Kalman filters (EKFR1 and EKFR2) are introduced. The dynamic models of all the filters are based on relative motion including J2 perturbation. However, the SDREF and the EKFR1 use linear state propagation, whereas EKFR2 employs nonlinear state propagation. The navigation simulation is performed for each filter using live GPS signals simulated by a GPS signal generator, and the result is analyzed in terms of estimation accuracy and computational load. As a result, the SDREF provides a relative navigation solution with 3-D RMS accuracies of 6.0 mm and 0.153 mm/s for position and velocity, respectively, for a separation of 50 km with a computation time of approximately 34 s. The simulation results demonstrate that the SDREF estimates the relative states as rapidly as the EKFR1 and as accurately as the EKFR2, which means that the developed SDREF combines the strong points of EKFR1 and EKFR2 and overcomes their disadvantages.

  4. GPS-Based Navigation And Orbit Determination for the AMSAT AO-40 Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, George; Moreau, Michael; Carpenter, Russell; Bauer, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The AMSAT OSCAR-40 (AO-40) spacecraft occupies a highly elliptical orbit (HEO) to support amateur radio experiments. An interesting aspect of the mission is the attempted use of GPS for navigation and attitude determination in HEO. Previous experiences with GPS tracking in such orbits have demonstrated the ability to acquire GPS signals, but very little data were produced for navigation and orbit determination studies. The AO-40 spacecraft, flying two Trimble Advanced Navigation Sensor (TANS) Vector GPS receivers for signal reception at apogee and at perigee, is the first to demonstrate autonomous tracking of GPS signals from within a HEO with no interaction from ground controllers. Moreover, over 11 weeks of total operations as of June 2002, the receiver has returned a continuous stream of code phase, Doppler, and carrier phase measurements useful for studying GPS signal characteristics and performing post-processed orbit determination studies in HEO. This paper presents the initial efforts to generate AO-40 navigation solutions from pseudorange data reconstructed from the TANS Vector code phase, as well as to generate a precise orbit solution for the AO-40 spacecraft using a batch filter.

  5. Guidance, Navigation and Control for Satellite Proximity Operations using Tschauner-Hempel Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okasha, Mohamed; Newman, Brett

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the development of relative navigation, guidance, and control algorithms of an autonomous space rendezvous and docking system are presented. These algorithms are based on using the analytical closed-form solution of the Tschauner-Hempel equations that is completely explicit in time. The navigation system uses an extended Kalman filter based on Tschauner-Hempel equations to estimate the relative position and velocity of the chaser vehicle with respect to the target vehicle and the chaser attitude and gyros biases. This filter uses the range and angle measurements of the target relative to the chaser from a simulated LIDAR system along with the star tracker and gyro measurements of the chaser. The corresponding measurement models, process noise matrix and other filter parameters are provided. The guidance and control algorithms are based on the glideslope used in the past for rendezvous and proximity operations of the Space Shuttle with other vehicles. These algorithms are used to approach, flyaround, and to depart form a target vehicle in elliptic orbits. The algorithms are general and able to translate the chaser vehicle in any direction, decelerate while approaching the target vehicle, and accelerate when moving away. Numerical nonlinear simulations that illustrate the relative navigation, attitude estimation, guidance, and control algorithms performance and accuracy are evaluated in the current paper. The analyses include the navigations errors, trajectory dispersions and attitude dispersions.

  6. Inter-satellite links: A versatile tool for geodesy and planetary and interplanetary navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlicht, Anja; Hugentobler, Urs; Hauk, Markus; Murböck, Michael; Pail, Roland

    2016-07-01

    With the use of low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking gravity field recovery made a big step forward. Based on this technique the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission delivers monthly gravity field with high precision, allowing to measure effects in Earth water storage basins and variations in ice mass in Greenland and Antarctica from space. GRACE is using a Ka-band inter-satellite ranging technique, GRACE Follow-On will in addition test optical ranging. In fundamental physics high-precision optical inter-satellite tracking will be used to detect gravitational waves in space, as a first step LISA Pathfinder was launched recently. Inter-satellite links are not only used for ranging, also data transfer in space is based on such links. ESA's European Data Relay System will be established in up-coming years to collect data from the low orbiting Sentinel satellites and transfer the high data rate to ground. The same link may be used for ranging, data transfer and time transfer, a functionality that is discussed for next generation Galileo satellites. But to exploit this synergy a common concept for all three tasks has to be developed. In this paper we show that with inter-satellite ranging techniques with µm accuracy the limited accuracy of GNSS based orbit determination of low Earth orbiters (LEO), which is due to the limitations of one-way microwave tracking (unsynchronized clocks, phase center variations and offsets of the sending and receiving antennas) can be overcome. In the ESA study GETRIS the following question is answered: How can a highly accurate and precise GEO-based two-way ranging method support GNSS tracking? The reduction of systematic errors in LEO precise orbit determination (POD) by exploiting the synergy between ranging, data- and time-transfer is assessed in a concept consisting of precise two-way GEO-LEO tracking (as used for data transfer) and an ultra-stable oscillator on-board of the geostationary satellite (GEO

  7. Satellite navigation for meteorological purposes - Inverse referencing for NOAA-N and ERS-1 imagers with a 1 km nadir pixel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klokocnik, J.; Kostelecky, J.; Grassl, H.; Schluessel, P.; Pospisilova, L.; Gooding, R. H.; Lala, P.

    1992-08-01

    Inverse referencing navigation for meteorological satellites NOAA-N and the remote sensing satellite ERS-1 is studied and the PIXPOS software package has been developed and applied to radiometer observations from NOAA-N satellites. By inverse referencing, the geodetic coordinates of a point on the surface are given, and the corresponding image coordinates are obtained from satellite orbital elements or coordinates. Iterative techniques for inverse referencing from mean orbital elements or osculating position and velocity, accounting for all required orbital perturbations with respect to given nadir pixel size, are presented.

  8. Satellite-station time synchronization information based real-time orbit error monitoring and correction of navigation satellite in Beidou System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Feng; Zhou, ShanShi; Hu, XiaoGong; Zhou, JianHua; Liu, Li; Guo, Rui; Li, XiaoJie; Wu, Shan

    2014-07-01

    Satellite-station two-way time comparison is a typical design in Beidou System (BDS) which is significantly different from other satellite navigation systems. As a type of two-way time comparison method, BDS time synchronization is hardly influenced by satellite orbit error, atmosphere delay, tracking station coordinate error and measurement model error. Meanwhile, single-way time comparison can be realized through the method of Multi-satellite Precision Orbit Determination (MPOD) with pseudo-range and carrier phase of monitor receiver. It is proved in the constellation of 3GEO/2IGSO that the radial orbit error can be reflected in the difference between two-way time comparison and single-way time comparison, and that may lead to a substitute for orbit evaluation by SLR. In this article, the relation between orbit error and difference of two-way and single-way time comparison is illustrated based on the whole constellation of BDS. Considering the all-weather and real-time operation mode of two-way time comparison, the orbit error could be quantifiably monitored in a real-time mode through comparing two-way and single-way time synchronization. In addition, the orbit error can be predicted and corrected in a short time based on its periodic characteristic. It is described in the experiments of GEO and IGSO that the prediction accuracy of space signal can be obviously improved when the prediction orbit error is sent to the users through navigation message, and then the UERE including terminal error can be reduced from 0.1 m to 0.4 m while the average accuracy can be improved more than 27%. Though it is still hard to make accuracy improvement for Precision Orbit Determination (POD) and orbit prediction because of the confined tracking net and the difficulties in dynamic model optimization, in this paper, a practical method for orbit accuracy improvement is proposed based on two-way time comparison which can result in the reflection of orbit error.

  9. Submicrosecond comparisons of time standards via the Navigation Technology Satellites (NTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buisson, J. A.; Mccaskill, T.; Oaks, J.; Lynch, D.; Wardrip, S. C.; Whitworth, G.

    1978-01-01

    An interim demonstration was performed of the time transfer capability of the NAVSTAR GPS system using a single NTS satellite. Measurements of time difference (pseudo-range) are made from the NTS tracking network and at the participating observatories. The NTS network measurements are used to compute the NTS orbit trajectory. The central NTS tracking station has a time link to the Naval Observatory UTC (USNO,MC1) master clock. Measurements are used with the NTS receiver at the remote observatory, the time transfer value UTC (USNO,MC1)-UTC (REMOTE, VIA NTS) is calculated. Intercomparisons were computed using predicted values of satellite clock offset and ephemeus.

  10. Estimating and assessing Galileo navigation system satellite and receiver differential code biases using the ionospheric parameter and differential code bias joint estimation approach with multi-GNSS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Junchen; Song, Shuli; Liao, Xinhao; Zhu, Wenyao

    2016-04-01

    With the increased number of Galileo navigation satellites joining the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) service, there is a strong need for estimating their differential code biases (DCBs) for high-precision GNSS applications. There have been studies for estimating DCBs based on an external global ionospheric model (GIM) proposed by Montenbruck et al. (2014). In this study, we take a different approach by joining the construction of a GIM and estimating DCB together with multi-GNSS observations, including GPS, the BeiDou navigation system, and the Galileo navigation system (GAL). This approach takes full advantage of the collective strength of the individual systems while maintaining high solution consistency. Daily GAL DCBs were estimated simultaneously with ionospheric model parameters from 3 months' multi-GNSS observations. The stability of the resulting GAL DCB estimates was analyzed in detail. It was found that the standard deviations (STDs) of all satellite DCBs were less than 0.17 ns. For GAL receivers, the STDs were greater than for the satellites, with most values <2 ns. Comparison of the statistics of time-ranged stability of satellite DCBs over different time intervals revealed that the difference in STD between 28 and 7 day intervals was small, with the maximum not exceeding 0.01 ns. In almost all cases, the difference in GAL satellite DCBs between two consecutive days was <0.8 ns. The main conclusion is that based on the stability of the GAL DCBs, only occasional calibration is required. Furthermore, the 30 day-averaged satellite DCBs may satisfy the requirement of high-precision applications depending on the GAL satellite DCBs.

  11. The fixed-bias Langmuir probe on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System satellite: calibration and validation.

    PubMed

    Klenzing, J; Rowland, D

    2012-11-01

    A fixed-bias spherical Langmuir probe is included as part of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite. C/NOFS gathers data in the equatorial ionosphere between 400 and 860 km, where the primary constituent ions are H(+) and O(+). The ion current collected by the probe surface per unit plasma density is found to be a strong function of ion composition. The calibration of the collected current to an absolute density is discussed, and the performance of the spherical probe is compared to other in situ instruments on board the C/NOFS satellite. The application of the calibration is discussed with respect to future fixed-bias probes; in particular, it is demonstrated that some density fluctuations will be suppressed in the collected current if the plasma composition rapidly changes along with density. This is illustrated in the observation of plasma density enhancements on C/NOFS. PMID:23206077

  12. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION AND INITIALIZATION OF THE MAGELLAN GPS SATELLITE NAVIGATOR (UA-F-22.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the general procedures for the operation and initialization of the Magellan Global Positioning System (GPS) Satellite Navigator. This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval during the Arizona NHEXAS project and the "Bord...

