Science.gov

Sample records for nci study demonstrates

  1. NCI/EPA AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY (AHS): DEVELOPMENT OF THE BIOMARKER QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), ind the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) have planned a long-term prospective epidemiologic study of men, women, and dependent children in agricultural areas to identify and...

  2. NCI Cohort Consortium Membership

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium membership is international and includes investigators responsible for more than 40 high-quality cohorts who are studying large and diverse populations in more than 15 different countries.

  3. TBMS1 exerts its cytotoxicity in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells through nucleolar stress-induced p53/MDM2-dependent mechanism, a quantitative proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingying; Xie, Guobin; Xia, Ji; Su, Dan; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Fuquan; Xu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Tubeimoside-1 (TBMS1) exerts its anticancer effects by inducing G2/M arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. However, the precise molecular mechanism of its anti-tumor effects has not been fully elucidated, especially the signaling pathways involved in the early stage of TBMS1 stimulation. In this study, we employed stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics approach and identified 439 proteins that exhibit significant differential expressions in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells upon exposure to TBMS1. Gene ontology and network analysis using DAVID and STRING on-line tools revealed that several nucleolar stress (ribosomal biogenesis) response proteins were differentially regulated by TBMS1. Functional validation demonstrated that TBMS1-induced NCI-H460 cell cytotoxicity involved nucleolar stress-induced p53/murine double minute clone 2 (MDM2), mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:26549658

  4. NCI Cohort Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium is an extramural-intramural partnership formed by the National Cancer Institute to address the need for large-scale collaborations to pool the large quantity of data and biospecimens necessary to conduct a wide range of cancer studies.

  5. Unravelling Protein-DNA Interactions at Molecular Level: A DFT and NCI Study.

    PubMed

    González, J; Baños, I; León, I; Contreras-García, J; Cocinero, E J; Lesarri, A; Fernández, J A; Millán, J

    2016-02-01

    Histone-DNA interactions were probed computationally at a molecular level, by characterizing the bimolecular clusters constituted by selected amino acid derivatives with polar (asparagine and glutamine), nonpolar (alanine, valine, and isoleucine), and charged (arginine) side chains and methylated pyrimidinic (1-methylcytosine and 1-methylthymine) and puric (9-methyladenine and 9-methylguanine) DNA bases. The computational approach combined different methodologies: a molecular mechanics (MMFFs forced field) conformational search and structural and vibrational density-functional calculations (M06-2X with double and triple-ζ Pople's basis sets). To dissect the interactions, intermolecular forces were analyzed with the Non-Covalent Interactions (NCI) analysis. The results for the 24 different clusters studied show a noticeable correlation between the calculated binding energies and the propensities for protein-DNA base interactions found in the literature. Such correlation holded even for the interaction of the selected amino acid derivatives with Watson and Crick pairs. Therefore, the balance between hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions (specially stacking) in the control of the final shape of the investigated amino acid-DNA base pairs seems to be well reproduced in dispersion-corrected DFT molecular models, reinforcing the idea that the specificity between the amino acids and the DNA bases play an important role in the regulation of DNA. PMID:26765058

  6. Emergency Preparedness at NCI

    Cancer.gov

    Information to help prepare for an emergency. Includes resources for patients and health care providers to continue cancer care, NCI contacts for grantees, and resources to prepare and update NCI employees and contractors.

  7. NCI Grant Resources Room

    Cancer.gov

    If you’re interested in information about NCI grants, visit the Grant Resources Room. You can talk to NCI staff about grant application and review processes, and even schedule a one-on-one consultation.

  8. Comparison of the ISU, NCI, MSM, and SPADE Methods for Estimating Usual Intake: A Simulation Study of Nutrients Consumed Daily

    PubMed Central

    Laureano, Greice H. C.; Torman, Vanessa B. L.; Crispim, Sandra P.; Dekkers, Arnold L. M.; Camey, Suzi A.

    2016-01-01

    Various methods are available for estimating usual dietary intake distributions. Hence, there is a need for simulation studies to compare them. The methods Iowa State University (ISU), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Multiple Source Method (MSM) and Statistical Program to Assess Dietary Exposure (SPADE) were previously compared in another study, but some results were inconclusive due to the small number of replications used in the simulation. Seeking to overcome this limitation, the present study used 1000 simulated samples for 12 different scenarios to compare the accuracy of estimates yielded by the aforementioned methods. The focus is on scenarios that exhibited the most uncertainty in the conclusions of the mentioned study above, i.e., scenarios with small sample sizes, skewed intake distributions, and large ratios of the between- and within-person variances. Bias was used as a measure of accuracy. For scenarios with small sample sizes (n=150), the ISU, MSM and SPADE methods generally achieved more accurate estimates than the NCI method, particularly for the 10th and 90th percentiles. The differences between methods became smaller with larger sample sizes (n = 300 and n = 500). With few exceptions, the methods were found to perform similarly. PMID:26999193

  9. NCI & Division Obligations

    Cancer.gov

    Displays obligations for grants, contracts, training fellowships, intramural research, and management and support, including the number of grant awards, funding amounts, and percent of the total NCI budget.

  10. Orbital construction demonstration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design and program plan for an Orbital Construction Demonstration Article (OCDA) was developed that can be used for evaluating and establishing practical large structural assembly operations. A flight plan for initial placement and continued utility is presented as a basic for an entirely new shuttle payload line-item having great future potential benefit for space applications. The OCDA is a three-axis stabilized platform in low-earth orbit with many structural nodals for mounting large construction and fabrication equipments. This equipment would be used to explore methods for constructing the large structures for future missions. The OCDA would be supported at regular intervals by the shuttle. Construction experiments and consumables resupply are performed during shuttle visit periods. A 250 kw solar array provides sufficient power to support the shuttle while attached to the OCDA and to run construction experiments at the same time. Wide band communications with a Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite compatible high gain antenna can be used between shuttle revisits to perform remote controlled, TV assisted construction experiments.

  11. NCI Central Review Board Receives Accreditation

    Cancer.gov

    The Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs has awarded the NCI Central Institutional Review Board full accreditation. AAHRPP awards accreditation to organizations demonstrating the highest ethical standards in clinical res

  12. NCI at ASCO

    Cancer.gov

    NCI-designated cancer centers are being extensively represented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago this year with a large array of clinical trial results and findings.

  13. NCI Contact Center

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI offers free, scientifically accurate, and easy-to-understand information on a range of cancer topics in English and Spanish. Get live help from compassionate information specialists at 1-800-4-CANCER.

  14. NCI Visuals Online

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Visuals Online contains images from the collections of the National Cancer Institute's Office of Communications and Public Liaison, including general biomedical and science-related images, cancer-specific scientific and patient care-related images, and portraits of directors and staff of the National Cancer Institute.

  15. NCI launches largest-ever study of breast cancer genetics in black women

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Genetic Study in African-Ancestry Populations initiative is a collaborative research project that will identify genetic factors that may underlie breast cancer disparities. It is the largest study ever to investigate how genetic and biol

  16. NCI study finds extreme obesity may shorten life expectancy up to 14 years

    Cancer.gov

    Extremely obese people have increased risks of dying from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to results of an analysis of data pooled from 20 large studies of people from three

  17. Evaluation of a Supermarket Intervention: The NCI-Giant Food Eat for Health Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Blossom H.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Based on a complex time series evaluation, a 2-year intervention in 40 supermarkets in Washington (DC) and Baltimore (Maryland) indicates that a nutrition education program could produce small but positive changes in consumers' food purchasing behavior. Limitations of the study and its implications for future evaluations are discussed. (SLD)

  18. Dilute Aperture Visible Nulling Coronagraph Imaging (DAViNCI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. M.; Vasisht, G.; Lane, B. F.; Woodruff, R.; Vasudevan, G.; Samuele R.; Harvey, K.; Clampin, M.; Lyon, R.; Guyon, O.; Tolls, V.

    2008-01-01

    The presentation focuses on instrument and mission overview, science case, Team X study, and technology status. Topics include DAViNCI study milestones, number of targets versus inner working angle, planet orbit and IWA, combiner/nuller instrument, DAViNCI Team X costs, technology status and near future plans, and deep laser null 1.23 x 10(exp -7) suppression. Summary points are: dilute aperture concept advantages, lower cost than a comparable 7-8m coronagraph working at 2 lambda/D, technology progress prior to 2008 was seriously limited by available funding but showed 1e-y suppression (2006) of laser light needed for 1e-9 to approximately 1e-10 contrast, and current technology effort is off to a fast date with a demonstration of less than 100pm wavefront measurement in Nov 08.

  19. Analysis of Environmental Chemical Mixtures and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk in the NCI-SEER NHL Study

    PubMed Central

    Czarnota, Jenna; Gennings, Chris; Colt, Joanne S.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Cerhan, James R.; Severson, Richard K.; Hartge, Patricia; Ward, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    , Wheeler DC. 2015. Analysis of environmental chemical mixtures and non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk in the NCI-SEER NHL Study. Environ Health Perspect 123:965–970; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408630 PMID:25748701

  20. NCI Approves Funding Plan for NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2014, the Scientific Program Leaders (SPL) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) approved the funding plan for the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP will conduct multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States. The program will receive $93 million a year for five years. |

  1. A Whole-Genome SNP Association Study of NCI60 Cell Line Panel Indicates a Role of Ca2+ Signaling in Selenium Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Sevtap; Briollais, Laurent; Ibrahim-zada, Irada; Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Choi, Yun Hee; Musquera, Mireia; Fleshner, Neil; Venkateswaran, Vasundara; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested an association between selenium intake and protection from a variety of cancer. Considering this clinical importance of selenium, we aimed to identify the genes associated with resistance to selenium treatment. We have applied a previous methodology developed by our group, which is based on the genetic and pharmacological data publicly available for the NCI60 cancer cell line panel. In short, we have categorized the NCI60 cell lines as selenium resistant and sensitive based on their growth inhibition (GI50) data. Then, we have utilized the Affymetrix 125K SNP chip data available and carried out a genome-wide case-control association study for the selenium sensitive and resistant NCI60 cell lines. Our results showed statistically significant association of four SNPs in 5q33–34, 10q11.2, 10q22.3 and 14q13.1 with selenium resistance. These SNPs were located in introns of the genes encoding for a kinase-scaffolding protein (AKAP6), a membrane protein (SGCD), a channel protein (KCNMA1), and a protein kinase (PRKG1). The knock-down of KCNMA1 by siRNA showed increased sensitivity to selenium in both LNCaP and PC3 cell lines. Furthermore, SNP-SNP interaction (epistasis) analysis indicated the interactions of the SNPs in AKAP6 with SGCD as well as SNPs in AKAP6 with KCNMA1 with each other, assuming additive genetic model. These genes were also all involved in the Ca2+ signaling, which has a direct role in induction of apoptosis and induction of apoptosis in tumor cells is consistent with the chemopreventive action of selenium. Once our findings are further validated, this knowledge can be translated into clinics where individuals who can benefit from the chemopreventive characteristics of the selenium supplementation will be easily identified using a simple DNA analysis. PMID:20830292

  2. NCI Community Oncology Research Program Approved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2013, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Board of Scientific Advisors approved the creation of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). NCORP will bring state-of-the art cancer prevention, control, treatment and imaging clinical trials, cancer care delivery research, and disparities studies to individuals in their own communities. |

  3. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  4. Data Sets from Major NCI Initiaves

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Data Catalog includes links to data collections produced by major NCI initiatives and other widely used data sets, including animal models, human tumor cell lines, epidemiology data sets, genomics data sets from TCGA, TARGET, COSMIC, GSK, NCI60.

  5. Digital Standards for NCI Websites

    Cancer.gov

    The Digital Standards for NCI Websites and Social Media provide developers and content managers guidance on the visual and content standards, as well as policies and procedures, in effect for National Cancer Institute (NCI) digital media – including traditional and mobile websites, as well as social and new media channels.

  6. NCI-MATCH Trial Draws Strong Interest.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    After 800 cancer patients enrolled during the first 3 months of the NCI-MATCH trial, organizers have extended a temporary halt in enrollment to gear up for the next phase. The basket study, which matches patients to approved or experimental drugs based on specific genetic mutations in their tumors, is expected to resume in April or May. PMID:26896095

  7. RADON MITIGATION STUDIES: NASHVILLE DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an EPA radon mitigation demonstration project involving 14 houses in the Nashville, TN, area with indoor radon levels of 5.6-47.6 pCi/L, using a variety of techniques, designed to be the most cost effective methods possible to implement, and yet adequa...

  8. Antitumor activity of gambogic acid on NCI-H1993 xenografts via MET signaling pathway downregulation

    PubMed Central

    LI, DONGLEI; YANG, HUIWEI; LI, RUNPU; WANG, YANLI; WANG, WEIJUN; LI, DONGJIE; MA, SHAOLIN; ZHANG, XUYU

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the anti-tumor mechanisms of gambogic acid (GA) on NCI-H1993 xenografts in vivo. Non-small cell lung carcinoma NCI-H1993 cells, which harbor a MET gene amplification, were subcutaneously injected into athymic nude mice. The mice were randomly assigned to treatment with 10, 20 or 30 mg/kg GA for 3 weeks. At the end of the efficacy study, all the mice were sacrificed and the tumor tissues were subjected to western blot analysis and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. GA inhibited NCI-H1993 xenograft tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis demonstrated that expression of phosphorylated (p)-MET and its downstream signaling molecules p-AKT and p-ERK1/2 were significantly inhibited by GA. IHC analysis of Ki-67 expression demonstrated that GA treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. GA exerted antitumor effects on NCI-H1993 xenografts in vivo by direct regulation of the MET signaling pathway. Theses antitumor effects were primarily a result of its anti-proliferation function. PMID:26722245

  9. NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) Trial

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's gateway for information about the NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) trial, in which patients with advanced cancer are assigned to treatment arms based on the molecular profiles of their disease.

  10. CXCL14 enhances proliferation and migration of NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells overexpressing the glycoproteins containing heparan sulfate or sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Cho Rong; You, Dong-Joo; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Moon, Mi Jin; Lee, Cheolju; Oh, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Curie; Seong, Jae Young; Hwang, Jong-Ik

    2013-05-01

    CXCL14 is a chemokine family member that is involved in various cellular responses in addition to immune cell activation. Although constitutive CXCL14 expression in normal epithelial cells may help protect against infection by activating immune systems, its expression in cancer cells has raised controversy regarding its possible role in tumorigenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms for this disparity remain unknown. Investigation of cellular CXCL14 binding properties might increase our understanding of the peptide's roles in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we found that CXCL14 binds to various cell types. Interestingly, binding to NCI-H460 cells was prevented by heparan sulfate and N-acetyl neuraminic acid. Next, we examined effect of CXCL14 binding in NCI-H460 and NCI-H23. CXCL14 enhanced proliferation and migration in NCI-H460 but had no effect on NCI-H23. A reporter gene assay with various transcription factor response elements revealed that only nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling was activated by CXCL14 in NCI-H460 cells, which was blocked by BAPTA-AM, TPCA-1, and brefeldin A. Exogenous expression of some glycoproteins such as syndecan-4, podoplanin, and CD43 in these cells enhanced CXCL14 binding and NF-κB activity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CXCL14 binding to glycoproteins harboring heparan sulfate proteoglycans and sialic acids leads proliferation and migration of some cancer cells. PMID:23161284

  11. Join TTC! | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) offers a unique opportunity for training through the NCI TTC Fellowship program. TTC also has a unit dedicated to marketing these research opportunities and their underlying technologies to potential collaborators and licensees.

  12. NCI-Frederick” Is Retired; Replaced with “NCI at Frederick” | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer If you are used to using the term “NCI-Frederick” to identify your work location, please note that this name has been officially retired. This change was made to ensure consistency with the naming conventions used by other NCI locations, such as NCI at Shady Grove. Please be aware of the distinction between the terms “NCI at Frederick” and “the NCI Campus at Frederick,” as follows:

  13. The NCI All Ireland Cancer Conference.

    PubMed

    Johnston; Daly; Liu

    1999-01-01

    education and training and also promote clinical trials and cancer epidemiology programs. Major components of the NCI Ireland Agreement will include some of the following: EDUCATION AND EXCHANGE OF SCHOLARS: Education will form one of the major platforms of this agreement through the support of educational programs for medical, nursing and scientific staff. These will include the exchange of scholars, including Ph.D., M.D. and nursing students. Particular emphasis will be given to the exchange of medical and nursing trainees focused on clinical research. This will have an immediate clinical impact and will naturally extend the support that has already been given to the training of medical and scientific trainees from the Island of Ireland. Further exchanges would include Ph.D. students, laboratory-based M.D.s in training, clinical visiting professors and investigators from the U.S. wishing to extend their studies in Ireland. CLINICAL TRIALS: Another major area for partnership will be the enhancement of a clinical trials infrastructure and clinical trial development. Modernization of cancer care requires that delivery of care should be in the context of evidence-based medicine. This requires a vigorous and contemporary clinical trials infrastructure which would center around the clinical trials infrastructure already established at the Northern Ireland Cancer Centre and the Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group (ICORG) in the Republic of Ireland. The NCI has already commissioned the development of a new Clinical Trials Information System (CTIS) which seeks as its goal to set international standards in the clinical trials process, and it has already committed significant resources to its implementation. The outcome of this element of partnership will be that clinical trials performed in Irish institutions will immediately be compatible for collation, analysis and presentation with studies performed in the U.S. Moreover, this system will allow participating centers to

  14. DNA Fingerprinting of the NCI-60 Cell Line Panel

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Philip L.; Reinhold, William C.; Varma, Sudhir; Hutchinson, Amy A.; Pommier, Yves; Chanock, Stephen J.; Weinstein, John N.

    2009-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute’s NCI-60 cell line panel, the most extensively characterized set of cells in existence and a public resource, is frequently used as a screening tool for drug discovery. Since many laboratories around the world rely on data from the NCI-60 cells, confirmation of their genetic identities represents an essential step in validating results from them. Given the consequences of cell line contamination or misidentification, quality control measures should routinely include DNA fingerprinting. We have, therefore, used standard DNA microsatellite short tandem repeats to profile the NCI-60, and the resulting DNA fingerprints are provided here as a reference. Consistent with previous reports, the fingerprints suggest that several NCI-60 lines have common origins: the melanoma lines MDA-MB-435, MDA-N, and M14; the central nervous system lines U251 and SNB-19; the ovarian lines OVCAR-8 and OVCAR-8/ADR (also called NCI/ADR); and the prostate lines DU-145, DU-145 (ATCC), and RC0.1. Those lines also demonstrate that the ability to connect two fingerprints to the same origin is not affected by stable transfection or by the development of multidrug resistance. As expected, DNA fingerprints were not able to distinguish different tissues-of-origin. The fingerprints serve principally as a barcodes. PMID:19372543

  15. METAvivor Reps Visit NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Three representatives of METAvivor visited NCI at Frederick on April 13 to meet and tour with Balamurugan Kuppusamy, Ph.D., staff scientist in the laboratory of Esta Sterneck, Ph.D., senior investigator, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research.  The purpose of the visit was to learn more about Kuppusamy’s research. Kuppusamy is a recipient of a $50,000, two-year grant awarded by METAvivor to study the role of the CEBPD-FBXW7 signaling pathway in inflammatory breast cancer.

  16. NCCAM/NCI Phase 1 Study of Mistletoe Extract and Gemcitabine in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mansky, Patrick J.; Sannes, Timothy S.; Johnson, Laura Lee; Blackman, Marc R.; Grem, Jean L.; Swain, Sandra M.; Monahan, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. European Mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts (mistletoe) are commonly used for cancer treatment in Europe. This phase I study of gemcitabine (GEM) and mistletoe in advanced solid cancers (ASC) evaluated: (1) safety, toxicity, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD), (2) absolute neutrophil count (ANC) recovery, (3) formation of mistletoe lectin antibodies (ML ab), (4) cytokine plasma concentrations, (5) clinical response, and (6) pharmacokinetics of GEM. Methods. Design: increasing mistletoe and fixed GEM dose in stage I and increasing doses of GEM with a fixed dose of mistletoe in stage II. Dose limiting toxicities (DLT) were grade (G) 3 nonhematologic and G4 hematologic events; MTD was reached with 2 DLTs in one dosage level. Response in stage IV ASC was assessed with descriptive statistics. Statistical analyses examined clinical response/survival and ANC recovery. Results. DLTs were G4 neutropenia, G4 thrombocytopenia, G4 acute renal failure, and G3 cellulitis, attributed to mistletoe. GEM 1380 mg/m2 and mistletoe 250 mg combined were the MTD. Of 44 patients, 24 developed nonneutropenic fever and flu-like syndrome. GEM pharmacokinetics were unaffected by mistletoe. All patients developed ML3 IgG antibodies. ANC showed a trend to increase between baseline and cycle 2 in stage I dose escalation. 6% of patients showed partial response, 42% stable disease. Median survival was 200 days. Compliance with mistletoe injections was high. Conclusion. GEM plus mistletoe is well tolerated. No botanical/drug interactions were observed. Clinical response is similar to GEM alone. PMID:24285980

  17. NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) Trial

    Cancer.gov

    Information about the NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) Program, in which researchers will examine tumor tissue from patients with advanced solid tumors and lymphomas that have stopped responding to treatment

  18. The Exomes of the NCI-60 Panel: a Genomic Resource for Cancer Biology and Systems Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Abaan, Ogan D.; Polley, Eric C.; Davis, Sean R.; Zhu, Yuelin J.; Bilke, Sven; Walker, Robert L.; Pineda, Marbin; Gindin, Yevgeniy; Jiang, Yuan; Reinhold, William C.; Holbeck, Susan L.; Simon, Richard M.; Doroshow, James H.; Pommier, Yves; Meltzer, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    The NCI-60 cell lines are the most frequently studied human tumor cell lines in cancer research. This panel has generated the most extensive cancer pharmacology database worldwide. In addition, these cell lines have been intensely investigated, providing a unique platform for hypothesis driven research focused on enhancing our understanding of tumor biology. Here, we report a comprehensive analysis of coding variants in the NCI-60 panel of cell lines identified by whole exome sequencing (WES), providing a list of possible cancer specific variants for the community. Furthermore, we identify pharmacogenomic correlations between specific variants in genes like TP53, BRAF, ERBBs and ATAD5 and anti-cancer agents such as nutlin, vemurafenib, erlotinib and bleomycin demonstrating one of many ways the data could be utilized to validate and generate novel hypotheses for further investigation. As new cancer genes are identified through large-scale sequencing studies, the data presented here for the NCI-60 will be an invaluable resource for identifying cell lines with mutations in such genes for hypothesis driven research. To enhance the utility of the data for the greater research community, the genomic variants are freely available in different formats and from multiple sources including the CellMiner and Ingenuity websites. PMID:23856246

  19. Studying the Greenhouse Effect: A Simple Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papageorgiou, G.; Ouzounis, K.

    2000-01-01

    Studies the parameters involved in a presentation of the greenhouse effect and describes a simple demonstration of this effect. Required equipment includes a 100-120 watt lamp, a 250mL beaker, and a thermometer capable of recording 0-750 degrees Celsius together with a small amount of chloroform. (Author/SAH)

  20. 78 FR 2678 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... National Cancer Institute (NCI) SmokefreeTXT (Text Message) Program Evaluation (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance... memorandum. This study seeks to assess the efficacy of the SmokefreeTXT program, a text message smoking... text- messaging service and a series of web-based surveys. All web-based survey data will be...

  1. Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group (PPWG)

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group to support development of a comprehensive and interdisciplinary pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacogenomics cancer research program.

  2. An anthraquinone derivative from Luffa acutangula induces apoptosis in human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460 through p53-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Vanajothi, Ramar; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2016-06-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antiproliferative activity of 1,8-dihydroxy-4-methylanthracene-9,10-dione (DHMA) isolated from the Luffa acutangula against human non-small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460). Induction of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was determined through fluorescence microscopic technique. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting analysis was carried out to detect the expression of pro-apoptotic (p53, p21, caspase-3, Bax, GADD45A, and ATM) and anti-apoptotic (NF-κB) proteins in NCI-H460 cell line. In silico studies also performed to predict the binding mechanism of DHMA with MDM2-p53 protein. The DHMA inhibited the cell viability of NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 of about 50 µg/ml. It significantly reduced cell viability correlated with induction of apoptosis, which was associated with ROS generation. The apoptotic cell death was further confirmed through dual staining and DNA fragmentation assay. DHMA significantly increased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein such as p53, p21, Bax, and caspase-3 but downregulated the expression of NF-κB in NCI-H460 cell line. In silico studies demonstrate that DHMA formed hydrogen bond interaction with key residues Trp26, Phe55 and Lys24 by which it disrupt the binding of p53 with MDM2 receptor. These findings suggested that DHMA induces apoptosis in NCI-H460 via a p53-dependent pathway. This the first study on cytotoxic and apoptosis inducing activity of DHMA from L. acutangula against NCI-H460 cell line. Therefore, DHMA has therapeutic potential for lung cancer treatment. PMID:26585176

  3. NCI Holds on to Defelice Cup | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI kept the Defelice Cup trophy this year after beating Leidos Biomedical Research, 15 to 9, at the 10th annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament held on Columbus Day. Sixteen players on each team battled it out at the yearly contractor vs. government tournament held at Rattlewood Golf Course in Mount Airy, Md. NCI leads the series 6–4. “The score was the highest NCI margin of victory in the 10-year series,” said Denny Dougherty, retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick. “The intensity of the annual competition has increased each year and has become...

  4. NCI at AACR 2016 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) will be participating at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting, to be held April 16-20, 2016, in New Orleans at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Sessions Featuring NCI Staff An overview of the NCI-sponsored sessions and NCI experts presenting at AACR. |

  5. Dinutuximab (Unituxin™) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    In 2010, NCI entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with United Therapeutics Corp., under which the company assumed responsibility for manufacturing dinutuximab and moving it through the steps required for regulatory approval.

  6. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  7. The effect of jet and DBD plasma on NCI-78 blood cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Kaushik, Neha; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-06-01

    In this study we describe the effects of a nonthermal jet and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on the T98G brain cancer cell line. The results of this study reveal that the jet and DBD plasma inhibits NCI-78 blood cancer cells growth efficiently with the loss of metabolic viability of cells. The main goal of this study is to induce cell death in NCI-78 blood cancer cells by the toxic effect of jet and DBD plasma.

  8. NCI at Frederick Employees Honored at NCI Director’s Awards Program | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Nineteen staff members affiliated with NCI at Frederick or the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) were recognized at the 2014 NCI Director’s Award Ceremony for their outstanding contributions to advancing cancer research. The ceremony, held Dec. 1, took place at the NIH Natcher Conference Center, on the main campus in Bethesda.

  9. NCI at Frederick Employees Recognized at the 2013 NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer More than 60 NCI at Frederick government and contractor employees were recognized at the NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony on Nov. 14, held on the main NIH campus in Bethesda.

  10. NCI at Frederick Employees Honored at NCI Director’s Awards Program | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Nineteen staff members affiliated with NCI at Frederick or the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) were recognized at the 2014 NCI Director’s Award Ceremony for their outstanding contributions to advancing cancer research. The ceremony, held Dec. 1, took place at the NIH Natcher Conference Center, on the main campus in Bethesda.

  11. Demethoxycurcumin-induced DNA Damage Decreases DNA Repair-associated Protein Expression Levels in NCI-H460 Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yang-Ching; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Ji, Bin-Chuan; Yang, Mei-Due; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-05-01

    Demethoxycurcumin (DMC) is a key component of Chinese medicine (Turmeric) and has been proven effective in killing various cancer cells. Its role in inducing cytotoxic effects in many cancer cells has been reported, but its role regarding DNA damage on lung cancer cells has not been studied in detail. In the present study, we demonstrated DMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using the Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively. Western blotting indicated that DMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DNA damage response), DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), and p53 (tumor suppressor protein). DMC activated phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Furthermore, we used confocal laser systems microscopy to examine the protein translocation. The results showed that DMC promotes the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X from the cytosol to the nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, DMC induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. PMID:25964547

  12. Mechanochemical endovenous Ablation versus RADiOfrequeNcy Ablation in the treatment of primary great saphenous vein incompetence (MARADONA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is associated with an excellent outcome in the treatment of great saphenous vein (GSV) incompetence. The use of thermal energy as a treatment source requires the instillation of tumescence anesthesia. Mechanochemical endovenous ablation (MOCA) combines mechanical endothelial damage, using a rotating wire, with the infusion of a liquid sclerosant. Tumescence anesthesia is not required. Preliminary experiences with MOCA showed good results and low post-procedural pain. Methods/Design The MARADONA (Mechanochemical endovenous Ablation versus RADiOfrequeNcy Ablation) trial is a multicenter randomized controlled trial in which 460 patients will be randomly allocated to MOCA or RFA. All patients with primary GSV incompetence who meet the eligibility criteria will be invited to participate in this trial. The primary endpoints are anatomic and clinical success at a one-year follow-up, and post-procedural pain. The secondary endpoints are technical success, complications, operation time, procedural pain, disease-specific quality of life, time taken to return to daily activities and/or work, and cost-efficiency analyses after RFA or MOCA. Both groups will be evaluated on an intention to treat base. Discussion The MARADONA trial is designed to show equal results in anatomic and clinical success after one year, comparing MOCA with RFA. In our hypothesis MOCA has an equal anatomic and clinical success compared with RFA, with less post-procedural pain. Trial registration Clinicaltrials NCT01936168 PMID:24726004

  13. NCI at Frederick Team Receives 2014 HHS Green Champions Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A team of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research employees at NCI at Frederick received the Energy and Fleet Management Award, one of the 2014 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Green Champions Awards, for comparing the costs and energy usage of two -80°C freezer technologies. This was the first scientific study to be jointly conducted by Leidos Biomedical Research’s Applied and Developmental Research Directorate (ADRD) and Facilities Maintenance and Engineering Directorate (FME).  

  14. Organometallic Iridium(III) Anticancer Complexes with New Mechanisms of Action: NCI-60 Screening, Mitochondrial Targeting, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Platinum complexes related to cisplatin, cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2], are successful anticancer drugs; however, other transition metal complexes offer potential for combating cisplatin resistance, decreasing side effects, and widening the spectrum of activity. Organometallic half-sandwich iridium (IrIII) complexes [Ir(Cpx)(XY)Cl]+/0 (Cpx = biphenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = phenanthroline (1), bipyridine (2), or phenylpyridine (3)) all hydrolyze rapidly, forming monofunctional G adducts on DNA with additional intercalation of the phenyl substituents on the Cpx ring. In comparison, highly potent complex 4 (Cpx = phenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = N,N-dimethylphenylazopyridine) does not hydrolyze. All show higher potency toward A2780 human ovarian cancer cells compared to cisplatin, with 1, 3, and 4 also demonstrating higher potency in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) NCI-60 cell-line screen. Use of the NCI COMPARE algorithm (which predicts mechanisms of action (MoAs) for emerging anticancer compounds by correlating NCI-60 patterns of sensitivity) shows that the MoA of these IrIII complexes has no correlation to cisplatin (or oxaliplatin), with 3 and 4 emerging as particularly novel compounds. Those findings by COMPARE were experimentally probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of A2780 cells exposed to 1, showing mitochondrial swelling and activation of apoptosis after 24 h. Significant changes in mitochondrial membrane polarization were detected by flow cytometry, and the potency of the complexes was enhanced ca. 5× by co-administration with a low concentration (5 μM) of the γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase inhibitor L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO). These studies reveal potential polypharmacology of organometallic IrIII complexes, with MoA and cell selectivity governed by structural changes in the chelating ligands. PMID:23618382

  15. Organometallic Iridium(III) anticancer complexes with new mechanisms of action: NCI-60 screening, mitochondrial targeting, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Jessica M; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Qamar, Bushra; Liu, Zhe; Hands-Portman, Ian; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Platinum complexes related to cisplatin, cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2], are successful anticancer drugs; however, other transition metal complexes offer potential for combating cisplatin resistance, decreasing side effects, and widening the spectrum of activity. Organometallic half-sandwich iridium (Ir(III)) complexes [Ir(Cp(x))(XY)Cl](+/0) (Cp(x) = biphenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = phenanthroline (1), bipyridine (2), or phenylpyridine (3)) all hydrolyze rapidly, forming monofunctional G adducts on DNA with additional intercalation of the phenyl substituents on the Cp(x) ring. In comparison, highly potent complex 4 (Cp(x) = phenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = N,N-dimethylphenylazopyridine) does not hydrolyze. All show higher potency toward A2780 human ovarian cancer cells compared to cisplatin, with 1, 3, and 4 also demonstrating higher potency in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) NCI-60 cell-line screen. Use of the NCI COMPARE algorithm (which predicts mechanisms of action (MoAs) for emerging anticancer compounds by correlating NCI-60 patterns of sensitivity) shows that the MoA of these Ir(III) complexes has no correlation to cisplatin (or oxaliplatin), with 3 and 4 emerging as particularly novel compounds. Those findings by COMPARE were experimentally probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of A2780 cells exposed to 1, showing mitochondrial swelling and activation of apoptosis after 24 h. Significant changes in mitochondrial membrane polarization were detected by flow cytometry, and the potency of the complexes was enhanced ca. 5× by co-administration with a low concentration (5 μM) of the γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase inhibitor L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO). These studies reveal potential polypharmacology of organometallic Ir(III) complexes, with MoA and cell selectivity governed by structural changes in the chelating ligands. PMID:23618382

  16. An overview of the NCI precision medicine trials-NCI MATCH and MPACT.

    PubMed

    Do, Khanh; O'Sullivan Coyne, Geraldine; Chen, Alice P

    2015-09-01

    The concept of oncogene addiction was first proposed by Weinstein in 2002, postulating that tumors rely on a single dominant mutation, the oncogenic "driver", for growth and survival. We have since come to realize that the genomic landscape of tumors is heterogeneous and more complex than previously thought. Advances in biotechnology and bioinformatics over the past decade have shifted treatment paradigms with regard to the development of molecular targeted therapeutics to identify and target the presumptive dominant lesion. As such, the decision of choosing targeted treatment strategies has become increasingly more reliant on the reporting of genomic screens of patients' tumor tissue. Whether this change in treatment paradigm will translate into improved clinical benefit, remains to be seen. To this end, the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched precision-based medicine trials to address this question. NCI Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (MATCH), a genomic pre-screening study, was designed to explore the efficacy of using targeted agents to target specific molecular aberrations and whether these same therapies have comparable activity across different tumor subtypes. Molecular Profiling-based Assignment of Cancer Therapy (MPACT), is a smaller, provocative trial designed to address whether targeting an oncogenic "driver" would be more efficacious than one not. The Exceptional Responders' initiative further aims to evaluate patients who have derived an unexpected durable benefit to these therapies, with retrospective analysis of their tumors to delineate potential predictive biomarkers which could predict response. The results of these trials will serve to help guide the field of precision medicine and personalized care. PMID:26408298

  17. At NCI, Supporting the Best Science

    Cancer.gov

    Yesterday, at the AACR annual meeting, Dr. Doug Lowy spoke directly to the research community about his goals as NCI Acting Director. Dr. Lowy said that he plans to continue many of the programs launched by his predecessor, Dr. Harold Varmus, and to sharp

  18. NCI and Leidos Play Ball | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The ping of an aluminum bat off a ball or the thump of a pop-up fly ball caught in a glove are two sounds familiar to baseball fans. Slow-pitch softball sounds—like those in the August game between mixed teams of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly SAIC-Frederick) players—are similar.

  19. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry.

  20. NCI/DCCPS R21 Program Announcements

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  1. NCI/DCCPS R03 Program Announcements

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  2. License Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Since the government cannot engage in the development, manufacture, and sale of products, the NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) makes its discoveries (and discoveries from nine other NIH Institutes) available to organizations that can assist in the further development and commercialization of these basic science discoveries, to convert them into public health benefits.

  3. NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the Employee Diversity Team’s display case exhibit “Recognizing the NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team,” in the lobby of Building 549. The Poster staff recognizes that this article does not include everyone who was involved in the response to the Ebola crisis, both at NCI at Frederick and in Africa. When the Ebola crisis broke out in 2014 in West Africa, staff members from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research responded quickly. Members of the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) were instrumental not only in setting up the clinical trials of the vaccine in Liberia, but also in providing training, community outreach, and recruitment strategies for the trials.

  4. Cytotoxicity against KB and NCI-H187 cell lines of modified flavonoids from Kaempferia parviflora.

    PubMed

    Yenjai, Chavi; Wanich, Suchana

    2010-05-01

    Flavones 1-4 isolated from Kaempferia parviflora were used for structural modification. Sixteen flavonoid derivatives, including four new derivatives, were synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxicity against KB and NCI-H187 cell lines. Flavanones 2a-4a demonstrated higher cytotoxic activity than the parent compounds. Cytotoxicity against KB cell line of oxime 1c was about 7 times higher than the ellipticine standard. Interestingly, oximes 1c and 2c exhibited highly potent cytotoxicity against NCI-H187 cell line with IC(50) values of 0.014 and 0.23 microM, respectively. Oximes 4c and 5c showed strong cytotoxicity against NCI-H187 cell line with IC(50) values of 4.04 and 2.32 microM, respectively. PMID:20362442

  5. Molecular Characterization of TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion in the NCI-H660 Prostate Cancer Cell Line: A New Perspective for an Old Model1*

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Kirsten D.; Setlur, Sunita R.; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Demichelis, Francesca; Perner, Sven; Tomlins, Scott; Tchinda, Joëlle; Laxman, Bharathi; Vessella, Robert L; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lee, Charles; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Rubin, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have established that a significant fraction of prostate cancers harbor a signature gene fusion between the 5′ region of androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 and an ETS family transcription factor, most commonly ERG. Studies on the molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of this important chromosomal rearrangement are currently limited to the VCaP cell line derived from a vertebral bone metastasis of a hormone-refractory prostate tumor. Here we report on the NCI-H660 cell line, derived from a metastatic site of an extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma arising from the prostate. NCI-H660 harbors TMPRSS2-ERG fusion with a homozygous intronic deletion between TMPRSS2 and ERG. We demonstrate this by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, a two-stage dual-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay testing for TMPRSS2 and ERG break-aparts, and single-nucleotide polymorphism oligonucleotide arrays. The deletion is consistent with the common intronic deletion found on chromosome 21q22.2-3 in human prostate cancer samples. We demonstrate the physical juxtaposition of TMPRSS2 and ERG on the DNA level by fiber FISH. The androgen receptor-negative NCI-H660 cell line expresses ERG in an androgen-independent fashion. This in vitro model system has the potential to provide important pathobiologic insights into TMPRSS2-ERG fusion prostate cancer. PMID:17401460

  6. NCI's Transdisciplinary High Performance Scientific Data Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ben; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Car, Nicholas; Cox, Simon; Druken, Kelsey; Evans, Bradley; Fraser, Ryan; Ip, Alex; Kemp, Carina; King, Edward; Minchin, Stuart; Larraondo, Pablo; Pugh, Tim; Richards, Clare; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages Earth Systems data collections sourced from several domains and organisations onto a single High Performance Data (HPD) Node to further Australia's national priority research and innovation agenda. The NCI HPD Node has rapidly established its value, currently managing over 10 PBytes of datasets from collections that span a wide range of disciplines including climate, weather, environment, geoscience, geophysics, water resources and social sciences. Importantly, in order to facilitate broad user uptake, maximise reuse and enable transdisciplinary access through software and standardised interfaces, the datasets, associated information systems and processes have been incorporated into the design and operation of a unified platform that NCI has called, the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). The key goal of the NERDIP is to regularise data access so that it is easily discoverable, interoperable for different domains and enabled for high performance methods. It adopts and implements international standards and data conventions, and promotes scientific integrity within a high performance computing and data analysis environment. NCI has established a rich and flexible computing environment to access to this data, through the NCI supercomputer; a private cloud that supports both domain focused virtual laboratories and in-common interactive analysis interfaces; as well as remotely through scalable data services. Data collections of this importance must be managed with careful consideration of both their current use and the needs of the end-communities, as well as its future potential use, such as transitioning to more advanced software and improved methods. It is therefore critical that the data platform is both well-managed and trusted for stable production use (including transparency and reproducibility), agile enough to incorporate new technological advances and

  7. Factors Influencing Patient Pathways for Receipt of Cancer Care at an NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Gage-Bouchard, Elizabeth A.; Rodriguez, Elisa M.; Saad-Harfouche, Frances G.; Miller, Austin; Erwin, Deborah O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the field of oncology, increasing access to high quality care has been identified as a priority to reduce cancer disparities. Previous research reveals that the facilities where patients receive their cancer care have implications for cancer outcomes. However, there is little understanding of how patients decide where to seek cancer care. This study examined the factors that shape patients’ pathways to seek their cancer care at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center (NCI-CCC), and differences in these factors by race, income and education. Methods In-depth interviews and survey questionnaires were administered to a random sample of 124 patients at one NCI-CCC in the Northeast US. In-depth interview data was first analyzed qualitatively to identify themes and patterns in patients’ pathways to receive their cancer care at an NCI-CCC. Logistic Regression was used to examine if these pathways varied by patient race, income, and education. Results Two themes emerged: following the recommendation of a physician and following advice from social network members. Quantitative data analysis shows that patient pathways to care at an NCI-CCC varied by education and income. Patients with lower income and education most commonly sought their cancer care at an NCI-CCC due to the recommendation of a physician. Patients with higher income and education most commonly cited referral by a specialist physician or the advice of a social network member. There were no statistically significant differences in pathways to care by race. Conclusions Our findings show that most patients relied on physician recommendations or advice from a social network member in deciding to seek their cancer care at an NCI-CCC. Due to the role of physicians in shaping patients’ pathways to the NCI-CCC, initiatives that strengthen partnerships between NCI-CCCs and community physicians who serve underserved communities may improve access to NCI-CCCs. PMID

  8. Diagnostic Marker for Improving Treatment Outcomes of Hepatitis C | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Researchers have discovered Interferon-lambda 4 (IFNL4), a protein found through analysis of genomic data. Preliminary studies indicate that this protein may play a role in the clearance of HCV and may be a new target for diagnosing and treating HCV infection. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) Immunoepidemiology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to further co-develop a gene-based diagnostic for Hepatitis C virus (HepC, HCV).

