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1

Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength.  

PubMed

Most excitatory inputs in the mammalian brain are made on dendritic spines, rather than on dendritic shafts. Spines compartmentalize calcium, and this biochemical isolation can underlie input-specific synaptic plasticity, providing a raison d'etre for spines. However, recent results indicate that the spine can experience a membrane potential different from that in the parent dendrite, as though the spine neck electrically isolated the spine. Here we use two-photon calcium imaging of mouse neocortical pyramidal neurons to analyze the correlation between the morphologies of spines activated under minimal synaptic stimulation and the excitatory postsynaptic potentials they generate. We find that excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitudes are inversely correlated with spine neck lengths. Furthermore, a spike timing-dependent plasticity protocol, in which two-photon glutamate uncaging over a spine is paired with postsynaptic spikes, produces rapid shrinkage of the spine neck and concomitant increases in the amplitude of the evoked spine potentials. Using numerical simulations, we explore the parameter regimes for the spine neck resistance and synaptic conductance changes necessary to explain our observations. Our data, directly correlating synaptic and morphological plasticity, imply that long-necked spines have small or negligible somatic voltage contributions, but that, upon synaptic stimulation paired with postsynaptic activity, they can shorten their necks and increase synaptic efficacy, thus changing the input/output gain of pyramidal neurons. PMID:24982196

Araya, Roberto; Vogels, Tim P; Yuste, Rafael

2014-07-15

2

The correlation between clinical prediagnosis and pathology results in the diagnosis of neck masses.  

PubMed

The importance of clinical assessment and its contribution to the diagnosis of neck masses was investigated in patients presenting with a neck mass. In our study, we collected the medical history of a total of 127 patients, including 66 males and 61 females, who presented with a neck mass. Physical exams, endoscopic examinations, laboratory tests, a variety of imaging studies, and fine-needle aspiration biopsies were performed. The relationship between age, duration and location of the neck mass, FNAB results, and definitive histopathological diagnosis were investigated as well as the correlation between the consensus diagnosis reached after the evaluation of the medical history, physical examination and imaging studies, and definitive histopathological diagnosis. A strong and positive relationship (p < 0.01) was found between patients' ages and the definitive diagnosis established by histopathological examination. There was no statistically significant relationship (p > 0.05) between the duration and location of the neck mass and definitive diagnosis established by histopathological examination. And no statistically significant relationship (p > 0.05) was found between FNAB results and definitive histopathological diagnosis. Although no statistically significant relationship was found between the characteristics of neck masses and age, duration and location of masses and FNAB results, there was a statistically significant correlation between the pre-diagnosis estimated by ENT specialists and definitive diagnosis established by histopathological examination. A strong and positive relationship (p < 0.01) was found between clinical pre-diagnosis and definitive diagnosis established by histopathological examination. In patients presenting with a neck mass, the diagnosis should be made based on the medical history, physical examination, radiologic imaging and FNAB results, treatment decisions should be based on those findings. PMID:25032107

Ozdas, Talih; Ozcan, Kursat Murat; Ozdogan, Fatih; Cetin, Mehmet Ali; Dere, Huseyin

2014-09-01

3

Neck Strength Imbalance Correlates With Increased Head Acceleration in Soccer Heading  

PubMed Central

Background: Soccer heading is using the head to directly contact the ball, often to advance the ball down the field or score. It is a skill fundamental to the game, yet it has come under scrutiny. Repeated subclinical effects of heading may compound over time, resulting in neurologic deficits. Greater head accelerations are linked to brain injury. Developing an understanding of how the neck muscles help stabilize and reduce head acceleration during impact may help prevent brain injury. Hypothesis: Neck strength imbalance correlates to increasing head acceleration during impact while heading a soccer ball. Study Design: Observational laboratory investigation. Methods: Sixteen Division I and II collegiate soccer players headed a ball in a controlled indoor laboratory setting while player motions were recorded by a 14-camera Vicon MX motion capture system. Neck flexor and extensor strength of each player was measured using a spring-type clinical dynamometer. Results: Players were served soccer balls by hand at a mean velocity of 4.29 m/s (±0.74 m/s). Players returned the ball to the server using a heading maneuver at a mean velocity of 5.48 m/s (±1.18 m/s). Mean neck strength difference was positively correlated with angular head acceleration (rho = 0.497; P = 0.05), with a trend toward significance for linear head acceleration (rho = 0.485; P = 0.057). Conclusion: This study suggests that symmetrical strength in neck flexors and extensors reduces head acceleration experienced during low-velocity heading in experienced collegiate players. Clinical Relevance: Balanced neck strength may reduce head acceleration cumulative subclinical injury. Since neck strength is a measureable and amenable strength training intervention, this may represent a modifiable intrinsic risk factor for injury.

Dezman, Zachary D.W.; Ledet, Eric H.; Kerr, Hamish A.

2013-01-01

4

Mutations in EGFR signal pathway in correlation with response to treatment of head and neck cancers.  

PubMed

The prognostic and predictive value of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and some genetic alterations in an EGFR signal pathway, such as the EGFR amplification, the EGFR activating tyrosine kinase domain mutations or the k-ras gene mutation were investigated in our study. The aim of the research was to evaluate the occurrence of the above-mentioned biomarkers in correlation with a therapeutic response and survival in patients with locoregionally advanced spinocellular head and neck cancers. Keywords: Head and neck cancer, EGFR, predictive marker, k-ras, EGFR amplification, EGFR tyrosine kinase domain mutation. PMID:21724523

Neuwirthová, J; Pavel, S; Rottenberg, J; Kost?ica, R; Zden?k, M; Hajdúch, M; Drábek, J; Srovnal, J; Berkovcová, J

2011-07-01

5

Endovascular occlusion of intracranial aneurysms with electrically detachable coils: Correlation of aneurysm neck size and treatment results  

Microsoft Academic Search

To devise a method to measure aneurysm neck size on angiographic films, and to correlate the sizes obtained with the extent of endovascular aneurysm occlusion, performed with electrically detachable coils. The angiograms of 79 intracranial aneurysms treated by endovascular occlusion using electrically detachable coils were retrospectively analyzed. A method using the average reported caliber of the major intracranial vessels was

A. F. Zubillaga; G. Guglielmi; F. Vinuela; G. R. Duckwiler

1994-01-01

6

Heparanase augments EGF-receptor phosphorylation: correlation with head & neck tumor progression  

PubMed Central

Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that specifically cleaves heparan sulfate side chains, a class of glycosaminoglycans abundantly present in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface. Heparanase activity is strongly implicated in tumor metastasis attributed to remodeling of the subepithelial and subendothelial basement membranes resulting in dissemination of metastatic cancer cells. Moreover, heparanase up regulation was noted in an increasing number of primary human tumors, correlating with tumors larger in size, increased microvessel density, and reduced post operative survival rate, implying that heparanase function is not limited to tumor metastasis. This notion is supported by recent findings revealing induction of signaling molecules (i.e., Akt, p38) and gene transcription (i.e., tissue factor, VEGF) by enzymatically-inactive heparanase. Here, we provide evidence that active and inactive heparanase proteins enhance EGF-receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation. Enhanced EGFR phosphorylation was associated with increased cell migration, cell proliferation, and colony formation which were attenuated by Src inhibitors. Similarly, heparanase gene silencing by means of siRNA was associated with reduced Src and EGFR phosphorylation levels and decreased cell proliferation. Moreover, heparanase expression correlated with increased phospho-EGFR levels and progression of head and neck carcinoma, providing a strong clinical support for EGFR modulation by heparanase. Thus, heparanase appears to modulate two critical systems involved in tumor progression, namely VEGF expression and EGFR activation. Neutralizing heparanase enzymatic and non-enzymatic functions is therefore expected to profoundly affect tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis.

Cohen-Kaplan, Victoria; Doweck, Ilana; Naroditsky, Inna; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ilan, Neta

2009-01-01

7

Congenital cystic neck masses: embryology and imaging appearances, with clinicopathological correlation.  

PubMed

Congenital cystic masses of the neck are uncommon and can present in any age group. Diagnosis of these lesions can be sometimes challenging. Many of these have characteristic locations and imaging findings. The most common of all congenital cystic neck masses is the thyroglossal duct cyst. The other congenital cystic neck masses are branchial cleft cyst, cystic hygroma (lymphangioma), cervical thymic and bronchogenic cysts, and the floor of the mouth lesions including dermoid and epidermoid cysts. In this review, we illustrate the common congenital cystic neck masses including embryology, clinical findings, imaging features, and histopathological findings. PMID:24629659

Gaddikeri, Santhosh; Vattoth, Surjith; Gaddikeri, Ramya S; Stuart, Royal; Harrison, Keith; Young, Daniel; Bhargava, Puneet

2014-01-01

8

Overexpression of TWIST2 correlates with poor prognosis in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas  

PubMed Central

Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are a heterogeneous group of tumors with variable presentation and clinical behavior. Despite improvements in surgical and radiation therapy techniques, the 5-year survival rate has not improved significantly over the past decades. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify novel markers that may allow for the development of personalized therapeutic approaches. In the present study we evaluated the prognostic role of the expression of genes related to the induction of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). To this aim, a consecutive series of 69 HNSCC were analyzed for the expression of TWIST1, TWIST2, SNAI1, SNAI2, E-Cadherin, N-Cadherin and Vimentin. TWIST1, TWIST2, SNAI1 and SNAI2 were significantly overexpressed in HNSCC, with TWIST2, SNAI1 and SNAI2 being more markedly increased in tumors compared to normal mucosae. The expression of TWIST1 and SNAI2 was associated with upregulation of mesenchymal markers, but failed to correlate with pathological parameters or clinical behaviour. In contrast, we found that upregulation of TWIST2, which was independent of the activation of a mesenchymal differentiation program, correlated with poor differentiation grade (p=0.016) and shorter survival (p=0.025), and identifies a subset of node-positive oral cavity/pharynx cancer patients with very poor prognosis (p<0.001). Overall our study suggests that the assessment of TWIST2 expression might help to stratify HNSCC patients for risk of disease progression, pointing to TWIST2 as a potential prognostic marker.

Gasparotto, Daniela; Polesel, Jerry; Marzotto, Alessandra; Colladel, Roberta; Piccinin, Sara; Modena, Piergiorgio; Grizzo, Alessandra; Sulfaro, Sandro; Serraino, Diego; Barzan, Luigi; Doglioni, Claudio; Maestro, Roberta

2011-01-01

9

SPARC Expression Correlates with Tumor Response to Albumin-Bound Paclitaxel in Head and Neck Cancer Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

SPARC up-regulation is a poor prognostic factor in head and neck cancer. It was hypothesized that because of a SPARC-albumin interaction, tumoral SPARC facilitates the accumulation of albumin in the tumor and increases the effectiveness of albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel). This hypothesis was tested by correlating the re- sponse to nab-paclitaxel and SPARC tumor expression in a retrospective analysis of a

Neil Desai; Vuong Trieu; Bruno Damascelli; Patrick Soon-Shiong

10

Correlation Between Preoperative Lymphoscintigraphy and Metastatic Nodal Disease Sites in 362 Patients With Cutaneous Melanomas of the Head and Neck  

PubMed Central

Objective: Lymphoscintigraphy for head and neck melanomas demonstrates a wide variation in lymphatic drainage pathways, and sentinel nodes (SNs) are reported in sites that are not clinically predicted (discordant). To assess the clinical relevance of these discordant node fields, the lymphoscintigrams of patients with head and neck melanomas were analyzed and correlated with the sites of metastatic nodal disease. Methods: In 362 patients with head and neck melanomas who underwent lymphoscintigraphy, the locations of the SNs were compared with the locations of the primary tumors. The SNs were removed and examined in 136 patients and an elective or therapeutic regional lymph node dissection was performed in 40 patients. Results: Lymphoscintigraphy identified a total of 918 SNs (mean 2.5 per patient). One or more SNs was located in a discordant site in 114 patients (31.5%). Lymph node metastases developed in 16 patients with nonoperated SNs, all underneath the tattoo spots on the skin used to mark the position of the SNs. In 14 patients SN biopsy revealed metastatic melanoma. After a negative SN biopsy procedure 11 patients developed regional lymph node metastases during follow-up. Elective and therapeutic neck dissections demonstrated 10 patients with nodal metastases, all located in predicted node fields. Of the 51 patients with involved lymph nodes, 7 had positive nodes in discordant sites (13.7%). Conclusions: Metastases from head and neck melanomas can occur in any SN demonstrated by lymphoscintigraphy. SNs in discordant as well as predicted node fields should be removed and examined to optimize the accuracy of staging.

de Wilt, Johannes H. W.; Thompson, John F.; Uren, Roger F.; Ka, Vivian S. K.; Scolyer, Richard A.; McCarthy, William H.; O'Brien, Christopher J.; Quinn, Michael J.; Shannon, Kerwin F.

2004-01-01

11

Loss of heterozygosity at 15q21.3 correlates with occurrence of metastases in head and neck cancer.  

PubMed

Deletions on the long arm of chromosome 15 suggesting the presence of potential tumor suppressor genes have been found in several tumors including carcinomas of the colorectum, urinary bladder, breast, lung, and head and neck. Here, we analyzed allelic imbalance on chromosome 15q in head and neck carcinomas and corresponding lymph node metastases to define common regions of aberrations with potential involvement in development and progression of these tumors. We studied a panel of 40 polymorphic microsatellite markers, spanning 15q13-15q26, in 63 head and neck carcinomas and 38 lymph node metastases. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) could be demonstrated in 34 primary tumors (54%) and 35 metastases (92%). Aberration mapping defined three minimum regions of aberrations: a region between the markers D15S106 and D15S1029 in 15q21.3 (estimated as 3.9 Mb; region 1) was affected in the majority of tumors, whereas two other regions between D15S144 and D15S1040 in 15q13.3-14 (estimated as 2.4 Mb; region 2) and between D15S130 and D15S985 in 15q26.2-26.3 (estimated as 4.7 Mb; region 3) were less often involved. Allelic loss in region 1 correlated with T stages (P=0.0029) and metastatic potential (P=0.0018). LOH in regions 2 and 3 occurred predominantly in metastases (P=0.0129 and P=0.0013, respectively). No correlation with grading, localization, or clinical outcome could be established for any of the affected regions. Our data hint at aberrations in 15q21.3 as a possible important characteristic for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas with risk of progression. PMID:16906132

Poetsch, Micaela; Kleist, Britta

2006-11-01

12

Low appendicular muscle mass is correlated with femoral neck bone mineral density loss in postmenopausal women  

PubMed Central

Background After menopause, rapid bone mass loss occurs in response to hypoestrogenism. Several studies suggest that muscle mass and bone mineral density (BMD) are positively associated in postmenopausal women. Therefore, it may be assumed that postmenopausal low appendicular muscle mass (aMM) can increase BMD loss in a short period of time. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess relationship of aMM with femoral neck BMD in postmenopausal women. Methods Prospective, controlled clinical Trial including 64 women aged 45-70 years, who had not had their last menstruation for at least one year. Subjects were divided into two groups: low aMM (n = 32), and normal aMM (n-32). Femoral neck BMD and muscle mass were measured by DXA at baseline and after twelve months. Pairwise and independent t tests were used for data analysis. Results Baseline weight, BMI and muscle mass (total and appendicular) significantly differ between groups (p < 0.05). After twelve months, femoral neck BMD was significantly lower in the group with low aMM, whereas no significant difference was observed in the group with normal aMM (p < 0.05). Conclusion In postmenopausal women, low appendicular muscle mass is associated negatively with femoral neck BMD in a short period of time.

2011-01-01

13

Cytoplasmic ezrin and moesin correlate with poor survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

Members of the 4.1 superfamily of proteins, including ezrin, moesin, merlin, and willin regulate many normal physiologic processes such as cellular shape, motility, and proliferation. In addition, they contribute both to tumor development and tumor progression. We reported previously that strong cytoplasmic ezrin expression was independently associated with poorer patient survival. One hundred and thirty-one histologically confirmed primary head and neck squamous cell carcinomas were examined prospectively for cancer progression and survival at a large health care center in the Bronx, NY, USA. Immunohistochemical analysis of ezrin, moesin, merlin, and willin expression in tissue microarray samples of primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma revealed a significant association of increased cytoplasmic ezrin with poor cancer survival. Global RNA analyses suggest that cancers with high cytoplasmic ezrin have a more invasive phenotype. This study supports our previous findings associating cytoplasmic ezrin with more aggressive behavior and poorer outcome and indicates the need for a multi-institutional study to validate the use of cytoplasmic ezrin as a biomarker for treatment planning in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:22228071

Schlecht, Nicolas F; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret; Smith, Richard V; Kawachi, Nicole; Broughel, Darcy; Lin, Juan; Keller, Christian E; Reynolds, Paul A; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Harris, Thomas; Childs, Geoffrey; Belbin, Thomas J; Prystowsky, Michael B

2012-06-01

14

p53 mutation, but not p53 overexpression, correlates with survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed Central

Survival in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) was compared with overexpression and mutation of the p53 gene. Archival tissue from 77 tumours was analysed for protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC) with the monoclonal antibody Do-7, and for the presence of mutation in exons 5-8 using single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP), followed by DNA sequencing in SSCP-positive cases. p53 expression was scored as high (>70% nuclei stained) in 25 (32%) tumours, as intermediate (10-70% nuclei stained) in 19 (25%) tumours and as low (<10% nuclei stained) in 33 (43%) tumours. Twelve (18%) tumours exhibited gene mutation (ten missense and two nonsense mutations) and an additional five tumours contained changes that could not result in amino acid substitution or protein truncation. There was no correlation between gene expression and mutation, mutations being equally frequent in tumours with either high (4/25), intermediate (4/19) or low protein expression (4/33). Fifty-eight patients were eligible for survival analysis. There was a strong correlation between p53 mutation and cause-specific survival; median survival among mutated cases was 12.5 months compared with >160 months among non-mutated patients (P < 0.005). There was no correlation between p53 overexpression and survival. The results suggest that p53 mutation status is an important prognostic factor in HNSCC, and that IHC analysis of protein overexpression is an inadequate measure of gene mutation in these tumours. Images Figure 1

Mineta, H.; Borg, A.; Dictor, M.; Wahlberg, P.; Akervall, J.; Wennerberg, J.

1998-01-01

15

Correlations between Thymidylate Synthase Expression and Chemosensitivity to 5Fluorouracil, Cell Proliferation and Clinical Outcome in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a widely used drug in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Thymidylate synthase (TS), which is the target enzyme of 5-FU, has been demonstrated to be a key regulatory enzyme. In this study, we examined whether TS expression is correlated with chemosensitivity to 5-FU, cell proliferation and clinical outcome in HNSCC. Methods: An antisense TS

Ryuji Yasumatsu; Torahiko Nakashima; Hideoki Uryu; Toranoshin Ayada; Takahiro Wakasaki; Ryunosuke Kogo; Muneyuki Masuda; Masakazu Fukushima; Shizuo Komune

2009-01-01

16

p53 oncoprotein overexpression correlates with mutagen-induced chromosome fragility in head and neck cancer patients with multiple malignancies.  

PubMed Central

In this study, we analysed immunocytochemically p53 expression in first primary and second primary cancers from 25 head and neck cancer patients (HNCPs) with multiple malignancies in comparison with oncoprotein expression in tumour tissues from 25 historical HNCP controls with single cancer in a match-paired analysis. Moreover, we investigated bleomycin-induced chromosome fragility in both groups of HNCPs and in 21 additional healthy controls. Thirty-nine out of 75 tumour specimens analysed (52%) showed positive p53 immunostaining. Eleven out of 25 (44%) from single cancer patients and 28 out of 50 (56%) tumours from HNCPs with multiple malignancies were p53 positive. In the group of multiple primary cancers, nine patients (36%) showed positive staining of both first and second primaries, whereas six (24%) had positive labelling of first primary cancer but not of the subsequent second primary, four (16%) patient showed p53 expression only in the second primary cancer and six (24%) patients showed no p53 immunoreactivity in both tumours. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated a higher sensitivity to clastogens of HNCPs with multiple tumours than of HNCPs with a single cancer (P < 0.01), and a significant correlation between chromosome fragility and p53 overexpression (P < 0.01) only in HNCPs with multiple malignancies more than in those with single head and neck cancer (P = 0.11). Moreover, we found that patients with p53-positive staining of both first and second primaries showed a statistically significant higher mutagen sensitivity than those with a single p53 immunoreactive tumour or those in whom both cancers were p53 negative (P < 0.01). Our data suggest that subjects with increased susceptibility to carcingogens after exposure to tobacco or alcohol are at higher risk for multiple cancers in which one of the most common genetic events is aberrant p53 expression. Images Figure 1

Gallo, O.; Bianchi, S.; Giovannucci-Uzzielli, M. L.; Santoro, R.; Lenzi, S.; Salimbeni, C.; Abbruzzese, M.; Alajmo, E.

1995-01-01

17

Cyclooxygenase-2 Pathway Correlates with VEGF Expression in Head and Neck Cancer. Implications for Tumor Angiogenesis and Metastasis  

PubMed Central

Abstract We evaluated the role of COX-2 pathway in 35 head and neck cancers (HNCs) by analyzing COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in relation to tumor angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis. COX-2 activity was also correlated to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein expression. COX-2 mRNA and protein expression was higher in tumor samples than in normal mucosa. PGE2 levels were higher in the tumor front zone in comparison with tumor core and normal mucosa (P<.0001). Specimens from patients with lymph node metastasis exhibited higher COX-2 protein expression (P=.0074), PGE2 levels (P=.0011) and microvessel density (P<.0001) than specimens from patients without metastasis. A significant correlation between COX-2 and tumor vascularization (rs=0.450, P=.007) as well as between COX-2 and microvessel density with VEGF expression in tumor tissues was found (rs = 0.450, P=.007; rs=0.620, P=.0001, respectively). The induction of COX-2 mRNA and PGE2 synthesis by EGF and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in A-431 and SCC-9 cell lines, resulted in an increase in VEGF mRNA and protein production. Indomethacin and celecoxib reversed the EGF- and LPS-dependent COX-2, VEGF, and PGE2 increases. This study suggests a central role of COX-2 pathway in HNC angiogenesis by modulating VEGF production and indicates that COX-2 inhibitors may be useful in HNC treatment.

Gallo, Oreste; Franchi, Alessandro; Magnelli, Lucia; Sardi, Iacopo; Vannacci, Alfredo; Boddi, Vieri; Chiarugi, Vincenzo; Masini, Emanuela

2001-01-01

18

DNA Repair Biomarkers XPF and Phospho-MAPKAP Kinase 2 Correlate with Clinical Outcome in Advanced Head and Neck Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Induction chemotherapy is a common therapeutic option for patients with locoregionally-advanced head and neck cancer (HNC), but it remains unclear which patients will benefit. In this study, we searched for biomarkers predicting the response of patients with locoregionally-advanced HNC to induction chemotherapy by evaluating the expression pattern of DNA repair proteins. Methods Expression of a panel of DNA-repair proteins in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded specimens from a cohort of 37 HNC patients undergoing platinum-based induction chemotherapy prior to definitive chemoradiation were analyzed using quantitative immunohistochemistry. Results We found that XPF (an ERCC1 binding partner) and phospho-MAPKAP Kinase 2 (pMK2) are novel biomarkers for HNSCC patients undergoing platinum-based induction chemotherapy. Low XPF expression in HNSCC patients is associated with better response to induction chemoradiotherapy, while high XPF expression correlates with a worse response (p?=?0.02). Furthermore, low pMK2 expression was found to correlate significantly with overall survival after induction plus chemoradiation therapy (p?=?0.01), suggesting that pMK2 may relate to chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions We identified XPF and pMK2 as novel DNA-repair biomarkers for locoregionally-advanced HNC patients undergoing platinum-based induction chemotherapy prior to definitive chemoradiation. Our study provides insights for the use of DNA repair biomarkers in personalized diagnostics strategies. Further validation in a larger cohort is indicated.

Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Wang, XiaoZhe; Heitmann, Jana; Villegas-Bergazzi, Vivian; Sprott, Kam; Finn, Stephen; O'Regan, Esther; Farrow, Allan D.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Lingen, Mark W.; Cohen, Ezra E. W.; Stenson, Kerstin; Weaver, David T.; Vokes, Everett E.

2014-01-01

19

Dissection of cranial arteries in the neck: correlation of MRI and arteriography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Retrospective correlation of MRI and angiographic findings in nine patients with suspected cervical vascular dissections revealed MRI evidence of vessel abnormalities in eight patients, seven of whom proved to have arterial dissections. One patient whose MRI showed no abnormalities also proved to have a dissection, shown by angiography. Two patients had associated pseudoaneurysms not demonstrated by MRI. Five dissections involved

D. E. Sue; M. N. Brant-Zawadzki; J. Chance

1992-01-01

20

Neck pain  

MedlinePLUS

Pain - neck; Neck stiffness ... this as having a stiff neck. If neck pain involves nerves, you may feel numbness, tingling, or ... A common cause of neck pain is muscle strain or tension. Usually, ... Such activities include: Bending over a desk for hours Poor ...

21

Inactivation of p53 and amplification of cyclin D1 correlate with clinical outcome in head and neck cancer.  

PubMed

The authors have investigated whether genetic abnormalities in two genes, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of p53 and amplification of the cyclin D1 gene, correlate with clinical outcome in 56 matched pairs of blood and tumor from patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Frequency of p53 LOH was 47.4%, of cyclin D1 amplification 33.9%, and of both abnormalities together 23.7%. p53 LOH was associated with T4 (P = 0.003) and stage IV (P = 0.015) tumors. Cyclin D1 amplification was associated with recurrences and/or metachronous tumors (P = 0.007). The total number of p53 and cyclin D1 abnormalities (scored as zero, one, and two) show a pattern that seems to be additive; the increase in the number of these abnormalities is associated with a proportional increase in the frequency of T4, stage IV, presence of recurrences and/or metachronous tumors, and possibly a proportional decrease in the disease-free interval in the sample. The association of the markers with recurrences and/or metachronous tumors persists if the tumor stage effect is mathematically removed. The combined analysis of the p53 and cyclin D1 abnormalities seems to be more informative than either of them individually and may have predictive value in SCCHN. PMID:9504605

Nogueira, C P; Dolan, R W; Gooey, J; Byahatti, S; Vaughan, C W; Fuleihan, N S; Grillone, G; Baker, E; Domanowski, G

1998-03-01

22

The Activation Pattern of Blood Leukocytes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Is Correlated to Survival  

PubMed Central

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is known to cause substantial immunosuppression. The present study was designed to characterize blood leukocyte activation in HNSCC and to investigate if the individual activation pattern could be related to tumor progress and survival. The leukocyte activation profile of HNSCC patients and healthy controls was assessed with flow cytometry. HNSCC patients displayed increased numbers of monocytes, neutrophils and total leukocytes as well as an enhanced neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. In addition, patients had a higher percentage of CD69+, CD71+ and CD98+ T cell subsets and NK cells, and a reduced expression of L-selectin in CD14highCD16+ monocytes and neutrophils, when compared to controls. These changes could be correlated to both tumor burden and spread to lymph nodes. Among the cancer patients an increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, a low neutrophil and CD14high CD16+ monocyte activation state and an elevated CD4/CD8 ratio were related to poor survival. In contrast, a high percentage of CD98+ Th cells appeared to be associated with a better outcome. Taken together, the present data indicate that HNSCC causes activation of blood leukocytes and that the individual activation pattern can be linked to prognosis.

Millrud, Camilla Rydberg; Mansson Kvarnhammar, Anne; Uddman, Rolf; Bjornsson, Sven; Riesbeck, Kristian; Cardell, Lars Olaf

2012-01-01

23

Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Saito, Naoko [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Qureshi, Muhammad M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Ozonoff, Al [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Romesser, Paul B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-02-01

24

Pretreatment anemia is correlated with the reduced effectiveness of radiation and concurrent chemotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Pretreatment anemia is an adverse prognostic variable in squamous cell head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone. Tumor hypoxia is an adverse parameter for treatment with RT alone or with RT and concurrent chemotherapy (CCT). Tumor hypoxia is more prevalent in patients who present with pretreatment hemoglobin (Hgb) concentrations less than 13 g/dL. RT/CCT improves survival over RT alone in advanced HNC, and its use is becoming more widespread. This study was performed to evaluate whether pretreatment Hgb less than 13 g/dL was correlated with treatment outcome in patients with advanced HNC treated with a uniform regimen of RT/CCT. Methods and materials: The study population consisted of patients with AJCC Stage III or IV, M0 HNC who were treated with 70 to 72.5 Gy accelerated hyperfractionated RT (1.25 Gy b.i.d.) and CCT consisting of 2 cycles of CDDP (12-20 mg/m{sup 2}/d x 5 days) and continuous infusion 5-FU (600 mg/m{sup 2}/d x 5 days) during Week 1 and Week 6. A planned break in RT occurred during Week 4. These patients were enrolled on the experimental arm of a prospective randomized trial that compared this regimen to hyperfractionated irradiation alone from 1990 to 1996. RT/CCT was delivered as standard therapy from 1996 to 2000. The primary endpoint was failure-free survival (FFS). Secondary endpoints included local-regional control and overall survival. Results: One hundred and fifty-nine patients were treated from 1990 to 2000. The median (25-75%) pretreatment Hgb was 13.6 (12.2-13.5) g/dL. Hgb was 13 g/dL or higher in 105 patients and less than 13 g/dL in 54 patients. Primary tumor sites included oropharynx (43%), hypopharynx/larynx (36%), oral cavity (9%), and nasopharynx (6%). Seventy-eight percent of the patients with Hgb 13 g/dL or higher and 92% of the patients with Hgb less than 13 g/dL had a primary tumor stage of T3 or T4 (p = 0.01). Node-positive disease was present in 74 of 105 (70%) of patients with Hgb 13 g/dL or higher patients and in 36/54 (67%) of patients with Hgb less than 13 g/dL patients. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 42 months (range, 4-128 months). Five-year FFS was 75% for patients with Hgb 13 g/dL or higher vs. 50% for patients with Hgb less than 13 g/dL had a (p < 0.01). A total of 49 failures occurred in both patient cohorts. The median (25-75%) decrease in Hgb during RT/CCT was 2.2 (1.3-3.1) g/dL, both in patients who failed and in those who remained disease-free. Conclusion: Pretreatment Hgb less than 13 g/dL is correlated with adverse outcomes in advanced HNC patients treated with RT/CCT. Whether anemia actually causes poor outcomes remains unknown. The therapeutic effect of anemia correction is being evaluated in prospective trials.

Prosnitz, Robert G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)]. E-mail: robert.prosnitz@duke.edu; Yao, Bin M.S. [Amgen, Inc. Thousand Oaks, CA (United States); Farrell, Catherine L. [Amgen, Inc. Thousand Oaks, CA (United States); Clough, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Brizel, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2005-03-15

25

Vascular endothelial growth factor-A and Poly(A) binding protein-interacting protein 2 expression in human head and neck carcinomas: correlation and prognostic significance.  

PubMed

Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) has been demonstrated to play an important role in tumour angiogenesis and to influence prognosis in many cancers. However its prognostic value in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) remains controversial. Therefore, we investigated the clinical relevance of VEGF-A expression in HNSCCs and analysed whether its expression was associated with PAIP2 protein levels, a VEGF-A mRNA-binding partner that strongly regulates VEGF-A expression in tissue culture. We determined the correlation of VEGF-A and PAIP2 protein levels, quantitatively evaluated in tumour tissue homogenates from 54 patients with HNSCC, to clinicopathological parameters. We showed that VEGF-A expression in HNSCC is correlated to the stage of tumour differentiation (P=0.050) and is an independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival (P=0.001) and overall survival (P=0.0004). In a pharynx carcinoma cell line, we demonstrated by RNA interference that VEGF-A expression is closely controlled by PAIP2. Moreover, in human HNSCCs, VEGF-A expression is significantly correlated to PAIP2 protein levels (P=0.0018). Nevertheless, PAIP2 expression is associated with neither clinicopathological factors nor patient's survival. Our data suggest that, in contrast to PAIP2 protein levels, which are unrelated to tumour prognosis, VEGF-A expression could serve as a prognostic marker in head and neck cancer and may be helpful for targeted therapies. PMID:16641910

Onesto, C; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; Chamorey, E; Formento, J-L; Ramaioli, A; Pagès, G

2006-05-22

26

The lack of correlation between proliferation (Ki-67, PCNA, LI, Tpot), p53 expression and radiosensitivity for head and neck cancers  

PubMed Central

A study was made of the relationship between measurements of radiosensitivity versus proliferation and p53 status in head and neck cancers. Inherent tumour radiosensitivity was assessed as surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) using a clonogenic soft agar assay (n = 77). The results were compared to data on proliferation obtained by both flow cytometry (labelling index (LI), the potential doubling time (Tpot) n = 55) and immunohistochemistry (Ki-67 and PCNA; n = 68), together with immunohistochemical p53 expression (n = 68). There were no overall significant differences in the median values of the various parameters analysed for the different sites within the head and neck region, disease stages, grades of tumour differentiation or nodal states. A subgroup analysis showed that oropharyngeal (n = 22) versus oral cavity (n = 35) tumours were more radiosensitive (P = 0.056) and had a higher Ki-67 index (P = 0.001). Node-positive tumours had higher LI (P = 0.021) and a trend towards lower Tpot (P = 0.067) values than node-negative ones. No correlations were seen between SF2 and any of the parameters studied. The long-standing dogma of an increased radiosensitivity of rapidly proliferating cells in contrast to slowly proliferating cells was not confirmed. The study shows that parallel measurements of different biological markers can be obtained for a large number of patients with head and neck cancers. The independence of the various parameters studied suggests that there may be potential for their combined use as prognostic factors for the outcome of radiotherapy. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign

Bjork-Eriksson, T; West, C M L; Cvetskovska, E; Svensson, M; Karlsson, E; Magnusson, B; Slevin, N J; Edstrom, S; Mercke, C

1999-01-01

27

Fitness, motor competence and body composition as correlates of adolescent neck/shoulder pain: an exploratory cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Adolescent neck/shoulder pain (NSP) is a common and sometimes debilitating problem. Several risk factors for this condition have been investigated, but no studies have previously evaluated associations between fitness, motor competence, body composition and adolescent NSP. Methods 1608 males and females of mean age 14 years answered questions on their history of NSP (4 measures), and were tested for aerobic fitness, upper and lower limb power, trunk endurance, grip strength, shoulder flexibility, motor competence and anthropometric factors. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to test for associations between NSP and physical variables. Results There were significant gender differences for most physical and pain variables. After multivariate analysis, males had lower odds of NSP if they had reduced back endurance [OR: 0.66 (95% CI: 0.46–0.97)], reduced persistent control [0.42 (0.19–0.95], and increased muscle power [0.33 (0.12–0.94)], and higher odds of NSP if they had a higher basketball throw [2.47 (1.22–5.00)] and jump performance [3.47 (1.55–7.74)]. Females had lower odds for NSP if they had a reduced jump performance [0.61(0.41–0.92)], a better basketball throw [0.60(0.40–0.90)], lower shoulder flexibility [0.54 (0.30–0.98)] and a higher aerobic capacity [0.61 (0.40–0.93)], and higher odds for NSP if they had greater abdominal endurance [1.57(1.07–2.31)] and greater bimanual dexterity [1.77(1.18–2.65)]. Females showed a U shaped relationship between NSP and back endurance [low: 2.12 (1.20–3.74); high 2.12 (1.18–3.83)]. Conclusion Adolescent NSP was associated with fitness and motor competence, although the associations varied with gender, and their strength was limited.

Perry, Mark C; Straker, Leon M; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Smith, Anne J; Hands, Beth

2008-01-01

28

Cell-cycle Distribution and Thymidilate Synthatase (TS) Expression Correlate With 5-FU Resistance in Head and Neck Carcinoma Cells.  