  13. Signal processing and calibration of low-cost strap-down inertial navigation system for land-survey mini-satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somov, Yevgeny; Butyrin, Sergey; Hajiyev, Chingiz

    2014-12-01

    Magnetometers are widely used for attitude determination of low Earth orbit (LEO) information satellites. In order to estimate the satellite attitude accurately, bias of magnetometer must be estimated. In this study a linear Kalman filter based algorithm for the estimation of magnetometer biases is proposed. Proposed algorithms are simulated through attitude dynamics of a small satellite. We shortly present also discrete algorithms for in-flight calibration and alignment of a low cost strap-down inertial navigation system with correction by signals from the Sun and magnetic sensors.

  14. Orbit and clock determination of BDS regional navigation satellite system based on IGS M-GEX and WHU BETS tracking network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GENG, T.; Zhao, Q.; Shi, C.; Shum, C.; Guo, J.; Su, X.

    2013-12-01

    BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) began to provide the regional open service on December 27th 2012 and will provide the global open service by the end of 2020. Compared to GPS, the space segment of BDS Regional System consists of 5 Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO), 5 Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit satellites (IGSO) and 4 Medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites. Since 2011, IGS Multiple-GNSS Experiment (M-GEX) focuses on tracking the newly available GNSS signals. This includes all signals from the modernized satellites of the GPS and GLONASS systems, as well as signals of the BDS, Galileo and QZSS systems. Up to now, BDS satellites are tracked by around 25 stations with a variety of different antennas and receivers from different GNSS manufacture communities in M-GEX network. Meanwhile, there are 17 stations with Unicore Communications Incorporation's GPS/BDS receivers in BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) network by Wuhan University. In addition, 5 BDS satellites have been tracking by the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS). BDS performance is expected to be further studied by the GNSS communities. Following an introduction of the BDS system and above different tracking network, this paper discusses the achieved BDS characterization and performance assessment. Firstly, the BDS signal and measurement quality are analyzed with different antennas and receivers in detail compared to GPS. This includes depth of coverage for satellite observation, carrier-to-noise-density ratios, code noise and multipath, carrier phase errors. Secondly, BDS Precise Orbit Determination (POD) is processed. Different arc lengths and sets of orbit parameters are tested using Position And Navigation Data Analysis software (PANDA) which is developed at the Wuhan University. GEO, IGSO and MEO satellites orbit quality will be assessed using overlap comparison, 2-day orbit fit and external validations with Satellite Laser Range (SLR). Then BDS satellites are equipped

  15. Initial results of precise orbit and clock determination for COMPASS navigation satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Li, Min; Qu, Lizhong; Hu, Zhigang; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2013-05-01

    The development of the COMPASS satellite system is introduced, and the regional tracking network and data availability are described. The precise orbit determination strategy of COMPASS satellites is presented. Data of June 2012 are processed. The obtained orbits are evaluated by analysis of post-fit residuals, orbit overlap comparison and SLR (satellite laser ranging) validation. The RMS (root mean square) values of post-fit residuals for one month's data are smaller than 2.0 cm for ionosphere-free phase measurements and 2.6 m for ionosphere-free code observations. The 48-h orbit overlap comparison shows that the RMS values of differences in the radial component are much smaller than 10 cm and those of the cross-track component are smaller than 20 cm. The SLR validation shows that the overall RMS of observed minus computed residuals is 68.5 cm for G01 and 10.8 cm for I03. The static and kinematic PPP solutions are produced to further evaluate the accuracy of COMPASS orbit and clock products. The static daily COMPASS PPP solutions achieve an accuracy of better than 1 cm in horizontal and 3 cm in vertical. The accuracy of the COMPASS kinematic PPP solutions is within 1-2 cm in the horizontal and 4-7 cm in the vertical. In addition, we find that the COMPASS kinematic solutions are generally better than the GPS ones for the selected location. Furthermore, the COMPASS/GPS combinations significantly improve the accuracy of GPS only PPP solutions. The RMS values are basically smaller than 1 cm in the horizontal components and 3-4 cm in the vertical component.

  16. An Innovative Method for Low Cost, Autonomous Navigation for Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Harman, Rick; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack

    1998-01-01

    An innovative approach to autonomous attitude, trajectory, and rate estimation is presented for low earth orbit (LEO) satellites which relies on magnetometers and sun sensors. These two sensors are reliable, inexpensive, and are used routinely in LEO missions for attitude determination and control. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is developed from two existing systems, one which uses an EKF to estimate attitude and trajectory using magnetometer and gyro data and a second pseudo-linear filter which estimates rotation rate using magnetometer and sun sensor data. The theoretical background of the combined system is presented along with test results from noisy, simulated sensor data.

  17. Network global navigation satellite system survey to harmonize water-surface elevation data for the Rainy River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ziegeweid, Jeffrey R.; Silliker, R. Jason; Densmore, Brenda K.; Krahulik, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Continuously recording water-level streamgages in Rainy Lake and Namakan Reservoir are used to regulate water levels according to rule curves established in 2000 by the International Joint Commission; however, water levels at streamgages were referenced to a variety of vertical datums, confounding efforts to model the flow of water through the system, regulate water levels during periods of high inflow, and evaluate the effectiveness of the rule curves. In October 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey, Natural Resources Canada, International Joint Commission, and National Park Service began a joint field study with the goal of obtaining precise elevations referenced to a uniform vertical datum for all reference marks used to set water levels at streamgages throughout Rainy Lake and Namakan Reservoir. This report was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with Natural Resources Canada, International Joint Commission, and National Park Service.Three field crews deployed Global Navigation Satellite System receivers statically over 16 reference marks colocated with active and discontinued water-level streamgages throughout Rainy River, Rainy Lake, Namakan Reservoir, and select tributaries of Rainy Lake and Namakan Reservoir. A Global Navigation Satellite System receiver also was deployed statically over a National Geodetic Survey cooperative base network control station for use as a quality-control reference mark. Satellite data were collected simultaneously during a 5-day period and processed independently by the U.S. Geological Survey and Natural Resources Canada to obtain accurate positioning and elevations for the 17 surveyed reference marks. Processed satellite data were used to convert published water levels to elevations above sea level referenced to the Canadian Geodetic Vertical Datum of 2013 in order to compare water-surface elevations referenced to a uniform vertical datum throughout the study area. In this report, an “offset” refers to the

  18. Supporting Development of Satellite's Guidance Navigation and Control Software: A Product Line Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McComas, David; Stark, Michael; Leake, Stephen; White, Michael; Morisio, Maurizio; Travassos, Guilherme H.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch (FSB) is developing a Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) Flight Software (FSW) product line. The demand for increasingly more complex flight software in less time while maintaining the same level of quality has motivated us to look for better FSW development strategies. The GNC FSW product line has been planned to address the core GNC FSW functionality very similar on many recent low/near Earth missions in the last ten years. Unfortunately these missions have not accomplished significant drops in development cost since a systematic approach towards reuse has not been adopted. In addition, new demands are continually being placed upon the FSW which means the FSB must become more adept at providing GNC FSW functionality's core so it can accommodate additional requirements. These domain features together with engineering concepts are influencing the specification, description and evaluation of FSW product line. Domain engineering is the foundation for emerging product line software development approaches. A product line is 'A family of products designed to take advantage of their common aspects and predicted variabilities'. In our product line approach, domain engineering includes the engineering activities needed to produce reusable artifacts for a domain. Application engineering refers to developing an application in the domain starting from reusable artifacts. The focus of this paper is regarding the software process, lessons learned and on how the GNC FSW product line manages variability. Existing domain engineering approaches do not enforce any specific notation for domain analysis or commonality and variability analysis. Usually, natural language text is the preferred tool. The advantage is the flexibility and adapt ability of natural language. However, one has to be ready to accept also its well-known drawbacks, such as ambiguity, inconsistency, and contradictions. While most domain analysis

  19. Use of Faraday-rotation data from beacon satellites to determine ionospheric corrections for interplanetary spacecraft navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royden, H. N.; Green, D. W.; Walson, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    Faraday-rotation data from the linearly polarized 137-MHz beacons of the ATS-1, SIRIO, and Kiku-2 geosynchronous satellites are used to determine the ionospheric corrections to the range and Doppler data for interplanetary spacecraft navigation. The JPL operates the Deep Space Network of tracking stations for NASA; these stations monitor Faraday rotation with dual orthogonal, linearly polarized antennas, Teledyne polarization tracking receivers, analog-to-digital converter/scanners, and other support equipment. Computer software examines the Faraday data, resolves the pi ambiguities, constructs a continuous Faraday-rotation profile and converts the profile to columnar zenith total electron content at the ionospheric reference point; a second program computes the line-of-sight ionospheric correction for each pass of the spacecraft over each tracking complex. Line-of-sight ionospheric electron content using mapped Faraday-rotation data is compared with that using dispersive Doppler data from the Voyager spacecraft; a difference of about 0.4 meters, or 5 x 10 to the 16th electrons/sq m is obtained. The technique of determining the electron content of interplanetary plasma by subtraction of the ionospheric contribution is demonstrated on the plasma torus surrounding the orbit of Io.

  20. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  1. Force Modeling and State Propagation for Navigation and Maneuver Planning for the Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscoe, C.; Griesbach, J.; Westphal, J.; Hawes, D.; Carrico, J.

    2013-09-01

    The state propagation accuracy resulting from different choices of gravitational force models and orbital perturbations is investigated for a pair of CubeSats flying in formation in low Earth orbit (LEO). Accurate on-board state propagation is necessary to autonomously plan maneuvers and perform proximity operations and docking safely. The ability to perform high-precision navigation is made especially challenging by the limited computer processing power available on-board the spacecraft. Propagation accuracy is investigated both in terms of the absolute (chief) state and the relative (deputy relative to chief) state. Different perturbing effects are quantified and related directly to important mission factors such as maneuver accuracy, fuel use (mission lifetime), and collision prediction/avoidance (mission safety). The Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) program is to demonstrate rendezvous proximity operations (RPO), formation flying, and docking with a pair of 3U CubeSats. The program is sponsored by NASA Ames via the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) in support of its Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP). The goal of the mission is to demonstrate complex RPO and docking operations with a pair of low-cost 3U CubeSat satellites using passive navigation sensors. The primary orbital perturbation affecting spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) is the Earth oblateness, or J2, perturbation. Provided that a spacecraft does not have an extremely high area-to-mass ratio or is not flying at a very low altitude, the effect of J2 will usually be greater than that of atmospheric drag, which will typically be the next largest perturbing force in LEO. After these perturbations, factors such as higher-order Earth gravitational parameters, third-body perturbations, and solar radiation pressure will follow in magnitude but will have much less noticeable effects than J2 and drag. For spacecraft formations, where relative dynamics and not

  2. The effect of secular resonances on the long-term orbital evolution of uncontrollable objects on satellite radio navigation systems in the MEO region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordovitsyna, T. V.; Tomilova, I. V.; Chuvashov, I. N.