  9. Role of autophagy in apoptosis induction by methylene chloride extracts of Mori cortex in NCI-H460 human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Chi, Gyoo Yong; Eom, Hyun Sup; Kim, Gi-Young; Hyun, Jin Won; Kim, Wun-Jae; Lee, Su-Jae; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2012-06-01

    The root of Mori cortex has traditionally been used in Korea for the treatment of cutaneous inflammation, pulmonary asthma, and congestion for thousands of years. The present study was designed to validate the anticancer effects of methylene chloride extracts of the M. cortex root (MEMC) in NCI-H460 human lung carcinoma cells. Exposure to MEMC was found to result in growth inhibition by the induction of caspase‑dependent apoptosis in NCI-H460 cells, which correlated with upregulated expression of death receptor (DR)4, DR5 and FasL, downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression, cleavage of Bid, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, autophagosomes, a characteristic finding of autophagy, and markers of autophagy, conversion of microtubule-associated protein light chain-3 (LC3)-I to LC3-II and increased beclin-1 accumulation, were observed in MEMC-treated NCI-H460 cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine or LC3B small interfering (siRNA) resulted in enhanced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that MEMC-induced autophagy functions as a suppressor of apoptosis. MEMC-induced autophagy was also blocked by N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and catalase, indicating that H2O2 can regulate autophagy. Our data demonstrate that MEMC triggers both ROS-mediated autophagy and caspase-dependent apoptosis, and that autophagy plays a protective role against apoptotic cell death. PMID:22367066

  10. Halaven® - eribulin mesylate (analog of halichondrin B) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Under a CRADA with NCI, Eisai Co. provided eribulin for NCI's preclinical development activities and to support NCI's Phase I clinical trials. Eisai ultimately took the product, Halaven®, to licensure.

  11. U.S. EPA's Ultraviolet Disinfection Technologies Demonstration Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will give a background on USEPA's Disinfection Technologies Demonstration Study. This will include regulatory background, science background, goals of the project, and ultimate expected outcome of the project. This presentation will preceed a panel discussion ...

  12. The Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    After making such a discovery, NCI researchers should immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention and consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Specialist about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form.

  13. Differential Regulation of Human 3β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 for Steroid Hormone Biosynthesis by Starvation and Cyclic Amp Stimulation: Studies in the Human Adrenal NCI-H295R Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Gaby; Mullis, Primus E.; Flück, Christa E.

    2013-01-01

    Human steroid biosynthesis depends on a specifically regulated cascade of enzymes including 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSD3Bs). Type 2 HSD3B catalyzes the conversion of pregnenolone, 17α-hydroxypregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone to progesterone, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone and androstenedione in the human adrenal cortex and the gonads but the exact regulation of this enzyme is unknown. Therefore, specific downregulation of HSD3B2 at adrenarche around age 6–8 years and characteristic upregulation of HSD3B2 in the ovaries of women suffering from the polycystic ovary syndrome remain unexplained prompting us to study the regulation of HSD3B2 in adrenal NCI-H295R cells. Our studies confirm that the HSD3B2 promoter is regulated by transcription factors GATA, Nur77 and SF1/LRH1 in concert and that the NBRE/Nur77 site is crucial for hormonal stimulation with cAMP. In fact, these three transcription factors together were able to transactivate the HSD3B2 promoter in placental JEG3 cells which normally do not express HSD3B2. By contrast, epigenetic mechanisms such as methylation and acetylation seem not involved in controlling HSD3B2 expression. Cyclic AMP was found to exert differential effects on HSD3B2 when comparing short (acute) versus long-term (chronic) stimulation. Short cAMP stimulation inhibited HSD3B2 activity directly possibly due to regulation at co-factor or substrate level or posttranslational modification of the protein. Long cAMP stimulation attenuated HSD3B2 inhibition and increased HSD3B2 expression through transcriptional regulation. Although PKA and MAPK pathways are obvious candidates for possibly transmitting the cAMP signal to HSD3B2, our studies using PKA and MEK1/2 inhibitors revealed no such downstream signaling of cAMP. However, both signaling pathways were clearly regulating HSD3B2 expression. PMID:23874725

  14. Representing the NCI Thesaurus in OWL DL: Modeling tools help modeling languages

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Natalya F.; de Coronado, Sherri; Solbrig, Harold; Fragoso, Gilberto; Hartel, Frank W.; Musen, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Thesaurus is a biomedical reference ontology. The NCI Thesaurus is represented using Description Logic, more specifically Ontylog, a Description logic implemented by Apelon, Inc. We are exploring the use of the DL species of the Web Ontology Language (OWL DL)—a W3C recommended standard for ontology representation—instead of Ontylog for representing the NCI Thesaurus. We have studied the requirements for knowledge representation of the NCI Thesaurus, and considered how OWL DL (and its implementation in Protégé-OWL) satisfies these requirements. In this paper, we discuss the areas where OWL DL was sufficient for representing required components, where tool support that would hide some of the complexity and extra levels of indirection would be required, and where language expressiveness is not sufficient given the representation requirements. Because many of the knowledge-representation issues that we encountered are very similar to the issues in representing other biomedical terminologies and ontologies in general, we believe that the lessons that we learned and the approaches that we developed will prove useful and informative for other researchers. PMID:19789731

  15. Anticancer mechanisms of YC-1 in human lung cancer cell line, NCI-H226.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Jen; Hsu, Mei-Hua; Huang, Li-Jiau; Yamori, Takao; Chung, Jing-Gung; Lee, Fang-Yu; Teng, Che-Ming; Kuo, Sheng-Chu

    2008-01-15

    As part of a continuing search for potential anticancer drug candidates, 1-benzyl-3-(5-hydroxymethyl-2-furyl)indazole (YC-1) was evaluated in the Japanese Cancer Institute's (JCI) in vitro disease-oriented anticancer screen. The results indicated that YC-1 showed impressive selective toxicity against the NCI-H226 cell line. Therefore, the molecular mechanism by which YC-1 affects NCI-H226 cell growth was studied. YC-1 inhibited NCI-H226 cell growth in a time- and a concentration-dependent manner. YC-1 suppressed the protein levels of cyclin D1, CDK2 and cdc25A, up-regulated p16, p21 and p53, increased the number of NCI-H226 cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Long exposure to YC-1 induced apoptosis by mitochondrial-dependent pathway. In addition, YC-1 inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein activities to abolish tumor cells metastasis. These findings suggest a mechanism of cytotoxic action of YC-1 and indicate that YC-1 may be a promising chemotherapy agent against lung cancer. PMID:17880926

  16. Measuring Problem Solving with Technology: A Demonstration Study for NAEP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Randy Elliot; Persky, Hilary; Weiss, Andy; Jenkins, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a study intended to demonstrate how an emerging skill, problem solving with technology, might be measured in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Two computer-delivered assessment scenarios were designed, one on solving science-related problems through electronic information search and the other on solving…

  17. NCI at Frederick Contributes to Feds Feed Families | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Once again, NCI at Frederick participated in the annual Feds Feed Families event, which challenges federal workers to help knock out hunger with a food drive. This year, NIH collected 26,315 pounds of non-perishable goods, beating its goal of collecting 20,000 pounds. This includes over four tons of food that was collected at satellite locations, including NCI at Frederick. The food collected at NCI at Frederick was donated locally to the Frederick Rescue Mission. These donations help feed local families in need through the holiday season.

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Tumor Growth | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Nanobiology Program, Protein Interaction Group is seeking parties to license or co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize monoclonal antibodies against the insulin-like growth factor for the treatment of cancer.

  19. 2012 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2012 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  20. 2011 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2011 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  1. 2014 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    An archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  2. NCI Director Also to Be Interim FDA Commissioner

    Cancer.gov

    Andrew von Eschenbach, M.D., director of the NCI, was asked by President Bush on Friday, September 23, 2005, to assume the additional role of interim Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

  3. Centro para la Salud Mundial (CGH) del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    El Centro para la Salud Mundial (CGH) del NCI coordina actividades de investigación y trabaja con socios nacionales e internacionales para comprender y enfrentar la carga que representa el cáncer a nivel mundial.

  4. 2008 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2008 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  5. NCI at ASCO: A brief overview on women's cancers

    Cancer.gov

    The 2014 annual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago in June highlighted results from a number of NCI-supported and -sponsored clinical trial results in women’s cancers. Taken together, these results represent important advances

  6. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Alliance in the News

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer is conducting cutting-edge research using nanotechnology to transform the diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and clinical outcomes for cancer patients. Read news stories and announcements below about the Alliance's multidisciplinary work.

  7. 2013 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    An archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  8. 2009 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2009 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  9. NCI and the Precision Medicine Initiative®

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's activities related to precision medicine focuses on new and expanded precision medicine clinical trials; mechanisms to overcome drug resistance to cancer treatments; and developing a shared digital repository of precision medicine trials data.

  10. NCI scientists at forefront of new prostate cancer diagnostics

    Cancer.gov

    Introduction of the UroNav was the result of nearly a decade’s research and development, principally conducted at NCI. Resembling a stylized computer workstation on wheels, the system electronically fuses together pictures from magnetic resonance imaging

  11. 2010 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2010 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  12. Micatu Tissue Arrayer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI researcher recognized a critical need to create a low-cost, easy-to-use tissue microarrayer (TMA), an instrument used by researchers and pathologists to accurately examine tissue samples from patients.

  13. Líneas Vitales: Programas y servicios del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    Artículos y videos sobre los programas y servicios del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer de la serie educativa Líneas Vitales del NCI, la cual está dirigida especialmente a poblaciones multiculturales.

  14. Invention Development Program Helps Nurture NCI at Frederick Technologies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Invention Development Fund (IDF) was piloted by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC) in 2014 to facilitate the commercial development of NCI technologies. The IDF received a second round of funding from the NCI Office of the Director and the Office of Budget and Management to establish the Invention Development Program (IDP) for fiscal year 2016. The IDP is using these funds to help advance a second set of inventions.

  15. Inactivated Tianjin strain, a novel genotype of Sendai virus, induces apoptosis in HeLa, NCI-H446 and Hep3B cells

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JUN; HAN, HAN; WANG, BIN; SHI, LIYING

    2016-01-01

    The Sendai virus strain Tianjin is a novel genotype of the Sendai virus. In previous studies, ultraviolet-inactivated Sendai virus strain Tianjin (UV-Tianjin) demonstrated antitumor effects on human breast cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro antitumor effects of UV-Tianjin on the human cervical carcinoma HeLa, human small cell lung cancer NCI-H446 and human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep 3B cell lines, and the possible underlying mechanisms of these antitumor effects. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay revealed that UV-Tianjin treatment inhibited the proliferation of HeLa, NCI-H446 and Hep 3B cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Hoechst and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining indicated that UV-Tianjin induced dose-dependent apoptosis in all three cell lines with the most significant effect observed in the HeLa cell line. In the HeLa cell line, UV-Tianjin-induced apoptosis was further confirmed by the disruption of the mitochondria membrane potential and the activation of caspases, as demonstrated by fluorescent cationic dye and colorimetric assays, respectively. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that UV-Tianjin treatment resulted in significant upregulation of cytochrome c, apoptosis protease activating factor-1, Fas, Fas ligand and Fas-associated protein with death domain, and activated caspase-9, −8 and −3 in HeLa cells. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that UV-Tianjin exhibits anticancer activity in HeLa, NCI-H446 and Hep 3B cell lines via the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that in the HeLa cell line, intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways may be involved in UV-Tianjin-induced apoptosis. PMID:27347098

  16. A simple demonstration when studying the equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Valery; Varaksina, Ekaterina

    2016-06-01

    The paper proposes a lecture experiment that can be demonstrated when studying the equivalence principle formulated by Albert Einstein. The demonstration consists of creating stroboscopic photographs of a ball moving along a parabola in Earth's gravitational field. In the first experiment, a camera is stationary relative to Earth's surface. In the second, the camera falls freely downwards with the ball, allowing students to see that the ball moves uniformly and rectilinearly relative to the frame of reference of the freely falling camera. The equivalence principle explains this result, as it is always possible to propose an inertial frame of reference for a small region of a gravitational field, where space-time effects of curvature are negligible.

  17. Demonstration Report: ESTCP UXO Discrimination Study ESTCP PROJECT # MM-0838

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, Erika

    2010-02-15

    In 2003, the Defense Science Board observed: 'The problem is that instruments that can detect the buried UXOs also detect numerous scrap metal objects and other artifacts, which leads to an enormous amount of expensive digging. Typically 100 holes may be dug before a real UXO is unearthed! The Task Force assessment is that much of this wasteful digging can be eliminated by the use of more advanced technology instruments that exploit modern digital processing and advanced multi-mode sensors to achieve an improved level of discrimination of scrap from UXOs.' Significant progress has been made in discrimination technology. To date, testing of these approaches has been primarily limited to test sites with only limited application at live sites. Acceptance of discrimination technologies requires demonstration of system capabilities at real UXO sites under real world conditions. Any attempt to declare detected anomalies to be harmless and requiring no further investigation will require demonstration to regulators of not only individual technologies, but of an entire decision making process. This characterization study was be the second phase in what is expected to be a continuing effort that will span several years. The FY06 Defense Appropriation contained funding for the 'Development of Advanced, Sophisticated, Discrimination Technologies for UXO Cleanup' in the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP). ESTCP responded by conducting a UXO Discrimination Study at the former Camp Sibert, AL. The results of this first demonstration were very encouraging. Although conditions were favorable at this site, a single target of interest (4.2-in mortar) and benign topography and geology, all of the classification approaches demonstrated were able to correctly identify a sizable fraction of the anomalies as arising from non-hazardous items that could be safely left in the ground. To build upon the success of the first phase of this study, ESTCP sponsored a

  18. Studies demonstrate modified T cells effective in treating blood-borne cancers

    Cancer.gov

    At the 2013 American Society of Hematology meeting in Dec. 2013, James Kochenderfer, M.D., NCI, presented findings from two clinical trials evaluating the use of genetically modified immune system T cells as cancer therapy. These reports represent import

  19. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer: achievement and path forward.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Krzysztof; Farrell, Dorothy; Panaro, Nicholas J; Grodzinski, Piotr; Barker, Anna D

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a 'disruptive technology', which can lead to a generation of new diagnostic and therapeutic products, resulting in dramatically improved cancer outcomes. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) of National Institutes of Health explores innovative approaches to multidisciplinary research allowing for a convergence of molecular biology, oncology, physics, chemistry, and engineering and leading to the development of clinically worthy technological approaches. These initiatives include programmatic efforts to enable nanotechnology as a driver of advances in clinical oncology and cancer research, known collectively as the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer (ANC). Over the last 5 years, ANC has demonstrated that multidisciplinary approach catalyzes scientific developments and advances clinical translation in cancer nanotechnology. The research conducted by ANC members has improved diagnostic assays and imaging agents, leading to the development of point-of-care diagnostics, identification and validation of numerous biomarkers for novel diagnostic assays, and the development of multifunctional agents for imaging and therapy. Numerous nanotechnology-based technologies developed by ANC researchers are entering clinical trials. NCI has re-issued ANC program for next 5 years signaling that it continues to have high expectations for cancer nanotechnology's impact on clinical practice. The goals of the next phase will be to broaden access to cancer nanotechnology research through greater clinical translation and outreach to the patient and clinical communities and to support development of entirely new models of cancer care. PMID:20552623

  20. Whirl Flutter Studies for a SSTOL Transport Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Hoffman, Krishna

    2004-01-01

    A proposed new class of aircraft - the Advanced Theater Transport (ATT) will combine strategic range and high payload with 'Super-STOL' (short take-off and landing) capability. It is also proposed to modify a YC-15 into a technology demonstrator with a 20-deg tilt wing; four, eight-bladed propellers; cross-shafted gearboxes and V-22 engines. These constitute a unique combination of design features that potentially affect performance, loads and whirl-mode stability (whirl flutter). NASA Ames Research Center is working with Boeing and Hamilton Sundstrand on technology challenges presented by the concept; the purpose of NASA involvement is to establish requirements for the demonstrator and for early design guidance, with emphasis on whirl flutter. CAMRAD II is being used to study the effects of various design features on whirl flutter, with special attention to areas where such features differ from existing aircraft, notably tiltrotors. Although the stability margins appear to be more than adequate, the concept requires significantly different analytical methods, principally including far more blade modes, than typically used for tiltrotors.

  1. NCI Funding Trends and Priorities in Physical Activity and Energy Balance Research Among Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Catherine M; Bluethmann, Shirley M; Tesauro, Gina; Perna, Frank; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Elena, Joanne W; Ross, Sharon A; O'Connell, Mary; Bowles, Heather R; Greenberg, Deborah; Nebeling, Linda

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that a healthy lifestyle consisting of physical activity, healthy diet, and weight control is associated with reduced risk of morbidity and mortality after cancer. However, these behavioral interventions are not widely adopted in practice or community settings. Integrating heath behavior change interventions into standard survivorship care for the growing number of cancer survivors requires an understanding of the current state of the science and a coordinated scientific agenda for the future with focused attention in several priority areas. To facilitate this goal, this paper presents trends over the past decade of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) research portfolio, fiscal year 2004 to 2014, by funding mechanism, research focus, research design and methodology, primary study exposures and outcomes, and study team expertise and composition. These data inform a prioritized research agenda for the next decade focused on demonstrating value and feasibility and creating desire for health behavior change interventions at multiple levels including the survivor, clinician, and healthcare payer to facilitate the development and implementation of appropriately targeted, adaptive, effective, and sustainable programs for all survivors. PMID:26547926

  2. The Use of Demonstrative Pronoun and Demonstrative Determiner "This" in Upper-Level Student Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rustipa, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Demonstrative "this" is worthy to investigate because of the role of "this" as a common cohesive device in academic writing. This study attempted to find out the variables underlying the realization of demonstrative "this" in graduate-student writing of Semarang State University, Indonesia. The data of the study were…

  3. A Chinaman's Chance in Civil Rights Demonstration: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Yawsoon

    A traffic incident in April of 1975 developed into an unprecedented civil rights demonstration by Chinese residents in New York City's Chinatown in May of that year. This paper attempts to trace the factors which led to this large scale demonstration and analyze the development of decision making in this case. The demonstration was the result of…

  4. A Preliminary Study of Demonstratives in Aklanon Narratives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Kristine; Barlaan, Rodolfo

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the spatiotemporal, discourse and emotional or connotative functions of demonstratives in Aklanon narrative discourse. The demonstrative system of Aklanon in terms of the spatial relation between speaker and hearer is described. Discourse functions of demonstratives (exophoric, endophoric, cataphoric, and anaphoric reference)…

  5. Rubus coreanus Miquel extract causes apoptosis of doxorubicin-resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Choi, Hyeong Sim; Cho, Sung-Gook; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Cancer cells can acquire an anticancer, drug-resistant phenotype following chemotherapy, which is tightly linked to cancer malignancy and patient survival rates. Therefore, the identification of options to treat chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells is an urgent requirement. Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) has long been used as a source of food. In addition, it has been reported that RCM has effective functions against particular diseases, including cancer and inflammation. In the present study, it was demonstrated that RCM extract caused the apoptotic cell death of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR‑RES ovarian cancer cells by phosphorylating c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK). The RCM‑mediated reduction of cell viability showed no synergism with doxorubicin. In addition, ellagic acid and quercetin, which are phytochemicals found in RCM, also caused apoptosis of the NCI/ADR‑RES cells. In subsequent investigations of the RCM‑altered signaling pathway, RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin were found to commonly induce the phosphorylation of JNK and AKT. Additionally, the inhibition of JNK with SP600125 repressed the apoptotic cell death induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, and the inhibition of JNK appeared to switch apoptosis to necrosis. JNK inhibition also reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, which was induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, suggesting that the phosphorylation of JNK is required for AKT phosphorylation in RCM‑, ellagic acid‑ or quercetin‑induced apoptotic cell death. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study led to the conclusion that RCM caused apoptosis of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation, and suggested that RCM may be effective in the treatment of chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells. PMID:26986492

  6. An NCI perspective on creating sustainable biospecimen resources.

    PubMed

    Vaught, Jimmie; Rogers, Joyce; Myers, Kimberly; Lim, Mark David; Lockhart, Nicole; Moore, Helen; Sawyer, Sherilyn; Furman, Jeffrey L; Compton, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    High-quality biospecimens with appropriate clinical annotation are critical in the era of personalized medicine. It is now widely recognized that biospecimen resources need to be developed and operated under established scientific, technical, business, and ethical/legal standards. To date, such standards have not been widely practiced, resulting in variable biospecimen quality that may compromise research efforts. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR) was established in 2005 to coordinate NCI's biospecimen resource activities and address those issues that affect access to the high-quality specimens and data necessary for its research enterprises as well as the broader translational research field. OBBR and the NCI Biorepository Coordinating Committee developed NCI's "Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources" after consultation with a broad array of experts. A Biospecimen Research Network was established to fund research to develop additional evidence-based practices. Although these initiatives will improve the overall availability of high-quality specimens and data for cancer research, OBBR has been authorized to implement a national biobanking effort, cancer HUman Biobank (caHUB). caHUB will address systematically the gaps in knowledge needed to improve the state-of-the-science and strengthen the standards for human biobanking. This commentary outlines the progressive efforts by NCI in technical, governance, and economic considerations that will be important as the new caHUB enterprise is undertaken. PMID:21672889

  7. DNA fingerprinting of the NCI-60 cell line panel.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Philip L; Reinhold, William C; Varma, Sudhir; Hutchinson, Amy A; Pommier, Yves; Chanock, Stephen J; Weinstein, John N

    2009-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute's NCI-60 cell line panel, the most extensively characterized set of cells in existence and a public resource, is frequently used as a screening tool for drug discovery. Because many laboratories around the world rely on data from the NCI-60 cells, confirmation of their genetic identities represents an essential step in validating results from them. Given the consequences of cell line contamination or misidentification, quality control measures should routinely include DNA fingerprinting. We have, therefore, used standard DNA microsatellite short tandem repeats to profile the NCI-60, and the resulting DNA fingerprints are provided here as a reference. Consistent with previous reports, the fingerprints suggest that several NCI-60 lines have common origins: the melanoma lines MDA-MB-435, MDA-N, and M14; the central nervous system lines U251 and SNB-19; the ovarian lines OVCAR-8 and OVCAR-8/ADR (also called NCI/ADR); and the prostate lines DU-145, DU-145 (ATCC), and RC0.1. Those lines also show that the ability to connect two fingerprints to the same origin is not affected by stable transfection or by the development of multidrug resistance. As expected, DNA fingerprints were not able to distinguish different tissues-of-origin. The fingerprints serve principally as a barcodes. PMID:19372543

  8. Auditing the NCI Thesaurus with Semantic Web Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mougin, Fleur; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Auditing biomedical terminologies often results in the identification of inconsistencies and thus helps to improve their quality. In this paper, we present a method based on Semantic Web technologies for auditing biomedical terminologies and apply it to the NCI thesaurus. We stored the NCI thesaurus concepts and their properties in an RDF triple store. By querying this store, we assessed the consistency of both hierarchical and associative relations from the NCI thesaurus among themselves and with corresponding relations in the UMLS Semantic Network. We show that the consistency is better for associative relations than for hierarchical relations. Causes for inconsistency and benefits from using Semantic Web technologies for auditing purposes are discussed. PMID:18999265

  9. Syntax of Demonstrative Adjectives in Japanese: A Preliminary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuda, Minoru

    1996-01-01

    The interactions among demonstrative adjectives in certain genitive phrases and WH-words in Japanese are investigated in this report on a work in progress. It is argued that certain demonstrative adjectives in Japanese, such as "ano" ("that"), occupy the highest Spec position in DP and that they block A-bar movement out of DP; genitive phrases,…

  10. Research, Demonstration, and Evaluation Studies: Fiscal Year 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Barbara, Ed.

    This report provides descriptive information on the research, demonstration, and evaluation programs of the Office of Child Development during fiscal year 1974. An overview describing the role, function, and long range goals of the Office of Child Development is presented. Specific research, demonstration, and evaluation projects (both…

  11. Research, Demonstration, and Evaluation Studies: Fiscal Year 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackley, Ray, Ed.

    This report provides descriptive information on the Research, Demonstration, and Evaluation Program of the Office of Child Development (OCD) for Fiscal Year 1976. An overview describing the mission, function and long range goals of the OCD is included along with a discussion of the Research, Demonstration and Evaluation Program and its activities…

  12. Research, Demonstration, and Evaluation Studies Fiscal Year 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Arlene, Ed.

    This report provides descriptive information on the research, demonstration, and evaluation program of the Office of Child Development (OCD) for fiscal year 1975. An overview describing the role, function, and long range goals of OCD is included along with a discussion of the research, demonstration, and evaluation program's major areas of…

  13. A Case Study of Three Satellite Technology Demonstration School Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Gordon

    The Satellite Technology Demonstration (STD) represented a cooperative and complex effort involving federal, regional, state and local interests and demonstrated the feasibility of media distribution by communication satellite of social services for rural audiences. As part of a comprehensive evaluation plan, the summative data base was augmented…

  14. Orbital construction demonstration study. Volume 3: Requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive set of requirements that defines the objective, scope and configuration of the orbital test facility needed to demonstrate the necessary automated fabrication, construction and assembly technology is provided. In addition to the requirements for the orbital demonstration facility, a detailed list of experiment requirements is included for various areas of technology.

  15. The exomes of the NCI-60 panel: a genomic resource for cancer biology and systems pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Abaan, Ogan D; Polley, Eric C; Davis, Sean R; Zhu, Yuelin J; Bilke, Sven; Walker, Robert L; Pineda, Marbin; Gindin, Yevgeniy; Jiang, Yuan; Reinhold, William C; Holbeck, Susan L; Simon, Richard M; Doroshow, James H; Pommier, Yves; Meltzer, Paul S

    2013-07-15

    The NCI-60 cell lines are the most frequently studied human tumor cell lines in cancer research. This panel has generated the most extensive cancer pharmacology database worldwide. In addition, these cell lines have been intensely investigated, providing a unique platform for hypothesis-driven research focused on enhancing our understanding of tumor biology. Here, we report a comprehensive analysis of coding variants in the NCI-60 panel of cell lines identified by whole exome sequencing, providing a list of possible cancer specific variants for the community. Furthermore, we identify pharmacogenomic correlations between specific variants in genes such as TP53, BRAF, ERBBs, and ATAD5 and anticancer agents such as nutlin, vemurafenib, erlotinib, and bleomycin showing one of many ways the data could be used to validate and generate novel hypotheses for further investigation. As new cancer genes are identified through large-scale sequencing studies, the data presented here for the NCI-60 will be an invaluable resource for identifying cell lines with mutations in such genes for hypothesis-driven research. To enhance the utility of the data for the greater research community, the genomic variants are freely available in different formats and from multiple sources including the CellMiner and Ingenuity websites. PMID:23856246

  16. Use of interactive lecture demonstrations: A ten year study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manjula D.; Johnston, Ian D.; Johnston, Helen; Varvell, Kevin; Robertson, Gordon; Hopkins, Andrew; Stewart, Chris; Cooper, Ian; Thornton, Ronald

    2010-07-01

    The widely held constructivist view of learning advocates student engagement via interactivity. Within the physics education research community, several specific interactive strategies have been developed to enhance conceptual understanding. One such strategy, the Interactive Lecture Demonstration (ILD) is designed for large lecture classes and, if measured using specific conceptual surveys, is purported to provide learning gains of up to 80%. This paper reports on learning gains for two different Projects over ten years. In Project 1, the ILDs were implemented from 1999 to 2001 with students who had successfully completed senior high school physics. The learning gains for students not exposed to the ILDs were in the range 13% to 16% while those for students exposed to the ILDs was 31% to 50%. In Project 2, the ILDs were implemented from 2007 to 2009 with students who had not studied senior high school physics. Since the use of ILDs in Project 1 had produced positive results, ethical considerations dictated that all students be exposed to ILDs. The learning gains were from 28% to 42%. On the one hand it is pleasing to note that there is an increase in learning gains, yet on the other, we note that the gains are nowhere near the claimed 80%. This paper also reports on teacher experiences of using the ILDs, in Project 2.

  17. Denver Potable Water Reuse Demonstration Project: comprehensive chronic rat study.

    PubMed

    Condie, L W; Lauer, W C; Wolfe, G W; Czeh, E T; Burns, J M

    1994-11-01

    The health effects testing program for the Denver Water Department's Potable Water Reuse Demonstration Project was designed to evaluate the relative health effects of highly treated reclaimed water derived from secondary wastewater in comparison with Denver's present high-quality drinking water. The 1 x 10(6) gal/day treatment plant provided 500-fold concentrates of water that had been treated by multiple processes to remove microbial and chemical contaminants. Fischer 344 rats were exposed to the complex mixture solutions for up to 2 yr to evaluate chronic toxicity and oncogenicity effects. The following parameters were evaluated: clinical observations, survival rate, growth, food and water consumption, haematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, organ weights, gross autopsy and histopathological examination of all lesions, major tissues and organs. Clinical pathology, gross pathology, and microscopic pathology conducted at wk 26 and 65 and at the end of the study did not reveal any findings that could be considered to be treatment related. Administration of drinking water concentrates at up to 500 times the original concentration in the original water samples to F344 rats for up to 104 wk did not result in any overt toxicological or carcinogenic effects. PMID:7959456

  18. NCI at Frederick Receives a Royal Visit | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and NCI at Frederick recently had the honor of hosting Professor Dr. Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn Mahidol of Thailand. Her Royal Highness has a special interest in scientific research related to the use of natural products for treating disease. The purpose of her visit was to discuss the work on natural products being undertaken at NCI at Frederick. Her Royal Highness attended talks by researchers from both the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL), CCR, and the Natural Products Branch (NPB), Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD).

  19. NCI at Frederick Receives a Royal Visit | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and NCI at Frederick recently had the honor of hosting Professor Dr. Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn Mahidol of Thailand.  Her Royal Highness has a special interest in scientific research related to the use of natural products for treating disease. The purpose of her visit was to discuss the work on natural products being undertaken at NCI at Frederick. Her Royal Highness attended talks by researchers from both the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL), CCR, and the Natural Products Branch (NPB), Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD).

  20. Robert Wiltrout Says Goodbye to NCI in 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    After 34 years at NCI, Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., said he is looking forward to trading his I-270 commute for another type of commute: exploring the waterways of Maryland, Alaska, and Wyoming to fulfill his love of fishing. Wiltrout officially retired as director of the NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) on July 2 of last year. Throughout his college academic career, Wiltrout had an interest in science, but it was not until he was working on a research project for his master’s degree that he considered a career in scientific research.

  1. Human habitation field study of the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaker, Harry L.; Archer, Ronald D.; Szabo, Richard; Twyford, Evan S.; Conlee, Carl S.; Howard, Robert L.

    2013-10-01

    Landing and supporting a permanent outpost on a planetary surface represents humankind's capability to expand its own horizons and challenge current technology. With this in mind, habitability of these structures becomes more essential given the longer durations of the missions. The purpose of this evaluation was to obtain preliminary human-in-the-loop performance data on the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) in a Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) configuration during a 14-day simulated lunar exploration field trial and to apply this knowledge to further enhance the habitat's capabilities for forward designs. Human factors engineers at the NASA/Johnson Space Center's Habitability and Human Factors Branch recorded approximately 96 h of crew task performance with four work stations. Human factors measures used during this study included the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) and customized post questionnaires. Overall the volume for the PEM was considered acceptable by the crew; however; the habitat's individual work station volume was constrained when setting up the vehicle for operation, medical operations, and suit maintenance while general maintenance, logistical resupply, and geo science was considered acceptable. Crew workload for each station indicated resupply as being the lowest rated, with medical operations, general maintenance, and geo science tasks as being light, while suit maintenance was considered moderate and general vehicle setup being rated the highest. Stowage was an issue around the habitat with the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV) resupply stowage located in the center of the habitat as interfering with some work station volumes and activities. Ergonomics of the geo science station was considered a major issue, especially with the overhead touch screens.

  2. Determination of betamethasone and triamcinolone acetonide by GC-NCI-MS in excreta of treated animals and development of a fast oxidation procedure for derivatisation of corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Courtheyn, D; Vercammen, J; Logghe, M; Seghers, H; De Wasch, K; De Brabander, H

    1998-12-01

    The use of corticosteroids in combination with other hormonal substances has long been known to result in increased mass gain with bovines. Practice has demonstrated, however, that even the single use of a glucocorticoid may result in growth promoting effects. In addition to the popular dexamethasone, more recently other corticosteroids have also been misused for fattening purposes. The first part of this study deals with the detection of two of them, namely betamethasone and triamcinolone acetonide. Betamethasone was administered orally to a cow at a dose of 50 mg d-1 for 5 d, then later the same cow was injected intramuscularly with a dose of 50 mg of betamethasone dipropionate. Excretion in urine and faeces was followed with both HPLC-enzyme immunoassay and a previously described method based on negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NCI-MS) after oxidation. For the triamcinolone acetonide study a cow was treated with 50 mg d-1 of the drug during a 7 d period. Excretion in faeces was followed with GC-NCI-MS. As triamcinolone acetonide is resistant to the previously described oxidation procedure, however, a hydrolysis step had to be introduced prior to oxidation. In addition to this specific modification necessary for triamcinolone acetonide, in a subsequent part of this study the original oxidation procedure with pyridinium chlorochromate was re-investigated especially to shorten the procedure. With the introduction of potassium dichromate the reaction time could be decreased from 3 h to 10 min. PMID:10435270

  3. 78 FR 27974 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress... for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National Cancer... this publication. Proposed Collection: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology...

  4. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports SUMMARY..., Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National Cancer... (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports,...

  5. Use of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: A Ten Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Manjula D.; Johnston, Ian D.; Johnston, Helen; Varvell, Kevin; Robertson, Gordon; Hopkins, Andrew; Stewart, Chris; Cooper, Ian; Thornton, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The widely held constructivist view of learning advocates student engagement via interactivity. Within the physics education research community, several specific interactive strategies have been developed to enhance conceptual understanding. One such strategy, the Interactive Lecture Demonstration (ILD) is designed for large lecture classes and,…

  6. Novel Method Of Preparing Vaccines | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    This invention from the NCI Cancer and Inflammation Program describes methods to prepare vaccines for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. The National Cancer Institute's Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel methods of preparing vaccines.

  7. Creating Start-up Companies around NCI Inventions | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Rose Freel, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer The National Cancer Institute (NCI), led by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC),  the Avon Foundation, and The Center for Advancing Innovation have partnered to create a “first-of-a-kind” Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge.

  8. NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of cancer care investigators, providers, academia, and other organizations that care for diverse populations in health systems. View the list of publications from NCORP. | Clinical Trials network of cancer care professionals who care for diverse populations across the U.S.

  9. Centros oncológicos designados por el NCI

    Cancer.gov

    El programa de centros oncológicos designados por el Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI) reconoce a los centros de todo el país que cumplen con rigurosos criterios para participar en proyectos avanzados de primer nivel para la investigación multidisciplinaria del cáncer.

  10. NCI intramural research highlighted at 2014 AACR meeting

    Cancer.gov

    This year’s American Association for Cancer Research meeting featured plenary talks by two NCI scientists, Steven Rosenberg, M.D., and Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., that highlighted the challenges in developing varied and potentially synergistic treatments f

  11. Decontamination demonstration facility (D. D. F) modularization/mobility study

    SciTech Connect

    FitzPatrick, V.F.; Butts, H.L.; Moles, R.G.; Lundgren, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    The component decontamination technology, developed under the DOE sponsored TRU Waste Decontamination Program, has potential benefits to nuclear utility owners in four strategic areas: (1) Meeting ALARA Criteria for Maintenance/Operations; (2) Management of wastes and waste forms; (3) Accident Response; (4) Decommissioning. The most significant step in transferring this technology directly to the nuclear industry is embodied in the TMI Decontamination Demonstration Facility (D.D.F.).

  12. Orbital construction demonstration study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conceptual design and program plan for an Orbital Construction Demonstration Article (OCDA), that can be used for technology growth and verification, and as the construction facility for a variety of large structures is presented. The OCDA design includes a large work platform, a rotating manipulator boom, a 250 kw solar array, and a core module of subsystems with a total mass of 37,093 kg, that can be assembled in three shuttle flights. An analysis of OCDA continued utility potential indicates that a shuttle tended platform with 250 kW of power can effectively be used to construct highly beneficial antenna systems and large demonstration articles that advance solar power satellite technologies. The construction of 100 m parabolic reflectors for use as a radiometer for measuring soil moisture and water salinity was found to be within the capabilities of OCDA concept. With 252 fixed beams for high population centers, and 16 scanning beams for rural areas, the antenna has the potential to significantly improve U.S. space based communications systems. The OCDA, that is slightly increased in size, was found adequate to build a large 2 MW solar array which, when coupled to a transmit antenna, demonstrate power transfer from space to ground.

  13. NCI in vitro and in silico anticancer screen, cell cycle pertubation and apoptosis-inducing potential of new acylated, benzylidene and isopropylidene derivatives of andrographolide.

    PubMed

    Wong, Charng Choon; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao; Sumon, Shariful Hasan; Sidik, Shiran Mohamad; Phillips, Roger; Lajis, Nordin H; Stanslas, Johnson

    2014-09-01

    Andrographolide (AGP) is the main bioactive constituent isolated from the traditional medicinal, Andrographis paniculata which contributes towards its various biological activities, including anticancer property. In this study, a series of new AGP derivatives were semi-synthesised and screened against the NCI in vitro 60 cell lines. From the screening results, we had identified SRS07 as the most potent AGP derivative, against breast and colon cancer cell lines. Subsequently, SRS07 was tested for its capability to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MCF-7 and HCT116 cancer cells. SRS07 effectively induced G1 cell cycle arrest in both cell lines and ultimately apoptosis by inducing DNA fragmentation in HCT116 cells. The apoptotic cell death induced by SRS07 was confirmed via FITC Annexin-V double staining. Western blot analysis of SRS07-treated HCT116 cells revealed that the compound induced apoptosis be activating caspase 8 which in turn cleaved Bid to t-Bid to initiate cell death cascade. Prediction of the possible mode of action of SRS07 by utilising NCI COMPARE analysis failed to reveal a distinct mechanism category. Hence, it is speculated that SRS07 possesses novel mechanism of action. In conclusion, SRS07 demonstrated superior in vitro anticancer profiles and emerged as a potential lead anticancer candidate. PMID:25168151

  14. Direct oxide reduction demonstration, small-scale studies

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.L.; Santi, D.J.; Fisher, D.C.; Humiston, T.J.

    1991-12-09

    This project was initiated to provide process design information to the Plutonium Recovery Project (PRP). Although direct oxide reduction (DOR) has been operated in a production mode both at the Rocky Flats Plant (now operated by EG&G, Inc.) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, many aspects of the process are ill-defined. Because the PRP plans include significant DOR capability, a well-defined process should minimize capital cost and maximize productivity. Reduced radiation exposure may also be realized. A detailed, statistically valid investigation of the direct oxide reduction process was carried out utilizing 100 grams or less of plutonium dioxide per experiment. Conditions were established for obtaining 95% + yields. Conclusions drawn from the results of the experimental work were utilized to make recommendations for future large-scale investigative and confirmative work as well large-scale production demonstration work. 4 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Direct oxide reduction demonstration, small-scale studies

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.L.; Santi, D.J.; Fisher, D.C.; Humiston, T.J.

    1991-12-09

    This project was initiated to provide process design information to the Plutonium Recovery Project (PRP). Although direct oxide reduction (DOR) has been operated in a production mode both at the Rocky Flats Plant (now operated by EG G, Inc.) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, many aspects of the process are ill-defined. Because the PRP plans include significant DOR capability, a well-defined process should minimize capital cost and maximize productivity. Reduced radiation exposure may also be realized. A detailed, statistically valid investigation of the direct oxide reduction process was carried out utilizing 100 grams or less of plutonium dioxide per experiment. Conditions were established for obtaining 95% + yields. Conclusions drawn from the results of the experimental work were utilized to make recommendations for future large-scale investigative and confirmative work as well large-scale production demonstration work. 4 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Oncofertility Resources at NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers

    PubMed Central

    Clayman, Marla L.; Harper, Maya M.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Reinecke, Joyce; Shah, Shivani

    2015-01-01

    NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers (CCCs) set the standard for providing exemplary patient care. Quality cancer care includes discussions about fertility and referrals to fertility specialists for patients at risk for sterility. This study sought to determine what fertility preservation (FP) resources are available in CCCs and how well those are integrated into patient care. Leaders at each CCC received a letter requesting a short telephone interview with individuals who could provide information about the institution’s FP resources. A semi-structured interview guide was used and responses were audio-recorded. Data were analyzed using content and thematic analysis. Interviews were conducted with 30 of the 39 CCCs that see adult patients (77%). The remaining institutions included 4 nonresponders, 3 that referred the interviewers to childhood cancer survivorship clinics, 1 that refused, and 1 that could not identify any FP resources. Participants were primarily affiliated with reproductive endocrinology (n=15) or hematology/oncology divisions (n=10). Institutional policies regarding consistent provision of FP information were rare (n=4), although most sites (n=20) either had some services on-site or had referral programs (n=8). However, only 13 had some experimental services, such as ovarian tissue cryopreservation. Respondents reported barriers to provision of FP, including oncologists’ identification of patients at risk, low referral rates, and perceptions of patient prognosis. Only 8 (27%) sites had staff with time dedicated to FP. CCCs vary widely in implementing FP-recommended practice to their patients. CCCs are positioned to provide exemplary oncofertility care, but most need to better integrate FP information and referral into practice. PMID:24335685

  17. Partial Irrigation Feasibility Study and Demonstration Project, Phase IV Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Northwest Economic Association.

    1987-09-01

    This report deals with a three year study of the practice of partial irrigation. (Partial irrigation is defined as the deliberate underirrigation of a crop while maintaining or improving farm income.) Objective was to observe and document the use of this strategy on farms in the Columbia Basin. Wheat and corn were studied as candidates for partial irrigation. Potatoes were included only to better understand how irrigation practices in the Columbia Basin are influenced by this crop. The report begins with a review of the underlying theory of partial irrigation. The second section of the report details the procedures followed during the study. The third section, covering the results of the study, is presented in four parts. The first is a summary of the relevant data. The second consists of observations on the practice of partial irrigation. The results observed for wheat over the three years of the study are interpreted in terms of the theory outlined in the first section. The third part of the results section deals with case studies of the economic merits of the partial irrigation practices that were observed. 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  18. Environmental process improvement feasibility study and demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodger L.

    1994-01-01

    This report is the final product of an environmental study conducted by Western Commercial Space Center, Inc. under contract to Tennessee-Calspan Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research. The purpose of this investigation is to accurately document the current environmental and permitting processes associated with commercial space launch activity at Vandenberg AFB, and make recommendations to streamline those processes. The particular areas of interest focus on: identifying applicable Federal, state, and local laws, Department of Defense directives, and Air force regulations; defining the environmental process on Vandenberg AFB and how it relates with other agencies, including Federal and state regulatory agencies; and defining the air quality permit process. Study investigation results are applied to an example Pilot Space Launch Vehicle (PSLV) planning to launch from Vandenberg AFB. The PSLV space hardware is analyzed with respect to environmental and permitting issues associated with vehicle processing, facilities required (existing or new), and launch. The PSLV verified the earlier findings of the study and gave insight into streamlining recommendations.