PubMed

Background: Acquired chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) remains one of the obstacles for the success of 5-FU-based cancer chemotherapy, and some molecular mechanisms of acquired 5-FU resistance are still unknown. The main action of 5-FU is the suppression of DNA replication by inhibiting Thymidylate Synthase (TS). Materials and Methods: We analyzed 5-FU resistance mechanisms using the head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, UM-SCC-23, and two different resistant cell lines, UM-SCC-23/WR and UM-SCC-23/MR, which were procured from UM-SCC-23 cells. To acquire resistantance, the two cells underwent repeated treatment of 5-FU with different durations and frequency. We determined differences in the cell-cycle distribution and the expression of TS proteins in the three cell lines. Moreover, cell-cycle distribution in cells wich acquired resistance after 5-FU treatment, was compared to that of parental cells, using flow cytometric analysis. Results: There was a remarkable increase in TS protein expression levels in UM-SCC-23/WR following 5-FU treatment. S-phase cells of UM-SCC-23 and UM-SCC-23/WR cells were immediately increased after treatment with 5-FU, whereas UM-SCC-23/MR were accumulated to the S-phase slightly later. Conclusion: The cell-cycle perturbation or elevation of TS protein expression may be involved in acquired 5-FU resistance and identifies 5-FU resistance mechanisms in the two different 5-FU treatment regimens. PMID:24922653

Ijichi, Kei; Adachi, Makoto; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Murakami, Shingo

2014-06-01

29

Detection of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with diffusion weighted MRI after (chemo)radiotherapy: Correlation between radiologic and histopathologic findings  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the value of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in differentiating persistent or recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) from nontumoral postradiotherapeutic alterations. Methods and Materials: In 26 patients with suspicion of persistent or recurrent HNSCC, MRI of the head and neck was performed, including routine turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences and an additional echo-planar DW-MRI sequence, using a large range of b-values (0-1000 s/mm{sup 2}). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated. In the suspect areas at the primary site and in the suspect lymph nodes, signal intensity was measured on the native b0 and b1000 images and ADC values were calculated for these tissues. The same was done for surrounding irradiated normal tissue. Imaging results were correlated to histopathology. Results: Signal intensity on native b0 images was significantly lower for HNSCC than for nontumoral postradiotherapeutic tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 66.2%, specificity of 60.8%, and accuracy of 62.4%. Signal intensity on native b1000 images was significantly higher for HNSCC than for nontumoral tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 71.6%, specificity of 71.3%, and accuracy of 71.4%. ADC values were significantly lower for HNSCC than for nontumoral tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 94.6%, specificity of 95.9%, and accuracy of 95.5%. When compared with computed tomography, TSE-MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography, DW-MRI yielded fewer false-positive results in persistent primary site abnormalities and in persistent adenopathies, and aided in the detection of subcentimetric nodal metastases. Conclusions: Diffusion weighted-MRI accurately differentiates persistent or recurrent HNSCC from nontumoral tissue changes after (chemo)radiotherapy.

Vandecaveye, Vincent [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Keyzer, Frederik de [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Nuyts, Sandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Deraedt, Karen [Department of Pathology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Dirix, Piet [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Hamaekers, Pascal [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Vander Poorten, Vincent [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Delaere, Pierre [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Hermans, Robert [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)]. E-mail: Robert.Hermans@uzleuven.be

2007-03-15

30

High level expression of AMAP1 protein correlates with poor prognosis and survival after surgery of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients  

PubMed Central

Background Despite recent advances in cancer therapeutics in general, the survival of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) has not improved substantially over the past few decades. HNSCC cells often exhibit invasive and metastatic phenotypes, and expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and cortactin has been highly implicated in the development of malignancy in HNSCCs. We have shown previously that an Arf6 pathway, in which Arf6 is activated by GEP100 and employs AMAP1 (also called DDEF1 or ASAP1) as its downstream effector, is pivotal for the invasion and metastasis of different breast cancer cells. This pathway is activated by receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGFR; and moreover, AMAP1 physically associates with cortactin, in which inhibition of this binding effectively blocks invasion and metastasis. We here investigated whether the expression of Arf6 pathway components correlates with the poor prognosis of HNSCC patients. We have shown previously that AMAP1 protein levels are not correlated with its mRNA levels, and hence we here employed immunohistochemical staining of HNSCC clinical specimens to investigate AMAP1 protein levels. Results We found that high levels of AMAP1 protein expression on its own, as well as its co-overexpression with EGFR statistically correlates with poor disease-free survival and poor overall survival, while high levels of cortactin expression or its co-expression with EGFR did not. Conclusion Our identification of predictive biomarkers, together with our previous findings on the coherent signaling pathway that these biomarkers ultimately generate should be powerful information for the further development of HNSCC therapeutics.

2014-01-01

31

Overview of Neck Pain  

MedlinePLUS

... and Back) > Overview of Neck Pain Overview of Neck Pain Page Content Developing a Program That's Right for ... or activity? What Kinds of Problems Might Cause Neck Pain? Treatment for any neck condition is recommended as ...

32

Correlation Between Pretreatment FDG-PET Biological Target Volume and Anatomical Location of Failure after Radiation Therapy for Head & Neck Cancers  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose: To assess whether the pretreatment FDG-PET defined biologic target volume (PET-BTV) correlates with the anatomical sites of loco-regional failure (LRF) after RT for head & neck cancer (HNC). Materials & Methods: We retrospectively identified 61 HNC patients treated definitively with either 3-D CRT or IMRT who had a pre-therapy PET/CT. The GTV and high risk CTV1 definitions included composite data obtained from diagnostic CT, PET/CT, physical examination, and MRI when available. The median CTV1 dose was 70Gy. 95% received chemotherapy. For patients with LRF, a recurrence volume (Vr) was identified and was mapped to the pretreatment planning CT and pretreatment PET scan. Results: At a median follow-up of 22 months, 15% (9/61) patients had LRF. For patients with a LRF, 100% (9/9) of failures were inside the GTV. One of nine [11% (95% CI: 3%-45%)] had Vr which mapped outside of the pretreatment PETBTV, while 8/9 patients had Vr within the PET-BTV. Predictors of LRF in our series included GTV volume (p=0.003), but not mean SUV (p=0.13) or max SUV (p=0.25). Conclusions: Following treatment in which the GTV was defined based on the composite of imaging and physica examination, the majority, but not all, LRF occurred within the PET-BTV. These results support an important, but not exclusive, role of FDG-PET in defining the GTV.

Soto, Daniel E.; Kessler, Marc L.; Piert, Morand; Eisbruch, Avraham

2009-01-01

33

Low-Level Expression of miR-375 Correlates with Poor Outcome and Metastasis While Altering the Invasive Properties of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas  

PubMed Central

Small, noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be abnormally expressed in every tumor type examined. We used comparisons of global miRNA expression profiles of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) samples and adjacent normal tissue to rank those miRNAs that were most significantly altered in our patient population. Rank Consistency Score analysis revealed miR-375 to have the most significantly lowered miRNA levels in tumors relative to matched adjacent nonmalignant tissue from the same patient among 736 miRNAs that were evaluated. This result has been previously observed by other groups; however, we extend this finding with the unique observation that low miR-375 expression levels correlate significantly with cancer survival and distant metastasis. In a study of 123 primary HNSCC patients using multivariable Cox proportional hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), both death from disease (HR: 12.8, 95% CI: 3 to 49) and incidence of distant metastasis (HR: 8.7, 95% CI: 2 to 31) correlated with lower expression levels of miR-375 regardless of the site or stage of the tumor. In addition, we found that oral cavity tumor cell lines (eg, UMSCC1 and UMSCC47) overexpressing miR-375 were significantly less invasive in vitro than their matched empty vector controls. We conclude that miR-375 represents a potential prognostic marker of poor outcome and metastasis in HNSCC and that it may function by suppressing the tumor's invasive properties.

Harris, Thomas; Jimenez, Lizandra; Kawachi, Nicole; Fan, Jian-Bing; Chen, Jing; Belbin, Tom; Ramnauth, Andrew; Loudig, Olivier; Keller, Christian E.; Smith, Richard; Prystowsky, Michael B.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Segall, Jeffrey E.; Childs, Geoffrey

2012-01-01

34

Low-level expression of miR-375 correlates with poor outcome and metastasis while altering the invasive properties of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.  

PubMed

Small, noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be abnormally expressed in every tumor type examined. We used comparisons of global miRNA expression profiles of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) samples and adjacent normal tissue to rank those miRNAs that were most significantly altered in our patient population. Rank Consistency Score analysis revealed miR-375 to have the most significantly lowered miRNA levels in tumors relative to matched adjacent nonmalignant tissue from the same patient among 736 miRNAs that were evaluated. This result has been previously observed by other groups; however, we extend this finding with the unique observation that low miR-375 expression levels correlate significantly with cancer survival and distant metastasis. In a study of 123 primary HNSCC patients using multivariable Cox proportional hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), both death from disease (HR: 12.8, 95% CI: 3 to 49) and incidence of distant metastasis (HR: 8.7, 95% CI: 2 to 31) correlated with lower expression levels of miR-375 regardless of the site or stage of the tumor. In addition, we found that oral cavity tumor cell lines (eg, UMSCC1 and UMSCC47) overexpressing miR-375 were significantly less invasive in vitro than their matched empty vector controls. We conclude that miR-375 represents a potential prognostic marker of poor outcome and metastasis in HNSCC and that it may function by suppressing the tumor's invasive properties. PMID:22234174

Harris, Thomas; Jimenez, Lizandra; Kawachi, Nicole; Fan, Jian-Bing; Chen, Jing; Belbin, Tom; Ramnauth, Andrew; Loudig, Olivier; Keller, Christian E; Smith, Richard; Prystowsky, Michael B; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Segall, Jeffrey E; Childs, Geoffrey

2012-03-01

35

Nuclear NF-?B Expression Correlates With Outcome Among Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Primary Chemoradiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Background: To examine whether nuclear NF-?B expression correlates with outcome in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 101 patients with locally advanced primary HNSCC were treated with definitive simultaneous CRT. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were analyzed for NF-?B p65 (RelA) nuclear immunoreactivity. A sample was assigned to be positive with more than 5% positive nuclear expression. The predictive relevance of NF-?B and clinicopathologic factors for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to age, sex, total radiation dose, fractionation mode, total chemotherapy applied, T stage or grading. Patients with p65 nuclear positive biopsy specimens showed significantly a higher rate of lymph node metastasis (cN2c or cN3 status, P=.034). Within a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range, 2.33-62.96 months) OS, PFS, and DMFS were significantly poorer in the p65 nuclear positive group (P=.008, P=.027, and P=.008, respectively). These correlations remained significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: NF-?B/p65 nuclear expression is associated with increased lymphatic and hematogenous tumor dissemination and decreased survival in HNSCC patients treated with primary CRT. Our results may foster further investigation of a predictive relevance of NF-?B/p65 and its role as a suitable target for a molecular-based targeted therapy in HNSCC cancer.

Balermpas, Panagiotis [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Michel, Yvonne [Senckenberg Institute of Pathology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Senckenberg Institute of Pathology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Sipek, Florian; Rödel, Franz; Rödel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Fokas, Emmanouil, E-mail: emmanouil.fokas@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)

2013-07-15

36

ENHANCED RESPONSE OF HUMAN HEAD AND NECK CANCER XENOGRAFT TUMORS TO CISPLATIN COMBINED WITH 2-DEOXY-D-GLUCOSE CORRELATES WITH INCREASED 18F-FDG UPTAKE AS DETERMINED BY PET IMAGING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To determine whether the response of human head and neck cancer xenografts to cisplatin (CIS) could be enhanced with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG); whether 2-(18F)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake correlated with responses to this drug combination; and whether 2DG would enhance CIS-induced radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival responses to CIS + 2DG were determined in FaDu and Cal-27 cells and reduced\\/oxidized glutathione

ANDREAN L. SIMONS; MELISSA A. FATH; DAVID M. MATTSON; BRIAN J. SMITH; SUSAN A. WALSH; MICHAEL M. GRAHAM; RICHARD D. HICHWA; JOHN M. BUATTI; KEN DORNFELD; DOUGLAS R. SPITZ

37

Detection of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with diffusion weighted MRI after (chemo)radiotherapy: Correlation between radiologic and histopathologic findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To investigate the value of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in differentiating persistent or recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) from nontumoral postradiotherapeutic alterations. Methods and Materials: In 26 patients with suspicion of persistent or recurrent HNSCC, MRI of the head and neck was performed, including routine turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences and an additional echo-planar DW-MRI

Vincent Vandecaveye; Frederik De Keyzer; Sandra Nuyts; Karen Deraedt; Piet Dirix; Pascal Hamaekers; Vincent Vander Poorten; Pierre Delaere; Robert. Hermans

2007-01-01

38

Downregulation of SMG-1 in HPV-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma due to promoter hypermethylation correlates with improved survival  

PubMed Central

Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV) is linked with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). HPV-positive HNSCCs show a better prognosis than HPV-negative HNSCCs, which may be explained by sensitivity of the HPV-positive HNSCCs to ionizing radiation (IR). Although the molecular mechanism behind sensitivity to IR in HPV-positive HNSCC is unresolved, DNA damage response (DDR) might be a significant determinant of IR sensitivity. An important player in the DDR, SMG-1 (suppressor with morphogenetic effect on genitalia) is a potential tumor suppressor and may therefore be deregulated in cancer. No studies have yet been conducted linking defects in SMG-1 expression with cancer. We investigated whether deregulation of SMG-1 could be responsible for defects in the DDR in oropharyngeal HNSCC. Experimental Design Expression and promoter methylation status of SMG-1 were investigated in HNSCCs. To identify a functional link between HPV infection and SMG-1, we transfected the HPV-negative cells with an E6/E7 expression construct. SMG-1 shRNAs were expressed in HPV-negative cells to estimate survival upon IR. Results Forced E6/E7 expression in HPV-negative cells resulted in SMG-1 promoter hypermethylation and decreased SMG-1 expression. Due to promoter hypermethylation HPV-positive HNSCC cells and tumors express SMG-1 at lower levels than HPV-negative SCCs. Depletion of SMG-1 in HPV-negative HNSCC cells resulted in increased radiation sensitivity, while SMG-1 overexpression protected HPV-positive tumor cells from irradiation. Conclusions Levels of SMG-1 expression negatively correlated with HPV status in cancer cell lines and tumors. Diminished SMG-1 expression may contribute to the enhanced response to therapy exhibited by HPV- positive HNSCCs.

Gubanova, Evgenia; Brown, Brandee; Ivanov, Sergei V.; Helleday, Thomas; Mills, Gordon B; Yarbrough, Wendell G.; Issaeva, Natalia

2014-01-01

39

Hamartomas, teratomas and teratocarcinosarcomas of the head and neck: Report of 3 new cases with clinico-pathologic correlation, cytogenetic analysis, and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Background Germ-cell tumors (GCT) are a histologically and biologically diverse group of neoplasms which primarily occur in the gonads but also develop at different extragonadal sites in the midline of the body. The head and neck region including the upper respiratory tract is a very rare location for such tumors in both children and adults, which can cause diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. Methods We describe here two new cases of multilineage tumors including sinonasal teratocarcinosarcoma [SNTCS], and congenital oronasopharyngeal teratoma (epignathus) and compare their features with those of a new case of a rare salivary gland anlage tumor [SGAT], an entity for which the pathogenesis is unclear (i.e. hamartoma versus neoplasm). We correlate their presenting clinico-pathological features and compare histologic and cytogenetic features in an attempt to elucidate their pathogenesis and biologic potentials. Results and discussion Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal abnormalities only in the case of SNTCS that showed trisomy 12 and 1p deletion. Both cytogenetic abnormalities are characteristically present in malignant germ cell tumors providing for the first time evidence that this rare tumor type indeed might represent a variant of a germ cell neoplasm. The SGAT and epignathus carried no such cytogenetic abnormalities, in keeping with their limited and benign biologic potential. Conclusion The comparison of these three cases should serve to emphasize the diversity of multilineage tumors (hamartomas and GCT) of the upper respiratory tract in regards to their biology, age of presentation and clinical outcomes. Malignant tumors of germ cell origins are more likely to affect adults with insidious symptom development, while benign tumors can nevertheless cause dramatic clinical symptoms which, under certain circumstances, can be fatal.

Vranic, Semir; Caughron, Samuel K; Djuricic, Slavisa; Bilalovic, Nurija; Zaman, Sadiq; Suljevic, Ismet; Lydiatt, William M; Emanuel, Jane; Gatalica, Zoran

2008-01-01

40

Neck Injuries and Disorders  

MedlinePLUS

... tendons, ligaments, or nerves - can cause neck problems. Neck pain is very common. Pain may also come from ... upper arms. Muscle strain or tension often causes neck pain. The problem is usually overuse, such as from ...

41

Socio-demographic correlates of betel, areca and smokeless tobacco use as a high risk behavior for head and neck cancers in a squatter settlement of Karachi, Pakistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Head and neck cancers are a major cancer burden in Pakistan. They share a common risk factor profile including regular consumption of products of betel, areca and tobacco. Use of paan, chaalia, gutka, niswar and tumbaku is acceptable in Pakistan and is considered a normal cultural practice. This cross-sectional study was carried out to understand the relation of socio-demographic

Samia Mazahir; Rabia Malik; Maria Maqsood; Kanwal AliRaza Merchant; Farida Malik; Atif Majeed; Zafar Fatmi; Muhammad Rizwanulhaq Khawaja; Shehzad Ghaffar

2006-01-01

42

Neck curve polynomials in neck rupture model  

SciTech Connect

The Neck Rupture Model is a model that explains the scission process which has smallest radius in liquid drop at certain position. Old fashion of rupture position is determined randomly so that has been called as Random Neck Rupture Model (RNRM). The neck curve polynomials have been employed in the Neck Rupture Model for calculation the fission yield of neutron induced fission reaction of {sup 280}X{sub 90} with changing of order of polynomials as well as temperature. The neck curve polynomials approximation shows the important effects in shaping of fission yield curve.

Kurniadi, Rizal; Perkasa, Yudha S.; Waris, Abdul [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06

43

SITE OF DISEASE AND TREATMENT PROTOCOL AS CORRELATES OF SWALLOWING FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCER TREATED WITH CHEMORADIATION  

PubMed Central

Background The relationship between type of chemoradiation treatment, site of disease, and swallowing function has not been sufficiently examined in patients with head and neck cancer treated primarily with chemoradiation. Methods Fifty-three patients with advanced-stage head and neck cancer were evaluated before and 3 months after chemoradiation treatment to define their swallowing disorders and characterize their swallowing physiology by site of lesion and chemoradiation protocol. One hundred forty normal subjects were also studied. Results The most common disorders at baseline and 3 months after treatment were reduced tongue base retraction, reduced tongue strength, and slowed or delayed laryngeal vestibule closure. Frequency of functional swallow did not differ significantly across disease sites after treatment, although frequency of disorders was different at various sites of lesion. The effects of the chemotherapy protocols were small. Conclusions The site of the lesion affects the frequency of occurrence of specific swallow disorders, whereas chemoradiation protocols have minimal effect on oropharyngeal swallow function.

Rademaker, Alfred W.; Pauloski, Barbara Roa; Lazarus, Cathy L.; Mittal, Bharat B.; Brockstein, Bruce; MacCracken, Ellen; Haraf, Daniel J.; Vokes, Everett E.; Newman, Lisa A.; Liu, Dachao

2006-01-01

44

Correlation of Nuclear Morphometry and AgNOR Score with Radiation Response in Squamous Cell Cancers of the Head and Neck: A Preliminary Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Prediction of radiation response before the completion of the radiotherapy schedule is challenging. Information about radiation response could help oncologist to choose the appropriate combination and sequence of therapies in the multidisciplinary management of cancer. Methods: The study involved 26 patients with squamous cell cancers of the head and neck region who received radiotherapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions over a 2-week period as part of a split-course technique. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was performed on day 1 and day 5 of the schedule. The silver staining of the nuclear organiser region (AgNOR) and nuclear morphometric study were done on both days. Results: The median age of the patients was 44 years old. The primary tumours were distributed in the nasopharynx (n = 11), larynx and hypopharynx (n = 5), metastatic node (n = 4), and miscellaneous tumours were found in the head and neck sub sites (n = 6). The mean initial AgNOR score was 3.0, range 1.2–7.0. The median of nuclear and nucleolar diameters were 11.07 ?m, range 7.70–16.6 ?m, and 2.92 ?m, range 1.09–11.66 ?m, respectively. Patients with a pre-radiotherapy AgNOR score of greater than 2.5 were associated with disease progression and metastasis. However, the increased of nuclear diameter on day 5 compared with baseline predicted a good radiation response in patients (P = 0.016). Conclusion: Intra-radiotherapy nuclear morphometry combined with baseline AgNOR score could be a simple and useful tool for the prediction of radiation response in head and neck cancers.

Biswal, Biswa Mohan; Othman, Nor Hayati

2010-01-01

45

Enhanced Response of Human Head and Neck Cancer Xenograft Tumors to Cisplatin Combined With 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Correlates With Increased {sup 18}F-FDG Uptake as Determined by PET Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether the response of human head and neck cancer xenografts to cisplatin (CIS) could be enhanced with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG); whether 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake correlated with responses to this drug combination; and whether 2DG would enhance CIS-induced radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival responses to CIS + 2DG were determined in FaDu and Cal-27 cells and reduced/oxidized glutathione levels were monitored as parameters indicative of oxidative stress. The efficacy of CIS + 2DG was determined in FaDu and Cal-27 xenografts, and FDG uptake was determined by using positron emission tomography. Results: Use of CIS + 2DG enhanced cell killing of FaDu and Cal-27 cells compared with either drug alone while increasing the percentage of oxidized glutathione in vitro. Use of CIS + 2DG inhibited FaDu and Cal-27 tumor growth and increased disease-free survival compared with either drug alone. The Cal-27 tumors showed greater pretreatment FDG uptake and increased disease-free survival when treated with 2DG + CIS relative to FaDu tumors. Treatment with 2DG enhanced CIS-induced radiosensitization in FaDu tumor cells grown in vitro and in vivo and resulted in apparent cures in 50% of tumors. Conclusions: These results show the enhanced therapeutic efficacy of CIS + 2DG in human head and neck cancer cells in vitro and in vivo compared with either drug alone, as well as the potential for FDG uptake to predict tumor sensitivity to 2DG + CIS. These findings provide a strong rationale for evaluating 2DG + CIS in combined-modality head and neck cancer therapy with radiation in a clinical setting.

Simons, Andrean L.; Fath, Melissa A.; Mattson, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Smith, Brian J. [Department of Biostatistics, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Walsh, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Graham, Michael M.; Hichwa, Richard D. [Department of Radiology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Buatti, John M.; Dornfeld, Ken [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Spitz, Douglas R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)], E-mail: douglas-spitz@uiowa.edu

2007-11-15

46

Is there a correlation between 18F-FDG-PET standardized uptake value, T-classification, histological grading and the anatomic subsites in newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck?  

PubMed

(18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET)/CT imaging of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) renders the possibility to study metabolic tumor activity by measuring FDG-uptake expressed as maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)). A correlation between SUV(max) and several factors including T-classification, histological tumor differentiation or different anatomic subsites is of potential interest in HNSCC. The aim of this study was to evaluate how metabolic tumor activity derived from FDG-PET correlates with prognostic clinical and pathological parameters including these factors. 262 patients with HNSCC undergoing PET/CT for initial staging were assessed separately for a potential correlation between SUV(max) and T-classification, histological grading, and anatomical subsites of the primary tumor. Nonparametric testing showed a significant correlation between SUV(max) and T-classification (P < 0.001). On the contrary, no statistically significant correlation was found between SUV(max) and histological tumor grading. Furthermore, no statistical significant correlation between the different anatomical subsites and SUV(max) were found. There was no significant correlation of SUV(max) and tumor grading after adjustment for T-stage and anatomical localization of the tumor, neither. Conclusion: Metabolic tumor activity correlates with T-stage of HNSCC. However, histological tumor grading does not correlate with SUV(max). The role of primary tumor SUV(max) as a predictor of outcome or survival remains unclear. Clinicians should therefore exercise caution in attributing any clinical importance to SUV(max) obtained from a single PET/CT exam. PMID:20680640

Haerle, Stephan K; Huber, G F; Hany, T F; Ahmad, N; Schmid, D T

2010-10-01

47

Head and Neck Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the neck. Most begin in the moist tissues that line the mouth, nose and throat. Symptoms include A lump or sore that ...

48

Correlation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This chapter will discuss the concept of correlation , which is used in later chapters that will explain the concepts of validity and reliability. Here, the authors introduce the Pearson correlation coefficient, a statistic that is used with ratio

Christmann, Edwin P.; Badgett, John L.

2008-11-01

49

Neck flexion related activity of flight control muscles in the flow-stimulated pigeon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pigeons blown upon from in front were subjected to trapezoidal or stepped laterad neck flexions. The left-right response pattern of wing and tail muscles was regularly correlated with the direction of static neck flexion (Fig. 2). There was no difference whether the head or the body was deflected. In stepped neck flexions, the correlation between muscle activity and stimulus going

Dietrich Bilo; Angela Bilo

1983-01-01

50

Socio-demographic correlates of betel, areca and smokeless tobacco use as a high risk behavior for head and neck cancers in a squatter settlement of Karachi, Pakistan  

PubMed Central

Background Head and neck cancers are a major cancer burden in Pakistan. They share a common risk factor profile including regular consumption of products of betel, areca and tobacco. Use of paan, chaalia, gutka, niswar and tumbaku is acceptable in Pakistan and is considered a normal cultural practice. This cross-sectional study was carried out to understand the relation of socio-demographic factors for the consumption of paan, chaalia, gutka, niswar and tumbaku in Pakistani population. Through systematic sampling, 425 subjects from a squatter settlement in Karachi were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. High risk behavior was defined as Daily use of any of the above products. Results Daily use of all the substances except chaalia was higher among males compared to females. Chaalia use was higher among adolescents than adults while non-married consumed both chaalia and gutka more than married. Mohajir ethnicity had higher prevalence of paan, gutka and tumbaku use while Pathans had higher prevalence of niswar use. Conclusion Prevalence of use of chewable products is high in Pakistan with particularly high use of certain substances related with socio-demographic profiles. Industrially prepared products, chaalia and gutka, are gaining popularity among youth. Policies and focused interventions can be developed taking into consideration the preferred use of products among different socio-demographic groups.

Mazahir, Samia; Malik, Rabia; Maqsood, Maria; Merchant, Kanwal AliRaza; Malik, Farida; Majeed, Atif; Fatmi, Zafar; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwanulhaq; Ghaffar, Shehzad

2006-01-01

51

Correlational Analysis of neck/shoulder Pain and Low Back Pain with the Use of Digital Products, Physical Activity and Psychological Status among Adolescents in Shanghai  

PubMed Central

Purpose This study investigates the neck/shoulder pain (NSP) and low back pain (LBP) among current high school students in Shanghai and explores the relationship between these pains and their possible influences, including digital products, physical activity, and psychological status. Methods An anonymous self-assessment was administered to 3,600 students across 30 high schools in Shanghai. This questionnaire examined the prevalence of NSP and LBP and the level of physical activity as well as the use of mobile phones, personal computers (PC) and tablet computers (Tablet). The CES-D (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression) scale was also included in the survey. The survey data were analyzed using the chi-square test, univariate logistic analyses and a multivariate logistic regression model. Results Three thousand sixteen valid questionnaires were received including 1,460 (48.41%) from male respondents and 1,556 (51.59%) from female respondents. The high school students in this study showed NSP and LBP rates of 40.8% and 33.1%, respectively, and the prevalence of both influenced by the student’s grade, use of digital products, and mental status; these factors affected the rates of NSP and LBP to varying degrees. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that Gender, grade, soreness after exercise, PC using habits, tablet use, sitting time after school and academic stress entered the final model of NSP, while the final model of LBP consisted of gender, grade, soreness after exercise, PC using habits, mobile phone use, sitting time after school, academic stress and CES-D score. Conclusions High school students in Shanghai showed high prevalence of NSP and LBP that were closely related to multiple factors. Appropriate interventions should be implemented to reduce the occurrences of NSP and LBP.

Li, Jipeng; Li, Yangyang; Zhang, Yongxing; Zhao, Qinghua

2013-01-01

52

Neck skin rejuvenation.  

PubMed

The author of this article uses the pulsed ablative CO2 laser for resurfacing of the neck and face, based on the gold standard status of the CO2 laser and a novel post-treatment plan that greatly reduces adverse effects traditionally associated with fully ablative resurfacing. The croton oil peel is an inexpensive and effective modality for rejuvenating neck skin. The use of either technique as an adjunct to neck lift surgery, with or without facelift surgery, permits surgeons to fulfill the expectations of patients who want the skin of their face and neck to be homogeneous and more attractive. PMID:24745383

Duplechain, J Kevin

2014-05-01

53

Respiratory weakness in patients with chronic neck pain.  

PubMed

Respiratory muscle strength is one parameter that is currently proposed to be affected in patients with chronic neck pain. This study was aimed at examining whether patients with chronic neck pain have reduced respiratory strength and with which neck pain problems their respiratory strength is associated. In this controlled cross-sectional study, 45 patients with chronic neck pain and 45 healthy well-matched controls were recruited. Respiratory muscle strength was assessed through maximal mouth pressures. The subjects were additionally assessed for their pain intensity and disability, neck muscle strength, endurance of deep neck flexors, neck range of movement, forward head posture and psychological states. Paired t-tests showed that patients with chronic neck pain have reduced Maximal Inspiratory (MIP) (r = 0.35) and Maximal Expiratory Pressures (MEP) (r = 0.39) (P < 0.05). Neck muscle strength (r > 0.5), kinesiophobia (r < -0.3) and catastrophizing (r < -0.3) were significantly associated with maximal mouth pressures (P < 0.05), whereas MEP was additionally negatively correlated with neck pain and disability (r < -0.3, P < 0.05). Neck muscle strength was the only predictor that remained as significant into the prediction models of MIP and MEP. It can be concluded that patients with chronic neck pain present weakness of their respiratory muscles. This weakness seems to be a result of the impaired global and local muscle system of neck pain patients, and psychological states also appear to have an additional contribution. Clinicians are advised to consider the respiratory system of patients with chronic neck pain during their usual assessment and appropriately address their treatment. PMID:23199797

Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Kapreli, Eleni; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Oldham, Jacqueline

2013-06-01

54

NECK AND SHOULDER PAIN  

PubMed Central

Neck and shoulder pains are presenting or incidental symptoms in a large variety of conditions. There may be similarities in the anatomicophysiological mechanism of pain production and in the clinical picture in many of these conditions. Many of the vague and refractory cases of neck and shoulder pain and of migraine may be due to cervical disc disease. Scalenus anticus syndrome and cardiac disease can be diagnosed or differentiated from cervical disc syndrome only by thorough investigation. Proper treatment of neck and shoulder pain is dependent upon correct diagnosis through complete history, physical examination and laboratory tests, as described in this presentation.

Fields, Albert; Hoesley, John

1949-01-01

55

Melanoma - neck (image)  

MedlinePLUS

This melanoma on the neck is variously colored with a very darkly pigmented area found centrally. It has irregular ... be larger than 0.5 cm. Prognosis in melanoma is best defined by its depth on resection.

56

Head and Neck Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... the throat meets the back of the nasal cavity. Unlike other head and neck cancers, this one ... a lot of fermented foods. Sinuses and nasal cavity. About three-quarters of cancers found in the ...

57

Head and Neck Cancers  

MedlinePLUS

... image of head and neck cancer regions. Oral cavity : Includes the lips, the front two-thirds of ... entering the air passages. Paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity : The paranasal sinuses are small hollow spaces in ...

58

[Lymphorrhea after neck dissection].  

PubMed

In this publication lymphorrhea was described as one of possible complications after the neck dissection surgery of Crile-Jawdy?ski procedurae. The matter of this complication is rise of pressure in lymph system. 4 women with this complication after neck dissection, the best treatment is drainage of the operated area. In one patient, because of the failure of conservative treatment, another surgical intervention was preformed. The full treatment of lymphorrhea was after 4-6 weeks. PMID:10481496

Nowaczyk, M T

1999-01-01

59

Femoral Neck Fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Fractures around the hip joint result from violent force such as high-energy trauma or less frequently in association with\\u000a pathological conditions [1]. Femoral neck fracture as an atypical presentation of child abuse has also been presented recently\\u000a [2]. The overall incidence of femoral neck fractures in children is less than 1% [3]. They occur in children of all ages,\\u000a but

Peter W. Engelhardt

60

Where is the neck?  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose The alpha angle is the most used measurement to classify concavity of the femoral head-neck junction. It is not only used for treatment decisions for hip impingement, but also in cohort studies relating hip morphology and osteoarthritis. Alpha angle measurement requires identification of the femoral neck axis, the definition of which may vary between studies. The original “3-point method” uses 1 single point to construct the femoral neck axis, whereas the “anatomic method” uses multiple points and attempts to define the true anatomic neck axis. Depending on the method used, the alpha angle may or may not account for other morphological characteristics such as head-neck offset. Methods We compared 2 methods of alpha angle measurement (termed “anatomic” and “3-point”) in 59 cadaver femora and 83 cross-table lateral radiographs of asymptomatic subjects. Results were compared using Bland-Altman plots. Results Discrepancies of up to 13 degrees were seen between the methods. The 3-point method had an “equalizing effect” by disregarding femoral head position relative to the neck: in femora with high alpha angle, it resulted in lower values than anatomic measurement, and vice versa in femora with low alpha angles. Using the anatomic method, we derived a reference interval for the alpha angle in normal hips in the general population of 30–66 degrees. Interpretation We recommend the anatomic method because it also reflects the position of the femoral head on the neck. Consensus and standardization of technique of alpha angle measurement is warranted, not only for planar measurements but also for CT or MRI-based measurements.

2014-01-01

61

CD45RA-Foxp3high but not CD45RA+Foxp3low suppressive T regulatory cells increased in the peripheral circulation of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and correlated with tumor progression  

PubMed Central

Background T regulatory cells (Tregs) contribute to the progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) by suppressing antitumor immunity. However, little is known regarding the functional heterogeneity of Tregs in HNSCC patients. Methods Using multicolor flow cytometry, the frequency of three Treg subsets, separated on the basis of CD45RA and Foxp3, from the peripheral circulation of newly-presenting HNSCC patients (19 oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, 20 hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, 18 nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, 19 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, and 36 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma) were assessed with regard to 31 healthy donors and clinicopathological features. Moreover, the functional capacity of each Treg subsets was evaluated based on CD45RA and CD25 expression. Results The frequency of Tregs in the peripheral circulation of HNSCC patients as a whole cohort was higher than in healthy donors (P correlate with tumor stage (P correlate with tumor stage and nodal status; suggesting a role in tumor progression which may be manipulated by future immunotherapy.

2014-01-01

62

Head and neck leiomyosarcoma.  

PubMed

Soft tissue sarcomas of head and neck region, account for 4-15% of all soft tissue sarcomas and less than 1% of all neoplasms in this region. Leiomyosarcoma is malignant tumor of smooth muscle which accounts for only 4% of head and neck sarcomas. The tumor is commonly encountered as a slow growing, discrete firm, and non-ulcerated painless mass. The physical appearance of these tumors can be deceptively benign and can be mistaken for non-malignant conditions. An early diagnosis and aggressive initial treatment remains the mainstay of therapy for a good prognosis. We are presenting eight cases of primary leiomyosarcoma of head and neck region with review of literature and highlight the need for early prudent diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24427607

Yadav, Jagveer; Bakshi, Jaimanti; Chouhan, Mahendra; Modi, Rahul

2013-07-01

63

Neck pain and disability due to neck pain: what is the relation?  