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of the study of long-term orbital evolution of space debris objects, formed from end-of-life space vehicles (SV) of satellite radio navigation systems in the medium Earth orbit (MEO) region. Dynamical features of the evolution of objects in this region have been studied on the basis of 20-year laser surveillance with the Etalon-1 and Etalon-2 satellites and the results of numerical simulation of the long-term evolution of operating and disposal orbits of uncontrolled GLONASS and GPS SVs. It is shown that perturbations from secular lunisolar resonances produce an eccentricity growth for orbits with inclinations chosen for navigation constellations; this significantly changes the positions of these orbits in space and results in the ingress of end-of-life objects into the area of operating SVs.

  3. Laser range measurement for a satellite navigation scheme and mid-range path selection and obstacle avoidance. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuraski, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    The functions of a laser rangefinder on board an autonomous Martian roving vehicle are discussed. The functions are: (1) navigation by means of a passive satellite and (2) mid-range path selection and obstacle avoidance. The feasibility of using a laser to make the necessary range measurements is explored and a preliminary design is presented. The two uses of the rangefinder dictate widely different operating parameters making it impossible to use the same system for both functions.

  4. Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach for Vehicle Positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System in Urban Areas

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Hang; Li, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Long, Teng

    2015-01-01

    For vehicle positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in urban areas, open-loop tracking shows better performance because of its high sensitivity and superior robustness against multipath. However, no previous study has focused on the effects of the code search grid size on the code phase measurement accuracy of open-loop tracking. Traditional open-loop tracking methods are performed by the batch correlators with fixed correlation space. The code search grid size, which is the correlation space, is a constant empirical value and the code phase measuring accuracy will be largely degraded due to the improper grid size, especially when the signal carrier-to-noise density ratio (C/N0) varies. In this study, the Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach (ACSA-OLTA) is proposed to improve the code phase measurement dependent pseudo range accuracy. In ACSA-OLTA, the correlation space is adjusted according to the signal C/N0. The novel Equivalent Weighted Pseudo Range Error (EWPRE) is raised to obtain the optimal code search grid sizes for different C/N0. The code phase measuring errors of different measurement calculation methods are analyzed for the first time. The measurement calculation strategy of ACSA-OLTA is derived from the analysis to further improve the accuracy but reduce the correlator consumption. Performance simulation and real tests confirm that the pseudo range and positioning accuracy of ASCA-OLTA are better than the traditional open-loop tracking methods in the usual scenarios of urban area. PMID:26343683

  5. Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach for Vehicle Positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System in Urban Areas.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Hang; Li, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Long, Teng

    2015-01-01

    For vehicle positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in urban areas, open-loop tracking shows better performance because of its high sensitivity and superior robustness against multipath. However, no previous study has focused on the effects of the code search grid size on the code phase measurement accuracy of open-loop tracking. Traditional open-loop tracking methods are performed by the batch correlators with fixed correlation space. The code search grid size, which is the correlation space, is a constant empirical value and the code phase measuring accuracy will be largely degraded due to the improper grid size, especially when the signal carrier-to-noise density ratio (C/N₀) varies. In this study, the Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach (ACSA-OLTA) is proposed to improve the code phase measurement dependent pseudo range accuracy. In ACSA-OLTA, the correlation space is adjusted according to the signal C/N₀. The novel Equivalent Weighted Pseudo Range Error (EWPRE) is raised to obtain the optimal code search grid sizes for different C/N₀. The code phase measuring errors of different measurement calculation methods are analyzed for the first time. The measurement calculation strategy of ACSA-OLTA is derived from the analysis to further improve the accuracy but reduce the correlator consumption. Performance simulation and real tests confirm that the pseudo range and positioning accuracy of ASCA-OLTA are better than the traditional open-loop tracking methods in the usual scenarios of urban area. PMID:26343683

  6. A real-time algorithm for integrating differential satellite and inertial navigation information during helicopter approach. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, TY

    1994-01-01

    A real-time, high-rate precision navigation Kalman filter algorithm is developed and analyzed. This Navigation algorithm blends various navigation data collected during terminal area approach of an instrumented helicopter. Navigation data collected include helicopter position and velocity from a global position system in differential mode (DGPS) as well as helicopter velocity and attitude from an inertial navigation system (INS). The goal of the Navigation algorithm is to increase the DGPS accuracy while producing navigational data at the 64 Hertz INS update rate. It is important to note that while the data was post flight processed, the Navigation algorithm was designed for real-time analysis. The design of the Navigation algorithm resulted in a nine-state Kalman filter. The Kalman filter's state matrix contains position, velocity, and velocity bias components. The filter updates positional readings with DGPS position, INS velocity, and velocity bias information. In addition, the filter incorporates a sporadic data rejection scheme. This relatively simple model met and exceeded the ten meter absolute positional requirement. The Navigation algorithm results were compared with truth data derived from a laser tracker. The helicopter flight profile included terminal glideslope angles of 3, 6, and 9 degrees. Two flight segments extracted during each terminal approach were used to evaluate the Navigation algorithm. The first segment recorded small dynamic maneuver in the lateral plane while motion in the vertical plane was recorded by the second segment. The longitudinal, lateral, and vertical averaged positional accuracies for all three glideslope approaches are as follows (mean plus or minus two standard deviations in meters): longitudinal (-0.03 plus or minus 1.41), lateral (-1.29 plus or minus 2.36), and vertical (-0.76 plus or minus 2.05).

  7. GLORI (GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument): A New Airborne GNSS-R receiver for land surface applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, Erwan; Zribi, Mehrez; Fanise, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    GLORI (GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument) is a new receiver dedicated to the airborne measurement of surface parameters such as soil moisture and biomass above ground and sea state (wave height and direction) above oceans. The instrument is based on the PARIS concept [Martin-Neira, 1993] using both the direct and surface-reflected L-band signals from the GPS constellation as a multistatic radar source. The receiver is based on one up-looking and one down-looking dual polarization hemispherical active antennas feeding a low-cost 4-channel SDR direct down-conversion receiver tuned to the GPS L1 frequency. The raw measurements are sampled at 16.368MHz and stored as 2-bit, IQ binary files. In post-processing, GPS acquisition and tracking are performed on the direct up-looking signal while the down-looking signal is processed blindly using tracking parameters from the direct signal. The obtained direct and reflected code-correlation waveforms are the basic observables for geophysical parameters inversion. The instrument was designed to be installed aboard the ATR42 experimental aircraft from the French SAFIRE fleet as a permanent payload. The long term goal of the project is to provide real-time continuous surface information for every flight performed. The aircraft records attitude information through its Inertial Measurement Unit and a commercial GPS receiver records additional information such as estimated doppler and code phase, receiver location, satellites azimuth and elevation. A series of test flights were performed over both the Toulouse and Gulf of Lion (Mediterranean Sea) regions during the period 17-21 Nov 2014 together with the KuROS radar [Hauser et al., 2014]. Using processing methods from the literature [Egido et al., 2014], preliminary results demonstrate the instrument sensitivity to both ground and ocean surface parameters estimation. A dedicated scientific flight campaign is planned at the end of second quarter 2015 with

  8. Real-Time seismic waveforms monitoring with BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) observations for the 2015 Mw 7.8 Nepal earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, T.

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays more and more high-rate Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) data become available in real time, which provide more opportunities to monitor the seismic waveforms. China's GNSS, BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS), has already satisfied the requirement of stand-alone precise positioning in Asia-Pacific region with 14 in-orbit satellites, which promisingly suggests that BDS could be applied to the high-precision earthquake monitoring as GPS. In the present paper, real-time monitoring of seismic waveforms using BDS measurements is assessed. We investigate a so-called "variometric" approach to measure real-time seismic waveforms with high-rate BDS observations. This approach is based on time difference technique and standard broadcast products which are routinely available in real time. The 1HZ BDS data recorded by Beidou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) during the 2015 Mw 7.8 Nepal earthquake is analyzed. The results indicate that the accuracies of velocity estimation from BDS are 2-3 mm/s in horizontal components and 8-9 mm/s in vertical component, respectively, which are consistent with GPS. The seismic velocity waveforms during earthquake show good agreement between BDS and GPS. Moreover, the displacement waveforms is reconstructed by an integration of velocity time series with trend removal. The displacement waveforms with the accuracy of 1-2 cm are derived by comparing with post-processing GPS precise point positioning (PPP).

  9. Estimation of differential code biases for Beidou navigation system using multi-GNSS observations: How stable are the differential satellite and receiver code biases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Junchen; Song, Shuli; Zhu, Wenyao

    2016-04-01

    Differential code biases (DCBs) are important parameters that must be estimated accurately and reliably for high-precision GNSS applications. For optimal operational service performance of the Beidou navigation system (BDS), continuous monitoring and constant quality assessment of the BDS satellite DCBs are crucial. In this study, a global ionospheric model was constructed based on a dual system BDS/GPS combination. Daily BDS DCBs were estimated together with the total electron content from 23 months' multi-GNSS observations. The stability of the resulting BDS DCB estimates was analyzed in detail. It was found that over a long period, the standard deviations (STDs) for all satellite B1-B2 DCBs were within 0.3 ns (average: 0.19 ns) and for all satellite B1-B3 DCBs, the STDs were within 0.36 ns (average: 0.22 ns). For BDS receivers, the STDs were greater than for the satellites, with most values <2 ns. The DCBs of different receiver families are different. Comparison of the statistics of the short-term stability of satellite DCBs over different time intervals revealed that the difference in STD between 28- and 7-day intervals was small, with a maximum not exceeding 0.06 ns. In almost all cases, the difference in BDS satellite DCBs between two consecutive days was <0.8 ns. The main conclusion is that because of the stability of the BDS DCBs, they only require occasional estimation or calibration. Furthermore, the 30-day averaged satellite DCBs can be used reliably for the most demanding BDS applications.

  10. Microcomputers and astronomical navigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin-Jouan, Y.

    1996-04-01

    Experienced navigators remember ancient astronomical navigation and its limitations. Using microcomputers in small packages and selecting up-to-date efficient methods will overcome many of these limitations. Both features lead to focus on observations, and encourage an increase in their numbers. With no intention of competing with satellite navigation, sextant navigation in the open sea can then be accessed again by anybody. It can be considered for demonstrative use or as a complement to the GPS.

  11. Spherical harmonic series for derivatives of all orders of the gravitational potential of a planet and their application in satellite geodesy and space navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovskaya, M. S.; Vershkov, A. N.

