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Sample records for nda efficacy supplement

  1. Efficacy of nutritional supplements used by athletes.

    PubMed

    Beltz, S D; Doering, P L

    1993-12-01

    Findings on the efficacy of nutritional supplements used by athletes are reviewed. Many athletes have turned away from anabolic steroids and toward nutritional supplements in the hope of gaining a competitive edge without threatening their health. Athletes may require slightly more protein than sedentary people do to maintain positive nitrogen balance, but it is dubious whether extra dietary protein will help someone to achieve athletic goals. Purified amino acids have become a popular if expensive form of protein supplementation; there is no scientific evidence, however, to support their use. Excessive protein supplementation can lead to dehydration, gout, liver and kidney damage, calcium loss, and gastrointestinal effects. Supplementation with vitamins and minerals in excess of recommended daily allowances appears to have no effect on muscle mass or athletic performance. Other substances touted as having ergogenic properties are carnitine, cobamamide, growth hormone releasers, octacosanol, and ginseng; again, there is no reliable scientific evidence to support claims that products containing these compounds have ergogenic potential, and heavy supplementation may lead to adverse effects. Nutritional supplements are promoted through unsubstantiated claims by magazine advertisements, health food stores, coaches, and other sources. The FDA considers nutritional supplements to be foodstuffs, not drugs, and therefore has not required that they be proved safe and effective. Dosage guidelines are inadequate, and quality control is poor. The FDA has begun to revise regulations governing labeling and health claims for these products. There is little if any evidence that nutritional supplements have ergogenic effects in athletes consuming a balanced diet, and some products have the potential for harm. PMID:8137607

  2. Safety, Efficacy, and Legal Issues Related to Dietary Supplements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on the effects of dietary supplements on collegiate and adult populations. Anabolic steroids, amphetamines, and other drugs have been used for decades to improve athletic performance. However, the legal issues and dangers associated with these drugs have resulted in reluctance by many athletes to use them. Because dietary…

  3. Efficacy of a Botanical Supplement with Concentrated Echinacea purpurea for Increasing Aerobic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Bellar, David; Moody, Kaitlyn M.; Richard, Nicholas S.; Judge, Lawrence W.

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation evaluated the efficacy of a botanical supplement that delivered a concentrated dose of Echinacea purpurea (8 grams day?1). The participants were 13 apparently healthy, recreationally active college students (VO2 max: 51?mL O2/kg?min). The participants were provided with a 30-day supplementation regime. Data regarding maximum aerobic capacity was collected through pre- and posttesting surrounding the 30-day supplementation regime. The participants were instructed to maintain normal levels of physical activity and exercise during the experimental period. The levels of physical activity and exercise were monitored via the Leisure and Physical Activity Survey. The participants did not report any significant increases in aerobic physical activity or exercise during the supplementation period. Paired samples t-test analysis did not reveal a significant difference in maximum aerobic capacity, t(12) = 0.67, P = .516. Presupplementation maximum aerobic capacity (M = 51.0, SD = 6.8) was similar to postsupplementation values (M = 51.8, SD = 6.5). This study suggests that botanical supplements containing a concentrated dose of Echinacea purpurea is not an effective intervention to increase aerobic capacity of recreationally active individuals. PMID:24967264

  4. Nonvitamin, nonmineral supplement use and beliefs about safety and efficacy among rural older adults in southeast and south central Idaho.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Carol F; Page, Randy M; Hayward, Karen S

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the use of herbal, botanical, and nonherbal dietary supplements (referred to as nonvitamin, nonmineral [NVNM] supplements) among rural older adults residing in southeast and south central Idaho, and explored perceptions of the safety and efficacy of these supplements. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 365 rural older adults participating in a congregate meals program at a local senior center using a written questionnaire developed for the study. Of the 365 study participants, 39.5% reported using NVNM supplements in the past 12 months. The majority of the participants felt that the NVNM supplements they used were effective, and few reported adverse effects. The majority of the participants felt that NVNM supplements were safe; however, safety concerns were expressed specifically in terms of concurrent use with prescription medication. PMID:17890204

  5. Efficacy of Vitamin C Supplements in Prevention of Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bobae; Oh, Seung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have reported inconsistent findings regarding the association between vitamin C supplementation and the risk of cancer. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of RCTs to investigate the efficacy of vitamin C supplements for prevention of cancer. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases in November 2014 using common keywords related to vitamin C supplements and cancer. Results Among 785 articles, a total of seven trials were identified, which included 62,619 participants; 31,326 and 31,293 were randomized to vitamin C supplementation and control or placebo groups, respectively, which were included in the final analysis. A fixed-effects meta-analysis of all seven RCTs revealed no significant association between vitamin C supplementation and cancer (relative risk, 1.00; 95% confidence intervals, 0.95-1.05). Similarly, subgroup meta-analysis by dose of vitamin C administered singly or in combination with other supplements, follow-up period, methodological quality, cancer mortality, gender, smoking status, country, and type of cancer also showed no efficacy of vitamin C supplementation for cancer prevention. Conclusion This meta-analysis shows that there is no evidence to support the use of vitamin C supplements for prevention of cancer. PMID:26634093

  6. Efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in depression in adults: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of vitamin D in management of depression is unclear. Results from observational and emerging randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the efficacy of vitamin D in depression lack consistency - with some suggesting a positive association while others show a negative or inconclusive association. Methods/Design The primary aim of this study is to conduct a systematic review of RCTs to assess the effect of oral vitamin D supplementation versus placebo on depression symptoms measured by scales and the proportion of patients with symptomatic improvement according to the authors’ original definition. Secondary aims include assessing the change in quality of life, adverse events and treatment discontinuation. We will conduct the systematic review and meta-analysis according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We will search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (1966 to present), EMBASE (1980 to present), CINAHL (1982 to present), PsychINFO (1967 to present) and ClinicalTrials.gov. Unpublished work will be identified by searching two major conferences: the International Vitamin Conference, the Anxiety Disorders and Depression Conference, while grey literature will be acquired by contacting authors of included studies. We will use the random-effects meta-analysis to synthesize the data by pooling the results of included studies. Discussion The results of this systematic review will be helpful in clarifying the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation and providing evidence to establish guidelines for implementation of vitamin D for depression in general practice and other relevant settings. Study registration Unique identifier: CRD42013003849. PMID:23927040

  7. Efficacy of an oral hyaluronate and collagen supplement as a preventive treatment of elbow dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Martí-Angulo, Simón; García-López, Núria; Díaz-Ramos, Ana

    2014-12-01

    One hundred and five Labrador dogs were randomly divided into two groups to determine the number of animals that develop elbow dysplasia when treated with an oral supplement compared to untreated ones. Efficacy of the oral treatment was also evaluated once illness was diagnosed. The supplement (Hyaloral) contained hyaluronic acid, hydrolysed collagen, glucosamine, chondroitin sulphate, and gamma oryzanol. Clinical evaluation of the elbow joints was completed at months 3, 6, 12, and 20 by orthopaedic evaluations, radiography, serologic and blood analysis, and veterinarian evaluation of dysplasia symptoms. All side effects were recorded. In the control group, 33.3% of the dogs developed radiographic evidence of elbow dysplasia compared to 18.5% in the treated group. Symptoms of dysplasia at 12 months differed between the treated (12.5%) and control (61.5%) animals, and were significantly different at 20 months (p < 0.05). Differences in lameness along with movement and swelling of the elbows between groups were observed after 12 months. The treated group had improved significantly by the last visit (p < 0.05). No adverse side effects were reported. In conclusion, oral treatment with Hyaloral may have a potential cumulative action that provides protection against dysplasia and significantly improves symptoms of elbow dysplasia. PMID:25234322

  8. Efficacy of an oral hyaluronate and collagen supplement as a preventive treatment of elbow dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    García-López, Núria; Díaz-Ramos, Ana

    2014-01-01

    One hundred and five Labrador dogs were randomly divided into two groups to determine the number of animals that develop elbow dysplasia when treated with an oral supplement compared to untreated ones. Efficacy of the oral treatment was also evaluated once illness was diagnosed. The supplement (Hyaloral) contained hyaluronic acid, hydrolysed collagen, glucosamine, chondroitin sulphate, and gamma oryzanol. Clinical evaluation of the elbow joints was completed at months 3, 6, 12, and 20 by orthopaedic evaluations, radiography, serologic and blood analysis, and veterinarian evaluation of dysplasia symptoms. All side effects were recorded. In the control group, 33.3% of the dogs developed radiographic evidence of elbow dysplasia compared to 18.5% in the treated group. Symptoms of dysplasia at 12 months differed between the treated (12.5%) and control (61.5%) animals, and were significantly different at 20 months (p < 0.05). Differences in lameness along with movement and swelling of the elbows between groups were observed after 12 months. The treated group had improved significantly by the last visit (p < 0.05). No adverse side effects were reported. In conclusion, oral treatment with Hyaloral may have a potential cumulative action that provides protection against dysplasia and significantly improves symptoms of elbow dysplasia. PMID:25234322

  9. ARIES NDA Robot operators` manual

    SciTech Connect

    Scheer, N.L.; Nelson, D.C.

    1998-05-01

    The ARIES NDA Robot is an automation device for servicing the material movements for a suite of Non-destructive assay (NDA) instruments. This suite of instruments includes a calorimeter, a gamma isotopic system, a segmented gamma scanner (SGS), and a neutron coincidence counter (NCC). Objects moved by the robot include sample cans, standard cans, and instrument plugs. The robot computer has an RS-232 connection with the NDA Host computer, which coordinates robot movements and instrument measurements. The instruments are expected to perform measurements under the direction of the Host without operator intervention. This user`s manual describes system startup, using the main menu, manual operation, and error recovery.

  10. Efficacy of Supplementation with B Vitamins for Stroke Prevention: A Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongli; Pi, Fuhua; Ding, Zan; Chen, Wei; Pang, Shaojie; Dong, Wenya; Zhang, Qingying

    2015-01-01

    Background Supplementation with B vitamins for stroke prevention has been evaluated over the years, but which combination of B vitamins is optimal for stroke prevention is unclear. We performed a network meta-analysis to assess the impact of different combinations of B vitamins on risk of stroke. Methods A total of 17 trials (86 393 patients) comparing 7 treatment strategies and placebo were included. A network meta-analysis combined all available direct and indirect treatment comparisons to evaluate the efficacy of B vitamin supplementation for all interventions. Results B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke and cerebral hemorrhage. The risk of stroke was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 as compared with folic acid plus vitamin B12 and was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 as compared with placebo or folic acid plus vitamin B12. The treatments ranked in order of efficacy for stroke, from higher to lower, were folic acid plus vitamin B6 > folic acid > folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > niacin > vitamin B6 > placebo > folic acid plus vitamin B12. Conclusions B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke; different B vitamins and their combined treatments had different efficacy on stroke prevention. Folic acid plus vitamin B6 might be the optimal therapy for stroke prevention. Folic acid and vitamin B6 were both valuable for stroke prevention. The efficacy of vitamin B12 remains to be studied. PMID:26355679

  11. Anti-fall Efficacy of Oral Supplemental Vitamin D and Active Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Results from fall prevention trials with supplemental vitamin D have been mixed and trials varied by dose, type of vitamin D (D3 = cholecalciferol or D2 = ergocalciferol), and quality of fall assessment. A possible differential benefit of supplemental versus alpha-hydroxylated vitamin D (active D) h...

  12. Zinc supplementation induces apoptosis and enhances antitumor efficacy of docetaxel in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kocdor, Hilal; Ates, Halil; Aydin, Suleyman; Cehreli, Ruksan; Soyarat, Firat; Kemanli, Pinar; Harmanci, Duygu; Cengiz, Hakan; Kocdor, Mehmet Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to exogenous zinc results in increased apoptosis, growth inhibition, and altered oxidative stress in cancer cells. Previous studies also suggested that zinc sensitizes some cancer cells to cytotoxic agents depending on the p53 status. Therefore, zinc supplementation may show anticancer efficacy solely and may increase docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Methods Here, we report the effects of several concentrations of zinc combined with docetaxel on p53-wild-type (A549) and p53-null (H1299) cells. We evaluated cellular viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression as well as oxidative stress parameters, including superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and malondialdehyde levels. Results Zinc reduced the viability of A549 cells and increased the apoptotic response in both cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Zinc also amplified the docetaxel effects and reduced its inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) values. The superoxide dismutase levels increased in all treatment groups; however, glutathione peroxidase was slightly increased in the combination treatments. Zinc also caused malondialdehyde elevations at 50 ?M and 100 ?M. Conclusion Zinc has anticancer efficacy against non-small-cell lung cancer cells in the presence of functionally active p53 and enhances docetaxel efficacy in both p53-wild-type and p53-deficient cancer cells. PMID:26251569

  13. Measuring the Impact of a Supplemental Civic Education Program on Students' Civic Attitude and Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piñgul, Ferdinand S.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the impact of Project Citizen Philippines, an extra-classroom civic education program, on its 3rd and 4th year high school participants' civic attitude and efficacy beliefs. Three hundred forty three participants and 107 non-participants from various public high schools in the Philippines' National Capital Region were compared…

  14. Efficacy of Systemic Vitamin C Supplementation in Reducing Corneal Opacity Resulting from Infectious Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Wun; Yoo, Woong-Sun; Kim, Seong-Jae; Chung, In-Young; Seo, Seong-Wook; Yoo, Ji-Myong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vitamin C supplementation on reducing the size of corneal opacity resulting from infectious keratitis. The study included 82 patients (82 affected eyes), admitted for infectious keratitis from January 2009 to August 2013, who were followed for more than 3 months. Patients were divided into control, oral vitamin C (3 g/d), and intravenous vitamin C (20 g/d) groups during hospitalization. Corneal opacity sizes were measured using anterior segment photographs and Image J program (version 1.27; National Institutes of Health, Jinju, South Korea) at admission, discharge, and final follow-up. The corneal opacity size used for analysis was the measured opacity size divided by the size of the whole cornea. The corneal opacity size decreased by 0.03?±?0.10 in the oral vitamin C group, 0.07?±?0.22 in the intravenous vitamin C group, and 0.02?±?0.15 in the control group. Intravenous vitamin C reduced the corneal opacity size more than oral vitamin C (P?=?0.043). Intravenous vitamin C produced greater reduction in corneal opacity size in younger patients (P?=?0.015) and those with a hypopyon (P?=?0.036). Systemic vitamin C supplementation reduced the size of corneal opacity resulting from infectious keratitis. Intravenous vitamin C was more beneficial than oral supplementation, especially in younger patients and those with hypopyon. PMID:25415664

  15. Efficacy of systemic vitamin C supplementation in reducing corneal opacity resulting from infectious keratitis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Wun; Yoo, Woong-Sun; Kim, Seong-Jae; Chung, In-Young; Seo, Seong-Wook; Yoo, Ji-Myong

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vitamin C supplementation on reducing the size of corneal opacity resulting from infectious keratitis.The study included 82 patients (82 affected eyes), admitted for infectious keratitis from January 2009 to August 2013, who were followed for more than 3 months. Patients were divided into control, oral vitamin C (3 g/d), and intravenous vitamin C (20 g/d) groups during hospitalization. Corneal opacity sizes were measured using anterior segment photographs and Image J program (version 1.27; National Institutes of Health, Jinju, South Korea) at admission, discharge, and final follow-up. The corneal opacity size used for analysis was the measured opacity size divided by the size of the whole cornea.The corneal opacity size decreased by 0.03 ± 0.10 in the oral vitamin C group, 0.07 ± 0.22 in the intravenous vitamin C group, and 0.02 ± 0.15 in the control group. Intravenous vitamin C reduced the corneal opacity size more than oral vitamin C (P = 0.043). Intravenous vitamin C produced greater reduction in corneal opacity size in younger patients (P = 0.015) and those with a hypopyon (P = 0.036).Systemic vitamin C supplementation reduced the size of corneal opacity resulting from infectious keratitis. Intravenous vitamin C was more beneficial than oral supplementation, especially in younger patients and those with hypopyon. PMID:25415664

  16. Smear layer removal efficacy of combination of herbal extracts in two different ratios either alone or supplemented with sonic agitation: An in vitro scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Naveen; Gyanani, Hitesh; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the combination of two natural extracts in varying ratios for removal of smear layer either alone or supplemented with sonic agitation. Materials and Methods: Fifty extracted single-rooted teeth were collected, disinfected and decoronated below the cementoenamel junction to obtain standardized root length of 10 mm. Root canals were instrumented using rotary files at working length 1 mm short of the apex. Specimens were divided into six groups according to the irrigation protocol as follows: Group A – Distilled water, Group B – 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, Group C – Herbal extracts in 1:1 ratio, Group D – Herbal extracts in 1:1 ratio supplemented with sonic agitation, Group E – Herbal extracts in 2:1 ratio, Group F – Herbal extracts in 2:1 ratio supplemented with sonic agitation. Specimens were longitudinally sectioned and evaluated under scanning electron microscope for smear layer removal efficacy. Obtained scores were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and post-hoc test. Results: Among all, Group B showed the best results followed by Group F. Remaining other groups showed inferior outcome (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The combination of two extracts in 2:1 ratio was slightly better than 1:1 ratio and the smear layer removal efficacy was further improved when accompanied with sonic agitation. PMID:26430300

  17. Annex 1: Submission from Bruce McKirdy, NDA Annex 1: Submission from Bruce McKirdy, NDA

    E-print Network

    Annex 1: Submission from Bruce McKirdy, NDA Annex 1: Submission from Bruce McKirdy, NDA Annex 1. Submission from Bruce McKirdy, NDA Summary The geology of West Cumbria is potentially suitable for hosting process or an unlikely37 event), other safety functions will ensure that the overall performance

  18. The effect of prebiotic supplementation with inulin on cardiometabolic health: Rationale, design, and methods of a controlled feeding efficacy trial in adults at risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Cassie M; Davy, Brenda M; Halliday, Tanya M; Hulver, Mathew W; Neilson, Andrew P; Ponder, Monica A; Davy, Kevin P

    2015-11-01

    Prediabetes is associated with low-grade chronic inflammation that increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). An elevated lipopolysaccharide concentration, associated with dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota, has been implicated in the development of both T2D and CVD. Selective modulation of the intestinal microbiota with prebiotics reduces intestinal permeability and endotoxin concentrations, inflammation, and metabolic dysfunction in rodents. The effect of prebiotic supplementation on cardio-metabolic function in humans at risk for T2D is not known. The primary aim of this trial is to determine the influence of prebiotic supplementation with inulin on insulin sensitivity and skeletal muscle metabolic flexibility in adults at risk for T2D. We hypothesize that prebiotic supplementation with inulin will improve insulin sensitivity and skeletal muscle metabolic flexibility. We will randomize 48 adults (40-75yrs) with prediabetes or a score ?5 on the American Diabetes Association (ADA) risk screener to 6weeks of prebiotic supplementation with inulin (10g/day) or placebo. Subjects will be provided with all food for the duration of the study, to avoid potential confounding through differences in dietary intake between individuals. Intestinal permeability, serum endotoxin concentrations, insulin sensitivity, skeletal muscle metabolic flexibility, endothelial function, arterial stiffness, and fecal bacterial composition will be measured at baseline and following treatment. The identification of prebiotic supplementation with inulin as an efficacious strategy for reducing cardio-metabolic risk in individuals at risk of T2D could impact clinical practice by informing dietary recommendations and increasing acceptance of prebiotics by the scientific and medical community. PMID:26520413

  19. Effect of Medicinal Plant By-products Supplementation to Total Mixed Ration on Growth Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Economic Efficacy in the Late Fattening Period of Hanwoo Steers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. J.; Kim, D. H.; Guan, Le Luo; Ahn, S. K.; Cho, K. W.; Lee, Sung S.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of medicinal plant by-products (MPB) supplementation to a total mixed ration (TMR) on growth, carcass characteristics and economic efficacy in the late fattening period of Hanwoo steers. Twenty seven steers (body weight [BW], 573±57 kg) were assigned to 3 treatment groups so that each treatment based on BW contained 9 animals. All groups received ad libitum TMR throughout the feeding trial until slaughter (from 24 to 30 months of age) and treatments were as follows: control, 1,000 g/kg TMR; treatment 1 (T1), 970 g/kg TMR and 30 g/kg MPB; treatment 2 (T2), 950 g/kg TMR and 50 g/kg MPB. Initial and final BW were not different among treatments. Resultant data were analyzed using general linear models of SAS. Average daily gain and feed efficiency were higher (p<0.05) for T1 than control, but there was no difference between control and T2. Plasma albumin showed low-, intermediate- and high-level (p<0.05) for control, T1 and T2, whereas non-esterified fatty acid was high-, intermediate- and high-level (p<0.05) for control, T1 and T2, respectively. Carcass weight, carcass rate, backfat thickness and rib eye muscle area were not affected by MPB supplementation, whereas quality and yield grades were highest (p<0.05) for T1 and T2, respectively. Daily feed costs were decreased by 0.5% and 0.8% and carcass prices were increased by 18.1% and 7.6% for T1 and T2 compared to control, resulting from substituting TMR with 30 and 50 g/kg MPB, respectively. In conclusion, the substituting TMR by 30 g/kg MPB may be a potential feed supplement approach to improve economic efficacy in the late fattening period of Hanwoo steers. PMID:26580440

  20. Review of the safety and efficacy of vitamin A supplementation in the treatment of children with severe acute malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines recommend for children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM), high-dose vitamin A (VA) supplements be given on day 1 of admission, and on days 2 and 14 in the case of clinical signs of vitamin A deficiency (VAD). Daily low-dose VA follows, delivered in a pre...

  1. Los Alamos safeguards program overview and NDA in safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Keepin, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the Los Alamos safeguards program has developed, tested, and implemented a broad range of passive and active nondestructive analysis (NDA) instruments (based on gamma and x-ray detection and neutron counting) that are now widely employed in safeguarding nuclear materials of all forms. Here very briefly, the major categories of gamma ray and neutron based NDA techniques, give some representative examples of NDA instruments currently in use, and cite a few notable instances of state-of-the-art NDA technique development. Historical aspects and a broad overview of the safeguards program are also presented.

  2. Safety and Efficacy of High-dose Daily Vitamin D3 Supplementation in Children and Young Adults With Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Kelly A; Bertolaso, Chiara; Schall, Joan I; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Stallings, Virginia A

    2015-07-01

    Suboptimal vitamin D (vit D) status (<32 ng/mL) is ubiquitous among African American children with type SS sickle cell disease (SCD-SS). The vit D supplemental dose to normalize vit D status is unknown. Five to 20-year-old African American children with (n=21) and without (n=23) SCD-SS were randomized to vit D3 supplementation (4000 or 7000 IU/d) and evaluated at 6 and 12 weeks for changes in vit D and SCD status. A dose was considered unsafe if serum calcium was elevated associated with elevated serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). At baseline 95% of subjects with SCD-SS and 87% of healthy controls had suboptimal vit D status (mean±SD, 19.2±7.2 and 22.3±9.3 ng/mL, respectively). After 12 weeks supplementation, both D3 doses were safe and well tolerated. Neither group achieved the a priori efficacy criterion of 25(OH)D?32 ng/mL in >80% of subjects (45% in SCD-SS and 63% in controls). However, for both subjects with SCD-SS and healthy subjects by 12 weeks, deficient (<20 ng/mL) vit D status was eliminated only in those receiving 7000 IU/d. For subjects with SCD-SS, by 12 weeks there was a significant (all P<0.05) increase in fetal hemoglobin, decrease in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and reduction in the percentage of subjects with a high platelet count. PMID:25985241

  3. Efficacy of Enteral Supplementation Enriched with Glutamine, Fiber, and Oligosaccharide on Mucosal Injury following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iyama, Satoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Tatsumi, Hiroomi; Hashimoto, Akari; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Ibata, Soushi; Ono, Kaoru; Murase, Kazuyuki; Takada, Kohichi; Sato, Yasushi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Miyanishi, Koji; Akizuki, Emi; Nobuoka, Takayuki; Mizugichi, Toru; Takimoto, Rishu; Kobune, Masayoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Kato, Junji

    2014-01-01

    The combination of glutamine, fiber and oligosaccharides (GFO) is thought to be beneficial for alleviating gastrointestinal mucosal damage caused by chemotherapy. A commercial enteral supplementation product (GFO) enriched with these 3 components is available in Japan. We performed a retrospective study to test whether oral GFO decreased the severity of mucosal injury following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Of 44 HSCT patients, 22 received GFO and 22 did not. Severity of diarrhea/mucositis, overall survival, weight loss, febrile illness/documented infection, intravenous hyperalimentation days/hospital days, engraftment, acute and chronic GVHD, and cumulative incidence of relapse were studied. Sex, age, performance status, diagnosis, disease status, and treatment variables were similar in both groups. There were fewer days of diarrhea grade 3–4 in patients receiving GFO than in those who did not (0.86 vs. 3.27 days); the same was true for days of mucositis grade 3–4 (3.86 vs. 6.00 days). Survival at day 100 was 100% in the GFO group, but only 77.3% for the patients not receiving GFO (p = 0.0091, log-rank test). Weight loss and the number of days of intravenous hyperalimentation were better in the GFO group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.0014, respectively). Although not significant, less gut bacterial translocation with Enterococcus species developed in the GFO group (p = 0.0728) than in the non-GFO group. Other outcomes were not affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comparative clinical study of GFO supplementation to alleviate mucosal injury after allo-HSCT. We conclude that glutamine, fiber and oligosaccharide supplementation is an effective supportive therapy to decrease the severity of mucosal damage in HSCT. PMID:25493082

  4. Ingesting a preworkout supplement containing caffeine, creatine, ?-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days is both safe and efficacious in recreationally active men.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Kristina L; Moon, Jordan R; Fairman, Ciaran M; Spradley, Brandon D; Tai, Chih-Yin; Falcone, Paul H; Carson, Laura R; Mosman, Matt M; Joy, Jordan M; Kim, Michael P; Serrano, Eric R; Esposito, Enrico N

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of consuming a preworkout supplement (SUP) containing caffeine, creatine, ?-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days. We hypothesized that little to no changes in kidney and liver clinical blood markers or resting heart rate and blood pressure (BP) would be observed. In addition, we hypothesized that body composition and performance would improve in recreationally active males after 28 days of supplementation. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, participants were randomly assigned to ingest one scoop of either the SUP or placebo every day for 28 days, either 20 minutes before exercise or ad libitum on nonexercise days. Resting heart rate and BP, body composition, and fasting blood samples were collected before and after supplementation. Aerobic capacity as well as muscular strength and endurance were also measured. Significant (P < .05) main effects for time were observed for resting heart rate (presupplementation, 67.59 ± 7.90 beats per minute; postsupplementation, 66.18 ± 7.63 beats per minute), systolic BP (presupplementation, 122.41 ± 11.25 mm Hg; postsupplementation, 118.35 ± 11.58 mm Hg), blood urea nitrogen (presupplementation, 13.12 ± 2.55 mg/dL; postsupplementation, 15.24 ± 4.47 mg/dL), aspartate aminotransferase (presupplementation, 34.29 ± 16.48 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.76 ± 4.71 IU/L), and alanine aminotransferase (presupplementation, 32.76 ± 19.72 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.88 ± 9.68 IU/L). Significant main effects for time were observed for body fat percentage (presupplementation, 15.55% ± 5.79%; postsupplementation, 14.21% ± 5.38%; P = .004) and fat-free mass (presupplementation, 70.80 ± 9.21 kg; postsupplementation, 71.98 ± 9.27 kg; P = .006). A significant decrease in maximal oxygen consumption (presupplementation, 47.28 ± 2.69 mL/kg per minute; postsupplementation, 45.60 ± 2.81 mL/kg per minute) and a significant increase in percentage of oxygen consumption per unit time at which ventilatory threshold occurred (presupplementation, 64.38% ± 6.63%; postsupplementation, 70.63% ± 6.39%) and leg press one-repetition maximum (presupplementation, 218.75 ± 38.43 kg; postsupplementation, 228.75 ± 44.79 kg) were observed in the SUP only. No adverse effects were noted for renal and hepatic clinical blood markers, resting heart rate, or BP. Supplements containing similar ingredients and doses should be safe for ingestion periods lasting up to 28 days in healthy, recreationally trained, college-aged men. PMID:24916558

  5. Preliminary Assessment of the Efficacy of Supplementing Knee Extension Capability in a Lower Limb Exoskeleton with FES

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Hugo A.; Farris, Ryan J.; Ha, Kevin; Goldfarb, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe a cooperative controller that combines the knee joint actuation of an externally powered lower limb exoskeleton with the torque and power contribution from the electrically stimulated quadriceps muscle group. The efficacy of combining these efforts is experimentally validated with a series of weighted leg lift maneuvers. Measurements from these experiments indicate that the control approach effectively combines the respective efforts of the motor and muscle, such that good control performance is achieved, with substantial torque and energy contributions from both the biological and non-biological actuators. PMID:23366646

  6. Anesthetic efficacy of the supplemental X-tip intraosseous injection using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline in patients with irreversible pulpitis: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Bhuyan, Atool Chandra; Latha, Satheesh Sasidharan; Jain, Shefali; Kataki, Rubi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pain management remains the utmost important qualifying criteria in minimizing patient agony and establishing a strong dentist–patient rapport. Symptomatic irreversible pulpitis is a painful condition necessitating immediate attention and supplemental anesthetic techniques are often resorted to in addition to conventional inferior alveolar nerve block. Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis, in mandibular posterior teeth, using 4% Articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline as local anesthetic, when the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block proved ineffective. Materials and Methods: X-tip system was used to administer 1.7 ml of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline in 30 patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular posterior teeth with moderate to severe pain on endodontic access after administration of an inferior alveolar nerve block. Results: The results of the study showed that 25 X-tip injections (83.33%) were successful and 5 X-tip injections (16.66%) were unsuccessful. Conclusion: When the inferior alveolar nerve block fails to provide adequate pulpal anesthesia, X-tip system using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline was successful in achieving pulpal anesthesia in patients with irreversible pulpitis. PMID:25506137

  7. Emerging Supplements in Sports

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Bryan C.; Lavallee, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Nutritional supplements advertised as ergogenic are commonly used by athletes at all levels. Health care professionals have an opportunity and responsibility to counsel athletes concerning the safety and efficacy of supplements on the market. Evidence Acquisition: An Internet search of common fitness and bodybuilding sites was performed to identify supplement promotions. A search of MEDLINE (2000–August, 2011) was performed using the most commonly identified supplements, including glutamine, choline, methoxyisoflavone, quercetin, zinc/magnesium aspartate, and nitric oxide. The search terms supplement, ergogenic aid, and performance were also used. Results: Six common and newer supplements were identified, including glutamine, choline, methoxyisoflavone, quercetin, zinc/magnesium aspartate, and nitric oxide. Conclusions: Controlled studies have not determined the effects of these supplements on performance in athletes. Scientific evidence is not available to support the use of these supplements for performance enhancement. PMID:23016081

  8. Supplemental Data: Supplemental Methods

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    Supplemental Data: Supplemental Methods: Hela array. HeLa cells (ATCC) were transfected with mi.01. Supplemental Table: Top 100 Biologic Process Gene Ontology Terms Modulated in HeLa Cells Transfected with mi

  9. Efficacy and safety of oral magnesium supplementation in the treatment of depression in the elderly with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, equivalent trial.

    PubMed

    Barragán-Rodríguez, Lazaro; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral magnesium supplementation, with magnesium chloride (MgCl2), in the treatment of newly diagnosed depression in the elderly with type 2 diabetes and hypomagnesemia. Twenty-three elderly patients with type 2 diabetes and hypomagnesemia were enrolled and randomly allocated to receive either 50 mL of MgCl2 5% solution equivalent to 450 mg of elemental magnesium or Imipramine 50 mg daily during 12 weeks. Widowhood or divorce in the last six months, alcoholism, degenerative illnesses of the nervous central system, recent diagnosis of diabetes, previous or current treatment with antidepressants, chronic diarrhea, use of diuretics, and reduced renal function were exclusion criteria. Hypomagnesemia was defined by serum magnesium levels < 1.8 mg/dL and depression by Yasavage and Brink score > or = 11 points. The primary trial end point was the improvement of depression symptoms. At baseline, there were no differences by age (69 +/- 5.9 and 66.4 +/- 6.1 years, p = 0.39), duration of diabetes (11.8 +/- 7.9 and 8.6 +/- 5.7 years, p = 0.33), serum magnesium levels (1.3 +/- 0.04 and 1.4 +/- 0.04 mg/dL, p = 0.09), and Yasavage and Brink Score (17.9 +/- 3.9 and 16.1 +/- 4.5 point, p = 0.34) in the groups with MgCl2 and imipramine, respectively. At end of follow-up, there were no significant differences in the Yasavage and Brink score (11.4 +/- 3.8 and 10.9 +/- 4.3, p = 0.27) between the groups in study; whereas serum magnesium levels were significantly higher in the group with MgCl2 (2.1 +/- 0.08 mg/dL) than in the subjects with imipramine (1.5 +/- 0.07 mg/dL), p < 0.0005. In conclusion, MgCl2 is as effective in the treatment of depressed elderly type 2 diabetics with hypomagnesemia as imipramine 50 mg daily. PMID:19271419

  10. The efficacy of bait supplements for improving the rate of discovery of bait stations in the field by the formosan subterranean termite (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field tests of four different bait supplements were conducted in City Park, New Orleans, Louisiana. The four bait supplements tested included two different formulations of decayed material, a sports drink, and the combination of an application of an aqueous solution of Summon Preferred Food SourceTM...

  11. Efficacy of ?-mannanase supplementation to corn-soya bean meal-based diets on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood urea nitrogen, faecal coliform and lactic acid bacteria and faecal noxious gas emission in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Upadhaya, Santi Devi; Park, Jae Won; Lee, Jae Hwan; Kim, In Ho

    2016-02-01

    A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of ?-mannanase supplementation to a diet based on corn and soya bean meal (SBM) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), faecal coliforms and lactic acid bacteria, and noxious gas emission in growing pigs. A total of 140 pigs [(Landrace × Yorkshire) × Duroc; average body weight 25 ± 3 kg] were randomly allotted to a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with dietary treatments consisting of hulled or dehulled SBM without or with supplementation of 400 U ?-mannanase/kg. During the 6 weeks of experimental feeding, ?-mannanase supplementation had no effect on body weight gain, feed intake and gain:feed (G:F) ratio. Compared with dehulled SBM, feeding hulled SBM caused an increased feed intake of pigs in the entire trial (p = 0.05). The G:F ratio was improved in pigs receiving dehulled SBM (p < 0.05). Dietary treatments did not influence the total tract digestibility of dry matter, nitrogen and gross energy. Enzyme supplementation reduced (p < 0.05) the population of faecal coliforms and tended to reduce the NH3 concentration after 24 h of fermentation in a closed box containing faecal slurry. Feeding hulled SBM tended to reduce NH3 emission on days 3 and 5 of fermentation. In conclusion, mannanase supplementation had no influence on growth performance and nutrient digestibility but showed a positive effect on reducing coliform population and tended to reduce NH3 emission. Dehulled SBM increased G:F ratio and hulled SBM tended to reduce NH3 emission. PMID:26635142

  12. A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled, Multi-center, Extension Trial Evaluating the Efficacy of a New Oral Supplement in Women with Self-perceived Thinning Hair

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this six-month, randomized, double-blind, multi-center, placebo-controlled study was to determine if the administration of a new oral supplement will promote terminal hair growth. Design: A randomized, double-blind study. Setting: Two private practices (dermatology and facial plastics). Participants: Women 21 to 75 years of age with self-perceived thinning hair. Measurements: The primary efficacy endpoint was the change in terminal and vellus hairs in a 4cm2 target area of the scalp after 90 and 180 days of treatment. Secondary endpoints were change in hair diameter and responses to Quality of Life and Self-Assessment questionnaires. Results: Subjects treated with the new oral supplement achieved a significant increase in the number of baseline terminal hairs at 90 and 180 days (for each, p<0.0001, respectively) and were significantly greater then placebo (p<0.0001). Treatment with the new oral supplement was also associated with a significant increase in baseline terminal hair diameter after 90 (p=0.006) and 180 days of treatment (p=0.001) which was significantly greater than placebo at the end of the study (p=0.003). Improvements in hair growth and hair diameter were associated with significant improvement in most responses to Self-Assessment and Quality of Life Questionnaire responses. There were no adverse events. Conclusion: The daily administration of a new oral supplement was associated with significant increases in the number of terminal and vellus hairs and hair diameter. Most study participants believed the use of the oral supplement resulted in significant improvement in skin and hair quality and quality of life. PMID:26705444

  13. Setup and organisation of a NDA-system procurement project

    SciTech Connect

    Botte, John; Gielen, Paul

    2007-07-01

    Belgoprocess is momentarily in the process of purchasing its fifth NDA-system. Measurement systems are, although based on general designs, not from the shelf items but tailor-made sophisticated and highly automated devices. It is obvious that such a project cannot be carried out by solely a NDA team, but needs a multifunctional team. This team combines NDA expertise with experts in civil works, electrical and mechanical engineering, procurement, IT, safety and legal administration. From less positive experiences in the past, Belgoprocess learned a lot and has now a systematic in place. This systematic structures the project from definition of requirements to operation, a two to three year process. This paper defines the phases of a NDA project and gives for each phase some do's and don'ts. A second subject is the writing and handling of the vast but needed and required documentation. It gives a brief overview of the over thirty documents and files needed. The described, integrated and formal approach reduces the risk of failing projects, systems not meeting the expectations or denied qualification. It puts clear agreements in place, smoothening the relationship between company, supplier and authorities. (authors)

  14. Efficacy of Multivitamin/mineral Supplementation to Reduce Chronic Disease Risk: A Critical Review of the Evidence from Observational Studies and Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Giana; Drake, Victoria J; Frei, Balz

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed recent scientific evidence regarding the effects of multivitamin/mineral (MVM) supplements on risk of chronic diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and age-related eye diseases. Data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational, prospective cohort studies were examined. The majority of scientific studies investigating the use of MVM supplements in chronic disease risk reduction reported no significant effect. However, the largest and longest RCT of MVM supplements conducted to date, the Physicians' Health Study II (PHS II), found a modest and significant reduction in total and epithelial cancer incidence in male physicians, consistent with the Supplémentation en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioxydants (SU.VI.MAX) trial. In addition, PHS II found a modest and significant reduction in the incidence of nuclear cataract, in agreement with several other RCTs and observational, prospective cohort studies. The effects of MVM use on other subtypes of cataract and age-related macular degeneration remain unclear. Neither RCTs nor prospective cohort studies are without their limitations. The placebo-controlled trial design of RCTs may be inadequate for nutrient interventions, and residual confounding, measurement error, and the possibility of reverse causality are inherent to any observational study. National surveys show that micronutrient inadequacies are widespread in the US and that dietary supplements, of which MVMs are the most common type, help fulfill micronutrient requirements in adults and children. PMID:24941429

  15. The efficacy of micronutrient supplementation in reducing the prevalence of anaemia and deficiencies of zinc and iron among adolescents in Sri Lanka

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of combined iron and zinc over the iron- or zinc-only supplementation in correcting deficiency and possible interactive effects in a group of adolescent school children. Subjects and methods: Schoolchildren (n=821) of 12–16 years of age were randomized into ...

  16. Efficacy of whey protein supplementation on resistance exercise-induced changes in muscle strength, lean mass, and function in mobility-limited older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein supplementation may augment resistance exercise-induced increases in muscle strength and mass. Further studies are required to determine whether this effect extends to functionally compromised older adults. The objectives of the study were to compare the effects of whey protein concent...

  17. A brief history of NDA at the IAEA.

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, J. K.; Sinkule, B. J.; Hsue, S.-T.; Abhold, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    Nearly 30 years ago, the first portable nondestructive assay instrument, a SAM-II, was brought to Vienna for IAEA consideration. This initial foray into the usage of nondestructive assay (NDA) as an independent assessment tool has materialized into one of the important tools for IAEA inspections. NDA instruments have several inherent advantages for inspectors; their measurements generate no radioactive waste, provide immediate answers, do not require specialized operators, and can be either taken to the items to be measured (portable instruments), or the items for measurement can be brought to the instruments, such as can be applied in on-site IAEA laboratories or off-site IAEA lab at Siebersdorf. The SAM-II was a small, lightweight, battery-powered, gamma-ray instrument used for uranium enrichment measurements. It was also found to be usehl for locating nuclear material, distinguishing between uranium and plutonium, and determining the active length of items like fuel pins. However it was not well suited for determining the amount of bulk material present, except for small containers of low-density materials. A 6-sided neutron coincidence counter, easily disassembled so it could be shipped and carried by airplane, was developed for bulk measurements of plutonium. The HLNCC (High Level Neutron Coincidence Counter) was immediately useful for quantitative measurements of pure plutonium oxide. However, the IAEA had to make a trade-off between the ease of use of NDA instruments on-site, and the problems of obtaining small samples for shipment to an independent lab for more accurate analysis. NDA does not create radioactive waste, so as waste handling has become more cautious and more regulated, NDA looks better and better. After acceptance of NDA by the IAEA for routine use, the follow-up question was naturally, 'How much better can this measurement be made?' The Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS) supported multiple and varied efforts in this direction, such as improving both the plutonium isotopic distribution measurement and the multiplicity counter, so that the assays can be performed on any plutonium samples instead of only pure oxides. Advances have also been made on uranium bulk measurements by the development of the active well coincidence counter. Meanwhile, several large bulk-handling facilities have been coming on line under IAEA safeguards. These facilities require full-time inspectors to be present whenever the plant is operating. The IAEA requested help so that measurements can be made even when inspectors are not present. The evolution and success of unattended NDA has been responsible for the capability of the IAEA to monitor large bulk-handling facilities without substantial increase in inspection effort. The integration of NDA with containment & surveillance measures and automation has been crucial to reducing inspection manpower. These systems have developed to the point where the IAEA can make credible conclusions on large high-throughput plants such as mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication or reprocessing plants.

  18. Spent Fuel NDA Research Path for the Sweden Encapsulation-Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Stephen J.; Trellue, Holly R.; Liljenfeldt, Henrik

    2015-01-22

    This set of slides provides a description of research performed to date on spent fuel NDA: Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel Project, and NDA analysis and research planned for CLINK. The general purpose is strengthening the technical toolkit of safeguard inspectors. Data mining is being applied to determine the optimal mathematical structure to match the complexity of spent fuel NDA signals and to enable a range of quantities to be estimated.

  19. PA02.15. Validation of ayurvedic concept of anthropometry and clinical evaluation of efficacy of “Suktyadi Yog” as a calcium supplementation in children

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S Vinod; Kumar, N Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aims to validate the ayurvedic anthropometical parameter for assessment of proper growth & devlopment and also to identify any disease linkage. For proper bony growth adequate calcium supplement is necessary. Evaluation of role of an ayurvedic compound containing calcium preparation needed therefore included in the second phase of the study. In calcium deficiency Ayurvedic Managment “Suktyadi Yog” may be useful. It is a rich source of calcium and have deepaniya drugs. Deepaniya drugs is useful for absorption of calcium. Method: Validations of Ayurvedic Sharir pramana on the basis of modern concept (Parameters) in children and Peer review journals were searched to list content of “Suktyadi yog” with calcium supplementation activities, particularly acting in calcium deficient and healthy children. Result: Result of the study show Sharir praman of children found almost equal to as explained in ayurvedic texts. Out of all research Sukti bhasma, Godanti bhasma, yasad bhasma and Trikatu was found potent to reduce Calcium deficiency. It is very cost effective, easily available with highest calcium supplementation properties. Conclusion: Calcium deficiency is a major problem in children and “Suktyadi yog” is a best option to reduce it.