PubMed Central

Pain and disability are interrelated, but the relationship between pain and disability is not straightforward. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between neck pain (NP) intensity, NP duration, and disability based on the population-based ‘Funen Neck and Chest Pain’ study. Pain intensity was measured using 11-box numerical rating scales, pain duration was measured using the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire, and disability was measured by the Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale. Spearman rank correlation coefficients and logistic regression analyses were used to measure correlations and strength of associations between pain intensity, pain duration, and disability given domain specific characteristics (socioeconomic, health and physical, comorbidity, and variables related to consequences of NP). Neck pain was very common, but mainly mild and did not result in major disability. The correlations between NP intensity and disability were moderate but strongly associated, whereas weaker correlations and almost no associations were found between NP duration and disability. Pain duration is a poor indicator of disability. Given these variations, pain intensity and disability should be considered as two distinct dimensions and measured separately. These results have implications for future clinical and epidemiological studies.

Hartvigsen, Jan

2007-01-01

64

Head and Neck Melanoma  

PubMed Central

The incidence of malignant melanoma appears to be increasing at an alarming rate throughout the world over the past 30–40 years and continues to increase in the United States, Canada, Australia, Asia, and Europe. The behavior of head and neck melanoma is aggressive, and it has an overall poorer prognosis than that of other skin sites. The authors review the published literature and text books, intending to give an overall picture of malignant melanomas of the head and neck and a special emphasis on treatment considerations with controversies in treatment including biopsy, radiation therapy, sentinel node biopsy, and nodal dissection.

Shashanka, R.; Smitha, B. R.

2012-01-01

65

Robotic approaches to the neck.  

PubMed

This article introduces and evaluates the feasibility of robot-assisted neck dissection as well as robot-assisted neck surgery via a modified facelift or retroauricular approach. Robot-assisted neck surgery is feasible compared with conventional techniques and shows a clear cosmetic benefit. PMID:24882801

Koh, Yoon Woo; Choi, Eun Chang

2014-06-01

66

Neck circumference as a measure of neck fat and abdominal visceral fat in Chinese adults  

PubMed Central

Background Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is a unique pathogenic fatty deposit, in that it is closely correlated with risk of cardiovascular diseases. The present study is to investigate the usefulness of neck circumference (NC) to indicate VAT. Methods Participants aged 35 to 75 years who had taken abdomen and neck computer tomography (CT) examination were included in this study. Neck adipose tissue, abdominal VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) areas, as well as sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) were measured by CT. Body anthropometrics and metabolic parameters including blood glucose, lipid profiles and blood pressure were also measured. Results A lower abdomen CT examination was carried out on a total of 177 patients (87 male and 90 female) with a mean age of 59 years. Of the 177 participants, 15 men and 15 women also took a neck CT examination. With a comparable age and BMI, neck adipose area was correlated with abdominal VAT area significantly in men (r?=?0.57, p?=?0.028) and women (r?=?0.53, p?=?0.041). NC is positively correlated with VAT both in men (r?=?0.49, p?correlated significantly with VAT both in men and women (r?=?0.68, 0.42, 0.46 in men and 0.50, 0.23, 0.39 in women, p?correlation in men (r?=?0.32, p?=?0.001) and no correlation in women (r?=?0.08, p?=?0.442). Additionally, BMI was more strongly correlated with VAT than NC in both sexes (both p?correlation between NC and VAT was present in Chinese men and women, which may be accounted by the fact that neck fat area is significantly correlated with abdominal VAT. Meanwhile, SAD is the best predictor for visceral fat in the Chinese population.

2014-01-01

67

Proprioception in the neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proprioception in the neck was investigated in normal human subjects. Three experiments studied rotation of the head about a vertical axis on the body. Accuracy of pointing, thresholds for detection of passive movement, and control of fine movement were tested. Comparison of the accuracy of pointing at the big toe with the nose and with the arm, showed a smaller

J. L. Taylor; D. I. McCloskey

1988-01-01

68

Restraining and neck cutting or stunning and neck cutting of veal calves.  

PubMed

Brain and heart activities were measured in 31 veal calves during restraining and rotating followed by neck cutting with or without stunning to evaluate welfare. After neck cutting correlation dimension analyses and %power of EEG beta wave fraction decreased gradually to lower values resulting in an induction of unconsciousness lasting on average 80s. Corneal reflex response ceased 135±57s after neck cutting. The CD scores and the %power of beta waves fell immediately after post-cut captive bolt and pre-cut electrical stunning to levels indicating unconsciousness. Heart rate in lairage increased upon entrance to the restrainer and again after rotation, heart rate variability decreased. Rotating the restrainer 90°, 120° or 180° compromised veal calf welfare and should be avoided. It is recommended to use post-cut captive bolt stunning or pre-cut electrical stunning inducing immediate unconsciousness. PMID:22209298

Lambooij, E; van der Werf, J T N; Reimert, H G M; Hindle, V A

2012-05-01

69

Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

2014-01-30

70

Hyperparathyroidism after neck irradiation.  

PubMed

A retrospective review of 1550 cases of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) treated surgically over a 30-year period reveals a past history of exposure to neck irradiation in 10 cases (0.7 per cent). The indication for radiotherapy was benign disease in nine and papillary thyroid carcinoma in one case. The mean interval between radiation exposure and the detection of HPT was 32 years (range 3-63 years). Patients treated with radioactive iodine alone developed HPT after a mean of 5 years while the interval for those treated with external beam therapy alone was a mean of 44 years. The parathyroid histology was adenoma in six cases, carcinoma in three cases and nodular hyperplasia in one case. All patients had coincident benign thyroid disease apart from one that had previously had papillary carcinoma and another with follicular carcinoma. Neck irradiation has been shown to confer an increased risk of HPT due to parathyroid adenoma and carcinoma. Radiotherapy for benign disease has generally been abandoned and these cases demonstrate a further contra-indication for the use of neck irradiation. PMID:3179662

Christmas, T J; Chapple, C R; Noble, J G; Milroy, E J; Cowie, A G

1988-09-01

71

Scale effects in necking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geometrically similar specimens spanning a scale range of 100:1 are tested quasi-statically to failure. Images of neck development are acquired using optical means for large specimens, and in-situ scanning electron microscope testing for small specimens, to examine the dependence of neck geometry on a broad range of specimen sizes. Size effects typically arise when the smallest specimen dimension is on the order of a microstructural length (e.g. grain size, dislocation mean free path, etc.), or in the presence of significant plastic strain gradients, which increase the density of geometrically necessary dislocations. This study was carried out for the purpose of investigating scale dependence in models used for predicting dynamic deformation and damage to very high strains for ballistic impact applications, such as the Goldthorpe path-dependent failure model, which includes temperature and strain-rate dependence but does not account for specimen size or a dependence on microstructural lengths. Although the experiments show that neck geometry does not exhibit a clear dependence on specimen size across the range of length scales tested, the statistical variation due to microstructural variations was found to increase monotonically with decreasing size, becoming significant for the smallest (0.35 mm diameter) size, allowing a limit to be identified for reliable model calibration.

Dunnett, T.; Balint, D.; MacGillivray, H.; Church, P.; Gould, P.

2012-08-01

72

Cervical biomechanics and neck pain of "head-spinning" breakdancers.  

PubMed

The cervical spine of breakdancers is at great risk due to reversed body loading during headspin manoeuvers. This study focused on the cervical biomechanics of breakdancers and a correlation with neck pain. A standardized interview and biomechanical testing of the cervical spine of 25 participants with "headspin" ability ages 16-34 years and an age-matched cohort of 25 participants without any cervical spine problems was conducted. Neck pain history, Neck Disability Index (NDI), cervical range of motion (CROM) and cervical torque were recorded. The "headspin" group reported significantly better subjective fitness, more cervical complaints, higher pain intensity, a longer history of neck pain and a worse NDI compared to the "normal" collective. The "headspin" group showed a 2-2.5 times higher rate of neck pain than the normal population, with increased cervical flexion (p<0.05) and increased cervical torque in all planes (p<0.001). The CROM showed a negative moderate to strong correlation with NDI, pain intensity and history of neck pain. Sports medicine practitioners should be aware of headspin maneuver accidents that pose the risk of fractures, dislocations and spinal cord injuries of breakdancers. PMID:24399685

Kauther, M D; Piotrowski, M; Hussmann, B; Lendemans, S; Wedemeyer, C; Jaeger, M

2014-05-01

73

Cervical Spondylosis (Arthritis of the Neck)  

MedlinePLUS

... Orthopaedic Surgeons. Cervical Spondylosis (Arthritis of the Neck) Neck pain is extremely common. It can be caused by ... have all been linked to higher risks of neck pain and spondylosis: • Genetics - if your family has a ...

74

Centrosomal abnormalities, multipolar mitoses, and chromosomal instability in head and neck tumours with dysfunctional telomeres  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carcinomas of the head and neck typically exhibit complex chromosome aberrations but the underlying mutational mechanisms remain obscure. Evaluation of cell division dynamics in low-passage cell lines from three benign and five malignant head and neck tumours revealed a strong positive correlation between multipolarity of the mitotic spindle and the formation of bridges at anaphase in both benign and malignant

D Gisselsson; T Jonson; C Yu; C Martins; N Mandahl; J Wiegant; Y Jin; F Mertens; C Jin

2002-01-01

75

Pretreatment oxygenation predicts radiation response in advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and purpose: Hypoxic tumor cells are known to be relatively radioresistant. The aim of the study was to correlate oxygenation status and radiation response in advanced squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck.Methods and patients: Pretreatment oxygenation status was measured in 34 lymph nodes and one primary tumor neck using oxygen electrodes. The primary oxygenation endpoint was the fraction

Marianne Nordsmark; Marie Overgaard; Jens Overgaard

1996-01-01

76

Reoperative Head and Neck Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Operative procedures performed in the head and neck in children compose a significant element in pediatric surgical practice. There are a broad variety of these procedures, from correction of complex congenital anomalies to treatment of a variety of acquired lesions. The successful conduct of these operations requires a thorough knowledge of normal head and neck anatomy and precise attention to

Bradley M. Rodgers

77

[Warthin's tumor in the neck].  

PubMed

Papillar lymphomatous cystoadenoma on the neck as first stage of development. Other lesions of this nature in atypical areas as larynx, minor salivary glands or oropharynx has been described, but is not frequent on heterotopic location so peculiar. In that case the real diagnostic problem was the differential with neck masses. Description of the case and review of the literature. PMID:10645014

Ramírez Ponferrada, R; Gallardo, A; Solís, E; Rodríguez, E; Castilla, J M

1999-01-01

78

[Anemia in head and neck cancers].  

PubMed

Anemia is very common in head and neck cancer patients, and seems to be correlated with intratumoral hypoxia. Anemia is one of the main prognostic factors of locoregional recurrence and, in some studies, of poor survival. Blood transfusions and human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO) are the two main methods used in clinical practice to correct hemoglobin level during curative treatment. Blood transfusions were rarely evaluated, and did not influence locoregional control of patients treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Retrospective studies evaluating combined treatment of rHuEPO and radiotherapy reported positive impact on locoregional recurrence and actuarial survival. Since the end of 2003, this approach is a matter for debate after the negative results of a prospective randomized study on progression-free survival concerning head and neck cancer patients treated with definitive or postoperative external radiotherapy with or without rHuEPO. Although many biases were reported against this publication, several questions are to be answered in the near future. Among them, erythropoietin receptor expression and activation on tumour cell seem to be the more appropriate explanation of these negative results. In October 2004, preliminary results of the RTOG 99-03 study have been presented at the Astro annual meeting in Atlanta. This prospective randomized trial was designed to determine if concurrent rHuEPO administration (40,000 units) with radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy) could improve locoregional control in non-operative head and neck cancers. In the rHuEPO arm, haemoglobin level was significantly increased compared with control arm. However, the addition of concurrent rHuEPO to definitive radiotherapy did not improve locoregional control or survival for mildly/moderately anemic patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Future clinical trials using biological markers are thus imperative to target which patients could benefit from these molecules. PMID:15932808

Azria, David; Zouhair, Abderrahim; Serre, Antoine; Lemanski, Claire; Schneider, Maurice; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Lartigau, Eric

2005-05-01

79

The difficult neck in facelifting.  

PubMed

The management of the neck often presents the most challenging aspect of the facelift procedure. The aesthetic neck has a well-defined jaw line, a pleasing and adequate cervicomental angle, and visible definitions of the deeper lateral and midline structures, such as the sternocleidomastoid muscles and trachea. Several unfavorable anatomic characteristics will present that will compound the challenge. These characteristics are contrasted with ideal features and include the following: an excess of adipose tissue, an excess of either thin or thick inelastic skin, marked relaxation of the suspension structures of the neck with resultant platysma banding and jowling, and unfavorable skeletal features such as microgenia and hyoid malposition. These patients present for rhytidectomy with inadequate chin projection, an obtuse cervicomental angle, sagging skin, and a heavy neck. To maximize rhytidectomy results in these patients with difficult neck anatomy, special attention to the anatomy and application of recognized techniques in an individualized manner is recommended. This article reviews the issues encountered in the management of the difficult neck in facelifting, with special attention given to patients with a heavy neck. PMID:25076452

Fedok, Fred G; Chaikhoutdinov, Irina; Garritano, Frank

2014-08-01

80

The epidemiology of neck pain.  

PubMed

Neck pain is becoming increasingly common throughout the world. It has a considerable impact on individuals and their families, communities, health-care systems, and businesses. There is substantial heterogeneity between neck pain epidemiological studies, which makes it difficult to compare or pool data from different studies. The estimated 1 year incidence of neck pain from available studies ranges between 10.4% and 21.3% with a higher incidence noted in office and computer workers. While some studies report that between 33% and 65% of people have recovered from an episode of neck pain at 1 year, most cases run an episodic course over a person's lifetime and, thus, relapses are common. The overall prevalence of neck pain in the general population ranges between 0.4% and 86.8% (mean: 23.1%); point prevalence ranges from 0.4% to 41.5% (mean: 14.4%); and 1 year prevalence ranges from 4.8% to 79.5% (mean: 25.8%). Prevalence is generally higher in women, higher in high-income countries compared with low- and middle-income countries and higher in urban areas compared with rural areas. Many environmental and personal factors influence the onset and course of neck pain. Most studies indicate a higher incidence of neck pain among women and an increased risk of developing neck pain until the 35-49-year age group, after which the risk begins to decline. The Global Burden of Disease 2005 Study is currently making estimates of the global burden of neck pain in relation to impairment and activity limitation, and results will be available in 2011. PMID:21665126

Hoy, D G; Protani, M; De, R; Buchbinder, R

2010-12-01

81

Adjunctive procedures to neck rejuvenation.  

PubMed

Rejuvenation of the neck often requires more than just a neck lift. Various steps and procedures exist to enhance the surgical technique or overall result. Fibrin sealants can be used to improve the recovery process and obviate the need for drain placement. Chin augmentation can be a critical part of creating a more refined neckline. Submandibular gland excision has been put forth as helpful to the overall aesthetic result. A low and anteriorly positioned hyoid bone creates an unattractive neckline that is difficult to treat. This article focuses on techniques beyond lifting and resurfacing that may enhance neck rejuvenation. PMID:24745385

Hamilton, Mark M; Chan, David

2014-05-01

82

49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...572.113 Neck assembly. The head/neck assembly consists of the parts...78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum...except that the direction of the head/neck assembly is rotated around...

2009-10-01

83

49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...572.113 Neck assembly. The head/neck assembly consists of the parts...78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum...except that the direction of the head/neck assembly is rotated around...

2010-10-01

84

The Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia and neck pain, disability and range of motion: a narrative review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Background: The Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK) that was developed in 1990 is a 17 item scale originally developed to measure the fear of movement related to chronic lower back pain. Objective: To review the literature regarding TSK and neck pain, perceived disability and range of motion of the cervical spine. Methods: Medline, MANTIS, Index to Chiropractic Literature and CINAHL were searched. Results: A total of 16 related articles were found and divided into four categories: TSK and Neck Pain; TSK, Neck Pain and Disability; TSK, Neck Pain, Disability and Strength; and TSK, Neck Pain and Surface Electromyography. Conclusion: The fear avoidance model can be applied to neck pain sufferers and there is value from a psychometric perspective in using the TSK to assess kinesiophobia. Future research should investigate if, and to what extent, other measureable factors commonly associated with neck pain, such as decreased range of motion, correlate with kinesiophobia.

Hudes, Karen

2011-01-01

85

Evaluation of the Dunlap/Rippstein method for determination of femoral neck angles.  

PubMed

The accuracy of the Dunlap method, as modified by Rippstein, for measuring the femoral neck angles was evaluated using adult bodies. The results were correlated to measurements on the dissected femurs. The Dunlap/Rippstein method correlated well with the determinations made in the specimens. The accuracy of the method was within +/- 7 degrees for the anteversion angle and within -5 to +9 degrees for the head-neck-shaft angle. PMID:3993421

Reikerås, O; Høiseth, A; Reigstad, A

1985-01-01

86

Head and Neck Cancer Prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Head and neck cancer (HNC) represents a broad spectrum of diseases that involves the nasal and oropharyngeal cavities, the\\u000a paranasal sinuses, the major and minor salivary glands, the larynx and the lymphatic tissues of the neck. The world-wide yearly\\u000a incidence exceeds over half a million cases. Tobacco (smoking and smokeless) and alcohol use are the principal risk factors,\\u000a however, a

Fausto Chiesa; Angelo Ostuni; Roberto Grigolato; Luca Calabrese

87

Incorporation of Lower Neck Shear Forces to Predict Facet Joint Injury Risk in Low-Speed Automotive Rear Impacts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lower neck shear force remains a viable candidate for a low-velocity automotive rear-impact injury criterion. Data were previously reported to demonstrate high correlations between the magnitude of lower neck shear force and lower cervical spine facet joint motions. The present study determined the ability of lower neck shear force to predict soft-tissue injury risk in simulated automotive rear impacts. Rear-impact

Brian D. Stemper; Steven G. Storvik

2010-01-01

88

Palmitoylethanolamide and stearoylethanolamide levels in the interstitium of the trapezius muscle of women with chronic widespread pain and chronic neck-shoulder pain correlate with pain intensity and sensitivity.  

PubMed

Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a complex condition characterized by central hyperexcitability and altered descending control of nociception. However, nociceptive input from deep tissues is suggested to be an important drive. N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are endogenous lipid mediators involved in regulation of inflammation and pain. Previously we have reported elevated levels of the 2 NAEs, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type-? ligand N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) and N-stearoylethanolamine (SEA) in chronic neck/shoulder pain (CNSP). In the present study, the levels of PEA and SEA in women with CWP (n=18), CNSP (n=34) and healthy controls (CON, n=24) were investigated. All subjects went through clinical examination, pressure pain threshold measurements and induction of experimental pain in the tibialis anterior muscle. Microdialysis dialysate of the trapezius was collected before and after subjects performed a repetitive low-force exercise and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The levels of PEA and SEA in CNSP were significantly higher post exercise compared with CWP, and both pre and post exercise compared with CON. Levels of both NAEs decreased significantly pre to post exercise in CWP. Intercorrelations existed between aspects of pain intensity and sensitivity and the level of the 2 NAEs in CWP and CNSP. This is the first study demonstrating that CNSP and CWP differ in levels of NAEs in response to a low-force exercise which induces pain. Increases in pain intensity as a consequence of low-force exercise were associated with low levels of PEA and SEA in CNSP and CWP. These results indicate that PEA and SEA have antinociceptive roles in humans. PMID:23707281

Ghafouri, Nazdar; Ghafouri, Bijar; Larsson, Britt; Stensson, Niclas; Fowler, Christopher J; Gerdle, Björn

2013-09-01

89

Long-Term Follow-Up of Neck Expansion after Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the rate, extent and clinical significance of neck dilatation after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods Patients who underwent elective EVAR using bifurcated Zenith (Cook, Bloomington, IN) stent-grafts and had at least 48-months of clinical and radiographic follow-up were included in the present study. Computed tomographic images were analyzed on a 3-dimensional workstation (TeraRecon, San Mateo, CA). Neck diameter was measured 10 mm below the most inferior renal artery, in planes orthogonal to the aorta. Nominal stent graft diameter was obtained from implantation records. Results 46 patients met the inclusion criteria. Median follow-up was 59 months (range 48-120 months). Neck dilation occurred in all 46 cases. The rate of neck dilation was greatest at early follow-up intervals. At 48-months, median neck dilation was 5.3 mm (range 2.3-9.8 mm). The extent of neck dilation at 48-months correlated with percentage of stent-graft oversizing (Spearman’s rho 0.61, p<0.001). There were no cases of type I endoleak or migration (> 5 mm). Conclusions Following EVAR with the Zenith stent-graft, the neck dilates until its diameter approximates the diameter of the stent-graft. Neck dilation was not associated with type I endoleak or migration of the stent-graft.

Monahan, Thomas S; Chuter, Timothy AM; Reilly, Linda M; Rapp, Joseph H; Hiramoto, Jade S

2010-01-01

90

Femoral Neck Version Affects Medial Femorotibial Loading  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (?10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (FEM-FEA), a virtual experiment was executed with the femoral models aligned in a neutral upright position, distally supported on a fully congruent tibial tray and proximally loaded with a vertical only hip joint load of 2800?N. Equivalent stresses and their distribution on the medial compartment were computed and comparatively evaluated. Within our context, the neck-shaft angle proved to be of rather indifferent influence. Reduction of femoral version, however, appeared as the most influencing parameter regarding the tendency of the medial compartment to establish its bearing equilibrium towards posteromedial directions, as a consequence of the corresponding anteroposterior changes of the hip centre over the horizontal tibiofemoral plane. We found a correlation between femoral anteversion and medial tibiofemoral compartment contact pressure. Our findings will be further elucidated by more sophisticated FEM-FEA and by clinical studies that are currently planned.

Papaioannou, T. A.; Digas, Georgios; Bikos, Ch.; Karamoulas, V.; Magnissalis, E. A.

2013-01-01

91

Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs  

MedlinePLUS

... 5/2013 Symptoms and Signs Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck Cancer Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention Symptoms ... on the side of your screen. People with head and neck cancer often experience the following symptoms or signs. ...

92

Assessment of Neck Muscle Biodynamics During Impact.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An experimental effort was conducted to assess the neck muscle's biodynamic characteristics using electromyographic (EMG) data collected during a human impact study. EMG data were collected from specific neck muscles of volunteer human subjects before, du...

K. R. Getschow C. E. Perry D. M. Bonetti C. L. Taylor

1993-01-01

93

Relationship Between Brassiere Cup Size and Shoulder-Neck Pain in Women  

PubMed Central

There are very few reports in regard to relationship between breast size and shoulder-neck pain. The purpose of this study is to examine the correlations among breast size, brassiere cup size, and moment-in-time reporting of shoulderneck pain in a group of adult women. Three hundred thirty nine female volunteers from the hospital staff answered the questionnaire. Breast size, brassiere cup size, and shoulder-neck pain were self-reported by each participant. The relationship among breast size, brassiere cup size and shoulder-neck pain was investigated. Spearman’s test showed no significant relationship between shoulder-neck pain and brassiere cup size. However, after participants were classified into two groups (small brassiere cup size and large brassiere cup size with 219 and 120 participants, respectively), there was a significant positive correlation between shoulder-neck pain and large brassiere cup size (p<0.05). There was no significant relationship between shoulder-neck pain and breast size. In conclusion, large brassiere cup size is an important cause of shoulder-neck pain.

Oo, Myint; Wang, Zhuo; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Kasai, Yuichi

2012-01-01

94

Relationship between brassiere cup size and shoulder-neck pain in women.  

PubMed

There are very few reports in regard to relationship between breast size and shoulder-neck pain. The purpose of this study is to examine the correlations among breast size, brassiere cup size, and moment-in-time reporting of shoulderneck pain in a group of adult women. Three hundred thirty nine female volunteers from the hospital staff answered the questionnaire. Breast size, brassiere cup size, and shoulder-neck pain were self-reported by each participant. The relationship among breast size, brassiere cup size and shoulder-neck pain was investigated. Spearman's test showed no significant relationship between shoulder-neck pain and brassiere cup size. However, after participants were classified into two groups (small brassiere cup size and large brassiere cup size with 219 and 120 participants, respectively), there was a significant positive correlation between shoulder-neck pain and large brassiere cup size (p<0.05). There was no significant relationship between shoulder-neck pain and breast size. In conclusion, large brassiere cup size is an important cause of shoulder-neck pain. PMID:22509231

Oo, Myint; Myint, Zhuo; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Kasai, Yuichi

2012-01-01

95

Contemporary management of deep neck space infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deep neck infections continue to be seen despite the wide use of antibiotics. These infections follow along fascial planes to create deep neck space abscesses. The clinical presentation often points to the space involved. Understanding the regional anatomy gives the surgeon the ability to treat these grave infections. The records of 24 patients with a diagnosis of deep neck space

PAUL W. GIDLEY; BECHARA Y. GHORAYEB; CHARLES M. STIERNBERG

1997-01-01

96

Microvascular Reconstruction After Previous Neck Dissection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Microvascular reconstruction of defects in the head and neck is more challenging in patients who have undergone a previous neck dissection, owing to prior resection of potential cervical recipient blood vessels used for free flap perfusion. Objective: To evaluate the reliability and safety of free flap reconstruction in patients with previous neck dis- section. Patients and Methods: Sixty free

Christian Head; Joel A. Sercarz; Elliot Abemayor; Thomas C. Calcaterra; Jeffrey D. Rawnsley; Keith E. Blackwell

2002-01-01

97

Computed tomography of the head and neck  

SciTech Connect

This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Planning Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors; Comparison of CT and MR of the Head and Neck; The Orbit and Globe; The Base of the Tongue; The Salivary Glands; and Head and Neck Lesions in Children.

Carter, B.L.

1985-01-01

98

Penetrating injuries of the neck.  

PubMed Central

A review of 271 patients with penetrating wounds of the neck is presented. A policy of selective conservative management appears totally justified in view of the low mortality and morbidity in this series. Particular attention has been paid to the presentation and surgical approach to the injured vertebral artery. Images Fig. 3

Demetriades, D.; Stewart, M.

1985-01-01

99

Head and Neck Steering Committee  

Cancer.gov

The NCI Head and Neck Steering Committee (HNSC) was established in 2007. The HNSC is currently composed of the Steering Committee and three task forces. Members of HNSC include committee co-chairs, representatives from the Cooperative Groups, Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPOREs), community oncologists, biostatisticians, pathologists, patient advocates, and NCI staff.

100

Femoral neck anteversion in ballerinas.  

PubMed

The elite ballet dancer has greater-than-average turnout, or external rotation, in the hip. Anatomic constraints, such as the angle of version of the femoral neck, or the femoral neck anteversion (FNA) angle, may limit the amount of external rotation or turnout in the hip. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dancers who have better-than-average turnout have lower-than-average FNA angles. Fourteen elite female dancers from three major American ballet companies were studied. The FNA angles were measured in 28 hips by magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The mean FNA angle in the dancers measured 11.9 degrees (range, 4 degrees-24 degrees), and was similar to the mean FNA angle in the general population (11.4 degrees). It was concluded that the average femoral neck anteversion angle in this select group of dancers is similar to that of the general population, although none of the dancers in this study had severe femoral neck anteversion. PMID:8168323

Bauman, P A; Singson, R; Hamilton, W G

1994-05-01

101

The role of neuroplasticity in experimental neck pain: A study of potential mechanisms impeding clinical outcomes of training.  

PubMed

Training is a mainstay in the clinical management of neck pain, yet, effects of various training protocols are only small to moderate and improvements are required. Previous investigations of the nervous system indicate a correlation between neuroplastic adaptation to training and functional recovery. The interaction between neck pain and training thus needs further exploration. This was a randomized experimental study of the effects of experimental neck pain and training on corticomotor excitability. Healthy volunteers were randomized to training and experimental neck pain, training and no pain, and pain and no training. Primary endpoints were corticomotor excitability assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography measured as changes in amplitudes and latencies of motor evoked potentials (MEPs), recorded at baseline and after 30 min, 1 h, and 1 week. Additionally, correlations between changes in MEPs and motor learning, effects of pain and concomitant neck training on pain, muscle strength, and fatigue were investigated. Data were analyzed by repeated measurement ANOVA, paired t tests, Grubbs' outlier test and correlation coefficients. Results indicated that neck pain and training significantly enhanced the inhibition of the amplitudes of the MEPs for 1 week. The results indicate that moderate neck pain and training induce long-lasting inhibition of the corticomotor pathways. This inhibition may limit the outcome of neck training in painful conditions in contrast to pain-free training conditions. PMID:24815594

Rittig-Rasmussen, Bjarne; Kasch, Helge; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

2014-08-01

102

Case report: Multimodality imaging of van Neck-Odelberg disease  

PubMed Central

Synchondrosis ischiopubic syndrome (SIS), also known as van Neck–Odelberg disease, is a syndrome characterized by an atypical ossification pattern of the ischiopubic synchondrosis. Its radiological features may mimic stress fracture, neoplasm, osteomyelitis, or posttraumatic osteolysis, causing problems in diagnosis, sometimes leading to unnecessary workup. We report two cases in which the correlation between the clinical and multimodality imaging data enabled the correct diagnosis of SIS.

Macarini, Luca; Lallo, Tania; Milillo, Paola; Muscarella, Silvana; Vinci, Roberta; Stoppino, Luca P

2011-01-01

103

Case report: Multimodality imaging of van Neck-Odelberg disease.  

PubMed

Synchondrosis ischiopubic syndrome (SIS), also known as van Neck-Odelberg disease, is a syndrome characterized by an atypical ossification pattern of the ischiopubic synchondrosis. Its radiological features may mimic stress fracture, neoplasm, osteomyelitis, or posttraumatic osteolysis, causing problems in diagnosis, sometimes leading to unnecessary workup. We report two cases in which the correlation between the clinical and multimodality imaging data enabled the correct diagnosis of SIS. PMID:21799592

Macarini, Luca; Lallo, Tania; Milillo, Paola; Muscarella, Silvana; Vinci, Roberta; Stoppino, Luca P

2011-04-01

104

Chromosomal changes characterize head and neck cancer with poor prognosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well established that genetic alterations may be associated to prognosis in tumor patients. This study investigates\\u000a chromosomal changes that predict the clinical outcome of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and correlate to characteristic\\u000a clinicopathological parameters. We applied comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to tissue samples from 117 HNSCC patients\\u000a scheduled for radiotherapy. Genomic aberrations occurring in more

Verena L. Bauer; Herbert Braselmann; Michael Henke; Dominik Mattern; Axel Walch; Kristian Unger; Michael Baudis; Silke Lassmann; Reinhard Huber; Johannes Wienberg; Martin Werner; Horst F. Zitzelsberger

2008-01-01

105

[Hereditary head and neck tumors].  

PubMed

Hereditary paraganglioma, Gorlin-Goltz syndrome and Fanconi anemia are among the rare hereditary tumor syndromes of the head and neck. Patients with hereditary paraganglioma often develop multiple tumors of the glomus caroticum and glomus jugulotympanicum. The corresponding genetic defects of the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase complex induce autonomous tumor cell growth. In patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome basal cell carcinomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors usually occur much earlier than in patients with sporadic tumors. The associated germline mutations are located in the patched gene which is a modulator of the cell cycle. Fanconi anemia represents a chromosomal instability syndrome which is characterized by early onset of pancytopenia, i.e. bone marrow failure and subsequent development of acute myeloid leukemia and/or squamous cell carcinomas, especially of the head and neck. A total of 13 different gene clusters have been identified in 2 DNA associated complexes which play an important role in DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:20844882

Schwarz-Furlan, S; Brase, C; Stockmann, P; Furlan, I; Hartmann, A

2010-10-01

106

Strain energy in the femoral neck during exercise.  

PubMed

Physical activity is recommended to mitigate the incidence of hip osteoporotic fractures by improving femoral neck strength. However, results from clinical studies are highly variable and unclear about the effects of physical activity on femoral neck strength. We ranked physical activities recommended for promoting bone health based on calculations of strain energy in the femoral neck. According to adaptive bone-remodeling theory, bone formation occurs when the strain energy (S) exceeds its homeostatic value by 75%. The potential effectiveness of activity type was assessed by normalizing strain energy by the applied external load. Tensile strain provided an indication of bone fracture. External force and joint motion data for 15 low- and high-load weight-bearing and resistance-based activities were used. High-load activities included weight-bearing activities generating a ground force above 1 body-weight and maximal resistance exercises about the hip and the knee. Calculations of femoral loads were based on musculoskeletal and finite-element models. Eight of the fifteen activities were likely to trigger bone formation, with isokinetic hip extension (?S=722%), one-legged long jump (?S=572%), and isokinetic knee flexion (?S=418%) inducing the highest strain energy increase. Knee flexion induced approximately ten times the normalized strain energy induced by hip adduction. Strain and strain energy were strongly correlated with the hip-joint reaction force (R(2)=0.90-0.99; p<0.05) for all activities, though the peak load location was activity-dependent. None of the exercises was likely to cause fracture. Femoral neck mechanics is activity-dependent and maximum isokinetic hip-extension and knee-flexion exercises are possible alternative solutions to impact activities for improving femoral neck strength. PMID:24746018

Martelli, Saulo; Kersh, Mariana E; Schache, Anthony G; Pandy, Marcus G

2014-06-01

107

Predictors of femoral neck fracture following hip resurfacing: a cadaveric study.  

PubMed

We aimed to establish if radiological parameters, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and quantitative CT (qCT) could predict the risk of sustaining a femoral neck fracture following hip resurfacing. Twenty-one unilateral fresh frozen femurs were used. Each femur had a plain digital anteroposterior radiograph, DEXA scan and qCT scan. Femurs were then prepared for a Birmingham Hip Resurfacing femoral component and loaded to failure. Results demonstrated that gender and qCT measurements showed strong correlation with failure load. QCT could be used as an individual measure to predict risk of post-operative femoral neck fracture. However, when qCT is unavailable; gender, pre-operative DEXA scan and Neck Width measurements can be used together to assess risk of post-operative femoral neck fracture in patients due to undergo hip resurfacing. PMID:22770857

Davis, Edward T; Olsen, Michael; Zdero, Rad; Smith, Gemma M; Waddell, James P; Schemitsch, Emil H

2013-01-01

108

The relationship between head and neck anthropometry and kinematic response during impact acceleration.  

PubMed

Research on the effects of impact acceleration on the body, primarily the head and neck, has been conducted at the U.S. Naval Biodynamics Laboratory for nearly two decades. Over 150 Navy enlisted men have been subjected to impact acceleration on a sled propelled by a nitrogen-powered horizontal accelerator. Their head and neck kinematic responses during the experimental impact were measured and stored in automated data bases. Similarly, anthropometric measurements were recorded for these subjects. To investigate the relation between head and neck anthropometry and response to impact acceleration, tests involving 15 subjects were selected. A strong relation was found between head and neck anthropometry and linear acceleration of the head along the Z axis. Lesser correlations were determined between the anthropometric measurements and linear acceleration along the X axis and angular acceleration about the Y axis. These findings are potentially applicable to areas such as aircrew selection, physical training and protective equipment development. PMID:1550531

Mawn, S V; Lambert, J J; Catyb, J L

1992-01-01

109

Effect of clinical symptoms on the indication for selective neck dissection for N0 carcinomas of the parotid gland  

PubMed Central

Lymph node metastasis is a major prognostic factor in parotid carcinoma, however, the pre-operative diagnosis of occult nodal metastasis is difficult in clinical N0 (cN0) parotid cancer patients. In addition, the indication of neck dissection in T1-3 cN0 patients is controversial. The current study investigated 17 patients with clinical T1-3 cN0 parotid cancer, and analyzed the correlation between patient symptoms/findings and pathological N status/tumor histological grade. In the statistical analysis, pain was found to significantly correlate with neck metastasis. Furthermore, cN0-staged patients without pain exhibited no neck metastasis. However, no significant correlation was identified between patient symptoms or findings and histological grade. These results indicate the possibility that selective neck dissection can be omitted for T1-3 cN0-staged patients without pain.