    2012-04-01

    Series of spherical harmonics are constructed for derivatives of all orders of the gravitational potential of an arbitrary three-dimensional body, including the Earth, Moon and other planets. These series have a common structure, as simple as the potential itself. They differ from each other and from the series for the potential only by numerical coefficients of the spherical functions, by the degree of a numerical multiplier of the sum of double series, and by the limits of summation. The constructed series can be applied in solving many problems of celestial mechanics, satellite geodesy, and space navigation.

  12. COST Action ES1206 : Advanced Global Navigation Satellite Systems Tropospheric Products for Monitoring Severe Weather Events and Climate (GNSS4SWEC) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.

    2013-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have revolutionised positioning, navigation, and timing, becoming a common part of our everyday life. Aside from these well-known civilian and commercial applications, GNSS is now an established atmospheric observing system which can accurately sense water vapour, the most abundant greenhouse gas, accounting for 60-70% of atmospheric warming. Severe weather forecasting is challenging, in part due to the high temporal and spatial variation of atmospheric water vapour. Water vapour is under-sampled in the current meteorological and climate observing systems, obtaining and exploiting more high-quality humidity observations is essential to weather forecasting and climate monitoring. The new COST Action, ES1206, will address new and improved capabilities from con-current developments in both the GNSS and meteorological communities. For the first time, the synergy of the three GNSS systems (GPS, GLONASS and Galileo) will be used to develop new, advanced tropospheric products, exploiting the full potential of multi-GNSS water vapour estimates on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, from real-time monitoring and forecasting of severe weather, to climate research. In addition the Action will promote the use of meteorological data in GNSS positioning, navigation, and timing services. The Action will stimulate knowledge transfer and data sharing throughout Europe.

  13. COST Action ES1206 : Advanced Global Navigation Satellite Systems Tropospheric Products for Monitoring Severe Weather Events and Climate (GNSS4SWEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jonathan; Guerova, Guergana; Dousa, Jan; de Haan, Siebren; Bock, Olivier; Dick, Galina; Pottiaux, Eric; Pacione, Rosa

    2014-05-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have revolutionised positioning, navigation, and timing, becoming a common part of our everyday life. Aside from these well-known civilian and commercial applications, GNSS is now an established atmospheric observing system which can accurately sense water vapour, the most abundant greenhouse gas, accounting for 60-70% of atmospheric warming. Severe weather forecasting is challenging, in part due to the high temporal and spatial variation of atmospheric water vapour. Water vapour is under-sampled in the current meteorological and climate observing systems, obtaining and exploiting more high-quality humidity observations is essential to weather forecasting and climate monitoring. The new COST Action, ES1206, will address new and improved capabilities from con-current developments in both the GNSS and meteorological communities. For the first time, the synergy of the three GNSS systems (GPS, GLONASS and Galileo) will be used to develop new, advanced tropospheric products, exploiting the full potential of multi-GNSS water vapour estimates on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, from real-time monitoring and forecasting of severe weather, to climate research. In addition the Action will promote the use of meteorological data in GNSS positioning, navigation, and timing services. The Action will stimulate knowledge transfer and data sharing throughout Europe.

  14. Response of Global Navigation Satellite System receivers to known shaking between 0.2 and 20 Hertz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, John; Evans, John R.; Blume, Fredrick; Johanson, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, several technological advances have allowed Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers to have the capability to record displacements at high frequencies, with sampling rates approaching 100 samples per second (sps). In addition, communication and computer hardware and software have allowed various institutions, including the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), to retrieve, process, and display position changes recorded by a network of GNSS sites with small, less than 1-s delays between the time that the GNSS receiver records signals from a constellation of satellites and the time that the position is estimated (a method known as “real-time”). These improvements in hardware and software have allowed the USGS to process GNSS (or a subset of the GNSS, the Global Positioning System, GPS) data in real-time at 1 sps with the goal of determining displacements from earthquakes and volcanoes in real-time. However, the current set of GNSS equipment can record at rates of 100 sps, which allows the possibility of using this equipment to record earthquake displacements over the full range of frequencies that typically are recorded by acceleration and velocity transducers. The advantage of using GNSS to record earthquakes is that the displacement, rather than acceleration or velocity, is recorded, and for large earthquakes, the GNSS sensor stays on scale and will not distort the observations due to clipping of the signal at its highest amplitude. The direct observation of displacement is advantageous in estimating the size and spatial extent of the earthquake rupture. Otherwise, when using velocity or acceleration sensors, the displacements are determined by numerical integration of the observations, which can introduce significant uncertainty in the estimated displacements. However, GNSS technology can, at best, resolve displacements of a few millimeters, and for most earthquakes, their displacements are less than 1 mm. Consequently, to be useful

  15. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS A 0.18 μm CMOS dual-band low power low noise amplifier for a global navigation satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, Li; Yiqi, Zhuang; Zhenrong, Li; Gang, Jin

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a dual-band low noise amplifier for the receiver of a global navigation satellite system. The differences between single band and multi-band design methods are discussed. The relevant parameter analysis and the details of circuit design are presented. The test chip was implemented in a TSMC 0.18 μm 1P4M RF CMOS process. The LNA achieves a gain of 16.8 dB/18.9 dB on 1.27 GHz/1.575 GHz. The measured noise figure is around 1.5-1.7 dB on both bands. The LNA consumes less than 4.3 mA of current from a 1.8 V power supply. The measurement results show consistency with the design. And the LNA can fully satisfy the demands of the GNSS receiver.

  16. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION AND INITIALIZATION OF THE MAGELLAN GPS SATELLITE NAVIGATOR (UA-F-22.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the general procedures for the operation and initialization of the Magellan Global Positioning System (GPS) Satellite Navigator. This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval during the Arizona NHEXAS project and the Borde...

  17. PAU/GNSS-R: Implementation, Performance and First Results of a Real-Time Delay-Doppler Map Reflectometer Using Global Navigation Satellite System Signals

    PubMed Central

    Marchan-Hernandez, Juan Fernando; Camps, Adriano; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Nereida; Bosch-Lluis, Xavier; Ramos-Perez, Isaac; Valencia, Enric

    2008-01-01

    Signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) were originally conceived for position and speed determination, but they can be used as signals of opportunity as well. The reflection process over a given surface modifies the properties of the scattered signal, and therefore, by processing the reflected signal, relevant geophysical data regarding the surface under study (land, sea, ice…) can be retrieved. In essence, a GNSS-R receiver is a multi-channel GNSS receiver that computes the received power from a given satellite at a number of different delay and Doppler bins of the incoming signal. The first approaches to build such a receiver consisted of sampling and storing the scattered signal for later post-processing. However, a real-time approach to the problem is desirable to obtain immediately useful geophysical variables and reduce the amount of data. The use of FPGA technology makes this possible, while at the same time the system can be easily reconfigured. The signal tracking and processing constraints made necessary to fully design several new blocks. The uniqueness of the implemented system described in this work is the capability to compute in real-time Delay-Doppler maps (DDMs) either for four simultaneous satellites or just one, but with a larger number of bins. The first tests have been conducted from a cliff over the sea and demonstrate the successful performance of the instrument to compute DDMs in real-time from the measured reflected GNSS/R signals. The processing of these measurements shall yield quantitative relationships between the sea state (mainly driven by the surface wind and the swell) and the overall DDM shape. The ultimate goal is to use the DDM shape to correct the sea state influence on the L-band brightness temperature to improve the retrieval of the sea surface salinity (SSS).

  18. A New Navigation Satellite Clock Bias Prediction Method Based on Modified Clock-bias Quadratic Polynomial Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. P.; Lu, Z. P.; Sun, D. S.; Wang, N.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better express the characteristics of satellite clock bias (SCB) and improve SCB prediction precision, this paper proposed a new SCB prediction model which can take physical characteristics of space-borne atomic clock, the cyclic variation, and random part of SCB into consideration. First, the new model employs a quadratic polynomial model with periodic items to fit and extract the trend term and cyclic term of SCB; then based on the characteristics of fitting residuals, a time series ARIMA ~(Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average) model is used to model the residuals; eventually, the results from the two models are combined to obtain final SCB prediction values. At last, this paper uses precise SCB data from IGS (International GNSS Service) to conduct prediction tests, and the results show that the proposed model is effective and has better prediction performance compared with the quadratic polynomial model, grey model, and ARIMA model. In addition, the new method can also overcome the insufficiency of the ARIMA model in model recognition and order determination.

  19. The NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS): A Constellation of Bi-static Ocean Scatterometer Microsatellites to Probe the Inner Core of Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruf, C. S.; Clarizia, M. P.; Ridley, A. J.; Gleason, S.; O'Brien, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is the first NASA Earth Ventures spaceborne mission. CYGNSS consists of a constellation of eight small observatories carried into orbit on a single launch vehicle. The eight satellites comprise a constellation that flies closely together to measure the ocean surface wind field with unprecedented temporal resolution and spatial coverage, under all precipitating conditions, and over the full dynamic range of wind speeds experienced in a TC. The 8 CYGNSS observatories will fly in 500 km circular orbits at a common inclination of ~35°. Each observatory includes a Delay Doppler Mapping Instrument (DDMI) consisting of a modified GPS receiver capable of measuring surface scattering, a low gain zenith antenna for measurement of the direct GPS signal, and two high gain nadir antennas for measurement of the weaker scattered signal. Each DDMI is capable of measuring 4 simultaneous bi-static reflections, resulting in a total of 32 wind measurements per second across the globe by the full constellation. Simulation studies will be presented which examine the sampling as functions of various orbit parameters of the constellation. For comparison purposes, a similar analysis is conducted using the sampling of several past and present conventional spaceborne ocean wind scatterometers. Differences in the ability of the sensors to resolve the evolution of the TC inner core will be examined. The CYGNSS observatories are currently in Phase C development. An update on the current status of the mission will be presented, including the expected precision, accuracy and spatial and temporal sampling properties of the retrieved winds.

  20. Using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data for Hazard Estimation in Some Active Regions in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Mohamed, Abdel-Monem

    2016-07-01

    Egypt rapidly growing development is accompanied by increasing levels of standard living particular in its urban areas. However, there is a limited experience in quantifying the sources of risk management in Egypt and in designing efficient strategies to keep away serious impacts of earthquakes. From the historical point of view and recent instrumental records, there are some seismo-active regions in Egypt, where some significant earthquakes had occurred in different places. The special tectonic features in Egypt: Aswan, Greater Cairo, Red Sea and Sinai Peninsula regions are the territories of a high seismic risk, which have to be monitored by up-to date technologies. The investigations of the seismic events and interpretations led to evaluate the seismic hazard for disaster prevention and for the safety of the dense populated regions and the vital national projects as the High Dam. In addition to the monitoring of the recent crustal movements, the most powerful technique of satellite geodesy GNSS are used where geodetic networks are covering such seismo-active regions. The results from the data sets are compared and combined in order to determine the main characteristics of the deformation and hazard estimation for specified regions. The final compiled output from the seismological and geodetic analysis threw lights upon the geodynamical regime of these seismo-active regions and put Aswan and Greater Cairo under the lowest class according to horizontal crustal strains classifications. This work will serve a basis for the development of so-called catastrophic models and can be further used for catastrophic risk management. Also, this work is trying to evaluate risk of large catastrophic losses within the important regions including the High Dam, strategic buildings and archeological sites. Studies on possible scenarios of earthquakes and losses are a critical issue for decision making in insurance as a part of mitigation measures.