  19. Feasibility study of full-reactor gas core demonstration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, J. F.; Lofthouse, J. H.; Shaffer, C. J.; Macbeth, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Separate studies of nuclear criticality, flow patterns, and thermodynamics for the gas core reactor concept have all given positive indications of its feasibility. However, before serious design for a full scale gas core application can be made, feasibility must be shown for operation with full interaction of the nuclear, thermal, and hydraulic effects. A minimum sized, and hence minimum expense, test arrangement is considered for a full gas core configuration. It is shown that the hydrogen coolant scattering effects dominate the nuclear considerations at elevated temperatures. A cavity diameter of somewhat larger than 4 ft (122 cm) will be needed if temperatures high enough to vaporize uranium are to be achieved.

  20. Transcriptomic landscape of Pueraria lobata demonstrates potential for phytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Han, Rongchun; Takahashi, Hiroki; Nakamura, Michimi; Yoshimoto, Naoko; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi has a long and broad application in the treatment of disease. However, in the US and EU, it is treated as a notorious weed. The information to be gained from decoding the deep transcriptome profile would facilitate further research on P. lobata. In this study, more than 93 million fastq format reads were generated by Illumina's next-generation sequencing approach using five types of P. lobata tissue, followed by CLC de novo assembly methods, ultimately yielding about 83,041 contigs in total. Then BLASTx similarity searches against the NCBI NR database and UniProtKB database were conducted. Once the duplicates among BLASTx hits were eliminated, ID mapping against the UniProt database was conducted online to retrieve Gene Ontology information. In search of the putative genes relevant to essential biosynthesis pathways, all 1,348 unique enzyme commission numbers were used to map pathways against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Enzymes related to the isoflavonoid and flavonoid biosynthesis pathways were focused for detailed investigation and subsequently, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was conducted for biological validation. Metabolites of interest, puerarin and daidzin were studied by HPLC. The findings in this report may serve as a footstone for further research into this promising medicinal plant. PMID:26157443

  1. NCI Updates Tobacco Policies Following Re-accreditation | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    This year, NCI was re-accredited as one of nearly 200 CEO Cancer Gold Standard employers across the United States. According to its website, “the CEO Cancer Gold Standard provides a framework for employers to have a healthier workplace by focusing on cancer risk reduction, early detection, and access to clinical trials and high-quality care.”  As part of this re-accreditation, NCI has updated its Tobacco-Free Policy. Part of this policy includes posting signs around campus reminding visitors and staff that NCI’s campus is tobacco-free. Therefore, the use of all tobacco products is prohibited. This includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco.

  2. NCI Updates Tobacco Policies Following Re-accreditation | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    This year, NCI was re-accredited as one of nearly 200 CEO Cancer Gold Standard employers across the United States. According to its website, “the CEO Cancer Gold Standard provides a framework for employers to have a healthier workplace by focusing on cancer risk reduction, early detection, and access to clinical trials and high-quality care.” As part of this re-accreditation, NCI has updated its Tobacco-Free Policy. Part of this policy includes posting signs around campus reminding visitors and staff that NCI’s campus is tobacco-free. Therefore, the use of all tobacco products is prohibited. This includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco.

  3. Webcams for Bird Detection and Monitoring: A Demonstration Study

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Willem W.; Vermeulen, Bart; Stuckens, Jan; Lhermitte, Stefaan; Van der Zande, Dimitry; Van Ranst, Marc; Coppin, Pol

    2010-01-01

    Better insights into bird migration can be a tool for assessing the spread of avian borne infections or ecological/climatologic issues reflected in deviating migration patterns. This paper evaluates whether low budget permanent cameras such as webcams can offer a valuable contribution to the reporting of migratory birds. An experimental design was set up to study the detection capability using objects of different size, color and velocity. The results of the experiment revealed the minimum size, maximum velocity and contrast of the objects required for detection by a standard webcam. Furthermore, a modular processing scheme was proposed to track and follow migratory birds in webcam recordings. Techniques such as motion detection by background subtraction, stereo vision and lens distortion were combined to form the foundation of the bird tracking algorithm. Additional research to integrate webcam networks, however, is needed and future research should enforce the potential of the processing scheme by exploring and testing alternatives of each individual module or processing step. PMID:22319308

  4. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Tutorials and Seminar Series

    Cancer.gov

    View details about tutorials and seminars hosted by Alliance members and members of the cancer research community. These events provide a forum for sharing innovative perspectives on research and development efforts in the field of nanotechnology and their application to cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Also visit the Event Listing section to find scientific meetings and events where NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer leaders and members are participating.

  5. Susan Koogle Marks 40+ Years at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer In 1973, Susan Koogle commuted from Washington County to a small data processing company in Arlington, Va. When gas prices spiked from 25 to 54 cents a gallon, she began to look for a job closer to home. That’s when she came to work at NCI at Frederick, and in December 2013, she marked her 40th year with the facility.

  6. Collaboration Opportunities with the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB) at NCI | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB) at the National Cancer Institute has developed the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB), which is a unique infrastructure for collecting biospecimens for the purpose of conducting biospecimen research. Biospecimens from the BPV program will be made available to collaborators with the capability to perform molecular analysis as part of a collaborative research agreement with the NCI-BBRB.

  7. Long non-coding RNA expression profiling in the NCI60 cancer cell line panel using high-throughput RT-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Mestdagh, Pieter; Lefever, Steve; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Derveaux, Stefaan; Hellemans, Jan; Vandesompele, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form a new class of RNA molecules implicated in various aspects of protein coding gene expression regulation. To study lncRNAs in cancer, we generated expression profiles for 1707 human lncRNAs in the NCI60 cancer cell line panel using a high-throughput nanowell RT-qPCR platform. We describe how qPCR assays were designed and validated and provide processed and normalized expression data for further analysis. Data quality is demonstrated by matching the lncRNA expression profiles with phenotypic and genomic characteristics of the cancer cell lines. This data set can be integrated with publicly available omics and pharmacological data sets to uncover novel associations between lncRNA expression and mRNA expression, miRNA expression, DNA copy number, protein coding gene mutation status or drug response PMID:27377824

  8. Long non-coding RNA expression profiling in the NCI60 cancer cell line panel using high-throughput RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Mestdagh, Pieter; Lefever, Steve; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Derveaux, Stefaan; Hellemans, Jan; Vandesompele, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form a new class of RNA molecules implicated in various aspects of protein coding gene expression regulation. To study lncRNAs in cancer, we generated expression profiles for 1707 human lncRNAs in the NCI60 cancer cell line panel using a high-throughput nanowell RT-qPCR platform. We describe how qPCR assays were designed and validated and provide processed and normalized expression data for further analysis. Data quality is demonstrated by matching the lncRNA expression profiles with phenotypic and genomic characteristics of the cancer cell lines. This data set can be integrated with publicly available omics and pharmacological data sets to uncover novel associations between lncRNA expression and mRNA expression, miRNA expression, DNA copy number, protein coding gene mutation status or drug response. PMID:27377824

  9. Silencing of tripartite motif (TRIM) 29 inhibits proliferation and invasion and increases chemosensitivity to cisplatin in human lung squamous cancer NCI-H520 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunxiao; Huang, Xiaoxi; Hou, Shengcai; Hu, Bin; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background TRIM29 belongs to the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family. It has been reported to be a tumor suppressor or have oncogenic function in many cancer types. The aim of this study was to investigate whether downregulation of TRIM29 by small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) could inhibit cell proliferation and invasion and increase chemosensitivity to cisplatin in human lung squamous cancer NCI-H520 cells in vitro. Methods We transformed TRIM29 siRNA into NCI-H520 cells. Real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting assay were employed to determine TRIM29 messenger (m)RNA and protein expressions. MTT assay was used to determine the cell proliferation. Transwell invasion assay was used to determine the cell invasion. An Annexin V-propidium iodide (AnnV/PI) staining apoptosis test was used for detecting apoptosis. Results TRIM29 siRNA could specifically and efficiently suppress TRIM29 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Silencing of the TRIM29 by siRNA in NCI-H520 cells inhibited cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. TRIM29 knockdown resulted in chemosensitivity enhancement in NCI-H520 cells. Conclusion Downregulation of TRIM29 can lead to potent antitumor activity and chemosensitizing effect in human lung squamous cancer NCI-H520 cells. PMID:26273332

  10. Spergularia marina Induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in NCI-H716 Cells Through Bile Acid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong; Lee, Yu Mi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spergularia marina Griseb. (SM) is a halophyte that grows in mud flats. The aerial portions of SM have been eaten as vegetables and traditionally used to prevent chronic diseases in Korea. However, there has been no scientific report that demonstrates the pharmacological effects of SM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is important for the maintenance of glucose and energy homeostasis through acting as a signal in peripheral and neural systems. To discover a functional food for regulating glucose and energy homeostasis, we evaluated the effect of an aqueous ethanolic extract (AEE) of SM on GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. In addition, we explored the Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) agonist activity of AEE-SM in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells transiently transfected with human TGR5. As a result, treatment of NCI-H716 cells with AEE-SM increased GLP-1 secretion and intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of NCI-H716 cells with TGR5-specific small interference RNA inhibited AEE-SM-induced GLP-1 secretion and the increase in Ca2+ and cAMP levels. Moreover, AEE-SM showed that the TGR5 agonist activity in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with TGR5. The results suggest that AEE-SM might be a candidate for a functional food to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis. PMID:25260089

  11. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  12. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  13. New Phone System Coming to NCI Campus at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Travis Fouche and Trent McKee, Guest Writers Beginning in September, phones at the NCI Campus at Frederick will begin to be replaced, as the project to upgrade the current phone system ramps up. Over the next 16 months, the Information Systems Program (ISP) will be working with Facilities Maintenance and Engineering and Computer & Statistical Services to replace the current Avaya phone system with a Cisco Unified Communications phone system. The Cisco system is already in use at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

  14. NCI at Frederick Employees Sew for Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The R&W Club Frederick hosted a sewing party on Feb. 18 to give employees a chance to help sew pillowcases for children hospitalized for illnesses and cancer treatments. The nonprofit organization ConKerr Cancer provides the pillowcases to children across the country. Melissa Porter, administrative manager, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick, and vice chair of the R&W Club Frederick, said the event went well. While the turnout was lower than expected, 27 pillowcases were completed, she said.

  15. Before You Collaborate, You Should Partner with NCI TTC | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Jeffrey W. Thomas, Contributing Writers As the fall and winter seasons progress, you may be attending more scientific conferences, where you may find a number of opportunities for research collaborations. To assist your lab in reaching its research goals through collaborations, the staff of the National Cancer Institute Technology Transfer Center (NCI TTC) can guide you through a tool box of agreements you may need for protecting your intellectual property (IP) and effectively managing your collaboration. 

  16. Cantharidin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair-associated protein levels in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-09-01

    Cantharidin is one of the major compounds from mylabris and it has cytotoxic effects in many different types of human cancer cells. Previously, we found that cantharidin induced cell death through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells. However, cantharidin-affected DNA damage, repair, and associated protein levels in NCI-H460 cells have not been examined. In this study, we determined whether cantharidin induced DNA damage and condensation and altered levels of proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. Incubation of NCI-H460 cells with 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 μM of cantharidin caused a longer DNA migration smear (comet tail). Cantharidin also increased DNA condensation. These effects were dose-dependent. Cantharidin (5, 10, and 15 μM) treatment of NCI-H460 cells reduced protein levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA-1), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1). Protein translocation of p-p53, p-H2A.X (S140), and MDC1 from cytoplasm to nucleus was induced by cantharidin in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, this study showed that cantharidin caused DNA damage and inhibited levels of DNA repair-associated proteins. These effects may contribute to cantharidin-induced cell death in vitro. PMID:24639390

  17. Matrine suppresses invasion and metastasis of NCI-H1299 cells by enhancing microRNA-133a expression

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hehe; Zhao, Xixi; Qu, Jinkun; Zhang, Jia; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Matrine has been proved to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of human lung cancer cells. However, less studies involved in evaluating the effects and mechanism of matrine in cell migration and invasion of lung cancer. This study was aim to investigate the involvement of miR-133a in matrine’s anti-invasion and anti-metastasis in lung cancer. MTT assay was used to assess the inhibition of proliferation effects of matrine in NCI-H1299 cells. Migration and invasion abilities of NCI-H1299 cells were investigated by Transwell assays. Expression of miR-133a was detected by real-time PCR. Anti-miR technique was applied to inhibit miR-133a in matrine treated HCI-H1299 cells. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. As results, matrine treatment significantly inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of NCI-H1299 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, accompanied by significantly elevation of miR-133a expression. However, matrine failed to inhibit the metastatic ability when cells transfected with anti-miR-133a. Matrine treatment also suppressed activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. The inhibitory effects of matrine on activation of EGFR pathway were also reversed by anti-miR-133a transfection in NCI-H1299 cells. In conclusion, matrine inhibited the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cell by elevating expression of miR-133a which further suppressed activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. PMID:26379863

  18. Matrine suppresses invasion and metastasis of NCI-H1299 cells by enhancing microRNA-133a expression.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hehe; Zhao, Xixi; Qu, Jinkun; Zhang, Jia; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Matrine has been proved to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of human lung cancer cells. However, less studies involved in evaluating the effects and mechanism of matrine in cell migration and invasion of lung cancer. This study was aim to investigate the involvement of miR-133a in matrine's anti-invasion and anti-metastasis in lung cancer. MTT assay was used to assess the inhibition of proliferation effects of matrine in NCI-H1299 cells. Migration and invasion abilities of NCI-H1299 cells were investigated by Transwell assays. Expression of miR-133a was detected by real-time PCR. Anti-miR technique was applied to inhibit miR-133a in matrine treated HCI-H1299 cells. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. As results, matrine treatment significantly inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of NCI-H1299 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, accompanied by significantly elevation of miR-133a expression. However, matrine failed to inhibit the metastatic ability when cells transfected with anti-miR-133a. Matrine treatment also suppressed activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. The inhibitory effects of matrine on activation of EGFR pathway were also reversed by anti-miR-133a transfection in NCI-H1299 cells. In conclusion, matrine inhibited the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cell by elevating expression of miR-133a which further suppressed activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. PMID:26379863

  19. Effects of Cx43 gene modification on the proliferation and migration of the human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226.

    PubMed

    Zang, J-P; Wei, R

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226 was transfected with the recombinant plasmid pBudCE4.1_Cx43 to explore the role of the Cx43 gene in cell growth, cell cycle, and tumor migration. pBudCE4.1-Cx43 was transfected into human lung squamous carcinoma NCI-H226 cells using Lipofectamine TM2000. The mRNA and protein expressions of Cx43 in the transfected cells were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The cell-cell communication was detected using the scratch dye tracer method and the cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. The CCK-8 proliferation, scratch healing, and cell invasion assays were performed to evaluate the effect of the Cx43 gene transfection on the proliferation, migration, and invasive abilities of NCI-H226 cells. Cx43 mRNA and protein expressions and the fluorescence intensity in the scratch healing test were significantly higher in the experimental group than those in the control and blank groups (P < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively). The CCK-8 proliferation assay and the scratch healing experiment revealed significantly inhibited NCI-H226 cell proliferation (especially 72 h after incubation) and cell migration, respectively, in the experimental group, compared to the control and blank groups (P < 0.001 and <0.05, respectively). The transwell chamber test showed a statistically significant decrease in the invasive ability of NCI-H226 cells in the experimental group (P < 0.05). Therefore, Cx43 gene transfection could inhibit the migration of human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226, thereby inhibiting tumor cell proliferation. PMID:26535624

  20. mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of the NCI-60 integrated with drug activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongfang; D’Andrade, Petula; Fulmer-Smentek, Stephanie; Lorenzi, Philip; Kohn, Kurt W.; Weinstein, John N.; Pommier, Yves; Reinhold, William C.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Spotlight on Molecular Profiling series, we present here new profiling studies of mRNA and microRNA expression for the 60 cell lines of the NCI DTP drug screen (NCI-60) using the 41,000-probe Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray and the 15,000-feature Agilent Human microRNA Microarray V2. The expression levels of ~21,000 genes and 723 human microRNAs were measured. These profiling studies include quadruplicate technical replicates for six and eight cell lines for mRNA and microRNA, respectively, and duplicates for the remaining cell lines. The resulting data sets are freely available and searchable online in our CellMiner database. The result indicates high reproducibility for both platforms and an essential biological similarity across the various cell types. The mRNA and microRNA expression levels were integrated with our previously published 1,429-compound database of anticancer activity obtained from the NCI DTP drug screen. Large blocks of both mRNAs and microRNAs were identified with predominately unidirectional correlations to ~1,300 drugs including 121 drugs with known mechanisms of action. The data sets presented here will facilitate the identification of groups of mRNAs, microRNAs and drugs that potentially affect and interact with one another. PMID:20442302

  1. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

  2. Rep. Delaney Learns about Breast Cancer Research at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Rep. John Delaney (D-Md., 6th District) visited the NCI Campus at Frederick on October 21 to learn more about the research that scientists at NCI at Frederick are doing on breast cancer. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

  3. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute ... were as easy to find as a cigarette? NCI QuitPal is a free, interactive app for iPhone ...

  4. Softball Games Bring NCI and Leidos Biomed Employees Together | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Leidos Biomed employees took to the fields at Nallin Pond for the third annual slow-pitch softball games on August 26. The series attracted 54 employees who were divided into four teams, Red, Blue, Gray, and White, and they were cheered on by about 40 enthusiastic spectators. In the first set of games, the Gray team defeated the Blue team, 15–8, and the White team pulled out a win against the Red team, 17–15. After a brief rest, the two winning teams and the two losing teams faced each other in a second set of games. On Field 1, the “winners” match-up of the Gray and White teams was a nail biter, with a close score throughout the game. Daylight was a factor, however, and the team captains decided to call the game for safety reasons. With a lead of 15 to 13, the Gray team was declared the overall winner.

  5. Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III

    EPA Science Inventory

    This booklet, ETV Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III contains two case studies, addressing verified environmental technologies for decentalized wastewater treatment and converting animal waste to energy. Each case study contains a brief description ...

  6. Shotgun Lipidomic Profiling of the NCI60 Cell Line Panel Using Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Lovrics, Anna; Sessler, Judit; McKenzie, James S; Bodai, Zsolt; Doria, M Luisa; Kucsma, Nora; Szakacs, Gergely; Takats, Zoltan

    2016-08-01

    Rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS) was used for the rapid mass spectrometric profiling of cancer cell lines. Spectral reproducibility was assessed for three different cell lines, and the extent of interclass differences and intraclass variance was found to allow the identification of these cell lines based on the REIMS data. Subsequently, the NCI60 cell line panel was subjected to REIMS analysis, and the resulting data set was investigated for its distinction of individual cell lines and different tissue types of origin. Information content of REIMS spectral profiles of cell lines were found to be similar to those obtained from mammalian tissues although pronounced differences in relative lipid intensity were observed. Ultimately, REIMS was shown to detect changes in lipid content of cell lines due to mycoplasma infection. The data show that REIMS is an attractive means to study cell lines involving minimal sample preparation and analysis times in the range of seconds. PMID:27377867

  7. The Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial: VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. In the United States, 90% of men with prostate cancer are more than age 60 years, diagnosed by early detection with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test, and have disease believed confined to the prostate gland (clinically localized). Common treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer include watchful waiting (WW), surgery to remove the prostate gland (radical prostatectomy), external-beam radiation therapy and interstitial radiation therapy (brachytherapy), and androgen deprivation. Little is known about the relative effectiveness and harms of treatments because of the paucity of randomized controlled trials. The Department of Veterans Affairs/National Cancer Institute/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Cooperative Studies Program Study #407:Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT), initiated in 1994, is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with WW in men with clinically localized prostate cancer. We describe the study rationale, design, recruitment methods, and baseline characteristics of PIVOT enrollees. We provide comparisons with eligible men declining enrollment and men participating in another recently reported randomized trial of radical prostatectomy vs WW conducted in Scandinavia. We screened 13 022 men with prostate cancer at 52 US medical centers for potential enrollment. From these, 5023 met initial age, comorbidity, and disease eligibility criteria, and a total of 731 men agreed to participate and were randomized. The mean age of enrollees was 67 years. Nearly one-third were African American. Approximately 85% reported that they were fully active. The median PSA was 7.8ng/mL (mean 10.2ng/mL). In three-fourths of men, the primary reason for biopsy leading to a diagnosis of prostate cancer was a PSA elevation or rise. Using previously developed tumor risk

  8. NCI Takes Back the Defelice Cup at Ninth Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer After being down by a point in the morning, NCI reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from Leidos Biomedical Research, with a final score of 12 ½ to 11 ½, at the ninth annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament, held Oct. 13. “The tightest matches in the nine-year history of this cup competition resulted in a narrow victory for NCI and allowed NCI to take a 5–4 victory total,” said Denny Dougherty, one of the team captains for Leidos Biomed and a retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick.

  9. Perioperative outcomes after radical cystectomy at NCI-designated centres: Are they any better?

    PubMed Central

    Roghmann, Florian; Ravi, Praful; Hanske, Julian; Meyer, Christian P.; Preston, Mark A.; Noldus, Joachim; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In 1971, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) introduced a network of NCI-designated Cancer Centers (CC), which underwent a comprehensive approval process relying on research, education and prevention activities. In this study, we examine the effect of CC status on perioperative outcomes after radical cystectomy (RC). Methods: Within the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we focused on RC performed from 2006 to 2010. As all recognized centres were residency teaching institutions, we stratified according to teaching and CC-teaching status. We examined the rates of in-hospital mortality, intra- and postoperative complications, prolonged length of hospital stay, as well as blood transfusion. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were further adjusted for confounding factors. Results: Overall, 22 840 RC patients (5451 at non-teaching, 10 857 at residency teaching, 6532 at CC-teaching institutions) were identified. Patients treated at residency teaching and CC-teaching institutions were younger, had less comorbidities, and more likely to have private insurance. In multivariable analyses, patients treated at residency and CC-teaching institutions were less likely to experience postoperative complications (odds ratio [OR] 0.73 and 0.66, respectively) and blood transfusions (OR 0.77 and 0.53, respectively) relative to patients treated at non-teaching institutions. In addition, CC patients were also less likely to experience in-hospital mortality (OR 0.61, all p < 0.001) as compared to non-teaching institutions. Conclusions: On average, patients treated at residency and CC-teaching institutions are less likely to experience unfavourable outcomes after RC. Moreover, patients treated at CC fared better than patients treated at residency teaching institutions. Our findings acknowledge the quality of RC care at accredited centres. PMID:26225174

  10. Virgin Islands Demonstration Library Network Study: Exploring Library Networking in Remote, Disadvantaged Areas. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Henry C.; And Others

    The Virgin Islands Demonstration Library Network Study (VIDLNS) seeks to determine whether the development of either local or regional library networks would be the key to optimal organization of small library collections in isolated areas. This report describes the research and demonstration components of the exploratory phase of the project: (1)…

  11. Transport, metabolism, cytotoxicity and effects of novel taxanes on the cell cycle in MDA-MB-435 and NCI/ADR-RES cells.

    PubMed

    Ehrlichová, Marie; Ojima, Iwao; Chen, Jin; Václavíková, Radka; Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Vobořilová, Jana; Simek, Petr; Horský, Stanislav; Souček, Pavel; Kovář, Jan; Brabec, Marek; Gut, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Resistance of tumours to taxanes causes chemotherapy failure in numerous patients. Resistance is partly due to the low tumour uptake of taxanes and their rapid metabolism. Structural modifications of taxanes can reduce their P-glycoprotein-related efflux or decrease metabolism and consequently increase taxane efficiency. This study compared cytotoxicity and effects of the cell cycle, transport and metabolism of novel taxanes SB-T-1102, SB-T-1103, SB-T-1214 and SB-T-1216, fluorinated SB-T-12851, SB-T-12852, SB-T-12853, SB-T-12854 and IDN5109 with paclitaxel in paclitaxel-sensitive (MDA-MB-435) and paclitaxel-resistant (NCI/ADR-RES) human cancer cells. We have shown before that NCI/ADR-RES cells were 1,000-fold less sensitive to paclitaxel than MDA-MB-435 cells in correspondence to P-glycoprotein overexpression and up to 20-fold lower uptake of the drug in the resistant cells. The uptake of novel taxanes was 1.2 to 3.8 times lower than that of paclitaxel in the MDA-MB-435 cells, but 1.5 to 6.5 times higher in NCI/ADR-RES cells. NCI/ADR-RES cells were correspondingly only 2- to 6.6-fold less sensitive than the MDA-MB-435 cells to novel taxanes. Both cell lines showed minimal metabolism of the novel taxanes which was therefore not responsible for their different sensitivity, the observed differences in their individual efficiency and higher effects than paclitaxel. All novel taxanes caused G(2)/M block of the cell cycle similar to paclitaxel, but lower at concentrations by order of magnitude. Thus, structural modifications of taxanes resulting in their decreased P-glycoprotein-related transport probably caused their higher efficiency than paclitaxel in multidrug-resistant NCI/ADR-RES tumour cells. PMID:22855252

  12. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To Promote Translational Research and Development Opportunities of Nanotechnology-Based Cancer Solutions AGENCY: National Cancer Institute (NCI), Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research (OCNR),...

  13. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  14. NCI and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Sign Statement of Intent

    Cancer.gov

    Today the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Cancer Institute/Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CICAMS) signed a statement of intent to share an interest in fostering collaborative biomedical research in oncology and a common goal

  15. Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

  16. Gardasil® and Cervarix® | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Vaccine for human papilloma virus (HPV) to protect from cancers Key elements of the technology for Gardasil® and Cervarix originated from the HPV research of the laboratory of Drs. Douglas Lowy and John Schiller of the NCI.

  17. National Medal of Technology Awarded to NCI Drs. Lowy and Schiller

    Cancer.gov

    President Obama announced that two NCI scientists would be recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation -- the nation's highest honor for technological achievement. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO)

  18. NCI Launches Proteomics Assay Portal - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Methods, Investigators from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) announced the launch of a proteomics Assay Portal for multiple reaction monitoring-mass

  19. The Eight-Year Study: From Evaluative Research to Demonstration Project, 1930-1940

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    From 1932 to 1940, the Progressive Education Association (PEA) conducted its Eight-Year Study. At first, the study appeared to be a poorly funded comparison of two groups of students in secondary schools. During the last four years, as more financial support became available, the Eight-Year Study became a broadly based demonstration of a wide…

  20. A design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of the viscous barrier technology

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.; Yen, P.; Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Williams, P.; Myer, L.; Pruess, K.

    1996-09-01

    This report is the design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s new subsurface containment technology for waste isolation using a new generation of barrier liquids. The test site is located in central California in a quarry owned by the Los Banos Gravel Company in Los Banos, California, in heterogeneous unsaturated deposits of sand, silt, and -ravel typical of many of the and DOE cleanup sites and particularly analogous to the Hanford site. The coals of the field demonstration are (a) to demonstrate the ability to create a continuous subsurface barrier isolating a medium-scale volume (30 ft long by 30 ft wide by 20 ft deep, i.e. 1/10th to 1/8th the size of a buried tank at the Hanford Reservation) in the subsurface, and (b) to demonstrate the continuity, performance, and integrity of the barrier.

  1. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration: Prephase A Government Point-of-Departure Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, J. A.; Addona, B. M.; Gwaltney, D. A.; Holt, K. A.; Hopkins, R. C.; Matis, J. A.; McRight, P. S.; Popp, C. G.; Sutherlin, S. G.; Thomas, H. D.; Baysinger, M. F.; Maples, C. D.; Capizzo, P. D.; Fabisinski, L. L.; Hornsby, L. S.; Percy, T. K.; Thomas, S. D.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to define a point-of-departure prephase A mission concept for the cryogenic propellant storage and transfer technology demonstration mission to be conducted by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT). The mission concept includes identification of the cryogenic propellant management technologies to be demonstrated, definition of a representative mission timeline, and definition of a viable flight system design concept. The resulting mission concept will serve as a point of departure for evaluating alternative mission concepts and synthesizing the results of industry- defined mission concepts developed under the OCT contracted studies

  2. Case Study for the ARRA-funded GSHP Demonstration at University at Albany

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobing; Malhotra, Mini; Xiong, Zeyu

    2015-03-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects—a distributed GSHP system at a new 500-bed apartment-style student residence hall at the University at Albany. This case study is based on the analysis of detailed design documents, measured performance data, published catalog data of heat pump equipment, and actual construction costs. Simulations with a calibrated computer model are performed for both the demonstrated GSHP system and a baseline heating, ventilation, and airconditioning (HVAC) system to determine the energy savings and other related benefits achieved by the GSHP system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GSHP system, as well as the pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the demonstrated GSHP system compared with the baseline HVAC system. This case study also identifies opportunities for improving the operational efficiency of the demonstrated GSHP system.

  3. Fire vs. Metal: A Laboratory Study Demonstrating Microbial Responses to Soil Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromberger, Mary E.

    2005-01-01

    Incubation studies are traditionally used in soil microbiology laboratory classes to demonstrate microbial respiration and N mineralization-immobilization processes. Sometimes these exercises are done to calculate a N balance in N fertilizer-amended soils. However, examining microbial responses to environmental perturbations would appeal to soil…

  4. THE ENGLISH PROGRAM OF THE USOE CURRICULUM STUDY AND DEMONSTRATION CENTER MATERIALS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    AFTER FIVE YEARS OF FEDERALLY-SUPPORTED CURRICULUM RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, 14 STUDY CENTERS AND FIVE DEMONSTRATION CENTERS ARE NOW MAKING THE RESULTS OF THEIR WORK AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC. THIS PAMPHLET LISTS TITLES OF REPORTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS PREPARED BY THE FOLLOWING CENTERS--(1) CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY, (2) TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA…

  5. 1993 FIELD STUDY/DEMONSTRATION OF AUTOMATED GAS CHROMATOGRAPH IN CONNECTICUT AND OTHER LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to install, test and demonstrate two automated gas chromatographic (GC) systems to state and regional EPA groups. he two GC systems required no liquid cryogen for operational purposes. he Dynatherm/Hewlett Packard GC system was designed for the m...

  6. A Study of Library Cooperatives, Networks and Demonstration Projects. Final Report. Volume I: Findings and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Ruth; And Others

    This study evaluates the impact and effectiveness of the Library Research and Demonstration Program of the Higher Education Act (HEA II-B), and Title III, Interlibrary Cooperation, of the Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA III), USOE administered grant programs to aid in developing and improving library and information services. It…

  7. Sensitivity of NCI-H292 human lung mucoepidermoid cells for respiratory and other human viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C; Castells, E; Banks, G G; Bryan, J A; McEwen, C T

    1993-01-01

    NCI-H292 mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells from human lungs were shown in an earlier report to be a fully adequate substitute for primary rhesus monkey kidney (MK) cells for the isolation and propagation of the human paramyxoviruses. Although sensitivity for ortho- and paramyxoviruses was the principal reason for using MK cells, the cells were also sensitive to many other viruses, which constituted another important value of MK cells. That MK cells supported the initial isolation and growth of so many respiratory viruses made it a mandatory cell type for any clinical laboratory. We therefore felt it was imperative to evaluate the virus spectrum of NCI-H292 cells, which are being used as a substitute for MK cells in many laboratories. In the present report, we show that NCI-H292 cells are sensitive for vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, adenoviruses, BK polyomavirus, reoviruses, measles virus, respiratory syncytial virus, some strains of influenza virus type A, most enteroviruses, and rhinoviruses, in addition to the parainfluenza and mumps viruses originally reported. Furthermore, these viruses replicate in NCI-H292 cells to the same virus and antigen titers and at the same speed of replication as they do in their usually preferred cells. The NCI-H292 cells are therefore an excellent substitute for MK cells in terms of laboratory safety, ease of availability, paramyxovirus isolation, and broad virus spectrum but cannot substitute for MK cells for the isolation of influenza viruses. Images PMID:8314992

  8. Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the headspace of NCI-H1666 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sponring, Andreas; Filipiak, Wojciech; Ager, Clemens; Schubert, Jochen; Miekisch, Wolfram; Amann, Anton; Troppmair, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) provides an elegant approach for cancer screening and disease monitoring, whose use is currently limited by a lack of validated cancer-derived metabolites, which may serve as biomarkers. The aim of the experiments presented here was to investigate the release and consumption of VOCs from the non small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H1666, which was originally derived from a bronchoalveolar carcinoma.Following detachment by trypsinization suspended cells were incubated in a sealed fermenter for 21 hours. 200 ml of headspace from the cell culture were sampled, diluted with dry, highly purified air and preconcentrated by adsorption on three different solid sorbents with increasing adsorption strength. VOC-analysis was performed by thermodesorption-gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). In contrast to our previous studies experiments with NCI-H1666 cells only confirmed the consumption of several aldehydes, n-butyl acetate and the ethers methyl tert-butyl ether and ethyl tert-butyl ether, but no unequivocal release of VOCs was observed. Together with our previously published work these data indicate that the consumption of certain VOCs is commonly observed while their release shows cell line-restricted patterns, whose underlying causes are unknown. PMID:21263191

  9. Cooperativity of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in microsolvated DMSO and DMF clusters: a DFT, AIM, and NCI analysis.

    PubMed

    Venkataramanan, Natarajan Sathiyamoorthy

    2016-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to study the hydrogen-bonding in the DMSO-water and DMF-water complexes. Quantitative molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and atoms-in-molecules (AIM) analysis are applied to quantify the relative complexation of DMSO and DMF with water molecules. The interaction energy of DMSO with water molecules was higher than in DMF-water complexes. The existence of cooperativity effect helps in the strong complex formation. A linear dependence was observed between the hydrogen bond energies EHB, and the total electron densities in the BCP's of microsolvated complexes which supports the existence of cooperativity effect for the complexation process. Due to the stronger DMSO/DMF and water interaction, the water molecules in the formed complexes have a different structure than the isolated water clusters. NCI analysis shows that the steric area is more pronounced in DMF-water complex than the DMSO-water complex which accounts for the low stability of DMF-water complexes compared to the DMSO-water complex. Graphical abstract NCI analysis shows that the steric area is more pronounced in DMF-water complex than the DMSO-water complex which accounts for the low stability of DMF-water complexes compared to the DMSO-water complex. PMID:27278055

  10. Complex modes of bonding: NCI/ELI-D vs. DORI surface analyses of hapticities and hydrogen-hydrogen contacts in zincocene related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebs, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Atoms-in-molecules (AIM) topology is prone to wrong/ambiguous bond assignments (lacking bond critical points) in areas of low electron densities (ED), e.g. for hydrogen-hydrogen contacts, and flat density gradients, e.g. for metal-ring contacts (hapticities), both in experimental and computed ED. Within this study, two ED-derived bonding indicators are applied to a set of zincocene related compounds: non-covalent interactions (NCI) surfaces are combined with electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) surfaces and compared to density overlap regions indicator (DORI) surfaces. Both methods (NCI/ELI-D, DORI) result in spatial deconvolution of covalent and non-covalent interactions and unravel weak interactions not observed in the AIM topology.

  11. Analysis of hydrogen-bond interaction potentials from the electron density: Integration of NCI regions

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-García, Julia; Yang, Weitao; Johnson, Erin R.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are of crucial relevance to many problems in chemistry biology and materials science. The recently-developed NCI (Non-Covalent Interactions) index enables real-space visualization of both attractive (van der Waals and hydrogen-bonding) and repulsive (steric) interactions based on properties of the electron density It is thus an optimal index to describe the interplay of stabilizing and de-stabilizing contributions that determine stable minima on hydrogen-bonding potential-energy surfaces (PESs). In the framework of density-functional theory energetics are completely determined by the electron density Consequently NCI will be shown to allow quantitative treatment of hydrogen-bond energetics. The evolution of NCI regions along a PES follows a well-behaved pattern which, upon integration of the electron density is capable of mimicking conventional hydrogen-bond interatomic potentials. PMID:21786796

  12. Case study for ARRA-funded ground-source heat pump (GSHP) demonstration at Oakland University

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Piljae; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-09-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, a ground-source variable refrigerant flow (GS-VRF) system installed at the Human Health Building at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, maintenance records, construction costs, and simulations of the energy consumption of conventional central heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems providing the same level of space conditioning as the demonstrated GS-VRF system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GS-VRF system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the GS-VRF system compared with conventional HVAC systems. This case study also identified opportunities for reducing uncertainties in the performance evaluation, improving the operational efficiency, and reducing the installed cost of similar GSHP systems in the future.

  13. NIH and NCI grant-related changes during fiscal years 2014 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Rosemary S. L.

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 fiscal year (FY) continued to be a challenging one for all federal agencies despite the many Congressional strategies proposed to address the U.S. budget deficit. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 passed by the House and Senate in December 2013 approved a two-year spending bill which cancelled the FY2014 and FY2015 required sequestration cuts (i.e., 4-5% National Institute of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI) budget reduction initiated on March 1, 2013), but extended the sequestration period through FY2023. This bill passage helped minimize any further budget reductions and resulted in a final FY2014 NIH budget of 29.9 billion and a NCI budget of 4.9 billion. Both NIH and NCI worked hard to maintain awarding the same number of NIH/NCI investigator-initiated R01 and exploratory R21 grants funded in FY2014 and similar to the level seen in FY2013 and previous years (see Tables 1 and 2). Since Congress only recently passed the 2015 spending bill in December 16, 2014, the final NIH and NCI budget appropriations for FY2015 remains unknown at this time and most likely will be similar to the FY2014 budget level. The NCI overall success and funding rates for unsolicited investigator-initiated R01 applications remained at 15%, while the success rate for exploratory R21 applications was 12% in FY2014 with similar rates seen in FY2013 (see Tables 1 and 2). The success rate for biomedical research applications in the Photodynamic Therapy and laser research field will be provided for the past few years. NIH provides numerous resources to help inform the extramural biomedical research community of new and current grant applicants about new grant policy changes and the grant submission and review processes.

  14. Extracellular matrix components induce endocrine differentiation in vitro in NCI-H716 cells.

    PubMed Central

    de Bruïne, A. P.; Dinjens, W. N.; van der Linden, E. P.; Pijls, M. M.; Moerkerk, P. T.; Bosman, F. T.

    1993-01-01

    Endocrine cells occur in +/- 30% of colorectal adenocarcinomas. The significance of this phenomenon in terms of tumor behavior is still controversial. Endocrine differentiation in colorectal cancer cell lines is almost confined to tumor xenografts in vivo, suggesting that endocrine differentiation might be regulated by epithelial-stromal interactions. This hypothesis was studied in the cecal adenocarcinoma-derived cell line NCI-H716 by comparing the expression of chromogranin A protein and messenger RNA in vivo and in vitro and by attempts to induce differentiation in vitro. We found that chromogranin A expression, which was strongest in vivo, could be significantly enhanced in vitro by culturing tumor cells in the presence of native extracellular matrix, on fibroblast feeder layers, and in a defined medium with basic fibroblast growth factor. The results suggest that the extracellular matrix induces endocrine differentiation through factors (e.g., basic fibroblast-growth factor) that may be produced by stromal cells and after secretion bind to the extracellular matrix. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8456938

  15. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  16. EHS and FME Lend Their Expertise to NCI Campus Refurbishment Project | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    In October 2015, the NCI executive officer and the director of NCI’s Office of Space and Facilities Management (OSFM) announced a wide-ranging refurbishment plan for NCI at Frederick. Since then, a project team comprising members from the Office of Scientific Operations, the Management Operations Support Branch, OSFM, the Center for Cancer Research, the Environment, Health, and Safety (EHS) directorate, and the Facilities Maintenance and Engineering (FME) directorate have met regularly with the laboratory groups affected by the refurbishment plan. Read more...

  17. Pharmacodynamic properties of faropenem demonstrated by studies of time-kill kinetics and postantibiotic effect.

    PubMed

    Boswell, F J; Andrews, J M; Wise, R

    1997-03-01

    The pharmacodynamic properties of faropenem, a new oral penem antibiotic, were investigated by studying time-kill kinetics and postantibiotic effect. Time-kill kinetics were employed against strains of Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Streptococcus pyogenes. The postantibiotic effects of faropenem were studied using strains of E. coli, S. aureus, H. influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The time-kill kinetic data demonstrated that faropenem has bactericidal activity. Faropenem exhibited a significant postantibiotic effect against all strains except H. influenzae. PMID:9096193

  18. Tethered elevator and platforms as space station facilities: Systems studies and demonstrative experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Several key concepts of the science and applications tethered platforms were studied. Some conclusions reached are herein listed. Tether elevator and platform could improve the space station scientific and applicative capabilities. The space elevator presents unique characteristics as microgravity facility and as a tethered platform servicing vehicle. Pointing platforms could represent a new kind of observation facility for large class of payloads. The dynamical, control and technological complexity of these concepts advised demonstrative experiments. The on-going tethered satellite system offers the opportunity to perform such experiments. And feasibility studies are in progress.

  19. Dynamic modeling and validation of a lignocellulosic enzymatic hydrolysis process--a demonstration scale study.

    PubMed

    Prunescu, Remus Mihail; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-12-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis process is one of the key steps in second generation biofuel production. After being thermally pretreated, the lignocellulosic material is liquefied by enzymes prior to fermentation. The scope of this paper is to evaluate a dynamic model of the hydrolysis process on a demonstration scale reactor. The following novel features are included: the application of the Convection-Diffusion-Reaction equation to a hydrolysis reactor to assess transport and mixing effects; the extension of a competitive kinetic model with enzymatic pH dependency and hemicellulose hydrolysis; a comprehensive pH model; and viscosity estimations during the course of reaction. The model is evaluated against real data extracted from a demonstration scale biorefinery throughout several days of operation. All measurements are within predictions uncertainty and, therefore, the model constitutes a valuable tool to support process optimization, performance monitoring, diagnosis and process control at full-scale studies. PMID:24212094

  20. Control del cáncer y salud mundial: noticia del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI)

    Cancer.gov

    En combinación con una reunión de alto nivel de las Naciones Unidas sobre enfermedades no transmisibles en países en vías de desarrollo, el doctor Harold Varmus, director del NCI, y el doctor Ted L. Trimble, del NCI, han publicado un comentario en Science

  1. 78 FR 69426 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: NIH NCI Central Institutional Review Board...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... more information on the proposed project contact: CAPT Michael Montello, Pharm. D., MBA, Cancer Therapy... National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health, may not conduct or sponsor, and the.../31/2014, Revision, National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH). Need and...

