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Sample records for neck clinicoplathologic correlation

  1. Correlation between Trunk Posture and Neck Reposition Sense among Subjects with Forward Head Neck Postures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han Suk; Chung, Hyung Kuk; Park, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the correlation of abnormal trunk postures and reposition sense of subjects with forward head neck posture (FHP). Methods. In all, postures of 41 subjects were evaluated and the FHP and trunk posture including shoulder, scapular level, pelvic side, and anterior tilting degrees were analyzed. We used the head repositioning accuracy (HRA) test to evaluate neck position senses of neck flexion, neck extension, neck right and left side flexion, and neck right and left rotation and calculated the root mean square error in trials for each subject. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and regression analysis were used to assess the degree of correlation between the trunk posture and HRA value, and a significance level of ? = 0.05 was considered. Results. There were significant correlations between the HRA value of right side neck flexion and pelvic side tilt angle (p < 0.05). If pelvic side tilting angle increases by 1 degree, right side neck flexion increased by 0.76 degrees (p = 0.026). However, there were no significant correlations between other neck motions and trunk postures. Conclusion. Verifying pelvic postures should be prioritized when movement is limited due to the vitiation of the proprioceptive sense of neck caused by FHP. PMID:26583125

  2. Correlation between Trunk Posture and Neck Reposition Sense among Subjects with Forward Head Neck Postures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Suk; Chung, Hyung Kuk; Park, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the correlation of abnormal trunk postures and reposition sense of subjects with forward head neck posture (FHP). Methods. In all, postures of 41 subjects were evaluated and the FHP and trunk posture including shoulder, scapular level, pelvic side, and anterior tilting degrees were analyzed. We used the head repositioning accuracy (HRA) test to evaluate neck position senses of neck flexion, neck extension, neck right and left side flexion, and neck right and left rotation and calculated the root mean square error in trials for each subject. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and regression analysis were used to assess the degree of correlation between the trunk posture and HRA value, and a significance level of ? = 0.05 was considered. Results. There were significant correlations between the HRA value of right side neck flexion and pelvic side tilt angle (p < 0.05). If pelvic side tilting angle increases by 1 degree, right side neck flexion increased by 0.76 degrees (p = 0.026). However, there were no significant correlations between other neck motions and trunk postures. Conclusion. Verifying pelvic postures should be prioritized when movement is limited due to the vitiation of the proprioceptive sense of neck caused by FHP. PMID:26583125

  3. Neck Strength Imbalance Correlates With Increased Head Acceleration in Soccer Heading

    PubMed Central

    Dezman, Zachary D.W.; Ledet, Eric H.; Kerr, Hamish A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Soccer heading is using the head to directly contact the ball, often to advance the ball down the field or score. It is a skill fundamental to the game, yet it has come under scrutiny. Repeated subclinical effects of heading may compound over time, resulting in neurologic deficits. Greater head accelerations are linked to brain injury. Developing an understanding of how the neck muscles help stabilize and reduce head acceleration during impact may help prevent brain injury. Hypothesis: Neck strength imbalance correlates to increasing head acceleration during impact while heading a soccer ball. Study Design: Observational laboratory investigation. Methods: Sixteen Division I and II collegiate soccer players headed a ball in a controlled indoor laboratory setting while player motions were recorded by a 14-camera Vicon MX motion capture system. Neck flexor and extensor strength of each player was measured using a spring-type clinical dynamometer. Results: Players were served soccer balls by hand at a mean velocity of 4.29 m/s (±0.74 m/s). Players returned the ball to the server using a heading maneuver at a mean velocity of 5.48 m/s (±1.18 m/s). Mean neck strength difference was positively correlated with angular head acceleration (rho = 0.497; P = 0.05), with a trend toward significance for linear head acceleration (rho = 0.485; P = 0.057). Conclusion: This study suggests that symmetrical strength in neck flexors and extensors reduces head acceleration experienced during low-velocity heading in experienced collegiate players. Clinical Relevance: Balanced neck strength may reduce head acceleration cumulative subclinical injury. Since neck strength is a measureable and amenable strength training intervention, this may represent a modifiable intrinsic risk factor for injury. PMID:24459547

  4. Endovascular occlusion of intracranial aneurysms with electrically detachable coils: Correlation of aneurysm neck size and treatment results

    SciTech Connect

    Zubillaga, A.F.; Guglielmi, G.; Vinuela, F.; Duckwiler, G.R.

    1994-05-01

    To devise a method to measure aneurysm neck size on angiographic films, and to correlate the sizes obtained with the extent of endovascular aneurysm occlusion, performed with electrically detachable coils. The angiograms of 79 intracranial aneurysms treated by endovascular occlusion using electrically detachable coils were retrospectively analyzed. A method using the average reported caliber of the major intracranial vessels was applied to determine the aneurysm neck sizes on the diagnostic angiograms. The cases were divided into two groups according to neck size, 4 mm being the discriminative value for small and wide necks. The posttreatment angiogram of each case was analyzed to evaluate the degree of occlusion achieved by the technique. Necks were successfully measured in 95% of the aneurysms. Complete aneurysm thrombosis was observed in 85% of the small-necked aneurysms and in 15% of the wide-necked aneurysms. Accurate angiographic measurements of neck diameter can be obtained in most aneurysms. The size of an aneurysm neck correlates well with the results of the endovascular treatment. Small-necked aneurysms can be satisfactorily occluded with this technique. In wide-necked aneurysms this technique should be reserved for lesions having a high surgical risk. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength

    E-print Network

    Yuste, Rafael

    Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength Roberto November 22, 2013) Most excitatory inputs in the mammalian brain are made on dendritic spines, rather than on dendritic shafts. Spines compart- mentalize calcium, and this biochemical isolation can underlie input

  6. CK8 correlates with malignancy in leukoplakia and carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Gires, Olivier . E-mail: olivier.gires@med.uni-muenchen.de; Mack, Brigitte; Rauch, Jens; Matthias, Christoph

    2006-04-28

    Screening of head and neck carcinoma patients with the proteomics-based AMIDA technology yielded a set of tumour-associated antigens, including the intermediate filament protein cytokeratin 8 (CK8). The expression pattern and specificity of CK8 was compared with those of the established markers pan-cytokeratins and CK13, and with that of the proliferation marker Ki67. Expression of CK8 correlated positively with malignancies of the head and neck areas. CK8 was not expressed in healthy epithelium, except for some rare cases of cells of the basal layer and laryngeal tissue. In contrast, the vast majority of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and metastases strongly expressed CK8. Interestingly, CK8 de novo expression correlated with dysplastic areas of oral leukoplakic lesions, while hyperplastic leukoplakia remained CK8-negative but strongly panCK and CK13 positive. Thus, CK8 is an attractive marker molecule for a differentiated diagnosis of leukoplakia and head and neck carcinomas, which possesses notedly improved specificity as compared with panCK and CK13.

  7. Differential biomarker expression in head and neck cancer correlates with anatomical localization.

    PubMed

    Tamás, László; Szentkúti, Gabriella; Eros, Mónika; Dános, Kornél; Brauswetter, Diána; Szende, Béla; Zsákovics, Ivett; Krenács, Tibor

    2011-09-01

    We tested the expression of known (p16(ink4), Ki67, p53, EGFR) and a new immunohistochemical (collagen XVII/BP180) biomarker in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of diverse anatomical localization. Tissue microarrays (TMA) of 124 SCC were created, immunostained, and analyzed following whole slide digitalization using the Pannoramic Scan and the TMA Module software (3DHISTECH Kft, Budapest, Hungary). Statistical analysis of scoring results was carried out using Pearson's chi-square test. We observed the significant elevation of p16(ink4) and Ki67 expression in supraglottic, tonsillar and tonsillo-lingual SCCs compared to those affecting the oral cavity, oropharynx without tonsils, larynx without supraglottis and the hypopharynx. This differential antigen expression may reflect the diverse route of embryologic differentiation followed by the affected regions except those of the tonsils and the supraglottis which show similar antigenic pattern but diverse developmental path. All the other biomarkers tested including p53, collagen XVII and EGFR were detected in the majority of cancers including high grade cases, but did not reveal any significant regional difference. Based on our results oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas may not be regarded as one entity. Concerning the oral cavity and the oropharynx, cancers affecting the tonsils (palatine and lingual) show significantly elevated p16(ink4) and Ki67 expression; so as the cancers of the supraglottis compared to the rest of larynx. Consequently, tonsillar and supraglottic cancers show similar biomarker profiles. Correlation of differential biomarker expression with diverse biological behavior in head and neck cancers need further investigations. PMID:21487776

  8. Allelotype of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: fractional allele loss correlates with survival.

    PubMed Central

    Field, J. K.; Kiaris, H.; Risk, J. M.; Tsiriyotis, C.; Adamson, R.; Zoumpourlis, V.; Rowley, H.; Taylor, K.; Whittaker, J.; Howard, P.

    1995-01-01

    Allelic imbalance or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies have been used extensively to identify regions on chromosomes that may contain putative tumour-suppressor genes. We have undertaken an extensive allelotype of 80 specimens of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) using 145 polymorphic microsatellite markers on 39 chromosome arms. Allelic imbalances were found most frequently on chromosome arms 3p, 9p, 17p and 18q with over 45% LOH and imbalances on 1p, 1q, 2p, 5q, 6p, 6q, 8p, 8q, 9q, 11q, 13q, 17q and 19q were found in more than 20% of SCCHN. These LOH data were analysed against a range of clinicopathological parameters which included previously untreated and previously treated tumours; correlations were found between LOH on 9q and nodes at pathology (P = 0.02) and between histopathological grade and LOH on 12q (P = 0.02) and 13q (P = 0.01). In the group of previously untreated tumours, a correlation was found between site of tumour and LOH on 3p (P = 0.019), and 8p (P = 0.029), while TNM staging correlated with LOH on 3p (P = 0.019) and 17p (P = 0.016). Fractional allele loss (FAL) was calculated for 52 tumours with LOH data on nine or more chromosomal arms and found to have a median value of 0.22 (range 0.0-0.80). Correlations were found between FAL > median value and nodes at pathology (P = 0.01) and tumour grade (P = 0.06), demonstrating that advanced tumours with lymph node metastasis often had LOH at multiple sites. FAL > median value was found to correlate with a poor survival (P < 0.03) and, furthermore, FAL > median value correlated with poor survival in the previously untreated patients (P < 0.019). These results indicate that assessment of the accumulation of genetic damage, as provided by allelotype data, provides a useful molecular indicator of the tumour behaviour and clinical outcome. Images Figure 1 PMID:7577465

  9. Clinico-Pathological Correlation of ?-Catenin and Telomere Dysfunction in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, Swatishree; Saha, Arka; Kar, Madhabananda; Ghosh, Chinmoy; Adhya, Amit; Baisakh, Manas; Mohapatra, Nachiketa; Venkatesan, Shriram; Hande, Manoor Prakash; Banerjee, Birendranath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tumorigenesis is a complex process of accumulated alteration in function of multiple genes and pathways. Wnt signalling pathway is involved in various differentiation events during embryonic development and is conserved in various species. Objective: A multicentre collaborative initiative is undertaken to study the occurrence, prognosis and molecular mechanism of HNSCC (Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma) which is highly prevalent in eastern parts of India. From a large cohort of HNSCC tissue repository, 67 cases were selected for multi-parametric investigation. Results: 67 cases showed stable ?-catenin expression. We have seen correlation, if any, of the transcription factor - ?-catenin, telomere maintenance and shelterin complex proteins - TRF2, Rap1 and hTert with respect to tumor differentiation and telomere dysfunction. Immunohistochemistry of ?-catenin protein showed stable and high expression in tumor when compared to stroma. MDSCC (Moderately Differentiated Squamous cell carcinoma) cases expressed nuclear expression of ?-catenin in invasive fronts and showed increased genomic instability. Higher frequency of Anaphase bridges was observed ranging from <3% in normal cut margin to 13% in WDSCC (Well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma) and 18% in MDSCC (Moderately differentiated Squamous cell carcinoma). There was significant decrease in telomere length in MDSCC (<4) when compared to the normal cut margin samples (<7). Quantitative Real Time-PCR confirmed a significant correlationship between stable ?-catenin expression and poor clinical and pathological outcome. Conclusion: The Stabilisation and accumulation of ?-catenin was significant and correlated well with de-differentiation process as well as prognosis and therapy outcome of the patients in the cohort. Expression status of molecular markers such as ?-catenin, hTert, TRF2 and RAP1 correlate significantly with the process of tumorigenesis and prognosis and may play a role in therapeutic management of Head and neck patients. PMID:25653721

  10. Genomic Correlate of Exceptional Erlotinib Response in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Lui, Vivian W. Y.; Egloff, Ann Marie; Goetz, Eva M.; Li, Hua; Johnson, Jonas T.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Bauman, Julie E.; Stransky, Nicolas; Zeng, Yan; Gilbert, Breean R.; Pendleton, Kelsey P.; Wang, Lin; Chiosea, Simion; Sougnez, Carrie; Wagle, Nikhil; Zhang, Fan; Du, Yu; Close, David; Johnston, Paul A.; McKenna, Aaron; Carter, Scott L.; Golub, Todd R.; Getz, Gad; Mills, Gordon B.; Garraway, Levi A.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Randomized clinical trials demonstrate no benefit for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors in unselected patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, a patient with stage IVA HNSCC received 13 days of neoadjuvant erlotinib and experienced a near-complete histologic response. OBJECTIVE To determine a mechanism of exceptional response to erlotinib therapy in HNSCC. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Single patient with locally advanced HNSCC who received erlotinib monotherapy in a window-of-opportunity clinical trial (patients scheduled to undergo primary cancer surgery are treated briefly with an investigational agent). Whole-exome sequencing of pretreatment tumor and germline patient samples was performed at a quaternary care academic medical center, and a candidate somatic variant was experimentally investigated for mediating erlotinib response. INTERVENTION A brief course of erlotinib monotherapy followed by surgical resection. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Identification of pretreatment tumor somatic alterations that may contribute to the exceptional response to erlotinib. Hypotheses were formulated regarding enhanced erlotinib response in preclinical models harboring the patient tumor somatic variant MAPK1 E322K following the identification of tumor somatic variants. RESULTS No EGFR alterations were observed in the pretreatment tumor DNA. Paradoxically, the tumor harbored an activating MAPK1 E322K mutation (allelic fraction 0.13), which predicts ERK activation and erlotinib resistance in EGFR-mutant lung cancer. The HNSCC cells with MAPK1 E322K exhibited enhanced EGFR phosphorylation and erlotinib sensitivity compared with wild-type MAPK1 cells. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Selective erlotinib use in HNSCC may be informed by precision oncology approaches. PMID:26181029

  11. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Minh Tam; Lee, Richard; Saito, Naoko; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Ozonoff, Al; Romesser, Paul B.; Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

  12. Pretreatment anemia is correlated with the reduced effectiveness of radiation and concurrent chemotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Prosnitz, Robert G. . E-mail: robert.prosnitz@duke.edu; Yao, Bin M.S.; Farrell, Catherine L.; Clough, Robert; Brizel, David M.

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: Pretreatment anemia is an adverse prognostic variable in squamous cell head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone. Tumor hypoxia is an adverse parameter for treatment with RT alone or with RT and concurrent chemotherapy (CCT). Tumor hypoxia is more prevalent in patients who present with pretreatment hemoglobin (Hgb) concentrations less than 13 g/dL. RT/CCT improves survival over RT alone in advanced HNC, and its use is becoming more widespread. This study was performed to evaluate whether pretreatment Hgb less than 13 g/dL was correlated with treatment outcome in patients with advanced HNC treated with a uniform regimen of RT/CCT. Methods and materials: The study population consisted of patients with AJCC Stage III or IV, M0 HNC who were treated with 70 to 72.5 Gy accelerated hyperfractionated RT (1.25 Gy b.i.d.) and CCT consisting of 2 cycles of CDDP (12-20 mg/m{sup 2}/d x 5 days) and continuous infusion 5-FU (600 mg/m{sup 2}/d x 5 days) during Week 1 and Week 6. A planned break in RT occurred during Week 4. These patients were enrolled on the experimental arm of a prospective randomized trial that compared this regimen to hyperfractionated irradiation alone from 1990 to 1996. RT/CCT was delivered as standard therapy from 1996 to 2000. The primary endpoint was failure-free survival (FFS). Secondary endpoints included local-regional control and overall survival. Results: One hundred and fifty-nine patients were treated from 1990 to 2000. The median (25-75%) pretreatment Hgb was 13.6 (12.2-13.5) g/dL. Hgb was 13 g/dL or higher in 105 patients and less than 13 g/dL in 54 patients. Primary tumor sites included oropharynx (43%), hypopharynx/larynx (36%), oral cavity (9%), and nasopharynx (6%). Seventy-eight percent of the patients with Hgb 13 g/dL or higher and 92% of the patients with Hgb less than 13 g/dL had a primary tumor stage of T3 or T4 (p = 0.01). Node-positive disease was present in 74 of 105 (70%) of patients with Hgb 13 g/dL or higher patients and in 36/54 (67%) of patients with Hgb less than 13 g/dL patients. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 42 months (range, 4-128 months). Five-year FFS was 75% for patients with Hgb 13 g/dL or higher vs. 50% for patients with Hgb less than 13 g/dL had a (p < 0.01). A total of 49 failures occurred in both patient cohorts. The median (25-75%) decrease in Hgb during RT/CCT was 2.2 (1.3-3.1) g/dL, both in patients who failed and in those who remained disease-free. Conclusion: Pretreatment Hgb less than 13 g/dL is correlated with adverse outcomes in advanced HNC patients treated with RT/CCT. Whether anemia actually causes poor outcomes remains unknown. The therapeutic effect of anemia correction is being evaluated in prospective trials.

  13. Down-regulation of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma correlated with tumorigenesis, not with metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Li, Fen; Hua, Qingquan; Chen, Shiming; Xiao, Bokui; Dai, Mengyuan; Li, Man; Zheng, Anyuan; Yu, Di; Hu, Zhangwei; Tao, Zezhang

    2015-01-01

    To examine the significance of the Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in diagnosing head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and predicting regional metastasis. We first used GEO dataset to analyze the NGAL gene expression in HNSCC. Then, we summarized the characteristics of patients retrospectively selected in clinic. Expression of NGAL protein in human HNSCC tumor, lymph node and normal samples were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Next, we further investigated the NGAL expression in a tissue microassay to analyze the relationship between NGAL protein expression and TNM stage. Finally, we tested the NGAL protein expression in head and neck cancer cell lines. Analysis of GEO dataset concluded that NGAL gene expression in HNSCC was lower than that in normal tissue (P<0.01). There was no statistically significant difference of NGAL gene expression between T-stage and N-stage (P>0.05). NGAL protein expression in tumor was lower than that in normal tissue (P<0.01). There was no statistically significant difference of NGAL protein expression between metastasis group and non-metastasis group (P>0.05). Expression of NGAL protein was not correlated with TNM stage of HNSCC. Aggressive HNSCC cell lines have lower NGAL protein expression. Our data demonstrated that the expression of NGAL protein was correlated with tumorigenesis of HNSCC, but not with regional metastasis. It may serve as a novel biomarker for prognostic evaluation of patients with HNSCC. PMID:26464627

  14. In Vivo Correlation of Glucose Metabolism, Cell Density and Microcirculatory Parameters in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: Initial Results Using Simultaneous PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kubiessa, Klaus; Boehm, Andreas; Barthel, Henryk; Kluge, Regine; Kahn, Thomas; Sabri, Osama; Stumpp, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous acquisition of 18F-FDG-PET, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (T1w-DCE) in an integrated simultaneous PET/MRI in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and to investigate possible correlations between these parameters. Methods 17 patients that had given informed consent (15 male, 2 female) with biopsy-proven HNSCC underwent simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET/MRI including DWI and T1w-DCE. SUVmax, SUVmean, ADCmean, ADCmin and Ktrans, kep and ve were measured for each tumour and correlated using Spearman’s ?. Results Significant correlations were observed between SUVmean and Ktrans (? = 0.43; p ? 0.05); SUVmean and kep (? = 0.44; p ? 0.05); Ktrans and kep (? = 0.53; p ? 0.05); and between kep and ve (? = -0.74; p ? 0.01). There was a trend towards statistical significance when correlating SUVmax and ADCmin (? = -0.35; p = 0.08); SUVmax and Ktrans (? = 0.37; p = 0.07); SUVmax and kep (? = 0.39; p = 0.06); and ADCmean and ve (? = 0.4; p = 0.06). Conclusion Simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET/MRI including DWI and T1w-DCE in patients with HNSCC is feasible and allows depiction of complex interactions between glucose metabolism, microcirculatory parameters and cellular density. PMID:26270054

  15. Stiff Neck

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk X-Ray Exam: Neck Meningitis Infant Torticollis Torticollis Lyme Disease Meningitis Lyme Disease Burner (Stinger) Meningitis Lyme ...

  16. Overview of Neck Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Back) > Overview of Neck Pain Overview of Neck Pain Page Content Developing a Program That's Right for ... activity? What Kinds of Problems Might Cause Neck Pain? Treatment for any neck condition is recommended as ...

  17. Detection of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with diffusion weighted MRI after (chemo)radiotherapy: Correlation between radiologic and histopathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Vandecaveye, Vincent; Keyzer, Frederik de; Nuyts, Sandra; Deraedt, Karen; Dirix, Piet; Hamaekers, Pascal; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Delaere, Pierre; Hermans, Robert . E-mail: Robert.Hermans@uzleuven.be

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the value of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in differentiating persistent or recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) from nontumoral postradiotherapeutic alterations. Methods and Materials: In 26 patients with suspicion of persistent or recurrent HNSCC, MRI of the head and neck was performed, including routine turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences and an additional echo-planar DW-MRI sequence, using a large range of b-values (0-1000 s/mm{sup 2}). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated. In the suspect areas at the primary site and in the suspect lymph nodes, signal intensity was measured on the native b0 and b1000 images and ADC values were calculated for these tissues. The same was done for surrounding irradiated normal tissue. Imaging results were correlated to histopathology. Results: Signal intensity on native b0 images was significantly lower for HNSCC than for nontumoral postradiotherapeutic tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 66.2%, specificity of 60.8%, and accuracy of 62.4%. Signal intensity on native b1000 images was significantly higher for HNSCC than for nontumoral tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 71.6%, specificity of 71.3%, and accuracy of 71.4%. ADC values were significantly lower for HNSCC than for nontumoral tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 94.6%, specificity of 95.9%, and accuracy of 95.5%. When compared with computed tomography, TSE-MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography, DW-MRI yielded fewer false-positive results in persistent primary site abnormalities and in persistent adenopathies, and aided in the detection of subcentimetric nodal metastases. Conclusions: Diffusion weighted-MRI accurately differentiates persistent or recurrent HNSCC from nontumoral tissue changes after (chemo)radiotherapy.

  18. Correlation of Osteoradionecrosis and Dental Events With Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Estilo, Cherry L.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Shah, Jatin P.; Mechalakos, James G.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is a known complication of radiation therapy to the head and neck. However, the incidence of this complication with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dental sequelae with this technique have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Materials: From December 2000 to July 2007, 168 patients from our institution have been previously reported for IMRT of the oral cavity, nasopharynx, larynx/hypopharynx, sinus, and oropharynx. All patients underwent pretreatment dental evaluation, including panoramic radiographs, an aggressive fluoride regimen, and a mouthguard when indicated. The median maximum mandibular dose was 6,798 cGy, and the median mean mandibular dose was 3,845 cGy. Patient visits were retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of ORN, and dental records were reviewed for the development of dental events. Univariate analysis was then used to assess the effect of mandibular and parotid gland dosimetric parameters on dental endpoints. Results: With a median clinic follow-up of 37.4 months (range, 0.8-89.6 months), 2 patients, both with oral cavity primaries, experienced ORN. Neither patient had preradiation dental extractions. The maximum mandibular dose and mean mandibular dose of the 2 patients were 7,183 and 6,828 cGy and 5812 and 5335 cGy, respectively. In all, 17% of the patients (n = 29) experienced a dental event. A mean parotid dose of >26 Gy was predictive of a subsequent dental caries, whereas a maximum mandibular dose >70 Gy and a mean mandibular dose >40 Gy were correlated with dental extractions after IMRT. Conclusions: ORN is rare after head-and-neck IMRT, but is more common with oral cavity primaries. Our results suggest different mechanisms for radiation-induced caries versus extractions.

  19. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy, physical treatments, postural techniques (yoga, pilates, Alexander technique), pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatment, soft collars and special pillows, spray and stretch, surgery, traction, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). PMID:19445809

  20. High level expression of AMAP1 protein correlates with poor prognosis and survival after surgery of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in cancer therapeutics in general, the survival of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) has not improved substantially over the past few decades. HNSCC cells often exhibit invasive and metastatic phenotypes, and expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and cortactin has been highly implicated in the development of malignancy in HNSCCs. We have shown previously that an Arf6 pathway, in which Arf6 is activated by GEP100 and employs AMAP1 (also called DDEF1 or ASAP1) as its downstream effector, is pivotal for the invasion and metastasis of different breast cancer cells. This pathway is activated by receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGFR; and moreover, AMAP1 physically associates with cortactin, in which inhibition of this binding effectively blocks invasion and metastasis. We here investigated whether the expression of Arf6 pathway components correlates with the poor prognosis of HNSCC patients. We have shown previously that AMAP1 protein levels are not correlated with its mRNA levels, and hence we here employed immunohistochemical staining of HNSCC clinical specimens to investigate AMAP1 protein levels. Results We found that high levels of AMAP1 protein expression on its own, as well as its co-overexpression with EGFR statistically correlates with poor disease-free survival and poor overall survival, while high levels of cortactin expression or its co-expression with EGFR did not. Conclusion Our identification of predictive biomarkers, together with our previous findings on the coherent signaling pathway that these biomarkers ultimately generate should be powerful information for the further development of HNSCC therapeutics. PMID:24621372

  1. Anterior gradient protein 2 expression in high grade head and neck squamous cell carcinoma correlated with cancer stem cell and epithelial mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Si-Rui; Wang, Wei-Ming; Huang, Cong-Fa; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Anterior gradient protein 2 (AGR2) is a novel biomarker with potential oncogenic role. We sought to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic role of AGR2 on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with an emphasis on its correlation of cancer stemloid cells (CSC) and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). We found that AGR2 protein levels were higher in HNSCC than in normal oral mucosa. High levels of AGR2 were associated with the T category, pathological grade and lymph node metastasis of HNSCC. Expression of AGR2 increased in recurring HNSCC after radiotherapy and in post cisplatin-based chemotherapeutic tissues. In HNSCC cell lines, knock-down of AGR2 induced apoptosis, reduced sphere formation, and down-regulated Survivin, Cyclin D1, Bcl2, Bcl2l1, Slug, Snail, Nanog and Oct4. In addition, over-expressed AGR2 in transgenic mice with spontaneous HNSCC was associated with lost function of Tgfbr1 and/or lost function of Pten. In vitro knockdown TGFBR1 in HNSCC cell lines increased AGR2 expression. These results suggest that AGR2 is involved in EMT and self-renewal of CSC and may present a potential therapeutic target (oncotarget) for HNSCC. PMID:25871396

  2. Nuclear NF-?B Expression Correlates With Outcome Among Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Primary Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Michel, Yvonne; Wagenblast, Jens; Seitz, Oliver; Sipek, Florian; Rödel, Franz; Rödel, Claus; Fokas, Emmanouil

    2013-07-15

    Background: To examine whether nuclear NF-?B expression correlates with outcome in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 101 patients with locally advanced primary HNSCC were treated with definitive simultaneous CRT. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were analyzed for NF-?B p65 (RelA) nuclear immunoreactivity. A sample was assigned to be positive with more than 5% positive nuclear expression. The predictive relevance of NF-?B and clinicopathologic factors for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to age, sex, total radiation dose, fractionation mode, total chemotherapy applied, T stage or grading. Patients with p65 nuclear positive biopsy specimens showed significantly a higher rate of lymph node metastasis (cN2c or cN3 status, P=.034). Within a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range, 2.33-62.96 months) OS, PFS, and DMFS were significantly poorer in the p65 nuclear positive group (P=.008, P=.027, and P=.008, respectively). These correlations remained significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: NF-?B/p65 nuclear expression is associated with increased lymphatic and hematogenous tumor dissemination and decreased survival in HNSCC patients treated with primary CRT. Our results may foster further investigation of a predictive relevance of NF-?B/p65 and its role as a suitable target for a molecular-based targeted therapy in HNSCC cancer.

  3. Correlating planned radiation dose to the cochlea with primary site and tumor stage in patients with head and neck cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jeanette; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine tumor characteristics that predict higher planned radiation (RT) dose to the cochlea in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). From 2004 to 2012, 99 patients with HNC underwent definitive IMRT to a median dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions, with the right and left cochlea-vestibular apparatus contoured for IMRT optimization as avoidance structures. If disease involvement was adjacent to the cochlea, preference was given to tumor coverage by prescription dose. Descriptive statistics were calculated for dose-volume histogram planning data, and mean planning dose to the cochlea (from left or right cochlea, receiving the greater amount of RT dose) was correlated to primary site and tumor stage. Mean (standard deviation) cochlear volume was 1.0 (0.60) cm{sup 3} with maximum and mean planned doses of 31.9 (17.5) Gy and 22.1 (13.7) Gy, respectively. Mean planned dose (Gy) to cochlea by tumor site was as follows: oral cavity (18.6, 14.4), oropharynx (21.7, 9.1), nasopharynx (36.3, 10.4), hypopharynx (14.9, 7.1), larynx (2.1, 0.62), others including the parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus (33.6, 24.0), and unknown primary (25.6, 6.7). Average mean planned dose (Gy) to the cochlea in T0-T2 and T3-T4 disease was 22.0 and 29.2 Gy, respectively (p = 0.019). By site, a significant difference was noted for nasopharynx and others (31.6 and 50.7, p = 0.012) but not for oropharynx, oral cavity, and hypopharynx. Advanced T category predicted for higher mean cochlear dose, particularly for nasopharyngeal, parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus HNC sites.

  4. Pretreatment Apparent Diffusion Coefficient of the Primary Lesion Correlates With Local Failure in Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy or Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Yoshio; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Sunami, Shunya; Kamitani, Takeshi; Setoguchi, Taro; Yoshiura, Takashi; Nakashima, Torahiko; Nishikawa, Kei; Honda, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of a primary lesion correlates with local failure in primary head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 38 patients with primary HNSCC (12 oropharynx, 20 hypopharynx, 4 larynx, 2 oral cavity) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy with radiation dose to gross tumor volume equal to or over 60 Gy and who underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion-weighted imaging. Ten patients developed local failure during follow-up periods of 2.0 to 9.3 months, and the remaining 28 showed local control during follow-up periods of 10.5 to 31.7 months. The variables that could affect local failure (age, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, N stage, dose, treatment method, tumor location, and overall treatment time) were analyzed using logistic regression analyses for all 38 patients and for 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease. Results: In univariate logistic analysis for all 38 cases, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, and treatment method showed significant (p < 0.05) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC and T stage revealed significance (p < 0.01). In univariate logistic analysis for the 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease, ADC and dose showed significant (p < 0.01) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC alone showed significance (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results suggest that pretreatment ADC, along with T stage, is a potential indicator of local failure in HNSCC treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy.

  5. Perfusion Estimated With Rapid Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlates Inversely With Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and Pimonidazole Staining in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, Stephanie B.; Betts, Guy; Bonington, Suzanne C.; Homer, Jarrod J.; Slevin, Nick J.; Kershaw, Lucy E.; Valentine, Helen; West, Catharine M.L.; Buckley, David L.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze, in a pilot study, rapidly acquired dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data with a general two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model and correlate parameters obtained with measurements of hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Eight patients were scanned before surgery. The DCE-MRI data were acquired with 1.5-s temporal resolution and analyzed using the two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model to obtain estimates of parameters including perfusion and permeability surface area. Twelve to 16 h before surgery, patients received an intravenous injection of pimonidazole. Samples taken during surgery were used to determine the level of pimonidazole staining using immunohistochemistry and VEGF expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Correlations between the biological and imaging data were examined. Results: Of the seven tumors fully analyzed, those that were poorly perfused tended to have high levels of pimonidazole staining (r = -0.79, p = 0.03) and VEGF expression (r = -0.82, p = 0.02). Tumors with low permeability surface area also tended to have high levels of hypoxia (r = -0.75, p = 0.05). Hypoxic tumors also expressed higher levels of VEGF (r = 0.82, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Estimates of perfusion obtained with rapid DCE-MRI data in patients with head-and-neck cancer correlate inversely with pimonidazole staining and VEGF expression.

  6. Immunohistochemical detection of osteopontin in advanced head-and-neck cancer: Prognostic role and correlation with oxygen electrode measurements, hypoxia-inducible-factor-1{alpha}-related markers, and hemoglobin levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bache, Matthias; Reddemann, Rolf; Said, Harun M.; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen; Taubert, Helge; Becker, Axel; Kuhnt, Thomas; Haensgen, Gabriele; Dunst, Juergen; Vordermark, Dirk . E-mail: vordermark_d@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: The tumor-associated glycoprotein osteopontin (OPN) is discussed as a plasma marker of tumor hypoxia. However, the association of immunohistochemical OPN expression in tumor sections with tumor oxygenation parameters (HF5, median pO{sub 2}), the hypoxia-related markers hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), or hemoglobin and systemic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels has not been investigated. Methods and Materials: Tumor tissue sections of 34 patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with radiotherapy were assessed by immunochemistry for the expression of OPN, HIF-1{alpha}, and CA IX. Relationship of OPN expression with tumor oxygenation parameters (HF5, median pO{sub 2}), HIF-1{alpha} and CA IX expression, hemoglobin and serum VEGF level, and clinical parameters was studied. Results: Bivariate analysis showed a significant correlation of positive OPN staining with low hemoglobin level (p = 0.02), high HIF-1{alpha} expression (p = 0.02), and high serum vascular endothelial growth factor level (p = 0.02) for advanced head-and-neck cancer. Furthermore, considering the 31 Stage IV patients, the median pO{sub 2} correlated significantly with the OPN expression (p = 0.02). OPN expression alone had only a small impact on prognosis. However, in a univariate Cox proportional hazard regression model, the expression of either OPN or HIF-1{alpha} or CA IX was associated with a 4.1-fold increased risk of death (p = 0.02) compared with negativity of all three markers. Conclusion: Osteopontin expression detected immunohistochemically is associated with oxygenation parameters in advanced head-and-neck cancer. When the results of OPN, HIF-1{alpha}, and CA IX immunohistochemistry are combined into a hypoxic profile, a strong and statistically significant impact on overall survival is found.

  7. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... increases your risk. In fact, 85 percent of head and neck cancers are linked to tobacco use, including smoking ...

  8. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain. Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing a cervical collar. You rarely need surgery.

  9. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  10. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular head and ...

  11. ANO1/TMEM16A interacts with EGFR and correlates with sensitivity to EGFR-targeting therapy in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Anke; Gutierrez, Abraham; Kulkarni, Sucheta; Kemp, Carolyn; Bonenfant, Debora; Voshol, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) contributes to the pathogenesis of head&neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, only a subset of HNSCC patients benefit from anti-EGFR targeted therapy. By performing an unbiased proteomics screen, we found that the calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 interacts with EGFR and facilitates EGFR-signaling in HNSCC. Using structural mutants of EGFR and ANO1 we identified the trans/juxtamembrane domain of EGFR to be critical for the interaction with ANO1. Our results show that ANO1 and EGFR form a functional complex that jointly regulates HNSCC cell proliferation. Expression of ANO1 affected EGFR stability, while EGFR-signaling elevated ANO1 protein levels, establishing a functional and regulatory link between ANO1 and EGFR. Co-inhibition of EGFR and ANO1 had an additive effect on HNSCC cell proliferation, suggesting that co-targeting of ANO1 and EGFR could enhance the clinical potential of EGFR-targeted therapy in HNSCC and might circumvent the development of resistance to single agent therapy. HNSCC cell lines with amplification and high expression of ANO1 showed enhanced sensitivity to Gefitinib, suggesting ANO1 overexpression as a predictive marker for the response to EGFR-targeting agents in HNSCC therapy. Taken together, our results introduce ANO1 as a promising target and/or biomarker for EGFR-directed therapy in HNSCC. PMID:25823819

  12. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePLUS

    American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS History AHNS Leadership Past Presidents In Memory Professionalism & Ethics Find A Specialist Humanitarian Efforts AHNS ...

  13. Correlational Analysis of neck/shoulder Pain and Low Back Pain with the Use of Digital Products, Physical Activity and Psychological Status among Adolescents in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jipeng; Li, Yangyang; Zhang, Yongxing; Zhao, Qinghua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study investigates the neck/shoulder pain (NSP) and low back pain (LBP) among current high school students in Shanghai and explores the relationship between these pains and their possible influences, including digital products, physical activity, and psychological status. Methods An anonymous self-assessment was administered to 3,600 students across 30 high schools in Shanghai. This questionnaire examined the prevalence of NSP and LBP and the level of physical activity as well as the use of mobile phones, personal computers (PC) and tablet computers (Tablet). The CES-D (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression) scale was also included in the survey. The survey data were analyzed using the chi-square test, univariate logistic analyses and a multivariate logistic regression model. Results Three thousand sixteen valid questionnaires were received including 1,460 (48.41%) from male respondents and 1,556 (51.59%) from female respondents. The high school students in this study showed NSP and LBP rates of 40.8% and 33.1%, respectively, and the prevalence of both influenced by the student’s grade, use of digital products, and mental status; these factors affected the rates of NSP and LBP to varying degrees. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that Gender, grade, soreness after exercise, PC using habits, tablet use, sitting time after school and academic stress entered the final model of NSP, while the final model of LBP consisted of gender, grade, soreness after exercise, PC using habits, mobile phone use, sitting time after school, academic stress and CES-D score. Conclusions High school students in Shanghai showed high prevalence of NSP and LBP that were closely related to multiple factors. Appropriate interventions should be implemented to reduce the occurrences of NSP and LBP. PMID:24147114

  14. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  15. Torticollis (wry neck) (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Torticollis is a form of dystonia (prolonged muscle contractions) in which the neck muscles, particularly the sternocleidomastoid muscle, contract involuntarily causing the head to turn. Torticollis may occur without known cause (idiopathic), ...

  16. Melanoma - neck (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    This melanoma on the neck is variously colored with a very darkly pigmented area found centrally. It has irregular ... be larger than 0.5 cm. Prognosis in melanoma is best defined by its depth on resection.

  17. Talar neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Berlet, G C; Lee, T H; Massa, E G

    2001-01-01

    Clinical management of talar neck fractures is complex and fraught with complications. As Gaius Julius Caesar stated: "The die is cast"; often the outcome of a talar neck fracture is determined at the time of injury. The authors believe, however, that better results can be achieved by following some simple guidelines. The authors advocate prompt and precise anatomic surgical reduction, preferring the medial approach with secondary anterolateral approach. Preservation of blood supply can be achieved by a thorough understanding of vascular pathways and efforts to stay within appropriate surgical intervals. The authors advocate bone grafting of medial neck comminution (if present) to prevent varus malalignment and rigid internal fixation to allow for joint mobilization postoperatively. These guidelines may seem simple, but when dealing with the complexity of talar neck fractures, the foot and ankle surgeon needs to focus and rely on easily grasped concepts to reduce poor outcomes. PMID:11465133

  18. Head and Neck Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rotenberg, Dov

    1987-01-01

    Tumours of the head and neck show a wide spectrum of natural behaviour ranging from the most benign to the extremely lethal. Investigative techniques are of limited usefulness. History and physical examination are the foundations for diagnosis, though ultimate proof rests on surgical biopsy. The author of this article discusses the more common head and neck neoplasms. He gives brief descriptions of some tumours, highlighting their specific characteristics and their natural behaviour. He also suggests methods of investigation and gives brief overviews of modes of therapy. He discusses advances in management of head and neck neoplasms within the past decade and describes the technique of fine-needle cytologic aspirate. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:21263883

  19. Vertical neck lifting.

    PubMed

    Jacono, Andrew A; Talei, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    The authors' vertical neck lifting procedure is an extended deep plane facelift, which elevates the skin and SMAS-platysma complex as a composite unit. The goal is to redrape cervicomental laxity vertically onto the face rather than laterally and postauricularly. The authors consider this an extended technique because it lengthens the deep plane flap from the angle of the mandible into the neck to release the cervical retaining ligaments that limit platysmal redraping. This technique does not routinely use midline platysmal surgery because it counteracts the extent of vertical redraping. A majority of aging face patients are good candidates for this procedure in isolation, but indications for combining vertical neck lifting with submental surgery are elucidated. PMID:24745389

  20. Head and neck melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shashanka, R; Smitha, B R

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma appears to be increasing at an alarming rate throughout the world over the past 30-40 years and continues to increase in the United States, Canada, Australia, Asia, and Europe. The behavior of head and neck melanoma is aggressive, and it has an overall poorer prognosis than that of other skin sites. The authors review the published literature and text books, intending to give an overall picture of malignant melanomas of the head and neck and a special emphasis on treatment considerations with controversies in treatment including biopsy, radiation therapy, sentinel node biopsy, and nodal dissection. PMID:22570796

  1. Understanding selection for long necks in different taxa.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David M; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2012-08-01

    There has been recent discussion about the evolutionary pressures underlying the long necks of extant giraffes and extinct sauropod dinosaurs. Here we summarise these debates and place them in a wider taxonomic context. We consider the evolution of long necks across a wide range of (both living and extinct) taxa and ask whether there has been a common selective factor or whether each case has a separate explanation. We conclude that in most cases long necks can be explained in terms of foraging requirements, and that alternative explanations in terms of sexual selection, thermoregulation and predation pressure are not as well supported. Specifically, in giraffe, tortoises, and perhaps sauropods there is likely to have been selection for high browsing. It the last case there may also have been selection for reaching otherwise inaccessible aquatic plants or for increasing the energetic efficiency of low browsing. For camels, wading birds and ratites, original selection was likely for increased leg length, with correlated selection for a longer neck to allow feeding and drinking at or near substrate level. For fish-eating long-necked birds and plesiosaurs a small head at the end of a long neck allows fast acceleration of the mouth to allow capture of elusive prey. A swan's long neck allows access to benthic vegetation, for vultures the long neck allows reaching deep into a carcass. Geese may be an unusual case where anti-predator vigilance is important, but so may be energetically efficient low browsing. The one group for which we feel unable to draw firm conclusions are the pterosaurs, this is in keeping with the current uncertainty about the biology of this group. Despite foraging emerging as a dominant theme in selection for long necks, for almost every taxonomic group we have identified useful empirical work that would increase understanding of the selective costs and benefits of a long neck. PMID:22171805

  2. Anatomy of neck configuration in fission decay

    E-print Network

    S. K. Patra; R. K. Choudhury; L. Satpathy

    2010-05-10

    The anatomy of neck configuration in the fission decay of Uranium and Thorium isotopes is investigated in a microscopic study using Relativistic mean field theory. The study includes $^{236}U$ and $^{232}Th$ in the valley of stability and exotic neutron rich isotopes $^{250}U$, $^{256}U$, $^{260}U$, $^{240}Th$, $^{250}Th$, $^{256}Th$ likely to play important role in the r-process nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution. Following the static fission path, the neck configurations are generated and their composition in terms of the number of neutrons and protons are obtained showing the progressive rise in the neutron component with the increase of mass number. Strong correlation between the neutron multiplicity in the fission decay and the number of neutrons in the neck is seen. The maximum neutron-proton ratio is about 5 for $^{260}$U and $^{256}$Th suggestive of the break down of liquid-drop picture and inhibition of the fission decay in still heavier isotopes. Neck as precursor of a new mode of fission decay like multi-fragmentation fission may also be inferred from this study.

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-30

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  4. Early history of neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio; Silver, Carl E

    2008-12-01

    With the exception of distant metastases, the presence of lymph node metastasis in the neck is accepted as the single most important adverse independent prognostic factor and an indicator of survival in squamous carcinoma of the head and neck. Neck dissection in its various forms is the standard surgical treatment for clinical, subclinical and subpathologic metastatic cancer to the neck. The pertinent literature from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century was reviewed. The four giants of late nineteenth century surgery: von Langenbeck, Billroth, von Volkmann and Kocher developed and reported the early cases of different types of neck dissection. Butlin, in England, conceived and developed the concept of elective neck dissection. In 1888, the Polish surgeon Jawdy?sky reported and described in detail the first successful extended en bloc neck dissection. Crile, in 1905 and 1906, reported the first significant series of radical en bloc neck dissections, bringing this procedure to the attention of the medical world as an effective operation with reproducible technique and results. The greatest impetus to the status of this surgical procedure came from Martin and colleagues, who published a monumental report in 1951 of 1,450 cases that established the place and technique of radical neck dissection in the modern treatment of head and neck cancer. Neck dissection, for treatment of cervical lymph node metastases in head and neck cancer, was conceived and attempted in the nineteenth century, with some limited success reported by the end of that era. An effective operation was described and reported in the early twentieth century and evolved by the mid century into a fundamental tool in the management of patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:18488240

  5. Pediatric Head and Neck Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Qaisi, Mohammed; Eid, Issam

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck malignancies are rare in pediatric patients, and represent 12% of all pediatric malignancies. The incidence for these head and neck tumors is 1.49 cases per 1,000,000 person-years. Among the most common pediatric head and neck malignancies are lymphomas (27%), neural tumors including primitive neurectodermal tumors (23%), thyroid malignancies (21%), soft tissue sarcomas including rhabdomyosarcoma (12%), nasopharyngeal carcinoma, skeletal and odontogenic malignancies including osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and ameloblastic carcinoma. This article presents an overview of pediatric head and neck malignancies with emphasis on diagnosis and management. PMID:26614697

  6. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  7. Evolution of neck vertebral shape and neck retraction at the transition to modern turtles: an integrated geometric morphometric approach.

    PubMed

    Werneburg, Ingmar; Wilson, Laura A B; Parr, William C H; Joyce, Walter G

    2015-03-01

    The unique ability of modern turtles to retract their head and neck into the shell through a side-necked (pleurodiran) or hidden-necked (cryptodiran) motion is thought to have evolved independently in crown turtles. The anatomical changes that led to the vertebral shapes of modern turtles, however, are still poorly understood. Here we present comprehensive geometric morphometric analyses that trace turtle vertebral evolution and reconstruct disparity across phylogeny. Disparity of vertebral shape was high at the dawn of turtle evolution and decreased after the modern groups evolved, reflecting a stabilization of morphotypes that correspond to the two retraction modes. Stem turtles, which had a very simple mode of retraction, the lateral head tuck, show increasing flexibility of the neck through evolution towards a pleurodiran-like morphotype. The latter was the precondition for evolving pleurodiran and cryptodiran vertebrae. There is no correlation between the construction of formed articulations in the cervical centra and neck mobility. An increasing mobility between vertebrae, associated with changes in vertebral shape, resulted in a more advanced ability to retract the neck. In this regard, we hypothesize that the lateral tucking retraction of stem turtles was not only the precondition for pleurodiran but also of cryptodiran retraction. For the former, a kink in the middle third of the neck needed to be acquired, whereas for the latter modification was necessary between the eighth cervical vertebra and first thoracic vertebra. Our paper highlights the utility of 3D shape data, analyzed in a phylogenetic framework, to examine the magnitude and mode of evolutionary modifications to vertebral morphology. By reconstructing and visualizing ancestral anatomical shapes, we provide insight into the anatomical features underlying neck retraction mode, which is a salient component of extant turtle classification. PMID:25305281

  8. Penetrating wounds of the neck.

    PubMed

    Miller, R H; Duplechain, J K

    1991-02-01

    The management of penetrating wounds of the neck provides several decision-making steps that remain controversial. The two basic concepts of management include the idea that all wounds deep to the platysma should be explored and (the more conservative concept) that selective neck exploration should be based on a battery of tests to identify traumatic injuries. The areas of agreement within these two schools of thought include exploration of wounds with obvious injury, exploration of wounds in which patients cannot be stabilized satisfactorily for further testing, and the idea that all patients with wounds deep to the platysma should be admitted to the hospital. The remaining issues, including the need for angiography, barium swallow, or endoscopy, still are contested. Mandatory exploration of neck wounds became popular during World War II. The weapons used, the lack of accurate testing, and delays in treatment caused by transport problems played significant roles in the development of this policy. Proponents of mandatory exploration of neck wounds contend that delays in treatment result in increased mortality rates. Also delays caused by lengthy diagnostic testing have resulted in rapid exsanguination of patients who might otherwise have been surgically salvageable. These factors, along with the potential for undetected injuries and the associated complications (including false aneurysms and mediastinitis) favor mandatory exploration. Advocates of routine neck explorations also note the low morbidity rates associated with a neck exploration. Reported rates of negative exploration are high, however, approaching 45%, and mortality rates vary from 2% to 9%. Selective neck exploration has gained popularity in some centers because of the lower negative exploration rates associated with this treatment, while comparable mortality rates are achieved. May found a negative exploration rate of 12% in his series of selective neck explorations and a mortality rate of approximately 3%. Furthermore, Noyes found that the hospital stay for patients with selective observation management not requiring a neck exploration was 2.8 days, compared with 4.2 days for patients with mandatory but negative neck explorations. A summary of diagnostic techniques and their indications in selecting patients with penetrating neck wounds for surgery is presented in Table 5. It has become apparent that both selective and mandatory explorations of neck wounds play important roles in treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2027695

  9. Adjunctive procedures to neck rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Mark M; Chan, David

    2014-05-01

    Rejuvenation of the neck often requires more than just a neck lift. Various steps and procedures exist to enhance the surgical technique or overall result. Fibrin sealants can be used to improve the recovery process and obviate the need for drain placement. Chin augmentation can be a critical part of creating a more refined neckline. Submandibular gland excision has been put forth as helpful to the overall aesthetic result. A low and anteriorly positioned hyoid bone creates an unattractive neckline that is difficult to treat. This article focuses on techniques beyond lifting and resurfacing that may enhance neck rejuvenation. PMID:24745385

  10. Comparison of neck tension palpation rating systems with surface electromyographic and acoustic measures in vocal hyperfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Cara E.; Heaton, James T.; Braden, Maia N.; Jetté, Marie E.; Stadelman-Cohen, Tara K.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to evaluate current neck tension palpation rating systems to determine inter-rater reliability and possible correlation with neck surface electromyography (sEMG, collected from three electrode recording locations) and measures of the third formant for /a/ during various vocal behaviors. Study Design This prospective study examined the neck muscle tension of 16 participants before and after a single session of voice therapy. Methods Inter-rater reliability and relationships between palpation ratings and objective measures of sEMG (anterior neck) and the third formant for /a/ were assessed using Pearson’s correlations (r). Results Inter-rater reliability was relatively low as measured by Pearson’s correlations, although Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test results were similar as those in a previous study. Correlations between palpation ratings and sEMG, and between ratings of laryngeal height and the third formant for /a/ were generally low. Correlations increased between anterior neck sEMG and ratings of suprahyoid muscle tension when examined in a reduced set of individuals with higher inter-rater reliability. Conclusions Palpation rating scales do not reliably capture changes that may occur in neck muscle tension of typical voice therapy patients over one session. Consequently, little can be concluded from correlations between sEMG and palpation ratings. PMID:20347260

  11. Minimally invasive neck lifts: have they replaced neck lift surgery?

    PubMed

    Dayan, Steven H; Arkins, John P; Chaudhry, Rahman

    2013-05-01

    The aging neck is accompanied by an increase in submental fat, platysmal banding, and redundant dyspigmented skin. Creating a more acute cervicomental angle, distinct mandibular border, homogeneous skin tone, and smoother texture helps to achieve a more youthful appearance. The aesthetic provider's armamentarium has long had surgical techniques in the highest regard, but a new wave of minimally invasive procedures looks to offer a nonsurgical approach to cervicomental rejuvenation. Selecting the appropriate procedure for appropriate patients that will effectively meet their aesthetic goals and expectations is the core of successful neck rejuvenation. PMID:23731587

  12. The value of PET/CT to assess clinically negative necks.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Enver; Naibo?lu, Bar??; Meacham, Ryan; Ryoo, Cherie; Agrawal, Amit; Schuller, David E

    2012-11-01

    The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of [(18)F]-2-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in evaluating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) to the cervical lymph nodes, with specific attention to the efficacy in regard to clinically negative necks. This was a retrospective review of 243 patients with HNSCC between years 2005 and 2007 treated at a comprehensive cancer care institution who underwent pre-operative PET/CT and neck dissection with either an N0 (112 patients) or N+ (131 patients) clinical nodal status. PET/CT findings were correlated with histopathological results of surgical specimens. A majority of the primary sites were oral cavity and oropharynx (70%), followed by larynx, unknown primary and hypopharynx. In the group of 112 patients who underwent 144 neck dissections with N0 nodal status, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive (NPV) and accuracy were 57, 82, 59, 80 and 74%, respectively. In the group of 131 patients who underwent 169 neck dissections with N+ nodal status, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 93, 70, 96, 58 and 91%, respectively. PET/CT has a much reduced rate of efficacy for the clinically negative neck compared to the clinically positive neck. PET/CT in its current stage does not appear to offer an advantage in staging the clinically N0 neck due to high rates of false positives and negatives. PMID:22249837

  13. Initial conformation of kinesin's neck linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yi-Zhao; Ji, Qing; Liu, Shu-Xia; Yan, Shi-Wei

    2014-10-01

    How ATP binding initiates the docking process of kinesin's neck linker is a key question in understanding kinesin mechanisms. By exploiting a molecular dynamics method, we investigate the initial conformation of kinesin's neck linker in its docking process. We find that, in the initial conformation, the neck linker has interactions with ?0 and forms a ‘cover-neck bundle’ structure with ?0. From this initial structure, the formation of extra turns and the docking of the cover-neck bundle structure can be achieved. The motor head provides a forward force on the initial cover-neck bundle structure through ATP-induced rotation. This force, together with the hydrophobic interaction of ILE327 with the hydrophobic pocket on the motor head, drives the formation of the extra turn and initiates the neck linker docking process. Based on these findings, a pathway from ATP binding-induced motor head rotation to neck linker docking is proposed.