  1. Spatial variability of nutrients (N, P) in a deep, temperate lake with a low trophic level supported by global navigation satellite systems, geographic information system and geostatistics.

    PubMed

    Łopata, Michał; Popielarczyk, Dariusz; Templin, Tomasz; Dunalska, Julita; Wiśniewski, Grzegorz; Bigaj, Izabela; Szymański, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We investigated changes in the spatial distribution of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) in the deep, mesotrophic Lake Hańcza. The raw data collection, supported by global navigation satellite system (GNSS) positioning, was conducted on 79 sampling points. A geostatistical method (kriging) was applied in spatial interpolation. Despite the relatively small area of the lake (3.04 km(2)), compact shape (shore development index of 2.04) and low horizontal exchange of water (retention time 11.4 years), chemical gradients in the surface waters were found. The largest variation concerns the main biogenic element - phosphorus. The average value was 0.032 at the extreme values of 0.019 to 0.265 mg L(-1) (coefficient of variation 87%). Smaller differences are related to nitrogen compounds (0.452-1.424 mg L(-1) with an average value of 0.583 mg L(-1), the coefficient of variation 20%). The parts of the lake which are fed with tributaries are the richest in phosphorus. The water quality of the oligo-mesotrophic Lake Hańcza has been deteriorating in recent years. Our results indicate that inferences about trends in the evolution of examined lake trophic status should be based on an analysis of the data, taking into account the local variation in water chemistry. PMID:24804657

  2. Inertial/multisensor navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alikiotis, Dimitri

    1987-01-01

    A Multisensor Navigation System as proposed by the Ohio University Avionics Engineering Center is illustrated. The proposed system incorporates radio (Lorac-C), satellite (Global Positioning System) and an inertial navigation system (INS). The inertial part of the system will be of a low grade since the INS will be used primarily for filtering the GPS data and for short term stability. Loran-C and GPS will be used for long term stability.

  3. Methods of practice and guidelines for using survey-grade global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) to establish vertical datum in the United States Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rydlund, Paul H.; Densmore, Brenda K.

    2012-01-01

    Geodetic surveys have evolved through the years to the use of survey-grade (centimeter level) global positioning to perpetuate and post-process vertical datum. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) uses Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) technology to monitor natural hazards, ensure geospatial control for climate and land use change, and gather data necessary for investigative studies related to water, the environment, energy, and ecosystems. Vertical datum is fundamental to a variety of these integrated earth sciences. Essentially GNSS surveys provide a three-dimensional position x, y, and z as a function of the North American Datum of 1983 ellipsoid and the most current hybrid geoid model. A GNSS survey may be approached with post-processed positioning for static observations related to a single point or network, or involve real-time corrections to provide positioning "on-the-fly." Field equipment required to facilitate GNSS surveys range from a single receiver, with a power source for static positioning, to an additional receiver or network communicated by radio or cellular for real-time positioning. A real-time approach in its most common form may be described as a roving receiver augmented by a single-base station receiver, known as a single-base real-time (RT) survey. More efficient real-time methods involving a Real-Time Network (RTN) permit the use of only one roving receiver that is augmented to a network of fixed receivers commonly known as Continually Operating Reference Stations (CORS). A post-processed approach in its most common form involves static data collection at a single point. Data are most commonly post-processed through a universally accepted utility maintained by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS), known as the Online Position User Service (OPUS). More complex post-processed methods involve static observations among a network of additional receivers collecting static data at known benchmarks. Both classifications provide users

  4. Post-disposal orbital evolution of satellites and upper stages used by the GPS and GLONASS navigation constellations: The long-term impact on the Medium Earth Orbit environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano

    2012-08-01

    The long-term evolution and environmental impact in MEO of all the abandoned spacecraft and upper stages associated with the GPS and GLONASS navigation constellations were analyzed. The orbits of the disposed objects, as of 1 May 2011, were propagated for 200 years and snapshots of their evolving distribution were obtained, together with an estimation of the changing collision probability with the spacecraft of the operational navigation systems existing or planned in MEO, i.e., GLONASS, GPS, Beidou and Galileo. The probability that the abandoned objects considered will collide with the operational spacecraft of the navigation constellations is very low, even taking into account the intrinsic eccentricity instability of the disposal orbits. Assuming the present or envisaged configuration of the constellations in MEO, the probability of collision, integrated over 200 years, would be <1/300 with a GLONASS spacecraft, <1/15,000 with a GPS or Beidou spacecraft, and <1/250,000 with a Galileo spacecraft. The worst disposal strategy consists in abandoning satellites and upper stages close to the altitude of the operational constellation (GLONASS), while a re-orbiting a few hundred km away (GPS) is able to guarantee an effective long-term dilution of the collision risk, irrespective of the eccentricity instability due to geopotential and luni-solar perturbations. The disposal strategies applied so far to the GPS satellites should be able to guarantee for at least a few centuries a sustainable MEO environment free of collisions among intact objects. Consequently, there would be no need to adopt disposal schemes targeting also the optimal value of the eccentricity vector. However, it should be pointed out that the GPS disposal strategy was devised well in advance of the Beidou constellation announcement, so most of the abandoned satellites were re-orbited fairly close to the altitude of the new Chinese system. A new re-orbiting approach will be therefore needed in the future.

  5. AVHRR image navigation - Summary and review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William J.; Brown, Jim; Nowak, Z. Paul

    1989-01-01

    The navigation of imagery from polar orbiting weather satellites includes the correction for geometric distortions due to earth shape/earth rotation, satellite orbit variations, and satellite attitude along with the resampling of the satellite image to a selected geographic map projection. The routine image navigation procedure also compensates for the distortion of the satellite imagery due to the nonlinear scanning of the sensor system. This paper reviews general methods for performing this image navigation, ranging from a method that assumes no orbital information and, thus, relies on nominal orbital parameter values and image corrections computed by matching ground control points (GCPs), to a method that uses high-quality satellite ephemeris data to make the correction with a limited number of GCPs. A procedure to optimize the image navigation by using a spatial remapping, or interpolation, is introduced and outlined. Recommendations are made for people interested in the processing of AVHRR imagery.

  6. TDRSS Augmentation System for Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Gregory W.; Gramling, Cheryl; Valdez, Jennifer; Baldwin, Philip

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) reinvigorated the development of the TDRSS Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS). TASS is a global, space-based, communications and navigation service for users of Global Navigation Satellite Systems(GNSS) and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). TASS leverages the existing TDRSS to provide an S-band beacon radio navigation and messaging source to users at orbital altitudes 1400 km and below.

  7. Satellite navigation for meteorological purposes: Inverse referencing for NOAA-N and ERS-1 imagers with a 1 km nadir pixel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klokočník, J.; Kostelecký, J.; Grassl, H.; Schlüssel, P.; Pospíšilová, L.; Gooding, R. H.; Lála, P.

    Iterative methods for inverse referencing from mean orbital elements or osculating position and velocity, accounting for all necessary orbital perturbations with respect to given nadir pixel size, are described. [Inverse referencing means that the geodetic coordinates of a point on the surface are given and the corresponding image coordinates (scan line number and pixel number) are obtained from satellite orbital elements or coordinates.] The idea is to treat a pixel like a satellite tracking station on the ground. This permits the use of existing software for the computation of satellite ephemerides and orbit determination. The time of culmination of a satellite over the pixel and the off-nadir angle at that moment have been computed. Two variants for such a computation have been tested. Numerical results for the NOAA-N meteorological satellites and ERS-1 are presented. The present state of our software for inverse referencing should fulfil ordinary requirements posed by meteorologists. For NOAA-N satellites, the accuracy achieved roughly the nadir pixel size. The main obstacle to an increase in accuracy is the low quality of the mean orbital elements usually available. For ERS-1, the accuracy may achieve a level of 100 m. A software package, containing versions of the FORTRAN 77 programs PIXPO 3, PIXPO 4 and PIXPOSC, for various data types, including US-2 line or TBUS mean elements or a state vector, is available for scientific exchange.

  8. Micro Navigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Kia, T.; Chau, S. N.

    2001-01-01

    Miniature high-performance low-mass space avionics systems are desired for planned future outer planetary exploration missions (i.e. Europa Orbiter/Lander, Pluto-Kuiper Express). The spacecraft fuel and mass requirements enabling orbit insertion is the driving requirement. The Micro Navigator is an integrated autonomous Guidance, Navigation & Control (GN&C)micro-system that would provide the critical avionics function for navigation, pointing, and precision landing. The Micro Navigator hardware and software allow fusion of data from multiple sensors to provide a single integrated vehicle state vector necessary for six degrees of freedom GN&C. The benefits of this MicroNavigator include: 1) The Micro Navigator employs MEMS devices that promise orders of magnitude reductions in mass power and volume of inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes), celestial sensing devices (startracker, sun sensor), and computing element; 2) The highly integrated nature of the unit will reduce the cost of flight missions. a) The advanced miniaturization technologies employed by the Micro Navigator lend themselves to mass production, and therefore will reduce production cost of spacecraft. b) The integral approach simplifies interface issues associated with discrete components and reduces cost associated with integration and test of multiple components; and 3) The integration of sensors and processing elements into a single unit will allow the Micro Navigator to encapsulate attitude information and determination functions into a single object. This is particularly beneficial for object-oriented software architectures that are used in advanced spacecraft. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Autonomous navigation using lunar beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, A. R.; Ellis, J.; French, J.; Null, G.; Yunck, T.; Wu, S.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of using lunar beacon signal transmission for on-board navigation for earth satellites and near-earth spacecraft is described. The system would require powerful transmitters on the earth-side of the moon's surface and black box receivers with antennae and microprocessors placed on board spacecraft for autonomous navigation. Spacecraft navigation requires three position and three velocity elements to establish location coordinates. Two beacons could be soft-landed on the lunar surface at the limits of allowable separation and each would transmit a wide-beam signal with cones reaching GEO heights and be strong enough to be received by small antennae in near-earth orbit. The black box processor would perform on-board computation with one-way Doppler/range data and dynamical models. Alternatively, GEO satellites such as the GPS or TDRSS spacecraft can be used with interferometric techniques to provide decimeter-level accuracy for aircraft navigation.

  10. Interplanetary navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of NASA's planetary navigation techniques is traced, and radiometric and optical data types are described. Doppler navigation; the Deep Space Network; differenced two-way range techniques; differential very long base interferometry; and optical navigation are treated. The Doppler system enables a spacecraft in cruise at high absolute declination to be located within a total angular uncertainty of 1/4 microrad. The two-station range measurement provides a 1 microrad backup at low declinations. Optical data locate the spacecraft relative to the target to an angular accuracy of 5 microrad. Earth-based radio navigation and its less accurate but target-relative counterpart, optical navigation, thus form complementary measurement sources, which provide a powerful sensory system to produce high-precision orbit estimates.