  20. INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH ON INFANT SUPPLEMENTATION STUDY: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIALS OF MICRONUTRIENT SUPPLEMENTATION DURING INFANCY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Research on Infant Supplementation (IRIS) studies, performed in 4 developing country settings across the world and presented in this supplement, show that the use of a daily multiple micronutrient supplement during infancy is more efficacious for improving micronutrient status, ane...

  1. Efficacy of Cistanche Tubulosa and Laminaria Japonica Extracts (MK-R7) Supplement in Preventing Patterned Hair Loss and Promoting Scalp Health

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Joon; Kim, Tae Su; Kwon, Hyun Jung; Lee, Sung Pyo; Kang, Myung Hwa; Kim, Myeung Nam

    2015-01-01

    Cistanche tubulosa and Laminaria japonica have been reported to have anti-oxidative, anticoagulant, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. They are expected to be a promising candidates for promoting hair growth and treating dandruff and scalp inflammation as a consequence. In this double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial, we investigated the efficacy of Cistanche tubulosa extract and Laminaria japonica extract complex (MK-R7) in promoting hair health in patients with mild to moderate patterned hair loss. Using phototrichogram (Folliscope 4.0, LeadM, Seoul, Korea), we compared the density and diameter of hairs in patients receiving a placebo or Cistanche tubulosa extract and Laminaria japonica extract complex (MK-R7) at baseline, 8 and 16 weeks of the study. In order to determine the efficacy of treatment on dandruff and scalp inflammation, investigator's assessment score and patient's subjective score were also performed. We found a statistically significant increase in the hair density of the test group (n = 45, MK-R7 400 mg) after 16 weeks of consuming the MK-R7 (test group: 23.29 n/cm2 ± 24.26, control: 10.35 n/cm2 ± 20.08, p < 0.05). In addition, we found a statistically significant increase in hair diameter in the test group compared to control group at week 16 (test group: 0.018 mm ± 0.015, control: 0.003 mm ± 0.013, p < 0.05). There were also significant outcomes regarding the investigator's visual assessment and patient's subjective score of dandruff and scalp inflammation in the test group compared to those in control group. Based on the results of this clinical study, we conclude that Cistanche tubulosa extract and Laminaria japonica extract complex (MK-R7) are promising substances for promoting health of the scalp and hair. PMID:25954733

  2. Understanding female collegiate athletes' intentions to consume sports supplements: an application of the theory of planned behavior 

    E-print Network

    Housman, Jeff Michael

    2007-09-17

    The Dietary Supplements Health and Education Act (DSHEA) of 1994 made safety and efficacy testing of dietary supplements the responsibility of the consumer. Currently, there exists little data on safety and efficacy of ...

  3. Chronic Supplementation of Curcumin Enhances the Efficacy of Antidepressants in Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing-Jie; Pei, Liu-Bao; Zhang, Yong; Wen, Zi-Yu; Yang, Jian-Li

    2015-08-01

    Major depressive disorder is a devastating mental illness leading to a lifetime prevalence of higher than 16% on individuals. The treatment delay and inevitable adverse effects are major limitations of current depression interventions. Emerging evidence indicates that curcumin produced significant antidepressant properties in depression in both rodents and humans without adverse effects. Therefore, it is necessary to further clarify the antidepressant actions of curcumin and the underlying mechanism in depressed patients. A total of 108 male adults aged between 31 and 59 years were systematically recruited in Tianjin Anding Hospital. Subjects were administered the Chinese version of 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale that measures different scores of depressive symptoms. The subjects were asked to take 2 capsules containing either 1000 mg of curcumin or placebo soybean powder daily for 6 weeks on the basis of their current antidepressant medications. The plasma levels of interleukin 1?, tumor necrosis factor ?, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and salivary cortisol were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before and after curcumin or placebo treatment during the 6-week procedure. Chronic supplementation with curcumin produced significant antidepressant behavioral response in depressed patients by reduction of 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores. Furthermore, curcumin decreases inflammatory cytokines interleukin 1? and tumor necrosis factor ? level, increases plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, and decreases salivary cortisol concentrations compared with placebo group. These findings indicate the potential benefits of further implications of supplementary administration of curcumin to reverse the development of depression and enhance the outcome of antidepressants treatment in major depressive disorder. PMID:26066335

  4. Demonstration of NDA technology for reprocessing input analytical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ottmar, H.; Eberle, H.; Koch, L.

    1986-01-01

    A versatile, nondestructive system for the measurement of uranium and plutonium concentrations in process solutions from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels has been developed at KfK and successfully demonstrated in a hot cell environment at the European Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe. The NDA system incorporates the proven X-ray techniques of K-edge densitometry and fluorescence analysis of K series X-rays. The feasibility of direct nondestructive uranium and plutonium assay in reprocessing input solutions using this system is demonstrated from measurements on actual dissolver solutions. The performance of the system is evaluated by comparing the results with those of parallel analyses performed by the conventional isotope dilution mass-spectrometry technique.

  5. RUMINATIONS ON NDA MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTY COMPARED TO DA UNCERTAINTY

    SciTech Connect

    Salaymeh, S.; Ashley, W.; Jeffcoat, R.

    2010-06-17

    It is difficult to overestimate the importance that physical measurements performed with nondestructive assay instruments play throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. They underpin decision making in many areas and support: criticality safety, radiation protection, process control, safeguards, facility compliance, and waste measurements. No physical measurement is complete or indeed meaningful, without a defensible and appropriate accompanying statement of uncertainties and how they combine to define the confidence in the results. The uncertainty budget should also be broken down in sufficient detail suitable for subsequent uses to which the nondestructive assay (NDA) results will be applied. Creating an uncertainty budget and estimating the total measurement uncertainty can often be an involved process, especially for non routine situations. This is because data interpretation often involves complex algorithms and logic combined in a highly intertwined way. The methods often call on a multitude of input data subject to human oversight. These characteristics can be confusing and pose a barrier to developing and understanding between experts and data consumers. ASTM subcommittee C26-10 recognized this problem in the context of how to summarize and express precision and bias performance across the range of standards and guides it maintains. In order to create a unified approach consistent with modern practice and embracing the continuous improvement philosophy a consensus arose to prepare a procedure covering the estimation and reporting of uncertainties in non destructive assay of nuclear materials. This paper outlines the needs analysis, objectives and on-going development efforts. In addition to emphasizing some of the unique challenges and opportunities facing the NDA community we hope this article will encourage dialog and sharing of best practice and furthermore motivate developers to revisit the treatment of measurement uncertainty.

  6. Efficacy of a supplemental candy coproduct as an alternative carbohydrate source to lactose on growth performance of newly weaned pigs in a commercial farm condition.

    PubMed

    Guo, J Y; Phillips, C E; Coffey, M T; Kim, S W

    2015-11-01

    The experiment investigated the effects of a supplemental candy coproduct (Chocolate Candy Feed [CCF]; International Ingredient Corp., St. Louis, MO), an alternative carbohydrate source to dietary lactose, on growth performance and on health status of nursery pigs. Crossbred pigs ( = 1,408; 21 d of age and 7.1 ± 0.3 kg BW; Smithfield Premium Genetics, Rose Hill, NC) were randomly assigned to 4 treatments (16 pens/treatment and 22 pigs/pen) in a randomized complete block design: 0, 15, 30, and 45% of lactose replaced by CCF based on equal amounts of total sugars. The experimental period was divided into 3 phases: phase I (1.8 kg diet/pig for 11 ± 1 d), phase II (6.8 kg diet/pig for 17 ± 2 d), and phase III (until 49 d after weaning). Pigs received a common phase III diet. The levels of lactose, supplied by whey permeate (79.3 ± 0.8% lactose), were 20, 8, and 0% in phase I, II, and III, respectively. All experimental diets contained the same levels of essential AA and energy (ME) for each phase. Fecal scores were observed on d 5, 7, and 9 after weaning. Blood samples were taken at the end of phase I and II to measure blood urea N. The duration of phase I tended to linearly decrease ( = 0.063) with increasing CCF. In phase I, the ADFI increased ( < 0.05) with increasing CCF whereas ADG and G:F did not change. In phase II, the duration and ADFI did not change whereas ADG linearly decreased ( < 0.05) with increasing CCF. However, the G:F was not changed as CCF increased. During phase I and II together, the duration was linearly decreased ( < 0.05) as CCF increased, whereas no difference in growth performance was observed. Overall, ADFI, ADG, and G:F were not affected by replacing whey permeate with CCF in diets, indicating no adverse effects of a candy coproduct as a carbohydrate substitute to lactose on growth performance of nursery pigs. Blood urea N did not change in phase I but tended to linearly increase ( = 0.088) in phase II as CCF increased. There were no differences in fecal scores and mortality as CCF increased. However, increasing CCF tended to linearly decrease ( = 0.083) morbidity, which implies no adverse effects of a candy coproduct replacement on health status of nursery pigs. In conclusion, a candy coproduct can be used to replace up to 45% of dietary lactose for nursery pigs without negative effects on growth performance or health status. A candy coproduct could be an economical alternative to partly replace the use of lactose in swine production. PMID:26641050

  7. Supplemental Material Supplemental methods

    E-print Network

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Photoshop using regions similar to those shown in Supplemental figure 1. Technetium experiments. Technetium-99m experiments were done by labeling Suc-e9-xPLG(MeC)Ax-r9-k(DTPA) (MeC = methylcysteine) peptide with technetium-99m and injecting the probe intravenously into animals (n=3). Organs were counted using a gamma

  8. Review and Ranking of NDA Techniques to Determine Plutonium Content in Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cheatham, Jesse R; Wagner, John C

    2010-01-01

    A number of efforts are under way to improve nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) safeguard applications. These efforts have largely focused on advancing individual NDA approaches to assay plutonium content. Although significant improvements have been made in NDA techniques, relatively little work has been done to thoroughly and systematically compare the methods. A comparative review of the relative strengths and weaknesses of current NDA techniques brings a new perspective to guide future research. To gauge the practicality and effectiveness of the various relevant NDA approaches, criteria have been developed from two broad categories: functionality and operability. The functionality category includes accuracy estimates, measurement time, plutonium verification capabilities, and assembly or fuel rod assay. Since SNF composition changes with operational history and cooling times, the viability of certain NDA approaches will also change over time. While active interrogation approaches will benefit from reduced background radiation, passive assays will lose the information contained in short-lived isotopes. Therefore, the expected assay accuracy as a function of time is considered. The operability category attempts to gauge the challenges associated with the application of different NDA techniques. This category examines the NDA deploy-ability, measurement capabilities and constraints in spent fuel pools, required on-site facilities, NDA technique synergies, and the extent to which the measurements are obtrusive to the facility. Each topic listed in the categories will be given a numerical score used to rank the different NDA approaches. While the combined numerical score of each technique is informative, the individual-topic scoring will allow for a more-tailored ranking approach. Since the needs and tools of the International Atomic Energy Agency differ from those of a recycling facility, the best assay technique may change with users and SNF characteristics. This ranking system will also examine the merits of a staged inspection with quick measurements followed by more-accurate assays of suspicious SNF. The final results of this ranking process will be used to guide the NDA safeguards research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  9. Impact of NDA Uncertainites on NCS at the K-25 Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Kimball , Ian Gauld

    2008-05-29

    The K-25 Building at the East Tennessee Technology Park is relying on the use of Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) methods for characterizing hold-up materials in process equipment. The characterization data is used for many purposes including mass estimates for nuclear criticality safety (NCS) and waste disposition. This paper addresses the sensitivity of certain parameters in the NDA process to overall mass measurement results.

  10. Dietary Supplements and Sports Performance: Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Melvin

    2005-01-01

    This is the third in a series of six articles to discuss the major classes of dietary supplements (vitamins; minerals; amino acids; herbs or botanicals; metabolites, constituents/extracts, or combinations). The major focus is on efficacy of such dietary supplements to enhance exercise or sport performance. PMID:18500957

  11. Sports Supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Administration (FDA) approval before they come on the market. Supplement manufacturers do have to follow the FDA's ... be unsafe after it has gone on the market. Critics of the supplement industry point out cases ...

  12. Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    Dietary supplements are vitamins, minerals, herbs, and many other products. They can come as pills, capsules, powders, drinks, ... possible Tell your health care provider about any dietary supplements you use Do not take a bigger dose ...

  13. Mobile Nondestructive Assay (NDA) Measurements of Standard Waste Boxes (SWB)

    SciTech Connect

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Berg, Randal K.; Haggard, Daniel L.; Hilliard, James R.; Mapili, Gabriel M.

    2006-11-01

    A mobile NDA system was composed and qualified for Safeguards measurements of multiple standard waste boxes (SWB) generated as a result of clean-out activities at Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The system included a neutron slab counter and high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. PC/FRAM software was used to determine the isotopic composition of plutonium residue contained in the waste in order to interpret two independent measurement results provided by total neutron counting and gamma energy analysis (GEA). The measurement procedure developed to estimate transuranic (TRU) content of boxes was based on assumptions about characteristics of the matrix and material distribution. The neutron slab counter was calibrated with various plutonium working standards that were placed in a surrogate SWB specifically made to simulate miscellaneous waste debris. Transmission measurements with a californium source were used to correct for the matrix effects. An In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) was used to acquire spectra from SWBs and ISOCS software was applied to generate the efficiency curve of the HPGe detector. Infinite energy extrapolation was introduced to correct GEA results for self-attenuation. The gamma and neutron results obtained on multiple SWBs are compared and discussed in the paper. Revised measurement positions for the detector and the transmission source are also suggested based on experience gained during the measurements.

  14. Podophyllum hexandrum as a potential botanical supplement for the medical management of nuclear and radiological emergencies (NREs) and free radical-mediated ailments: leads from in vitro/in vivo radioprotective efficacy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rajesh; Chawla, Raman; Dhaker, Atlar Singh; Adhikari, Manish; Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Shikha; Gupta, Damodar; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh K; Tripathi, Rajender P

    2010-03-01

    Management of radiation-induced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species requires a holistic approach to mitigate the deleterious effects of free radicals. Flora of the Himalayas, which prevails under extreme climatic conditions, has been explored for its potential utility to develop radioprotective drugs. The Himalayan high altitude medicinal plant, Podophyllum hexandrum Royle, was selected on the basis of its unique properties, and a novel fractionated nonpolar extract (REC-2003) was prepared and evaluated for radioprotective efficacy, in vitro as well as in vivo. The free radical scavenging activity of REC-2003 was found to be > 75% (20 ?g/ml) with maximum superoxide scavenging activity (57.56 ± 1.38%) recorded at 1 mg/ml concentration (tetrazolium-based estimation). More than 30% inhibition of nitric oxide radicals was observed at concentrations > 0.5 mg/ml, while hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (deoxy-D-ribose assay) exhibited a dose-dependent (100-600 ?g/ml) increase. Significantly high (90%) protection to human erythrocytes was observed at 75 ?g/ml, which was found to be the most optimized dose. Similarly, more than 90% inhibition was observed against lipid peroxidation (evaluated by estimating levels of malondialdehyde). The significant antihemolytic potential of REC-2003 could be attributed to its ability to scavenge free radicals, reduce peroxidative stress on lipid membranes, and render protection to DNA (evaluated using plasmid relaxation assay). All these activities holistically contributed toward the radioprotective ability. REC-2003 (8 mg/kg BW; intraperitoneal (i.p.), -30 min) rendered > 80% total-body protection in Swiss Albino Strain 'A' mice [against lethal radiation (10 Gy)] in a 30-day survival assay. Phytochemical characterization of the constituents of REC-2003 revealed the presence of polyphenolics (flavonoids). The characterized constituents also included the aryl-tetralin lignans like podophyllotoxin, its glycoside, 4'-demethyl derivative, and epi-podophyllotoxin. The optimized requisite single dose (8 mg/KgBW; i.p., -30 min) for obtaining significant radioprotection is reasonably low and establishes its future utility as a dietary supplement in the medical management of free radical-mediated diseases and specifically for rescue missions during nuclear and radiological emergencies (NREs). PMID:22435572

  15. Automatic identification of NDA measured items: Use of E-tags

    SciTech Connect

    Chitumbo, K.; Olsen, R.; Hatcher, C.R.; Kadner, S.P.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes how electronic identification devices or E-tags could reduce the time spent by LAEA inspectors making nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements. As one example, the use of E-tags with a high-level neutron coincidence counter (HLNC) is discussed in detail. Sections of the paper include inspection procedures, system description, software, and future plans. Mounting of E-tabs, modifications to the HLNC, and the use of tamper indicating devices are also discussed. The technology appears to have wide application to different types of nuclear facilities and inspections and could significantly change NDA inspection procedures.

  16. Dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Ron J; King, Doug S; Lea, Trevor

    2004-01-01

    For the athlete training hard, nutritional supplements are often seen as promoting adaptations to training, allowing more consistent and intensive training by promoting recovery between training sessions, reducing interruptions to training because of illness or injury, and enhancing competitive performance. Surveys show that the prevalence of supplement use is widespread among sportsmen and women, but the use of few of these products is supported by a sound research base and some may even be harmful to the athlete. Special sports foods, including energy bars and sports drinks, have a real role to play, and some protein supplements and meal replacements may also be useful in some circumstances. Where there is a demonstrated deficiency of an essential nutrient, an increased intake from food or from supplementation may help, but many athletes ignore the need for caution in supplement use and take supplements in doses that are not necessary or may even be harmful. Some supplements do offer the prospect of improved performance; these include creatine, caffeine, bicarbonate and, perhaps, a very few others. There is no evidence that prohormones such as androstenedione are effective in enhancing muscle mass or strength, and these prohormones may result in negative health consequences, as well as positive drug tests. Contamination of supplements that may cause an athlete to fail a doping test is widespread. PMID:14971436

  17. Weight Loss Nutritional Supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerson, Joan M.

    Obesity has reached what may be considered epidemic proportions in the United States, not only for adults but for children. Because of the medical implications and health care costs associated with obesity, as well as the negative social and psychological impacts, many individuals turn to nonprescription nutritional weight loss supplements hoping for a quick fix, and the weight loss industry has responded by offering a variety of products that generates billions of dollars each year in sales. Most nutritional weight loss supplements are purported to work by increasing energy expenditure, modulating carbohydrate or fat metabolism, increasing satiety, inducing diuresis, or blocking fat absorption. To review the literally hundreds of nutritional weight loss supplements available on the market today is well beyond the scope of this chapter. Therefore, several of the most commonly used supplements were selected for critical review, and practical recommendations are provided based on the findings of well controlled, randomized clinical trials that examined their efficacy. In most cases, the nutritional supplements reviewed either elicited no meaningful effect or resulted in changes in body weight and composition that are similar to what occurs through a restricted diet and exercise program. Although there is some evidence to suggest that herbal forms of ephedrine, such as ma huang, combined with caffeine or caffeine and aspirin (i.e., ECA stack) is effective for inducing moderate weight loss in overweight adults, because of the recent ban on ephedra manufacturers must now use ephedra-free ingredients, such as bitter orange, which do not appear to be as effective. The dietary fiber, glucomannan, also appears to hold some promise as a possible treatment for weight loss, but other related forms of dietary fiber, including guar gum and psyllium, are ineffective.

  18. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  19. [Desorption behaviors of 4-nitrophenol on hyper-cross-linked polymer resin NDA-701].

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-hong; Huang, Ben-sheng; Qiu, Jing; Zhang, Wei-ming

    2011-05-01

    Desorption behaviors of loaded 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) on hyper-cross-linked polymer resin NDA-701 were studied. The molar ratio of NaOH and 4-NP desorbed (M(NAOH/4-NP)) selection experiments were carried out at two different reaction temperature(303 K and 333 K). Desorption kinetics characteristic of4-NP on NDA-701 in the batch and fixed-bed mode were examined at different reaction temperature and M(NaOH/4-NP) values. The results showed that optimal M(NaOH/4-NP) values were 1.2 and 100% 4-NP could be desorbed from NDA-701 at two different temperature. When the M(NaOH/4-NP) was lower than 1.2, the desorption efficiency increases with the increase of temperature, but the function of temperature decrease with increasing of M(NaH/4-NP) values for desorption ratio. The information indicated that desorption thermodynamic characteristic of NDA-701 was controlled by M(NaOH/4-NP) values. Desorption kinetics in the alkaline system can be well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and desorption rate is increased with the increase of desorption temperatures, the k2 value increase from 0.010 g x (mmol x min)(-1) to 0.035 g x (mmol x min)(-1) when desorption temperature increase from 303 K to 333 K. Nevertheless, higher M(NaOH/4-NP) values could not promote desorption rate if only M(NaOH/4-NP) value was larger than the optimal molar ratio of NaOH and 4-NP. When M(NaOH/4-NP) values increase from 1.2 to 5.0, the k2 value increase from 0.038 g x (mmol x min)(-1) to 0.044 g x (mmol x min)(-1) merely at 333 K. the results indicated that desorption kinetic characteristic of NDA-701 was controlled by temperature. NDA-701 can be completely recovered using 2 times Bed Volume of 2% NaOH solution at the temperature of 333 K, comparing with field application, implying that more energy and cost can be saved in comparison with the actual desorption process in the industry. PMID:21780596

  20. Efficient solutions to the NDA-NCA low-order eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, J. A.; Kelley, C. T.

    2013-07-01

    Recent algorithmic advances combine moment-based acceleration and Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) methods to accelerate the computation of the dominant eigenvalue in a k-eigenvalue calculation. In particular, NDA-NCA [1], builds a sequence of low-order (LO) diffusion-based eigenvalue problems in which the solution converges to the true eigenvalue solution. Within NDA-NCA, the solution to the LO k-eigenvalue problem is computed by solving a system of nonlinear equation using some variant of Newton's method. We show that we can speed up the solution to the LO problem dramatically by abandoning the JFNK method and exploiting the structure of the Jacobian matrix. (authors)

  1. NRF-Based NDA of Nuclear Material Using Monochromatic ?-Ray Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuma, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Angell, C. T.; Hajima, R.; Minato, F.; Suyama, K.; Seya, M.; Johnson, M. S.; McNabb, D. P.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is useful for nondestructive assay (NDA) of nuclear materials such as spent nuclear fuel. Counting precision of the NRF-based measurement system can be affected by background counts from self-activity of spent fuel and coherent scattering such as Rayleigh, nuclear Thomson, and Delbrück scattering. In this talk, the measurement principle and calculated uncertainties of the proposed detection system are presented.

  2. [Efficacy studies].

    PubMed

    Pedro-Botet, Juan; Flores-Le Roux, Juana A

    2014-07-01

    Pravafenix(®) is a fixed-dose combination of 40mg of pravastatin and 160 mg of fenofibrate. The rationale behind the use of Pravafenix(®) is based on the increased residual cardiovascular risk observed in high risk patients with hypertriglyceridemia and/or low HDL cholesterol levels despite treatment with statins in monotherapy. In this article, we review the available evidence on the clinical efficacy of Pravafenix(®), which shows complementary benefits in the overall lipid profile of high risk patients with mixed dyslipidemia not controlled with 40-mg pravastatin or 20-mg simvastatin. PMID:25043542

  3. Analysis of historical delta values for IAEA/LANL NDA training courses

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William; Santi, Peter; Swinhoe, Martyn; Bonner, Elisa

    2009-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) supports the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) by providing training for IAEA inspectors in neutron and gamma-ray Nondestructive Assay (NDA) of nuclear material. Since 1980, all new IAEA inspectors attend this two week course at LANL gaining hands-on experience in the application of NDA techniques, procedures and analysis to measure plutonium and uranium nuclear material standards with well known pedigrees. As part of the course the inspectors conduct an inventory verification exercise. This exercise provides inspectors the opportunity to test their abilities in performing verification measurements using the various NDA techniques. For an inspector, the verification of an item is nominally based on whether the measured assay value agrees with the declared value to within three times the historical delta value. The historical delta value represents the average difference between measured and declared values from previous measurements taken on similar material with the same measurement technology. If the measurement falls outside a limit of three times the historical delta value, the declaration is not verified. This paper uses measurement data from five years of IAEA courses to calculate a historical delta for five non-destructive assay methods: Gamma-ray Enrichment, Gamma-ray Plutonium Isotopics, Passive Neutron Coincidence Counting, Active Neutron Coincidence Counting and the Neutron Coincidence Collar. These historical deltas provide information as to the precision and accuracy of these measurement techniques under realistic conditions.

  4. A low-fat yoghurt supplemented with a rooster comb extract on muscle joint function in adults with mild knee pain: a randomized, double blind, parallel, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of efficacy.

    PubMed

    Solà, Rosa; Valls, Rosa-Maria; Martorell, Isabel; Giralt, Montserrat; Pedret, Anna; Taltavull, Núria; Romeu, Marta; Rodríguez, Àurea; Moriña, David; Lopez de Frutos, Victor; Montero, Manuel; Casajuana, Maria-Carmen; Pérez, Laura; Faba, Jenny; Bernal, Gloria; Astilleros, Anna; González, Roser; Puiggrós, Francesc; Arola, Lluís; Chetrit, Carlos; Martinez-Puig, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Preliminary results suggested that oral-administration of rooster comb extract (RCE) rich in hyaluronic acid (HA) was associated with improved muscle strength. Following these promising results, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of low-fat yoghurt supplemented with RCE rich in HA on muscle function in adults with mild knee pain; a symptom of early osteoarthritis. Participants (n = 40) received low-fat yoghurt (125 mL d(-1)) supplemented with 80 mg d(-1) of RCE and the placebo group (n = 40) consumed the same yoghurt without the RCE, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind, parallel trial over 12 weeks. Using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex System 4), RCE consumption, compared to control, increased the affected knee peak torque, total work and mean power at 180° s(-1), at least 11% in men (p < 0.05) with no differences in women. No dietary differences were noted. These results suggest that long-term consumption of low-fat yoghurt supplemented with RCE could be a dietary tool to improve muscle strength in men, associated with possible clinical significance. However, further studies are needed to elucidate reasons for these sex difference responses observed, and may provide further insight into muscle function. PMID:26302034

  5. ?-Alanine supplementation and military performance.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Harris, Roger C; Moran, Daniel S

    2015-12-01

    During sustained high-intensity military training or simulated combat exercises, significant decreases in physical performance measures are often seen. The use of dietary supplements is becoming increasingly popular among military personnel, with more than half of the US soldiers deployed or garrisoned reported to using dietary supplements. ?-Alanine is a popular supplement used primarily by strength and power athletes to enhance performance, as well as training aimed at improving muscle growth, strength and power. However, there is limited research examining the efficacy of ?-alanine in soldiers conducting operationally relevant tasks. The gains brought about by ?-alanine use by selected competitive athletes appears to be relevant also for certain physiological demands common to military personnel during part of their training program. Medical and health personnel within the military are expected to extrapolate and implement relevant knowledge and doctrine from research performed on other population groups. The evidence supporting the use of ?-alanine in competitive and recreational athletic populations suggests that similar benefits would also be observed among tactical athletes. However, recent studies in military personnel have provided direct evidence supporting the use of ?-alanine supplementation for enhancing combat-specific performance. This appears to be most relevant for high-intensity activities lasting 60-300 s. Further, limited evidence has recently been presented suggesting that ?-alanine supplementation may enhance cognitive function and promote resiliency during highly stressful situations. PMID:26206727

  6. Optimization of the Nano-Dust Analyzer (NDA) for operation under solar UV illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O`Brien, L.; Grün, E.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The performance of the Nano-Dust Analyzer (NDA) instrument is analyzed for close pointing to the Sun, finding the optimal field-of-view (FOV), arrangement of internal baffles and measurement requirements. The laboratory version of the NDA instrument was recently developed (O'Brien et al., 2014) for the detection and elemental composition analysis of nano-dust particles. These particles are generated near the Sun by the collisional breakup of interplanetary dust particles (IDP), and delivered to Earth's orbit through interaction with the magnetic field of the expanding solar wind plasma. NDA is operating on the basis of impact ionization of the particle and collecting the generated ions in a time-of-flight fashion. The challenge in the measurement is that nano-dust particles arrive from a direction close to that of the Sun and thus the instrument is exposed to intense ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The performed optical ray-tracing analysis shows that it is possible to suppress the number of UV photons scattering into NDA's ion detector to levels that allow both high signal-to-noise ratio measurements, and long-term instrument operation. Analysis results show that by avoiding direct illumination of the target, the photon flux reaching the detector is reduced by a factor of about 103. Furthermore, by avoiding the target and also implementing a low-reflective coating, as well as an optimized instrument geometry consisting of an internal baffle system and a conical detector housing, the photon flux can be reduced by a factor of 106, bringing it well below the operation requirement. The instrument's FOV is optimized for the detection of nano-dust particles, while excluding the Sun. With the Sun in the FOV, the instrument can operate with reduced sensitivity and for a limited duration. The NDA instrument is suitable for future space missions to provide the unambiguous detection of nano-dust particles, to understand the conditions in the inner heliosphere and its temporal variability, and to constrain the chemical differentiation and processing of IDPs.

  7. Efficacies and adverse reactions of modified vitamin supplement programs before pemetrexed chemotherapy as a second-line treatment against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant wild-type lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengzhi; Qin, Yinyin; Ming, Ouyang; Xie, Zhanghong; Zhang, Jiexia; Li, Shiyue; Chen, Rongchang; Zhong, Nanshan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to observe the efficacies and adverse reactions of modified vitamin programs before pemetrexed chemotherapy (second-line treatment) against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant wild-type lung adenocarcinoma. Methods: 477 patients with IIIB, phase IV glomerular filtration rate (GFR) mutant-negative lung adenocarcinomas and performed pemetrexed chemotherapy were collected and divided into group A (167 cases, with modified program) and group B (310 cases, with traditional program). The modified program was: orally administrated 400 ?g folic acid once per day and 1 day before the first-round pemetrexed chemotherapy, until the 21st day of the final administration of pemetrexed, and intramuscularly injected 500 ?g vitamin B12 1 day before the first-round pemetrexed chemotherapy, and injected once 1 day before every round pemetrexed treatment. Results: Comparison between group A and group B: mean chemotherapy cycles (4.08 vs 3.98); effectiveness rate (22.16% vs 22.90%); disease control rate (56.51% vs 55.00%); without significant difference (P > 0.05). Two groups currently all reached the median overall survival (OS). The median progression-free survival (PFS): 4.2 vs 4.1 months; OS: 12.9 vs 13.2 months, without statistical difference (P > 0.05). Such side effects between the two groups as leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, creatinine increasing, alanine transaminase (ALT) increasing, stomatitis, peripheral neuropathy, alopecia and rash had no significant difference (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The modified vitamin supportive treatment could ensure the efficacy, significantly simplify, facilitate the clinical application, and increase the associated toxicities, indicating that the pemetrexed-based chemotherapy did not need to be delayed because applying the vitamin supportive treatment. PMID:26550317

  8. Diabetes and Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Diabetes and Dietary Supplements On This Page Key Facts ... health product or practice. Are dietary supplements for diabetes safe? Some dietary supplements may have side effects, ...

  9. Multivitamin/Mineral Supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Datos en español Health Professional Other Resources Multivitamin/mineral Supplements Fact Sheet for Consumers What are multivitamin/mineral (MVM) dietary supplements? Multivitamin/mineral (MVM) supplements contain ...

  10. Fall prevention with supplemental and alpha-hydroxylated vitamin D: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Results from fall prevention trials with supplemental vitamin D have been mixed and a possible differential benefit of supplemental versus alpha-hydroxylated vitamin D (activeD) has not been established. We performed a meta-analysis on the efficacy of supplemental vitamin D and activeD with or witho...

  11. OLDER ADULTS WHO USE VITAMIN/MINERAL SUPPLEMENTS DIFFER FROM NONUSERS IN NUTRIENT INTAKE ADEQUACY AND DIETARY ATTITUDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to measure nutrient intake adequacy of vitamin/mineral supplement users and nonusers 51 years and older, determine the efficacy of current supplement practices, and identify predictors of supplement use. Two 24-hour recalls, and demographic and attitude information fro...

  12. ?-Alanine supplementation for athletic performance: an update.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M

    2014-06-01

    ?-alanine supplementation has become a common practice among competitive athletes participating in a range of different sports. Although the mechanism by which chronic ?-alanine supplementation could have an ergogenic effect is widely debated, the popular view is that ?-alanine supplementation augments intramuscular carnosine content, leading to an increase in muscle buffer capacity, a delay in the onset of muscular fatigue, and a facilitated recovery during repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise. ?-alanine supplementation appears to be most effective for exercise tasks that rely heavily on ATP synthesis from anaerobic glycolysis. However, research investigating its efficacy as an ergogenic aid remains equivocal, making it difficult to draw conclusions as to its effectiveness for training and competition. The aim of this review was to update, summarize, and critically evaluate the findings associated with ?-alanine supplementation and exercise performance with the most recent research available to allow the development of practical recommendations for coaches and athletes. A critical review of the literature reveals that when significant ergogenic effects have been found, they have been generally shown in untrained individuals performing exercise bouts under laboratory conditions. The body of scientific data available concerning highly trained athletes performing single competition-like exercise tasks indicates that this type of population receives modest but potentially worthwhile performance benefits from ?-alanine supplementation. Recent data indicate that athletes may not only be using ?-alanine supplementation to enhance sports performance but also as a training aid to augment bouts of high-intensity training. ?-alanine supplementation has also been shown to increase resistance training performance and training volume in team-sport athletes, which may allow for greater overload and superior adaptations compared with training alone. The ergogenic potential of ?-alanine supplementation for elite athletes performing repeated high-intensity exercise bouts, either during training or during competition in sports which require repeated maximal efforts (e.g., rugby and soccer), needs scientific confirmation. PMID:24276304

  13. Development of Safe and Effective Botanical Dietary Supplements.

    PubMed

    van Breemen, Richard B

    2015-11-12

    Regulated differently than drugs or foods, the market for botanical dietary supplements continues to grow worldwide. The recently implemented U.S. FDA regulation that all botanical dietary supplements must be produced using good manufacturing practice is an important step toward enhancing the safety of these products, but additional safeguards could be implemented, and unlike drugs, there are currently no efficacy requirements. To ensure a safe and effective product, botanical dietary supplements should be developed in a manner analogous to pharmaceuticals that involves identification of mechanisms of action and active constituents, chemical standardization based on the active compounds, biological standardization based on pharmacological activity, preclinical evaluation of toxicity and potential for drug-botanical interactions, metabolism of active compounds, and finally, clinical studies of safety and efficacy. Completing these steps will enable the translation of botanicals from the field to safe human use as dietary supplements. PMID:26125082

  14. Should supplemental antioxidant administration be avoided during chemotherapy and radiation therapy?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite nearly two decades of research investigating the use of dietary antioxidant supplementation during conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy, controversy remains about the efficacy and safety of this complementary treatment. Several studies of concurrent antioxidant administration with...

  15. A hybrid approach to the neutron transport K-eigenvalue problem using NDA-based algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, J. A.; Kelley, C. T.; Knoll, D. A.; Park, H.

    2013-07-01

    In order to provide more physically accurate solutions to the neutron transport equation it has become increasingly popular to use Monte Carlo simulation to model nuclear reactor dynamics. These Monte Carlo methods can be extremely expensive, so we turn to a class of methods known as hybrid methods, which combine known deterministic and stochastic techniques to solve the transport equation. In our work, we show that we can simulate the action of a transport sweep using a Monte Carlo simulation in order to solve the k-eigenvalue problem. We'll accelerate the solution using nonlinear diffusion acceleration (NDA) as in [1,2]. Our work extends the results in [1] to use Monte Carlo simulation as the high-order solver. (authors)

  16. How the NDA Provides Transparency and Visibility of the Technical Deliverability of the R and D Programme - 13303

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, Ian; James, Paula; Brownridge, Melanie; McMinn, Mervin

    2013-07-01

    The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) was created under the UK Energy Act 2004 to ensure the UK historic civil public sector nuclear legacy sites are decommissioned safely, securely, cost effectively and in ways that protect the environment. The delivery will involve carrying out many unique projects within a high hazard environment requiring the very highest standards in safety, security and environmental management. Unique problems require unique solutions and there is a substantial amount of research and development required for each project. The NDA's R and D strategic objective is to ensure that delivery of the NDA's mission is technically underpinned by sufficient and appropriate research and development. This drives a requirement to provide transparency and visibility of the technical deliverability of the programme through the technical baseline and accompanying research and development requirements. The NDA need to have confidence in the technical deliverability of the Site License Companies (SLCs) plans, provide overall visibility of R and D across the NDA Estate and ensure that appropriate R and D is being carried out in a timely manner. They need to identify where coordinated R and D programmes may be advantageous as a result of common needs, risks and opportunities and ensure key R and D needs across NDA are identified, prioritised and work programmes are costed and scheduled in the Lifetime Plans for individual sites and SLCs. Evidence of the Site License Company's approach and their corresponding technical underpinning programmes is achieved through submission of a number of outputs collectively known as TBuRDs (Technical Baseline and Underpinning Research and Development Requirements). This paper is a summary of the information generated by an independent review of those TBuRDs. It highlights some of the key messages, synergies and common R and D activities across the estate. It demonstrates the value of a consistent approach to collecting R and D data across multiple Sites with a view to enhancing knowledge transfer and improving delivery efficiency. It will be of interest to all who are running R and D programmes where other programmes may be carrying out similar activities. (authors)

  17. Tobacco Use Supplement: An Overview

    Cancer.gov

    1 Tobacco Use Supplement An Overview Gregory D. Weyland Current Population Survey (CPS) 2 Current Population Survey • Purpose and Uses – Monthly Labor Force Data – Supplements • Tobacco Use Supplement • Annual and EConomic Survey (ASEC) • Other Supplements 3 Current

  18. FDA 101: Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Commission. Once a dietary supplement is on the market, FDA has certain safety monitoring responsibilities. These include ... selling these products. It is not legal to market a dietary supplement product as a treatment or ...

  19. Dietary Supplements are Not all Safe and Not all Food: How the Low Cost of Dietary Supplements Preys on the Consumer.

    PubMed

    Sax, Joanna K

    2015-01-01

    Dietary supplements are regulated as food, even though the safety and efficacy of some supplements are unknown. These products are often promoted as 'natural.' This leads many consumers to fail to question the supplements' safety, and some consumers even equate 'natural' with safe. But, 'natural' does not mean safe. For example, many wild berries and mushrooms are dangerous although they are natural. Another example is tobacco--a key ingredient in cigarettes: it is natural, but overwhelming studies have established the harm of cigarette smoke. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires safety and efficacy testing prior to market entry for drugs. In contrast, the FDA only has limited ability to regulate the entry of new dietary supplements into the marketplace because supplements are treated as food. Two main arguments support the current regulatory structure of dietary supplements: (1) cost and (2) access. But lower cost and increased access to dietary supplements do not necessary have any relationship to safety and efficacy. Manufacturers' marketing techniques tout the health benefits of their supplements. Meanwhile, consumers are ingesting supplements without scientific studies indicating whether or not they are harmful. The FDA Food Safety and Modernization Act, signed into law on January 4, 2011, did not address the safety concerns regarding dietary supplements. This article discusses the regulatory deficiencies concerning dietary supplements and proposes novel solutions to address this specific sector of the food supply. This article advocates for the use of scientific data to support a multi-tiered classification system to ensure that dietary supplements on the market are safe. PMID:26591824

  20. Introduction to the supplement.

    PubMed

    Rappuoli, Rino

    2015-06-01

    In July of 2014, a symposium entitled "Enhancing Vaccine Immunity and Value" was held in Siena, Italy. The focus of the symposium was on how to best meet the challenge of developing and implementing vaccines for future disease targets. Vaccination has been responsible for averting estimated 3 billion cases of disease and more than 500 million lives to date through the prevention of infectious diseases. This has largely been responsible for dramatic increases in life span in developed countries. However, with the demographics of the world's population are changing, with many adults now surviving into their 80s, we now face the challenge of protecting the aging and other underserved populations not only against infectious diseases but also against cancer and other chronic conditions that occur in older adults. To face this challenge, we must harness new technologies derived from recent advances in the fields of immunology, structural biology, synthetic biology and genomics that promise a revolution in the vaccine field. Specifically, vaccine adjuvants have the potential to harness the immune system to provide protection against new types of diseases, improve protection in young children and expand this protection to adults and the elderly. However, in order to succeed, we need to overcome the non-technical challenges that could limit the implementation of innovative vaccines, including controversies regarding the safety of adjuvants, increasing regulatory complexity, the inadequate methods used to assess the value of novel vaccines, and the resulting industry alienation from future investment. In this supplement, we have assembled manuscripts from lectures and discussions of the symposium last July that addressed two related questions: how to improve vaccine efficacy using breakthrough technologies and how to capture the full potential of novel vaccines. PMID:26022560

  1. Using NDA Techniques to Improve Safeguards Metrics on Burnup Quantification and Plutonium Content in LWR SNF

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, Steven F; Charlton, William S; Solodov, Alexander A; Ehinger, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    Globally, there exists a long history in reprocessing in evaluation of the shipper/receiver difference (SRD) on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) received and processed. Typically, the declared shipper s values for uranium and plutonium in SNF (based on calculations involving the initial manufacturer s data and reactor operating history) are used as the input quantities to the head-end process of the facility. Problems have been encountered when comparing these values with measured results of the input accountability tank contents. A typical comparison yields a systematic bias indicated as a loss of 5 7 percent of the plutonium (Pu) and approximately 1 percent for the uranium (U). Studies suggest that such deviation can be attributed to the non-linear nature of the axial burnup values of the SNF. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Texas A&M University are co-investigating the development of a new method, via Nondestructive Assay (NDA) techniques, to improve the accuracy in burnup and Pu content quantification. Two major components have been identified to achieve this objective. The first component calculates a measurement-based burnup profile along the axis of a fuel rod. Gamma-ray data is collected at numerous locations along the axis of the fuel rod using a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector designed for a wide range of gamma-ray energies. Using two fission products, 137Cs and 134Cs, the burnup is calculated at each measurement location and a profile created along the axis of the rod based on the individual measurement locations. The second component measures the U/Pu ratio using an HPGe detector configured for relatively low-energy gamma-rays including x-rays. Fluorescence x-rays from U and Pu are measured and compared to the U/Pu ratio determined from a destructive analysis of the sample. This will be used to establish a relationship between the measured and actual values. This relationship will be combined with the burnup analysis results to establish a relationship between fission product activity and Pu content. It is anticipated that this new method will allow receiving facilities to make a limited number of NDA, gamma-ray, measurements to confirm the shipper declared values for burnup and Pu content thereby improving the SRD.