  14. Head and Neck International Group (HNIG)

    Cancer.gov

    The Head and Neck International Group was established in 2014 with the mission to promote and conduct high quality head and neck cancer clinical trials worldwide to improve outcomes in patients diagnosed with these diseases.

  15. Head and Neck Cancer Program Guest Expert

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    Head and Neck Cancer Program Guest Expert: Barbara Burtness, MD Professor of Medical Oncology; Clinical Research Program Leader, Head and Neck Cancer Program, Yale Cancer Center Hosts Anees Chagpar MD Research Program Leader for the Head and Neck Cancer Program. Here is Dr. Steven Gore. Gore

  16. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... For the convenience of the user, the revised text is set forth as follows: § 572.33 Neck. (c) * * * (3... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Neck. 572.33 Section 572.33 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.33 Neck....

  17. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor (Channel Class...the six axis neck transducer. The moment shall...the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by...

  18. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor (Channel Class...the six axis neck transducer. The moment shall...the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by...

  19. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor (Channel Class...the six axis neck transducer. The moment shall...the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by...

  20. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor (Channel Class...the six axis neck transducer. The moment shall...the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by...

  1. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor (Channel Class...the six axis neck transducer. The moment shall...the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by...

  2. The Tip of the Iceberg: Clinical Implications of Genomic Sequencing Projects in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, Andrew C; Ludwig, Megan L; Meraj, Taha S; Brenner, J Chad; Prince, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Recent genomic sequencing studies have provided valuable insight into genetic aberrations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite these great advances, certain hurdles exist in translating genomic findings to clinical care. Further correlation of genetic findings to clinical outcomes, additional analyses of subgroups of head and neck cancers and follow-up investigation into genetic heterogeneity are needed. While the development of targeted therapy trials is of key importance, numerous challenges exist in establishing and optimizing such programs. This review discusses potential upcoming steps for further genetic evaluation of head and neck cancers and implementation of genetic findings into precision medicine trials. PMID:26506389

  3. Multiple venous aneurysms of neck

    PubMed Central

    Swaika, Sweta; Basu, Sudipta; Bhadra, Ram C.; Maitra, Sujay

    2013-01-01

    Venous aneurysm of neck is a rare anomaly, usually presenting as a painless mass which increases in size on valsalva maneuver. A child with multiple aneurysms of the right common facial and external jugular veins diagnosed on Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance venography is reported. PMID:23599580

  4. The Relationship between Neck Pain and Cervical Alignment in Young Female Nursing Staff

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jang-Hun; Kim, Joo Han; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kwon, Taek-Hyun; Park, Yoon-Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Degenerative changes in the cervical spine are commonly accompanied by cervical kyphosis which can cause neck pain. This study examined the relationship between neck pain and cervical alignment. Methods A total of 323 female nursing staff from our hospital were enrolled. Sagittal radiographs of the cervical spine, Body Mass Index (BMI), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) measures of neck and arm pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI) and the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36 scores) were obtained and reviewed retrospectively. Global lordosis (GL) of the cervical spine was measured on radiograph images. Correlations between GL and questionnaire scores were investigated using the following three methods : 1) correlation between GL and questionnaire scores among the entire sample; 2) subgroup analysis of patients with "kyphosis (KYP) : GL scores<0" vs. those with "lordosis (LOR) : GL scores>0" on questionnaire measures; and 3) subgroup analysis of patients with pain vs. those without pain, on GL and questionnaire measures. Results There was no significant correlation between GL and any questionnaire measure. There was a significant difference between the mean GLs of the KYP and LOR groups, but there were no group differences in BMI, age or any questionnaire measures. There was no difference between the pain (n=92) and pain-free (n=231) groups in age, BMI or GL, but there were differences in neck, and arm pain, and physical function and NDI scores. Conclusions Our data suggest that kyphotic deformity was not associated with neck pain. PMID:26539266

  5. Immunotherapy With MK-3475 in Surgically Resectable Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Cancer of Head and Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Head and Neck

  6. A historical prospective cohort study of carotid artery stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Paul D. . E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Foote, Robert L.; McLaughlin, Mark P.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Ballman, Karla V.; Collie, A. Craig; Miller, Robert C.; Flemming, Kelly D.; Hallett, John W.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To determine carotid artery stenosis incidence after radiotherapy for head-and-neck neoplasms. Methods and Materials: This historical prospective cohort study comprised 44 head-and-neck cancer survivors who received unilateral neck radiotherapy between 1974 and 1999. They underwent bilateral carotid duplex ultrasonography to detect carotid artery stenosis. Results: The incidence of significant carotid stenosis (8 of 44 [18%]) in the irradiated neck was higher than that in the contralateral unirradiated neck (3 of 44 [7%]), although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.13). The rate of significant carotid stenosis events increased as the time after radiotherapy increased. The risk of ipsilateral carotid artery stenosis was higher in patients who had undergone a neck dissection vs. those who had not. Patients with significant ipsilateral stenosis also tended to be older than those without significant stenosis. No other patient or treatment variables correlated with risk of carotid artery stenosis. Conclusions: For long-term survivors after neck dissection and irradiation, especially those who are symptomatic, ultrasonographic carotid artery screening should be considered.

  7. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Mukunth, R; Srivastava, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU) femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the “Pubmed” search with the keywords “NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture.” A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a) treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG), (b) closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c) open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d) miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective), classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu's staging) neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90% cases. However, in stage III with or without AVN, the results of osteosynthesis are poor and the choice of treatment is replacement arthroplasty (hemi or total). PMID:25593354

  8. Embolization of the neck lymphatic varix, causing periodic neck swelling.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Anthony K; Pukenas, Brian A; Yan, Yan; Newman, Jason G; Itkin, Maxim

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 44-year-old female patient, presented to us after years of recurrent intermittent episodes of unilateral left neck swelling. An MR lymphangiogram demonstrated a lymphatic varix at the confluence of the left upper extremity lymphatic ducts, confirmed by intranodal axillary lymphangiography. After successful catheterization of the feeding lymphatic vessels, the varix was successfully embolized with detachable microcoils and an autologous blood patch. The patient has been free from symptoms on subsequent outpatient follow-up. PMID:24352865

  9. Direct and remote constriction of membrane necks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boži?, Bojan; Guven, Jemal; Vázquez-Montejo, Pablo; Svetina, Saša

    2014-05-01

    The physical properties of membrane necks are relevant in vesiculation, a process that plays an essential role in cellular physiology. Because the neck's radius is, in general, finite, membrane scission and the consequent pinching off of the vesicle can only occur if it is narrowed to permit the necessary membrane topological reformation. Here we examine, in a simple single phase lipid vesicle, how external forces can promote neck constriction not only by direct compression at the neck but also, counterintuitively, by dilation at remote locations. These results provide a new perspective on the role played by actin polymerization in the process of endocytosis.

  10. Objective classification of different head and neck positions and their influence on the radiographic pharyngeal diameter in sport horses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Various head and neck positions in sport horses are significant as they can interfere with upper airway flow mechanics during exercise. Until now, research has focused on subjectively described head and neck positions. The objective of this study was to develop an objective, reproducible method for quantifying head and neck positions accurately. Results Determining the angle between the ridge of the nose and the horizontal plane (ground angle) together with the angle between the ridge of nose and the line connecting the neck and the withers (withers angle) has provided values that allow precise identification of three preselected head and neck positions for performing sport horses. The pharyngeal diameter, determined on lateral radiographs of 35 horses, differed significantly between the established flexed position and the remaining two head and neck positions (extended and neutral). There was a significant correlation between the pharyngeal diameter and the ground angle (Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient ?0.769, p?correlation coefficient 0.774, p?neck positions in sport horses. The ground angle and the withers angle show significant correlation with the measured pharyngeal diameter in resting horses. Hence, these angles provide an appropriate method for assessing the degree of head and neck flexion. Further research is required to examine the influence of increasing head and neck flexion and the related pharyngeal diameter on upper airway function in exercising horses. PMID:24886564

  11. General Information about Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  13. Stages of Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  14. Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  15. Current philosophy in the surgical management of neck metastases for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Coskun, H Hakan; Medina, Jesus E; Robbins, K Thomas; Silver, Carl E; Strojan, Primož; Teymoortash, Afshin; Pellitteri, Phillip K; Rodrigo, Juan P; Stoeckli, Sandro J; Shaha, Ashok R; Suárez, Carlos; Hartl, Dana M; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P; Hamoir, Marc; Pitman, Karen T; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2015-06-01

    Neck dissection is an important treatment for metastases from upper aerodigestive carcinoma; an event that markedly reduces survival. Since its inception, the philosophy of the procedure has undergone significant change from one of radicalism to the current conservative approach. Furthermore, nonsurgical modalities have been introduced, and, in many situations, have supplanted neck surgery. The refinements of imaging the neck based on the concept of neck level involvement has encouraged new philosophies to evolve that seem to benefit patient outcomes particularly as this relates to diminished morbidity. The purpose of this review was to highlight the new paradigms for surgical removal of neck metastases using an evidence-based approach. PMID:24623715

  16. Inter-Vertebral Flexibility of the Ostrich Neck: Implications for Estimating Sauropod Neck Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Cobley, Matthew J.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Barrett, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The flexibility and posture of the neck in sauropod dinosaurs has long been contentious. Improved constraints on sauropod neck function will have major implications for what we know of their foraging strategies, ecology and overall biology. Several hypotheses have been proposed, based primarily on osteological data, suggesting different degrees of neck flexibility. This study attempts to assess the effects of reconstructed soft tissues on sauropod neck flexibility through systematic removal of muscle groups and measures of flexibility of the neck in a living analogue, the ostrich (Struthio camelus). The possible effect of cartilage on flexibility is also examined, as this was previously overlooked in osteological estimates of sauropod neck function. These comparisons show that soft tissues are likely to have limited the flexibility of the neck beyond the limits suggested by osteology alone. In addition, the inferred presence of cartilage, and varying the inter-vertebral spacing within the synovial capsule, also affect neck flexibility. One hypothesis proposed that flexibility is constrained by requiring a minimum overlap between successive zygapophyses equivalent to 50% of zygapophyseal articular surface length (ONP50). This assumption is tested by comparing the maximum flexibility of the articulated cervical column in ONP50 and the flexibility of the complete neck with all tissues intact. It is found that this model does not adequately convey the pattern of flexibility in the ostrich neck, suggesting that the ONP50 model may not be useful in determining neck function if considered in isolation from myological and other soft tissue data. PMID:23967284

  17. Preventable Sternocleidomastoid Muscular Atrophy after Neck Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Nao; Sawai, Natsuko Yoshimura; Ishimoto, Shunsuke; Ogura, Hide; Aikawa, Tomonao; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modified radical neck dissection (mRND) [preserving the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) and the spinal accessory nerve] and supraomohyoid neck dissection have become common surgical procedures for treating head and neck cancer. Postoperative severe asymmetry of the neck and severe atrophy of the SCM, however, have been demonstrated. Methods: Using computed tomographic images, cross-sectional areas of the SCMs were measured in 99 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity who underwent unilateral mRND or supraomohyoid neck dissection. An asymmetry index was used. Results: Innervation to the SCM was preserved in 91 patients. The spinal accessory nerve and the innervation were sacrificed in 3 patients; the innervation was repaired in 5 patients. Sacrifice of innervation to the SCM resulted in extremely severe asymmetry. Repair of the innervation prevented severe asymmetry in 40%. Preservation of the innervation prevented severe asymmetry in 75% at the middle portion of the neck and in 56% at the lower portion after mRND. Conclusion: Preserving innervation to the SCM and gentle handling of the nerve during neck dissection could prevent severe asymmetry after neck dissection. PMID:26495217

  18. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Doctors & Hospitals > Medical Tests & Exams > X-Ray Exam: Neck Print A A A Text Size What's in this article? What It Is Why It's Done Preparation Procedure What to Expect Getting the Results Risks Helping Your Child If You Have Questions What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  19. Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Most head and neck cancers begin in the moist, mucus membranes lining the inside of the mouth, nose and throat. These membranes are made up of squamous cells and the head and neck cancers that grow in these cells are called squamous cell carcinomas.

  20. Update Head and Neck Steering Committee

    Cancer.gov

    Update Head and Neck Steering Committee NCI Clinical Trials Advisory Committee December 8, 2008 Co-Chairs Arlene Forastiere, M.D. David Schuller, M.D. Andrew Trotti, M.D. Primary Goal Increase productivity of clinical research involving head and neck

  1. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  2. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  3. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  4. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  5. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck. 572.33 Section 572.33 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.33 Neck....

  6. [Psychological states and personality as factors in the morbidity of head and neck malignant tumors].

    PubMed

    Yamagiwa, M; Harada, T; Kubo, M; Miyahara, Y; Amesara, R; Sakakura, Y

    1991-06-01

    Many publications have repeatedly indicated that there seems to be a correlation between neoplastic disease and certain types of psychological situations. However, such studies subjected malignant tumors in head and neck region are scanty so far. We applied Cornell Medical Index Health Questionnaire (CMI) and Maudsley Personality Inventory (MPI) to collect medical and psychiatric data from 86 patients (56 males and 30 females) with head and neck malignant tumors and 115 control patients (73 males and 42 females) with head and neck diseases other than malignant tumors. Analysis of CMI data using Diagnostic Sheet, Fukamachi's method and Modification of Abe's method, and analysis of each of Extroversion-Introversion scale scores, Neuroticism scale scores and Lie scale scores of MPI led the following conclusion. 1) Both male and female patients with head and neck malignant tumors showed to be more depressive than their control patients were. Especially, between the two patient groups in males, there was a statistically significant (p less than 0.05) difference. 2) Regarding neurosis, autonomic nerve dysfunctioning and extroversion-introversion, none of these factors seemed to be related with the morbidity of head and neck malignant tumors. Further exploration of this issue, with a special attention to the relationship between depression and head and neck malignancy should be conducted, if possibly, from a prospective point of view. PMID:1886029

  7. ADC biomarker for head and neck tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Bravo, Irlanda; Hidalgo-Tobon, Silvia; Zaragoza, Kena; Reynoso-Noverón, Nancy; De Celis-Alonso, Benito; Delgado-Hernandez, Rosa

    2014-11-01

    According to the World Cancer Report, by 2020, global incidence of cancer may increase by 50%, which means 15 million new cases. In 2000, malignant tumors were the cause of 12% of the almost 56 million deaths worldwide due to all causes[1-4]. 18 men and 19 women, with an average age of 53 ± 14 years with diagnosis of head and neck cancer were scanned using a 1.5-T MR imaging unit (Signa HDxt; GE Medical Systems). Echo-planar DW imaging was performed in the transverse plane before the contrast material injection. Three b values were applied: 40, 100, and 800 sec/mm2. Primary tumors and nodes were evaluated, with diameters greater than 43 ± 15mm. In our study, ADC data for b-values of 40 showed correlation for identification of malignancy in primary tumors, and in the case of nodes there is a tendency toward malignancy in sequences in which a b-value of 800 is used.

  8. Cancers of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, C.

    1987-01-01

    The information in this text demonstrates the marked progress being made in the treatment of head and neck cancer, diseases which are among the most morbid in all medicine. New and promising surgical and radiotherapeutic techniques are discussed, including brachytherapy, hyperthermia, laser therapy and nuclear magnetic resonance. The timing of chemotherapy and the future rate of biologic modifiers and immune therapy are included. Innovative and creative surgical techniques geared towards improving the quality of life for head and neck patients are described. A final section of the volume covers other management problems including rhabdomyosarcoma and lymphomas of extranodal head and neck sites.

  9. http://oto.sagepub.com/ Otolaryngology --Head and Neck Surgery

    E-print Network

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    http://oto.sagepub.com/ Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery http://oto.sagepub.com/content/151 published online 4 August 2014Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery and Quyen T. Nguyen Nadia Nashi of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery can be found at:Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck SurgeryAdditional services

  10. www.yalecancercenter.org Screening for Head and Neck

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    www.yalecancercenter.org Screening for Head and Neck Cancers Guest Experts: Clarence Sasaki, MD head and neck cancer is? Morgensztern Head and neck cancer is a specific kind of cancer that usually? Morgensztern For me it started when I worked at the Veterans Hospital and head and neck is one of the most

  11. www.yalecancercenter.org Surgery for Head and Neck

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    www.yalecancercenter.org Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Treatments Guest Expert: Benjamin Judson and neck cancers. Here is Francine Foss. Foss Can you tell us a little bit about the whole area of head and neck cancers, what is involved in it and what do we consider to be the head and neck? Judson Usually

  12. Neck retardation and enhanced energy absorption in metalelastomer bilayers

    E-print Network

    Hutchinson, John W.

    triaxiality, both of which promote ductile fracture. In uniaxial tension, the onset of necking in a uniform strain at the onset of necking in a bar in uniaxial tension is e = N. This is also the necking strainNeck retardation and enhanced energy absorption in metal­elastomer bilayers Zhenyu Xue *, John W

  13. Three-dimensional measurement of femoral neck anteversion and neck shaft angle.

    PubMed

    Sangeux, Morgan; Pascoe, Jessica; Graham, H Kerr; Ramanauskas, Fiona; Cain, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional measurement technique for femoral neck anteversion and neck shaft angles which do not require alignment of the femoral and scanner axes. Two assessors performed the measurements on 11 patients (22 femurs). Repeatability between assessors was 2.7 degrees for femoral neck anteversion and 4.8 degrees for neck shaft angle. Measurements compared with an alternative single slice method were different by 2 degrees (3 degrees) in average. The method was repeatable and appropriate for clinical practice. PMID:25354092

  14. The femoral head–neck contour varies as a function of physeal development

    PubMed Central

    Vo, A.; Beaule, P. E.; Sampaio, M. L.; Rotaru, C.; Rakhra, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the femoral head–neck contour, characterised by the alpha angle, varies with the stage of physeal maturation using MRI evaluation of an asymptomatic paediatric population. Methods Paediatric volunteers with asymptomatic hips were recruited to undergo MRI of both hips. Femoral head physes were graded from 1 (completely open) to 6 (completely fused). The femoral head–neck contour was evaluated using the alpha angle, measured at the 3:00 (anterior) and 1:30 (anterosuperior) positions and correlated with physeal grade, with gender sub-analysis performed. Results A total of 43 asymptomatic paediatric volunteers (26 male, 17 female) with mean age 13.0 years (eight to 18) were included with review of bilateral hip MRIs. Correlation between the physeal grade and alpha angle was moderate in males at both the 3:00 (r = 0.477, p < 0.001) and 1:30 (r = 0.509, p < 0.001) positions, whereas there was no significant correlation in females. A significant difference was found between the alpha angles of all the physeal grades (3:00, p = 0.030, 1:30, p = 0.005), but only in males, with the angle increasing with higher grades. For physeal grading, the inter-reader reliability was substantial (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.694), and the intra-reader reliability was also substantial (ICC = 0.788). Conclusion The femoral head–neck contour varies and correlates with the stage of physeal development, but only in males, with the alpha angle increasing with progressive physeal maturation. This suggests that gender differences exist in the natural physiological growth, development or remodelling of femoral head–neck junction. In males, pre-physeal fusion may be a critical period of vulnerability for development of morphologic abnormalities of the femoral head–neck junction. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:17–22 PMID:25673625

  15. [Rhabdomyosarcoma of the neck in adults].

    PubMed

    Fernández Pérez, A; Moreno León, J A; Fernández-Nogueras Jiménez, F; Rubí Uría, J

    1999-04-01

    The clinical case of a 59-year-old male with neck rhabdomyosarcoma is reported. The literature is reviewed for the epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of this infrequent sarcoma. PMID:10362865

  16. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. Aging small Canada geese by neck plumage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, K.F.; Schoonover, L.J.

    1969-01-01

    The neck plumage method, a new technique for separating immature from adult Canada geese (Branta canadensis) in the hand, was evaluated by comparison with the notched tail feather and cloacal examination methods. Two (1.4 percent) of 141 geese examined were misaged, resulting in a 6 percent error in the immature-adult ratio obtained by the neck plumage method. The neck plumage method is a rapid aging method and reasonable accuracy (94 percent) can be obtained. It can also be used to differentiate immatures from adults on the ground at distances up to 175 yards, but was almost impossible to use when geese were in flight. As yet, the neck plumage method has only been tested on the subspecies (B. c. hutchinsii-parvipes complex) in the Tall-Grass Prairie population of small Canada geese.

  18. Postoperative hypertension after radical neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Celikkanat, S; Akyol, M U; Koç, C; Olçer, S; Ensari, S; Turgut, S; Ozdem, C

    1997-07-01

    Postoperative hypertension after radical neck dissection was detected in 20.2% of 109 neck dissections in our department between 1989 and 1993. It was probably caused by carotid sinus denervation and appeared after the vasodilation generated by anesthesia had subsided. If postoperative hypertension was encountered after the first operation, the risk of such hypertension after surgery on the contralateral side significantly increased. PMID:9230330

  19. Neck strength: a protective factor reducing risk for concussion in high school sports.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christy L; Fletcher, Erica N; Fields, Sarah K; Kluchurosky, Lisa; Rohrkemper, Mary Kay; Comstock, R Dawn; Cantu, Robert C

    2014-10-01

    As the number of high school students participating in athletics continues to increase, so will the number of sports-related concussions unless effective concussion prevention programs are developed. We sought to develop and validate a cost-effective tool to measure neck strength in a high school setting, conduct a feasibility study to determine if the developed tool could be reliably applied by certified athletic trainers (ATs) in a high school setting, and conduct a pilot study to determine if anthropometric measurements captured by ATs can predict concussion risk. In the study's first phase, 16 adult subjects underwent repeated neck strength testing by a group of five ATs to validate the developed hand-held tension scale, a cost effective alternative to a hand-held dynamometer. In the second phase, during the 2010 and 2011 academic years, ATs from 51 high schools in 25 states captured pre-season anthropometric measurements for 6,704 high school athletes in boys' and girls' soccer, basketball, and lacrosse, as well as reported concussion incidence and athletic exposure data. We found high correlations between neck strength measurements taken with the developed tool and a hand-held dynamometer and the measurements taken by five ATs. Smaller mean neck circumference, smaller mean neck to head circumference ratio, and weaker mean overall neck strength were significantly associated with concussion. Overall neck strength (p < 0.001), gender (p < 0.001), and sport (p = 0.007) were significant predictors of concussions in unadjusted models. After adjusting for gender and sport, overall neck strength remained a significant predictor of concussion (p = 0.004). For every one pound increase in neck strength, odds of concussion decreased by 5 % (OR = 0.95, 95 % CI 0.92-0.98). We conclude that identifying differences in overall neck strength may be useful in developing a screening tool to determine which high school athletes are at higher risk of concussion. Once identified, these athletes could be targeted for concussion prevention programs. PMID:24930131

  20. Sharp neck injuries in suicidal intention.

    PubMed

    Biétry, Damien; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis; Müller, Thomas; Zbären, Peter; Caversaccio, Marco; Arnold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Sharp neck injuries in suicidal intention often present as serious emergency situations with the need for an immediate diagnosis and treatment. We report our study of the clinical evolution of this emergency condition. This study investigates the cases of sharp neck injuries in suicidal intention treated at our institution between 2000 and 2010. Patient records were collected in a retrospectively reviewed and analyzed database. The current literature was compared to our findings. We found 36 cases (10 female and 26 male). The neck injuries were superficial and profound in 16 and 20 patients, respectively. Twenty-two patients were seen by the Head and Neck surgeon. A surgical neck exploration was necessary in 19 cases. Tracheal, laryngeal, pharyngeal and vascular injuries were found in one, five, three and three cases, respectively. The hospital stay ranged from 1 to 47 days. All the patients underwent emergency psychiatric assessment and were subsequently referred for psychiatric treatment. One patient died in the emergency room from an additional arterial injury to the wrist. Sharp neck injuries in suicidal intention treated with an interdisciplinary medical, surgical and psychiatric emergency assessment and treatment have low mortality and morbidity. PMID:25543307

  1. Modeling neck mobility in fossil turtles.

    PubMed

    Werneburg, Ingmar; Hinz, Juliane K; Gumpenberger, Michaela; Volpato, Virginie; Natchev, Nikolay; Joyce, Walter G

    2015-05-01

    Turtles have the unparalleled ability to retract their heads and necks within their shell but little is known about the evolution of this trait. Extensive analysis of neck mobility in turtles using radiographs, CT scans, and morphometry reveals that basal turtles possessed less mobility in the neck relative to their extant relatives, although the anatomical prerequisites for modern mobility were already established. Many extant turtles are able to achieve hypermobility by dislocating the central articulations, which raises cautions about reconstructing the mobility of fossil vertebrates. A 3D-model of the Late Triassic turtle Proganochelys quenstedti reveals that this early stem turtle was able to retract its head by tucking it sideways below the shell. The simple ventrolateral bend seen in this stem turtle, however, contrasts with the complex double-bend of extant turtles. The initial evolution of neck retraction therefore occurred in a near-synchrony with the origin of the turtle shell as a place to hide the unprotected neck. In this early, simplified retraction mode, the conical osteoderms on the neck provided further protection. PMID:24497449

  2. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the neck].

    PubMed

    Kovaci?, Marijan; Kovaci?, Ivan; Delalija, Boris

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and rapidly progressive infection characterized by necrosis of the superficial fascia and spread on the surrounding skin or muscles, which can be fatal. It usually occurs in the limbs, abdominal wall and perineum. In this retrospective review, the authors present 15 patients with cervical necrotizing fasciitis. The patient mean age was 54.7 years and they had one or more comorbid health problems. Five of them had descending necrotizing mediastinitis and three had progressive sepsis with toxic shock syndrome. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotic therapy was administered to all patients immediately, and in three of them we used five-day intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for the signs of toxic shock syndrome. After positive computed tomography imaging for necrotizing fasciitis, we used surgical exploration and debridement of necrotic tissue. In five patients, the initial surgery also included mediastinal transcervical drainage. Preoperative tracheotomy was performed in six patients and delayed tracheotomy in one patient. Histopathologically, all cases showed extensive necrosis of debrided fascia and vascular thrombosis of the neck soft tissue. The mortality rate was 6.7% (1/15). The authors point to the importance of early diagnosis and timely surgical management, broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy when patients are too unstable to undergo surgery. PMID:24279256

  3. Motor vehicle occupants, neck injuries, and seat belt utilization: a 5-year study of fatalities in New York City.

    PubMed

    Sgarlato, Anthony; Deroux, Stephen J

    2010-03-01

    Despite the implementation of numerous safety devices in automobiles, vehicular occupant fatalities following collisions remain common. We reviewed all fatalities of vehicular occupants in New York City over a 5-year period on whom autopsies were performed (437) to determine the incidence of neck injuries and correlate them with seat belt utilization; 26.5% had neck injuries (mild to severe) and only 10.3% of these occupants were confirmed to be wearing seatbelts. Of those that had documentation of seat belt utilization there were twice as many neck injuries in the unbelted group. We highlight two cases of submarining with severe neck injuries that were related to automatic 2-point shoulder harness restraints without engagement of the lap belt. PMID:20070463

  4. The relationship between impact force, neck strength, and neurocognitive performance in soccer heading in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Gregory M; Conte, Catherine; Lightbourne, Kristian

    2014-02-01

    Head impacts are common in contact sports, but only recently has there been a rising awareness of the effects of subconcussive impacts in adolescent athletes. A better understanding of how to attenuate head impacts is needed and therefore, this study investigated the relationship between neck strength, impact, and neurocognitive function in an acute bout of soccer heading in a sample of female high school varsity soccer players. Seventeen participants completed the ImPACT neurocognitive test and had their isometric neck strength tested (flexion, extension, and bilateral flexion) before heading drills. Each participant was outfitted with custom headgear with timing switches and a three-dimensional accelerometer affixed to the back of the head, which allowed for measurement of impact during heading. Participants performed a series of 15 directional headers, including 5 forward, 5 left and 5 right headers in a random order, then completed the ImPACT test again. Neurocognitive tests revealed no significant changes following heading. However, there were statistically significant, moderate, negative correlations (r = -0.500:-0.757, p < .05) between neck strength and resultant header acceleration, indicating that those with weaker necks sustained greater impacts. This suggests neck strengthening may be an important component of any head injury prevention/reduction program. PMID:24091298

  5. The relationship between impact force, neck strength, and neurocognitive performance in soccer heading in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Gregory M; Conte, Catherine; Lightbourne, Kristian

    2014-02-01

    Head impacts are common in contact sports, but only recently has there been a rising awareness of the effects of subconcussive impacts in adolescent athletes. A better understanding of how to attenuate head impacts is needed and therefore, this study investigated the relationship between neck strength, impact, and neurocognitive function in an acute bout of soccer heading in a sample of female high school varsity soccer players. Seventeen participants completed the ImPACT neurocognitive test and had their isometric neck strength tested (flexion, extension, and bilateral flexion) before heading drills. Each participant was outfitted with custom headgear with timing switches and a three-dimensional accelerometer affixed to the back of the head, which allowed for measurement of impact during heading. Participants performed a series of 15 directional headers, including 5 forward, 5 left and 5 right headers in a random order, then completed the ImPACT test again. Neurocognitive tests revealed no significant changes following heading. However, there were statistically significant, moderate, negative correlations (r = -0.500:-0.757, p < .05) between neck strength and resultant header acceleration, indicating that those with weaker necks sustained greater impacts. This suggests neck strengthening may be an important component of any head injury prevention/reduction program. PMID:24662117

  6. Future directions and treatment strategies for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wise-Draper, Trisha M; Draper, David J; Gutkind, J Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; Wells, Susanne I

    2012-09-01

    Head and neck cancer is a devastating disease that afflicts many individuals worldwide. Conventional therapies are successful in only a limited subgroup and often leave the patient with disfigurement and long lasting adverse effects on normal physiologic functions. The field is in dire need of new therapies. Oncolytic viral as well as targeted therapies have shown some success in other malignancies and are attractive for the treatment of head and neck cancer. Recently, it has been shown that a subset of head and neck cancers is human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and that this subset of cancers is biologically distinct and more sensitive to chemoradiation therapies although the underlying mechanism is unclear. However, chemoresistance remains a general problem. One candidate mediator of therapeutic response, which is of interest for the targeting of both HPV-positive and -negative tumors is the human DEK proto-oncogene. DEK is upregulated in numerous tumors including head and neck cancers regardless of their HPV status. Depletion of DEK in tumor cells in culture results in sensitivity to genotoxic agents, particularly in rapidly proliferating cells. This suggests that tumors with high DEK protein expression may be correlated with poor clinical response to clastogenic therapies. Targeting molecules such as DEK in combination with new and/or conventional therapies, holds promise for novel future therapeutics for head and neck cancer. PMID:22683420

  7. MRI of cerebrum and cervical columna within two days after whiplash neck sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Borchgrevink, G; Smevik, O; Haave, I; Haraldseth, O; Nordby, A; Lereim, I

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate if MRI within 2 days of a motor vehicle accident could reveal pathology of importance for understanding long-term disability after whiplash neck-sprain injuries. As part of a prospective study cervical and cerebral MRI was performed on 40 neck sprain patients with whiplash injury after car accidents. The imaging was done within 2 days of the injury to make sure that any neck muscle bleeding, oedema or other soft tissue injuries could be detected. The MRI findings from the patients were both correlated to reported symptoms 6 months after the accident and compared to a control group of 20 volunteers. The MRI of both brain and neck revealed no significant differences between the patients and the control group. When the patients were grouped according to the main MRI findings at intake and compared according to the development of subjective symptoms reported by the patients, the only significant difference was more headaches at 6 months in the groups with disk pathology or spondylosis when compared to the group with no pathology. In conclusion, MRI within 2 days of the whiplash neck-sprain injury could not detect pathology connected to the injury nor predict symptom development and outcome. PMID:9764227

  8. Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck

    E-print Network

    Bogyo, Matthew

    Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery Resident............................................................................................................................................ 9 STANFORD HEAD AND NECK TEAM...................................................................................................................................14 Goals and Objectives PGY 2: SUH Head & Neck

  9. Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery Resident ........................................................................................................................................... 10 STANFORD HEAD AND NECK TEAM .................................................................................................................................... 15 Goals and Objectives PGY 2: SUH Head & Neck

  10. Modelling fluid accumulation in the neck using simple baseline fluid metrics: implications for sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Vena, Daniel; Yadollahi, A; Bradley, T Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common respiratory disorder among adults. Recently we have shown that sedentary lifestyle causes an increase in diurnal leg fluid volume (LFV), which can shift into the neck at night when lying down to sleep and increase OSA severity. The purpose of this work was to investigate various metrics that represent baseline fluid retention in the legs and examine their correlation with neck fluid volume (NFV) and to develop a robust model for predicting fluid accumulation in the neck. In 13 healthy awake non-obese men, LFV and NFV were recorded continuously and simultaneously while standing for 5 minutes and then lying supine for 90 minutes. Simple regression was used to examine correlations between baseline LFV, baseline neck circumference (NC) and change in LFV with the outcome variables: change in NC (?NC) and in NFV (?NFV90) after lying supine for 90 minutes. An exhaustive grid search was implemented to find combinations of input variables which best modeled outcomes. We found strong positive correlations between baseline LFV (supine and standing) and ?NFV90. Models developed for predicting ?NFV90 included baseline standing LFV, baseline NC combined with change in LFV after lying supine for 90 minutes. These correlations and the developed models suggest that a greater baseline LFV might contribute to increased fluid accumulation in the neck. These results give more evidence that sedentary lifestyle might play a role in the pathogenesis of OSA by increasing the baseline LFV. The best models for predicting ?NC include baseline LFV and NC; they improved accuracies of estimating ?NC over individual predictors, suggesting that a combination of baseline fluid metrics is a good predictor of the change in NC while lying supine. Future work is aimed at adding additional baseline demographic features to improve model accuracy and eventually use it as a screening tool to predict severity of OSA prior to sleep. PMID:25569948

  11. Treatment of Neck Pain: Noninvasive Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Carragee, Eugene J.; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Carroll, Linda J.; Nordin, Margareta; Guzman, Jaime; Peloso, Paul M.; Holm, Lena W.; Côté, Pierre; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Cassidy, J. David; Haldeman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Study Design. Best evidence synthesis. Objective. To identify, critically appraise, and synthesize literature from 1980 through 2006 on noninvasive interventions for neck pain and its associated disorders. Summary of Background Data. No comprehensive systematic literature reviews have been published on interventions for neck pain and its associated disorders in the past decade. Methods. We systematically searched Medline and screened for relevance literature published from 1980 through 2006 on the use, effectiveness, and safety of noninvasive interventions for neck pain and associated disorders. Consensus decisions were made about the scientific merit of each article; those judged to have adequate internal validity were included in our best evidence synthesis. Results. Of the 359 invasive and noninvasive intervention articles deemed relevant, 170 (47%) were accepted as scientifically admissible, and 139 of these related to noninvasive interventions (including health care utilization, costs, and safety). For whiplash-associated disorders, there is evidence that educational videos, mobilization, and exercises appear more beneficial than usual care or physical modalities. For other neck pain, the evidence suggests that manual and supervised exercise interventions, low-level laser therapy, and perhaps acupuncture are more effective than no treatment, sham, or alternative interventions; however, none of the active treatments was clearly superior to any other in either the short-or long-term. For both whiplash-associated disorders and other neck pain without radicular symptoms, interventions that focused on regaining function as soon as possible are relatively more effective than interventions that do not have such a focus. Conclusion. Our best evidence synthesis suggests that therapies involving manual therapy and exercise are more effective than alternative strategies for patients with neck pain; this was also true of therapies which include educational interventions addressing self-efficacy. Future efforts should focus on the study of noninvasive interventions for patients with radicular symptoms and on the design and evaluation of neck pain prevention strategies.

  12. Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Shyh-An

    2010-01-01

    Treatment for patients with head and neck cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach. Radiotherapy is employed as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant to surgery. Each specific subsite dictates the appropriate radiotherapy techniques, fields, dose, and fractionation scheme. Quality of life is also an important issue in the management of head and neck cancer. The radiation-related complications have a tremendous impact on the quality of life. Modern radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy, can offer precise radiation delivery and reduce the dose to the surrounding normal tissues without compromise of target coverage. In the future, efforts should be made in the exploration of novel strategies to improve treatment outcome in patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:22550433

  13. Regional Myocutaneous Flaps for Head and Neck Reconstruction: Experience of a Head and Neck Cancer Unit

    PubMed Central

    Okoturo, Eyituoyo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pectoralis major myocutaneous pedicle flap and other regional myocutaneous pedicle flaps (RMF), despite the superiority shown by free flaps, have remained relevant in the reconstruction of major head and neck oncologic defects. It has continued to find relevance as the preferred reconstruction of choice in some general head and neck reconstructive applications. While its role has been defined in developed environment, the same cannot be said for developing environment. The aim thus, was to review our experiences with RMFs in head and neck reconstructions, with a view to evaluating the indications and outcomes in a limited opportunity environment with some free flaps expertise. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study from records of RMF cases performed for head and neck reconstruction, at the study institution. Eligibility for study inclusion comprised case cohorts with advanced head and neck diseases requiring ablative surgery and reconstruction with pectoralis major flaps and other RMFs. Results: A total of 17 cases were treated with RMFs. 10 were pectoralis major flaps while 7 were other RMFs. The main indications were failed free flaps and financial constraints. No regional pedicle flap failure was recorded; however, complication rate was 35.5% (6/17). Conclusion: Pectoralis major flaps and other RMFs were very reliable option for head and neck reconstruction. Free flap failure and financial constraints were the main indications for RMF reconstruction indications in head and neck reconstruction in a developing environment with some free flap expertise. PMID:26425058

  14. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture. PMID:26696712

  15. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Thariat, Juliette; Ahamad, Anesa; Williams, Michelle D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Rosenthal, David I.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2012-03-01

    Background: This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. Methods: Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox's proportional hazard model. Results: Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients, of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p < 0.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. Conclusions: With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge.

  16. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thariat, Juliette; Ang, K. Kian; Allen, Pamela K.; Ahamad, Anesa; Williams, Michelle D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Rosenthal, David I.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Morrison, William H.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation, and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. METHODS Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox analyses. RESULTS Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p <.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. CONCLUSIONS With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge. PMID:22284033

  17. [Unusual suicide by mechanical neck compression].

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Sven

    2008-01-01

    A 36-year-old man was found dead with his neck being jammed between the hydraulic tail lift and the side wall of a truck. Based on the investigations, the technical facilities of the tail lift, the results of the postmortem examination and the autopsy it could be demonstrated that the victim, who suffered drom depression, had intentionally brought himself into this position and committed suicide by compression of the neck. The pathomorphological findings and the technical reconstruction of this unusual death are presented. PMID:18389864

  18. Hyperparathyroidism following head and neck irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.D.; Frame, B.; Miller, M.J.; Kleerskoper, M.; Block, M.A.; Parfitt, A.M.

    1980-02-01

    A history of head and neck irradiation in childhood or adolescence was found in 22 of 130 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism compared with only 12 of 400 control patients. Among 200 patients with a known history of childhood irradiation, biochemical or surgical evidence of hyperparathyroidism was found in ten, a prevalence of 5%. This is at least 30 times the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism in the general population. The data indicate that head and neck irradiation should be regarded as an important risk factor in the subsequent development of hyperparathyroidism.

  19. HPV & head and neck cancer: a descriptive update

    E-print Network

    Goon, Peter K. C.; Stanley, Margaret A.; Ebmeyer, Jorg; Steinstraesser, Lars; Upile, Tahwinder; Jerjes, Waseem; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Gorner, Martin; Sudhoff, Holger H.

    2009-10-14

    Abstract The incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has been gradually increasing over the last three decades. Recent data have now attributed a viral aetiology to a subset of head and neck cancers. Several studies indicate...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... Reviewed January 2015 What is head and neck squamous cell carcinoma? Squamous cell carcinoma is a cancer that arises ...

  1. 49 CFR 572.163 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.163 Neck assembly and test procedure. The neck assembly is...

  2. Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Main Content Are You ... Problems Too? Remember Are You Being Treated With Radiation for Cancer in Your Head or Neck? If ...

  3. Transoral Endoscopic Head and Neck Surgery: The Contemporary Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Gil Chai; Holsinger, Floyd Christopher; Li, Ryan J

    2015-12-01

    Traditional open surgical approaches are indicated for treatment of select tumor subsites of head and neck cancer, but can also result in major cosmetic and functional morbidity. Transoral surgical approaches have been used for head and neck cancer since the 1960s, with their application continuing to evolve with the changing landscape of this disease and recent innovations in surgical instrumentation. The potential to further reduce treatment morbidity with transoral surgery, while optimizing oncologic outcomes, continues to be investigated. This review examines current literature evaluating oncologic and quality-of-life outcomes achieved through transoral head and neck surgery. PMID:26568549

  4. Neck circumference as a new anthropometric indicator for prediction of insulin resistance and components of metabolic syndrome in adolescents: Brazilian Metabolic Syndrome Study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Cleliani de Cassia; Zambon, Mariana Porto; Vasques, Ana Carolina J.; Rodrigues, Ana Maria de B.; Camilo, Daniella Fernandes; Antonio, Maria Ângela R. de G. M.; Cassani, Roberta Soares L.; Geloneze, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation between neck circumference and insulin resistance and components of metabolic syndrome in adolescents with different adiposity levels and pubertal stages, as well as to determine the usefulness of neck circumference to predict insulin resistance in adolescents. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 388 adolescents of both genders from ten to 19 years old. The adolescents underwent anthropometric and body composition assessment, including neck and waist circumferences, and biochemical evaluation. The pubertal stage was obtained by self-assessment, and the blood pressure, by auscultation. Insulin resistance was evaluated by the Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance. The correlation between two variables was evaluated by partial correlation coefficient adjusted for the percentage of body fat and pubertal stage. The performance of neck circumference to identify insulin resistance was tested by Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve. RESULTS: After the adjustment for percentage body fat and pubertal stage, neck circumference correlated with waist circumference, blood pressure, triglycerides and markers of insulin resistance in both genders. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the neck circumference is a useful tool for the detection of insulin resistance and changes in the indicators of metabolic syndrome in adolescents. The easiness of application and low cost of this measure may allow its use in Public Health services. PMID:25119754

  5. Head and neck response of a finite element anthropomorphic test device and human body model during a simulated rotary-wing aircraft impact.

    PubMed

    White, Nicholas A; Danelson, Kerry A; Gayzik, F Scott; Stitzel, Joel D

    2014-11-01

    A finite element (FE) simulation environment has been developed to investigate aviator head and neck response during a simulated rotary-wing aircraft impact using both an FE anthropomorphic test device (ATD) and an FE human body model. The head and neck response of the ATD simulation was successfully validated against an experimental sled test. The majority of the head and neck transducer time histories received a CORrelation and analysis (CORA) rating of 0.7 or higher, indicating good overall correlation. The human body model simulation produced a more biofidelic head and neck response than the ATD experimental test and simulation, including change in neck curvature. While only the upper and lower neck loading can be measured in the ATD, the shear force, axial force, and bending moment were reported for each level of the cervical spine in the human body model using a novel technique involving cross sections. This loading distribution provides further insight into the biomechanical response of the neck during a rotary-wing aircraft impact. PMID:25085863

  6. www.yalecancercenter.org Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    www.yalecancercenter.org Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Guest Expert: Hari Deshpande, MD Assistant care of patients with head and neck cancer. I started at Yale in 2004 and since then I have been working with patients with what is known as head and neck squamous cell cancers as well as other head

  7. RESEARCH Open Access Head and neck lymph node region delineation

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    RESEARCH Open Access Head and neck lymph node region delineation with image registration Chia and neck represent a great epidemiological problem in western countries. Head and neck cancer accounts to clinical criteria, the results suggest the technique has promise. Background Malignant tumors in the head

  8. Kinesin's cover-neck bundle folds forward to generate force

    E-print Network

    Khalil, Ahmad S.

    considered was the neck linker (NL), which connects the N-terminal motor head to the -helical stalk. This 12Kinesin's cover-neck bundle folds forward to generate force Ahmad S. Khalila , David C. Appleyardb the forward drive is produced when the N-terminal cover strand forms a -sheet with the neck linker to yield

  9. Quality in Action Ensuring Head and Neck Oncology Patients Receive

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    Quality in Action Ensuring Head and Neck Oncology Patients Receive Recommended Pretreatment Dental Care at Erie County Medical Center, Buffalo, NY Abstract Purpose: Head and neck (H&N) cancer therapy of the head and neck (H&N) are treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy (RT), or a multimodality

  10. Neck development in metal/elastomer bilayers under dynamic stretchings

    E-print Network

    Hutchinson, John W.

    of necking under quasi-static tension occurs when the average true stress becomes equal to the overallNeck development in metal/elastomer bilayers under dynamic stretchings Zhenyu Xue a,*, John W comprised of an elastomer layer bonded to a metal layer is studied with emphasis on neck development under

  11. 49 CFR 572.173 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...Newton-meters, FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...Newton-meters, FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing...

  12. 49 CFR 572.173 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...Newton-meters, FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...Newton-meters, FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing...

  13. 49 CFR 572.173 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...Newton-meters, FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...Newton-meters, FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing...

  14. Neck muscle fatigue alters upper limb proprioception.

    PubMed

    Zabihhosseinian, Mahboobeh; Holmes, Michael W R; Murphy, Bernadette

    2015-05-01

    Limb proprioception is an awareness by the central nervous system (CNS) of the location of a limb in three-dimensional space and is essential for movement and postural control. The CNS uses the position of the head and neck when interpreting the position of the upper limb, and altered input from neck muscles may affect the sensory inputs to the CNS and consequently may impair the awareness of upper limb joint position. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fatigue of the cervical extensors muscles (CEM) using a submaximal fatigue protocol alters the ability to recreate a previously presented elbow angle with the head in a neutral position. Twelve healthy individuals participated. CEM activity was examined bilaterally using surface electromyography, and kinematics of the elbow joint was measured. The fatigue protocol included an isometric neck extension task at 70 % of maximum until failure. Joint position error increased following fatigue, demonstrating a significant main effect of time (F 2, 18?=?19.41, p???0.0001) for absolute error. No significant differences were found for variable error (F 2, 18?=?0.27, p?=?0.76) or constant error (F 2, 18?=?1.16 of time, p???0.33). This study confirms that fatigue of the CEM can reduce the accuracy of elbow joint position matching. This suggests that altered afferent input from the neck subsequent to fatigue may impair upper limb proprioception. PMID:25764200

  15. Synergistic Approaches to Neck Rejuvenation and Lifting.

    PubMed

    Weinkle, Allison P; Sofen, Bryan; Emer, Jason

    2015-11-01

    There is an increasing trend shifting the aesthetic focus downward from the face with a significant number of new treatments aimed at the aging neck and below. Clinical characteristics of neck youth include clear skin texture and tone without laxity or fat, in addition to a well-defined cervicomental angle and distinct mandibular border. Similarly to treating facial aging, the neck requires a comprehensive assessment of all factors involved in the aging process - loss of volume, increased skin laxity, worsening texture and clarity, and crepe skin/wrinkling - as each requires a combination approach for improvement. It is essential to address each above factors for more than minimal improvement. A multitude of options including neuromodulators, energy based devices, surgery, and injectable agents for fat reduction are available in our armamentarium and understanding these options solo, or ideally in combination, is essential for best practice and optimal results. Herein, we describe synergic approaches to the treatment of neck aging.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2015;14(11):1215-1228. PMID:26580870

  16. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... velocity of 3.4±0.1 m/s measured at the center of the pendulum accelerometer (Figure 22 as set forth in 49 CFR 572.33) at the time the pendulum makes contact with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time...)—ES-2re Neck Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary Time(ms) Velocity(m/s)...

  17. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... velocity of 3.4±0.1 m/s measured at the center of the pendulum accelerometer (Figure 22 as set forth in 49 CFR 572.33) at the time the pendulum makes contact with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time...)—ES-2re Neck Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary Time(ms) Velocity(m/s)...

  18. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... velocity of 3.4±0.1 m/s measured at the center of the pendulum accelerometer (Figure 22 as set forth in 49 CFR 572.33) at the time the pendulum makes contact with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time...)—ES-2re Neck Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary Time(ms) Velocity(m/s)...

  19. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 3.4±0.1 m/s measured at...with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Neck Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  20. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 3.4±0.1 m/s measured at...with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Neck Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  1. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 3.4±0.1 m/s measured at...with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Neck Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  2. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 3.4±0.1 m/s measured at...with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Neck Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  3. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 3.4±0.1 m/s measured at...with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Neck Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  4. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...can be measured by placing a transducer at the occipital condyles...when using the six-axis neck transducer: M = Mx + 0.01778 Fy Where Mx and Fy are the moment and force measured by the transducer and expressed in terms of...