MARUO, TAKASHI; FUJIMOTO, YASUSHI; YOSHIDA, KENJI; HIRAMATSU, MARIKO; SUZUKI, ATSUSHI; NISHIO, NAOKI; SHIMONO, MARIKO; NAKASHIMA, TSUTOMU

2014-01-01

110

Combination Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer  

Cancer.gov

No standard therapy currently exists for head and neck cancer that recurs after treatment with radiation. Laboratory studies have shown that bortezomib (Velcade), a new type of cancer drug called a proteasome inhibitor, inhibits growth of head and neck cancer cells. This clinical study is the first test of whether bortezomib can increase the effectiveness of repeat radiation treatment for patients whose head and neck cancer has recurred.

111

Anatomic Variations in Head and Neck Reconstruction  

PubMed Central

Head and neck reconstruction is a technically challenging procedure. Variations encountered in the recipient vessels and commonly used flaps add to the complexity of surgery. This article reviews the commonly encountered variations in the recipient vessels in the neck with emphasis on alternatives and techniques to circumvent these variations. Flaps commonly used in head and neck reconstruction are also reviewed in detail. Furthermore, safety, potential pitfalls, and technical pearls are highlighted.

Tan, Bien-Keem; Wong, Chin-Ho; Chen, Hung-Chi

2010-01-01

112

Patients with non-specific neck disorders commonly report upper limb disability.  

PubMed

Patients with neck disorders can report difficulties with functional use of their upper limb because of their neck pain. Yet, there is little information on the frequency and specifically, the nature of these upper limb activities. This study surveyed patients with neck pain disorders (n = 103) presenting for management at private physiotherapy clinics in a large metropolitan area to investigate the frequency and nature of reduced upper limb function. Participants were asked to complete four questionnaires, the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, the Neck Disability Index (NDI), Pictorial Fear of Activity Scale-Cervical (PFActS-C) and Patient Specific Functional Scale (PSFS). Approximately 80% of patients spontaneously reported that upper limb activities aggravated their neck pain (PSFS). Most frequently, these activities involved loading of the upper limb such as lifting. Eight activity items on the DASH were scored positive by ?50% of participants. Participants had mild to moderately severe neck pain (NDI: range 2-68%). The DASH and NDI were moderately-highly correlated (? = 0.669; p < 0.001), indicating the higher the neck pain severity the greater the upper limb functional restrictions. There was a low correlation between the NDI and PFActS-C (? = 0.319; p = 0.001). These findings provide evidence that upper limb function is often impaired in association with neck pain disorders and suggest clinicians should routinely question patients regarding upper limb function. The DASH could be used as a suitable outcome measure in its current or possibly a modified form. PMID:23726285

Osborn, William; Jull, Gwendolen

2013-12-01

113

Embolization of the neck lymphatic varix, causing periodic neck swelling.  

PubMed

We report a case of a 44-year-old female patient, presented to us after years of recurrent intermittent episodes of unilateral left neck swelling. An MR lymphangiogram demonstrated a lymphatic varix at the confluence of the left upper extremity lymphatic ducts, confirmed by intranodal axillary lymphangiography. After successful catheterization of the feeding lymphatic vessels, the varix was successfully embolized with detachable microcoils and an autologous blood patch. The patient has been free from symptoms on subsequent outpatient follow-up. PMID:24352865

Guzman, Anthony K; Pukenas, Brian A; Yan, Yan; Newman, Jason G; Itkin, Maxim

2014-08-01

114

Direct and remote constriction of membrane necks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The physical properties of membrane necks are relevant in vesiculation, a process that plays an essential role in cellular physiology. Because the neck's radius is, in general, finite, membrane scission and the consequent pinching off of the vesicle can only occur if it is narrowed to permit the necessary membrane topological reformation. Here we examine, in a simple single phase lipid vesicle, how external forces can promote neck constriction not only by direct compression at the neck but also, counterintuitively, by dilation at remote locations. These results provide a new perspective on the role played by actin polymerization in the process of endocytosis.

Boži?, Bojan; Guven, Jemal; Vázquez-Montejo, Pablo; Svetina, Saša

2014-05-01

115

Objective classification of different head and neck positions and their influence on the radiographic pharyngeal diameter in sport horses  

PubMed Central

Background Various head and neck positions in sport horses are significant as they can interfere with upper airway flow mechanics during exercise. Until now, research has focused on subjectively described head and neck positions. The objective of this study was to develop an objective, reproducible method for quantifying head and neck positions accurately. Results Determining the angle between the ridge of the nose and the horizontal plane (ground angle) together with the angle between the ridge of nose and the line connecting the neck and the withers (withers angle) has provided values that allow precise identification of three preselected head and neck positions for performing sport horses. The pharyngeal diameter, determined on lateral radiographs of 35 horses, differed significantly between the established flexed position and the remaining two head and neck positions (extended and neutral). There was a significant correlation between the pharyngeal diameter and the ground angle (Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient ?0.769, p?correlation coefficient 0.774, p?neck positions in sport horses. The ground angle and the withers angle show significant correlation with the measured pharyngeal diameter in resting horses. Hence, these angles provide an appropriate method for assessing the degree of head and neck flexion. Further research is required to examine the influence of increasing head and neck flexion and the related pharyngeal diameter on upper airway function in exercising horses.

2014-01-01

116

Image cytometric nuclear texture features in inoperable head and neck cancer: a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Background Image cytometry can measure numerous nuclear features which could be considered a surrogate end-point marker of molecular genetic changes in a nucleus. The aim of the study was to analyze image cytometric nuclear features in paired samples of primary tumor and neck metastasis in patients with inoperable carcinoma of the head and neck. Materials and methods. Image cytometric analysis of cell suspensions prepared from primary tumor tissue and fine needle aspiration biopsy cell samples of neck metastases from 21 patients treated with concomitant radiochemotherapy was performed. Nuclear features were correlated with clinical characteristics and response to therapy. Results Manifestation of distant metastases and new primaries was associated (p<0.05) with several chromatin characteristics from primary tumor cells, whereas the origin of index cancer and disease response in the neck was related to those in the cells from metastases. Many nuclear features of primary tumors and metastases correlated with the TNM stage. Conclusions A specific pattern of correlation between well-established prognostic indicators and nuclear features of samples from primary tumors and those from neck metastases was observed. Image cytometric nuclear features represent a promising candidate marker for recognition of biologically different tumor subgroups.

Strojan-Flezar, Margareta; Lavrencak, Jaka; Zganec, Mario; Strojan, Primoz

2011-01-01

117

Neck Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neck Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Arabic (???????) Neck Exercises English (Arabic) ?????? ?????? - ??????? Multimedia Patient ...

118

Inter-vertebral flexibility of the ostrich neck: implications for estimating sauropod neck flexibility.  

PubMed

The flexibility and posture of the neck in sauropod dinosaurs has long been contentious. Improved constraints on sauropod neck function will have major implications for what we know of their foraging strategies, ecology and overall biology. Several hypotheses have been proposed, based primarily on osteological data, suggesting different degrees of neck flexibility. This study attempts to assess the effects of reconstructed soft tissues on sauropod neck flexibility through systematic removal of muscle groups and measures of flexibility of the neck in a living analogue, the ostrich (Struthio camelus). The possible effect of cartilage on flexibility is also examined, as this was previously overlooked in osteological estimates of sauropod neck function. These comparisons show that soft tissues are likely to have limited the flexibility of the neck beyond the limits suggested by osteology alone. In addition, the inferred presence of cartilage, and varying the inter-vertebral spacing within the synovial capsule, also affect neck flexibility. One hypothesis proposed that flexibility is constrained by requiring a minimum overlap between successive zygapophyses equivalent to 50% of zygapophyseal articular surface length (ONP50). This assumption is tested by comparing the maximum flexibility of the articulated cervical column in ONP50 and the flexibility of the complete neck with all tissues intact. It is found that this model does not adequately convey the pattern of flexibility in the ostrich neck, suggesting that the ONP50 model may not be useful in determining neck function if considered in isolation from myological and other soft tissue data. PMID:23967284

Cobley, Matthew J; Rayfield, Emily J; Barrett, Paul M

2013-01-01

119

Neck masses in infants and children.  

PubMed

Neck masses, both inflammatory and tumoral, are common in infants and children, and most are benign. This article examines the imaging characteristics of various neck masses in infants and children. Routine radiographs, ultrasound, CT scan, MR imaging, and nuclear scintigraphy are discussed. PMID:9374993

Swischuk, L E; John, S D

1997-11-01

120

Anthropomorphic dummy neck modeling and injury considerations.  

PubMed

This study investigates the modeling of the Hybrid III dummy head and neck system and its response under impulsive loading. Two neck models were proposed, one rigid, one flexible; both give satisfactory head kinematics upon comparing to minisled test results. The flexible neck model provides a more detailed understanding of the Hybrid III neck structure behavior. It indicates that the Hybrid III neck has a torque response similar to a human neck but has higher shear response. During flexion whiplash, the torque at the occipital condyle reverses its direction at about 25 ms after impact. Since concussion may be related to the head angular acceleration, which reaches its peak value in the first 25 ms, it might be necessary to extend the existing human torque-rotation corridor to include the neck response in this region. For flexion whiplash impact, simulation results indicated that the neck injury threshold is reached before exceeding the head injury threshold as the impact velocity is increased. PMID:2930623

Deng, Y C

1989-02-01

121

Neural crest origins of the neck and  

Microsoft Academic Search

The neck and shoulder region of vertebrates has undergone a complex evolutionary history. To identify its underlying mechanisms we map the destinations of embryonic neural crest and mesodermal stem cells using Cre-recombinase- mediated transgenesis. The single-cell resolution of this genetic labelling reveals cryptic cell boundaries traversing the seemingly homogeneous skeleton of the neck and shoulders. Within this assembly of bones

Toshiyuki Matsuoka; Per E. Ahlberg; Nicoletta Kessaris; Palma Iannarelli; Ulla Dennehy; William D. Richardson; Andrew P. McMahon; Georgy Koentges

122

Displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the relationship of the disposition and outcome of patients with displaced femoral neck fractures with the type of surgical treatment. From 1993 to 1996, 186 patients with displaced femoral neck fractures who were 65 years of age or older were treated at one hospital. One hundred and twenty fractures were treated with reduction and internal fixation; 66

Richard Iorio; William L Healy; David Appleby; John Milligan; Michael Dube

2004-01-01

123

Femoral Neck Fractures After Hip Resurfacing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Femoral neck fracture is an important early complication after hip resurfacing. Our aims were firstly to determine the incidence of fracture in an independent series and secondly, in a case control study, to investigate potential risk factors. Fifteen femoral neck fractures occurred in a series of 842 procedures, representing an incidence of 1.8%. No relationship existed between age, sex, and

Robert-Tobias Steffen; Pedro R. Foguet; Stephen J. Krikler; Roger Gundle; David J. Beard; David W. Murray

2009-01-01

124

Analysis and measurement of neck loads  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: To examine the loads imposed on the structures of the neck by the performance of physical tasks, a biomechanical model of the neck was con- structed. The model incorporated 14 bilateral pairs of muscle equivalents crossing the C4 level. A double linear programming optimization scheme that minimized maximum muscle contraction intensity and then vertebral com- pression force while equilibrating

Sean P. Moroney; Albert B. Schultz; James A. A. Miller

1988-01-01

125

Chondrosarcomas of the head and neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chondrosarcomas of the head and neck are uncommon. Over a 35-year period (1950–1985) at our institution, 557 patients had an established diagnosis of chondrosarcoma. In 28 (5%) of these patients, the tumor was located in the head and neck region. A retrospective analysis was performed in an attempt to accurately define clinical characteristics, management, and outcome in these 28 patients.

Deborah S. Ruark; Uwe K. Schlehaider; Jatin P. Shah

1992-01-01

126

Reliability of normalisation methods for EMG analysis of neck muscles.  

PubMed

Acceptable reliability of normalisation contractions in electromyography (EMG) is paramount for testing conducted over a number of days or if normal laboratory strength testing equipment is unavailable. This study examined the reliability of maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) and sub-maximal (60%) isometric contractions for use in neck muscle EMG studies. Surface EMG was recorded bilaterally from eight sites around the neck at C4/5 level from five healthy male subjects. Subjects performed MVIC and sub-maximal normalisation contractions using an isokinetic dynamometer (ID) and a portable cable dynamometer with attached strain gauge (PCD) in addition to a MVIC against a manual resistance (MR). Subjects were tested in flexion, extension, left and right lateral bending and were retested by the same tester within a two-week period. Intra class correlation co-efficients (ICC) were calculated for each testing method and contraction direction and a mean ICC was calculated across all contraction directions. All normalisation methods produced excellent within-day reliability (mean ICC >0.80) but only the MVICs using the ID and PCD had acceptable reliability when assessed between-days. This study confirmed the validity of using MVICs elicited using the ID and PCD as reliable reference contractions for the normalisation of neck EMG. PMID:16477104

Netto, Kevin J; Burnett, Angus F

2006-01-01

127

The relationship between lower neck shear force and facet joint kinematics during automotive rear impacts.  

PubMed

A primary goal of biomechanical safety research is the definition of localized injury thresholds in terms of quantities that are repeatable and easily measureable during experimentation. Recent biomechanical experimentation using human cadavers has highlighted the role of lower cervical facet joints in the injury mechanism resulting from low-speed automotive rear impacts. The present study was conducted to correlate lower neck forces and moments with facet joint motions during simulated rear impacts in an effort to define facet joint injury tolerance thresholds that can be used to assess automobile safety. Four male and four female intact head-neck complexes were obtained from cadaveric specimens and subjected to simulated automotive rear impacts using a pendulum-minisled device. Cervical spine segmental angulations and localized facet joint kinematics were correlated to shear and axial forces, and bending moments at the cervico-thoracic junction using linear regression. R(2) coefficients indicated that spinal kinematics correlated well with lower neck shear force and bending moment. Correlation slope was steeper in female specimens, indicating greater facet joint motions for a given loading magnitude. This study demonstrated that lower neck loads can be used to predict lower cervical facet joint kinematics during automotive rear impacts. Higher correlation slope in female specimens corresponds to higher injury susceptibility in that population. Although lower neck shear force and bending moment demonstrated adequate correlation with lower cervical facet joint motions, shear force is likely the better predictor due to similarity in the timing of peak magnitudes with regard to maximum facet joint motions. PMID:21433081

Stemper, Brian D; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Maiman, Dennis J

2011-04-01

128

Penetrating Neck Trauma: Review of 192 Cases  

PubMed Central

Background The neck region contains a high density of vital organ structures within a relatively small and unprotected anatomic region, making it one of the most vulnerable areas of the body for all types of injuries. Objectives In this article, we studied penetrating neck trauma cases in Alzahra Hospital over a 10-year period. Patients and Methods In this retrospective, descriptive, analytical study, penetrating neck trauma cases admitted to Alzahra Hospital between April 2000 and April 2010 were analyzed for epidemiology, mechanism of trauma, zone of trauma, therapeutic method, injuries to other organs, complications, and mortality. Results Among 192 penetrating neck injuries, the mean age at the time of injury was 25.08 ± 15.02 years. Of these cases, 96.4% occurred in men. The most common mechanisms of trauma was stab wounds (85.93%). In 56.3% of penetrating neck injuries, zone 2 was involved. Neck exploration was positive in 84.4% of cases, and 52.1% of patients underwent surgery. Vascular exploration was the most common cause of surgery (67.2% of patients). The most common surgical intervention was vein ligation (50.8% of cases). In 11.98% of cases, another organ injury occurred simultaneously, and chest injury was the most common coexisting problem (65.2%). Complications were reported in 9.3% of patients, and the need for intubation was the most common complication (5.2% of patients). Mortality rate was 1.5%. Conclusions According to the findings of this study, the most common cause of penetrating neck injuries was stab wounds, and the majority of patients were young men, therefore, preventive measures should be implemented. Because of fatal complications associated with neck injuries, we recommend early neck exploration in unstable cases or when injuries are deeper than the platysma.

Mahmoodie, Mohsen; Sanei, Behnam; Moazeni-Bistgani, Mohammad; Namgar, Mohammad

2012-01-01

129

Pathology Case Study: Anterior Cervical Neck Mass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a head & neck pathology case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology in which a 55-year-old male has an increasing neck mass with a choking feeling. Visitors are given both the microscopic and gross descriptions, including images, and are given the opportunity to diagnose the patient. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in head and neck pathology.

Schubert, Eric

2007-08-31

130

Racemose cysticercosis presenting as cystic neck swelling  

PubMed Central

Cysticercosis is a parasitic infection caused by the larvae of the tapeworm Taenia solium which occurs in neural and extraneural forms. Latter commonly involves subcutaneous tissue, skeletal muscles, and eyes. Head and neck sites commonly involved are buccal mucosa, tongue, and lips. It presents as single or multiple submucosal/cutaneous firm nodules. We report a case of cysticercosis of the supraclavicular region of the neck where it presented as a large soft cystic swelling. The diagnosis was made by sonography and confirmed by gross and microscopic examination to be racemose cysticercosis. This is a very rare cause of a neck swelling not reported previously in the literature.

Jain, Shraddha; Kumar, Sunil; Joshi, Deepti; Kaushal, Amit

2012-01-01

131

Neck and back pain: musculoskeletal disorders.  

PubMed

In this article, non-neurologic causes of neck and back pain are reviewed. Musculoskeletal pain generators include muscle, tendon, ligament, intervertebral disc, articular cartilage, and bone. Disorders that can produce neck and back pain include muscle strain, ligament sprain, myofascial pain, fibromyalgia, facet joint pain, internal disc disruption, somatic dysfunction, spinal fracture, vertebral osteomyelitis, and polymyalgia rheumatica. Atlantoaxial instability and atlanto-occipital joint pain are additional causes of neck pain. Back pain resulting from vertebral compression fracture, Scheuermann's disease, spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis, pregnancy, Baastrup's disease, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, and sacral stress fracture is discussed. PMID:17445737

Meleger, Alec L; Krivickas, Lisa S

2007-05-01

132

Timely management of penetrating neck trauma: Report of three cases  

PubMed Central

In head and neck surgery, penetrating neck injuries are uncommon. The neck contains many important structures, so such trauma can cause significant morbidity and mortality. A patient with penetrating neck trauma should be examined promptly in the emergency room. If possible, damaged tissue and organ fragments should be preserved carefully.

Kaya, Kamil Hakan; Koc, Arzu Karaman; Uzut, Mahmut; Altintas, Ahmet; Yegin, Yakup; Say?n, Ibrahim; Kayhan, Fatma Tulin

2013-01-01

133

Endurance and fatigue characteristics of the neck flexor and extensor muscles during isometric tests in patients with postural neck pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustained postural loading of the cervical spine during work or recreational tasks may contribute to the development of neck pain. The aim of this study was to compare neck muscle endurance and fatigue characteristics during sub-maximal isometric endurance tests in patients with postural neck pain, with asymptomatic subjects. Thirteen female patients with postural neck pain and 12 asymptomatic female control

Stephen Edmondston; Guðný Björnsdóttir; Thorvaldur Pálsson; Hege Solgård; Kasper Ussing; Garry Allison

2011-01-01

134

Head and neck mucosal melanoma: a review.  

PubMed

: Head and neck mucosal melanoma (MM) is an aggressive and rare neoplasm of melanocytic origin. To date, few retrospective series and case reports have been reported on MM. This article reviews the current evidence on head and neck MM and the molecular pathways that mediate the pathogenesis of this disease. Head and neck MM accounts for 0.7%-3.8% of all melanomas and involve (in decreasing order of frequency) the sinonasal cavity, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, and upper esophagus. Although many studies have examined MM of the head and neck and the underlying molecular pathways, individual genetic and molecular alterations were less investigated. Further studies are needed to complement existing data and to increase our understanding of melanocytes tumorigenesis. PMID:24423929

Lourenço, Silvia V; Fernandes, Juliana D; Hsieh, Ricardo; Coutinho-Camillo, Claudia M; Bologna, Sheyla; Sangueza, Martin; Nico, Marcello M S

2014-07-01

135

Isolated Enteric Cyst in the Neck  

PubMed Central

We report an extremely rare case of isolated enteric cyst in the neck region which was diagnosed on the histopathological examination. It was suspected to be duplication cyst on radiology. We have also evaluated the differential diagnosis and management issues.

Mahore, Amit; Sankhe, Shilpa; Tikeykar, Vishakha

2014-01-01

136

Eyelid lymphedema following neck dissection and radiotherapy.  

PubMed

Chronic eyelid lymphedema following neck dissection and radiotherapy is rare with 1 report in the literature. The authors report 3 cases and review the literature. Two cases had bilateral neck dissection and developed bilateral eyelid lymphedema and 1 case had unilateral neck dissection (left side) and developed ipsilateral lymphedema. Two patients underwent surgical debulking of lymphedema with significant improvement in symptoms. One patient declined surgical intervention, and the lymphedema remained unchanged. Chronic eyelid lymphedema following neck dissection and radiotherapy occurs where predominant lymphatic drainage to the submandibular and deep cervical lymph node basin is removed. Lymphedema tends to persist when it occurs and in selected cases appearance can be effectively improved by debulking and excision of festoons. PMID:23446298

Sagili, Suresh; Selva, Dinesh; Malhotra, Raman

2013-01-01

137

Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer  

Cancer.gov

This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

138

Techniques for rejuvenation of the neck platysma.  

PubMed

This article reviews evaluation and techniques for neck rejuvenation. It includes a detailed overview of cervical rhytidectomy and discusses the potential complications associated with surgical correction. A review of clinical outcomes in the literature is also included. PMID:24745386

Farrior, Edward; Eisler, Lindsay; Wright, Harry V

2014-05-01

139

[Phlegmon of the neck after tonsillectomy].  

PubMed

A case of the neck phlegmon on the seventh day after the tonsillectomy due to recurrent peritonsillar abscesses was described. Intravenous antibiotic therapy (Amikacin) and drainage prevented complications was applied. The complete recovery was observed. PMID:2052373

Obrebowski, A

1991-01-01

140

Treatment for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer  

Cancer.gov

In this clinical trial, researchers seek to determine if giving concurrent radiation therapy and chemotherapy to patients with inoperable, recurrent head and neck cancer who were treated initially with radiation therapy will improve survival rates for these patients.

141

Neck Injury in Advanced Military Aircraft Environments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Anecdotal evidence suggests that soft tissue neck injury may be an occupational hazard for fighter pilots, particularly those in the later generation trainer and combat aircraft. Recent advances in helmet-mounted devices increase the potential for injury....

1990-01-01

142

Aging small Canada geese by neck plumage  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The neck plumage method, a new technique for separating immature from adult Canada geese (Branta canadensis) in the hand, was evaluated by comparison with the notched tail feather and cloacal examination methods. Two (1.4 percent) of 141 geese examined were misaged, resulting in a 6 percent error in the immature-adult ratio obtained by the neck plumage method. The neck plumage method is a rapid aging method and reasonable accuracy (94 percent) can be obtained. It can also be used to differentiate immatures from adults on the ground at distances up to 175 yards, but was almost impossible to use when geese were in flight. As yet, the neck plumage method has only been tested on the subspecies (B. c. hutchinsii-parvipes complex) in the Tall-Grass Prairie population of small Canada geese.

Higgins, K. F.; Schoonover, L. J.

1969-01-01

143

Manipulation or Mobilisation for Neck Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Manipulation and mobilisation are often used, either alone or combined with other treatment approaches, to treat neck pain. Objectives To assess if manipulation or mobilisation improves pain, function\\/disability, patient satisfaction, quality of life, and global perceived effect in adults with acute\\/subacute\\/chronic neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache or radicular findings. Search strategy CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, issue

A. Gross; J. Miller; J. D'Sylva; S. J. Burnie; C. H. Goldsmith; N. Graham; T. Haines; G. Brønfort; J. L. Hoving

2010-01-01

144

Femoral neck fractures after hip resurfacing.  

PubMed

Femoral neck fracture is an important early complication after hip resurfacing. Our aims were firstly to determine the incidence of fracture in an independent series and secondly, in a case control study, to investigate potential risk factors. Fifteen femoral neck fractures occurred in a series of 842 procedures, representing an incidence of 1.8%. No relationship existed between age, sex, and fracture incidence. Mechanical factors such as notching, femoral neck lengthening, and varus alignment of the femoral component were found to have a similar incidence in both fracture and control groups. The proportion of patients that had at least 1 mechanical risk factor was not different between the 2 groups (fracture group, 50%; control group, 41%). Established avascular necrosis of the femoral head was evident in all retrieved femoral heads (n = 9) of patients who sustained postoperative fracture; in none of these patients was avascular necrosis the initial diagnosis. This study suggests that in our practice, mechanical factors, such as neck notching, neck lengthening, or varus angulations, are not the primary cause of femoral neck fractures. PMID:18555654

Steffen, Robert-Tobias; Foguet, Pedro R; Krikler, Stephen J; Gundle, Roger; Beard, David J; Murray, David W

2009-06-01

145

Lessons learned from next-generation sequencing in head and neck cancer  

PubMed Central

Scientific innovation has enabled whole exome capture and massively parallel sequencing of cancer genomes. In head and neck cancer, next-generation sequencing has granted us further understanding of the mutational spectrum of squamous cell carcinoma. As a result of these new technologies, frequently occurring mutations were identified in NOTCH1, a gene that had not previously been implicated in head and neck cancer. The current review describes the most common mutations in head and neck cancer: TP53, NOTCH1, HRAS, PIK3CA, and CDKN2A. Emphasis is placed on the involved cellular pathways, clinical correlations, and potential therapeutic interventions. Additionally, the implications of human papillomavirus on mutation patterns are discussed.

Loyo, Myriam; Li, Ryan J.; Bettegowda, Chetan; Pickering, Curtis R.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Agrawal, Nishant

2013-01-01

146

The effect of balance training on cervical sensorimotor function and neck pain.  

PubMed

The authors' aim was to evaluate the effect of balance training on cervical joint position sense in people with subclinical neck pain. Thirty-four participants were randomly assigned to balance training or to stay active. Sensorimotor function was determined before and after 5 weeks of training by assessing the ability to reproduce the neutral head position and a predefined rotated head position. After balance training, the intervention group showed improved joint repositioning accuracy and decreased pain whereas no effects were observed in the control group. A weak correlation was identified between reduced neck pain intensity and improved joint repositioning. The present data demonstrate that balance training can effectively improve cervical sensorimotor function and decrease neck pain intensity. PMID:23663191

Beinert, Konstantin; Taube, Wolfgang

2013-01-01

147

Molecular classification of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma using cDNA microarrays.  

PubMed

Squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck constitute an anatomically heterogeneous group of neoplasms that share in common a causal association with tobacco and alcohol exposure. The clinical course of these neoplasms is difficult to predict based on established prognostic clinicopathological criteria. Given the genetic complexity of head and neck cancers, it is not surprising that correlations with individual genetic abnormalities have also been disappointing. Several authors have suggested that global gene expression patterns can be used to subgroup patients with cancer. Here we report the use of cDNA microarrays containing 9216 clones to measure global patterns of gene expression in these neoplasms. We have used a statistical algorithm to identify 375 genes, which divide patients with head and neck tumors into two clinically distinct subgroups based on gene expression patterns. Our results demonstrate that gene expression profiling can be used as a predictor of outcome. PMID:11861402

Belbin, Thomas J; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Barber, Ilana; Socci, Nicholas; Wenig, Bruce; Smith, Richard; Prystowsky, Michael B; Childs, Geoffrey

2002-02-15

148

Comparison of electromyographic activity and range of neck motion in violin students with and without neck pain during playing.  

PubMed

Neck pain is common in violin students during a musical performance. The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in superficial neck muscles with neck motion when playing the violin as well as neck range of motion (ROM) at rest, between violin students with and without neck pain. Nine violin students with neck pain and nine age- and gender-matched subjects without neck pain were recruited. Muscle activity of the bilateral upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and superficial cervical extensor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Kinematic data on neck motion while playing and active neck ROM were also measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Independent t-tests were used to compare EMG activity with kinematic data between groups. These analyses revealed that while playing, both the angle of left lateral bending and leftward rotation of the cervical spine were significantly greater in the neck pain group than among those without neck pain. Similarly, EMG activity of the left upper trapezius, both cervical extensors, and both sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly greater in the neck pain group. The active ROM of left axial rotation was significantly lower in the neck pain group. These results suggest that an asymmetric playing posture and the associated increased muscle activity as well as decreased neck axial rotation may contribute to neck pain in violin students. PMID:23247874

Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Ha, Sung-min; Kim, Su-jung; Choi, Hyun-jung; Weon, Jong-hyuck

2012-12-01

149

Future directions and treatment strategies for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.  

PubMed

Head and neck cancer is a devastating disease that afflicts many individuals worldwide. Conventional therapies are successful in only a limited subgroup and often leave the patient with disfigurement and long lasting adverse effects on normal physiologic functions. The field is in dire need of new therapies. Oncolytic viral as well as targeted therapies have shown some success in other malignancies and are attractive for the treatment of head and neck cancer. Recently, it has been shown that a subset of head and neck cancers is human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and that this subset of cancers is biologically distinct and more sensitive to chemoradiation therapies although the underlying mechanism is unclear. However, chemoresistance remains a general problem. One candidate mediator of therapeutic response, which is of interest for the targeting of both HPV-positive and -negative tumors is the human DEK proto-oncogene. DEK is upregulated in numerous tumors including head and neck cancers regardless of their HPV status. Depletion of DEK in tumor cells in culture results in sensitivity to genotoxic agents, particularly in rapidly proliferating cells. This suggests that tumors with high DEK protein expression may be correlated with poor clinical response to clastogenic therapies. Targeting molecules such as DEK in combination with new and/or conventional therapies, holds promise for novel future therapeutics for head and neck cancer. PMID:22683420

Wise-Draper, Trisha M; Draper, David J; Gutkind, J Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; Wells, Susanne I

2012-09-01

150

Future Directions and Treatment Strategies for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas  

PubMed Central

Head and neck cancer is a devastating disease that afflicts many individuals worldwide. Conventional therapies are successful in only a limited subgroup and often leave the patient with disfigurement and long lasting adverse effects on normal physiological functions. The field is in dire need of new therapies. Oncolytic viral as well as targeted therapies have shown some success in other malignancies and are attractive for the treatment of head and neck cancer. Recently, it has been shown that a subset of head and neck cancers is human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and that this subset of cancers is biologically distinct and more sensitive to chemoradiation therapies although the underlying mechanism is unclear. However, chemoresistance remains a general problem. One candidate mediator of therapeutic response, which is of interest for the targeting of both HPV-positive and -negative tumors is the human DEK proto-oncogene. DEK is upregulated in numerous tumors including head and neck cancers regardless of their HPV status. Depletion of DEK in tumor cells in culture results in sensitivity to genotoxic agents, particularly in rapidly proliferating cells. This suggests that tumors with high DEK protein expression may be correlated with poor clinical response to clastogenic therapies. Targeting molecules such as DEK in combination with new and/or conventional therapies, holds promise for novel future therapeutics for head and neck cancer.

Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Draper, David J.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Wells, Susanne I.

2012-01-01

151

Analysis of 120 Pectoralis Major Flaps for Head and Neck Reconstruction  

PubMed Central

Background A pectoralis major flap is one of the standard tools for the reconstruction of defects of the head and neck. Despite the technical advancement in free tissue transfer in head and neck reconstruction, the benefits of a pectoralis major flap should not be overlooked. The purpose of this study is to evaluate our 17 years of experience in reconstructing defects of the head and neck region using the pectoralis major flap. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 112 patients (120 cases) who underwent pectoralis major flap operations for head and neck reconstruction during a period ranging from 1994 to 2010. Results In our series, no total necrosis of the flap occurred. Of the total cases, 30.8% presented with flap-related complications. Major complications occurred in 20% of all of the cases but were then all successfully treated. The male sex was correlated with the occurrence of overall complications (P=0.020) and major complications (P=0.007). Preoperative albumin levels of <3.8 g/dL were correlated with the formation of fistula (P=0.030). Defects of the hypopharynx were correlated with the occurrence of major complications (P=0.019) and the formation of fistula (P=0.012). Secondary reconstructions were correlated with the occurrence of overall complications (P=0.013) and the formation of fistula (P=0.030). Conclusions A pectoralis major flap is still considered to be a safe, versatile one-stage reconstruction procedure in the management of the defects of head and neck and the protection of the carotid artery.

You, Young Sun; Chang, Yong Joon; Kim, Kuyl Hee; Jung, Sung Won; Rho, Young Soo

2012-01-01

152

Femoral neck shortening after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture.  

PubMed

This study assesses femoral neck shortening and its effect on gait pattern and muscle strength in patients with femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation. Seventy-six patients from a multicenter randomized controlled trial participated. Patient characteristics and Short Form 12 and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were collected. Femoral neck shortening, gait parameters, and maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured and differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Variables of patients with little or no shortening, moderate shortening, and severe shortening were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Median femoral neck shortening was 1.1 cm. Subtle changes in gait pattern, reduced gait velocity, and reduced abductor muscle strength were observed. Age, weight, and Pauwels classification were risk factors for femoral neck shortening. Femoral neck shortening decreased gait velocity and seemed to impair gait symmetry and physical functioning. In conclusion, internal fixation of femoral neck fractures results in permanent physical limitations. The relatively young and healthy patients in our study seem capable of compensating. Attention should be paid to femoral neck shortening and proper correction with a heel lift, as inadequate correction may cause physical complaints and influence outcome. PMID:23823040

Zielinski, Stephanie M; Keijsers, Noël L; Praet, Stephan F E; Heetveld, Martin J; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

2013-07-01

153

[Minocycline sclerotherapy for lymphorrhea following neck dissection].  

PubMed

Postoperative cervical lymphorrhea is a complication uncommonly encountered following neck dissection for which several treatment modalities have been described in the literature. We managed 8 cases of lymphorrhea after neck dissection by injecting Minocycline through a drainage tube. We attempted this procedure for lymph discharge that had continued despite pressure dressing and systemic management with nutritional modification for about 1 week. This treatment rapidly resolved lymph discharge in 6 of the 8 cases. No patient required surgical intervention. Minocycline sclerotherapy has typically been used to treat pleural effusion, ascites, pneumothorax, and other cystic diseases of the liver, pancreas, and kidney. In many cases, this therapy brings rapid resolution. This inefficiency is due to the acidity and toxicity of Minocycline. No major adverse effects have been reported. We believe that Minocycline sclerotherapy is effective for rapidly resolving lymphorrhea following neck dissection and use of this therapy should be attempted before surgical intervention. PMID:12692958

Koda, Hiroko; Gotsu, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Taro; Ishikawa, Norihiko; Kishimoto, Seiji

2003-02-01

154

Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer  

PubMed Central

Treatment for patients with head and neck cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach. Radiotherapy is employed as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant to surgery. Each specific subsite dictates the appropriate radiotherapy techniques, fields, dose, and fractionation scheme. Quality of life is also an important issue in the management of head and neck cancer. The radiation-related complications have a tremendous impact on the quality of life. Modern radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy, can offer precise radiation delivery and reduce the dose to the surrounding normal tissues without compromise of target coverage. In the future, efforts should be made in the exploration of novel strategies to improve treatment outcome in patients with head and neck cancer.

Yeh, Shyh-An

2010-01-01

155

Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Background: This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. Methods: Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox's proportional hazard model. Results: Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients, of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p < 0.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. Conclusions: With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge.