  2. Dietary supplements and team-sport performance.

    PubMed

    Bishop, David

    2010-12-01

    A well designed diet is the foundation upon which optimal training and performance can be developed. However, as long as competitive sports have existed, athletes have attempted to improve their performance by ingesting a variety of substances. This practice has given rise to a multi-billion-dollar industry that aggressively markets its products as performance enhancing, often without objective, scientific evidence to support such claims. While a number of excellent reviews have evaluated the performance-enhancing effects of most dietary supplements, less attention has been paid to the performance-enhancing claims of dietary supplements in the context of team-sport performance. Dietary supplements that enhance some types of athletic performance may not necessarily enhance team-sport performance (and vice versa). Thus, the first aim of this review is to critically evaluate the ergogenic value of the most common dietary supplements used by team-sport athletes. The term dietary supplements will be used in this review and is defined as any product taken by the mouth, in addition to common foods, that has been proposed to have a performance-enhancing effect; this review will only discuss substances that are not currently banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Evidence is emerging to support the performance-enhancing claims of some, but not all, dietary supplements that have been proposed to improve team-sport-related performance. For example, there is good evidence that caffeine can improve single-sprint performance, while caffeine, creatine and sodium bicarbonate ingestion have all been demonstrated to improve multiple-sprint performance. The evidence is not so strong for the performance-enhancing benefits of ?-alanine or colostrum. Current evidence does not support the ingestion of ribose, branched-chain amino acids or ?-hydroxy-?-methylbutyrate, especially in well trained athletes. More research on the performance-enhancing effects of the dietary supplements highlighted in this review needs to be conducted using team-sport athletes and using team-sport-relevant testing (e.g. single- and multiple-sprint performance). It should also be considered that there is no guarantee that dietary supplements that improve isolated performance (i.e. single-sprint or jump performance) will remain effective in the context of a team-sport match. Thus, more research is also required to investigate the effects of dietary supplements on simulated or actual team-sport performance. A second aim of this review was to investigate any health issues associated with the ingestion of the more commonly promoted dietary supplements. While most of the supplements described in the review appear safe when using the recommended dose, the effects of higher doses (as often taken by athletes) on indices of health remain unknown, and further research is warranted. Finally, anecdotal reports suggest that team-sport athletes often ingest more than one dietary supplement and very little is known about the potential adverse effects of ingesting multiple supplements. Supplements that have been demonstrated to be safe and efficacious when ingested on their own may have adverse effects when combined with other supplements. More research is required to investigate the effects of ingesting multiple supplements (both on performance and health). PMID:21058748

  3. Aspartate as an ergogenic supplement.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, François

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate has been regularly listed in exercise physiology textbooks as an ergogenic substance since the first known trial by Professor Henri Laborit's laboratory in the late 1950s, aimed at verifying its ergogenic potential. The main outcomes of aspartate supplementation are attenuation of exercise-induced hyperammonaemia and increase of exercise endurance. In the available literature, the impact of aspartate on endurance seems generally favourable in humans, but it is not so favourable in experimental animals. In studies reporting increased endurance, no correlation has been found between its dosage and the increment of exercise time. Mechanisms supposed to explain the ergogenic effect of aspartate have also been reviewed in this article. Claims of a glycogen-sparing action, reduced hyperammonaemia and a higher rate of free fatty acid oxidation have not been confirmed unequivocally by the literature. Aspartate has not been shown to increase muscle endurance or strength. It is often used in combinations that are briefly reviewed in this article. However, the number of studies are presently too low to draw conclusions about the efficacy of these aspartate combinations. Furthermore, as in most studies on supplements, including aspartate alone or in combination, it is difficult to exclude a potential publication bias against non-significant results. PMID:18081364

  4. Review: Evidence-based Clinical Research of Anti-obesity Supplements in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yasueda, Asuka; Ito, Toshinori; Maeda, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically throughout the world, and weight reduction through lifestyle management is urgently warranted. At present, numerous supplements advertised for their anti-overweight property are available in the Japanese market, but most of these lack proper evidence. Thus, we investigated dietary supplements that have been tested in clinical trials. Search Strategy: We researched anti-obesity supplements in the Japanese market using the google search engine in Japanese with the key terms “anti-obesity supplements,” ”diet supplements,” and “weight reduction supplements.” Results: We listed 49 companies that supply anti-obesity supplements. Of these, 11 had published clinical evidence of the anti-obesity efficacy of their supplements. These products contain the following active ingredients: Angelica keiskei, bofu-tsusho-san, capsaishin, DHA/EPA, forskohlii, garcinia cambogia, lactoferrin, L-carnitine, oligonol, tea catechin, and yeast hydrolysate. Conclusion: We obtained 11 supplements for which clinical evidence was published in medical journals in English. We also found 10 products for which clinical or animal evidence was published in Japanese. We expect that many companies will produce evidence of the efficacy of their products in the near future, thereby validating the use of dietary anti-obesity supplements in Japan. PMID:26005506

  5. DIETARY SUPPLEMENTATION WITH BLUEBERRY EXTRACTS IMPROVES THE SURVIVAL AND FUNCTION OF GRAFTED EMBRYONIC DOPAMINE NEURONS IN RATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transplantation of embryonic dopamine (DA) neurons into the striatum is a viable treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, transplanted cells survive poorly. This study provides evidence that dietary supplementation with blueberry extract (BBE) provides an efficacious, easily administered a...

  6. Dietary Supplementation with Olive Oil or Fish Oil and Vascular Effects of Concentrated Ambient Particulate Matter Exposure in Human Volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) induces endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Olive oil (OO) and fish oil (FO) supplements have beneficial effects on endothelial function. Objective: In this study we evaluated the efficacy of...

  7. Optimization of the Separation of NDA-Derivatized Methylarginines by Capillary and Microchip Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Linz, Thomas H.; Snyder, Christa M.; Lunte, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The methylated arginines (MAs) monomethylarginine (MMA), asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) have been shown to be independent predictors of cardiovascular disease. This article describes progress regarding the development of an analytical method capable of rapidly analyzing MAs using capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microchip electrophoresis (MCE) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. Several parameters including buffer composition and separation voltage were optimized to achieve an ideal separation. The analytes of interest were derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) to produce fluorescent 1-cyanobenz[f]isoindole (CBI) derivatives and then subjected to CE analysis. Baseline resolution of SDMA, ADMA, MMA, and arginine was achieved in less than 8 min. The limits of detection for SDMA, ADMA, MMA, and arginine were determined to be 15, 20, 25, and 5 nM, respectively, which are well below the expected plasma concentrations. The CE separation method was then transferred to a glass MCE device with LIF detection. MAs were baseline resolved in 3 min on-chip using a 14 cm separation channel with detection limits of approximately 10 nM for each species. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of the separation of MAs by MCE. PMID:22357605

  8. Nondestructive assay (NDA) of fissile material solutions in tanks at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Fleissner, J.G.; Lamb, F.W.; Maul, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    Nondestructive assay of holdup in solution tanks at Rocky Flats has been performed to address criticality safety concerns since 1974. Destructive analysis techniques were used for quantification of the fissile material content of the tanks. With termination of operations in 1989, including sparging and sampling of tanks, a need arose for nondestructive assay of solutions in tanks to confirm previous inventory values. Gamma ray measurement methodologies were investigated and several techniques, including Poor Man`s Densitometry were implemented. These techniques have been applied to several different types of tanks including: annular, raschig ring filled, and pencil tanks. For the annular tanks ``Poor Man`s Densitometry`` is used, with the densities of the measured solutions normalized to the value of one ``accepted`` concentration tank. Measurement uncertainties for this technique has been better than was anticipated. Measurements are also performed at several levels to attempt to detect variations in density. For the current tank draining program, solution in tanks is assayed by the NDA gamma-ray technique before draining. Measurement results were obtained for plutonium, uranium, and mixtures of U/Pu solutions for concentrations ranging from less than 0.5 g/l to 150 g/l. Tanks with expected concentrations were used to establish a relationship between concentration and count rate. ``Bootstrapping`` calibration techniques were used in some cases to obtain quantitative results.

  9. The use of TI-208 gamma rays for safeguards, nondestructive-assay (NDA) measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R. B.; Chiang, L. G.; Norris, M. J.; Gunn, C. A.; Adaline, B. C.

    2009-05-26

    This paper examines two cases where gamma rays from Tl-208, including the 2614keV gamma ray, were used to detect anomalies in waste material. In addition to the characterization of waste for waste acceptance, and compliance with environmental and transportation laws, there is a safeguards element as well. The more sophisticated method of NDA at Y-12 includes a means to detect shielded special nuclear material (SNM). Excess count rates in the 2614keV gamma ray from Tl-208 are an indication of potential shielded HEU in waste as well as other containers. The 2614keV gamma ray is easy to monitor routinely. When a large 2614keV peak is detected, further investigation can be conducted from the gamma spectrum. This paper describes this further investigation in two cases. In one case self-shielded HEU was detected. In the other case the Tl-208 gamma rays came from a piece of Th-232 metal.

  10. Remote-controlled NDA (nondestructive assay) systems for process areas in a MOX (mixed oxide) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.C.; Menlove, H.O.; Augustson, R.H.; Ohtani, T.; Seya, M.; Takahashi, S.; Abedin-Zadeh, R.

    1989-01-01

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) systems have been designed and installed in the process area of an automated mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. These instruments employ neutron coincidence counting methods to measure the spontaneous-fission rate of plutonium in the powders, pellets, and fuel pins in the process area. The spontaneous fission rate and the plutonium isotopic ratios determine the mass of plutonium in the sample. Measurements can be either attended or unattended. The fuel-pin assay system (FPAS) resides above the robotic conveyor system and measures the plutonium content in fuel-pin trays containing up to 24 pins (/approximately/1 kg of plutonium). The material accountancy glove-box (MAGB) counters consist of two slab detectors mounted on the sides of the glove box to measure samples of powder or pellets as they are brought to the load cell. Samples measured by the MAGB counters may contain up to 18 kg of MOX. This paper describes the design and performance of four systems: the fuel-pin assay system and three separate MAGB systems. The paper also discusses the role of Monte Carlo transport techniques in the detector design and subsequent instrument calibration. 5 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Quantitative NDA measurements of advanced reprocessing product materials containing uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden

    The ability of inspection agencies and facility operators to measure powders containing several actinides is increasingly necessary as new reprocessing techniques and fuel forms are being developed. These powders are difficult to measure with nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques because neutrons emitted from induced and spontaneous fission of different nuclides are very similar. A neutron multiplicity technique based on first principle methods was developed to measure these powders by exploiting isotope-specific nuclear properties, such as the energy-dependent fission cross sections and the neutron induced fission neutron multiplicity. This technique was tested through extensive simulations using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code and by one measurement campaign using the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and two measurement campaigns using the Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC) with various (alpha,n) sources and actinide materials. Four potential applications of this first principle technique have been identified: (1) quantitative measurement of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium materials; (2) quantitative measurement of mixed oxide (MOX) materials; (3) quantitative measurement of uranium materials; and (4) weapons verification in arms control agreements. This technique still has several challenges which need to be overcome, the largest of these being the challenge of having high-precision active and passive measurements to produce results with acceptably small uncertainties.

  12. Common dietary supplements for cognitive health

    PubMed Central

    Gestuvo, MK; Hung, WW

    2012-01-01

    Advancing age is a major risk factor for cognitive impairment and dementia. Currently, there are no effective preventive strategies for cognitive decline. Since physicians have no drug therapies to offer, patients and families may turn to complementary and alternative medicine to preserve cognition. Dietary supplements are one of the most common forms of complementary and alternative medicine that patients use and although limited, evidence for their potential interactions with other treatments has been documented. Considering the insufficient evidence for their efficacy, potential for interaction with other therapies and costs to patients, physicians should be aware of the use of dietary supplements among their patients so that they can advise their patients on the potential benefits and harms. PMID:22451847

  13. Distalgesic; safety and efficacy. Efficacy: UK experience.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, R D

    1984-08-01

    The UK experience of Distalgesic efficacy is examined, and 18 trials have been reviewed, of which only five were controlled and only three contained a placebo. Three trials are examined in detail and the problems of trial methodology discussed. The assessment of analgesic effect in chronic painful conditions presents considerable problems. Despite the fact that Distalgesic appears to be a useful analgesic in the clinical situation, long-term controlled studies of its effectiveness in chronic pain are still awaited. PMID:6384026

  14. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Evaluation of Dietary Supplements for Performance Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Jackie L; Franks, Rob; Ransone, Jack; Powers, Michael E; Laquale, Kathleen M; Carlson-Phillips, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To help athletic trainers promote a “food-first” philosophy to support health and performance, understand federal and sport governing body rules and regulations regarding dietary supplements and banned substances, and become familiar with reliable resources for evaluating the safety, purity, and efficacy of dietary supplements. Background The dietary supplement industry is poorly regulated and takes in billions of dollars per year. Uneducated athletes need to gain a better understanding of the safety, eligibility, and efficacy concerns associated with choosing to take dietary supplements. The athletic trainer is a valuable athletic team member who can help in the educational process. In many cases, athletic trainers are asked to help evaluate the legality, safety, and efficacy of dietary supplements. For this position statement, our mission is to provide the athletic trainer with the necessary resources for these tasks. Recommendations Proper nutrition and changes in the athlete's habitual diet should be considered first when improved performance is the goal. Athletes need to understand the level of regulation (or lack thereof) governing the dietary supplement industry at the international, federal, state, and individual sport-participation levels. Athletes should not assume a product is safe simply because it is marketed over the counter. All products athletes are considering using should be evaluated for purity (ie, truth in labeling), safety, and efficacy. PMID:23672334

  15. Performance enhancement with supplements: incongruence between rationale and practice

    PubMed Central

    Petróczi, Andrea; Naughton, Declan P; Mazanov, Jason; Holloway, Allison; Bingham, Jerry

    2007-01-01

    Background Athletes are expected to consider multiple factors when making informed decision about nutritional supplement use. Besides rules, regulations and potential health hazards, the efficacy of different nutritional supplements in performance enhancement is a key issue. The aim of this paper was to find evidence for informed decision making by investigating the relationship between specific performance-related reasons for supplement use and the reported use of nutritional supplements. Methods The 'UK Sport 2005 Drug Free Survey' data (n = 874) were re-analysed using association [?2] and 'strength of association' tests [?] to show the proportion of informed choices and to unveil incongruencies between self-reported supplement use and the underlying motives. Results Participants (n = 520) reported supplement use in the pattern of: vitamin C (70.4%), creatine (36.1%), whey protein (30.6%), iron (29.8%), caffeine (23.8%), and ginseng (8.3%) for the following reasons: strength maintenance (38.1%), doctors' advice (24.2%), enhancing endurance (20.0%), ability to train longer (13.3%), and provided by the governing body (3.8%). Of thirty possible associations between the above supplements and reasons, 11 were predictable from literature precedents and only 8 were evidenced and these were not strong (? < .7). The best associations were for the ability to train longer with creatine (reported by 73.9%, ?2 = 49.14, p < .001; ? = .307, p < .001), and maintaining strength with creatine (reported by 62.6%, ?2 = 97.08, p < .001; ? = .432, p < .001) and whey protein (reported by 56.1%, ?2 = 97.82, p < .001; ? = .434, p < .001). Conclusion This study provided a platform for assessing congruence between athletes' reasons for supplement use and their actual use. These results suggest that a lack of understanding exists in supplement use. There is an urgent need to provide accurate information which will help athletes make informed choices about the use of supplements. PMID:17997853

  16. Dietary Supplements for Toddlers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you can’t get her to eat more iron-rich foods, consult your pediatrician about adding an iron supplement ... and keep offering her a wide variety of iron-rich foods so that, eventually, supplementation won’t be necessary. ...

  17. Current Biology Supplemental Information

    E-print Network

    Stearns, Tim

    Current Biology Supplemental Information Zeta-Tubulin Is a Member of a Conserved Tubulin Module Sedzinski, John B. Wallingford, and Tim Stearns #12;Supplemental Figures: Figure S1. Zeta-tubulin) Zeta-tubulin is expressed in adult tissues of X. tropicalis, with highest expression in the testis

  18. MSEIP Documentation Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James E.

    The Midwestern States Educational Information Project's "MSEIP Documentation Supplement" is a companion publication to "MSEIP Documentation of Project Development and General System Design; Revised, June 1969." (LI 003275). The supplement starts with an overview of the MSEIP Data Control System which explains many of the techniques used in the…

  19. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  20. Diet and psoriasis, part III: role of nutritional supplements.

    PubMed

    Millsop, Jillian W; Bhatia, Bhavnit K; Debbaneh, Maya; Koo, John; Liao, Wilson

    2014-09-01

    Patients with psoriasis are increasingly turning to the use of alternative and complementary medicine to manage their psoriasis. Patients often inquire about what dietary supplements may be beneficial, including the use of oral vitamin D, vitamin B12, selenium, and omega-3 fatty acids in fish oils. In this review we examine the extent to which each of these common nutritional interventions has been studied for the treatment of psoriasis. We weighed evidence from both controlled and uncontrolled prospective trials. The evidence of benefit was highest for fish oils. For other supplements, there is need for additional large, randomized clinical trials to establish evidence of efficacy. PMID:24780177

  1. Sano, et al. SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION I. Supplemental Materials and Methods

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    Sano, et al. SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION I. Supplemental Materials and Methods Cell Lines-1 HeLa cells) or RPMI (H322M cells) supplemented with 10% tetracycline­ free FBS, penicillin (100 UI% CO2. For DT40 cells we used RPMI supplemented with 10% FBS and 1% chicken serum. To induce BI-1

  2. A review of creatine supplementation in age-related diseases: more than a supplement for athletes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel N.; Agharkar, Amruta S.; Gonzales, Eric B.

    2014-01-01

    Creatine is an endogenous compound synthesized from arginine, glycine and methionine. This dietary supplement can be acquired from food sources such as meat and fish, along with athlete supplement powders. Since the majority of creatine is stored in skeletal muscle, dietary creatine supplementation has traditionally been important for athletes and bodybuilders to increase the power, strength, and mass of the skeletal muscle. However, new uses for creatine have emerged suggesting that it may be important in preventing or delaying the onset of neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging. On average, 30% of muscle mass is lost by age 80, while muscular weakness remains a vital cause for loss of independence in the elderly population. In light of these new roles of creatine, the dietary supplement’s usage has been studied to determine its efficacy in treating congestive heart failure, gyrate atrophy, insulin insensitivity, cancer, and high cholesterol. In relation to the brain, creatine has been shown to have antioxidant properties, reduce mental fatigue, protect the brain from neurotoxicity, and improve facets/components of neurological disorders like depression and bipolar disorder. The combination of these benefits has made creatine a leading candidate in the fight against age-related diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, long-term memory impairments associated with the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, and stroke. In this review, we explore the normal mechanisms by which creatine is produced and its necessary physiology, while paying special attention to the importance of creatine supplementation in improving diseases and disorders associated with brain aging and outlining the clinical trials involving creatine to treat these diseases. PMID:25664170

  3. Performance of growing cattle on poor-quality rangelands supplemented with farm-formulated protein supplements in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Gusha, J; Katsande, S; Zvinorova, P I; Halimani, T E; Chiuta, T

    2015-10-01

    Farmers use different non-conventional protein supplements and different feeding strategies to aid their animals survive the dry season in Zimbabwe. The strategies can be giving supplements once a week or once every other day up to very little supplement daily. Supplements are either legume crop residues or forage legumes. However, the efficacy of the use of non-conventional protein supplements in promoting growth and at the same time lowering the age at first calving is little understood. The study tested whether supplementing with farm-formulated non-conventional feeds could reduce live weight loss during the dry season and promote live weight gain as well as early development of sexual maturity in beef cattle. In a completely randomized design, thirty dams with calves on hooves were allocated to five different treatments which were repeated during the dry season for 3 years. The 3-year study results show that weight loss can be controlled, resulting in positive growth in both the pre-weaning and post-weaning phases of growing cattle. Yearlings fed solely on natural pasture lost significant weight during the dry season as compared to supplemented groups. The period to puberty and first calving was achieved at 18 and 27 months, respectively. Using non-conventional protein supplements could thus improve livestock productivity in resource-poor farming communities. It was concluded that smallholder farmers can supplement cattle with a kilogram per day of low-cost farm-based non-conventional legume meal to improve livestock productivity in semi-arid regions of Zimbabwe. PMID:25754582

  4. Iron supplements (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  5. Herbal Products and Supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and prescription medicines just because they come from nature. Although herbal health products and supplements are advertised as “natural,” their ingredients aren’t necessarily natural to the human body. They may have strong effects on your ...

  6. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Dietary Supplements Hoodia Horse Chestnut I Iodine Iron K Kava Vitamin K L Lavender Licorice Root M Magnesium Melatonin Milk ... B6 Vitamin C Vitamin D Vitamin E Vitamin K W Weight Loss Y Yohimbe Z Zinc Share ...

  7. Children and Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Dietary Supplements and Nutraceuticals (Endocrine Practice) [945KB PDF] Probiotics and Children (Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition) [ ... Two Studies Explore the Potential Health Benefits of Probiotics (07/04/08) Traditional Chinese Herbs May Benefit ...

  8. USP Verified Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... amounts Does not contain harmful levels of specified contaminants Is made according to FDA and USP Good ... market. Misleading health claims, potentially harmful levels of contaminants, and supplement mislabeling challenge consumer trust. The USP ...

  9. Supplements to Textbook Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Ken

    1994-01-01

    Describes the many kinds of materials that English teachers can draw upon to enrich and expand students' experiences with literature. Outlines ancillary materials used to supplement the study of William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." (HB)

  10. NCI Diversity Supplements Guidelines

    Cancer.gov

    This document applies to applications requesting research supplement funding to active National Cancer Institute (NCI) grants in response to PA-15-322. The purpose is to clarify the application process and highlight NCI-specific requirements.

  11. A clinical trial of glutathione supplementation in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Janet K.; Geier, David A.; Adams, James B.; Garver, Carolyn R.; Audhya, Tapan; Geier, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Recent evidence shows that subjects diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have significantly lower levels of glutathione than typically developing children. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of two commonly used glutathione supplements in subjects diagnosed with an ASD to determine their efficacy in increasing blood glutathione levels in subjects diagnosed with an ASD. Material/Methods The study was an eight-week, open-label trial using oral lipoceutical glutathione (n=13) or transdermal glutathione (n=13) in children, 3–13 years of age, with a diagnosis of an ASD. Subjects underwent pre- and post-treatment lab testing to evaluate plasma reduced glutathione, oxidized glutathione, cysteine, taurine, free and total sulfate, and whole-blood glutathione levels. Results The oral treatment group showed significant increases in plasma reduced glutathione, but not whole-blood glutathione levels following supplementation. Both the oral and transdermal treatment groups showed significant increases in plasma sulfate, cysteine, and taurine following supplementation. Conclusions The results suggest that oral and transdermal glutathione supplementation may have some benefit in improving some of the transsulfuration metabolites. Future studies among subjects diagnosed with an ASD should further explore the pharmacokinetics of glutathione supplementation and evaluate the potential effects of glutathione supplementation upon clinical symptoms. PMID:22129897

  12. Treatment Efficacy: Voice Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramig, Lorraine Olson; Verdolini, Katherine

    1998-01-01

    Reviews research on the efficacy of treatment for voice disorders. Voice disorders are defined, their frequency of occurrence is reported, and their impact on individuals is documented. Treatment related to vocal misuse, medical or physical conditions, and psychogenic disorders are discussed and case studies are presented. (Author/CR)

  13. Efficacy of Computer-Assisted Instruction for the Development of Early Literacy Skills in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaruso, Paul; Rodman, Alyson

    2011-01-01

    Two studies examined the efficacy of using computer-assisted instruction (CAI) to supplement a phonics-based reading curriculum for preschoolers and kindergartners in an urban public school system. The CAI programs provided exercises in phonological awareness and basic phonics skills. We compared treatment classes using CAI with control classes…

  14. Using Small-Scale Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate the Efficacy of New Curricular Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drits-Esser, Dina; Bass, Kristin M.; Stark, Louisa A.

    2014-01-01

    How can researchers in K-12 contexts stay true to the principles of rigorous evaluation designs within the constraints of classroom settings and limited funding? This paper explores this question by presenting a small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) designed to test the efficacy of curricular supplemental materials on epigenetics. The…

  15. Efficacy of a First-Grade Responsiveness-to-Intervention Prevention Model for Struggling Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jennifer K.; Compton, Donald L.; Fuchs, Douglas; Fuchs, Lynn S.; Bouton, Bobette; Barquero, Laura A.; Cho, Eunsoo

    2013-01-01

    This randomized control trial examined the efficacy of a multitiered supplemental tutoring program within a first-grade responsiveness-to-intervention prevention model. Struggling first-grade readers (n = 649) were screened and progress monitored at the start of the school year. Those identified as unresponsive to general education Tier 1 (n =…

  16. Motivational Interviewing Skills are Positively Associated with Nutritionist Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marley, Scott C.; Carbonneau, Kira; Lockner, Donna; Kibbe, Debra; Trowbridge, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationships between physical and social self-concepts, motivational interviewing (MI), and nutrition assessment skills with dimensions of counseling self-efficacy. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinics. Participants: Sixty-five WIC…

  17. Comparisons of luminaires: Efficacies and system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, L. D.; Both, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    Lighting designs for architectural (aesthetic) purposes, vision and safety, and plant growth have many features in common but several crucial ones that are not. The human eye is very sensitive to the color (wavelength) of light, whereas plants are less so. There are morphological reactions, particularly to the red and blue portions of the light spectrum but, in general, plants appear to accept and use light for photosynthesis everywhere over the PAR region of the spectrum. In contrast, the human eye interprets light intensity on a logarithmic scale, making people insensitive to significant differences of light intensity. As a rough rule, light intensity must change by 30 to 50% for the human eye to recognize the difference. Plants respond much more linearly to light energy, at least at intensities below photosynthetic saturation. Thus, intensity differences not noticeable to the human eye can have significant effects on total plant growth and yield, and crop timing. These factors make luminaire selection and lighting system design particularly important when designing supplemental lighting systems for plant growth. Supplemental lighting for plant growth on the scale of commercial greenhouses is a relatively expensive undertaking. Light intensities are often much higher than required for task (vision) lighting, which increases both installation and operating costs. However, and especially in the northern regions of the United States (and Canada, Europe, etc.), supplemental lighting during winter may be necessary to produce certain crops (e.g., tomatoes) and very useful to achieve full plant growth potential and crop timing with most other greenhouse crops. Operating costs over the life of a luminaire typically will exceed the initial investment, making lighting efficacy a major consideration. This report reviews tests completed to evaluate the efficiencies of various commercially-available High-Pressure Sodium luminaires, and then describes the results of using a commercial lighting design computer program, Lumen-Micro, to explore how to place luminaires within greenhouses and plant growth chambers to achieve light (PAR) uniformity and relatively high lighting efficacies. Several suggestions are presented which could encourage systematic design of plant lighting systems.

  18. Comparisons of luminaires: Efficacies and system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, L. D.; Both, A. J.

    1994-03-01

    Lighting designs for architectural (aesthetic) purposes, vision and safety, and plant growth have many features in common but several crucial ones that are not. The human eye is very sensitive to the color (wavelength) of light, whereas plants are less so. There are morphological reactions, particularly to the red and blue portions of the light spectrum but, in general, plants appear to accept and use light for photosynthesis everywhere over the PAR region of the spectrum. In contrast, the human eye interprets light intensity on a logarithmic scale, making people insensitive to significant differences of light intensity. As a rough rule, light intensity must change by 30 to 50% for the human eye to recognize the difference. Plants respond much more linearly to light energy, at least at intensities below photosynthetic saturation. Thus, intensity differences not noticeable to the human eye can have significant effects on total plant growth and yield, and crop timing. These factors make luminaire selection and lighting system design particularly important when designing supplemental lighting systems for plant growth. Supplemental lighting for plant growth on the scale of commercial greenhouses is a relatively expensive undertaking. Light intensities are often much higher than required for task (vision) lighting, which increases both installation and operating costs. However, and especially in the northern regions of the United States (and Canada, Europe, etc.), supplemental lighting during winter may be necessary to produce certain crops (e.g., tomatoes) and very useful to achieve full plant growth potential and crop timing with most other greenhouse crops. Operating costs over the life of a luminaire typically will exceed the initial investment, making lighting efficacy a major consideration. This report reviews tests completed to evaluate the efficiencies of various commercially-available High-Pressure Sodium luminaires, and then describes the results of using a commercial lighting design computer program, Lumen-Micro, to explore how to place luminaires within greenhouses and plant growth chambers to achieve light (PAR) uniformity and relatively high lighting efficacies. Several suggestions are presented which could encourage systematic design of plant lighting systems.

  19. Dietary Supplements for Weight Loss

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ma huang) is a plant that’s native to China. It contains substances that stimulate your nervous system, ... Office of Dietary Supplements Frequently Asked Questions: Which brand( s) of dietary supplements should I purchase? For information ...

  20. Breastfeeding FAQs: Solids and Supplementing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Breastfeeding FAQs: Solids and Supplementing KidsHealth > Parents > Growth & Development > Feeding & Eating > Breastfeeding FAQs: Solids and Supplementing Print A A A ...

  1. Supplemental Information EXTENDED EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES

    E-print Network

    Soloveichik, David

    (Invitrogen) supplemented with penicillin, streptomycin and glutamine at 37 C with 5% CO2 in a humidified, cells were starved over- night in DMEM supplemented with glutamine, penicillin, streptomycin, and 20 m

  2. Dietary Supplements: What Is Safe?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and side effects of dietary supplements Dietary supplement advertising and promotion Talking with your doctor about dietary ... Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair ...

  3. Vitamin Supplements: Healthy or Hoax?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hoax? Updated:Jun 12,2015 Can vitamin and mineral supplements really make you healthier? Overwhelmed by the towering shelves of vitamin and mineral supplements in the grocery store? There are so ...

  4. Internet Supplement for Vector Calculus

    E-print Network

    Wilkerson, Clarence

    4.1B Rotations and the Sunshine Formula . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 4.1C The Principle of Least on the Sunshine formula (see §4.1C of this internet supplement), see http in writing the supplement on the sunshine formula (see the supplement to Chapter 4) and for making a variety

  5. Internet Supplement for Vector Calculus

    E-print Network

    Hulshof, Joost

    Rotations and the Sunshine Formula . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 4.1C The Principle of Least Action on the Sunshine formula (see §4.1C of this internet supplement), see http in writing the supplement on the sunshine formula (see the supplement to Chapter 4) and for making a variety

  6. Calcium Supplements and Kidney Health

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Calcium_Supplements_101415.html Calcium Supplements and Kidney Health HealthDay News Video - October 15, 2015 To use ... health news that matters to you. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Calcium Dietary Supplements Kidney Stones About MedlinePlus ...

  7. Soy isoflavone supplementation and bone mineral density in menopausal women: a 2-y multicenter clinical trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isoflavones are naturally occurring plant estrogens that are abundant in soy. Although purported to protect against bone loss, the efficacy of soy isoflavone supplementation in the prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women remains controversial. Our aim was to test the effect of soy isoflav...

  8. Effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on nitric oxide metabolism and blood pressure in menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isoflavones, having chemical structures similar to estrogens, are believed to stimulate nitric oxide production and thus lower blood pressure. The efficacy of soy isoflavone supplementation to stimulate nitric oxide production and lower blood pressure in menopausal women with high normal blood press...

  9. Recent Advances in Berry Supplementation and Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To summarize recent findings and current concepts in the beneficial effects of berry consumption on brain function during aging. Berryfruit supplementation has continued to demonstrate efficacy in reversing age-related cognitive decline in animal studies. In terms of the mechanisms behind the effe...

  10. Effect of mineral supplementation on the performance by stocker cattle grazing winter wheat pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the efficacy of mineral supplementing stocker cattle grazing wheat pasture, 2 experiments were conducted. In Exp 1, 72 steer and heifer calves (avg BW = 228 kg) were randomly assigned to 12, 4.9-ha pastures on November 12 at 1.2 calves/ha (4 pastures), and February 5 at 2.5 calves/ha (8...

  11. Prophylactic Supplementation of Caprylic Acid in Feed Reduces Salmonella Enteritidis Colonization in Commercial Broiler Chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a major foodborne pathogen for which chickens serve as reservoir hosts. Reducing Salmonella Enteritidis carriage in chickens would reduce contamination of poultry meat and eggs with this pathogen. We investigated the prophylactic efficacy of feed supplemented with caprylic ...

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Behavioral Economic Supplement to Brief Motivational Interventions for College Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James G.; Dennhardt, Ashley A.; Skidmore, Jessica R.; Borsari, Brian; Barnett, Nancy P.; Colby, Suzanne M.; Martens, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Behavioral economic theory suggests that a reduction in substance use is most likely when there is an increase in rewarding substance-free activities. The goal of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the incremental efficacy of a novel behavioral economic supplement (Substance-Free Activity Session [SFAS]) to a…

  13. Taking iron supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... taking a vitamin C supplement or drinking orange juice with your iron pill. This can help the iron absorb into your body. Drinking 8 ounces of fluid with an iron pill is also okay. Tell your health care provider about all the medicines you are ...

  14. Psychology: Teacher Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Rebecca

    This supplement provides teachers with tests, quizzes, answers to questions in the text, and general teaching information for using the student text, "Psychology," by Rebecca Stark. Quizzes included are on the topics of human development; the nervous system; the brain; cognitive development; sensation and perception; conditioning; learning;…

  15. Developmental Cell Supplemental Data

    E-print Network

    Bartel, David

    ::gfp plus ajm-1::gfp which mark seam cell nuclei and cell borders, respectively (a gift from M. Maduro and J1 Developmental Cell Supplemental Data Li et al. Regulatory mutations of mir-48, a C. elegans let-7/hbl-1 controls developmental time and is regulated by microRNAs. Dev Cell 4, 625-637. Mello, C. C

  16. Supplemental Information spacer spacer

    E-print Network

    Lim, Wendell

    Supplemental Information cas9 repeat spacer spacer dsDNA Transcription DNA scanning CRISPRcas1 cas2RNA) and the host RNase III. After cleavage, one single protein, Cas9, recognizes and binds to the cleaved form of the crRNA. Cas9 guides crRNA to DNA and scans the DNA molecule. The complex is stabilized by basepairing

  17. Supporting Information Supplement 1

    E-print Network

    Kondic, Lou

    fidelity present in the slice edges following the metal lift off step limited the maximum thin filmSupporting Information Supplement 1 The lithography and metallization methods used constrain/width) for the initial varicose slices was limited to relatively small h/w ratios. It is also important to note

  18. Whole Food versus Supplement: Comparing the Clinical Evidence of Tomato Intake and Lycopene Supplementation on Cardiovascular Risk Factors12

    PubMed Central

    Burton-Freeman, Britt M.; Sesso, Howard D.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in the United States and worldwide. A link between diet and CVD is well established, with dietary modification a foundational component of CVD prevention and management. With the discovery of bioactive components beyond the essential nutrients of foods, a new era of nutritional, medical, botanical, physiologic, and analytical sciences has unfolded. The ability to identify, isolate, purify, and deliver single components has expanded the dietary supplement business and health opportunity for consumers. Lycopene is an example of a food component that has attracted attention from scientists as well as food, agriculture, and dietary supplement industries. A major question, however, is whether delivering lycopene through a supplement source is as effective as or more effective than consuming lycopene through whole food sources, specifically the tomato, which is the richest source of lycopene in the Western diet. In this review, we examined clinical trials comparing the efficacy of lycopene supplements with tomato products on intermediate CVD risk factors including oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial function, blood pressure, and lipid metabolism. Overall, the present review highlights the need for more targeted research; however, at present, the available clinical research supports consuming tomato-based foods as a first-line approach to cardiovascular health. With the exception of blood pressure management where lycopene supplementation was favored, tomato intake provided more favorable results on cardiovascular risk endpoints than did lycopene supplementation. Indeed, future research that is well designed, clinically focused, mechanistically revealing, and relevant to human intake will undoubtedly add to the growing body of knowledge unveiling the promise of tomatoes and/or lycopene supplementation as an integral component of a heart-healthy diet. PMID:25469376

  19. Development of the nano-dust analyzer (NDA) for detection and compositional analysis of nanometer-size dust particles originating in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, L.; Auer, S.; Gemer, A.; Grün, E.; Horanyi, M.; Juhasz, A.; Kempf, S.; Malaspina, D.; Mocker, A.; Moebius, E.; Srama, R.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2014-03-01

    A linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer is developed for the detection and chemical analysis of nanometer-sized particles originating near the Sun. Nano-dust particles are thought to be produced by mutual collisions between interplanetary dust particles slowly spiraling toward the Sun and are accelerated outward to high velocities by interaction with the solar wind plasma. The WAVES instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft reported the detection, strong temporal variation, and potentially high flux of these particles. Here we report on the optimization and the results from the detailed characterization of the instrument's performance using submicrometer sized dust particles accelerated to 8-60 km/s. The Nano Dust Analyzer (NDA) concept is derived from previously developed detectors. It has a 200 cm2 effective target area and a mass resolution of approximately m/?m = 50. The NDA instrument is designed to reliably detect and analyze nanometer-sized dust particles while being pointed close to the Sun's direction, from where they are expected to arrive. Measurements by such an instrument will determine the size-dependent flux of the nano-dust particles and its variations, it will characterize the composition of the nano-dust and, ultimately, it may determine their source. The flight version of the NDA instrument is estimated to be <5 kg and requires <10 W for operation.

  20. Development of the nano-dust analyzer (NDA) for detection and compositional analysis of nanometer-size dust particles originating in the inner heliosphere.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, L; Auer, S; Gemer, A; Grün, E; Horanyi, M; Juhasz, A; Kempf, S; Malaspina, D; Mocker, A; Moebius, E; Srama, R; Sternovsky, Z

    2014-03-01

    A linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer is developed for the detection and chemical analysis of nanometer-sized particles originating near the Sun. Nano-dust particles are thought to be produced by mutual collisions between interplanetary dust particles slowly spiraling toward the Sun and are accelerated outward to high velocities by interaction with the solar wind plasma. The WAVES instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft reported the detection, strong temporal variation, and potentially high flux of these particles. Here we report on the optimization and the results from the detailed characterization of the instrument's performance using submicrometer sized dust particles accelerated to 8-60 km/s. The Nano Dust Analyzer (NDA) concept is derived from previously developed detectors. It has a 200 cm(2) effective target area and a mass resolution of approximately m/?m = 50. The NDA instrument is designed to reliably detect and analyze nanometer-sized dust particles while being pointed close to the Sun's direction, from where they are expected to arrive. Measurements by such an instrument will determine the size-dependent flux of the nano-dust particles and its variations, it will characterize the composition of the nano-dust and, ultimately, it may determine their source. The flight version of the NDA instrument is estimated to be <5 kg and requires <10 W for operation. PMID:24689626

  1. Military-specific application of nutritional supplements: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Hoedebecke, Kyle; Brink, Will

    2015-01-01

    The Soldiers of America's military endure numerous physical and mental challenges that demand strict physical fitness regimens, extreme mental agility, and a perpetual readiness to deploy at a moment's notice. The chronicity of these stressors has the potential to dramatically reduce performance - both directly and indirectly.  Because of this risk, many Soldiers turn to nutritional supplements with hopes of optimizing performance. Increasing amounts of research have demonstrated that various supplements may enhance overall physical prowess, health, and offer quicker recovery in the face of corporal or psychological extremes. Most individuals, including many medical and nutrition professionals, possess only an elementary comprehension of nutritional supplements and their effect on Soldiers in training or combat environments. Nevertheless, a grasp of these details is required for safety and optimal benefits. Various compounds have been evaluated - to include evidence within the military setting - and found to augment endurance, increase cognitive function, decrease knee pain, or offer hearing or lung protection in the face of high-energy impulses. These efficacious outcomes may serve to augment the health and longevity of these Soldiers; however, continued research is needed for efficacy and long-term safety within specific environments. PMID:25949806

  2. Military-specific application of nutritional supplements: a brief overview

    PubMed Central

    Hoedebecke, Kyle; Brink, Will

    2015-01-01

    The Soldiers of America's military endure numerous physical and mental challenges that demand strict physical fitness regimens, extreme mental agility, and a perpetual readiness to deploy at a moment's notice. The chronicity of these stressors has the potential to dramatically reduce performance - both directly and indirectly.  Because of this risk, many Soldiers turn to nutritional supplements with hopes of optimizing performance. Increasing amounts of research have demonstrated that various supplements may enhance overall physical prowess, health, and offer quicker recovery in the face of corporal or psychological extremes. Most individuals, including many medical and nutrition professionals, possess only an elementary comprehension of nutritional supplements and their effect on Soldiers in training or combat environments. Nevertheless, a grasp of these details is required for safety and optimal benefits. Various compounds have been evaluated - to include evidence within the military setting - and found to augment endurance, increase cognitive function, decrease knee pain, or offer hearing or lung protection in the face of high-energy impulses. These efficacious outcomes may serve to augment the health and longevity of these Soldiers; however, continued research is needed for efficacy and long-term safety within specific environments. PMID:25949806

  3. Effective Nutritional Supplement Combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Matt; Cribb, Paul J.

    Few supplement combinations that are marketed to athletes are supported by scientific evidence of their effectiveness. Quite often, under the rigor of scientific investigation, the patented combination fails to provide any greater benefit than a group given the active (generic) ingredient. The focus of this chapter is supplement combinations and dosing strategies that are effective at promoting an acute physiological response that may improve/enhance exercise performance or influence chronic adaptations desired from training. In recent years, there has been a particular focus on two nutritional ergogenic aids—creatine monohydrate and protein/amino acids—in combination with specific nutrients in an effort to augment or add to their already established independent ergogenic effects. These combinations and others are discussed in this chapter.

  4. Nutrition and nutritional supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Manissier, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Skin acts as a natural barrier between internal and external environments thus plays an important role in vital biological functions such as protection against mechanical/chemical damages, micro-organisms, ultraviolet damage. Nutrition has a critical impact on strengthening skin’s capabilities to fight against these multiple aggressions. Nutritional deficiencies are often associated with skin health disorders, while diets can either positively or negatively influence skin condition. More recently, the concept of nutritional supplementation has emerged as a new strategy in the daily practice of dermatology as well as a complementary approach to topical cosmetics in the field of beauty. Focusing on human clinical data, this paper proposes to illustrate the link between skin health and nutrition and to exemplify the beneficial actions of nutritional supplementation in skin health and beauty. PMID:20808515

  5. Efficacy of radioiodine urinalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Broga, D.W.; Berk, H.W.; Sharpe, A.R. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Little exists in the literature to support the efficacy of urinalysis for demonstrating thyroid uptake of radioiodine. A review was made of a variety of kinetic models. Computer analysis and graphics were used to assess the variables in the two models chosen for this study. The applicability of each model was tested by using data obtained from a group of euthyroid subjects. The results indicate that using an integral urine-sampling method and a three-component model yields minimum detectable thyroid uptakes which fall well below required reporting limits. Furthermore, the results show that integral urine samples obtained in the first few hours post exposure may be used to predict major thyroid uptakes in time for effective thyroid blocking.