  5. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...can be measured by placing a transducer at the occipital condyles...when using the six-axis neck transducer: M = Mx + 0.01778 Fy Where Mx and Fy are the moment and force measured by the transducer and expressed in terms of...

  6. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...can be measured by placing a transducer at the occipital condyles...when using the six-axis neck transducer: M = Mx + 0.01778 Fy Where Mx and Fy are the moment and force measured by the transducer and expressed in terms of...

  7. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...can be measured by placing a transducer at the occipital condyles...when using the six-axis neck transducer: M = Mx + 0.01778 Fy Where Mx and Fy are the moment and force measured by the transducer and expressed in terms of...

  8. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...can be measured by placing a transducer at the occipital condyles...when using the six-axis neck transducer: M = Mx + 0.01778 Fy Where Mx and Fy are the moment and force measured by the transducer and expressed in terms of...

  9. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49... shown in 49 CFR Part 572 Figure 15, at the instant the pendulum makes contact with the...

  10. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49... shown in 49 CFR Part 572 Figure 15, at the instant the pendulum makes contact with the...

  11. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49... CFR Part 572 Figure 15, at the instant the pendulum makes contact with the decelerating mechanism;...

  12. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly. 572.113 Section 572.113 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Side Impact Hybrid...

  13. Is Planned Neck Dissection Necessary for Head and Neck Cancer After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Min |. E-mail: min-yao@uiowa.edu; Hoffman, Henry T.; Funk, Gerry F. |; Chang, Kristi; Smith, Russell B. |; Tan Huaming; Clamon, Gerald H.; Dornfeld, Ken |; Buatti, John M. |

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine regional control of local regional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), along with the role and selection criteria for neck dissection after IMRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 90 patients with stage N2A or greater HNSCC were treated with definitive IMRT from December 1999 to July 2005. Three clinical target volumes were defined and were treated to 70 to 74 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy, respectively. Neck dissection was performed for selected patients after IMRT. Selection criteria evolved during this period with emphasis on post-IMRT [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in recent years. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 29 months (range, 0.2-74 months). All living patients were followed at least 9 months after completing treatment. Thirteen patients underwent neck dissection after IMRT because of residual lymphadenopathy. Of these, 6 contained residual viable tumor. Three patients with persistent adenopathy did not undergo neck dissection: 2 refused and 1 had lung metastasis. Among the remaining 74 patients who were observed without neck dissection, there was only 1 case of regional failure. Among all 90 patients in this study, the 3-year local and regional control was 96.3% and 95.4%, respectively. Conclusions: Appropriately delivered IMRT has excellent dose coverage for cervical lymph nodes. A high radiation dose can be safely delivered to the abnormal lymph nodes. There is a high complete response rate. Routine planned neck dissection for patients with N2A and higher stage after IMRT is not necessary. Post-IMRT [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is a useful tool in selecting patients appropriate for neck dissection.

  14. Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Muscle use evoked by exercise was determined by quantifying shifts in signal relaxation times of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Images were collected at rest and after exercise at each of two intensities (moderate and intense) for each of four head movements: 1) extension, 2) flexion, 3) rotation, and 4) lateral flexion. OBJECTIVE. This study examined the intensity and pattern of neck muscle use evoked by various movements of the head. The results will help elucidate the pathophysiology, and thus methods for treating disorders of the cervical musculoskeletal system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in T2 has been shown to indicate muscle use during the activity. The noninvasive nature of magnetic resonance imaging appears to make it an ideal approach for studying the function of the complex neuromuscular system of the neck. METHODS. The extent of T2 increase was examined to gauge how intensely nine different neck muscles or muscle pairs were used in seven subjects. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation was assessed to infer the pattern of use among and within individual neck muscles or muscle pairs. RESULTS. Signal relaxation increased with exercise intensity for each head movement. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation also increased with exercise load. Neck muscles or muscle pairs extensively used to perform each head movement were: extension--semispinalis capitis and cervicis and splenius capitis; flexion--sternocleidomastoid and longus capitis and colli; rotation--splenius capitis, levator scapulae, scalenus, semispinalis capitis ipsilateral to the rotation, and sternocleidomastoid contralateral; and lateral flexion--sternocleidomastoid CONCLUSION. The results of this study, in part, agree with the purported functions of neck muscles derived from anatomic location. This also was true for the few selected muscles that have been examined in human electromyographic studies. Neck muscle function and morphology can be studied at a detailed level using exercise-induced shifts in magnetic resonance images.

  15. Why sauropods had long necks; and why giraffes have short necks.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael P; Wedel, Mathew J

    2013-01-01

    The necks of the sauropod dinosaurs reached 15 m in length: six times longer than that of the world record giraffe and five times longer than those of all other terrestrial animals. Several anatomical features enabled this extreme elongation, including: absolutely large body size and quadrupedal stance providing a stable platform for a long neck; a small, light head that did not orally process food; cervical vertebrae that were both numerous and individually elongate; an efficient air-sac-based respiratory system; and distinctive cervical architecture. Relevant features of sauropod cervical vertebrae include: pneumatic chambers that enabled the bone to be positioned in a mechanically efficient way within the envelope; and muscular attachments of varying importance to the neural spines, epipophyses and cervical ribs. Other long-necked tetrapods lacked important features of sauropods, preventing the evolution of longer necks: for example, giraffes have relatively small torsos and large, heavy heads, share the usual mammalian constraint of only seven cervical vertebrae, and lack an air-sac system and pneumatic bones. Among non-sauropods, their saurischian relatives the theropod dinosaurs seem to have been best placed to evolve long necks, and indeed their necks probably surpassed those of giraffes. But 150 million years of evolution did not suffice for them to exceed a relatively modest 2.5 m. PMID:23638372

  16. Pre-operative segmentation of neck CT datasets for the planning of neck dissections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, Jeanette; Dornheim, Jana; Preim, Bernhard; Hertel, Ilka; Strauss, Gero

    2006-03-01

    For the pre-operative segmentation of CT neck datasets, we developed the software assistant NeckVision. The relevant anatomical structures for neck dissection planning can be segmented and the resulting patient-specific 3D-models are visualized afterwards in another software system for intervention planning. As a first step, we examined the appropriateness of elementary segmentation techniques based on gray values and contour information to extract the structures in the neck region from CT data. Region growing, interactive watershed transformation and live-wire are employed for segmentation of different target structures. It is also examined, which of the segmentation tasks can be automated. Based on this analysis, the software assistant NeckVision was developed to optimally support the workflow of image analysis for clinicians. The usability of NeckVision was tested within a first evaluation with four otorhinolaryngologists from the university hospital of Leipzig, four computer scientists from the university of Magdeburg and two laymen in both fields.

  17. Why sauropods had long necks; and why giraffes have short necks

    PubMed Central

    Wedel, Mathew J.

    2013-01-01

    The necks of the sauropod dinosaurs reached 15 m in length: six times longer than that of the world record giraffe and five times longer than those of all other terrestrial animals. Several anatomical features enabled this extreme elongation, including: absolutely large body size and quadrupedal stance providing a stable platform for a long neck; a small, light head that did not orally process food; cervical vertebrae that were both numerous and individually elongate; an efficient air-sac-based respiratory system; and distinctive cervical architecture. Relevant features of sauropod cervical vertebrae include: pneumatic chambers that enabled the bone to be positioned in a mechanically efficient way within the envelope; and muscular attachments of varying importance to the neural spines, epipophyses and cervical ribs. Other long-necked tetrapods lacked important features of sauropods, preventing the evolution of longer necks: for example, giraffes have relatively small torsos and large, heavy heads, share the usual mammalian constraint of only seven cervical vertebrae, and lack an air-sac system and pneumatic bones. Among non-sauropods, their saurischian relatives the theropod dinosaurs seem to have been best placed to evolve long necks, and indeed their necks probably surpassed those of giraffes. But 150 million years of evolution did not suffice for them to exceed a relatively modest 2.5 m. PMID:23638372

  18. Capability of a neck worn device to measure sleep/wake, airway position, and differentiate benign snoring from obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Levendowski, Daniel J; Veljkovic, Bratislav; Seagraves, Sean; Westbrook, Philip R

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of a neck-worn device in measuring sleep/wake, detecting supine airway position, and using loud snoring to screen for obstructive sleep apnea. Study A included 20 subjects who wore the neck-device during polysomnography (PSG), with 31 records obtained from diagnostic and split-night studies. Study B included 24 community-based snorers studied in-home for up to three-nights with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) severity measured with a validated Level III recorder. The accuracy of neck actigraphy-based sleep/wake was measured by assessing sleep efficiency (SE). Differences in sleep position measured at the chest and neck during PSG were compared to video-editing. Loud snoring acquired with an acoustic microphone was compared to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) by- and acrosspositions. Over-reported SE by neck actigraphy was inversely related to OSA severity. Measurement of neck and chest supine position were highly correlated with video-edits (r=0.93, 0.78). Chest was bias toward over-estimating supine time while the majority of neck-device supine position errors occurred during CPAP titrations. Snoring was highly correlated with the overall, supine, and non-supine PSG-AHI (r=0.79, 0.74, 0.83) and was both sensitive and specific in detecting overall, supine, and non-supine PSGAHI>10 (sensitivity=81, 88, 82%; specificity=87, 79, 100%). At home sleep testing-AHI>10, the sensitivity and specificity of loud snoring was superior when users were predominantly non-supine as compared to baseline (sensitivity=100, 92%; specificity=88, 77%). Neck actigraphy appears capable of estimating sleep/wake. The accuracy of supine airway detection with the neck-device warrants further investigation. Measurement of loud snoring appears to provide a screening tool for differentiating positional apneic and benign snorers. PMID:24599632

  19. National survey of back & neck pain amongst consultant ophthalmologists in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Hyer, Jonathan N; Lee, Richard M; Chowdhury, Haziq R; Smith, Henry B; Dhital, Anish; Khandwala, Mona

    2015-12-01

    Repetitive tasks, awkward or prolonged working postures, and high cognitive load are risk factors for occupational musculoskeletal disorders. Ophthalmologists may be vulnerable given that they are exposed to a combination of these factors. This national study assesses the prevalence, severity and associations of back and neck pain amongst UK consultant ophthalmologists. A postal survey was conducted using addresses supplied by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson correlation coefficient, two-tailed probability testing, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Dunn's multiple comparison test. 518 responses were received (50.3 % response rate). Back and neck pain were reported by 50.6 % (262/518) and 31.8 % (165/518) of respondents, respectively, with 62.4 % (323/518) reporting one or both. 33.6 % (174/518) reported pain whilst operating, of whom 78.7 % (137/174) found operating exacerbated their pain. 31.7 % (164/518) reported pain when using the slit lamp, of whom 71.3 % (117/164) found it exacerbated their pain. Individual subspecialties showed a significant relative risk of back or neck pain in some circumstances, when compared to ophthalmologists as a whole. Occupational back and neck pain remains a problem amongst ophthalmologists. Recommendations are made for modifications to the working environment, and consideration should be given to improving education for trainees. PMID:25609503

  20. Novel Treatment of Neck Wrinkles with an Intradermal Radiofrequency Device

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Moo Yeol; Li, Kapsok; Kim, Myeung Nam; Hong, Chang Kwun; Kim, Hyuk; Koh, Hyun-Ju; Park, Won-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Neck wrinkles commonly develop owing to the aging process. However, recently, the number of patients with neck wrinkles has been increasing. Also, an increasing number of young patients have presented with this condition, possibly because of the effect of the head-down posture that they adopt when using their computer or smartphone. We report two cases of young adults with a prominent neck wrinkle. In case 1, a 29-year-old woman with a neck wrinkle was treated with six intradermal radiofrequency (RF) procedures. Her neck wrinkle was significantly improved with the RF treatment. In case 2, a 32-year-old woman with a wrinkle and generalized light brownish tiny papules on the neck was treated with three intradermal RF procedures simultaneously with 30% glycolic acid peeling. Her wrinkle and skin tone were improved dramatically. We conclude that intradermal RF has a considerable efficacy for reducing neck wrinkles. PMID:25673937

  1. Screening for catastrophic neck injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Dec, Katherine L; Cole, Steven L; Dec, Sarah L

    2007-01-01

    The cervical spine is prone to injury due to the structure of the articulating vertebrae at the level of C4-C6, where the spinal cord occupies more of the spinal canal. Cervical spine injuries can occur in all sports and all ages. Participation in contact sports certainly increases the possibility of cervical spine injuries. In screening for catastrophic neck injuries it is vital to examine incidence and injury surveillance statistics in sports. These data can help determine sport-specific preponderance of catastrophic injury. Screening methods for predisposition to catastrophic cervical spine injuries include a concise history, physical examination, and radiographic methods. There is currently no universal classification system utilizing imaging of the cervical spine that has been validated as a screening method for catastrophic neck injuries. PMID:17212907

  2. Posttraumatic Boutonnière and Swan Neck Deformities.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Kathleen E; Lee, Donald H

    2015-10-01

    Boutonnière and swan neck deformities of the finger can be the result of trauma. The complex anatomy of the extensor mechanism of the finger makes understanding the pathomechanics of these deformities challenging. These posttraumatic deformities should not be confused with those associated with inflammatory arthritis because the treatment options are often very different. An accurate clinical assessment is essential for selecting the appropriate treatment method. Physical examination, including Elson and intrinsic-plus tests, and plain radiography are important tools for diagnosis. A variety of nonsurgical and surgical treatment modalities can be used to restore the motion of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints and rebalance the forces across these joints. An understanding of the anatomy, clinical presentation, treatment options, and expected outcomes is crucial for optimal treatment of posttraumatic boutonnière and swan neck deformities. PMID:26320165

  3. HPV-Associated Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vokes, Everett E; Agrawal, Nishant; Seiwert, Tanguy Y

    2015-12-01

    Over the last two decades, it has been recognized that head and neck cancers, primarily in the oropharynx, can be a distinct entity that is causally related to human papilloma virus (HPV). Fakhry et al. (1) established in 2008 that such tumors have a strikingly better prognosis with improved responsiveness to chemotherapy as well as chemoradiotherapy and favorable survival rates. Since then, new studies have contributed to our increased understanding of this new entity, ranging from a detailed understanding of the genetic fingerprint and risk modifiers such as smoking to successful early attempts to personalize therapy with de-escalation in the definitive intent treatment setting and specific evaluation of targeted therapies in this patient population. This Commentary seeks to summarize the state of the art of our understanding of HPV-associated head and neck cancers that has emerged since the publication of seminal findings by Fakhry et al. PMID:26656751

  4. Immunity in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers are a diverse group of malignancies that includes an increasing number of virally mediated cancers in addition to tumors caused by tobacco and alcohol use. In both cases, tumor development is intimately related to the host immune system, and the status of an endogenous antitumor response is likely prognostic. Virally mediated cancers provide unique targets for preventive vaccines that generate immune responses directed against virus-associated antigens. Once head and neck tumors develop, they are commonly treated with surgery, radiotherapy, and/or chemotherapy. These treatments are associated with significant toxicities, and despite this, subgroups of patients respond poorly and are likely to relapse and die of their disease. Tumor immunotherapy may allow for improvements in both treatment-associated toxicity and outcome. In addition to providing specific targets for therapeutic vaccines and adoptive therapy, virally associated cancers may also be particularly dependent on immune checkpoints; therefore, immune checkpoint inhibitors are being actively tested for these diseases. Cancers that are not virally mediated may also respond to immunotherapies, and biomarkers that could predict response to immunotherapy irrespective of viral status are being evaluated. Multiple ongoing studies are testing benefits of immunotherapy in the management of metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Early promising results pave the way for future studies that will expand testing to nonmetastatic diseases and other types of head and neck cancers. Prospects of combining various immunotherapies and more established treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy are very intriguing and may provide synergistic benefits. PMID:25568068

  5. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... transducers specified in 49 CFR 572.200(e) shall be 71 to 81 degrees with respect to the longitudinal axis of... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22,...

  6. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... transducers specified in 49 CFR 572.200(e) shall be 71 to 81 degrees with respect to the longitudinal axis of... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22,...

  7. Head, neck, and brain tumor embolization guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Duffis, E Jesus; Prestigiacomo, Charles Joseph; Abruzzo, Todd; Albuquerque, Felipe; Bulsara, Ketan R; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fraser, Justin F; Hirsch, Joshua A; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Do, Huy M; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Meyers, Philip M; Narayanan, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Background Management of vascular tumors of the head, neck, and brain is often complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Peri-operative embolization of vascular tumors may help to reduce intra-operative bleeding and operative times and have thus become an integral part of the management of these tumors. Advances in catheter and non-catheter based techniques in conjunction with the growing field of neurointerventional surgery is likely to expand the number of peri-operative embolizations performed. The goal of this article is to provide consensus reporting standards and guidelines for embolization treatment of vascular head, neck, and brain tumors. Summary This article was produced by a writing group comprised of members of the Society of Neurointerventional Surgery. A computerized literature search using the National Library of Medicine database (Pubmed) was conducted for relevant articles published between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2010. The article summarizes the effectiveness and safety of peri-operative vascular tumor embolization. In addition, this document provides consensus definitions and reporting standards as well as guidelines not intended to represent the standard of care, but rather to provide uniformity in subsequent trials and studies involving embolization of vascular head and neck as well as brain tumors. Conclusions Peri-operative embolization of vascular head, neck, and brain tumors is an effective and safe adjuvant to surgical resection. Major complications reported in the literature are rare when these procedures are performed by operators with appropriate training and knowledge of the relevant vascular and surgical anatomy. These standards may help to standardize reporting and publication in future studies. PMID:22539531

  8. Evolution and development of the vertebrate neck

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, Rolf; Knight, Robert; Johanson, Zerina

    2013-01-01

    Muscles of the vertebrate neck include the cucullaris and hypobranchials. Although a functional neck first evolved in the lobe-finned fishes (Sarcopterygii) with the separation of the pectoral/shoulder girdle from the skull, the neck muscles themselves have a much earlier origin among the vertebrates. For example, lampreys possess hypobranchial muscles, and may also possess the cucullaris. Recent research in chick has established that these two muscles groups have different origins, the hypobranchial muscles having a somitic origin but the cucullaris muscle deriving from anterior lateral plate mesoderm associated with somites 1–3. Additionally, the cucullaris utilizes genetic pathways more similar to the head than the trunk musculature. Although the latter results are from experiments in the chick, cucullaris homologues occur in a variety of more basal vertebrates such as the sharks and zebrafish. Data are urgently needed from these taxa to determine whether the cucullaris in these groups also derives from lateral plate mesoderm or from the anterior somites, and whether the former or the latter represent the basal vertebrate condition. Other lateral plate mesoderm derivatives include the appendicular skeleton (fins, limbs and supporting girdles). If the cucullaris is a definitive lateral plate-derived structure it may have evolved in conjunction with the shoulder/limb skeleton in vertebrates and thereby provided a greater degree of flexibility to the heads of predatory vertebrates. PMID:22697305

  9. Inverted drop testing and neck injury potential.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Stephen; Herbst, Brian; Meyer, Steve; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam

    2003-01-01

    Inverted drop testing of vehicles is a methodology that has long been used by the automotive industry and researchers to test roof integrity and is currently being considered by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration as a roof strength test. In 1990 a study was reported which involved 8 dolly rollover tests and 5 inverted drop tests. These studies were conducted with restrained Hybrid III instrumented Anthropometric Test Devices (ATD) in production and rollcaged vehicles to investigate the relationship between roof strength and occupant injury potential. The 5 inverted drop tests included in the study provided a methodology producing "repeatable roof impacts" exposing the ATDs to the similar impact environment as those seen in the dolly rollover tests. Authors have conducted two inverted drop test sets as part of an investigation of two real world rollover accidents. Hybrid-III ATD's were used in each test with instrumented head and necks. Both test sets confirm that reduction of roof intrusion and increased headroom can significantly enhance occupant protection. In both test pairs, the neck force of the dummy in the vehicle with less crush and more survival space was significantly lower. Reduced roof crush and dynamic preservation of the occupant survival space resulted in only minor occupant contact and minimal occupant loading, establishing a clear causal relationship between roof crush and neck injuries. PMID:12724903

  10. Talar Neck Fracture after United Tibiotalar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Platt, W.; Welck, M.; Rudge, B.

    2015-01-01

    Tibiotalar arthrodesis is a well-established treatment for tibiotalar arthritis, for example, in younger high demand patients. Talar neck fractures are less common though well-recognised sequelae of foot ankle trauma. Here we present the clinical case of a 69-year-old male who presented to our institution with a nonunion of a talar neck fracture, having undergone a left tibiotalar fusion 24 years previously. To the authors' knowledge, this injury has only been described once previously in the literature. However, the original case described a fracture sustained in the very early postoperative period following tibiotalar fusion, postulated to be secondary to postimmobilisation osteopaenia or stress risers from metalwork. The aetiology in this case is likely due to axial compression transmitted to the talar neck via the calcaneus. The predisposing factors for nonunion are discussed, highlighting the importance of vigilance for this injury in any patient with concomitant tibiotalar fusion and foot trauma. The management of this patient is discussed. PMID:26491589

  11. Head and neck cancers in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Poonam; Dutta, Sourav; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Nair, Sudhir

    2014-04-01

    Head and neck cancers are the most common cancers in developing countries, especially in Southeast Asia. Head and neck cancers are more common in males compared to females. This is mainly attributed to tobacco, areca nut, alcohol, etc. Oral cancers are most common amongst all head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC). HNSCC in the developing world differ from those in the Western world in terms of age, site of disease, etiology, and molecular biology. Poverty, illiteracy, advanced stage at presentation, lack of access to health care, and poor treatment infrastructure pose a major challenge in management of these cancers. The annual GDP (gross domestic product) spent on health care is very low in developing countries compared to the developed countries. Cancer treatment leads to a significant financial burden on the cancer patients and their families. Several health programs have been implemented to curb this rising burden of disease. The main aims of these health programs are to increase awareness among people regarding tobacco and to improve access to health care facilities, early diagnosis, treatment, and palliative care. PMID:24808947

  12. [PET in head and neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Talbot, Jean-Noël; Périé, Sophie; Kerrou, Khaldoun; Montravers, Françoise; Balogova, Sona; Grahek, Dany; Gutman, Fabrice; Saint Guily, Jean Lacau

    2006-09-01

    FDG PET is useful when cancer in the head or neck (except for tumors of the salivary glands, which cannot be characterized accurately) is diagnosed or suspected but not confirmed by biopsy. It can, for example, find evidence of suspicious lymph nodes in clinically N0 necks, detect foci suggestive of distant metastases or second cancers, and provide useful prognostic information. Because it can be very difficult to identify anatomical structures and landmarks on PET images in the head and neck region, PET/CT fusion is very helpful in this area. In early assessment of chemotherapy, the absence of a significant reduction in FDG uptake after one or two cycles predicts lack of efficacy and thus indicates the need to modify the regimen. Conversely, the disappearance of FDG foci indicates effective treatment and good prognosis but cannot rule out the persistence of any malignant tissue at the end of treatment, especially neoadjuvant. Diagnostic impact is probably greatest in monitoring for recurrence and restaging known recurrence: FDG PET should be performed - perhaps routinely - early enough that curative options are still open, but long enough after the end of treatment to avoid false positive results from inflammation. The strategy and timing of FDG PET during follow-up should be determined in more detail in the future, as should the role (if any) of fluorotyrosine (FET) PET in squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:16969332

  13. X-pinch dynamics: Neck formation and implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Artyomov, A. P.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Fedunin, A. V.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.

    2014-10-15

    We propose a model that describes the neck formation and implosion in an X-pinch. The process is simulated to go in two stages. The first stage is neck formation. This stage begins with an electrical explosion of the wires forming the X-pinch, and at the end of the stage, a micropinch (neck) is formed in the region where the wires are crossed. The second stage is neck implosion. The implosion is accompanied by outflow of matter from the neck region, resulting in the formation of a “hot spot”. Analytical estimates obtained in the study under consideration indicate that these stages are approximately equal in duration. Having analyzed the neck implosion dynamics, we have verified a scaling which makes it possible to explain the observed dependences of the time of occurrence of an x-ray pulse on the X-pinch current and mass.

  14. Patterns of sexual, bilateral and interpopulational variation in human femoral neck-shaft angles

    PubMed Central

    ANDERSON, JOHN Y.; TRINKAUS, ERIK

    1998-01-01

    Data on femoral neck-shaft angles were collected for 30 modern, historic and prehistoric human population samples, and analysed with respect to sexual dimorphism, bilateral asymmetry, geographical patterning and general economic level. Although some samples had modest sexual dimorphism in this angle, and some individuals exhibited clear asymmetry, there were no consistent patterns of sexual or side differences across human populations. Similarly, there was no evidence for geographic differences, since broad regional groups lacked significant differences and mean angles were not correlated with latitude. However, there is a significant increase in mean neck-shaft angles across populations with an increasingly sedentary existence and with mechanisation. The last reflects the developmental plasticity of this feature with respect to habitual load levels during ontogeny of the hip region. PMID:9643428

  15. Osteoid Osteoma of the Talar Neck With Subacute Presentation.

    PubMed

    Assafiri, Ibrahim; Sraj, Shafic

    2015-10-01

    Osteoid osteoma of the talar neck is a rare clinical entity that is frequently missed on initial assessment in patients with ankle pain. We present a case report of an adolescent with talar neck osteoid osteoma who presented with persistent pain after an injury. We review the differential diagnosis of persistent anterior ankle pain and review the treatment options for osteoid osteoma of the talar neck. PMID:26447421

  16. Plant-calf, Egg-head and Horse-neck

    E-print Network

    Rdo rje don 'grub

    2011-01-01

    stream_source_info Plant-calf, Egg-head and Horse-neck.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 8698 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Plant-calf, Egg-head and Horse-neck.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... (Video) Plant-calf, Egg-head and Horse-neck ‘Plant-calf, Egg-head and Horse-neck’ was told by Don drug in A mdo Tibetan. Rta rgyugs, a subdivision of Rka phug Administrative Village, is a farming village located in Khams ra Town, Gcan tsa County...

  17. Head and Neck Sarcomas: The UCLA Experience

    PubMed Central

    Tajudeen, Bobby A.; Fuller, Jennifer; Lai, Chi; Grogan, Tristan; Elashoff, David; Abemayor, Elliot; St. John, Maie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To profile the clinical presentation, subtype distribution, and treatment results of sarcomas of the head and neck at a single tertiary academic center over an 11-year period. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was performed by examining the records and reviewing the pathology of 186 patients with head and neck sarcomas treated at UCLA Medical Center from 2000 to 2011. Results The mean age of the study population was 49 +/? 22 years. 58% of the patients were male and 42% were female. Median duration of follow-up for the entire group was 18.5 months. The most common presenting symptom was a mass lesion in 59.9% of patients. The nasal cavity/sinus was the most common presenting site seen in 22% of patients. Solitary fibrous tumor/hemangiopericytoma was the most common subtype. 15% of patients had evidence of prior radiation exposure. 26.3% of tumors were greater than 5cm and 35.5% were high-grade. Margins were positive in 31.2% of patients. Lymph node metastasis was rare at 6.5%. Perineural invasion was identified in 6.5%. Among all subtypes, 5-yr recurrence-free survival and overall survival were 50% and 49%, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that grade and margin status were predictors of recurrence-free survival while grade and age affected overall survival. Conclusions Head and neck sarcomas are a rare entity frequently presenting as a mass lesion. In our series, lesions tended to be high-grade with a significant portion of surgical specimens having positive margins. Grade and margin status were the most important predictors of survival. PMID:24721744

  18. What a Pain in the Neck! Good Habits to Remember to Prevent Neck Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on the arm of a couch. On the phone a lot? Use a speakerphone or headsets -- do not cradle the phone in your neck. Exercise. Treat your body to ... Bryn Mawr Ave., Ste 200 Rosemont, Illinois 60018 phone (847) 737-6000 fax (847) 754-4368 © 2015 ...

  19. Cystic masses of neck: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Mahesh Kumar; Malik, Amita; Sureka, Binit; Thukral, Brij Bhushan

    2012-01-01

    Cystic masses of neck consist of a variety of pathologic entities. The age of presentation and clinical examination narrow down the differential diagnosis; however, imaging is essential for accurate diagnosis and pretreatment planning. Ultrasound is often used for initial evaluation. Computed tomography (CT) provides additional information with regard to the extent and internal composition of the mass. Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) has a supplementary role for confirmation of diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging may be needed in some cases for preoperative assessment. PMID:23833426

  20. Open Line, Assistant, Associate, or full Professor Head and Neck Oncology

    E-print Network

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Open Line, Assistant, Associate, or full Professor Head and Neck in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University is recruiting a head and neck medical. The Stanford Head and Neck Oncology Program (HNOP) has a history of accomplishment

  1. 78 FR 65451 - Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire... oira_submission@omb.eop.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-- NEW (Neck (Cervical Spine...- ] NEW (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire).'' SUPPLEMENTARY...

  2. Fatigue During Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy: Prospective Study on 117 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja . E-mail: barbara.fossa@ieo.it; Santoro, Luigi; Alterio, Daniela; Franchi, Benedetta; Fiore, Maria Rosaria; Fossati, Piero; Kowalczyk, Anna; Canino, Paola; Ansarin, Mohssen; Orecchia, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: Fatigue is an underevaluated cancer-related and treatment-related symptom. We analyzed fatigue in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 117 patients were enrolled (mean age, 58 years). Radiation therapy (median dose, 66 Gy) was given with either exclusive or postoperative intent in 52 and 65 patients, respectively. Chemotherapy (CT) was added before and/or during RT in 61 patients. The patients completed a 20-item questionnaire (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory [MFI-20]) before, during (weekly), and after RT. The impact of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on fatigue was evaluated with unifactorial and multifactorial tests. Results: Fatigue level increased during RT reaching a maximum at Week 6 and then slowly decreased. In multivariate stepwise regression analysis age (inversely related, p < 0.05), psychologic disorders (p < 0.005), and previous head-and-neck surgery (inversely related, p < 0.005) were correlated with higher pre-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p = 0.035), need of cortisone during RT (p = 0.005), and thyroid disorders (p = 0.032) were correlated with higher during-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p < 0.001), and need of cortisone during RT (p < 0.005) were correlated with higher post-RT fatigue level. No impact of gender, performance status, comorbidities other than psychologic and thyroid, tumor stage/site, RT intent, dose, volume, duration, or toxicity was observed. Conclusion: Fatigue affects all patients undergoing RT for head-and-neck cancer, reaches maximum score at the 6th week of RT, and slowly decreases thereafter. Age, thyroid dysfunction, psychologic disorders, pre-RT fatigue score, CT, and cortisone use are correlated with RT-related fatigue levels.

  3. Incidence of shoulder and neck pain in a working population: effect modification between mechanical and psychosocial exposures at work? Results from a one year follow up of the Malmö shoulder and neck study cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ostergren, P.; Hanson, B.; Balogh, I.; Ektor-Andersen, J.; Isacsson, A.; Orbaek, P.; Winkel, J.; Isacsson, S.; t for

    2005-01-01

    Study objective: To assess the impact of mechanical exposure and work related psychosocial factors on shoulder and neck pain. Design: A prospective cohort study. Participants: 4919 randomly chosen, vocationally active men and women ages 45–65 residing in a Swedish city. Neck and shoulder pain were determined by the standardised Nordic questionnaire. Mechanical exposure was assessed by an index based on 11 items designed and evaluated for shoulder and neck disorders. Work related psychosocial factors were measured by the Karasek and Theorell demand-control instrument. Main results: High mechanical exposure was associated with heightened risk for shoulder and neck pain among men and women during follow up. Age adjusted odds ratios (OR) were 2.17 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.65, 2.85) and 1.59 (95% CI: 1.22, 2.06), respectively. In women, job strain (high psychological job demands and low job decision latitude) correlated with heightened risk (OR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.29, 2.31). These risk estimates remained statistically significant when controlled for high mechanical exposure regarding job strain (and vice versa), and for sociodemographic factors. Testing for effect modification between high mechanical exposure and job strain showed them acting synergistically only in women. Conclusion: Job related mechanical exposure in both sexes, and psychosocial factors in women, seem independently of each other to play a part for development of shoulder and neck pain in vocationally active people. The effect of psychosocial factors was more prominent in women, which could be the result of biological factors as well as gender issues. These results suggest that interventions aiming at reducing the occurrence of shoulder and neck pain should include both mechanical and psychosocial factors. PMID:16100307

  4. [Immunotherapy in head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Kansy, B; Hussain, T; Mattheis, S; Wollenberg, B; Brandau, S; Lang, S

    2015-11-01

    The physiological immune response to malignant cells is based on the interaction of antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages, with T and B lymphocytes. CD8(+) effector and natural killer cells are primarily responsible for tumor cell lysis. Tumor cells exploit several mechanisms to influence the body's immune system and promote development and progress of solid head and neck malignancies. Via regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and cancer-associated fibroblasts, tumor cells promote development of suppressive signaling pathways that enable tumor progression. Novel immune therapeutics aim to influence these signaling pathways. Current studies are investigating agents which influence immune-stimulating or immune-suppressive cytokines, as well as drug-based Toll-like receptor activation and vaccination in head and neck cancer. Development of monoclonal antibodies allows for direct and highly specific binding of therapeutics to cell receptors - recently discovered immune checkpoint receptors are particularly intriguing targets. Monoclonal antibodies directed specifically toward T cell-stimulating receptors such as CD28 and CD134, or immunosuppressive receptors CTLA-4 and PD-1, are currently under investigation and have shown promising results. PMID:26452491

  5. Giant Arteriovenous Malformation of the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Dieng, P. A.; Ba, P. S.; Gaye, M.; Diatta, S.; Diop, M. S.; Sene, E.; Ciss, A. G.; Ndiaye, A.; Ndiaye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) have a wide range of clinical presentations. Operative bleeding is one of the most hazardous complications in the surgical management of high-flow vascular malformations. In the cervical region, the presence of vital vascular structures, such as the carotid artery and jugular vein, may increase this risk. This is a case of massive arteriovenous malformation deforming the neck and the face aspect of this aged lady and growing for several years. A giant mass of the left neck occupied the carotid region and the subclavian region. The AVM was developed between the carotid arteries, jugular veins, and vertebral and subclavian vessels, with arterial and venous flux. The patient underwent surgery twice for the cure of that AVM. The first step was the ligation of the external carotid. Seven days later, the excision of the mass was done. In postoperative period the patient presented a peripheral facial paralysis which completely decreased within 10 days. The first ligation of the external carotid reduces significantly the blood flow into the AVM. It permitted secondarily the complete ablation of the AVM without major bleeding even though multiple ligations were done. PMID:26347847

  6. 49 CFR 572.123 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Neck assembly and test procedure. 572.123 Section 572.123 Transportation...OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Six-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.123 Neck...

  7. 49 CFR 572.123 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Neck assembly and test procedure. 572.123 Section 572.123 Transportation...OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Six-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.123 Neck...

  8. NECK LOCALIZATION AND GEOMETRY QUANTIFICATION OF INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSMS

    E-print Network

    Kakadiaris, Ioannis

    NECK LOCALIZATION AND GEOMETRY QUANTIFICATION OF INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSMS E. Sgouritsaa , A. Mohamedb ABSTRACT We present an approach for accurate localization of the neck of intracranial aneurysms the surface of the segmented vessel. We then separate the aneurysm from the parent vessels and localize its

  9. The superior trapezius myocutaneous flap in head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Aviv, J E; Urken, M L; Lawson, W; Biller, H F

    1992-07-01

    The superior trapezius myocutaneous flap, based on the paraspinous perforating branches of the intercostal vessels, is generally not a first-line choice for reconstruction of head and neck defects. However, after wound breakdown following radical neck dissection and radiation therapy, the superior trapezius flap is extremely reliable for coverage of exposed major neck vessels. The flap was used in 30 patients undergoing lateral neck reconstruction. All 30 patients had undergone prior neck dissection and all but two had undergone prior radiation therapy. There were no flap failures. The superior trapezius flap is unique among other regional myocutaneous flaps presently in use in that it has a superiorly based pedicle, which reduces the problem of gravitational pull on the suture lines of severely unfavorable recipient beds. Another advantage of using the denervated muscle of this flap is that it imposes no additional functional loss. The deficiencies of this flap are primarily related to its limited arc of rotation, thereby precluding its use when resurfacing defects that extend beyond the midline of the neck. The reliability of the superior trapezius flap after neck dissection can be explained by the angiosome concept. Based on that concept, previous ligation of the transverse cervical vessels during a neck dissection serves to simultaneously stage this flap, thereby improving its reliability and potential surface area available. PMID:1627289

  10. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-01-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that…

  11. Head and Neck Answers - MP/H Rules

    Cancer.gov

    Answers and Rationale Head and Neck Case # Primary Data Item Name Preferred Answer Rationale Head/Neck 1 Is this a multiple primary? Yes/No Yes Tumors in sites with IC D-O-3 topography codes that are different at the second character are multiple

  12. Language Engineering : The Real Bottle Neck of Natural Language Processing

    E-print Network

    PANEL Language Engineering : The Real Bottle Neck of Natural Language Processing Panel Organizer, Makoto Nagao Department of Electrical Engineering Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, Japan The bottle neck of simplicity. For example: punctua- tion is very important for processing real text, but LTs have nothing

  13. Neck schwannoma diagnosed by core needle biopsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nasrollah, N; Trimboli, P; Bianchi, D; Taccogna, S

    2015-12-01

    Here we present a case of a 58 year old man referred to our hospital to undergo neck and thyroid ultrasonography (US) following palpable neck mass. US revealed a solid hypoechoic nodule in right thyroid lobe, and a solid lesion on the right laterocervical neck region with ultrasound suspicious features of neoplastic lymph node. In order to achieve a diagnosis of the neck mass and to get a proper evaluation of the thyroid nodule, we decided to perform a fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of both lesions. At cytopathologic examination the thyroid nodule appeared as benign, while cytologic sampling of the neck lesion was inadequate for a proper evaluation. Thus, we performed core needle biopsy (CNB) of the neck lesion like recently proposed for thyroid lesions; also, to definitively exclude malignancy of thyroid nodule, this also underwent CNB. Histologic report of CNB confirmed benign thyroid nodule, while the neck lesion revealed a proliferation of neuronal type consistent with schwannoma. The patient has been addressed to clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up. CNB appears as a safe and minimally-invasive approach to diagnose indeterminate neck masses and avoid unnecessary diagnostic surgery. PMID:26550065

  14. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. 9.109 Section 9.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.109 Northern Neck...

  15. AN IMPROVED METHOD OF SEXING RING-NECKED PHEASANT CHICKS

    E-print Network

    AN IMPROVED METHOD OF SEXING RING-NECKED PHEASANT CHICKS By EUGENE E. WOEHLER AND JOHN M. GATES. J, January 1970 Pl'. 228-231 20-W #12;AN IMPROVED METHOD OF SEXING RING·NECKED PHEASANT CHICKSl of Naturol Resources, Modison Abstract: Sex of newly hatched pheasants (Phasianus colchicm) can be easily

  16. Neck Proprioception Shapes Body Orientation and Perception of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Pettorossi, Vito Enrico; Schieppati, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This review article deals with some effects of neck muscle proprioception on human balance, gait trajectory, subjective straight-ahead (SSA), and self-motion perception. These effects are easily observed during neck muscle vibration, a strong stimulus for the spindle primary afferent fibers. We first remind the early findings on human balance, gait trajectory, SSA, induced by limb, and neck muscle vibration. Then, more recent findings on self-motion perception of vestibular origin are described. The use of a vestibular asymmetric yaw-rotation stimulus for emphasizing the proprioceptive modulation of motion perception from the neck is mentioned. In addition, an attempt has been made to conjointly discuss the effects of unilateral neck proprioception on motion perception, SSA, and walking trajectory. Neck vibration also induces persistent aftereffects on the SSA and on self-motion perception of vestibular origin. These perceptive effects depend on intensity, duration, side of the conditioning vibratory stimulation, and on muscle status. These effects can be maintained for hours when prolonged high-frequency vibration is superimposed on muscle contraction. Overall, this brief outline emphasizes the contribution of neck muscle inflow to the construction and fine-tuning of perception of body orientation and motion. Furthermore, it indicates that tonic neck-proprioceptive input may induce persistent influences on the subject’s mental representation of space. These plastic changes might adapt motion sensitiveness to lasting or permanent head positional or motor changes. PMID:25414660

  17. A Modified Dissection Method to Preserve Neck Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankin, Mark H.; Stoller, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    The neck is not only one of the more challenging anatomical regions to dissect but also has important application to clinical conditions, diseases, and procedures. In this study, we describe two simple modifications for dissection of the neck that (1) aid in the identification and preservation of the cutaneous branches of the cervical plexus and…

  18. Doing Great Things in Great Neck, New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Catherine Applefeld

    2007-01-01

    This article features Joe Rutkowski, an instrumental music director at Great Neck North School in New York. Rutkowski had been teaching for 17 years at Great Neck North and is quite popular for the way he makes his students deeply involved with music. Rutkowski, who is a fourth-generation musician in a family of instrumentalists, received…

  19. 49 CFR 572.133 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...01778m is the distance from force to occipital condyle...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing...

  20. 49 CFR 572.133 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...01778m is the distance from force to occipital condyle...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing...

  1. 49 CFR 572.123 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...y-axis and FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...01778m is the distance from force to occipital condyle...y-axis and FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing...

  2. 49 CFR 572.123 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...y-axis and FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...01778m is the distance from force to occipital condyle...y-axis and FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing...

  3. 49 CFR 572.133 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...01778m is the distance from force to occipital condyle...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing...

  4. 49 CFR 572.133 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...01778m is the distance from force to occipital condyle...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing...

  5. 49 CFR 572.123 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...y-axis and FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...01778m is the distance from force to occipital condyle...y-axis and FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing...

  6. 49 CFR 572.133 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11...01778m is the distance from force to occipital condyle...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing...

  7. Head and Neck Cases - MP/H Rules

    Cancer.gov

    Head and Neck Case 1 PATIENT HISTORY Patient History May 7, 2007 Otolaryngology Head & Neck Subjective: Patient was recently seen by a dentist, who noted a roughness in his lower alveolus, and wanted to have this evaluated prior to denture fitting.

  8. The equine neck and its function during movement and locomotion.

    PubMed

    Zsoldos, Rebeka R; Licka, Theresia F

    2015-10-01

    During both locomotion and body movements at stance, the head and neck of the horse are a major craniocaudal and lateral balancing mechanism employing input from the visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems. The function of the equine neck has recently become the focus of several research groups; this is probably also feeding on an increase of interest in the equine neck in equestrian sports, with a controversial discussion of specific neck positions such as maximum head and neck flexion. The aim of this review is to offer an overview of new findings on the structures and functions of the equine neck, illustrating their interplay. The movement of the neck is based on intervertebral motion, but it is also an integral part of locomotion; this is illustrated by the different neck conformations in the breeds of horses used for various types of work. The considerable effect of the neck movement and posture onto the whole trunk and even the limbs is transmitted via bony, ligamentous and muscular structures. Also, the fact that the neck position can easily be influenced by the rider and/or by the employment of training aids makes it an important avenue for training of new movements of the neck as well as the whole horse. Additionally, the neck position also affects the cervical spinal cord as well as the roots of the spinal nerves; besides the commonly encountered long-term neurological effects of cervical vertebral disorders, short-term changes of neural and muscular function have also been identified in the maximum flexion of the cranial neck and head position. During locomotion, the neck stores elastic energy within the passive tissues such as ligaments, joint capsules and fasciae. For adequate stabilisation, additional muscle activity is necessary; this is learned and requires constant muscle training as it is essential to prevent excessive wear and tear on the vertebral joints and also repetitive or single trauma to the spinal nerves and the spinal cord. The capability for this stabilisation decreases with age in the majority of horses due to changes in muscle tissue, muscle coordination and consequently muscle strength. PMID:26163862

  9. Swing of the Surgical Pendulum: A Return to Surgery for Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in the 21st Century?

    SciTech Connect

    Holsinger, F. Christopher Weber, Randal S.

    2007-10-01

    Treatment for head and neck cancer has evolved significantly during the past 100 years. Beginning with Bilroth's total laryngectomy on New Year's Day in 1873, 'radical' surgery remained the only accepted treatment for head and neck cancer when optimal local and regional control was the goal. Bigger was still better when it came to managing the primary tumor and the neck. The 'commando' procedure and radical neck dissection were the hallmarks of this first generation of treatments of head-and-neck cancer. With the advent of microvascular reconstructive techniques, larger and more comprehensive resections could be performed. Despite these large resections and their 'mutilating' sequelae, overall survival did not improve. Even for intermediate-stage disease in head-and-neck cancer, the 5-year survival rate did not improve >50%. Many concluded that more than the scalpel was needed for optimal local and regional control, especially for intermediate- and advanced-stage disease. Most important, the multidisciplinary teams must identify and correlate biomarkers in the tumor and host that predict for a response to therapy and for optimal functional recovery. As the pendulum swings back, a scientific approach using tissue biomarkers for the response to treatment in the setting of multidisciplinary trials must emerge as the new paradigm. In the postgenomic era, treatment decisions should be made based on functional and oncologic parameters-not just to avoid perceived morbidity.

  10. Free Flap Procedures for Reconstruction After Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kini, Erin

    2015-12-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer are seeking improved surgical procedures to avoid severe defects that result from head and neck cancer resection. Free flap reconstruction provides vascularized tissue that has been transferred from a distant donor site on a patient's body to a recipient site, markedly improving wound closure and protecting structures of the head and neck. This article discusses free flap procedures for reconstruction after head and neck cancer resection, including the following procedure phases: airway protection and neck dissections, tumor resection, flap harvest, microvascular anastomosis of the flap, and reconstruction and closure. The article also explains specific risk factors for patients undergoing free flap procedures that have been identified in the literature and include procedure length, hypothermia, and pressure injuries. Each of these factors is discussed regarding its specific effect on this patient population, and the nursing interventions to reduce these risks are identified. PMID:26616329

  11. Blindness after bilateral neck dissection: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Pazos, G A; Leonard, D W; Blice, J; Thompson, D H

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this review of the literature is to identify the probable causes of blindness after bilateral radical neck dissections. This case report and literature review also discusses possible preventive measures that may avert this catastrophic outcome. Cases of blindness after bilateral radical neck dissection were identified by an electronic literature search, as well as cross-checking all references of the above-identified papers. Eleven previous cases of blindness after bilateral neck dissection were identified. The most common cause was posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION), which was permanent. We present the only case in the literature in which blindness occurred after radical neck dissections separated by a span of 9 years. The cause of blindness in our patient was posterior ischemic optic neuropathy. Contributing factors included anemia, hypotension, and disruption of collateral venous return from the neck. PMID:10512147

  12. [Neck pain. Functional and radiological findings compared with topical pain descriptions].

    PubMed

    Krasny, C; Tilscher, H; Hanna, M

    2005-01-01

    Topical pain descriptions of the neck are summarized under the unspecific diagnosis "cervical syndrome" (CS). Neck pain localized in the cranial half of the cervical spine attended with occipital extension is defined as "cervicocephalic syndrome" (OCS). Pain concerning the caudal half with extention in both upper limbs or into the interscapular region is called "cervicobrachial syndrom" (UCS). The combination of both syndromes is described as "cervicocephalic and -brachial syndrom" (OUCS).The retrospective analyzed cohort of 75 patients showed a distribution of incidence of 1:20:17 of OCS : UCS : OUCS. Symptoms like headache, vertigo or tinnitus were reported in 34.7% of all cases, only 4% had MRI documented radicular lesions. Functional disturbances showed a maximum in the segments C2-3 (81.4%) and C3-4 (66.7%). Segmental blockades occurred 6 times more frequently than segmental hyper-mobility. Most of the radiological findings were localized in the vertebral segments C4-5 and C5-6, degenerative disc and joint diseases were predominant. The distribution of functional disturbances and radiological findings of the vertebral segments showed no significant coincidence. Therefore this study proved that there are no correlations between manual-medical findings and radiological results related to the subtypes of chronic neck pain. PMID:15375652

  13. Full-field OCT for fast diagnostic of head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leeuw, Frederic; Casiraghi, Odile; Ben Lakhdar, Aïcha; Abbaci, Muriel; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne

    2015-02-01

    Full-Field OCT (FFOCT) produces optical slices of tissue using white light interferometry providing in-depth 2D images, with an isotropic resolution around 1 micrometer. These optical biopsy images are similar to those obtained with established histological procedures, but without tissue preparation and within few minutes. This technology could be useful when diagnosing a lesion or at the time of its surgical management. Here we evaluate the clinical value of FFOCT imaging in the management of patients with Head and Neck cancers by assessing the accuracy of the diagnosis done on FFOCT images from resected specimen. FFOCT images from Head and Neck samples were first compared to the gold standard (HES-conventional histology). An image atlas dedicated to the training of pathologists was built and diagnosis criteria were identified. Then, we performed a morphological correlative study: both healthy and cancerous samples from patients who undergo Head and Neck surgery of oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx were imaged. Images were interpreted in a random way by two pathologists and the FFOCT based diagnostics were compared with HES (gold standard) of the same samples. Here we present preliminary results showing that FFOCT provides a quick assessment of tissue architecture at microscopic level that could guide surgeons for tumor margin delineation during intraoperative procedure.