  2. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-07-07

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. The EM heating process for soil decontamination is based on volumetric heating technologies developed during the `70s for the recovery of fuels from shale and tar sands by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) under a co-operative program with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional modifications of the technology developed during the mid `80s are currently used for the production of heavy oil and waste treatment. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 to 95 C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern.

  3. Feasibility study for a demonstration plant for liquefaction and coprocessing of waste plastics and tires

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shelley, M.

    1998-04-01

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste polymers and the coprocessing of waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was carried out by a committee of participants from five universities, the US DOE Federal Energy Technology Center, and Burns & Roe Corporation. The study included an assessment of current recycling practices, a review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability. A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and a preliminary economic analysis for various feedstock mixes was carried out. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 8% to 16% as tipping fees for waste plastic and tires increased over a range comparable to that existing in the US. A number of additional feedstock scenarios that were both more and less profitable were also considered and are briefly discussed.

  4. Feasibility study for a demonstration plant for liquefaction and coprocessing of waste plastics and tires

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shelley, M.; El-Halwagi, M.; Schindler, H.; Eastman, M.

    1998-07-01

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste polymers and the coprocessing of waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was carried out by a committee of participants from five universities, the US DOE Federal Energy Technology Center, and Burns and Roe Corporation. The study included an assessment of current recycling practices, a review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability. A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and a preliminary economic analysis for various feedstock mixes was carried out. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 200 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 8% to 16% as tipping fees for waste plastic and tires increased over a range comparable to that existing in the US. A number of additional feedstock scenarios that were both more and less profitable were also considered and are briefly discussed.

  5. Initial Development and Pilot Study Design of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations for ASTRO 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwortz, Andria C.; French, D. A; Gutierrez, Joseph V; Sanchez, Richard L; Slater, Timothy F.; Tatge, Coty

    2014-06-01

    Interactive lecture demonstrations (ILDs) have repeatedly shown to be effective tools for improving student achievement in the context of learning physics. As a first step toward systematic development of interactive lecture demonstrations in ASTRO 101, the introductory astronomy survey course, a systematic review of education research, describing educational computer simulations (ECSs) reveals that initial development requires a targeted study of how ASTRO 101 students respond to ECSs in the non-science majoring undergraduate lecture setting. In this project we have adopted the process by which ILDs were designed, pilot-tested, and successfully implemented in the context of physics teaching (Sokoloff & Thornton, 1997; Sokoloff & Thornton, 2004). We have designed the initial pilot-test set of ASTRO 101 ILD instructional materials relying heavily on ECSs. Both an instructor’s manual and a preliminary classroom-ready student workbook have been developed, and we are implementing a pilot study to explore their effectiveness in communicating scientific content, and the extent to which they might enhance students’ knowledge of and perception about astronomy and science in general. The study design uses a pre-/post-test quasi-experimental study design measuring students’ normalized gain scores, calculated as per Hake (1998) and Prather (2009), using a slightly modified version of S. Slater’s (2011) Test Of Astronomy STandards TOAST combined with other instruments. The results of this initial study will guide the iterative development of ASTRO 101 ILDs that are intended to both be effective at enhancing student achievement and easy for instructors to successfully implement.

  6. (Update) HIV Conference to Be Held on February 25 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program (HIV DRP), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), will hold a conference on “Host Factors and Cofactors in HIV Infection” at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) campus in Frederick, Md., on Feb. 25, from 1:00 to 5:35 p.m.

  7. HIV Conference to Be Held on October 21 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program Conference on “Virus Structure: Putting the Pieces Together” will be held at NCI at Frederick on October 21, 2014, from 1:00 to 5:45 p.m. in the Conference Center auditorium, Building 549.

  8. 76 FR 14034 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ...In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval.......

  9. Se lanza Red Nacional de Estudios Clínicos del NCI

    Cancer.gov

    El Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI) puso en marcha una nueva red de investigación de estudios clínicos con el objetivo de mejorar el tratamiento de más de 1,6 millones de estadounidenses que reciben un diagnóstico de cáncer cada año.

  10. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), presented the awards.

  11. Reducing Friction: An Update on the NCIP Open Development Initiative - NCI BioMedical Informatics Blog

    Cancer.gov

    NCIP has migrated 132 repositories from the NCI subversion repository to our public NCIP GitHub channel with the goal of facilitating third party contributions to the existing code base. Within the GitHub environment, we are advocating use of the GitHub “fork and pull” model.

  12. Treatment of Prostate Cancer using Anti-androgen Small Molecules | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop and commercialize a new class of small molecules for the treatment of prostate cancer. General information on co-development research collaborations, can be found on our web site (http://ttc.nci.nih.gov/forms).

  13. 75 FR 4827 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... while CTRP is not directly related to the conduct of a clinical trial, the NCI hopes to use the... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Clinical Trials... purpose and safety of clinical trials conducted outside of the United States. An e-mail response was...

  14. 76 FR 22714 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Health Information National Trends Survey 4 (HINTS 4) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ...In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval.......

  15. 78 FR 53763 - Proposed Collection; 60-day Comment Request Cancer Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ...In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Written......

  16. [Exploration and demonstration study on drug combination from clinical real world].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan-ming; Wang, Lian-xin; Wang, Yong-yan

    2014-09-01

    Drug combination is extensive in the clinical real world,which is an important part and the inherent requirements of the post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The key issues and technology include multi-domain and multi-disciplinary such as the rationality, efficacy and safety evaluation of combination drug starting from clinical real world, study on component in vivo and mechanism of combination drug, the risk/benefit assessment and cost-benefit evaluation of combination drug and so on. The topic has been studied as clinical demonstration on combination therapy of variety of diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, insomnia, depression, hepatitis, herpes zoster, psoriasis and ectopic pregnancy. Meanwhile, multi-disciplinary dynamic innovation alliance of clinical drug combination has been presented, which can promote the academic development and improving service ability and level of TCM. PMID:25532371

  17. A study of hazardous air pollutants at the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCD Program is a joint effort between government and industry to develop a new generation of coal utilization processes. In 1986, the Ohio Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power (AEP), was awarded cofunding through the CCT program for the Tidd Pressure Fluidized Bed Combustor (PFBC) Demonstration Plant located in Brilliant, Ohio. The Tidd PFBC unit began operation in 1990 and was later selected as a test site for an advanced particle filtration (APF) system designed for hot gas particulate removal. The APF system was sponsored by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) through their Hot Gas Cleanup Research and Development Program. A complementary goal of the DOE CCT and METC R&D programs has always been to demonstrate the environmental acceptability of these emerging technologies. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) have focused that commitment toward evaluating the fate of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) associated with advanced coal-based and hot gas cleanup technologies. Radian Corporation was contacted by AEP to perform this assessment of HAPs at the Tidd PFBC demonstration plant. The objective of this study is to assess the major input, process, and emission streams at Plant Tidd for the HAPs identified in Title III of the CAAA. Four flue gas stream locations were tested: ESP inlet, ESP outlet, APF inlet, and APF outlet. Other process streams sampled were raw coal, coal paste, sorbent, bed ash, cyclone ash, individual ESP hopper ash, APF ash, and service water. Samples were analyzed for trace elements, minor and major elements, anions, volatile organic compounds, dioxin/furan compounds, ammonia, cyanide, formaldehyde, and semivolatile organic compounds. The particle size distribution in the ESP inlet and outlet gas streams and collected ash from individual ESP hoppers was also determined.

  18. The Quality Improvement Demonstration Study: An example of evidence-based policy-making in practice

    PubMed Central

    Shimkhada, Riti; Peabody, John W; Quimbo, Stella A; Solon, Orville

    2008-01-01

    Background Randomized trials have long been the gold-standard for evaluating clinical practice. There is growing recognition that rigorous studies are similarly needed to assess the effects of policy. However, these studies are rarely conducted. We report on the Quality Improvement Demonstration Study (QIDS), an example of a large randomized policy experiment, introduced and conducted in a scientific manner to evaluate the impact of large-scale governmental policy interventions. Methods In 1999 the Philippine government proposed sweeping reforms in the National Health Sector Reform Agenda. We recognized the unique opportunity to conduct a social experiment. Our ongoing goal has been to generate results that inform health policy. Early on we concentrated on developing a multi-institutional collaborative effort. The QIDS team then developed hypotheses that specifically evaluated the impact of two policy reforms on both the delivery of care and long-term health status in children. We formed an experimental design by randomizing matched blocks of three communities into one of the two policy interventions plus a control group. Based on the reform agenda, one arm of the experiment provided expanded insurance coverage for children; the other introduced performance-based payments to hospitals and physicians. Data were collected in household, hospital-based patient exit, and facility surveys, as well as clinical vignettes, which were used to assess physician practice. Delivery of services and health status were evaluated at baseline and after the interventions were put in place using difference-in-difference estimation. Results We found and addressed numerous challenges conducting this study, namely: formalizing the experimental design using the existing health infrastructure; securing funding to do research coincident with the policy reforms; recognizing biases and designing the study to account for these; putting in place a broad data collection effort to account for

  19. Non-physics peer demonstrators in undergraduate laboratories: a study of students’ perceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Michael; Kirkup, Les

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory demonstrators play a crucial role in facilitating students’ learning in physics subjects. Inspired by the success of peer-led activities, we introduced peer demonstrators to support student learning in first-year physics subjects that enrol students not intending to major in physics. Surveys were administered to 1700 students over 4 years in four subjects to examine student perceptions of how demonstrators assisted them in the laboratory. Scores awarded to peer demonstrators by students were no lower than those awarded to demonstrators traditionally employed in the first year physics laboratory. These latter demonstrators were drawn mainly from the ranks of physics research students. The findings validate the recruitment of peer demonstrators and will be used to inform the recruitment and support programmes for laboratory demonstrators.

  20. The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES): A UAV-Based Science Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Croskey, C. L.; Desch, M. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Houser, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Mach, D. M.; Mitchell, J. D.; Stoneburner, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)- based project that investigated thunderstorms in the vicinity of the Florida Everglades in August 2002. ACES was conducted to investigate storm electrical activity and its relationship to storm morphology, and to validate satellite-based lightning measurements. In addition, as part of the NASA sponsored UAV-based science demonstration program, this project provided a scientifically useful demonstration of the utility and promise of UAV platforms for Earth science and applications observations. ACES employed the Altus II aircraft, built by General Atomics - Aeronautical Systems, Inc. Key science objectives simultaneously addressed by ACES are to: (1) investigate lightning-storm relationships, (2) study storm electrical budgets, and provide Lightning Imaging Sensor validation. The ACES payload included electrical, magnetic, and optical sensors to remotely characterize the lightning activity and the electrical environment within and around thunderstorms. ACES contributed important electrical and optical measurements not available from other sources. Also, the high altitude vantage point of the UAV observing platform (up to 55,000 feet) provided cloud-top perspective. By taking advantage of its slow flight speed (70 to 100 knots), long endurance, and high altitude flight, the Altus was flown near, and when possible, over (but never into) thunderstorms for long periods of time that allowed investigations to be conducted over entire storm life cycles. An innovative real time weather system was used to identify and vector the aircraft to selected thunderstorms and safely fly around these storms, while, at the same time monitor the weather near our base of operations. In addition, concurrent ground-based observations that included radar (Miami and Key West WSRBD, NASA NPOL), satellite imagery, and lightning (NALDN and Los Alamos EDOT) enable the UAV measurements to be more completely

  1. Computational analysis of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric steroid profiling in NCI H295R cells following angiotensin II, forskolin and abiraterone treatment.

    PubMed

    Mangelis, Anastasios; Dieterich, Peter; Peitzsch, Mirko; Richter, Susan; Jühlen, Ramona; Hübner, Angela; Willenberg, Holger S; Deussen, Andreas; Lenders, Jacques W M; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal steroid hormones, which regulate a plethora of physiological functions, are produced via tightly controlled pathways. Investigations of these pathways, based on experimental data, can be facilitated by computational modeling for calculations of metabolic rate alterations. We therefore used a model system, based on mass balance and mass reaction equations, to kinetically evaluate adrenal steroidogenesis in human adrenal cortex-derived NCI H295R cells. For this purpose a panel of 10 steroids was measured by liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometry. Time-dependent changes in cell incubate concentrations of steroids - including cortisol, aldosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and their precursors - were measured after incubation with angiotensin II, forskolin and abiraterone. Model parameters were estimated based on experimental data using weighted least square fitting. Time-dependent angiotensin II- and forskolin-induced changes were observed for incubate concentrations of precursor steroids with peaks that preceded maximal increases in aldosterone and cortisol. Inhibition of 17-alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase with abiraterone resulted in increases in upstream precursor steroids and decreases in downstream products. Derived model parameters, including rate constants of enzymatic processes, appropriately quantified observed and expected changes in metabolic pathways at multiple conversion steps. Our data demonstrate limitations of single time point measurements and the importance of assessing pathway dynamics in studies of adrenal cortical cell line steroidogenesis. Our analysis provides a framework for evaluation of steroidogenesis in adrenal cortical cell culture systems and demonstrates that computational modeling-derived estimates of kinetic parameters are an effective tool for describing perturbations in associated metabolic pathways. PMID:26435452

  2. Baca geothermal demonstration project baseline ecosystem studies of cooling tower emission effects

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, P.; Osterling, R.; Price, D.; Westermeier, J.

    1981-03-01

    Results of baseline studies for boron, arsenic, mercury, and fluorine in vegetation and soil near the Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant are provided for the 1980 sampling season. Preliminary results of visual vegetation assessments and population density studies of soil invertebrate fauna are also provided. Foliage samples were collected for chemical analysis on a total of 17 plots on 5 transects. Two to five plant species were sampled at each plot. Samples were collected in June-July and September. Soil samples were collected at each plot during September. Visual vegetation inspections were conducted along each transect. Eighty-eight soil samples were collected for soil invertebrate studies. Boron, arsenic, mercury, and fluorine levels in vegetation were within normal range for natural vegetation and crops. Concentrations of soil arsenic and mercury were comparable to foliage concentrations. Boron concentrations were lower in soil than in foliage, whereas soil fluorine concentrations were considerably higher than foliage concentrations. With the exception of heavy insect infestations in June-July, no vegetation abnormalities were noted. Preliminary soil invertebrate analysis indicated an overall arthropod density of approximately 100,000/m/sup 2/ which appears within the normal range encountered in forest and meadow soil.

  3. Bioremediation demonstration on Kwajalein Island: Site characterization and on-site biotreatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L.; Korte, N.E.; Pickering, D.A. ); Phelps, T.J. )

    1991-09-01

    An environmental study was conducted during February 1991 on Kwajalein Island, a US Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Base in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). This study was undertaken for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) acting in behalf of USAKA. The purpose of the study was to determine if selected locations for new construction on Kwajalein Island were contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons as suspected and, if so, whether bioremediation appeared to be a feasible technology for environmental restoration. Two different sites were evaluated: (1) the site planned freshwater production facility and (2) a site adjacent to an aboveground diesel fuel storage tank. Within the proposed construction zone for the freshwater production facility (a.k.a desalination plant), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) where either absent or at low levels. Characterization data for another potential construction site adjacent to an aboveground diesel fuel storage tank southeast of the old diesel power plant revealed high concentrations of diesel fuel in the soil and groundwater beneath the site. Results of this investigation indicate that there are petroleum-contaminated soils on Kwajalein Island and bioremediation appears to be a viable environmental restoration technique. Further experimentation and field demonstration are required to determine the design and operating conditions that provide for optimum biodegradation and restoration of the petroleum-contaminated soils. 17 refs., 7 figs., 26 figs.

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the following chemistry lecture demonstrations and experiments: (1) a versatile kinetic demonstration; (2) the Bakelite Demonstration; (3) applying Beer's law; and (4) entropy calculations. (HM)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations which are intended for chemistry college students. These demonstrations are: (1) enhancement of concentration quenching by micelles; and (2) the thermite lecture demonstration. (HM)

  7. Agricultural Health Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts Training Cancer Training at NCI Funding for ... Closeout NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grant Management Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small ...

  8. RCRA permit modifications and the functional equivalency demonstration: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Kinker, J.; Lyon, W.; Carnes, R.; Loehr, C.; Elsberry, K.; Garcia, P.

    1996-05-01

    Hazardous waste operating permits issued under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) often impose requirements, typically by reference to the original permit application, that specific components and equipment be used. Consequently, changing these items, even for the purpose of routine maintenance, may first require that the owner/operator request a potentially time-consuming and costly permit modification. However, the owner/operator may demonstrate that a modification is not required because the planned changes are functionally equivalent, as defined by RCRA, to the original specifications embodied by the permit. The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is scheduled for maintenance and improvements that involve replacement of components. The incinerator`s carbon adsorption unit/high efficiency particulate air filtration system, in particular, was redesigned to improve reliability and minimize maintenance. A study was performed to determine whether the redesigned unit would qualify as functionally equivalent to the original component. in performing this study, the following steps were taken: (a) the key performance factors were identified; (b) performance data describing the existing unit were obtained; (c) performance of both the existing and redesigned units was simulated; and (d) the performance data were compared to ascertain whether the components could qualify as functionally equivalent.

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two chemistry demonstrations including a demonstration of chemical inhibition and "The Rayleigh Fountain" which demonstrates the polarity of the water molecule. Provides instructions and explanations for each demonstration. (CW)

  11. Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) Rendezvous Proximity Operations Design and Trade Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesbach, J.; Westphal, J. J.; Roscoe, C.; Hawes, D. R.; Carrico, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) program is to demonstrate rendezvous proximity operations (RPO), formation flying, and docking with a pair of 3U CubeSats. The program is sponsored by NASA Ames via the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) in support of its Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP). The goal of the mission is to demonstrate complex RPO and docking operations with a pair of low-cost 3U CubeSat satellites using passive navigation sensors. The program encompasses the entire system evolution including system design, acquisition, satellite construction, launch, mission operations, and final disposal. The satellite is scheduled for launch in Fall 2015 with a 1-year mission lifetime. This paper provides a brief mission overview but will then focus on the current design and driving trade study results for the RPO mission specific processor and relevant ground software. The current design involves multiple on-board processors, each specifically tasked with providing mission critical capabilities. These capabilities range from attitude determination and control to image processing. The RPO system processor is responsible for absolute and relative navigation, maneuver planning, attitude commanding, and abort monitoring for mission safety. A low power processor running a Linux operating system has been selected for implementation. Navigation is one of the RPO processor's key tasks. This entails processing data obtained from the on-board GPS unit as well as the on-board imaging sensors. To do this, Kalman filters will be hosted on the processor to ingest and process measurements for maintenance of position and velocity estimates with associated uncertainties. While each satellite carries a GPS unit, it will be used sparsely to conserve power. As such, absolute navigation will mainly consist of propagating past known states, and relative navigation will be considered to be of greater importance. For relative observations

  12. Competencies Demonstrated by Municipal Employees during Adaptation to Climate Change: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruneau, Diane; Kerry, Jackie; Blain, Sylvie; Evichnevetski, Evgueni; Deguire, Paul; Barbier, Pierre-Yves; Freiman, Viktor; Therrien, Jimmy; Langis, Joanne; Lang, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Since coastal communities are already subjected to the impacts of climate change, adaptation has become a necessity. This article presents competencies demonstrated by Canadian municipal employees during an adaptation process to sea level rise. To adapt, the participants demonstrated the following competencies: problem solving (highlighting…

  13. Study and Development of a Sub-Orbital Re-Entry Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savino, R.

    The Italian and European Space Agencies are supporting a research programme, developed in Campania region by a cluster of industries, research institutes and universities, on a low-cost re-entry capsule, able to return payloads from the ISS to Earth and/or to perform short-duration scientific missions in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The ballistic capsule is characterized by a deployable, disposable "umbrella-like" heat shield that allows relatively small dimensions at launch and a sufficient exposed surface area in re-entry conditions, reducing the ballistic coefficient and leading to acceptable heat fluxes, mechanical loads and final descent velocity. ESA is supporting a preliminary study to develop a flight demonstrator of the capsule to be embarked as a secondary payload onboard a sub-orbital sounding rocket. The deployable thermal protection system concept may be applied to future science and robotic exploration mission requiring planetary entry and, possibly also to missions in the framework of Human Space flight, requiring planetary entry or re-entry. The technology offers also an interesting potential for aerobraking, aerocapture and for de-orbiting. This paper summarizes the results of these activities, which are being more and more refined as the work proceeds, including the definition and analysis of the mission scenario, the aerodynamic, aerothermodynamic, mechanical and structural analyses and the technical definition of avionics, instrumentation and main subsystems.

  14. Quantitative and empirical demonstration of the Matthew effect in a study of career longevity

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Alexander M.; Jung, Woo-Sung; Yang, Jae-Suk; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-01-01

    The Matthew effect refers to the adage written some two-thousand years ago in the Gospel of St. Matthew: “For to all those who have, more will be given.” Even two millennia later, this idiom is used by sociologists to qualitatively describe the dynamics of individual progress and the interplay between status and reward. Quantitative studies of professional careers are traditionally limited by the difficulty in measuring progress and the lack of data on individual careers. However, in some professions, there are well-defined metrics that quantify career longevity, success, and prowess, which together contribute to the overall success rating for an individual employee. Here we demonstrate testable evidence of the age-old Matthew “rich get richer” effect, wherein the longevity and past success of an individual lead to a cumulative advantage in further developing his or her career. We develop an exactly solvable stochastic career progress model that quantitatively incorporates the Matthew effect and validate our model predictions for several competitive professions. We test our model on the careers of 400,000 scientists using data from six high-impact journals and further confirm our findings by testing the model on the careers of more than 20,000 athletes in four sports leagues. Our model highlights the importance of early career development, showing that many careers are stunted by the relative disadvantage associated with inexperience. PMID:21173276

  15. Design of the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Blaine, Rachel E.; Davison, Kirsten K.; Gortmaker, Steven; Anand, Shikha; Falbe, Jennifer; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Perkins, Meghan; Giles, Catherine; Criss, Shaniece; Colchamiro, Rachel; Woo Baidal, Jennifer; Land, Thomas; Smith, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Childhood obesity is highly prevalent, is associated with both short- and long-term adverse outcomes, disproportionately affects racial/ethnic minority and economically deprived children, and represents a major threat to public health. Among the most promising approaches for its prevention and management are multilevel, multisector strategies. Methods/Design: The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) Study was a comprehensive, systematic intervention to prevent and reduce childhood obesity among low-income children ages 2–12 years in two selected cities in Massachusetts. Building on the Obesity Chronic Care Model, MA-CORD expanded a state public health department community-level obesity prevention initiative that incorporated evidence-based interventions in primary healthcare, the Women, Infants, and Children program, early care and education, schools/afterschool programs, as well as community-wide programs to improve food, beverage, physical activity (PA), and messaging environments. The study used a combination of pre– and post–time series and quasi-experimental designs to examine the extent to which the intervention resulted in changes in BMI, individual-level lifestyle behaviors, satisfaction with healthcare services, and quality of life among children, as well as changes in health policies, programs, and environments in the two intervention cities, compared to a comparison city. The intervention period was 2 years. Conclusions: MA-CORD will determine the extent to which a multisetting, multilevel intervention that integrates activities in primary care with broader public health interventions in schools, early care and education, and the community at large can improve children's dietary and PA behaviors and ultimately reduce obesity in low-income children. PMID:25469676

  16. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permit modifications and the functional equivalency demonstration: a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Elsberry, K.; Garcia, P.; Carnes, R.; Kinker, J.; Loehr, C; Lyon, W.

    1996-02-01

    Hazardous waste operating permits issued under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) often impose requirements that specific components and equipment be used. Consequently, changing these items, may first require that the owner/operator request a potentially time-consuming and costly permit modification. However, the owner/operator may demonstrate that a modification is not required because the planned changes are ``functionally equivalent.`` The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is scheduled for maintenance and improvements. The incinerator`s carbon adsorption unit/high efficiency particulate air filtration system, was redesigned to improve reliability and minimize maintenance. A study was performed to determine whether the redesigned unit would qualify as functionally equivalent to the original component. In performing this study, the following steps were taken: (a) the key performance factors were identified; (b) performance data describing the existing unit were obtained; (c) performance of both the existing and redesigned units was simulated; and (d) the performance data were compared to ascertain whether the components could qualify as functionally equivalent. In this case, the key performance data included gas residence time and distribution of flow over the activated carbon. Because both units were custom designed and fabricated, a simple comparison of manufacturers` specifications was impossible. Therefore, numerical simulation of each unit design was performed using the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulic computer code to model isothermal hydrodynamic performance under steady-state conditions. The results of residence time calculations from the model were coupled with flow proportion and sampled using a Monte Carlo-style simulation to derive distributions that describe the predicted residence times.

  17. 2β, 3β, 23-trihydroxy-urs-12-ene-28-olic acid (TUA) isolated from Actinidia chinensis Radix inhibits NCI-H460 cell proliferation by decreasing NF-κB expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qi-Lai; Li, Hong-Liang; Huang, Zhi-Qin; Chen, Yi-Jian; Liu, Ta-Si

    2015-10-01

    A natural ursolic compound, 2β, 3β, 23-trihydroxy-urs-12-ene-28-olic acid (TUA) was isolated from the root of Actinidia chinensis Planch (A. chinensis Radix). Since a large number of triterpenoid compound has marked anticancer effects toward various types of cancer cell lines in vitro, this study was carried out to investigate the anticancer effect of TUA in non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCCs) and the underlying apoptotic mechanism of TUA was examined in NCI-H460 cell lines. Cell proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle were measured using a cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The activity of transcription factor NF-κB was determined by EMSA method. The expression of apoptosis- and proliferation-related proteins was determined by western blotting. The effect of TUA on NF-κB mRNA expression in NCI-H460 cells was detected by RT-PCR. TUA significantly suppressed the viability of NCI-H460 cells. Also, TUA significantly increased the sub G1 population by cell cycle analysis and in a concentration dependent manner in NCI-H460 cells. Such an effect was accompanied by p65 (NF-κB subunit) inactivation by an inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, and by inhibition of p65 mRNA expressions. Consistently Overall, our findings suggest that TUA induces apoptosis via inhibition of NF-κB (p65) expression level and activation of IκBα in NCI-H460 cells as a potent anticancer candidate for lung cancer treatment. PMID:26134000

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student demonstrations. (CW)

  19. 2007 EORTC-NCI-ASCO Annual Meeting: Molecular Markers in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lukan, C

    2008-01-01

    The recent EORTC-NCI-ASCO Annual Meeting on ‘Molecular Markers in Cancer’ was held on 15–17 November 2007 in Brussels, Belgium. It was the largest meeting to date and marked the first year in which the American Association of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) joined in the efforts of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in organizing this annual event. More than 300 clinicians, pathologists, laboratory scientists and representatives from regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry came together for three days of intense discussion, debate and reflection on the latest biomarker therapeutic discoveries, strategies and clinical applications. The poster discussion sessions featured 79 research abstracts. The three most outstanding abstracts, all authored by young female researchers, were selected for presentation during the main meeting sessions. Highlights of each scientific session are presented. PMID:22275966

  20. NAS battery demonstration at American Electric Power:a study for the DOE energy storage program.

    SciTech Connect

    Newmiller, Jeff; Norris, Benjamin L. (Norris Energy Consulting Company, Martinez, CA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

    2006-03-01

    The first U.S. demonstration of the NGK sodium/sulfur battery technology was launched in August 2002 when a prototype system was installed at a commercial office building in Gahanna, Ohio. American Electric Power served as the host utility that provided the office space and technical support throughout the project. The system was used to both reduce demand peaks (peak-shaving operation) and to mitigate grid power disturbances (power quality operation) at the demonstration site. This report documents the results of the demonstration, provides an economic analysis of a commercial sodium/sulfur battery energy storage system at a typical site, and describes a side-by-side demonstration of the capabilities of the sodium/sulfur battery system, a lead-acid battery system, and a flywheel-based energy storage system in a power quality application.

  1. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute Past Issues / Winter 2013 Table ... Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute What if the tools you need to quit smoking were as ...

  2. Methods for Selection of Cancer Patients and Predicting Efficacy of Combination Therapy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Lung Cancer Biomarkers Group of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks parties interested in collaborative research to further co-develop methods for selecting cancer patients for combination therapy.

  3. Separation and preconcentration phenomena in internally heated poly(dimethylsilicone) capillaries: preliminary modelling and demonstration studies.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, N D; Kanu, A B; Waters, K E; Grant, B M B; Reader, A J; Thomas, C L P

    2005-05-01

    The concept of achieving low-resolution separations in internally heated capillary membranes is discussed in terms of controlling the diffusion coefficients of volatile organic compounds in poly(dimethylsilicone) membranes in space and time. The behaviour of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in polydimethylsilicone was used in conjunction with a mixed-physics finite element model, incorporating second order partial differential equations, to describe time and spatial variations of mass-flux, membrane temperature and diffusion coefficients. The model, coded with Femlab, predicted highly non-linear diffusion coefficient profiles resulting from temperature programming a 500 [micro sign]m thick membrane, with an increase in the diffusion coefficient of approximately 30% in the last 30% of the membrane thickness. Simulations of sampling hypothetical analytes, with disparate temperature dependent diffusion coefficient relationships, predicted distinct thermal desorption profiles with selectivities that reflected the extent of diffusion through the membrane. The predicted desorption profiles of these analytes also indicated that low resolution separations were possible. An internally heated poly(dimethylsilicone) capillary membrane was constructed from a 10 cm long, 1.5 mm od capillary with 0.5 mm thick walls. Thirteen aqueous standards of volatile organic compounds of environmental significance were studied, and low-resolution separations were indicated, with temperature programming of the membrane enabling desorption profiles to be differentiated. Further, analytically useful relationships in the [micro sign]g cm(-3) concentration range were demonstrated with correlation coefficients >0.96 observed for linear regressions of desorption profile intensities to analyte concentrations. PMID:15852148

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  5. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) partition coefficients; (2) Rutherford simulation experiment; and (3) demonstration of the powerful oxidizing property of dimanganeseheptoxide. Background information, materials needed, and procedures are provided for each demonstration. (JN)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides procedures for demonstrations: (1) the ferrioxalate actinometer, which demonstrates a photochemical reaction; and (2) the silver mirror, which demonstrates the reduction of a metal salt to the metal and/or the reducing power of sugars. (CS)

  8. NCI60 Cancer Cell Line Panel Data and RNAi Analysis Help Identify EAF2 as a Modulator of Simvastatin and Lovastatin Response in HCT-116 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Sevtap; Azorsa, David O.; Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Ibrahim-Zada, Irada; Gonzales, Irma M.; Arora, Shilpi; Henderson, Meredith C.; Choi, Yun Hee; Briollais, Laurent; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Tuzmen, Sukru

    2011-01-01

    Simvastatin and lovastatin are statins traditionally used for lowering serum cholesterol levels. However, there exists evidence indicating their potential chemotherapeutic characteristics in cancer. In this study, we used bioinformatic analysis of publicly available data in order to systematically identify the genes involved in resistance to cytotoxic effects of these two drugs in the NCI60 cell line panel. We used the pharmacological data available for all the NCI60 cell lines to classify simvastatin or lovastatin resistant and sensitive cell lines, respectively. Next, we performed whole-genome single marker case-control association tests for the lovastatin and simvastatin resistant and sensitive cells using their publicly available Affymetrix 125K SNP genomic data. The results were then evaluated using RNAi methodology. After correction of the p-values for multiple testing using False Discovery Rate, our results identified three genes (NRP1, COL13A1, MRPS31) and six genes (EAF2, ANK2, AKAP7, STEAP2, LPIN2, PARVB) associated with resistance to simvastatin and lovastatin, respectively. Functional validation using RNAi confirmed that silencing of EAF2 expression modulated the response of HCT-116 colon cancer cells to both statins. In summary, we have successfully utilized the publicly available data on the NCI60 cell lines to perform whole-genome association studies for simvastatin and lovastatin. Our results indicated genes involved in the cellular response to these statins and siRNA studies confirmed the role of the EAF2 in response to these drugs in HCT-116 colon cancer cells. PMID:21483694

  9. Development of Criteria to Measure the Extent of Implementation and the Effectiveness of Demonstration in Vocational Education. Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Associates, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    This document presents case studies of eight demonstration projects selected to assess the practicality and feasibility of a monograph for improving and measuring the impact of vocational education demonstration projects. An introduction provides background of the project that developed that monograph and information on the case studies, including…

  10. Identification of Two Nickel Ion-Induced Genes, NCI16 and PcGST1, in Paramecium caudatum

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Nobuyuki; Nakano, Takanari; Ikeda, Masaaki; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe the isolation of two nickel-induced genes in Paramecium caudatum, NCI16 and PcGST1, by subtractive hybridization. NCI16 encoded a predicted four-transmembrane domain protein (∼16 kDa) of unknown function, and PcGST1 encoded glutathione S-transferase (GST; ∼25 kDa) with GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Exposing cells to cobalt chloride also caused the moderate upregulation of NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs. Both nickel sulfate and cobalt chloride dose dependently induced NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs, but with different profiles. Nickel treatment caused a continuous increase in PcGST1 and NCI16 mRNA levels for up to 3 and 6 days, respectively, and a notable increase in H2O2 concentrations in P. caudatum. NCI16 expression was significantly enhanced by incubating cells with H2O2, implying that NCI16 induction in the presence of nickel ions is caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). On the other hand, PcGST1 was highly induced by the antioxidant tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) but not by H2O2, suggesting that different mechanisms mediate the induction of NCI16 and PcGST1. We introduced a luciferase reporter vector with an ∼0.42-kb putative PcGST1 promoter into cells and then exposed the transformants to nickel sulfate. This resulted in significant luciferase upregulation, indicating that the putative PcGST1 promoter contains a nickel-responsive element. Our nickel-inducible system also may be applicable to the efficient expression of proteins that are toxic to host cells or require temporal control. PMID:25001407

  11. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  12. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of large space structure technology is discussed, with emphasis on space fabricated structures which are automatically manufactured in space from sheet-strip materials and assembled on-orbit. Definition of a flight demonstration involving an Automated Beam Builder and the building and assembling of large structures is presented.

  13. Case Study of The ARRA-Funded GSHP Demonstration at the Natural Sources Building, Montana Tech

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, Mini; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-04-01

    Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 ground source heat pump (GSHP) projects were competitively selected in 2009 to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. One of the selected demonstration projects was proposed by Montana Tech of the University of Montana for a 56,000 sq ft, newly constructed, on-campus research facility – the Natural Resources Building (NRB) located in Butte, Montana. This demonstrated GSHP system consists of a 50 ton water-to-water heat pump and a closed-loop ground heat exchanger with two redundant 7.5 hp constant-speed pumps to use water in the nearby flooded mines as a heat source or heat sink. It works in conjunction with the originally installed steam HX and an aircooled chiller to provide space heating and cooling. It is coupled with the existing hot water and chilled water piping in the building and operates in the heating or cooling mode based on the outdoor air temperature. The ground loop pumps operate in conjunction with the existing pumps in the building hot and chilled water loops for the operation of the heat pump unit. The goal of this demonstration project is to validate the technical and economic feasibility of the demonstrated commercial-scale GSHP system in the region, and illustrate the feasibility of using mine waters as the heat sink and source for GSHP systems. Should the demonstration prove satisfactory and feasible, it will encourage similar GSHP applications using mine water, thus help save energy and reduce carbon emissions. The actual performance of the system is analyzed with available measured data for January through July 2014. The annual energy performance is predicted and compared with a baseline scenario, with the heating and cooling provided by the originally designed systems. The comparison is made in terms of energy savings, operating cost savings, cost-effectiveness, and environmental benefits. Finally

  14. Bufalin Inhibits NCI-H460 Human Lung Cancer Cell Metastasis In Vitro by Inhibiting MAPKs, MMPs, and NF-κB Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shin-Hwar; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Yu, Fu-Shun; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsia, Te-Chun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Bufalin, a component of Chan Su (a traditional Chinese medicine), has been known to have antitumor effects for thousands of years. In this study, we investigated its anti-metastasis effects on NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Under sub-lethal concentrations (from 25 up to 100 nM), bufalin significantly inhibits the invasion and migration nature of NCI-H460 cells that were measured by Matrigel Cell Migration Assay and Invasion System. Bufalin also suppressed the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which was examined by gelatin zymography methods. Western blotting revealed that bufalin depressed several key metastasis-related proteins, such as NF-κB, MMP-2, MMP-9, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), phosphorylated Akt, growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphorylated p38, and phosphorylated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). As evidenced by immunostaining and the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), bufalin induced not only a decreased cytoplasmic NF-κB production, but also decreased its nuclear translocation. Several metastasis-related genes, including Rho-associated (Rho A), coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1), and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), were down-regulated after bufalin treatment. In conclusion, bufalin is effective in inhibiting the metastatic nature of NCI-H460 cells in low, sub-lethal concentrations. Such an effect involves many mechanisms including MMPs, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF-κB systems. Bufalin has a potential to evolve into an anti-metastasis drug for human lung cancer in the future. PMID:26446205

  15. Cells from Degenerative Intervertebral Discs Demonstrate Unfavorable Responses to Mechanical and Inflammatory Stimuli: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Coelho, J. Paulo; Vo, Nam V.; Pacek, Corey; Westrick, Edward; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mechanical forces and inflammatory signaling influence intervertebral disc matrix homeostasis. We hypothesized that annulus fibrosus cells from degenerative discs would have altered responses to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli compared with cells isolated from normal discs. Design Annulus fibrosus cells were isolated from New Zealand White rabbits with normal and magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed degenerative discs created by annular stab. Cells were cultured with and without inflammatory and mechanical stimuli (tensile strain). After 4 or 24 hrs, the mRNA expression of inflammatory, catabolic, and anabolic genes was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Baseline gene expression differences were noted between cells from normal and degenerative discs. Degenerative cells demonstrated a more proinflammatory response profile to inflammatory and mechanical stimuli and loss of the beneficial effects of mechanical signaling. Decreased expression of catabolic and anabolic genes was observed in degenerative cells under conditions of inflammatory and mechanical stimuli. Conclusions These data demonstrate that degenerative cells have a decreased capacity to respond positively to beneficial levels of mechanical strain and demonstrate an exaggerated response to an inflammatory stimulus. This may, in part, help to explain differential responses to motion-based therapies in patients with intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:22760106

  16. Factors Influencing Blount County, Tennessee Home Demonstration Club Members' Use of Consumer Credit. A Research Summary of a Graduate Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neas, Ethel Josephine; And Others

    A study was made of the use of consumer credit by Home Demonstration Club (HDC) members in Blount County, Tennessee, as a basis for planning educational programs. Data were secured by group interviews from 237 Home Demonstration Club members representing 24 clubs. The data were classified according to the members use of consumer credit: those who…

  17. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations; one on Boyle's Law, to illustrate the gas law and serve as a challenging problem for the students; the other is a modified Color Blind Traffic Light demonstration in which the oscillating reactions were speeded up. (GA)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described which are suitable for introductory chemistry classes. The first involves the precipitation of silver, and the second is a demonstration of the relationship between rate constants and equilibrium constants using water and beakers. (BB)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents: (1) a simple demonstration which illustrates the driving force of entropy using the familiar effects of the negative thermal expansion coefficient of rubber; and (2) a demonstration of tetrahedral bonding using soap films. (CS)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for college level chemistry courses including: "Electrochemical Cells Using Sodium Silicate" and "A Simple, Vivid Demonstration of Selective Precipitation." Lists materials, preparation, procedures, and precautions. (CW)

  6. Low inter-rater reliability in grading of rectal bleeding using NCI CTC and RTOG toxicity scales: a survey of radiation oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Le, Minh-Phuong; Zhang, Zhe; Tran, Phuoc T.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Song, Danny Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) Rectal bleeding is one of the most common toxicities following prostate radiotherapy (RT), and both NCI CTC and RTOG grading scales are frequently used to report outcomes. We measured concordance among genitourinary radiation oncologists in using these scales to grade rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials From 6/2013–1/2014, a web-based survey was sent to 250 American and Canadian academic radiation oncologists who treat prostate cancer. Participants were provided 4 case vignettes where patients received RT and developed rectal bleeding and were asked for management plans and to rate the bleeding according to NCI CTC v.4 and RTOG late toxicity grading (scales provided). In 2 cases, participants were also asked if they would send the patient for colonoscopy. A multilevel, random intercept modeling approach was used to assess sources of variation (case, respondent) in toxicity grading to calculate the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Agreement on a dichotomous grading scale (low grades 1–2 vs. high grades 3–4) was also assessed, using kappa statistic for multiple respondents. Results Seventy-two radiation oncologists (28%) completed the survey. Forty-seven (65%) reported having either written or been principal investigator on a study using these scales. Agreement between respondents was moderate (ICC=0.52, 95% CI 0.47–0.58) when using NCI CTC and fair using the RTOG scale (ICC=0.28, 95% CI 0.20–0.40). Respondents who chose an invasive management were more likely to select a higher toxicity grade (p<0.0001). Using the dichotomous scale, we observed moderate agreement (kappa=0.42, 95% CI 0.40–0.44) with the NCI CTC scale, but only slight agreement with the RTOG scale (kappa=0.19, 95% CI 0.17–0.21). Conclusion Low inter-rater reliability was observed among radiation oncologists grading rectal bleeding using two common scales. Clearer definitions of late rectal bleeding toxicity should be constructed to reduce this variability

  7. The effects of HIF-1alpha on gene expression profiles of NCI-H446 human small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene targeted therapy refers to any therapy focused on one of the many biological features of the tumor. Such features are mediated by specific genes that are involved in tumor metastasis, recurrence, poor response to chemotherapy and others. Hypoxia is an important pathognomonic feature of many malignant tumors including SCLC (small cell lung cancer). HIF-1alpha, which is induced by hypoxia, is the most important regulatory factor of many specific genes that can influence the biological features of tumors. Methods In this study, we tried to elucidate the changes in gene expression profiles of SCLC NCI-H446 cells mediated by HIF-1alpha. According to different treatments of cells, three experimental pairwise comparisons were designed: hypoxia group vs. control group, Ad5-HIF-1alpha group vs. Ad5 group, and Ad5-siHIF-1 alpha group Vs Ad5 group. Results Results from the analysis of gene expression profiles indicated that there were 65 genes upregulated and 28 genes downregulated more than two-fold in all three experimental pairwise comparisons. These genes were involved in transport, signal-transduction, cell adhesion/motility, growth factor/cytokines, transcription, inflammatory response, metabolic process, in addition to others. SOCS1, IGFBP5, IL-6 and STAT3 were also upregulated at protein level. SOCS1 could significantly induce apoptosis and suppress growth of NCI-H446 cells but HIF-1alpha could induce growth and suppress apoptosis. Conclusions Through this research, we are trying to find novel functional genes that are mediated by HIF-1alpha and provide the theoretical basis for new therapeutic targets. HIF-1 alpha maybe upregulate the expression of SOCS1 through mediation of STAT3 and IL-6. In addition, SOCS1 could significantly induce apoptosis and suppress growth of NCI-H446 cells. This was contrary to HIF-1alpha and it indicated that there might be an antagonism effect between HIF-1alpha and SOCS1 on regulating growth and apoptosis of NCI-H446

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a demonstration involving the controlled combustion of a mixture of metals with black and smokeless powder in a small Erlenmeyer flask. Also describes demonstrations using a device that precludes breathing of hazardous vapors during class demonstrations; the device is easy to transport and use in rooms without sinks. (JN)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  11. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    List of materials needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first is an inexpensive and quick method for demonstrating column chromatography of plant pigments of spinach extract. The second is a demonstration of cathodic protection by impressed current. (JN)

  13. Feasibility study of endoscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography: Simulation demonstration and phantom application

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Cao, Xin; Yang, Defu; Chen, Dongmei; Ripoll, Jorge; Tian, Jie

    2013-08-28

    Even though endoscopic fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (eFDOT) exhibits significant potential, currently its application is limited due to the existence of strong autofluorescence and the imaging inaccuracy caused by a very short source-detector distance. Motivated by the emerging X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) technology, we presented an endoscopic XLCT (eXLCT) methodology. In the methodology, the aperture angle of the objective was incorporated into the forward model, providing a more accurate description of light propagation. Numerical simulation with a heterogeneous geometry and an imaging experiment with a physical phantom were illustrated to demonstrate the feasibility of the presented eXLCT methodology.