Thariat, Juliette [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology/IBDC CNRS UMR, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice, Cedex 2 (France); Ang, K. Kian; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ahamad, Anesa [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); University of the West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago); Williams, Michelle D. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Myers, Jeffrey N. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); El-Naggar, Adel K. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ginsberg, Lawrence E. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medicine, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Morrison, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S., E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-03-01

156

Chiropractic and Neck Pain: Conservative Care of Cervical Pain, Injury  

MedlinePLUS

... head, normal aging, and everyday wear and tear. Neck pain can be very bothersome, and it can have ... are some of the most typical causes of neck pain: Injury and Accidents: A sudden forced movement of ...

157

49 CFR 572.133 - Neck assembly and test procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 false Neck assembly and test procedure. 572.133 Section 572.133...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.133 Neck...

2013-10-01

158

Hyperparathyroidism following head and neck irradiation  

SciTech Connect

A history of head and neck irradiation in childhood or adolescence was found in 22 of 130 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism compared with only 12 of 400 control patients. Among 200 patients with a known history of childhood irradiation, biochemical or surgical evidence of hyperparathyroidism was found in ten, a prevalence of 5%. This is at least 30 times the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism in the general population. The data indicate that head and neck irradiation should be regarded as an important risk factor in the subsequent development of hyperparathyroidism.

Rao, S.D.; Frame, B.; Miller, M.J.; Kleerskoper, M.; Block, M.A.; Parfitt, A.M.

1980-02-01

159

Study on measurement method of necking process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, a new method of optical scanning measurement was put forward, using the semiconductor laser and octagon prism. This method realized on-line non-touch measurement of the necking value and necking position in the process of material tensile testing by the assist of machine scanning. The principle and key technical of this measuring method had been introduced, and the main factor to the measurement accuracy was analysed too. It is shown by test that this method is more accurate, faster and simpler than ever before for giving out the capability of material by omnipotence tensile machine.

Zhang, Lizhong; Yu, Zhenglin; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Guohua; Wang, Yanfei

2005-02-01

160

Intramuscular sternohyoid hemangioma: an unusual neck mass.  

PubMed

A neck mass with soft consistency suggests the diagnosis of a cyst which is usually congenital in origin. Needle aspiration yielding blood should alert the physician the possibility of hemangioma although it is very rare. Ultrasonography and computed tomography will delineate the extent and nature of the lesion and provide the roadmap for surgical excision. We report a case of a girl who presented with a painless neck mass which was later found to be a hemangioma originating from the sternohyoid muscle. The morphology and immunohistochemical stain were consistent with hemangioma. PMID:23629567

M, Irfan; Soleh, Mohd Najeb; Abdul Rahman, Khairul Shakir; T S, Sharifah Emilia

2013-04-01

161

Multidisciplinary Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer  

PubMed Central

Head and neck cancer remains a significant cause of morbidity worldwide. Multimodality treatment is often the only way to achieve improved function, quality of life, and survival, calling for a multidisciplinary team approach, particularly in view of the rapid advances being made in various fields. The roles of the head and neck surgeon and reconstructive surgeon are discussed, together with the input afforded by specialists in areas such as diagnostic imaging, radiation therapy, medical oncology, and gene therapy. Telemedicine is of importance in centers where multidisciplinary expertise is not available.

Varkey, Prashanth; Liu, Yi-Tien; Tan, Ngian Chye

2010-01-01

162

Civilian firearm injuries in head and neck.  

PubMed

Firearm injuries to the head and neck contribute to substantial medical, medicolegal, economic as well as social problems. Internal wounds in the head and neck by firearms are usually complicated and are diagnostically and therapeutically challenging cases. Based on four cases of non-fatal firearm injuries, we discuss problems related to firearm wounds, their irregular path, final lodgment of the bullet and their diagnostic and therapeutic consequences. In the present study it was observed that a fatal looking firearm injury can result in a favourable and interesting outcome. PMID:23120188

Sonkhya, Nishi; Singhal, Pawan; Srivastava, Subodh P

2005-07-01

163

The relationship between survival and socio-economic status for head and neck cancer in Canada  

PubMed Central

Background Human papilloma virus (HPV) is emerging as the primary cause for some head and neck cancers. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between head and neck cancer (HNC) survival and socioeconomic status (SES) in Canada, and to investigate changes in the relationship between HNC survival and SES from 1992 to 2005. Methods Cases were drawn from the Canadian Cancer Registry (1992–2005), and were categorized into three subsites: oropharynx, oral cavity, and “other” (hypopharynx, larynx, and nasopharynx). Demographic and socioeconomic information were extracted from the Canadian Census of Population data for the study period, which included three census years: 1991, 1996 and 2001. We linked cases to income quintiles (InQs) according to patients’ postal codes. Results Overall survival, without controlling for smoking, for oropharyngeal cancer increased dramatically from 1992–2005 in Canada. This increase in survival for oropharynx cancer was eliminated by the introduction of controls for smoking. Survival for all head and neck cancer subsites was strongly correlated with SES, as measured by income quintile, with lower InQ’s having lower survival than higher. Lastly, the magnitude of the difference in survival between the highest and lowest income quintiles increased significantly over the time period studied for oropharynx cancer, but did not statistically significantly change for oral cavity cancer or other head and neck cancers. Conclusions These data confirm a significant impact of socioeconomic deprivation on overall survival for head and neck cancers in Canada, and may provide indirect evidence that HPV-positive head and neck cancers are more common in higher socioeconomic groups.

2014-01-01

164

Effects of neck flexion on discriminative and cognitive processing in anticipatory postural control during bilateral arm movement.  

PubMed

We investigated the effect of neck flexion on discriminative and cognitive processing in postural control during bilateral arm movement while standing, using event-related potential (ERP) and electromyogram. Fourteen healthy subjects flexed their arms to the target stimuli with a 20% probability in neck resting and flexion positions. Amplitude and latency of N2 and P3, anterior deltoid (AD) reaction time, onset time of postural muscles with respect to AD activation, and peak amplitude and latency of all muscles were measured. With neck flexion, N2 and P3 amplitudes increased, N2 and P3 latencies and AD reaction time shortened, and onset times of all postural muscles became earlier. No significant differences in peak amplitude and latency of each muscle were found between neck positions. Significant positive correlations were found in changes with neck flexion between P3 latency and AD reaction time, and between N2 latency and onset time of erector spinae. These suggest that with neck flexion, attention allocation to discriminative and cognitive processing increased, and the processing speed increased with shortening of reaction time in focal muscles. In addition, the onset time of postural muscles became earlier without changing the activation pattern, which was associated with the hastened discriminative processing. PMID:22579828

Fujiwara, Katsuo; Yaguchi, Chie; Kunita, Kenji; Mammadova, Aida

2012-06-19

165

Jaw–neck dysfunction in whiplash-associated disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports data from recent studies on integrative jaw–neck motor control in healthy subjects and disturbed jaw–neck behaviour in whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). The results show that neck function is an integral part of natural jaw behaviour, and that neck injury can impair jaw function and therefore disturb eating behaviour. We also show preliminary results from implementation of a new

Per-Olof Eriksson; Birgitta Häggman-Henrikson; Hamayun Zafar

2007-01-01

166

Neck proprioceptors contribute to the modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity to the lower limbs of humans.  

PubMed

Several different strategies have now been used to demonstrate that the vestibular system can modulate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in humans and thereby contribute to the regulation of blood pressure during changes in posture. However, it remains to be determined how the brain differentiates between head-only movements that do not require changes in vasomotor tone in the lower limbs from body movements that do require vasomotor changes. We tested the hypothesis that neck movements modulate MSNA in the lower limbs of humans. MSNA was recorded in 10 supine young adult subjects, at rest, during sinusoidal stretching of neck muscles (100 cycles, 35° peak to peak at 0.37 ± 0.02 Hz) and during a ramp-and-hold (17.5° for 54 ± 9 s) static neck muscle stretch, while their heads were held fixed in space. Cross-correlation analysis revealed cyclical modulation of MSNA during sinusoidal neck muscle stretch (modulation index 45.4 ± 5.3 %), which was significantly less than the cardiac modulation of MSNA at rest (78.7 ± 4.2 %). Interestingly, cardiac modulation decreased significantly during sinusoidal neck displacement (63.0 ± 9.3 %). By contrast, there was no significant difference in MSNA activity during static ramp-and-hold displacements of the neck to the right or left compared with that with the head and neck aligned. These data suggest that dynamic, but not static, neck movements can modulate MSNA, presumably via projections of muscle spindle afferents to the vestibular nuclei, and may thus contribute to the regulation of blood pressure during orthostatic challenges. PMID:24691758

Bolton, P S; Hammam, E; Macefield, V G

2014-07-01

167

The variation of the strength of neck extensor muscles and semispinalis capitis muscle size with head and neck position.  

PubMed

Semispinalis capitis muscle (SECM) is a massive and long cervico-thoracic muscle which functions as a main head and neck extensor muscle. The aim of this study was to detect the effect of head and neck positions on the strength of neck extensor muscles and size of SECM in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy women students voluntarily participated in this study. An ultrasonography apparatus (Hitachi EUB 525) and a system of tension-meter were used to scan the right SECM at the level of third cervical spine and to measure the strength of neck extensor muscles at three head and neck positions. Neck extensor muscles were stronger in neutral than flexion or than extension positions while the size of SECM was larger in extension than neutral or than flexion position. The force generation capacity of the main neck extensor muscle was lower at two head and neck flexion and extension positions than neutral position. PMID:23561867

Rezasoltani, A; Nasiri, R; Faizei, A M; Zaafari, G; Mirshahvelayati, A S; Bakhshidarabad, L

2013-04-01

168

Neck tumour with syncope due to paroxysmal sympathetic withdrawal  

Microsoft Academic Search

A patient with recurrent squamous carcinoma metastatic to the neck after radical neck dissection and high dose radiation therapy developed paroxysmal hypotensive episodes that were severe, spontaneous and characterised by suppressed sympathetic but not enhanced parasympathetic activity. Intravenous pressors were successful in treating acute episodes but neither drug therapy nor surgical neck exploration reliably prevented syncopal attacks. Glossopharyngeal and\\/or vagal

J Onrot; R G Wiley; A Fogo; I Biaggioni; D Robertson; A S Hollister

1987-01-01

169

49 CFR 572.133 - Neck assembly and test procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...drawing 880105-250. (b) When the head-neck assembly consisting of the head (drawing 880105-100X), neck (drawing 880105-250), bib simulator...2.0 in-lb). (3) Mount the head-neck assembly, defined in subsection...

2010-10-01

170

49 CFR 572.133 - Neck assembly and test procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...drawing 880105-250. (b) When the head-neck assembly consisting of the head (drawing 880105-100X), neck (drawing 880105-250), bib simulator...2.0 in-lb). (3) Mount the head-neck assembly, defined in subsection...

2009-10-01

171

FDG-PET in Head and Neck, and Thyroid Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

FDG-PET has become a standard clinical imaging modality in patients with head and neck cancer. It contributes valuable information in localizing a primary tumor in patients with neck nodal metastases from an unknown primary, in the staging of primary head and neck cancer, and in the detection of recurrent disease. In addition, FDG-PET provides inde- pendent prognostic information in patients

Homer A. Macapinlac

2005-01-01

172

Femoral neck fracture: a complication of femoral nailing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fracture of the shaft of the femur in adults is common after road traffic accidents. Until recently it was not known that a fracture of the femoral neck can occur while fixing the femoral shaft fracture with an intramedullary nail. We report three patients in whom femoral neck fractures occurred during femoral nailing. Fractures of the femoral neck were

F. A. Khan; M. A. Ikram; A. A. Badr; H. Al-Khawashki

1995-01-01

173

Neck injury tolerance under inertial loads in side impacts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neck injury remains a major issue in road safety. Current side impact dummies and side impact crashworthiness assessments do not assess the risk of neck injury. These assessments are limited by biofidelity and knowledge regarding neck injury criteria and tolerance levels in side impacts. Side impact tests with PMHS were performed at the Heidelberg University in the 1980s and 1990s

Andrew S McIntosh; Dimitrios Kallieris; Bertrand Frechede

2007-01-01

174

Neck Circumference as an Anthropometric Measure of Obesity in Diabetics  

PubMed Central

Background: Obesity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Insulin resistance is associated with visceral subcutaneous fat content. Neck circumference (NC) is a marker of upper body subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare NC in diabetics and non-diabetics and to correlate NC with other anthropometric measures. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 350 type 2 diabetics and 350 non-diabetics of >30 years of age. Anthropometric parameters like body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference, and NC were measured. Independent t-test and Pearson's correlation were the tests of significance done to analyze quantitative data. Results: There was positive correlation of NC, BMI, and index of central obesity. The NC in diabetics was significantly higher than in non-diabetics (P < 0.001). NC >36 cm in diabetics and >37 cm in non-diabetics was the best cutoff value to determine subjects with central obesity. Conclusion: The findings indicated that NC may be used both in clinical practice and in epidemiologic studies as a straightforward and reliable index. It is an economical easy to use test with less consumption of time and correlates well with other standard anthropometric parameters.

Aswathappa, Jagadamba; Garg, Sumit; Kutty, Karthiyanee; Shankar, Vinutha

2013-01-01

175

Death Following Atypical Compression of the Neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors present 3 cases of asphyxia caused by atypical compression of the neck by the metal bed bars fitted at the sides of the bed to prevent falling out. These occurred in 3 elderly women living in nursing homes, confined to bed by severe neuro- psychiatric disturbances. In all 3 cases, the minor nature of the skin lesions and

Nunzio Di Nunno; Michele Vacca; Fulvio Costantinides; Cosimo Di Nunno

2003-01-01

176

Molecular therapy of head and neck cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aberrant expression of growth factor receptor systems and dysregulation of the downstream cell signalling molecules have been reported in a wide range of epithelial tumours including head and neck cancer. In some cases, such alterations have been associated with a poor prognosis. In the past 25 years, several antigen specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, mouse, chimeric, humanized and human versions), and

Helmout Modjtahedi

2005-01-01

177

Outcomes Research in Head and Neck Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quality of life (QOL) considerations are uniquely important in head and neck oncology outcomes research due to the multidimensional impact of these tumors and their treatment. Patient variables, tumor variables and treatment variables must be considered comprehensively in order to maximize the validity of QOL outcome measures. There are a multitude of QOL instruments, which can be classified into: (1)

Kevin Fung; Jeffrey E. Terrell

2004-01-01

178

Anatomy of lithosphere necking during orthogonal rifting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The evolution of lithosphere necking is a fundamental parameter controlling the structural architecture and thermal-state of rifted margin. The necking shape depends on several parameters, including the extensional strain-rate and thermal layering of the lithosphere. Despite a large number of analogue and numerical modelling studies on lithosphere extension, a quantitative description of the evolution of necking through time is still lacking. We used analogue modelling to simulate in three-dimension the progression of lithosphere thinning and necking during orthogonal rifting. In our models we simulated a typical "cold and young" 4-layer lithosphere stratigraphy: brittle upper crust (loose quartz sand), ductile lower crust (silicon-barite mixture), brittle upper mantle (loose quartz sand), and ductile lower mantle (silicon-barite mixture). The experimental lithosphere rested on a glucose syrup asthenosphere. We monitored model evolution by periodic and coeval laser scanning of both the surface topography and the lithosphere base. After model completion, each of the four layers was removed and the top of the underlying layer was scanned. This technical approach allowed us to quantify the evolution in space and time of the thinning factors for both the whole lithosphere (?z) and the crust (?). The area of incremental effective stretching (?y) parallel to the extensional direction was obtained from the ?z maps.

Nestola, Yago; Cavozzi, Cristian; Storti, Fabrizio

2013-04-01

179

Perioperative Immunonutrition in Head and Neck Cancer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Head and neck cancer (HNCA) has one of the highest mortality rates of all cancers. Immune-modulating nutrition (IMN) support before and after surgery has the potential to promote host defense, anti-tumor activities, and wound healing. The purpose of this ...

M. McCarthy

2007-01-01

180

Neck irradiation, carotid injury and its consequences.  

PubMed

Carotid stenosis is a major sequela of head and neck irradiation that has not received the attention it deserves. Its impact on the quality of life of patients can be substantial. This review discusses the incidence, pathogenesis and consequences of radiation-induced carotid stenosis following head and neck irradiation. This review is based on literature search (Medline and Pub Med) and cross-referencing. The incidence of significant carotid stenosis following head and neck irradiation range from 30% to 50%. Patients with carotid stenosis are at increased risk for stroke. Factors such as hypertension, diabetes, smoking and obesity increase the risk. Increased attention to the clinical signs of carotid stenosis and evaluation of these patients with appropriate imaging studies, together with strict implementation of management of hypertension and diabetes and, counseling on obesity and smoking have the potential to reduce the incidence of this sequela of head and neck irradiation. Those patients with severe carotid stenosis can be managed with endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting. PMID:15380164

Abayomi, Olubunmi K

2004-10-01

181

Hypoxia in head and neck cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A high level of hypoxia in solid tumours is an adverse prognostic factor for the poor outcome of cancer patients following treatment. This review describes the status of research into finding a practical method for measuring hypoxia and treating hypoxic tumours. The application of such methodology would enable the selection of head and neck cancer treatment based on an individual's

A Y Isa; M Phil; T H WARD; C M L WEST; N J SLEVIN; J J HOMER

2006-01-01

182

Economic burden of head and neck cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

This literature review presents the economics of head and neck cancer (HNC), the world's sixth most common neoplasm. HNC economics is complicated by the involvement of multiple body sites, multiple medical specialties, and multiple treatment modalities. Economic analyses of HNC published in English between 1990 and 2002 were identified from electronic data sources. Additional studies were identified manually from bibliographies

Jennifer M. Lee; Marco Turini; Marc F. Botteman; Jennifer M. Stephens; Chris L. Pashos

2004-01-01

183

Localized Necking: An Inclined Imperfection Model.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Marciniak and Kuczynski (M-K) analysis, which associates localized necking in sheet metal with pre-existing imperfections, has been modified such that the imperfection or groove is inclined (rather than normal) to the major principal strain axes. The ...

K. S. Chan A. K. Ghosh D. A. Koss

1981-01-01

184

Bladder Neck Closure for Treating Pediatric Incontinence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims of Study: In order to evaluate the effects of bladder neck closure (BNC) for treatment of pediatric incontinence, on the quality of life of those children, we reviewed the files of 17 children who underwent this procedure during the last 5 years. Information on previous surgery before BNC, continence and complications after BNC and patient satisfaction are gathered.Material and

P. Hoebeke; P. De Kuyper; H. Goeminne; E. Van Laecke; K. Everaert

2000-01-01

185

Disseminated cryptococcosis involving the head and neck.  

PubMed

A middle-aged patient with HIV presented with very distinctive maculopapular cutaneous lesions involving the face and lymphadenopathy confined to the neck. A diagnosis of disseminated cryptococcosis was made based on pathological analysis of lymph node and skin lesions. PMID:24495975

Lazzara, Matthew; Joshi, Arjun

2014-01-01

186

Molecular therapy in head and neck oncology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Therapeutic management of locally advanced, recurrent and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is often limited by a rather unfavorable efficacy and toxicity ratio. Since the 1990s, targeted molecular therapy has been extensively investigated both as a single modality and in combination with cytotoxic treatments, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. EGFR is commonly over expressed in HNSCC and

Søren M. Bentzen; Jan B. Vermorken; Jacques Bernier

2009-01-01

187

Regional survey of femoral neck fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the South-west Thames Region 2619 patients (2105 women and 514 men) were discharged with a diagnosis of femoral neck fracture in 1974. The equivalent of a 250-bedded hospital was occupied throughout the year. The incidence, average length of stay, and mortality rate rose with increasing age and there were differences in these indices in the five health areas. These

S C Gallannaugh; A Martin; P H Millard

1976-01-01

188

Deep Neck Infections: A Constant Challenge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Although the advent of antibiotics and improved dental care decreased the incidence and mortality, deep neck infections (DNIs) are not uncommon and present a challenging problem due to the complex anatomy and potentially lethal complications that may arise. Objectives: This study reviews our experience with DNIs and tries to identify the predisposing factors of life-threatening complications. Methods: A retrospective

Paolo Boscolo-Rizzo; Carlo Marchiori; Francesca Montolli; Alberto Vaglia; Maria Cristina Da Mosto

2006-01-01

189

Head and Neck Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Head and Neck Steering Committee Roster Co-chairs Ezra Cohen, M.D.University of Chicago Chicago, IL John "Drew" Ridge, M.D., Ph.D.Fox Chase Cancer CenterPhiladelphia, PA Brian O'Sullivan, M.B.University of Toronto, Princess Margaret HospitalToronto, Ontario Members David

190

Malignant Triton Tumor (MTT) of the neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

Malignant Triton Tumor (MTT) is a rare, malignant periphere nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. One third of described MTT's were located at the head and neck region. One third of these are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. MTT most often appears in the third decade.MTT's are very aggressive tumors with early metastases and the overall survival is poor (26%).

Kristine Bjørndal Sørensen; Christian Godballe; Annelise Krogdahl

2006-01-01

191

Chronic calcific tendinitis of the neck  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the first three cases of chronic calcific tendinits of the neck. This condition is diagnosed radiologically by the presence of calcification located just inferior to the anterior tubercle of C1. The calcification is at the insertion of the longus colli muscle. No soft tissue swelling is present and the patients are asymptomatic.

Newmark, H.; Zee, C.S.; Frankel, P.; Robinson, A.; Blau, L.; Gans, D.C.

1981-12-01

192

Head and Neck Cancer: Altered Fractionation Schedules  

Microsoft Academic Search

Local control is paramount in the treatment of local- ized advanced head and neck cancer. Standard radio- therapy cures a high percentage of early tumors—more than 80% of the early laryngeal tumors—but fewer of the advanced tumors. Attempts have therefore been made to improve the therapeutic ratio by: A) hyperfractionation: reducing the dose per fraction to reduce late morbidity; the

M. I. SAUNDERS; Marie Curie

193

49 CFR 572.17 - Neck.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.17 Neck...relative to the pendulum arm of the head center of...relative to the pendulum arm of the head center...relative to the pendulum arm. Rotation (degrees...a height such that the velocity at impact is...

2010-10-01

194

49 CFR 572.17 - Neck.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.17 Neck...relative to the pendulum arm of the head center of...relative to the pendulum arm of the head center...relative to the pendulum arm. Rotation (degrees...a height such that the velocity at impact is...

2013-10-01

195

49 CFR 572.17 - Neck.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.17 Neck...relative to the pendulum arm of the head center of...relative to the pendulum arm of the head center...relative to the pendulum arm. Rotation (degrees...a height such that the velocity at impact is...

2009-10-01

196

Giant osteochondroma of the talar neck.  

PubMed

Giant osteochondroma is an uncommon entity and it is rare in the foot and ankle region. It is extremely rare to originate from the talus. In this case report we present a case of giant osteochondroma arising from the talar neck measuring 100 mm × 90 mm × 30 mm. It is unique because of the size, site and the age at presentation. PMID:23415762

Al Mutani, Mohammed; Mahmood, Aatif; Chandrasekar, C R

2013-03-01

197

Effect of vibration stimulation to neck extensor muscles on reaction time in various saccadic eye movements.  

PubMed

We investigated the effect of vibration stimulation to the neck extensors on reaction time in various saccades that are controlled by different higher neural system. Visually guided, memory-guided and anti saccades were performed under no-vibration and vibration (frequency, 100 Hz; amplitude, 0.5 mm) applied to the trapezius muscles. For memory-guided and anti saccades, the reaction time under the vibration was significantly shorter than that under no-vibration. A significant correlation was found between the shortening of reaction time for memory-guided saccade and that for visually guided saccade (r = 0.726, p <.01), but no significant correlation was found between anti-saccade and other saccades. These findings suggested that the higher saccadic neural pathway was strongly activated during the vibration stimulation to the neck extensors, and furthermore the effect of activation on facilitatory and inhibitory functions differed among the three types of saccades. PMID:19922393

Fujiwara, Katsuo; Kunita, Kenji; Furune, Naoe

2009-01-01

198

Is Planned Neck Dissection Necessary for Head and Neck Cancer After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine regional control of local regional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), along with the role and selection criteria for neck dissection after IMRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 90 patients with stage N2A or greater HNSCC were treated with definitive IMRT from December 1999 to July 2005. Three clinical target volumes were defined and were treated to 70 to 74 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy, respectively. Neck dissection was performed for selected patients after IMRT. Selection criteria evolved during this period with emphasis on post-IMRT [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in recent years. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 29 months (range, 0.2-74 months). All living patients were followed at least 9 months after completing treatment. Thirteen patients underwent neck dissection after IMRT because of residual lymphadenopathy. Of these, 6 contained residual viable tumor. Three patients with persistent adenopathy did not undergo neck dissection: 2 refused and 1 had lung metastasis. Among the remaining 74 patients who were observed without neck dissection, there was only 1 case of regional failure. Among all 90 patients in this study, the 3-year local and regional control was 96.3% and 95.4%, respectively. Conclusions: Appropriately delivered IMRT has excellent dose coverage for cervical lymph nodes. A high radiation dose can be safely delivered to the abnormal lymph nodes. There is a high complete response rate. Routine planned neck dissection for patients with N2A and higher stage after IMRT is not necessary. Post-IMRT [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is a useful tool in selecting patients appropriate for neck dissection.

Yao Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA (United States)]|[Department of Otolaryngology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA (United States)]. E-mail: min-yao@uiowa.edu; Hoffman, Henry T.; Funk, Gerry F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA (United States)]|[Department of Otolaryngology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA (United States); Chang, Kristi [Department of Otolaryngology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA (United States); Smith, Russell B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA (United States)]|[Department of Otolaryngology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA (United States); Tan Huaming [Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Clamon, Gerald H. [Department of Medical Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA (United States); Dornfeld, Ken [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA (United States)]|[Department of Otolaryngology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA (United States); Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA (United States)]|[Department of Otolaryngology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa Health Care, Iowa City, IA (United States)

2007-07-01

199

Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STUDY DESIGN. Muscle use evoked by exercise was determined by quantifying shifts in signal relaxation times of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Images were collected at rest and after exercise at each of two intensities (moderate and intense) for each of four head movements: 1) extension, 2) flexion, 3) rotation, and 4) lateral flexion. OBJECTIVE. This study examined the intensity and pattern of neck muscle use evoked by various movements of the head. The results will help elucidate the pathophysiology, and thus methods for treating disorders of the cervical musculoskeletal system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in T2 has been shown to indicate muscle use during the activity. The noninvasive nature of magnetic resonance imaging appears to make it an ideal approach for studying the function of the complex neuromuscular system of the neck. METHODS. The extent of T2 increase was examined to gauge how intensely nine different neck muscles or muscle pairs were used in seven subjects. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation was assessed to infer the pattern of use among and within individual neck muscles or muscle pairs. RESULTS. Signal relaxation increased with exercise intensity for each head movement. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation also increased with exercise load. Neck muscles or muscle pairs extensively used to perform each head movement were: extension--semispinalis capitis and cervicis and splenius capitis; flexion--sternocleidomastoid and longus capitis and colli; rotation--splenius capitis, levator scapulae, scalenus, semispinalis capitis ipsilateral to the rotation, and sternocleidomastoid contralateral; and lateral flexion--sternocleidomastoid CONCLUSION. The results of this study, in part, agree with the purported functions of neck muscles derived from anatomic location. This also was true for the few selected muscles that have been examined in human electromyographic studies. Neck muscle function and morphology can be studied at a detailed level using exercise-induced shifts in magnetic resonance images.

Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

1995-01-01

200

Why sauropods had long necks; and why giraffes have short necks  

PubMed Central

The necks of the sauropod dinosaurs reached 15 m in length: six times longer than that of the world record giraffe and five times longer than those of all other terrestrial animals. Several anatomical features enabled this extreme elongation, including: absolutely large body size and quadrupedal stance providing a stable platform for a long neck; a small, light head that did not orally process food; cervical vertebrae that were both numerous and individually elongate; an efficient air-sac-based respiratory system; and distinctive cervical architecture. Relevant features of sauropod cervical vertebrae include: pneumatic chambers that enabled the bone to be positioned in a mechanically efficient way within the envelope; and muscular attachments of varying importance to the neural spines, epipophyses and cervical ribs. Other long-necked tetrapods lacked important features of sauropods, preventing the evolution of longer necks: for example, giraffes have relatively small torsos and large, heavy heads, share the usual mammalian constraint of only seven cervical vertebrae, and lack an air-sac system and pneumatic bones. Among non-sauropods, their saurischian relatives the theropod dinosaurs seem to have been best placed to evolve long necks, and indeed their necks probably surpassed those of giraffes. But 150 million years of evolution did not suffice for them to exceed a relatively modest 2.5 m.

Wedel, Mathew J.

2013-01-01

201

Optical Correlation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Coherent optical correlators, classified as spatial plane correlators, frequency plane correlators, and special reference correlators, are examined. Basic principles, advantages, and disadvantages are discussed, and comparisons made with incoherent correl...

J. A. Boden

1974-01-01

202

Deep neck abscesses: the Singapore experience.  

PubMed

This study aims to review our experience with deep neck abscesses, identify key trends, and improve the management of this condition. This is a retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with deep neck abscesses in the Department of ENT (Otorhinolaryngology) at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore between 2004 and 2009. Patient demographics, etiology, bacteriology, systemic disease, radiology, treatment, complications, duration of hospitalization, and outcomes were reviewed. 131 patients were included (64.9% male, 35.1% female) with a median age of 51.0 years. 54 (41.2%) patients had diabetes mellitus. The parapharyngeal space (23.7%) was the most commonly involved space. Odontogenic and upper airway infections were the leading causes of deep neck abscesses (28.0% each). Klebsiella pneumoniae (27.1%) was the most commonly cultured organism in this study and among the diabetic patients (50.0%). 108 (82.4%) patients underwent surgical drainage. 42 patients suffered complications. All 19 patients, who had upper airway obstruction, had either a tracheostomy or intubation. Patients with multi-space abscesses, diabetes mellitus, and complications had prolonged hospitalizations. Old age and diabetes are risk factors for developing deep neck abscesses and their sequelae. The empiric choice of antibiotics should recognize that a dental source is likely, and that Klebsiella is most common in diabetics. Surgical drainage and adequate antibiotic coverage remains the cornerstone of treatment of deep neck abscesses. Therapeutic needle aspiration may successfully replace surgical drainage, if the abscesses are small and no complications are imminent. Airway obstruction should be anticipated in multi-space and floor of mouth abscesses. PMID:20857130

Lee, Yan Qing; Kanagalingam, Jeevendra

2011-04-01

203

Current potential and limitations of molecular diagnostic methods in head and neck cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditional diagnostic methods such as clinical assessment, histopathological examination and imaging techniques are limited\\u000a in their capacity to provide information on prognosis and treatment choice of head and neck cancer. In recent years, molecular\\u000a techniques have been developed that enabled us to get more insight into the molecular biological cellular pathways underlying\\u000a tumor progression and metastasis. Correlation of these molecular

Magdy E. Mahfouz; Juan P. Rodrigo; Robert P. Takes; Mohamed N. Elsheikh; Alessandra Rinaldo; Ruud H. Brakenhoff; Alfio Ferlito

2010-01-01

204

Computed tomography imaging of acute neck inflammatory processes  

PubMed Central

Early diagnosis and management of neck infections and inflammatory processes is a common challenge for emergency and ear, neck and throat physicians, as well as radiologists. Emergency neck infections are diverse in their presentation, ranging from a transient enlargement of a lymph node to a rapidly spreading necrotizing fasciitis. Symptoms and signs, with the clinical history, usually suggest the diagnosis. But complex neck anatomy and sometimes limited physical examination can obscure and delay diagnosis, thus the need for an appropriate imaging exam and correct interpretation. In this pictorial review, we will consider common neck acute inflammatory processes that may be encountered in the emergency room and discuss some of their salient imaging findings.

Bou-Assaly, Wessam; Mckellop, Jason; Mukherji, Suresh

2010-01-01

205

[Rare giant salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma on the neck].  

PubMed

The patient has found his neck mass for more than 30 years, and the neck mass has slowly growed into giant tumor. Five days ago, the neck giant mass suddenly burst, hemorrhage and overflow liquid. The giant mass with irregular in shape, surface uneven, skin highly tension and superficial venous engorgement, was seen in left lateral neck. CT scan demonstrates a mixture of solid, cystic and lobulated mass shadow within subcutaneous fat spaces of left lateral neck. Postoperative pathological examination proved that it is salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma. PMID:24620671

Shi, Dongling; Li, Qinghuai

2013-12-01

206

Neck dissection with cervical sensory preservation in thyroid cancer  

PubMed Central

Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Recently, controversy has focused on the management of lymph node metastases, which represent approximately 90% of disease recurrences and may require considerable time, effort, and resources to diagnose and treat. Neck dissections play an essential role in the management of head and neck cancer. A modified radical neck dissection (MND) refers to resection of the lymph nodes in levels II through V and often including the central nodes in level VI. When performing modified neck dissection, we recommend to protect more reserved cervical plexus. The purpose is to better protect patient’s neck skin feeling.

Xue, Shuai; Wang, Peisong

2013-01-01

207

Oral and head and neck cancer. Special listing  

SciTech Connect

The Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Diagnostic and prognostic studies of oral and head and neck cancers; Treatment of oral and head and neck cancers; Rehabilitation and other support following treatment of oral and head and neck cancers; Etiology, epidemiology, and follow-up studies of patients with oral and head and neck cancers; Training programs for dental professions; Broad clinical programs for treatment of head and neck cancers; Salivary gland pathology.

Not Available

1980-07-03

208

Japanese Board Certification System for head and neck surgeons.  

PubMed

The Japan Society for Head and Neck Surgery (JSHNS) started a board certification system for head and neck surgeons in 2010. To become certified, the following qualification and experiences are required: (1) board certification as otorhinolaryngologist, (2) 2 years of clinical experience in a board-certified training facility, (3) clinical care of 100 patients with head and neck cancer under the supervision of board-certified faculty and (4) surgical experience in 50 major head and neck surgical procedures, including 20 neck dissections, under the supervision of board-certified faculty. The following scientific activities are also required during the preceding 5 years: (1) two clinical papers on head and neck cancers presented at major scientific meetings, (2) one clinical paper on head and neck cancer published in a major journal, (3) attendance at two annual meetings of JSHNS and (4) enrolment in three educational programs approved by JSHNS. The qualifying examination consists of multiple choice tests and oral examinations. A total of 151 head and neck surgeons were certified in 2010 followed by 43 in 2011 and 34 in 2012, while the membership of JSHNS dramatically increased from 1201 in 2007 to 1748 in 2013. Although the board certification system for head and neck surgeons was started only recently, it has encouraged many residents and fellows as well as established head and neck surgeons. We believe that this system will contribute to further advancement in the clinical practice for head and neck cancers in Japan. PMID:24581685

Yoshimoto, Seiichi; Nakashima, Torahiko; Fujii, Takashi; Matsuura, Kazuto; Otsuki, Naoki; Asakage, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Hanai, Nobuhiro; Homma, Akihiro; Monden, Nobuya; Okami, Kenji; Sugasawa, Masashi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Nibu, Ken-ichi; Kamata, Shin-etsu; Kishimoto, Seiji; Kohno, Naoyuki; Fukuda, Satoshi; Hisa, Yasuo

2014-08-01

209

Prediction of Difficult Laryngoscopy in Obese Patients by Ultrasound Quantification of Anterior Neck Soft Tissue1  

PubMed Central

Prediction of difficult laryngoscopy in obese patients is challenging. In 50 morbidly obese patients, we quantified the neck soft tissue from skin to anterior aspect of trachea at the vocal cords using ultrasound. Thyromental distance <6 cm, mouth opening <4 cm, limited neck mobility, Mallampati score >2, abnormal upper teeth, neck circumference >45 cm, and sleep apnoea were considered predictors of difficult laryngoscopy. Of the nine (18%) difficult laryngoscopy cases, seven had obstructive sleep apnoea history; whereas, only 2 of the 41 easy laryngoscopy patients did (P<0.001). Difficult laryngoscopy patients had larger neck circumference [50 (3.8) vs. 43.5 (2.2) cm; P<0.001] and more pre-tracheal soft tissue [28 (2.7) mm vs. 17.5 (1.8) mm; P<0.001] [mean (SD)]. Soft tissue values completely separated difficult and easy laryngoscopies. None of the other predictors correlated with difficult laryngoscopy. Thus, an abundance of pretracheal soft tissue at the level of vocal cords is a good predictor of difficult laryngoscopy in obese patients.