  6. Prevalence and predictors of children's dietary supplement use: the 2007 National Health Interview Survey1234

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Johanna; Nahin, Richard L; Rogers, Gail T; Barnes, Patricia M; Jacques, Paul M; Sempos, Christopher T; Bailey, Regan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the characteristics of US children who are dietary supplement users. Objective: We described the prevalence and predictors of and reasons for giving children dietary supplements. Design: The study included children <18 y of age who participated in the Complementary and Alternative Medicine supplement of the National Health Interview Survey of 2007 whose proxies provided complete information on child dietary supplement use. Results: A total of 37% of subjects used dietary supplements, 31% of subjects used multivitamin mineral (MVM) products exclusively, 4% of subjects used single vitamins or minerals solely or in combination with MVMs, and 2% of subjects used nonvitamin, nonmineral products either solely or in combination with other supplements. Users were more likely than nonusers to be Asian, white, or non-Hispanic; belong to families with higher parental education and income levels; reside in areas other than the South; be in good, very good, or excellent health; have private health insurance; and have a usual place at which they received conventional medical care. Children (3%) with the most disease burden and health care were more likely to use supplements than were healthier children. Supplements were given for the prevention or treatment of many illnesses and conditions. Neither the caregiver's reasons nor specific supplements used were consistently associated with particular conditions. Conclusions: The 37% of US children who used any type of dietary supplements differed from nonusers in family socioeconomic status and many other health-related characteristics. Users were given supplements to prevent or treat many illnesses and conditions for which there is only limited evidence of their efficacy. PMID:23576049

  7. Development of an NDA system for high-level waste from the Chernobyl new safe confinement construction site

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-yoon; Browne, Michael C; Rael, Carlos D; Carroll, Colin J; Sunshine, Alexander; Novikov, Alexander; Lebedev, Evgeny

    2010-01-01

    In early 2009, preliminary excavation work has begun in preparation for the construction of the New Safe Confinement (NSC) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) in Ukraine. The NSC is the structure that will replace the present containment structure and will confine the radioactive remains of the ChNPP Unit-4 reactor for the next 100 years. It is expected that special nuclear material (SNM) that was ejected from the Unit-4 reactor during the accident in 1986 could be uncovered and would therefore need to be safeguarded. ChNPP requested the assistance of the United States Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) with developing a new non-destructive assay (NDA) system that is capable of assaying radioactive debris stored in 55-gallon drums. The design of the system has to be tailored to the unique circumstances and work processes at the NSC construction site and the ChNPP. This paper describes the Chernobyl Drum Assay System (CDAS), the solution devised by Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sonalysts Inc., and the ChNPP, under NNSA's International Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP). The neutron counter measures the spontaneous fission neutrons from the {sup 238}U, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 244}Cm in a waste drum and estimates the mass contents of the SNMs in the drum by using of isotopic compositions determined by fuel burnup. The preliminary evaluation on overall measurement uncertainty shows that the system meets design performance requirements imposed by the facility.

  8. Failure of mineral-vitamin supplements to prevent tansy ragwort (Senecio jacobaea) toxicosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A E

    1982-04-01

    The efficacy of 2 mineral-vitamin supplements in preventing or alleviating initial pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) toxicosis in cattle was tested. Three groups of calves were fed 1 of the 2 supplements plus tansy ragwort (Senecio jacobaea) containing PA and 2 groups of calves were fed tansy ragwort without the supplement. Toxicity comparisons were based on differences in observed clinical signs, serum enzyme changes, survival time of calves, and histopathologic examination of hepatic tissue. Typical tansy ragwort toxicosis terminating in death developed in all calves. There were no marked differences in responses of the groups of calves. Seemingly, the supplements did not afford protection or alleviate tansy ragwort-related PA toxicosis in calves. PMID:6462075

  9. [Physical activity and dietary supplements].

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Kristian; Hansen, Harald S; Hansen, Mette; Kiens, Bente; Kvorning, Thue; Nielsen, Lars N; Rasmussen, Lone B; Aagaard, Peter G

    2009-08-17

    The Danish Fitness and Nutrition Council has examined the scientific literature to evaluate the performance and health-related aspects of consuming dietary supplements in the context of physical activity. Certain nutritional supplements such as creatine and caffeine have documented ergogenic effects in specific situations. However, for the moderately physically active adult and healthy individual, who already consumes an energy- and nutrient balanced diet, consuming any currently legal dietary supplement does not seem to confer additional benefits on performance or health. PMID:19732518

  10. MICROBIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF FOOD SUPPLEMENTS.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Magdalena; Kubicka, Marcelina M; Kami?ska, Dorota; D?ugaszewska, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Many specialists note that the food offered today - as a result of very complex technological processing - is devoid of many components that are important for the organism and the shortages have to be supplemented. The simplest for it is to consume diet supplements that provide the missing element in a concentrated form. In accordance with the applicable law, medicinal products include all substances or mixtures of substances that are attributed with properties of preventing or treating diseases with humans or animals. Permits to admit supplements to the market are issued by the Chief Sanitary Inspector and the related authorities; permits for medicines are issued by the Chief Pharmaceutical Inspector and the Office for Registration of Medicinal Products, Medical Devices and Biocidal Products. Therefore, admittance of a supplement to the market is less costly and time consuming_than admittance of a medicine. Supplements and medicines may contain the same component but medicines will have a larger concentration than supplements. Sale of supplements at drug stores and in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids or powders makes consumer often confusing supplements with medicines. Now there are no normative documents specifying limits of microbiological impurities in diet supplements. In Polish legislation, diet supplements are subject to legal acts concerning food. Medicines have to comply with microbiological purity requirements specified in the Polish Pharmacopeia. As evidenced with the completed tests, the proportion of diet supplement samples with microbiological impurities is 6.5%. Sales of diet supplements have been growing each year, they are consumed by healthy people but also people with immunology deficiencies and by children and therefore consumers must be certain that they buy safe products. PMID:26642690

  11. Nutritional Supplementation and Meal Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, Jim

    For the competitive athlete and the serious recreational athlete, nutritional supplementation can have a positive effect on training and on performance. There are many fad supplements on the market, and many that have come and gone. However, two nutrients have withstood the test of time and many tests in research laboratories around the world, and they continue to have positive training- and performance-enhancing effects. Carbohydrates are commonly supplemented to improve energy availability and to replace valuable muscle and liver glycogen stores. Protein supplementation usually is associated with building muscle tissue.

  12. Dietary supplements for aquatic sports.

    PubMed

    Derave, Wim; Tipton, Kevin D

    2014-08-01

    Many athletes use dietary supplements, with use more prevalent among those competing at the highest level. Supplements are often self-prescribed, and their use is likely to be based on an inadequate understanding of the issues at stake. Supplementation with essential micronutrients may be useful when a diagnosed deficiency cannot be promptly and effectively corrected with food-based dietary solutions. When used in high doses, some supplements may do more harm than good: Iron supplementation, for example, is potentially harmful. There is good evidence from laboratory studies and some evidence from field studies to support health or performance benefits from appropriate use of a few supplements. The available evidence from studies of aquatic sports is small and is often contradictory. Evidence from elite performers is almost entirely absent, but some athletes may benefit from informed use of creatine, caffeine, and buffering agents. Poor quality assurance in some parts of the dietary supplements industry raises concerns about the safety of some products. Some do not contain the active ingredients listed on the label, and some contain toxic substances, including prescription drugs, that can cause health problems. Some supplements contain compounds that will cause an athlete to fail a doping test. Supplement quality assurance programs can reduce, but not entirely eliminate, this risk. PMID:24667103

  13. Bodybuilding supplementation and tooth decay.

    PubMed

    Ali, M S; Batley, H; Ahmed, F

    2015-07-10

    Supplementation is a key component in bodybuilding and is increasingly being used by amateur weight lifters and enthusiasts to build their ideal bodies. Bodybuilding supplements are advertised to provide nutrients needed to help optimise muscle building but they can contain high amounts of sugar. Supplement users are consuming these products, while not being aware of their high sugar content, putting them at a higher risk of developing dental caries. It is important for dental professionals to recognise the increased risk for supplement users and to raise awareness, provide appropriate preventative advice and be knowledgeable of alternative products to help bodybuilders reach their goals, without increasing the risk of dental caries. PMID:26159983

  14. Special Supplement Introduction: Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Fernyhough, Charles; Waters, Flavie

    2014-01-01

    This Special Supplement presents reports from 11 working groups of the interdisciplinary International Consortium on Hallucination Research meeting in Durham, UK, September 2013. Topics include psychological therapies for auditory hallucinations, culture and hallucinations, hallucinations in children and adolescents, visual hallucinations, interdisciplinary approaches to the phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), AVHs in persons without need for care, a multisite study of the PSYRATS instrument, subtypes of AVHs, the Hearing Voices Movement, Research Domain Criteria for hallucinations, and cortical specialization as a route to understanding hallucinations. PMID:24936079

  15. Special supplement introduction: hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Fernyhough, Charles; Waters, Flavie

    2014-07-01

    This Special Supplement presents reports from 11 working groups of the interdisciplinary International Consortium on Hallucination Research meeting in Durham, UK, September 2013. Topics include psychological therapies for auditory hallucinations, culture and hallucinations, hallucinations in children and adolescents, visual hallucinations, interdisciplinary approaches to the phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), AVHs in persons without need for care, a multisite study of the PSYRATS instrument, subtypes of AVHs, the Hearing Voices Movement, Research Domain Criteria for hallucinations, and cortical specialization as a route to understanding hallucinations. PMID:24936079

  16. Supplemental Material (Doan and Rudner 2007) 1 SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIAL

    E-print Network

    Rudner, David

    Supplemental Material (Doan and Rudner 2007) 1 SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIAL Perturbations to engulfment do that perturbations to engulfment directly inhibit the B processing enzyme (Jiang et al., 2005). These researchers of these experiments is that the level of the B processing enzyme is significantly reduced in the absence of Bof

  17. 22 CFR 71.12 - Dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Dietary supplements. 71.12 Section 71...Incarcerated Abroad § 71.12 Dietary supplements. (a) Eligibility criteria...considered eligible for the dietary supplement program under the...

  18. 22 CFR 71.12 - Dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Dietary supplements. 71.12 Section 71...Incarcerated Abroad § 71.12 Dietary supplements. (a) Eligibility criteria...considered eligible for the dietary supplement program under the...

  19. 22 CFR 71.12 - Dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Dietary supplements. 71.12 Section 71...Incarcerated Abroad § 71.12 Dietary supplements. (a) Eligibility criteria...considered eligible for the dietary supplement program under the...

  20. 22 CFR 71.12 - Dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Dietary supplements. 71.12 Section 71...Incarcerated Abroad § 71.12 Dietary supplements. (a) Eligibility criteria...considered eligible for the dietary supplement program under the...

  1. 22 CFR 71.12 - Dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Dietary supplements. 71.12 Section 71...Incarcerated Abroad § 71.12 Dietary supplements. (a) Eligibility criteria...considered eligible for the dietary supplement program under the...

  2. Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Fact Sheets

    MedlinePLUS

    ... DRI Tool Daily Value (DV) Tables Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Fact Sheets A - E | F - L | M - S | ... Information Botanical Dietary Supplements: Background Information Vitamin and Mineral Fact Sheets Botanical Supplement Fact Sheets Frequently Asked ...

  3. Psychology of Supplementation in Sport and Exercise: Motivational Antecedents and Biobehavioral Outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Rafer; Arent, Shawn

    Research concerning the physiological and biobehavioral effects of supplements commonly used in sport or exercise settings has multiplied rapidly over the last decade. However, less attention has been directed to understanding the motivational pathways leading to sport and exercise supplement use. This chapter summarizes known usage rates for sport/fitness supplements and describes motivational theories and constructs that may be of use for understanding individuals' use of these substances. In this respect, we contend that researchers should consider behavioral approaches, the theory of planned behavior, balance theory, achievement goal theory, social physique anxiety, and muscle dysmorphia as useful for developing an understanding of the psychological influences on supplement use. For some of the latter theories/constructs, research has already shown support for their explanatory abilities, whereas research is scant and the utility for understanding sport/exercise supplement use is yet to be determined for many of the theories. In addition to describing the motivation behind supplement use, this chapter summarizes the biobehavioral effects of a select group of supplements commonly used to improve performance, fitness, or health. Specifically, we consider psychobiological effects of caffeine, creatine, Ginkgo biloba, and St. John's wort related to enhanced arousal, improved memory and cognition, enhanced brain function and protection, and reduced depression. There is promising initial evidence for the efficacy of these compounds in producing favorable psychological outcomes, although certain shortcomings of many studies on these compounds must be taken into account before reaching definitive conclusions.

  4. GRAND DANUBE NO SINGLE SUPPLEMENT

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    GRAND DANUBE PASSAGE NO SINGLE SUPPLEMENT FOR SOLO TRAVELERS CRUISE THE featuring PRAGUE & SOFIA and informa- tion. Single supplement waived for solo travelers! (Limited availability.) AUGUST 22-SEPTEMBER 5 by delving into the rich culture of Prague, and explore its Old Town, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Embark

  5. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:24007251

  6. Fitness supplements as a gateway substance for anabolic-androgenic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Tom; Harty, Seth; Langenbucher, James W

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 3.0% of young Americans have used anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). A traditional model of adolescent substance use, the gateway hypothesis, suggests that drug use follows a chronological, causal sequence, whereby initial use of a specific drug leads to an increased likelihood of future drug use. Therefore, the use of illicit appearance and performance enhancing drugs (APED), such as AASs, also follows an analogous progression, whereby legal APEDs, (e.g., nutritional supplements) precedes illicit APED use. We examined the relationship between nutritional supplement use, beliefs about APEDs, and APED use in 201 male (n = 100) and female (n = 101) undergraduates. Participants completed measures of muscle dysmorphia (MDDI), body checking (BCQ, MBCQ), eating disorder symptoms (EDE-Q), perfectionism (FMPS), positive beliefs about the efficacy-safety of AAS use and APED use patterns. A series of covariance structure models (CSM) showed body image disturbance, compulsive exercise, illicit drug use, and perfectionism, independent of gender, were significant predictors of positive beliefs about AAS. Those who used both fat burning and muscle building supplements reported the strongest beliefs in AAS efficacy-safety, which was associated with higher likelihood of current illicit APED use. There was evidence of significant indirect relationships between supplement use and illicit APED use through contact with other AAS users and beliefs about AAS. The potential role for nutritional supplement use in the initiation of illegal APED use is discussed. Future prevention efforts may benefit from targeting legal APED users in youth. PMID:22486333

  7. Nutritional Supplements for Endurance Athletes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Christopher J.

    Athletes engaged in heavy endurance training often seek additional nutritional strategies to help maximize performance. Specific nutritional supplements exist to combat certain factors that limit performance beginning with a sound everyday diet. Research has further demonstrated that safe, effective, legal supplements are in fact available for today's endurance athletes. Several of these supplements are marketed not only to aid performance but also to combat the immunosuppressive effects of intense endurance training. It is imperative for each athlete to research the legality of certain supplements for their specific sport or event. Once the legality has been established, it is often up to each individual athlete to decipher the ethics involved with ingesting nutritional supplements with the sole intent of improving performance.

  8. Determining plutonium mass in spent fuel with non-destructive assay techniques - NGSU research overview and update on 6 NDA techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Stephen J; Conlin, Jeremy L; Evans, Louise G; Hu, Jianwei; Blanc, Pauline C; Lafleur, Adrienne M; Menlove, Howard O; Schear, Melissa A; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Croft, Stephen; Fensin, Michael L; Freeman, Corey R; Koehler, William E; Mozin, V; Sandoval, N P; Lee, T H; Cambell, L W; Cheatham, J R; Gesh, C J; Hunt, A; Ludewigt, B A; Smith, L E; Sterbentz, J

    2010-09-15

    This poster is one of two complementary posters. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE has initiated a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in, and detect the diversion of pins from, spent nuclear fuel assemblies with non-destructive assay (NDA). This research effort has the goal of quantifying the capability of 14 NDA techniques as well as training a future generation of safeguards practitioners. By November of 2010, we will be 1.5 years into the first phase (2.5 years) of work. This first phase involves primarily Monte Carlo modelling while the second phase (also 2.5 years) will focus on experimental work. The goal of phase one is to quantify the detection capability of the various techniques for the benefit of safeguard technology developers, regulators, and policy makers as well as to determine what integrated techniques merit experimental work, We are considering a wide range of possible technologies since our research horizon is longer term than the focus of most regulator bodies. The capability of all of the NDA techniques will be determined for a library of 64 17 x 17 PWR assemblies [burnups (15, 30, 45, 60 GWd/tU), initial enrichments (2, 3, 4, 5%) and cooling times (1, 5, 20, 80 years)]. The burnup and cooling time were simulated with each fuel pin being comprised of four radial regions. In this paper an overview of the purpose will be given as well as a technical update on the following 6 neutron techniques: {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Self-Integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry. The technical update will quantify the anticipated performance of each technique for the 64 assemblies of the spent fuel library.

  9. Efficacy of Antimicrobial Therapy for Mycoplasma genitalium Infections.

    PubMed

    Manhart, Lisa E; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Golden, Matthew R; Martin, David H

    2015-12-15

    Mycoplasma genitalium has been causally linked with nongonococcal urethritis in men and cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, preterm birth, spontaneous abortion, and infertility in women, yet treatment has proven challenging. To inform treatment recommendations, we reviewed English-language studies describing antimicrobial susceptibility, resistance-associated mutations, and clinical efficacy of antibiotic therapy, identified via a systematic search of PubMed supplemented by expert referral. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) from some contemporary isolates exhibited high-level susceptibility to most macrolides and quinolones, and moderate susceptibility to most tetracyclines, whereas other contemporary isolates had high MICs to the same antibiotics. Randomized trials demonstrated poor efficacy of doxycycline and better, but declining, efficacy of single-dose azithromycin therapy. Treatment failures after extended doses of azithromycin similarly increased, and circulating macrolide resistance was present in high levels in several areas. Moxifloxacin remains the most effective therapy, but treatment failures and quinolone resistance are emerging. Surveillance of M. genitalium prevalence and antimicrobial resistance patterns is urgently needed. PMID:26602619

  10. Supplements and drugs used to enhance athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Congeni, Joseph; Miller, Stephen

    2002-04-01

    The temptation of using drugs and supplements as shortcuts to improving athletic performance or even to enhance appearance is very seductive to adolescents. This age group is often characterized by a desire for quick results and a lack of concern for future consequences. Preventing the use of drugs to enhance athletic performance is difficult even when we have good medical and scientific evidence to prove a dangerous risk-benefit ratio, such as with AASs. The use of "nutritional supplements" is even more difficult to control. The protection of these substances by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 removed control of these substances from the FDA. Therefore, release and widespread use of new supplements occurs before significant clinical study of benefit and adverse effects takes place. The distributors' financial interest, the products' promotional claims, and the athletes' and coaches' insatiable desire to win at all costs are a volatile combination. This spawns the production of a huge number of "natural" products, making it even more difficult to assess efficacy, safety, legality, and purity of these substances. Health care professionals need to rely on research when available, stay current on trends in athletes' drug and supplement use, and discuss the individual athlete's concerns when they arise. The preparticipation physical examination can be a good opportunity for discussion. Finally, physicians need to educate athletes, parents, coaches, trainers, and other physicians. A reasonable strength and conditioning program and a well-balanced diet must be presented as a sensible alternative to a riskier, shortcut mindset. PMID:11993292

  11. Vitamin D Supplementation and Immune Response to Antarctic Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Mehta, S. K.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Bourbeau, Y.; Locke, J. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Smith, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining vitamin D status without sunlight exposure is difficult without supplementation. This study was designed to better understand interrelationships between periodic cholecalciferol(vitamin D3) supplementation and immune function in Antarctic workers. The effect of 2 oral dosing regimens of vitamin D3 supplementation on vitamin D status and markers of immune function were evaluated in people in Antarctica with no ultraviolet light exposure for 6 mo. Participants were given a 2,000-IU (50 g) daily (n=15) or 10,000-IU (250 g) weekly (n=14) vitamin D3 supplement for 6 mo during a winter in Antarctica. Biological samples were collected at baseline and at 3 and 6 mo. Vitamin D intake, markers of vitamin D and bone metabolism, and latent virus reactivation were determined. After 6 mo the mean (SD) serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentration increased from 56 plus or minus 17 to 79 plus or minus 16 nmol/L and 52 plus or minus 10 to 69 plus or minus 9 nmol/L in the 2,000-IU/d and 10,000-IU/wk groups (main effect over time P less than 0.001). Participants with a greater BMI (participant BMI range = 19-43 grams per square meter) had a smaller increase in 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 after 6 mo supplementation (P less than 0.05). Participants with high serum cortisoland higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 were less likely to shed Epstein-Barr virus in saliva (P less than 0.05). The doses given raised vitamin D status in participants not exposed to sunlight for 6 mo, and the efficacy was influenced by baseline vitamin D status and BMI. The data also provide evidence that vitamin D, interacting with stress, can reduce risk of latent virus reactivation during the winter in Antarctica.

  12. Walking the talk: Fit WIC wellness programs improve self-efficacy in pediatric obesity prevention counseling. — Measures of the Food Environment

    Cancer.gov

    Six sites of the California Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participated in a staff wellness pilot intervention designed to improve staff self-efficacy in counseling WIC clients about childhood overweight. A pre-post test design with intervention and control groups was used; outcome measures included staff perceptions of the intervention's effects on the workplace environment, their personal habits and health beliefs, and their counseling self-efficacy.

  13. Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Print Report Error T he Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) is a joint project of the National ... participants in the latest survey in the DSLD database (NHANES): The search options: Quick Search, Browse Dietary ...

  14. Supplement to Logic and Computer

    E-print Network

    Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

    1 Supplement to Logic and Computer Design Fundamentals 3rd Edition1 CMOS CIRCUITS So far we have Design Fundamentals are provided here for optional coverage and for self-study if desired. This material

  15. Should You Take Dietary Supplements?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... whether you need a supplement in the first place, the dose and possible interactions with medicine you’re already taking.” For vitamins and minerals, check the % Daily Value (DV) for each nutrient to make sure you’ ...

  16. Sialic acid supplementation ameliorates puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Pawluczyk, Izabella Z A; Najafabadi, Maryam G; Brown, Jeremy R; Bevington, Alan; Topham, Peter S

    2015-09-01

    Defects in sialylation are known to have serious consequences on podocyte function leading to collapse of the glomerular filtration barrier and the development of proteinuria. However, the cellular processes underlying aberrant sialylation in renal disease are inadequately defined. We have shown in cultured human podocytes that puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) downregulates enzymes involved in sialic acid metabolism and redox homeostasis and these can be rescued by co-treatment with free sialic acid. The aim of the current study was to ascertain whether sialic acid supplementation could improve renal function and attenuate desialylation in an in vivo model of proteinuria (PAN nephrosis) and to delineate the possible mechanisms involved. PAN nephrotic rats were supplemented with free sialic acid, its precursor N-acetyl mannosamine or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Glomeruli, urine, and sera were examined for evidence of kidney injury and therapeutic efficacy. Of the three treatment regimens, sialic acid had the broadest efficacy in attenuating PAN-induced injury. Proteinuria and urinary nephrin loss were reduced. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that podocyte ultrastructure, exhibited less severe foot process effacement. PAN-induced oxidative stress was ameliorated as evidenced by a reduction in glomerular NOX4 expression and a downregulation of urine xanthine oxidase levels. Sialylation dysfunction was improved as indicated by reduced urinary concentrations of free sialic acid, restored electrophoretic mobility of podocalyxin, and improved expression of a sialyltransferase. These data indicate that PAN induces alterations in the expression of enzymes involved in redox control and sialoglycoprotein metabolism, which can be ameliorated by sialic acid supplementation possibly via its properties as both an antioxidant and a substrate for sialylation. PMID:26121320

  17. Conceptual Development of a Measure to Assess Pharmacists' Knowledge of Herbal and Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsiang-Wen; Mahady, Gail B.; Popovich, Nicholas G.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To describe the conceptual development of a measure for assessing pharmacist knowledge of herbal and dietary supplements. Methods A standardized approach to constructing a multiple-choice competency examination following 8 pre-specified criteria (eg, specifying the target spectrum of herbal and dietary supplements) was used to create an item bank. The quality of each item was evaluated by 5 herbal and dietary supplement content experts based on specific criteria in 3 rounds of review. Results From 122 initial items, 56 items were retained for the item bank representing 4 content areas: efficacy/effectiveness, safety, drug-supplement interactions, and regulation. The experts tended to agree that the constructed items represented a wide range of difficulty. Conclusion The initial development of a conceptually based item bank/measure of pharmacist herbal and dietary supplement knowledge lays the groundwork for a large-scale validation study. The measure should be useful as a standalone tool and as a component of a knowledge, attitude, and behavior survey for the assessment of pharmacist traits related to herbal and dietary supplements. PMID:18698390

  18. Clioquinol Synergistically Augments Rescue by Zinc Supplementation in a Mouse Model of Acrodermatitis Enteropathica

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, Jim; De Lisle, Robert C.; Finkelstein, David; Adlard, Paul A.; Bush, Ashley I.; Andrews, Glen K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Zinc deficiency due to poor nutrition or genetic mutations in zinc transporters is a global health problem and approaches to providing effective dietary zinc supplementation while avoiding potential toxic side effects are needed. Methods/Principal Findings Conditional knockout of the intestinal zinc transporter Zip4 (Slc39a4) in mice creates a model of the lethal human genetic disease acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE). This knockout leads to acute zinc deficiency resulting in rapid weight loss, disrupted intestine integrity and eventually lethality, and therefore provides a model system in which to examine novel approaches to zinc supplementation. We examined the efficacy of dietary clioquinol (CQ), a well characterized zinc chelator/ionophore, in rescuing the Zip4intest KO phenotype. By 8 days after initiation of the knockout neither dietary CQ nor zinc supplementation in the drinking water was found to be effective at improving this phenotype. In contrast, dietary CQ in conjunction with zinc supplementation was highly effective. Dietary CQ with zinc supplementation rapidly restored intestine stem cell division and differentiation of secretory and the absorptive cells. These changes were accompanied by rapid growth and dramatically increased longevity in the majority of mice, as well as the apparent restoration of the homeostasis of several essential metals in the liver. Conclusions These studies suggest that oral CQ (or other 8-hydroxyquinolines) coupled with zinc supplementation could provide a facile approach toward treating zinc deficiency in humans by stimulating stem cell proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24015258

  19. Iodine Supplementation: Usage “with a Grain of Salt”

    PubMed Central

    Prete, Alessandro; Corsello, Salvatore Maria

    2015-01-01

    Iodine supplementation through salt iodization is a worldwide, effective strategy for preventing iodine deficiency-related problems. Its safety and efficacy profile has been extensively investigated, and benefits far outweigh the potential iodine-induced risks. Moreover, iodine supplementation during pregnancy in order to avoid brain damage in the newborn is considered a mainstay of preventive medicine. Exposure to high amounts of iodine is actually well tolerated in most cases and can be unrecognized. Nevertheless, at-risk individuals may develop thyroid dysfunction even when they are exposed to increases in iodine intake universally considered as safe. Iodine-induced thyroid disorders include thyroid autoimmunity, thyrotoxicosis, iodine-induced goiter, and hypothyroidism. Moreover, a relationship between iodine intake and histotype distribution of differentiated thyroid cancer has been observed, with a progressive shift from follicular to papillary thyroid cancer. To date, evaluating iodine status in a clinical setting has limitations, and assessing the actual risk for each individual can be challenging, since it is influenced by personal history, genetics, and environmental factors. In conclusion, iodine supplementation programs need to be continued and strengthened, but iodine should be used “with a grain of salt,” because a growing number of susceptible individuals will be exposed to the risk of developing iodine-induced thyroid disorders. PMID:25873950

  20. Improved efficacy in onychomycosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Paquet, Maryse

    2013-01-01

    The success rate of onychomycosis treatment is limited by several factors, including the access of the therapeutic agent to the fungal mass, the presence of conidia, and the susceptibility of the different infectious agents to the antifungals. Different strategies used to improve efficacy of the currently available antifungal treatments, their rationale, and the published evidence of their beneficial effects are reviewed. An improved efficacy was demonstrated for some of these strategies, such as combined oral and topical antifungal therapies, whereas most of them lack clear and direct evidence of an increase in therapeutic success. PMID:24079584

  1. Role of melatonin supplementation in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Polimeni, Giovanni; Esposito, Emanuela; Bevelacqua, Valentina; Guarneri, Claudio; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are chronic and progressive disorders characterized by selective destruction of neurons in motor, sensory and cognitive systems. Despite their different origin, free radicals accumulation and consequent tissue damage are importantly concerned for the majority of them. In recent years, research on melatonin revealed a potent activity of this hormone against oxidative and nitrosative stress-induced damage within the nervous system. Indeed, melatonin turned out to be more effective than other naturally occurring antioxidants, suggesting its beneficial effects in a number of diseases where oxygen radical-mediated tissue damage is involved. With specific reference to the brain, the considerable amount of evidence accumulated from studies on various neurodegeneration models and recent clinical reports support the use of melatonin for the preventive treatment of major neurodegenerative disorders. This review summarizes the literature on the protective effects of melatonin on Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, Huntington's disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Additional studies are required to test the clinical efficacy of melatonin supplementation in such disorders, and to identify the specific therapeutic concentrations needed. PMID:24389194

  2. Effects of gamma oryzanol supplementation on anthropometric measurements & muscular strength in healthy males following chronic resistance training

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Saghar; Esa, Norhaizan Mohd; Marandi, Seyed Mohammad; Ghasemi, Gholamali; Eslami, Sepehr

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Enhanced muscle strength is seen when resistance exercise is combined with the consumption of nutritional supplements. Although there is a limited number of studies available about the efficacy of gamma oryzanol supplementation with resistance exercise in humans, but its usage as a nutritional supplement for strength is common in athletes. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of gamma oryzanol supplementation during 9-week resistance training on muscular strength and anthropometric measurements of young healthy males. Methods: In this double-blind clinical trial, changes of anthropometric measurements and muscular strength were studied after chronic resistance exercise and gamma oryzanol supplementation in 30 healthy volunteers (16 in supplement and 14 in placebo). Each day, gamma oryzanol supplement (600 mg) and placebo (the same amount of lactose) were consumed after training. The participants exercised with 80 per cent 1-Repetition Maximum (1-RM), for one hour and four days/week. Anthropometric measurements and subjects’ 1-RM for muscular strength were determined at the commencement and end of the 9-week study. Results: There was no significant difference between the baseline characteristics and target variables at baseline between the two groups. After gamma oryzanol supplementation, there was no significant difference in the means of anthropometric and skin fold measurements between the supplement and placebo groups. However, there were significant differences between the supplement and placebo groups for 1-RM of bench press and leg curl, which showed that gamma oryzanol improved muscle strength following resistance training. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings indicated that 600 mg/day gamma oryzanol supplementation during the 9-week resistance training did not change anthropometric and body measurements, but it increased muscular strength in young healthy males. Further, studies need to be done in trained athletes, women, and in patients who suffer from muscular fatigue. PMID:25109720

  3. A Conceptual Model of Referee Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Guillén, Félix; Feltz, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual model of referee efficacy, defines the concept, proposes sources of referee specific efficacy information, and suggests consequences of having high or low referee efficacy. Referee efficacy is defined as the extent to which referees believe they have the capacity to perform successfully in their job. Referee efficacy beliefs are hypothesized to be influenced by mastery experiences, referee knowledge/education, support from significant others, physical/mental preparedness, environmental comfort, and perceived anxiety. In turn, referee efficacy beliefs are hypothesized to influence referee performance, referee stress, athlete rule violations, athlete satisfaction, and co-referee satisfaction. PMID:21713174

  4. Regulation of vitamin and mineral supplements: lessons from the Truehope saga.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian

    2010-05-01

    A series of court and regulatory hearings has characterised the distribution and promotion in Canada of Empower Plus, a vitamin and mineral supplement promoted by its distributors as efficacious for a remarkable array of psychiatric conditions, including bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The column chronicles the saga and the multiple ethical and scientific concerns that arise from it. It argues that, given the risks posed to the vulnerable by supplements constituted by micronutrients that may uninformedly be seen as a viable alternative to orthodox pharmacotherapies, none of which are panaceas, supplements should be subjected to rigorous medico-scientific assessment and regulation. It laments the too rare institution of consumer protection actions brought in an effort to protect the public in such scenarios. PMID:20552935

  5. Effects of Commercially Available Dietary Supplements on Resting Energy Expenditure: A Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Roger A.; Conn, Carole A.; Mermier, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available dietary products advertised to promote weight loss are an underresearched but heavily purchased commodity in the United States. Despite only limited evidence, interest in dietary supplements continues to increase. This work uniquely summarizes the current evidence evaluating the efficacy of several over-the-counter thermogenic products for their effects on resting energy expenditure. Currently, there is some evidence suggesting dietary products containing select ingredients can increase energy expenditure in healthy young people immediately following consumption (within 6 hours). It is unclear if supplement-induced increases in metabolic rate provide additional benefit beyond that provided by dietary constituents that contain similar ingredients. It is also unclear if dietary supplements are effective for weight loss in humans. PMID:24967272

  6. Precision Efficacy Analysis for Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.

    When multiple linear regression is used to develop a prediction model, sample size must be large enough to ensure stable coefficients. If the derivation sample size is inadequate, the model may not predict well for future subjects. The precision efficacy analysis for regression (PEAR) method uses a cross- validity approach to select sample sizes…

  7. Biological and chemical standardization of a hop (Humulus lupulus) botanical dietary supplement.

    PubMed

    Krause, Elizabeth; Yuan, Yang; Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Dong, Huali; Dietz, Birgit M; Nikolic, Dejan; Pauli, Guido F; Bolton, Judy L; van Breemen, Richard B

    2014-06-01

    Concerned about the safety of conventional estrogen replacement therapy, women are using botanical dietary supplements as alternatives for the management of menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes. Before botanical dietary supplements can be evaluated clinically for safety and efficacy, botanically authenticated and standardized forms are required. To address the demand for a standardized, estrogenic botanical dietary supplement, an extract of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) was developed. Although valued in the brewing of beer, hop extracts are used as anxiolytics and hypnotics and have well-established estrogenic constituents. Starting with a hop cultivar used in the brewing industry, spent hops (the residue remaining after extraction of bitter acids) were formulated into a botanical dietary supplement that was then chemically and biologically standardized. Biological standardization utilized the estrogen-dependent induction of alkaline phosphatase in the Ishikawa cell line. Chemical standardization was based on the prenylated phenols in hops that included estrogenic 8-prenylnaringenin, its isomer 6-prenylnaringenin, and pro-estrogenic isoxanthohumol and its isomeric chalcone xanthohumol, all of which were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The product of this process was a reproducible botanical extract suitable for subsequent investigations of safety and efficacy. PMID:24861737

  8. Hypertensive retinopathy associated with use of the ephedra-free weight-loss herbal supplement Hydroxycut.

    PubMed

    Willis, Scott L; Moawad, Fouad J; Hartzell, Joshua D; Iglesias, Melissa; Jackson, William L

    2006-01-01

    The use of performance-enhancing and weight-loss supplements is prevalent in the United States, and over the past decade, there has been growing concern with regard to the safety and efficacy of these products. It is well documented that ephedra-based products are associated with adverse reactions, including serious cardiovascular and neurologic injuries. With new restrictions placed on such products, companies are now marketing caffeine-based ephedra-free herbal supplements. Less is known about the potential side effects of these products. We present the case of a 42-year-old, previously healthy man who developed malignant hypertension and hypertensive retinopathy while taking Hydroxycut, a caffeine-based ephedra-free supplement. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of hypertensive retinopathy associated with the use of Hydroxycut. Given the lack of investigative studies in regard to their safety and efficacy, judicious care should be taken with the use of all herbal supplements, including those designated as ephedra-free. PMID:17406200

  9. 7 CFR 372.10 - Supplementing environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...false Supplementing environmental impact statements. 372.10 Section...10 Supplementing environmental impact statements. Once a decision to supplement an environmental impact statement is made, a...

  10. 7 CFR 372.10 - Supplementing environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...false Supplementing environmental impact statements. 372.10 Section...10 Supplementing environmental impact statements. Once a decision to supplement an environmental impact statement is made, a...

  11. 7 CFR 372.10 - Supplementing environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...false Supplementing environmental impact statements. 372.10 Section...10 Supplementing environmental impact statements. Once a decision to supplement an environmental impact statement is made, a...

  12. 7 CFR 372.10 - Supplementing environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...false Supplementing environmental impact statements. 372.10 Section...10 Supplementing environmental impact statements. Once a decision to supplement an environmental impact statement is made, a...

  13. 7 CFR 372.10 - Supplementing environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...false Supplementing environmental impact statements. 372.10 Section...10 Supplementing environmental impact statements. Once a decision to supplement an environmental impact statement is made, a...

  14. Nutritional Supplements for Strength Power Athletes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilborn, Colin

    Over the last decade research involving nutritional supplementation and sport performance has increased substantially. Strength and power athletes have specific needs to optimize their performance. Nutritional supplementation cannot be viewed as a replacement for a balanced diet but as an important addition to it. However, diet and supplementation are not mutually exclusive, nor does one depend on the other. Strength and power athletes have four general areas of supplementation needs. First, strength athletes need supplements that have a direct effect on performance. The second group of supplements includes those that promote recovery. The third group comprises the supplements that enhance immune function. The last group of supplements includes those that provide energy or have a direct effect on the workout. This chapter reviews the key supplements needed to optimize the performance and training of the strength athlete.

  15. Evidence-Based Approach to Fiber Supplements and Clinically Meaningful Health Benefits, Part 1

    PubMed Central

    McRorie, Johnson W.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fiber that is intrinsic and intact in fiber-rich foods (eg, fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains) is widely recognized to have beneficial effects on health when consumed at recommended levels (25 g/d for adult women, 38 g/d for adult men). Most (90%) of the US population does not consume this level of dietary fiber, averaging only 15 g/d. In an attempt to bridge this “fiber gap,” many consumers are turning to fiber supplements, which are typically isolated from a single source. Fiber supplements cannot be presumed to provide the health benefits that are associated with dietary fiber from whole foods. Of the fiber supplements on the market today, only a minority possess the physical characteristics that underlie the mechanisms driving clinically meaningful health benefits. The first part (current issue) of this 2-part series will focus on the 4 main characteristics of fiber supplements that drive clinical efficacy (solubility, degree/rate of fermentation, viscosity, and gel formation), the 4 clinically meaningful designations that identify which health benefits are associated with specific fibers, and the gel-dependent mechanisms in the small bowel that drive specific health benefits (eg, cholesterol lowering, improved glycemic control). The second part (next issue) of this 2-part series will focus on the effects of fiber supplements in the large bowel, including the 2 mechanisms by which fiber prevents/relieves constipation (insoluble mechanical irritant and soluble gel-dependent water-holding capacity), the gel-dependent mechanism for attenuating diarrhea and normalizing stool form in irritable bowel syndrome, and the combined large bowel/small bowel fiber effects for weight loss/maintenance. The second part will also discuss how processing for marketed products can attenuate efficacy, why fiber supplements can cause gastrointestinal symptoms, and how to avoid symptoms for better long-term compliance. PMID:25972618

  16. Evidence-Based Approach to Fiber Supplements and Clinically Meaningful Health Benefits, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    McRorie, Johnson W.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fiber that is intrinsic and intact in fiber-rich foods (eg, fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains) is widely recognized to have beneficial effects on health when consumed at recommended levels (25 g/d for adult women, 38 g/d for adult men). Most (90%) of the US population does not consume this level of dietary fiber, averaging only 15 g/d. In an attempt to bridge this “fiber gap,” many consumers are turning to fiber supplements, which are typically isolated from a single source. Fiber supplements cannot be presumed to provide the health benefits that are associated with dietary fiber from whole foods. Of the fiber supplements on the market today, only a minority possess the physical characteristics that underlie the mechanisms driving clinically meaningful health benefits. In this 2-part series, the first part (previous issue) described the 4 main characteristics of fiber supplements that drive clinical efficacy (solubility, degree/rate of fermentation, viscosity, and gel formation), the 4 clinically meaningful designations that identify which health benefits are associated with specific fibers, and the gel-dependent mechanisms in the small bowel that drive specific health benefits (eg, cholesterol lowering, improved glycemic control). The second part (current issue) of this 2-part series will focus on the effects of fiber supplements in the large bowel, including the 2 mechanisms by which fiber prevents/relieves constipation (insoluble mechanical irritant and soluble gel-dependent water-holding capacity), the gel-dependent mechanism for attenuating diarrhea and normalizing stool form in irritable bowel syndrome, and the combined large bowel/small bowel fiber effects for weight loss/maintenance. The second part will also discuss how processing for marketed products can attenuate efficacy, why fiber supplements can cause gastrointestinal symptoms, and how to avoid symptoms for better long-term compliance. PMID:25972619

  17. Singapore High School Students' Creativity Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Ai-Girl; Ho, Valerie; Yong, Lim-Chyi

    2007-01-01

    Background: Singapore education adopted nurturing creativity and developing creativity efficacy among their students and children. This study investigated Singapore high school students' creativity efficacy based on the contemporary model of creativity (Amabile, 1983, 1996), self efficacy (Bandura, 1989, 1997) and inclusion education. Aims:…

  18. Enhancing Self-Efficacy and Learning Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jay W.

    2002-01-01

    Studied the effect of a communication designed to enhance the self-efficacy beliefs of introductory psychology students. Neutral e-mail messages of messages designed to enhance self-efficacy were sent to 76 college students. Results show that self-efficacy beliefs were related to examination scores and were significantly affected by the…

  19. The Influence of Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Metacognitive Prompting on Genetics Problem Solving Ability among High School Students in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aurah, Catherine Muhonja

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of social cognitive theory, the influence of self-efficacy beliefs and metacognitive prompting on genetics problem solving ability among high school students in Kenya was examined through a mixed methods research design. A quasi-experimental study, supplemented by focus group interviews, was conducted to investigate both the…

  20. The Efficacy of a 9-Month Treadmill Walking Program on the Exercise Capacity and Weight Reduction for Adolescents with Severe Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Rendoff, Andrew D.; Grover, Travis; Beets, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a 9-month treadmill walking (TW) program on exercise capacity and body mass index (BMI) for adolescents with severe autism. Ten youth residing in a residential/school treatment facility were assigned to either a supplemental treadmill walking (TW) or control group. Both groups continued to participate in their…

  1. Nutritional supplements: fact vs. fiction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W A; Landry, G L

    1998-10-01

    An athlete may think that if a small amount of a chemical helps his or her performance, more will work better. The most appealing supplements are those that claim to help build muscle, improve endurance, and reduce body fat. Widespread acceptance of herbal of "natural" alternatives to mainstream medicine (especially nutritional supplements) is increasing, and the market is largely unregulated. The authors summarize the facts and fiction surrounding the use of popular products that may be found at the pharmacy and health food store that are being used in the locker rooms of high schools, colleges, and gyms in the U.S. They urge clinicians to stress the value of a well balanced diet to their active adolescent patients and not to encourage supplement use. PMID:9928464

  2. Vaccine Efficacy and Affinity Maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hayoun; Deem, Michael W.

    2002-03-01

    We propose macroscopic equations to describe variable vaccine efficacy between repeated vaccinee and first time vaccinee. The main ingredients are antigenic distance between epidemic strain and vaccne strain, and affinity maturation dynamics which differs in primary and second response. Increase of affinity by repeated vaccine leads to localization in immune space. This localization decreases the ability of the immune system to response to distant, but related epidemic strains.