  14. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures, Volume 2: Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of large space structure (LSS) technology is discussed, with emphasis on space fabricated structures which are automatically manufactured in space from sheet-strip materials and assembled on-orbit. It is concluded that an LSS flight demonstration using an Automated Beam Builder and the orbiter as a construction base, could be performed in the 1983-1984 time period. The estimated cost is $24 million exclusive of shuttle launch costs. During the mission, a simple space platform could be constructed in-orbit to accommodate user requirements associated with earth viewing and materials exposure experiments needs.

  15. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.

    2000-02-01

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state.

  16. Relationships among Internet health information use, patient behavior and self efficacy in newly diagnosed cancer patients who contact the National Cancer Institute's NCI Atlantic Region Cancer Information Service (CIS).

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Linda; Bass, Sarah; Ruzek, Sheryl Burt; McKeown-Conn, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This NCI funded study examined the relationship between the use of Internet health information by people newly diagnosed with cancer (N=500), with patient task behavior and perceived self efficacy. Study variables were compared among Direct users of Internet health information (people using the Internet themselves), Indirect users of Internet health information (people receiving Internet health information from friends or family members), and Non-users of Internet health information (people not using the Internet or receiving health information from the Internet). The subjects were recruited from persons who called the Atlantic Region of the NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS), located at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, PA. Follow up phone interviews were done with participants six weeks after initial contact to assess impact of the use of the Internet on perceived patient task behavior and self efficacy. Results show significant relationships between Internet use and all study variables. PMID:12463827

  17. Multi-Lab EV Smart Grid Integration Requirements Study. Providing Guidance on Technology Development and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Markel, T.; Meintz, A.; Hardy, K.; Chen, B.; Bohn, T.; Smart, J.; Scoffield, D.; Hovsapian, R.; Saxena, S.; MacDonald, J.; Kiliccote, S.; Kahl, K.; Pratt, R.

    2015-05-28

    The report begins with a discussion of the current state of the energy and transportation systems, followed by a summary of some VGI scenarios and opportunities. The current efforts to create foundational interface standards are detailed, and the requirements for enabling PEVs as a grid resource are presented. Existing technology demonstrations that include vehicle to grid functions are summarized. The report also includes a data-based discussion on the magnitude and variability of PEVs as a grid resource, followed by an overview of existing simulation tools that vi This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. can be used to explore the expansion of VGI to larger grid functions that might offer system and customer value. The document concludes with a summary of the requirements and potential action items that would support greater adoption of VGI.

  18. Demonstration and study of the dispersion of water waves with a computer-controlled ripple tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ströbel, Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    The design of a ripple tank built in an undergraduate student project is described. Water waves are excited acoustically using computer programmable wave shapes. The projected wave patterns are recorded with a video camera and analyzed quantitatively. From the propagation of wave packets in distilled water at three different depths, the phase and group velocities are measured in the frequency range from 2 to 50 Hz. Good agreement with theory is found. The propagation of wave trains of different shapes is recorded and explained on the basis of the stationary phase approximation. Various types of precursors are detected. For a depth slightly above the critical depth and thus nearly dispersion-free, the solitary-like propagation of a single pulse is observed. In shallow water, the compression of a chirped pulse is demonstrated. Circular waves produced by falling water drops are recorded and analyzed.

  19. Multi-long-slit Spectroscopy For Kinematic Studies. I. Implementation And Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Choi, J.; Cisneros, S.; Patterson, M.; Wu, C.

    2007-12-01

    Several methods exist for spectroscopy of ionized gas to measure the kinematics of galaxies. These include single long-slit spectroscopy, or integral field spectroscopy where a multi-fiber or lenslet-array feeds a spectrograph, or an imaging Fabry-Perot. We demonstrate here another method for 2-dimensional spectroscopy, using a mask with several parallel long slits in combination with a narrow band filter. This enables observations at H-alpha for up to 16 slits simultaneously with the Apache Point Observatory's ARC-3.5m telescope, using a conventional optical spectrograph (the Double Imaging Spectrograph). Compared to most multi-fiber and lenslet integral field instruments, this setup allows for larger field of view. For our system, the 16 slits are distributed over a 4x5 arcmin sq. area. Compared to a Fabry-Perot, our method can be faster for obtaining 2-D velocity fields for disk galaxies since we do not require scanning an etalon through all velocity channels. Complete 2-D coverage can be obtained with our method too by stepping the telescope in position between exposures. Galaxies at different redshifts or other emission lines can be observed by changing the narrow band filter. The implementation is very inexpensive in terms of hardware cost and involves only production of a set of multi-long-slit masks and suitable filters. The spectral resolution we can obtain is typical of that of a medium resolution spectrograph, about 2-4 Angstrom depending on slit width and grating. We demonstrate the implementation through observations of the Owl nebula and the nearby spiral M33. This research was supported by an award from Research Corporation.

  20. Improving Students' Study Habits by Demonstrating the Mnemonic Benefits of Semantic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugg, Julie M.; DeLosh, Edward L.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an in-class exercise that illustrates the advantage of semantic over nonsemantic study habits. The exercise includes a survey of students' current study strategies, followed by the presentation of an abbreviated version of Craik and Tulving's(1975) classic levels-of-processing experiment. We observed significant benefits of…

  1. Demonstration of digital radiographs by means of ink jet-printed paper copies: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kirkhorn, T; Kehler, M; Nilsson, J; Lyttkens, K; Andersson, B; Holmer, N G

    1992-11-01

    Different digital medical images have been printed on paper with a continuous ink jet printer, and the quality has been evaluated. The emphasis has been on digital chest radiographs from a computed radiography system. The ink jet printing technique is described as well as the handling of the image data from image source to printer. Different versions of paper prints and viewing conditions were compared to find the optimum alternative. The evaluation has been performed to maximize the quality of the paper images to make them conform with the corresponding film prints and monitor images as much as possible. The continuous ink jet technique offers high-quality prints on paper at a considerably lower cost per copy compared with the cost of a film print. With a future switch-over from diagnosing of digital images on film to diagnosing them on monitors, hard copies for demonstration purposes will occasionally be needed. This need can be filled by ink jet-printed paper copies. PMID:1457540

  2. Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: A case demonstrated by a cytogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Pokale, Yamini S; Jadhav, Ajinkya M; Kate, Ushang

    2012-01-01

    We present a case with a 4p terminal deletion, evidenced in GTG-banded chromosome study. Phenotypic signs described in the classical Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome were found on clinical examination of our patient. PMID:22754235

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF LOW COST, LOW BURDEN EXPOSURE MONITORING STRATEGIES FOR USE IN LONGITUDINAL COHORT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large longitudinal cohort study designed to evaluate the association between children's exposures to environmental agents and health outcomes presents many challenges for exposure monitoring. Exposure of the child must be measured for multiple chemicals through multiple path...

  4. Chitosan-poly(acrylic) acid polyionic complex: in vivo study to demonstrate prolonged gastric retention.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Susana; Prada, Pablo; de la Torre, Paloma M; Torrado, Santiago

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a chitosan-poly(acrylic) acid based controlled drug release system for gastric antibiotic delivery. Different mixtures of amoxicillin (A), chitosan (CS), and poly(acrylic) acid (PAA) were employed to obtain these polyionic complexes. A non-invasive method was employed for determining the gastric residence time of the formulations. It was studied the swelling behavior and drug release from these complexes. Gastric emptying rate study was performed by means of the [13C]octanoic acid breath test. The gastric emptying rates of two different formulations (conventional and gastric retentive system) were studied. Swelling studies indicated that the extent of swelling was greater in the polyionic complexes than in the single chitosan formulations. The amoxicillin diffusion from the hydrogels was controlled by the polymer/drug interaction. The property of these complexes to control the solute diffusion depends on the network mesh size, which is a significant factor in the overall behavior of the hydrogels. The gastric half-emptying time of the polyionic complex was significantly delayed compared to the reference formulation, showing mean values of 164.32+/-26.72 and 65.06+/-11.50min, respectively (P<0.01). The results of this study suggest that, these polyionic complexes are good systems for specific gastric drug delivery. PMID:14609680

  5. Microsoft Office 365 Deployment Continues through June at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The latest Microsoft suite, Office 365 (O365), is being deployed to all NCI at Frederick computers during the months of May and June to comply with federal mandates. The suite includes the latest versions of Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Skype for Business, along with cloud-based capabilities. These cloud-based capabilities will help meet the federal mandates that require all Health and Human Services operating divisions to migrate e-mail to the cloud by the end of 2016.

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Provides directions for setup and performance of two demonstrations. The first demonstrates the principles of Raoult's Law; using a simple apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure. The second illustrates the energy available from alcohol combustion (includes safety precautions) using an alcohol-fueled missile. (JM)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Described are demonstrations designed to reveal the important "nonsolvent" properties of water through its interaction with a toy called "Magic Sand" and other synthetic silica derivatives, especially those bonded with organic moities. The procedures for seven demonstrations along with a discussion of the effects are presented. (CW)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a demonstration utilized to measure the heat of vaporization using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Explained is that when measurement is made as part of a demonstration, it raises student's consciousness that chemistry is experimentally based. (Author/DS)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations: "The Construction and Use of Commercial Voltaic Cell Displays in Freshman Chemistry"; Dramatizing Isotopes: Deuterated Ice Cubes Sink"; and "A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate Differing Gas Diffusion Rates (Graham's Law)." Materials, procedures, and safety considerations are discussed. (CW)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic…

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  2. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE I FINAL REPORT: CONCEPTUAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses results of a conceptual design, cost, and evaluation study of energy recovery from landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. The conceptual design of the fuel cell energy recovery system is described, and its economic and environm...

  3. The Warm-Cold Study: A Classroom Demonstration of Impression Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symbaluk, Diane G.; Cameron, Judy

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure for teaching experimental design to students in the social sciences. Argues that by replicating Solomon Asch's and H. Kelley's classic studies on impression formation, students learn how to conduct experiments, analyze data, and evaluate the significance of research. Provides instructions for implementing the strategy. (DSK)

  4. [Comparative sonographic-anatomic studies aimed at demonstrating intrarenal fine structure].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H G; Posel, P

    1985-07-01

    The detailed structure of the kidneys was studied in 40 excised organs by means of high resolution sonography. It becomes possible to differentiate the details within the renal parenchyma and the sinus. Intrarenal vascular details can also be defined. The clinical relevance of these results is discussed. PMID:2992015

  5. Research study demonstrates computer simulation can predict warpage and assist in its elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glozer, G.; Post, S.; Ishii, K.

    1994-10-01

    Programs for predicting warpage in injection molded parts are relatively new. Commercial software for simulating the flow and cooling stages of injection molding have steadily gained acceptance; however, warpage software is not yet as readily accepted. This study focused on gaining an understanding of the predictive capabilities of the warpage software. The following aspects of this study were unique. (1) Quantitative results were found using a statistically designed set of experiments. (2) Comparisons between experimental and simulation results were made with parts produced in a well-instrumented and controlled injection molding machine. (3) The experimental parts were accurately measured on a coordinate measuring machine with a non-contact laser probe. (4) The effect of part geometry on warpage was investigated.

  6. CINRG Duchenne Natural History Study demonstrates insufficient diagnosis and treatment of cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spurney, Christopher; Shimizu, Reiko; Hache, Lauren P.; Kolski, Hanna; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Clemens, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy is a common cause of morbidity and death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods A cross-sectional analysis of clinical data from a multi-institutional, international CINRG DMD Natural History Study of 340 DMD patients aged 2 to 28 years. Cardiomyopathy was defined as shortening fraction (SF) <28% or ejection fraction (EF) <55%. Results 231 participants reported a prior clinical echocardiogram study, and 174 had data for SF or EF. The prevalence of cardiomyopathy was 27% (47/174), and it was significantly associated with age and clinical stage. The association of cardiomyopathy with age and clinical stage was not changed by glucocorticoid use as a covariate (P>0.68). In patients with cardiomyopathy, 57 % (27/47) reported not taking any cardiac medications. Cardiac medications were used in 12% (15/127) of patients without cardiomyopathy. Discussion Echocardiograms were underutilized, and cardiomyopathy was undertreated in this DMD natural history cohort. PMID:24395289

  7. Demonstration of multi- and single-reader sample size program for diagnostic studies software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillis, Stephen L.; Schartz, Kevin M.

    2015-03-01

    The recently released software Multi- and Single-Reader Sample Size Sample Size Program for Diagnostic Studies, written by Kevin Schartz and Stephen Hillis, performs sample size computations for diagnostic reader-performance studies. The program computes the sample size needed to detect a specified difference in a reader performance measure between two modalities, when using the analysis methods initially proposed by Dorfman, Berbaum, and Metz (DBM) and Obuchowski and Rockette (OR), and later unified and improved by Hillis and colleagues. A commonly used reader performance measure is the area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve. The program can be used with typical common reader-performance measures which can be estimated parametrically or nonparametrically. The program has an easy-to-use step-by-step intuitive interface that walks the user through the entry of the needed information. Features of the software include the following: (1) choice of several study designs; (2) choice of inputs obtained from either OR or DBM analyses; (3) choice of three different inference situations: both readers and cases random, readers fixed and cases random, and readers random and cases fixed; (4) choice of two types of hypotheses: equivalence or noninferiority; (6) choice of two output formats: power for specified case and reader sample sizes, or a listing of case-reader combinations that provide a specified power; (7) choice of single or multi-reader analyses; and (8) functionality in Windows, Mac OS, and Linux.

  8. STUDY OF HOME DEMONSTRATION UNITS IN A SAMPLE OF 27 COUNTIES IN NEW YORK STATE, NUMBER 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALEXANDER, FRANK D.; HARSHAW, JEAN

    AN EXPLORATORY STUDY EXAMINED CHARACTERISTICS OF 1,128 HOME DEMONSTRATION UNITS TO SUGGEST HYPOTHESES AND SCOPE FOR A MORE INTENSIVE STUDY OF A SMALL SAMPLE OF UNITS, AND TO PROVIDE GUIDANCE IN SAMPLING. DATA WERE OBTAINED FROM A SPECIALLY DESIGNED MEMBERSHIP CARD USED IN 1962. UNIT SIZE AVERAGED 23.6 MEMBERS BUT THE RANGE WAS FAIRLY GREAT. A NEED…

  9. "Ready To Learn" Transmedia Demonstration Station Study: A Report to the CPB-PBS "Ready to Learn Initiative"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasnik, Shelley; Llorente, Carlin

    2012-01-01

    The 2012 Transmedia Demonstration Stations program study is part of the multiyear CPB-PBS "Ready To Learn" summative evaluation initiative by Education Development Center, Inc., (EDC) and SRI International (SRI). Through a series of related studies, the authors are documenting, and, whenever possible, measuring the impact of PBS KIDS transmedia…

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  11. Kinetic Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgardt, Erik D.; Ryan, Hank

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on chemical reaction kinetics that consists of a predemonstration activity, the demonstration, and a set of postdemonstration activities that help students transfer the concepts to actual chemical reactions. Simulates various aspects of chemical reaction kinetics. (JRH)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  15. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a demonstration involving the transformation of a hydrophobic liquid to a partially hydrophobic semisolid. Safety considerations are noted. (JN)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in college chemistry classes. Includes "Spectroscopy in Large Lecture Halls" and "The Endothermic Dissolution of Ammonium Nitrate." Gives materials lists and procedures as well as a discussion of the results. (CW)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  1. Dictyostelium discoideum to human cells: pharmacogenetic studies demonstrate a role for sphingolipids in chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen; Min, Junxia; Alexander, Hannah

    2006-03-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle for the treatment of cancer and a subject of extensive research. Numerous mechanisms of drug resistance have been proposed, and they differ for different drugs. Nevertheless, it is clear that our understanding of this important problem is still incomplete, and that new targets for modulating therapy still await discovery. The attractive biology and the availability of powerful molecular techniques have made the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, a powerful non-mammalian model for drug target discovery, and the problem of drug resistance. To understand the molecular basis of chemoresistance to the widely used drug cisplatin, both genetic and pharmacological approaches have been applied to this versatile experimental system. These studies have resulted in the identification of novel molecular pathways which can be used to increase the efficacy of cisplatin, and brought attention to the role of sphingolipids in mediating the cellular response to chemotherapeutic drugs. In the following review, we will describe the history and utility of D. discoideum in pharmacogenetics, and discuss recent studies which focus attention on the role of sphingolipids in chemotherapy and chemoresistance. PMID:16403600

  2. α -Mangostin from Cratoxylum arborescens (Vahl) Blume Demonstrates Anti-Ulcerogenic Property: A Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Sidahmed, Heyam M A; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Mohan, Syam; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Mohamed Elhassan Taha, Manal; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Hadi, A Hamid A; Vadivelu, Jamunarani; Loke Fai, Mun; Rahmani, Mawardi; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal

    2013-01-01

    Cratoxylum arborescens (Vahl) Blume is an Asian herbal medicine with versatile ethnobiological properties including treatment of gastric ulcer. This study evaluated the antiulcerogenic mechanism(s) of α -mangostin (AM) in a rat model of ulcer. AM is a prenylated xanthone derived through biologically guided fractionation of C. arborescens. Rats were orally pretreated with AM and subsequently exposed to acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol. Following treatment, ulcer index, gastric juice acidity, mucus content, histological and immunohistochemical analyses, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), and nonprotein sulfhydryl groups (NP-SH) were evaluated. The anti-Helicobacter pylori, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitory effect, and antioxidant activity of AM were also investigated in vitro. AM (10 and 30 mg/kg) inhibited significantly (P < 0.05) ethanol-induced gastric lesions by 66.04% and 74.39 %, respectively. The compound induces the expression of Hsp70, restores GSH levels, decreases lipid peroxidation, and inhibits COX-2 activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AM showed an effective in vitro anti-H. pylori activity. The efficacy of the AM was accomplished safely without presenting any toxicological parameters. The results of the present study indicate that the antioxidant properties and the potent anti-H. pylori, in addition to activation of Hsp70 protein, may contribute to the gastroprotective activity of α -mangostin. PMID:23634169

  3. α-Mangostin from Cratoxylum arborescens (Vahl) Blume Demonstrates Anti-Ulcerogenic Property: A Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Sidahmed, Heyam M. A.; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Mohamed Elhassan Taha, Manal; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Vadivelu, Jamunarani; Loke Fai, Mun; Rahmani, Mawardi; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal

    2013-01-01

    Cratoxylum arborescens (Vahl) Blume is an Asian herbal medicine with versatile ethnobiological properties including treatment of gastric ulcer. This study evaluated the antiulcerogenic mechanism(s) of α-mangostin (AM) in a rat model of ulcer. AM is a prenylated xanthone derived through biologically guided fractionation of C. arborescens. Rats were orally pretreated with AM and subsequently exposed to acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol. Following treatment, ulcer index, gastric juice acidity, mucus content, histological and immunohistochemical analyses, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), and nonprotein sulfhydryl groups (NP-SH) were evaluated. The anti-Helicobacter pylori, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitory effect, and antioxidant activity of AM were also investigated in vitro. AM (10 and 30 mg/kg) inhibited significantly (P < 0.05) ethanol-induced gastric lesions by 66.04% and 74.39 %, respectively. The compound induces the expression of Hsp70, restores GSH levels, decreases lipid peroxidation, and inhibits COX-2 activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AM showed an effective in vitro anti-H. pylori activity. The efficacy of the AM was accomplished safely without presenting any toxicological parameters. The results of the present study indicate that the antioxidant properties and the potent anti-H. pylori, in addition to activation of Hsp70 protein, may contribute to the gastroprotective activity of α-mangostin. PMID:23634169

  4. Improved Method for Preparing Cisplatin-Dendrimer Nanocomplex and Its Behavior Against NCI-H460 Lung Cancer Cell.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoang; Nguyen, Ngoc Hoa; Tran, Ngoc Quyen; Nguyen, Cuu Khoa

    2015-06-01

    The effect of anticancer drugs could be significantly enhanced if it is encapsulated in drug delivery vehicles such as liposomes, polymers, dendrimers and other materials. For some conventional cisplatin encapsulating methods, however, suffers from low loading efficiency. Therefore, in order to overcome this limitation, in our study, sonication was used in preparation of the nanocomplex of a species of aquated cisplatin and carboxylated PAMAM dendrimer G3.5 to evaluate loading capacity as well as plantinum release behavior using FT-IR, UV-Vis, NMR, ICP-AES, and TEM. The results show that 25.20 and 27.83 wt/wt% of cisplatin were loaded under stirring and sonication respectively, a remarkably improvement in loading efficiency compared to that of conventional method that used of cisplatin. In vitro study showed that this drug-nanocarrier complex also help reduce cisplatin's cytotoxicity but can still keep sufficient antiproliferative activity against lung cancer cell, NCI-H460, with IC50 at 0.985 ± 0.01 μM. PMID:26369018

  5. Demonstration of an advanced circulation fludized bed coal combustor phase 1: Cold model study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Govind, R.

    1993-03-20

    It was found that there was a strong dependence of the density profile on the secondary air injection location and that there was a pronounced solid separation from the conveying gas, due to the swirl motion. Furthermore, the swirl motion generated strong internal circulation patterns and higher slip velocities than in the case of nonswirl motion as in an ordinary circulating fluidized bed. Radial solids flux profiles were measured at different axial locations. The general radial profile in a swirling circulating fluidized bed indicated an increased downward flow of solids near the bed walls, and strong variations in radial profiles along the axial height. For swirl numbers less than 0.9, which is typical for swirling circulating fluidized beds, there is no significant increase in erosion due to swirl motion inside the bed. Pending further investigation of swirl motion with combustion, at least from our cold model studies, no disadvantages due to the introduction of swirl motion were discovered.

  6. Genomewide association study in cervical dystonia demonstrates possible association with sodium leak channel

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Kin Y; Schneider, Susanne A; Trabzuni, Daniah; Stamelou, Maria; Edwards, Mark; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Silverdale, Monty; Hardy, John; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia is a common movement disorder. A number of monogenic causes have been identified. However, the majority of dystonia cases are not explained by single gene defects. Cervical dystonia is one of the commonest forms without genetic causes identified. This pilot study aimed to identify large effect-size risk loci in cervical dystonia. A genomewide association study (GWAS) was performed. British resident cervical dystonia patients of European descent were genotyped using the Illumina-610-Quad. Comparison was made with controls of European descent from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium using logistic regression algorithm from PLINK. SNPs not genotyped by the array were imputed with 1000 Genomes Project data using the MaCH algorithm and minimac. Postimputation analysis was done with the mach2dat algorithm using a logistic regression model. After quality control measures, 212 cases were compared with 5173 controls. No single SNP passed the genomewide significant level of 5 × 10−8 in the analysis of genotyped SNP in PLINK. Postimputation, there were 5 clusters of SNPs that had P value <5 × 10−6, and the best cluster of SNPs was found near exon 1 of NALCN, (sodium leak channel) with P = 9.76 × 10−7. Several potential regions were found in the GWAS and imputation analysis. The lowest P value was found in NALCN. Dysfunction of this ion channel is a plausible cause for dystonia. Further replication in another cohort is needed to confirm this finding. We make this data publicly available to encourage further analyses of this disorder. PMID:24227479

  7. Calyxin Y induces hydrogen peroxide-dependent autophagy and apoptosis via JNK activation in human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xiao-bing; Wang, Jun-song; Geng, Ya-di; Yang, Chang-shui; Kong, Ling-yi

    2013-10-28

    Calyxin Y has been recently isolated from Alpinia katsumadai which has a folk use as an anti-tumor medicine. Calyxin Y induced caspase-dependent cell death in NCI-H460 cells, and concomitantly, provoked cytoprotective autophagy with the upregulation of critical Atg proteins. The cleavage of Atg proteins by caspases acted as a switch between autophagy and apoptosis induced by calyxin Y. Intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was triggered upon exposure to calyxin Y via the induction of autophagy and apoptosis. We provided evidence that activated JNK was upstream effectors controlling both autophagy and apoptosis in response to elevated H2O2. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that calyxin Y serves multiple roles as a promising chemotherapeutic agent that induces H2O2-dependent autophagy and apoptosis via JNK activation. PMID:23811287

  8. Intermittent flow system for population toxicity studies demonstrated with Daphnia and copper

    SciTech Connect

    van Leeuwen, C.J.; Buechner, J.L.; van Dijk, H.

    1988-04-01

    Until the introduction of continuous-flow procedures, the physical aspects of testing the toxicity of chemicals and aqueous effluents to aquatic organisms had been of minor consideration. Today's devices ranging from pneumatic systems to electric pumps, all have some drawback or other but many of them are reduced to a minimum by the use of the proportional diluter, which is a well-established and reliable dosing apparatus. However, the Mount-Brungs diluter cannot be used for testing volatile chemicals, nor does it allow simultaneous dosing of a constant food suspension and several toxicant concentrations, which are important conditions for population toxicity studies with small invertebrates like the crustacean Daphnia magna. These restrictions are removed by the use of electric pumps, solenoids and time relays. The system described here provides for the delivery of 250 mL every 5 min to 6 h with no perceptible current-induced effects on the test organisms; it allows the automatic supply of known concentrations of food at each dilution cycle as well as the testing of volatile chemicals. The system has operated for almost 3 years and has proven to be reliable, accurate and easy to maintain. In order to illustrate its usefulness in tests with Daphnia populations, the toxicity of copper was tested.

  9. Intermittent flow system for population toxicity studies demonstrated with Daphnia and copper

    SciTech Connect

    van Leeuwen, C.J.; Buechner, J.L.; van Dijk, H. )

    1988-05-01

    Until the introduction of continuous-flow procedures, the physical aspects of testing the toxicity of chemicals and aqueous effluents to aquatic organisms had been of minor consideration. Today's devices ranging from pneumatic systems to electric pumps, all have some drawback or other but many of them are reduced to a minimum by the use of the proportional diluter, which is a well-established and reliable dosing apparatus. However, the Mount-Brungs diluter cannot be used for testing volatile chemicals, nor does it allow simultaneous dosing of a constant food suspension and several toxicant concentrations, which are important conditions for population toxicity studies with small invertebrates like the crustacean Daphnia magna. These restrictions are removed by the use of electric pumps, solenoids and time relays. The system described here provides for the delivery of 250 mL every 5 min to 6 h with no perceptible current-induced effects on the test organisms; it allows the automatic supply of known concentrations of food at each dilution cycle as well as the testing of volatile chemicals. In order to illustrate its usefulness in tests with Daphnia populations, the toxicity of copper was tested.

  10. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures.

    PubMed

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26-27, 2013, entitled "Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research" and "Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems." The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

  11. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

  12. Development study of precooled-cycle hypersonic turbojet engine for flight demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tetsuya; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Kojima, Takayuki; Okai, Keiichi; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Masaki, Daisaku; Hongo, Motoyuki; Ohta, Toyohiko

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes a development study of a precooled-cycle hypersonic turbojet engine for the first stage of TSTO space plane and hypersonic airplane. With reflecting the key technologies accumulated from ATREX (expander cycle ATR engine) ground tests, the next flyable subscale engine "S-engine" is now developed. S-engine has 23cm×23cm of rectangular cross-section, 2.2 m of the overall length and about 100 kg of the weight employing a variable-geometry rectangular inlet and nozzle. It produces 1.2 kN of thrust at SLS, which corresponds to {1}/{4} of the ATREX engine. Design of the hypersonic components such as the inlet, precooler and nozzle has been finished and their aerodynamic performances were verified by wind tunnel tests and CFD analyses. A prototype model of the diagonal-flow compressor whose pressure ratio is 6 was manufactured. Its rotating tests under the very-low pressure conditions are now in progress. The reverse-flow annular combustion chamber was successfully tested. The first flight test of the S-engine is to be conducted in 2008 by the balloon-based operation vehicle (BOV) which is about 5 m in length, 0.55 m in diameter and 500 kg in weight. The vehicle is dropped from an altitude of 40 km by a high altitude balloon. After 40-s free-fall, the vehicle pulls up and S-engine operates for 30 s at about Mach 2. High altitude tests of the engine components corresponding to the BOV's flight condition have been conducted.

  13. Longitudinal and retrospective study has demonstrated morphometric variations in the fingerprints of elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lara Rosana Vieira; Mizokami, Leila Lopes; Vieira, Paola Rabello; Kuckelhaus, Selma Aparecida Souza

    2016-02-01

    Dermatoglyphics can be found in the thick skin of both hands and feet which make the identification process possible, however morphological changes throughout life can affect identification in elderly individuals. Considering that dermatoglyphics is an important biometric method, due to it being practical and inexpensive, this longitudinal and retrospective study was aimed to evaluate the morphological variations in fingerprints obtained from men and women (n=20) during their adult and elderly stages of life; the time between obtaining the two fingerprints was 33.5±9.4 years. For the morphometric analysis, an area of 1 cm(2) was selected to quantify the visible friction ridges, minutiae, interpapillary and white lines, and later side-by-side confrontation was used to determine the identity of the individuals. Our results showed a reduction of friction ridges, an increase in the number of white lines for the group (men and women) and a decrease in the number of interpapillary lines in the group of women. It also showed that the selection of compatible fingerprints by the automated AFIS/VRP system allowed the identification of 23 individuals (57.5%), but when the identification was made by the automated AFIS/VRP system, followed by the analysis of archived patterns to eliminate incompatible fingerprints, determination of the identity of 28 individuals (70.0%) was possible. The dermatoglyphics of the elderly suffered morphometric changes that prevented the identification of 30% of them, probably due to the aging process, and pointed to the importance of improving the methods of obtaining fingerprints to clarify issues related to the identification of the elderly. PMID:26734989

  14. Using discrepant events in science demonstrations to promote student engagement in scientific investigations: An action research study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Vincent J.

    Students' scientific investigations have been identified in national standards and related reform documents as a critical component of students' learning experiences in school, yet it is not easy to implement them in science classrooms. Could science demonstrations help science teachers put this recommendation into practice? While demonstrations are a common practice in the science classroom and research has documented some positive effects in terms of student motivation and engagement from their use, the literature also shows that, as traditionally presented, science demonstrations do not always achieve their intended outcomes. This, in turn, suggested the value of investigating what design elements of demonstrations could be used to promote specific instructional goals. Employing action research as a methodology, the proposed study was developed to explore how science demonstrations can be designed so as to most effectively promote student engagement in scientific investigations. More specifically, I was interested in examining the effects of using a discrepant event as part of the demonstration, as a way to create cognitive conflict and, thus, increase interest and engagement. I also investigated the relative merit of the well-researched POE (Predict, Observe, Explain) design versus employing demonstrations that appear to the student to be unplanned (what I will refer to as NOE, or a Naturally Occurring Experience). This study was informed by Constructivism, Situated Cognition and Conceptual Change as theoretical frameworks. The project included the design, implementation and study of an intervention consisting of three instructional units designed to support students' learning of the concepts of density, molecular arrangement of gas particles, and cohesion, respectively. In each of these units, lasting a total of two 80-minute class periods, students were asked to design and conduct an investigation to gain a better understanding of the concept under study. In

  15. Specification aggregate quarry expansion: a case study demonstrating sustainable management of natural aggregate resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Tucker, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Many countries, provinces, territories, or states in the European Union, Australia, Canada, the United States, and elsewhere have begun implementing sustainability programs, but most of those programs stop short of sustainable management of aggregate resources. Sustainable practices do not always have to be conducted under the title of sustainability. This case study describes how Lafarge, a large multinational construction materials supplier, implemented the principles of sustainability even though there was an absence of existing local government policies or procedures addressing sustainable resource management. Jefferson County, Colorado, USA, is one of three counties in the six-county Denver, Colorado, region that has potentially available sources of crushed stone. Crushed stone comprises 30 percent of the aggregate produced in the area and plays a major role in regional aggregate resource needs. Jefferson County is home to four of the five crushed stone operations in the Denver region. Lafarge operates one of those four quarries. Lafarge recently proposed to expand its reserves by exchanging company-owned land for existing dedicated open space land adjacent to their quarry but owned by Jefferson County. A similar proposal submitted about 10 years earlier had been denied. Contrary to the earlier proposal, which was predicated on public relations, the new proposal was predicated on public trust. Although not explicitly managed under the moniker of sustainability, Lafarge used basic management principles that embody the tenets of sustainability. To achieve the goals of sustainable aggregate management where no governmental policies existed, Lafarge not only assumed their role of being a responsible corporate and environmental member of the community, but also assumed the role of facilitator to encourage and enable other stakeholders to responsibly resolve legitimate concerns regarding the Lafarge quarry proposal. Lafarge successfully presented an enlightened

  16. Including stratigraphic hierarchy information in geostatistical simulation: a demonstration study on analogs of alluvial sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comunian, Alessandro; Felletti, Fabrizio; Giacobbo, Francesca; Giudici, Mauro; Bersezio, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    When building a geostatistical model of the hydrofacies distribution in a volume block it is important to include all the relevant available information. Localised information about the observed hydrofacies (hard data) are routinely included in the simulation procedures. Non stationarities in the hydrofacies distribution can be handled by considering auxiliary (soft) data extracted, for example, from the results of geophysical surveys. This piece of information can be included as auxiliary data both in variogram based methods (i.e. co-Kriging) and in multiple-point statistics (MPS) methods. The latter methods allow to formalise some soft knowledge about the considered model of heterogeneity using a training image. However, including information related to the stratigraphic hierarchy in the training image is rarely straightforward. In this work, a methodology to include the information about the stratigraphic hierarchy in the simulation process is formalised and implemented in a MPS framework. The methodology is applied and tested by reconstructing two model blocks of alluvial sediments with an approximate volume of few cubic meters. The external faces of the blocks, exposed in a quarry, were thoroughly mapped and their stratigraphic hierarchy was interpreted in a previous study. The bi-dimensional (2D) maps extracted from the faces, which are used as training images and as hard data, present a vertical trend and complex stratigraphic architectures. The training images and the conditioning data are classified according to the proposed stratigraphic hierarchy, and the hydrofacies codes are grouped to allow a sequence of interleaved binary MPS simulation. Every step of the simulation sequence corresponds to a group of hydrofacies defined in the stratigraphic hierarchy. The blocks simulated with the proposed methodology are compared with blocks simulated with a standard MPS approach. The comparisons are performed on many realisations using connectivity indicators and

  17. Demonstration Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles "Skip"

    1998-05-01

    Last week I did a demonstration that produced a serious explosion. After putting methanol in a big glass carboy and rotating the carboy to build up some methanol vapor, I lit the mouth of the carboy. What normally happens is a "jet engine" effect out of the mouth of the carboy. In my case, the carboy exploded. Two polycarbonate blast shields were shattered and glass was blown as far as 15 feet away. I was not seriously cut and bruised, but had I not been using the two blast shields, I would have been severely injured. At this time, I am not sure what caused the explosion. I have done this demonstration around one hundred times with no problem using the exact same amount of methanol and technique. I think it is important to get the word out that this demonstration may be more dangerous than previously thought. I would also welcome any hypotheses concerning what caused the carboy to explode.

  18. The NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway is associated with tumor cell resistance to arsenic trioxide across the NCI-60 panel

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic is associated with increased risk for different types of cancer. Paradoxically, arsenic trioxide can also be used to induce remission in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with a success rate of approximately 80%. A comprehensive study examining the mechanisms and potential signaling pathways contributing to the anti-tumor properties of arsenic trioxide has not been carried out. Methods Here we applied a systems biology approach to identify gene biomarkers that underlie tumor cell responses to arsenic-induced cytotoxicity. The baseline gene expression levels of 14,500 well characterized human genes were associated with the GI50 data of the NCI-60 tumor cell line panel from the developmental therapeutics program (DTP) database. Selected biomarkers were tested in vitro for the ability to influence tumor susceptibility to arsenic trioxide. Results A significant association was found between the baseline expression levels of 209 human genes and the sensitivity of the tumor cell line panel upon exposure to arsenic trioxide. These genes were overlayed onto protein-protein network maps to identify transcriptional networks that modulate tumor cell responses to arsenic trioxide. The analysis revealed a significant enrichment for the oxidative stress response pathway mediated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) with high expression in arsenic resistant tumor cell lines. The role of the NRF2 pathway in protecting cells against arsenic-induced cell killing was validated in tumor cells using shRNA-mediated knock-down. Conclusions In this study, we show that the expression level of genes in the NRF2 pathway serve as potential gene biomarkers of tumor cell responses to arsenic trioxide. Importantly, we demonstrate that tumor cells that are deficient for NRF2 display increased sensitivity to arsenic trioxide. The results of our study will be useful in understanding the mechanism of

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses three broad classes of magnetic behavior: diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic. Presents a simple lecture demonstration using an overhead projector to synthesize triiron tetraoxide and to show its interaction with a magnetic field and comparing it to a paramagnetic material. (MVL)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations that require almost no preparation time, are visually stimulating, and present a variety of material for class discussion (with sample questions provided). The first involves a sodium bicarbonate hydrochloric acid volcano; the second involves a dissolving polystyrene cup. Procedures used and information on…

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliche, Jean-Marie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: 1) the effect of polarity on solubility using sodium dichromate, TTE, ligroin, and water to form nonpolar-polar-nonpolar layers with the polar layer being colored; 2) determination of egg whites to be yellow by determining the content of yellow colored riboflavin in the egg white. (MVL)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides instructions and a list of materials needed to demonstrate: (1) a model of the quantum mechanical atom; (2) principles involved in metal corrosion and in the prevention of this destructive process by electrochemical means; and (3) a Thermit reaction, modified to make it more dramatic and interesting for students. (SK)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first involves the colorful complexes of copper(II). The second involves reverse-phase separation of Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD & C) dyes using a solvent gradient. (JN)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first shows the effect of polarity on solubility. The second is based on the unexpected formation of a precipitate of barium nitrate when barium carbonate or barium phosphate is treated with dilute nitric acid. List of materials needed and procedures used are included. (JN)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  7. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: one that illustrates the attainment of equilibrium in first-order reactions by changing the volumes of two beakers of water at a specified rate, and another that illustrates the role of indicators in showing pH changes in buffer solutions. (MLH)

  8. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1: Results of treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.; Cline, S.R.; Bogle, M.A.; Tixier, J.S.

    1997-12-01

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993 to apply in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was later extended to include all of Pit 1 and was performed to support a possible Interim Record of Decision or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches beginning as early as FY 1997. This treatability study was carried out to establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlap of melt settings which will be necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. In April 1996 an expulsion of an estimated 10% of the 196 Mg (216 tons) melt body occurred resulting in significant damage to ISV equipment and, ultimately, led to an indefinite suspension of further ISV operations at Pit 1. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and status of the project in fulfilling these objectives through September 1997.

  9. Development, Demonstration, and Dissemination: Case Studies of Selected Specific Projects in Adult Basic Education. Occasional Paper No. 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beder, Harold W.; Darkenwald, Gordon G.

    In an effort to determine the effectiveness of 309 (b) projects (experimental demonstration projects in Adult Basic Education funded through the Adult Education Act), selected projects were used as the basis for several case studies and evaluated. Project RFD was never intended to be utilized by Adult Basic Education (ABE) programs but instead…

  10. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS - PHASE I. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST, AND EVALUATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses Phase I (a conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study) of a program to demonstrate the recovery of energy from waste methane produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge. The fuel cell is being used for this application becau...

  11. The Effect of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations on Students' Understanding of Heat and Temperature: A Study from Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanahoung, Choksin; Chitaree, Ratchapak; Soankwan, Chernchok; Sharma, Manjula D.; Johnston, Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations over traditional instruction on university students' understanding of heat and temperature. The participants were 327 first year undergraduate students from two science classes in two academic years from the same university in Thailand. One class…

  12. Antiproliferative Mechanisms of Action of the Flavin Dehydrogenase Inhibitors Diphenylene Iodonium and Di-2-thienyliodonium Based on Molecular Profiling of the NCI-60 Human Tumor Cell Panel

    PubMed Central

    Doroshow, James H.; Juhasz, Agnes; Ge, Yun; Holbeck, Susan; Lu, Jiamo; Antony, Smitha; Wu, Yongzhong; Jiang, Guojian; Roy, Krishnendu

    2012-01-01

    Flavoprotein-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in cytokine-mediated signal transduction in normal tissues and tumor cells. The flavoenzyme inhibitors diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and di-2-thienyliodonium (DTI) have been used to inhibit membrane-bound, flavoprotein-containing NADPH oxidases, including epithelial and leukocyte NADPH oxidases (Nox1-5 and Duox 1 and 2). Recent evidence suggests that DPI can decrease tumor cell proliferation; however, the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly defined. To explore the mechanisms underlying DPI- and DTI-related tumor cell growth delay, we examined growth inhibition patterns produced by both agents in the NCI-60 tumor panel, and determined expression levels of Nox gene family members across these cell lines. Possible molecular targets were predicted using the COMPARE program. DPI was more potent than DTI (GI50: 10 nM versus 10 μM); DPI and DTI exposure produced unique patterns of growth inhibition when evaluated against the small molecule anticancer database of the National Cancer Institute. Growth inhibition profiling of DPI revealed a modest positive correlation with Nox1 levels; novel mechanisms of DPI and DTI action, including alterations in Stat, Erk1/2, and Akt pathways, were inferred by correlation with NCI-60 Affymetrix® array data. Exposure of HT-29 colon cancer cells, which express Nox1, to DPI and DTI confirmed their inhibitory effects on steady state ROS levels, and demonstrated decreased Stat, Erk1/2, and Akt signaling mediated by IL-4, IL-6, IL-13, and IL-22, possibly due to a concomitant increase in tumor cell phosphatase activity. These findings suggest that DPI and DTI may act therapeutically by altering ROS-related signal transduction. PMID:22305747

  13. NCI Awards 18 Grants to Continue the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) Biomarkers Effort | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI has awarded 18 grants to continue the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN), a national infrastructure that supports the integrated development, validation, and clinical application of biomarkers for the early detection of cancer. The awards fund 7 Biomarker Developmental Laboratories, 8 Clinical Validation Centers, 2 Biomarker Reference Laboratories, and a Data Management and Coordinating Center (DMCC). |

  14. 76 FR 28439 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... was previously published in the Federal Register on March 15, 2011 (76 FR 14034) and allowed 60-days... Genetics Services Directory Web-Based Application Form and Update Mailer Summary: Under the provisions of... Collection: Title: NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-based Application Form and Update Mailer....