Ezri, T.; Gewurtz, G.; Sessler, D.I.; Medalion, B.; Szmuk, P.; Hagberg, C.; Susmallian, S.

2005-01-01

210

Modified valgus osteotomy of the femoral neck for late presenting femoral neck stress fractures in military recruits  

PubMed Central

Neglected or late presenting femoral neck stress fractures are often associated with varus deformity, with potential risks of nonunion and osteonecrosis. We proposed a surgical technique whereby a wedge osteotomy was performed at the basal part of the neck, on the tensile surface, keeping the inferomedial femoral neck as a hinge. The femoral shaft was abducted to close the osteotomy site and it was fixed with three cannulated cancellous screws. Three military recruits who presented with neglected femoral neck stress fracture with varus deformity were operated on with the proposed modified femoral neck valgus osteotomy. All the fractures united without any complications and the patients resumed their professional activity.

Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Manoharan, Shakthivel RR; Chakrabarty, Somya

2013-01-01

211

Retrospective Study of Selective Submandibular Neck Dissection versus Radical Neck Dissection for N0 or N1 Necks in Level I Patients with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of selective submandibular neck dissection (SMND) in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with or without nodal metastasis. Patients. From a total of 384 patients with untreated OSCC who underwent radical excision, we identified 229 with clinically N0 necks and 68 with clinically N1 necks in level I. Main Outcome Measures. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year regional control and 5-year disease specific survival (DSS) were compared for SMND, radical neck dissection (RND), and modified radical neck dissection (MRND). Results. In clinically node-negative necks, the regional control rates were 85.2% with SMND and 83.3% with MRND (P = 0.89), and 5-year DSS rates were 86.5% and 87.0%, respectively, (P = 0.94). In clinically N1 necks, the regional control rates were 81.3% with SMND and 83.0% with RND (P = 0.72), and the DSS rates were 81.3% and 80.0%, respectively, (P = 0.94). Type of neck dissection was not significantly associated with regional control or DSS on either univariate or multivariate analysis using Cox's proportional hazard model. Conclusions. SMND can be effectively applied in elective and therapeutic management to patients with OSCC that are clinically assessed as N0 or N1 to level I of the neck.

Yanai, Yuta; Sugiura, Tsuyoshi; Imajyo, Ikumi; Yoshihama, Naoya; Akimoto, Naonari; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Hayashi, Kohei; Fujinaga, Takahiro; Shirasuna, Kanemitsu; Takenoshita, Yasuharu; Mori, Yoshihide

2012-01-01

212

[Overloading to neck extensor muscles is an aggravating factor to induce further neck drop in isolated neck extensor myopathy (Katz). A case report].  

PubMed

A 78-year-old woman was hospitalized because of progressive anterior neck drop over 4 months prior to admission. She was normal except for mild weakness of her neck, trapezius and biceps brachii muscles. EMG revealed mild myopathic changes in the neck extensors, trapezius, deltoid and sternocleidomastoid muscles. Bilateral splenius capitis muscles had high intensities on T2-weighted and STIR pulse-sequenced MRI. However, there were no inflammatory changes in the right splenius muscle biopsy. Accordingly, the abnormal MRI finding seems not to result from an inflammatory process but from an physiological increase of intracellular water content due to sustained muscle contraction. Because apparent neuromuscular diseases responsible for neck drop were excluded, her clinical features met the criteria of isolated neck extensor myopathy (INEM, Katz). After strict bed-rest for one month, her neck drop improved dramatically. When she returned to the previous life style after discharge, her symptoms of the neck drop reappeared. Although the cause of INEM remains unclear, the present case indicates that the condition is reversible at least in the early stage of the disease, and the overloading to the neck extensor muscles is an aggravating factor of the neck drop in INEM. PMID:11257793

Oishi, K; Shigeto, H; Maruyama, K; Oya, Y; Ogawa, M; Nonaka, I; Kawai, M

2000-09-01

213

Ultrastructure of dendritic spines: correlation between synaptic and spine morphologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dendritic spines are critical elements of cortical circuits, since they establish most excitatory synapses. Recent studies have reported correlations between morphological and functional parameters of spines. Specifically, the spine head volume is correlated with the area of the postsynaptic density (PSD), the number of postsynaptic receptors and the ready-releasable pool of transmitter, whereas the length of the spine neck is

Jon I. Arellano; Ruth Benavides-Piccione; Javier DeFelipe; Rafael Yuste

2007-01-01

214

Spine neck plasticity regulates compartmentalization of synapses.  

PubMed

Dendritic spines have been proposed to transform synaptic signals through chemical and electrical compartmentalization. However, the quantitative contribution of spine morphology to synapse compartmentalization and its dynamic regulation are still poorly understood. We used time-lapse super-resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED) imaging in combination with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) measurements, two-photon glutamate uncaging, electrophysiology and simulations to investigate the dynamic link between nanoscale anatomy and compartmentalization in live spines of CA1 neurons in mouse brain slices. We report a diversity of spine morphologies that argues against common categorization schemes and establish a close link between compartmentalization and spine morphology, wherein spine neck width is the most critical morphological parameter. We demonstrate that spine necks are plastic structures that become wider and shorter after long-term potentiation. These morphological changes are predicted to lead to a substantial drop in spine head excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) while preserving overall biochemical compartmentalization. PMID:24657968

Tønnesen, Jan; Katona, Gergely; Rózsa, Balázs; Nägerl, U Valentin

2014-05-01

215

Combined tracheoesophageal transection after blunt neck trauma.  

PubMed

Survival following tracheoesophageal transection is uncommon. Establishing a secure airway has the highest priority in trauma management. Understanding the mechanism of the incident can be a useful adjunct in predicting the likelihood and severity of specific anatomical patterns of injuries. We discuss published literature on combined tracheoesophageal injuries after blunt neck trauma and their outcome. A search of MEDLINE for papers published regarding tracheoesophageal injury was made. The literature search identified 14 such articles referring to a total of 27 patients. Age ranged from 3-73 years. The mechanism of injury was secondary to a rope/wire in 33%, metal bar in 4% of cases and unspecified in 63%. All of the patients were managed surgically. A number of tissues were used to protect the anastomosis including pleural and sternocleidomastoid muscle flaps. There were no reported mortalities. Patients with combined tracheoesophageal injury after blunt neck trauma require acute management of airway along with concomitant occult injuries. PMID:23723621

Hamid, Umar Imran; Jones, James Mark

2013-04-01

216

Combined tracheoesophageal transection after blunt neck trauma  

PubMed Central

Survival following tracheoesophageal transection is uncommon. Establishing a secure airway has the highest priority in trauma management. Understanding the mechanism of the incident can be a useful adjunct in predicting the likelihood and severity of specific anatomical patterns of injuries. We discuss published literature on combined tracheoesophageal injuries after blunt neck trauma and their outcome. A search of MEDLINE for papers published regarding tracheoesophageal injury was made. The literature search identified 14 such articles referring to a total of 27 patients. Age ranged from 3-73 years. The mechanism of injury was secondary to a rope/wire in 33%, metal bar in 4% of cases and unspecified in 63%. All of the patients were managed surgically. A number of tissues were used to protect the anastomosis including pleural and sternocleidomastoid muscle flaps. There were no reported mortalities. Patients with combined tracheoesophageal injury after blunt neck trauma require acute management of airway along with concomitant occult injuries.

Hamid, Umar Imran; Jones, James Mark

2013-01-01

217

Pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma of the head and neck.  

PubMed

Pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma is not exclusive to the head and neck. However, the unique anatomy of the head and neck requires special consideration and treatment modifications. The low incidence of these tumors has prevented the development of rigorous treatment protocols. Treatment strategies must be individualized on the basis of histopathologic subtype, prognostic indicators, tumor location, tumor extent, available clinical trial data, and hospital resources. The primary treatment of these tumors typically involves a combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Advancements in surgical and radiotherapy techniques have reduced patient morbidity, whereas new chemotherapeutic protocols have improved local disease control and overall survival. Because of the infrequency and complexity of these tumors, patients may benefit from referral to centers with a comprehensive multidisciplinary team that has experience treating these tumors in the pediatric population. If possible, patients should be enrolled and treated on the current Children's Oncology Group protocol. PMID:16343365

Gillespie, M Boyd; Marshall, David T; Day, Terry A; Mitchell, Allen O; White, David R; Barredo, Julio C

2006-01-01

218

Multiple Cancers of the Head and Neck  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Multiple head and neck cancers are not rare entities and according to studies in the literature, their incidence is increasing. The emergence of multiple cancers is explained by the phenomenon of "field cancerization". Patients with cancer of the upper digestive and respiratory tract develop most often a second malignancy, usually in the upper aero-digestive tract and among them, those with larynx cancer ranks first among patients with multiple cancers. In the literature and in practice, we met rare combination of multiple cancers, associations that appear to be "random", cannot be explained by any of the hypotheses developed: exposure to carcinogens, genetic susceptibility, and immunodeficiency or cancer treatments after index tumor. Follow-up of patients who have had a head and neck cancer and periodic control are important for early detection of multiple cancers.

HEROIU (CATALOIU), Adriana-Daniela; DANCIU, Cezara Elisabeta; POPESCU, Cristian Radu

2013-01-01

219

[Unilateral neck mass, dysphagia and dyspnea].  

PubMed

Extraocular sebaceous carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor, arising from skin and salivary glands. An important differential diagnosis in the head and neck region is metastasizing squamous cell carcinoma. Using case histories, the clinical and histological findings as well as the therapeutic principles of this entity are described. Only a few cases of this malignancy in the ENT area are published in the literature. PMID:20694546

Hertel, V; Bozzato, A; Alexiou, C

2010-08-01

220

A disappearing left-sided neck mass.  

PubMed

The patient was a 48-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with complaints of a left-sided painful neck mass, which changed in size relative to ingestion of meals. He denied voice change, fever, chills, weight loss, dysphagia and hoarseness. Physical examination was unremarkable. CT scan demonstrated a 3.9 mm calculus of the submandibular gland duct. Therapeutic sialendocopy was successfully performed. PMID:22764156

Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt

2012-01-01

221

Translational Research in Head and Neck Oncology  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Translational research in head and neck oncology has evolved dramatically. Ongoing discoveries in basic mechanisms of cancer\\u000a biology and technological advances in both diagnostic imaging and radiation delivery have enhanced the ability to improve\\u000a treatment outcomes. The overarching goal for all translational research should be to enlarge the armamentarium from which\\u000a clinicians can rationally select the most appropriate options for

David S. Yoo; David M. Brizel

222

Neck injury response to direct head impact.  

PubMed

Previous in vivo studies have observed flexion of the upper or upper/middle cervical spine and extension at inferior spinal levels due to direct head impacts. These studies hypothesized that hyperflexion may contribute to injury of the upper or middle cervical spine during real-life head impact. Our objectives were to determine the cervical spine injury response to direct head impact, document injuries, and compare our results with previously reported in vivo data. Our model consisted of a human cadaver neck (n=6) mounted to the torso of a rear impact dummy and carrying a surrogate head. Rearward force was applied to the model's forehead using a cable and pulley system and free-falling mass of 3.6kg followed by 16.7kg. High-speed digital cameras tracked head, vertebral, and pelvic motions. Average peak spinal rotations observed during impact were statistically compared (P<0.05) to physiological ranges obtained from intact flexibility tests. Peak head impact force was 249 and 504N for the 3.6 and 16.7kg free-falling masses, respectively. Occipital condyle loads reached 205.3N posterior shear, 331.4N compression, and 7.4Nm extension moment. We observed significant increases in intervertebral extension peaks above physiologic at C6/7 (26.3° vs. 5.7°) and C7/T1 (29.7° vs. 4.6°) and macroscopic ligamentous and osseous injuries at C6 through T1 due to the 504N impacts. Our results indicate that a rearward head shear force causes complex neck loads of posterior shear, compression, and extension moment sufficient to injure the lower cervical spine. Real-life neck injuries due to motor vehicle crashes, sports impacts, or falls are likely due to combined loads transferred to the neck by direct head impact and torso inertial loads. PMID:22613632

Ivancic, Paul C

2013-01-01

223

Head and Neck Tumors: Surgery Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The extracranial head and neck region is complex and varied with respect to anatomy, physiology, and pathology. Squamous cell\\u000a carcinoma represents a large proportion of upper aerodigestive tract (sinonasal cavity, oral cavity, nasopharynx, oropharynx,\\u000a hypopharynx, and larynx) malignancies. However, the salivary glands have pathology ranging from mucoepidermoid to adenoid\\u000a cystic and adenocarcinoma. Likewise, common malignancies of the thyroid gland include

Gregory Y. Chin; Uttam K. Sinha

224

Paragangliomas of the head and neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paragangliomas (PGs) are rare tumors of the head and neck that require a multidisciplinary approach to their management. The\\u000a recent elucidation of the genetic and molecular etiology for this disease has led to significant advances in our understanding\\u000a of this disease and has had an important clinical impact. Consideration of genetic testing is strongly suggested for selected\\u000a patients and their

Michael E. Kupferman; Ehab Y. Hanna

2008-01-01

225

Blood transfusion requirements in femoral neck fracture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The blood transfusion requirements of a consecutive series of 249 unselected patients with femoral neck fracture were studied retrospectively. A total of 339 Units of blood were transfused (a mean of 1.36 Units per patient). Blood transfusion occurred in 132 patients (53.0%), with each receiving a mean of 2.57 Units. Patients aged 80 years and above as a group were

D. G. Swain; P. G. Nightingale; J. V. Patel

2000-01-01

226

Bipolar hemiarthroplasty in femoral neck fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty-two elderly patients with a femoral neck fracture treated by bipolar hemiarthroplasty and 36 patients (matched for age) with an Austin-Moore hemiarthroplasty were followed-up and compared. Bipolar replacement resulted in a higher percentage of satisfactory results, less postoperative pain, greater range of movement, more rapid return to unassisted activity, fewer unsatisfactory results and no acetabular erosion. The device functioned as

R. Malhotra; R. Arya; S. Bhan

1995-01-01

227

Undisplaced femoral neck fracture in the elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results and the related conditions of 250 undisplaced femoral neck fractures managed by percutaneous Knowles pinning were evaluated. All of the patients were over 59 years old, and the protocol of management and follow-up was determined prospectively. The duration from injury to management was 3.0 (range 1–12) days, the operation time was 20 (range 10–44) min, and most of

F.-Y. Chiu; W.-H. Lo

1996-01-01

228

Melanoma of the head and neck.  

PubMed Central

A series of 94 patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma of the head and neck region has been studied. Fifty-three of the patients had regional lymph node dissections performed and the results in 37 performed more than 5 years ago are presented. The policy of elective lymph node dissection for invasive melanoma of the head and neck is strongly endorsed, although not proven by the data presented in this limited series. Whenever possible, a total excisional biopsy should be performed to establish the diagnosis. It is recommended that all melanomas be classified by the method of Clark and Mihm and that the level of invasion also be determined. There is an appreciable error in the clinical evaluation of lymph nodes for metastases. In general, it is suggested that elective regional lymph node dissections be performed for invasive melanoma (levels III, IV and V). The literature pertaining to cutaneous melanoma of the head and neck has been reviewed and surgical and pathological problems peculiar to lesions of this region are emphasized.

Harris, M N; Roses, D F; Culliford, A T; Gumport, S L

1975-01-01

229

Head and Neck Cancers in Developing Countries  

PubMed Central

Head and neck cancers are the most common cancers in developing countries, especially in Southeast Asia. Head and neck cancers are more common in males compared to females. This is mainly attributed to tobacco, areca nut, alcohol, etc. Oral cancers are most common amongst all head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC). HNSCC in the developing world differ from those in the Western world in terms of age, site of disease, etiology, and molecular biology. Poverty, illiteracy, advanced stage at presentation, lack of access to health care, and poor treatment infrastructure pose a major challenge in management of these cancers. The annual GDP (gross domestic product) spent on health care is very low in developing countries compared to the developed countries. Cancer treatment leads to a significant financial burden on the cancer patients and their families. Several health programs have been implemented to curb this rising burden of disease. The main aims of these health programs are to increase awareness among people regarding tobacco and to improve access to health care facilities, early diagnosis, treatment, and palliative care.

Joshi, Poonam; Dutta, Sourav; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Nair, Sudhir

2014-01-01

230

Head and neck cancers in developing countries.  

PubMed

Head and neck cancers are the most common cancers in developing countries, especially in Southeast Asia. Head and neck cancers are more common in males compared to females. This is mainly attributed to tobacco, areca nut, alcohol, etc. Oral cancers are most common amongst all head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC). HNSCC in the developing world differ from those in the Western world in terms of age, site of disease, etiology, and molecular biology. Poverty, illiteracy, advanced stage at presentation, lack of access to health care, and poor treatment infrastructure pose a major challenge in management of these cancers. The annual GDP (gross domestic product) spent on health care is very low in developing countries compared to the developed countries. Cancer treatment leads to a significant financial burden on the cancer patients and their families. Several health programs have been implemented to curb this rising burden of disease. The main aims of these health programs are to increase awareness among people regarding tobacco and to improve access to health care facilities, early diagnosis, treatment, and palliative care. PMID:24808947

Joshi, Poonam; Dutta, Sourav; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Nair, Sudhir

2014-04-01

231

Inverted drop testing and neck injury potential.  

PubMed

Inverted drop testing of vehicles is a methodology that has long been used by the automotive industry and researchers to test roof integrity and is currently being considered by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration as a roof strength test. In 1990 a study was reported which involved 8 dolly rollover tests and 5 inverted drop tests. These studies were conducted with restrained Hybrid III instrumented Anthropometric Test Devices (ATD) in production and rollcaged vehicles to investigate the relationship between roof strength and occupant injury potential. The 5 inverted drop tests included in the study provided a methodology producing "repeatable roof impacts" exposing the ATDs to the similar impact environment as those seen in the dolly rollover tests. Authors have conducted two inverted drop test sets as part of an investigation of two real world rollover accidents. Hybrid-III ATD's were used in each test with instrumented head and necks. Both test sets confirm that reduction of roof intrusion and increased headroom can significantly enhance occupant protection. In both test pairs, the neck force of the dummy in the vehicle with less crush and more survival space was significantly lower. Reduced roof crush and dynamic preservation of the occupant survival space resulted in only minor occupant contact and minimal occupant loading, establishing a clear causal relationship between roof crush and neck injuries. PMID:12724903

Forrest, Stephen; Herbst, Brian; Meyer, Steve; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam

2003-01-01

232

Experimental Injury Biomechanics of the Pediatric Neck  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motor vehicle related crashes rank as the most common cause of spinal related injuries in the pediatric population (Platzer et al. 2007; Brown et al. 2001; Kokoska et al. 2001; Eleraky et al. 2000; Hamilton and Myles 1992a; Bonadio 1993; Babcock 1975). Pediatric spinal related trauma accounts for between 1 and 12 % of all spinal related injuries (Hamilton and Myles 1992a; Hadley et al. 1988; Aufdermaur 1974). Cervical spine trauma in children accounts for approximately 2 % of all cervical spinal injuries (Henrys et al. 1977). Approximately 1-2 % of all children admitted for traumatic injury are related to injuries to the cervical spine (Platzer et al. 2007; Brown et al. 2001; Kokoska et al. 2001; Orenstein et al. 1994; Rachesky et al. 1987). Overall, pediatric neck injury rates are significantly lower than adult rates; however, the neck injury rate in children between the ages of 11 and 15 years approaches the adult rate of 18.8 per 100,000 (McGrory et al 1993; Myers and Winkelstein 1995). For children less than 11 years of age, neck injuries are relatively rare (1.2 per 100,000), but have particularly devastating consequences (McGrory et al. 1993). The overall mortality rate amongst victims of pediatric spinal trauma is approximately 16-41 % but considerably higher for the youngest ages (Platzer et al. 2007; Brown et al. 2001; Kokoska et al. 2001; Eleraky et al. 2000; Givens et al. 1996; Orenstein et al. 1994; Hamilton and Myles 1992b).

Nightingale, Roger W.; Luck, Jason F.

233

Vertebral Distraction during Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion Causes Postoperative Neck Pain  

PubMed Central

Objective Vertebral distraction is routinely performed during anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Overdistraction can injure the facet joints and may cause postoperative neck pain consequently. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical relevance of distraction force during ACDF. Methods This study included 24 consecutive patients with single level cervical disc disease undergoing single level ACDF. We measure the maximum torque just before the the arm of the Caspar retractor was suspended by the rachet mechanism by turning the lever on the movable arm using a torque meter. In order to turn the lever using the torque driver, we made a linear groove on the top of the lever. We compared the neck disability index (NDI) and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores between the high torque group (distraction force>6 kgf·cm) and the low torque group (distraction force?6 kgf·cm) at routine postoperative intervals of 1, 3, 5 days and 1, 3, 6 months. Results The VAS scores for posterior neck pain had a linear correlation with torque at postoperative 1st and 3rd days (y=0.99×-1.1, r2=0.82; y=0.77×-0.63, r2=0.73, respectively). VAS scores for posterior neck pain were lower in the low torque group than in the high torque group on both 1 and 3 days postoperatively (3.1±1.3, 2.6±1.0 compared with 6.0±0.6, 4.9±0.8, p<0.01). However, the difference in NDI scores was not statistically significant in all postoperative periods. Conclusion Vertebral distraction may cause posterior neck pain in the immediate postoperative days. We recommend not to distract the intervertebral disc space excessively with a force of more than 6.0 kgf·cm.

Ha, Seung Man; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Oh, Seung Hun; Song, Ji Hwan; Kim, Hyoung Ihl

2013-01-01

234

MR Imaging of Solitary Fibrous Tumors in the Head and Neck  

PubMed Central

Objective Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a very rare tumor. The purpose of this study is to determine the MR imaging features of SFT in the intracranial and extracranial head and neck regions. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed six MR images and two CT images of six histologically proven cases of SFT that occurred in four men and two women, and their ages ranged from 46 to 59 years. These imaging findings were correlated with the microscopic findings of their surgical specimens. Results Six SFTs arose in the meninges (the petrous ridge and the pituitary fossa), the parotid gland, the parapharyngeal space, the buccal space and the maxillary sinus. On the MR images, SFTs in the intracranial and extracranial head and neck regions were mostly isointense to the muscle on the T1-weighted images, they were hyperintense on the T2-weighted images and they all had intense enhancement. On the T1- and T2-weighted images, hypointense lines were observed within in five SFTs. On the CT images, the SFTs were hypodense to the muscle on the unenhanced images and they were heterogeneously enhanced on the contrast-enhanced images. An exceptional case of pituitary SFT was hypointense on the T2-weighted images and it was hyperdense on the unenhanced CT images, which correlated with the increased collagenous component and the cellular compactness. Conclusion The imaging features of SFT are nonspecific; however, SFT should be included in the differential diagnosis of masses involving the intracranial and extracranial head and neck regions.

Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Hyung Jin; Shin, Ji Hoon; Jeong, Ae Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Cho, Kyung Ja

2005-01-01

235

Effect of Occupant and Impact Factors on Forces within Neck: II. Analysis of Specific Subsets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The forces generated in the cervical spine were evaluated for a substantial number of motor-vehicle occupants in an associated study.[1] Correlation between these forces and various occupant- and impact-related parameters was generally not high for the broad groupings of the population considered at that time. In this research, smaller subsets with more elements in common were extracted from the data to try to detect any underlying relationships that might exist for the neck force. Although correlation coefficients for these subsets were higher than those for the previous groupings in more than three-quarters of the matches undertaken, the values still did not indicate consistently good fits. This suggests that there is no simple relationship for the force within the cervical spine and this, in turn, means that the potential for neck injury has to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. 1. Effect of Occupant and Impact Factors on Forces within Neck: I. Overview of Large Population, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. in press (2000).

Shaibani, Saami J.

2000-03-01

236

Direction of hip arthroplasty dislocation in patients with femoral neck fractures  

PubMed Central

In order to prevent hip arthroplasty dislocations, information regarding the direction of the dislocation is important for accurate implant positioning and for optimising the postoperative regimens in relation to the surgical approach used. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of the surgical approach on the direction of the dislocation in patients treated by a hemiarthroplasty (HA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) after a femoral neck fracture. Fracture patients have a high risk for dislocations, and this issue has not been previously studied in a selected group of patients with a femoral neck fracture. We analysed the radiographs of the primary dislocation in 74 patients who had sustained a dislocation of their HA (n?=?42) or THA (n?=?32). In 42 patients an anterolateral (AL) surgical approach was used and in 32 a posterolateral (PL). The surgical approach significantly influenced the direction of dislocation in patients treated with HA (p?correlation was found after THA (p?=?0.388). For THA patients there was a correlation between the mean angle of anteversion of the acetabular component and the direction of dislocation when comparing patients with anterior and posterior dislocations (p?=?0.027). These results suggest that the surgical approach of a HA has an influence on the direction of dislocation, in contrast to THA where the position of the acetabular component seems to be of importance for the direction of dislocation in patients with femoral neck fractures.

Lapidus, Gunilla; Tornkvist, Hans; Tidermark, Jan; Lapidus, Lasse J.

2010-01-01

237

Rejuvenation of the neck with liposuction and ancillary techniques.  

PubMed

An aesthetically pleasing neck is an important component of physical appearance and a frequently targeted area for a variety of rejuvenative procedures. In appropriately selected patients, liposuction of the neck using tumescent local anesthesia can effectively render a more youthful appearance to the anterior and lateral neck by removing superficial adipose tissue and redraping the skin. This article will review all aspects of neck liposuction, including neck and lower face anatomy, proper patient selection and evaluation, necessary equipment, as well as all peri-procedural management. An in-depth discussion of administration of tumescent local anesthesia and proper liposuction technique is also included. Lastly, a number of ancillary techniques to further enhance the appearance of the neck including laser lipolysis, fractional ablative CO(2) resurfacing, and treatment of platysmal banding will be briefly discussed. PMID:21276156

Stebbins, William G; Hanke, C William

2011-01-01

238

Flexed neck posture due to cervical posttraumatic syringomyelia.  

PubMed

A flexed neck posture, especially with prolonged sitting, developed in three quadriplegic patients as a manifestation of posttraumatic syringomyelia (PTS). This posture developed at 1, 6, and 20 years after spinal cord injury. All patients complained of increasing weakness of the neck with several hours of sitting, and all required analgesics for aching neck pain. Neck weakness preceded an ascent of the level of sensory or motor deficit in two patients, and followed it in one. Current muscle testing failed to demonstrate weakness of neck extension in any patients, but electromography revealed chronic denervation and reinervation of cervical paraspinal muscles in each patient. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a syrinx extending from the site of injury to the medulla oblongata in each case. We conclude that a flexed neck posture can represent: (1) a loss of stamina in denervated head support musculature, (2) either a precursor or successor to the conventional signs of PTS, and (3) high cervical syringomyelia. PMID:2600594

Frisbie, J H; Aguilera, E J; Foo, D

1989-01-01

239

Longitudinal evaluation of time related femoral neck narrowing after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing  

PubMed Central

AIM: To track the short-term neck narrowing changes in Birmingham metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MOMHR) patients. METHODS: Since 2001, the Center for Hip and Knee Replacement started a registry to prospectively collect data on hip and knee replacement patients. From June 2006 to October 2008, 139 MOMHR were performed at our center by two participate surgeons using Birmingham MOMHR prosthesis (Smith Nephew, United States). It is standard of care for patients to obtain low, anteriorposterior (LAP) pelvis radiographs immediately after MOMHR procedure and then at 3 mo, 1 year and 2 year follow up office visits. Inclusion criteria for the present study included patients who came back for follow up office visit at above mentioned time points and got LAP radiographs. Exclusion criteria include patients who missed more than two follow up time points and those with poor-quality X-rays. Two orthopaedic residency trained research fellows reviewed the X-rays independently at 4 time points, i.e., immediate after surgery, 3 mo, 1 year and 2 year. Neck-to-prosthesis ratio (NPR) was used as main outcome measure. Twenty cases were used as subjects to identify the reliability between two observers. An intraclass correlation coefficient at 0.8 was considered as satisfied. A paired t-test was used to evaluate the significant difference between different time points with P < 0.05 considered to be statistically significant. RESULTS: The mean NPRs were 0.852 ± 0.056, 0.839 ± 0.052, 0.835 ± 0.051, 0.83 ± 0.04 immediately, 3 mo, 1 year and 2 years post-operatively respectively. At 3 mo, NPR was significantly different from immediate postoperative X-ray (P < 0.001). There was no difference between 3 mo and 1 year (P = 0.14) and 2 years (P = 0.53). Femoral neck narrowing (FNN) exceeding 10% of the diameter of the neck was observed in only 4 patients (5.6%) at two years follow up. None of these patients developed a femoral neck fracture (FNF). CONCLUSION: Femoral neck narrowing after MOMHR occurred as early as 3 mo postoperatively, and stabilized thereafter. Excessive FNN was not common in patients within the first two years of surgery and was not correlated with risk of FNF.

Wang, Wenbao; Geller, Jeffrey A; Hasija, Rohit; Choi, Jung Keun; Patrick, David A Jr.; Macaulay, William

2013-01-01

240

Head and neck paragangliomas: clinical and molecular genetic classification  

PubMed Central

Head and neck paragangliomas are tumors arising from specialized neural crest cells. Prominent locations are the carotid body along with the vagal, jugular, and tympanic glomus. Head and neck paragangliomas are slowly growing tumors, with some carotid body tumors being reported to exist for many years as a painless lateral mass on the neck. Symptoms depend on the specific locations. In contrast to paraganglial tumors of the adrenals, abdomen and thorax, head and neck paragangliomas seldom release catecholamines and are hence rarely vasoactive. Petrous bone, jugular, and tympanic head and neck paragangliomas may cause hearing loss. The internationally accepted clinical classifications for carotid body tumors are based on the Shamblin Class I–III stages, which correspond to postoperative permanent side effects. For petrous-bone paragangliomas in the head and neck, the Fisch classification is used. Regarding the molecular genetics, head and neck paragangliomas have been associated with nine susceptibility genes: NF1, RET, VHL, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2 (SDH5), and TMEM127. Hereditary HNPs are mostly caused by mutations of the SDHD gene, but SDHB and SDHC mutations are not uncommon in such patients. Head and neck paragangliomas are rarely associated with mutations of VHL, RET, or NF1. The research on SDHA, SDHAF2 and TMEM127 is ongoing. Multiple head and neck paragangliomas are common in patients with SDHD mutations, while malignant head and neck paraganglioma is mostly seen in patients with SDHB mutations. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. Good postoperative results can be expected in carotid body tumors of Shamblin Class I and II, whereas operations on other carotid body tumors and other head and neck paragangliomas frequently result in deficits of the cranial nerves adjacent to the tumors. Slow growth and the tendency of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas to be multifocal may justify less aggressive treatment strategies.

Offergeld, Christian; Brase, Christoph; Yaremchuk, Svetlana; Mader, Irina; Rischke, Hans Christian; Glasker, Sven; Schmid, Kurt W; Wiech, Thorsten; Preuss, Simon F; Suarez, Carlos; Kopec, Tomasz; Patocs, Attila; Wohllk, Nelson; Malekpour, Mahdi; Boedeker, Carsten C; Neumann, Hartmut PH

2012-01-01

241

Managing a wooden foreign body in the neck  

PubMed Central

An interesting case is presented of a wooden foreign body in the neck entering through the right lower vestibule of the mouth. The foreign body traveled subcutaneously in the neck and got stuck in the clavicle, without damaging any vital structures. In this case, the authors highlight the mode of entry of the foreign body, the peculiarity of the wooden foreign body, the management protocol and the outcomes of the penetrating neck injury by the wooden stick.

Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Bhandary, Sangita; Karki, Prahlad

2009-01-01

242

Castleman's disease as a uncommon cause of a neck mass.  

PubMed

Castleman's disease is an uncommon cause of a neck mass; in only 6% of the cases reported in the literature was the disease located in the neck. We present the case of a 21-year-old woman who developed a swelling in the left side of her neck that was subsequently diagnosed as Castleman's disease. The different forms of the disease and its histopathology are discussed. PMID:7848650

Kooper, D P; Tiwari, R M; van der Valk, P

1994-01-01

243

Functional neck dissection: an evaluation and review of 843 cases.  

PubMed

After briefly reviewing the principles, indications, and merits of functional neck dissection, the results of 1200 neck dissections performed on 843 patients in the period 1961-1979 are presented. They compare very favorably with those reported for classic (radical) neck dissection by other leading authors; however, a retrospective analysis of data derived from material of different origin is hardly possible and has a disputable value. Therefore, we decided to compare our data on functional neck dissections (FND) with those of classic neck dissections (CND) performed by the same surgical team at the same clinic in the period 1948-1960. The clinical material was largely the same in both cases, and the data were collected and analyzed using the same criteria. In both series, neck dissections were divided into elective and curative. It could be demonstrated that the number of neck recurrences observed in the dissected necks is the same for FND and CND in curative dissections, while it is considerably lower for FND in elective neck dissections. This of course does not prove improved radicality in FND, but only proves that a systematic bilateral elective neck dissection in N0 cases affords improved cancerological safety. This radical bilateral approach to regional lymph nodes is made possible routinely by FND which avoids the problems of unnecessary mutilation. The figures produced speak in favor of a wider adoption of FND especially for expanding the indications to elective treatment of regional lymph nodes in cancer of the head and neck. Elective neck dissection is made practically harmless by this newer technique and averts the dreadful appearance of late metastases in N0 cases. PMID:6738274

Bocca, E; Pignataro, O; Oldini, C; Cappa, C

1984-07-01

244

Sentinel Node Biopsy for Head and Neck Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The presence of cervical lymph node metastases remains one of the most important prognostic factors for various solid tumors\\u000a of the head and neck, including melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). In patients with\\u000a clinically evident neck involvement, the regional lymphatics clearly require directed treatment, and this may involve therapeutic\\u000a neck dissection or radiotherapy. However, the

Lee Alkureishi; Gary L. Ross

245

Current potential and limitations of molecular diagnostic methods in head and neck cancer.  

PubMed

Traditional diagnostic methods such as clinical assessment, histopathological examination and imaging techniques are limited in their capacity to provide information on prognosis and treatment choice of head and neck cancer. In recent years, molecular techniques have been developed that enabled us to get more insight into the molecular biological cellular pathways underlying tumor progression and metastasis. Correlation of these molecular changes with clinical events has been explored. However, consistently useful markers have not been identified yet, although many promising developments are in progress. It may be expected that in the near future, molecular markers will be useful for clinical purposes. In this paper, an overview will be given of the several molecular techniques that may have potential to be introduced in clinical practice in the management of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:20037788

Mahfouz, Magdy E; Rodrigo, Juan P; Takes, Robert P; Elsheikh, Mohamed N; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Brakenhoff, Ruud H; Ferlito, Alfio

2010-06-01

246

Effects of neck pain on reaching overhead and reading: a case-control study of long and short neck flexion  

PubMed Central

Background Reaching overhead and reading are tasks that many individuals encounter daily. The level of difficulty of these tasks increases if an individual has neck pain. This study determined the neck movement patterns during these two tasks by comparing neck flexion of individuals with and without neck pain. Methods This case control study used the portable video technology, Dartfish ProSuite 5.5 Video Software, to analyse neck flexion movement patterns. Healthy individuals and individuals with neck pain were videotaped while they completed two tasks: reaching overhead from a standing position and reading from a sitting position. A single position of interest was selected for analysis from both tasks. The degree of neck flexion presented by the participant in this position at the beginning and end of the task was recorded. The angle change between these two time points was calculated for each participant. Differences between groups were determined by comparing the average flexion angle changes in groups by t-tests. Results The average angle change experienced by controls and neck pain participants during the overhead reaching tasks were very similar and a significant difference was not observed. The average angle changes experienced by the two groups during the reading task were more variable, but not significantly different. A t-test comparing average neck flexion angle change during dominant arm elevation for controls (m?=??5.28?, sd?=?31.14) and neck pain participants (m?=?5.07?, sd?=?32.41) revealed a mean between group difference of ?10.34? (t17?=??0.688, p?=?0.5003). The average neck flexion angle change during long neck flexion was not statistically different between controls (m?=?10.08?, sd?=?18.89) and neck pain participants (m?=?4?, sd?=?18.18); although the mean between group difference was 6.08? (t17?=?0.6856, p?=?0.5022). Conclusions Task performance is highly variable between individuals making it difficult to assess the impact of neck pain on small samples even with detailed motion analysis. Despite this, there was a difference in neck posture during reaching activities between controls and patients with neck pain. Neck pain can therefore influence the movement patterns used during daily activities. This has implications for primary and secondary prevention.