  3. NASA Thesaurus Supplement: A three part cumulative supplement to the 1982 edition of the NASA Thesaurus (supplement 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The three part cumulative NASA Thesaurus Supplement to the 1982 edition of the NASA Thesaurus includes: part 1, hierarchical listing; part 2, access vocabulary, and part 3, deletions. The semiannual supplement gives complete hierarchies for new terms and includes new term indications for terms new to this supplement.

  4. NASA Thesaurus Supplement: A three part cumulative supplement to the 1982 edition of the NASA Thesaurus (supplement 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The three part cumulative NASA Thesaurus Supplement to the 1982 edition of the NASA Thesaurus includes Part 1, Hierarchical Listing, Part 2, Access Vocabulary, and Part 3, Deletions. The semiannual supplement gives complete hierarchies for new terms and includes new term indications for entries new to this supplement.

  5. Progress in Developing Dietary Supplement Databases: The Analytically Validated Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) and Dietary Supplement Label Databases (DSLD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although an estimated 50% of the US population consumes dietary supplements, analytically substantiated data on bioactive constituents in them are sparse. Several programs funded by the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health enhance dietary supplement database deve...

  6. Accounts Payable Check Request Supplement/Checklist

    E-print Network

    Geller, Michael R.

    Accounts Payable Check Request Supplement/Checklist Payments to Nonresident Aliens (non-salary payments) October,2004 http://www.busfin.uga.edu/forms/check_request_supplement.pdf This checklist should

  7. Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Supplemental Feeding 

    E-print Network

    Carpenter, Bruce B.; Hart, Charles R.

    2001-05-31

    When forage quality and/or quantity is affected by drought, livestock producers usually must decide whether to offer supplemental feed. This publication offers advice on making decisions about supplementation and gives feed management tips....

  8. Prostate Cancer and Men's Health Supplements

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Prostate_Cancer_102015.html Prostate Cancer and Men's Health Supplements HealthDay News Video - October 21, 2015 To ... health news that matters to you. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Dietary Supplements Men's Health Prostate Cancer About ...

  9. Muscle Mass and Weight Gain Nutritional Supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Bill

    There are numerous sports supplements available that claim to increase lean body mass. However, for these sports supplements to exert any favorable changes in lean body mass, they must influence those factors regulating skeletal muscle hypertrophy (i.e., satellite cell activity, gene transcription, protein translation). If a given sports supplement does favorably influence one of these regulatory factors, the result is a positive net protein balance (in which protein synthesis exceeds protein breakdown). Sports supplement categories aimed at eliciting a positive net protein balance include anabolic hormone enhancers, nutrient timing pre- and postexercise workout supplements, anticatabolic supplements, and nitric oxide boosters. Of all the sports supplements available, only a few have been subject to multiple clinical trials with repeated favorable outcomes relative to increasing lean body mass. This chapter focuses on these supplements and others that have a sound theoretical rationale in relation to increasing lean body mass.

  10. ISAB 2003-3 Supplementation Report ISAB Review of Salmon and Steelhead Supplementation

    E-print Network

    ISAB 2003-3 Supplementation Report 1 ISAB Review of Salmon and Steelhead Supplementation to natural populations of salmon and steelhead where supplementation was broadly viewed as those salmon are the empirical results of salmon supplementation to date? What has worked, and what aspects are largely

  11. 14 CFR 91.211 - Supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen. 91.211 Section 91.211... Requirements § 91.211 Supplemental oxygen. (a) General. No person may operate a civil aircraft of U.S. registry... the required minimum flight crew is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of...

  12. 14 CFR 91.211 - Supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen. 91.211 Section 91.211... Requirements § 91.211 Supplemental oxygen. (a) General. No person may operate a civil aircraft of U.S. registry... the required minimum flight crew is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of...

  13. BUSINESS/FARM SUPPLEMENT School Year

    E-print Network

    Dorf, Martin E.

    First BUSINESS/FARM SUPPLEMENT School Year 2015-16 Instructions for Completing the Business/Farm Supplement If you have more than one business or farm, or a business and a farm, complete a supplement --specifically, Form 1040, Schedules C, D and F, as applicable. If an incorporated business is involved, refer

  14. 14 CFR 91.211 - Supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen. 91.211 Section 91.211... Requirements § 91.211 Supplemental oxygen. (a) General. No person may operate a civil aircraft of U.S. registry... the required minimum flight crew is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of...

  15. 14 CFR 91.211 - Supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen. 91.211 Section 91.211... Requirements § 91.211 Supplemental oxygen. (a) General. No person may operate a civil aircraft of U.S. registry... the required minimum flight crew is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of...

  16. 14 CFR 91.211 - Supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen. 91.211 Section 91.211... Requirements § 91.211 Supplemental oxygen. (a) General. No person may operate a civil aircraft of U.S. registry... the required minimum flight crew is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of...

  17. Office of Dietary Supplements Inside this issue

    E-print Network

    Shen, Jun

    Office of Dietary Supplements Update Inside this issue In the Beginning.. 1 ODS Activities Office of Dietary Supplements National Institutes of Health 6100 Executive Blvd. Rm. 3B01, MSC 7517 Celebrates Its 10th Birthday The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS

  18. Office of Dietary Supplements Inside this issue

    E-print Network

    Shen, Jun

    Office of Dietary Supplements Update Inside this issue Multivitamins Conference May 15-17 1 Office of Dietary Supplements National Institutes of Health 6100 Executive Blvd. Rm. 3B01, MSC 7517. For further information about them and other ODS- funded opportunities, visit http:// dietary-supplements

  19. Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program

    E-print Network

    Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program: Exercise H Final Report Melissa M://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.7903 NISTIR 7903 #12;ii Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program: Exercise H Final Report Melissa M. Phillips Catherine A

  20. 14 CFR 91.211 - Supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen. 91.211 Section 91.211 Aeronautics...Requirements § 91.211 Supplemental oxygen. (a) General. No person may operate...is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of the flight at...

  1. 14 CFR 91.211 - Supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen. 91.211 Section 91.211 Aeronautics...Requirements § 91.211 Supplemental oxygen. (a) General. No person may operate...is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of the flight at...

  2. 14 CFR 91.211 - Supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen. 91.211 Section 91.211 Aeronautics...Requirements § 91.211 Supplemental oxygen. (a) General. No person may operate...is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of the flight at...

  3. 14 CFR 91.211 - Supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen. 91.211 Section 91.211 Aeronautics...Requirements § 91.211 Supplemental oxygen. (a) General. No person may operate...is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of the flight at...

  4. 14 CFR 91.211 - Supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen. 91.211 Section 91.211 Aeronautics...Requirements § 91.211 Supplemental oxygen. (a) General. No person may operate...is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of the flight at...

  5. Over-the-Counter Medication and Herbal or Dietary Supplement Use in College: Dose Frequency and Relationship to Self-Reported Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasio, Michael J.; Curry, Kim; Sutton-Skinner, Kelly M.; Glassman, Destinee M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A growing number of researchers have examined the use of over-the-counter (OTC) medications and herbal or dietary supplements among college students. There is concern about the efficacy and safety of these products, particularly because students appear to use them at a higher rate than does the general public. Participants and Methods:…

  6. Supplement to Logic and Computer

    E-print Network

    Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

    1 Supplement to Logic and Computer Design Fundamentals 3rd Edition1 MORE OPTIMIZATION A PRIME IMPLICATION SELECTION ALGORITHM In Chapter 2 of Logic and Computer Design Fundamentals by Mano and Kime not covered in the third edition of Logic and Computer Design Fundamentals are provided here for optional

  7. Aerospell Supplemental Spell Check File

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Aerospell is a supplemental spell check file that can be used as a resource for researchers, writers, editors, students, and others who compose scientific and technical texts. The file extends the general spell check dictionaries of word processors by adding more than 13,000 words used in a broad range of aerospace and related disciplines.

  8. CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE SUPPLEMENT TO

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    CAPITAL PROGRAMMING GUIDE V 3.0 SUPPLEMENT TO OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULAR A­11-Developmental Item O&M Operations and Maintenance OMB Office of Management and Budget OFPP Office of Federal Procurement Policy, Office of Management and Budget PIR Post-implementation Review RMO Resource Management

  9. Neuron, Volume 73 Supplemental Information

    E-print Network

    Gollisch, Tim

    Dynamic Nonlinear Stimulus Integration in the Retina Daniel Bölinger and Tim Gollisch #12;Supplemental on the retina was approximately 6 µm. The stimulus screen was updated with a frame rate of 100 Hz and controlled through custom-made software, based on Visual C++ and OpenGL. Stimuli were presented on a gray background

  10. Cell, Volume 129 Supplemental Data

    E-print Network

    .5, 150 mM sodium chloride, 50 mM - glycerophosphate, 10 mM sodium pyrophosphate, 30 mM sodium flouride, 1Cell, Volume 129 Supplemental Data Systematic Discovery of In Vivo Phosphorylation Networks Rune Discovery of In Vivo Phosphorylation Networks - Cell, Volume 129 2 Kinase family prediction To maximise

  11. Laboratory Animal Welfare Supplement IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluckstein, Fritz P., Comp.

    This document is the fourth supplement to a 1984 bibliography on laboratory animal welfare. Items presented were selected because they represent some of the most significant of those providing recent information or because they were considered useful. The period covered is October, 1986 through October, 1987. Monographs, conference proceedings,…

  12. Neuron, Volume 78 Supplemental Information

    E-print Network

    Gentner, Timothy

    Neuron, Volume 78 Supplemental Information Associative Learning Enhances Population Coding colored dot denotes the mean response for two neurons to each of four stimuli. Each colored ellipse) For a positive relationship, neuron pairs with positive signal correlation and large noise correlation have

  13. Cell, Volume 126 Supplemental Data

    E-print Network

    Jacobsen, Steve

    Cell, Volume 126 Supplemental Data An ARGONAUTE4-Containing Nuclear Processing Center Colocalized and rdr2 Mutant Nuclei rdr2 #12;Table S1. Nuclei Counts for the Characterization of the Nucleolar Dot Frequency of localization displayed in figure images Total nuclei examined (n) AGO4 nucleolar dot

  14. Cell, Volume 127 Supplemental Data

    E-print Network

    Sheen, Jen

    1 Cell, Volume 127 Supplemental Data Regulatory Functions of Nuclear Hexokinase1 Complex in Glucose the nuclei. The pellet was washed three times in nuclei resuspension buffer (NRB), 20 mM Tris-HCl, 25-fold enrichment during the nuclei isolation process before protein gel loading. Thus, the ratio for HXK

  15. Putting science behind botanical supplements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes the goals and activities of the Center for Research on Botanical Dietary Supplements at Iowa State University and the University of Iowa, a multidisciplinary effort to investigate the bioactivity and bioavailability of three genera of medicinal plants: Echinacea, Hypericum, and...

  16. Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D requirements have become one of the most highly debated and controversial topics in nutrition. Recommendations for vitamin D intake during pregnancy are a central part of this discussion. The publication of a controlled trial of vitamin D supplementation in pregnant women by Hollis and cow...

  17. Neuron, Volume 77 Supplemental Information

    E-print Network

    Gaudry, Quentin

    component of the generator current is absent in nompC mutants Supplemental Experimental Procedures n/a n.0 normalizedcurrent 100806040200 time after adapting step (msec) 2 pA 20 msec 180 pA generator current spike- mediated. Bidirectional responses in type AB JONs. (A) A large piezoelectric test step (0.032 radians) in either

  18. Neuron, Volume 67 Supplemental Information

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Rachel

    Neuron, Volume 67 Supplemental Information Electrical Coupling between Olfactory Glomeruli Emre. This allowed detection of mRNA without using a DNA digestion step. As a positive control, we verified that our (Cha). As a negative control, we verified that it does not contain a GABA biosynthetic enzyme (Gad1

  19. Nutritional supplements as radioprotectors -- A review and proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Muscatello, A.C.

    1998-12-31

    The scientific literature contains several reports that show nutritional substances, such as vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals (plant chemicals), provide substantial radioprotective effects in animal studies. Incorporating these substances to the human diet, already voluntarily practiced by a large segment of the population, in addition to providing other favorable health effects, may also provide a radioprotective effect. This potential radioprotective effect would be very useful in mitigating the effects of occupational radiation exposure to astronauts (especially future Mars explorers), airline crews, nuclear workers, both commercial and government, and populations exposed to nuclear accidents, e.g. Chernobyl. This paper reviews the existing evidence of radioprotective effects by nutritional supplements and proposes that their efficacy be evaluated, first with animal studies, followed by human tests with astronauts and cosmonauts on long-term missions, such as to the Mir space station and the International Space Station (ISS).

  20. Updated cost-effectiveness analysis of supplemental glutamine for parenteral nutrition of intensive-care patients

    PubMed Central

    Pradelli, L; Povero, M; Muscaritoli, M; Eandi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Intravenous (i.v.) glutamine supplementation of parenteral nutrition (PN) can improve clinical outcomes, reduce mortality and infection rates and shorten the length of hospital and/or intensive care unit (ICU) stays compared with standard PN. This study is a pharmacoeconomic analysis to determine whether i.v. glutamine supplementation of PN remains both a highly favourable and cost-effective option for Italian ICU patients. Subjects/Methods: A previously published discrete event simulation model was updated by incorporating the most up-to-date and clinically relevant efficacy data (a clinically realistic subgroup analysis from a published meta-analysis), recent cost data from the Italian health-care system and the latest epidemiology data from a large Italian ICU database (covering 230 Italian ICUs and more than 77?000 patients). Sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the results. Results: Parenteral glutamine supplementation can significantly improve ICU efficiency in Italy, as the additional cost of supplemented treatment is more than completely offset by cost savings in hospital care. Supplementation was more cost-effective (cost-effectiveness ratio (CER)=€35?165 per patient discharged alive) than standard, non-supplemented PN (CER=€40?156 per patient discharged alive), and it resulted in mean cost savings of €4991 per patient discharged alive or €1047 per patient admitted to the hospital. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these results. Conclusions: Alanyl-glutamine supplementation of PN is a clinically and economically attractive strategy for ICU patients in Italy and may be applicable to selected ICU patient populations in other countries. PMID:25469466

  1. Creatine as nutritional supplementation and medicinal product.

    PubMed

    Benzi, G; Ceci, A

    2001-03-01

    Because of assumed ergogenic effects, the creatine administration has become popular practice among subjects participating in different sports. Appropriate creatine monohydrate dosage may be considered a medicinal product since, in accordance with the Council Directive 65/65/EEC, any substance which may be administered with a view to restoring, correcting or modifying physiological functions in humans beings is considered a medicinal product. Thus, quality, efficacy and safety must characterise the substance. In addition, the European Court of Justice has held that a product which is recommended or described as having preventive or curative properties is a medicinal product even if it is generally considered as a foodstuff and even if it has no known therapeutic effect in the present state of scientific knowledge. In biochemical terms, creatine administration increases creatine and phosphocreatine muscle concentration, allowing for an accelerated rate of ATP synthesis. In thermodynamics terms, creatine stimulates the creatine-creatine kinase-phosphocreatine circuit, which is related to the mitochondrial function as a highly organised system for the control of the subcellular adenylate pool. In pharmacokinetics terms, creatine entry into skeletal muscle is initially dependent on the extracellular concentration, but the creatine transport is subsequently downregulated. In pharmacodynamics terms, the creatine enhances the possibility to maintain power output during brief periods of high-intensity exercises. In spite of uncontrolled daily dosage and long-term administration, no researches on creatine monohydrate safety in humans were set up by standardised protocols of clinical pharmacology and toxicology, as currently occurs in phases I and II for products for human use. More or less documented side effects induced by creatine monohydrate are weight gain; influence on insulin production; feedback inhibition of endogenous creatine synthesis; long-term damages on renal function. A major point that related to the quality of creatine monohydrate products is the amount of creatine ingested in relation to the amount of contaminants present. During the industrial production of creatine monohydrate from sarcosine and cyanamide, variable amounts of contaminants (dicyandiamide, dihydrotriazines, creatinine, ions) are generated and, thus, their tolerable concentrations (ppm) must be defined and made consumers known. Furthermore, because sarcosine could originate from bovine tissues, the risk of contamination with prion of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad-cow disease) can t be excluded. Thus, French authorities forbade the sale of products containing creatine. Creatine, as other nutritional factors, can be used either at supplementary or therapeutic levels as a function of the dose. Supplementary doses of nutritional factors usually are of the order of the daily turnover, while therapeutic ones are three or more times higher. In a subject of 70 kg with a total creatine pool of 120 g, the daily turnover is approximately of 2 g. Thus, in healthy subjects nourished with fat-rich, carbohydrate, protein-poor diet and participating in a daily recreational sport, the oral creatine monohydrate supplementation should be of the order of the daily turnover, i.e., less than 2.5-3 g per day, bringing the gastrointestinal absorption to account. In healthy athletes submitted daily to high-intensity strength or sprint training, the maximal oral creatine monohydrate supplementation should be of the order of two times the daily turnover, i.e., less than 5-6 g per day for less than two weeks, and the creatine monohydrate supplementation should be taken under appropriate medical supervision. The oral administration of more that 6 g per day of creatine monohydrate should be considered as a therapeutic intervention and should be prescribed by physicians only in the cases of suspected or proven deficiency, or in conditions of severe stress and/or injury. The incorporation of creatine into the medicinal product class is supported also by the use i

  2. Pixantrone: merging safety with efficacy.

    PubMed

    Papadatos-Pastos, Dionysios; Pettengell, Ruth

    2013-02-01

    Pixantrone is a novel anthracycline derivative, manufactured by Cell Therapeutics Incorporated, WA, USA. It was developed with the aim to retain the efficacy of anthracyclines and be less cardiotoxic. Initial safety trials and single-arm, Phase II trials have shown preliminary evidence of anticancer activity and manageable toxicity. These results were validated in multicenter, randomized clinical trials where pixantrone was used as single agent or in combination with other cytotoxics. Following the results of PIX301, it is now approved by the EMA for use as monotherapy in pretreated patients with refractory non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Ongoing trials are assessing the use of pixantrone in combination with other drugs. PMID:23373776

  3. Why US children use dietary supplements

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Regan L.; Gahche, Jaime J.; Thomas, Paul R.; Dwyer, Johanna T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dietary supplements are used by one-third of children. We examined motivations for supplement use in children, the types of products used by motivations, and the role of physicians and health care practitioners in guiding choices about supplements. Methods: We examined motivations for dietary supplement use reported for children (from birth to 19 y of age; n = 8,245) using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2010. Results: Dietary supplements were used by 31% of children; many different reasons were given as follows: to “improve overall health” (41%), to “maintain health” (37%), for “supplementing the diet” (23%), to “prevent health problems” (20%), and to “boost immunity” (14%). Most children (~90%) who use dietary supplements use a multivitamin–mineral or multivitamin product. Supplement users tend to be non-Hispanic white, have higher family incomes, report more physical activity, and have health insurance. Only a small group of supplements used by children (15%) were based on the recommendation of a physician or other health care provider. Conclusion: Most supplements used by children are not under the recommendation of a health care provider. The most common reasons for use of supplements in children are for health promotion, yet little scientific data support this notion in nutrient-replete children. PMID:24002333

  4. The COPD Self-Efficacy Scale.

    PubMed

    Wigal, J K; Creer, T L; Kotses, H

    1991-05-01

    Many individuals with COPD develop a lack of confidence regarding their ability to avoid breathing difficulty while participating in certain activities, however minimal the physical demands of the activity may be. This lack of confidence may be expressed as low self-efficacy. As a result of low self-efficacy, COPD patients may refrain from many routine activities of daily living. Identifying situations in which individuals with COPD experience low self-efficacy would allow the development of specific treatment interventions designed to increase the patient's self-efficacy in those situations and consequently increase activity. We developed a 34-item COPD Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) to assess self-efficacy in individuals afflicted with COPD. The CSES has good test-retest reliability (r = .77), excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .95), and a five-factor structure (negative affect, intense emotional arousal, physical exertion, weather/environmental, and behavioral risk factors. PMID:2019177

  5. Principals' transformational leadership and teachers' collective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Dussault, Marc; Payette, Daniel; Leroux, Mathieu

    2008-04-01

    The study was designed to test the relationship of principals' transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership with teachers' collective efficacy. Bandura's theory of efficacy applied to the group and Bass's transformational leadership theory were used as the theoretical framework. Participants included 487 French Canadian teachers from 40 public high schools. As expected, there were positive and significant correlations between principals' transformational and transactional leadership and teachers' collective efficacy. Also, there was a negative and significant correlation between laissez-faire leadership and teachers' collective efficacy. Moreover, regression analysis showed transformational leadership significantly enhanced the predictive capabilities of transactional leadership on teachers' collective efficacy. These results confirm the importance of leadership to predict collective efficacy and, by doing so, strengthen Bass's theory of leadership. PMID:18567210

  6. The Efficacy of Soccer Headgear

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yan-Ying; Broglio, Michael D.; Sell, Timothy C.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The potential for risks associated with chronic soccer heading has led some soccer leagues to mandate the use of soccer headgear. Although manufacturers have designed and promoted these headbands to decrease the forces associated with heading a soccer ball, their efficacy has not been tested. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of 3 brands of soccer headgear: Headers, Headblast, and Protector, as compared with a non-headband condition. Design and Setting: A force platform was mounted vertically with each headband attached with a length of hook-and-loop tape. A JUGS Soccer Machine projected balls at the platform and headband at 56.45 kph (35 mph). Measurements: We measured vertical ground reaction force for 50 trials of each condition and calculated peak force, time to peak force, and impulse. Results: We found a significant reduction in peak force of impact with all 3 headbands. The Protector headband also showed the greatest decrease in time to peak force and impulse, whereas the Headers headband showed a significant increase in impulse. Conclusions: All 3 headbands were effective at reducing the peak impact force. The Protector headband appeared the most effective at reducing time to peak force and impulse within the design of this study. The clinical effectiveness of these products remains to be seen. PMID:14608431

  7. Efficacy and safety of probiotics as adjuvant agents for Helicobacter pylori infection: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    LV, ZHIFA; WANG, BEN; ZHOU, XIAOJIANG; WANG, FUCAI; XIE, YONG; ZHENG, HUILIE; LV, NONGHUA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether probiotics could help to improve the eradication rates and reduce the side effects associated with anti-Helicobacter pylori treatment, and to investigate the optimal time and duration of probiotic administration during the treatment, thus providing clinical practice guidelines for eradication success worldwide. By searching Pubmed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Science Citation Index, all the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics as adjuvant agents of anti-H. pylori standard triple-therapy regimens with placebo or no treatment were selected. Statistical analysis was performed with the Comprehensive Meta Analysis Software. Subgroup, meta-regression and sensitivity analyses were also carried out. Twenty-one RCTs involving a total of 3,814 participants met the inclusion criteria. The pooled eradication rates of the probiotic group were 80.3% (1,709/2,128) by intention-to-treat (ITT) and 83.8% (1,709/2,039) by pro-protocol analyses; the pooled relative risk (RR) by ITT for probiotic supplementation versus treatment without probiotics was 1.12 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06–1.19]. A reduced risk of overall H. pylori therapy-related adverse effects was also found with probiotic supplementation (RR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.40–0.91). The subgroup analyses showed that probiotic supplementation prior and subsequent to the treatment regimen both improved eradication rates for H. pylori infection. Furthermore, probiotic treatment lasting >2 weeks and including Lactobacillus or multiple probiotic strains significantly enhanced the efficacy. In conclusion, supplementation with probiotics for H. pylori eradication may be effective in increasing eradication rates and decreasing therapy-related side effects. Probiotic administration prior or subsequent to therapy and for a duration of >2 weeks may increase the eradication efficacy. PMID:25667617

  8. Plant food supplements with anti-inflammatory properties: a systematic review (II).

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Dell'Agli, Mario; Badea, Mihaela; Dima, Lorena; Colombo, Elisa; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Restani, Patrizia; Bosisio, Enrica

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to summarize the evidence for or against the efficacy of plant food supplements (PFS) for coping inflammatory conditions by considering epidemiological and human intervention studies. The review considers six botanical species commonly used as food supplements/medicinals: Urtica dioica L., Symphytum officinalis L., Calendula officinalis L., Curcuma longa L., Boswellia serrata Roxb., and Harpagophytum procumbens L. The search retrieved 579 publications. By removing the duplicates and applying the inclusion/exclusion criteria, the final number of papers was 47. No epidemiological data were found. The bibliographic search found no paper regarding the anti-inflammatory effects of Calendula officinalis L. and Symphytum officinalis L. by oral use. In spite of the long-term traditional use for inflammatory disorders, Curcuma longa L. and Harpagophytum procumbens L. warrant further investigation, whereas the efficacy of Urtica dioica L, even if the available data on hard endpoints are promising, requires other trials. Boswellia serrata Roxb. was found to be the most promising, since it shows the best efficacy for the treatment of pain/inflammatory conditions. In conclusion, it is advisable to conduct further studies with more homogeneous population and larger number of subjects by avoiding the heterogeneity of the herbal preparations considered. PMID:23391017

  9. Synthetic Androgens as Designer Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacological effects and metabolism of unapproved steroids due to the absence of clinical studies. The large number of designer steroid findings in dietary supplements and the detection of new compounds combined with legal loopholes for their distribution in many countries show that stricter regulations and better information policy are needed. PMID:26074745

  10. Particle Suspension Mechanisms - Supplemental Material

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, M B

    2011-03-03

    This supplemental material provides a brief introduction to particle suspension mechanisms that cause exfoliated skin cells to become and remain airborne. The material presented here provides additional context to the primary manuscript and serves as background for designing possible future studies to assess the impact of skin cells as a source of infectious aerosols. This introduction is not intended to be comprehensive and interested readers are encouraged to consult the references cited.

  11. APPARENT EFFICACY OF FOOD-BASED CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTATION IN PREVENTING RICKETS IN BANGLADESH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Rickets occurs in southeastern Bangladesh. Previous studies have found that calcium (Ca) intakes in this area are less than half of recommended levels but that vitamin D status is not deficient, suggesting the disease to be due to Ca-deficiency. Objective: The objective was to determ...

  12. Evaluation of Di-indolylmethane supplementation to modulate tamoxifen efficacy in | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content Division of Cancer Prevention Search form Search Main menu Home Major Programs Research Networks Map Alliance of Glycobiologists for Detection of Cancer Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) Cancer Prevention

  13. Safety and efficacy of NovaSil clay as a dietary supplement to prevent aflatoxicosis 

    E-print Network

    Afriyie-Gyawu, Evans

    2006-04-12

    of multiple animal species. In the future, the hypothesis is that this strategy may also be appropriate for humans. Thus, the overall research goal was to investigate NSP suitability for human use through in vitro characterization followed by in vivo...

  14. The Relative Importance of Specific Self-Efficacy Sources in Pretraining Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howardson, Garett N.; Behrend, Tara S.

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy is clearly important for learning. Research identifying the most important sources of self-efficacy beliefs, however, has been somewhat limited to date in that different disciplines focus largely on different sources of self-efficacy. Whereas education researchers focus on Bandura's original sources of "enactive mastery,"…

  15. Collective Efficacy Beliefs in Student Work Teams: Relation to Self-Efficacy, Cohesion, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, Robert W.; Schmidt, Janet; Schmidt, Linda

    2006-01-01

    A measure of collective efficacy was developed and administered to undergraduates working in project teams in engineering courses. Findings in each of two samples revealed that the measure contained a single factor and was related to ratings of team cohesion and personal efficacy. Collective efficacy was also found to relate to indicators of team…

  16. Teacher Efficacy: Influence of Principal Leadership Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipp, Kristine A.

    This paper presents findings of a study that explored the relationships among principals' leadership behaviors and teacher efficacy in Wisconsin middle schools involved in building-level change efforts. An adaptation of Bandura's social cognitive learning theory of self-efficacy (A. Woolfolk and W. Hoy 1993) provided the theoretical framework.…

  17. TESTING ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY ON POROUS MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficacy of antimicrobial treatments to eliminate or control biological growth in the indoor environment can easily be tested on nonporous surfaces. However, the testing of antimicrobial efficacy on porous surfaces, such as those found in the indoor environment [i.e., gypsum ...

  18. Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET)

    Cancer.gov

    The Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the cancer prevention efficacy and safety of a daily combination of 30 milligrams (mg) of beta-carotene and 25,000 IU of retinyl palmitate in 18,314 persons who were at high risk for lung cancer.

  19. Development of Physics Self-Efficacy Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çali?kan, Serap; Selçuk, Gamze S.; Erol, Mustafa

    2007-04-01

    In this article, we describe development of a Physics Self-Efficacy Scale (PSES) that is a self-administered measure to assess physics self-efficacy beliefs regarding one's ability to successfully perform physics tasks in physics classroom. The scale is initially composed of 56 items prepared following a brief scrutiny of relating literature on self-efficacy. It was initially administered 30 physics teacher candidates and was also examined by 6 experts of physics education, then ambiguous or incomprehensible 6 items were dismissed. This PSES was tested on 558 undergraduate students all completed fundamental physics courses. Cronbach's Alpha reliability coefficient of the PSES was calculated as 0.94. The final version of the PSES contained 30 items with 5 dimensions namely, 1. Self-efficacy towards solving physics problems, 2. Self-efficacy towards physics laboratory, 3. Self-efficacy towards learning physics, 4. Self-efficacy towards application of physics knowledge and 5. Self-efficacy towards memorizing physics knowledge.

  20. Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavelle, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: While "teaching self-efficacy" has been supported as an important construct related to teacher competence (eg. Goddard, Hoy & Hoy, 2000), little is known about how in-service teachers think about themselves as writers, or writing self-efficacy, particularly as it relates to writing performance. The present study is a preliminary…

  1. Measuring Teacher Efficacy to Implement Inclusive Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Umesh; Loreman, Tim; Forlin, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure perceived teacher efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms. An 18-item scale was developed on a sample of 607 pre-service teachers selected from four countries (Canada, Australia, Hong Kong and India). Factor analysis of responses from the sample revealed three factors: efficacy in…

  2. VOLUME 13 SUPPLEMENT 1 AES 2012 Abstract Supplement -Epilepsy Currents Online

    E-print Network

    Besio, Walter G.

    VOLUME 13 SUPPLEMENT 1 AES 2012 Abstract Supplement - Epilepsy Currents Online AES 2012 Annual..................................................................................................476 Pediatric Epilepsy Highlights Session: Monday, December 3.....................................................................................................492 The Journal of the American Epilepsy Society #12;Results: From Cadence software simulations, the ASICs operate

  3. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement: catalog of infrared observations summarizes all infrared astronomical observations at far infrared wavelengths published in the scientific literature between 1965 and 1982. The Supplement list contains 25% of the observations in the full catalog of infrared observations (C10), and essentially eliminates most visible stars from the listings. The Supplement is more compact than the main Catalog (it does not contain the bibliography and position index of the C10), and is intended for easy reference during astronomical observations.

  4. Clinical safety and efficacy of probiotic administration following burn injury.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Theresa; Gottschlich, Michele M; James, Laura E; Allgeier, Chris; Weitz, Julie; Kagan, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Provision of probiotics has been limited postburn by questionable potential for bacterial translocation and risk of infection in an immune-compromised population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of probiotic administration in acutely burned, pediatric patients. Subjects were randomized to receive probiotic (n = 10) vs placebo (n = 10) twice daily. The investigational product was initiated within 10 days of burn, and daily supplementation continued until wound closure. Nursing staff was provided education regarding optimal procedures to minimize potential for study product cross contamination. Clinical outcomes (infection, antibiotic, antifungal, and operative days, tolerance, and mortality) were recorded. Length of stay was modified for burn size. Student's t-test, ? test, and nonparametric Wilcoxon's rank-sum test were used for comparative analysis. No differences were noted (probiotic; placebo) for age (7.1 ± 2.2; 6.9 ± 1.7), burn size (38.0 ± 5.9; 45.5 ± 4.45), full thickness (24.6 ± 5.6; 32.1 ± 5.4), postburn day admit (0.8 ± 0.4; 1.1 ± 0.4), or inhalation injury (10%; 20%). Infection days, antibiotic use, constipation, and emesis were similar between groups. Trends toward increased antifungal and laxative use as well as diarrhea incidence were evident in the controls (P < .30). Flatulence was statistically higher with probiotics. The control group trended toward higher requirement for excision/graft procedure. Medical length of stay was not significantly different between groups; however, time required to complete wound healing was shortened with probiotics. This study documents safety and provides preliminary efficacy data relative to probiotic supplementation postburn. PMID:25559730

  5. Dietary Fiber Supplements: Effects in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome and Relationship to Gastrointestinal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Camilleri, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) is a term that reflects to a heterogenous group of natural food sources, processed grains and commercial supplements. Several forms of DF have been used as complementary or alternative agents in the management of manifestations of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity. Not surprisingly, there is a great variation in the biological efficacy of DF in metabolic syndrome and body weight control. Diverse factors and mechanisms have been reported as mediators of the effects of DF on the metabolic syndrome and obesity. Among this array of mechanisms, the modulation of gastric sensorimotor influences appears to be crucial for the effects of DF, but also quite variable. This article focuses on the role, mechanism of action and benefits of different forms of fiber and supplements on obesity and metabolic syndrome, glycemia, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular risk, and explores the effects of DF on gastric sensorimotor function and satiety in mediating these actions of DF. PMID:19931537

  6.  Hepatotoxicity associated with dietary energy supplements: use and abuse by young athletes.

    PubMed

    Avelar-Escobar, Giovanni; Méndez-Navarro, Jorge; Ortiz-Olvera, Nayeli X; Castellanos, Guillermo; Ramos, Roberto; Gallardo-Cabrera, Víctor E; Vargas-Alemán, José de Jesús; Díaz de León, Oscar; Rodríguez, Elda V; Dehesa-Violante, Margarita

    2012-01-01

     In recent years there has been a significant increase in the consumption of dietary energy supplements (DES) associated with the parallel advertising against obesity and favoring high physical performance. We present the case and outcome of a young patient who developed acute mixed liver injury (hepatocellular and cholestatic) after ingestion of various "over the counter" products to increase muscle mass and physical performance (NO Xplode®, creatine, L-carnitine, and Growth Factor ATN®). The diagnosis was based on the exclusion of other diseases and liver biopsy findings. The dietary supplement and herbal multivitamins industry is one with the highest growth rates in the market, with annual revenues amounting to billions and constantly lacking scientific or reproducible evidence about the efficacy and/or safety of the offered products. Furthermore, and contrary to popular belief, different forms of injury associated with these natural substances have been documented particularly in the liver, supporting the need of a more strict regulation. PMID:22700641

  7. Maternal multiple micronutrient supplementation and pregnancy outcomes in developing countries: meta-analysis and meta-regression

    PubMed Central

    Spiegelman, Donna; Shankar, Anuraj H; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To systematically review randomized controlled trials comparing the effect of supplementation with multiple micronutrients versus iron and folic acid on pregnancy outcomes in developing countries. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched. Outcomes of interest were birth weight, low birth weight, small size for gestational age, perinatal mortality and neonatal mortality. Pooled relative risks (RRs) were estimated by random effects models. Sources of heterogeneity were explored through subgroup meta-analyses and meta-regression. Findings Multiple micronutrient supplementation was more effective than iron and folic acid supplementation at reducing the risk of low birth weight (RR:?0.86, 95% confidence interval, CI:?0.79–0.93) and of small size for gestational age (RR:?0.85; 95% CI: 0.78–0.93). Micronutrient supplementation had no overall effect on perinatal mortality (RR:?1.05; 95% CI:?0.90–1.22), although substantial heterogeneity was evident (I2?=?58%; P for heterogeneity?=?0.008). Subgroup and meta-regression analyses suggested that micronutrient supplementation was associated with a lower risk of perinatal mortality in trials in which >?50% of mothers had formal education (RR:?0.93; 95% CI:?0.82–1.06) or in which supplementation was initiated after a mean of 20 weeks of gestation (RR:?0.88; 95% CI:?0.80–0.97). Conclusion Maternal education or gestational age at initiation of supplementation may have contributed to the observed heterogeneous effects on perinatal mortality. The safety, efficacy and effective delivery of maternal micronutrient supplementation require further research. PMID:21673856

  8. The Effects of Pre-Exercise Ginger Supplementation on Muscle Damage and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Melissa D; Zavorsky, Gerald S; Smoliga, James M

    2015-06-01

    Ginger possesses analgesic and pharmacological properties mimicking non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We aimed to determine if ginger supplementation is efficacious for attenuating muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) following high-intensity resistance exercise. Following a 5-day supplementation period of placebo or 4?g ginger (randomized groups), 20 non-weight trained participants performed a high-intensity elbow flexor eccentric exercise protocol to induce muscle damage. Markers associated with muscle damage and DOMS were repeatedly measured before supplementation and for 4?days following the exercise protocol. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed one repetition maximum lift decreased significantly 24?h post-exercise in both groups (p?supplementation may be used to accelerate recovery of muscle strength following intense exercise but does not influence indicators of muscle damage or DOMS. PMID:25787877

  9. VITAMIN D SUPPLEMENTATION OF BREASTFED INFANTS: A RANDOMIZED DOSE-RESPONSE TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Ekhard E.; Nelson, Steven E.; Jeter, Janice M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Breastfed infants require supplementation with vitamin D but little is known about the necessary dose. This double blind trial evaluated four different doses of vitamin D. Methods Exclusively breastfed infants (N=213) were randomized at 1 month to one of 4 doses, which they received through 9 months while receiving no formula. The supplements provided daily 200 IU, 400 IU, 600 IU or 800 IU of vitamin D. The primary endpoint was plasma 25(OH)D level and secondary outcomes were plasma PTH and calcium, and illness incidence. The study was conducted during winter at 41° N. Results Most infants had low (<50 nmol/L) 25(OH)D levels at 1 month, but with supplementation levels rose. Overall, levels of 25(OH)D differed significantly in proportion to vitamin D dose. There were no effects of vitamin D on illness incidence or growth. Low levels were common, with 7.8% of levels being <50 nmol/L and 15 infants having 2 to 4 low levels. Conclusion The 4 doses of vitamin D produced different plasma levels of 25(OH)D. The higher doses were somewhat more efficacious in maintaining vitamin D sufficiency in breastfed infants. The findings support the recommended dose of 400 IU/d and stress the need to start supplementation at birth. PMID:24858141

  10. Composition of Lutein Ester Regioisomers in Marigold Flower, Dietary Supplement, and Herbal Tea.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Rabalski, Iwona

    2015-11-11

    Characterization of lutein and its esters in a health product is necessary for its efficacy. In the current study lutein ester regioisomers were quantified and identified in several dietary supplements and herbal teas in comparison with marigold flower, the commercial source of lutein. The products were extracted with three solvents and separated on a C30 column. The separated esters were identified/confirmed with LC-MS in APCI+ve mode with the use of synthetic lutein esters. The total content of lutein esters substantially varied among marigold flowers (167-5752 ?g/g), supplements (88,000-110,700 ?g/g), and herbal teas (12.4-91.3 ?g/g). Lutein supplement had a lutein profile similar to that of marigold flower, whereas herbal tea showed an extremely different profile. Lutein dipalmitate was the dominant compound in supplements and marigold flowers followed by lutein 3'-O-myristate-3-O-palmitate and lutein 3'-O-palmitate-3-O-myristate. Lutein was the major compound in marigold herbal tea with small amounts of lutein mono- and diesters. Differences in the concentration and composition of lutein compounds among marigold products could indicate distinct product quality and lutein bioavailability. PMID:26496496

  11. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) supplementation prevents cognitive impairment and amyloid deposition in APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Lo, Adrian C; Callaerts-Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Nunes, Ana F; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; D'Hooge, Rudi

    2013-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease hallmarked by extracellular A?(1-42) containing plaques, and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) containing hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Progressively, memory deficits and cognitive disabilities start to occur as these hallmarks affect hippocampus and frontal cortex, regions highly involved in memory. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression, which is high in the vicinity of A? plaques and NFTs, was found to influence ?-secretase activity, the molecular crux in A?(1-42) production. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is an endogenous bile acid that downregulates CTGF expression in hepatocytes and has been shown to possess therapeutic efficacy in neurodegenerative models. To investigate the possible in vivo therapeutic effects of TUDCA, we provided 0.4% TUDCA-supplemented food to APP/PS1 mice, a well-established AD mouse model. Six months of TUDCA supplementation prevented the spatial, recognition and contextual memory defects observed in APP/PS1 mice at 8 months of age. Furthermore, TUDCA-supplemented APP/PS1 mice displayed reduced hippocampal and prefrontal amyloid deposition. These effects of TUDCA supplementation suggest a novel mechanistic route for Alzheimer therapeutics. PMID:22974733

  12. Selenium supplementation in thyroid associated ophthalmopathy: an update

    PubMed Central

    Dharmasena, Aruna

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of selenium (Se) has already been proven in thyroid disease and thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO). In spite of clear scientific proof of its benefits in TAO, there appears to be no clear agreement among the clinicians regarding its optimum dose, duration of the treatment, efficacy and safety to date. In this review, the author summarises the findings of 135 English language articles published on this subject over the past four decades from 1973 to 2013. The regulation and metabolism of thyroid hormones require a steady supply of Se and recent studies have revealed several possible mechanisms by which Se improves the severity of thyroid disease and TAO. These mechanisms include 1) inhibitory effect of HLA-DR molecule expression on thyrocytes; 2) profound reductions of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibodies (TSHR-Ab) and TPO antibodies (TPO-Ab); 3) prevention of dysregulation of cell-mediated immunity and B cell function; 4) neutralising reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibition of redox control processes required for the activation, differentiation and action of lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer cells involved in both acute and chronic orbital inflammation in TAO; 5) inhibition of expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and 6) inhibition of prostaglandin and leukotriene synthesis. An increased oxidative stress has been observed in both acute and chronic phases of thyroid disease with raised tissue concentrations of ROS. The benefits of Se supplementation in individuals with TAO appear to be proportionate to the degree of systemic activity of the thyroid disease. The maximal benefit of Se supplementation is therefore seen in the subjects who are hyperthyroid. Restoration of euthyroidism is one of the main goals in the management of TAO and when anti-thyroid drugs are combined with Se, the patients with Graves' disease (GD) and autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) achieved euthyroidism faster than those treated with anti-thyroid drugs alone. Se status of normal adult humans can vary widely and Se supplementation may confer benefit only if serum Se levels are insufficient. The author recommends that serum Se levels of patients with TAO to be assessed prior to and during Se supplementation at regular intervals to avoid potential iatrogenic chronic Se overdose. PMID:24790886

  13. Selenium supplementation in thyroid associated ophthalmopathy: an update.

    PubMed

    Dharmasena, Aruna

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of selenium (Se) has already been proven in thyroid disease and thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO). In spite of clear scientific proof of its benefits in TAO, there appears to be no clear agreement among the clinicians regarding its optimum dose, duration of the treatment, efficacy and safety to date. In this review, the author summarises the findings of 135 English language articles published on this subject over the past four decades from 1973 to 2013. The regulation and metabolism of thyroid hormones require a steady supply of Se and recent studies have revealed several possible mechanisms by which Se improves the severity of thyroid disease and TAO. These mechanisms include 1) inhibitory effect of HLA-DR molecule expression on thyrocytes; 2) profound reductions of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibodies (TSHR-Ab) and TPO antibodies (TPO-Ab); 3) prevention of dysregulation of cell-mediated immunity and B cell function; 4) neutralising reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibition of redox control processes required for the activation, differentiation and action of lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer cells involved in both acute and chronic orbital inflammation in TAO; 5) inhibition of expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and 6) inhibition of prostaglandin and leukotriene synthesis. An increased oxidative stress has been observed in both acute and chronic phases of thyroid disease with raised tissue concentrations of ROS. The benefits of Se supplementation in individuals with TAO appear to be proportionate to the degree of systemic activity of the thyroid disease. The maximal benefit of Se supplementation is therefore seen in the subjects who are hyperthyroid. Restoration of euthyroidism is one of the main goals in the management of TAO and when anti-thyroid drugs are combined with Se, the patients with Graves' disease (GD) and autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) achieved euthyroidism faster than those treated with anti-thyroid drugs alone. Se status of normal adult humans can vary widely and Se supplementation may confer benefit only if serum Se levels are insufficient. The author recommends that serum Se levels of patients with TAO to be assessed prior to and during Se supplementation at regular intervals to avoid potential iatrogenic chronic Se overdose. PMID:24790886

  14. The Safety and Efficacy of Anabolic Steroid Precursors: What is the Scientific Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Anabolic steroid precursors have gained widespread popularity as ergogenic supplements. Advertisements for these supplements claim that they increase endogenous testosterone production and protein synthesis, resulting in increased lean body mass and strength during training. At this time scientific support is limited, but the potential for serious side effects exists and the popularity of these supplements continues to grow. This review provides rationales for the ergogenic claims regarding steroid precursors and compares claims with data from scientifically controlled investigations. Data Sources: A search of MEDLINE and SPORT Discus from 1960 to 2001 using the key words dehydroepiandrosterone, androstenedione, and androstenediol in combination with testosterone, estrogen, exercise, performance, and side effects. Data Synthesis: Although fairly new to the athletic community, steroid precursors have been used as ergogenic or anabolic agents for quite some time. Suggested gains in strength and lean body mass are attributed to an increase in the endogenous production of testosterone and enhanced protein synthesis. Most of the scientific data, however, do not support manufacturers' ergogenic claims, and the potential for serious side effects, such as decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and increased estrogen concentrations, has been associated with precursor use. Thus, the safety and efficacy of these supplements must be questioned. Conclusions/Recommendations: It appears that the risks associated with the use of anabolic steroid precursors outweigh any possible ergogenic benefits. Furthermore, these supplements are banned by most athletic organizations. Thus, it is extremely important that athletic trainers are able to educate athletes on these issues so they can continue to perform at an optimum level in a safe and healthy manner. PMID:16558675

  15. An Analysis on the Effect of Computer Self-Efficacy over Scientific Research Self-Efficacy and Information Literacy Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuncer, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Present research investigates reciprocal relations amidst computer self-efficacy, scientific research and information literacy self-efficacy. Research findings have demonstrated that according to standardized regression coefficients, computer self-efficacy has a positive effect on information literacy self-efficacy. Likewise it has been detected…

  16. Vitamin supplementation and athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Williams, M H

    1989-01-01

    Vitamins serve primarily as regulators of metabolic functions, many of which are critical to exercise performance. Depending upon the nature of their sport, e.g., strength, speed, power, endurance, or fine motor control, athletes may use megadoses of various vitamins in attempts to increase specific metabolic processes important to improved performance. Surveys have indicated that most elite athletes do take vitamin supplements, often in dosages greater than 50-100 times the United States Recommended Dietary Allowances. The theoretical basis underlying the use of each vitamin depends upon its specific metabolic function in relation to sport. Vitamin A functions to maintain night vision; thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and pantothenic acid are all involved in muscle cell energy metabolism; niacin may also block free fatty acid release; pyridoxine is involved in the synthesis of hemoglobin and other oxygen transfer protein; folic acid and vitamin B12 are integrally involved in red blood cell (RBC) development; vitamins C and E are antioxidants, possibly preventing the destruction of the red blood cell membrane during exercise; vitamin D may be involved in muscle cell energetics through its influence on calcium. These are but a few of the possible metabolic functions of vitamins which have been suggested to have ergogenic applications to sport. Research has shown that a vitamin deficiency impairs physical performance. If this deficiency is corrected, performance usually improves. In general, vitamin supplementation to an athlete on a well-balanced diet has not been shown to improve performance. However, additional research with certain vitamins appears to be warranted, such as with the vitamin B complex and fine motor control, and with vitamin E and endurance at high altitudes. Moreover, research with megadose supplementation may also be necessary. PMID:2507696

  17. Dietary Supplement Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Parian, Alyssa; Limketkai, Berkeley N

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are chronic relapsing and remitting chronic diseases for which there is no cure. The treatment of IBD frequently requires immunosuppressive and biologic therapies which carry an increased risk of infections and possible malignancy. There is a continued search for safer and more natural therapies in the treatment of IBD. This review aims to summarize the most current literature on the use of dietary supplements for the treatment of IBD. Specifically, the efficacy and adverse effects of vitamin D, fish oil, probiotics, prebiotics, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, aloe vera and cannabis sativa are reviewed. PMID:26561079

  18. Nutrition Supplements: Science vs Hype.

    PubMed

    Armsey, T D; Green, G A

    1997-06-01

    Aggressive marketing has led millions of recreational and elite athletes to use nutrition supplements in hopes of improving performance. Unfortunately, these aids can be costly and potentially harmful, and the advertised ergogenic gains are often based on little or no scientific evidence. No benefits have been convincingly demonstrated for amino acids, L-carnitine, L-tryptophan, or chromium picolinate. Creatine, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may confer ergogenic or anabolic effects. Chromium picolinate and DHEA have adverse side effects, and the safety of the other products remains in question. PMID:20086916

  19. Fingerprinting of Materials: Technical Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    This supplement to the Guidelines for Maintaining a Chemical Fingerprinting Program has been developed to assist NASA personnel, contractors, and sub-contractors in defining the technical aspects and basic concepts which can be used in chemical fingerprinting programs. This material is not meant to be totally inclusive to all chemical fingerprinting programs, but merely to present current concepts. Each program will be tailored to meet the needs of the individual organizations using chemical fingerprinting to improve their quality and reliability in the production of aerospace systems.