  15. (Updated) NCI Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget Proposes $25 Million for Frederick National Lab | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; image by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer The additional funding requested for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) in the Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget was $25 million, or approximately 3.5 percent of the total additional funding request of $715 million.   Officially called the Professional Judgment Budget, the Bypass Budget is a result of the National Cancer Act of 1971, which authorizes NCI to submit a budget directly to the president, to send to Congress. With a focus on NCI’s research priorities and areas of cancer research with potential for investment, the Bypass Budget specifies additional funding, over and above the current budget, that is needed to advance

  16. (Updated) NCI Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget Proposes $25 Million for Frederick National Lab | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; image by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer The additional funding requested for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) in the Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget was $25 million, or approximately 3.5 percent of the total additional funding request of $715 million. Officially called the Professional Judgment Budget, the Bypass Budget is a result of the National Cancer Act of 1971, which authorizes NCI to submit a budget directly to the president, to send to Congress. With a focus on NCI’s research priorities and areas of cancer research with potential for investment, the Bypass Budget specifies additional funding, over and above the current budget, that is needed to advance

  17. NCI's High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Computing Platform for Environmental and Earth System Data Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ben; Allen, Chris; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Gohar, Kashif; Porter, David; Pugh, Tim; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful and flexible in-situ petascale computational environment to enable both high performance computing and Data-intensive Science across a wide spectrum of national environmental and earth science data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress so far to harmonise the underlying data collections for future interdisciplinary research across these large volume data collections. NCI has established 10+ PBytes of major national and international data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the major Australian national-scale scientific collections), leading research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. New infrastructures created at NCI mean the data collections are now accessible within an integrated High Performance Computing and Data (HPC-HPD) environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large-scale high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. The hardware was designed at inception to ensure that it would allow the layered software environment to flexibly accommodate the advancement of future data science. New approaches to software technology and data models have also had to be developed to enable access to these large and exponentially

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenster, Ariel E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Identifies a technique using methylene blue and glucose to explain a genetically related enzyme shortage causing blue skin in humans. Offers a laser technique to study solubility of silver salts of chloride and chromate. Encourages the use of models and class participation in the study of chirality and enantiomers. (ML)

  19. NCI's national environmental research data collection: metadata management built on standards and preparing for the semantic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingbo; Bastrakova, Irina; Evans, Ben; Gohar, Kashif; Santana, Fabiana; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages national environmental research data collections (10+ PB) as part of its specialized high performance data node of the Research Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI) program. We manage 40+ data collections using NCI's Data Management Plan (DMP), which is compatible with the ISO 19100 metadata standards. We utilize ISO standards to make sure our metadata is transferable and interoperable for sharing and harvesting. The DMP is used along with metadata from the data itself, to create a hierarchy of data collection, dataset and time series catalogues that is then exposed through GeoNetwork for standard discoverability. This hierarchy catalogues are linked using a parent-child relationship. The hierarchical infrastructure of our GeoNetwork catalogues system aims to address both discoverability and in-house administrative use-cases. At NCI, we are currently improving the metadata interoperability in our catalogue by linking with standardized community vocabulary services. These emerging vocabulary services are being established to help harmonise data from different national and international scientific communities. One such vocabulary service is currently being established by the Australian National Data Services (ANDS). Data citation is another important aspect of the NCI data infrastructure, which allows tracking of data usage and infrastructure investment, encourage data sharing, and increasing trust in research that is reliant on these data collections. We incorporate the standard vocabularies into the data citation metadata so that the data citation become machine readable and semantically friendly for web-search purpose as well. By standardizing our metadata structure across our entire data corpus, we are laying the foundation to enable the application of appropriate semantic mechanisms to enhance discovery and analysis of NCI's national environmental research data information. We expect that this will further

  20. GASIS demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Vidas, E.H.

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  1. Are Sudanese community pharmacists capable to prescribe and demonstrate asthma inhaler devices to patrons? A mystery patient study

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Abuzar; Ahmed Hassan, Imad S.; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham M.

    Although community pharmacists have become more involved in the care of asthma patients, several studies have assessed pharmacists’'ability to illustrate appropriately inhalation technique of different asthma devices. Many studies addressed inappropriate use of asthma devices by patients and pharmacists, in addition to its clinical, humanistic and economic burden. Objective To evaluate community pharmacists' practical knowledge and skills of demonstrating proper inhalation technique of asthma inhaler devices available in Sudan. Methods Three hundred community pharmacies located around the three major hospitals in the capital city (Khartoum) and four other provinces were approached, and four asthma devices were assessed: Metered-dose inhaler (MDI) (n=105), MDI with Spacer (n=83), Turbuhaler (n=61), and Diskus (n=51). Investigator (a pharmacist) acted as a mystery patient. He selected one device and asked the serving pharmacist to demonstrate how to use the device. Investigator completed a checklist of 9 steps of inhaler device use immediately after leaving the pharmacy. Essential steps derived from published literature were pre-specified for each device. Five evaluation categories were accordingly formulated as follows: optimal technique, adequate technique, poor technique, totally unfamiliar with the device, and does not know. Results More than half of the pharmacists approached with metered dose inhaler did not know how to use optimal technique (ie all steps correct) all through. A third poorly demonstrated the technique, and only one pharmacist was categorized as being able to demonstrate an "optimal technique". The majority of pharmacists approached with spacing chamber and dry powder inhalers (Turbuhaler and Diskus) either did not know proper technique or were totally unfamiliar with the devices. Conclusions The majority of community pharmacists, who were expected to educate asthma patients on their dispensed inhalers, lack the basic knowledge of proper use

  2. Feasibility study to demonstrate cardiac imaging using fast kVp switching dual-energy computed tomography: phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhav, Priti; Imai, Yasuhiro; Narayanan, Suresh; Dutta, Sandeep; Chandra, Naveen; Hsieh, Jiang

    2012-03-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography is a novel imaging tool that has the potential to reduce beam hardening artifacts and enhance material separation over conventional imaging techniques. Dual-energy acquisitions can be performed by using a fast kVp technology to switch between acquiring adjacent projections at two distinct x-ray spectra (80 and 140 kVp). These datasets can be used to further compute material density and monochromatic images for better material separation and beam hardening reduction by virtue of the projection domain process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using dual-energy in cardiac imaging for myocardial perfusion detection and coronary artery lumen visualization. Data was acquired on a heart phantom, which consisted of the chambers and aorta filled with Iodine density solution (500 HU @ 120 kVp), a defect region between the aorta and chamber (40 HU @ 120 kVp), two Iodinefilled vessels (400 HU @ 120 kVp) of different diameters with high attenuation (hydroxyapatite) plaques (HAP), and with a 30-cm water equivalent body ring around the phantom. Prospective ECG-gated single-energy and prospective ECG-gated dual-energy imaging was performed. Results showed that the generated monochromatic images had minimal beam hardening artifacts which improved the accuracy and detection of the myocardial defect region. Material density images were useful in differentiating and quantifying the actual size of the plaque and coronary artery lumen. Overall, this study shows that dual-energy cardiac imaging will be a valuable tool for cardiac applications.

  3. Site sampling and treatability studies for demonstration of WasteChem's asphalt encapsulation technology under EPA's SITE program

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, J.; Tsadwa, S.; Wills, N.; Evans, M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents a sampling approach that was used to determine whether there were adequate quantities and concentrations of wastes at the Woodland Township Route 532 Site for demonstration of the asphalt encapsulation technology. This paper also presents the result of a bench-scale treatability study on wastes from this site. The preliminary sampling and analysis confirmed most of the types of organic and inorganic contaminants found at the Woodland Township Route 532 site during the remedial investigation (RI). However, the contamination levels varied over relatively short distances across the site from some contaminants. The bench-scale treatability study indicated that, when compared with concentrations in the untreated waste, WasteChem's asphalt encapsulation technology reduced semivolatile organic compound concentrations in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure extracts of treated wastes. The study also indicated that metals concentrations in the TCLP extracts were lower in the treated wastes than the untreated wastes in some samples and higher in others.

  4. Seasat-A ASVT: Commercial demonstration experiments. Results analysis methodology for the Seasat-A case studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The SEASAT-A commercial demonstration program ASVT is described. The program consists of a set of experiments involving the evaluation of a real time data distributions system, the SEASAT-A user data distribution system, that provides the capability for near real time dissemination of ocean conditions and weather data products from the U.S. Navy Fleet Numerical Weather Central to a selected set of commercial and industrial users and case studies, performed by commercial and industrial users, using the data gathered by SEASAT-A during its operational life. The impact of the SEASAT-A data on business operations is evaluated by the commercial and industrial users. The approach followed in the performance of the case studies, and the methodology used in the analysis and integration of the case study results to estimate the actual and potential economic benefits of improved ocean condition and weather forecast data are described.

  5. Structural and Genetic Studies Demonstrate Neurologic Dysfunction in Triosephosphate Isomerase Deficiency Is Associated with Impaired Synaptic Vesicle Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Zeccola, Alison M.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Talsma, Aaron D.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Heroux, Annie; Levitan, Edwin S.; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) deficiency is a poorly understood disease characterized by hemolytic anemia, cardiomyopathy, neurologic dysfunction, and early death. TPI deficiency is one of a group of diseases known as glycolytic enzymopathies, but is unique for its severe patient neuropathology and early mortality. The disease is caused by missense mutations and dysfunction in the glycolytic enzyme, TPI. Previous studies have detailed structural and catalytic changes elicited by disease-associated TPI substitutions, and samples of patient erythrocytes have yielded insight into patient hemolytic anemia; however, the neuropathophysiology of this disease remains a mystery. This study combines structural, biochemical, and genetic approaches to demonstrate that perturbations of the TPI dimer interface are sufficient to elicit TPI deficiency neuropathogenesis. The present study demonstrates that neurologic dysfunction resulting from TPI deficiency is characterized by synaptic vesicle dysfunction, and can be attenuated with catalytically inactive TPI. Collectively, our findings are the first to identify, to our knowledge, a functional synaptic defect in TPI deficiency derived from molecular changes in the TPI dimer interface. PMID:27031109

  6. NATO/CCMS pilot study on demonstration of remedial-action technologies for contaminated land and ground water: 1988 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sanning, D.E.; Smith, M.A.; Bell, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes the nature, structure and content of the NATO Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS) Pilot Study Demonstration of Remedial Action Technologies for Contaminated Land and Groundwater and the associated CCMS Fellowship program. To date, twelve projects in six countries have been selected for inclusion in the program which will involve periodic expert review during the five years for which the project will run. The paper draws special attention to the work on microbial clean up techniques included in the program, and the outcome of the first international meeting held in Washington, D.C. in 1987.

  7. Impact of the 2010 Consensus Recommendations of the Clinical Trial Design Task Force of the NCI Investigational Drug Steering Committee.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Lesley; Groshen, Susan; Rosner, Gary L; Sullivan, Daniel M; Spriggs, David R; Reeves, Steven; Gravell, Amy; Ivy, S Percy; Ratain, Mark J

    2015-11-15

    Oncology phase III trials have a high failure rate, leading to high development costs. The Clinical Trials Design Task Force of the Investigational Drug Steering Committee of the NCI Cancer Therapy and Evaluation Program developed Recommendations regarding the design of phase II trials. We report here on the results of a Concordance Group review charged with documenting whether concordance rates improved after the publication of the Recommendations. One hundred and fifty-five trials were reviewed. Letter of Intents (LOI) from the post-Recommendation period were more likely to be randomized (44% vs. 34%) and biomarker selected (19% vs. 10%). Single-arm studies using time-to-event endpoints (benchmarked against historical data) were similar, as was the type of tumor. There was a significant improvement in the rate of concordance, with 74% of LOIs scored as concordant compared with 58% before the Recommendations (P = 0.042). This included a marked decrease in the use of single-arm designs to evaluate the activity of drug combinations (19% vs. 5%, P = 0.009). There were areas for which clarification was warranted, including the need for protocols to include further development plans, the use of realistic benchmarks, the careful evaluation of historical controls, and the use of a standard treatment option as a control. Ongoing critical evaluation of current trial design methodology and the development of new Guidelines when appropriate will continue to improve drug development ensuring that safe and effective cancer therapeutics are made available to our patients as quickly and efficiently as possible. PMID:26567365

  8. Efonidipine, a Ca(2+)-channel blocker, enhances the production of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate in NCI-H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Keiichi; Saito, Takatoshi; Tojo, Katsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Steroid biosynthesis is initiated with transportation of cholesterol along with steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) into the mitchondria and is achieved with several steroidogenic enzymes. It has been reported that Ca(2+) channel blockers (CCBs), such as azelnidipine, efonidipine and nifedipine, suppress the biosynthesis of aldosterone and cortisol, but the overall effects of CCBs on steroid biosynthesis remain to be clarified. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of CCBs on the expression of steroidogenic enzymes and the production of adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) that has anti-atherosclerotic actions. NCI-H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells and HepG2 human hepatoma cells were cultured for 24 hours with or without a CCB (amlodipine, efonidipine, nifedipine, azelnidipine R(-)-efonidipine, verapamil or diltiazem). HepG2 hepatoma cells were used to confirm the effects of CCBs on the expression of StAR. In fact, efonidipine and nifedipine increased the expression of StAR in HepG2 cells. Efonidipine and nifedipine, but not other examined CCBs, also increased the N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (dbcAMP)-induced StAR mRNA, which reflects the action of adrenocorticotropic hormone, and efonidipine and R(-)-efonidipine enhanced the dbcAMP-induced DHEA-S production in NCI-H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells. Therefore, efonidipine and nifedipine might increase the expression of StAR and, in turn, efonidipine enhanced the dbcAMP-induced DHEA-S production, independent of Ca(2+) channel blockade. These results indicate that such effects are not associated with Ca(2+) influx. Moreover, only efonidipine enhanced the angiotensin II-induced expression of StAR mRNA (P < 0.01 vs. angiotensin II alone). In conclusion, efonidipine might exert an additional action beyond anti-hypertensive actions. PMID:21757861

  9. Appropriate small dam management for minimizing catchment-wide safety threats: International benchmarked guidelines and demonstrative cases studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisaniello, John D.; Tingey-Holyoak, Joanne; Burritt, Roger L.

    2012-01-01

    Small dam safety is generally being ignored. The potential for dam failure resulting in catastrophic consequences for downstream communities, property, and the environment, warrants exploration of the threats and policy issues associated with the management of small/farm dams. The paper achieves this through a comparative analysis of differing levels of dam safety assurance policy: absent, driven, strong, and model. A strategic review is undertaken to establish international dam safety policy benchmarks and to identify a best practice model. A cost-effective engineering/accounting tool is presented to assist the policy selection process and complement the best practice model. The paper then demonstrates the significance of the small-dam safety problem with a case study of four Australian States,policy-absent South Australia, policy-driven Victoria, policy-strong New South Wales, and policy-modelTasmania. Surveys of farmer behavior practices provide empirical evidence of the importance of policy and its proper implementation. Both individual and cumulative farm dam failure threats are addressed and, with supporting empirical evidence, the need for "appropriate" supervision of small dams is demonstrated. The paper adds to the existing international dam policy literature by identifying acceptable minimum level practice in private/farm dam safety assurance policy as well as updated international best practice policy guidelines while providing case study demonstration of how to apply the guidelines and empirical reinforcement of the need for "appropriate" policy. The policy guidelines, cost-effective technology, and comparative lessons presented can assist any jurisdiction to determine and implement appropriate dam safety policy.

  10. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chun-Xiu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yin-Xue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Dong; Yang, Tianxing; Pan, Si-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with a poor response to current chemotherapy. Danusertib is a pan-inhibitor of the Aurora kinases and a third-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent anticancer effects, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human gastric cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of danusertib on cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the molecular mechanisms involved in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells. The results showed that danusertib had potent growth-inhibitory, apoptosis-inducing, and autophagy-inducing effects on AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Danusertib arrested AGS and NCI-N78 cells in G2/M phase, with downregulation of expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and upregulation of expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danusertib induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, with an increase in expression of proapoptotic protein and a decrease in antiapoptotic proteins in both cell lines. Danusertib induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and triggered activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Further, danusertib induced autophagy, with an increase in expression of beclin 1 and conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-I) to LC3-II in both cell lines. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as well as activation of 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase contributed to the proautophagic effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. SB202191 and wortmannin enhanced the autophagy-inducing effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. In addition, danusertib inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition with an increase in expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in expression

  11. Phenome-wide association studies demonstrating pleiotropy of genetic variants within FTO with and without adjustment for body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M.; Field, Julie R.; Bradford, Yuki; Shaffer, Christian M.; Carroll, Robert J.; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Bastarache, Lisa; Edwards, Todd L.; Hebbring, Scott J.; Lin, Simon; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Crane, Paul K.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Crawford, Dana C.; Pathak, Jyotishman; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Carrell, David S.; Crosslin, David R.; Ledbetter, David H.; Carey, David J.; Tromp, Gerard; Williams, Marc S.; Larson, Eric B.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Peissig, Peggy L.; Brilliant, Murray H.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Chute, Christopher G.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Bottinger, Erwin; Chisholm, Rex; Smith, Maureen E.; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Joshua C.

    2014-01-01

    Phenome-wide association studies (PheWAS) have demonstrated utility in validating genetic associations derived from traditional genetic studies as well as identifying novel genetic associations. Here we used an electronic health record (EHR)-based PheWAS to explore pleiotropy of genetic variants in the fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO), some of which have been previously associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). We used a population of 10,487 individuals of European ancestry with genome-wide genotyping from the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network and another population of 13,711 individuals of European ancestry from the BioVU DNA biobank at Vanderbilt genotyped using Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. A meta-analysis of the two study populations replicated the well-described associations between FTO variants and obesity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.11–1.24, p = 2.10 × 10−9) and FTO variants and T2D (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.08–1.21, p = 2.34 × 10−6). The meta-analysis also demonstrated that FTO variant rs8050136 was significantly associated with sleep apnea (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.07–1.22, p = 3.33 × 10−5); however, the association was attenuated after adjustment for body mass index (BMI). Novel phenotype associations with obesity-associated FTO variants included fibrocystic breast disease (rs9941349, OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.74–0.91, p = 5.41 × 10−5) and trends toward associations with non-alcoholic liver disease and gram-positive bacterial infections. FTO variants not associated with obesity demonstrated other potential disease associations including non-inflammatory disorders of the cervix and chronic periodontitis. These results suggest that genetic variants in FTO may have pleiotropic associations, some of which are not mediated by obesity. PMID:25177340

  12. In vivo demonstration of ultrasound power delivery to charge implanted medical devices via acute and survival porcine studies.

    PubMed

    Radziemski, Leon; Makin, Inder Raj S

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies are an important step in proving the utility and safety of an ultrasound based implanted battery recharging system. To this end an Ultrasound Electrical Recharging System (USER™) was developed and tested. Experiments in vitro demonstrated power deliveries at the battery of up to 600 mW through 10-15 mm of tissue, 50 mW of power available at tissue depths of up to 50 mm, and the feasibility of using transducers bonded to titanium as used in medical implants. Acute in vivo studies in a porcine model were used to test reliability of power delivery, temperature excursions, and cooling techniques. The culminating five-week survival study involved repeated battery charging, a total of 10.5h of ultrasound exposure of the intervening living tissue, with an average RF input to electrical charging efficiency of 20%. This study was potentially the first long term cumulative living-tissue exposure using transcutaneous ultrasound power transmission to an implanted receiver in situ. Histology of the exposed tissue showed changes attributable primarily due to surgical implantation of the prototype device, and no damage due to the ultrasound exposure. The in vivo results are indicative of the potential safe delivery of ultrasound energy for a defined set of source conditions for charging batteries within implants. PMID:26243566

  13. A CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATING GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES--SOMERSWORTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the activities described in this document is to provide a demonstration of the procedures and methodologies described within the "Guidance for Evaluating Landfill Gas Emissions from Closed or Abandoned Facilities" (Guidance). This demonstration provides an example ...

  14. Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Chris Moore delivers a presentation from the Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration (ETDD) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX....

  15. Analysis of FDA-Approved Anti-Cancer Agents in the NCI60 Panel of Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Holbeck, Susan L.; Collins, Jerry M.; Doroshow, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Since the early 1990's the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has utilized a panel of 60 human tumor cell lines representing 9 tissue types to screen for potential new anti-cancer agents. To date, about 100,000 compounds and 50,000 natural product extracts have been screened. Early in this program it was discovered that the pattern of growth inhibition in these cell lines was similar for compounds of similar mechanism. The development of the COMPARE algorithm provided a means by which investigators, starting with a compound of interest, could identify other compounds whose pattern of growth inhibition was similar. With extensive molecular characterization of these cell lines, COMPARE and other user-defined algorithms have been used to link patterns of molecular expression and drug sensitivity. We describe here results of screening current FDA-approved anti-cancer agents in the NCI60 screen, with an emphasis on those agents that target signal transduction. We have analyzed results from agents with mechanisms of action presumed to be similar; we have also performed hierarchical clustering of all of these agents. The addition of data from recently approved anti-cancer agents will increase the utility of the NCI60 databases to the cancer research community. These data are freely accessible to the public on the DTP web site (http://dtp.cancer.gov/). The FDA-approved anti-cancer agents are themselves available from the NCI as a plated set of compounds for research use. PMID:20442306

  16. Case Study for the ARRA-funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration at Denver Museum of Nature & Science

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Piljae; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-11-30

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects were competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one such GSHP demonstration projects that uses a recycled water heat pump (RWHP) system installed at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science in Denver, Colorado. The RWHP system uses recycled water from the city’s water system as the heat sink and source for a modular water-to-water heat pump (WWHP). This case study was conducted based on the available measured performance data from December 2014 through August 2015, utility bills of the building in 2014 and 2015, construction drawings, maintenance records, personal communications, and construction costs. The annual energy consumption of the RWHP system was calculated based on the available measured data and other related information. It was compared with the performance of a baseline scenario— a conventional VAV system using a water-cooled chiller and a natural gas fired boiler, both of which have the minimum energy efficiencies allowed by ASHRAE 90.1-2010. The comparison was made to determine energy savings, operating cost savings, and CO2 emission reductions achieved by the RWHP system. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate the simple payback of the RWHP system. Summarized below are the results of the performance analysis, the learned lessons, and recommended improvement in the operation of the RWHP system.

  17. In memoriam: an appreciation for the NCI R25T cancer education and career development program.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shine

    2014-06-01

    On September 7, 2013, the NCI R25T award mechanism ended its final "receipt/review/award cycle" after more than two decades shaping the cancer prevention and control workforce. Created in 1991 to respond to a national shortage of cancer prevention and control researchers, the R25T supported innovative institutional programs with specialized curricula preparing individuals for careers as independent scientists for the field. Required elements ensured developing transdisciplinary sensibilities and skills highly suited to team science, including conducting collaborative research with mentors of complementary expertise. R25Ts provided trainee stipends, research, education, and travel funds at levels far higher than T32 National Service Research Awards to attract individuals from diverse disciplines. Graduates are faculty at all academic ranks, and hold leadership positions such as associate directors of cancer prevention and control. Beyond its trainees, R25Ts also recruited into the field other students exposed through courses in specialized prevention curricula, as well as course instructors and trainee mentors, who did not initially consider their work to be relevant to cancer prevention. Although advances are being achieved, prevention efforts are not yet fully realized, and currently unknown is the impact on the workforce of terminating the R25T, including whether it is another barrier to preventing cancer. PMID:24895444

  18. NCI Think Tank Concerning the Identifiability of Biospecimens and “-Omic” Data

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Carol J.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Green, Tiffany; Kinsinger, Christopher; Lockhart, Nicole C.; Nelson, Stefanie A.; Rodriguez, Laura L.; Buccini, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    On June 11 and 12, 2012, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) hosted a think tank concerning the identifiability of biospecimens and “omic” Data in order to explore challenges surrounding this complex and multifaceted topic. The think tank brought together forty-six leaders from several fields, including cancer genomics, bioinformatics, human subject protection, patient advocacy, and commercial genetics. The first day involved presentations regarding the state of the science of re-identification; current and proposed regulatory frameworks for assessing identifiability; developments in law, industry and biotechnology; and the expectations of patients and research participants. The second day was spent by think tank participants in small break-out groups designed to address specific sub-topics under the umbrella issue of identifiability, including considerations for the development of best practices for data sharing and consent, and targeted opportunities for further empirical research. We describe the outcomes of this two day meeting, including two complimentary themes that emerged from moderated discussions following the presentations on Day 1, and ideas presented for further empirical research to discern the preferences and concerns of research participants about data sharing and individual identifiability. PMID:23579437

  19. Highlights of recent developments and trends in cancer nanotechnology research--view from NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hull, L C; Farrell, D; Grodzinski, P

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of cancer and cancer related deaths in the United States has decreased over the past two decades due to improvements in early detection and treatment, cancer still is responsible for a quarter of the deaths in this country. There is much room for improvement on the standard treatments currently available and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recognized the potential for nanotechnology and nanomaterials in this area. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer was formed in 2004 to support multidisciplinary researchers in the application of nanotechnology to cancer diagnosis and treatment. The researchers in the Alliance have been productive in generating innovative solutions to some of the central issues of cancer treatment including how to detect tumors earlier, how to target cancer cells specifically, and how to improve the therapeutic index of existing chemotherapies and radiotherapy treatments. Highly creative ideas are being pursued where novelty in nanomaterial development enables new modalities of detection or therapy. This review highlights some of the innovative materials approaches being pursued by researchers funded by the NCI Alliance. Their discoveries to improve the functionality of nanoparticles for medical applications includes the generation of new platforms, improvements in the manufacturing of nanoparticles and determining the underlying reasons for the movement of nanoparticles in the blood. PMID:23948249

  20. Concordance of Gene Expression and Functional Correlation Patterns across the NCI-60 Cell Lines and the Cancer Genome Atlas Glioblastoma Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zeeberg, Barry R.; Kohn, Kurt W.; Kahn, Ari; Larionov, Vladimir; Weinstein, John N.; Reinhold, William; Pommier, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Background The NCI-60 is a panel of 60 diverse human cancer cell lines used by the U.S. National Cancer Institute to screen compounds for anticancer activity. We recently clustered genes based on correlation of expression profiles across the NCI-60. Many of the resulting clusters were characterized by cancer-associated biological functions. The set of curated glioblastoma (GBM) gene expression data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) initiative has recently become available. Thus, we are now able to determine which of the processes are robustly shared by both the immortalized cell lines and clinical cancers. Results Our central observation is that some sets of highly correlated genes in the NCI-60 expression data are also highly correlated in the GBM expression data. Furthermore, a “double fishing” strategy identified many sets of genes that show Pearson correlation ≥0.60 in both the NCI-60 and the GBM data sets relative to a given “bait” gene. The number of such gene sets far exceeds the number expected by chance. Conclusion Many of the gene-gene correlations found in the NCI-60 do not reflect just the conditions of cell lines in culture; rather, they reflect processes and gene networks that also function in vivo. A number of gene network correlations co-occur in the NCI-60 and GBM data sets, but there are others that occur only in NCI-60 or only in GBM. In sum, this analysis provides an additional perspective on both the utility and the limitations of the NCI-60 in furthering our understanding of cancers in vivo. PMID:22848369

  1. Histopathological and expression profiling studies of early tumor responses to near-infrared PDT treatment in SCID mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, Jean R.; Rebane, Aleksander; Drobizhev, Mikhail A.; Meng, Fanqin; Gong, Aijun; Elliott, Aleisha; McInnerney, Kate; Pascucci, Elizabeth; Spangler, Charles W.

    2008-02-01

    A novel class of porphyrin-based near-infrared photodynamic therapy (PDT) sensitizers is studied. We achieve regressions of human small cell lung cancer (NCI-H69), non-small cell lung cancer (A 459) and breast cancer (MDAMB- 231) xenografts in SCID mice at significant tissue depth by irradiation with an amplified femtosecond pulsed laser at 800 nm wavelength. Significant tumor regressions were observed during the first 10-14 days post treatment. Tumor histopathology was consistent with known PDT effects, while no significant changes were noted in irradiated normal tissues. In vivo imaging studies using intravenous injections of fluorescent dextran demonstrated an early loss of tumor blood flow. RNA was isolated from NCI-H69 PDT treated SCID mouse xenografts and paired untreated xenografts at 4 hours post laser irradiation. Similarly RNA was isolated from PDT treated and untreated Lewis lung carcinomas growing in C57/Bl6 mice. Expression profiling was carried out using Affymetrix TM human and mouse GeneChips®. Cluster analysis of microarray expression profiling results demonstrated reproducible increases in transcripts associated with apoptosis, stress, oxygen transport and gene regulation in the PDT treated NCI-H69 samples. In addition, PDT treated Lewis lung carcinomas showed reproducible increases in transcripts associated with immune response and lipid biosynthesis. PDT treated C57/Bl6 mice developed cytotoxic T cell activity towards this tumor, while untreated tumor bearing mice failed to do so.

  2. Media Competition Implementation for the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (MA-CORD): Adoption and Reach

    PubMed Central

    Criss, Shaniece; Cheung, Lilian; Giles, Catherine; Gortmaker, Steven; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Davison, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (MA-CORD) was a multi-level, multi-sector community intervention with a media competition component to provide an overarching synergy and promote awareness of target behaviors to reduce childhood obesity. Students participating in the media competition were tasked with developing videos, song/rap lyrics, and artwork that reflected the goals. The aim of this study is to document the process used to develop and implement the media competition along with its reach and adoption. An adapted version of Neta and colleagues’ 2015 framework on dissemination and implementation was used to summarize the process by which the media competition was developed and implemented. Adoption was defined by whether eligible schools or afterschool programs decided to implement the media competition. Reach was defined by student participation rates within schools/programs and the number of votes cast for the finalists on the coalition website and students’ paper ballots. A total of 595 students participated in the media competition from 18 school and afterschool programs in two communities. Adoption of the media competitions ranged from 22% to 100% in programs and reach ranged from 3% to 33% of the student population. The documentation of the implementation should contribute to the replication of the media competition. PMID:27058549

  3. Media Competition Implementation for the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (MA-CORD): Adoption and Reach.

    PubMed

    Criss, Shaniece; Cheung, Lilian; Giles, Catherine; Gortmaker, Steven; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Davison, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (MA-CORD) was a multi-level, multi-sector community intervention with a media competition component to provide an overarching synergy and promote awareness of target behaviors to reduce childhood obesity. Students participating in the media competition were tasked with developing videos, song/rap lyrics, and artwork that reflected the goals. The aim of this study is to document the process used to develop and implement the media competition along with its reach and adoption. An adapted version of Neta and colleagues' 2015 framework on dissemination and implementation was used to summarize the process by which the media competition was developed and implemented. Adoption was defined by whether eligible schools or afterschool programs decided to implement the media competition. Reach was defined by student participation rates within schools/programs and the number of votes cast for the finalists on the coalition website and students' paper ballots. A total of 595 students participated in the media competition from 18 school and afterschool programs in two communities. Adoption of the media competitions ranged from 22% to 100% in programs and reach ranged from 3% to 33% of the student population. The documentation of the implementation should contribute to the replication of the media competition. PMID:27058549

  4. 77 FR 37059 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Active Controls in Studies To Demonstrate Effectiveness of a New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... Demonstrate Effectiveness of a New Animal Drug for Use in Companion Animals; Availability AGENCY: Food and... Demonstrate Effectiveness of a New Animal Drug for Use in Companion Animals.'' This draft guidance advises... of new animal drugs for use in companion animals. The intent of the guidance is to...

  5. North-South Corridor Demonstration Project: Ethical and Logistical Challenges in the Design of a Demonstration Study of Early Antiretroviral Treatment for Long Distance Truck Drivers along a Transport Corridor through South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, G. B.; Venter, W. D. F.; Lange, J. M. A.; Rees, H.; Hankins, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Long-distance truck drivers are at risk of acquiring and transmitting HIV and have suboptimal access to care. New HIV prevention strategies using antiretroviral drugs to reduce transmission risk (early antiretroviral therapy (ART) at CD4 count >350 cells/μL) have shown efficacy in clinical trials. Demonstration projects are needed to evaluate “real world” programme effectiveness. We present the protocol for a demonstration study to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and cost of an early ART intervention for HIV-positive truck drivers along a transport corridor across South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Zambia, as part of an enhanced strategy to improve treatment adherence and retention in care. Methods and Analysis. This demonstration study would follow an observational cohort of truck drivers receiving early treatment. Our mixed methods approach includes quantitative, qualitative, and economic analyses. Key ethical and logistical issues are discussed (i.e., choice of drug regimen, recruitment of participants, and monitoring of adherence, behavioural changes, and adverse events). Conclusion. Questions specific to the design of tailored early ART programmes are amenable to operational research approaches but present substantial ethical and logistical challenges. Addressing these in demonstration projects can inform policy decisions regarding strategies to reduce health inequalities in access to HIV prevention and treatment programmes. PMID:23606977

  6. The city of San Diego Environmental Service Department`s Ridgehaven green building demonstration project: Project case study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gottfried, D.A.; Schoichet, E.A.

    1998-05-01

    This case study describes the greening of Ridgehaven, the City of San Diego Environmental Services Department`s (ESD`s) new 73,000 sf{sup 2} headquarters building. The use of green design techniques within the conventional renovation of the existing structure significantly increased energy efficiency and indoor air quality (IAQ), and decreased the project`s environmental impact. Despite the constraining municipal budget, tight time schedule, and mandated public bidding procedures, the design team made energy efficiency, IAQ, and resource efficiency their primary design determinants. In the design phase the team screened materials and systems for environmental impact, and their effect on IAQ. Existing materials and systems were frequently reused, thus salvaging or recycling many items that might have gone to landfill. The design team also addressed the environmental impacts of construction and building operations. The ``Green Building Demonstration Program`` included educational outreach and the creation of a unique Manufacturer`s Partnership Program to highlight the effectiveness of green building products and systems. The evaluation featured computerized energy modeling and life-cycle based financial analysis to optimize the energy system design. The annual average energy consumption is designed to be close to 50% of the energy consumption for a comparable California Title 24 energy code compliant building, thus making it one of the most energy efficient buildings in San Diego.

  7. Recommendations from the iSBTc-SITC/FDA/NCI Workshop on Immunotherapy Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Lisa H.; Palucka, A. Karolina; Britten, Cedrik M.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Håkansson, Leif; Janetzki, Sylvia; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kleen, Thomas-Oliver; Lee, Peter P.; Maccalli, Cristina; Maecker, Holden T.; Maino, Vernon C.; Maio, Michele; Malyguine, Anatoli; Masucci, Giuseppe; Pawelec, Graham; Potter, Douglas M.; Rivoltini, Licia; Salazar, Lupe G.; Schendel, Dolores J.; Slingluff, Craig L.; Song, Wenru; Stroncek, David F.; Tahara, Hideaki; Thurin, Magdalena; Trinchieri, Giorgio; van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wigginton, Jon M.; Marincola, Francesco; Khleif, Samir; Fox, Bernard A.; Disis, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To facilitate development of innovative immunotherapy approaches, especially for treatment concepts exploiting the potential benefits of personalized therapy, there is a need to develop and validate tools to identify patients who can benefit from immunotherapy. Despite substantial effort, we do not yet know which parameters of anti-tumor immunity to measure and which assays are optimal for those measurements. Experimental Design The iSBTc-SITC, FDA and NCI partnered to address these issues for immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we review the major challenges, give examples of approaches and solutions and present our recommendations. Results and Conclusions While specific immune parameters and assays are not yet validated, we recommend following standardized (accurate, precise and reproducible) protocols and use of functional assays for the primary immunologic readouts of a trial; consideration of central laboratories for immune monitoring of large, multi-institutional trials; and standardized testing of several phenotypic and functional potential potency assays specific to any cellular product. When reporting results, the full QA/QC performed, selected examples of truly representative raw data and assay performance characteristics should be included. Lastly, to promote broader analysis of multiple aspects of immunity, and gather data on variability, we recommend that in addition to cells and serum, that RNA and DNA samples be banked (under standardized conditions) for later testing. We also recommend that sufficient blood be drawn to allow for planned testing of the primary hypothesis being addressed in the trial, and that additional baseline and post-treatment blood is banked for testing novel hypotheses (or generating new hypotheses) that arise in the field. PMID:21558394

  8. Deciphering causal and statistical relations of molecular aberrations and gene expressions in NCI-60 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer cells harbor a large number of molecular alterations such as mutations, amplifications and deletions on DNA sequences and epigenetic changes on DNA methylations. These aberrations may dysregulate gene expressions, which in turn drive the malignancy of tumors. Deciphering the causal and statistical relations of molecular aberrations and gene expressions is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms of clinical phenotypes. Results In this work, we proposed a computational method to reconstruct association modules containing driver aberrations, passenger mRNA or microRNA expressions, and putative regulators that mediate the effects from drivers to passengers. By applying the module-finding algorithm to the integrated datasets of NCI-60 cancer cell lines, we found that gene expressions were driven by diverse molecular aberrations including chromosomal segments' copy number variations, gene mutations and DNA methylations, microRNA expressions, and the expressions of transcription factors. In-silico validation indicated that passenger genes were enriched with the regulator binding motifs, functional categories or pathways where the drivers were involved, and co-citations with the driver/regulator genes. Moreover, 6 of 11 predicted MYB targets were down-regulated in an MYB-siRNA treated leukemia cell line. In addition, microRNA expressions were driven by distinct mechanisms from mRNA expressions. Conclusions The results provide rich mechanistic information regarding molecular aberrations and gene expressions in cancer genomes. This kind of integrative analysis will become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in the era of personalized medicine. PMID:22051105

  9. Virus-Free Human Placental Cell Lines To Study Genetic Functions | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Section on Cellular Differentiation is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize immortalized virus-free human placental cell lines.The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Section on Cellular Differentiation is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize immortalized virus-free human placental cell lines.

  10. 76 FR 2253 - TRICARE; Coverage of National Cancer Institute (NCI) Sponsored Phase I Studies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    .... Public Comments The DoD published a proposed rule on June 22, 2009 (74 FR 29435- 29436). One set of..., injected into the blood, or injected into the muscle), how often, and what dose is safe. DATES: Effective... evaluate how a new drug should be given (by mouth, injected into the blood, or injected into the...

  11. Mouse Model for the Preclinical Study of Metastatic Disease | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute seeks partners for collaborative research to co-develop a mouse model that shows preclinical therapeutic response of residual metastatic disease.

  12. Comparative results of 327 chemical carcinogenicity studies.

    PubMed Central

    Haseman, J K; Huff, J E; Zeiger, E; McConnell, E E

    1987-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) have carried out a number of laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies and presented the results of these experiments in a series of Technical Reports. This paper tabulates the results of the 327 NCI/NTP studies carried out to date on 308 distinct chemicals, and discusses certain issues relevant to the evaluation of carcinogenicity in these experiments. This compilation of results from NCI/NTP carcinogenicity experiments provides a large database that can be used to study structure-activity correlations, interspecies concordance, and associations between laboratory animal carcinogenicity and other toxicological effects. PMID:3691430

  13. Isotopic Analysis of Fingernails as a USGS Open House Demonstration of the Use of Stable Isotopes in Foodweb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Young, M. B.; Choy, D.