  11. Autonomous Navigation Using Celestial Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Gramling, Cheryl; Leung, Dominic; Belur, Sheela; Long, Anne

    1999-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Enterprises envision frequent low-cost missions to explore the solar system, observe the universe, and study our planet. Satellite autonomy is a key technology required to reduce satellite operating costs. The Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center (GNCC) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) currently sponsors several initiatives associated with the development of advanced spacecraft systems to provide autonomous navigation and control. Autonomous navigation has the potential both to increase spacecraft navigation system performance and to reduce total mission cost. By eliminating the need for routine ground-based orbit determination and special tracking services, autonomous navigation can streamline spacecraft ground systems. Autonomous navigation products can be included in the science telemetry and forwarded directly to the scientific investigators. In addition, autonomous navigation products are available onboard to enable other autonomous capabilities, such as attitude control, maneuver planning and orbit control, and communications signal acquisition. Autonomous navigation is required to support advanced mission concepts such as satellite formation flying. GNCC has successfully developed high-accuracy autonomous navigation systems for near-Earth spacecraft using NASA's space and ground communications systems and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Recently, GNCC has expanded its autonomous navigation initiative to include satellite orbits that are beyond the regime in which use of GPS is possible. Currently, GNCC is assessing the feasibility of using standard spacecraft attitude sensors and communication components to provide autonomous navigation for missions including: libration point, gravity assist, high-Earth, and interplanetary orbits. The concept being evaluated uses a combination of star, Sun, and Earth sensor measurements along with forward-link Doppler

  12. NASA tracking ship navigation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenna, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The ship position and attitude measurement system that was installed aboard the tracking ship Vanguard is described. An overview of the entire system is given along with a description of how precise time and frequency is utilized. The instrumentation is broken down into its basic components. Particular emphasis is given to the inertial navigation system. Each navigation system used, a mariner star tracker, navigation satellite system, Loran C and OMEGA in conjunction with the inertial system is described. The accuracy of each system is compared along with their limitations.

  13. One-way return-link Doppler navigation with the Tracking and Data Satellite System (TDRSS) - The ultrastable oscillator (USO) experiment on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, J. B.; Nemesure, M.; Teles, J.; Brown-Conwell, E. R.; Jackson, J. A.; Reamy, V. L.; Maher, M. J.; Elrod, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    The principal objectives of the USO experiment on the COBE spacecraft are defined, and results of space qualification studies for the COBE USO experiment are summarized. The principal objectives of the experiment are: (1) to determine flight performance of the USO coupled to the second-generation TDRSS transponder; (2) space qualify TDRSS noncoherent one-way return-link Doppler tracking; and (3) analyze algorithms for one-way navigation with real data. The three objectives of the experiment have been met in the first stage of the experiment analysis.

  14. Detecting changes in reflected Global Navigation Satellite System signals over land using a spaceborne receiver: Results from the TechDemoSat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, C. C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Zuffada, C.; Shah, R.; Hajj, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Spaceborne GPS and GNSS receivers can be used to retrieve information about changes on the Earth's surface. Both experimental and modeling efforts have shown that these receivers can detect changes in reflected GNSS signals that are indicative of changes in sea state. Numerous studies using GNSS receivers flown on aircraft have also shown that the reflected signals are sensitive to changes in soil moisture and vegetation cover. However, the only analysis of the detection of GNSS reflected signals over land using spaceborne receivers has been limited to the small amount of data recorded nearly 10 years ago by the UK-DMC satellite. Last year's launch of the TechDemoSat (TDS) satellite, carrying an instrument similar to that planned for NASA's CYGNSS mission, represents an enormous opportunity to investigate the potential of using spaceborne GNSS receivers to sense changes in the land surface, including soil moisture and flood-inundated areas. With a revisit time of only a few hours, the observations from the CYGNSS constellation could provide data with a temporal resolution that would be unmatched by traditional remote sensing satellites. Here, we present data collected over land by the receiver onboard TDS and report its sensitivity to changes in surface roughness, vegetation parameters, and open water (lakes and rivers), as well as standing water beneath vegetation (marshes and wetlands). In particular, we investigate how the normalized peak power of the delay-Doppler maps that are recorded by the receiver is affected by changes in the land surface. Preliminary results indicate that the signal is strongly affected by changes in topography. However, once this effect is removed using digital elevation models, the influence of rivers, lakes, and wetlands on the signal is clearly seen. Examples of large signal changes coming from areas of likely-saturated ground lend credence to the idea that these data could also be sensitive to changes in surface soil moisture.

  15. Celestial Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenkrantz, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    In the unit described in this article, students discover the main principles of navigation, build tools to observe celestial bodies, and apply their new skills to finding their position on Earth. Along the way students see how science, mathematics, technology, and history are intertwined.

  16. Antenna Measurement and Design for the CanX-7 Nanosatellite and the Development of a Global Navigation Satellite System Based Attitude Determination System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Paris Yen-Jun

    This thesis describes and presents solutions to various challenges small satellites may encounter during design and operation, particularly in the areas of communications and attitude determination. The first section of this thesis presents simulation and measurement of communications antennas on a nanosatellite to verify that the antennas have sufficient gain and polarization to enable near-omnidirectional operation. Near-omnidirectional antennas are essential to ensure reliable communication with the spacecraft regardless of its attitude, especially when fine pointing ability is unavailable or inadequate. Next, the following section covers the design of a circularly polarized patch antenna for use on an aircraft tracking payload. Lastly, the final section of this thesis presents the development and analysis of a technique for augmenting a single GPS antenna on a spacecraft to estimate attitude. It is possible for GPS measurements to partially supplement an existing attitude sensor that has been denied operation.

  17. Almanac services for celestial navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelmes, S.; Whittaker, J.

    2015-08-01

    Celestial navigation remains a vitally important back up to Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and relies on the use of almanac services. HM Nautical Almanac Office (HMNAO) provides a number of these services. The printed book, The Nautical Almanac, produced yearly and now available as an electronic publication, is continuously being improved, making use of the latest ideas and ephemerides to provide the user with their required data. HMNAO also produces NavPac, a software package that assists the user in calculating their position as well as providing additional navigational and astronomical tools. A new version of NavPac will be released in 2015 that will improve the user experience. The development of applications for mobile devices is also being considered. HMNAO continues to combine the latest improvements and theories of astrometry with the creation of books and software that best meet the needs of celestial navigation users.

  18. Viking navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneil, W. J.; Rudd, R. P.; Farless, D. L.; Hildebrand, C. E.; Mitchell, R. T.; Rourke, K. H.; Euler, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the navigation of the Viking spacecraft throughout their flight from Earth launch to Mars landing is given. The flight path design, actual inflight control, and postflight reconstruction are discussed in detail. The preflight analyses upon which the operational strategies and performance predictions were based are discussed. The inflight results are then discussed and compared with the preflight predictions and, finally, the results of any postflight analyses are presented.

  19. Ionospheric modelling for navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon Angel, M. A.

    Signals transmitted to and from satellites for communication and navigation purposes must pass through the ionosphere Ionospheric irregularities most common at equatorial latitudes although they could occur anywhere can have a major impact on system performance and reliability and commercial navigation service satellite-based providers need to account for their effects For a GNSS single-frequency receiver the Slant Total Electron Content STEC must be known by the user through broadcast corrections In this context there are several sets of broadcast parameters that can be defined to take into account this ionospheric term The chosen model to generate the ionospheric correction coefficients for the present study is the NeQuick model although with a number of adaptations intended to improve effective ionospheric effect modelling performances The aim of this study is to describe a possible adaptation to the NeQuick model for real time purposes and suitable for single frequency users Therefore it will be necessary to determine the performance of this modified NeQuick model in correcting the ionospheric delay In order to generate the ionospheric corrections for single frequency receivers using the NeQuick model a certain approach should be followed to adapt the performance of NeQuick since this model was originally developed to provide TEC using averaged monthly information of the solar activity and not daily one Thus to use NeQuick for real time applications as an ionospheric broadcasted model such as Klobuchar solar daily information at the user point

  20. Satellites at work (Space in the seventies)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corliss, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    The use of satellites in the areas of communications, meteorology, geodesy, navigation, air traffic control, and earth resources technology is discussed. NASA contributions to various programs are reviewed.

  1. INL Autonomous Navigation System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-30

    The INL Autonomous Navigation System provides instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The system permits high-speed autonomous navigation including obstacle avoidance, waypoing navigation and path planning in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  2. National aerospace meeting of the Institute of Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fell, Patrick

    The program for this year's aerospace meeting of The Institute of Navigation addressed developments in the evolving Global Positioning System (GPS) of navigation satellites, inertial navigation systems, and other electronic navigation systems and their applications. Also included in the program were a limited number of papers addressing the geodetic use of the GPS system.The Global Positioning System is a constellation of 18 navigation satellites being developed by the Department of Defense to provide instantaneous worldwide navigation. The system will support a multitude of military applications. The first paper by Jacobson reviewed the engineering development of GPS navigation receivers stressing the use of common hardware and software modules. A later paper by Ould described the mechanization of a digital receiver for GPS applications designed for faster acquisition of the spread spectrum satellite transmissions than analog receivers. The paper by Brady discussed the worldwide coverage that is provided by the limited number of satellites that will constitute the GPS constellation through 1983. The capability provided by the satellites presently on orbit would support a variety of experiments at almost any location. Tables of multiple satellite availability are provided for numerous worldwide locations. For civil aviation applications, Vogel addressed the satellite geometry considerations for low cost GPS user equipment, Esposito described the Federal Aviation Administration acceptance tests of a GPS navigation receiver, and Hopkins discussed the design and capability of an integrated GPS strapdown attitude and heading reference system for avionics.

  3. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  4. Optical Navigation Image of Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's Galileo spacecraft, now in orbit around Jupiter, returned this optical navigation image June 3, 1996, showing that the spacecraft is accurately targeted for its first flyby of the giant moon Ganymede on June 27. The missing data in the frame is the result of a special editing feature recently added to the spacecraft's computer to transmit navigation images more quickly. This is first in a series of optical navigation frames, highly edited onboard the spacecraft, that will be used to fine-tune the spacecraft's trajectory as Galileo approaches Ganymede. The image, used for navigation purposes only, is the product of new computer processing capabilities on the spacecraft that allow Galileo to send back only the information required to show the spacecraft is properly targeted and that Ganymede is where navigators calculate it to be. 'This navigation image is totally different from the pictures we'll be taking for scientific study of Ganymede when we get close to it later this month,' said Galileo Project Scientist Dr. Torrence Johnson. On June 27, Galileo will fly just 844 kilometers (524 miles) above Ganymede and return the most detailed, full-frame, high-resolution images and other measurements of the satellite ever obtained. Icy Ganymede is the largest moon in the solar system and three-quarters the size of Mars. It is one of the four large Jovian moons that are special targets of study for the Galileo mission. Of the more than 5 million bits contained in a single image, Galileo performed on-board editing to send back a mere 24,000 bits containing the essential information needed to assure proper targeting. Only the light-to-dark transitions of the crescent Ganymede and reference star locations were transmitted to Earth. The navigation image was taken from a distance of 9.8 million kilometers (6.1 million miles). On June 27th, the spacecraft will be 10,000 times closer to Ganymede.