  14. Dynamic tensile failure mechanics of the musculoskeletal neck using a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Yliniemi, Eno M; Pellettiere, Joseph A; Doczy, Erica J; Nuckley, David J; Perry, Chris E; Ching, Randal P

    2009-05-01

    Although the catapult phase of pilot ejections has been well characterized in terms of human response to compressive forces, the effect of the forces on the human body during the ensuing ejection phases (including windblast and parachute opening shock) has not been thoroughly investigated. Both windblast and parachute opening shock have been shown to induce dynamic tensile forces in the human cervical spine. However, the human tolerance to such loading is not well known. Therefore, the main objective of this research project was to measure human tensile neck failure mechanics to provide data for computational modeling, anthropometric test device development, and improved tensile injury criteria. Twelve human cadaver specimens, including four females and eight males with a mean age of 50.1+/-9 years, were subjected to dynamic tensile loading through the musculoskeletal neck until failure occurred. Failure load, failure strain, and tensile stiffness were measured and correlated with injury type and location. The mean failure load for the 12 specimens was 3100+/-645 N, mean failure strain was 16.7+/-5.4%, and mean tensile stiffness was 172+/-54.5 N/mm. The majority of injuries (8) occurred in the upper cervical spine (Oc-C3), and none took place in the midcervical region (C3-C5). The results of this study assist in filling the existing void in dynamic tensile injury data and will aid in developing improved neck injury prevention strategies. PMID:19388771

  15. Necking and notch strengthening in metallic glass with symmetric sharp-and-deep notches.

    PubMed

    Sha, Z D; Pei, Q X; Liu, Z S; Zhang, Y W; Wang, T J

    2015-01-01

    Notched metallic glasses (MGs) have received much attention recently due to their intriguing mechanical properties compared to their unnotched counterparts, but so far no fundamental understanding of the correlation between failure behavior and notch depth/sharpness exists. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we report necking and large notch strengthening in MGs with symmetric sharp-and-deep notches. Our work reveals that the failure mode and strength of notched MGs are strongly dependent on the notch depth and notch sharpness. By increasing the notch depth and the notch sharpness, we observe a failure mode transition from shear banding to necking, and also a large notch strengthening. This necking is found to be caused by the combined effects of large stress gradient at the notch roots and the impingement and subsequent arrest of shear bands emanating from the notch roots. The present study not only shows the failure mode transition and the large notch strengthening in notched MGs, but also provides significant insights into the deformation and failure mechanisms of notched MGs that may offer new strategies for the design and engineering of MGs. PMID:26022224

  16. Necking and notch strengthening in metallic glass with symmetric sharp-and-deep notches

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Z. D.; Pei, Q. X.; Liu, Z. S.; Zhang, Y. W.; Wang, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Notched metallic glasses (MGs) have received much attention recently due to their intriguing mechanical properties compared to their unnotched counterparts, but so far no fundamental understanding of the correlation between failure behavior and notch depth/sharpness exists. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we report necking and large notch strengthening in MGs with symmetric sharp-and-deep notches. Our work reveals that the failure mode and strength of notched MGs are strongly dependent on the notch depth and notch sharpness. By increasing the notch depth and the notch sharpness, we observe a failure mode transition from shear banding to necking, and also a large notch strengthening. This necking is found to be caused by the combined effects of large stress gradient at the notch roots and the impingement and subsequent arrest of shear bands emanating from the notch roots. The present study not only shows the failure mode transition and the large notch strengthening in notched MGs, but also provides significant insights into the deformation and failure mechanisms of notched MGs that may offer new strategies for the design and engineering of MGs. PMID:26022224

  17. Effects of different head-neck positions on the larynges of ridden horses.

    PubMed

    Zebisch, A; May, A; Reese, S; Gehlen, H

    2014-10-01

    Hyperflexion, that is the strong deflection of the horse's head, poll and neck, is a prevalent training technique in equitation. Hyperflexion has come under criticism in recent years for being suspected of affecting the horses' well-being contrary to animal welfare. The goal of the present study is a comparison between the impacts of different poll-neck positions on findings in the upper respiratory tract of ridden horses. For this purpose, video recordings of the larynges of 14 horses were taken using an overground endoscope. The videos were recorded at rest and during three different riding phases: firstly, in a stretching posture, secondly, in a working position and, thirdly, in hyperflexion. A comparison between the analyses of the working position and hyperflexion phases revealed a significant reduction in the laryngeal opening area (p = 0.001) with a value of 8.2 ± 5.0%. Furthermore, other parameters of the larynx evaluated also showed a significant diminishment. These changes did not correlate with the age of the horses or their level of education, and they were independent of the individual anatomical conditions of the poll-neck region. In summary, it can be stated that hyperflexion causes a considerable compression of the larynx. PMID:24329611

  18. True stress-strain curve acquisition for irradiated stainless steel including the range exceeding necking strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Kitsunai, Yuji; Koshiishi, Masato

    2015-10-01

    True stress-strain curves were obtained for irradiated 316L stainless steel by a tensile test and by a curve estimation procedure. In the tensile test, the digital image correlation technique together with iterative finite element analysis was applied in order to identify curves for strain larger than the necking strain. The true stress-strain curves were successfully obtained for the strain of more than 0.4 whereas the necking strain was about 0.2 in the minimum case. The obtained true stress-strain curves were approximated well with the Swift-type equation including the post-necking strain even if the exponential constant n was fixed to 0.5. Then, the true stress-strain curves were estimated by a curve estimation procedure, which was referred to as the K-fit method. Material properties required for the K-fit method were the yield and ultimate strengths or only the yield strength. Some modifications were made for the K-fit method in order to improve estimation accuracy for irradiated stainless steels.

  19. Effects of neck bands on survival of greater snow geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menu, S.; Hestbeck, J.B.; Gauthier, G.; Reed, A.

    2000-01-01

    Neck bands are a widely used marker in goose research. However, few studies have investigated a possible negative effect of this marker on survival. We tested the effect of neck bands on the survival of adult female greater snow geese (Chen caerulescens atlantica) by marking birds with either a neck band and a metal leg band or a leg band only on Bylot Island (Nunavut, formerly included in the Northwest Territories, Canada) from 1990 to 1996. Annual survival was estimated using leg-band recoveries in fall and winter and using neck-band sightings in spring and fall. Recapture rates were estimated using summer recaptures. Using recovery data, the selected model yielded a survival similar for the neck-banded and leg-banded only birds (S = 0.845 ?? 0.070 vs. S = 0.811 ?? 0.107). The hypothesis of equality of survival between the 2 groups was easily accepted under most constraints imposed on survival or recovery rates. However, failure to account for a different direct recovery rate for neck-banded birds would lead us to incorrectly conclude a possible negative effect of neck bands on survival. Using sighting data, mean annual survival of neck-banded birds was independently estimated at 0.833 ?? 0.057, a value very similar to that estimated with band-recovery analysis. Raw recapture rates during summer were significantly lower for neck-banded birds compared to those marked with leg bands only (4.6% vs. 12.1%), but in this analysis, survival, site fidelity, reproductive status, and recapture rates were confounded. We conclude that neck bands did not affect survival of greater snow geese, but could possibly affect other demographic traits such as breeding propensity and emigration.

  20. Modelling of Local Necking and Fracture in Aluminium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achani, D.; Eriksson, M.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Lademo, O.-G.

    2007-05-01

    Non-linear Finite Element simulations are extensively used in forming and crashworthiness studies of automotive components and structures in which fracture need to be controlled. For thin-walled ductile materials, the fracture-related phenomena that must be properly represented are thinning instability, ductile fracture and through-thickness shear instability. Proper representation of the fracture process relies on the accuracy of constitutive and fracture models and their parameters that need to be calibrated through well defined experiments. The present study focuses on local necking and fracture which is of high industrial importance, and uses a phenomenological criterion for modelling fracture in aluminium alloys. As an accurate description of plastic anisotropy is important, advanced phenomenological constitutive equations based on the yield criterion YLD2000/YLD2003 are used. Uniaxial tensile tests and disc compression tests are performed for identification of the constitutive model parameters. Ductile fracture is described by the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion and an in-plane shear tests is performed to identify the fracture parameter. The reason is that in a well designed in-plane shear test no thinning instability should occur and it thus gives more direct information about the phenomenon of ductile fracture. Numerical simulations have been performed using a user-defined material model implemented in the general-purpose non-linear FE code LS-DYNA. The applicability of the model is demonstrated by correlating the predicted and experimental response in the in-plane shear tests and additional plane strain tension tests.

  1. Statistical analysis of 4 types of neck whiplash injuries based on classical meridian theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yemeng; Zhao, Yan; Xue, Xiaolin; Li, Hui; Wu, Xiuyan; Zhang, Qunce; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Tianfang

    2015-01-01

    As one component of the Chinese medicine meridian system, the meridian sinew (Jingjin, (see text), tendino-musculo) is specially described as being for acupuncture treatment of the musculoskeletal system because of its dynamic attributes and tender point correlations. In recent decades, the therapeutic importance of the sinew meridian has become revalued in clinical application. Based on this theory, the authors have established therapeutic strategies of acupuncture treatment in Whiplash-Associated Disorders (WAD) by categorizing four types of neck symptom presentations. The advantage of this new system is to make it much easier for the clinician to find effective acupuncture points. This study attempts to prove the significance of the proposed therapeutic strategies by analyzing data collected from a clinical survey of various WAD using non-supervised statistical methods, such as correlation analysis, factor analysis, and cluster analysis. The clinical survey data have successfully verified discrete characteristics of four neck syndromes, based upon the range of motion (ROM) and tender point location findings. A summary of the relationships among the symptoms of the four neck syndromes has shown the correlation coefficient as having a statistical significance (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), especially with regard to ROM. Furthermore, factor and cluster analyses resulted in a total of 11 categories of general symptoms, which implies syndrome factors are more related to the Liver, as originally described in classical theory. The hypothesis of meridian sinew syndromes in WAD is clearly supported by the statistical analysis of the clinical trials. This new discovery should be beneficial in improving therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25980049

  2. Scapular neck length and implications for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty: An anatomic study of 442 cadaveric specimens

    PubMed Central

    Fortun, Chad M.; Streit, Jonathan J.; Horton, Steven A.; Muh, Stephanie J.; Gillespie, Robert J.; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) may be used to treat a variety of pathologic shoulder conditions, but complications such as scapular notching continue raise concerns. Variable anatomy surrounding the glenoid may have implications for future RTSA design, but at present the anatomy of the scapular neck in the human population has not been clearly defined. Materials and Methods: 442 human scapulae from the Hamann-Todd Osteological Collection were measured for scapular neck length (SNL) and scapular neck angle (SNA). SNL was defined as the distance from the most lateral portion of the infraglenoid tubercle to the most inferolateral portion of the glenoid fossa. The SNA was measured according to Gerber et al. previously. The mean, standard deviation and ranges for SNL and SNA were calculated and compared based on sex and race, and interobserver variability was calculated. Results: The mean SNL was 1.06 cm ± 0.33 cm (0.37-2.43 cm). Males demonstrated a larger SNL (1.08 cm ± 0.33 cm) than females (1.01 cm ± 0.32 cm) (P < 0.12), and Caucasians (1.09 cm ± 0.33 cm) demonstrated a significantly larger SNL than African-Americans (1.00 cm ± 0.32) (P < 0.01). The mean SNA was 106.7° ± 11.0° (76.9-139.4°). No significant correlation was found between SNL and SNA (Pearson Correlation Coefficient = 0.018) (P < 0.702). Conclusion: Scapular neck length and SNA vary widely within the population but there appears to be a tendency towards increased SNL in males and Caucasians. Clinical Relevance: The anatomy of the scapular neck may have significant implications for RTSA design, surgical planning, and reduction of associated complications. PMID:25937712

  3. Interfractional Displacement Analysis of the Spinal Cord for 21 Head & Neck Cases in Radiation Therapy Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Armin; Giske, Kristina; Stoiber, Eva; Bendl, Rolf

    A monomodal slice-based displacement analysis of the spinal cord for three-dimensional computer tomography imaging in radiation therapy planning is presented. In total, 21 head and neck cases with tumor indications close to the spinal cord are studied and evaluated. Two-dimensional cross-correlation is applied to propagate manually segmented contours of the spinal cord from a high-resolution planning CT to subsequently acquired control CTs. The method and the fully automatic implementation turned out to be reliable and robust. A very few manual corrections on the resulting contours remained necessary in single transversal slices.

  4. High-velocity gunshot wounds to the head and neck: a review of wound ballistics.

    PubMed

    Yetiser, S; Kahramanyol, M

    1998-05-01

    Patients who sustain gunshot injuries to the head and neck face heavy tissue damage and eventually life-threatening conditions. A very significant factor that determines the degree of injury is the course and extent of the missile track. The missile track is well correlated with bullet structure, size, and velocity, which have distinct features in civilian and military firearm injuries. The missile entrance or exist wound may be out of sight in some injuries, and often it is difficult to predict the severity of the injury in the chaotic circumstances of the battlefield. We studied the wound ballistics in five soldiers who suffered penetrating cranial and cervical firearm injuries. PMID:9597854

  5. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-02-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  6. The Articulation of Sauropod Necks: Methodology and Mythology

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kent A.

    2013-01-01

    Sauropods are often imagined to have held their heads high atop necks that ascended in a sweeping curve that was formed either intrinsically because of the shape of their vertebrae, or behaviorally by lifting the head, or both. Their necks are also popularly depicted in life with poses suggesting avian flexibility. The grounds for such interpretations are examined in terms of vertebral osteology, inferences about missing soft tissues, intervertebral flexibility, and behavior. Osteologically, the pronounced opisthocoely and conformal central and zygapophyseal articular surfaces strongly constrain the reconstruction of the cervical vertebral column. The sauropod cervico-dorsal vertebral column is essentially straight, in contrast to the curvature exhibited in those extant vertebrates that naturally hold their heads above rising necks. Regarding flexibility, extant vertebrates with homologous articular geometries preserve a degree of zygapophyseal overlap at the limits of deflection, a constraint that is further restricted by soft tissues. Sauropod necks, if similarly constrained, were capable of sweeping out large feeding surfaces, yet much less capable of retracting the head to explore the enclosed volume in an avian manner. Behaviorally, modern vertebrates generally assume characteristic neck postures which are close to the intrinsic curvature of the undeflected neck. With the exception of some vertebrates that can retract their heads to balance above their shoulders at rest (e.g., felids, lagomorphs, and some ratites), the undeflected neck generally predicts the default head height at rest and during locomotion. PMID:24205266

  7. Characteristics of visual disturbances reported by subjects with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Treleaven, Julia; Takasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Visual symptoms are often reported by patients with neck pain. The aim of the study was to report on the prevalence and most troublesome visual disturbances in subjects with neck pain. Seventy subjects with neck pain and seventy healthy control subjects answered questions about the presence and magnitude (/12) - product of frequency (0-4) and intensity (0-3) of each of 16 visual symptoms noted to be associated with neck pain and other possible causes. A visual complaint index (VCI) (/168) was generated from the sum of the magnitude rating of 14 significant symptoms. The neck pain group had significantly (P > 0.05) greater prevalence and magnitude of 14/16 visual complaints and VCI (mean 27.4) compared to control subjects (mean 6.2). The most prevalent symptoms were 'need to concentrate to read' (70%) and 'sensitivity to light' (58.6%). The least prevalent were 'double vision' (28.6%) and 'dizzy reading' (38.6%). The most troublesome symptoms (greatest magnitude) were 'need to concentrate to read' (3.4/12), 'visual fatigue' (3/12), 'difficulty judging distances' (2.1/12) and 'sensitivity to light' (2.1/12) while the least troublesome complaints were 'double vision' (0.5/12), 'red eyes' (1/12) and 'spots and words moving' (1/12). The characteristics of the visual symptoms were mostly consistent for those previously associated with neck pain. Subjects with traumatic neck pain had a significantly higher VCI compared to those with idiopathic neck pain. The results could help with differential diagnosis. The visual symptoms might be related to eye movement control disturbances in neck pain, however further research is required. PMID:24521926

  8. Sauropod Necks: Are They Really for Heat Loss?

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional digital models of 16 different sauropods were used to examine the scaling relationship between metabolism and surface areas of the whole body, the neck, and the tail in an attempt to see if the necks could have functioned as radiators for the elimination of excess body heat. The sauropod taxa sample ranged in body mass from a 639 kg juvenile Camarasaurus to a 25 t adult Brachiosaurus. Metabolism was assumed to be directly proportional to body mass raised to the ¾ power, and estimates of body mass accounted for the presence of lungs and systems of air sacs in the trunk and neck. Surface areas were determined by decomposing the model surfaces into triangles and their areas being computed by vector methods. It was found that total body surface area was almost isometric with body mass, and that it showed negative allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. In contrast, neck area showed positive allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. Tail area show negative allometry with respect to metabolic rate. The many uncertainties about the biology of sauropods, and the variety of environmental conditions that different species experienced during the groups 150 million years of existence, make it difficult to be absolutely certain about the function of the neck as a radiator. However, the functional combination of the allometric increase of neck area, the systems of air sacs in the neck and trunk, the active control of blood flow between the core and surface of the body, changing skin color, and strategic orientation of the neck with respect to wind, make it plausible that the neck could have functioned as a radiator to avoid over-heating. PMID:24204747

  9. Sauropod necks: are they really for heat loss?

    PubMed

    Henderson, Donald M

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional digital models of 16 different sauropods were used to examine the scaling relationship between metabolism and surface areas of the whole body, the neck, and the tail in an attempt to see if the necks could have functioned as radiators for the elimination of excess body heat. The sauropod taxa sample ranged in body mass from a 639 kg juvenile Camarasaurus to a 25 t adult Brachiosaurus. Metabolism was assumed to be directly proportional to body mass raised to the ¾ power, and estimates of body mass accounted for the presence of lungs and systems of air sacs in the trunk and neck. Surface areas were determined by decomposing the model surfaces into triangles and their areas being computed by vector methods. It was found that total body surface area was almost isometric with body mass, and that it showed negative allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. In contrast, neck area showed positive allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. Tail area show negative allometry with respect to metabolic rate. The many uncertainties about the biology of sauropods, and the variety of environmental conditions that different species experienced during the groups 150 million years of existence, make it difficult to be absolutely certain about the function of the neck as a radiator. However, the functional combination of the allometric increase of neck area, the systems of air sacs in the neck and trunk, the active control of blood flow between the core and surface of the body, changing skin color, and strategic orientation of the neck with respect to wind, make it plausible that the neck could have functioned as a radiator to avoid over-heating. PMID:24204747

  10. Pocket atlas of head and neck MRI anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lufkin, R.B.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    This pocket atlas depicts the anatomy of the head and neck as seen in magnetic resonance (MR) images. The collection of 140 high-resolution images covers all major areas - neck, larynx, oropharynx, tongue, nasopharynx, skull base, sinuses, and temporal bone - displayed in sagittal, axial, and coronal MR image planes. The images show maximum fat/muscle contrast for better visualization of fascial planes. In certain areas of the anatomy, such as the neck and temporal bone, surface coils were used to achieve significant advantages in image quality over standard head or body coils.

  11. Examination of the patient with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Rachel; Liu, Jeffrey C

    2015-07-01

    Head and neck cancer typically refers to epithelial malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract and may include neoplasms of the thyroid, salivary glands, and soft tissue, bone sarcomas, and skin cancers. Two-thirds of patients present with advanced disease involving regional lymph nodes at the time of diagnosis. A thorough history and detailed examination are integral to oncologic staging and treatment planning. This article begins with an overview of the head and neck examination (with special attention to detailed findings with clinical implications), followed by a discussion of the major head and neck subsites, and clinical pearls surrounding the examination. PMID:25979391

  12. 34. Detail of neck and shoulder connection showing toga clasp ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Detail of neck and shoulder connection showing toga clasp and shoulder lights that improved nighttime illumination of head. May 1984. - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York, New York County, NY

  13. The Mutational Landscape of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    E-print Network

    Lander, Eric S.

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a common, morbid, and frequently lethal malignancy. To uncover its mutational spectrum, we analyzed whole-exome sequencing data from 74 tumor-normal pairs. The majority ...

  14. Multi-atlas segmentation in head and neck CT scans

    E-print Network

    Arbisser, Amelia M

    2012-01-01

    We investigate automating the task of segmenting structures in head and neck CT scans, to minimize time spent on manual contouring of structures of interest. We focus on the brainstem and left and right parotids. To generate ...

  15. Genome Study Yields Clues to Head and Neck Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have surveyed the genetic changes in nearly 300 head and neck cancers, revealing some previously unknown alterations that may play a role in the disease, including in patients whose cancer is associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  16. A Septin-Dependent Diffusion Barrier at Dendritic Spine Necks

    E-print Network

    Ewers, Helge

    Excitatory glutamatergic synapses at dendritic spines exchange and modulate their receptor content via lateral membrane diffusion. Several studies have shown that the thin spine neck impedes the access of membrane and ...

  17. Acupuncture May Ease Neck Pain Over Long Term

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155500.html Acupuncture May Ease Neck Pain Over Long Term 'Alexander ... Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two alternative therapies -- acupuncture and the Alexander technique -- appear equally beneficial for ...

  18. 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Head and Neck Cancer most commonly refers to squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, throat, and voice box. However, ... in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is squamous cell carcinoma. It makes up a little over a half ...

  19. Multiword Expressions: A Pain in the Neck for NLP

    E-print Network

    Palmer, Martha

    Multiword Expressions: A Pain in the Neck for NLP Ivan A. Sag1 , Timothy Baldwin1 , Francis Bond2 techniques. 1 Introduction The tension between symbolic and statistical methods has been apparent in nat

  20. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Research Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®) General Information About Oral Complications Key Points ... bleeding in the mouth. Nerve damage. Complications of radiation therapy Oral complications caused by radiation therapy to ...

  1. Interventional neuroradiology of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Turowski, Bernd; Zanella, Friedhelm E

    2003-08-01

    Vascular interventions are important and helpful for treatment of various pathologies of the head and neck. Interventional neuroradiology of the head and neck includes image-guided biopsies, vessel occlusion, and local chemotherapy. Knowledge of anatomy, functional relationships between intra- and extracranial vessels, and pathology are the basis for therapeutic success. The interventional neuroradiologist is responsible for appropriate selection of patients based on clinical information, indications, and risk assessment. Neuroradiologic imaging, especially CT and MR imaging, and appropriate analysis of angiographic findings help ensure indication for treatment and plan an intervention. Technical equipment, including an angiographic unit, catheters, needles, embolizing materials, and so forth, are important. Knowledge of hemodynamics is relevant to avoid complications and to find the optimal technique for solving the clinical problem. Indications for image-guided biopsies are preverterbal fluid-collections, spinal and paraspinal inflammations and abscesses, deep cervical malignancies, vertebral body, and skull base tumors. Special care should be taken to preserve critical structures in this region, including spinal nerve roots, cervical plexus, main peripheral nerves, and vessels. Indications for vessel occlusion are emergency situations to stop bleeding in vascular lesions (traumatic, malformation, or tumors) by reduction of pressure, preoperative reduction of blood flow to minimize the surgical risk, palliative occlusion of feeding vessels to produce tumor necrosis, or potential curative (or presurgical) occlusion of vascular malformations. Pressure reduction to support normal coagulation, such as epistaxis, in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia can be achieved by proximal vessel occlusion with large particles or platinum coils. Prevention of intraoperative bleeding requires occlusion of the microvascular bed with small particles. Examples of these interventions are: a hemangioma of the hard palate, a juvenile angiofibroma, a hemangiopericytoma, a malignant meningioma, a malignant fibrous histiocytoma, and a glomus tumor. Effective treatment of vascular malformations, such as AV fistulas or angiomas, needs exact occlusion of the fistula or the angiomatous nidus, which is demonstrated in the case of an AV angioma of the base of the tongue. Chemotherapy with local intra-arterial cisplatin combined with intravenous administration of sodium thiosulfate as antidote is indicated as an adjuvant modality in a multimodal regimen of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma or as palliative treatment of recurrent and otherwise untreatable malignant tumors of the head and neck. Examples are a carcinoma of the alveolar ridge, a squamous cell carcinoma of the floor of the mouth, and a nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma. Palliative treatment of a bleeding oropharyngeal cancer is another example of interventional treatment. Selective treatment, either occluding or pharmacologic, may be preoperative, palliative, or curative. The objective is reduction of surgical risk, improvement of quality of life, or curative therapy of a lesion. Thus, the interventional treatment should not be associated with morbidity or mortality. Major complications, such as cerebral stroke, blindness, or cranial nerve palsies, can result from application of inappropriate techniques or poor evaluation of angiographic findings and should be avoided in the majority of cases. Sometimes collateral lesions are unavoidable. These include inflammation, necrosis, and nerve damage. Based on neuroradiologic experience, most of those risks are predictable. The benefits, risks, and expected damages of neuroradiologic interventions must be balanced during the informed consent procedure with the patient. Avoiding complications, handling unavoidable problems, and dealing with complications is a skill founded on knowledge and experience. Continuing education is a firm basis to push the limits of interventions and expand benefits without increasing risk for the patient. Neverthele

  2. Arthroscopic Femoral Neck Osteoplasty in the Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Roxanne M.; Kuzma, Scott A.; Krych, Aaron J.; Levy, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Femoral neck osteoplasty is an integral component for successful treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Current techniques allow this to be performed arthroscopically, and results are equivalent to those of open procedures when typical anterior and anterosuperior lesions are considered. The arthroscopic procedure is dependent on obtaining adequate visualization through capsular management and proper leg positioning, and it requires fluoroscopy to guide and verify an adequate resection. We present our preferred technique for arthroscopic femoral neck osteoplasty. PMID:24749017

  3. Surgical Technique Refinements in Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jeffrey C.; Shah, Jatin P.

    2010-01-01

    The head and neck region poses a challenging arena for oncologic surgery. Diseases and their treatment can affect a myriad of functions, including sight, hearing, taste, smell, breathing, speaking, swallowing, facial expression and appearance. This review discusses several areas where refinements in surgical techniques have led to improved patient outcomes. This includes surgical incisions, neck lymphadenectomy, transoral laser microsurgery, minimally invasive thyroid surgery, and the use of vascularized free flaps for oromandibular reconstruction. PMID:20512941

  4. Predictors of persistent neck pain after whiplash injury

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, K; Wiles, N J; Lecky, F E; Hawes, S J; Silman, A J; Macfarlane, G J; Jones, G T

    2006-01-01

    Objective To establish the aetiological influences of persistent neck pain following a motor vehicle collision and to construct a model for use in the emergency department for identifying patients at high risk of persistent symptoms. Design Prospective cohort study. Patients recruited from hospital emergency departments were sent a questionnaire to gather information on various exposures. They were followed up at 1, 3, and 12 months to identify those with persistent symptoms. Main outcome measure Persistent neck pain (pain at 1, 3, and 12 months after collision). Results The baseline survey included 765 patients. Subsequently, 480 completed a questionnaire at each follow up time point, of whom 128 (27%) reported neck pain on each occasion. Few collision specific factors predicted persistent neck pain. In contrast, a high level of general psychological distress, pre?collision history of widespread body pain, type of vehicle, whiplash associated symptoms, and initial neck disability best predicted the persistence of symptoms. Furthermore, these factors, in combination, accounted for more than a fivefold increase in the risk of persistent neck pain. Conclusion The greatest predictors of persistent neck pain following a motor vehicle collision relate to psychological distress and aspects of pre?collision health rather than to various attributes of the collision itself. With these factors, and those relating to initial injury severity, it is possible to identify a subgroup of patients presenting with neck pain with the highest risk of persistent symptoms. Thus, it is possible to identify whiplash patients with a poor prognosis and to provide closer follow up and specific attention to management in these individuals. PMID:16498156

  5. Neck incision planning for total laryngectomy: A finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Allen L; Clark, James H; Agrawal, Nishant; Moussa, Walied; Richmon, Jeremy D

    2015-11-26

    Post-operative complications can be attributed to technical aspects of surgery, yet no studies have investigated the mechanics behind commonly used incisions for total laryngopharyngectomies (TLP). This procedure, seen in head and neck cancer patients, necessitates free tissue transfer to construct a neo-pharynx, creating an inherently greater risk of complications. We sought to investigate the impact of neck incision location on these post-operative complications for TLP using finite element analysis (FEA). A nonlinear hyperelastic 2-D finite element model was used to evaluate the stress and strain along the incision line of two separate neck incision models commonly used for TLP: low-neck apron (LNA) incisions that incorporate the patient?s tracheostoma and mid-neck apron (MNA) incisions that do not communicate with the tracheostoma. A constant displacement was applied to the incision to simulate normal neck extension experienced during the post-operative phase. Each neck incision was also modeled at varying strain energy densities to simulate various stages of wound healing. For a constant displacement of 40mm, the principal von Mises stress of the LNA incision varied between 5.87 and 6.41MPa, depending on the hyperelastic properties of the healing incision. This stress was concentrated at the junction of the incision and the fixed tracheostomal edge. The MNA model demonstrated a principal von Mises stress that varied between 0.558 and 0.711MPa and was concentrated along the midline of the neck incision. MNA incisions for TL patients result in principal von Mises stresses which are up to 11 times lower than those seen in LNA incisions. These results coincided with clinical observations from a concurrent study that showed a decrease in rate of wound dehiscence for patients undergoing TLP with an MNA incision. PMID:26556716

  6. Reconstructive Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hanasono, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades. Microvascular free flap reconstructions largely replaced other techniques. More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance. The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible. PMID:26556426

  7. Neck swelling after thyroidectomy: not always a haematoma.

    PubMed

    Zou, Maggie; Reid, Diane; Ravichandran, Duraisamy

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a patient who returned with a neck swelling 6?days following thyroidectomy and central neck compartment lymphadenectomy for suspected thyroid carcinoma. The initial clinical suspicion pointed to a haematoma, but a needle aspiration showed chyle. Chyle leak is a rare complication of thyroid surgery. In the described case, this was successfully managed conservatively with repeated aspirations and a low-fat diet. We discuss the aetiology, presentation and management of this complication. PMID:26564112

  8. Robotic transaxillary central neck dissection: video description of the technique.

    PubMed

    Agcaoglu, Orhan; Aliyev, Shamil; Siperstein, Allan; Berber, Eren

    2012-08-01

    Although various groups have described their experiences with robotic transaxillary thyroidectomy, to our knowledge, robotic central neck dissection has not been described in the North American literature. We here demonstrate the technique of robotic central neck dissection at the time of transaxillary total thyroidectomy. The procedure was performed under general anesthesia through a 6-cm right axillary incision. The robotic camera and 2 working robotic arms were used for the procedure. PMID:22874698

  9. Penetrating nontorso trauma: the head and the neck

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Acute penetrating injuries to the head and neck cause considerable anxiety for most clinicians owing to concern for airway control and neurologic injury and to limited clinician experience in most centres. This article discusses an organized approach to the evaluation and initial treatment of penetrating injuries to the head and neck based on regional anatomy and clinical examination. The approach is particularly helpful in the context of ongoing hemorrhage and/or airway compromise. PMID:26022154

  10. Lymphedema Outcomes in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Little, Leila G.; Skoracki, Roman J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Lewin, Jan S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to describe the presentation of external head and neck lymphedema in patients treated for head and neck cancer and examine their initial response to complete decongestive therapy. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. Subjects and Methods Patients evaluated for head and neck cancer at MD Anderson Cancer Center after treatment 01/2007-01/2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Response to complete decongestive therapy was evaluated per changes in lymphedema severity rating or surface tape measures. Predictors of therapy response were examined using regression models. Results 1,202 patients were evaluated. Most patients (62%) had soft, reversible pitting edema (MDACC Stage 1b). Treatment response was evaluated in 733 patients after receiving therapy; 439 (60%) improved after complete decongestive therapy. Treatment adherence independently predicted complete decongestive therapy response (p<0.001). Conclusions These data support the effectiveness of a head and neck cancer-specific regimen of lymphedema therapy for cancer patients with external head and neck lymphedema. Our findings suggest that head and neck lymphedema is distinct from lymphedema that affects other sites, requiring adaptations in traditional methods of management and measurement. PMID:25389318

  11. Neck afferent involvement in cardiovascular control during movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, P. S.; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that labyrinth and neck afferent information contributes to the regulation of somatomotor function during movement and changes in posture. There is also convincing evidence that the vestibular system participates in the modulation of sympathetic outflow and cardiovascular function during changes in posture, presumably to prevent orthostatic hypotension. However, the labyrinth organs do not provide any signals concerning body movements with respect to the head. In contrast, the neck receptors, particularly muscle spindles, are well located and suited to provide information about changes in body position with respect to the head and vestibular signals. Studies in the cat suggest that neck afferent information may modulate the vestibulosympathetic reflex responses to head-neck movements. There is some evidence in the cat to suggest involvement of low threshold mechanoreceptors. However, human studies do not indicate that low threshold mechanoreceptors in the neck modulate cardiovascular responses. The human studies are consistent with the studies in the cat in that they demonstrate the importance of otolith activation in mediating cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to changes in posture. This paper briefly reviews the current experimental evidence concerning the involvement of neck afferent information in the modulation of cardiovascular control during movement and changes in posture.

  12. The cervical anatomy of Samotherium, an intermediate-necked giraffid.

    PubMed

    Danowitz, Melinda; Domalski, Rebecca; Solounias, Nikos

    2015-11-01

    Giraffidae are represented by many extinct species. The only two extant taxa possess diametrically contrasting cervical morphology, as the okapi is short-necked and the giraffe is exceptionally long-necked. Samotherium major, known from the Late Miocene of Samos in Greece and other Eurasian localities, is a key extinct giraffid; it possesses cervical vertebrae that are intermediate in the evolutionary elongation of the neck. We describe detailed anatomical features of the cervicals of S. major, and compare these characteristics with the vertebrae of the two extant giraffid taxa. Based on qualitative morphological characters and a quantitative analysis of cervical dimensions, we find that the S. major neck is intermediate between that of the okapi and the giraffe. Specifically, the more cranial (C2-C3) vertebrae of S. major represent a mosaic of features shared either with the giraffe or with the okapi. The more caudal (C5-C7) S. major vertebrae, however, appear transitional between the two extant taxa, and hence are more unique. Notably, the C6 of S. major exhibits a partially excavated ventral lamina that is strong cranially but completely absent on the caudal half of the ventral vertebral body, features between those seen in the giraffe and the okapi. Comprehensive anatomical descriptions and measurements of the almost-complete cervical column reveal that S. major is a truly intermediate-necked giraffid. Reconstructions of the neck display our findings. PMID:26716010

  13. The cervical anatomy of Samotherium, an intermediate-necked giraffid

    PubMed Central

    Danowitz, Melinda; Domalski, Rebecca; Solounias, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    Giraffidae are represented by many extinct species. The only two extant taxa possess diametrically contrasting cervical morphology, as the okapi is short-necked and the giraffe is exceptionally long-necked. Samotherium major, known from the Late Miocene of Samos in Greece and other Eurasian localities, is a key extinct giraffid; it possesses cervical vertebrae that are intermediate in the evolutionary elongation of the neck. We describe detailed anatomical features of the cervicals of S. major, and compare these characteristics with the vertebrae of the two extant giraffid taxa. Based on qualitative morphological characters and a quantitative analysis of cervical dimensions, we find that the S. major neck is intermediate between that of the okapi and the giraffe. Specifically, the more cranial (C2–C3) vertebrae of S. major represent a mosaic of features shared either with the giraffe or with the okapi. The more caudal (C5–C7) S. major vertebrae, however, appear transitional between the two extant taxa, and hence are more unique. Notably, the C6 of S. major exhibits a partially excavated ventral lamina that is strong cranially but completely absent on the caudal half of the ventral vertebral body, features between those seen in the giraffe and the okapi. Comprehensive anatomical descriptions and measurements of the almost-complete cervical column reveal that S. major is a truly intermediate-necked giraffid. Reconstructions of the neck display our findings. PMID:26716010

  14. Surgical errors and risks – the head and neck cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Harréus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck surgery is one of the basic principles of head and neck cancer therapy. Surgical errors and malpractice can have fatal consequences for the treated patients. It can lead to functional impairment and has impact in future chances for disease related survival. There are many risks for head and neck surgeons that can cause errors and malpractice. To avoid surgical mistakes, thorough preoperative management of patients is mandatory. As there are ensuring operability, cautious evaluation of preoperative diagnostics and operative planning. Moreover knowledge of anatomical structures of the head and neck, of the medical studies and data as well as qualification in modern surgical techniques and the surgeons ability for critical self assessment are basic and important prerequisites for head and neck surgeons in order to make out risks and to prevent from mistakes. Additionally it is important to have profound knowledge in nutrition management of cancer patients, wound healing and to realize and to be able to deal with complications, when they occur. Despite all precaution and surgical care, errors and mistakes cannot always be avoided. For that it is important to be able to deal with mistakes and to establish an appropriate and clear communication and management for such events. The manuscript comments on recognition and prevention of risks and mistakes in the preoperative, operative and postoperative phase of head and neck cancer surgery. PMID:24403972

  15. An integrated approach towards future ballistic neck protection materials selection.

    PubMed

    Breeze, John; Helliker, Mark; Carr, Debra J

    2013-05-01

    Ballistic protection for the neck has historically taken the form of collars attached to the ballistic vest (removable or fixed), but other approaches, including the development of prototypes incorporating ballistic material into the collar of an under body armour shirt, are now being investigated. Current neck collars incorporate the same ballistic protective fabrics as the soft armour of the remaining vest, reflecting how ballistic protective performance alone has historically been perceived as the most important property for neck protection. However, the neck has fundamental differences from the thorax in terms of anatomical vulnerability, flexibility and equipment integration, necessitating a separate solution from the thorax in terms of optimal materials selection. An integrated approach towards the selection of the most appropriate combination of materials to be used for each of the two potential designs of future neck protection has been developed. This approach requires evaluation of the properties of each potential material in addition to ballistic performance alone, including flexibility, mass, wear resistance and thermal burden. The aim of this article is to provide readers with an overview of this integrated approach towards ballistic materials selection and an update of its current progress in the development of future ballistic neck protection. PMID:23637268

  16. Radial Neck Osteotomy for Malunion of Radial Neck Fracture in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Vandergugten, Simon; Troussel, Serge; Lefebvre, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In a case of a neglected radial neck fracture in childhood, the management of initial fracture and its complications are subjected to discussion. In children, open reduction should be avoided but an angulation less than 30° must be obtained. Several techniques exist to manage symptomatic malunion in adults, including resection, prosthesis, and osteotomy. When performing an osteotomy, it is important first to preserve an intact osseous hinge to avoid avascular necrosis and second to align the edge of the radial head articular surface with the lateral edge of the coronoid process, in order to avoid overstuffing elbow joint. PMID:26347364

  17. Spinal Cord Injury Incurred by Neck Massage

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Hyun Suk; Ko, Yeong-A; Lim, Seong Hoon; Kim, Joon Sung

    2012-01-01

    Massage is generally accepted as a safe and a widely used modality for various conditions, such as pain, lymphedema, and facial palsy. However, several complications, some with devastating results, have been reported. We introduce a case of a 43-year-old man who suffered from tetraplegia after a neck massage. Imaging studies revealed compressive myelopathy at the C6 level, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), and a herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) at the C5-6 level. After 3 years of rehabilitation, his motor power improved, and he is able to walk and drive with adaptation. OPLL is a well-known predisposing factor for myelopathy in minor trauma, and it increases the risk of HNP, when it is associated with the degenerative disc. Our case emphasizes the need for additional caution in applying manipulation, including massage, in patients with OPLL; patients who are relatively young (i.e., in the fifth decade of life) are not immune to minor trauma. PMID:23185737

  18. Hemodynamic Responses to Head and Neck Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Carbo, Jorge E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1994-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide head and neck cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objective of this study was to measure the scalp temperature and circulatory responses during use of one commercially available thermal control system. The Life Support Systems, Inc. Mark VII portable cooling system and a liquid cooling helmet were used in this study. Two EEG electrodes and one skin temperature transducer were placed on the anterior midline of the scalp to measure the scalp blood and temperature. Blood flow was measured using a bipolar impedance rheograph. Ten subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature, were tested at high, medium, moderate, moderate-low and low coolant temperatures. Scalp blood flow was recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 200 Hz. Scalp temperature and cooling helmet Inlet temperature was logged periodically during the test period. This study quantifies the effect of head cooling upon scalp temperature and blood flow. These data may also be used to select operational specifications of the head cooling system for biomedical applications such as the treatment of migraine headaches, scalp cooling during chemotherapy, and cooling of multiple sclerosis patients.

  19. Bladder neck incompetence at posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2015-01-01

    The finding of an incompetent bladder neck (BN) at the time of posterior urethroplasty will necessarily exacerbate the already difficult situation. In such cases the aim of the treatment is not only to restore urethral continuity by end-to-end urethral anastomosis, but also to restore the function of the BN to maintain urinary continence. Fortunately, the incidence of incompetence of the BN at posterior urethroplasty is uncommon, usually ?4.5%. It seems that pelvic fracture-related BN injuries, in contrast to urethral injuries which result from a shearing force, are due to direct injury by the sharp edge of the fractured and displaced pubic bone. The risk of injuries to the BN is greater in children, in patients with a fracture involving both superior and inferior pubic rami on the same side, and in those managed initially by primary realignment. An incompetent BN is suspected by finding an open rectangular BN on cystography, and a fixedly open BN on suprapubic cystoscopy. An incompetent BN can be treated either subsequent to or concomitant with the urethral repair, according to whether a perineal or a perineo-abdominal urethroplasty is used, respectively. Several options have been reported to treat pelvic fracture-related BN incompetence, including reconstructing the BN, forming a new sphincter by tubularisation of a rectangular flap of the anterior bladder wall, and mechanical occlusion by an artificial sphincter or collagen injection. Reconstruction of the BN by the Young-Dees-Leadbetter?? procedure probably provides the most successful results. PMID:26019982

  20. Melanoma Metastases to the Neck Nodes: Role of Adjuvant Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Strojan, Primoz; Jancar, Boris; Cemazar, Maja; Perme, Maja Pohar; Hocevar, Marko

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To review experiences in the treatment of regionally advanced melanoma to the neck and/or parotid with emphasis on the role of adjuvant radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Clinical and histopathologic data, treatment details, and outcomes in patients treated during the period 2000-2006 at the Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana, Slovenia, were reviewed. Results: A total of 40 patients with 42 dissections underwent surgery, and 43 patients with 45 dissections received irradiation postoperatively to a median equivalent dose (eqTD{sub 2}: 2 Gy/fraction, 1 fraction/day, 5 fractions/week) of 60 Gy (range, 47.8-78.8). Regional control 2 years after surgery was 56% (95% confidence interval [CI] 40-72%) and after postoperative radiotherapy 78% (CI 63-92%) (p = 0.015). On multivariate analysis, postoperative radiotherapy (yes vs. no: hazard ratio [HR] 6.3, CI 2.0-20.6) and sum of the risk factors present (i.e., risk factor score; HR 1.7 per score point, CI 1.2-2.6) were predictive for regional control. On logistic regression testing, the number of involved nodes was associated with the probability of distant metastases (p = 0.021). The incidence of late toxicity did not correlate with the mode of therapy, eqTD{sub 2}, or fractionation pattern. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy has the potential to compensate effectively for the negative impact of adverse histopatologic features to disease control in a dissected nodal basin. More conventionally fractionated radiotherapy regimens using fraction doses of 2-2.5 Gy, with cumulative eqTD{sub 2{>=}}60 Gy, are recommended. The number of involved lymph nodes is proposed as an additional criterion for limiting the implementation of adjuvant irradiation.

  1. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Microenvironment Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in Neck Nodal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Jacobus; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Wang Ya

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess noninvasively the tumor microenvironment of neck nodal metastases in patients with head-and-neck cancer by investigating the relationship between tumor perfusion measured using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and hypoxia measured by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole ({sup 18}F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: Thirteen newly diagnosed head-and-neck cancer patients with metastatic neck nodes underwent DCE-MRI and {sup 18}F-FMISO PET imaging before chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The matched regions of interests from both modalities were analyzed. To examine the correlations between DCE-MRI parameters and standard uptake value (SUV) measurements from {sup 18}F-FMISO PET, the nonparametric Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated. Furthermore, DCE-MRI parameters were compared between nodes with {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake and nodes with no {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: For the 13 patients, a total of 18 nodes were analyzed. The nodal size strongly correlated with the {sup 18}F-FMISO SUV ({rho} = 0.74, p < 0.001). There was a strong negative correlation between the median k{sub ep} (redistribution rate constant) value ({rho} = -0.58, p = 0.042) and the {sup 18}F-FMISO SUV. Hypoxic nodes (moderate to severe {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake) had significantly lower median K{sup trans} (volume transfer constant) (p = 0.049) and median k{sub ep} (p = 0.027) values than did nonhypoxic nodes (no {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake). Conclusion: This initial evaluation of the preliminary results support the hypothesis that in metastatic neck lymph nodes, hypoxic nodes are poorly perfused (i.e., have significantly lower K{sup trans} and k{sub ep} values) compared with nonhypoxic nodes.

  2. RELATION OF MUCOUS MEMBRANE ALTERATIONS TO ORAL INTAKE DURING THE FIRST YEAR AFTER TREATMENT FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Rademaker, Alfred W.; Logemann, Jerilyn A.; Lundy, Donna; Bernstein, Michelle; McBreen, Carrie; Santa, Daphne; Campanelli, Angela; Kelchner, Lisa; Klaben, Bernice; Discekici-Harris, Muveddet

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute oral mucositis is associated with pain and impaired swallowing. Little information is available on the effects of chronic mucositis on swallowing. Methods Sixty patients treated for cancer of the head and neck were examined during the first year after their cancer treatment. Oral mucosa was rated with the Oral Mucositis Assessment Scale. Stimulated whole-mouth saliva, oral pain rating, percent of oral intake, and 2 subscales of the Performance Status Scale for Head and Neck (PSS-HN) cancer were also collected. Results Mucositis scores and pain ratings decreased over time while functional measures of eating improved over time. Reduction in chronic mucositis was correlated with improved oral intake and diet. Conclusion Lack of association with pain was attributed to the absence of ulcerations. Continued impairment of oral intake during the first year posttreatment may be related to oral mucosal changes and other factors. PMID:20737496

  3. [Cancer immunotherapy in head and neck region].

    PubMed

    Eura, M

    2001-04-01

    There is no one common immunotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer (H&N cancer). A streptococcal agent, OK-432, which is classified as a biological response modifier (BRM), is occasionally used by means of local administration for recurrent H&N cancer, and the response rate is approximately 18%. In regard to specific immunotherapy, a murine monoclonal antibody (named mAb 225) against the epidermal growth factor receptor (FGFR) that is frequently overexpressed in H&N cancer has been produced in the U.S.A. Furthermore, to obviate human anti-mouse antibody responses, a chimeric human-to-murine version of mAb 225 (C225) was developed by exchanging the constant regions of mAb 225 to counterparts in human immune globulin. Phase I clinical trials of C225 in the U.S.A. demonstrated that treatment with C225 was well tolerated and that C225 given in combination with cisplatin has biologic activity. On the other hand, many tumor antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been identified from a variety of malignant tumors and some of them, including the MAGE-3 antigen, are frequently expressed in H&N cancer. We identified an MAGE-3-derived epitope recognized by HLA-A24-restricted CTL from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In contrast we failed to generate CTL specific for MAGE-3+/HLA-A24+ tumors from PBMC in any of 5 HLA-A24+ cancer patients whose tumors expressed the MAGE-3 gene. Therefore, we did not apply MAGE-3-derived CTL epitope in clinical uses such as peptide vaccine and peptide pulsed dendritic cell infusion for H&N cancer. PMID:11329779

  4. Random Positional Variation Among the Skull, Mandible, and Cervical Spine With Treatment Progression During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Peter H. Ahn, Andrew I.; Lee, C. Joe; Shen Jin; Miller, Ekeni; Lukaj, Alex; Milan, Elissa; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: With 54{sup o} of freedom from the skull to mandible to C7, ensuring adequate immobilization for head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT) is complex. We quantify variations in skull, mandible, and cervical spine movement between RT sessions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head-and-neck RT patients underwent serial computed tomography. Patients underwent planned rescanning at 11, 22, and 33 fractions for a total of 93 scans. Coordinates of multiple bony elements of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine were used to calculate rotational and translational changes of bony anatomy compared with the original planning scan. Results: Mean translational and rotational variations on rescanning were negligible, but showed a wide range. Changes in scoliosis and lordosis of the cervical spine between fractions showed similar variability. There was no correlation between positional variation and fraction number and no strong correlation with weight loss or skin separation. Semi-independent rotational and translation movement of the skull in relation to the lower cervical spine was shown. Positioning variability measured by means of vector displacement was largest in the mandible and lower cervical spine. Conclusions: Although only small overall variations in position between head-and-neck RT sessions exist on average, there is significant random variation in patient positioning of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine elements. Such variation is accentuated in the mandible and lower cervical spine. These random semirigid variations in positioning of the skull and spine point to a need for improved immobilization and/or confirmation of patient positioning in RT of the head and neck.

  5. Biodynamic simulations of the effect of a neck-mounted air bag on the head/neck response during high G acceleration.

    PubMed

    Lee, C M; Freivalds, A; Lee, S Y

    1991-08-01

    New helmet-mounted devices (such as night-vision goggles, laser eye protection, etc.) have created new safety hazards for pilots during ejection or high G maneuvering. In order to prevent the resulting head/neck injuries, this study extends the air-bag protection system developed for ground vehicles to a neck mounted system for aircrew personnel. Results, carried out by computer biodynamic simulations using the Articulated Total Body Model (ATB), showed that: 1) helmet weight had little effect on head/neck torque, contact force and flexion angle; 2) initial head/neck position and center of gravity offsets of the helmet-mounted devices had significant effects on head-neck torques, contact forces, and neck flexion angles; and 3) the neck mounted air bag significantly reduced neck torques, contact forces, and neck flexion angles. We conclude that the neck-mounted air bag system could significantly reduce the severity of head/neck injuries to pilots during ejection or high G maneuvering. PMID:1930056

  6. Clear cell chondrosarcoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Clear cell chondrosarcoma is a rare variant of chondrosarcoma that mostly involves the end of long bones. However, nine cases have been reported in the head and neck: four in larynx, two in nasal septum, two in maxilla and one in the skull. These cases form the basis of this review. Head and neck cases accounts for less than 5% of Clear cell chondrosarcomas in the whole body and the larynx is the most common place. The histological findings of head and neck cases are consistent with general features of this entity in the whole body and nearly all tumors in this case series had a component of conventional chondrosarcoma. Clear cell chondrosarcoma is an intracompartmental tumor and retains "Grenz zone" just beneath the epithelium. Therefore, the overlying mucosa remained intact in all laryngeal cases. Nasal tumor caused ballooning of the septum and the maxillary lesion did not involve the oral mucosa. This tumor presents various radiographic features in the head and neck area. Chondroblastoma, chondroma, osteoblastoma, osteosarcoma and metastatic renal cell carcinoma are included in the histologic differential diagnoses. Differentiation from chondroblastic osteosarcoma is important in the maxilla. A wide resection is adequate in most cases. However, some laryngeal cases show tendency to recur. Clear cell chondrosarcoma is a slow growing tumor and this necessitates a long time follow-up of patients. Due to the extreme rarity in the head and neck, diagnosis of Clear cell chondrosarcoma in this area, must be confirmed by histochemical and immunohistochemical studies. PMID:22520362

  7. Irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic neck/body adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Irreversible electroporation (IRE) of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck has been used to palliate appropriate stage 3 pancreatic cancers without evidence of metastasis and who have undergone appropriate induction therapy. Currently there has not been a standardized reported technique for pancreatic mid-body tumors for patient selection and intra-operative technique. Patients Subjects are patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck who have undergone appropriate induction chemotherapy for a reasonable duration. Main outcome measures Technique of open IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck/body is described, with the emphasis on intra-operative ultrasound and intra-operative electroporation management. Results The technique of open IRE of the pancreatic neck/body with bracketing of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery with continuous intraoperative ultrasound imaging and consideration of intraoperative navigational system is described. Conclusions IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck is feasible for appropriate patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26029461

  8. Shoulder Dysfunction After Radiotherapy in Surgically and Nonsurgically Treated Necks

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiang; Guo, Shu; Wang, Di; Xu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our goal was to evaluate the shoulder dysfunction after radiotherapy in surgically and nonsurgically treated necks. A prospective pair matched design was performed. A total of 96 patients from 3 groups were enrolled in the study. The patients were asked to complete the shoulder domain section of the University of Washington Quality of Life questionnaire on 2 occasions: preoperatively and 12 months postoperatively. None of the patients had a shoulder impairment before the operation. At the follow-up session, 4 patients who had received radiotherapy only reported mild shoulder dysfunction, the mean score was 96.3, the difference was significant compared with the preoperative score (P?=?0.046). For patients who had received neck dissection, 7 patients reported that the impaired shoulder function caused them to change their work and 14 patients reported that their shoulder function was affected a little; the mean score was 71.6. For patients who had received both neck dissection and postoperative radiotherapy, 9 patients reported that they had changed their work due to shoulder dysfunction and 16 patients reported mild shoulder impairment; the mean score was 65.3 and the difference was not significant (P?=?0.304). Radiotherapy does not increase shoulder dysfunction in surgically treated necks, but it could induce shoulder impairment in nonsurgically treated necks. PMID:26222857

  9. Therapeutic applications of botulinum neurotoxins in head and neck disorders

    PubMed Central

    Alshadwi, Ahmad; Nadershah, Mohammed; Osborn, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this article is to review the mechanism of action, physiological effects, and therapeutic applications of botulinum neurotoxins in the head and neck area. Study design An extensive literature search was performed using keywords. The resulting articles were analyzed for relevance in four areas: overview on botulinum neurotoxins, the role of botulinum neurotoxins in the management of salivary secretory disorders, the role of botulinum neurotoxins in the management of facial pain, and the role of botulinum neurotoxins in head and neck movement disorders. Institutional review board approval was not needed due the nature of the study. Results Botulinum neurotoxin therapy was demonstrated to be a valuable alternative to conventional medical therapy for many conditions affecting the head and neck area in terms of morbidly, mortality, and patient satisfaction with treatment outcomes. Conclusion Botulinum neurotoxin therapy provides viable alternatives to traditional treatment modalities for some conditions affecting the head and neck region that have neurological components. This therapy can overcome some of the morbidities associated with conventional therapy. More research is needed to determine the ideal doses of botulinum neurotoxin to treat different diseases affecting the head and neck regions. PMID:25544809

  10. Airway management in patients with burn contractures of the neck.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Smita; Mullick, Parul

    2015-12-01

    Airway management of patients with burn contracture of the neck (PBC neck) is a challenge to the anesthesiologist. Patient evaluation includes history, physical and airway examination. A safe approach in the airway management of a patient with moderate to severe PBC neck is to secure the airway with the patient awake. The anesthesiologist should have a pre-planned strategy for intubation of the difficult airway. The choices advocated for airway management of such patients include awake fiberoptic-guided intubation, use of intubating laryngeal mask airway, intubation without neuromuscular blocking agents, intubation with neuromuscular blocking agents after testing the ability to ventilate by mask, pre-induction neck scar release under local anesthesia and ketamine or sedation followed by direct laryngoscopy and intubation and video-laryngoscope guided intubation, amongst others. Preparation of the patient includes an explanation of the proposed procedure, sedation, administration of antisialogogues and regional anesthesia of the airway. The various options for intubation of patients with PBC neck, intraoperative concerns and safe extubation are described. Back-up plans, airway rescue strategies and a review of literature on this subject are presented. PMID:25868969

  11. Cognitive Functioning After Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Hui K.; Bernstein, Lori J.; Brown, Jennifer; Ringash, Jolie; Vakilha, Mehrdad; Wang, Lisa; Goldstein, David; Kim, John; Hope, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Abdul Razak, Albiruni R.; Chen, Eric X.; Siu, Lillian L.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive cognitive function (CF) assessment in patients who were relapse free after curative intent radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent neuropsychological tests to assess their objective CF; completed questionnaires to assess subjective CF, quality of life, and affect; and underwent blood tests to assess hematologic, biochemical, endocrine, and cytokine status. Retrospectively, the dosimetry of incidental radiation to the brain was determined for all patients, and the dose intensity of cisplatin was determined in those who had undergone chemoradiotherapy. Results: A total of 10 patients were enrolled (5 treated with radiotherapy only and 5 with radiotherapy and cisplatin). The mean time from the end of treatment was 20 months (range, 9-41). All patients were able to complete the assessment protocol. Of the 10 patients, 9 had impaired objective CF, with memory the most severely affected. The severity of memory impairment correlated significantly with the radiation dose to the temporal lobes, and impaired dexterity correlated significantly with the radiation dose to the cerebellum, suggesting that these deficits might be treatment related. Patients receiving cisplatin appeared to have poorer objective CF than patients receiving only RT, although this difference did not achieve statistical significance, likely owing to the small sample size. Consistent with the published data, objective CF did not correlate with subjective CF or quality of life. No association was found between objective CF and patients' affect, hematologic, biochemical, endocrine, and cytokine status. Conclusion: Neuropsychological testing is feasible in squamous cell carcinoma of the head-and-neck survivors. The findings were suggestive of treatment-related cognitive dysfunction. These results warrant additional investigation.