  20. Nutritional Supplements to Enhance Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegenfuss, Tim N.; Landis, Jamie; Greenwood, Mike

    The ability to recover from intense exercise often separates good athletes from great ones. In the past, "recovery" often simply included rest, physical modalities (e.g., massage, hydration therapy) and meeting basic nutritional needs for fluid and energy intake. Today, athletes have a number of additional options to help them recover from high intensity training, one of which includes the judicious use of dietary supplements. This chapter briefly reviews nutritional strategies that have a strong theoretical background for enhancing rehydration/electrolyte balance, replenishing energy reserves, minimizing oxidative damage, and stimulating muscle repair.

  1. NASA Thesaurus supplement: A four part cumulative supplement to the 1988 edition of the NASA Thesaurus (supplement 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The four-part cumulative supplement to the 1988 edition of the NASA Thesaurus includes the Hierarchical Listing (Part 1), Access Vocabulary (Part 2), Definitions (Part 3), and Changes (Part 4). The semiannual supplement gives complete hierarchies and accepted upper/lowercase forms for new terms.

  2. Research Review: The Role of Diet in the Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder--An Appraisal of the Evidence on Efficacy and Recommendations on the Design of Future Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jim; Buitelaar, Jan; Cortese, Samuele; Ferrin, Maite; Konofal, Eric; Lecendreux, Michel; Simonoff, Emily; Wong, Ian C. K.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of three dietary treatments for ADHD has been repeatedly tested in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). These interventions are restricted elimination diets (RED), artificial food colour elimination (AFCE) and supplementation with free fatty acids (SFFA). There have been three systematic reviews and associated…

  3. 42 CFR 403.220 - Supplemental Health Insurance Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... false Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. 403.220 Section 403.220 Public...403.220 Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. (a) Membership. The Supplemental Health Insurance Panel (Panel) consists of— (1) The...

  4. 42 CFR 403.220 - Supplemental Health Insurance Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... false Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. 403.220 Section 403.220 Public...403.220 Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. (a) Membership. The Supplemental Health Insurance Panel (Panel) consists of— (1) The...

  5. 42 CFR 403.220 - Supplemental Health Insurance Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... false Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. 403.220 Section 403.220 Public...403.220 Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. (a) Membership. The Supplemental Health Insurance Panel (Panel) consists of— (1) The...

  6. 42 CFR 403.220 - Supplemental Health Insurance Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... false Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. 403.220 Section 403.220 Public...403.220 Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. (a) Membership. The Supplemental Health Insurance Panel (Panel) consists of— (1) The...

  7. 42 CFR 403.220 - Supplemental Health Insurance Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... false Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. 403.220 Section 403.220 Public...403.220 Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. (a) Membership. The Supplemental Health Insurance Panel (Panel) consists of— (1) The...

  8. 14 CFR 121.597 - Flight release authority: Supplemental operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight release authority: Supplemental operations...AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.597 Flight release authority: Supplemental...

  9. 14 CFR 121.597 - Flight release authority: Supplemental operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight release authority: Supplemental operations...AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.597 Flight release authority: Supplemental...

  10. 14 CFR 121.597 - Flight release authority: Supplemental operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight release authority: Supplemental operations...AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.597 Flight release authority: Supplemental...

  11. 14 CFR 121.597 - Flight release authority: Supplemental operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight release authority: Supplemental operations...AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.597 Flight release authority: Supplemental...

  12. 14 CFR 121.597 - Flight release authority: Supplemental operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight release authority: Supplemental operations...AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.597 Flight release authority: Supplemental...

  13. Supplement to the Mainstem Lower Columbia River and

    E-print Network

    Supplement Supplement to the Mainstem Lower Columbia River and Columbia River Estuary Subbasin Plan River Estuary Partnership SUPPLEMENT TEXT.DOC #12;#12;Contents 1 Introduction...............................................................................................................................2-1 Strategy 1: Reduce Effects of the Columbia River Hydrosystem .................................2

  14. 43 CFR 10010.25 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 10010.25 Section 10010...ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Environmental Impact Statements § 10010.25 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) Supplement...

  15. 43 CFR 10010.25 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 10010.25 Section 10010...ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Environmental Impact Statements § 10010.25 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) Supplement...

  16. 43 CFR 10010.25 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 10010.25 Section 10010...ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Environmental Impact Statements § 10010.25 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) Supplement...

  17. 43 CFR 10010.25 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 10010.25 Section 10010...ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Environmental Impact Statements § 10010.25 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) Supplement...

  18. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. 119.1 Section 119.1 Food and...Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of...

  19. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. 119.1 Section 119.1 Food and...Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of...

  20. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. 119.1 Section 119.1 Food and...Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of...

  1. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. 119.1 Section 119.1 Food and...Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of...

  2. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. 119.1 Section 119.1 Food and...Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of...

  3. 75 FR 29513 - Developing a Supplemental Poverty Measure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ...100429203-0204-01] Developing a Supplemental Poverty Measure AGENCY: Bureau of the Census...approach to developing a Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) presented in a report...Working Group on Developing a Supplemental Poverty Measure,'' which was recently...

  4. THE INTERNATIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION ON DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS (IBIDS) DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements (IBIDS) database provides access to bibliographic citations and abstracts from published, international, scientific literature on dietary supplements. The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Instit...

  5. Mixing Medications and Dietary Supplements Can Endanger Your Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... effective when taken with St. John’s Wort, an herbal supplement. Depending on the medication involved, the results OMCvoeeurd- ... a prescrip- tion blood thinner), ginkgo biloba (an herbal supplement), aspirin and vita- min E (a supplement) can ...

  6. 17 CFR 229.902 - (Item 902) Individual partnership supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...902) Individual partnership supplements. 229.902 Section 229...SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 AND ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT...902) Individual partnership supplements. (a) If two or more...229.902) in a separate supplement to the disclosure...

  7. HemoHIM enhances the therapeutic efficacy of ionizing radiation treatment in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Ran; Ju, Eun-Jin; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2010-02-01

    Although radiotherapy is commonly used for a variety of cancers, radiotherapy alone does not achieve a satisfactory therapeutic outcome. In this study, we examined the possibility that HemoHIM can enhance the anticancer effects of ionizing radiation (IR) in melanoma-bearing mice. The HemoHIM was prepared by adding the ethanol-insoluble fraction to the total water extract of a mixture of three edible herbs-Angelica Radix, Cnidium Rhizoma, and Paeonia Radix. Anticancer effects of HemoHIM were evaluated in melanoma-bearing mice exposed to IR. IR treatment (5 Gy at 7 days after melanoma cell injection) reduced the weight of the solid tumors, and HemoHIM supplementation with IR enhanced the decreases in tumor weight (P < .03). In the melanoma-bearing mice treated with IR, HemoHIM administration also increased the activity of natural killer cells and cytotoxic T cells, although the proportions of these cells in spleen were not different. In addition, HemoHIM administration increased the interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion from lymphocytes stimulated with concanavalin A, which seemed to contribute to the enhanced efficacy of HemoHIM in tumor-bearing mice treated with IR. In conclusion, HemoHIM may be a beneficial supplement during radiotherapy for enhancing the antitumor efficacy. PMID:20136435

  8. Efficacy, Dosage, and Duration of Action of Branched Chain Amino Acid Therapy for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Elkind, Jaclynn A.; Lim, Miranda M.; Johnson, Brian N.; Palmer, Chris P.; Putnam, Brendan J.; Kirschen, Matthew P.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in long-lasting cognitive impairments for which there is currently no accepted treatment. A well-established mouse model of mild to moderate TBI, lateral fluid percussion injury (FPI), shows changes in network excitability in the hippocampus including a decrease in net synaptic efficacy in area CA1 and an increase in net synaptic efficacy in dentate gyrus. Previous studies identified a novel therapy consisting of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), which restored normal mouse hippocampal responses and ameliorated cognitive impairment following FPI. However, the optimal BCAA dose and length of treatment needed to improve cognitive recovery is unknown. In the current study, mice underwent FPI then consumed 100?mM BCAA supplemented water ad libitum for 2, 3, 4, 5, and 10?days. BCAA therapy ameliorated cognitive impairment at 5 and 10?days duration. Neither BCAA supplementation at 50?mM nor BCAAs when dosed 5?days on then 5?days off was sufficient to ameliorate cognitive impairment. These results suggest that brain injury causes alterations in hippocampal function, which underlie and contribute to hippocampal cognitive impairment, which are reversible with at least 5?days of BCAA treatment, and that sustaining this effect is dependent on continuous treatment. Our findings have profound implications for the clinical investigation of TBI therapy. PMID:25870584

  9. Sertindole: a clinical efficacy profile.

    PubMed

    Hale, A

    2002-01-01

    Sertindole is an effective atypical antipsychotic drug that is associated with significant improvements in the symptoms of schizophrenia. It is at least as efficacious as haloperidol and risperidone in treating the overall and positive symptoms of schizophrenia and has been shown to have advantages over these two drugs with respect to the treatment of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. In clinical trials, notable improvements in patients' quality of life were observed, which suggest that patients prescribed sertindole would be more likely to adhere to treatment and continue taking the drug as part of their long-term treatment regimen. Continued treatment gives patients the best chance of avoiding relapse. Indeed, other benefits of sertindole demonstrated in clinical trials include relatively low relapse and re-admission rates. Sertindole could theoretically reduce the financial burden of schizophrenia on health- and social-care systems by reducing the need for re-hospitalization and by enabling patients to manage their illness and to live as normal a life as possible. PMID:24931885

  10. The relation between teachers' personal teaching efficacy and students' academic efficacy for science and inquiry science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurien, Sarah Anjali

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between middle school teachers' personal teaching efficacy and their students' academic efficacy for science and inquiry science. Teachers can create classroom environments that promote the development of students' science self-efficacy (Britner & Pajares, 2006). Teachers who are efficacious and believe they are able to effectively teach science are more comfortable teaching science (Plourde, 2002) and more likely to commit classroom time to teaching science. Additionally, they are better equipped to challenge and support students as they develop their science skills and efficacy beliefs. Therefore, it was expected that teachers' personal teaching efficacy for science would be related to their students' science efficacy. Similarly, it was predicted that teachers' personal teaching efficacy for inquiry science would be related to their students' inquiry science efficacy. It was expected that the relation between teacher and student efficacy would not differ by students' gender. Data was collected from 26 middle school science teachers who were participating in a professional development program and 660 students from their classes. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) analyses were completed to evaluate the relation between teacher and student efficacy for science and inquiry science. Planned analyses revealed no significant predictors of students' science and inquiry science efficacy. Exploratory analyses were then conducted which added student grade and a measure evaluating the quality of teacher-student relationships to the original HLM analyses. Results indicated a significant interaction between the quality of teacher-student relationships and student grade on the prediction of students' science and inquiry science efficacy. A discussion of the results along with limitations of the study and avenues for future research will be provided.

  11. 33 CFR 87.5 - Supplemental signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Supplemental signals. 87.5 Section 87.5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX IV: DISTRESS SIGNALS § 87.5 Supplemental signals. Attention is drawn to the...

  12. 33 CFR 87.5 - Supplemental signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Supplemental signals. 87.5 Section 87.5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX IV: DISTRESS SIGNALS § 87.5 Supplemental signals. Attention is drawn to the...

  13. USDA dietary supplement ingredient database, release 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL),Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), USDA, in collaboration with the Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health (ODS/NIH) and other federal agencies has developed a Dietary Supplement Ingredient ...

  14. Measuring Vitamins and Minerals in Dietary Supplements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Describe 1) why information on vitamin and mineral intakes from dietary supplements is needed for estimating total nutrient intakes in populations 2) the current status and challenges in developing an analytically validated dietary supplement ingredient database (DSID) 3) lessons from pil...

  15. Effect of molasses supplementation on ruminal fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This fact sheet summarizes the results of two continuous culture fermentor studies that evaluated the effects of molasses supplementation on ruminal fermentation of a pasture diet. The first study compared molasses with corn supplementation. Diets consisted of pasture only, molasses plus pasture, co...

  16. Annual grass as supplements for beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has shown when limit grazing cool-season annual grasses as a supplement in a complementary forage system, energy and CP supplementation are not required and hay requirements are reduced 23% for gestating beef cows. To further improve the sustainability of complementary forage systems, repla...

  17. 47 CFR 87.321 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.321 Section 87.321 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aviation Support Stations § 87.321 Supplemental eligibility. Each applicant must certify as to...

  18. 47 CFR 87.321 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.321 Section 87.321 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aviation Support Stations § 87.321 Supplemental eligibility. Each applicant must certify as to...

  19. 40 CFR 152.132 - Supplemental distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Supplemental distribution. 152.132... Supplemental distribution. The registrant may distribute or sell his registered product under another person's name and address instead of (or in addition to) his own. Such distribution and sale is...

  20. 40 CFR 152.132 - Supplemental distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplemental distribution. 152.132... Supplemental distribution. The registrant may distribute or sell his registered product under another person's name and address instead of (or in addition to) his own. Such distribution and sale is...

  1. Enhanced Nutrition Education Instead of Consuming Supplements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowder, Todd; Kidd, Kellie; Jensen, Nancy; Jensen, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Fueled by the internet, instantaneous videos, and the emphasis to look "right" or always win athletic competitions, many students are seeking information on nutrition and dietary supplements. Classroom observations reveal student interest and discussions are among the highest when the topic is dietary supplements. Teachers and coaches provide an…

  2. Dietary Supplements: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... FDA-1088 or completing a form online . In addition, report your reaction to the dietary supplement company by using the contact information on the product label. Quality Dietary supplements ... of the wrong ingredient, the addition of too much or too little of an ...

  3. 47 CFR 87.239 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.239 Section 87.239 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Multicom Stations § 87.239 Supplemental eligibility. Each applicant for a multicom may be...

  4. 47 CFR 87.239 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.239 Section 87.239 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Multicom Stations § 87.239 Supplemental eligibility. Each applicant for a multicom may be...

  5. 47 CFR 87.215 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.215 Section 87.215 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.215 Supplemental eligibility. (a) A unicom and any...

  6. 47 CFR 87.239 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.239 Section 87.239 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Multicom Stations § 87.239 Supplemental eligibility. Each applicant for a multicom may be...

  7. 47 CFR 87.215 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.215 Section 87.215 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.215 Supplemental eligibility. (a) A unicom and any...

  8. 47 CFR 87.239 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.239 Section 87.239 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Multicom Stations § 87.239 Supplemental eligibility. Each applicant for a multicom may be...

  9. 47 CFR 87.239 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.239 Section 87.239 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Multicom Stations § 87.239 Supplemental eligibility. Each applicant for a multicom may be...

  10. 47 CFR 87.215 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.215 Section 87.215 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.215 Supplemental eligibility. (a) A unicom and any...

  11. 47 CFR 87.215 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.215 Section 87.215 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.215 Supplemental eligibility. (a) A unicom and any...

  12. 47 CFR 87.215 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.215 Section 87.215 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.215 Supplemental eligibility. (a) A unicom and any...

  13. Supplement consumption in body builder athletes

    PubMed Central

    Karimian, Jahangir; Esfahani, Parivash Shekarchizadeh

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Widespread use of supplements is observed among world athletes in different fields. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and determinants of using supplements among body builder athletes. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 250 men and 250 women from 30 different bodybuilding clubs. Participants were asked to complete a self-administered standardized anonymous check-list. RESULTS: Forty nine percent of the respondents declared supplement use. Men were more likely to take supplements than women (86.8% vs. 11.2%, p = 0.001). Reasons for using supplements were reported to be for health (45%), enhancing the immune system (40%) and improving athletic performance (25%). Most athletes (72%) had access to a nutritionist but underused this resource. Coaches (65%) had the greatest influence on supplementation practices followed by nutritionists (30%) and doctors (25%) after them. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of supplement use among bodybuilders was high. Sex, health-related issues and sport experts were determinant factors of supplement use. PMID:22973330

  14. Sage for Abstract Algebra A Supplement to

    E-print Network

    Beezer, Robert A.

    Sage for Abstract Algebra A Supplement to Abstract Algebra, Theory and Applications by Robert A Robert A. Beezer GNU Free Documentation License Sage Version 6.3 AATA Version 2014-15 #12;Copyright 2011;Preface This supplement explains how to use the open source software Sage to aid in your understanding

  15. Sage for Abstract Algebra A Supplement to

    E-print Network

    Beezer, Robert A.

    Sage for Abstract Algebra A Supplement to Abstract Algebra, Theory and Applications by Robert A Robert A. Beezer GNU Free Documentation License Sage Version 5.11 AATA Version 2013-14 #12;Copyright 2011;Preface This supplement explains how to use the open source software Sage to aid in your understanding

  16. Journal Supplements Focused on Physical Activity Measurement

    Cancer.gov

    This journal supplement summarizes and builds upon a workshop which convened researchers from diverse sectors and organizations to critically review the state-of-the-science. The supplement discusses current technologies for objective physical activity monitoring, provides recommendations for the use of these technologies, and explores future directions in the development of new tools and approaches.

  17. 47 CFR 87.473 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.473 Section 87.473 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Stations in the Radiodetermination Service § 87.473 Supplemental eligibility. (a) Licenses for radionavigation land test stations...

  18. 18 CFR 740.13 - Supplemental instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Supplemental instructions. 740.13 Section 740.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL STATE WATER MANAGEMENT PLANNING PROGRAM § 740.13 Supplemental instructions. As deemed appropriate, the...

  19. 18 CFR 740.13 - Supplemental instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Supplemental instructions. 740.13 Section 740.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL STATE WATER MANAGEMENT PLANNING PROGRAM § 740.13 Supplemental instructions. As deemed appropriate, the...

  20. 18 CFR 740.13 - Supplemental instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Supplemental instructions. 740.13 Section 740.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL STATE WATER MANAGEMENT PLANNING PROGRAM § 740.13 Supplemental instructions. As deemed appropriate, the...

  1. 18 CFR 740.13 - Supplemental instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Supplemental instructions. 740.13 Section 740.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL STATE WATER MANAGEMENT PLANNING PROGRAM § 740.13 Supplemental instructions. As deemed appropriate, the Council may amplify the guidelines in this part...

  2. 18 CFR 740.13 - Supplemental instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supplemental instructions. 740.13 Section 740.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL STATE WATER MANAGEMENT PLANNING PROGRAM § 740.13 Supplemental instructions. As deemed appropriate, the Council may amplify the guidelines in this part...

  3. 33 CFR 87.5 - Supplemental signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplemental signals. 87.5 Section 87.5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX IV: DISTRESS SIGNALS § 87.5 Supplemental signals. Attention is drawn to the...

  4. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY MARRIAGE AND FERTILITY SUPPLEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    These supplements to the June round of the Current Population Survey (conducted at five-year intervals starting in 1971) were designed to examine transitions in the American family and to measure the demographic implications of these transitions for children. The supplements ask ...

  5. CURRENT PATTERNS OF SUPPLEMENT USE IN ADOLESCENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many adults take vitamin mineral supplements, but there is relatively little up-to-date information available on vitamin-mineral supplement use among adolescents. In the 1998 Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health Tracking Study (CATCH III), a school-based dietary intervention sponsor...

  6. 21 CFR 814.108 - Supplemental applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supplemental applications. 814.108 Section 814.108 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PREMARKET APPROVAL OF MEDICAL DEVICES Humanitarian Use Devices § 814.108 Supplemental applications. After FDA approval of an...

  7. 21 CFR 814.39 - PMA supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false PMA supplements. 814.39 Section 814.39 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PREMARKET APPROVAL OF MEDICAL DEVICES Premarket Approval Application (PMA) § 814.39 PMA supplements. Link to an amendment published at 75 FR...

  8. 21 CFR 814.39 - PMA supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false PMA supplements. 814.39 Section 814.39 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PREMARKET APPROVAL OF MEDICAL DEVICES Premarket Approval Application (PMA) § 814.39 PMA supplements. (a) After FDA's approval of a PMA, an...

  9. 21 CFR 814.108 - Supplemental applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Supplemental applications. 814.108 Section 814.108 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PREMARKET APPROVAL OF MEDICAL DEVICES Humanitarian Use Devices § 814.108 Supplemental applications. After FDA approval of an...

  10. 7 CFR 246.10 - Supplemental foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Supplemental foods. 246.10 Section 246.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION PROGRAM FOR WOMEN, INFANTS AND CHILDREN Participant Benefits § 246.10...

  11. Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program

    E-print Network

    Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program: Exercise J Final Report Melissa M.6028/NIST.IR.7997 NISTIR 7997 #12;Dietary Supplement Laboratory Quality Assurance Program: Exercise F Final Assurance Program: Exercise J Final Report Melissa M. Phillips Catherine A. Rimmer Laura J. Wood Mary Bedner

  12. 47 CFR 87.527 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.527 Section 87.527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Automatic Weather Stations (AWOS/ASOS) § 87.527 Supplemental eligibility. (a) Licenses will be granted...

  13. 47 CFR 87.527 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.527 Section 87.527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Automatic Weather Stations (AWOS/ASOS) § 87.527 Supplemental eligibility. (a) Licenses will be granted...

  14. 47 CFR 87.527 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.527 Section 87.527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Automatic Weather Stations (AWOS/ASOS) § 87.527 Supplemental eligibility. (a) Licenses will be granted...

  15. 47 CFR 87.527 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.527 Section 87.527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Automatic Weather Stations (AWOS/ASOS) § 87.527 Supplemental eligibility. (a) Licenses will be granted...

  16. 47 CFR 87.527 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Supplemental eligibility. 87.527 Section 87.527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Automatic Weather Stations (AWOS/ASOS) § 87.527 Supplemental eligibility. (a) Licenses will be granted...

  17. 40 CFR 45.135 - Supplemental conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplemental conditions. 45.135 Section 45.135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE TRAINING ASSISTANCE § 45.135 Supplemental conditions. Training awards are subject to the following conditions: (a) Trainees must be citizens of...

  18. Krukowski and Miller Web Supplement Feb. 7, 2001 1 Web Supplement to Krukowski and Miller, Nature Neuroscience

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    Krukowski and Miller Web Supplement ­ Feb. 7, 2001 1 Web Supplement to Krukowski and Miller, Nature and Miller Web Supplement ­ Feb. 7, 2001 2 The sum is over presynaptic spike times tj, and ffast represents

  19. 10 CFR 1021.314 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 1021.314 Section...PROVISIONS) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING...1021.314 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) DOE...

  20. 10 CFR 1021.314 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 1021.314 Section...PROVISIONS) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING...1021.314 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) DOE...

  1. 10 CFR 1021.314 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 1021.314 Section...PROVISIONS) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING...1021.314 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) DOE...

  2. 10 CFR 1021.314 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 1021.314 Section...PROVISIONS) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING...1021.314 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) DOE...

  3. 10 CFR 1021.314 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 1021.314 Section...PROVISIONS) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING...1021.314 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) DOE...

  4. 75 FR 22681 - Supplemental Guidance on Overdraft Protection Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ...OTS is proposing to issue this Supplemental Guidance on Overdraft Protection Programs (Supplemental Guidance) to update the Guidance on Overdraft Protection Programs OTS previously issued on February 18,...

  5. 7 CFR 1948.61 - State supplements and guides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RURAL DEVELOPMENT Section 601 Energy Impacted Area Development Assistance... Public Law 103-354 office). (a) State supplements. State Directors may supplement this subpart...

  6. Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) prescribes several approaches to achieve its goal of doubling the salmon and steelhead runs of the Columbia River. Among those approaches are habitat restoration, improvements in adult and juvenile passage at dams and artificial propagation. Supplementation will be a major part of the new hatchery programs. The purpose of the Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) is to provide an overview of ongoing and planned supplementation activities, to construct a conceptual framework and model for evaluating the potential benefits and risks of supplementation and to develop a plan for better regional coordination of research and monitoring and evaluation of supplementation. RASP has completed its first year of work. Progress toward meeting the first year`s objectives and recommendations for future tasks are contained in this report.

  7. Efficacy of different strategies to treat anemia in children: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anemia continues to be a major public health problem among children in many regions of the world, and it is still not clear which strategy to treat it is most effective. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and children's acceptance of several recognized strategies to treat anemia. Methods Non-breastfed children (n = 577), 6 to 43 mo of age, were screened for the trial; 267 were anemic (hemoglobin < 11.7 g/dL), and 266 of those were randomized into 1 of 5 treatments to received daily either: an iron supplement (IS), an iron+folic acid supplement (IFS), a multiple micronutrient supplement (MMS), a micronutrient-fortified complementary food as porridge powder (FCF), or zinc+iron+ascorbic acid fortified water (FW). The iron content of each daily dose was 20, 12.5, 10, 10 and 6.7 mg respectively. Hemoglobin (Hb), ferritin, total iron, weight and height were measured at baseline and after 4 months of treatment. Morbidity, treatment acceptability and adherence were recorded during the intervention. Results All treatments significantly increased Hb and total iron concentration; ferritin did not change significantly. Groups MMS, IS and IFS increased Hb (g/dL) [1.50 (95%CI: 1.17, 1.83), 1.48 [(1.18, 1.78) and 1.57 (1.26, 1.88), respectively] and total iron ((?g/dL) [0.15 (0.01, 0.29), 0.19 (0.06, 0.31) and 0.12(-0.01, 0.25), respectively] significantly more than FCF [0.92 (0.64, 1.20)] but not to FW group [0.14 (0.04, 0.24)]. The prevalence of anemia was reduced to a greater extent in the MMS and IFS groups (72% and 69%, respectively) than in the FCF group (45%) (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in anthropometry or in the number of episodes of diarrhea and respiratory infections among treatment groups. The supplements MMS and IS were less acceptable to children, than IFS, FCF and FW. Conclusion The three supplements IS, ISF and MMS increased Hb more than the FCF; the supplements that contained micronutrients (IFS and MMS) were more effective for reducing the prevalence of anemia. In general, fortified foods were better accepted by the study participants than supplements. ClinicalTrial.gov Identifier NCT00822380 PMID:20863398

  8. Efficacy of flavonoids in the management of high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jaime L; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G

    2015-12-01

    Plant compounds such as flavonoids have been reported to exert beneficial effects in cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. Information on the effects of isolated individual flavonoids for management of high blood pressure, however, is more limited. This review is focused on the flavonoids, as isolated outside of the food matrix, from the 5 main subgroups consumed in the Western diet (flavones, flavonols, flavanones, flavan-3-ols, and anthocyanins), along with their effects on hypertension, including the potential mechanisms for regulating blood pressure. Flavonoids from all 5 subgroups have been shown to attenuate a rise in or to reduce blood pressure during several pathological conditions (hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus). Flavones, flavonols, flavanones, and flavanols were able to modulate blood pressure by restoring endothelial function, either directly, by affecting nitric oxide levels, or indirectly, through other pathways. Quercetin had the most consistent blood pressure-lowering effect in animal and human studies, irrespective of dose, duration, or disease status. However, further research on the safety and efficacy of the flavonoids is required before any of them can be used by humans, presumably in supplement form, at the doses required for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26491142

  9. Preparation and biological efficacy of haddock bone calcium tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Jiancong; Deng, Shanggui; Xie, Chao; Tong, Guozhong

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the possible use of waste products obtained after processing haddock, the present study prepared haddock bone calcium powder by NaOH and ethanol soaking (alkalinealcohol method) and prepared haddock bone calcium tablets using the powder in combination with appropriate excipients. The biological efficacy of the haddock bone calcium tablets was investigated using Wistar rats as an experiment model. Results show that the optimal parameters for the alkalinealcohol method are: NaOH concentration 1 mol/L, immersion time 30 h; ethanol concentration 60%, immersion time 15 h. A mixture of 2% polyvinylpyrrolidone in ethanol was used as an excipient at a ratio of 1:2 to full-cream milk powder, without the use of a disintegrating agent. This process provided satisfactory tablets in terms of rigidity and taste. Animal studies showed that the haddock bone calcium tablets at a dose of 2 g·kg-1·d-1 or 5g·kg-1·d-1 significantly increased blood calcium and phosphorus levels and bone calcium content in rats. Therefore, these tablets could be used for calcium supplementation and prevent osteoporosis. Although the reasons of high absorption in the rats fed with haddock bone calcium tablets are unclear, it is suggested that there are some factors, such as treatment with method of alkaline-alcohol or the added milk, may play positive roles in increasing absorption ratio.

  10. Determinants of dietary supplement use--healthy individuals use dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Christina L F; Christensen, Jane; Dragsted, Lars O; Tjønneland, Anne; Roswall, Nina

    2015-06-28

    The prevalence of dietary supplement use varies largely among populations, and previous studies have indicated that it is high in the Danish population compared with other European countries. The diversity in supplement use across countries indicates that cultural and environmental factors could influence the use of dietary supplements. Only few studies investigating the use of dietary supplements have been conducted in the Danish population. The present cross-sectional study is based on 54,948 Danes, aged 50-64 years, who completed self-administrated questionnaires on diet, dietary supplements and lifestyle between 1993 and 1997. A health index including smoking, physical activity, alcohol and diet, and a metabolic risk index including waist circumference, urinary glucose and measured hypertension were constructed. Logistic regression was used to investigate these determinants in relation to the intake of dietary supplements. We found that 71 % of the participants were dietary supplement users; female sex, older age groups and higher educated participants were more likely to be users of any dietary supplements. One additional point in the health index was associated with 19, 16 and 9 % higher likelihood of being user of any, more common and less common supplements, respectively. In the metabolic risk index, one additional point was associated with 17 and 16 % lower likelihood of being user of any supplement and more common supplements, respectively. No significant association was found for less common supplement use. In conclusion, those with the healthiest lifestyle were more likely to use dietary supplements. Thus, lifestyle and dietary composition should be considered as confounders on supplement use and health outcomes. PMID:25940747

  11. Lactation performance by dairy cows fed supplemental biotin and a B-vitamin blend.

    PubMed

    Majee, D N; Schwab, E C; Bertics, S J; Seymour, W M; Shaver, R D

    2003-06-01

    The objective of Trial 1 was to evaluate in dairy cows the effects of dietary supplementation with biotin and a B-vitamin blend on dry matter intake (DMI), milk yield, composition and component yields, total tract nutrient digestion, and plasma metabolites. Twenty-four multiparous Holstein cows averaging 46 +/- 8 d in milk at trial initiation were randomly assigned to treatments in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with 28 d periods. The four treatments were: 1) a control diet (C) with no supplemental B-vitamins; 2) C plus supplemental biotin at 20 mg/d (B); 3) C plus supplemental thiamin (150 mg/d), riboflavin (150 mg/d), pyridoxine (120 mg/d), B12 (0.5 mg/d), niacin (3000 mg/d), pantothenic acid (475 mg/d), folic acid (100 mg/d), and biotin (20 mg/d) (BBVIT1X); 4) C plus supplemental thiamin (300 mg/d), riboflavin (300 mg/d), pyridoxine (240 mg/d), B12 (1.0 mg/d), niacin (6000 mg/d), pantothenic acid (950 mg/d), folic acid (200 mg/d), and biotin (40 mg/d) (BBVIT2X). Intake of DM was increased 0.7 kg/d for B vs. C and BBVIT1X and 1.3 kg/d for B vs. BBVIT2X. Milk yield was increased 1.7 kg/d for B vs. C. For BBVIT1X, milk yield was similar to B and BBVIT2X and tended to be higher than C. Yields of milk protein and lactose but not fat were higher for B than C. For BBVIT1X, milk component yields were similar to B and tended to be higher than C, with the exception of lactose yield where BBVIT1X was higher than C. The objective of Trial 2 was to evaluate DMI and milk yield, composition and component yields by dairy cows fed diets supplemented with either 40 mg/d biotin or the B-vitamin blend (BBVIT1X) compared to cows supplemented with 20 mg/d dietary biotin. Neither the 40 mg/d biotin treatment nor the B-vitamin blend enhanced lactation performance over the 20 mg/d biotin treatment. Biotin efficacy in short-term trials suggests that biotin may improve milk yield directly via effects on intake and (or) nutrient metabolism rather than indirectly via improved hoof health. More research is needed to determine the mode of action for supplemental dietary biotin. PMID:12836947

  12. Parameters for defining efficacy in fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Shisha, Tamas

    2010-01-01

    Complications of the bone-healing process, especially in elderly, osteoporotic patients, are cause of important medical and economical burden. At the same time, there is no clinical study today to have shown the efficacy of a pharmacological treatment to enhance fracture repair. The author analyzes the potential criteria that could be used for the evaluation of treatment efficacy to enhance fracture healing in the frame of a clinical study. PMID:22461284

  13. Reflections on the efficacy of pertussis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fine, P E; Clarkson, J A

    1987-01-01

    The literature on the protection imparted by conventional whole-cell pertussis vaccines was reviewed, and the extent to which the great variation in estimates of vaccine efficacy is attributable to methodologic problems in study design and analysis or to biologic features of the natural history of pertussis was explored. The protection against disease imparted by pertussis vaccines may be greater than that against infection. Estimates of vaccine efficacy from case-control studies are higher than those from studies of household secondary-attack rates; likewise, estimates of efficacy are higher when based on clinically severe or bacteriologically positive cases rather than simply on notified cases. Some of the reported differences in protection by different vaccines may be attributable to relations between the antigenic composition of the vaccine used and that of the circulating strain of Bordetella pertussis. Failure to consider age trends has sometimes led to spuriously high estimates of efficacy. Many biases can affect efficacy studies, and it is usually difficult to assess whether the net effect has been to underestimate or to overestimate "true" efficacy. The immunity imparted by conventional pertussis vaccines may be neither as solid nor as stable as that imparted by many live-virus vaccines. These issues must be considered during the evaluation of acellular pertussis vaccines. PMID:3317732

  14. Clinical and Antibiofilm Efficacy of Antimicrobial Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Finnegan, Simon; Percival, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Hydrogels have been shown to have a significant role to play in wound healing. Hydrogels are used to assist in the management of dry, sloughy, or necrotic wounds. However, recent scientific evidence has shown that biofilms delay wound healing and increase a wound propensity to infection. It is therefore essential that hydrogels incorporating antimicrobials demonstrate efficacy on biofilms. Consequently, it is the aim of this article to review the efficacy of hydrogels, incorporating antimicrobials, on wounds with specific reference to their efficacy on biofilms. Recent Advances: Technologies being developed for the management of wounds are rapidly expanding. In particularly next-generation hydrogels, incorporating copolymers, have been reported to enable the smart release of antimicrobials. This has led to the development of a more tailored patient-specific antimicrobial hydrogel therapy. Critical Issues: Evidence relating to the efficacy of hydrogels, incorporating antimicrobials, on biofilms within both the in vitro and in vivo environments is lacking. Future Direction: Studies that investigate the efficacy of antimicrobial hydrogel wound dressings on both in vivo and in vitro biofilms are important. However, there is a significant need for better and more reproducible in vivo biofilm models. Until this is possible, data generated from appropriate and representative in vitro models will help to assist researchers and clinicians in evaluating antimicrobial and antibiofilm hydrogel technology for the extrapolation of efficacy data relevant to biofilms present in the in vivo environment. PMID:26155382

  15. The influence of dietary vitamin C and E supplementation on the physiological response of pirarucu, Arapaima gigas, in net culture.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Glauber Cruz; Tavares-Dias, Marcos; Ono, Eduardo Akifumi; de Andrade, Jaqueline Inês Alves; Brasil, Elenice Martins; Roubach, Rodrigo; Urbinati, Elisabeth Criscuolo; Marcon, Jaydione Luiz; Affonso, Elizabeth Gusmão

    2006-10-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of dietary vitamin C (ascorbic acid or AA), vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol or alpha-T), and C+E supplementation on the blood parameters of Arapaima gigas grown in net cages for 45 days. Four treatments were tested: control (commercial feed); C800; E500 and C+E (800+500) with supplementation of 800 mg AA kg(-1), 500 mg alpha-T kg(-1) and 800+500 mg AA+alpha-T kg(-1), respectively. Hematocrit (Ht), red blood cells (RBC), and hemoglobin concentration (Hb) (oxidative status indicators), thrombocytes and leukocytes (immunological indicators), plasma protein and glucose were evaluated. Fish fed vitamin C and C+E supplemented diets showed greater weight gain and survival. Dietary vitamin C and C+E diet supplementation resulted in increased Ht, Hb, RBC, MCHC, total leukocytes, total proteins, thrombocytes and eosinophils compared to the control and alpha-T. The alpha-tocopherol-supplemented diet reduced the number of total thrombocytes, lymphocytes and neutrophils and increased glucose and eosinophils relatively to the control. In general, leukocytes and thrombocytes were good indicators of the efficiency of vitamin on the defense mechanism of the A. gigas reared in cages. Results indicate that high alpha-T diet supplementation provides no benefit for the maintenance of the oxidative or the immunological status of A. gigas. However, it was demonstrated that high dietary AA improves A. gigas immunological status. Red blood cell indices and immune system indicators showed no synergistic effect between the vitamins after supplementing the A. gigas diet with alpha-T+AA. PMID:16934509

  16. Vitamin A supplementation modifies the association between mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses and resolution of enteric pathogen infections123

    PubMed Central

    Santos, José Ignacio; Rosado, Jorge L; Estrada-Garcia, Teresa; Haas, Meredith; Al Mamun, Abdullah; DuPont, Herbert L; Nanthakumar, Nanda N