    2011-12-01

    The USGS Isotope Tracers Project uses stable isotopes and tritium to add a unique dimension of chemical information to a wide range of environmental investigations. The use and application of isotopes is usually an unfamiliar and even esoteric topic to the general public. Therefore during three USGS open house events, as a public outreach effort, we demonstrated the use of stable isotopes by analyzing nitrogen and carbon isotopes from very small fragments of fingernail from willing participants. We titled the exhibit "You Are What You Eat". The results from all participants were plotted on a graph indicating the general influence of different food groups on the composition of body tissues as represented by fingernails. All participants were assigned a number and no personal-identification information was collected. A subset of participants provided us with an estimate of the number of days a week various foods were eaten and if they were vegetarians, vegans or non-vegetarians. Volunteers from our research group were on hand to explain and discuss fundamental concepts such as how foods attain their isotopic composition, the difference between C3 and C4 plants, the effects of assimilation, trophic enrichment, and the various uses of stable isotopes in environmental studies. The results of the fingernail analyses showed the variation of the range of isotopic compositions among about 400 people at each event, the distinct influence of C4 plants (mainly corn and cane sugar) on our carbon isotopic composition, and the isotopic differences between vegetarians and non vegetarians among other details (http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/projects/fingernails/). A poll of visitors attending the open house event in 2006 indicated that "You Are What You Eat" was among the most popular exhibits. Following the first two open house events we were contacted by a group of researchers from Brazil who had completed a very similar study. Our collaboration resulted in a publication in

  14. A ZO-1/α5β1-Integrin Complex Regulates Cytokinesis Downstream of PKCε in NCI-H460 Cells Plated on Fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    de Franceschi, Nicola; Saari, Markku; Ivarsson, Ylva; Zimmermann, Pascale; Brech, Andreas; Stenmark, Harald; Ivaska, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that integrin adhesion to the extracellular matrix at the cleavage furrow is essential for cytokinesis of adherent cells. Here, we report that tight junction protein ZO-1 (Zonula Occludens-1) is required for successful cytokinesis in NCI-H460 cells plated on fibronectin. This function of ZO-1 involves interaction with the cytoplasmic domain of α5-integrin to facilitate recruitment of active fibronectin-binding integrins to the base of the cleavage furrow. In the absence of ZO-1, or a functional ZO-1/α5β1-integrin complex, proper actin-dependent constriction between daughter cells is impaired and cells fail cytokinesis. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that in ZO-1 depleted cells the furrow becomes delocalized from the matrix. We also show that PKCε-dependent phosphorylation at Serine168 is required for ZO-1 localization to the furrow and successful cell division. Altogether, our results identify a novel regulatory pathway involving the interplay between ZO-1, α5-integrin and PKCε in the late stages of mammalian cell division. PMID:23967087

  15. Our Choice/Nuestra Opción: The Imperial County, California, Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (CA-CORD)

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra, Leticia; Binggeli-Vallarta, Amy; Moody, Jamie; McKenzie, Thomas L.; Angulo, Janette; Hoyt, Helina; Chuang, Emmeline; Ganiats, Theodore G.; Gahagan, Sheila; Ji, Ming; Zive, Michelle; Schmied, Emily; Arredondo, Elva M.; Elder, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite recent declines among young children, obesity remains a public health burden in the United States, including among Latino/Hispanic children. The determining factors are many and are too complex to fully address with interventions that focus on single factors, such as parenting behaviors or school policies. In this article, we describe a multisector, multilevel intervention to prevent and control childhood obesity in predominantly Mexican-origin communities in Southern California, one of three sites of the CDC-funded Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CA-CORD) study. Methods: CA-CORD is a partnership between a university-affiliated research institute, a federally qualified health center, and a county public health department. We used formative research, advisory committee members' recommendations, and previous research to inform the development of the CA-CORD project. Our theory-informed multisector, multilevel intervention targets improvements in four health behaviors: fruit, vegetable, and water consumption; physical activity; and quality sleep. Intervention partners include 1200 families, a federally qualified health center (including three clinics), 26 early care and education centers, two elementary school districts (and 20 elementary schools), three community recreation centers, and three restaurants. Intervention components in these sectors target changes in behaviors, policies, systems, and the social and physical environment. Evaluation activities include assessment of the primary outcome, BMI z-score, at baseline, 12-, and 18-months post-baseline, and sector evaluations at baseline, 12, and 24 months. Conclusions: Identifying feasible and effective strategies to prevent and control childhood obesity has the potential to effect real changes in children's current and future health status. PMID:25584664

  16. USFWS demonstration fees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Jonathan; Vaske, Jerry; Donnelly, Maureen; Shelby, Lori

    2002-01-01

    This study examined National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) visitors' reactions to changes in fees implemented as part of the fee demonstration program. Visitors' evaluations of the fees paid were examined in addition to their beliefs about fees and the fee demonstration program, and the impact of fees paid on their intention to return. All results were analyzed relative to socio-demographic characteristics.

  17. 77 FR 12598 - Notice Correction; A Multi-Center International Hospital-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI) The Federal Register notice published on February 24, 2012 (77 FR 11136) announcing the submission to OMB of the project titled, ``A multi-center international hospital-based case-control study of lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI)'' was submitted with...

  18. The Microgravity Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Wargo, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The Demonstrator is a tool to create microgravity conditions in your classroom. A series of demonstrations is used to provide a dramatically visual, physical connection between free-fall and microgravity conditions and to understand why various types of experiments are performed under microgravity conditions. A wealth of back-round material on free-fall, microgravity, and micro-gravity sciences is available in two educational documents available through the NASA Teacher Resource Centers: Microgravity-Activity Guide for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education, and The Mathematics of Microgravity. The remainder of this manual is divided into five sections. The first explains how to put the Microgravity Demonstrator together. The next section introduces the individual demonstrations and discusses the underlying physical science concepts. Following that are detailed steps for conducting each demonstration to make your use of the Demonstrator most effective. Next are some ideas on how to make your own Microgravity Demonstrator. The last section is a tips and troubleshooting guide for video connections and operations. If you have one of the NASA Microgravity Demonstrators, this entire manual should be useful. If you have a copy of the Microgravity Demonstrator Videotape and would like to use that as a teaching tool, the Demonstrations and Scientific Background section of this manual will give you insight into the science areas studied in microgravity.

  19. Flagship Technology Demonstrations (FTD)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Mike Conley delivers a presentation from the Flagship Technology Demonstrations (FTD) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of t...

  20. Computational Environments and Analysis methods available on the NCI High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Foster, C.; Minchin, S. A.; Pugh, T.; Lewis, A.; Wyborn, L. A.; Evans, B. J.; Uhlherr, A.

    2014-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful in-situ computational environment to enable both high performance computing and data-intensive science across a wide spectrum of national environmental data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress in addressing harmonisation of the underlying data collections for future transdisciplinary research that enable accurate climate projections. NCI makes available 10+ PB major data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the national scientific records), major research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. The data is accessible within an integrated HPC-HPD environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large scale and high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. This computational environment supports a catalogue of integrated reusable software and workflows from earth system and ecosystem modelling, weather research, satellite and other observed data processing and analysis. To enable transdisciplinary research on this scale, data needs to be harmonised so that researchers can readily apply techniques and software across the corpus of data available and not be constrained to work within artificial disciplinary boundaries. Future challenges will

  1. 78 FR 63477 - Guidance for Industry on Active Controls in Studies To Demonstrate Effectiveness of a New Animal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... INFORMATION: I. Background In the Federal Register of June 20, 2012 (77 FR 37059), FDA published the notice of... Demonstrate Effectiveness of a New Animal Drug for Use in Companion Animals; Availability AGENCY: Food and... Effectiveness of a New Animal Drug for Use in Companion Animals.'' This guidance advises industry on the use...

  2. Physical Education and Recreation for Handicapped Children; Proceedings of a Study Conference on Research and Demonstration Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Recreation and Park Association, Arlington, VA.

    Included are articles on the status of physical education for the retarded, the visually handicapped, the hearing impaired, and the emotionally disturbed. Concepts in research and demonstration needs in physical education and recreation for the physically handicapped are presented. Papers consider the status of recreation for the handicapped as…

  3. Known and Unknown Weaknesses in Software Animated Demonstrations (Screencasts): A Study in Self-Paced Learning Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palaigeorgiou, George; Despotakis, Theofanis

    2010-01-01

    Learning about computers continues to be regarded as a rather informal and complex landscape dominated by individual exploratory and opportunistic approaches, even for students and instructors in Computer Science Departments. During the last two decades, software animated demonstrations (SADs), also known as screencasts, have attracted particular…

  4. Using Discrepant Events in Science Demonstrations to Promote Student Engagement in Scientific Investigations: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancuso, Vincent J.

    2010-01-01

    Students' scientific investigations have been identified in national standards and related reform documents as a critical component of students' learning experiences in school, yet it is not easy to implement them in science classrooms. Could science demonstrations help science teachers put this recommendation into practice? While demonstrations…

  5. NCI Researchers Discover Exceptionally Potent Antibodies with Potential for Prophylaxis and Therapy of MERS-Coronavirus Infections | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer In a recent article published in the Journal of Virology, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Laboratory of Experimental Immunology (LEI), Cancer and Inflammation Program, NCI Center for Cancer Research, reported the identification of three human monoclonal antibodies (m336, m337, and m338) that target the part of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) that is responsible for binding to its receptor. These antibodies are exceptionally potent inhibitors of MERS-CoV infection and also provide a basis for creating a future MERS-CoV vaccine.

  6. NCI-60 Whole Exome Sequencing and Pharmacological CellMiner Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Reinhold, William C.; Varma, Sudhir; Sousa, Fabricio; Sunshine, Margot; Abaan, Ogan D.; Davis, Sean R.; Reinhold, Spencer W.; Kohn, Kurt W.; Morris, Joel; Meltzer, Paul S.; Doroshow, James H.; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing provides unprecedented insights into cancer biology and pharmacological response. Here we assess these two parameters for the NCI-60, which is among the richest genomic and pharmacological publicly available cancer cell line databases. Homozygous genetic variants that putatively affect protein function were identified in 1,199 genes (approximately 6% of all genes). Variants that are either enriched or depleted compared to non-cancerous genomes, and thus may be influential in cancer progression and differential drug response were identified for 2,546 genes. Potential gene knockouts are made available. Assessment of cell line response to 19,940 compounds, including 110 FDA-approved drugs, reveals ≈80-fold range in resistance versus sensitivity response across cell lines. 103,422 gene variants were significantly correlated with at least one compound (at p<0.0002). These include genes of known pharmacological importance such as IGF1R, BRAF, RAD52, MTOR, STAT2 and TSC2 as well as a large number of candidate genes such as NOM1, TLL2, and XDH. We introduce two new web-based CellMiner applications that enable exploration of variant-to-compound relationships for a broad range of researchers, especially those without bioinformatics support. The first tool, “Genetic variant versus drug visualization”, provides a visualization of significant correlations between drug activity-gene variant combinations. Examples are given for the known vemurafenib-BRAF, and novel ifosfamide-RAD52 pairings. The second, “Genetic variant summation” allows an assessment of cumulative genetic variations for up to 150 combined genes together; and is designed to identify the variant burden for molecular pathways or functional grouping of genes. An example of its use is provided for the EGFR-ERBB2 pathway gene variant data and the identification of correlated EGFR, ERBB2, MTOR, BRAF, MEK and ERK inhibitors. The new tools are implemented as an updated web-based Cell

  7. FGFR2 Is Amplified in the NCI-H716 Colorectal Cancer Cell Line and Is Required for Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Anjili; Ware, Christopher; Davis, Lenora; Gazdar, Adi; Pan, Bo-Sheng; Lutterbach, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant kinase activation resulting from mutation, amplification, or translocation can drive growth and survival in a subset of human cancer. FGFR2 is amplified in breast and gastric cancer, and we report here the first characterization of FGFR2 gene amplification in colorectal cancer in the NCI-H716 colorectal cancer cell line. FGFR2 is highly expressed and activated in NCI-H716 cells, and FGFR selective small molecule inhibitors or FGFR2 shRNA strongly inhibited cell viability in vitro, indicating “addiction” of NCI-H716 cells to FGFR2. NCI-H716 growth in a xenograft model was also inhibited by an FGFR small molecule inhibitor. FGFR2 was required for activation of multiple downstream signaling proteins including AKT, ERK, S6RP and NFKB. Inhibition of downstream kinases such as AKT or ERK alone had modest effects on proliferation, whereas combined inhibition of AKT and ERK signaling resulted in a loss of viability similar to FGFR2 inhibition. We identified elevated FGFR2 expression in a small subset of primary colorectal cancer, however FGFR2 amplification was not observed. Although FGFR2 amplification is not common in primary colon cancer or lymph node and liver metastases, other subsets of colorectal cancer such as ascites, from which the NCI-H716 cell line was derived, have yet to be tested. These results suggest that emerging FGFR inhibitor therapeutics may have efficacy in a subset of colon cancer driven by FGFR2 amplification. PMID:24968263

  8. Study and Demonstration of Planning and Scheduling Concepts for the Earth Observing System Data and Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Randal; Thalman, Nancy

    1993-01-01

    The University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (CU/LASP) along with the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) designed, implemented, tested, and demonstrated a prototype of the distributed, hierarchical planning and scheduling system comtemplated for the Earth Observing System (EOS) project. The planning and scheduling prototype made use of existing systems: CU/LASP's Operations and Science Instrument Support Planning and Scheduling (OASIS-PS) software package; GSFC's Request Oriented Scheduling Engine (ROSE); and JPL's Plan Integrated Timeliner 2 (Plan-It-2). Using these tools, four scheduling nodes were implemented and tied together using a new communications protocol for scheduling applications called the Scheduling Applications Interface Language (SAIL). An extensive and realistic scenario of EOS satellite operations was then developed and the prototype scheduling system was tested and demonstrated using the scenario. Two demonstrations of the system were given to NASA personnel and EOS core system (ECS) contractor personnel. A comprehensive volume of lessons learned was generated and a meeting was held with NASA and ECS representatives to review these lessons learned. A paper and presentation on the project's final results was given at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Computing in Aerospace 9 conference.

  9. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  10. Virtual Screening of Specific Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R) Inhibitors from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Molecular Database

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Cong; Huang, Yan-Xin; Bao, Yong-Li; Sun, Lu-Guo; Wu, Yin; Yu, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Yu; Song, Zhen-Bo; Zheng, Li-Hua; Sun, Ying; Wang, Guan-Nan; Li, Yu-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) is an attractive drug target for cancer therapy and research on IGF1R inhibitors has had success in clinical trials. A particular challenge in the development of specific IGF1R inhibitors is interference from insulin receptor (IR), which has a nearly identical sequence. A few potent inhibitors that are selective for IGF1R have been discovered experimentally with the aid of computational methods. However, studies on the rapid identification of IGF1R-selective inhibitors using virtual screening and confidence-level inspections of ligands that show different interactions with IGF1R and IR in docking analysis are rare. In this study, we established virtual screening and binding-mode prediction workflows based on benchmark results of IGF1R and several kinase receptors with IGF1R-like structures. We used comprehensive analysis of the known complexes of IGF1R and IR with their binding ligands to screen specific IGF1R inhibitors. Using these workflows, 17 of 139,735 compounds in the NCI (National Cancer Institute) database were identified as potential specific inhibitors of IGF1R. Calculations of the potential of mean force (PMF) with GROMACS were further conducted for three of the identified compounds to assess their binding affinity differences towards IGF1R and IR. PMID:23242155

  11. Aquated cisplatin and heparin-pluronic nanocomplexes exhibiting sustainable release of active platinum compound and NCI-H460 lung cancer cell antiproliferation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Nhat-Anh N; Nguyen, Thi Phuong; Cuu Khoa, Nguyen; Tran, Ngoc Quyen

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, platinum compounds have been many contributions in medicine. Development of new drugs from the active platinum compounds as well as nanocarriers for targeted delivery and reducing side effects of the drugs has paid much attention. In the study, nanocomplexes were prepared from aquated species of cisplatin and pluronic-conjugated heparin which distributed in the range of 80-100 nm by Transmission Electron Microscopy and 134 nm by Dynamic light scattering (DLS). Formation of the complex was confirmed by FTIR and DLS. The nanocomplexes exhibited high drug-loading capacity (approximately 42.5% wt/wt at 37 °C and 37.5% wt/wt at 25 °C). In vitro, drug-loaded nanogels showed much slower release profiles of cisplatin CDDP in pH 7.4 (physiological pH) compared with pH 5.5 condition at 37 °C. Moreover, the cytotoxicity assay results also indicated that Hep-F127 was cytocompatible; meanwhile, CDDP-loaded nanocomplex was able to reduce the cytotoxic ability of free CDDP (IC50 = 5.68 ± 0.73 μg/ml), which still maintain a significantly antiproliferative activity on NCI-H460 lung cancer cell. The in vitro preliminarily obtained results indicate that the nanocomplex is a candidate for CDDP delivery which can be studied further in cancer therapy. PMID:26886825

  12. Quantitative trait loci predicting circulating sex steroid hormones in men from the NCI-Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald L.; Ardanaz, Eva; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Chanock, Stephen J.; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Diver, W. Ryan; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loïc; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Stattin, Pär; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Daniel O.; Thomas, Gilles; Thun, Michael J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Yeager, Meredith; Kaaks, Rudolf; Hunter, David J.; Hayes, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Twin studies suggest a heritable component to circulating sex steroid hormones and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). In the NCI-Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, 874 SNPs in 37 candidate genes in the sex steroid hormone pathway were examined in relation to circulating levels of SHBG (N = 4720), testosterone (N = 4678), 3α-androstanediol-glucuronide (N = 4767) and 17β-estradiol (N = 2014) in Caucasian men. rs1799941 in SHBG is highly significantly associated with circulating levels of SHBG (P = 4.52 × 10−21), consistent with previous studies, and testosterone (P = 7.54 × 10−15), with mean difference of 26.9 and 14.3%, respectively, comparing wild-type to homozygous variant carriers. Further noteworthy novel findings were observed between SNPs in ESR1 with testosterone levels (rs722208, mean difference = 8.8%, P = 7.37 × 10−6) and SRD5A2 with 3α-androstanediol-glucuronide (rs2208532, mean difference = 11.8%, P = 1.82 × 10−6). Genetic variation in genes in the sex steroid hormone pathway is associated with differences in circulating SHBG and sex steroid hormones. PMID:19574343

  13. Lithium-ion Battery Demonstration for the 2007 NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, William; Baldwin, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Electrochemistry Branch designed and produced five lithium-ion battery packs for demonstration in a portable life support system (PLSS) on spacesuit simulators. The experimental batteries incorporated advanced, NASA-developed electrolytes and included internal protection against over-current, over-discharge and over-temperature. The 500-gram batteries were designed to deliver a constant power of 38 watts over 103 minutes of discharge time (130 Wh/kg). Battery design details are described and field and laboratory test results are summarized.

  14. Analysis of farmland fragmentation in China Modernization Demonstration Zone since "Reform and Openness": a case study of South Jiangsu Province.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Xia, Nan; Jiang, Penghui; Zhong, Lishan; Pian, Yuzhe; Duan, Yuewei; Huang, Qiuhao; Li, Manchun

    2015-01-01

    Farmland is a fundamental resource for human survival and development. However, farmland fragmentation has become a serious problem, causing ecological damage and low crop production efficiency in many parts of the world. Based on remote sensing and socioeconomic data, we used landscape pattern indices, Morphological Spatial Pattern Analysis (MSPA), and Markov chain models to analyze the temporal and spatial pattern changes in farmland in South Jiangsu Province (the first "Modernization Demonstration Zone" in China) during 1985-2010. Our results demonstrated that the total farmland area decreased by ca. 24% and the farmland pattern became fragmented during 1985-2008: core farmland decreased and islet farmland increased. Additionally, the farmland patch density (PD) increased and three other landscape indices (NLSI, MESH, and COHESION) showed significant decreases. Although the fragmentation rate slowed after 2008, the convergence rate to a stationary farmland distribution became faster, and transitions tended to be less deterministic after 2000. Economic and population growth and policy changes positively contributed to this phenomenon. Therefore, the primary task of farmland protection should be to preserve contiguous farmlands and reduce scattered patches in order to promote farmland connectivity. PMID:26135496

  15. Planetary and Space Science Education by Mathematica Demonstrations: Lunar Probe Planning, Instrumentations and Field Operation Simulations for Hunveyor Model by Studies of Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabai, S.; Bérczi, Sz.

    2008-03-01

    By interactive Mathematica Demonstrations of the Wolfram Research instrumentation, mechatronics and field operation simulations of lunar and martian space probes were studied focusing on our Surveyor- type educational space probe model: Hunveyor.

  16. mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of radioresistant NCI-H520 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    GUO, WEI; XIE, LI; ZHAO, LONG; ZHAO, YUEHUAN

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and to identify key molecules conferring radioresistance, the radioresistant subclone NCI-H520/R, derived from the NCI-H520 NSCLC cell line, was established with eight rounds of sublethal irradiation. The radioresistant features were subsequently assessed using a clonogenic assay, analysis of apoptosis and an MTT assay, the gene expression levels were examined using an Agilent Whole Human Genome 4×44 k Oligo microarray and Agilent Human miRCURY™ LNA array, and confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Pathway analysis and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis were performed to determine the biological functions of the subset of differentially expressed genes. miRNA-mRNA correlation analysis between the expression levels of each miRNA and all its predicted target genes was performed to further understand the radioresistance in the NCI-H520 cells. Following eight rounds of sublethal irradiation, a total of 2,862 mRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in the NCI-H520/R cells, including 893 upregulated genes and 1,969 downregulated genes. A total of 162 upregulated miRNAs and 274 downregulated miRNAs were significantly deregulated in the NCI-H520/R cells. Multiple core regulatory processes and signaling pathways were identified as being of likely relevance to radioresistance in NCI-H520/R cells, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and neurotrophin signaling pathway. The expression of genes associated with radioresistance reflects the complex biological processes involved in clinical cancer cell eradication and requires further investigation for future enhancement of therapy. PMID:25873351

  17. mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of radioresistant NCI-H520 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Xie, Li; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and to identify key molecules conferring radioresistance, the radioresistant subclone NCI-H520/R, derived from the NCI-H520 NSCLC cell line, was established with eight rounds of sublethal irradiation. The radioresistant features were subsequently assessed using a clonogenic assay, analysis of apoptosis and an MTT assay, the gene expression levels were examined using an Agilent Whole Human Genome 4 x 44 k Oligo microarray and Agilent Human miRCURY(™) LNA array, and confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Pathway analysis and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis were performed to determine the biological functions of the subset of differentially expressed genes. miRNA-mRNA correlation analysis between the expression levels of each miRNA and all its predicted target genes was performed to further understand the radioresistance in the NCI-H520 cells. Following eight rounds of sublethal irradiation, a total of 2,862 mRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in the NCI-H520/R cells, including 893 upregulated genes and 1,969 downregulated genes. A total of 162 upregulated miRNAs and 274 downregulated miRNAs were significantly deregulated in the NCI-H520/R cells. Multiple core regulatory processes and signaling pathways were identified as being of likely relevance to radioresistance in NCI-H520/R cells, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and neurotrophin signaling pathway. The expression of genes associated with radioresistance reflects the complex biological processes involved in clinical cancer cell eradication and requires further investigation for future enhancement of therapy. PMID:25873351

  18. Synthetic aperture imaging at 1.5μ: laboratory demonstration and potential application to planet surface studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkansky, Mark; Lucke, Robert L.; Funk, Eric E.; Reintjes, John F.; Rickard, Lee J.

    2002-12-01

    Two-dimensional imaging with synthetic aperture ladar (SAL) has been demonstrated in the laboratory. The method is entirely analogous to scan-mode synthetic aperture radar (SAR), which was used on the Magellan mission to Venus, but with 104-5 times shorter wavelength has the potential for much better resolution. The laboratory experiment is described and the theoretical limits placed on SNR by the combination of photon statistics and laser speckle are stated. SAL's limitations of small ground footrpint size and SNR < 1 for single-look imagery can be alleviated by multiple images and mosaicking of scenes. Design equations are given that show what hardware capabilities are needed to implement a desired system. They show that a 10 μ SAL in orbit around Mars can give centimeter-class resolution with reasonable laser power (<= 100 wt). Major engineering development hurdles must be overcome before any such system can be built.

  19. THE REPRESENTATIONAL ROLE OF DEMONSTRATIONS IN TEACHING CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES IN SCIENCE, STUDIES IN TELEVISED INSTRUCTION, AND DIMENSIONS OF VISUAL REPRESENTATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GROPPER, GEORGE L.; AND OTHERS

    TWO STUDIES CONCERNED WITH THE REPRESENTATIONAL ROLE OF DEMONSTRATIONS IN TEACHING CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF SCIENCE ARE REPORTED. THE TWO STUDIES WERE PERFORMED WITH DIMENSIONS OF VISUAL TV PRESENTATIONS VARIED IN THE CONTEXT OF PROGRAMED LESSONS. STUDY ONE COMPARES THE EFFECTIVENESS OF REALISTIC (LIVE) WITH NONREALISTIC (ANIMATED)…

  20. Development and demonstration of the TRUEX solvent extraction process

    SciTech Connect

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Copple, J.M.; Dow, J.A.; Everson, L.; Hutter, J.C.; Leonard, R.A.; Nunez, L.; Regalbuto, M.C.; Sedlet, J.; Srinivasan, B.; Weber, S.; Wygmans, D.G.

    1993-03-01

    The Generic TRUEX Model (GTM) was developed for use in designing site and feed-specific TRUEX flowsheets and in estimating the space and cost requirements for installing a TRUEX process. This paper discusses data collected in support of the GTM and its use in (1) designing process flowsheets and (2) performing sensitivity analyses. Demonstration of the TRUEX process is underway at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), where plutonium-containing analytical waste solutions generated at the DOE New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) are being converted from TRU waste ({approximately}l g Pu/L), with no current means of disposal, to solutions that contain less than 10 nCi of transuranic elements per milliliter of waste solution. Results and implications of this demonstration are discussed in this paper.

  1. Development and demonstration of the TRUEX solvent extraction process

    SciTech Connect

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Copple, J.M.; Dow, J.A.; Everson, L.; Hutter, J.C.; Leonard, R.A.; Nunez, L.; Regalbuto, M.C.; Sedlet, J.; Srinivasan, B.; Weber, S.; Wygmans, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    The Generic TRUEX Model (GTM) was developed for use in designing site and feed-specific TRUEX flowsheets and in estimating the space and cost requirements for installing a TRUEX process. This paper discusses data collected in support of the GTM and its use in (1) designing process flowsheets and (2) performing sensitivity analyses. Demonstration of the TRUEX process is underway at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), where plutonium-containing analytical waste solutions generated at the DOE New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) are being converted from TRU waste ([approximately]l g Pu/L), with no current means of disposal, to solutions that contain less than 10 nCi of transuranic elements per milliliter of waste solution. Results and implications of this demonstration are discussed in this paper.

  2. Spacecraft servicing demonstration plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergonz, F. H.; Bulboaca, M. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary spacecraft servicing demonstration plan is prepared which leads to a fully verified operational on-orbit servicing system based on the module exchange, refueling, and resupply technologies. The resulting system can be applied at the space station, in low Earth orbit with an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV), or be carried with an OMV to geosynchronous orbit by an orbital transfer vehicle. The three phase plan includes ground demonstrations, cargo bay demonstrations, and free flight verifications. The plan emphasizes the exchange of multimission modular spacecraft (MMS) modules which involves space repairable satellites. Three servicer mechanism configurations are the engineering test unit, a protoflight quality unit, and two fully operational units that have been qualified and documented for use in free flight verification activity. The plan balances costs and risks by overlapping study phases, utilizing existing equipment for ground demonstrations, maximizing use of existing MMS equipment, and rental of a spacecraft bus.

  3. Study plan for conducting a section 316(a) demonstration: K-Reactor cooling tower, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.

    1991-02-01

    The K Reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS) began operation in 1954. The K-Reactor pumped secondary cooling water from the Savannah River and discharged directly to the Indian Grave Branch, a tributary of Pen Branch which flows to the Savannah River. During earlier operations, the temperature and discharge rates of cooling water from the K-reactor were up to approximately 70{degree}C and 400 cfs, substantially altering the thermal and flow regimes of this stream. These discharges resulted in adverse impacts to the receiving stream and wetlands along the receiving stream. As a component of a Consent Order (84-4-W as amended) with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, the Department of Energy (DOE) evaluated the alternatives for cooling thermal effluents from K Reactor and concluded that a natural draft recirculating cooling tower should be constructed. The cooling tower will mitigate thermal and flow factors that resulted in the previous impacts to the Indian Grave/Pen Branch ecosystem. The purpose of the proposed biological monitoring program is to provide information that will support a Section 316(a) Demonstration for Indian Grave Branch and Pen Branch when K-Reactor is operated with the recirculating cooling tower. The data will be used to determine that Indian Grave Branch and Pen Branch support Balanced Indigenous Communities when K-Reactor is operated with a recirculating cooling tower. 4 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  4. Freshwater drowning in a child: A case study demonstrating the role of post-mortem computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Filograna, Laura; Tartaglione, Tommaso; Vetrugno, Giuseppe; Guerra, Claudio; Fileni, Adriano; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, modern imaging techniques have gained ground in forensics. A crucial question is whether virtual autopsy is capable of replacing traditional autopsy. Forensic diagnosis of freshwater drowning (FWD) is based on the evidence of findings from external inspection (e.g. frothy fluid exuding from the mouth and nostrils), internal examination (e.g. pulmonary congestion, enlargement of heart chambers) and biochemical analysis (haemodilution), findings which are non-specific. The detection of diatoms in organs of the systemic circulation may be of some assistance, but this analysis is rarely performed and is of debatable validity. An 18-month-old child was found dead at home in a swimming pool. Considering the family's wishes to avoid autopsy, the district attorney authorised a whole-body post-mortem computed tomography scan (PMCT). The main imaging findings were frothy fluid in the upper airways, fluid in the trachea and main bronchi, many pulmonary nodular ground glass opacities (GGO) in non-dependent regions and haemodilution. CT imaging did not show any other forensically relevant abnormality.A high concordance was found between the CT findings reported in the literature in cases of FWD and the imaging results. Thus, after the exclusion of other causes of death, advised by the forensic pathologist, the district attorney closed the case and the death was attributed to FWD. This case report demonstrates that PMCT imaging in cases of suspected FWD can provide some important findings for the diagnosis of FWD as the cause of death. PMID:25628338

  5. An epidemiological study of blood culture isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci demonstrating hospital-acquired infection.

    PubMed Central

    Burnie, J P; Naderi-Nasab, M; Loudon, K W; Matthews, R C

    1997-01-01

    We applied pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after SmaI digestion and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis with nine oligonucleotide primers to 146 blood culture isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis and 25 blood culture isolates of Staphylococcus haemolyticus. These were obtained over a 12-month period from patients on the neonatal and hematology units of the Central Manchester Health Care Trust. PFGE demonstrated two clusters of isolates of S. epidermidis (type A and type B) on the neonatal ward and a single cluster (type C) on the hematology unit. Type A was represented by 10 indistinguishable isolates from nine patients, type B was represented by 20 isolates from 14 patients, and type C was represented by 26 isolates from 10 patients. Type A isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol and type C isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, mirroring current antibiotic usage. There was no evidence of cross infection due to S. haemolyticus. RAPD analysis, on the basis of a single band difference, produced 58 types of S. epidermidis and 12 types of S. haemolyticus with primer 8 (ATG TAA GCT CCT GGG GAT TCA C; 5' to 3') and 54 types of S. epidermidis and 10 types of S. haemolyticus with primer 9 (AAG TAA GTG ACT GGG GTG AGC G; 5' to 3'). Combining the results confirmed cross infection. Types A, B, and C were concurrently isolated from the hands of the staff of the appropriate unit. Partial control was achieved by withdrawing ciprofloxacin use in the case of the hematology unit and improving hand hygiene in both units. PMID:9196185

  6. A Long-Term Experimental Study Demonstrates the Costs of Begging That Were Not Found over the Short Term

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Manuel; Ruiz-Raya, Francisco; Carra, Laura G.; Medina-Molina, Eloy; Ibáñez-Álamo, Juan Diego; Martín-Gálvez, David

    2014-01-01

    Parent–offspring conflict theory predicts that begging behaviour could escalate continuously over evolutionary time if it is not prevented by costliness of begging displays. Three main potential physiological costs have been proposed: growth, immunological and metabolic costs. However, empirical evidence on this subject remains elusive because published results are often contradictory. In this study, we test for the existence of these three potential physiological costs of begging in house sparrow (Passer domesticus) nestlings by stimulating a group of nestlings to beg for longer and another group for shorter periods than in natural conditions. All nestlings were fed with the same quantity of food. Our study involves a long-term experimental treatment for begging studies (five consecutive days). Long-term studies frequently provide clearer results than short-term studies and, sometimes, relevant information not reported by the latter ones. Our long-term experiment shows (i) a clear effect on the immune response even since the first measurement (6 hours), but it was higher during the second (long-term) than during the first (short-term) test; (ii) evidence of a growth cost of begging in house sparrow nestlings not previously found by other studies; (iii) body condition was affected by our experimental manipulation only after 48 hour; (iv) a metabolic cost of begging never previously shown in any species, and (v) for the first time, it has shown a simultaneous effect of the three potential physiological costs of begging: immunocompetence, growth, and metabolism. This implies first, that a multilevel trade-off can occur between begging and all physiological costs and, second, that a lack of support in a short-term experiment for the existence of a tested cost of begging does not mean absence of that cost, because it can be found in a long-term experiment. PMID:25372280

  7. A long-term experimental study demonstrates the costs of begging that were not found over the short term.

    PubMed

    Soler, Manuel; Ruiz-Raya, Francisco; Carra, Laura G; Medina-Molina, Eloy; Ibáñez-Álamo, Juan Diego; Martín-Gálvez, David

    2014-01-01

    Parent-offspring conflict theory predicts that begging behaviour could escalate continuously over evolutionary time if it is not prevented by costliness of begging displays. Three main potential physiological costs have been proposed: growth, immunological and metabolic costs. However, empirical evidence on this subject remains elusive because published results are often contradictory. In this study, we test for the existence of these three potential physiological costs of begging in house sparrow (Passer domesticus) nestlings by stimulating a group of nestlings to beg for longer and another group for shorter periods than in natural conditions. All nestlings were fed with the same quantity of food. Our study involves a long-term experimental treatment for begging studies (five consecutive days). Long-term studies frequently provide clearer results than short-term studies and, sometimes, relevant information not reported by the latter ones. Our long-term experiment shows (i) a clear effect on the immune response even since the first measurement (6 hours), but it was higher during the second (long-term) than during the first (short-term) test; (ii) evidence of a growth cost of begging in house sparrow nestlings not previously found by other studies; (iii) body condition was affected by our experimental manipulation only after 48 hour; (iv) a metabolic cost of begging never previously shown in any species, and (v) for the first time, it has shown a simultaneous effect of the three potential physiological costs of begging: immunocompetence, growth, and metabolism. This implies first, that a multilevel trade-off can occur between begging and all physiological costs and, second, that a lack of support in a short-term experiment for the existence of a tested cost of begging does not mean absence of that cost, because it can be found in a long-term experiment. PMID:25372280

  8. Research and development study for optimization of beryllium production operations. Task II report. Volume 1. Recommendations for subscale demonstration models

    SciTech Connect

    Zuehlke, J.R.

    1983-04-01

    The eleven evaluation reports in this Task II, Volume 1 report, are the results of a comprehensive literature search and study of new concepts or alternatives for beryllium metal production, currently available in industry today. Modifications to the current beryllium metal production process were also studied. Three processes were selected for in-depth evaluation and comparison to the current process with proposed improvements: sodium reduction of beryllium chloride to produce metallic beryllium; modified Hall process for beryllium flake; and electrowinning of beryllium chloride to produce metallic beryllium.

  9. Nurses' Health Study: demonstrating the impact of research, and adapting new measures and approaches to increase relevance and effect of cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Colditz, Graham A

    2016-01-01

    The Nurses' Health Study, a cohort of 121 701 female registered nurses, was established in 1976 to prospectively address the relationship between the use of oral contraceptives and the risk of breast cancer. Through follow-up questionnaires every 2 years, exposures have been updated and new exposure assessments added. Repeated measures have allowed a broad range of analyses, including change measures and risk according to time since exposure. Responding to emerging public health issues and accessing new measures (such as exposure to silicone implants, air pollution and the built environment) has allowed investigators to address an evolving spectrum of topics. Prospective data on a wide range of chronic conditions have allowed assessment of preventable fractions of diseases, development of risk prediction models, and other applications that bring data to bear on translation of epidemiologic findings to health policy and practice. The aim of this report is to highlight the features of the Nurses' Health Study and other cohorts that demonstrate continuing contributions to the changing epidemiology of chronic conditions. PMID:27421340

  10. A CASE STUDY DEMONSTRATING GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATING LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM CLOSED OR ABANDONED FACILITIES--SOUTH KINGSTOWN, RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a case study that applies EPA/600/R-05/123a, the guidance for conducting air pathway analyses of landfill gas emissions that are of interest to superfund remedial project managers, on-scene coordinators, facility owners, and potentially responsible parties. T...

  11. A Preliminary Study/Survey for Demonstration Community Housing Programs for the Adult Mentally Retarded, Physically Handicapped and Mentally Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Thomas W., Jr.; Hyman, Milton

    A study was conducted for the Michigan State Housing Development Authority to gather background data necessary to initiate prototype community housing for mentally and physically handicapped independent adults. In an extensive survey and analysis of the literature and existing facilities, the problem of mental retardation, including legislation…

  12. Demonstration of Classroom Survival Skills in Kindergarten: A Five-Year Transition Study of Children with Intellectual Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Coral; Carter, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Presents a study where 33 children with a range of intellectual disabilities who participated in a transition program embedded within a model inclusive preschool program were enrolled in mainstream kindergarten classes from 1995 to 1999. Explains that classroom survival skills, on-task behavior, and following teacher directions were measured.…

  13. DETERMINATION OF GOOD-ENGINEERING-PRACTICE STACK HEIGHT: A FLUID MODE DEMONSTRATION STUDY FOR A POWER PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study using fluid modeling to determine good-engineering-practice (GEP) stack height for a power plant installation is discussed. Measurements are presented to describe the simulated boundary layer structure, plume dispersion characteristics in the absence of the model plant bu...

  14. A Comparative Study of Competency-Based Courses Demonstrating a Potential Measure of Course Quality and Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Jackie; Dias, Laura Portolese; Schedler, Chris

    2015-01-01

    While competency-based education is growing, standardized tools for evaluating the unique characteristics of course design in this domain are still under development. This preliminary research study evaluated the effectiveness of a rubric developed for assessing course design of competency-based courses in an undergraduate Information Technology…

  15. A prospective study validating a clinical scoring system and demonstrating phenotypical-genotypical correlations in Silver-Russell syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Salah; Salem, Jennifer; Thibaud, Nathalie; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Lieber, Eli; Netchine, Irène; Harbison, Madeleine D

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple clinical scoring systems have been proposed for Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS). Here we aimed to test a clinical scoring system for SRS and to analyse the correlation between (epi)genotype and phenotype. Subjects and methods Sixty-nine patients were examined by two physicians. Clinical scores were generated for all patients, with a new, six-item scoring system: (1) small for gestational age, birth length and/or weight ≤−2SDS, (2) postnatal growth retardation (height ≤−2SDS), (3) relative macrocephaly at birth, (4) body asymmetry, (5) feeding difficulties and/or body mass index (BMI) ≤−2SDS in toddlers; (6) protruding forehead at the age of 1–3 years. Subjects were considered to have likely SRS if they met at least four of these six criteria. Molecular investigations were performed blind to the clinical data. Results The 69 patients were classified into two groups (Likely-SRS (n=60), Unlikely-SRS (n=9)). Forty-six Likely-SRS patients (76.7%) displayed either 11p15 ICR1 hypomethylation (n=35; 58.3%) or maternal UPD of chromosome 7 (mUPD7) (n=11; 18.3%). Eight Unlikely-SRS patients had neither ICR1 hypomethylation nor mUPD7, whereas one patient had mUPD7. The clinical score and molecular results yielded four groups that differed significantly overall and for individual scoring system factors. Further molecular screening led identifying chromosomal abnormalities in Likely-SRS-double-negative and Unlikely-SRS groups. Four Likely-SRS-double negative patients carried a DLK1/GTL2 IG-DMR hypomethylation, a mUPD16; a mUPD20 and a de novo 1q21 microdeletion. Conclusions This new scoring system is very sensitive (98%) for the detection of patients with SRS with demonstrated molecular abnormalities. Given its clinical and molecular heterogeneity, SRS could be considered as a spectrum. PMID:25951829

  16. A DEMONSTRATION OF A PRESURGICAL BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE EVALUATION FOR CATEGORIZING PATIENTS FOR IMPLANTABLE THERAPIES: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Schocket, Kimberly Gardner; Gatchel, Robert J.; Stowell, Anna Wright; Deschner, Martin; Robinson, Richard; Lou, Leland; Whitworth, Tony; Bernstein, Dana

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the current study was to evaluate the potential efficacy of a presurgical behavioral medicine evaluation (PBME) screening algorithm with patients undergoing evaluation for implantable pain management devices. Methods Sixty patients were evaluated for prognostic recommendations regarding outcomes from surgery for spinal cord stimulators and intrathecal pumps. Diagnostic interviews, review of medical charts, and psychosocial and functional measures were used in the initial evaluation. Results Patients were classified into one of four prognostic groups, from low to increasing risks: Green, Yellow-I, Yellow-II, and Red. The Green group showed the most positive biopsychosocial profile, while the Red groups showed the worst profiles. Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that the PBME algorithm may be an effective method for categorizing patients into prognostic groups. Psychological and adverse clinical features appear to have the most power in the classification of such patients. PMID:20657728

  17. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations using the overhead projector: (1) describes how to build a projecting voltmeter and presents uses for the classroom; and (2) investigates the color of fluorescent solutions by studying the absorption and transmission of light through the solutions. (MVL)

  18. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Described are three chemistry demonstrations: (1) a simple qualitative technique for taste pattern recognition in structure-activity relationships; (2) a microscale study of gaseous diffusion using bleach, HCl, ammonia, and phenolphthalein; and (3) the rotation of polarized light by stereoisomers of limonene. (MVL)

  19. Demonstration of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Identifying Markers for Wood Property and Male Strobili Traits in Cryptomeria japonica

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Kentaro; Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Moriguchi, Yoshinari; Ujino-Ihara, Tokuko; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Taguchi, Yuriko; Tsubomura, Miyoko; Mishima, Kentaro; Iki, Taiichi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Futamura, Norihiro; Shinohara, Kenji; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are an alternative to bi-parental QTL mapping in long-lived perennials. In the present study, we examined the potential of GWAS in conifers using 367 unrelated plus trees of Cryptomeria japonica D. Don, which is the most widely planted and commercially important tree species in Japan, and tried to detect significant associations between wood property traits and quantity of male strobili on the one hand, and 1,032 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) assigned to 1,032 genes on the other. Association analysis was performed with the mixed linear model taking into account kinship relationships and subpopulation structure. In total, 6 SNPs were found to have significant associations with the variations in phenotype. These SNPs were not associated with the positions of known genes and QTLs that have been reported to date, thus they may identify novel QTLs. These 6 SNPs were all found in sequences showing similarities with known genes, although further analysis is required to dissect the ways in which they affect wood property traits and abundance of male strobili. These presumptive QTL loci provide opportunities for improvement of C. japonica, based on a marker approach. The results suggest that GWAS has potential for use in future breeding programs in C. japonica. PMID:24260312

  20. A case study of bats and white-nose syndrome demonstrating how to model population viability with evolutionary effects.