  12. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Injections into the Neck.

    PubMed

    Ralph, Jeffrey W; Malik, Rabia; Layzer, Robert B

    2015-10-01

    Three cases of longitudinally extensive cervical myelopathies temporally associated with neck injections are presented. The spinal cord injury was similar radiographically, despite a number of different needle approaches and substances injected. In recent years, there have been reports of an acute cervical myelopathy immediately following an injection procedure in the neck. Various explanations have been offered for this unfortunate complication, including (1) direct injection into the cord leading to traumatic injury, (2) injection of particulate matter into the arterial supply of the cord causing microvascular embolism and spinal cord infarction, and (3) intraneural injection of the chemical with centripetal spread of the injectant from the nerve trunk to the substance of the cord. The merits of each of these 3 mechanisms in explaining these cases are discussed. Albeit rare, acute cervical myelopathy should be considered a potential complication from any deep injection of chemicals into the neck. PMID:26425248

  13. Sleep apnea syndrome after irradiation of the neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, J.P.; Whitlock, W.L.; Dietrich, R.A.; Shaw, T. )

    1989-12-01

    After irradiation of the neck for a squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar pillar and vocal cord, a 71-year-old man presented with a rapidly progressive sleep apnea syndrome. Previous reports describe the condition of patients with obstructive sleep apnea that developed after neck irradiation and secondary to supraglottic edema. Our patient had an obstructive component to his apnea similar to that described in previous cases, but, in addition, he had hypothyroidism. Myxedema is a well-described cause of both obstructive and central apnea. We believe both contributed to his condition. He was successfully treated by placement of a tracheostomy and by thyroid supplementation. In patients who present with sleep apnea after neck irradiation, especially with acute or severe symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include both a central cause from hypothyroidism as well as a peripheral obstructive cause from laryngeal edema.

  14. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Gurudutt, Vivek V.; Genden, Eric M.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is an epidemic that reaches all parts of the world. Making the diagnosis relies on the acumen of the clinician and pathologist. Various pathologic subtypes exist and differ in histology and prognosis. High-risk tumors need aggressive treatment and vigilant surveillance to monitor for recurrence. Large tumors, deep tissue invasion, perineural involvement, recurrence, location in high-risk areas, and immunosuppression are implicated in worsening prognosis. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment with adjuvant radiation therapy as needed for aggressive tumors; however, other modalities are potentially useful for low-risk lesions. The use of Mohs surgery has become increasingly useful and has shown high success rates. Involvement of parotid and neck lymph nodes significantly affects outcomes and the physician should be comfortable with management of this complex disease. This paper examines the diagnosis, pathology, clinical course, and treatment options for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. PMID:21461387

  15. Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Roopashri, G; Baig, Muqeet

    2013-01-01

    Necessity is the mother of all inventions. This is also true in case of cancer therapy. With increasing incidence of head and neck malignancies, remarkable developments have been made towards cancer development and treatment which continues to be a major challenge. Approximately fifty percent of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy which contributes towards forty percent of curative treatment for cancer. New developments in radiation oncology have helped to improve outlook for patients and find more effective treatment. With the advent of new technologies, radiotherapy seems to be promising in patients with head and neck malignancies these advancements include Altered fractionation, Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, Image Guided Radiotherapy, Stereotactic radiation, Charged-particle radiotherapy, and Intraoperative radiotherapy. How to cite this article: Roopashri G, Baig M. Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):119-23 . PMID:24453456

  16. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Injections into the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Jeffrey W.; Layzer, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Three cases of longitudinally extensive cervical myelopathies temporally associated with neck injections are presented. The spinal cord injury was similar radiographically, despite a number of different needle approaches and substances injected. In recent years, there have been reports of an acute cervical myelopathy immediately following an injection procedure in the neck. Various explanations have been offered for this unfortunate complication, including (1) direct injection into the cord leading to traumatic injury, (2) injection of particulate matter into the arterial supply of the cord causing microvascular embolism and spinal cord infarction, and (3) intraneural injection of the chemical with centripetal spread of the injectant from the nerve trunk to the substance of the cord. The merits of each of these 3 mechanisms in explaining these cases are discussed. Albeit rare, acute cervical myelopathy should be considered a potential complication from any deep injection of chemicals into the neck. PMID:26425248

  17. Rhabdomyoblastic Differentiation in Head and Neck Malignancies Other Than Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Thompson, Lester D R; Cardesa, Antonio; Barnes, Leon; Lewis, James S; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Hellquist, Henrik; Stenman, Goran; Hunt, Jennifer L; Williams, Michelle D; Slootweg, Pieter J; Devaney, Kenneth O; Gnepp, Douglas R; Wenig, Bruce M; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2015-12-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common soft tissue sarcoma that frequently affects children and adolescents and may involve the head and neck. Rhabdomyosarcoma is defined by skeletal muscle differentiation which can be suggested by routine histology and confirmed by immunohistochemistry for the skeletal muscle-specific markers myogenin or myoD1. At the same time, it must be remembered that when it comes to head and neck malignancies, skeletal muscle differentiation is not limited to rhabdomyosarcoma. A lack of awareness of this phenomenon could lead to misdiagnosis and, subsequently, inappropriate therapeutic interventions. This review focuses on malignant neoplasms of the head and neck other than rhabdomyosarcoma that may exhibit rhabdomyoblastic differentiation, with an emphasis on strategies to resolve the diagnostic dilemmas these tumors may present. Axiomatically, no primary central nervous system tumors will be discussed. PMID:25757816

  18. Standardization of Head and Neck Contouring Using the Acanthiomeatal Line

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Snehal; Teh, Bin S. Hinojosa, Jose; Bell, Bent C.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Butler, E. Brian

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived and actual chin position(s) used for radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancers in a variety of clinical settings. Dosimetrists were asked to describe the external landmarks used to set the chin position. The lateral treatment planning radiographic figures in Ang's textbook, Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancers: Indications and Techniques, were analyzed for chin position by drawing a horizontal line from the tip of the chin to the cervical spine. The physicians at 7 departments were asked to rate the chin positions used in their departments for head-and-neck simulations. Choices included: (1) mildly flexed, (2) neutral, (3) mildly extended, and (4) hyperextended. In addition, each center was asked to select 2 representative cases to show routine chin position. The dosimetrists fixed the chin in neutral position by placing a virtual plane defined by 3 points (the base of the nasal septum [acanthus] and the external auditory canals) perpendicular to the table top. The type of head holder was irrelevant. Eighty-two percent (31/38) of the figures in Ang's text showed positioning in the neutral position (tip of the chin intersected the cervical spine between C2-3/C3-4). Most (71.4%) of the radiotherapists thought their patients were treated in the hyperextended neck position but, in fact, 85.7% (12/14) of the simulations showed a neural neck position. Reproducible chin positioning can be obtained by using the acanthiomeatal line. Consistent use of this technique will create a uniformly positioned set of axial co-images that have consistent appearance of avoidance and lymphatic areas. This will simplify contouring on axial computed tomography (CT) images of the neck. Standardizing the chin position is an important step to developing a standardized atlas and developing an information tool for automated contouring.

  19. Racial Disparity Among the Head and Neck Cancer Population.

    PubMed

    Daraei, Pedram; Moore, Charles E

    2015-09-01

    Head and neck cancer is the ninth most common cancer in the USA, accounting for 3.3 % of all cancers. The incidence of head and neck cancer has plateaued recently; however, morbidity and mortality continue to remain high. Moreover, racial disparity between African-American and White patients has been studied in the head and neck community, and a vast difference still remains in mortality rate and late stage at presentation. A review of the English literature was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE for demographics, epidemiology, and studies that focused on the disparity in head and neck cancer between African-American and White patients. Age-adjusted incidence of head and neck cancer is increased in African-Americans, while the 5-year survival is decreased compared to Whites. African-American patients present with more advanced disease. When receiving similar multidisciplinary care, the overall survival was not significantly different, but racial disparity often persists in treatment regimens. Socioeconomic determinants such as insurance status play a critical role in racial disparity, along with low levels of public awareness, a lack of knowledge of specific risk factors, and a sense of mistrust that is seen in the African-American population. Disparity in the head and neck cancer community is worrisome, and although efforts have been taken to decrease the disparity, a significant difference exists. Fortunately, the disparity is reversible and can be eliminated. To do so, it is critical to extend to underserved community programs that provide appropriate screening and diagnosis, with subsequent follow-up and treatment following the standards of care. PMID:25398667

  20. Diagnostic possibilities with multidimensional images in head and neck area using efficient registration and visualization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Krol, Zdzislaw; Sader, Robert; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Gerhardt, Paul; Schweiger, Markus; Horch, Hans-Henning

    1997-05-01

    For several diseases in the head and neck area different imaging modalities are applied to the same patient.Each of these image data sets has its specific advantages and disadvantages. The combination of different methods allows to make the best use of the advantageous properties of each method while minimizing the impact of its negative aspects. Soft tissue alterations can be judged better in an MRI image while it may be unrecognizable in the relating CT. Bone tissue, on the other hand, is optimally imaged in CT. Inflammatory nuclei of the bone can be detected best by their increased signal in SPECT. Only the combination of all modalities let the physical come to an exact statement on pathological processes that involve multiple tissue structures. Several surfaces and voxel based matching functions we have tested allowed a precise merging by means of numerical optimization methods like e.g. simulated annealing without the complicated assertion of fiducial markers or the localization landmarks in 2D cross sectional slice images. The quality of the registration depends on the choice of the optimization procedure according to the complexity of the matching function landscape. Precise correlation of the multimodal head and neck area images together with its 2D and 3D presentation techniques provides a valuable tool for physicians.

  1. Elevated furin expression in aggressive human head and neck tumors and tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bassi, D E; Mahloogi, H; Al-Saleem, L; Lopez De Cicco, R; Ridge, J A; Klein-Szanto, A J

    2001-08-01

    Pro-protein convertases (PCs) are proteases that recognize and cleave precursor proteins. Furin, a well-studied PC, is ubiquitously expressed, and it has been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes. Some substrates for furin, such as membrane type 1 (MT1) matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), an MMP that activates gelatinase, a collagen-degrading enzyme, are associated with the advanced malignant phenotype. This report examines the expression of furin in carcinoma cell lines of different invasive ability. The levels of furin mRNA and protein correlated with the aggressiveness of tumor cell lines derived from head and neck and lung cancers. Furin expression also was investigated in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Furin mRNA was not detected in nonmetastasizing carcinomas. In contrast, furin mRNA was expressed in metastasizing HNSCCs. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis confirmed these results at the protein level. Furin activity was investigated indirectly by evaluating the expression of the pro-form and the processed form of MT1-MMP. Metastasizing HNSCCs showed increased expression of MT1-MMP. Furthermore, pro-MT1-MMP expression was noted in most of the nonmetastasizing HNSCCs analyzed by Western blot, and it was absent in the metastasizing HNSCCs. This finding suggests a lower level of furin-mediated MT1-MMP activation in the less aggressive cancers. These observations indicate that furin plays a role in tumor progression. Its overexpression in more aggressive or metastasizing cancers resulted in increased MMP processing. PMID:11536372

  2. Gene Expression Profiling to Predict Outcome After Chemoradiation in Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pramana, Jimmy; Brekel, Michiel van den; Velthuysen, Marie-Louise F. van; Wessels, Lodewijk F.A.; Nuyten, Dimitry S.; Hofland, Ingrid; Atsma, Douwe; Pimentel, Nuno; Hoebers, Frank J.P.; Rasch, Coen; Begg, Adrian C.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: The goal of the present study was to improve prediction of outcome after chemoradiation in advanced head and neck cancer using gene expression analysis. Materials and Methods: We collected 92 biopsies from untreated head and neck cancer patients subsequently given cisplatin-based chemoradiation (RADPLAT) for advanced squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). After RNA extraction and labeling, we performed dye swap experiments using 35k oligo-microarrays. Supervised analyses were performed to create classifiers to predict locoregional control and disease recurrence. Published gene sets with prognostic value in other studies were also tested. Results: Using supervised classification on the whole series, gene sets separating good and poor outcome could be found for all end points. However, when splitting tumors into training and validation groups, no robust classifiers could be found. Using Gene Set Enrichment analysis, several gene sets were found to be enriched in locoregional recurrences, although with high false-discovery rates. Previously published signatures for radiosensitivity, hypoxia, proliferation, 'wound,' stem cells, and chromosomal instability were not significantly correlated with outcome. However, a recently published signature for HNSCC defining a 'high-risk' group was shown to be predictive for locoregional control in our dataset. Conclusion: Gene sets can be found with predictive potential for locoregional control after combined radiation and chemotherapy in HNSCC. How treatment-specific these gene sets are needs further study.

  3. Molecular Aspects of Head and Neck Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Puram, Sidharth V; Rocco, James W

    2015-12-01

    In spite of a rapidly expanding understanding of head and neck tumor biology and optimization of radiation, chemotherapy, and surgical treatment modalities, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains a major cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Although our biologic understanding of these tumors had largely been limited to pathways driving proliferation, survival, and differentiation, the identification of HPV as a major driver of HNSCC and genomic sequencing analyses has dramatically influenced our understanding of tumor biology and approach to therapy. Here, we summarize molecular aspects of HNSCC biology and identify promising areas for potential diagnostic and therapeutic agents. PMID:26568543

  4. Head and neck cancer in two American presidents: Case reports.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Mea A; Wang, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Two former U.S. presidents, Ulysses S. Grant and Grover Cleveland, were diagnosed with head and neck cancer in 1884 and 1893, respectively. A historical review of the risk factors, diagnoses, and treatments is examined and compared with modern-day interpretations. A comparison was made using the original diagnoses with today's equivalent diagnosis. Different treatment outcomes at the time of the original diagnoses relative to today's treatment are reviewed. Clinicians must be familiar with risk factors, signs, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of head and neck cancer. PMID:22313921

  5. Head and Neck Cancer: An Evolving Treatment Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Cognetti, David M.; Weber, Randal S.; Lai, Stephen Y.

    2009-01-01

    Since the inception of this journal in 1948, the understanding of etiologic factors that contribute to and the treatment of head and neck cancer has evolved dramatically. Advances in surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have improved locoregional control, survival, and quality of life. The outcomes of these treatment modalities have shifted the focus of curative efforts from radical ablation to preservation and restoration of function. This evolution has been documented in the pages of Cancer for the past 6 decades. This review focuses on the evolution of treatment approaches for head and neck cancer and future directions while recognizing the historic contributions recorded within this journal. PMID:18798532

  6. Rehabilitation of Dysphagia Following Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pauloski, Barbara R.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Patients with cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx or larynx may be treated with surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Each treatment type may have a negative impact on posttreatment swallowing function; these effects are presented in this chapter. The clinician has a number of rehabilitative procedures available to reduce or eliminate swallowing disorders in patients treated for cancer of the head and neck. The various procedures--including postures, maneuvers, modifications to bolus volume and viscosity, range of motion exercises, and strengthening exercises--and their efficacy in treated head and neck cancer patients are discussed. PMID:18940647

  7. Carotid sheath-like foreign body in the neck.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Emin; Hacizade, Yusuf; Isildak, Huseyin; Agayev, Ayaz; Mercan, Hasan; Alimoglu, Yalcin; Korkut, Nazim

    2010-07-01

    In otolaryngology practice, we see young children who have inserted a foreign body (FB), which is usually found at home, into their ears or nose. Uncommon complications of an ingested FB are penetration and migration into the neck. Interestingly, among such FBs, sharp fish bones are the most commonly observed in Turkey. In our patient, the FB caused deep neck infection because of FB reaction. In our patient, we could not find any clue of a FB during examination. We were able to see the FB by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Interestingly, the FB looked like a carotid sheath on the MR image. PMID:20647842

  8. Evaluation of Head and Neck Tumors with Functional MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jacobus F A; Parra, Carlos; Lu, Yonggang; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. MR imaging-based diffusion and perfusion techniques enable the noninvasive assessment of tumor biology and physiology, which supplement information obtained from standard structural scans. Diffusion and perfusion MR imaging techniques provide novel biomarkers that can aid monitoring in pretreatment, during treatment, and posttreatment stages to improve patient selection for therapeutic strategies; provide evidence for change of therapy regime; and evaluate treatment response. This review discusses pertinent aspects of the role of diffusion and perfusion MR imaging and computational analysis methods in studying head and neck cancer. PMID:26613878

  9. Head, Neck Cancer Patients May Be at Higher Risk for Suicide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155697.html Head, Neck Cancer Patients May Be at Higher Risk for ... online Nov. 12 in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery . "While there is a considerable body of ...

  10. Muscles of Head (and Neck, in part) muscles of facial expression

    E-print Network

    Houde, Peter

    Muscles of Head (and Neck, in part) muscles of facial expression occipitofrontalis, galea muscles of neck splenius capitus sternocleidomastoid scaleneus group: (anterior, middle, posterior) longus biceps brachii (long and short heads) triceps (brachii, long head) Pelvic Girddle trunk to femur

  11. HEAD AND NECK LYMPH NODE REGION DELINEATION USING A HYBRID IMAGE REGISTRATION METHOD

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    HEAD AND NECK LYMPH NODE REGION DELINEATION USING A HYBRID IMAGE REGISTRATION METHOD Chia-Chi Teng1 the brain mapping. We are proposing an image registration method that maps predefined head and neck nodal

  12. Head and Neck Lymph Node Region Delineation with 3-D CT Image Registration

    E-print Network

    Shapiro, Linda

    Head and Neck Lymph Node Region Delineation with 3-D CT Image Registration Chia-Chi Teng , Mary M¥ Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery¤ Department of Computer Science University of Washington

  13. Virus Analysis in Head and Neck and Bladder Cancers - Michael Parfenov, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Virus Analysis in Head and Neck and Bladder Cancers - Michael Parfenov Virus Analysis in Head and Neck and Bladder Cancers - Michael Parfenov, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012 You will need Adobe Flash

  14. Neck-band retention for Canada geese in the Mississippi (USA) flyway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Weiss, N.T.; Rusch, D.H.; Craven, S.R.; Trost, R.E.; Caswell, F.D.

    1990-01-01

    We used capture, harvest, and observation histories of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) banded in the Mississippi flyway, 1974-88, to examine the problem of neck-band retention. Methods for the analysis of survival data were used to estimate rates of neck-band retention and to evaluate factors associated with neck-band loss. Sex, age of bird at banding, rivet use, and neck-band type significantly influenced neck-band retention. For most of the resulting cohorts (e.g., sex, age, rivet, and neck-band type categories), neck-band retention rates decreased through time. We caution against using small samples or data collected during short-term studies to determine retention rates. We suggest that observation data be used in neck-band retention studies to increase the efficiency of estimating retention time.

  15. Intrasession and interrater reliability of rehabilitative ultrasound imaging measures of the deep neck flexors: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    McGaugh, Janna; Ellison, Jennifer

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the intrasession and interrater reliability of rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) to measure the deep neck flexors (DNF). Two investigators traced the DNF muscle borders in eight female subjects aged 33?±?11.2 years. Of the eight subjects, five subjects reported a greater than 6-month history of neck pain, and three subjects were asymptomatic healthy controls. Cross-sectional area (CSA) (cm(2)) of right and left muscle groups were calculated. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for CSA measures were 0.67 (95% CI: 0.27-0.87) for rater 1 with a standard error of measurement (SEM) of 0.06?cm(2); 0.87 (95% CI: 0.65-0.96) for rater 2 with an SEM of 0.09?cm(2); and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.44-0.87) for interrater reliability between rater 1 and rater 2 with an SEM of 0.11?cm(2). The mean difference between CSA (cm(2)) measures were 0.00?±?0.10?cm(2) for rater 1 and 0.09?±?0.13?cm(2) for rater 2. The mean differences for CSA were 0.04?±?0.12?cm(2). This pilot investigation suggests that RUSI could be used to reliably assess the size of the deep neck flexors. PMID:21682580

  16. Between-day reliability of electromechanical delay of selected neck muscles during performance of maximal isometric efforts

    PubMed Central

    Almosnino, Sivan; Pelland, Lucie; Pedlow, Samuel V; Stevenson, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the between-day reliability of the electromechanical delay (EMD) of selected neck muscles during the performance of maximal isometric contractions in five different directions. Methods Twenty-one physically active males participated in two testing sessions separated by seven to eight days. Using a custom-made fixed frame dynamometer, cervical force and surface electromyography (EMG) were recorded bilaterally from the splenius capitis, upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles during the performance of efforts in extension, flexion, left and right lateral bending, and protraction. The EMD was extracted using the Teager-Kaiser Energy Operator. Reliability indices calculated for each muscle in each testing direction were: the difference in scores between the two testing sessions and corresponding 95% confidence intervals, the standard error of measurement (SEM) and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). Results EMD values showed no evidence of systematic difference between the two testing sessions across all muscles and testing directions. The SEM for extension, flexion and lateral bending efforts ranged between 2.5 ms to 4.8 ms, indicating a good level of measurement precision. For protraction, SEM values were higher and considered to be imprecise for research and clinical purposes. ICC values for all muscles across all testing directions ranged from 0.23 to 0.79. Conclusion EMD of selected neck muscles can be measured with sufficient precision for the assessment of neck muscle function in an athletic population in the majority of directions tested. PMID:19775461

  17. ForPeerReview Neck Muscle Paths and Moment Arms are Significantly

    E-print Network

    Krishnamoorthy, Bala

    ForPeerReview Only Neck Muscle Paths and Moment Arms are Significantly Affected by Wrapping Surface, Bioengineering Keywords: neck muscles, moment arms, wrapping surface, muscle path URL: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/gcmb Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering #12;ForPeerReview Only Neck Muscle Paths

  18. Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans Amelia M. Arbisser

    E-print Network

    Golland, Polina

    Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M. Arbisser B.S., Computer Science of Engineering Thesis Committee #12;2 #12;Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M structures in head and neck CT scans, to minimize time spent on manual contouring of structures of interest

  19. Kinesin's Front Head Is Gated by the Backward Orientation of Its Neck Linker

    E-print Network

    Yildiz, Ahmet

    Report Kinesin's Front Head Is Gated by the Backward Orientation of Its Neck Linker Graphical by the backward orientation of its neck linker. This front-head gating mechanism facilitates the coordinated Reports Report Kinesin's Front Head Is Gated by the Backward Orientation of Its Neck Linker Merve Yusra

  20. Reduced-Order Constrained Optimization (ROCO): Clinical Application to Head-and-Neck IMRT

    E-print Network

    Reduced-Order Constrained Optimization (ROCO): Clinical Application to Head-and-Neck IMRT Linda and lung sites, to the head-and-neck (H&N) site, demonstrating that it can quickly and automatically, head-and-neck, constrained optimization, dimensionality reduction #12;2 I. INTRODUCTION In previous

  1. Passive Activation of Neck Proprioceptive Inputs Does Not Influence the Discharge

    E-print Network

    rotation of the body relative to a stationary head, thereby allowing us to dissociate the effect of neck. Both PVP (A) and VO (B) neurons were unresponsive to the passive rotation of the neck when the head486 Passive Activation of Neck Proprioceptive Inputs Does Not Influence the Discharge Patterns

  2. INVOLVEMENT OF THE FGFR4 Arg388 ALLELE IN HEAD AND NECK SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    E-print Network

    Ullrich, Axel

    INVOLVEMENT OF THE FGFR4 Arg388 ALLELE IN HEAD AND NECK SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA Sylvia STREIT 1/Arg polymorphism (388) in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) of the oral cavity and the oropharynx in human HNSCC. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: fibroblast growth factor receptor 4; head and neck

  3. HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENT SIMILARITY BASE ON ANATOMICAL STRUCTURAL GEOMETRY

    E-print Network

    Shapiro, Linda

    HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENT SIMILARITY BASE ON ANATOMICAL STRUCTURAL GEOMETRY Chia-Chi Teng1 treatment planning systems for head and neck cancer patients, there is a need to identify reference patients or prototypical models with the most similar anatomy in the head and neck region, our prototype system can do

  4. 75 FR 34181 - Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, Haddam Neck Plant, Independent Spent Fuel Storage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ...NAC-MPC casks at the Haddam Neck ISFSI, which were loaded under...1025 to the casks at the Haddam Neck ISFSI, if approved, would have...present at the site of the Haddam Neck ISFSI. Alternative to the Proposed...NRC's ADAMS, which provides text and image files of NRC's...

  5. 76 FR 41530 - Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, Haddam Neck Plant; Notice of Consideration of Approval...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ...Company, Haddam Neck Plant; Notice of Consideration...and Opportunity for a Hearing AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...operator of the Haddam Neck Plant. According to an application...changes to the Haddam Neck Plant facility or operational...filing of requests for hearing and petitions for...

  6. 76 FR 59153 - Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, VA, and Featherstone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck (Mason Neck) and Featherstone National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs; refuges). In... Fish and Wildlife Service Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, VA, and Featherstone National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, VA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...

  7. 76 FR 59153 - Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, VA, and Featherstone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ...Service [FWS-R5-R-2011-N128; BAC-4311-K9-S3] Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County...CCP) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck (Mason Neck) and Featherstone...

  8. 76 FR 582 - Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, VA, and Featherstone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ...Service [FWS-R5-R-2010-N137; BAC-4311-K9-S3] Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County...conservation plan and the environmental assessment (CCP/EA) for Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck (Mason Neck) National Wildlife...

  9. Nest Site Characteristics of Ring-necked Pheasants in Eastern South Dakota

    E-print Network

    Nest Site Characteristics of Ring-necked Pheasants in Eastern South Dakota JON R. PURVIS·, ANDY E measured during 1996 at 42 nests ofring-necked pheasants (Phasianus co/chicus) in Moody and Lake counties allow better assessment ofring-necked pheasant nesting cover for investigators in prairie landscapes

  10. Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Locher, Julie L.; Nabell, Lisle M.; Carroll, William R.; Magnuson, J. Scott; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The use of altered fractionation radiotherapy (RT) regimens, as well as concomitant chemotherapy and RT, to intensify therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer can lead to increased rates of long-term dysphagia. Methods and Materials: We identified 122 patients who had undergone definitive RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, after excluding those who had been treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary, had Stage I-II disease, developed locoregional recurrence, had <12 months of follow-up, or had undergone postoperative RT. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were correlated with a composite of 3 objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence at the last follow-up visit; aspiration on a modified barium swallow study or a clinical diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia; or the presence of a pharyngoesophageal stricture. Results: A composite dysphagia outcome occurred in 38.5% of patients. On univariate analysis, the primary site (p = 0.01), use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), RT schedule (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of composite long-term dysphagia. The use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), primary site (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.02) remained significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent chemotherapy to RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer resulted in increased long-term dysphagia. Early intervention using swallowing exercises, avoidance of nothing-by-mouth periods, and the use of intensity-modulated RT to reduce the dose to the uninvolved swallowing structures should be explored further in populations at greater risk of long-term dysphagia.

  11. Quality of information available via the internet for patients with head and neck cancer: are we improving?

    PubMed

    Best, James; Muzaffar, Jameel; Mitchell-Innes, Alistair

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the type, content, accessibility and quality of information available via the internet for patients with head and neck cancer. The Google search engine was used to generate lists of the first 100 websites for general head and neck cancer and the first ten for head and neck cancers by anatomical location (160 total). Websites were evaluated with the validated DISCERN and LIDA instruments, the SMOG (Simple measure of gobbledygook) readability score and against the JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) criteria. 40 of the 160 websites ranked by Google were suitable for analysis. Seven websites (17.5%) partially or fully achieved all four JAMA benchmarks and only one (2.5%) site achieved none. 28 (70%) included reference to quality of life factors. Correlations were identified between Google site rank and all four of our appraisal tools; LIDA (-0.966, p = 0.006), JAMA (-5.93, p = 0.028), DISCERN (-0.568, p = 0.037) and SMOG (4.678, p = 0.04). Google site rank and both government run sites (-35.38, p = 0.034) and sites run by universities or hospitals (-27.32, p = 0.016) also showed an association. Comparing our observations with those of Riordain in 2008, there has been little improvement in the quality of head and neck cancer information available online over this time. Given the variability in quality of information online, patients would benefit from being directed to reliable websites by clinicians. PMID:25370600

  12. Adaptive Planning in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancers: Single-Institution Experience and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Peter H.; Chen, Chin-Cheng; Ahn, Andrew I.; Hong, Linda; Scripes, Paola G.; Shen Jin; Lee, Chen-Chiao; Miller, Ekeni; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Anatomic changes and positional variability during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer can lead to clinically significant dosimetric changes. We report our single-institution experience using an adaptive protocol and correlate these changes with anatomic and positional changes during treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head and neck IMRT patients underwent serial computed tomography (CT) scans during their radiation course. After undergoing the planning CT scan, patients underwent planned rescans at 11, 22, and 33 fractions; a total of 89 scans with 129 unique CT plan combinations were thus analyzed. Positional variability and anatomic changes during treatment were correlated with changes in dosimetric parameters to target and avoidance structures between planning CT and subsequent scans. Results: A total of 15/23 patients (65%) benefited from adaptive planning, either due to inadequate dose to gross disease or to increased dose to organs at risk. Significant differences in primary and nodal targets (planning target volume, gross tumor volume, and clinical tumor volume), parotid, and spinal cord dosimetric parameters were noted throughout the treatment. Correlations were established between these dosimetric changes and weight loss, fraction number, multiple skin separations, and change in position of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine. Conclusions: Variations in patient positioning and anatomy changes during IMRT for head and neck cancer can affect dosimetric parameters and have wide-ranging clinical implications. The interplay between random positional variability and gradual anatomic changes requires careful clinical monitoring and frequent use of CT- based image-guided radiation therapy, which should determine variations necessitating new plans.

  13. Venous air embolism from head and neck wounds.

    PubMed

    Adams, V I; Hirsch, C S

    1989-05-01

    Air emboli in the chambers of the right side of the heart and in the pulmonary artery were documented in 16 autopsies representing shotgun and gunshot wounds of the head, traffic fatalities with head trauma, and one neck incision. The pathology of venous air embolism and its interpretation in the context of death investigation are discussed. PMID:2653272

  14. Severe and Catastrophic Neck Injuries Resulting from Tackle Football

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torg, Joseph S.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Use of the spring-loaded blocking and tackling devices should be discontinued due to severe neck injuries resulting from their use; employment of the head and helmet as the primary assault weapon in blocking, tackling, and head butting should be condemned for the same reason. (MJB)

  15. Experimental neck muscle pain impairs standing balance in humans

    E-print Network

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; 10.1007/s00221-008-1639-7

    2009-01-01

    Impaired postural control has been reported in patients with chronic neck pain of both traumatic and non-traumatic etiologies, but whether painful stimulation of neck muscle per se can affect balance control during quiet standing in humans remains unclear. The purpose of the present experiment was thus to investigate the effect of experimental neck muscle pain on standing balance in young healthy adults. To achieve this goal, 16 male university students were asked to stand upright as still as possible on a force platform with their eyes closed in two conditions of No pain and Pain of the neck muscles elicited by experimental painful electrical stimulation. Postural control and postural performance were assessed by the displacements of the center of foot pressure (CoP) and of the center of mass (CoM), respectively. The results showed increased CoP and CoM displacements variance, range, mean velocity, and mean and median frequencies in the Pain relative to the No pain condition. The present findings emphasize t...

  16. Intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Homma, Akihiro; Onimaru, Rikiya; Matsuura, Kazuto; Robbins, K Thomas; Fujii, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Intra-arterial chemotherapy has been used to treat localized malignant neoplasms in patients with head and neck cancer for over 50 years as the head and neck region is particularly well suited to regional chemotherapy. Early intra-arterial chemotherapy did not prove its efficacy. In addition, the additional complications associated with establishing and maintaining arterial access have further dampened enthusiasm for this approach. Subsequent significant advances in vascular radiology techniques and the development of new devices, such as fluoroscopy units and angiographic catheters, have made possible safe, accurate and repeated superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy. Intra-arterial infusion of high-dose cisplatin with systemic neutralization by intravenous sodium thiosulfate (RADPLAT) is a theoretically attractive approach to the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer. However, a Dutch trial comparing intra-arterial and intravenous chemoradiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer showed that RADPLAT was not superior to intravenous chemoradiotherapy. Therefore, further investigation of RADPLAT, including the refinement of the indications for its application, is needed. PMID:26486825

  17. Sporadic Multifocal Venous Malformations of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Michael V.; Patel, Neha A.; Hu, Shirley; Pantelides, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To report a case of unusually widespread sporadic venous malformations of the head and neck associated with normal D-dimer levels and, due to the protean clinical manifestations and increased risk of coagulopathy of these lesions, to review their diagnosis and clinical management. Case Report. A 25-year-old man presented with a one-year history of intermittent right-sided neck swelling and tongue swelling. Physical exam revealed additional lesions present throughout the head and neck. There was no family history suggestive of heritable vascular malformations. Radiographic imaging demonstrated 15 lesions located in various tissue layers consistent with venous malformations. A coagulation screen showed a normal prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio, D-dimer level, and fibrinogen level. It was determined that the patient was not at increased risk for intraoperative coagulopathy and preoperative heparin administration would not be necessary. The patient's buccal and tongue lesions were subsequently excised with no complications. The patient also underwent sclerotherapy evaluation for his neck mass. Conclusion. This case describes a unique presentation of sporadic multifocal venous malformations. It also emphasizes the importance of prompt diagnosis and workup when multiple venous malformations are present to prevent morbidity during surgical excision secondary to intravascular coagulopathy. PMID:26483982

  18. [Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma in head and neck region].

    PubMed

    Cerda, T; Sun, X S; Cazorla, A; Laurent, C; Floret, F; Haudebourg, J; Thyss, A; Thariat, J

    2014-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcomas are a recently described entity, with biphenotypic characteristics of lymphomas and sarcomas. The treatment is hardly consensual in the literature. We report two head and neck cases, of favorable outcome after surgery and radiotherapy. Histopathology and differential diagnoses are discussed as well as the therapeutic strategies used. PMID:24373643

  19. Cellular/Molecular Spine Neck Plasticity Controls Postsynaptic Calcium Signals

    E-print Network

    Oertner, Thomas

    Cellular/Molecular Spine Neck Plasticity Controls Postsynaptic Calcium Signals through Electrical and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 95064 Dendritic spines have signals. However, estimates of the resistance between the spine head and the parent dendrite suggest

  20. The nutritional assessment of head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Magnano, Mauro; Mola, Patrizia; Machetta, Giacomo; Maffeis, Paola; Forestiero, Ilenia; Cavagna, Roberta; Artino, Elena; Boffano, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Patients affected by head and neck cancer are particularly at risk for nutritional depletion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status of patients affected by head and neck cancer at diagnosis. All adult patients with head and neck cancer between January 2009 and December 2013 were included. The following data were recorded: demographics, tobacco and/or alcohol consumption, weight, height, the reference weight 6 months before the diagnosis, tumor site, tumor stage, and laboratory data. Then, Body mass index (BMI), and Buzby nutrition risk index (NRI) were calculated. Statistical analysis was used to search for associations among multiple variables. 122 men and 22 women were enrolled. As for reference BMI, 77 patients were overweight, whereas just 7 subjects were underweight. At diagnosis, 72 subjects were overweight according to BMI, whereas 52 patients were underweight. Instead, according to NRI, 96 patients were severely malnourished, 42 patients were moderately malnourished, whereas just 6 patients had a normal value of NRI. The assessment of nutrition by BMI excluded from a thorough consideration all overweight and obese patients with head and neck cancer. Instead, NRI correctly identified both undernourished and overweight/obese patients as "malnourished" subjects. PMID:25534287

  1. Noninvasive intraoperative angiography for reconstruction of head and neck defects.

    PubMed

    Daram, Shiva P; Sacks, Justin M; Kupferman, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of head and neck defects after cancer resection involves the use of local, pedicled musculocutaneous, and free flaps. Flap failure is often caused by vascular insufficiency, and it is associated with the presence of cardiovascular or peripheral vascular disease, a history of smoking, and previous radiation and/or surgery. Failure rates may be reduced by the use of indocyanine green near-infrared fluorescence laser angiography, which detects perfusion deficits intraoperatively. Although this technology has been validated in other fields, there is limited experience in the head and neck region. We present 3 cases in which different head and neck flaps were used along with this technology in patients at high risk for flap failure. All flaps were successfully implanted without perioperative or long-term complications. The increasing complexity, age, and comorbidities of the head and neck cancer population pose significant reconstructive challenges. This report demonstrates the feasibility of employing intraoperative angiography for local, pedicled, and free flaps. This noninvasive tool optimizes intraoperative planning and assesses viability, potentially lowering failure rates in high-risk patients. Identification of patients who most benefit from this technology warrants further investigation. PMID:26535829

  2. Pediatric surgical pathology of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, J A; Weiland, L H

    1994-08-01

    Anatomically, the head and neck region is composed of a greater variety of structures than any other part of the body. Practically all the anatomic structures can be the site of the various pathological processes. Multiplying the anatomic structures by the various pathological processes produces an infinite number of pathological diagnoses that may be encountered in the head and neck region. The large number of pathological possibilities provides a challenge for the pathologist working in surgical pathology of the head and neck region in children. Whenever a specimen is submitted to the laboratory, it is necessary to have at one's disposal a list of differential diagnoses. Clinical information is of importance in interpreting specimens if excellence in patient management is to be achieved. Therefore, it is imperative that open communication exist between the clinician and the pathologist. Thus, a combination of knowledge of the pathological possibilities, the range of differential diagnoses, the ability to use newer technologies, such as cell marker determinations by flow cytometry and immunoperoxidase, and dialogue with clinical physicians will provide some assurance of the ultimate in patient care. Herein the authors discuss some of the more common and important neoplasms encountered in pediatric head and neck surgical pathology. PMID:7987632

  3. Why does necking ignore notches in dynamic tension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotbaum, Y.; Osovski, S.; Rittel, D.

    2015-09-01

    Recent experimental work has revealed that necking of tensile specimens, subjected to dynamic loading, is a deterministic phenomenon, governed by the applied boundary conditions. Furthermore it was shown that the potential sited, dictated by the boundary conditions, may prevail even in the presence of a notch, thus necking may occur away of the notched region. The present paper combines experimental and numerical work to address this issue. Specifically, it is shown that the dynamic tensile failure locus is dictated by both the applied velocity boundary condition and the material mechanical properties, specifically strain-rate sensitivity and strain-rate hardening. It is shown that at sufficiently high impact velocities, the flows stress in the notch vicinity becomes quite higher than in the rest of the specimen, so that while the former resists deformation, it transfers the load to the latter, resulting in the formation of a local neck and failure away from the notch. Small local perturbations in the material properties are shown to be sufficient to stabilize the structure under local failure until a neck forms elsewhere. While the physical observations are quite counterintuitive with respect to the engineering views of stress concentrator's effect, the present work rationalizes those observations and also provides information for the designers of dynamically tensioned structures that may contain notches or similar flaws.

  4. Head and neck MR imaging in the pediatric patient

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, R.B.; Lufkin, R.B.; Kangarloo, H.; Hanafee, W.N.; Wilson, G.H.

    1986-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies of the head and neck (excluding the brain) were obtained in 49 children believed to have lesions of the head and neck. Seven children had normal images; in the remaining 42, lesions were divided into four categories: midline lesions, lesions of symmetric paired structures, facial lesions, and naso-pharyngeal and oropharyngeal lesions. All entities were well delineated by MR imaging. The imaging planes and sequences chosen depended on the suspected abnormality. Midline lesions were best imaged in the sagittal plane, lesions of paired structures and the face in the axial or coronal planes, and naso-pharyngeal and oropharyngeal lesions in the axial or sagittal planes. Intracranial extension of head and neck neoplasms was best evaluated in the coronal plane. Surface coils provided better resolution and were thus more useful in evaluating small superficial lesions; head or body coils were more useful in defining the extent of large lesions. T2-weighted images provided better differentiation between normal and tumor tissue in patients with head and neck neoplasms.

  5. Pictorial essay: Vascular interventions in extra cranial head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Suyash S; Shetty, Nitin S; Dharia, Tejas P; Polnaya, Ashwin M

    2012-01-01

    Medicine is an ever changing field and interventional radiology (IR) procedures are becoming increasingly popular because of high efficacy and its minimally invasive nature of the procedure. Management of disease processes in the extra cranial head and neck (ECHN) has always been a challenge due to the complex anatomy of the region. Cross sectional imaging of the ECHN has grown and evolved tremendously and occupies a pivotal and integral position in the clinical management of variety of head and neck pathologies. Advances in angiographic technologies including flat panel detector systems, biplane, and 3-dimensional rotational angiography have consolidated and expanded the role of IR in the management of various ECHN pathologies. The ECHN is at cross roads between the origins of great vessels and the cerebral vasculature. Thorough knowledge of functional and technical aspects of neuroangiography is essential before embarking on head and neck vascular interventions. The vessels of the head and neck can be involved by infectious and inflammatory conditions, get irradiated during radiotherapy and injured due to trauma or iatrogenic cause. The ECHN is also a common site for various hypervascular neoplasms and vascular malformations, which can be treated with endovascular and percutaneous embolization. This pictorial essay provides a review of variety of ECHN pathologies which were managed by various IR procedures using different approaches. PMID:23833428

  6. 49 CFR 572.133 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... assembly, defined in subsection (b) of this section, on the pendulum described in Figure 22 of 49 CFR 572... accelerometer mounted on the pendulum as shown in Figure 22 of 49 CFR 572 at the instant of contact with the... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.133 Neck assembly and test procedure....

  7. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-02-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that qualitatively undergoes the same forces acting in whiplash and shows the same behavior is used to analyze the kinematics of both the head and the cervical spine and the resulting neck loads. The rapid acceleration during a whiplash event causes the extension and flexion of the cervical spine, which in turn can cause dislocated vertebrae, torn ligaments, intervertebral disc herniation, and other trauma that appear to be the likely causes of subsequent painful headache or neck pain symptoms. Thus, whiplash provides a connection between the dynamics of the human body and physics. Its treatment can enliven the usual teaching in kinematics, and both theoretical and experimental approaches provide an interesting biological context to teach introductory principles of mechanics.

  8. Pediatric Vascular Tumors of the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Carl; Peacock, Zachary S; Troulis, Maria J

    2016-02-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are often involved in the diagnosis and treatment of vascular neoplasms of the head and neck. An incorrect diagnosis may lead to improper or unnecessary treatment. This article reviews the diagnosis and management of vascular tumors. PMID:26293330

  9. 33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m., from May 1 through October 31, and between...

  10. 33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m., from May 1 through October 31, and between...

  11. 33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m., from May 1 through October 31, and between...

  12. 33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m., from May 1 through October 31, and between...

  13. 33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m., from May 1 through October 31, and between...

  14. Targeting EGF-receptor-signalling in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, C W M; Morgan, M A; Eckardt, A

    2007-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the use of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy to treat squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), prognosis has improved little over the past 30 years. There is a clear need for novel, more effective therapies to prevent relapse, control metastases and improve overall survival. Improved understanding of SCCHN disease biology has led to the introduction of molecularly targeted treatment strategies in these cancers. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is expressed at much higher levels in SCCHN tumours than in normal epithelial tissue, and EGFR expression correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, much effort is currently directed toward targeting aberrant EGFR activity (e.g. cell signalling) in SCCHN. This review discusses the efficacy of novel therapies targeting the EGFR (e.g. anti-EGFR antibodies and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors) that are currently tested in SCCHN patients. PMID:17224925

  15. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in head and neck cancer: its role and treatment implications

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Michel; Zouhair, Abderrahim; Azria, David; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2006-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the ErbB family of receptors. Its stimulation by endogenous ligands, EGF or transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-?) results in activation of intracellular tyrosine kinase, therefore, cell cycle progression. High levels of EGFR expression are correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to radiation therapy in a variety of cancers, mostly in squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Blocking the EGFR by a monoclonal antibody results in inhibition of the stimulation of the receptor, therefore, in inhibition of cell proliferation, enhanced apoptosis, and reduced angiogenesis, invasiveness and metastases. The EGFR is a prime target for new anticancer therapy in SCCHN, and other agents in development include small molecular tyrosine kinase inhibitors and antisense therapies. PMID:16722544

  16. Anthropometric Assessment of Neck Adipose Tissue and Airway Volume Using Multidetector Computed Tomography: An Imaging Approach and Association With Overall Mortality.

    PubMed

    Maresky, Hillel S; Sharfman, Zachary; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Gomori, J M; Copel, Laurian; Tal, Sigal

    2015-11-01

    Neck adiposity tissue volume (NATV) accumulation is an indicator for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Neck circumference is a poor measure of NATV, and a quantifier for this entity has not yet been established.To evaluate volumetric quantification by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as a reproducible anthropometric tool to measure NATV and airway volume (AWV).A total of 519 patients, including a subset of 70 random patients who underwent head and neck CT scanning in our hospital within 1 year (2013), were studied. Included patients were all those undergoing nonenhanced CT (NECT) or CT angiography (CTA). Neck cross-sectional areas (NCSA) were measured at 2 separate levels of the neck, and 3D postprocessing tissue reconstruction was performed, and NATV and AWVs were quantified volumetrically for all patients within the year.The average NCSA at the level of the soft palate and thyroid cartilage was 22,579 and 14,500?mm, respectively. NATV when compared to the upper and lower levels of NCSA showed correlations of 0.64 and 0.79, respectively (P?correlation between NATV and body mass index (BMI) was found (r?=?0.658, P?

  17. Refining Measurement of Social Cognitive Theory Factors Associated with Exercise Adherence in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Laura Q; Fogleman, Amanda; Verhulst, Steven; Bhugra, Mudita; Rao, Krishna; Malone, James; Robbs, Randall; Robbins, K Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Social cognitive theory (SCT) measures related to exercise adherence in head and neck cancer (HNCa) patients were developed. Enrolling 101 HNCa patients, psychometric properties and associations with exercise behavior were examined for barriers self-efficacy, perceived barriers interference, outcome expectations, enjoyment, and goal setting. Cronbach's alpha ranged from.84 to.95; only enjoyment demonstrated limited test-retest reliability. Subscales for barriers self-efficacy (motivational, physical health) and barriers interference (motivational, physical health, time, environment) were identified. Multiple SCT constructs were cross-sectional correlates and prospective predictors of exercise behavior. These measures can improve the application of the SCT to exercise adherence in HNCa patients. PMID:26177345

  18. Inorganic Contaminants, Nutrient Reserves and Molt Intensity in Autumn Migrant Red-Necked Grebes (Podiceps grisegena) at Georgian Bay.