  5. GOES-next navigation operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorello, John L., Jr.; Oh, In-Hwan; Ranne, C. Lee

    1988-01-01

    The next generation of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, GOES-I through -M (hereafter referred to as GOES-Next), begins a new era in the operation of weather satellites by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). With a new spacecraft design, three-axis attitude stabilization, new ground support equipment, and improved methods of image navigation and registration that use on board compensation techniques to correct images for satellite motion, NOAA expects improved performance over the current series of dual-spin spacecraft. To meet these expectations, planning is currently underway for providing the complex and intensive operational environment that will meet the challenge of operating the GOES-Next spacecraft. This paper describes that operational environment.

  6. Reference earth orbital research and applications investigations (blue book). Volume 5: Communications/navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The design and development of a communications/navigation facility for operation aboard space stations and space shuttles are discussed. The objectives of the facility are as follows: (1) to develop and demonstrate satellite and spacecraft technology applicable to space communications, navigation, and traffic control, (2) to optimize the use of the electromagnetic spectrum for communications and navigation satellite systems, and (3) to provide fundamental understanding of the space communications and navigation sciences to permit application of this discipline to government and industry.

  7. Space optical navigation techniques: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebordão, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Optical or vision-based navigation is an enabling technology for satellite autonomous navigation associated to different navigation approaches such as cruising, fly-by, terrain relative navigation, landing, rendezvous and docking between spacecrafts, rigidity of multi-satellite constellations. Since 2001, in many different ESA projects, the author and his team (at INETI and currently at FCUL) have been associated to most of the developments of the optical components of autonomous navigation, in cooperation with space primes or GNC subsystems suppliers. A unique experience related to seemingly simple photonic concepts associated to computational vision, photonic noises, camera tradeoffs and system concepts has emerged, and deserves a synthesis especially because some of these concepts are being implemented in the ESA Proba 3 mission and ESA is currently updating the technology in view of forthcoming planetary missions to Jupiter, Jupiter moons and asteroids. It is important to note that the US have already flown several missions relying on autonomous navigation and that NASA experience is at least one decade old. System approaches, sources of difficulty, some tradeoffs in both (and between) hardware and software, critical interface issues between the imaging and GNC (Guidance, Navigation and Control) subsystems, image processing techniques, utilization of apriori or to be estimated information, uncertainties, simulation of the imaging chain and non-cooperative environments will be addressed synthetically for both passive (optical) and active (lidar) systems.

  8. Virtual Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammrs, Stephan R.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Satellite (VirtualSat) is a computer program that creates an environment that facilitates the development, verification, and validation of flight software for a single spacecraft or for multiple spacecraft flying in formation. In this environment, enhanced functionality and autonomy of navigation, guidance, and control systems of a spacecraft are provided by a virtual satellite that is, a computational model that simulates the dynamic behavior of the spacecraft. Within this environment, it is possible to execute any associated software, the development of which could benefit from knowledge of, and possible interaction (typically, exchange of data) with, the virtual satellite. Examples of associated software include programs for simulating spacecraft power and thermal- management systems. This environment is independent of the flight hardware that will eventually host the flight software, making it possible to develop the software simultaneously with, or even before, the hardware is delivered. Optionally, by use of interfaces included in VirtualSat, hardware can be used instead of simulated. The flight software, coded in the C or C++ programming language, is compilable and loadable into VirtualSat without any special modifications. Thus, VirtualSat can serve as a relatively inexpensive software test-bed for development test, integration, and post-launch maintenance of spacecraft flight software.

  9. Communications, Navigation, and Network Reconfigurable Test-bed Flight Hardware Compatibility Test S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Communications, Navigation, and Network Reconfigurable Test-bed Flight Hardware Compatibility Test Sets and Networks Integration Management Office Testing for the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System

  10. Relative Navigation for Spacecraft Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Kate R.; Gramling, Cheryl J.; Lee, Taesul; Kelbel, David A.; Long, Anne C.

    1998-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center (GNCC) is currently developing and implementing advanced satellite systems to provide autonomous control of formation flyers. The initial formation maintenance capability will be flight-demonstrated on the Earth-Orbiter-1 (EO-l) satellite, which is planned under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration New Millennium Program to be a coflight with the Landsat-7 (L-7) satellite. Formation flying imposes relative navigation accuracy requirements in addition to the orbit accuracy requirements for the individual satellites. In the case of EO-1 and L-7, the two satellites are in nearly coplanar orbits, with a small difference in the longitude of the ascending node to compensate for the Earth's rotation. The GNCC has performed trajectory error analysis for the relative navigation of the EO-1/L-7 formation, as well as for a more advanced tracking configuration using cross- link satellite communications. This paper discusses the orbit determination and prediction accuracy achievable for EO-1 and L-7 under various tracking and orbit determination scenarios and discusses the expected relative separation errors in their formation flying configuration.

  11. Relative navigation for spacecraft formation flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Kate R.; Gramling, Cheryl J.; Lee, Taesul; Kelbel, David A.; Long, Anne C.

    1998-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center (GNCC) is currently developing and implementing advanced satellite systems to provide autonomous control of formation flyers. The initial formation maintenance capability will be flight-demonstrated on the Earth-Orbiter-1 (EO-1) satellite, which is planned under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration New Millennium Program to be a coflight with the Landsat-7 (L-7) satellite. Formation flying imposes relative navigation accuracy requirements in addition to the orbit accuracy requirements for the individual satellites. In the case of EO-1 and L-7, the two satellites are in nearly coplanar orbits, with a small difference in the longitude of the ascending node to compensate for the Earth's rotation. The GNCC has performed trajectory error analysis for the relative navigation of the EO-1/L-7 formation, as well as for a more advanced tracking configuration using cross-link satellite communications. This paper discusses the orbit determination and prediction accuracy achievable for EO-1 and L-7 under various tracking and orbit determination scenarios and discusses the expected relative separation errors in their formation flying configuration.

  12. Autonomous Navigation Improvements for High-Earth Orbiters Using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Anne; Kelbel, David; Lee, Taesul; Garrison, James; Carpenter, J. Russell; Bauer, F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center is currently developing autonomous navigation systems for satellites in high-Earth orbits where acquisition of the GPS signals is severely limited This paper discusses autonomous navigation improvements for high-Earth orbiters and assesses projected navigation performance for these satellites using Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Positioning Service (SPS) measurements. Navigation performance is evaluated as a function of signal acquisition threshold, measurement errors, and dynamic modeling errors using realistic GPS signal strength and user antenna models. These analyses indicate that an autonomous navigation position accuracy of better than 30 meters root-mean-square (RMS) can be achieved for high-Earth orbiting satellites using a GPS receiver with a very stable oscillator. This accuracy improves to better than 15 meters RMS if the GPS receiver's signal acquisition threshold can be reduced by 5 dB-Hertz to track weaker signals.

  13. Apollo Onboard Navigation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews basic navigation concepts, describes coordinate systems and identifies attitude determination techniques including Primary Guidance, Navigation and Control System (PGNCS) IMU management and Command and Service Module Stabilization and Control System/Lunar Module (LM) Abort Guidance System (AGS) attitude management. The presentation also identifies state vector determination techniques, including PGNCS coasting flight navigation, PGNCS powered flight navigation and LM AGS navigation.

  14. Libration Point Navigation Concepts Supporting the Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Folta, David C.; Moreau, Michael C.; Quinn, David A.

    2004-01-01

    This work examines the autonomous navigation accuracy achievable for a lunar exploration trajectory from a translunar libration point lunar navigation relay satellite, augmented by signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS). We also provide a brief analysis comparing the libration point relay to lunar orbit relay architectures, and discuss some issues of GPS usage for cis-lunar trajectories.

  15. Optical Navigation Preparations for New Horizons Pluto Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, William M., Jr.; Dumont, Philip J.; Jackman, Coralie D.

    2012-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft will encounter Pluto and its satellites in July 2015. As was the case for the Voyager encounters with Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, mission success will depend heavily on accurate spacecraft navigation, and accurate navigation will be impossible without the use of pictures of the Pluto system taken by the onboard cameras. We describe the preparations made by the New Horizons optical navigators: picture planning, image processing algorithms, software development and testing, and results from in-flight imaging.

  16. Active-imaging-based underwater navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, David; Schmitt, Gwenaël.; Fischer, Colin; Laurenzis, Martin; Christnacher, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are widely used for the localization and the navigation of unmanned and remotely operated vehicles (ROV). In contrast to ground or aerial vehicles, GNSS cannot be employed for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) without the use of a communication link to the water surface, since satellite signals cannot be received underwater. However, underwater autonomous navigation is still possible using self-localization methods which determines the relative location of an AUV with respect to a reference location using inertial measurement units (IMU), depth sensors and even sometimes radar or sonar imaging. As an alternative or a complementary solution to common underwater reckoning techniques, we present the first results of a feasibility study of an active-imaging-based localization method which uses a range-gated active-imaging system and can yield radiometric and odometric information even in turbid water.

  17. Earth satellites: A first look by the United States Navy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Immediately following World War II, the U.S. Navy considered the possibility of launching an earth satellite for navigational, communications, and meteorological applications. The technical feasibility of the satellite was based on extensions of German V-2 technology.

  18. Interplanetary approach optical navigation with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerath, N.

    1978-01-01

    The use of optical data from onboard television cameras for the navigation of interplanetary spacecraft during the planet approach phase is investigated. Three optical data types were studied: the planet limb with auxiliary celestial references, the satellite-star, and the planet-star two-camera methods. Analysis and modelling issues related to the nature and information content of the optical methods were examined. Dynamic and measurement system modelling, data sequence design, measurement extraction, model estimation and orbit determination, as relating optical navigation, are discussed, and the various error sources were analyzed. The methodology developed was applied to the Mariner 9 and the Viking Mars missions. Navigation accuracies were evaluated at the control and knowledge points, with particular emphasis devoted to the combined use of radio and optical data. A parametric probability analysis technique was developed to evaluate navigation performance as a function of system reliabilities.