    PubMed

    Maslo, Brooke; Fefferman, Nina H

    2015-08-01

    Ecological factors generally affect population viability on rapid time scales. Traditional population viability analyses (PVA) therefore focus on alleviating ecological pressures, discounting potential evolutionary impacts on individual phenotypes. Recent studies of evolutionary rescue (ER) focus on cases in which severe, environmentally induced population bottlenecks trigger a rapid evolutionary response that can potentially reverse demographic threats. ER models have focused on shifting genetics and resulting population recovery, but no one has explored how to incorporate those findings into PVA. We integrated ER into PVA to identify the critical decision interval for evolutionary rescue (DIER) under which targeted conservation action should be applied to buffer populations undergoing ER against extinction from stochastic events and to determine the most appropriate vital rate to target to promote population recovery. We applied this model to little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) affected by white-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease causing massive declines in several North American bat populations. Under the ER scenario, the model predicted that the DIER period for little brown bats was within 11 years of initial WNS emergence, after which they stabilized at a positive growth rate (λ = 1.05). By comparing our model results with population trajectories of multiple infected hibernacula across the WNS range, we concluded that ER is a potential explanation of observed little brown bat population trajectories across multiple hibernacula within the affected range. Our approach provides a tool that can be used by all managers to provide testable hypotheses regarding the occurrence of ER in declining populations, suggest empirical studies to better parameterize the population genetics and conservation-relevant vital rates, and identify the DIER period during which management strategies will be most effective for species conservation. PMID:25808080

  1. Brentuximab vedotin demonstrates objective responses in a phase 2 study of relapsed/refractory DLBCL with variable CD30 expression.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Eric D; Sharman, Jeff P; Oki, Yasuhiro; Advani, Ranjana H; Winter, Jane N; Bello, Celeste M; Spitzer, Gary; Palanca-Wessels, Maria Corinna; Kennedy, Dana A; Levine, Pamela; Yang, Jing; Bartlett, Nancy L

    2015-02-26

    Several non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) subtypes, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), variably express CD30. This phase 2, open-label study evaluated the efficacy of brentuximab vedotin, an anti-CD30 antibody-drug conjugate, in relapsed/refractory CD30(+) NHL. This planned subset analysis of B-cell NHLs includes 49 patients with DLBCL and 19 with other B-cell NHLs. Objective response rate was 44% for DLBCL, including 8 (17%) complete remissions (CRs) with a median duration of 16.6 months thus far (range, 2.7 to 22.7+ months). There was no statistical correlation between response and level of CD30 expression; however, all responding patients had quantifiable CD30 by computer-assisted assessment of immunohistochemistry. DLBCL patients were generally refractory to first-line (76%) and most recent therapies (82%), and 44% of these refractory patients responded (15% CRs). Patients with other B-cell lymphomas also responded: 1 CR, 2 partial responses (PRs) of 6 with gray zone, 1 CR of 6 with primary mediastinal B-cell, and 1 CR of 3 with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Adverse events were consistent with known toxicities. The combination of brentuximab vedotin with rituximab was generally well tolerated and had activity similar to brentuximab vedotin alone. Overall, significant activity with brentuximab vedotin was observed in relapsed/refractory DLBCL, and responses occurred across a range of CD30 expression. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01421667. PMID:25573987

  2. NCI adopta el sendero científico para lograr las metas de la Misión contra el Cáncer

    Cancer.gov

    El director interino del NCI, doctor Douglas Lowy, aceptó hoy las recomendaciones de un Panel Listón Azul para 10 planteamientos científicos que en cinco años lograrán un progreso contra el cáncer equivalente a una década de trabajo.

  3. Centro para la Salud Mundial del NCI anuncia becas de investigación para tecnologías portátiles

    Cancer.gov

    El Centro para la Salud Mundial del NCI (CGH) anunció el otorgamiento de subvenciones que apoyarán el desarrollo y la validación de tecnologías portátiles y de bajo costo para mejorar la detección temprana, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento del cáncer.

  4. Estudio del NCI revela que la obesidad extrema puede acortar la esperanza de vida hasta en 14 años

    Cancer.gov

    Los adultos con obesidad extrema tienen mayor riesgo de morir a edad más joven por cáncer y muchas otras causas entre ellas, enfermedades cardíacas, accidentes cerebrovasculares, diabetes y enfermedades del hígado y los riñones, según estudio del NCI.

  5. NCI adopta el sendero científico para lograr las metas de la Misión Nacional contra el Cáncer

    Cancer.gov

    El director interino del NCI, doctor Douglas Lowy, aceptó hoy las recomendaciones de un Panel Listón Azul para 10 planteamientos científicos que en cinco años lograrán un progreso contra el cáncer equivalente a una década de trabajo.

  6. NCI en el congreso de ASCO: Breve reseña de los resultados de investigaciones de cánceres en mujeres

    Cancer.gov

    En el congreso anual de la Sociedad Americana de Oncología Clínica (ASCO) 2014 celebrado en junio en Chicago, se destacaron los resultados de varios estudios clínicos patrocinados por el NCI sobre cánceres en la mujer.

  7. El NCI inicia un estudio para evaluar la utilidad de la secuenciación genética para mejorar los resu

    Cancer.gov

    El Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI) lanzará este mes un estudio clínico piloto denominado M-PACT con la finalidad de evaluar si el tratamiento asignado según mutaciones genéticas específicas puede brindar beneficios a pacientes con tumores sólidos meta

  8. An Aqueous Extract of Tuberaria lignosa Inhibits Cell Growth, Alters the Cell Cycle Profile, and Induces Apoptosis of NCI-H460 Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joana M; Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Xavier, Cristina P R; Lima, M João; Lima, Raquel T; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2016-01-01

    Tuberaria lignosa (Sweet) Samp. is found in European regions, and has antioxidant properties due to its composition in ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds. Given its traditional use and antioxidant properties, the tumor cell growth inhibitory potential of aqueous extracts from T. lignosa (prepared by infusion and decoction) was investigated in three human tumor cell lines: MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer), and HCT-15 (human colorectal adenocarcinoma). Both extracts inhibited the growth of these cell lines; the most potent one being the T. lignosa extract obtained by infusion in the NCI-H460 cells (GI50 of approximately 50 μg/mL). Further assays were carried out with this extract in NCI-H460 cells. At 100 μg/mL or 150 μg/mL it caused an increase in the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a decrease of cells in S phase of the cell cycle. Additionally, these concentrations caused an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. In agreement, a decrease in total poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and pro-caspase 3 levels was found. In conclusion, the T. lignosa extract obtained by infusion was more potent in NCI-H460 cells, altering the cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis. This work highlights the importance of T. lignosa as a source of bioactive compounds with tumor cell growth inhibitory potential. PMID:27164073

  9. Prospective demonstration of brain plasticity after intensive abacus-based mental calculation training: An fMRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. L.; Wu, T. H.; Cheng, M. C.; Huang, Y. H.; Sheu, C. Y.; Hsieh, J. C.; Lee, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    Abacus-based mental calculation is a unique Chinese culture. The abacus experts can perform complex computations mentally with exceptionally fast speed and high accuracy. However, the neural bases of computation processing are not yet clearly known. This study used a BOLD contrast 3T fMRI system to explore the brain activation differences between abacus experts and non-expert subjects. All the acquired data were analyzed using SPM99 software. From the results, different ways of performing calculations between the two groups were seen. The experts tended to adopt efficient visuospatial/visuomotor strategy (bilateral parietal/frontal network) to process and retrieve all the intermediate and final results on the virtual abacus during calculation. By contrast, coordination of several networks (verbal, visuospatial processing and executive function) was required in the normal group to carry out arithmetic operations. Furthermore, more involvement of the visuomotor imagery processing (right dorsal premotor area) for imagining bead manipulation and low level use of the executive function (frontal-subcortical area) for launching the relatively time-consuming sequentially organized process was noted in the abacus expert group than in the non-expert group. We suggest that these findings may explain why abacus experts can reveal the exceptional computational skills compared to non-experts after intensive training.

  10. Preconceptual design study for solidifying high-level waste: Appendices A, B and C West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, O.F.

    1981-04-01

    This report presents a preconceptual design study for processing radioactive high-level liquid waste presently stored in underground tanks at Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC) near West Valley, New York, and for incorporating the radionculides in that waste into a solid. The high-level liquid waste accumulated from the operation of a chemical reprocessing plant by the Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. from 1966 to 1972. The high-level liquid waste consists of approximately 560,000 gallons of alkaline waste from Purex process operations and 12,000 gallons of acidic (nitric acid) waste from one campaign of processing thoria fuels by a modified Thorex process (during this campaign thorium was left in the waste). The alkaline waste contains approximately 30 million curies and the acidic waste contains approximately 2.5 million curies. The reference process described in this report is concerned only with chemically processing the high-level liquid waste to remove radionuclides from the alkaline supernate and converting the radionuclide-containing nonsalt components in the waste into a borosilicate glass.

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid reconstitution via a perfusion-based cadaveric model: feasibility study demonstrating surgical simulation of neuroendoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Winer, Jesse L; Kramer, Daniel R; Robison, Richard A; Ohiorhenuan, Ifije; Minneti, Michael; Giannotta, Steven; Zada, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Cadaveric surgical simulation carries the advantage of realistic anatomy and haptic feedback but has been historically difficult to model for intraventricular approaches given the need for active flow of CSF. This feasibility study was designed to simulate intraventricular neuroendoscopic approaches and techniques by reconstituting natural CSF flow in a cadaveric model. In 10 fresh human cadavers, a simple cervical laminectomy and dural opening were made, and a 12-gauge arterial catheter was introduced. Saline was continuously perfused at physiological CSF pressures to reconstitute the subarachnoid space and ventricles. A neuroendoscope was subsequently inserted via a standard right frontal bur hole. In 8 of the 10 cadavers, adequate reconstitution and endoscopic access of the lateral and third ventricles were achieved. In 2 cadavers, ventricular access was not feasible, perhaps because of a small ventricle size and/or deteriorated tissue quality. In all 8 cadavers with successful CSF flow reconstitution and endoscopic access, identifying the foramen of Monro was possible, as was performing septum pellucidotomy and endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Furthermore, navigation of the cerebral aqueduct, fourth ventricle, prepontine cistern, and suprasellar cistern via the lamina terminalis was possible, providing a complementary educational paradigm for resident education that cannot typically be performed in live surgery. Surgical simulation plays a critical and increasingly prominent role in surgical education, particularly for techniques with steep learning curves including intraventricular neuroendoscopic procedures. This novel model provides feasible and realistic surgical simulation of neuroendoscopic intraventricular procedures and approaches. PMID:25859805

  12. Design of an Optimal Microseismic Monitoring Network: Synthetic Study for the Kimberlina CO2 Storage Demonstration Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Chen, T.; Lin, Y.; Foxall, W.; Hutchings, L. J.; Bachmann, C. E.; Daley, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    As part of the U.S. DOE initiative, National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) to develop quantitative risk assessment methodologies for carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS), we explore the design of an optimal microseismic monitoring network using synthetic earthquake data for the Kimberlina CCUS pilot site in California. The overpressure field calculated by fluid flow modeling within a reservoir confined by two fault zones in the vicinity of the Kimberlina injection well is input to induced earthquake simulations carried out using the code RSQSim (Dieterich and Richards-Dinger, Seismol. Res. Let., 2012). Velocity and attenuation structures developed using geological data for the reservoir overburden and underburden are used for numerical wave propagation modeling to calculate surface ground motion time series produced by the simulated microseismic events. We then invert the time series data using a fat-ray double-difference tomography method to locate the events, and compare the results with the known locations. The tomography method is applied to time series calculated for different surface recording network configurations to study the resulting variations in event locations uncertainties, and to assess an optimal network for cost-effective, long-term monitoring for CCUS.

  13. Plasma Lysosphingomyelin Demonstrates Great Potential as a Diagnostic Biomarker for Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Welford, Richard W. D.; Garzotti, Marco; Marques Lourenço, Charles; Mengel, Eugen; Marquardt, Thorsten; Reunert, Janine; Amraoui, Yasmina; Kolb, Stefan A.; Morand, Olivier; Groenen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a devastating, neurovisceral lysosomal storage disorder which is characterised by variable manifestation of visceral signs, progressive neuropsychiatric deterioration and premature death, caused by mutations in the NPC1 and NPC2 genes. Due to the complexity of diagnosis and the availability of an approved therapy in the EU, improved detection of NP-C may have a huge impact on future disease management. At the cellular level dysfunction or deficiency of either the NPC1 or NPC2 protein leads to a complex intracellular endosomal/lysosomal trafficking defect, and organ specific patterns of sphingolipid accumulation. Lysosphingolipids have been shown to be excellent biomarkers of sphingolipidosis in several enzyme deficient lysosomal storage disorders. Additionally, in a recent study the lysosphingolipids, lysosphingomyelin (SPC) and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph), appeared to be elevated in the plasma of three adult NP-C patients. In order to investigate the clinical utility of SPC and GlcSph as diagnostic markers, an in-depth fit for purpose biomarker assay validation for measurement of these biomarkers in plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was performed. Plasma SPC and GlcSph are stable and can be measured accurately, precisely and reproducibly. In a retrospective analysis of 57 NP-C patients and 70 control subjects, median plasma SPC and GlcSph were significantly elevated in NP-C by 2.8-fold and 1.4-fold respectively. For miglustat-naïve NP-C patients, aged 2–50 years, the area under the ROC curve was 0.999 for SPC and 0.776 for GlcSph. Plasma GlcSph did not correlate with SPC levels in NP-C patients. The data indicate excellent potential for the use of lysosphingomyelin in NP-C diagnosis, where it could be used to identify NP-C patients for confirmatory genetic testing. PMID:25479233

  14. Using CellMiner 1.6 for Systems Pharmacology and Genomic Analysis of the NCI-60.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, William C; Sunshine, Margot; Varma, Sudhir; Doroshow, James H; Pommier, Yves

    2015-09-01

    The NCI-60 cancer cell line panel provides a premier model for data integration, and systems pharmacology being the largest publicly available database of anticancer drug activity, genomic, molecular, and phenotypic data. It comprises gene expression (25,722 transcripts), microRNAs (360 miRNAs), whole-genome DNA copy number (23,413 genes), whole-exome sequencing (variants for 16,568 genes), protein levels (94 genes), and cytotoxic activity (20,861 compounds). Included are 158 FDA-approved drugs and 79 that are in clinical trials. To improve data accessibility to bioinformaticists and non-bioinformaticists alike, we have developed the CellMiner web-based tools. Here, we describe the newest CellMiner version, including integration of novel databases and tools associated with whole-exome sequencing and protein expression, and review the tools. Included are (i) "Cell line signature" for DNA, RNA, protein, and drugs; (ii) "Cross correlations" for up to 150 input genes, microRNAs, and compounds in a single query; (iii) "Pattern comparison" to identify connections among drugs, gene expression, genomic variants, microRNA, and protein expressions; (iv) "Genetic variation versus drug visualization" to identify potential new drug:gene DNA variant relationships; and (v) "Genetic variant summation" designed to provide a synopsis of mutational burden on any pathway or gene group for up to 150 genes. Together, these tools allow users to flexibly query the NCI-60 data for potential relationships between genomic, molecular, and pharmacologic parameters in a manner specific to the user's area of expertise. Examples for both gain- (RAS) and loss-of-function (PTEN) alterations are provided. PMID:26048278

  15. Secondary Analysis of the NCI-60 Whole Exome Sequencing Data Indicates Significant Presence of Propionibacterium acnes Genomic Material in Leukemia (RPMI-8226) and Central Nervous System (SF-295, SF-539, and SNB-19) Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Mark; Golovko, Georgiy; Khanipov, Kamil; Albayrak, Levent; Chumakov, Sergei; Pettitt, B. Montgomery; Strongin, Alex Y.; Fofanov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    The NCI-60 human tumor cell line panel has been used in a broad range of cancer research over the last two decades. A landmark 2013 whole exome sequencing study of this panel added an exceptional new resource for cancer biologists. The complementary analysis of the sequencing data produced by this study suggests the presence of Propionibacterium acnes genomic sequences in almost half of the datasets, with the highest abundance in the leukemia (RPMI-8226) and central nervous system (SF-295, SF-539, and SNB-19) cell lines. While the origin of these contaminating bacterial sequences remains to be determined, observed results suggest that computational control for the presence of microbial genomic material is a necessary step in the analysis of the high throughput sequencing (HTS) data. PMID:26039084

  16. Secondary Analysis of the NCI-60 Whole Exome Sequencing Data Indicates Significant Presence of Propionibacterium acnes Genomic Material in Leukemia (RPMI-8226) and Central Nervous System (SF-295, SF-539, and SNB-19) Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Mark; Golovko, Georgiy; Khanipov, Kamil; Albayrak, Levent; Chumakov, Sergei; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Strongin, Alex Y; Fofanov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    The NCI-60 human tumor cell line panel has been used in a broad range of cancer research over the last two decades. A landmark 2013 whole exome sequencing study of this panel added an exceptional new resource for cancer biologists. The complementary analysis of the sequencing data produced by this study suggests the presence of Propionibacterium acnes genomic sequences in almost half of the datasets, with the highest abundance in the leukemia (RPMI-8226) and central nervous system (SF-295, SF-539, and SNB-19) cell lines. While the origin of these contaminating bacterial sequences remains to be determined, observed results suggest that computational control for the presence of microbial genomic material is a necessary step in the analysis of the high throughput sequencing (HTS) data. PMID:26039084

  17. A VBM study demonstrating ‘apparent’ effects of a single dose of medication on T1-weighted MRIs

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Teresa R.; Wang, Ze; Shin, Joshua; Suh, Jesse J.; Detre, John A.; O'Brien, Charles P.; Childress, Anna Rose

    2012-01-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies have interpreted longitudinal medication- or behaviorally-induced changes observed on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRIs) as changes in neuronal structure. Although neurogenesis or atrophy certainly occurs, the use of T1-weighted scans to identify change in brain structure in vivo in humans has a vulnerability: the T1 relaxation time for arterial blood and gray matter are not clearly distinguishable and therefore, apparent reported structural findings might be at least partially related to changes in blood flow or other physiological signals. To examine the hypothesis that apparent structural modifications may reflect changes introduced by additional mechanisms irrespective of potential neuronal growth/atrophy, we acquired a high resolution T1-weighted structural scan and a 5-minute perfusion fMRI scan (a measurement of blood flow), prior to and after administration of an acute pharmacological manipulation, In a within subjects design, 15 subjects were either un-medicated or were administered a 20 mg dose of baclofen (an FDA-approved anti-spastic) approximately 110 minutes prior to acquiring a T1-weighted scan and a pseudo continuous arterial spin labeled (pCASL) perfusion fMRI scan. Using diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated lie algebra (DARTEL) within SPM7 we observed macroscopic, and therefore implausible, baclofen-induced decreases in VBM ‘gray matter’ signal in the dorsal rostral anterior cingulate [Family-wise error (FWE) corrected at p < 0.04, T= 6.54, extent: 1460 voxels] that overlapped with changes in blood flow. Given that gray matter reductions are unlikely following a single dose of medication these findings suggest that changes in blood flow are masquerading as reductions in gray matter on the T1-weighted scan irrespective of the temporal interval between baseline measures and longitudinal manipulations. These results underscore the crucial and immediate need to develop in vivo

  18. An intervention study demonstrates effects of MC4R genotype on boar taint and performances of growing-finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Van den Broeke, A; Aluwé, M; Tuyttens, F A M; Ampe, B; Vanhaecke, L; Wauters, J; Janssens, S; Coussé, A; Buys, N; Millet, S

    2015-03-01

    The Asp298Asn polymorphism of the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) in pigs is known to affect economically important traits such as growth rate and backfat thickness. We have assessed the possible use of this polymorphism as a molecular marker to perform genetic selection toward lower boar taint levels without compromising growth performance and carcass and meat quality in commercial boars and gilts. Homozygous boars and gilts of the AA genotype and GG genotype were compared in an intervention study with a 2 × 2 design to assess main effects and possible interactions between sex and genotype. The concentrations of the 3 boar taint compounds androstenone ( = 0.044), skatole ( = 0.049), and indole ( = 0.006) were significantly higher in fat of AA boars compared to GG boars. However, no effect on the sensory analysis of the fat samples could be observed. Between 20 and 115 kg BW, AA pigs showed higher ADFI than GG pigs ( < 0.001). An interaction between genotype and sex was observed for ADG ( = 0.044): AA boars had a significantly higher ADG than GG boars but there was no significant difference between the gilts. Daily lean meat gain tended to be higher in boars compared to gilts ( = 0.051), independent of genotype. Similarly, boars showed higher G:F compared to gilts ( < 0.001), without effect of genotype. Genotype and sex affected several carcass quality parameters but there was no interaction. Pigs of the AA genotype displayed a lower dressing percentage ( = 0.005), lower ham width ( = 0.024), lower muscle thickness ( = 0.011), and higher fat thickness ( < 0.001), resulting in a lower lean meat percentage ( < 0.001) in comparison with GG pigs. Gilts had a significantly higher dressing percentage ( < 0.001), higher muscle thickness ( < 0.001), higher ham width ( < 0.001), and lower ham angle ( < 0.001) compared to boars. Other than the boar taint compounds, meat quality was not affected by genotype. Pork of gilts was darker ( = 0.014) and less exudative during

  19. Pilot Study on Demonstration of Remedial Action Technologies for Contaminated Land and Groundwater Volumes 1 and 2 EPA/600/SR-93/012

    EPA Science Inventory

    This two-volume report presents information on a 5-yr pilot study (1986- 1991) sponsored by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's (NATO) Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS) entitled "Demonstration of Remedial Action Technologies for Contaminated Land and Gr...

  20. Maternal Factors That Influence Children's Positive Behavior: Demonstration of a Structural Equation Analysis of Selected Data from the Berkeley Growth Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crano, William D.; Mendoza, Jorge L.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis using data drawn from Nancy Bayley's Berkeley Growth Study is performed for didactic purposes to illustrate the use of structural equation modeling on a child development data set. Alternatives to standard latent factor approaches are demonstrated for use in research situations in which the subject-to-variable ratio is less than…

  1. Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Parsonage, Tom; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fabrications of large Beryllium optical components are fundamentally limited by available facility capabilities. To overcome this limitation, NASA funded Brush Wellman Corp to study a Be joining process. Four 76 mm diameters samples and a 0.5 mm diameter Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (JBMD) were fabricated. This presentation will review the fabrication of these samples and summarize the results of their cryogenic testing at MSFCs XRCF.

  2. Studying the Genetic Basis of Kidney Cancer - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Marston Linehan, NCI's Chief of Urologic Surgery, has spent the last several decades studying kidney cancer genes and treating kidney cancer patients. Learn more about his experience as a kidney cancer physician scientist and TCGA contributor in this

  3. NIH exceptional responders to cancer therapy study launched

    Cancer.gov

    The Exceptional Responders Initiative, a study to investigate the molecular factors of tumors associated with exceptional treatment responses of cancer patients to drug therapies, was launched today by NCI. Scientists will attempt to identify the molecula

  4. Computer based screening for novel inhibitors against Vibrio cholerae using NCI diversity set-II: an alternative approach by targeting transcriptional activator ToxT.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shakhinur Islam; Khadka, Bijendra; Akter, Arzuba; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Sultana, Razia

    2014-06-01

    Cholera is a severe diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae and remains as a major health risk in developing countries. The emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant V. cholerae strains during the past two decades is now a major problem in the treatment of cholera and have created the urgent need for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Targeting transcriptional factor is now a novel approach to tackle the development of multi-drug resistant strain. In the recent year virtual high throughput screening has emerged as a widely accepted powerful technology in the identification of novel and diverse lead. This study provides new insight to the search for new potent and selective inhibitors that still remains necessary to avoid the risk of possible resistance and reduce toxicity and side effects of currently available cholera drugs. The publications of high resolution X-ray structure of V. cholerae ToxT has open the way to the structure based virtual screening to identify new small molecular inhibitors which still remain necessary to avoid the risk of possible resistance and reduce toxicity and side effects of currently available cholera drugs. In this study we have performed structure based virtual screening approach using NCI diversity set-II to look for novel inhibitor of ToxT and proposed eight candidate compounds with high scoring function. Thus from complex scoring and binding ability it is elucidated that these compounds could be the promising inhibitors or could be developed as novel lead compounds for drug design against cholera. PMID:25172449

  5. A Study of Library Cooperatives, Networks and Demonstration Projects. Final Report. Volume II: Case Study Reports: Twelve Projects Supported by the HEA II-B Library Research and Demonstration Program and LSCA III Multitype Library Cooperation and Networking in Ten States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Joseph; And Others

    Case studies describing programs funded under the Library Research and Demonstration Component (II-B) of the Higher Education Act (HEA), and Title III of the Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) are included. The awarding of grants, and contracts to support research and demonstrations for improving library and information sciences,…

  6. Common genetic variants in prostate cancer risk prediction – Results from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Sara; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cox, David; Travis, Ruth C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Andriole, Gerald; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Crawford, E. David; Diver, W. Ryan; Ganziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J.; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Pala, Valeria; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Daniel O.; Thun, Michael J.; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Willett, Walter C.; Yeager, Meredith; Hayes, Richard B.; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Kraft, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the goals of personalized medicine is to generate individual risk profiles that could identify individuals in the population that exhibit high risk. The discovery of more than two-dozen independent SNP markers in prostate cancer has raised the possibility for such risk stratification. In this study, we evaluated the discriminative and predictive ability for prostate cancer risk models incorporating 25 common prostate cancer genetic markers, family history of prostate cancer and age. Methods We fit a series of risk models and estimated their performance in 7,509 prostate cancer cases and 7,652 controls within the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We also calculated absolute risks based on SEER incidence data. Results The best risk model (C-statistic=0.642) included individual genetic markers and family history of prostate cancer. We observed a decreasing trend in discriminative ability with advancing age (P=0.009), with highest accuracy in men younger than 60 years (C-statistic=0.679). The absolute ten-year risk for 50-year old men with a family history ranged from 1.6% (10th percentile of genetic risk) to 6.7% (90th percentile of genetic risk). For men without family history, the risk ranged from 0.8% (10th percentile) to 3.4% (90th percentile). Conclusions Our results indicate that incorporating genetic information and family history in prostate cancer risk models can be particularly useful for identifying younger men that might benefit from PSA screening. Impact Although adding genetic risk markers improves model performance, the clinical utility of these genetic risk models is limited. PMID:22237985

  7. The UF/NCI family of hybrid computational phantoms representing the current US population of male and female children, adolescents, and adults—application to CT dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Amy M.; O'Reilly, Shannon; Lee, Choonsik; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2014-09-01

    Substantial increases in pediatric and adult obesity in the US have prompted a major revision to the current UF/NCI (University of Florida/National Cancer Institute) family of hybrid computational phantoms to more accurately reflect current trends in larger body morphometry. A decision was made to construct the new library in a gridded fashion by height/weight without further reference to age-dependent weight/height percentiles as these become quickly outdated. At each height/weight combination, circumferential parameters were defined and used for phantom construction. All morphometric data for the new library were taken from the CDC NHANES survey data over the time period 1999-2006, the most recent reported survey period. A subset of the phantom library was then used in a CT organ dose sensitivity study to examine the degree to which body morphometry influences the magnitude of organ doses for patients that are underweight to morbidly obese in body size. Using primary and secondary morphometric parameters, grids containing 100 adult male height/weight bins, 93 adult female height/weight bins, 85 pediatric male height/weight bins and 73 pediatric female height/weight bins were constructed. These grids served as the blueprints for construction of a comprehensive library of patient-dependent phantoms containing 351 computational phantoms. At a given phantom standing height, normalized CT organ doses were shown to linearly decrease with increasing phantom BMI for pediatric males, while curvilinear decreases in organ dose were shown with increasing phantom BMI for adult females. These results suggest that one very useful application of the phantom library would be the construction of a pre-computed dose library for CT imaging as needed for patient dose-tracking.

  8. Increased PEA3/E1AF and decreased Net/Elk-3, both ETS proteins, characterize human NSCLC progression and regulate caveolin-1 transcription in Calu-1 and NCI-H23 NSCLC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Karin A; Marquez, Hector A; Li, Jun; Cao, Yuxia; Hinds, Anne; O'Hara, Carl J; Kathuria, Satinder; Ramirez, Maria I; Williams, Mary C; Kathuria, Hasmeena

    2009-08-01

    Caveolin-1 protein has been called a 'conditional tumor suppressor' because it can either suppress or enhance tumor progression depending on cellular context. Caveolin-1 levels are dynamic in non-small-cell lung cancer, with increased levels in metastatic tumor cells. We have shown previously that transactivation of an erythroblastosis virus-transforming sequence (ETS) cis-element enhances caveolin-1 expression in a murine lung epithelial cell line. Based on high sequence homology between the murine and human caveolin-1 promoters, we proposed that ETS proteins might regulate caveolin-1 expression in human lung tumorigenesis. We confirm that caveolin-1 is not detected in well-differentiated primary lung tumors. Polyoma virus enhancer activator 3 (PEA3), a pro-metastatic ETS protein in breast cancer, is expressed at low levels in well-differentiated tumors and high levels in poorly differentiated tumors. Conversely, Net, a known ETS repressor, is expressed at high levels in the nucleus of well-differentiated primary tumor cells. In tumor cells in metastatic lymph node sites, caveolin-1 and PEA3 are highly expressed, whereas Net is now expressed in the cytoplasm. We studied transcriptional regulation of caveolin-1 in two human lung cancer cell lines, Calu-1 (high caveolin-1 expressing) and NCI-H23 (low caveolin-1 expressing). Chromatin immunoprecipitation-binding assays and small interfering RNA experiments show that PEA3 is a transcriptional activator in Calu-1 cells and that Net is a transcriptional repressor in NCI-H23 cells. These results suggest that Net may suppress caveolin-1 transcription in primary lung tumors and that PEA3 may activate caveolin-1 transcription in metastatic lymph nodes. PMID:19483189

  9. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  10. Herschel's Interference Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkalskis, Benjamin S.; Freeman, J. Reuben

    2000-01-01

    Describes Herschel's demonstration of interference arising from many coherent rays. Presents a method for students to reproduce this demonstration and obtain beautiful multiple-beam interference patterns. (CCM)

  11. MO-E-BRF-01: Research Opportunities in Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology (Highlight of ASTRO NCI 2013 Workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, S; Jaffray, D; Chetty, I; Benedict, S

    2014-06-15

    Radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments for solid tumors, in large part due to significant technological advances associated with, for instance, the ability to target tumors to very high levels of accuracy (within millimeters). Technological advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as an oncologic treatment option for patients. ASTRO, AAPM and NCI sponsored a workshop “Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology” at the NCI campus in Bethesda, MD on June 13–14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to bring together expert clinicians and scientists to discuss the role of disruptive technologies in radiation oncology, in particular with regard to how they are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. The technologies discussed encompassed imaging and delivery aspects, along with methods to enable/facilitate application of them in the clinic. Measures for assessment of the performance of these technologies, such as techniques to validate quantitative imaging, were reviewed. Novel delivery technologies, incorporating efficient and safe delivery mechanisms enabled by development of tools for process automation and the associated field of oncology informatics formed one of the central themes of the workshop. The discussion on disruptive technologies was grounded in the need for evidence of efficacy. Scientists in the areas of technology assessment and bioinformatics provided expert views on different approaches toward evaluation of technology efficacy. Clinicians well versed in clinical trials incorporating disruptive technologies (e.g. SBRT for early stage lung cancer) discussed the important role of these technologies in significantly improving local tumor control and survival for these cohorts of patients. Recommendations summary focused on the opportunities associated with translating the technologies into the clinic and assessing their

  12. Engineering Study for a Full Scale Demonstration of Steam Reforming Black Liquor Gasification at Georgia-Pacific's Mill in Big Island, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Robert De Carrera; Mike Ohl

    2002-03-19

    Georgia-Pacific Corporation performed an engineering study to determine the feasibility of installing a full-scale demonstration project of steam reforming black liquor chemical recovery at Georgia-Pacific's mill in Big Island, Virginia. The technology considered was the Pulse Enhanced Steam Reforming technology that was developed and patented by Manufacturing and Technology Conversion, International (MTCI) and is currently licensed to StoneChem, Inc., for use in North America. Pilot studies of steam reforming have been carried out on a 25-ton per day reformer at Inland Container's Ontario, California mill and on a 50-ton per day unit at Weyerhaeuser's New Bern, North Carolina mill.

  13. SSME Key Operations Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brian; Bradley, Michael; Ives, Janet

    1997-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) test program was conducted between August 1995 and May 1996 using the Technology Test Bed (TTB) Engine. SSTO vehicle studies have indicated that increases in the propulsion system operating range can save significant weight and cost at the vehicle level. This test program demonstrated the ability of the SSME to accommodate a wide variation in safe operating ranges and therefore its applicability to the SSTO mission. A total of eight tests were completed with four at Marshall Space Flight Center's Advanced Engine Test Facility and four at the Stennis Space Center (SSC) A-2 attitude test stand. Key demonstration objectives were: 1) Mainstage operation at 5.4 to 6.9 mixture ratio; 2) Nominal engine start with significantly reduced engine inlet pressures of 50 psia LOX and 38 psia fuel; and 3) Low power level operation at 17%, 22%, 27%, 40%, 45%, and 50% of Rated Power Level. Use of the highly instrumented TTB engine for this test series has afforded the opportunity to study in great detail engine system operation not possible with a standard SSME and has significantly contributed to a greater understanding of the capabilities of the SSME and liquid rocket engines in general.

  14. PFBC Utility Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

  15. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Craig; Carroll, Paul; Bell, Abigail

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and

  16. P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) to support participation in the ETCTN

    Cancer.gov

    P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) to support participation in the ETCTN

  17. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  18. 1H High Resolution Magic-Angle Coil Spinning (HR-MACS) - NMR Metabolic Profiling of whole Saccharomyces cervisiae cells: A Demonstrative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Alan; Boutin, Celine; Aguiar, Pedro

    2014-06-01

    The low sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is its prime shortcoming compared to other analytical methods for metabolomic studies. It relies on large sample volume (30-50 µl for HR-MAS) for rich metabolic profiling, hindering high-throughput screening especially when the sample requires a labor-intensive preparation or is a sacred specimen. This is indeed the case for some living organisms. This study evaluates a 1H HR-MAS approach for metabolic profiling of small volume (250 nl) whole bacterial cells, Saccharomyces cervisiae, using an emerging micro-NMR technology: high-resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS). As a demonstrative study for whole cells, we perform two independent metabolomics studies identifying the significant metabolites associated with osmotic stress and aging.

  19. Nanotechnology-based cancer therapeutics--promise and challenge--lessons learned through the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Dorothy; Ptak, Krzysztof; Panaro, Nicholas J; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2011-02-01

    The new generation of nanotechnology-based drug formulations is challenging the accepted ways of cancer treatment. Multi-functional nanomaterial constructs have the capability to be delivered directly to the tumor site and eradicate cancer cells selectively, while sparing healthy cells. Tailoring of the nano-construct design can result in enhanced drug efficacy at lower doses as compared to free drug treatment, wider therapeutic window, and lower side effects. Nanoparticle carriers can also address several drug delivery problems which could not be effectively solved in the past and include reduction of multi-drug resistance effects, delivery of siRNA, and penetration of the blood-brain-barrier. Although challenges in understanding toxicity, biodistribution, and paving an effective regulatory path must be met, nanoscale devices carry a formidable promise to change ways cancer is diagnosed and treated. This article summarizes current developments in nanotechnology-based drug delivery and discusses path forward in this field. The discussion is done in context of research and development occurring within the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer program. PMID:20814720

  20. Vortex Apparatus and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakerin, Said

    2010-05-01

    Vortex flow, from millimeter to kilometer in scale, is important in many scientific and technological areas. Examples are seen in water strider locomotion, from industrial pipe flow (wastewater treatment) to air traffic control (safe distance between aircrafts on a runway ready for takeoff) to atmospheric studies.2-5 In this paper, we focus on a particular vortex known as bathtub vortex (BTV). It occurs when water is drained from a hole at the bottom of a container such as a bathtub or a sink under the action of gravity. The vortex has a funnel shape with a central air core, resembling a tornado. We have designed a portable apparatus to demonstrate bathtub vortex on a continual basis. The apparatus consists of a clear cylinder supported by a frame over a water reservoir and a submersible pump. Young and old have been equally amazed by watching the demonstrations at various public presentations held at the University of the Pacific recently. With material cost of less than 100, the apparatus can be easily fabricated and used at other universities. With a short set-up time, it is an ideal device for promoting science to the general public, and it can be used to enhance lectures in physics courses as well.

  1. NIH mouse study finds gut microorganisms may determine cancer treatment outcome

    Cancer.gov

    An intact gut commensal microbiota, which is a population of microorganisms living in the intestine, is required for optimal response to cancer therapy, according to a mouse study by scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)

  2. NIH study finds that coffee drinkers have lower risk of death

    Cancer.gov

    Older adults who drank coffee -- caffeinated or decaffeinated -- had a lower risk of death overall than others who did not drink coffee, according a study by researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health,

  3. Fruit & Vegetable Screeners in the Eating at America's Table Study (EATS): Instruments

    Cancer.gov

    These instruments are in the public domain and may be used by any investigator. However, because they were used in NCI's Eating at America's Table Study (EATS) project, investigators must remove the first page, which is the EATS identifier page.

  4. NIH study shows increased risk for two types of myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Cancer.gov

    Adults with a form of muscular dystrophy called myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) may be at increased risk of developing cancer, according to a study by investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

  5. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes several chemistry demonstrations that use an overhead projector. Some of the demonstrations deal with electrochemistry, and another deals with the reactions of nonvolatile immiscible liquid in water. (TW)

  6. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  7. 1H high resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS) μNMR metabolic profiling of whole Saccharomyces cervisiae cells: a demonstrative study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alan; Boutin, Céline; Aguiar, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    The low sensitivity and thus need for large sample volume is one of the major drawbacks of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This is especially problematic for performing rich metabolic profiling of scarce samples such as whole cells or living organisms. This study evaluates a 1H HR-MAS approach for metabolic profiling of small volumes (250 nl) of whole cells. We have applied an emerging micro-NMR technology, high-resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS), to study whole Saccharomyces cervisiae cells. We find that high-resolution high-sensitivity spectra can be obtained with only 19 million cells and, as a demonstration of the metabolic profiling potential, we perform two independent metabolomics studies identifying the significant metabolites associated with osmotic stress and aging. PMID:24971307

  8. (1)H high resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS) μNMR metabolic profiling of whole Saccharomyces cervisiae cells: a demonstrative study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alan; Boutin, Céline; Aguiar, Pedro M

    2014-01-01

    The low sensitivity and thus need for large sample volume is one of the major drawbacks of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This is especially problematic for performing rich metabolic profiling of scarce samples such as whole cells or living organisms. This study evaluates a (1)H HR-MAS approach for metabolic profiling of small volumes (250 nl) of whole cells. We have applied an emerging micro-NMR technology, high-resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS), to study whole Saccharomyces cervisiae cells. We find that high-resolution high-sensitivity spectra can be obtained with only 19 million cells and, as a demonstration of the metabolic profiling potential, we perform two independent metabolomics studies identifying the significant metabolites associated with osmotic stress and aging. PMID:24971307

  9. Demonstration of fuel cells to recover energy from anaerobic digester gas. Phase 1. A conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study. Final report, February-August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Trocciola, J.C.; Healy, H.C.

    1995-03-01

    The report discusses Phase I (a conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study) of a program to demonstrate the recovery of energy from waste methane produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge. The fuel cell is being used for this application because it is potentially one of the cleanest energy technologies available. The program is focused on utilizing a commercial Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) power plant because of its inherently high fuel efficiency, low emissions characteristics, and high state of development. The environmental impact of widespread use of this concept would be a significant reduction in global warming and acid rain air emissions.

  10. Fusion power demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.

    1983-09-01

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment.

  11. Structural assembly demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The experiment is of an operational variety, designed to assess crew capability in Large Space System (LSS) assembly. The six Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment objectives include: (1) the establishment of a quantitative correlation between LSS neutral buoyancy simulation and on-orbit assembly operations in order to enhance the validity of those assembly simulations; (2) the quantitative study of the capabilities and mechanics of human assembly in an Extravehicular Activity environment; (3) the further corroboration of the LSS Assembly Analysis cost algorithm through the obtainment of hard data base information; (4) the verification of LSS assembly techniques and timeless, as well as the identification of crew imposed loads and assembly aid requirements and concepts; (5) verification of a Launch/Assembly Platform structure concept for other LSS missions; and (6) lastly, to advance thermal control concepts through a flexible heat pipe.

  12. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  13. Classical Demonstration of Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Robert P.; Moore, Dennis R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a classical demonstration of polarization for high school students. The initial state of this model, which demonstrates the important concepts of the optical and quantum problems, was developed during the 1973 summer program on lecture demonstration at the U.S. Naval Academy. (HM)

  14. A Boyle's Law Demonstrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sathe, Dileep V.

    1984-01-01

    The usual apparatus for demonstrating Boyle's law produces reasonably accurate results, but is not impressive as a demonstration because students cannot easily appreciate the change in pressure. An apparatus designed to produce a more effective demonstration is described. Procedures employed are also described. (JN)

  15. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details two demonstrations for use with an overhead projector in a chemistry lecture. Includes "A Very Rapidly Growing Silicate Crystal" and "A Colorful Demonstration to Simulate Orbital Hybridization." The materials and directions for each demonstration are included as well as a brief explanation of the essential learning involved. (CW)

  16. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  17. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  18. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.

    2006-08-01

    By using astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients, I have been able to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students. I will present some of the edible demonstrations I have created including using popcorn to simulate radioactivity; using chocolate, nuts, and marshmallows to illustrate density and differentiation during the formation of the planets; and making big-bang brownies or chocolate chip-cookies to illustrate the expansion of the Universe. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented.

  19. Data surety demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Draelos, T.; Harris, M.; Herrington, P.; Kromer, D.

    1998-08-01

    The use of data surety within the International Monitoring System (IMS) is designed to offer increased trust of acquired sensor data at a low cost. The demonstrations discussed in the paper illustrate the feasibility of hardware authentication for sensor data and commands in a retrofit environment and a new system and of the supporting key management system. The individual demonstrations which are summarized in the paper are: (1) demonstration of hardware authentication for communication authentication in a retrofit environment; (2)demonstration of hardware authentication in a new system; and (3) demonstration of key management for sensor data and command authentication.

  20. Three-dimensional modeling of subsurface contamination: A case study from the radio frequency-heating demonstration at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Poppy, S.P. |; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Jarosch, T.R.

    1994-07-01

    Computer based three-dimensional modeling is a powerful tool used for visualizing and interpreting environmental data collected at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Three-dimensional modeling was used to image and interpret subsurface spatial data, primarily, changes in the movement, the accumulation, and the depletion of contaminants at the Integrated Demonstration Site (IDS), a proving ground for experimental environmental remediation technologies. Three-dimensional models are also educational tools, relaying complex environmental data to interested non-technical individuals who may be unfamiliar with the concepts and terminology involved in environmental studies. The public can draw their own conclusions of the success of the experiments after viewing the three-dimensional images set up in a chronological order. The three-dimensional grids generated during these studies can also be used to create images for visualization and animated sequences that model contamination movement. Animation puts the images of contamination distribution in motion and results in a new perspective on the effects of the remedial demonstration.