    2011-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of vitamin A supplementation on diarrheal disease morbidity may reflect the divergent effects that supplementation has on pathogen-specific immune responses and pathogen-specific outcomes. Objective: We examined how vitamin A supplementation modified associations between gut-cytokine immune responses and the resolution of different diarrheal pathogen infections. Design: Stools collected from 127 Mexican children who were 5–15 mo old and enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled vitamin A supplementation trial were screened for enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), and Giardia lamblia. Fecal concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), and interferon-? (IFN-?) were measured by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hazard models that incorporated categorized cytokine variables (ie, nondetectable, less than the median of detectable concentrations, and at least the median of detectable concentrations) were fit to the length of pathogen infections stratified by treatment group. Results: Vitamin A–supplemented children with fecal MCP-1 or IL-8 concentrations less than the median of detectable concentrations and IL-10 concentrations of at least median concentrations had longer durations of EPEC infection than did children in the placebo group. In supplemented children, detectable fecal TNF-? or IL-6 concentrations were associated with shorter ETEC infection durations, whereas MCP-1 concentrations of at least the median were associated with longer infection durations. Children in this group who had IL-4, IL-5, or IFN-? concentrations of at least median detectable concentrations had shorter durations of G. lamblia infection. Conclusion: The effect of supplementation on associations between fecal cytokine concentrations and pathogen infection resolution depends on the role of inflammatory immune responses in resolving specific pathogen infections. PMID:21248183

  17. Associations between intestinal mucosal function and changes in plasma zinc concentration following zinc supplementation1

    PubMed Central

    Wessells, K. Ryan; Hess, Sonja Y.; Rouamba, Noel; Ouédraogo, Zinewendé P.; Kellogg, Mark; Goto, Rie; Duggan, Christopher; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Brown, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Subclinical environmental enteropathy is associated with malabsorption of fats, carbohydrates, and vitamins A, B12 and folate; however, little information is available on mineral absorption. We therefore investigated the relationship between intestinal mucosal function (measured by the lactulose:mannitol permeability test and plasma citrulline concentration), and zinc absorption, as estimated by the change in plasma zinc concentration (PZC) following short-term zinc or placebo supplementation. Methods We conducted a randomized, partially-masked, placebo-controlled trial among 282 apparently healthy children 6–23 mo of age in Burkina Faso. After completing baseline intestinal function tests, participants received either 5 mg zinc, as zinc sulfate, or placebo, daily for 21 d. Results At baseline, mean ± SD PZC was 62.9 ± 11.9 µg/dL; median (IQR) urinary lactulose:mannitol (L:M) recovery ratio and plasma citrulline concentration were 0.04 (0.03 – 0.07) and 11.4 (9.0 – 15.6) µmol/L, respectively. Change in PZC was significantly greater in the zinc supplemented versus placebo group (15.6 ± 13.3 µg/dL vs. 0.02 ± 10.9 µg/dL; P < 0.0001), and was negatively associated with initial urinary L:M recovery ratio (?1.1 µg/dL per 50% increase in urinary L:M recovery ratio; P = 0.014); this latter relationship did not differ between supplementation groups (P = 0.26). Baseline plasma citrulline concentration was not associated with change in PZC. Conclusions Although altered intestinal permeability may reduce dietary zinc absorption, it likely does not undermine the efficacy of zinc supplementation, given the large increases in PZC following short-term zinc supplementation observed in this study, even among those with increased urinary L:M recovery ratios. PMID:23689263

  18. Pro-inflammatory properties of shark cartilage supplement.

    PubMed

    Merly, Liza; Smith, Sylvia L

    2015-04-01

    The erosion and breakdown of cartilage is generally recognized to be an integral manifestation of arthritic disease, which is often accompanied by the development and progression of inflammation associated with it. Commercial shark cartilage (SC) is a popular dietary supplement taken for the prevention and/or control of chronic disease, including arthritis. The efficacy of SC in maintaining joint health remains questionable; there is a lack of sufficient reliable information on its effect on immunocompetent cells, and the potential health risks involved have not been adequately assessed. Our earlier in vitro studies showed that SC extracts induce a Th1-type inflammatory cytokine response in human leucocytes, and collagen type II alpha 1 protein was shown to be an active cytokine-inducing component in SC. In this study, we further define the cellular response to SC stimulation by classifying leucocytes into primary and secondary responders employing enriched leucocyte subpopulations. Inhibitors of specific signaling pathways were used to verify the functional effect of SC on specific pathway(s) utilized. Results indicate the monocyte/macrophage as the initially responding cell, followed by lymphocytes and the production of interferon-?. Chemokines, MCP-1 and RANTES, were produced at significant levels in stimulated leucocyte cultures. Initial cellular activation is likely followed by activation of Jun Kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathways. This study presents evidence of significant immunological reactivity of components of commercial SC supplement, which could pose a potential health risk for consumers, particularly those with underlying inflammatory disease such as irritable bowel syndrome and arthritis. PMID:25600427

  19. Development of a Physical Education Teaching Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Charlotte A.; Hebert, Edward; Daigle, Kay; Martin, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Relationships have been found between teacher efficacy and many teaching and learning variables, but few researchers have examined teaching efficacy in physical education. The instrument reported here, the Physical Education Teaching Efficacy Scale, was developed based on the teaching efficacy literature, existing scales, and National Association…

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Intravenous Colistin in Neonates With Culture Proven Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Serafettin Tekgunduz, Kadir; Kara, Mustafa; Caner, Ibrahim; Demirelli, Yasar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although it is well described among adults, intravenous colistin use and its associated toxicities in newborns are poorly understood. Objectives: We present our experience of efficacy and safety of intravenous colistin in the treatment of sepsis in term and preterm neonates. Patients and Methods: The records of neonates who received colistin between January 2013 and February 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All neonates with culture proven nosocomial infections due to multidrug resistant organisms and treated continuously with colistin for more than 72 hours were included in the study. Results: Patients were evaluated for clinical and microbiological response to the drug and its and side effects. Twelve newborn infants with mean 31.8 ± 3.5 weeks gestational age and median 1482 (810 - 3200) gram birth weight were included. 11/12 (91.7%) patients showed microbiological clearance with intravenous colistin. One patient who had recurrent cerebrospinal fluid positive culture was treated with intraventricular colistin. The major side effects observed was hyponatremia and hypokalemia in 2 (16.6%) patients, all infants required magnesium supplementation. Conclusions: Intravenous colistin administration appears to be safe and efficacious for multidrug-resistant gram-negative infections in neonates, including preterm infants. However, we believe that large prospective controlled studies are needed to confirm its efficacy and safety in neonates. PMID:26396706

  1. Efficacy comparison of scopolamine (SCP) and diazepam (DZ) against soman-induced lethality in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, L.W.; Gennings, C.; Carter, W.H.; Anderson, D.R.; Lennox, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    Diazepam (DZ) and scopolamine (SCP) are known to be beneficial when each is used in combination with atropine (AT) + oxime therapy against intoxication by soman, but the efficacy of each might be expected to vary with the dosage of AT. Thus, the therapeutic efficacy of SCP (5 doses; 0 - 0.86 mg/kg) versus DZ (5 doses; 0 - 5 mg/kg), when used in conjunction with AT (3 doses; 0.5 - S mg/kg) + 2-PAM (25 mg/kg) therapy, was tested in groups of pyridostigmine pretreated guinea pigs exposed to 1.6, 2.0, 2.5 or 3.2 LD5Os of soman. Response surface methodology was employed to describe the relationship between lethality and the AT/DZ or AT/SCP dosages. Results show that within the indicated dose ranges used, the efficacy of SCP is not dependent on the presence of AT, whereas AT is needed for DZ to maintain the lowest probability of death. These findings suggest that in guinea pigs SCP could supplement AT or replace DZ as therapy against nerve agent intoxication.

  2. Timing of magnesium supplementation administered through drinking water to improve fresh and stored pork quality.

    PubMed

    Frederick, B R; van Heugten, E; See, M T

    2004-05-01

    Thirty-two pigs were used to determine the timing effect of magnesium (Mg) supplementation given through drinking water on pork quality. Pigs (16 barrows and 16 gilts) were individually penned, provided 2.7 kg of feed (0.12% Mg) daily (as-fed basis), and allowed free access to water via a nipple waterer for the duration of the study. After 5 d of adjustment, pigs (120 +/- 0.8 kg BW) were allotted randomly by weight and sex to 900 mg/L of supplemental Mg from magnesium sulfate heptahydrate in drinking water for -6, -4, -2, or 0 d relative to slaughter. The LM and semimembranosus (SM) muscles were removed 24 h postmortem. Retail display storage was simulated for 8 d, and the LM was vacuum-packaged for 25 or 50 d at 4 degrees C. Magnesium did not affect the pH of the LM at either 45 min (P = 0.15) or 24 h postmortem (P = 0.23). However, the pH of the SM at 24 h postmortem tended to be greater (P = 0.08) for pigs consuming Mg for 2 d than for those not supplemented. Fluid loss after 8 d of storage was less (P < 0.05) in the LM of pigs supplemented with Mg for 6 d than in those without supplementation. Furthermore, fluid loss from the SM of pigs provided supplemental Mg for 2 d, but not for 4 or 6 d, was lower (P < 0.05) on each day of retail display than the SM of unsupplemented pigs. Minolta L*, a*, and b* color measurements of the LM during display storage were not (P > 0.10) affected by Mg supplementation. However, Mg supplementation for 2 or 4 d decreased paleness (lower L* value) after 25 d (P < 0.05), but not 50 d (P > 0.10) of vacuum-packaged storage. Magnesium addition for 2 d decreased the extent of oxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) of the LM after 4 d of display storage compared with 0 d of Mg (P < 0.05). Oxidation of the SM during 8 d of display storage increased linearly (P < 0.05) as duration of supplementation increased from 2 to 6 d but did not differ (P = 0.22) from 0 d of Mg supplementation. Although the response to Mg supplementation was variable, supplementation for 2 d before slaughter was considered most efficacious because of the following: decreased fluid loss from the SM, and lower lipid oxidation formation in the LM during retail storage; a darker, more desirable LM color after 25 d of vacuum-packaged storage; and cost reductions compared with longer durations. PMID:15144086

  3. Selenium species in selenium fortified dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Niedzielski, Przemyslaw; Rudnicka, Monika; Wachelka, Marcin; Kozak, Lidia; Rzany, Magda; Wozniak, Magdalena; Kaskow, Zaneta

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a study of dietary supplements available on the Polish market. The supplements comprised a large group of products with selenium content declared by the producer. The study involved determination of dissolution time under different conditions and solubility as well as content and speciation of selenium. The total content was determined as well as organic selenium and the inorganic forms Se(IV) and Se(VI). The organic selenium content was calculated as the difference between total Se and inorganic Se. The values obtained were compared with producers' declarations. The work is the first such study of selenium supplements available on the market of an EU Member State. PMID:26212996

  4. Exploring the Relationship between Teaching Efficacy and Cultural Efficacy of Novice Science Teachers in High-Needs Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine; Bilica, Kimberly; Wandless, Ana; Gdovin, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study sought to investigate what relationship exists between teaching efficacy and cultural efficacy of novice science teachers in high-needs, high-minority urban schools. One major theme--the importance of establishing positive teacher-student relationships--surrounding teaching efficacy in the context of cultural efficacy

  5. 17 CFR 229.902 - (Item 902) Individual partnership supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 1934 AND ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975-REGULATION S-K Roll-Up Transactions § 229.902 (Item... supplement to the disclosure document for each entity. (b) The separate supplement required by paragraph (a... in the forepart of the supplement to the effect that: (i) Supplements have been prepared for...

  6. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing... ordinary conditions of use. Therefore, dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids are...

  7. Generalized Self-Efficacy, Holland Theme Self-Efficacy, and Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Lori D.; Borgen, Fred H.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of Self-Efficacy Scale, Skills Confidence Inventory; ACT Assessment, and grade point average (GPA) results for 189 women and 91 men revealed strong relationships between generalized self-efficacy and confidence in Investigative and Enterprising occupations for both and Conventional occupations for men. ACT scores were related to…

  8. Perceptions of Barriers to Employment, Coping Efficacy, and Career Search Efficacy in People with Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbiere, Marc; Mercier, Celine; Lesage, Alain

    2004-01-01

    The Barriers to Employment and Coping Efficacy Scale (BECES) and the Career Search Efficacy Scale (CSES) were designed to assist people in their work integration process. The BECES was specifically developed for people with mental illness. Although the CSES was not specifically designed for people with mental illness, its items appear relevant for…

  9. Selenium supplementation: does soil supplementation help and why?

    PubMed

    Arthur, John R

    2003-05-01

    There are now concerns that dietary Se intake is inadequate for the population in the UK and parts of Europe. Many different methods can be proposed to deal with this problem. Experience from Finland suggests that the addition of Se to fertiliser is a safe and effective means of increasing the intake of the micronutrient in the human population. However, careful consideration needs to be given to the potential consequences of increasing Se intake. It is important to understand the biochemical and physiological changes that may occur with any increase in Se intake within the UK population. Se is an essential component of at least twenty functional proteins within mammals. These proteins are essential for a range of metabolic functions, including antioxidant activity, thyroid hormone synthesis and immune function. Thus, any increase in Se intake has the potential to influence in a wide range of factors that may impinge on the incidence of chronic disease. Treatment of soil with Se-supplemented fertiliser will certainly increase total Se in food products derived from areas where this treatment is in place. Consumption of such foods will increase Se status in many populations where the existing intake does not meet requirements. If the increases in Se intake are not toxic the overall consequences have the potential to be beneficial. PMID:14506886

  10. Pediatric dyslipidemias: Prescription medication efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Browne, Barry; Vasquez, Susie

    2008-06-01

    Pharmacologic treatment of patients with severe pediatric dyslipidemias remains problematic and is of significant concern for health care professionals treating these individuals. Issues include selection of appropriate treatment modalities, lack of pediatric indications for some therapies, duration of treatment, and possible adverse effects with early initiation of potentially life-long therapies. The objective of this review is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the various prescription medications used to treat severe pediatric dyslipidemias, particularly heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. A PubMed search was used to identify published literature evaluating safety and efficacy of various pharmacologic interventions in severe pediatric dyslipidemias. In addition, product monographs for various branded and generic products identified in the published literature were reviewed for pediatrics-related information. Clinical trials literature, review articles, and national guidelines provide limited information indicating short-term safety and efficacy of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, bile acid sequestrants, ezetimibe, fibrates, niacin formulations, and combinations of these agents in pediatric patients. However, no long-term data regarding safety and efficacy are currently available. No long-term risk-benefit data are available for pediatric use of agents used for severe pediatric dyslipidemias, mostly familial hypercholesterolemia. Extended-duration clinical trials and observational data are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of long-term treatment for these patients. PMID:21291737

  11. Protective efficacy of piperine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep; Kalia, Nitin Pal; Suden, Pankaj; Chauhan, Prashant Singh; Kumar, Manoj; Ram, Anshu Beulah; Khajuria, Anamika; Bani, Sarang; Khan, Inshad Ali

    2014-07-01

    Piperine a trans-trans isomer of 1-piperoyl-piperidine was evaluated for its immunomodulatory activity to enhance the efficacy of rifampicin in a murine model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In-vitro immunomodulation of piperine was tested on mouse splenocytes for lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production and macrophage activation. Protective efficacy of piperine was tested in a mice infection model of M. tuberculosis for the activation of Th-1 response and synergistic combination efficacy with rifampicin. Murine splenocytes exposed to piperine exhibited proliferation of T and B cell, increased Th-1 cytokines and enhanced macrophage activation. Piperine (1 mg/kg) in mice infected with M. tuberculosis activated the differentiation of T cells into Th-1 sub-population (CD4+ / CD8+ subsets). There was an increase in secretion of Th-1 cytokines (IFN-? and IL-2) by these cells. The qRT-PCR studies revealed corresponding increases in the mRNA transcripts of IFN-? and IL-2 in the infected lung tissues. Combination of piperine and rifampicin (1 mg/kg) exhibited better efficacy of and resulted in additional 1.4 to 0.8 log reduction in lung cfu as compared to rifampicin alone. The up-regulation of Th1 immunity by piperine can be synergistically combined with rifampicin to improve its therapeutic efficacy in immune-compromised TB patients. PMID:24880706

  12. 47 CFR 87.277 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Enroute Stations, Aeronautical Fixed Stations, and Aircraft Data Link Land Test Stations Aeronautical Fixed Stations § 87.277 Supplemental eligibility. Aeronautical fixed station...

  13. 15 CFR 908.7 - Supplemental reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... MAINTAINING RECORDS AND SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.7 Supplemental reports...to the Administrator immediately if any report of weather modification activities submitted under § 908.4, §...

  14. 7 CFR 1430.511 - Supplemental payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Dairy Market Loss Assistance Program § 1430.511 Supplemental...under Public Law 106-387 will be made available to dairy operations in connection with normal milk...

  15. Nutritional supplementation: is it necessary for everybody?

    PubMed

    Wienecke, Elmar; Gruenwald, Joerg

    2007-01-01

    Mineral nutrients, vitamins, and trace elements are essential for the growth and development of a multicellular organism. Today, an adequate supply of nutrients is often unattainable solely through a well-balanced diet, so a targeted, individually designed dietary supplement regime is necessary. Nutrient deficiency, which is impossible to detect through plasma levels alone, is reliably detected through the intracellular measurement of the nutrient levels in the blood. Two case studies presented here indicate the need for supplementation as improvement in nutritional behavior could not replenish already exhausted nutrient reservoirs. Only supplementation was able to significantly boost nutrient levels and confer beneficial effects on general welfare, physical performance, and resistance to infections. Therefore, it appears that nutritional supplements are advisable for everyone, but more research is needed, especially on an intracellular level, to corroborate these findings. PMID:18029339

  16. 15 CFR 908.7 - Supplemental reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...REGULATIONS MAINTAINING REC-ORDS AND SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.7 Supplemental reports...must be made to the Administrator immediately if any report of weather modification activities submitted under § 908.4, §...

  17. 15 CFR 908.7 - Supplemental reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...REGULATIONS MAINTAINING REC-ORDS AND SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.7 Supplemental reports...must be made to the Administrator immediately if any report of weather modification activities submitted under § 908.4, §...

  18. 15 CFR 908.7 - Supplemental reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...REGULATIONS MAINTAINING REC- ORDS AND SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.7 Supplemental reports...must be made to the Administrator immediately if any report of weather modification activities submitted under § 908.4, §...

  19. 15 CFR 908.7 - Supplemental reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...REGULATIONS MAINTAINING RECORDS AND SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.7 Supplemental reports...must be made to the Administrator immediately if any report of weather modification activities submitted under § 908.4, §...

  20. 47 CFR 87.277 - Supplemental eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Aeronautical Enroute Stations, Aeronautical Fixed Stations, and Aircraft Data Link Land Test Stations Aeronautical Fixed Stations § 87.277 Supplemental eligibility. Aeronautical fixed station licenses will only be issued to the licensees of associated aeronautical enroute stations. Aeronautical fixed station...

  1. Dietary Supplements: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... only for safety, not effectiveness. The manufacturers and distributors of dietary supplements are responsible for making sure ... you are taking, check with the manufacturer or distributor about: • Information to support the claims of the ...

  2. Dietary Supplements: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... only for safety, not effectiveness. The manufacturers and distributors of dietary supplements are responsible for making sure ... you are taking, check with the manufacturer or distributor about: Information to support the claims of the ...

  3. Drugs, Herbs and Supplements: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginformation.html Drugs, Herbs and Supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Drugs Learn about your prescription drugs and over-the- ...

  4. [Nutrition and dietary supplements in neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Erbguth, F; Himmerich, H

    2014-12-01

    "Healthy" diets and supplements are widely used for prevention and disease modification in vascular, inflammatory and degenerative neurological diseases. Apart from a large number of cross-sectional and prospective cohort studies, there are only few interventional studies on individual dietary measures. A recent study confirmed the stroke preventive effect of a Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil and nuts; a ketogenic diet reduces seizure frequency in epilepsy. Supplementation of riboflavin, magnesium and coenzyme Q10 are probably effective in migraine prophylaxis. Creatine can improve muscle strength in muscular dystrophy and myositis. There is insufficient evidence to recommend any of the many dietary supplements, such as vitamins, omega-3 fatty acids and other substances for the prevention or improvement of all other neurological diseases. This review critically evaluates the present data on the role of nutrition and dietary supplements in neurological diseases. PMID:25403288

  5. Herbal remedies and supplements for weight loss

    MedlinePLUS

    ... counter supplements with claims of weight-loss properties contain some combination of these ingredients: Aloe vera Aspartate ... some of them. DO NOT use products that contain these ingredients: Ephedrine is the main active ingredient ...

  6. Tips for Older Dietary Supplement Users

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sure that you are getting all the vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients you need as you get ... Today's dietary supplements are not only vitamins and minerals. They also include other less-familiar substances, such ...

  7. NCI Re-Entry Supplements Guidelines

    Cancer.gov

    This document applies to applications requesting research supplement funding to active National Cancer Institute (NCI) grants in response to PA-15-321. The purpose is to clarify the application process and highlight NCI-specific requirements.

  8. 40 CFR 192.22 - Supplemental standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR URANIUM AND THORIUM MILL TAILINGS Implementation § 192.22 Supplemental standards. Federal agencies implementing subparts A and B may in lieu...

  9. 40 CFR 192.22 - Supplemental standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR URANIUM AND THORIUM MILL TAILINGS Implementation § 192.22 Supplemental standards. Federal agencies implementing subparts A and B may in lieu...

  10. 40 CFR 192.22 - Supplemental standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR URANIUM AND THORIUM MILL TAILINGS Implementation § 192.22 Supplemental standards. Federal agencies implementing subparts A and B may in lieu...

  11. Levels of Supplementation for Grazing Beef Heifers

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Carla Heloisa Avelino; Paulino, Mario Fonseca; Detmann, Edenio; de Campos Valadares Filho, Sebastião; de Barros, Lívia Vieira; Valente, Ériton Egidio Lisboa; de Oliveira Bauer, Maristela; Cabral, Carlos Eduardo Avelino

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of providing different levels of a supplement on the nutritional characteristics and productive performance of heifers on pasture during the rainy-dry transition and dry season in Brazil or tropical area. Thirty crossbred heifers with predominance of Zebu breed were used in a completely randomized experimental design. Treatments consisted of a mineral supplement and 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 kg/animal/d of a protein supplement containing 300 g crude protein (CP)/kg of dry matter (DM). In the rainy-dry transition season there was quadratic effect of the protein supplementation (p<0.10) on daily weight gain (DWG). A linear relationship (p<0.10) was found between increasing supplement intake and intakes of DM, organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), ether extract (EE), non fibrous carbohydrates (NFC) and total digestible nutrients (TDN). Coefficients of apparent digestibility of CP, EE, and NFC increased linearly (p<0.10) with increasing supplement levels, but there was no effect on the DM apparent digestibility (p>0.10); the microbial efficiency (g CPmic/kg TDN) and the relationship of microbial nitrogen flow with nitrogen intake (g/g nitrogen intake) were negative linear profiles. In the dry season, the descriptive pattern least squares means showed a trend of stabilization of DWG from the supply of 0.98 kg of protein supplement; the intakes of DM, OM, CP, EE, NFC, and TDN showed increasing linear relationship (p<0.10) with protein supplement levels; the means of apparent digestibility coefficients of the different dietary fractions presented a linear-response-plateau (LRP); the microbial nitrogen flow (g/d) showed positive linear profile (p<0.10) for supplementation levels. It is concluded that supplementation improves the productive performance of grazing heifers and that 1.0 kg/d of supplement per animal gives the maximum increment of weight gain. PMID:25050018

  12. Antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidant efficacies of zerumbone on the formation, development, and establishment of atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hemn, Hassan Othman; Noordin, Muhammad Mustapha; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Hazilawati, Hamza; Zuki, Abubakr; Chartrand, Max Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the high incidence of cholesterol-induced cardiovascular disease, particularly atherosclerosis, the current study was designed to investigate the preventive and therapeutic efficacies of dietary zerumbone (ZER) supplementation on the formation and development of atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with a high cholesterol diet. A total of 72 New Zealand white rabbits were divided randomly on two experimental studies carried out 8 weeks apart. The first experiment was designed to investigate the prophylactic efficacy of ZER in preventing early developed atheromatous lesion. The second experimental trial was aimed at investigating the therapeutic effect of ZER in reducing the atherosclerotic lesion progression and establishment. Sudanophilia, histopathological, and ultrastructural changes showed pronounced reduction in the plaque size in ZER-medicated aortas. On the other hand, dietary supplementation of ZER for almost 10 weeks as a prophylactic measure indicated substantially decreasing lipid profile values, and similarly, plaque size in comparison with high-cholesterol non-supplemented rabbits. Furthermore, the results of oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarker evaluation indicated that ZER is a potent antioxidant in suppressing the generation of free radicals in terms of atherosclerosis prevention and treatment. ZER significantly reduced the value of malondialdehyde and augmented the value of superoxide dismutase. In conclusion, our data indicated that dietary supplementation of ZER at doses of 8, 16, and 20 mg/kg alone as a prophylactic measure, and as a supplementary treatment with simvastatin, significantly reduced early plague formation, development, and establishment via significant reduction in serum lipid profile, together with suppression of oxidative damage, and therefore alleviated atherosclerosis lesions. PMID:26347047

  13. Supplement 1, Authors: A To B 

    E-print Network

    Doss, Mildred A.; Humphrey, Judith M.

    1953-01-01

    STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INDEX-CATALOGUE OF MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ZOOLOGY ?-? ? SUPPLEMENT 1 AUTHORS: ? ?? ? l? J. > ? OU UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INDEX-CATALOGUE OF MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ZOOLOGY SUPPLEMENT 1.... Iussu Societatis Pharmacol- ogicae Hafniae Edita. K?benhavn. Acta Zool. et Oecol., Univ. Lodziensis.?Acta Zoologica et Oecologica, Universitatis Lod- ziensis. L?dzkie Towarzystwo Naukowe So- cietas Scientiarum Lodziensis. L?dz. 2 UNITED STATES...

  14. Nutritional supplements for diabetes sold on the internet: business or health promotion?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes is one of the most widespread chronic disease. Although many medications are available for the treatment and prevention of diabetes, many people turn to nutritional supplements (NSs). In these years, the online sales have contributed to the growth of use of nutritional supplement. The aim of the research was to investigate the type of information provided by sales websites on NSs, and analyse the existence of scientific evidence about some of the most common ingredients found in available NSs for diabetes. Methods A web search was conducted in April 2012 to identify web sites selling NSs in the treatment of diabetes using Google, Yahoo and Bing! and the key word used was “diabetes nutritional supplements”. Website content was evaluated for the quality of information available to consumers and for the presence of a complete list of ingredients in the first NS suggested by the site. Subsequently, in order to analyze the scientific evidence on the efficacy of these supplements a PubMed search was carried out on the ingredients that were shared in at least 3 nutritional supplements. Results A total of 10 websites selling NSs were selected. Only half of the websites had a Food and Drug Administration disclaimer and 40% declared clearly that the NS offered was not a substitute for proper medication. A total of 10 NS ingredients were searched for on PubMed. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses or randomized control trials were present for all the ingredients except one. Most of the studies, however, were of poor quality and/or the results were conflicting. Conclusions Easy internet access to NSs lacking in adequate medical information and strong scientific evidence is a matter of public health concern, mainly considering that a misleading information could lead to an improper prevention both in healthy people and people suffering from diabetes. There is a clear need for more trials to assess the efficacy and safety of these NSs, better quality control of websites, more informed physicians and greater public awareness of these widely used products. PMID:23978193

  15. Vitamin D Supplementation for Childhood Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Importance There is growing evidence that vitamin D plays a role in the pathogenesis of asthma but it is unclear whether supplementation during childhood may improve asthma outcomes. Objectives The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of vitamin D supplementation as a treatment or adjunct treatment for asthma. Data Sources We searched MEDLINE, Embase, CENTRAL, and CINAHL through July 2014. Study Selection We included RCTs that evaluated vitamin D supplementation in children versus active control or placebo for asthma. Data Extraction and Synthesis One reviewer extracted data and one reviewer verified data accuracy. We qualitatively summarized the main results of efficacy and safety and meta-analyzed data on comparable outcomes across studies. We used GRADE for strength of evidence. Main Outcome Measures Main planned outcomes measures were ED visits and hospitalizations. As secondary outcomes, we examined measures of asthma control, including frequency of asthma exacerbations, asthma symptom scores, measures of lung function, ?2-agonist use and daily steroid use, adverse events and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Results Eight RCTs (one parallel, one crossover design) comprising 573 children aged 3 to 18 years were included. One study (moderate-quality, n = 100) reported significantly less ED visits for children treated with vitamin D. No other studies examined the primary outcome (ED visits and hospitalizations). There was a reduced risk of asthma exacerbations in children receiving vitamin D (low-quality; RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.63, 3 studies, n = 378). There was no significant effect for asthma symptom scores and lung function. The serum 25(OH)D level was higher in the vitamin D group at the end of the intervention (low-quality; MD 19.66 nmol/L, 95% CI 5.96 nmol/L to 33.37 nmol/L, 5 studies, n = 167). Limitations We identified a high degree of clinical diversity (interventions and outcomes) and methodological heterogeneity (sample size and risk of bias) in included trials. Conclusions and Relevance Randomized controlled trials provide some low-quality evidence to support vitamin D supplementation for the reduction of asthma exacerbations. Evidence on the benefits of vitamin D supplementation for other asthma-related outcomes in children is either limited or inconclusive. We recommend that future trials focus on patient-relevant outcomes that are comparable across studies, including standardized definitions of asthma exacerbations. PMID:26322509

  16. Morbidity and mortality reduction by supplemental vitamin A or beta-carotene in CBA mice given total-body gamma-radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, E.; Rettura, G.; Padawer, J.; Stratford, F.; Weinzweig, J.; Demetriou, A.A.; Levenson, S.M.

    1984-11-01

    Male CBA mice received graded doses (450-750 rad) of total-body gamma-radiation (TBR) from a dual-beam /sup 137/Cs irradiator. Commencing directly after TBR, 2 days later, or 6 days later, groups of mice received supplemental vitamin A (Vit A) or beta-carotene (beta-Car), compounds previously found to reduce radiation disease in mice subjected to partial-body X-irradiation. Given directly after TBR, supplemental Vit A decreased mortality, evidenced by increases in the radiation dose required to kill 50% of the mice within 30 days (LD50/30). In one experiment, Vit A increased the LD50/30 from 555 to 620 rad; in another experiment, Vit A increased the dose from 505 to 630 rad. Similarly, in a third experiment, supplemental beta-Car increased the LD50/30 from 510 to 645 rad. Additionally, each compound increased the survival times, even of those mice that died within 30 days. In addition to reduction of mortality and prolongation of survival time, supplemental Vit A moderated weight loss, adrenal gland hyperemia, thymus involution, and lymphopenia--all signs of radiation toxicity. Delaying the supplementation for 2 days after irradiation did not greatly reduce the efficacy of Vit A; however, delaying supplementation for 6 days decreased its effect almost completely.

  17. The Use of Dietary Supplements to Alleviate Androgen Deprivation Therapy Side Effects during Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dueregger, Andrea; Heidegger, Isabel; Ofer, Philipp; Perktold, Bernhard; Ramoner, Reinhold; Klocker, Helmut; Eder, Iris E.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa), the most commonly diagnosed cancer and second leading cause of male cancer death in Western societies, is typically androgen-dependent, a characteristic that underlies the rationale of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Approximately 90% of patients initially respond to ADT strategies, however many experience side effects including hot flashes, cardiotoxicity, metabolic and musculoskeletal alterations. This review summarizes pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating the ability of dietary supplements to alleviate adverse effects arising from ADT. In particular, we focus on herbal compounds, phytoestrogens, selenium (Se), fatty acids (FA), calcium, and Vitamins D and E. Indeed, there is some evidence that calcium and Vitamin D can prevent the development of osteoporosis during ADT. On the other hand, caution should be taken with the antioxidants Se and Vitamin E until the basis underlying their respective association with type 2 diabetes mellitus and PCa tumor development has been clarified. However, many other promising supplements have not yet been subjected large-scale clinical trials making it difficult to assess their efficacy. Given the demographic trend of increased PCa diagnoses and dependence on ADT as a major therapeutic strategy, further studies are required to objectively evaluate these supplements as adjuvant for PCa patients receiving ADT. PMID:25338271

  18. The use of dietary supplements to alleviate androgen deprivation therapy side effects during prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Dueregger, Andrea; Heidegger, Isabel; Ofer, Philipp; Perktold, Bernhard; Ramoner, Reinhold; Klocker, Helmut; Eder, Iris E

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa), the most commonly diagnosed cancer and second leading cause of male cancer death in Western societies, is typically androgen-dependent, a characteristic that underlies the rationale of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Approximately 90% of patients initially respond to ADT strategies, however many experience side effects including hot flashes, cardiotoxicity, metabolic and musculoskeletal alterations. This review summarizes pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating the ability of dietary supplements to alleviate adverse effects arising from ADT. In particular, we focus on herbal compounds, phytoestrogens, selenium (Se), fatty acids (FA), calcium, and Vitamins D and E. Indeed, there is some evidence that calcium and Vitamin D can prevent the development of osteoporosis during ADT. On the other hand, caution should be taken with the antioxidants Se and Vitamin E until the basis underlying their respective association with type 2 diabetes mellitus and PCa tumor development has been clarified. However, many other promising supplements have not yet been subjected large-scale clinical trials making it difficult to assess their efficacy. Given the demographic trend of increased PCa diagnoses and dependence on ADT as a major therapeutic strategy, further studies are required to objectively evaluate these supplements as adjuvant for PCa patients receiving ADT. PMID:25338271

  19. Components of an Anticancer Diet: Dietary Recommendations, Restrictions and Supplements of the Bill Henderson Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, Cynthia; Page, Stacey; Bell, Laurie Heilman; Verhoef, Marja

    2010-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines including dietary supplements, herbals and special diets to prevent or treat disease continues to be popular. The following paper provides a description of an alternative dietary approach to the self-management and treatment of cancer, the Bill Henderson Protocol (BHP). This diet encourages daily intake of raw foods, a combination of cottage cheese and flaxseed oil and a number of supplements. Some foods and food groups are restricted (e.g., gluten, meat, dairy). Early background theory that contributed to the protocol’s development is presented as is a summary of relevant evidence concerning the anti-cancer fighting properties of the individual components. Supplement intake is considered in relation to daily recommended intakes. Challenges and risks to protocol adherence are discussed. As with many complementary and alternative interventions, clear evidence of this dietary protocol’s safety and efficacy is lacking. Consumers of this protocol may require guidance on the ability of this protocol to meet their individual nutritional needs. PMID:22254073

  20. Herbal materials used in dietary supplements: Comparison of luminescence methods for detection of irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolin, E.; Boniglia, C.; Gargiulo, R.; Onori, S.

    2009-07-01

    In EU the treatment with ionising radiation is allowed for dried aromatic herbs, spices and seasonings, but not for herbal supplements and their ingredients. Nevertheless, controls carried out in EU at the product marketing stage, showed a large number of irradiated herbal supplements and herbal ingredients. Due to low sensitivity to radiation of this kind of products, the aim of this work was to test the efficacy of the luminescence-based methods in identifying irradiated herbal supplements. To this end, photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) and thermo-luminescence (TL) measurements were performed on 24 products, including 8 herbal raw materials (plants or parts of plants) and 16 herbal extracts. The PSL technique, provided intermediate results, with a low number of total counts near to the upper negative limit, for all irradiated herbal extracts, showing possible limits in the detection of these products, specially in view of their use in mixtures with non-irradiated components. The TL method, was successfully applied to all herbal materials; in the case of herbal extracts, however, particular attention at the mineral separation step was necessary.

  1. Safety and efficacy of human breast milk Lactobacillus fermentum CECT 5716. A mini-review of studies with infant formulae.

    PubMed

    López-Huertas, E

    2015-01-01

    Human breast milk has been described as a source of lactic acid bacteria. Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 is a human breast milk strain whose probiotic properties, safety and efficacy has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, including controlled trials with human adults. Since the origin of this probiotic strain is human breast milk, we aimed to investigate the safety and efficacy of an infant and a follow-on formulas supplemented with this strain of L. fermentum. We carried out two randomised controlled trials: one trial with infants of 6-12 months of age (follow-on formula study) and another one with infants from 1 to 5 months of age (infant formula study). The results from the trials showed that the probiotic formulas were safe, well tolerated and might be useful for the prevention of community-acquired infections. PMID:25519525

  2. Use of Longitudinal Dose–Response Modeling to Support the Efficacy and Tolerability of Alitretinoin in Severe Refractory Chronic Hand Eczema (CHE)

    PubMed Central

    Schmith, GD; Singh, R; Gomeni, R; Graff, O; Hamedani, AG; Troughton, JS; Learned, SM

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal dose–response analyses of alitretinoin (an investigational agent in the US) were conducted to supplement results from phase III studies in severe, refractory chronic hand eczema, with objectives to address several outstanding development issues (e.g., optimal dose, possible factors affecting efficacy and/or tolerability). Models were fitted to the physicians' global assessment score and triglycerides over time. Five hundred trials were simulated to evaluate the relevance of findings. Analyses clarified that the optimal dose of alitretinoin was 30 mg once daily, where response rates were ?10% over placebo at 12 weeks and increased by 5–7% over placebo for every 4 weeks thereafter, for up to 24 weeks. Elderly subjects had higher magnitudes of efficacy and an increased probability of high triglycerides. Results from analyses sufficiently addressed the development issues, thereby adding to the weight of evidence supporting the efficacy and safety of alitretinoin in the treatment of severe, refractory chronic hand eczema. PMID:26225249

  3. Nutritional supplements usage by Portuguese athletes.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Mónica; Fernandes, Maria João; Moreira, Pedro; Teixeira, Vítor Hugo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we determined the prevalence of nutritional supplements (NS) usage, the type of supplements used, the reasons for usage, and the source of nutritional advice among Portuguese athletes. Two hundred ninety-two athletes (68 % male, 12 - 37 years old) from 13 national sports federations completed a questionnaire that sought information on socio-demographics, sports data, and NS usage. Most athletes (66 %) consumed NS, with a median consumption of 4 supplements per athlete. The most popular supplements included multivitamins/minerals (67 %), sport drinks (62 %), and magnesium (53 %). Significant differences for the type of NS consumed were found between gender and age groups and the number of weekly training hours. Most athletes used NS to accelerate recovery (63 %), improve sports performance (62 %), and have more energy/reduce fatigue (60 %). Athletes sought advice on supplementation mainly from physicians (56 %) and coaches (46 %). Age and gender were found to influence reasons for use and the source of information. Reasons for NS usage were supported scientifically in some cases (e. g., muscle gain upon protein supplementation), but others did not have a scientific basis (e. g., use of glutamine and magnesium). Given the high percentage of NS users, there is an urgent need to provide athletes with education and access to scientific and unbiased information, so that athletes can make assertive and rational choices about the utilization of these products. PMID:24220164

  4. The use of dietary supplements by athletes.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Ronald J; Depiesse, Frederic; Geyer, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Many athletes use dietary supplements as part of their regular training or competition routine, including about 85% of elite track and field athletes. Supplements commonly used include vitamins, minerals, protein, creatine, and various "ergogenic" compounds. These supplements are often used without a full understanding or evaluation of the potential benefits and risks associated with their use, and without consultation with a sports nutrition professional. A few supplements may be helpful to athletes in specific circumstances, especially where food intake or food choice is restricted. Vitamin and mineral supplements should be used only when a food-based solution is not available. Sports drinks, energy bars, and protein-carbohydrate shakes may all be useful and convenient at specific times. There are well-documented roles for creatine, caffeine, and alkalinizing agents in enhancing performance in high-intensity exercise, although much of the evidence does not relate to specific athletic events. There are potential costs associated with all dietary supplements, including the risk of a positive doping result as a consequence of the presence of prohibited substances that are not declared on the label. PMID:18049988

  5. Oxidation of Marine Omega-3 Supplements and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Benjamin B.; Cameron-Smith, David; Hofman, Paul L.; Cutfield, Wayne S.

    2013-01-01

    Marine omega-3 rich oils are used by more than a third of American adults for a wide range of purported benefits including prevention of cardiovascular disease. These oils are highly prone to oxidation to lipid peroxides and other secondary oxidation products. Oxidized oils may have altered biological activity making them ineffective or harmful, though there is also evidence that some beneficial effects of marine oils could be mediated through lipid peroxides. To date, human clinical trials have not reported the oxidative status of the trial oil. This makes it impossible to understand the importance of oxidation to efficacy or harm. However, animal studies show that oxidized lipid products can cause harm. Oxidation of trial oils may be responsible for the conflicting omega-3 trial literature, including the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The oxidative state of an oil can be simply determined by the peroxide value and anisidine value assays. We recommend that all clinical trials investigating omega-3 harms or benefits report the results of these assays; this will enable better understanding of the benefits and harms of omega-3 and the clinical importance of oxidized supplements. PMID:23738326

  6. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is mandated by Congress to be the agency that collects, analyzes, and disseminates impartial, comprehensive data about energy including the volume consumed, its customers, and the purposes for which it is used. The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey (FBSS) was conducted by EIA in conjunction with DOE`s Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (OFEMP) to gain a better understanding of how Federal buildings use energy. This report presents the data from 881 completed telephone interviews with Federal buildings in three Federal regions. These buildings were systematically selected using OFEMP`s specifications; therefore, these data do not statistically represent all Federal buildings in the country. The purpose of the FBSS was threefold: (1) to understand the characteristics of Federal buildings and their energy use; (2) to provide a baseline in these three Federal regions to measure future energy use in Federal buildings as required in EPACT; and (3) to compare building characteristics and energy use with the data collected in the CBECS.

  7. Controversies in testosterone supplementation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khera, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone has now become one of the most widely used medications throughout the world. The rapid growth of the testosterone market in the past 10 years is due to many factors. We currently have a worldwide aging population. In the US, the number of men 65 years old or older is increasing 2–3 times faster than the number of men younger than 65 years. In addition, poor general health and certain medical conditions such as diabetes/metabolic syndrome (MetS), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and osteoporosis have been associated with low serum testosterone levels.123 There are now fewer concerns regarding the development of prostate cancer (PCa) after testosterone therapy, making it a more attractive treatment option. Finally, the introduction of different forms of testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) with increased promotion, marketing, and direct-to-consumer advertising is also driving market growth. As the demand for TST continues to grow, it is becoming more important for clinicians to understand how to diagnose and treat patients with low testosterone. PMID:25652639

  8. Lessons Learned in Engineering. Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, James C.; Ryan, Robert S.; Schultzenhofer, Luke A.

    2011-01-01

    This Contractor Report (CR) is a compilation of Lessons Learned in approximately 55 years of engineering experience by each James C. Blair, Robert S. Ryan, and Luke A. Schutzenhofer. The lessons are the basis of a course on Lessons Learned that has been taught at Marshall Space Flight Center. The lessons are drawn from NASA space projects and are characterized in terms of generic lessons learned from the project experience, which are further distilled into overarching principles that can be applied to future projects. Included are discussions of the overarching principles followed by a listing of the lessons associated with that principle. The lesson with sub-lessons are stated along with a listing of the project problems the lesson is drawn from, then each problem is illustrated and discussed, with conclusions drawn in terms of Lessons Learned. The purpose of this CR is to provide principles learned from past aerospace experience to help achieve greater success in future programs, and identify application of these principles to space systems design. The problems experienced provide insight into the engineering process and are examples of the subtleties one experiences performing engineering design, manufacturing, and operations. The supplemental CD contains accompanying PowerPoint presentations.