  19. NAVIGATION PERFORMANCE IN HIGH EARTH ORBITS USING NAVIGATOR GPS RECEIVER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, William; Naasz, Bo; Moreau, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    NASA GSFC has developed a GPS receiver that can acquire and track GPS signals with sensitivity significantly lower than conventional GPS receivers. This opens up the possibility of using GPS based navigation for missions in high altitude orbit, such as Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) in a geostationary orbit, and the Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission, in highly eccentric orbits extending to 12 Earth radii and higher. Indeed much research has been performed to study the feasibility of using GPS navigation in high Earth orbits and the performance achievable. Recently, GSFC has conducted a series of hardware in-the-loop tests to assess the performance of this new GPS receiver in various high Earth orbits of interest. Tracking GPS signals to down to approximately 22-25 dB-Hz, including signals from the GPS transmitter side-lobes, steady-state navigation performance in a geostationary orbit is on the order of 10 meters. This paper presents the results of these tests, as well as sensitivity analysis to such factors as ionosphere masks, use of GPS side-lobe signals, and GPS receiver sensitivity.

  20. Navigating the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Powsner, S M; Roderer, N K

    1994-01-01

    Navigating any complex set of information resources requires tools for both browsing and searching. A number of tools are available today for using Internet resources, and more are being developed. This article reviews existing navigational tools, including two developed at the Yale University School of Medicine, and points out their strengths and weaknesses. A major shortcoming of the present Internet navigation methods is the lack of controlled descriptions of the available resources. As a result, navigating the Internet is very difficult. PMID:7841913

  1. Evolution of patient navigation.

    PubMed

    Shockney, Lillie D

    2010-08-01

    The role of nurses in patient navigation has evolved over more than four decades. Navigators in cancer care can guide patients through the physical, emotional, and financial challenges that come with a diagnosis of cancer and facilitate communication among healthcare providers. Navigation has the potential to improve patient outcomes and system efficiency. Oncology nurses are well suited to help patients with cancer navigate the healthcare system from diagnosis and treatment through survivorship and palliative care. PMID:20682496

  2. Private Graphs - Access Rights on Graphs for Seamless Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorner, W.; Hau, F.; Pagany, R.

    2016-06-01

    After the success of GNSS (Global Navigational Satellite Systems) and navigation services for public streets, indoor seems to be the next big development in navigational services, relying on RTLS - Real Time Locating Services (e.g. WIFI) and allowing seamless navigation. In contrast to navigation and routing services on public streets, seamless navigation will cause an additional challenge: how to make routing data accessible to defined users or restrict access rights for defined areas or only to parts of the graph to a defined user group? The paper will present case studies and data from literature, where seamless and especially indoor navigation solutions are presented (hospitals, industrial complexes, building sites), but the problem of restricted access rights was only touched from a real world, but not a technical perspective. The analysis of case studies will show, that the objective of navigation and the different target groups for navigation solutions will demand well defined access rights and require solutions, how to make only parts of a graph to a user or application available to solve a navigational task. The paper will therefore introduce the concept of private graphs, which is defined as a graph for navigational purposes covering the street, road or floor network of an area behind a public street and suggest different approaches how to make graph data for navigational purposes available considering access rights and data protection, privacy and security issues as well.

  3. Navigation Accuracy Guidelines for Orbital Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Alfriend, Kyle T.

    2004-01-01

    Some simple guidelines based on the accuracy in determining a satellite formation s semi-major axis differences are useful in making preliminary assessments of the navigation accuracy needed to support such missions. These guidelines are valid for any elliptical orbit, regardless of eccentricity. Although maneuvers required for formation establishment, reconfiguration, and station-keeping require accurate prediction of the state estimate to the maneuver time, and hence are directly affected by errors in all the orbital elements, experience has shown that determination of orbit plane orientation and orbit shape to acceptable levels is less challenging than the determination of orbital period or semi-major axis. Furthermore, any differences among the member s semi-major axes are undesirable for a satellite formation, since it will lead to differential along-track drift due to period differences. Since inevitable navigation errors prevent these differences from ever being zero, one may use the guidelines this paper presents to determine how much drift will result from a given relative navigation accuracy, or conversely what navigation accuracy is required to limit drift to a given rate. Since the guidelines do not account for non-two-body perturbations, they may be viewed as useful preliminary design tools, rather than as the basis for mission navigation requirements, which should be based on detailed analysis of the mission configuration, including all relevant sources of uncertainty.

  4. Navigation Architecture for a Space Mobile Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Jennifer E.; Ashman, Benjamin; Gramling, Cheryl; Heckler, Gregory W.; Carpenter, Russell

    2016-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS) is a proposed beacon service to provide a global, space based GPS augmentation service based on the NASA Global Differential GPS (GDGPS) System. The TASS signal will be tied to the GPS time system and usable as an additional ranging and Doppler radiometric source. Additionally, it will provide data vital to autonomous navigation in the near Earth regime, including space weather information, TDRS ephemerides, Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP), and forward commanding capability. TASS benefits include enhancing situational awareness, enabling increased autonomy, and providing near real-time command access for user platforms. As NASA Headquarters' Space Communication and Navigation Office (SCaN) begins to move away from a centralized network architecture and towards a Space Mobile Network (SMN) that allows for user initiated services, autonomous navigation will be a key part of such a system. This paper explores how a TASS beacon service enables the Space Mobile Networking paradigm, what a typical user platform would require, and provides an in-depth analysis of several navigation scenarios and operations concepts. This paper provides an overview of the TASS beacon and its role within the SMN and user community. Supporting navigation analysis is presented for two user mission scenarios: an Earth observing spacecraft in low earth orbit (LEO), and a highly elliptical spacecraft in a lunar resonance orbit. These diverse flight scenarios indicate the breadth of applicability of the TASS beacon for upcoming users within the current network architecture and in the SMN.

  5. Schuler Period in LEO Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Russell J.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper generalizes and extends the concept of the Schuler oscillation that occurs in the theory of inertial navigation systems, allowing one to see how the Schuler phenomenon affects inertial navigation systems operating in space. We show why a low earth orbit satellite's orbital period is identical to the period of the Schuler pendulum, which is the period of the errors for terrestrial inertial navigation systems. We also show that the generalized form of the Schuler oscillation takes the same form as the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations for satellite relative motion and that the period of the out-of-plane motion in neighboring satellite relative trajectories is the same as the Schuler period. Finally, we describe how INS gyro drift manifests itself in different coordinate systems for the orbital case. These results may assist orbital flight dynamics and attitude control systems engineers in the design and analysis of INS-equipped spacecraft

  6. Preliminary navigation accuracy analysis for the TDRSS Onboard Navigation System (TONS) experiment on EP/EUVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramling, C. J.; Long, A. C.; Lee, T.; Ottenstein, N. A.; Samii, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    A Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Onboard Navigation System (TONS) is currently being developed by NASA to provide a high accuracy autonomous navigation capability for users of TDRSS and its successor, the Advanced TDRSS (ATDRSS). The fully autonomous user onboard navigation system will support orbit determination, time determination, and frequency determination, based on observation of a continuously available, unscheduled navigation beacon signal. A TONS experiment will be performed in conjunction with the Explorer Platform (EP) Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) mission to flight quality TONS Block 1. An overview is presented of TONS and a preliminary analysis of the navigation accuracy anticipated for the TONS experiment. Descriptions of the TONS experiment and the associated navigation objectives, as well as a description of the onboard navigation algorithms, are provided. The accuracy of the selected algorithms is evaluated based on the processing of realistic simulated TDRSS one way forward link Doppler measurements. The analysis process is discussed and the associated navigation accuracy results are presented.

  7. Oceanography from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. S.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that oceanographers have benefited from the space program mainly through the increased efficiency it has brought to ship operations. For example, the Transit navigation system has enabled oceanographers to compile detailed maps of sea-floor properties and to more accurately locate moored subsurface instrumentation. General descriptions are given of instruments used in satellite observations (altimeter, color scanner, infrared radiometer, microwave radiometer, scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar). It is pointed out that because of the large volume of data that satellite instruments generate, the development of algorithms for converting the data into a form expressed in geophysical units has become especially important.

  8. Space Weather Effects on Aircraft Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, J. C.; Cade, W. B.

    2012-12-01

    Many aircraft today use satellites for GPS navigation, arrival and departure to and from airspaces, and for "shooting" non-precision and precision Instrument Approaches into airports. Also in development is an Air Traffic Control system based on satellite technology that seeks to modernize current air traffic control and improve safety, eventually phasing out radar (though not yet in the very near future). Due to the general, commercial, and military aviation fields all becoming more and more reliant on satellite and GPS technologies, the effects of space weather events on these systems is of paramount concern to militaries, airlines, private pilots, and other aviation operators. In this study we analyze data from airlines and other resources regarding effects on satellite and GPS systems, which is crucial to the conduct of safe flight operations now and improving systems for future and continued use.

  9. Stereotaxy, navigation and the temporal concatenation.

    PubMed

    Apuzzo, M L; Chen, J C

    1999-01-01

    Nautical and cerebral navigation share similar elements of functional need and similar developmental pathways. The need for orientation necessitates the development of appropriate concepts, and such concepts are dependent on technology for practical realization. Occasionally, a concept precedes technology in time and requires periods of delay for appropriate development. A temporal concatenation exists where time allows the additive as need, concept and technology ultimately provide an endpoint of elegant solution. Nautical navigation has proceeded through periods of dead reckoning and celestial navigation to satellite orientation with associated refinements of instrumentation and charts for guidance. Cerebral navigation has progressed from craniometric orientation and burr hole mounted guidance systems to simple rectolinear and arc-centered devices based on radiographs to guidance by complex anatomical and functional maps provided as an amalgam of modern imaging modes. These maps are now augmented by complex frame and frameless systems which allow not only precise orientation, but also point and volumetric action. These complex technical modalities required and developed in part from elements of maritime navigation that have been translated to cerebral navigation in a temporal concatenation. PMID:10853057

  10. The Mathematics of Navigating the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintz, Gerald

    2000-01-01

    In navigating spacecraft throughout the solar system, the space navigator relies on three academic disciplines - optimization, estimation, and control - that work on mathematical models of the real world. Thus, the navigator determines the flight path that will consume propellant and other resources in an efficient manner, determines where the craft is and predicts where it will go, and transfers it onto the optimal trajectory that meets operational and mission constraints. Mission requirements, for example, demand that observational measurements be made with sufficient precision that relativity must be modeled in collecting and fitting (the estimation process) the data, and propagating the trajectory. Thousands of parameters are now determined in near real-time to model the gravitational forces acting on a spacecraft in the vicinity of an irregularly shaped body. Completing these tasks requires mathematical models, analyses, and processing techniques. Newton, Gauss, Lambert, Legendre, and others are justly famous for their contributions to the mathematics of these tasks. More recently, graduate students participated in research to update the gravity model of the Saturnian system, including higher order gravity harmonics, tidal effects, and the influence of the rings. This investigation was conducted for the Cassini project to incorporate new trajectory modeling features in the navigation software. The resulting trajectory model will be used in navigating the 4-year tour of the Saturnian satellites. Also, undergraduate students are determining the ephemerides (locations versus time) of asteroids that will be used as reference objects in navigating the New Millennium's Deep Space 1 spacecraft autonomously.