2013-01-01

247

Wound botulism presenting as a deep neck space infection.  

PubMed

Otolaryngologists commonly evaluate patients with findings suspicious for deep space soft tissue infections of the neck. In this case, a woman with a history of injection drug use (IDU) presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and neck pain. Multiple neck abscesses, too small to drain, were seen on imaging. Despite broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, she unexpectedly and rapidly developed respiratory failure requiring intubation. Further work-up diagnosed wound botulism (WB). To our knowledge, this is the first report of WB presenting as a deep neck space infection, and illustrates the importance of considering this deadly diagnosis in patients with IDU history and bulbar symptoms. PMID:22645053

Gouveia, Christopher; Mookherjee, Somnath; Russell, Matthew S

2012-12-01

248

Endurance and fatigue characteristics of the neck flexor and extensor muscles during isometric tests in patients with postural neck pain.  

PubMed

Sustained postural loading of the cervical spine during work or recreational tasks may contribute to the development of neck pain. The aim of this study was to compare neck muscle endurance and fatigue characteristics during sub-maximal isometric endurance tests in patients with postural neck pain, with asymptomatic subjects. Thirteen female patients with postural neck pain and 12 asymptomatic female control subjects completed timed sub-maximal muscle endurance tests for the neck flexor and extensor muscles. Muscle fatigue, defined as the time-dependent decrease in median frequency electromyography (EMG), was examined using surface EMG analysis during the tests. The median extensor test holding time was lower but not significantly different in the neck pain group (165 s) that the control group (228 s) (p = 0.17). There was no difference between groups in the flexor test holding time (neck pain = 36 s, controls = 38 s) (p = 0.96). The neck pain group was characterised by greater variability in neck flexor (p = 0.03) and extensor (p = 0.006) muscle endurance. For both tests, the rate of decrease in median frequency EMG was highly variable within and between groups with no significant difference between groups for the flexor or extensor test (p = 0.05-0.82). Patients with postural neck pain did not have significant impairment of neck muscle endurance or accelerated fatigue compared to control subjects. However, the greater variability in these indices of muscle function may reflect patient-specific changes in muscle function associated with neck pain disorder. PMID:21256071

Edmondston, Stephen; Björnsdóttir, Guðný; Pálsson, Thorvaldur; Solgård, Hege; Ussing, Kasper; Allison, Garry

2011-08-01

249

What a Pain in the Neck! Good Habits to Remember to Prevent Neck Pain  

MedlinePLUS

... on the arm of a couch. On the phone a lot? Use a speakerphone or headsets -- do not cradle the phone in your neck. Exercise. Treat your body to ... Bryn Mawr Ave., Ste 200 Rosemont, Illinois 60018 phone (847) 737-6000 fax (847) 737-6001 © 2014 ...

250

Validity and test re-test reliability of the neck disability index in the Nigerian clinical setting.  

PubMed

The neck disability index (NDI) is a valid and widely used clinical instrument, which enjoys the recommendation of the World Health Organization for outcome assessment in neck pain. Its psychometric properties have not been investigated in the Nigerian clinical setting. This study investigated the content validity and test-retest reliability of the NDI in order to encourage its integration in the Nigerian clinical setting. Content validity of NDI was assessed through an expert panel review for content relevance/coverage and pretesting. Thirty two subjects with neck pain, recruited through a purposive sampling technique participated in the study. The NDI was administered twice within 48 hours interval. Data were summarized in percentages. Intra class correlation coefficient was used to analyze data for test-retest reliability with alpha set at 0.05. Participants were 1 males, 21 females with a majority within age group 38-57. Twenty four (75%) participants had mild to moderate disability, 7 (21.9%) had severe to complete disability and one individual had no disability. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.969, P=0.01) between the scores obtained from the first administration of the NDI and the second administration. The NDI is a valid and reliable outcome measure and it is recommended for integration into the assessment of neck pain in the Nigerian clinical setting. PMID:22195381

Odole, A C; Adegoke, B O A; Akomas, N C

2011-06-01

251

Comprehensive approach to rejuvenation of the neck.  

PubMed

A comprehensive rejuvenation of the neck depends on accurate analysis of the lower face and neck with attention to the contours and deep-lying structures. Although many surgeons address the well-recognized changes in skin and soft tissue that occur with aging, we believe bone resorption is also an important component. Loss of bone volume leads to loss of support for the soft tissues of the face. The result is soft tissue ptosis and loss of angularity between the various planes of the face. Initially, there is loss of the submental shadow and loss of height of the mandibular ramus. The gonial angle loses its prominence, and the chin becomes ptotic. The line of the body of the mandible is further obscured by the appearance of jowls. As the mandible shrinks, the submandibular gland as well as the muscles that make up the floor of the mouth are pushed inferiorly. For loss of bone support, implants tailored to the areas of deficit and to the aesthetic goals are used. These implants used for the mandible are tridimensional structures made from beaded polyethylene material. This restores the bone volume and provides good support for the soft tissues. We routinely perform a deep-layer cervicoplasty. This involves removing fat from the subplatysmal layer and between the anterior bellies of the digastric muscles. The digastric muscles are plicated toward the midline. The platysma muscle is separated from the underlying submandibular gland. Ptosis of the submandibular gland is treated by suspension of the fascia with sutures or imbrication of the overlying muscle. A short corset platysmaplasty brings the platysma muscles to the midline. Above the level of the hyoid bone, the digastric muscles are included in the sutures. If the patient has an obtuse cervicomental angle, but good-quality skin, there may be no need to perform skin resection. In these patients who are candidates for nonexcisional cervicoplasty, we routinely place a neck suspension suture. Patients with poor skin quality or excessive skin on the neck and jawline will require an excisional cervicoplasty or cervicofacial rhytidectomy. We have obtained consistently good results using this comprehensive approach. PMID:11598819

Ramirez, O M; Robertson, K M

2001-05-01

252

Pathology Case Study: Left Neck Mass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology in which six-year-old girl has neck mass five years after a liver transplant for biliary atresia. Visitors are given both the microscopic and gross descriptions, including images, and are given the opportunity to diagnose the patient. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in pediatric pathology.

Cohen, Lance; Dickman, Paul S.; Richert, Charles A.

2007-09-07

253

Pathology Case Study: Right Neck Mass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology in which an elderly woman developed a right parotid gland tumor, and experienced regrowth after its removal. Visitors are given both the microscopic and gross descriptions, including images, and are given the opportunity to diagnose the patient. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in head and neck pathology.

Bastacky, Sheldon; Dhir, Rajiv; Mnuskin, Anna

2008-10-30

254

Malignant triton tumor (MTT) of the neck.  

PubMed

Malignant Triton Tumor (MTT) is a rare, malignant periphere nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. One third of described MTT's were located at the head and neck region. One third of these are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. MTT most often appears in the third decade. MTT's are very aggressive tumors with early metastases and the overall survival is poor (26%). Therefore, early diagnosis and correct treatment is of utmost importance. We report a case of MTT of the left supraclavicular region in a 41-year-old man. We present the pathological findings, both light and immunohistochemically. PMID:16185834

Sørensen, Kristine Bjørndal; Godballe, Christian; Krogdahl, Annelise

2006-03-01

255

Sex-specific prediction of neck muscle volumes  

PubMed Central

Biomechanical analyses of the head and neck system require knowledge of neck muscle forces, which are often estimated from neck muscle volumes. Here we use magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of 17 subjects (6 females, 11 males) to develop a method to predict the volumes of 16 neck muscles by first predicting the total neck muscle volume (TMV) from subject sex and anthropometry, and then predicting individual neck muscle volumes using fixed volume proportions for each neck muscle. We hypothesized that the regression equations for total muscle volume as well as individual muscle volume proportions would be sex specific. We found that females have 59% lower TMV compared to males (females: 510±43 cm3, males: 814±64 cm3; p<0.0001) and that TMV (in cm3) was best predicted by a regression equation that included sex (male=0, female=1) and neck circumference (NC, in cm): TMV=269+13.7NC?233 Sex (adjusted R2=0.868; p<0.01). Individual muscle volume proportions were not sex specific for most neck muscles, although small sex differences existed for three neck muscles (obliqus capitis inferior, longus capitis, and sternocleidomastoid). When predicting individual muscle volumes in subjects not used to develop the model, coefficients of concordance ranged from 0.91 to 0.99. This method of predicting individual neck muscle volumes has the advantage of using only one sex-specific regression equation and one set of sex-specific volume proportions. These data can be used in biomechanical models to estimate muscle forces and tissue loads in the cervical spine.

Zheng, Liying; Siegmund, Gunter; Ozyigit, Gulsum; Vasavada, Anita

2013-01-01

256

Fatigue During Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy: Prospective Study on 117 Consecutive Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Fatigue is an underevaluated cancer-related and treatment-related symptom. We analyzed fatigue in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 117 patients were enrolled (mean age, 58 years). Radiation therapy (median dose, 66 Gy) was given with either exclusive or postoperative intent in 52 and 65 patients, respectively. Chemotherapy (CT) was added before and/or during RT in 61 patients. The patients completed a 20-item questionnaire (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory [MFI-20]) before, during (weekly), and after RT. The impact of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on fatigue was evaluated with unifactorial and multifactorial tests. Results: Fatigue level increased during RT reaching a maximum at Week 6 and then slowly decreased. In multivariate stepwise regression analysis age (inversely related, p < 0.05), psychologic disorders (p < 0.005), and previous head-and-neck surgery (inversely related, p < 0.005) were correlated with higher pre-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p = 0.035), need of cortisone during RT (p = 0.005), and thyroid disorders (p = 0.032) were correlated with higher during-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p < 0.001), and need of cortisone during RT (p < 0.005) were correlated with higher post-RT fatigue level. No impact of gender, performance status, comorbidities other than psychologic and thyroid, tumor stage/site, RT intent, dose, volume, duration, or toxicity was observed. Conclusion: Fatigue affects all patients undergoing RT for head-and-neck cancer, reaches maximum score at the 6th week of RT, and slowly decreases thereafter. Age, thyroid dysfunction, psychologic disorders, pre-RT fatigue score, CT, and cortisone use are correlated with RT-related fatigue levels.

Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja [Division of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy) and University of Milan, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: barbara.fossa@ieo.it; Santoro, Luigi [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Alterio, Daniela [Division of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Franchi, Benedetta [Division of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Fiore, Maria Rosaria [Division of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Fossati, Piero [Division of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Kowalczyk, Anna [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk (Poland); Canino, Paola [Division of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Ansarin, Mohssen [Division of Head and Neck Surgery, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [Division of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy)

2007-06-01

257

Quenching residual stresses in 7060 aluminium alloy gas cylinder necks  

Microsoft Academic Search

A destructive technique under development to determine residual stresses in thick-walled pressure vessels has been employed to determine quenching residual stresses in 7060 aluminium alloy gas cylinder necks. The gas cylinders were supplied with interference fit collars attached to the apex of the gas cylinder neck. The effect the elastic interference fit stresses have on the quenching residual stresses in

D. J. Sharman; H. L. Stark; D. W. Kelly

1997-01-01

258

AN EVALUATION OF VARIOUS NECK INJURY CRITERIA IN VIGOROUS ACTIVITIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several different injury criteria have been proposed to predict the likelihood of AIS 1 neck injury in automobile collisions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of various injury criteria to predict the presence or absence of minor injury in human volunteers subjected to vigorous activities in which the neck was loaded in a direction similar to

J. R. Funk; J. M. Cormier; C. E. Bain; H. Guzman; E. Bonugli

259

Conversation about Necks--and Minds and Bodies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

States that by considering necks in a literal sense it may be possible to envision new metaphors for understanding minds, bodies, and ways of knowing. Discusses necks as important signs for such ideas as beauty or fragility. Focuses on views of epistemology, such as the disembodied way of knowing. (CMK)

Jeffers, Carol S.

2000-01-01

260

A Rare Presentation of Pellet Injury in the Neck  

PubMed Central

Penetrating neck injuries are dangerous and deserve emergency treatment by virtue of the vital structures present underneath. There is a potential risk of unrecognized vascular injury and retained foreign bodies with their associated complications in these wounds. Therefore, an early diagnostic workup to localize the site of injury and an immediate neck exploration are important.

Gupta, Bulbul; Gulati, Achal; Gupta, Divya

2011-01-01

261

A Modified Dissection Method to Preserve Neck Structures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The neck is not only one of the more challenging anatomical regions to dissect but also has important application to clinical conditions, diseases, and procedures. In this study, we describe two simple modifications for dissection of the neck that (1) aid in the identification and preservation of the cutaneous branches of the cervical plexus and…

Hankin, Mark H.; Stoller, Jeremy L.

2009-01-01

262

Human head-neck biomechanics under axial tension  

Microsoft Academic Search

A significant majority of cervical spine biomechanics studies has applied the external loading in the form of compressive force vectors. In contrast, there is a paucity of data on the tensile loading of the neck structure. These data are important as the human neck not only resists compression but also has to withstand distraction due to factors such as the

N. Yoganandan; F. A. Pintar; D. J. Maiman; J. F. Cusick; A. Sances; P. R. Walsh

1996-01-01

263

Sagittal alignment of the cervical spine after neck injury.  

PubMed

The normal sagittal alignment of the cervical spine is lordotic and is affected by the posture of the head and neck. The question of whether loss of cervical lordosis is the result of muscle spasm after injury or a normal variation, and the clinical significance of such changes in sagittal profile of the cervical spine has been an issue of several studies. The purpose of this paper is to study the incidence of normal cervical lordosis and its changes after neck injury compared to the healthy population. We studied the lateral radiographs of the cervical spine of 60 patients with neck injury compared to 100 patients without a neck injury. Lateral radiographs were obtained in the standing or sitting position, and the curvature of the cervical spine was measured using the angle formed between the inferior end plates of the C2 and C7 vertebrae. In the patients without neck injury, lordotic and straight cervical spine sagittal alignment was observed in 36.5% each, double curvature in 17%, and kyphotic in 10%. In the patients with neck injury, lordotic sagittal alignment was observed in 36%, straight in 34%, double curvature in 26% and kyphotic in 4%. No significant difference between the two groups regarding all types of sagittal alignment of the cervical spine was found (p > 0.100). The alterations in normal cervical lordosis in patients with neck injury must be considered coincidental. These alterations should not be associated with muscle spasm caused by neck pain. PMID:23412281

Beltsios, Michail; Savvidou, Olga; Mitsiokapa, Evanthia A; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kaspiris, Angelos; Efstathopoulos, Nikolaos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

2013-07-01

264

33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Mill Neck Creek. 117.800 Section 117.800 Navigation...Requirements New York § 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on...

2009-07-01

265

33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mill Neck Creek. 117.800 Section 117.800 Navigation...Requirements New York § 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on...

2010-07-01

266

Cardiovascular and respiratory complications after major head and neck surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Our aim was to gain insight into the incidence rates for, distribution of, and risk factors of postoperative cardiovascular and respiratory complications in major head and neck surgery. Methods. We performed a retrospective review of 469 patients who had undergone primary major head and neck surgery. Outcome measures were incidence rates, risk factors, and distribution over time for postoperative

Dirk R. Buitelaar; Alfons J. M. Balm; Ninja Antonini; Harm van Tinteren; Johannes M. Huitink

2006-01-01

267

Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that…

Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

2008-01-01

268

Six primary squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chronic irritation to mucosa of the head and neck area by carcinogen, commonly stemming from heavy usage of betel nuts, tobacco and alcohol, leads to dysplastic mucosal changes and eventually, multiple primary squamous cell carcinomas. With improvements in locoregional control, the problem of multiple primary malignancies of the head and neck is becoming apparent. We reported a unique case

Sheng-Po Hao

1998-01-01

269

Neck muscle fatigue affects postural control in man  

Microsoft Academic Search

We hypothesised that, since anomalous neck proprioceptive input can produce perturbing effects on posture, neck muscle fatigue could alter body balance control through a mechanism connected to fatigue-induced afferent inflow. Eighteen normal subjects underwent fatiguing contractions of head extensor muscles. Sway during quiet stance was recorded by a dynamometric platform, both prior to and after fatigue and recovery, with eyes

M Schieppati; A Nardone; M Schmid

2003-01-01

270

Types and complications of femoral neck fractures in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This multicenter collaborative study was undertaken to review the types and complications of femoral neck fractures in children. It is a retrospective clinical and radiological review of 108 femoral neck fractures. Cases originated from four different pediatric hospitals. All the patients had plain radiographs. Fractures occurred at all ages (one day to 18 years), and 63% of the patients were

E. M. Azouz; C. Karamitsos; M. H. Reed; L. Baker; K. Kozlowski; J.-C. Hoeffel

1993-01-01

271

Neck ligament strength is decreased following whiplash trauma  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Previous clinical studies have documented successful neck pain relief in whiplash patients using nerve block and radiofrequency ablation of facet joint afferents, including capsular ligament nerves. No previous study has documented injuries to the neck ligaments as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash. The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic mechanical properties

Yasuhiro Tominaga; Anthony B Ndu; Marcus P Coe; Arnold J Valenson; Paul C Ivancic; Shigeki Ito; Wolfgang Rubin; Manohar M Panjabi

2006-01-01

272

Neck and Back Pain in E-2C HAWKEYE Aircrew.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study was to determine select characteristics of neck and back symptoms among E-2C Hawkeye aircrew. One hundred eighty-five E-2C aircrew volunteered to complete a neck and back pain and symptoms survey. The mean (+- SD) age and flight ...

T. A. Loomis J. A. Hodgdon L. Hervig W. K. Prusacyzk

1999-01-01

273

The skull and neck of the basal theropod Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the skull and neck of Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis from specimens discovered recently in the Upper Triassic Ischigualasto Formation of northwestern Argentina. The skull has a rectangular profile and a transversely narrow snout. Marked supratemporal depressions for jaw adductor musculature on the skull roof and a well-developed, sliding intra-mandibular joint suggest that Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis was an active predator. The neck

Paul C. Sereno; Fernando E. Novas

1994-01-01

274

Simulation of necking using a damage coupled finite element method  

Microsoft Academic Search

Necking is a strain localization phenomenon that can cause catastrophic fracture in metal forming. Therefore, the prediction of necking is important. In the present work, an elasto-plastic constitutive equation accounting for isotropic hardening coupled with damage is implemented in the finite element code ABAQUS. A damage variable, that provides a mesoscopic description of material degradation, is used to quantify the

C. Y. Tang; J. P. Fan; T. C. Lee

2003-01-01

275

Head and Neck Cases - MP/H Rules  

Cancer.gov

Head and Neck Case 1 PATIENT HISTORY Patient History May 7, 2007 Otolaryngology Head & Neck Subjective: Patient was recently seen by a dentist, who noted a roughness in his lower alveolus, and wanted to have this evaluated prior to denture fitting.

276

49 CFR 572.73 - Neck assembly and test procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEVICES 6-Year-Old Child § 572.73 Neck assembly...relative to the pendulum arm of the head's center of...relative to the pendulum arm. (c) Neck test procedure...a height such that the velocity at impact is 17.00...other than the pendulum arm. (5) Allow at...

2009-10-01

277

49 CFR 572.73 - Neck assembly and test procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DEVICES 6-Year-Old Child § 572.73 Neck assembly...relative to the pendulum arm of the head's center of...relative to the pendulum arm. (c) Neck test procedure...a height such that the velocity at impact is 17.00...other than the pendulum arm. (5) Allow at...

2013-10-01

278

49 CFR 572.73 - Neck assembly and test procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEVICES 6-Year-Old Child § 572.73 Neck assembly...relative to the pendulum arm of the head's center of...relative to the pendulum arm. (c) Neck test procedure...a height such that the velocity at impact is 17.00...other than the pendulum arm. (5) Allow at...

2010-10-01

279

49 CFR 572.123 - Neck assembly and test procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Neck assembly and test procedure. 572.123 Section 572.123 Transportation...OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Six-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.123 Neck...

2013-10-01

280

HPV & head and neck cancer: a descriptive update  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has been gradually increasing over the last three decades. Recent data have now attributed a viral aetiology to a subset of head and neck cancers. Several studies indicate that oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is likely to be sexually acquired. The dominance of HPV 16 in HPV+ HNSCC is even

Peter KC Goon; Margaret A Stanley; Jörg Ebmeyer; Lars Steinsträsser; Tahwinder Upile; Waseem Jerjes; Manuel Bernal-Sprekelsen; Martin Görner; Holger H Sudhoff

2009-01-01

281

Altered fractionation for head and neck cancer.  

PubMed

A conventional course of radiation for squamous cell carcinoma in the United States is generally 70 Gy in 7 weeks, with a once-daily dose of 1.8 to 2 Gy. This schedule has a modest success rate in curing head and neck cancer. The past several decades have seen numerous investigations into altering this schedule to optimize the results of radiation. Two approaches, founded on radiobiologic principles and clinical observations, have been tested with overlap between both concepts. Hyperfractionation is based on the ability to deliver radiotherapy in small fractions and increased total doses, while not adding to late toxicity. Accelerated fractionation is based on the observations that radiation injury causes accelerated tumor clonogen repopulation and that shortening the overall treatment time helps overcome this phenomenon. Both approaches have been shown to result in modest gains when tested in randomized trials, culminating with the completion of a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial (RTOG 9003). This randomized trial of more than 1,000 patients addressed various fractionation schedules proposed to improve results for head and neck cancer patients treated with radiation. PMID:11702960

Garden, A S

2001-10-01

282

Photodynamic therapy of head and neck tumors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with the results of stage 1 clinical trials for sulfated aluminum phthalocyanine (PHS) (Photosens, Russia) in 1994-1996. The results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of head and neck tumors (HNT), side effects and ways of their correction and prevention, as well as changes in doses of injected photosensitizer (PS), regimes of light irradiation, choice of laser and type of irradiation (surface or interstitial) are discussed. PDT have been provided in 42 patients (93 tumor sites) with different head and neck tumors. Fluorescent diagnostics of tumor, accumulation of PS in tumor, adjacent tissue has been fulfilled. Total 78 PDT sessions have been done. As a source of light we used: quantoscope, solid laser, krypton laser, tunable dye laser, He-Ne-laser. In 38 tumor sites (21 patients) -- 40.8% -- we had clinical response, in 27 tumor sites (16 patients) -- 29.0% -- we had partial response, in 28 tumor sites (8 patients) -- 30.2% -- we had no response. Our experience shows pronounced efficacy of PDT for HNT, except of melanoma. Providing PDT twice with the interval 24 - 72 hours when retention of PS is sufficient for treatment, did additive effect to the tumor, but didn't increase adjacent tissue damage.

Vakoulovskaya, Elena G.; Shental, Victor V.; Abdoullin, N. A.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Tabolinovskaia, T. D.; Edinak, N. J.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Lioubaev, V. L.; Boikov, V. P.; Kondratjeva, T. T.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Agafonov, Valery V.

1996-12-01

283

Cancer of the head and neck.  

PubMed Central

Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, collectively known as head and neck cancers, arise from a multiplicity of sites. In the West, excess tobacco and alcohol consumption are the most important of the known predisposing factors; elsewhere in the world, notably in India and China, the aetiology, pattern of primary sites, and clinical behaviour are different. Clinically these tumours pose exceptional problems in management, and skilled multidisciplinary teams are necessary in order to achieve the highest level of service and research. Historically, surgery and radiotherapy have been the most important treatment modalities; chemotherapy is now increasingly employed but not yet fully established. Successful rehabilitation of patients with head and neck cancers requires access to high quality speech therapists and other support staff with training in functional pharyngeal disorders. Current research efforts are largely directed towards defining the proper role of chemotherapy and assessing the possible advantage of unconventional radiation approaches. In recent years the roles of primary, reconstructive, and salvage surgery have also become better defined. Many patients are suitable for randomisation into ongoing prospective clinical trials which have been specifically designed to address these issues. Images FIG 3 FIG 4 FIG 5

Tobias, J. S.

1994-01-01

284

Swing of the Surgical Pendulum: A Return to Surgery for Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in the 21st Century?  

SciTech Connect

Treatment for head and neck cancer has evolved significantly during the past 100 years. Beginning with Bilroth's total laryngectomy on New Year's Day in 1873, 'radical' surgery remained the only accepted treatment for head and neck cancer when optimal local and regional control was the goal. Bigger was still better when it came to managing the primary tumor and the neck. The 'commando' procedure and radical neck dissection were the hallmarks of this first generation of treatments of head-and-neck cancer. With the advent of microvascular reconstructive techniques, larger and more comprehensive resections could be performed. Despite these large resections and their 'mutilating' sequelae, overall survival did not improve. Even for intermediate-stage disease in head-and-neck cancer, the 5-year survival rate did not improve >50%. Many concluded that more than the scalpel was needed for optimal local and regional control, especially for intermediate- and advanced-stage disease. Most important, the multidisciplinary teams must identify and correlate biomarkers in the tumor and host that predict for a response to therapy and for optimal functional recovery. As the pendulum swings back, a scientific approach using tissue biomarkers for the response to treatment in the setting of multidisciplinary trials must emerge as the new paradigm. In the postgenomic era, treatment decisions should be made based on functional and oncologic parameters-not just to avoid perceived morbidity.

Holsinger, F. Christopher [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: holsinger@mdanderson.org; Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2007-10-01

285

Respiratory dysfunction in chronic neck pain patients. A pilot study.  

PubMed

The aim of this pilot study was to add weight to a hypothesis according to which patients presenting with chronic neck pain could have a predisposition towards respiratory dysfunction. Twelve patients with chronic neck pain and 12 matched controls participated in this study. Spirometric values, maximal static pressures, forward head posture and functional tests were examined in all subjects. According to the results, chronic neck patients presented with a statistically significant decreased maximal voluntary ventilation (P = 0.042) and respiratory muscle strength (Pimax and Pemax), (P = 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). Furthermore, the current study demonstrated a strong association between an increased forward head posture and decreased respiratory muscle strength in neck pateits. The connection of neck pain and respiratory function could be an important consideration in relation to patient assessment, rehabilitation and consumption of pharmacological agents. PMID:19187335

Kapreli, E; Vourazanis, E; Billis, E; Oldham, J A; Strimpakos, N

2009-07-01

286

Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients.

Junn, Jacqueline C.; Kim, Irene A.; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Tan, Marietta; Fan, Katherine Y.; Lake, Spencer T.; Zaboli, David; Messing, Barbara P.; Ulmer, Karen; Harrer, Karen B.; Gold, Dorothy; Ryniak, Keri L.; Zinreich, Eva S.; Tang, Mei; Levine, Marshall A.; Blanco, Ray G.; Saunders, John R.; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

2012-01-01

287

The Role of microRNA in Head and Neck Cancer: Current Knowledge and Perspectives.  

PubMed

Head and neck cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies worldwide. Patients with advanced disease stages frequently develop recurrences or distant metastasis, which results a five-year survival rates of less than 60% despite considerable advances in multimodality therapy. A better understanding of molecular basis of tumorigenesis is required to improve clinical outcomes and to develop new anti-cancer drugs. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, non-coding, RNA molecules that modulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They are important regulator in normal biological process; however miRNAs deregulation has been observed in many different tumors and is involved in tumorigenesis. miRNAs may act as tumor suppressors or as oncogenes. Several studies on head and neck cancer demonstrated how aberrant expression of miRNAs is involved in proliferation, metastasis, chemoresistence, and radioresistance. In addition, miRNAs are excellent biomarker targets because they circulate stable in human body fluids and can be obtained with non-invasive methods. Moreover, miRNAs up and down regulation has been correlated with specific cancer phenotype (poor prognosis, aggressiveness and resistance to treatment), playing a role as prognostic biomarkers. This review summarizes current finding on miRNAs in head and neck cancer and their potential role as target for next drug therapy. PMID:24802984

Courthod, Giulia; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Palermo, Loredana; Pisconti, Salvatore; Numico, Gianmauro

2014-01-01

288

Accuracy of fine needle aspiration cytology in head and neck masses.  

PubMed

In ENT clinical practice patients with neck swelling is a common presentation. To know their exact nature a simple, sensitive and diagnostic tool is required to prevent unnecessary costlier investigation and corresponding treatment. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a very safe, sensitive and diagnostic tool. This study was done to know the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the FNAC in head and neck masses. Present prospective study was done in 179 patients of head and neck masses which were subjected to FNAC and their results were later correlated with histopathological examination report (HPR) wherever available. Out of 179 FNAC, HPR available only in 152 cases. In present study 104 cases (58.10 %) of lymph node, 35 cases (19.55 %) of thyroid gland, 17 cases (9.49 %) of salivary gland, 12 cases (6.70 %) of soft tissue and 11 cases (6.14 %) of miscellaneous swellings were present. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of present study were 81.8, 95.0, 81.8 and 95.0 % respectively. The accuracy was 92.10 %. PMID:24822159

Poorey, V K; Tyagi, Amit

2014-06-01

289

Centrosomal abnormalities, multipolar mitoses, and chromosomal instability in head and neck tumours with dysfunctional telomeres  

PubMed Central

Carcinomas of the head and neck typically exhibit complex chromosome aberrations but the underlying mutational mechanisms remain obscure. Evaluation of cell division dynamics in low-passage cell lines from three benign and five malignant head and neck tumours revealed a strong positive correlation between multipolarity of the mitotic spindle and the formation of bridges at anaphase in both benign and malignant tumours. Cells exhibiting a high rate of mitotic abnormalities also showed several chromosome termini lacking TTAGGG repeats and a high frequency of dicentric chromosomes. Multicolour karyotyping demonstrated a preferential involvement in structural rearrangements of chromosomes with deficient telomeres. The majority of malignant, mitotically unstable tumours expressed the reverse transcriptase subunit of telomerase. These data indicate that some of the genomic instability in head and neck tumours is initiated by telomere dysfunction, leading to the formation of dicentric chromosomes. These form chromosome bridges at mitosis that could prevent the normal anaphase-telophase transition. In turn, this may cause an accumulation of centrosomes and mitotic multipolarity. Telomerase expression does not confer total stability to the tumour genome but could be crucial for moderating the rate of chromosomal evolution. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 37, 202–207. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600438 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK

Gisselsson, D; Jonson, T; Yu, C; Martins, C; Mandahl, N; Wiegant, J; Jin, Y; Mertens, F; Jin, C

2002-01-01

290

The use of the posterior lesser trochanter line to estimate femoral neck version: an analysis of computed tomography measurements.  

PubMed

We hypothesized that the lesser trochanter could be a useful guide for estimating femoral component version during total hip arthroplasty. We conducted a study of 88 patients to evaluate the relationship between the posterior lesser trochanter line (PLTL) and the femoral neck axis (FNA) using computed tomographic scans. The mean angle between the PLTL and the FNA was 17.4° ± 7.1° (range, -1.6° to 36.5°). The PLTL angle correlated (r(2) = 0.67-0.72) with the FNA angle. Intraclass correlation coefficient values showed a high level of intraobserver and interobserver agreement in the angles between the PLTL and the FNA. We found a constant relationship between the lesser trochanter and the FNA, and femoral neck version can be estimated, using the PLTL, with reasonable reliability. PMID:22521400

Shon, Won Yong; Yun, Ho Hyun; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Song, Seung Yeop; Park, Sung Bum; Lee, Jee Wun

2013-02-01

291

Prostaglandin-like material extracted from squamous carcinomas of the head and neck.  

PubMed Central

Tumour-associated prostaglandin-like material, assessed by bioassay, has been examined in 37 patients with primary and metastatic squamous carcinomas of the head and neck, previously treated by radiotherapy and chemotherapy followed by radical surgery. High amounts of prostaglandin-like material were extracted from tumours excised within 3 months of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. These amounts correlated with necrosis, inflammation and fibrosis, but not with tumour site, size or degree of differentiation. Most of the prostaglandins formed by these treated tumours thus seem to be associated with host stromal and inflammatory cells, rather than the neoplastic cells. The possible roles of prostaglandins in facilitating the spread of squamous carcinomas are discussed.

Bennett, A.; Carter, R. L.; Stamford, I. F.; Tanner, N. S.

1980-01-01

292

Clinimetric properties of the Turkish translation of a modified neck disability index  

PubMed Central

Background Neck pain is a common problem that can greatly affect a person's activities of daily living. Functional status questionnaires are important in assessing this effect, and are used to follow up neck pain management programs. The Neck Disability Index (NDI) is the first-created scale for neck pain-related disability and is widely translated and in common used in many countries. Our aim is investigate to clinometric properties of a Turkish version of modified NDI and to give a choice in daily practise of versions to be used. Methods The modified NDI was applied to 30 patients for reliability. 185 patients participated in the validity study. All patients were recruited from the outpatient clinic of our department. The scale was translated by the forward and backward translation procedure according to the COSMIN criteria. The test was repeated at 48 hours interval for reliability study. SPSS-10.0, software was used for statistical analyses. The Intraclass correlation coefficient was used for the test- retest reliability of the modified NDI. Cronbach ? was used for internal consistency. Factor analysis was used for construct validity. The validity of the modified NDI with respect to the SF-36, HAD, VAS pain, VAS disability was assessed using Spearman correlations. Results The Intraclass correlation coefficient between first and second (within 48 hours) evaluation of test (rs) was 0.92. Questions 1,4,6,8,10 were shown to have excellent reliability. (rs > 0.9). Question 10 was the most frequently challenged question because "recreational and social activities" do not have not the same meanings in Turkey than in western countries. This required that detailed explanations be provided by the investigators. Cronbach's alpha for the total index was 0.88. A single factor accounting for 80.2% of the variance was obtained. Validity studies demonstrated good and moderate correlations (rs) among NDI, HAD, VAS, physical function subtitle of SF 36 (0.62, 0.76, 0.68). Conclusions The modified NDI-Turkish version is a reliable and valid test and is suitable for daily practise.

2012-01-01

293

Congenital cysts and fistulas of the neck.  

PubMed

This retrospective study describes a series of 191 children treated for congenital cysts and fistulas of the neck between 1984 and 1999 in the pediatric ORL Department of La Timone Children's Hospital. Preauricular fistulas and cystic hygromas were not included. The anomalies in this series were classified as either malformations of the midline or malformations of laterocervical region. Malformations of the midline included the thyroglossal duct cysts (n=102) and dermoid cysts (n=21). The most common malformations of the laterocervical region were cysts and fistulas of the second cleft (n=37) followed by those of the first cleft (n=20),those of the fourth pouch (n=7), and thymic cysts (n=4). Diagnosis of malformations of the midline is usually straightforward. However, diagnosis of malformation of the laterocervical region can be problematic. Misdiagnosis often leads to inadequate treatment with recurrence and functional as well as cosmetic sequelae. PMID:11006451

Nicollas, R; Guelfucci, B; Roman, S; Triglia, J M

2000-09-29

294

Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck  

SciTech Connect

The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

1985-02-01

295

Modeling neck and brain injuries in infants.  