  9. Cyclosporine and Herbal Supplement Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, D.; Lunardon, L.; Bellia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporine (CyA) is a well-known immunosuppressant with a narrow therapeutic window. Its bioavailability is affected by many other traditional drugs and herbal extracts. Cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 and protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are involved in CyA bioavailability. Interactions of CyA with herbal extracts are not well known, but, given their increased concomitant use, it is important to know which extracts, many of which are commonly self-prescribed, can affect CyA blood concentrations. Decreased CyA blood concentration has been shown with St John's wort in case reports and, in vivo animal studies, with ginger, liquorice, scutellariae radix, and quercetin. Increased CyA concentration has been reported in patients with grapefruit juice, chamomile, or berberine, and with cannabidiol or resveratrol in animal studies. Effects of Echinacea and Serenoa repens on CyA levels have not been shown consistently, but concomitant use should be avoided. Although findings from animal studies cannot be directly translated into humans, avoiding concomitant use of herbal extracts is prudent until human clinical studies have ruled out any possible interaction. Clinicians should interview their patients carefully about their use of herbal supplements before CyA administration, and those receiving CyA should be warned about possible interactions between herbal preparations and CyA. PMID:24527031

  10. Self-Efficacy and green entrepreneurship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, K. L.; Suhaida, S.; Leong, Y. P.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate empirically the extent to which self-efficacy contributes to the development of green entrepreneurial intention. The measurement constructs of self-efficacy were classified into market opportunities, innovative environment, initiating relationships, defining purpose, coping with challenges, and developing human resources. The study comprises 252 usable convenient samples through structured questionnaires. The coefficient of determination R2 shows that the variance of intention to entrepreneurship is explained by the variance of the independent variables. It was also found that the model is fit for prediction.

  11. Hidden consequences of political efficacy: Testing an efficacy-apathy model of political mobilization.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Danny; Yogeeswaran, Kumar; Sibley, Chris G

    2015-10-01

    Political efficacy-the belief that one can influence politics-is a key predictor of people's involvement in social movements. Political institutions that are open to change should, however, be seen as just. Thus, political efficacy may ironically undermine minority group members' support for collective action by simultaneously increasing their belief in the fairness of the system. The current study aims to examine this possibility in a national sample of M?ori-New Zealand's indigenous minority population. Participants (N = 399) were M?ori (Mage = 44.22; SD = 13.30) women (n = 272) and men (n = 115; unreported = 12) who completed a survey assessing their levels of (a) political efficacy, (b) system justification, and (c) support for the political mobilization of their group, as well as relevant demographic covariates. Consistent with past research, political efficacy had a positive direct effect on participants' support for the political mobilization of M?ori. Nevertheless, political efficacy also had a negative indirect effect on political mobilization support via increases in system justification. These results held after controlling for participants' ethnic identification, self-efficacy, and conservatism. Our findings uncover a hidden consequence of political efficacy and show that, while believing that the political system is receptive to change predicts political mobilization, it can also undermine minorities' support for the mobilization of their group. Thus, our results uncover a previously unknown process that maintains inequality between ethnic minority and majority group members. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25774896

  12. The Effect of Ginger (Zingiber officinalis) and Artichoke (Cynara cardunculus) Extract Supplementation on Functional Dyspepsia: A Randomised, Double-Blind, and Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Giacosa, Attilio; Guido, Davide; Grassi, Mario; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Bombardelli, Ezio; Faliva, Milena A.; Rondanelli, Mariangela

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a frequent clinical finding in western world. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of a ginger and artichoke supplementation versus placebo in the treatment of FD. Methods. A prospective multicentre, double blind, randomized, placebo controlled, parallel-group comparison of the supplement and placebo over a period of 4 weeks was performed. Two capsules/day were supplied (before lunch and dinner) to 126 FD patients (supplementation/placebo: 65/61). Results. After 14 days of treatment, only supplementation group (SG) showed a significant amelioration (SG: ?S = +1.195 MCA score units (u), P = 0.017; placebo: ?P = +0.347?u, P = 0.513). The intercept (?) resulted to be significantly higher in SG than in placebo (?S ? ?P = +0.848?u, P < 0.001). At the end of the study, the advantage of SG versus placebo persists without variation (?S ? ?P = +0.077?u, P = 0.542). In SG, a significant advantage is observed for nausea (?S ? ?P = ?0.398?u, P < 0.001), epigastric fullness (?S ? ?P = ?0.241, P < 0.001), epigastric pain (?S ? ?P = ?0.173?u, P = 0.002), and bloating (?S ? ?P = ?0.167?u, P = 0.017). Conclusions. The association between ginger and artichoke leaf extracts appears safe and efficacious in the treatment of FD and could represent a promising treatment for this disease. PMID:25954317

  13. The Effect of Ginger (Zingiber officinalis) and Artichoke (Cynara cardunculus) Extract Supplementation on Functional Dyspepsia: A Randomised, Double-Blind, and Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Giacosa, Attilio; Guido, Davide; Grassi, Mario; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Bombardelli, Ezio; Perna, Simone; Faliva, Milena A; Rondanelli, Mariangela

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a frequent clinical finding in western world. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of a ginger and artichoke supplementation versus placebo in the treatment of FD. Methods. A prospective multicentre, double blind, randomized, placebo controlled, parallel-group comparison of the supplement and placebo over a period of 4 weeks was performed. Two capsules/day were supplied (before lunch and dinner) to 126 FD patients (supplementation/placebo: 65/61). Results. After 14 days of treatment, only supplementation group (SG) showed a significant amelioration (SG: ? S = +1.195 MCA score units (u), P = 0.017; placebo: ? P = +0.347?u, P = 0.513). The intercept (?) resulted to be significantly higher in SG than in placebo (? S - ? P = +0.848?u, P < 0.001). At the end of the study, the advantage of SG versus placebo persists without variation (? S - ? P = +0.077?u, P = 0.542). In SG, a significant advantage is observed for nausea (? S - ? P = -0.398?u, P < 0.001), epigastric fullness (? S - ? P = -0.241, P < 0.001), epigastric pain (? S - ? P = -0.173?u, P = 0.002), and bloating (? S - ? P = -0.167?u, P = 0.017). Conclusions. The association between ginger and artichoke leaf extracts appears safe and efficacious in the treatment of FD and could represent a promising treatment for this disease. PMID:25954317

  14. Maternal taurine supplementation attenuates maternal fructose-induced metabolic and inflammatory dysregulation and partially reverses adverse metabolic programming in offspring.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Reynolds, C M; Sloboda, D M; Gray, C; Vickers, M H

    2015-03-01

    Excessive fructose consumption is associated with insulin resistance (IR) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and high fructose intake during pregnancy can lead to compromised fetal development in the rat. Evidence suggests that the amino acid taurine can ameliorate fructose-induced IR and NAFLD in nonpregnant animals. This study investigated the efficacy of taurine supplementation on maternal fructose-induced metabolic dysfunction and neonatal health. Time-mated Wistar rats were randomized to four groups during pregnancy and lactation: (a) control diet (CON), (b) CON supplemented with 1.5% taurine in drinking water (CT), (c) CON supplemented with fructose solution (F) and (d) F supplemented with taurine (FT). Maternal and neonatal weights, plasma cytokines and hepatic gene expression were analyzed. Maternal hyperinsulinemia, increased homeostasis model assessment of IR indices and elevated proinflammatory cytokines were observed in F group and normalized in FT group. Maternal fructose-induced hepatic steatosis accompanied with increased liver weight was ameliorated with taurine supplementation. Maternal hepatic sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c and fatty acid synthase expression was significantly increased in the F group compared to the CON, CT and FT groups. Neonatal hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression was increased in male F neonates compared to the CON, CT and FT groups and was increased in female F and FT neonates compared to CON and CT. Interleukin-1? expression was decreased in male CT and FT neonates compared to other male groups. Hepatic tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 was lower in the male FT group than the F group. These results demonstrate that maternal taurine supplementation can partially reverse fructose-induced maternal metabolic dysfunction and may ameliorate adverse developmental programming effects in offspring in a sex-specific manner. PMID:25576095

  15. Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID): Preliminary USDA studies on composition of adult multivitamin/mineral supplements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Nutrient Data Laboratory, USDA, is collaborating with the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS), the National Center for Health Statistics, and other government agencies to design and populate a Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID). This analytically based, publicly available database wi...

  16. Cytokine response to vitamin E supplementation is dependent on pre-supplementation cytokine levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E supplementation has been suggested to improve immune response in the aged in part by altering cytokine production. However, there is not a consensus regarding the effect of supplemental vitamin E on cytokine production in humans. There is evidence that baseline immune health can affect im...

  17. 1 Filter_Supplemental-Info_090913.doc Supplemental Information Regarding RF/Microwave Filter Design

    E-print Network

    Weller/USF 1 Filter_Supplemental-Info_090913.doc Supplemental Information Regarding RF/Microwave Filter Design The video module on RF/microwave filter design, Filter Demonstration in Microwave Office, briefly discusses the topic of prototype filter design using the insertion loss method. This document

  18. VOLUME 13 SUPPLEMENT 1 AES 2012 Abstract Supplement -Epilepsy Currents Online

    E-print Network

    Besio, Walter G.

    VOLUME 13 SUPPLEMENT 1 AES 2012 Abstract Supplement - Epilepsy Currents Online AES 2012 Annual..................................................................................................476 Pediatric Epilepsy Highlights Session: Monday, December 3.....................................................................................................492 The Journal of the American Epilepsy Society #12;1.045 TELE-EPILEPSY: DEVELOPING A MULTI-MODAL DEVICE

  19. 21 CFR 111.510 - What requirements apply when a returned dietary supplement is received?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Returned Dietary Supplements... quarantine returned dietary supplements until quality control personnel conduct a material review and make...

  20. 21 CFR 111.510 - What requirements apply when a returned dietary supplement is received?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Returned Dietary Supplements... quarantine returned dietary supplements until quality control personnel conduct a material review and make...

  1. 21 CFR 111.455 - What requirements apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and labels?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and labels...OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Holding and Distributing...apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and...

  2. 21 CFR 111.455 - What requirements apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and labels?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and labels...OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Holding and Distributing...apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and...

  3. 21 CFR 111.455 - What requirements apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and labels?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and labels...OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Holding and Distributing...apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and...

  4. 21 CFR 111.455 - What requirements apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and labels?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and labels...OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Holding and Distributing...apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and...

  5. 21 CFR 111.455 - What requirements apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and labels?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and labels...OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Holding and Distributing...apply to holding components, dietary supplements, packaging, and...

  6. Dietary supplement intake in national-level Sri Lankan athletes.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Angela; Samarasinghe, Yasas; Senanayake, Dhammika; Lanerolle, Pulani

    2010-02-01

    Intake of dietary supplements is widespread among athletes in developed countries. This study evaluated the use of dietary supplements in athletes from a developing country. Dietary supplementation practices of 113 national-level athletes age 15-35 yr in Sri Lanka were assessed. All athletes from track-and-field, badminton, football, swimming, cycling, and karate squads who consented to participate in the study were administered an anonymous questionnaire by an interviewer. Information on number of supplements taken, frequency of use, nature of product, rationale, sources of advice, and reasons for taking supplements was obtained. Most athletes (94%) consumed dietary supplements. On average, 3.7 products/day were consumed. Footballers had significantly lower intake of supplements than other athletes (footballers 71%, others 98%; p < .05). They also consumed fewer products per day (footballers 0.7, others 3.5; p < .05). Popular supplements included multivitamins, vitamin E, calcium, energy foods and drinks, and creatine. Multiple supplement use was common, with 29% athletes taking 4 products/day. The athletes sought advice on supplement use from sports doctors (45%), team coaches (40%), or friends (15%). Most took supplements to improve performance (79%), and 19% claimed to take supplements to improve their overall health status. Dietary supplement use is widespread among national-level Sri Lankan athletes. The ad hoc use of supplements indicates that educational intervention in the sporting community is essential. PMID:20190347

  7. Evaluation of Herbal and Dietary Supplement Resource Term Coverage.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Nivedha; Adam, Terrance J; Pakhomov, Serguei V; Melton, Genevieve B; Zhang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is increasingly popular in places like North America and Europe where western medicine is primarily practiced. People are consuming herbal and dietary supplements along with western medications simultaneously. Sometimes, supplements and drugs react with one another via antagonistic or potentiation actions of the drug or supplement resulting in an adverse event. Unfortunately, it is not easy to study drug-supplement interactions without a standard terminology to describe herbal and dietary supplements. This pilot study investigated coverage of supplement databases to one another as well as coverage by the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and RxNorm for supplement terms. We found that none of the supplement databases completely covers supplement terms. UMLS, MeSH, SNOMED CT, RxNorm and NDF-RT cover 54%, 40%, 32%, 22% and 14% of supplement concepts, respectively. NDF-RT provides some value for grouping supplements into drug classes. Enhancing our understanding of the gap between the traditional biomedical terminology systems and supplement terms could lead to the development of a comprehensive terminology resources for supplements, and other secondary uses such as better detection and extraction of drug-supplement interactions. PMID:26262159

  8. The role of oxidative, inflammatory and neuroendocrinological systems during exercise stress in athletes: implications of antioxidant supplementation on physiological adaptation during intensified physical training.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Katie; Bentley, David; Coutts, Aaron J

    2015-04-01

    During periods of intensified physical training, reactive oxygen species (ROS) release may exceed the protective capacity of the antioxidant system and lead to dysregulation within the inflammatory and neuroendocrinological systems. Consequently, the efficacy of exogenous antioxidant supplementation to maintain the oxidative balance in states of exercise stress has been widely investigated. The aim of this review was to (1) collate the findings of prior research on the effect of intensive physical training on oxidant-antioxidant balance; (2) summarise the influence of antioxidant supplementation on the reduction-oxidation signalling pathways involved in physiological adaptation; and (3) provide a synopsis on the interactions between the oxidative, inflammatory and neuroendocrinological response to exercise stimuli. Based on prior research, it is evident that ROS are an underlying aetiology in the adaptive process; however, the impact of antioxidant supplementation on physiological adaptation remains unclear. Equivocal results have been reported on the impact of antioxidant supplementation on exercise-induced gene expression. Further research is required to establish whether the interference of antioxidant supplementation consistently observed in animal-based and in vivo research extends to a practical sports setting. Moreover, the varied results reported within the literature may be due to the hormetic response of oxidative, inflammatory and neuroendocrinological systems to an exercise stimulus. The collective findings suggest that intensified physical training places substantial stress on the body, which can manifest as an adaptive or maladaptive physiological response. Additional research is required to determine the efficacy of antioxidant supplementation to minimise exercise-stress during intensive training and promote an adaptive state. PMID:25398224

  9. Improvement of liver function by the administration of oyster extract as a dietary supplement to habitual alcohol drinkers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    OSAKI, KENJI; SHIMIZU, YOSHIO; YAMAMOTO, TETSURO; MIYAKE, FUMIHARU; KONDO, SUMIO; YAMAGUCHI, HIDEYO

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by elevated serum ?-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity with hepatic steatosis, hepatitis or occasionally fibrosis that may progress to cirrhosis. The potential therapeutic role of oyster extract (OE) or OE-containing dietary supplements (OE supplement) in ALD has seldom been evaluated. In the present study, 84 adults who had an alcohol-drinking habit and marginally high serum GGT levels were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled feeding trial to study the effect on alcohol-impaired liver function as reflected by an increased serum level of GGT, as well as the safety, of an OE supplement. The subjects were randomized to receive either an OE supplement (OE group) or placebo (placebo group). There were 42 subjects (31 males and 11 females) in each group, and all the enrolled subjects entered the study. Four individuals (5%) dropped out for reasons unassociated with the study and 6 other subjects were excluded from the efficacy analysis because they did not maintain the required frequency of alcohol intake. As a result, 38 subjects in the placebo group and 36 in the OE group underwent efficacy assessment. Assays of GGT and other liver enzymes were performed at baseline (week 0) and at weeks 4, 8 and 12 of the intervention period. The mean serum levels of GGT in the placebo group gradually increased, while those in the OE group tended to decrease, although no significant within-group differences were observed for either group. A significant between-group difference in the change of mean GGT from baseline was, however, found at week 12 (P=0.049). No OE supplement-associated untoward side-effects nor any abnormal changes in routine laboratory tests and anthropometric parameters were observed throughout the 12-week intervention. An OE supplement shows promise in reducing risk factors associated with ALD in adults with an alcohol intake habit. PMID:26622379

  10. Efficacy of MCAD screening in SIDS patients in Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.A. III; Vnencak-Jones, C.L.; Ulm, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Medium chain acyl-CoA deficiency (MCAD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of fatty acid oxidation. While several mutations have been identified in the MCAD gene, an A to G point mutation affecting codon 329 (K329E) represents >90% of those reported. Unfortunately, the reported carrier frequency of this mutation varies greatly between populations which reduces the efficiency of neonatal screening. Mounting evidence suggests a correlation between MCAD deficiency and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). To determine the utility of MCAD screening in SIDS patients, we screened for the K329E mutation in DNA extracted from paraffin blocks retrieved from 75 consecutive SIDS patients. Two of 75 (2.7%) had DNA findings consistent with MCAD. One patient (A) was homozygous for K329E while a second patient (B) was heterozygous for K329E. Although the second abnormal MCAD allele has not yet been identified in this patient, in a clinical setting of SIDS, this patient may well represent a compound heterozygote. Subsequent to the analysis, the family of A was contacted and a newborn sib was found to be homozygous for K329E. Carnitine supplementation and frequent feedings were started and the child is doing well. Evaluation of family B is planned. Our finding of 2/75 SIDS patients with DNA findings suggestive of MCAD demonstrates the efficacy of MCAD screening in this population in contrast to that of newborn screening in TN where the estimated K329E carrier frequency is 1/249 and the calculated incidence of MCAD disease is approximately 1/248,000. Our study (1) confirms the finding of MCAD in 2 to 3% of consecutive SIDS patients, (2) utility of DNA testing in presymtomatic sibs of SIDS patients attributable to MCAD and (3) provides accurate recurrent risks and enables prenatal testing for SIDS families where the diagnosis of MCAD has been established.

  11. Food supplementation among HIV-infected adults in Sub-Saharan Africa: impact on treatment adherence and weight gain.

    PubMed

    Audain, Keiron A; Zotor, Francis B; Amuna, Paul; Ellahi, Basma

    2015-11-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest proportion of undernourished people in the world, along with the highest number of people living with HIV and AIDS. Thus, as a result of high levels of food insecurity many HIV patients are also undernourished. The synergism between HIV and undernutrition leads to poor treatment adherence and high mortality rates. Undernutrition has a debilitating effect on the immune system due to key nutrient deficiencies and the overproduction of reactive species (oxidative stress), which causes rapid HIV progression and the onset of AIDS. Therapeutic food supplementation used in the treatment of severe acute malnutrition is being applied to HIV palliative care; however, little biochemical data exist to highlight its impact on oxidative stress and immune recovery. In addition, as most food supplements are imported by donor agencies, efforts are being put into local therapeutic food production such as the Food Multi-Mix concept to ensure sustainability. The purpose of this review is to highlight studies that examine the effectiveness of food supplementation in undernourished HIV patients in Sub-Saharan Africa; noting the parameters used to measure efficacy, as well as the long-term feasibility of supplementation. PMID:25761769

  12. Promoting Efficacy Research on Functional Analytic Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maitland, Daniel W. M.; Gaynor, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) is a form of therapy grounded in behavioral principles that utilizes therapist reactions to shape target behavior. Despite a growing literature base, there is a paucity of research to establish the efficacy of FAP. As a general approach to psychotherapy, and how the therapeutic relationship produces change,…

  13. ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY TESTING (IN-HOUSE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project initiates the in-house study of antimicrobial efficacy, growth parameters, and transport characteristics of biological contaminants. Viable and non-viable microbial analysis will be performed by growth culture and molecular biology techniques.

    Experiments w...

  14. Teacher Efficacy of Turkish Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gencay, Okkes Alpaslan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine the validity and reliability of the Teacher Efficacy Scale in Physical Education (TESPE) in Turkey's conditions, and to test if there are any differences in gender and teaching experience of Turkish PE teachers. Turkish version of the scale was administered to 257 physical education teachers (184…

  15. Pygmalion or Golem? Teacher Affect and Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Susan H.

    1995-01-01

    Examines how teacher expectations, their empathy, and their own sense of self-efficacy have an effect on their teaching and on their students. Points out some parallels between the affective issues in the classroom (the expectations teachers have of students) and in composition programs (the expectations administrators have for teachers of…

  16. Self-Efficacy, an Oriental Twist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Brady M.; Liu, Chia-Ju; Chiu, Hoan-Lin

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a case study involving Taiwanese elementary teachers who teach science at the elementary grade school level. It advocates the position that a teacher's personal science efficacy belief influences his or her science teaching outcome expectations. It also points to an important metamorphosis that is taking place…

  17. Self-Efficacy in Weight Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Matthew M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Developed and validated Weight Efficacy Life-Style Questionnaire (WEL), which consists of five situational factors: Negative Emotions, Availability, Social Pressure, Physical Discomfort, and Positive Activities. Found hierarchical model to provide best fit to data. Results from two studies (total n=382) showed WEL to be sensitive to changes in…

  18. Creative Self-Efficacy: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathisen, Gro Ellen; Bronnick, Kolbjorn S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of creativity training on creative self-efficacy. We developed a creativity course based on social cognitive theory. The course was conducted in two formats: a five-day course and a condensed one-day course. Samples consisted of students and municipality employees (five-day course), and special education teachers…

  19. Determination of repellent efficacy of natural compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1942, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has performed repellent testing, initially for the U.S. military. In recent years, there has been a collaborative effort to evaluate a number of natural extracts and compounds for their repellent efficacy. Plant-produced compounds are u...

  20. Estimating the efficacy of medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Trussell, J; Ellertson, C

    1999-09-01

    Comparisons of the efficacy of different regimens of medical abortion are difficult because of the widely varying protocols (even for testing identical regimens), divergent definitions of success and failure, and lack of a standard method of analysis. In this article we review the current efficacy literature on medical abortion, highlighting some of the most important differences in the way that efficacy has been analyzed. We then propose a standard conceptual approach and the accompanying statistical methods for analyzing clinical trials of medical abortion and to explain how clinical investigators can implement this approach. Our review reveals that research on the efficacy of medical abortion has closely followed the conceptual model used for analysis of surgical abortion. The problem, however, is that, whereas surgical abortion is a discrete event occurring in the space of a few minutes or less, medical abortion is a process typically lasting from several days to several weeks. In this process, two events may occur that are not possible with surgical abortion. First, the woman can opt out of the process before a fair determination of efficacy can be made. Second, the process of medical abortion allows time for surgical interventions that may be convenient for the clinician but not strictly necessary from a medical perspective. Another difference from surgical abortions is that, for medical abortions, different medical abortion protocols specify different waiting periods, giving the drugs less time to work in some studies than in others before a determination of efficacy is made. We argue that, when analyzing efficacy of medical abortion, researchers should abandon their close reliance on the analogy to surgical abortion. In fact, medical abortion is more appropriately analyzed by life table procedures developed for the study of another fertility regulation technology; contraception. As with medical abortion, a woman initiating use of a contraceptive method can change her mind after some period of exposure and opt out. Also, as with medical abortion, a contraceptive can fail, usually with the risk of failure depending heavily on whether or not the woman follows the protocol for that method precisely. Finally, as with medical abortion, medical conditions may arise that necessitate discontinuing use of the contraceptive method. In both cases, these medical conditions are sometimes open to interpretation or subject to the skill, judgment, or experience of the clinician involved. The appropriate information to collect for a multiple decrement life table analysis of medical abortion includes data on compliance with the protocol, timing of the event of interest (abortion) when it is observable, and, because we argue that these should be regarded as events of interest, a typology of any surgical interventions that are conducted during the woman's participation in the study. PMID:10640155

  1. Supplementation of prepartum dairy cows with ?-carotene.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R C; Guerreiro, B M; Morais Junior, N N; Araujo, R L; Pereira, R A N; Pereira, M N

    2015-09-01

    The prepartum supplementation of dairy cows with ?-carotene was evaluated. Cows were blocked by parity and expected calving date and assigned to a treatment: ?-carotene (1.2 g/cow per d) or control (no supplementation). The same total mixed ration batch was offered to all cows, and ?-carotene was top dressed to individual cows once per day. The data set contained 283 Holsteins that received a treatment for >14 d (29.1±6.9 d). Frequency distributions were analyzed with the GENMOD procedure of SAS using logistic regression for binomial data. Continuous variables were analyzed with the MIXED procedure of SAS. Within parity, nonparametric estimates of the survivor function for reproductive variables were computed using the product-limit method of the Kaplan-Meier method with the LIFETEST procedure of SAS. Plasma ?-carotene concentration before supplementation was similar between supplemented and nonsupplemented cows (2.99µg/mL) and peaked at 3.26±0.175µg/mL on d -15±2.4 precalving for supplemented cows (2.62±0.168µg/mL for control). Colostrum density, milk yield, and milk composition were similar between treatments. ?-Carotene tended to increase milk protein content from 2.90 to 2.96% and to decrease the proportion of primiparous cows with a milk fat to protein ratio >1.5 from 22.6 to 6.4%. The proportion of primiparous and multiparous cows with difficult calving, metritis, progesterone >1 ng/mL at 21 d and at 42 d in lactation, % conception at first service, and % pregnancy at 90 and 150 d in lactation were similar between treatments. A trend for decreased incidence of somatic cell count >200,000 cells/mL was present in multiparous cows supplemented with ?-carotene (38.9% vs. 28.1%). ?-Carotene was associated with a reduction in the proportion of multiparous cows with retained placenta 12 h postpartum from 29.9 to 21.7%; time of placenta release was 392 min (340 to 440) for ?-carotene and 490 min (395 to 540) for control (median and 95% confidence interval). For primiparous cows, placenta release was not affected by ?-carotene (incidence was 15.4%). The intervals from calving to first estrus, to first service, and to conception were not affected by ?-carotene supplementation in either parity. However, independent of treatment, cows with improved reproductive efficiency had increased postpartum ?-carotene concentration in plasma. The prepartum supplementation of ?-carotene increased plasma concentration around calving. No response in milk yield or reproductive performance was detected. Beta-carotene supplementation was associated with a lower incidence of retained placenta in multiparous cows. PMID:26188566

  2. Dietary Supplement Polypharmacy: An Unrecognized Public Health Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Gryzlak, Brian M.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Wallace, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Excessive and inappropriate use of medications, or ‘polypharmacy’, has been recognized as a public health problem. In addition, there is growing use of dietary supplements in the United States; however, little is known about the patterns of supplement use. Recent reports in the literature of cases of excessive or inappropriate use of herbal dietary supplements leading to the term ‘polyherbacy’. The clinical vignettes described in this article highlight the need for further research on the nature and extent of multiple and inappropriate dietary supplement use or ‘dietary supplement polypharmacy’. Clinical interviewing and population surveys both address this issue in complementary ways, and provide a further understanding of dietary supplement use patterns. PMID:18955288

  3. Vitamin supplementation benefits in master athletes.

    PubMed

    Brisswalter, Jeanick; Louis, Julien

    2014-03-01

    Master athletes are more than 35 years of age and continue to train as hard as their young counterparts despite the aging process. All life long, they are capable of accomplishing exceptional sporting performances. For these participants in endurance events, matching energy intake and expenditure is critical to maintain health and performance. The proportions of carbohydrate, fat, and protein must be optimized to provide enough calories to sustain the energy requirements of competition or training, and for recovery. In addition, endurance athletes must include adequate vitamins and minerals in their diets to maintain healthy immune function. Vitamins and minerals may be sufficient in the diets of endurance athletes, who have a high energy intake. This would make it unnecessary to use vitamin and mineral supplements. Furthermore, one major limitation for these athletes is the management of oxidative stress, which, when in excess, can be deleterious for the organism. For individuals exposed to oxidative stress, micronutritional supplementations rich in vitamins and minerals can be also an alternative strategy. Although these supplementations are increasingly used by master athletes, very few data are available on their effects on oxidative stress, muscle recovery, and physical performance. The potential benefits of supplement use in athletes are thus questionable. Some studies indicate no benefits, while others highlight potential negative side effects of vitamin supplementation. Additional studies are warranted in order to design adapted prescriptions in antioxidant vitamins and minerals. PMID:24323888

  4. Variable efficacy of repeated annual influenza vaccination Derek J. Smith,

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    Variable efficacy of repeated annual influenza vaccination Derek J. Smith, ¢¡ Stephanie Forrest-665-3493. Running head: Annual influenza vaccination. Classification: Medical Science Keywords: influenza, vaccination, original antigenic sin, vaccine efficacy, repeated vaccination. 1 #12;ABSTRACT Conclusions have

  5. A soft circuit curriculum to promote technological self-efficacy

    E-print Network

    Lovell, Emily Marie

    2011-01-01

    The development of technological self-efficacy in young people can have a dramatic impact on diversity in the field of computing. Students'self-efficacy and scientific understanding can benefit from engaging in hands-on ...

  6. Enhanced antitumor efficacy of cisplatin in combination with HemoHIM in tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin alone does not achieve a satisfactory therapeutic outcome. Also cisplatin accumulation shows toxicity to normal tissues. In this study, we examined the possibility of HemoHIM both to enhance anticancer effect with cisplatin and to reduce the side effects of cisplatin in melanoma-bearing mice. Methods HemoHIM was prepared by adding the ethanol-insoluble fraction to the total water extract of a mixture of 3 edible herbs, Angelica Radix, Cnidium Rhizoma and Paeonia Radix. Anticancer effects of HemoHIM with cisplatin were evaluated in melanoma-bearing mice. We used a Cr51-release assay to measure the activity of NK/Tc cell and ELISA to evaluate the production of cytokines. Results In melanoma-bearing mice, cisplatin (4 mg/kg B.W.) reduced the size and weight of the solid tumors, and HemoHIM supplementation with cisplatin enhanced the decrease of both the tumor size (p < 0.1) and weight (p < 0.1). HemoHIM itself did not inhibit melanoma cell growth in vitro, and did not disturb the effects of cisplatin in vitro. However HemoHIM administration enhanced both NK cell and Tc cell activity in mice. Interestingly, HemoHIM increased the proportion of NK cells in the spleen. In melanoma-bearing mice treated with cisplatin, HemoHIM administration also increased the activity of NK cells and Tc cells and the IL-2 and IFN-? secretion from splenocytes, which seemed to contribute to the enhanced efficacy of cisplatin by HemoHIM. Also, HemoHIM reduced nephrotoxicity as seen by tubular cell of kidney destruction. Conclusion HemoHIM may be a beneficial supplement during cisplatin chemotherapy for enhancing the anti-tumor efficacy and reducing the toxicity of cisplatin. PMID:19292900

  7. NDA Batch 2002-13

    SciTech Connect

    Hollister, R

    2009-09-17

    QC sample results (daily background check drum and 100-gram SGS check drum) were within acceptance criteria established by WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives for TRU Waste Characterization. Replicate runs were performed on drum LL85501243TRU. Replicate measurement results are identical at the 95% confidence level as established by WIPP criteria. HWM NCAR No. 02-1000168 issued on 17-Oct-2002 regarding a partially dislodged Cd sheet filter on the HPGe coaxial detector. This physical geometry occurred on 01-Oct-2002 and was not corrected until 10-Oct-2002, during which period is inclusive of the present batch run of drums. Per discussions among the Independent Technical Reviewer, Expert Reviewer and the Technical QA Supervisor, as well as in consultation with John Fleissner, Technical Point of Contact from Canberra, the analytical results are technically reliable. All QC standard runs during this period were in control. Data packet for SGS Batch 2002-13 generated using passive gamma-ray spectroscopy with the Pu Facility SGS unit is technically reasonable. All QC samples are in compliance with establiShed control limits. The batch data packet has been reviewed for correctness, completeness, consistency and compliance with WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives and determined to be acceptable.

  8. NDA BATCH 2008-05

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2009-12-03

    QC sample results (daily background check drums and 100-gram standard) were within acceptance criteria established by WIPPs Quality Assurance objectives for TRU Waste characterization. Replicate run was performed on the following drums LL85234292 and LL85101617. Replicate measurement results are acceptable at the 95% confidence level as established by WIPP criteria.

  9. NDA BATCH 2002-02

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2009-12-09

    QC sample results (daily background checks, 20-gram and 100-gram SGS drum checks) were within acceptable criteria established by WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives for TRU Waste Characterization. Replicate runs were performed on 5 drums with IDs LL85101099TRU, LL85801147TRU, LL85801109TRU, LL85300999TRU and LL85500979TRU. All replicate measurement results are identical at the 95% confidence level as established by WIPP criteria. Note that the batch covered 5 weeks of SGS measurements from 23-Jan-2002 through 22-Feb-2002. Data packet for SGS Batch 2002-02 generated using gamma spectroscopy with the Pu Facility SGS unit is technically reasonable. All QC samples are in compliance with established control limits. The batch data packet has been reviewed for correctness, completeness, consistency and compliance with WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives and determined to be acceptable. An Expert Review was performed on the data packet between 28-Feb-02 and 09-Jul-02 to check for potential U-235, Np-237 and Am-241 interferences and address drum cases where specific scan segments showed Se gamma ray transmissions for the 136-keV gamma to be below 0.1 %. Two drums in the batch showed Pu-238 at a relative mass ratio more than 2% of all the Pu isotopes.

  10. Quality assurance issues in the use of dietary supplements, with special reference to protein supplements.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Ronald J

    2013-11-01

    The use of dietary supplements is widespread in the general population, in athletes and recreational exercisers, and in military personnel. A wide array of supplements is available, but protein-containing products are consistently among the most popular, especially among those who engage in resistance training. There are significant risks associated with the use of unregulated dietary supplements. Risks include the absence of active ingredients, the presence of harmful substances (including microbiological agents and foreign objects), the presence of toxic agents, and the presence of potentially dangerous prescription-only pharmaceuticals. There is ample evidence of athletes who have failed doping tests because of the use of dietary supplements. There is also growing evidence of risks to health and of serious adverse events, including a small number of fatalities, as a result of supplement use. The risk associated with the use of protein powders produced by major manufacturers is probably low, and the risk can be further reduced by using only products that have been tested under one of the recognized supplement quality assurance programs that operate in various countries. Nevertheless, a small risk remains, and athletes, soldiers, and other consumers should conduct a cost-benefit analysis before using any dietary supplements. PMID:24027186

  11. Sense of Efficacy among Beginning Teachers in Sarawak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murshidi, Rahmah; Konting, Mohd Majid; Elias, Habibah; Fooi, Foo Say

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the level of teachers' sense of efficacy among beginning teachers in Sarawak, Malaysia. It also sought to investigate whether there is any difference in beginning teachers' sense of efficacy in relation to gender, race and types of teacher preparation program. The study was conducted by using the teacher sense of efficacy

  12. College Instructors' Sense of Teaching and Collective Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fives, Helenrose; Looney, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an exploratory investigation of college-level instructors' sense of teaching and collective efficacy. We investigated the relations of teacher- and collective-efficacy with a series of variables: experience, professional level, age, gender, academic domain (for teacher-efficacy only), and academic…

  13. Examining Dimensions of Self-Efficacy for Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruning, Roger; Dempsey, Michael; Kauffman, Douglas F.; McKim, Courtney; Zumbrunn, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    A multifactor perspective on writing self-efficacy was examined in 2 studies. Three factors were proposed--self-efficacy for writing ideation, writing conventions, and writing self-regulation--and a scale constructed to reflect these factors. In Study 1, middle school students (N = 697) completed the Self-Efficacy for Writing Scale (SEWS), along…

  14. Florida Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Mathematics Ability and Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mathematics ability and efficacy of Florida preservice agricultural education teachers. Results indicated that the preservice teachers were not proficient in solving agricultural mathematics problems. On the other hand, the preservice teachers were efficacious in personal teaching efficacy and personal…

  15. Self-Efficacy and Learning in Sorority and Fraternity Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Jon G., Jr.; Oberle, Crystal D.; Lilley, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Past research consistently reveals that "self-efficacy," referring to one's perceived ability to obtain a desired outcome, in academic courses is linked to academic achievement and motivation in those courses. In particular, high self-efficacy in courses is associated with high academic performance, and low self-efficacy in courses is associated…

  16. Self-Efficacy and Multicultural Competence of School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Delila; Bodenhorn, Nancy; Bryant, Rhonda M.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between school counselor self efficacy and perceived multicultural competence self efficacy in a sample of 157 school counselors. Results reveal School Counselor Self-Efficacy (SCSE) cultural acceptance subscale was a statistically significant predictor of all three multicultural competencies (MCC: Terminology,…

  17. Identifying Events that Impact Self-Efficacy in Physics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawtelle, Vashti; Brewe, Eric; Goertzen, Renee Michelle; Kramer, Laird H.

    2012-01-01

    We present a method of analyzing the development of self-efficacy in real time using a framework of self-efficacy opportunities (SEOs). Considerable research has shown a connection between self-efficacy, or the confidence in one's own ability to perform a task, and success in science fields. Traditional methods of investigating the development of…

  18. Teacher Efficacy in an Early Childhood Professional Development School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Ann; Willhite, Gary L.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher efficacy is the belief teachers have in their ability to impact student learning. Efficacy includes teacher confidence in instructional, management and collaboration skills. The following study addresses teacher efficacy in an Early Childhood Professional Development School (PDS). The PDS experience provides an opportunity for mentor…

  19. Examination of Faculty Self-Efficacy Related to Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvitz, Brian S.; Beach, Andrea L.; Anderson, Mary L.; Xia, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    Through this study we sought to gain understanding of the challenges professors face as they make the transition to teaching online. We measured professors' online teaching self-efficacy using survey research methods. Results showed that online teaching self-efficacy was high among the professors surveyed with no self-efficacy scores lower than…

  20. A Shifting Paradigm: Preservice Teachers' Multicultural Attitudes and Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Boham, Mikaela D.; Conlon-Khan, Lori; Fuentealba, Molly J.; Hall, Cynthia J.; Hoetker, Gregory A.; Hooley, Diana S.; Jang, Bong Seok; Luckey, Kristina L.; Moneymaker, Kelley J.; Shapiro, Matthew A.; Zenkert, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching in multicultural settings requires the awareness and ability to adapt to diverse needs and viewpoints. Teachers' multicultural efficacy may be gained from coursework or interactions within diverse communities. In this study the authors determined preservice teachers' multicultural efficacy using the Multicultural Efficacy Scale…

  1. 21 CFR 111.470 - What requirements apply to distributing dietary supplements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Holding and Distributing § 111.470 What requirements apply to distributing dietary supplements? You must distribute dietary supplements under conditions that will protect the dietary supplements against contamination and deterioration....

  2. 21 CFR 111.470 - What requirements apply to distributing dietary supplements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Holding and Distributing § 111.470 What requirements apply to distributing dietary supplements? You must distribute dietary supplements under conditions that will protect the dietary supplements against contamination and deterioration....

  3. Learn More about Dietary Supplements and Estimating Total Nutrient Intakes | Dietary Assessment Primer

    Cancer.gov

    Dietary supplements are defined as products intended to supplement the diet that contain one or more dietary ingredients. Supplements are taken orally as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid. The most commonly used dietary supplements are multivitamin-mineral products.

  4. Acne and whey protein supplementation among bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Simonart, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Accumulative evidence supports the role of nutritional factors in acne. I report here 5 healthy male adult patients developing acne after the consumption of whey protein, a favorite supplement of those engaged in bodybuilding. These observations are in line with biochemical and epidemiological data supporting the effects of milk and dairy products as enhancers of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling and acne aggravation. Further prospective studies are required to determine the possible role of dietary supplements in the fitness and bodybuilding environment. PMID:23257731

  5. TrekIndex Supplement Issue 1 

    E-print Network

    1979-01-01

    stream_source_info pdf_329.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 35239 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name pdf_329.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Mineral Supplementation of Beef Cows...?t make you money to furnish cattle 150 percent of their mineral needs if they?re only receiving 85 per- cent of their protein and energy needs or vice versa. Historical, But Still Relevant Phosphorus Research The importance of phosphorus supplementation...

  6. Glutamine supplementation to diets of 21-day old pigs 

    E-print Network

    Meier, Sabina Ann

    1995-01-01

    Five experiments were conducted to determine the effects of supplemental free Lglutamine (GLN) on growth performance, intestinal morphology and recovery of GLN in duodenal digesta in the 21-d old pig. In Exp. I and 2, supplementing either corn...

  7. 23 CFR 771.130 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 771.130 Section...ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.130 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) A draft...

  8. 23 CFR 771.130 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 771.130 Section...ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.130 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) A draft...

  9. 23 CFR 771.130 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 771.130 Section...ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.130 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) A draft...

  10. 23 CFR 771.130 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 771.130 Section...ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.130 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) A draft...

  11. 23 CFR 771.130 - Supplemental environmental impact statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Supplemental environmental impact statements. 771.130 Section...ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES § 771.130 Supplemental environmental impact statements. (a) A draft...

  12. 48 CFR 1837.203 - Policy. (NASA supplements paragraph (c))

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Policy. (NASA supplements paragraph (c)) 1837...Assistance Services 1837.203 Policy. (NASA supplements paragraph (c)) (c...1, Appointment of Personnel To/From NASA, Chapter 4, Employment of Experts...

  13. 48 CFR 1801.103 - Authority. (NASA supplements paragraph (a))

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Authority. (NASA supplements paragraph (a)) 1801.103 Section 1801.103... Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1801.103 Authority. (NASA supplements paragraph (a)) (a) Under the...

  14. 48 CFR 1837.203 - Policy. (NASA supplements paragraph (c))

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Policy. (NASA supplements paragraph (c)) 1837...Assistance Services 1837.203 Policy. (NASA supplements paragraph (c)) (c...1, Appointment of Personnel To/From NASA, Chapter 4, Employment of Experts...

  15. 78 FR 64442 - NASA FAR Supplement: Proposal Adequacy Checklist

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ...ADMINISTRATION 48 CFR Parts 1815 and 1852 RIN 2700-AE13 NASA FAR Supplement: Proposal Adequacy Checklist AGENCY...SUMMARY: NASA is proposing to amend the NASA FAR Supplement (NFS) to incorporate a...

  16. 48 CFR 1837.203 - Policy. (NASA supplements paragraph (c))

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Policy. (NASA supplements paragraph (c)) 1837...Assistance Services 1837.203 Policy. (NASA supplements paragraph (c)) (c...1, Appointment of Personnel To/From NASA, Chapter 4, Employment of Experts...

  17. 48 CFR 1813.003 - Policy. (NASA supplements paragraph (g))

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Policy. (NASA supplements paragraph (g)) 1813.003 Section 1813.003... SIMPLIFIED ACQUISITION PROCEDURES 1813.003 Policy. (NASA supplements paragraph (g)) (g) Acquisitions under...

  18. 48 CFR 1801.103 - Authority. (NASA supplements paragraph (a))

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

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