    PubMed

    Holman, Katie L; Schummer, Michael L; Petrie, Scott A; Chen, Yu-Wei; Belzile, Nelson

    2015-11-01

    Red-necked grebes (Podiceps grisegena) are piscivorous waterbirds that breed on freshwater lakes in northwestern Canada and stop-over at the Great Lakes during autumn migration to molt feathers and replenish lipid and protein reserves. The objectives of this study were to (1) describe concentrations of, and correlations among, inorganic contaminants in a sample of autumn migrant red-necked grebes from the Great Lakes, (2) compare concentrations of inorganic contaminants to those in autumn migrant common loons from Schummer et al. (Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 62:704, 2011a), (3) evaluate if the inorganic elements are negatively associated with lipid and protein reserves, and (4) determine if nutrient reserves and molt intensity were correlated. None of the 14 contaminants analyzed were above threshold levels known to cause acute health problems in piscivorous birds. Body masses of plucked birds were within the normal reported range. Lipid reserves varied positively with hepatic concentrations of arsenic, copper, iron, nickel, lead, and selenium and negatively with mercury and magnesium. Protein reserves variety negatively with hepatic concentrations of arsenic, calcium, nickel, lead, and zinc and positively with aluminum, cadmium, and iron. A negative correlation was observed between chest molt and lipid reserves but not between nutrient reserves and other feather tracts. The relationships between lipid reserves and both mercury and selenium were consistent with current research on other piscivorous waterbirds at the Great Lakes and justify continued work to determine interactions of these contaminants in waterbirds that breed, stage, and winter in the region. PMID:26250452

  19. Postradiation Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James D.; La, Trang H.; Chu, Karen; Quon, Andrew; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Maxim, Peter G.; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To explore the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume measured on postradiation {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with head-and-neck cancer who received pretreatment and posttreatment PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging along with definitive chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. The PET/CT parameters evaluated include the maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub 2.0}-MTV{sub 4.0}; where MTV{sub 2.0} refers to the volume above a standardized uptake value threshold of 2.0), and integrated tumor volume. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models were used to test for association between PET endpoints and disease-free survival and overall survival. Results: Multiple postradiation PET endpoints correlated significantly with outcome; however, the most robust predictor of disease progression and death was MTV{sub 2.0}. An increase in MTV{sub 2.0} of 21cm{sup 3} (difference between 75th and 25th percentiles) was associated with an increased risk of disease progression (hazard ratio [HR]= 2.5, p = 0.0001) and death (HR = 2.0, p = 0.003). In patients with nonnasopharyngeal carcinoma histology (n = 34), MTV{sub 2.0} <18 cm{sup 3} and MTV{sub 2.0} {>=}18 cm{sup 3} yielded 2-year disease-free survival rates of 100% and 63%, respectively (p = 0.006) and 2-year overall survival rates of 100% and 81%, respectively (p = 0.009). There was no correlation between MTV{sub 2.0} and disease-free survival or overall survival with nasopharyngeal carcinoma histology (n = 13). On multivariate analysis, only postradiation MTV{sub 2.0} was predictive of disease-free survival (HR = 2.47, p = 0.0001) and overall survival (HR = 1.98, p = 0.003). Conclusions: Postradiation metabolic tumor volume is an adverse prognostic factor in head-and-neck cancer. Biomarkers such as MTV are important for risk stratification and will be valuable in the future with risk-adapted therapies.

  20. Inflammatory biomarkers in serum in subjects with and without work related neck/shoulder complaints

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although it has recently been recognised that inflammation is important in the development of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), the exact pathophysiological pathways are unknown. Methods We investigated serum concentrations of inflammatory cytokines in 35 female supermarket cashiers with repetitive work tasks and work related neck/shoulder complaints, compared with those from 25 women without MSDs (6 supermarket cashiers and 19 middle-school teachers or faculty staff). None of the subjects were pregnant or lactating, and showed no signs of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, cancer, diabetes, coronary artery disease or inadequately controlled hypertension. Serum levels of IL-1?, IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, MCP-1, MIP-1?, MIP-1?, TNF-?, GM-CSF, CTGF and CRP were analysed. Results The women with pain related to MSD had higher serum concentrations of MIP-1? (median, 25th-75th percentile: 90.0 pg/mL, 62.5-110 vs. 73.1 pg/mL, 54.6-88.3; p?=?0.018), IL-12 (0.26 pg/mL, 0.26-0.26 vs. 0.26 pg/mL, 0.26-0.26; p?=?0.047) and CRP (0.5 mg/L, 0.5-1.6 vs. 0.5 mg/L, 0.5-0.5; p?=?0.003), than control subjects. Levels of MIP-1?, MIP-1? and CRP were correlated with the reported intensity of neck/shoulder pain (r?=?0.29, p?=?0.03 for MIP-1?; r?=?0.29, p?=?0.02 for MIP-1? and r?=?0.43, p?=?0.001 for CRP). No statistically significant differences in serum levels were found for the remaining cytokines. Conclusions Otherwise healthy females with ongoing work-related neck/shoulder pain showed higher serum concentrations of MIP-1?, IL-12 and CRP than controls, and the levels of MIP-1?, MIP-1? and CRP were correlated to pain intensity. These results support previous findings that inflammatory processes play a part in work related MSDs. PMID:24669872

  1. Open Reduction of Pediatric Femoral Neck Fractures Reduces Osteonecrosis Risk.

    PubMed

    Stone, Joseph D; Hill, Mary K; Pan, Zhaoxing; Novais, Eduardo N

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric femoral neck fractures are rare injuries that are associated with a high risk of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. This study compared pediatric patients with fully displaced femoral neck fractures treated with either open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) or closed reduction and internal fixation (CRIF). After institutional review board approval was obtained, the authors identified 53 patients who were treated for femoral neck fracture between 2003 and 2012. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) diagnosis of a fully displaced femoral neck fracture with no anatomic cortical contact; (2) age of at least 4 years; and (3) clinical/radiographic follow-up of at least 1 year. Medical records and radiographs were retrospectively reviewed. Excluded from the study were 16 patients who had fractures that were not fully displaced, 4 who were outside of the eligible age range, 1 who had insufficient radiographs, and 10 who had insufficient follow-up. Of the 22 patients included, 6 were treated with ORIF and 16 were treated with CRIF. Treatment groups were compared with Fisher's exact test for categorical outcome data and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test for continuous variables. There was a significantly (P=.051) greater occurrence of osteonecrosis after CRIF (50%) than after ORIF (0%). Further, patients who underwent ORIF had a higher (P=.009) quality of reduction, a higher (P=.046) rate of anatomic union, and fewer (P=.009) complications than those who underwent CRIF. Major complications occurred in significantly fewer (P=.015) hips after ORIF than after CRIF. No significant difference (P=.477) was seen between groups, according to the Ratliff assessment of final results. Fully displaced pediatric femoral neck fractures treated with ORIF had a significantly higher quality of reduction, with fewer complications, including osteonecrosis, than those treated with CRIF. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(11):e983-e990.]. PMID:26558678

  2. Neck-cooling improves repeated sprint performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Caroline; Stevens, Ryan; Everson, Bethan; Tyler, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of neck-cooling during exercise on repeated sprint ability in a hot environment. Seven team-sport playing males completed two experimental trials involving repeated sprint exercise (5 × 6 s) before and after two 45 min bouts of a football specific intermittent treadmill protocol in the heat (33.0 ± 0.2°C; 53 ± 2% relative humidity). Participants wore a neck-cooling collar in one of the trials (CC). Mean power output and peak power output declined over time in both trials but were higher in CC (540 ± 99 v 507 ± 122 W, d = 0.32; 719 ± 158 v 680 ± 182 W, d = 0.24 respectively). The improved power output was particularly pronounced (d = 0.51-0.88) after the 2nd 45 min bout but the CC had no effect on % fatigue. The collar lowered neck temperature and the thermal sensation of the neck (P < 0.001) but had no effect on heart rate, fluid loss, fluid consumption, lactate, glucose, plasma volume change, cortisol, or thermal sensation (P > 0.05). There were no trial differences but interaction effects were demonstrated for prolactin concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Prolactin concentration was initially higher in the collar cold trial and then was lower from 45 min onwards (interaction trial × time P = 0.04). RPE was lower during the football intermittent treadmill protocol in the collar cold trial (interaction trial × time P = 0.01). Neck-cooling during exercise improves repeated sprint performance in a hot environment without altering physiological or neuroendocrinological responses. RPE is reduced and may partially explain the performance improvement. PMID:26594177

  3. Neck-cooling improves repeated sprint performance in the heat

    PubMed Central

    Sunderland, Caroline; Stevens, Ryan; Everson, Bethan; Tyler, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of neck-cooling during exercise on repeated sprint ability in a hot environment. Seven team-sport playing males completed two experimental trials involving repeated sprint exercise (5 × 6 s) before and after two 45 min bouts of a football specific intermittent treadmill protocol in the heat (33.0 ± 0.2°C; 53 ± 2% relative humidity). Participants wore a neck-cooling collar in one of the trials (CC). Mean power output and peak power output declined over time in both trials but were higher in CC (540 ± 99 v 507 ± 122 W, d = 0.32; 719 ± 158 v 680 ± 182 W, d = 0.24 respectively). The improved power output was particularly pronounced (d = 0.51–0.88) after the 2nd 45 min bout but the CC had no effect on % fatigue. The collar lowered neck temperature and the thermal sensation of the neck (P < 0.001) but had no effect on heart rate, fluid loss, fluid consumption, lactate, glucose, plasma volume change, cortisol, or thermal sensation (P > 0.05). There were no trial differences but interaction effects were demonstrated for prolactin concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Prolactin concentration was initially higher in the collar cold trial and then was lower from 45 min onwards (interaction trial × time P = 0.04). RPE was lower during the football intermittent treadmill protocol in the collar cold trial (interaction trial × time P = 0.01). Neck-cooling during exercise improves repeated sprint performance in a hot environment without altering physiological or neuroendocrinological responses. RPE is reduced and may partially explain the performance improvement. PMID:26594177

  4. Deep neck abscess in neonatal period: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Mehmet; Dereci, Selim; Aslan, Yakup

    2014-04-01

    Deep neck abscess is very rare in neonatal period. We reported a deep neck abscess caused by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection (MSSA) in a neonate. A 10-day male infant was admitted to our neonatal unit with the complaints of fever, irritability, and refused to food intake. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed as an abscess in the neck. Needle aspiration from abscess revealed pus. Antibiotics and drainage were applied. We also reviewed the neonatal deep neck abscess reported in English literature and clinical presentation, risk factors, causing microorganisms, treatment, complication and outcome of deep neck abscesses were discussed. PMID:24512784

  5. Enlarged Parent Artery Lumen at Aneurysmal-Neck Segment in Wide-Necked Distal Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Won; Woo, Jung Min; Lim, Ok Kyun; Jo, Ye-eun; Kim, Jae Kyun; Kim, Eun Sang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Hypothesizing that the parent artery (PA) diameter of the aneurysm-neck segment is larger than those of normal segments, especially in wide-necked aneurysm cases, we conducted 3D angiographic analyses in wide-necked aneurysm cases focusing on the luminal morphologic change of the PA. Materials and Methods Under the approval of local IRB, we enrolled 26 patients with distal internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms, which were treated with stent assisted coiling. The PA diameters along the centerline were measured at 6 points with built-in software by two observers. Those 6 points were P1 and P2 proximally, P3 and P4 at the aneurysm ostium margins, and P5 and P6 distally. We performed an ANOVA test and a Bonferroni method for post hoc analyses. Linear regression analysis was performed to find any morphologic influencing factors. Results There were 20 distal ICA aneurysms out of 26 consecutive cases after exclusion. The differences in diameter at each point were statistically significant (p<0.0001). On post hoc analyses, the difference between P4 and P5 was significant both in maximum and mean PA diameters (p<0.0001 and p<0.001, respectively). Multivariate analyses failed to reveal any morphological influencing factor. Conclusion PAs harboring a wide-necked aneurysm requiring stent assistance for coiling showed significant enlargement of the lumen, especially at the distal transition segment of the aneurysm ostium and the PA. PMID:26389011

  6. A comparison of bladder neck preservation and bladder neck reconstruction for urinary incontinence after radical retro pubic prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanahi, Mohammad Hossein; Honarmand, Ramin; Khorrami, Mohammad Hataf; Najarzadegan, Mohammad Reza; Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Alizadeh, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and will include about 30% of all malignancies in men. Since the initial report of the anatomic radical prostatectomy, refinements in the surgical technique have been made. Several studies show that bladder neck preservation (BNP) during radical prostatectomy makes improve early return of urinary continence, erectile function or both. However, some clinical trials have suggested little difference between the return of continence while using modifications. In this study, we compared outcomes of BNP and bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) during radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). Materials and Methods: This prospective study was performed on 60 patients at a referral university hospital from March 2010 to March 2012. Study population was all patients candidate for RRP (RRP in this period. All patients divided into two groups, A and B (30 patients in each group). Group A (n = 30) who preserved bladder neck (BNP) and Group B (n = 30) who had BNR. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) before and at 2, 6, 9, 12 and18 months after surgery, anastomotic stricture symptoms, positive bladder neck margin, Gleason score and urine incontinence were compared between two groups. Also, we compared bladder neck contracture, urinary continence and positive surgical margin rates after BNP and BNR while retropubic prostatectomy in 24 months period follow-up. Results: The mean age of the patients was 61.81 ± 7.15 years (range, 50-74 years). After a follow-up period of 24 months, the PSA rising was not different between the two groups. After 2 months, 19 (63.33%) of patients in A group and the same number in B group were continent (P = 0.78). Stricture of the bladder neck at the anastomosis site requiring transurethral dilation occurred in 7 (23.33%) and 3 (10.0%) patients in groups A and B, respectively (P = 0.04). Conclusion: Although there was no difference in prevalence and duration of return of urinary continence after the operation between two groups, but results of our study showed that stenosis of the bladder neck was lower in BNP. Hence in the group of BNP, need for further operation and overflow incontinency due to the obstruction of urinary tract will be less likely than BNR and patients have better long time (24 months) urinary continence. PMID:25709654

  7. Complications of neck dissection at a tertiary level hospital: study of 30 cases.

    PubMed

    Masud, M K; Ahmad, S M; Karim, M A; Ferdouse, F; Fakir, A Y; Hanif, M A; Abdullah, M; Roy, A S

    2014-10-01

    Metastatic dissemination into lymph nodes of neck occurs frequently in head neck cancers which down grade the patient's curability and survival. Neck dissection is a curable option for its management. To evaluate the complications following different types of neck dissection. This cross sectional study was conducted among patients undergone different types of neck dissection due to cervical nodal metastasis and attended follow up during July 2010 to June 2011 in Department of ENTs and Head-Neck surgery Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Among 30 selected patient, 23 were male (76.67%) and 7 were female (23.33%), age ranged from 31-72 years (Mean=59.1±5.44). In different modalities of neck dissection 11 were modified neck dissection (36.67%) and 10(33.33%) were radical neck dissection. Common indication was carcinoma of unknown origin (66.67%). Involved neck nodes were commonly level II-IV (69.99%). Nodal stage was N2(50%) and N3 (40%).Common immediate complications were bleeding 03(10%), facial oedema 02 (6.67%) and thoracic duct injury 02(6.67%). Intermediate complications were seroma 05(16.67%), wound infection 04(13.33%) and chylous fistula 02(6.67%), Late Complications were hypertrophic scar 07(23.33%) and shoulder syndrome 06(20%). Proper indications, skilled surgery along with early recognize and treatment in both early and late manifestations of neck dissection preventing its grave sequence. PMID:25481582

  8. Matching Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy to an Anterior Low Neck Field

    SciTech Connect

    Amdur, Robert J. Liu, Chihray; Li, Jonathan; Mendenhall, William; Hinerman, Russell

    2007-10-01

    When using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to treat head and neck cancer with the primary site above the level of the larynx, there are two basic options for the low neck lymphatics: to treat the entire neck with IMRT, or to match the IMRT plan to a conventional anterior 'low neck' field. In view of the potential advantages of using a conventional low neck field, it is important to look for ways to minimize or manage the problems of matching IMRT to a conventional radiotherapy field. Treating the low neck with a single anterior field and the standard larynx block decreases the dose to the larynx and often results in a superior IMRT plan at the primary site. The purpose of this article is to review the most applicable studies and to discuss our experience with implementing a technique that involves moving the position of the superior border of the low neck field several times during a single treatment fraction.

  9. The Burden and Determinants of Neck Pain in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    van der Velde, Gabrielle; Carroll, Linda J.; Holm, Lena W.; Cassidy, J. David; Guzman, Jamie; Côté, Pierre; Haldeman, Scott; Ammendolia, Carlo; Carragee, Eugene; Hurwitz, Eric; Nordin, Margareta; Peloso, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Study Design Best evidence synthesis. Objective To undertake a best evidence synthesis of the published evidence on the burden and determinants of neck pain and its associated disorders in the general population. Summary of Background Data The evidence on burden and determinants of neck has not previously been summarized. Methods The Bone and Joint Decade 2000?2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders performed a systematic search and critical review of literature published between 1980 and 2006 to assemble the best evidence on neck pain. Studies meeting criteria for scientific validity were included in a best evidence synthesis. Results We identified 469 studies on burden and determinants of neck pain, and judged 249 to be scientifically admissible; 101 articles related to the burden and determinants of neck pain in the general population. Incidence ranged from 0.055 per 1000 person years (disc herniation with radiculopathy) to 213 per 1000 persons (self-reported neck pain). Incidence of neck injuries during competitive sports ranged from 0.02 to 21 per 1000 exposures. The 12-month prevalence of pain typically ranged between 30% and 50%; the 12-month prevalence of activity-limiting pain was 1.7% to 11.5%. Neck pain was more prevalent among women and prevalence peaked in middle age. Risk factors for neck pain included genetics, poor psychological health, and exposure to tobacco. Disc degeneration was not identified as a risk factor. The use of sporting gear (helmets, face shields) to prevent other types of injury was not associated with increased neck injuries in bicycling, hockey, or skiing. Conclusion Neck pain is common. Nonmodifiable risk factors for neck pain included age, gender, and genetics. Modifiable factors included smoking, exposure to tobacco, and psychological health. Disc degeneration was not identified as a risk factor. Future research should concentrate on longitudinal designs exploring preventive strategies and modifiable risk factors for neck pain.

  10. Cytoglobin is upregulated by tumour hypoxia and silenced by promoter hypermethylation in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, R J; Omar, M M; Rokadiya, S; Kogera, F A; Lowe, D; Hall, G L; Woolgar, J A; Homer, J; Liloglou, T; Field, J K; Risk, J M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Cytoglobin (Cygb) was first described in 2002 as an intracellular globin of unknown function. We have previously shown the downregulation of cytoglobin as a key event in a familial cancer syndrome of the upper aerodigestive tract. Methods: Cytoglobin expression and promoter methylation were investigated in sporadic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) using a cross-section of clinical samples. Additionally, the putative mechanisms of Cygb expression in cancer were explored by subjecting HNSCC cell lines to hypoxic culture conditions and 5-aza-2-deoxycitidine treatment. Results: In clinically derived HNSCC samples, CYGB mRNA expression showed a striking correlation with tumour hypoxia (measured by HIF1A mRNA expression P=0.013) and consistent associations with histopathological measures of tumour aggression. CYGB expression also showed a marked negative correlation with promoter methylation (P=0.018). In the HNSCC cell lines cultured under hypoxic conditions, a trend of increasing expression of both CYGB and HIF1A with progressive hypoxia was observed. Treatment with 5-aza-2-deoxycitidine dramatically increased CYGB expression in those cell lines with greater baseline promoter methylation. Conclusion We conclude that the CYGB gene is regulated by both promoter methylation and tumour hypoxia in HNSCC and that increased expression of this gene correlates with clincopathological measures of a tumour's biological aggression. PMID:19568272

  11. A Planned Neck Dissection Is Not Necessary in All Patients With N2-3 Head-and-Neck Cancer After Sequential Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Soltys, Scott G.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Fee, Willard E.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of a planned neck dissection (PND) after sequential chemoradiotherapy for patients with head-and-neck cancer with N2-N3 nodal disease. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 90 patients with N2-N3 head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1991 and 2001 on two sequential chemoradiotherapy protocols. All patients received induction and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorocuracil, with or without tirapazamine. Patients with less than a clinical complete response (cCR) in the neck proceeded to a PND after chemoradiation. The primary endpoint was nodal response. Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up durations for living and all patients were 8.3 years (range, 1.5-16.3 year) and 5.4 years (range, 0.6-16.3 years), respectively. Of the 48 patients with nodal cCR whose necks were observed, 5 patients had neck failures as a component of their recurrence [neck and primary (n = 2); neck, primary, and distant (n = 1); neck only (n = 1); neck and distant (n = 1)]. Therefore, PND may have benefited only 2 patients (4%) [neck only failure (n = 1); neck and distant failure (n = 1)]. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for those with a clinical partial response (cPR) undergoing PND (n = 30) was 53%. The 5-year neck control rates after cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR were 90%, 93%, and 78%, respectively (p = 0.36). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for the cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR groups were 53%, 75%, and 42%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusion: In our series, patients with N2-N3 neck disease achieving a cCR in the neck, PND would have benefited only 4% and, therefore, is not recommended. Patients with a cPR should be treated with PND. Residual tumor in the PND specimens was associated with poor outcomes; therefore, aggressive therapy is recommended. Studies using novel imaging modalities are needed to better assess treatment response.

  12. Effect of neck strength training on health-related quality of life in females with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled 1-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic neck pain is a common condition associated not only with a decrease in neck muscle strength, but also with decrease in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). While neck strength training has been shown to be effective in improving neck muscle strength and reducing neck pain, HRQoL among patients with neck pain has been reported as an outcome in only two short-term exercise intervention studies. Thus, reports on the influence of a long-term neck strength training intervention on HRQoL among patients with chronic neck pain have been lacking. This study reports the effect of one-year neck strength training on HRQoL in females with chronic neck pain. Methods One hundred eighty female office workers, 25 to 53 years of age, with chronic neck pain were randomized to a strength training group (STG, n = 60), endurance training group (ETG, n = 60) or control group (CG, n = 60). The STG performed high-intensity isometric neck strengthening exercises with an elastic band while the ETG performed lighter dynamic neck muscle training. The CG received a single session of guidance on stretching exercises. HRQoL was assessed using the generic 15D questionnaire at baseline and after 12 months. Statistical comparisons among the groups were performed using bootstrap-type analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with baseline values as covariates. Effect sizes were calculated using the Cohen method for paired samples. Results Training led to statistically significant improvement in the 15D total scores for both training groups, whereas no changes occurred for the control group (P = 0.012, between groups). The STG improved significantly in five of 15 dimensions, while the ETG improved significantly in two dimensions. Effect size (and 95% confidence intervals) for the 15D total score was 0.39 (0.13 to 0.72) for the STG, 0.37 (0.08 to 0.67) for the ETG, and -0.06 (-0.25 to 0.15) for the CG. Conclusions One year of either strength or endurance training seemed to moderately enhance the HRQoL. Neck and upper body training can be recommended to improve HRQoL of females with neck pain if they are motivated for long-term regular exercise. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01057836 PMID:20465854

  13. Non-invasive label-free investigation and typing of head and neck cancers by multimodal nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Tobias; Vogler, Nadine; Dietzek, Benjamin; Akimov, Denis; Inhestern, Johanna; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    Early detection and typing of tumors is pressing matter in clinical research with important impacts for prognosis and successful treatment. Currently, staining is the golden standard in histopathology but requires surgical removal of tissue. In order to avoid resection of non-diseased tissue a non-invasive real-time imaging method is required which can be applied ideally intrasurgically. In this proceeding a combination of second harmonic generation (SHG), two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) imaging has been employed to investigate tissue sections of head and neck carcinomas focussing on laryngeal carcinoma. Primary laryngeal and other head and neck carcinomas consist to 99% of squamous cell carcinoma. By fusing the various imaging methods it is possible to measure the thickness of the epithelial cell layer as a marker for dysplastic or cancerous tissue degradation and to differentiate keratinizing and nonkeratininzing squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). As nonkeratinizing SCCs of the oropharynx correlate with a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as a subentity of head and neck cancer, and HPV related tumors are associated with a better clinical prognosis, the differentiation between keratinizing and non-keratinizing forms of SCCs is of high diagnostic value. TPEF is capable of displaying cell nuclei, therefore, morphologic information as cell density, cell to cytoplasm ratio, size and shape of cell nuclei can be obtained. SHG - on the other hand - selectively reveals the collagen matrix of the connective tissue, which is useful for determination of tumor-islets boundaries within epithelial tissue - a prerequisite for precise resection. Finally CARS in the CH-stretching region visualizes the lipid content of the tissue, which can be correlated with the dysplastic grade of the tissue.

  14. Diffusion-Weighted MRI for Nodal Staging of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Impact on Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Vandecaveye, Vincent; De Keyzer, Frederik; Op de beeck, Katya; Poorten, Vincent Vander; Delaere, Pierre; Verbeken, Eric; Hermans, Robert; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) for nodal staging and its impact on radiotherapy (RT) planning. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), as well as MRI (with routine and DW sequences) prior to neck dissection. After topographic correlation, lymph nodes were evaluated microscopically with prekeratin immunostaining. Pathology results were correlated with imaging findings and an RT planning study was performed for these surgically treated patients. One set of target volumes was based on conventional imaging only, and another set was based on the corresponding DW-MRI images. A third reference set was contoured based solely on pathology results. Results: A sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 97% per lymph node were found for DW-MRI. Nodal staging agreement between imaging and pathology was significantly stronger for DW-MRI (kappa = 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.00) than for conventional imaging (kappa = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.16-0.96; p = 0.019, by McNemar's test). For both imaging modalities, the absolute differences between RT volumes and those obtained by pathology were calculated. Using an exact paired Wilcoxon test, the observed difference was significantly larger for conventional imaging than for DW-MRI for nodal gross tumor volume (p = 0.0013), as well as for nodal clinical target volume (p = 0.0415) delineation. Conclusions: These results suggest that DW-MRI is superior to conventional imaging for preradiotherapy nodal staging of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and provides a potential impact on organsparing and tumor control.

  15. WE-E-BRE-09: Investigation of the Association Between Radiation-Induced Pain and Radiation Dose in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, H; Dyk, P; Mullen, D; Eschen, L; Fergus, S; Chin, R; Thorstad, W; Oh, J; Apte, A; Deasy, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer who undergo radiotherapy often experience several undesirable side-effects, including xerostomia, trismus, and pain in the head and neck area, but little is know about the dose-volume predictors of such pain. We investigated the association between radiation dose and both throat and esophagus pain during radiotherapy. Methods: We analyzed 124 head and neck patients who received radiotherapy at the Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. For these patients, weekly PROs were recorded, including 16 pain and anatomical location questions. In addition, 17 observational symptoms were recorded. Patients were asked to describe their pain at each site according to a four-level scale: none (0), mild (1), moderate (2), and severe (3). We explored the association between throat pain and the mean dose received in oral cavity and between esophageal pain and the mean dose received in the esophagus. The severity of pain was determined by the difference between the baseline (week 1) pain score and the maximum pain score during treatment. The baseline pain score was defined as the first available pain score before receiving 10 Gy because radiotherapy pain originates later during treatment. Dose-volume metrics were extracted from treatment plans using CERR. To evaluate the correlation between pain and radiation dose, Spearman's correlation coefficient (Rs) was used. Results: The associations between throat pain and the mean dose to the oral cavity, and between esophagus pain and the mean dose to the esophagus, were both statistically significant, with Rs=0.320 (p=0.003) and Rs=0.424 (p<0.0001), respectively. Mean dose, for each structure, was a better predictor of pain than total integral dose. Conclusion: We demonstrated that pain during radiotherapy in head and neck patients highly correlates with the dose delivered. We will further investigate the association between other pain locations and relevant normal tissue dose characteristics.

  16. [Managment of head and neck cancers during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Kici?ski, Krzysztof; Skorek, Andrzej; Stankiewicz, Czes?aw

    2011-01-01

    The coincidence of malignant disease during pregnancy is uncommon. The incidence of cancer in pregnancy has increased, due to the tendency to postpone childbirth to an older age. Cancer complicates approximately 0.1% of all pregnancies. Managing head and neck cancers during pregnancy requires additional pregnancy-related understanding of the aetiological effect of pregnancy on cancer, knowledge of the direct and indirect effects of cancer on pregnancy, and the effect of diagnostic and treatment modalities on pregnancy. The timing of treatment is an important determinant on foetal wellbeing. A multidisciplinary approach should be adopted to enable parents and clinicians to make the best clinical decision. Clinicians must be cognizant with the ethical dilemmas of treatment. In head and neck cancers, pregnancy has no effect on maternal prognosis when compared to non-pregnant patients matched by age, cancer stage and treatment. PMID:22078281

  17. An Unusual Case of Elastofibroma in the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Chen, F; Lu, D; Tang, Y; Peng, J-J; Yang, H

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 45-year old woman with a painless soft tissue mass on the left side of her neck. At surgery, the lesion was solid and rubbery and revealed grey-white fibrous areas. It was pathologically confirmed as an elastofibroma, a rare, benign soft tissue tumour that is most commonly encountered in patients more than 55 years of age. Elastofibroma arising from connective tissue and usually found in the subscapular region is extremely rare in the neck. The pathogenesis of elasto-fibroma is still unclear but increased mechanical stress or nutritional derangement consequent to vascular involvement and hereditary factors may predispose to this lesion. Marginal excision is the treatment of choice in symptomatic patients. PMID:25303259

  18. Immunology and Immunotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Robert L

    2015-10-10

    The immune system plays a key role in the development, establishment, and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A greater understanding of the dysregulation and evasion of the immune system in the evolution and progression of HNSCC provides the basis for improved therapies and outcomes for patients. HNSCC cells evade the host immune system through manipulation of their own immunogenicity, production of immunosuppressive mediators, and promotion of immunomodulatory cell types. Through the tumor's influence on the microenvironment, the immune system can be exploited to promote metastasis, angiogenesis, and growth. This article provides a brief overview of key components of the immune infiltrating cells in the tumor microenvironment, reviewing immunological principles related to head and neck cancer, including the concept of cancer immunosurveillance and immune escape. Current immunotherapeutic strategies and emerging results from ongoing clinical trials are presented. PMID:26351330

  19. Vertebral artery dissection after a chiropractor neck manipulation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremy; Jones, Catherine; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis for ischemic central nervous system infarcts in young patients includes paradoxic emboli through cardiac shunts, vasculitis, and vascular trauma. We report a young woman who developed headache, vomiting, diplopia, dizziness, and ataxia following neck manipulation by her chiropractor. A computed tomography scan of the head revealed an infarct in the inferior half of the left cerebellar hemisphere and compression of the fourth ventricle causing moderate acute obstructive hydrocephalus. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed severe narrowing and low flow in the intracranial segment of the left distal vertebral artery. The patient was treated with mannitol and a ventriculostomy and had an excellent functional recovery. This report illustrates the potential hazards associated with neck trauma, including chiropractic manipulation. The vertebral arteries are at risk for aneurysm formation and/or dissection, which can cause acute stroke. PMID:25552813

  20. Vertebral artery dissection after a chiropractor neck manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeremy; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis for ischemic central nervous system infarcts in young patients includes paradoxic emboli through cardiac shunts, vasculitis, and vascular trauma. We report a young woman who developed headache, vomiting, diplopia, dizziness, and ataxia following neck manipulation by her chiropractor. A computed tomography scan of the head revealed an infarct in the inferior half of the left cerebellar hemisphere and compression of the fourth ventricle causing moderate acute obstructive hydrocephalus. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed severe narrowing and low flow in the intracranial segment of the left distal vertebral artery. The patient was treated with mannitol and a ventriculostomy and had an excellent functional recovery. This report illustrates the potential hazards associated with neck trauma, including chiropractic manipulation. The vertebral arteries are at risk for aneurysm formation and/or dissection, which can cause acute stroke. PMID:25552813

  1. Iridescence in the neck feathers of domestic pigeons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Haiwei; Shi, Lei; Sha, Jing; Li, Yizhou; Qin, Youhua; Dong, Biqin; Meyer, Serge; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhao, Li; Zi, Jian

    2006-11-01

    We conducted structural characterizations, reflection measurements, and theoretical simulations on the iridescent green and purple neck feathers of domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica). We found that both green and purple barbules are composed of an outer keratin cortex layer surrounding a medullary layer. The thickness of the keratin cortex layer shows a distinct difference between green and purple barbules. Green barbules vary colors from green to purple with the observing angle changed from normal to oblique, while purple barbules from purple to green in an opposite way. Both the experimental and theoretical results suggest that structural colors in green and purple neck feathers should originate from the interference in the top keratin cortex layer, while the structure beyond acts as a poor mirror.

  2. Dementia Risk in Irradiated Patients With Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Chang, Chia-Lun; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer are treated through surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy (CT). Carotid artery damage and neurotoxicity were previously observed in these patients. This study estimated the dementia risk associated with different treatment modalities in a head and neck cancer population with long-term follow-up.Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database and a cancer registry database from the Collaboration Center of Health Information Application were linked for the present analysis. Patients with head and neck cancer, treated from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2010, were included in the study. The follow-up duration was the period from the index date to December 31, 2012. Inclusion criteria were head and neck cancer; an age >20 years; and having undergone surgery, CT, concurrent CT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. Exclusion criteria were another cancer diagnosed before the head and neck cancer, death or being diagnosed with dementia within 2 years after the treatment of the head and neck cancer, stroke before the index date, distant metastasis, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, head and neck cancer recurrence, an unknown sex, and an age <20 years. In total, 20,135 patients were included.In patient groups that underwent surgery alone, surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, and chemoradiotherapy alone, the dementia incidence per 1000 person-years was 1.44, 1.04, and 1.98, respectively. The crude hazard ratio (HR) of dementia was 1.84 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-2.81) in the RT with or without CT group. After adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage, and comorbidity, the HR was 1.92 (95% CI 1.14-3.24). Examining the dementia risk in patients who received different treatment modalities according to the Cox proportional-hazard model revealed that an age >65 years and having undergone RT with or without CT were risk factors (P?6660 cGy exhibited a 1.69-fold (95% CI 0.97-2.95, P?=?0.063) higher dementia risk compared with those who received a total radiation dose <6660 cGy.Receiving a higher radiation dose increased the dementia risk and persistently escalated the dementia incidence even 9 years after RT. Younger (<65 y) patients have a high risk of dementia after RT. The selection of young patients for dose de-escalation requires improvement for reducing irradiation to the neck and areas near brain tissues, particularly in Taiwan, where the median patient age is 53 years. PMID:26559280

  3. Hip Arthroscopy for Excision of Osteoid Osteoma of Femoral Neck

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hatem Galal; Abdulla Babaqi, AbdulRahman; AbdelSalam El-Assal, Maher

    2014-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is the most commonly seen benign bone-forming lesion. It can occur anywhere, including the metaphyseal regions of small and large bones. We present 2 cases that underwent an arthroscopic technique for removal of OO of the femoral neck. The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography in addition to magnetic resonance imaging. The lesions were accessed arthroscopically and excised by unroofing and curettage. The clinical and radiographic findings are presented, along with the surgical management. The patients improved dramatically postoperatively. OO of the femoral neck should be included in the differential diagnosis of hip pain in young patients. Arthroscopic excision and curettage provide a good choice for management, with low morbidity and rapid recovery. PMID:24749036

  4. Photodynamic therapy of head and neck cancer with different sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoulovskaya, Elena G.; Shental, Victor V.; Abdoullin, N. A.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Tabolinovskaia, T. D.; Edinak, N. J.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kondratjeva, T. T.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Agafonov, Valery V.

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with the results of clinical trials for sulfated aluminum phthalocyanine (PHS) (Photosens, Russia; Photogeme (PG) in Russia. The results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of head and neck tumors (HNT), side effects and ways of their correction and prevention, as well as possibility to work out less toxic regimes of PDT with photosense, choice of laser and type of irradiation are discussed. PDT have been provided in 79 patients with different head and neck tumors. Efficacy of PDT depended on tumor size and its histological type. Undesirable changes in plasma content of antioxidants by means of high pressure liquid chromatography (HLPC) have been found in patients after PHS injection. Influence of short-term and long-term supplementation with beta-carotene and vitamin E on this parameters are discussed.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neck. Part II. Pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Moss, A.A.; Gamsu, G.; Clark, O.H.; Gooding, G.A.W.; Webb, W.R.

    1984-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the neck were obtained in 14 patients with thyroid, parathyroid, lymph node, or laryngeal lesions. Tumors and lymph nodes were more easily differentiated from muscle and blood vessels with MR than with CT because of the superior soft tissue contrast of MR. Tissue characterization allowed MR differentiation of thyroid nodules, thyroid cysts, and parathyroid tumors from normal thyroid tissue; however, nonspecifically increased T1 and T2 relaxation times overlapped for a variety of neoplastic and inflammatory conditions. Thyroid cyst fluid had the greatest water content and longest T1 and T2 times of all tissues studied. Parathyroid hyperplasia could not be differentiated from parathyroid adenoma; however, parathyroid tumors had slightly longer T1 and T2 times than thyroid nodules or lymph nodes. With further experience, MR tissue characterization may become a useful technique for evaluating neck masses.

  6. Evolution of neck radius and relaxation of coalescing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, David N.; Brown, Simon A.

    2009-08-01

    We use kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the coalescence of fcc nanoparticles via lattice-based diffusion of surface atoms. The radius of the neck region connecting the two nanoparticles is found to develop with characteristic power laws rtilde ta with atilde (1)/(3) and atilde (1)/(6) for the early and intermediate stages of coalescence, respectively. For late coalescence stages, when the nucleation of new atomic layers on nanoparticle facets is required for further coalescence, the nanoparticle size, temperature, and nanoparticle orientation all influence the development of the neck. In contrast, classical theory predicts an approximately constant value of a(˜(1)/(6)) . We also examine the temperature dependence of the equilibration times for relaxing nanoparticles and distinguish the limiting processes to be nucleation of new germs on a facet and/or the detachment of atoms from atomic layers.

  7. The Molecular Architecture of the Bacteriophage T4 Neck

    PubMed Central

    Fokine, Andrei; Zhang, Zhihong; Kanamaru, Shuji; Bowman, Valorie D.; Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Arisaka, Fumio; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    A hexamer of the bacteriophage T4 tail terminator protein, gp15, attaches to the top of the phage tail stabilizing the contractile sheath and forming the interface for binding of the independently assembled head. Here we report the crystal structure of the gp15 hexamer, describe its interactions in T4 virions that have either an extended tail or a contracted tail, and discuss its structural relationship to other phage proteins. The neck of T4 virions is decorated by the “collar” and “whiskers”, made of fibritin molecules. Fibritin acts as a chaperone helping to attach the long tail fibers to the virus during the assembly process. The collar and whiskers are environment-sensing devices, regulating the retraction of the long tail fibers under unfavorable conditions, thus preventing infection. Cryo-electron microscopy analysis suggests that twelve fibritin molecules attach to the phage neck with six molecules forming the collar and six molecules forming the whiskers. PMID:23434847

  8. [Dental state in patients with head and neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Rouers, M; Truntzer, P; Dubourg, S; Guihard, S; Antoni, D; Noël, G

    2015-05-01

    In France, in 2005, there were approximately 16,000 new cases of head and neck cancer. These cancers have an unfavourable prognosis: the survival rates at 3 and 10 years are 50% and 10% respectively. The consumption of alcohol and tobacco is the most important risk factor; in some countries HPV infection was identified as a risk factor of head and neck tumours. Furthermore, a poor oral hygiene seems to raise this risk. We found many decay and periodontium problems in patients with an upper aerodigestive tract cancer. An evaluation of dental state is necessary before any cancer treatment. Treatments by radiotherapy engender noxious effects: hypocellular, hypovascularization, hypoxie of the irradiated tissues, which lead to immediate and chronically oral complications such as mucositis, fibrosis, xerostomia, decay, or osteoradionecrosis. An oral follow-up of these patients can prevent these complications, or reduce the severity of oral complications, and promote a good oral state. PMID:25937188

  9. Moving Toward Bioadjuvant Approaches to Head and Neck Cancer Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Saba, Nabil F.; Hammond, Anthea; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2007-10-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma affects >45,000 Americans annually. Patients who are successfully treated for their primary tumor are at high risk of developing a second primary tumor, making effective preventive strategies highly desirable for this disease. Although a landmark study in 1990 suggested some benefit of high-dose retinoids in head and neck cancer prevention, subsequent trials using more tolerable doses have shown limited clinical success. Newer preventive strategies have included bioadjuvant therapy combining retinoids with interferon and {alpha}-tocopherol, combinations of molecularly targeted agents, and oncolytic viruses. Furthermore, considerable evidence has supported a cancer protective role for several nutrients, including green tea and curcumin analogs. Natural compounds such as these with favorable long-term safety profiles might be particularly suited to the cancer prevention setting, in which patients will usually tolerate only moderate risk and toxicity.

  10. Head-Neck Taper Corrosion in Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hussenbocus, S.; Kosuge, D.; Solomon, L. B.; Howie, D. W.; Oskouei, R. H.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity at the head-neck junction of the femoral component in THA became popular as a design feature with advantages of decreasing implant inventory and allowing adjustment of leg length, offset, and soft tissue balancing through different head options. The introduction of a new modular interface to femoral stems that were previously monoblock, or nonmodular, comes with the potential for corrosion at the taper junction through mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. The incidence of revision hip arthroplasty is on the rise and along with improved wear properties of polyethylene and ceramic, use of larger femoral head sizes is becoming increasingly popular. Taper corrosion appears to be related to all of its geometric parameters, material combinations, and femoral head size. This review article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical assessment, and management of taper corrosion at the head-neck junction. PMID:25954757

  11. Effectiveness of the supraomohyoid neck dissection in clinically N0 neck patients with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus

    PubMed Central

    Rahamthulla, S. A. K. Uroof; Priya, P. Vani; Hussain, S. M. D. Javeed; Nasyam, Fazil Arshad; Akifuddin, Syed; Srinivas, Velpula Sasidhar

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the effectiveness of the supraomohyoid neck dissection in clinically N0 neck patients with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study of five patients with squamous cell carcinoma of gingivobuccal mucosa of oral cavity with clinically N0 neck, conducted over a period of 2 years from July 2007 to Oct 2009 in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Narayana Dental College and Hospital. The study was conducted in patients irrespective of age, sex, size, thickness, and type of differentiation of the lesion. All patients have clinically non-palpable lymphnodes (N0 neck), while patients with palpable lymphnodes, patients with previous surgery, and patients with previous radiotherapy were excluded from the study. Results: Level I was the commonest site of neck metastasis in our study. Among the five patients, two (40%) patients (case 2 and 3) had occult cervical metastasis (level IB nodes are histopathologically positive nodes) and the remaining three patients (60%) had no occult cervical metastasis. The recurrence rate was 20% for patients who received postoperative radiotherapy. There was no morbidity and postoperative dysfunction and the mortality rate was only 20% in our study. Conclusion: Supraomohyoid neck dissection is the therapeutic procedure in clinically N0 neck patients with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus of mandible. Supraomohyoid neck dissection, when indicated, contributes to the concept of less-invasive surgery and offers functional and aesthetic advantages without compromising the clearance with minimal morbidity. PMID:25992339

  12. Radiation recall supraglottitis. A hazard in head and neck chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallenborn, P.A.; Postma, D.S.

    1984-09-01

    The enhanced effects of chemotherapy on previously irradiated tissue have been well demonstrated. When chemotherapy is given some time after irradiation and elicits a tissue reaction in the radiation field, the reaction is termed radiation recall. We review known interactions between chemotherapy and radiotherapy and report, to our knowledge, the first case of a supraglottitis radiation recall reaction. Familiarity with this phenomenon and potential complications of chemotherapy following head and neck irradiation may expedite early diagnosis and appropriate lifesaving treatment.

  13. Head and Neck Sarcomas: Analysis of the SEER Database

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kevin A.; Grogan, Tristan; Wang, Marilene B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To summarize the epidemiology of sarcomas occurring in the head and neck and identify prognostic factors for patient survival. Study Design and Setting Cross-sectional analysis of the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program. Methods The SEER 18 registries, comprising sarcoma diagnoses made from 1973 to 2010, were queried for sarcomas arising in the head and neck. Pediatric and adult patients were analyzed separately, and multivariate and propensity-matched analyses were performed to identify predictors of disease-specific survival. Results In all, 11,481 adult cases and 1244 pediatric cases were identified. In adults, the most common histologic subtypes were malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), Kaposi sarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma, while in the pediatric cohort, the most common histologic subtypes were rhabdomyosar-coma, MFH, and osteosarcoma. Cause-specific 2-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 76%, 66%, and 61% for adults and 84%, 73%, and 71% for pediatric patients. Multivariate analysis performed for adults revealed that male gender, absence of radiation therapy, and stage I disease were associated with improved cause-specific survival reaching statistical significance. However, a propensity-matched model demonstrated no significant difference in cause-specific survival between patients who received radiation and those who did not. Conclusion Sarcomas, a heterogeneous group of malignant mesenchymal tumors, are uncommonly found in the head and neck. This study represents the largest analysis of patients with head and neck sarcomas in the literature and demonstrates the impact of age, gender, primary site, histology, and radiation status on overall prognosis. PMID:25135525

  14. Comprehensive management of head and neck tumors, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Thawley, S.E.; Panje, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 14 parts, each containing several papers. The parts are: General Considerations in the Management of Patients with Head and Neck Tumors, Tumors of the Ear, Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses, Tumors of the Oral Cavity, Tumors of the Pharynx, Tumors of the Larynx, Tumors of the Skin, Dental and Jaw Tumors, Tumors of the Thyroid and Parathyroid Glands, Tumors of the Trachea, Tumors of the Eye, Orbit, and Lacrimal Apparatus, and Special Topics.

  15. Emerging applications for OCT in the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Marc; Kim, Jason H.; Armstrong, William B.; Djalilian, Hamid R.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2010-02-01

    Objectives: To describe the current and promising new applications of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) as a helpful tool when imaging the different sites in the head and neck. We used the OCT Niris system, which is the first commercially available OCT device for applications outside the field of ophthalmology. Methods: OCT images were obtained of normal, benign, premalignant and malignant lesions in different areas of the head and neck. The OCT imaging system has a tissue penetration depth of approximately 1-2mm, a scanning range of 2mm and a spatial depth resolution of approximately 10-20?m. Imaging was performed using a flexible probe in two different settings, the outpatient clinic and the operating room. Results: High-resolution cross-sectional images from the larynx were obtained with the patient awake, without the need for general anesthesia, under direct visualization with a flexible fiberoptic endoscope. The OCT probe was inserted through the nasal cavity and placed in slight contact with the laryngeal tissue. In the ears, cholesteatoma was differentiated from inflamed middle ear mucosa by the different hyperintensity. In the neck, normal as well as different pathologies of the thyroid were identified. Conclusions: This system is non invasive and easy to incorporate into the operating room setting as well as the outpatient clinic. It requires minimal set-up and only one person is required to operate the system. OCT has the distinctive capability to obtain highresolution images, and the microanatomy of different sites can be observed. OCT technology has the potential to offer a quick, efficient and reliable imaging method to help the surgeon not only in the operating room but also in the clinical setting to guide surgical biopsies and aid in clinical decision making of different head and neck pathologies, especially those arising form the larynx.

  16. Dynamic modeling of the neck muscles during horizontal head movement.

    PubMed

    Haapala, Stephenie A; Enderle, John D

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents modeling and simulation of superficial neck muscle movement in the horizontal plane (yaw). The parametric muscle model was constructed using Pro/Engineer 2000i Student Edition, Parametric Technologies Corp, and simulated using Pro/Mechanica. Pennation angles, force-tension, force-generation and rate of muscle activation data were obtained from anatomic and physiological studies. Saccadic eye movement models developed by G. Alexander Korentis and John Enderle also provided the basis for this model. PMID:12085608

  17. Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

    1983-07-01

    Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

  18. Comparison of the head and neck position of elite dressage horses during top-level competitions in 1992 versus 2008.

    PubMed

    Lashley, Morgan J J O; Nauwelaerts, Sandra; Vernooij, J C M; Back, W; Clayton, Hilary M

    2014-12-01

    Among veterinary surgeons, interest has recently increased in the role of the horse's neck as a causative factor in complex locomotor disturbances. Specifically, controversy surrounds the trend for the head to be carried behind the vertical (BHV) in contravention of Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) rules. The aim of this study was to determine whether the head angulation of elite dressage horses has changed over the last 25 years, and whether head angulation correlates with the competition score awarded. Head angle was measured from videos recorded during the Grand Prix test at the 1992 Olympic Games and the 2008 World Cup Final, during collected canter (CC), collected trot (CT), passage (Pa), and piaffe (Pi). Head angulations were BHV in CC and CT in both 1992 and 2008. The likelihood of being BHV during Pa or Pi was significantly greater in 2008 than in 1992 (P?<0.05). Higher scores correlated significantly with head positions that were further BHV during Pi in 2008 (P?<0.05). Head angulations were orientated BHV in all paces in 2008, whereas in 1992 this was only the case for CT and CC. These findings support the hypothesis that, in recent years, FEI dressage judges have not penalised horses for a head position BHV. The findings also support the need for further studies of the effects of head and neck position on the health of horses. PMID:25296851

  19. Extraction of 3D Femur Neck Trabecular Bone Architecture from Clinical CT Images in Osteoporotic Evaluation: a Novel Framework.

    PubMed

    Sapthagirivasan, V; Anburajan, M; Janarthanam, S

    2015-08-01

    The early detection of osteoporosis risk enhances the lifespan and quality of life of an individual. A reasonable in-vivo assessment of trabecular bone strength at the proximal femur helps to evaluate the fracture risk and henceforth, to understand the associated structural dynamics on occurrence of osteoporosis. The main aim of our study was to develop a framework to automatically determine the trabecular bone strength from clinical femur CT images and thereby to estimate its correlation with BMD. All the 50 studied south Indian female subjects aged 30 to 80 years underwent CT and DXA measurements at right femur region. Initially, the original CT slices were intensified and active contour model was utilised for the extraction of the neck region. After processing through a novel process called trabecular enrichment approach (TEA), the three dimensional (3D) trabecular features were extracted. The extracted 3D trabecular features, such as volume fraction (VF), solidity of delta points (SDP) and boundness, demonstrated a significant correlation with femoral neck bone mineral density (r = 0.551, r = 0.432, r = 0.552 respectively) at p < 0.001. The higher area under the curve values of the extracted features (VF: 85.3 %; 95CI: 68.2-100 %, SDP: 82.1 %; 95CI: 65.1-98.9 % and boundness: 90.4 %; 95CI: 78.7-100 %) were observed. The findings suggest that the proposed framework with TEA method would be useful for spotting women vulnerable to osteoporotic risk. PMID:26138077

  20. Extracranial non-vestibular head and neck schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoxin; Yuan, Junjie; Chen, Xinwei; Xu, Hongming; Zhou, Yuan; Dong, Pin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To retrospectively describe our 10-year experience with extracranial non-vestibular head and neck schwannomas by presenting their clinical features, diagnostic methods, surgical decisions, and treatment outcomes. Methods: This is a retrospective study conducted at the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai, China. The medical records of 46 patients diagnosed with schwannoma in the extracranial head and neck region as confirmed on paraffin-embedded sections from January 2003 to December 2012 were reviewed. Results: All tumors were benign, and 52% presented as asymptomatic palpable solitary masses. Compressive symptoms, which can represent meaningful indicators of the nerve of origin were commonly noted. The most common nerve of origin was the brachial plexus (n=13, 28.3%). Conclusion: While postoperative histopathologic examination is still the gold standard, fine needle aspiration cytology, CT scan, and magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the diagnosis of schwannomas. As schwannomas are radioresistant, and as, despite their benign nature, can cause severe secondary symptoms, the best treatment of choice is complete excision with preservation of functions. PMID:26593174

  1. Nonunion of fractures of the femoral neck in children

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Pedro F. Tucci; dos Reis, Fernando Baldy; Filho, José Laredo; Fernandes, Helio J. A.; Fujiki, Edison Noboru; Bensahel, Henri

    2008-01-01

    The authors present the prospective clinical outcome of nine pseudoarthroses resulting from surgical treatment carried out in nine children, whose ages varied from 6 years and 2 months to 14 years and 2 months (mean 10 years and 2 months), who had fractures of the femoral neck. Five were classified as type II, according to the Delbet classification modified by Colonna, and four were type III. The initial fractures were caused by high-energy traumas, such as trampling, bicycle falls, and car accidents. Treatment of choice was valgus osteotomy of the femoral neck associated or not with insertion of bony graft. The mean time of follow-up was 38 months, ranging from 23 to 71 months, and the mean time of pseudoarthrosis consolidation after osteotomy was 76.6 days, varying from 45 to 240 days. In this study, all the pseudoarthroses consolidated. For final analysis of clinical and radiographic results, the Ratliff’s classification was used. We obtained three cases as good results, five as fair and one as poor. The authors concluded that valgus osteotomy is a good option for treatment of pseudoarthrosis in the femoral neck fractures in children. PMID:19308588

  2. Visual response properties of neck motor neurons in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Hung, Y-S; van Kleef, J P; Ibbotson, M R

    2011-12-01

    Recent behavioural studies have demonstrated that honeybees use visual feedback to stabilize their gaze. However, little is known about the neural circuits that perform the visual motor computations that underlie this ability. We investigated the motor neurons that innervate two neck muscles (m44 and m51), which produce stabilizing yaw movements of the head. Intracellular recordings were made from five (out of eight) identified neuron types in the first cervical nerve (IK1) of honeybees. Two motor neurons that innervate muscle 51 were found to be direction-selective, with a preference for horizontal image motion from the contralateral to the ipsilateral side of the head. Three neurons that innervate muscle 44 were tuned to detect motion in the opposite direction (from ipsilateral to contralateral). These cells were binocularly sensitive and responded optimally to frontal stimulation. By combining the directional tuning of the motor neurons in an opponent manner, the neck motor system would be able to mediate reflexive optomotor head turns in the direction of image motion, thus stabilising the retinal image. When the dorsal ocelli were covered, the spontaneous activity of neck motor neurons increased and visual responses were modified, suggesting an ocellar input in addition to that from the compound eyes. PMID:21909972

  3. Why does necking ignore notches in dynamic tension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotbaum, Y.; Osovski, S.; Rittel, D.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experimental work has revealed that notched tensile specimens, subjected to dynamic loading, may fail by growing a neck outside of the notched region. This apparent lack of sensitivity to a classical stress concentration case was reported but not explained or modeled. The present paper combines experimental and numerical work to address this issue. Specifically, it is shown that the dynamic tensile failure locus is dictated by both the applied velocity boundary condition and the material mechanical properties, specifically strain-rate sensitivity and strain-rate hardening. It is shown that at sufficiently high impact velocities, the flows stress in the notch vicinity becomes quite higher than in the rest of the specimen, so that while the former resists deformation, it transfers the load to the latter. The result will be the formation of a local neck and failure away from the notch. This effect is shown to be active when the material properties are perturbed only at the local level, as in the case of machining of the notch, which in itself may again be sufficient to stabilize the structure under local failure until a neck forms elsewhere. While the physical observations are quite counterintuitive with respect to the engineering views of stress concentrator's effect, the present work rationalizes those observations and also provides information for the designers of dynamically tensioned structures that may contain notches or similar flaws.

  4. Nonsurgical treatment of aggressive fibromatosis in the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.B. Jr.; Shagets, F.W.; Mansfield, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a poorly defined, locally aggressive, yet histologically benign fibroblastic proliferative lesion that may occur in the head and neck. The lesion is highly cellular and locally infiltrative and has a propensity to invade and erode bone, compromising vital structures within the head and neck. However, it is not a true malignancy because it does not have malignant cytologic characteristics nor does it metastasize. We present two cases of aggressive fibromatosis occurring in young adult men. The first case involved a rapidly enlarging mass of the anterior maxilla that involved the upper lip, nasal alae, nasal septum, inferior turbinates, and hard palate. The patient underwent incisional biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Because of difficulty in determining the actual margins of this extensive lesion and the significant morbidity that would have resulted from surgical resection, we elected to treat this patient with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The second case was an extensive lesion involving the right temporal bone, pterygomaxillary space, and infratemporal, temporal, and middle cranial fossae. Incisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Because of the lack of functional and cosmetic deficits and the unavoidable morbidity of a surgical resection, this patient was treated with radiation therapy. Although wide field resection is the most satisfactory form of treatment, in situations in which this modality would result in unacceptable morbidity or if surgical margins are positive, then radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. Support for these therapeutic modalities is found in larger series of cases outside the head and neck.

  5. Imaging findings of vascular lesions in the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Güneyli, Serkan; Ceylan, Naim; Bayraktaro?lu, Selen; Acar, Türker; Sava?, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the head and neck include vascular neoplasms, vascular malformations, and hypervascular lesions, derived from nonvascular soft-tissue elements. We retrospectively evaluated magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography images of vascular lesions located in the head and neck. Twelve patients (seven males, five females) aged 1-68 years (mean age, 35.25 years) were included in this study. Most of the vascular lesions in our study were histologically diagnosed. The lesions were as follows: a hemangioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangioendothelioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangiopericytoma located in the larynx (n=1); a juvenile angiofibroma located in the nasopharynx (n=1); a glomus tumor located in the carotid bifurcation (n=1); venous malformations located in the parapharyngeal space, the pterygoid area, the orbital space, and the larynx (n=4); lymphatic malformations located in the parotid space and the supraclavicular area (n=2); and an arteriovenous malformation located in the infratemporal fossa (n=1). We present rare vascular lesions of the head and neck, which have typical radiological findings. PMID:25010372

  6. Imaging findings of vascular lesions in the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Güneyli, Serkan; Ceylan, Naim; Bayraktaro?lu, Selen; Acar, Türker; Sava?, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the head and neck include vascular neoplasms, vascular malformations, and hypervascular lesions, derived from nonvascular soft-tissue elements. We retrospectively evaluated magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography images of vascular lesions located in the head and neck. Twelve patients (seven males, five females) aged 1–68 years (mean age, 35.25 years) were included in this study. Most of the vascular lesions in our study were histologically diagnosed. The lesions were as follows: a hemangioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangioendothelioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangiopericytoma located in the larynx (n=1); a juvenile angiofibroma located in the nasopharynx (n=1); a glomus tumor located in the carotid bifurcation (n=1); venous malformations located in the parapharyngeal space, the pterygoid area, the orbital space, and the larynx (n=4); lymphatic malformations located in the parotid space and the supraclavicular area (n=2); and an arteriovenous malformation located in the infratemporal fossa (n=1). We present rare vascular lesions of the head and neck, which have typical radiological findings. PMID:25010372

  7. Design-related fretting wear in modular neck hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Viceconti, M; Ruggeri, O; Toni, A; Giunti, A

    1996-02-01

    An accelerated cyclic loading corrosion test was used to determine the corrosion behavior of a commercial (GSP) and a prototype titanium hip prosthesis each with a modular neck. Four GSP and four prototype stems were subjected to a 2-Hz cyclic load ranging between 200 and 2,100 N for 1,000,000 cycles. Three stems were tested in an environment of FeCl3 solution, three stems were tested in Ringer's solution, and two stems were tested in air. After cyclic loading, the specimens were carefully examined with optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). None of them showed macroscopic or microscopic signs of corrosion, regardless of the environment to which the specimens were subjected. However, macroscopic evidence of mechanical fretting was present at the neck-stem modular junction, primarily concentrated at the medial contact point between stem and neck, especially for the prototype stems. SEM analysis confirmed these observations. The appreciable differences observed between the two designs suggest that the problem can be minimized or eliminated with an accurately designed taper fitting. PMID:9019482

  8. Demons deformable registration for CBCT-guided procedures in the head and neck: Convergence and accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Nithiananthan, S.; Brock, K. K.; Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The accuracy and convergence behavior of a variant of the Demons deformable registration algorithm were investigated for use in cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided procedures of the head and neck. Online use of deformable registration for guidance of therapeutic procedures such as image-guided surgery or radiation therapy places trade-offs on accuracy and computational expense. This work describes a convergence criterion for Demons registration developed to balance these demands; the accuracy of a multiscale Demons implementation using this convergence criterion is quantified in CBCT images of the head and neck. Methods: Using an open-source ''symmetric'' Demons registration algorithm, a convergence criterion based on the change in the deformation field between iterations was developed to advance among multiple levels of a multiscale image pyramid in a manner that optimized accuracy and computation time. The convergence criterion was optimized in cadaver studies involving CBCT images acquired using a surgical C-arm prototype modified for 3D intraoperative imaging. CBCT-to-CBCT registration was performed and accuracy was quantified in terms of the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and target registration error (TRE). The accuracy and robustness of the algorithm were then tested in clinical CBCT images of ten patients undergoing radiation therapy of the head and neck. Results: The cadaver model allowed optimization of the convergence factor and initial measurements of registration accuracy: Demons registration exhibited TRE=(0.8{+-}0.3) mm and NCC=0.99 in the cadaveric head compared to TRE=(2.6{+-}1.0) mm and NCC=0.93 with rigid registration. Similarly for the patient data, Demons registration gave mean TRE=(1.6{+-}0.9) mm compared to rigid registration TRE=(3.6{+-}1.9) mm, suggesting registration accuracy at or near the voxel size of the patient images (1x1x2 mm{sup 3}). The multiscale implementation based on optimal convergence criteria completed registration in 52 s for the cadaveric head and in an average time of 270 s for the larger FOV patient images. Conclusions: Appropriate selection of convergence and multiscale parameters in Demons registration was shown to reduce computational expense without sacrificing registration performance. For intraoperative CBCT imaging with deformable registration, the ability to perform accurate registration within the stringent time requirements of the operating environment could offer a useful clinical tool allowing integration of preoperative information while accurately reflecting changes in the patient anatomy. Similarly for CBCT-guided radiation therapy, fast accurate deformable registration could further augment high-precision treatment strategies.

  9. The M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck Module, a Patient-Reported Outcome Instrument, Accurately Predicts the Severity of Radiation-Induced Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I. Mendoza, Tito R.; Chambers, Mark; Burkett, V. Shannon; Garden, Adam S.; Hessell, Amy C.; Lewin, Jan S.; Ang, K. Kian; Kies, Merrill S.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) module, a symptom burden instrument, with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-HN) module, a quality-of-life instrument, for the assessment of mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with radiotherapy and to identify the most distressing symptoms from the patient's perspective. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with head-and-neck cancer (n = 134) completed the MDASI-HN and FACT-HN before radiotherapy (time 1) and after 6 weeks of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (time 2). The mean global and subscale scores for each instrument were compared with the objective mucositis scores determined from the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: The global and subscale scores for each instrument showed highly significant changes from time 1 to time 2 and a significant correlation with the objective mucositis scores at time 2. Only the MDASI scores, however, were significant predictors of objective Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events mucositis scores on multivariate regression analysis (standardized regression coefficient, 0.355 for the global score and 0.310 for the head-and-neck cancer-specific score). Most of the moderate and severe symptoms associated with mucositis as identified on the MDASI-HN are not present on the FACT-HN. Conclusion: Both the MDASI-HN and FACT-HN modules can predict the mucositis scores. However, the MDASI-HN, a symptom burden instrument, was more closely associated with the severity of radiation-induced mucositis than the FACT-HN on multivariate regression analysis. This greater association was most likely related to the inclusion of a greater number of face-valid mucositis-related items in the MDASI-HN compared with the FACT-HN.

  10. Evaluation of Driver-vehicle Matching using Neck Muscle Activity and Vehicle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yoshiki; Umetsu, Daisuke; Ozaki, Shigeru

    Objective measurement of a car driver's feeling has been a subject of automobile researches. In the present study, we aimed at quantifying the matching between the physiological response of a driver and the vehicle motion. Assuming that the performance of a head stabilization mechanism, the vestibulo-collic reflex, affects driving feeling, we recorded the activity of neck muscles that help maintain the head position. Electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) using active electrodes and a compact amplifier. Vehicle acceleration and gas pedal movement were recorded with small accelerometers. Subjects were required to perform straight-line acceleration. Four road cars with different characteristics were used. EMG signals were filtered, full-wave rectified and averaged across trials. Main results are summarized as follows. First, the EMG response of a driver's neck muscle depended not only on vehicle acceleration but on its time derivative, jerk. A quantitative analysis showed that, for the data obtained with the four cars, the EMG profile can be reproduced by a linear sum of acceleration and jerk. The correlation coefficient, an index of goodness of matching, ranged from ~0.8 to ~0.95. Second, our analysis indicated that the relationship between the muscle response and the vehicle motion can be characterized by two parameters: the optimal weight for the jerk term and the optimal time lag. The current study proposes a method for characterizing a physiological response of a driver to dynamic vehicle motion. It remains to be investigated whether these parameters are related to the driving feeling.

  11. Kinesin-5 Allosteric Inhibitors Uncouple the Dynamics of Nucleotide, Microtubule, and Neck-Linker Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Scarabelli, Guido; Grant, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Kinesin motor domains couple cycles of ATP hydrolysis to cycles of microtubule binding and conformational changes that result in directional force and movement on microtubules. The general principles of this mechanochemical coupling have been established; however, fundamental atomistic details of the underlying allosteric mechanisms remain unknown. This lack of knowledge hampers the development of new inhibitors and limits our understanding of how disease-associated mutations in distal sites can interfere with the fidelity of motor domain function. Here, we combine unbiased molecular-dynamics simulations, bioinformatics analysis, and mutational studies to elucidate the structural dynamic effects of nucleotide turnover and allosteric inhibition of the kinesin-5 motor. Multiple replica simulations of ATP-, ADP-, and inhibitor-bound states together with network analysis of correlated motions were used to create a dynamic protein structure network depicting the internal dynamic coordination of functional regions in each state. This analysis revealed the intervening residues involved in the dynamic coupling of nucleotide, microtubule, neck-linker, and inhibitor binding sites. The regions identified include the nucleotide binding switch regions, loop 5, loop 7, ?4-?5-loop 13, ?1, and ?4-?6-?7. Also evident were nucleotide- and inhibitor-dependent shifts in the dynamic coupling paths linking functional sites. In particular, inhibitor binding to the loop 5 region affected ?-sheet residues and ?1, leading to a dynamic decoupling of nucleotide, microtubule, and neck-linker binding sites. Additional analyses of point mutations, including P131 (loop 5), Q78/I79 (?1), E166 (loop 7), and K272/I273 (?7) G325/G326 (loop 13), support their predicted role in mediating the dynamic coupling of distal functional surfaces. Collectively, our results and approach, which we make freely available to the community, provide a framework for explaining how binding events and point mutations can alter dynamic couplings that are critical for kinesin motor domain function. PMID:25418105

  12. Evaluation of Thyroid Disorders During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy by Using Functional Analysis and Ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen; Hashemi, Bijan; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie; Nikoofar, Alireza; Edraki, Hamid Reza; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate thyroid function and vascular changes during radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients treated with primary or postoperative radiotherapy for various cancers in the head and neck region were prospectively evaluated. The serum samples (triiodothyronine [T3], thyroxine [T4], thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free triiodothyronine [FT3], and free thyroxine [FT4]), the echo level of the thyroid gland, and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) parameters of the right inferior thyroid artery (RITA) of the patients were measured before and at regular intervals during radiotherapy. The thyroid gland dose-volume histograms of the patients were derived from their computed tomography-based treatment plans. Results: There was a significant fall in TSH level (p < 0.0001) but an increase in FT4 (p < 0.0001) and T4 (p < 0.022) levels during the radiotherapy course. The threshold dose required to produce significant changes was 12 Gy (Biologically Effective Dose in 2-Gy fractions, BED{sub 2}). There were significant rises in the patients' pulsatility index, resistive index, peak systolic velocity, blood volume flow levels, and RITA diameter (p < 0.0001), as detected by CDU during radiotherapy, compared to those parameters measured before the treatment. Hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns (p < 0.0001) were seen during radiotherapy compared to those before treatment. There was significant Pearson's correlation between the CDU parameters and T4, FT4, and TSH levels. Conclusions: Radiation-induced thyroiditis is regarded as primary damage to the thyroid gland. Thyroiditis can subsequently result in hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Our results demonstrated that changes in thyroid vessels occur during radiotherapy delivered to patients. Vessel changes also can be attributed to the late effect of radiation on the thyroid gland. The hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns observed in patients may result from the increase in intrathyroidal flow.

  13. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Alexandra D.; Nill, Simeon; Huber, Peter E.; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Juergen; Muenter, Marc W.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006-2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online correction methods, this approach allows significant improvement of target volume coverage and continuous parotid sparing without treatment delays.

  14. Cooling the Neck Region During Exercise in the Heat

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Christopher James; Sunderland, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Cooling the neck region can improve the ability to exercise in a hot environment. It might improve performance by dampening the perceived level of thermal strain, allowing individuals to override inhibitory signals. Objective: To investigate whether the enhanced ability to exercise in a hot environment observed when cooling the neck region occurs because of dampening the perceived level of thermal strain experienced and the subsequent overriding of inhibitory signals. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Walk-in environmental chamber. Patients or Other Participants: Eight endurance-trained, nonacclimated men (age ?=? 26 ± 2 years, height ?=? 1.79 ± 0.04 m, mass ?=? 77.0 ± 6.2 kg, maximal oxygen uptake [V?O2max] ?=? 56.2 ± 9.2 mL·kg?1·min?1) participated. Intervention(s): Participants completed 4 running tests at approximately 70% V?O2max to volitional exhaustion: 2 familiarization trials followed by 2 experimental trials (cooling collar [CC] and no collar [NC]). Trials were separated by 7 days. Familiarization and NC trials were performed without a collar and used to assess the test variability. Main Outcome Measure(s): Time to volitional exhaustion, heart rate, rectal temperature, neck skin temperature, rating of perceived exertion, thermal sensation, and feeling scale (pleasure/displeasure) were measured. Results: Time to volitional exhaustion was increased by 13.5% ± 3.8% (CC ?=? 43.15 ± 12.82 minutes, NC ?=? 38.20 ± 11.70 minutes; t7 ?=? 9.923, P < .001) with the CC, which reduced mean neck skin temperature throughout the test (P < .001). Participants terminated exercise at identical levels of perceived exertion, thermal sensation, and feeling scale, but the CC enabled participants to tolerate higher rectal temperatures (CC ?=? 39.61°C ± 0.45°C, NC ?=? 39.18°C ± 0.7°C; t7 ?=? ?3.217, P ?=? .02) and heart rates (CC ?=? 181 ± 6 beats/min, NC ?=? 178 ± 9 beats/min; t7 ?=? ?2.664, P ?=? .03) at the point of termination. Conclusions: Cooling the neck increased the time taken to reach volitional exhaustion by dampening the perceived levels of thermal strain. PMID:21214352

  15. Cementless bipolar hemiarthroplasty in femoral neck fractures in elderly

    PubMed Central

    Marya, SKS; Thukral, R; Hasan, R; Tripathi, M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cemented hip arthroplasty is an established treatment for femoral neck fracture in the mobile elderly. Cement pressurization raises intramedullary pressure and may lead to fat embolization, resulting in fatal bone cement implantation syndrome, particularly in patients with multiple comorbidities. The cementless stem technique may reduce this mortality risk but it is technically demanding and needs precise planning and execution. We report the perioperative mortality and morbidity of cementless bipolar hemiarthroplasty in a series of mobile elderly patients (age >70 years) with femoral neck fractures. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine elderly patients with mean age of 83 years (range:71-102 years) with femoral neck fractures (23 neck of femur and 6 intertrochanteric) were operated over a 2-year period (Nov 2005–Oct 2007). All were treated with cementless bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Clinical and radiological follow-up was done at 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, and then yearly. Results: The average follow-up was 36 months (range 26-49 months). The average duration of surgery and blood loss was 28 min from skin to skin (range, 20–50 min) and 260 ml (range, 95–535 ml), respectively. Average blood transfusion was 1.4 units (range, 0 to 4 units) Mean duration of hospital stay was 11.9 days (7–26 days). We had no perioperative mortality or serious morbidity. We lost two patients to follow-up after 12 months, while three others died due to medical conditions (10–16 months post surgery). Twenty-four patients were followed to final follow-up (average 36 months; range: 26–49 months). All were ambulatory and had painless hips; the mean Harris hip score was 85 (range: 69–96). Conclusion: Cementless bipolar hemiarthroplasty for femoral neck fractures in the very elderly permits early return to premorbid life and is not associated with any untoward cardiac event in the perioperative period. It can be considered a treatment option in this select group. PMID:21559103

  16. Matched asymptotic analysis to solve the narrow escape problem in a domain with a long neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaofei

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we mainly consider the narrow escape problem (NEP) in a two-dimensional domain ? with a long neck, which is the two-dimensional analogue of a dendritic spine geometry. The NEP requires the computation of the mean escape time of a Brownian particle starting from the head until it exits from the end of the neck, where the particle is absorbed. We divide the domain into the neck part ?n and the head part ?h, with the common boundary {{? }\\varepsilon }. The escape time in ?h can be considered to be the time from the head to the end of the neck, while the escape time in ?n can be considered to be the time from the neck to the end of the neck. We compute the two exit times separately and match them by considering some boundary value problem with an impedance boundary condition on {{? }\\varepsilon }, which we refer to as the Neumann-Robin boundary model.

  17. Blood flow dynamics during local photoreaction in a head and neck tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbach, Daniel; Tracy, Erin; Walker, Jessica; Baumann, Heinz; Sunar, Ulas

    2015-03-01

    We have applied continuous blood flow dynamics, quantified with diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), in investigating photodynamic therapy (PDT) induced local photoreaction in a head and neck tumor model. Photoclor (0.47 µmol/kg) was intravenously administered 24 hour before PDT. Two types of fluence rates were implemented: Low fluence rate (14 mW/cm2) and high fluence rate (75 mW/cm2). The total delivered fluence was 100 J for both types. We observed that PDT induced substantial vascular shut down in both types. While the shutdown was persistent in tumors exposed to low fluence rate PDT, the shutdown was transient in tumors exposed to high fluence PDT. Loss of microvascular structures was confirmed by the microscopic analyses of tumor section following immunostaining for CD31. Blood flow dynamics related metrics were also strongly correlated with crosslinking of STAT3, a molecular marker of photoreaction. STAT3 analysis indicated that low fluence rate yields a substantially higher photoreaction, and, thus, a more effective PDT. Our results indicate that noninvasive blood flow measurements can monitor the efficacy of PDT in real-time and potentially provide a feedback for its optimization.

  18. RUNX3 Has an Oncogenic Role in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Kudo, Yasusei; Iizuka, Shinji; Ogawa, Ikuko; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Kurihara, Hidemi; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Takata, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Background Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is a tumor suppressor of cancer and appears to be an important component of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-ß)-induced tumor suppression pathway. Surprisingly, we found that RUNX3 expression level in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tissues, which is one of the most common types of human cancer, was higher than that in normal tissues by a previously published microarray dataset in our preliminary study. Therefore, here we examined the oncogenic role of RUNX3 in HNSCC. Principal Findings Frequent RUNX3 expression and its correlation with malignant behavior were observed in HNSCC. Ectopic RUNX3 overexpression promoted cell growth and inhibited serum starvation-induced apoptosis and chemotherapeutic drug induced apoptosis in HNSCC cells. These findings were confirmed by RUNX3 knockdown. Moreover, RUNX3 overexpression enhanced tumorsphere formation. RUNX3 expression level was well correlated with the methylation status in HNSCC cells. Moreover, RUNX3 expression was low due to the methylation of its promoter in normal oral epithelial cells. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest that i) RUNX3 has an oncogenic role in HNSCC, ii) RUNX3 expression observed in HNSCC may be caused in part by demethylation during cancer development, and iii) RUNX3 expression can be a useful marker for predicting malignant behavior and the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs in HNSCC. PMID:19521519

  19. Microsatellite instability in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    Field, J. K.; Kiaris, H.; Howard, P.; Vaughan, E. D.; Spandidos, D. A.; Jones, A. S.

    1995-01-01

    Genomic instability or microsatellite instability (MI) in simple repeated sequences was initially recognised in colonic carcinomas and subsequently in other tumours. MI has been associated with mutations in genes concerned with replication and DNA repair. We investigated 34 microsatellite markers in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Fifty-six tumours, were studied, of which 25 were investigated with ten or more microsatellite markers. In this study we consider two or more microsatellite alterations in a tumour to be diagnostic of MI. We demonstrated that 7/25 (28%) of the tumours had MI at two or more loci and three of these tumours exhibited evidence of 20 or more loci with MI. No correlations were found between MI and previous treatment, site, histological differentiation, positive nodes at pathology, a history of alcohol intake or survival. MI has been demonstrated in T1N0 stage tumours, indicating that these changes may occur early in the disease process. A negative correlation was found between MI and a history of smoking (P = 0.02). Two or more markers of MI were found in three of four non-smokers compared with one of 13 in the smoking group of patients, which suggests a novel mechanism of carcinogenesis in non-smokers. Images Figure 1 PMID:7734301

  20. Fascin upregulation in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is associated with lymphatic metastasis

    PubMed Central

    PAPASPYROU, KONSTANTINOS; BROCHHAUSEN, CHRISTOPH; SCHMIDTMANN, IRENE; FRUTH, KAI; GOUVERIS, HARALAMPOS; KIRCKPATRICK, JAMES; MANN, WOLF; BRIEGER, JUERGEN

    2014-01-01

    Fascin is an actin-bundling protein that is associated with cellular motility and cancer-cell invasion. The present study aimed to examine the expression of fascin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and its potential use as a biomarker. In a prospective study with a median follow-up time of 48.8 months, tumor tissues, adjacent healthy tissues and cervical lymph node metastases were collected from 25 patients and analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The specimens were scored according to the intensity of fascin staining and the percentage of tumor cells stained using a semi-quantitative scoring approach; the data were analyzed and correlated with clinical follow-up observations. All of the investigators were blinded to the origin of the specimens. The expression levels of fascin were significantly increased in the tumor tissues (P=0.03) and lymph node metastases (P=0.03) compared with that of the normal tissues. The high expression level of fascin in the tumor tissues was correlated with the N-status, however, not with overall survival. Therefore, fascin may be a suitable marker for the prediction of regional lymphatic metastasis in HNSCC. PMID:24932286

  1. Human Preferences for Conformation Attributes and Head-And-Neck Positions in Horses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human preferences for certain morphological attributes among domestic animals may be entirely individual or, more generally, may reflect evolutionary pressures that favor certain conformation. Artificial selection for attributes, such as short heads and crested necks of horses, may have functional and welfare implications because there is evidence from other species that skull shape co-varies with behaviour. Crested necks can be accentuated by flexion of the neck, a quality that is often manipulated in photographs vendors use when selling horses. Equine head-and-neck positions acquired through rein tension can compromise welfare. Our investigation was designed to identify conformations and postures that people are attracted to when choosing their ‘ideal’ horse. Participants of an internet survey were asked to rate their preference for horse silhouettes that illustrated three gradations of five variables: facial shape, crest height, ear length, ear position and head-and-neck carriage. There were 1,234 usable responses. The results show that overall preferences are for the intermediate, rather than extreme, morphological choices (p=<0.001). They also indicate that males are 2.5 times less likely to prefer thicker necks rather than the intermediate shape, and 4 times more likely to prefer the thinner neck shape. When compared to the novice participants, experienced participants were 1.9 times more likely to prefer a thicker neck shape than the intermediate neck shape and 2.8 times less likely to prefer a thinner neck shape than the intermediate neck shape. There was overall preference of 93% (n=939) for the category of head carriage ‘In front of the vertical’. However, novice participants were 1.8 times more likely to choose ‘behind the vertical’ than ‘in front of the vertical’. Our results suggest that people prefer a natural head carriage, concave facial profile (dished face), larger ears and thicker necks. From these survey data, it seems that some innate preferences may run counter to horse health and welfare. PMID:26126209

  2. Human Preferences for Conformation Attributes and Head-And-Neck Positions in Horses.

    PubMed

    Caspar, Georgina L; Dhand, Navneet K; McGreevy, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Human preferences for certain morphological attributes among domestic animals may be entirely individual or, more generally, may reflect evolutionary pressures that favor certain conformation. Artificial selection for attributes, such as short heads and crested necks of horses, may have functional and welfare implications because there is evidence from other species that skull shape co-varies with behaviour. Crested necks can be accentuated by flexion of the neck, a quality that is often manipulated in photographs vendors use when selling horses. Equine head-and-neck positions acquired through rein tension can compromise welfare. Our investigation was designed to identify conformations and postures that people are attracted to when choosing their 'ideal' horse. Participants of an internet survey were asked to rate their preference for horse silhouettes that illustrated three gradations of five variables: facial shape, crest height, ear length, ear position and head-and-neck carriage. There were 1,234 usable responses. The results show that overall preferences are for the intermediate, rather than extreme, morphological choices (p=<0.001). They also indicate that males are 2.5 times less likely to prefer thicker necks rather than the intermediate shape, and 4 times more likely to prefer the thinner neck shape. When compared to the novice participants, experienced participants were 1.9 times more likely to prefer a thicker neck shape than the intermediate neck shape and 2.8 times less likely to prefer a thinner neck shape than the intermediate neck shape. There was overall preference of 93% (n=939) for the category of head carriage 'In front of the vertical'. However, novice participants were 1.8 times more likely to choose 'behind the vertical' than 'in front of the vertical'. Our results suggest that people prefer a natural head carriage, concave facial profile (dished face), larger ears and thicker necks. From these survey data, it seems that some innate preferences may run counter to horse health and welfare. PMID:26126209

  3. The “temporary caging” technique for catheter navigation in patients with intracranial wide-necked aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hidemichi; Onodera, Hidetaka; Wakui, Daisuke; Uchida, Masashi; Sase, Taigen; Morishima, Hiroyuki; Oshio, Kotaro; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of wide-necked aneurysms with preservation of the parent artery remains a challenge. The authors describe a novel and simple technique to navigate a balloon or stent-delivery catheter across a wide-necked aneurysm in which previously existing methods could have failed to pass the catheter across the neck of the aneurysm, which we have named “temporary caging” technique. The technical results using this method are presented in 6 cases. PMID:26379926

  4. Outcomes of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Loftus, Ian; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. The principal anatomic contraindication to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR) is an unfavorable proximal aortic neck. With increasing experience, a greater proportion of patients with unfavorable neck anatomy are being offered EVR. This study aimed to evaluate outcomes in patients with challenging proximal aortic neck anatomy. Methods. Prospectively collected data from 147 consecutive patients who underwent EVR between December 1997 and April 2005 were supplemented with a retrospective review of medical records and radiological images. Unfavorable anatomic features were defined as neck diameter >28 mm, angulation >60 deg., circumferential thrombus >50%, and length <10 mm. Eighty-seven patients with 0 adverse features (good necks) were compared with 60 patients with one or more adverse features (hostile necks). Results. Comparing the good neck with the hostile neck group, there were no significant differences in the incidence of primary technical success (p = 0.15), intraoperative adjunctive procedures (p = 0.22), early proximal type I endoleak (<30 days) (p = 1.0), late proximal type I endoleak (>30 days) (p = 0.57), distal type I endoleak (p = 0.40), type III endoleak (p 0.51), secondary interventions (p = 1.0), aneurysm sac expansion (p = 0.44), or 30 day mortality (p = 0.70). The good neck group had a significantly increased incidence of type II endoleak (p = 0.023). By multivariate analysis, the incidence of intraoperative adjunctive procedures was significantly increased in the presence of severe angulation (p = 0.041, OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.05-9.04). Conclusion. Patients with severely hostile proximal aortic neck anatomy may be treated with EVR, although severely angulated necks require additional intraoperative procedures. Early outcomes are encouraging and suggest that indications for EVR may be expanded to include patients with hostile neck anatomy.

  5. Nicotine dependence and smoking habits in patients with head and neck cancer*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Adriana Ávila; Bandeira, Celso Muller; Gonçalves, Antonio José; Araújo, Alberto José

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess smoking habits and nicotine dependence (ND) in patients with head and neck cancer Methods: This study involved 71 smokers or former smokers with squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx who were treated at a university hospital in the city of São Paulo between January and May of 2010. We used the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence to evaluate smoking habits and ND in the sample. Data regarding cancer treatment were collected from medical records. Depending on the variables studied, we used the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t-test, or Spearman's correlation test. Results: Of the 71 patients, 47 (66.2%) presented with high or very high ND, 40 (56.3%) smoked more than 20 cigarettes/day, and 32 (45.1%) smoked their first cigarette within 5 min of awakening. Advanced disease stage correlated significantly with the number of cigarettes smoked per day (p = 0.011) and with smoking history (p = 0.047). We found that ND did not correlate significantly with gender, disease stage, smoking cessation, or number of smoking cessation attempts, nor did the number of cigarettes smoked per day correlate with smoking cessation or gender. Treatment for smoking cessation was not routinely offered. Conclusions: In most of the patients studied, the level of ND was high or very high. The prevalence of heavy smoking for long periods was high in our sample. A diagnosis of cancer is a motivating factor for smoking cessation. However, intensive smoking cessation treatment is not routinely offered to smoking patients diagnosed with cancer. PMID:25029652

  6. Neck pain in military helicopter aircrew and the role of exercise therapy.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Danielle M; Harrison, Michael F; Neary, J Patrick

    2011-10-01

    Neck pain is a growing aeromedical concern for military forces on an international scale. Neck pain prevalence in the global military helicopter community has been reported in the range of 56.6-84.5%. Despite this high prevalence, historically, research examining helicopter aircrews has focused predominantly on low back pain. A number of recent studies have emerged examining flight-related factors that are hypothesized to contribute to the development of flight-related neck pain. Loading factors such as the posture adopted during flight, use of night vision goggles, and vibration have all been found to contribute to neck pain and muscular fatigue. Prolonged or repeated exposureto these loading factors has been hypothesized to perpetuate or contribute to the development of neck pain. Despite the high number of helicopter aircrew personnel that suffer from neck pain, very few individuals seek treatment for the disorder. The focus of medical personnel should, therefore, be directed toward a solution that addresses not only the issue of muscular fatigue, but the hesitancy to seek treatment. Previous research in military and civilian populations have used exercise therapy as a treatment modality for neck pain and have found improved endurance capacity in the neck musculature and reduced self-reported neck pain. PMID:21961403

  7. Chemotherapy in Children with Head and Neck Cancers: Perspectives and Review of Current Therapies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Daniel K; Schmidt, Mary Lou

    2016-02-01

    Cancers of the head and neck in children represent a heterogeneous group of malignancies requiring a variety of treatment modalities. In many instances of childhood head and neck cancers, chemotherapy will be required for treatment, often in conjunction with surgery and/or radiation therapy. Chemotherapy in children with head and neck cancers poses unique challenges in terms of immediate as well as long-term toxicities. This article focuses on the common chemotherapeutic agents, with a particular focus on early and late effects, used in the treatment of children with head and neck cancers. PMID:26614705

  8. Volumetric tumor burden and its effect on brachial plexus dosimetry in head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Romesser, Paul B.; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effect of gross tumor volume of the primary (GTV-P) and nodal (GTV-N) disease on planned radiation dose to the brachial plexus (BP) in head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Overall, 75 patients underwent definitive IMRT to a median total dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions. The right BP and left BP were prospectively contoured as separate organs at risk. The GTV was related to BP dose using the unpaired t-test. Receiver operating characteristics curves were constructed to determine optimized volumetric thresholds of GTV-P and GTV-N corresponding to a maximum BP dose cutoff of > 66 Gy. Multivariate analyses were performed to account for factors associated with a higher maximal BP dose. A higher maximum BP dose (> 66 vs ? 66 Gy) correlated with a greater mean GTV-P (79.5 vs 30.8 cc; p = 0.001) and ipsilateral GTV-N (60.6 vs 19.8 cc; p = 0.014). When dichotomized by the optimized nodal volume, patients with an ipsilateral GTV-N ? 4.9 vs < 4.9 cc had a significant difference in maximum BP dose (64.2 vs 59.4 Gy; p = 0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed that an ipsilateral GTV-N ? 4.9 cc was an independent predictor for the BP to receive a maximal dose of > 66 Gy when adjusted individually for BP volume, GTV-P, the use of a low anterior neck field technique, total planned radiation dose, and tumor category. Although both the primary and the nodal tumor volumes affected the BP maximal dose, the ipsilateral nodal tumor volume (GTV-N ? 4.9 cc) was an independent predictor for high maximal BP dose constraints in head and neck IMRT.

  9. Dosimetric Comparison of Split Field and Fixed Jaw Techniques for Large IMRT Target Volumes in the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2011-04-01

    Some treatment planning systems (TPSs), when used for large-field (>14 cm) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), create split fields that produce excessive multiple-leaf collimator segments, match-line dose inhomogeneity, and higher treatment times than nonsplit fields. A new method using a fixed-jaw technique (FJT) forces the jaw to stay at a fixed position during optimization and is proposed to reduce problems associated with split fields. Dosimetric comparisons between split-field technique (SFT) and FJT used for IMRT treatment is presented. Five patients with head and neck malignancies and regional target volumes were studied and compared with both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on an Eclipse TPS using beam data generated for Varian 2100C linear accelerator. A standard beam arrangement consisting of nine coplanar fields, equally spaced, was used in both techniques. Institutional dose-volume constraints used in head and neck cancer were kept the same for both techniques. The dosimetric coverage for the target volumes between SFT and FJT for head and neck IMRT plan is identical within {+-}1% up to 90% dose. Similarly, the organs at risk (OARs) have dose-volume coverage nearly identical for all patients. When the total monitor unit (MU) and segments were analyzed, SFT produces statistically significant higher segments (17.3 {+-} 6.3%) and higher MU (13.7 {+-} 4.4%) than the FJT. There is no match line in FJT and hence dose uniformity in the target volume is superior to the SFT. Dosimetrically, SFT and FJT are similar for dose-volume coverage; however, the FJT method provides better logistics, lower MU, shorter treatment time, and better dose uniformity. The number of segments and MU also has been correlated with the whole body radiation dose with long-term complications. Thus, FJT should be the preferred option over SFT for large target volumes.

  10. Effect of yoga on the Myofascial Pain Syndrome of neck

    PubMed Central

    Sharan, D; Manjula, M; Urmi, D; Ajeesh, PS

    2014-01-01

    Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) refers to pain attributed to muscle and its surrounding fascia, which is associated with “myofascial trigger points” (MTrPs). MTrPs in the trapezius has been proposed as the main cause of temporal and cervicogenic headache and neck pain. Literature shows that the prevalence of various musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) among physiotherapists is high. Yoga has traditionally been used to treat MSDs in various populations. But there is scarcity of literature which explains the effects of yoga on reducing MPS of the neck in terms of various physical parameters and subjective responses. Therefore, a pilot study was done among eight physiotherapists with minimum six months of experience. A structured yoga protocol was designed and implemented for five days in a week for four weeks. The outcome variables were Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hands (DASH) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) for Trigger Points, Cervical Range of Motion (CROM) - active & passive, grip and pinch strengths. The variables were compared before and after the intervention. Finally, the result revealed that all the variables (DASH: P<0.00, NDI: P<0.00, VAS: P<0.00, PPT: Left: P<0.00, PPT: Right: P<0.00, Grip strength: left: P<0.00, Grip strength: right: P<0.01, Key pinch: left: P<0.01, Key pinch: right: P<0.01, Palmar pinch: left: P<0.01, Palmar pinch: right: P<0.00, Tip pinch: left: P<0.01, Tip pinch: Right: P<0.01) improved significantly after intervention. PMID:25035608

  11. Alternative Agents to Prevent Fogging in Head and Neck Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piromchai, Patorn; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak

    2011-01-01

    Background: The essential factor for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in head and neck endoscopy is the visibility of the image. An anti-fogging agent can reduce this problem by minimizing surface tension to prevent the condensation of water in the form of small droplets on a surface. There is no report on the use of hibiscrub® or baby shampoo to reduce fogging in the literature. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy between commercial anti-fogging agent, hibiscrub® and baby shampoo to reduce fogging for the use in head and neck endoscopy. Methods: The study was conducted at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University in August 2010. Commercial anti-fogging agent, baby shampoo and hibiscrub® were applied on rigid endoscope lens before putting them into a mist generator. The images were taken at baseline, 15 seconds, 30 seconds and 1 minute. The images’ identifiers were removed before they were sent to two evaluators. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to rate the image quality from 0 to 10. Results: The difference in mean VAS score between anti-fogging agent, baby shampoo and hibiscrub® versus no agent were 5.46, 4.45 and 2.1 respectively. The commercial anti-fogging agent and baby shampoo had most protective benefit and performed significantly better than no agent (P = 0.05). Conclusions: Baby shampoo is an effective agent to prevent fogging during head and neck endoscopy and compares favourably with commercial anti-fogging agent. PMID:24179399

  12. Femoral Neck Fracture After Arthroscopic Femoroplasty of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Merz, Michael K; Christoforetti, John J; Domb, Benjamin G

    2015-08-01

    Hip arthroscopy is an increasingly common procedure, particularly for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Various complications have been previously reported, and the authors sought to further evaluate the safety of this procedure. This study was conducted to identify the incidence of femoral neck fracture as well as treatment and outcomes after arthroscopic femoroplasty. In April 2013, a survey was administered to 28 established hip arthroscopists regarding the breadth of their experience, including the total number of hip arthroscopies and proximal femoroplasties performed and the number of postoperative femoral neck fractures. Fracture type, patient age, patient sex, time to fracture, comorbidities, treatments, and outcomes were queried. The study identified 27,200 total arthroscopies and 14,945 proximal femoroplasties performed by the surgeons, with 11 postoperative proximal femur fractures. The incidence of proximal femur fracture after arthroscopic femoroplasty was 0.07%, based on combined data of high-volume hip arthroscopists at multiple medical centers. Mean time to fracture after arthroscopic femoroplasty was 40.5 (±26.6) days postoperatively. The male-to-female ratio was approximately 1:3 for those with fracture, and mean patient age was 52 (±13) years. More than half of the fractures were caused by violation of weight-bearing precautions. All patients had improvement in symptoms after treatment. Femoral neck fracture after arthroscopic femoroplasty is a rare complication for established hip arthroscopists. It is most common in women and patients older than 50 years. Treatment is based on the severity of the fracture, and patients have improved outcomes after treatment. PMID:26270756

  13. Systemic therapy strategies for head-neck carcinomas: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, most of which are squamous cell tumours, have an unsatisfactory prognosis despite intensive local treatment. This can be attributed, among other factors, to tumour recurrences inside or outside the treated area, and metastases at more distal locations. These tumours therefore require not only the standard surgical and radiation treatments, but also effective systemic modalities. The main option here is antineoplastic chemotherapy, which is firmly established in the palliative treatment of recurrent or metastatic stages of disease, and is used with curative intent in the form of combined simultaneous or adjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with inoperable or advanced tumour stages. Neoadjuvant treatment strategies for tumour reduction before surgery have yet to gain acceptance. Induction chemotherapy protocols before radiotherapy have to date been used in patients at high risk of distant metastases or as an aid for decision-making (“chemoselection”) in those with extensive laryngeal cancers, prior to definitive chemoradiotherapy or laryngectomy. Triple-combination induction therapy (taxanes, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) shows high remission rates with significant toxicity and, in combination with (chemo-)radiotherapy, is currently being compared with simultaneous chemoradiotherapy; the current gold standard with regards to efficacy and long-term toxicity. A further systemic treatment strategy, called “targeted therapy”, has been developed to help increase specificity and reduce toxicity. An example of targeted therapy, EGFR-specific antibodies, can be used in palliative settings and, in combination with radiotherapy, to treat advanced head and neck cancers. A series of other novel biologicals such as signal cascade inhibitors, genetic agents, or immunotherapies, are currently being evaluated in large-scale clinical studies, and could prove useful in patients with advanced, recurring or metastatic head and neck cancers. When developing a lasting, individualised systemic tumour therapy, the critical evaluation criteria are not only efficacy and acute toxicity but also (long-term) quality-of-life and the identification of dedicated predictive biomarkers. PMID:23320055

  14. Experimental study of the neck formation in an X pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, A. P.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Fedunin, A. V.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2014-11-01

    X-pinch experiments have been performed on a compact 250 kA, 180 ns pulsed power generator specially designed for this purpose at the Institute of High Current Electronics (Tomsk, Russia). The X pinches were composed of two molybdenum wires of diameter 25 ?m making an angle of 36° with the z-axis. The X-pinch dynamics was recorded with a 3 ns exposure time using an HSFC Pro four-frame camera. Axial plasma jets propagating toward both the anode and the cathode were observed. The jets became noticeable within 10 ns after the onset of current flow, which approximately corresponded to the time at which the electrical explosion of the X-pinch wires occurred. The velocity of the anode-directed jet reached 107 cm/s, which was about 1.5 times the velocity of the cathode-directed jet. These high jet velocities are inconsistent with the plasma temperature resulting from the wire explosion. Hence, these jets seem to develop due to implosion of the light plasma layer stripped by magnetic forces from the wire surface, and the increase in their velocities is perhaps due to cumulative effects taking place at the X-pinch axis. The X-pinch neck formed as a rule above the initial wire cross point (closer to the anode). In this region, the plasma diameter gradually increased with time and then drastically decreased 10-15 ns prior to the x-ray pulse. Immediately before the x-ray pulse, in the (250-300 ?m long) plasma neck, a lower scale constriction developed, forming a "hot spot". It has been confirmed that the anode-directed plasma jet could take some part of the X-pinch wire current because of the evident jet pinching in the anode region. This process seems to determine the neck length.

  15. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Saccular-Specific Hair Cell Addition Correlates with

    E-print Network

    Sisneros, Joseph A.

    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, and 3Department of Biology, University of Washington in the auditory thresholds recorded from the saccule. This demonstration of correlated seasonal plasticity of hair cell addition and auditory sensitivity may in part facilitate the adaptive auditory plasticity

  16. Deep space neck infection: principles of surgical management.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Timothy M; Assael, Leon A; Bell, R Bryan

    2008-08-01

    Knowledge of the management of infections of the deep spaces of the neck is essential to the daily practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Timely decisions must be made through the acute course of the disease. Interventions must be performed with the appropriate surgical skill. The surgeon must decide on medical and surgical management, including antibiotic selection, how to employ supportive resuscitative care, when to operate, what procedures to perform, and how to secure the airway. To make these decisions the surgeon must understand the anatomy of the region and the etiology of infection, appropriate diagnostic workup, and medical and surgical management. This article provides a review of these pertinent topics. PMID:18603196

  17. Airway management in pediatric head and neck infections.

    PubMed

    Leboulanger, Nicolas; Garabedian, Erea-Noel

    2012-08-01

    Infectious diseases of the head and neck in children are very common but may sometimes cause upper airway obstruction. Various degrees of respiratory distress are possible, but one will be extra-cautious with newborns and neonates, because the clinical features can evolve especially fast in young children. A child with a respiratory compromise should never be left unattended. Nasal, pharyngeal, and laryngeal airways can be involved and require specific management. Each time the airway of a child may be compromised, the pediatrician and otolaryngologist have to be prepared for the worst-case scenario: anticipation is essential and allows avoidance of serious troubles. PMID:22338592

  18. Complications of head and neck radiation therapy and their management

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmeier, R.L.; King, G.E.

    1983-04-01

    Patients who receive radiation therapy to the head and neck suffer potential complications and undesirable side-effects of this therapy. The extent of undesirable responses is dependent on the source of irradiation, the fields of irradiation, and the dose. The radiotherapist determines these factors by the extent, location, and radiosensitivity of the tumor. The potential undesirable side-effects are xerostomia, mucositis, fibrosis, trismus, dermatitis, photosensitivity, radiation caries, soft tissue necrosis, and osteoradionecrosis. Each of these clinical entities and their proposed management have been discussed.

  19. Minimally Invasive Parathyroidectomy Versus Bilateral Neck Exploration for Primary Hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Laird, Amanda M; Libutti, Steven K

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a disease that is caused by excess parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion from 1 or more of the parathyroid glands. Surgery is the only cure. Traditional surgical management consists of a 4-gland cervical exploration. Development of imaging specific to identification of parathyroid glands and application of the rapid PTH assay to operative management have made more minimal exploration possible. There are distinct advantages and disadvantages of minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) and bilateral neck exploration (BNE). The advantages of MIP seem to outweigh those of BNE, and MIP has replaced BNE as the operation of choice by many surgeons. PMID:26610777

  20. [Kimura' disease with localization at the neck (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sokolovski, A; Hundeiker, M; Pascu, F

    1981-05-01

    This disease is discussed in the past mostly in the dermatological literature, the ENT specialist is little aware of its existence. The condition is characterized by subcutaneous, painless nodules occurring most frequently in the region of the ear, parotid gland, cheek and lateral neck. The lesion must be differentiated from disease of the lymph nodes, especially malignant tumours. The pathologic diagnosis is based upon a hyperplasia of angiolymphatic tissue and marked blood eosinophilia. The prognosis appears to be favourable. A case is presented together with the clinical picture and histopathological findings. The differential diagnosis and treatment are discussed. PMID:7239954

  1. Management Strategies for Post-Prostatectomy Bladder Neck Contractures.

    PubMed

    Kovell, Robert Caleb; Terlecki, Ryan Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Patients who develop bladder neck contracture (BNC) after surgical treatment for prostate cancer often present with progressive lower urinary tract symptoms. Multiple risk factors contribute to BNC development including patient-related factors and technical considerations at the time of surgery. Initial management begins with endoscopic therapies, including dilation, transurethral incision (TUIBNC), and injection of adjunctive agents. When BNC remains refractory to these therapies, surgical reconstruction of the vesicourethral anastomosis or urinary diversion can be considered in select cases. This review presents an outline of the management of BNC after radical prostatectomy (RP), highlighting the recent literature related to the subject. PMID:26224157

  2. Immunochemistry and electron microscopy of head and neck rhabdomyoma.

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, T R; Sissons, M C; Stoney, P J; Ashworth, M T

    1988-01-01

    Rhabdomyomas are rare benign tumours originating in skeletal or cardiac muscle. Extracardiac tumours are usually situated in the head and neck. Four cases are presented, three arising in the larynx and the other in the cervical region. All four cases were studied by light and electron microscopy, and in three immunohistochemical staining for myoglobin, desmin, and vimentin was carried out to study the diagnostic features of the lesions and their histogenesis. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9 Fig 10 PMID:3056977

  3. Imaging of vascular lesions of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Griauzde, Julius; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of vascular lesions of the head and neck should be directed by classifying the lesions as tumors or malformations and by determining their flow characteristics. Location of the lesion is key when differentiating between vascular neoplasms. Ultrasonography is an appropriate screening tool; MRI is often used to confirm the diagnosis. Computed tomography can be used for further characterization of the lesion, particularly when there is bony involvement. In many cases, vascular lesions grow to be extensive. In these cases, percutaneous sclerotherapy or embolization therapy can be employed to aid in surgical resection. PMID:25476181

  4. Chemotherapy advances in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Georges, Peter; Rajagopalan, Kumar; Leon, Chady; Singh, Priya; Ahmad, Nadir; Nader, Kamyar; Kubicek, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    The management of locally advanced unresectable head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) continues to improve. One of the major advances in the treatment of HNSCC was the addition of chemotherapy to radiation in the treatment of non-surgical patients. The majority of the data regarding chemotherapy in HNSCC involve cisplatin chemotherapy with concurrent radiation. However, several new approaches have included targeted therapy against epidermal growth factor receptor and several recent studies have explored the role of induction chemotherapy in the treatment of HNSCC. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC. PMID:25493232

  5. Chemotherapy advances in locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Georges, Peter; Rajagopalan, Kumar; Leon, Chady; Singh, Priya; Ahmad, Nadir; Nader, Kamyar; Kubicek, Gregory J

    2014-12-10

    The management of locally advanced unresectable head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) continues to improve. One of the major advances in the treatment of HNSCC was the addition of chemotherapy to radiation in the treatment of non-surgical patients. The majority of the data regarding chemotherapy in HNSCC involve cisplatin chemotherapy with concurrent radiation. However, several new approaches have included targeted therapy against epidermal growth factor receptor and several recent studies have explored the role of induction chemotherapy in the treatment of HNSCC. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC. PMID:25493232

  6. Immunotherapy for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schoppy, David W; Sunwoo, John B

    2015-12-01

    Although head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has traditionally been considered to be a very immunosuppressive, or at least nonimmunogenic, tumor type, recent results from clinical studies of immune checkpoint blockade strategies have led to resurgence in the enthusiasm for immunotherapeutic approaches. Additional strategies for immunotherapy that are under active investigation include enhancement of cetuximab-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, tumor vaccines, and engineered T cells for adoptive therapy. All of these studies have early-phase clinical trials under way, and the next several years will be exciting as the results of these studies are reported. PMID:26568546

  7. A Phase Ib/II Study of BYL719 and Cetuximab in Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-16

    Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (RM HNSCC) Patients Who Are Resistant or Ineligible/Intolerant to Platinum-based Chemotherapy.; Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  8. Correlative Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques.

  9. Correlative Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

  10. The clinicopathological significances and biological functions of parafibromin expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Xue-Feng; Huang, Ke-Qiang; Ren, Li; Gou, Wen-Feng; Shen, Dao-Fu; Zhao, Shuang; Sun, Hong-Zhi; Takano, Yasuo; Zheng, Hua-Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Downregulated parafibromin expression is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of parathyroid, breast, gastric, colorectal, and lung cancers. To investigate the roles of parafibromin expression in tumorigenesis, progression, and prognostic evaluation of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), we transfected parafibromin-expressing plasmid into HNSCC cell and examined the phenotypes and their relevant molecules. Parafibromin expression was detected on tissue microarray containing squamous epithelium, dysplasia, and carcinoma of head and neck by immunohistochemistry. Parafibromin overexpression was found to suppress growth, migration, and invasion, and induce apoptosis, S arrest, and mesenchymal to epithelial transition (EMT), compared with the mock and control (P?correlated with lymph node metastasis, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging, but positively with human papillomavirus (HPV) positivity (P?correlation was observed between parafibromin expression and relapse-free survival rate by Kaplan-Meier curves (P?

  11. Melanoma-associated antigen expression and the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    HARTMANN, STEFAN; BRANDS, ROMAN C.; KÜCHLER, NORA; FUCHS, ANDREAS; LINZ, CHRISTIAN; KÜBLER, ALEXANDER C.; MÜLLER-RICHTER, URS D.A.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma-associated antigen (MAGE) has been identified in a variety of types of cancer. The expression of several MAGE subgroups is correlated with poor prognosis and chemotherapeutic resistance. One target of chemotherapeutic treatment in head and neck cancer is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in the context of melanoma-associated antigens is discussed in the present study. Five human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were treated with the EGFR TKIs, erlotinib and gefitinib. The efficacy of these agents was measured using a crystal violet assay. Furthermore, the expression levels of MAGE-A1, -A5, -A8, -A9, -A11 and -A12 were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The association between TKI efficacy and MAGE-A expression was analyzed by linear regression. The cell lines revealed inhomogeneous expression patterns for the MAGE-A subgroups. Four of the five cell lines demonstrated a good response to erlotinib and gefitinib. However, treatment with erlotinib induced better results than those of gefitinib, and revealed a concentration-dependent effect. The expression of MAGE-A5 and -A11 were significantly correlated with lower efficacy of erlotinib and gefitinib. By contrast, MAGE-A12 was associated with a superior response to these two drugs. One cell line, which expressed all investigated MAGE-A subgroups, was entirely resistant to the two TKIs. These results revealed a notable correlation between MAGE-A5 and -A11 and lower efficacy of EGFR TKIs. Pretreatment analysis of MAGE-A status may therefore aid improvement of chemoprevention using erlotinib and gefitinib in head and neck cancer.

  12. The Relationship Between Human Papillomavirus Status and Other Molecular Prognostic Markers in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Christina S.; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Cao Hongbin; Kwok, Shirley; Erickson, Julianna P.; Koong, Albert; Pourmand, Nader; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) status and known prognostic makers for head and neck cancers including tumor hypoxia, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and intratumoral T-cell levels and to determine the prognostic impact of these markers by HPV status. Methods and Materials: HPV status in 82 evaluable head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients was determined by pyrosequencing and related to p16{sup INK4a} staining and treatment outcomes. It was correlated with tumor hypoxia (tumor pO{sub 2} and carbonic anhydrase [CAIX] staining), EGFR status, and intratumoral lymphocyte expression (CD3 staining). Results: Forty-four percent of evaluable tumors had strong HPV signal by pyrosequencing. There was a significant relationship between strong HPV signal and p16{sup INK4a} staining as well as oropharynx location. The strong HPV signal group fared significantly better than others, both in time to progression (TTP, p = 0.008) and overall survival (OS, p = 0.004) for all patients and for the oropharyngeal subset. Positive p16{sup INK4a} staining was associated with better TTP (p = 0.014) and OS (p = 0.00002). There was no relationship between HPV status and tumor pO{sub 2} or CAIX staining. However, HPV status correlated inversely with EGFR reactivity (p = 0.0006) and directly with CD3(+) T-lymphocyte level (p = 0.03). Whereas CAIX and EGFR overexpression were negative prognostic factors regardless of HPV status, CD3(+) T-cell levels was prognostic only in HPV(-) tumors. Conclusion: HPV status was a prognostic factor for progression and survival. It correlated inversely with EGFR expression and directly with T-cell infiltration. The prognostic effect of CAIX and EGFR expression was not influenced by HPV status, whereas intratumoral T-cell levels was significant only for HPV(-) tumors.

  13. Blockade of telomerase reverse transcriptase enhances chemosensitivity in head and neck cancers through inhibition of AKT/ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tengda; Hu, Fengchun; Liu, Xingguang; Tao, Qian

    2015-11-01

    Head and Neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), characterized by the high frequency of local recurrence and distant metastases, is mostly related to highly malignant and resistant to apoptosis, resulting in significant insensitivity to chemotherapy. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), as the catalytic subunit of telomerase, was implicated in the telomerase-mediated cellular transformation, proliferation, stemness and cell survival. Moreover, overexpression of human TERT (hTERT) is reported to be correlated with advanced invasive stage of the tumor progression and poor prognosis. Here, we show that hTERT potentially mediated the apoptotic resistance and blockade of telomerase reverse transcriptase could enhance chemosensitivity in head and neck cancers. Mechanistically, hTERT interacts with the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK to suppress the expression of p53, ultimately, leading to modulation of the cellular sensitivity to chemotherapy. Thus, these findings suggest that hTERT targeting could be an attractive approach in combination with conventional chemotherapies for patients suffering from chemoinsensitivity or refractory HNSCC. PMID:26497550

  14. Head and neck mycetoma: the mycetoma research centre experience.

    PubMed

    Fahal, Ahmed; Mahgoub, El Sheikh; El Hassan, Ahmed Mohamed; Jacoub, Angom Osman; Hassan, Doaa

    2015-03-01

    Mycetoma is a unique neglected tropical disease which is endemic in what is known as the "mycetoma belt". The disease has many devastating impacts on patients and communities in endemic area and is characterised by massive deformity, destruction and disability. Mycetoma is commonly seen in the foot and hand and less frequent in other parts of the body. Mycetoma of the head and neck is a rarity and is associated with high morbidity and even mortality if not treated early. In this communication we report on 49 patients with head and neck mycetoma followed up at the Mycetoma Research Centre in Khartoum. Most of the reported patients had actinomycetoma and the majority were young adult males from mycetoma endemic areas in the Sudan. Most of them were students, farmers and workers. Prior to presentation the majority had long disease duration and the cause was multifactorial. Advanced disease with massive lesion, deformity and disability was the common presentation. There was no obvious history of local trauma, familial tendency or other predisposing factor identified in this group of patients. MRI and CT scan were the most accurate diagnostic tools to determine the disease extent. The treatment outcome was rather poor and characterised by low cure rate, poor outcome and high follows-up dropout. Such a gloomy outcome calls for structured and objective health education programs. PMID:25768090

  15. Head and Neck Mycetoma: The Mycetoma Research Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Fahal, Ahmed; Mahgoub, EL Sheikh; EL Hassan, Ahmed Mohamed; Jacoub, Angom Osman; Hassan, Doaa

    2015-01-01

    Mycetoma is a unique neglected tropical disease which is endemic in what is known as the “mycetoma belt”. The disease has many devastating impacts on patients and communities in endemic area and is characterised by massive deformity, destruction and disability. Mycetoma is commonly seen in the foot and hand and less frequent in other parts of the body. Mycetoma of the head and neck is a rarity and is associated with high morbidity and even mortality if not treated early. In this communication we report on 49 patients with head and neck mycetoma followed up at the Mycetoma Research Centre in Khartoum. Most of the reported patients had actinomycetoma and the majority were young adult males from mycetoma endemic areas in the Sudan. Most of them were students, farmers and workers. Prior to presentation the majority had long disease duration and the cause was multifactorial. Advanced disease with massive lesion, deformity and disability was the common presentation. There was no obvious history of local trauma, familial tendency or other predisposing factor identified in this group of patients. MRI and CT scan were the most accurate diagnostic tools to determine the disease extent. The treatment outcome was rather poor and characterised by low cure rate, poor outcome and high follows-up dropout. Such a gloomy outcome calls for structured and objective health education programs. PMID:25768090

  16. Dermoscopic and clinical features of head and neck melanoma*

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Cengiz, Abdurrahman Bugra; Emiroglu, Nazan; Comert, Ela; Wellenhof, Rainer Hofmann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The dermoscopic criteria of extrafacial melanomas are well-known. OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency of dermatoscopic findings in head and neck melanomas (HNM) and to assess the distinguishing dermoscopic criteria of facial and extrafacial melanoma. METHODS This observational study included 108 patients with HNM (63% male, mean age 64 years). Participants underwent individual dermoscopic imaging of clinically melanoma. All lesions were excised, and histopathological examination was performed on all specimens. RESULTS Drawing on histopathological analysis, lentigo maligna melanoma or lentigo maligna was diagnosed in 60 lesions, superficial spreading melanoma in 18, nodular in 10, desmoplastic in 8, superficial spreading melanoma in situ in 12. The most frequent location for head and neck melanoma was the cheek (60 patients, 55.6%). Eight prominent dermatoscopic features were observed in facial melanoma: annular-granular pattern (18%); rhomboidal structures (29%); pseudonetwork (29%); asymmetrical, pigmented, follicular openings (51%); obliterated hair follicles (8%); red rhomboidal structures (18%); increased density of the vascular network (32%); scar-like depigmentation (59%). CONCLUSIONS HNM has specific dermoscopic features, and classical extrafacial dermoscopic rules are less useful for diagnosis of facial melanoma. In our study, further characteristic dermatoscopic findings were detected in facial melanoma such as low frequencies of irregular dots, 2 or fewer colors in lesions, the presence of pseudonetwork, increased density of the vascular network, red rhomboidal structures, in addition to dermatoscopic findings of extrafacial melanoma. Thus, it is concluded that the prediction and identification of HNM may be evident with the help of these signs. PMID:26375217

  17. Assessment of pain during head and neck irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, D.E.; Janjan, N.; Byhardt, R.W.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation therapy for patients with head and neck malignancies frequently results in painful mucositis, which is usually poorly controlled with standard analgesics or topical anesthetics. To better understand the temporal development of radiation-induced pain and the effects of this pain on activities of daily living, 14 patients undergoing radiation therapy for a newly diagnosed head and neck malignancy completed daily pain diaries during the course of irradiation. All patients developed painful mucositis, usually beginning during the second or third week of radiation. Despite the use of analgesics/anesthetics, pain was rated as moderate or severe on 37% of treatment days and was noted to be constant or present throughout most of the day on 58% of treatment days. Eating and sleep disturbances related to pain occurred on 55% and 34% of treatment days, respectively. Eight patients had greater than a 2-kg weight loss. Radiation induces a predictable pattern of pain and comorbidity, which may be amenable to earlier and more aggressive analgesic treatment.

  18. Clinical outcomes of synchronous head and neck and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Won

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate clinical outcomes of synchronous head and neck and esophageal cancer (SHNEC). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 27 SHNEC patients treated with curative intent at a single institution. The treatment modality for individual cases was usually determined on a case by case basis. Results The median follow-up duration for the surviving patients was 28.2 months. The most common site of head and neck cancer was hypopharyngeal carcinoma (n = 21, 77.7%). The lower esophagus was the most common location of esophageal carcinoma (n = 16, 59.3%). The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 57.5% and 39.6%. Major pattern of failure was locoregional recurrence in the study patients. Esophageal cancer stage, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, and pretreatment weight loss were significant prognostic factors for OS in univariate analysis. Treatment-related death was observed in two patients, and one patient developed a grade 4 late treatment-related complication. Conclusion Although the survival outcome for SHNEC is poor, long-term survival might be achievable with aggressive treatment with stage I-II esophageal cancer and good performance. PMID:26484300

  19. [ENT emergency treatment and alcohol related head and neck injuries].

    PubMed

    Teudt, I; Grundmann, T; Pueschel, K; Hogan, B; Leventli, B

    2013-08-01

    The spectrum of ENT-diseases can differ widely among emergency departments (ED) of different geographic regions. Especially in terms of head and neck trauma a higher number of injuries can be expected in large cities due to alcohol related violence.The ED of a large hospital situated in the center of Hamburg Germany was analysed for ENT-emergency treatments in 2011 retrospectively. Beside usual patient statistics, the study focused on alcohol related injuries with an ENT-surgeon involved. All data were compared to reports by other EDs in Germany and alcohol related costs were approximated for initiation of prevention programs in the future.2 339 ENT-patients were admitted to the ED. 19% of all patients used an ambulance whereas 80% reached the ED by private transportation. The majority of patients were between 21 and 30 years of age. For 143 of all trauma cases alcohol involvement was documented. Subanalysis revealed male dominance and a high use of ambulance transportation.The high number of traumata differs considerably from other ENT studies. One reason is the hospital's close proximity to all time party districts like "Reeperbahn" and the "Port of Hamburg". In those areas high amounts of alcohol ingestion takes place leading to more injuries at the head- and neck region. Theoretically financial resources would be plenty after the initiation of those programs as the severe costs for alcohol related medical treatment would decline. PMID:23568584

  20. [Computer assistance to improve therapy planning for head neck oncology].

    PubMed

    Boehm, A; Müller, S; Pankau, T; Straub, G; Bohn, S; Fuchs, M; Dietz, A

    2011-12-01

    The ongoing development in therapies of head and neck malignomas has led to a further differentiation of treatment options. Complex surgical procedures, a wide variety of multi modal therapy options, changing radiation technologies (IMRT - Intensity-modulated radiation therapy) and numerous "targeted therapies" emphasize the need for a precise treatment plan. Beside this, imaging has seen significant improvements beyond the technical ones, e.?g. with the implementation of PET/CT scanners. This increase in pre-therapeutic data volume, together with a diversification of treatment options calls for a further discussion of the basics of therapeutic decisions. Planning relevant data processing by computer assisted systems can aid in these decisions. This work describes the current status of relevant computer assisted systems undergoing first testing for head and neck cancer therapy planning. Here, the integration of 3-dimensional patient data plays a central role. This planning tool forms the integrated base for a further development in the areas of radiation planning, documentation and study management. PMID:22161631

  1. Developmental framework to validate future designs of ballistic neck protection.

    PubMed

    Breeze, J; Midwinter, M J; Pope, D; Porter, K; Hepper, A E; Clasper, J

    2013-01-01

    The number of neck injuries has increased during the war in Afghanistan, and they have become an appreciable source of mortality and long-term morbidity for UK servicemen. A three-dimensional numerical model of the neck is necessary to allow simulation of penetrating injury from explosive fragments so that the design of body armour can be optimal, and a framework is required to validate and describe the individual components of this program. An interdisciplinary consensus group consisting of military maxillofacial surgeons, and biomedical, physical, and material scientists was convened to generate the components of the framework, and as a result it incorporates the following components: analysis of deaths and long-term morbidity, assessment of critical cervical structures for incorporation into the model, characterisation of explosive fragments, evaluation of the material of which the body armour is made, and mapping of the entry sites of fragments. The resulting numerical model will simulate the wound tract produced by fragments of differing masses and velocities, and illustrate the effects of temporary cavities on cervical neurovascular structures. Using this framework, a new shirt to be worn under body armour that incorporates ballistic cervical protection has been developed for use in Afghanistan. New designs of the collar validated by human factors and assessment of coverage are currently being incorporated into early versions of the numerical model. The aim of this paper is to describe this developmental framework and provide an update on the current progress of its individual components. PMID:22459006

  2. Supraclavicular artery island flap in head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Atallah, S; Guth, A; Chabolle, F; Bach, C-A

    2015-11-01

    Due to the complex anatomy of the head and neck, a wide range of pedicled or free flaps must be available to ensure optimal reconstruction of the various defects resulting from cancer surgery. The supraclavicular artery island flap is a fasciocutaneous flap harvested from the supraclavicular and deltoid regions. The blood supply of this flap is derived from the supraclavicular artery, a direct cutaneous branch of the transverse cervical artery in 93% of cases or the supraclavicular artery in 7% of cases. The supraclavicular artery is located in a triangle delineated by the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle medially, the external jugular vein posteriorly, and the median portion of the clavicle anteriorly. This pedicled flap is thin, malleable, and is easily and rapidly harvested with a reliable pedicle and minimal donor site morbidity. It can be used for one-step innervated reconstruction of many types of head and neck defects. It constitutes an alternative to local flaps, while providing equivalent functional results and must be an integral part of the cancer surgeon's therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:26386616

  3. Efficient and Robust Prediction of Localized Necking in Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretz, Holger; Engler, Olaf

    2011-08-01

    The recently proposed Critical Specific Tension (CST) model is jointly used with the well-known Marciniak and Kuczy?ski (M-K) model to predict localized necking in anisotropic sheet metals in the regime of negative and positive minor in-plane strains, respectively. A significantly simplified method is presented to calculate the critical tensile stress required in the CST model, without the need of iterative computations. In the present work the CST/M-K model is used along with a rate-independent phenomenological elasto-plastic constitutive model as well as the known visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) crystal plasticity model developed by Tomé and Lebensohn. A comparison between experimental data and the limit strains predicted by means of the phenomenological constitutive model reveals a very good agreement. In order to validate the correctness of the non-trivial computational implementation of the VPSC-based CST/M-K model the predicted necking strains are compared with results obtained by using the phenomenological constitutive model. It is shown that the results of both approaches are in good agreement.

  4. Size and rate dependent necking in thin metallic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, T.

    2014-01-01

    The control of the ductility of thin metallic films is a major issue in a variety of technologies involving flexible electronics, MEMS and deformable coatings. An enhanced closed form 1D imperfection based localization analysis is developed in order to investigate the mechanics of diffuse necking in metallic films. The model relies on a description of the localization process in a finite length specimen using either a 2- or 3-zone model, under plane stress or plane strain tension conditions. A strain gradient plasticity contribution to the stabilization of the localization process is taken into account in the hardening response through a simple estimate of the deformation gradient inside the necking zone. The model, with gradient plasticity effects, is validated towards 2D finite element simulations. The response of the material involves both strain-hardening and rate sensitivity, as well as possible creep relaxation. The plastic flow parameters are related to the grain size and film thickness. The model shows, in agreement with experiments, that the ductility can either drop to small values for very small grain sizes and/or film thickness due to the high strength and to the presence of imperfections, or can remain constant or even increase owing to an increased rate sensitivity resulting from thermally activated mechanisms. This last stabilization effect can be reinforced by gradient plasticity effects if allowed by the dominant deformation mechanism.

  5. Radiation-induced sarcomas of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Iyer, N Gopalakrishna

    2014-01-01

    With improved outcomes associated with radiotherapy, radiation-induced sarcomas (RIS) are increasingly seen in long-term survivors of head and neck cancers, with an estimated risk of up to 0.3%. They exhibit no subsite predilection within the head and neck and can arise in any irradiated tissue of mesenchymal origin. Common histologic subtypes of RIS parallel their de novo counterparts and include osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma/sarcoma nitricoxide synthase, and fibrosarcoma. While imaging features of RIS are not pathognomonic, large size, extensive local invasion with bony destruction, marked enhancement within a prior radiotherapy field, and an appropriate latency period are suggestive of a diagnosis of RIS. RIS development may be influenced by factors such as radiation dose, age at initial exposure, exposure to chemotherapeutic agents and genetic tendency. Precise pathogenetic mechanisms of RIS are poorly understood and both directly mutagenizing effects of radiotherapy as well as changes in microenvironments are thought to play a role. Management of RIS is challenging, entailing surgery in irradiated tissue and a limited scope for further radiotherapy and chemotherapy. RIS is associated with significantly poorer outcomes than stage-matched sarcomas that arise independent of irradiation and surgical resection with clear margins seems to offer the best chance for cure. PMID:25493233

  6. Management of neck lumps--a triage model.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, O. D.; Ellis, P. D.; Bearcroft, P. W.; Berman, L. H.; Grant, J. W.; Jani, P.

    2000-01-01

    We report our experience in the out-patient triage of 100 patients presenting with a lump in the neck. The out-patient visit consisted of a general history and examination, assessment of the upper air and food passages and, where indicated, ultrasound and core needle biopsy of the lump. Other investigations were performed as appropriate. One hundred neck lump patients were seen in a 9 month period. Ninety-six of these lumps were diagnosed on an out-patient basis, only four requiring admission for formal excision biopsy. Among the diagnoses were eleven lymphomas, nine parotid neoplasms, nine lymph node metastases, five thyroglossal cysts, and four branchial cysts. Almost half the patients seen had either a reactive lymphadenopathy, or no abnormality. The establishment of a tissue diagnosis on an out-patient basis allowed appropriate referrals to be made and management plans to be formulated. The theoretical risk of seeding of malignant cells in the needle tract is acknowledged and discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:10932654

  7. Deep Neck Infection and Descending Mediastinitis as a Complication of Propionibacterium acnes Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brotfain, Evgeni; Koyfman, Leonid; Saidel-Odes, Lisa; Borer, Abraham; Refaely, Yael; Klein, Moti

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is an anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium which causes numerous types of infections. Isolated Propionibacterium acnes deep neck infections are very rare. We present an interesting case of deep neck infection complicated by descending mediastinitis of isolated Propionibacterium acnes infection. PMID:26693363

  8. Salmonella recovery following air chilling for matched neck-skin and whole carcass sampling methodologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence and serogroups of Salmonella recovered following air chilling were determined for both enriched neck skin and matching enriched whole carcass samples. Commercially processed and eviscerated carcasses were air chilled to 4C before removing the neck skin (8.3 g) and stomaching in 83 mL...

  9. Electromyographic Control of a Hands-Free Electrolarynx Using Neck Strap Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubert, Heather L.; Stepp, Cara E.; Zeitels, Steven M.; Gooey, John E.; Walsh, Michael J.; Prakash, S. R.; Hillman, Robert E.; Heaton, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Three individuals with total laryngectomy were studied for their ability to control a hands-free electrolarynx (EL) using neck surface electromyography (EMG) for on/off and pitch modulation. The laryngectomy surgery of participants was modified to preserve neck strap musculature for EMG-based EL control (EMG-EL), with muscles on one side…

  10. 33 CFR 334.120 - Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.120 Section...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.120 Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger...

  11. Journal: Head & Neck Title: Surgical molecular navigation with a Ratiometric Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptide improves

    E-print Network

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Journal: Head & Neck Title: Surgical molecular navigation with a Ratiometric Activatable Cell , PhD; Minya Pu3 , MA; Roger Y. Tsien2, 4 , PhD; Quyen T. Nguyen1 , MD/PhD 1 Division of Head and Neck Surgery, University of California San Diego 2 Department of Pharmacology, University

  12. Neck-Linker Docking Coordinates the Kinetics of Kinesin's Heads Andras Czovek,

    E-print Network

    Derényi, Imre

    Neck-Linker Docking Coordinates the Kinetics of Kinesin's Heads Andra´s Czo¨vek, Gergely J. Szo kinetic model. Considering the two neck linkers as entropic springs that are allowed to dock to their head Conventional kinesin is a two-headed homodimeric motor protein, which is able to walk along microtubules proc

  13. Humoral response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium in naturally infected ring-neck doves (Streptopelia risoria) 

    E-print Network

    Gray, Patricia Lara-Lynn

    2009-05-15

    serodiagnostics could be of value in testing ring-neck doves (Streptopelia risoria) for M. a. avium infection, Western blot analysis was used to assess the humoral response of ring-neck doves exposed to M. a. avium, and to evaluate whether an association could...

  14. 49 CFR 572.143 - Neck-headform assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... plate insert (drawing 910420-048), bib simulator (drawing TE-208-050), urethane washer (drawing 210-2050), neck mounting plate (drawing TE-250-021), two jam nuts (drawing 9001336), load-moment transducer (drawing SA 572-S19), and headform (drawing TE-208-000). (b) When the neck and headform assembly,...

  15. Monte Carlo Analysis of Neck Linker Extension in Kinesin Molecular Motors

    E-print Network

    Hancock, William O.

    ). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparationMonte Carlo Analysis of Neck Linker Extension in Kinesin Molecular Motors Matthew L. Kutys1 , John by these two processes are not clear. The neck linker docking model is widely accepted in the field

  16. Voice Relative Fundamental Frequency via Neck-Skin Acceleration in Individuals with Voice Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lien, Yu-An S.; Calabrese, Carolyn R.; Michener, Carolyn M.; Murray, Elizabeth Heller; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Mehta, Daryush D.; Hillman, Robert E.; Noordzij, J. Pieter; Stepp, Cara E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the use of neck-skin acceleration for relative fundamental frequency (RFF) analysis. Method: Forty individuals with voice disorders associated with vocal hyperfunction and 20 age- and sex-matched control participants were recorded with a subglottal neck-surface accelerometer and a microphone while producing speech…

  17. Immobilization device for use on patients undergoing radiation therapy of the head or neck.

    PubMed

    Jeurink, J K

    1978-01-01

    A unit for head and neck immobilization during radiation therapy is described. The treatment machine's laser lights and a cardboard template insure the accurate reproduction of the position of the patient's head and neck. The immobilizing unit quickly and easily locks to maintain the patient's position. PMID:264026

  18. [Quality control in pathology and theranostics in head and neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Faure, Claire; Badoual, Cécile; Fleury, Bertrand; Milano, Gérard; Thariat, Juliette

    2014-05-01

    Head and neck malignant tumors diagnosis require both standardized technical and personalized management in order to optimize patient care and therapy. The quality of multidisciplinary discussion for that goal needs common vocabulary. More than morphology, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, additional molecular theranostics approaches are in fast progress in head and neck cancers, as well as their other anatomic counterparts. PMID:24886897

  19. The spine neck filters membrane potentials Roberto Araya, Jiang Jiang*, Kenneth B. Eisenthal

    E-print Network

    Yuste, Rafael

    The spine neck filters membrane potentials Roberto Araya, Jiang Jiang*, Kenneth B. Eisenthal for review August 21, 2006) Dendritic spines receive most synaptic inputs in the forebrain. Their morphology, with a spine head isolated from the dendrite by a slender neck, indicates a potential role in isolating inputs

  20. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1513 - Test Probe for Neck Entrapment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test Probe for Neck Entrapment 2 Figure 2 to Part 1513 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1513—Test Probe for Neck...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1513 - Test Probe for Neck Entrapment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test Probe for Neck Entrapment 2 Figure 2 to Part 1513 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1513—Test Probe for Neck...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1513 - Test Probe for Neck Entrapment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Test Probe for Neck Entrapment 2 Figure 2 to Part 1513 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1513—Test Probe for Neck...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1513 - Test Probe for Neck Entrapment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test Probe for Neck Entrapment 2 Figure 2 to Part 1513 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1513—Test Probe for Neck...

  4. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1513 - Test Probe for Neck Entrapment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Test Probe for Neck Entrapment 2 Figure 2 to Part 1513 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1513—Test Probe for Neck...

  5. Radiation Oncology-New Approaches in Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Danielle N; Schoenfeld, Jonathon D; Tishler, Roy B

    2015-12-01

    The many advances in radiotherapy for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck described in this article will have significant effects on the ultimate outcomes of patients who receive this treatment. The technological and clinical advances should allow one to maintain or improve disease control, while moderating the toxicity associated with head and neck radiation therapy. PMID:26568550

  6. 49 CFR 572.153 - Neck-headform assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572 -S23...load cell measures the force to the occipital condyle...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572...

  7. 49 CFR 572.153 - Neck-headform assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572 -S23...load cell measures the force to the occipital condyle...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572...

  8. 49 CFR 572.153 - Neck-headform assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572 -S23...load cell measures the force to the occipital condyle...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572...

  9. 49 CFR 572.153 - Neck-headform assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572 -S23...load cell measures the force to the occipital condyle...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572...

  10. 49 CFR 572.153 - Neck-headform assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572 -S23...load cell measures the force to the occipital condyle...y-axis, Fx is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572...

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER Sex ratio varies with egg investment in the red-necked

    E-print Network

    ORIGINAL PAPER Sex ratio varies with egg investment in the red-necked phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus Abstract Fisher's sex ratio theory predicts that on average parents should allocate resources equally of the sex with greater variation in fitness. We tested theoretical predictions in the red-necked phalarope

  12. Neck Muscle Paths and Moment Arms are Significantly Affected by Wrapping Surface Parameters

    E-print Network

    Krishnamoorthy, Bala

    Neck Muscle Paths and Moment Arms are Significantly Affected by Wrapping Surface Parameters.S.A. *Corresponding author. Email: vasavada@wsu.edu We have studied the effects of wrapping surfaces on muscle paths and moment arms of the semispinalis capitis muscle, one of the major extensors of the neck. Sensitivities

  13. Deep Neck Infection and Descending Mediastinitis as a Complication of Propionibacterium acnes Odontogenic Infection.

    PubMed

    Brotfain, Evgeni; Koyfman, Leonid; Saidel-Odes, Lisa; Borer, Abraham; Refaely, Yael; Klein, Moti

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is an anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium which causes numerous types of infections. Isolated Propionibacterium acnes deep neck infections are very rare. We present an interesting case of deep neck infection complicated by descending mediastinitis of isolated Propionibacterium acnes infection. PMID:26693363

  14. Modulation of Neck Intermuscular Beta Coherence during Voice and Speech Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepp, Cara E.; Hillman, Robert E.; Heaton, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to better understand neck intermuscular beta coherence (15-35 Hz; NIBcoh) in healthy individuals, with respect to modulation by behavioral tasks. Method: Mean NIBcoh was measured using surface electromyography at 2 anterior neck locations in 10 individuals during normal speech, static nonspeech maneuvers,…

  15. Comprehensive Genomic Characterization of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck - David Neil Hayes, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Characterization of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck - David Neil Hayes Comprehensive Genomic Characterization of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck - David Neil Hayes, TCGA Scientific

  16. Two days with a broken knife blade in the neck – an interesting case of Horner's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Marshall, S; De Kock, S

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old man presented to the Emergency department in a rural South African hospital after a left, submental neck stab with a knife. Examination was deemed unremarkable, and the patient was discharged, but re-attended 2 days later complaining of a painful, swollen neck. Further examination identified Horner's syndrome, and further investigation revealed that the blade of the knife had remained in the patient's neck. This was successfully removed in theatre. This case illustrates the importance of careful history, examination and diagnostic imaging in the management of penetrating neck injuries. Horner's syndrome can be easily missed in a busy Emergency department and may indicate life-threatening pathology in the context of neck trauma. The difficulties in assessing and managing this type of injury are discussed. PMID:22766569

  17. Gaps and opportunities in the management of the young femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Della Rocca, Gregory J

    2015-03-01

    Femoral neck fractures in young adults are difficult to treat. There are substantial gaps in our knowledge regarding treatment and prevention of young adult femoral neck fractures. Avoiding malunion or nonunion of these fractures after fixation remains a challenge. Currently available fixation techniques may allow for healing to occur, but in a shortened position, with negative consequences on gait mechanics and physical function. Osteonecrosis remains a problem, affecting up to half of patients who sustain femoral neck fractures. Achieving reliable healing may require a reconsideration of fracture fixation implants as well as biological methods to address metabolic, endocrine, and/or genetic abnormalities that may be present in the young adult femoral neck fracture patient. Also, prevention of low-energy femoral neck fractures (e.g. stress fracture) remains an area ripe for investigation. PMID:25496856

  18. A literature review of neck pain associated with computer use: public health implications

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bart N

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged use of computers during daily work activities and recreation is often cited as a cause of neck pain. This review of the literature identifies public health aspects of neck pain as associated with computer use. While some retrospective studies support the hypothesis that frequent computer operation is associated with neck pain, few prospective studies reveal causal relationships. Many risk factors are identified in the literature. Primary prevention strategies have largely been confined to addressing environmental exposure to ergonomic risk factors, since to date, no clear cause for this work-related neck pain has been acknowledged. Future research should include identifying causes of work related neck pain so that appropriate primary prevention strategies may be developed and to make policy recommendations pertaining to prevention. PMID:18769599

  19. Is there a role for neck manipulation in elderly falls prevention? – An overview

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Julie C.; Hartvigsen, Jan; French, Simon D.; Azari, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Many risk factors exist for falls in the elderly. Dizziness is an important risk factor for such falls. Spinal pain has also been identified as a risk factor for these falls. In this overview of the literature, we examine studies, including trials, of neck manipulation for neck pain, unsteadiness and falls risk relevant to the elderly. We also examine two related, but not mutually exclusive, mechanisms through which a putative beneficial effect may be mediated. These are the effects of neck manipulation on neck pain and on non-specific dizziness. We focus on the available evidence primarily in terms of clinical data rather than laboratory-based measures of balance. We conclude that chiropractors may have a role in falls prevention strategies in the subpopulation of the elderly that suffer from mechanical neck pain or dysfunction and non-specific dizziness. However, this role remains to be rigorously studied and properly defined. PMID:25729086

  20. Range of motion in a modular femoral stem system with a variety of neck options.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Sanaz; Chun, Sungwook; Cowan, James B; Bragdon, Charles; Malchau, Henrik; Rubash, Harry E

    2013-10-01

    Modular femoral stem systems decouple leg length, offset, and version. The hip ROM and type of impingement for 162 femoral head/neck combinations were measured at four extreme hip positions in a Sawbones pelvis and femur to identify constructs that lead to early impingement. Hip ROM increased in all positions with increasing head size and neck length. We identified a new type of impingement created by the build-up of the proximal femoral stem: femoral stem on acetabular liner impingement. Seventy percent of neutral neck options achieved our definition of acceptable ROM. In general, when utilizing a modular femoral stem, surgeons can minimize impingement by choosing the longest femoral neck that does not over-lengthen the limb, using the largest femoral head accommodated by the cup, and avoiding neck version unless the cup or stem is malaligned. PMID:23886407

  1. Severe neck infections that require wide external drainage: clinical analysis of 17 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Tamás; Horváth, Barnabás; Varga, Zsuzsa; Liktor, Bálint; Szabadka, Hajnalka; Csákó, László; Liktor, Bálint

    2015-11-01

    Infections in the neck layers and spaces are potentially life-threatening diseases causing further complications, like mediastinitis, airway obstruction, or sepsis. Despite of the need for a conservative approach, they still regularly require surgical intervention. Records of 17 patients with severe neck infections that were treated by wide external incision and open wound management were retrospectively analyzed. The aim of the study was to clinically characterize these most serious neck infections. The most common presenting symptoms were neck pain and tense neck mass (94-94 %) regularly with fever (65 %), always accompanied by a marked elevation of C reactive protein level (average 192 uG/l). These findings were constant and very similar among both the deep neck infection and necrotizing fasciitis cases. More than half of the patients (53 %) had at least one systemic co-morbidity. The parapharyngeal space was most commonly affected (83 %), but extended disease involving more than two major neck regions was found in 13 cases (76 %). Dental (29 %) was the most common primary infection, followed by peritonsillar abscess (23 %), Microbiological results showed a wide variety of corresponding bacteria. Mediastinitis was developed in three cases (18 %), and airway obstruction requiring tracheostomy in two cases (12 %). All the patients survived. Severe neck infections are a heterogenous group of diseases regarding to the primary site of infection, microbiology, localisation and host reaction. However, rapidly developed, painful, tense neck mass with a highly elevated CRP level should always alert for an extended or phlegmonous process in the layers or spaces of the neck. PMID:25359195

  2. Sternocleidomastoid muscle flap used for repairing the dead space after supraomohyoid neck dissection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinzhong; Han, Zhengxue

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication followed neck dissection and dead space is a common reason of SSI. The present study is aimed to explore whether the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) flap transposition to repair the dead space in level II of neck could decrease the postoperative SSI in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) underwent supraomohyoid neck dissection (SOND). Ninety-six patients with cT2-3N0 OSCC who underwent extended resection of primary cancer combined SOND and reconstructed with free flap from March 2011 to October 2014 in our department were included. Forty-eight cases underwent SCM transposition to repair the potential dead space in level II of the neck, the other 48 cases did not. The two groups were matched at age, gender, concomitant diseases, and perioperative treatments. All the patients underwent exhaustive hemostasis and careful placement of negative pressure drainage. The wound healing was observed on 7 days postoperatively. The SSI rates of neck between the two groups were compared using Fisher’s exact test. The dead space in level II was observed in all the neck wounds after SOND. The neck wounds healed by primary intention in 46 cases underwent SCM flap transposition, and in 39 cases underwent routine SOND only. Two cases with SCM flap transposition and 9 cases in the group without SCM flap transposition presented SSI in neck. There was significant difference in the SSI rate between the two groups (P = 0.0248). The dead space in level II could be an important cause of SSI in neck followed SOND. Repairing of the dead space in level II using SCM flap transposition reduce the SSI rate of neck followed SOND. PMID:25785129

  3. An ICON Overview on Physical Modalities for Neck Pain and Associated Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Nadine; Gross, Anita R; Carlesso, Lisa C; Santaguida, P. Lina; MacDermid, Joy C; Walton, Dave; Ho, Enoch

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Neck pain is common, can be disabling and is costly to society. Physical modalities are often included in neck rehabilitation programs. Interventions may include thermal, electrotherapy, ultrasound, mechanical traction, laser and acupuncture. Definitive knowledge regarding optimal modalities and dosage for neck pain management is limited. Purpose: To systematically review existing literature to establish the evidence-base for recommendations on physical modalities for acute to chronic neck pain. Methods: A comprehensive computerized and manual search strategy from January 2000 to July 2012, systematic review methodological quality assessment using AMSTAR, qualitative assessment using a GRADE approach and recommendation presentation was included. Systematic or meta-analyses of studies evaluating physical modalities were eligible. Independent assessment by at least two review team members was conducted. Data extraction was performed by one reviewer and checked by a second. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: Of 103 reviews eligible, 20 were included and 83 were excluded. Short term pain relief - Moderate evidence of benefit: acupuncture, intermittent traction and laser were shown to be better than placebo for chronic neck pain. Moderate evidence of no benefit: pulsed ultrasound, infrared light or continuous traction was no better than placebo for acute whiplash associated disorder, chronic myofascial neck pain or subacute to chronic neck pain. There was no added benefit when hot packs were combined with mobilization, manipulation or electrical muscle stimulation for chronic neck pain, function or patient satisfaction at six month follow-up. Conclusions: The current state of the evidence favours acupuncture, laser and intermittent traction for chronic neck pain. Some electrotherapies show little benefit for chronic neck pain. Consistent dosage, improved design and long term follow-up continue to be the recommendations for future research. PMID:24155804

  4. 33 CFR 334.380 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range. 334.380 Section 334.380 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.380 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck... Training Center, Atlantic, Dam Neck, Virginia Beach, Virginia, and other such agencies as he/she...

  5. 33 CFR 334.380 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range. 334.380 Section 334.380 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.380 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck... Training Center, Atlantic, Dam Neck, Virginia Beach, Virginia, and other such agencies as he/she...

  6. 33 CFR 334.380 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range. 334.380 Section 334.380 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.380 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck... Training Center, Atlantic, Dam Neck, Virginia Beach, Virginia, and other such agencies as he/she...

  7. 33 CFR 334.380 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range. 334.380 Section 334.380 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.380 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck... Training Center, Atlantic, Dam Neck, Virginia Beach, Virginia, and other such agencies as he/she...

  8. 33 CFR 334.380 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range. 334.380 Section 334.380 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.380 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck... Training Center, Atlantic, Dam Neck, Virginia Beach, Virginia, and other such agencies as he/she...

  9. Cross-validated models of the relationships between neck muscle electromyography and three-dimensional head kinematics during

    E-print Network

    Corneil, Brian D.

    between neck muscle electromyography and three-dimensional head kinemat- ics during gaze behavior. J in a complete model of 3-D head-neck system and should help constrain the study of premotor signals for head control during gaze behaviors. neck muscles; cross-validation; head posture; head movements GAZE

  10. Cool the worker with cold compresses to the head, neck, and face or have the worker wash his or her

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Cool the worker with cold compresses to the head, neck, and face or have the worker wash his or her head, face and neck with cold water. Encourage fre- quent sips of cool water. Workers with signs usually appears on the neck, upper chest, in the groin, under the breasts and in elbow creases. The best

  11. Neck Muscle Responses to Stimulation of Monkey Superior Colliculus. II. Gaze Shift Initiation and Volitional Head Movements

    E-print Network

    Corneil, Brian D.

    Neurophysiol 88: 2000­2018, 2002; 10.1152/jn.00960.2001. We report neck mus- cle activity and head movements neck electromyography (EMG) circumvents complications arising from the head's inertia and the kinetics responses and head movements either without or prior to gaze shifts, testifying to a SC drive to neck

  12. Relationships between neck muscle electromyography and three-dimensional head kinematics during centrally induced torsional head perturbations

    E-print Network

    Corneil, Brian D.

    Relationships between neck muscle electromyography and three-dimensional head kinematics during. Relationships between neck muscle electromyography and three- dimensional head kinematics during centrally-dimensional head kinematics and intramuscular EMG from six bilateral neck muscle pairs. We used a cross

  13. Network Modeling Identifies Molecular Functions Targeted by miR-204 to Suppress Head and Neck Tumor

    E-print Network

    Gerstein, Mark

    Network Modeling Identifies Molecular Functions Targeted by miR-204 to Suppress Head and Neck Tumor with tumor progression in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). We further demonstrate.1­22.3 CAGR locus, a well established risk factor locus in head and neck cancers for which tumor suppressor

  14. 75 FR 57535 - Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company; Haddam Neck Plant; Notice of Issuance of Amendment To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ...Atomic Power Company; Haddam Neck Plant; Notice of Issuance of...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Haddam Neck completed the transfer of their...the possession of the Haddam Neck facility pursuant to 10 CFR Part...System (ADAMS), which provides text and image files of NRC's...

  15. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 56 (2008) 93113 Material aspects of dynamic neck retardation

    E-print Network

    Vaziri, Ashkan

    2008-01-01

    sections well away from the neck by B. Approximate plane strain tension everywhere implies sBhB ¼ sJournal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 56 (2008) 93­113 Material aspects of dynamic neck, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA Received 15 November 2006; accepted 18 February 2007 Abstract Neck retardation

  16. Hydrogeology and extent of saltwater intrusion of the Great Neck peninsula, Great Neck, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumm, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    Great Neck, a peninsula, in the northwestern part of Nassau County, N.Y., is underlain by unconsolidated deposits that form a sequence of aquifers and confining units. Seven public-supply wells have been affected by the intrusion of saltwater from the surrounding embayments (Little Neck Bay, Long Island Sound, Manhasset Bay). Fifteen observation wells were drilled in 1991-96 for the collection of hydrogeologic, geochemical, and geophysical data to delineate the subsurface geology and extent of saltwater intrusion within the peninsula. Continuous high-resolution seismic-reflection surveys in the embayments surrounding the Great Neck peninsula and the Manhasset Neck peninsula to the east were completed in 1993 and 1994. Two hydrogeologic units are newly proposed herein.the North Shore aquifer and the North Shore confining unit. The new drill-core data collected in 1991-96 indicate that the Lloyd aquifer, the Raritan confining unit, and the Magothy aquifer have been completely removed from the northern part of the peninsula by extensive glacial erosion. Water levels at selected observation wells were measured quarterly throughout the study. The results from two studies of the effects of tides on ground-water levels in 1992 and 1993 indicate that water levels at wells screened within the North Shore and Lloyd aquifers respond to tides and pumping effects, but those in the overlying upper glacial aquifer (where the water table is located) do not. Data from quarterly water-level measurements and the tidal-effect studies indicate the North Shore and Lloyd aquifers to be hydraulically connected. Offshore seismic-reflection surveys in the surrounding embayments indicate at least two glacially eroded buried valleys with subhorizontal, parallel reflectors indicative of draped bedding that is interpreted as infilling by silt and clay. The buried valleys (1) truncate the surrounding coarse-grained deposits, (2) are asymmetrical and steep sided, (3) trend northwest-southeast, (4) are 2-4 miles long and about 1 mile wide, and (5) extend to more than 200 feet below sea level. Water from six public-supply wells screened in the Magothy and upper glacial aquifers contained volatile organic compounds in concentrations above the New York State Department of Health Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Levels, as did water from one public-supply well screened in the Lloyd aquifer, and from three observation wells screened in the upper glacial and Magothy aquifers. Four distinct wedge-shaped areas of saltwater intrusion have been delineated within the aquifers in Great Neck; three areas extend into the Lloyd and North Shore aquifers, and the fourth area extends into the upper glacial aquifer. Three other areas of saltwater intrusion also have been detected. Borehole-geophysical-logging data indicate that four of these saltwater wedges range from 20 to 125 feet in thickness and have sharp freshwater-saltwater interfaces, and that maximum chloride concentrations in 1996 ranged from 141 to 13,750 milligrams per liter. Seven public-supply wells have either been shut down or are currently being affected by saltwater intrusion.

  17. G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: Next Generation Therapeutic Targets in Head and Neck Cancer?

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Takeharu; Misawa, Kiyoshi; Misawa, Yuki; Uehara, Takayuki; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Kusaka, Gen; Maruta, Mikiko; Carey, Thomas E

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic outcome in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is poor in most advanced cases. To improve therapeutic efficiency, novel therapeutic targets and prognostic factors must be discovered. Our studies have identified several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as promising candidates. Significant epigenetic silencing of GPCR expression occurs in HNSCC compared with normal tissue, and is significantly correlated with clinical behavior. Together with the finding that GPCR activity can suppress tumor cell growth, this indicates that GPCR expression has potential utility as a prognostic factor. In this review, we discuss the roles that galanin receptor type 1 (GALR1) and type 2 (GALR2), tachykinin receptor type 1 (TACR1), and somatostatin receptor type 1 (SST1) play in HNSCC. GALR1 inhibits proliferation of HNSCC cells though ERK1/2-mediated effects on cell cycle control proteins such as p27, p57, and cyclin D1, whereas GALR2 inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in HNSCC cells. Hypermethylation of GALR1, GALR2, TACR1, and SST1 is associated with significantly reduced disease-free survival and a higher recurrence rate. Although their overall activities varies, each of these GPCRs has value as both a prognostic factor and a therapeutic target. These data indicate that further study of GPCRs is a promising strategy that will enrich pharmacogenomics and prognostic research in HNSCC. PMID:26251921

  18. Ex-vivo holographic microscopy and spectroscopic analysis of head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Stephen; Wurtz, Robert; Auyeung, Kelsey; Auyeung, Kris; Paspaley-Grbavac, Milan; Mulroe, Brigid; Sobrero, Maximiliano; Miles, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Optical probes to identify tumor margins in vivo would greatly reduce the time, effort and complexity in the surgical removal of malignant tissue in head and neck cancers. Current approaches involve visual microscopy of stained tissue samples to determine cancer margins, which results in the excision of excess of tissue to assure complete removal of the cancer. Such surgical procedures and follow-on chemotherapy can adversely affect the patient's recovery and subsequent quality of life. In order to reduce the complexity of the process and minimize adverse effects on the patient, we investigate ex vivo tissue samples (stained and unstained) using digital holographic microscopy in conjunction with spectroscopic analyses (reflectance and transmission spectroscopy) in order to determine label-free, optically identifiable characteristic features that may ultimately be used for in vivo processing of cancerous tissues. The tissue samples studied were squamous cell carcinomas and associated controls from patients of varying age, gender and race. Holographic microscopic imaging scans across both cancerous and non-cancerous tissue samples yielded amplitude and phase reconstructions that were correlated with spectral signatures. Though the holographic reconstructions and measured spectra indicate variations even among the same class of tissue, preliminary results indicate the existence of some discriminating features. Further analyses are presently underway to further this work and extract additional information from the imaging and spectral data that may prove useful for in vivo surgical identification.

  19. Noncontact diffuse optical assessment of blood flow changes in head and neck free tissue transfer flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chong; Radabaugh, Jeffrey P.; Aouad, Rony K.; Lin, Yu; Gal, Thomas J.; Patel, Amit B.; Valentino, Joseph; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of tissue blood flow (BF) changes after free tissue transfer may enable surgeons to predict the failure of flap thrombosis at an early stage. This study used our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy to monitor dynamic BF changes in free flaps without getting in contact with the targeted tissue. Eight free flaps were elevated in patients with head and neck cancer; one of the flaps failed. Multiple BF measurements probing the transferred tissue were performed during and post the surgical operation. Postoperative BF values were normalized to the intraoperative baselines (assigning "1") for the calculation of relative BF change (rBF). The rBF changes over the seven successful flaps were 1.89±0.15, 2.26±0.13, and 2.43±0.13 (mean±standard error), respectively, on postoperative days 2, 4, and 7. These postoperative values were significantly higher than the intraoperative baseline values (p<0.001), indicating a gradual recovery of flap vascularity after the tissue transfer. By contrast, rBF changes observed from the unsuccessful flaps were 1.14 and 1.34, respectively, on postoperative days 2 and 4, indicating less flow recovery. Measurement of BF recovery after flap anastomosis holds the potential to act early to salvage ischemic flaps.

  20. Molecular Characterization of Head and Neck Cancer: How Close to Personalized Targeted Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Worsham, Maria J.; Ali, Haythem; Dragovic, Jadranka; Schweitzer, Vanessa P.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular targeted therapy in squamous head and neck cancer (HNSCC) continues to make strides and holds much promise. Cetuximab remains the sole FDA-approved molecular targeted therapy available for HNSCC, though there are several new biological agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and other pathways in the regulatory approval pipeline. While targeted therapies have the potential to be personalized, their current use in HNSCC is not personalized. This is illustrated for EGFR targeted drugs, where EGFR as a molecular target has yet to be individualized for HNSCC. Future research needs to identify factors that correlate with response (or lack of one) and the underlying genotype-phenotype relationship that dictates this response. Comprehensive exploration of genetic and epigenetic landscapes in HNSCC is opening new frontiers to further enlighten, mechanistically inform, and set a course for eventually translating these discoveries into therapies for patients. This opinion offers a snap shot of the evolution of molecular subytping in HNSCC, its current clinical applicability, as well as new emergent paradigms with implications for controlling this disease in the future. PMID:22873739