PubMed

Researchers have studied brain injury in children by assessing linear and angular accelerations, without taking into account vibratory loads. A proposed approach employs a new mathematical head model that includes vibration to analyze how shaken-baby syndrome affects babies. To account for vibrations, it applies the finite-element method to model the stresses, strains, and displacements in the neck vertebrae and brain. This research also modeled the effects of a single blow to the head. In both cases, researchers determined the extent of alterations by comparing brain tissue strength with predictions of increased tension. The vibration results predict alterations in the cervical vertebrae in some oscillation modes and are consistent with studies of cervical cord whiplash injuries. The single-blow results predict brain and spinal cord alterations and are consistent with scanner slices made by other researchers. PMID:24808262

Ponce, E; Ponce, D

2011-01-01

296

Pathology Case Study: Neck and Back Pain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology, which describes a 28-year-old female who, after a car accident, complained of a sharp pain of the anterior and posterior base of the neck on expiration and with exertion. Visitors are given patient history, radiology results, along with gross and microscopic descriptions, including images, and are given the opportunity to diagnose the patient. A "Final Diagnosis" section provides a discussion of the findings as well as references. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in pathology.

Benjamin, Vallo; Hummel-Levine, Pascale; Zagzag, David

2009-03-16

297

AP2alpha Induces Epigenetic Silencing of Tumor Suppressive Genes and Microsatellite Instability in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundActivator protein 2 alpha (AP-2?) is involved in a variety of physiological processes. Increased AP-2? expression correlates with progression in various squamous cell carcinomas, and a recent publication found AP-2? to be overexpressed in ?70% of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) patient samples. It was found to repress transcription of the tumor suppressor gene C\\/CAAT Enhancer Binding Protein

Kristi L. Bennett; Todd Romigh; Charis Eng; Michael J. Pazin

2009-01-01

298

The Articulation of Sauropod Necks: Methodology and Mythology  

PubMed Central

Sauropods are often imagined to have held their heads high atop necks that ascended in a sweeping curve that was formed either intrinsically because of the shape of their vertebrae, or behaviorally by lifting the head, or both. Their necks are also popularly depicted in life with poses suggesting avian flexibility. The grounds for such interpretations are examined in terms of vertebral osteology, inferences about missing soft tissues, intervertebral flexibility, and behavior. Osteologically, the pronounced opisthocoely and conformal central and zygapophyseal articular surfaces strongly constrain the reconstruction of the cervical vertebral column. The sauropod cervico-dorsal vertebral column is essentially straight, in contrast to the curvature exhibited in those extant vertebrates that naturally hold their heads above rising necks. Regarding flexibility, extant vertebrates with homologous articular geometries preserve a degree of zygapophyseal overlap at the limits of deflection, a constraint that is further restricted by soft tissues. Sauropod necks, if similarly constrained, were capable of sweeping out large feeding surfaces, yet much less capable of retracting the head to explore the enclosed volume in an avian manner. Behaviorally, modern vertebrates generally assume characteristic neck postures which are close to the intrinsic curvature of the undeflected neck. With the exception of some vertebrates that can retract their heads to balance above their shoulders at rest (e.g., felids, lagomorphs, and some ratites), the undeflected neck generally predicts the default head height at rest and during locomotion.

Stevens, Kent A.

2013-01-01

299

Vasculo-Behcet's disease mimicking a metastatic neck mass.  

PubMed

This article presents a case of Behcet's Disease (BD) with vascular involvement of the neck, which mimicks a metastatic neck mass in the initial presentation. A 58-year-old man presented with dysphagia, weight loss, bulging on the lateral wall of the left pyriform sinus, and a firm and fixated neck mass suggestive of metastasis. Computed tomography of the neck demonstrated a solid mass, around the bifurcation of the carotid artery together with a pseudoaneurysm of the left external carotid artery. The mass was about four centimeters in diameter and extended to hypopharynx medially. Biopsy from neck mass and hypopharynx revealed no specific pathology. During follow-up the firm and fixated mass changed into a completely pulsatile one in the following three weeks. Reassessment of the patient's past history in detail revealed that he had had recurrent oro-genital ulcers, arthralgia and recurrent skin lesions. The pathergy test was positive. The patient was diagnosed to be BD and treatment consisting of colchicine 1 mg/day, peroral was started. He had a favorable outcome after treatment and was asymptomatic at follow-up of 24 months. It is unusual for BD to present as a neck mass but yet it must be considered in the differential diagnosis of neck masses. The present case report demonstrates how such a mass may mimic metastatic tumoral involvement and cause diagnostic dilemma. PMID:15802878

Uzun, Lokman; Ugur, Mehmet Birol; Ulukent, Suat Can; Ozdemir, Huseyin; Koca, Rafet

2005-05-01

300

The relationship between occupations and head and neck cancers.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between occupation and head and neck cancers. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this case-control study, 206 Turkish patients with head and neck cancers comprised the case group. The control group consisted of 206 age- and sex-matched patients without malignant disease. All patients completed a questionnaire regarding occupation; tobacco and alcohol consumption; educational status; and history of any systemic disease, benign head and neck disease, and cancer among family members. High-risk jobs were considered those in the industries of construction, wood, mining, metal, chemistry and agriculture. RESULTS: Patients with head and neck cancers worked in high-risk occupations more frequently than did controls [odds ratio (OR): 3.42, p<0.05]. Cancer risk decreased with the increase in time interval between quitting the high-risk job and time of interview. Smokers were at higher risk than nonsmokers (OR: 3.33, p<0.05). The risk was also higher in patients who drank alcohol regularly (OR: 1.59, p<0.05). However, occupation was found to be an independent high-risk factor for head and neck cancers in regression analysis. Frequency of benign head and neck disease and family history of cancer were not significant risk factors (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Our analysis showed that occupation and smoking were significant independent risk factors for the development of head and neck cancers among workers.

Pinar, Tevfik; Akdur, Recep; Tuncbilek, Arslan; Altundag, Kadri; Cengiz, Mustafa

2007-01-01

301

Characteristics of visual disturbances reported by subjects with neck pain.  

PubMed

Visual symptoms are often reported by patients with neck pain. The aim of the study was to report on the prevalence and most troublesome visual disturbances in subjects with neck pain. Seventy subjects with neck pain and seventy healthy control subjects answered questions about the presence and magnitude (/12) - product of frequency (0-4) and intensity (0-3) of each of 16 visual symptoms noted to be associated with neck pain and other possible causes. A visual complaint index (VCI) (/168) was generated from the sum of the magnitude rating of 14 significant symptoms. The neck pain group had significantly (P > 0.05) greater prevalence and magnitude of 14/16 visual complaints and VCI (mean 27.4) compared to control subjects (mean 6.2). The most prevalent symptoms were 'need to concentrate to read' (70%) and 'sensitivity to light' (58.6%). The least prevalent were 'double vision' (28.6%) and 'dizzy reading' (38.6%). The most troublesome symptoms (greatest magnitude) were 'need to concentrate to read' (3.4/12), 'visual fatigue' (3/12), 'difficulty judging distances' (2.1/12) and 'sensitivity to light' (2.1/12) while the least troublesome complaints were 'double vision' (0.5/12), 'red eyes' (1/12) and 'spots and words moving' (1/12). The characteristics of the visual symptoms were mostly consistent for those previously associated with neck pain. Subjects with traumatic neck pain had a significantly higher VCI compared to those with idiopathic neck pain. The results could help with differential diagnosis. The visual symptoms might be related to eye movement control disturbances in neck pain, however further research is required. PMID:24521926

Treleaven, Julia; Takasaki, Hiroshi

2014-06-01

302

Neck masses: diagnostic analysis of 630 cases in Turkish population.  

PubMed

Neck masses can be classified into three main categories: congenital, inflammatory and neoplastic. Our aim was to determine the distribution of diagnosis in patients who were followed-up for a neck mass and had undergone surgery for diagnostic indications. Six hundred and thirty cases referred to the Otorhinolaryngology and Head Neck Surgery Department of Haseki Research and Training Hospital between January 2005 and February 2012 with a neck mass who underwent excisional or incisional biopsy to establish a histopathologic diagnosis were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with a diagnosis of upper aerodigestive tract malignancy were excluded from the study. As well as the patients with thyroid masses were excluded. Only unknown primary neck masses were included in the study. The neck masses were categorized as inflammatory (33.49 %), congenital (18.9 %) or neoplastic (47.6 %). Neoplastic masses were either benign (51 %) or malignant (49 %) tumors. The most common causes were tuberculous lymphadenitis (40.28 %) among inflammatory masses, thyroglossal duct cysts (32.77 %) among congenital masses, pleomorphic adenoma (22.33 %) among benign neoplastic masses, and lymphoma (20 %) among malignant neoplastic masses. The most common types of mass were congenital in the 0-20 year age group, benign neoplastic in 21-40-year-old and malignant neoplastic in the >40-year group. Any neck mass, especially in an elderly patient, should be managed with caution as a considerable proportion may be malignant. In children and adolescents, a neck mass requiring surgery is most likely to be congenital. Tuberculosis should be considered as a cause of a neck mass due to a long-term inflammatory process in a developing country. PMID:23525652

Balikci, H H; Gurdal, M M; Ozkul, M H; Karakas, M; Uvacin, O; Kara, N; Alp, A; Ozbay, I

2013-11-01

303

Sauropod necks: are they really for heat loss?  

PubMed

Three-dimensional digital models of 16 different sauropods were used to examine the scaling relationship between metabolism and surface areas of the whole body, the neck, and the tail in an attempt to see if the necks could have functioned as radiators for the elimination of excess body heat. The sauropod taxa sample ranged in body mass from a 639 kg juvenile Camarasaurus to a 25 t adult Brachiosaurus. Metabolism was assumed to be directly proportional to body mass raised to the ¾ power, and estimates of body mass accounted for the presence of lungs and systems of air sacs in the trunk and neck. Surface areas were determined by decomposing the model surfaces into triangles and their areas being computed by vector methods. It was found that total body surface area was almost isometric with body mass, and that it showed negative allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. In contrast, neck area showed positive allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. Tail area show negative allometry with respect to metabolic rate. The many uncertainties about the biology of sauropods, and the variety of environmental conditions that different species experienced during the groups 150 million years of existence, make it difficult to be absolutely certain about the function of the neck as a radiator. However, the functional combination of the allometric increase of neck area, the systems of air sacs in the neck and trunk, the active control of blood flow between the core and surface of the body, changing skin color, and strategic orientation of the neck with respect to wind, make it plausible that the neck could have functioned as a radiator to avoid over-heating. PMID:24204747

Henderson, Donald M

2013-01-01

304

Sauropod Necks: Are They Really for Heat Loss?  

PubMed Central

Three-dimensional digital models of 16 different sauropods were used to examine the scaling relationship between metabolism and surface areas of the whole body, the neck, and the tail in an attempt to see if the necks could have functioned as radiators for the elimination of excess body heat. The sauropod taxa sample ranged in body mass from a 639 kg juvenile Camarasaurus to a 25 t adult Brachiosaurus. Metabolism was assumed to be directly proportional to body mass raised to the ¾ power, and estimates of body mass accounted for the presence of lungs and systems of air sacs in the trunk and neck. Surface areas were determined by decomposing the model surfaces into triangles and their areas being computed by vector methods. It was found that total body surface area was almost isometric with body mass, and that it showed negative allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. In contrast, neck area showed positive allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. Tail area show negative allometry with respect to metabolic rate. The many uncertainties about the biology of sauropods, and the variety of environmental conditions that different species experienced during the groups 150 million years of existence, make it difficult to be absolutely certain about the function of the neck as a radiator. However, the functional combination of the allometric increase of neck area, the systems of air sacs in the neck and trunk, the active control of blood flow between the core and surface of the body, changing skin color, and strategic orientation of the neck with respect to wind, make it plausible that the neck could have functioned as a radiator to avoid over-heating.

Henderson, Donald M.

2013-01-01

305

Unusual presentation of a radial neck fracture in a child  

PubMed Central

Fracture of the radial neck are uncommon injuries. In children, they may present as radial neck fractures, a components of forearm fracture dislocations, or as isolated fracture dislocations. Here, we present an unusual and previously undescribed variant of radial neck fracture with dislocation of the radial head to the medial side and ulnar nerve injury. The fracture dislocation was openly reduced and fixed with a small fragment plate. The fracture healed with some loss of rotational movements. At short followup of 6 months patient had useful elbow function but ulnar nerve did not recover.

Poduval, Murali; Kanagasabai, R; Abraham, Vineeth Thomas; Marimuthu, Chandrasekharan

2013-01-01

306

Complex reconstructions in head and neck cancer surgery: decision making  

PubMed Central

Defects in head and neck after tumor resection often provide significant functional and cosmetic deformity. The challenge for reconstruction is not only the aesthetic result, but the functional repair. Cancer may involve composite elements and the in sano resection may lead to an extensive tissue defect. No prospective randomized controlled studies for comparison of different free flaps are available. There are many options to cover defects and restore function in the head and neck area, however we conclude from experience that nearly all defects in head and neck can be closed by 5 different free flaps: radial forearm flap, free fibula flap, anterior lateral thigh flap, lateral arm flap and parascapular flap.

2011-01-01

307

A Triassic aquatic protorosaur with an extremely long neck.  

PubMed

By Middle Triassic time, a number of reptile lineages had diversified in shallow epicontinental seas and intraplatform basins along the margins of parts of Pangea, including the giraffe-necked protorosaurid reptile Tanystropheus from the Western Tethys (Europe and the Middle East), which grew to approximately 5 to 6 m long. Here we report another long-necked fossil, Dinocephalosaurus, from southwestern China, recently collected in Middle Triassic marine deposits approximately 230 million years old. This taxon represents unambiguous evidence for a fully aquatic protorosaur. Its extremely elongated neck is explained as an adaptation for aquatic life, perhaps for an increase in feeding efficiency. PMID:15448262

Li, Chun; Rieppel, Olivier; LaBarbera, Michael C

2004-09-24

308

Femoral neck shaft angle width is associated with hip-fracture risk in males but not independently of femoral neck bone density.  

PubMed

Objective: To investigate the specificity of the neck shaft angle (NSA) to predict hip fracture in males. Methods: We consecutively studied 228 males without fracture and 38 with hip fracture. A further 49 males with spine fracture were studied to evaluate the specificity of NSA for hip-fracture prediction. Femoral neck (FN) bone mineral density (FN-BMD), NSA, hip axis length and FN diameter (FND) were measured in each subject by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Between-mean differences in the studied variables were tested by the unpaired t-test. The ability of NSA to predict hip fracture was tested by logistic regression. Results: Compared with controls, FN-BMD (p?correlation (p?correlation with FN-BMD by capturing, as the strongest fracture predictor, some of the effects of NSA on the hip fracture. Conversely, NSA in females does not correlate with FN-BMD but independently predicts hip fractures. PMID:24678889

Ripamonti, C; Lisi, L; Avella, M

2014-05-01

309

Salmonella Neck Abscess as an Opportunistic Infection in Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Salmonella neck infections represent an uncommon cause of focal salmonellosis. While the incidence of nontyphoid salmonellosis is estimated at over 2 million cases annually, extraintestinal manifestations account for less than 1% of cases. This paper describes two patients with Salmonella neck abscesses as the initial presentation of diabetes mellitus. The first patient was diagnosed as having Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis sternocleidomastoid pyomyositis and the second patient Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium parapharyngeal abscess. Both patients had elevated hemoglobin A1c levels and had not been previously diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Salmonella spp. should be on the differential as a causative pathogen in patients presenting with neck abscesses and poorly controlled glucose levels. Diabetes may be a risk factor for salmonellosis due to decreased gastric acidity and prolonged gastric transit time. Prompt incision and drainage accompanied by antibiotics remains the treatment of choice for infected neck abscesses.

Jenkins, Stephen G.

2013-01-01

310

Generalized Melanoses and Nonmelanotic Pigmentations of the Head and Neck.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The dentist is in a strategic position to evaluate early color changes of the head and neck. Certain oral and perioral changes of pigmentation are amenable to early diagnosis. Systemically acquired generalized melanoses and nonmelanotic color changes shou...

R. H. Marlette

1974-01-01

311

Thinking, Memory Problems Tied to Blockages in Neck Artery  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Thinking, Memory Problems Tied to Blockages in Neck Artery Researcher ... 21, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Carotid Artery Disease Memory Mild Cognitive Impairment MONDAY, April 21, 2014 (HealthDay ...

312

Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®)  

Cancer.gov

Expert-reviewed information summary about oral complications, such as mucositis and salivary gland dysfunction, that occur in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy to the head and neck.

313

49 CFR 572.123 - Neck assembly and test procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, (Continued...for at least four hours prior to a test. (2) Torque the jam nut (drawing 9000341) on the neck cable (drawing...

2009-10-01

314

An amazing gunshot injury of the head and neck.  

PubMed

As the use of firearms has become more prevalent in society, both the number of homicidal & suicidal victims has increased Injuries from gunshot wounds, of the face and neck vary in extent and significance, forming a spectrum from trivial to life-endangering lesions. The face and the neck have many vital structures confined to a small area of the body, and hence, it has a greter potential of leading to a fatality in the event of trauma. We report a case of a civilian homicidal firearm injmy sustained in the head & neck region, with the bullet having travelled through the head & neck region without causing any mortality and minimal morbidity to the victim. PMID:23120055

Gulati, Achal; Chadha, Shelly; Singhal, Deepti; Agarwal, A K

2004-04-01

315

'Nerve Block' to Neck Might Help Ease Hot Flashes  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript. 'Nerve Block' to Neck Might Help Ease Hot Flashes Women in small study suffered fewer moderate- ... Feb. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women suffering from hot flashes might get some relief through an injection ...

316

Advances in otolaryngology-Head and neck surgery. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This book consists of 14 sections. The section titles are: The impact of AIDS on otolaryngology--head and neck surgery; The management of sleep apneas and snoring; Antimicrobial agents for infections in the ear, nose, and throat--head and neck; Nasal allergy: Medical and surgical treatment; Uses of computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in temporal bone imaging; Surgical management of otitis media with effusion; middle ear reconstruction: Current status; Cochlear implants: an overview; Diagnosis and management of acute facial paralysis; The use of the laser in head and neck surgery; The management and prevention of subglottic stenosis in infants and children; Management of the mass in the thyroid; Suction-assisted lipectomy of the head and neck area; and Ambulatory surgery.

Myers, E.N. (Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (US)); Bluestone, C.D. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (US))

1987-01-01

317

Electromyographic (EMG) neuromonitoring in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery.  

PubMed

Intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) is a relatively recent advance in electromyography (EMG) applied to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery. Its purpose is to allow real-time identification and functional assessment of vulnerable nerves during surgery. The nerves most often monitored in head and neck surgery are the motor branch of the facial nerve (VII), the recurrent or inferior laryngeal nerves (X), the vagus nerve (X), and the spinal accessory nerve (XI), with other cranial lower nerves monitored less frequently. Morbidity from trauma to these nerves is significant and obvious, such as unilateral facial paresis. Although functional restorative surgery is usually considered to repair the effects of such an insult, the importance of preventing nerve injury in head and neck surgery is obvious. This article focuses on the anesthetic considerations pertinent to IONM of peripheral cranial nerves during otolaryngologic-head and neck surgery. The specific modality of IONM is EMG, both spontaneous and evoked. PMID:20850075

Dillon, Francis X

2010-09-01

318

Identifying and treating the causes of neck pain.  

PubMed

Future studies are needed to further understand the pathophysiology of mechanical neck pain. Robust scientific evidence is sparse on which noninvasive treatments are the most beneficial and how to better select patients for particular noninvasive or invasive treatments. PMID:24758966

Evans, Ginger

2014-05-01

319

Complications of Head and Neck Reconstruction and Their Treatment  

PubMed Central

Head and neck reconstruction is an intensive multistep process that requires attention to detail to achieve a successful result. The knowledge and prevention of complications as well as their management is an essential part of the training of the surgeon participating in head and neck reconstruction. This article explores the general complications, including free flap failure, carotid artery blowout, hardware exposure, and ectropion, as well as regional complications relating to operations of the scalp, cranium, base of skull, midface, mandible, and pharyngoesophagus.

Tan, Bien-Keem; Por, Yong-Chen; Chen, Hung-Chi

2010-01-01

320

Neck influence on dynamics of cluster radioactivities and cold fission  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a two-center parametrization with smooth neck is used to describe the shapes during the fission process of {sup 234}U in a wide range of mass asymmetry (cold fission with {sup 100}Zr fragment, {sup 28}Mg radioactivity and {alpha}-decay). The optimum fission path has been found by minimizing the action integral. The neck influence is stronger for lower mass asymmetry.

Poenaru, D.N.; Greiner, W. (Inst. fuer Theoretisch Physik, J.W. Goethe-Univ., Postfach 111932, D-6000 Frankfurt am Main (DE)); Mirea, M.; Cata, I.; Mazilu, D. (Inst. of Atomic Physics, P.O. Box MG-6, RO-76900 Bucharest (RO))

1990-10-20

321

Metastasis of genitourinary tumors to the head and neck region  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the present study is to characterize genitourinary tumors (GU) metastatic to the head and neck and to determine\\u000a long-term prognoses. Using a retrospective chart review of 734 patients treated between January 1995 and May 2005 with an\\u000a ICD-9 code pertaining to a metastatic head and neck cancer, we found 37 patients with primary GU tumors. There were

Ore Ogunyemi; A. Rojas; K. Hematpour; D. Rogers; C. Head; C. Bennett

2010-01-01

322

[Penetrating neck injury of a blacksmith by splitter projectile].  

PubMed

Laryngeal injuries are rare but potentially life-threatening injuries. Due to the topography of the neck, accompanying injuries of the greater blood vessels, cervical nerves, thoracic organs and spinal cord are common. Therefore in initial diagnostics, these must be excluded from injuries which determine the prognosis. A patient presented with ventral perforation of the larynx, initial dyspnea, hematemesis and left-sided emphysema of the neck. Cause of the findings, we treated the patient non-operatively in interdisciplinary consensus. PMID:23949194

Fabian, T; Sakka, S G; Trojan, S; Wafaisade, A; Mutschler, M; Tjardes, T; Bouillon, B; Probst, C

2014-06-01

323

Rehabilitation of patients following major head and neck cancer surgery.  

PubMed

Cancer rehabilitation is accepted as an essential part of patient care, aiming to maximise the patient's quality of life. Patients who have received major surgery for head and neck cancer face many challenges and require a tailored rehabilitation programme. This review collate the evidence specific to head and neck cancer patients and divides the programme into five areas: functional, medical, aesthetic, psychological and social. This provides an overall framework in which to consider these unique rehabilitation requirements. PMID:22875267

Mitchell, Oliver; Durrani, Amer; Price, Richard

324

Arthroscopic Femoral Neck Osteoplasty in the Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement  

PubMed Central

Femoral neck osteoplasty is an integral component for successful treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Current techniques allow this to be performed arthroscopically, and results are equivalent to those of open procedures when typical anterior and anterosuperior lesions are considered. The arthroscopic procedure is dependent on obtaining adequate visualization through capsular management and proper leg positioning, and it requires fluoroscopy to guide and verify an adequate resection. We present our preferred technique for arthroscopic femoral neck osteoplasty.

Chow, Roxanne M.; Kuzma, Scott A.; Krych, Aaron J.; Levy, Bruce A.

2013-01-01

325

Neural crest origins of the neck and shoulder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The neck and shoulder region of vertebrates has undergone a complex evolutionary history. To identify its underlying mechanisms we map the destinations of embryonic neural crest and mesodermal stem cells using Cre-recombinase-mediated transgenesis. The single-cell resolution of this genetic labelling reveals cryptic cell boundaries traversing the seemingly homogeneous skeleton of the neck and shoulders. Within this assembly of bones and

Toshiyuki Matsuoka; Per E. Ahlberg; Nicoletta Kessaris; Palma Iannarelli; Ulla Dennehy; William D. Richardson; Andrew P. McMahon; Georgy Koentges

2005-01-01

326

Focus Issue: Neck Dissection for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

The staging and prognosis of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is intimately tied to the status of the cervical lymph nodes. Due to the high risk for occult nodal disease, most clinicians recommend treating the neck for these primary tumors. While there are many modalities available, surgical resection of nodal disease offers both a therapeutic and a diagnostic intervention. We review the relevant anatomy, nodal drainage patterns, clinical workup, surgical management and common complications associated with neck dissection for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

Van Abel, Kathryn M.; Moore, Eric J.

2012-01-01

327

Nationwide incidence survey of femoral neck fracture in Japan, 1992  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following the nationwide survey of femoral neck fracture in 1987, to clarify the incidence and distribution of this disease\\u000a in 1992 and to investigate incidence changes during the intervening 5 years, a second nationwide survey was performed. Of\\u000a 10740 orthopedic institutions in Japan, 4479 were selected using the optimum allocation method. Questionnaires concerning\\u000a new patients with femoral neck fracture were

Hajime Orimo; Tsutomu Hashimoto; Noriko Yoshimura; Saeko Fujiwara; Takayuki Hosoi; Masataka Shiraki; Masao Fukunaga; Toshitaka Nakamura; Yasumasa Fukushima; Kichizo Yamamoto

1997-01-01

328

Spontaneous subcapital femoral neck fracture complicating a healed intertrochanteric fracture  

Microsoft Academic Search

A spontaneous subcapital femoral neck fracture is an uncommon complication of a healed intertrochanteric hip fracture. To\\u000a determine the etiology of this complication, 274 patients who had been treated for intertrochanteric hip fractures were followed\\u000a up over an 8-year period from June 1988 to June 1996. We found 7 fractures of the subcapital femoral neck without a history\\u000a of a

H. Kanai; M. Igarashi; S. Yamamoto; H. Oda

1999-01-01

329

Electromyographic studies of neck muscles in the intact cat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural head movements in alert, unrestrained cats were studied using video-filming, videofluoroscopy and electromyographic (EMG) recording methods. In each cat, up to sixteen neck muscles or neck-muscle compartments were implanted with recording electrodes. Patterns of muscle recruitment were examined during systematically-selected behavioral epochs in which the cat held a range of stationary postures, and when it performed volitional and exploratory

F. J. R. Richmond; D. B. Thomson; G. E. Loeb

1992-01-01

330

Predictors of persistent neck pain after whiplash injury  

PubMed Central

Objective To establish the aetiological influences of persistent neck pain following a motor vehicle collision and to construct a model for use in the emergency department for identifying patients at high risk of persistent symptoms. Design Prospective cohort study. Patients recruited from hospital emergency departments were sent a questionnaire to gather information on various exposures. They were followed up at 1, 3, and 12 months to identify those with persistent symptoms. Main outcome measure Persistent neck pain (pain at 1, 3, and 12 months after collision). Results The baseline survey included 765 patients. Subsequently, 480 completed a questionnaire at each follow up time point, of whom 128 (27%) reported neck pain on each occasion. Few collision specific factors predicted persistent neck pain. In contrast, a high level of general psychological distress, pre?collision history of widespread body pain, type of vehicle, whiplash associated symptoms, and initial neck disability best predicted the persistence of symptoms. Furthermore, these factors, in combination, accounted for more than a fivefold increase in the risk of persistent neck pain. Conclusion The greatest predictors of persistent neck pain following a motor vehicle collision relate to psychological distress and aspects of pre?collision health rather than to various attributes of the collision itself. With these factors, and those relating to initial injury severity, it is possible to identify a subgroup of patients presenting with neck pain with the highest risk of persistent symptoms. Thus, it is possible to identify whiplash patients with a poor prognosis and to provide closer follow up and specific attention to management in these individuals.

Atherton, K; Wiles, N J; Lecky, F E; Hawes, S J; Silman, A J; Macfarlane, G J; Jones, G T

2006-01-01

331

Optical correlation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pattern recognition may supplement or replace certain navigational aids on spacecraft in docking or landing activities. The need to correctly identify terrain features remains critical in preparation of autonomous planetary landing. One technique that may solve this problem is optical correlation. Correlation has been successfully demonstrated under ideal conditions; however, noise significantly affects the ability of the correlator to accurately identify input signals. Optical correlation in the presence of noise must be successfully demonstrated before this technology can be incorporated into system design. An optical correlator is designed and constructed using a modified 2f configuration. Liquid crystal televisions (LCTV) are used as the spatial light modulators (SLM) for both the input and filter devices. The filter LCTV is characterized and an operating curve is developed. Determination of this operating curve is critical for reduction of input noise. Correlation of live input with a programmable filter is demonstrated.

Cotariu, Steven S.

1991-01-01

332

Dynamic Hip Screw for the Treatment of Femoral Neck Fractures: A Prospective Study with 96 Patients  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To study the correlation between avascular necrosis and the demographics, time elapsed from fracture to surgery, quality of reduction, Garden classification, and the position of the screw following use of the dynamic hip screw (DHS) in the treatment of subcapital neck fractures. Methods. A prospective study of 96 patients with subcapital neck fractures was carried out in a faculty hospital. Patients underwent surgery with closed reduction and internal fixation with DHS. Results. There were 58% male and 42% female patients, with a mean age of 53 years (+/?14). In terms of Garden classification, 60% were Garden IV, 26% were Garden III, and 14% were Garden II. Nonunion was observed in three cases (3%) and was treated with valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy, in all cases leading to successful healing. Avascular necrosis was observed in 16% of patients. The positioning of the screw into the femoral head showed a significant correlation with necrosis. Conclusions. The incidence of necrosis in patients under the age of 50 years is twice as high as that in older patients. Displacement is a predictive factor regarding osteonecrosis and is associated with a high and anterior position of the screw in the femoral head. Level II of evidence. Study Type: therapeutic study.

Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Jacobus, Lucas Senger; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Goncalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yepez, Anthony Kerbes; Barreto, Rodrigo Py Goncalves; Silva, Marcelo Faria

2014-01-01

333

Dynamic hip screw for the treatment of femoral neck fractures: a prospective study with 96 patients.  

PubMed

Objectives. To study the correlation between avascular necrosis and the demographics, time elapsed from fracture to surgery, quality of reduction, Garden classification, and the position of the screw following use of the dynamic hip screw (DHS) in the treatment of subcapital neck fractures. Methods. A prospective study of 96 patients with subcapital neck fractures was carried out in a faculty hospital. Patients underwent surgery with closed reduction and internal fixation with DHS. Results. There were 58% male and 42% female patients, with a mean age of 53 years (+/-14). In terms of Garden classification, 60% were Garden IV, 26% were Garden III, and 14% were Garden II. Nonunion was observed in three cases (3%) and was treated with valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy, in all cases leading to successful healing. Avascular necrosis was observed in 16% of patients. The positioning of the screw into the femoral head showed a significant correlation with necrosis. Conclusions. The incidence of necrosis in patients under the age of 50 years is twice as high as that in older patients. Displacement is a predictive factor regarding osteonecrosis and is associated with a high and anterior position of the screw in the femoral head. Level II of evidence. Study Type: therapeutic study. PMID:24967124

Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Jacobus, Lucas Senger; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Barreto, Rodrigo Py Gonçalves; Silva, Marcelo Faria

2014-01-01

334

Prospective Imaging Biomarker Assessment of Mortality Risk in Patients Treated with Head and Neck Radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Purpose The optimal roles for imaging-based biomarkers in the management of head and neck cancer remain undefined. Unresolved questions include whether functional or anatomic imaging biomarkers might improve mortality risk assessment for this disease. We addressed these issues in a prospective institutional trial. Methods and Materials Ninety-eight patients with locally advanced pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell cancer were enrolled. Each underwent pre-and post-chemoradiotherapy contrast-enhanced CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging. Imaging parameters were correlated with survival outcomes. Results Low post-radiation primary tumor FDG avidity correlated with improved survival on multivariate analysis; so too did complete primary tumor response by CT alone. Although both imaging modalities lacked sensitivity, each had high specificity and negative predictive value for disease-specific mortality risk assessment. Kaplan-Meier estimates confirmed that both CT and FDG-PET/CT stratify patients into distinct high- and low-probability survivorship groups on the basis of primary tumor response to radiotherapy. Subset analyses demonstrated that the prognostic value for each biomarker was primarily derived from patients at high risk for local treatment failure (HPV-negative disease, non-oropharyngeal primary disease, or tobacco use). Conclusions CT- and FDG-PET/CT-based biomarkers are useful clinical tools in head and neck cancer-specific mortality risk assessment following radiotherapy, particularly for high-risk HPV-unrelated disease. Focus should be placed on further refinement and corroboration of imaging-based biomarkers in future studies.

Moeller, Benjamin J.; Rana, Vishal; Cannon, Blake A.; Williams, Michelle D.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Macapinlac, Homer A.; Lee, J. Jack; Ang, K. Kian; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Chronowski, Gregory M.; Frank, Steven J.; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.; Lippman, Scott M.; Schwartz, David L.

2010-01-01

335

Superadditive correlation  

SciTech Connect

The fact that correlation does not imply causation is well known. Correlation between variables at two sites does not imply that the two sites directly interact, because, e.g., correlation between distant sites may be induced by chaining of correlation between a set of intervening, directly interacting sites. Such {open_quotes}noncausal correlation{close_quotes} is well understood in statistical physics: an example is long-range order in spin systems, where spins which have only short-range direct interactions, e.g., the Ising model, display correlation at a distance. It is less well recognized that such long-range {open_quotes}noncausal{close_quotes} correlations can in fact be stronger than the magnitude of any causal correlation induced by direct interactions. We call this phenomenon superadditive correlation (SAC). We demonstrate this counterintuitive phenomenon by explicit examples in (i) a model spin system and (ii) a model continuous variable system, where both models are such that two variables have multiple intervening pathways of indirect interaction. We apply the technique known as decimation to explain SAC as an additive, constructive interference phenomenon between the multiple pathways of indirect interaction. We also explain the effect using a definition of the collective mode describing the intervening spin variables. Finally, we show that the SAC effect is mirrored in information theory, and is true for mutual information measures in addition to correlation measures. Generic complex systems typically exhibit multiple pathways of indirect interaction, making SAC a potentially widespread phenomenon. This affects, e.g., attempts to deduce interactions by examination of correlations, as well as, e.g., hierarchical approximation methods for multivariate probability distributions, which introduce parameters based on successive orders of correlation. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

Giraud, B.G. [Service de Physique Theorique, Centre dEtudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [Service de Physique Theorique, Centre dEtudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Heumann, J.M. [Hewlett Packard Company, Manufacturing Test Division, P.O. Box 301, Loveland, Colorado 80539-0301 (United States)] [Hewlett Packard Company, Manufacturing Test Division, P.O. Box 301, Loveland, Colorado 80539-0301 (United States); Lapedes, A.S. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, The Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, The Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (United States)

1999-05-01

336

Spinal Cord Injury Incurred by Neck Massage  

PubMed Central

Massage is generally accepted as a safe and a widely used modality for various conditions, such as pain, lymphedema, and facial palsy. However, several complications, some with devastating results, have been reported. We introduce a case of a 43-year-old man who suffered from tetraplegia after a neck massage. Imaging studies revealed compressive myelopathy at the C6 level, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), and a herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) at the C5-6 level. After 3 years of rehabilitation, his motor power improved, and he is able to walk and drive with adaptation. OPLL is a well-known predisposing factor for myelopathy in minor trauma, and it increases the risk of HNP, when it is associated with the degenerative disc. Our case emphasizes the need for additional caution in applying manipulation, including massage, in patients with OPLL; patients who are relatively young (i.e., in the fifth decade of life) are not immune to minor trauma.

Cheong, Hyun Suk; Ko, Yeong-A; Lim, Seong Hoon; Kim, Joon Sung

2012-01-01

337

Meningitis following gunshot wound of the neck.  

PubMed

It is generally assumed that a missile fired from a gun is subjected to sufficient heat to render it sterilized. For this reason, retained bullets are not usually considered a source of infection. The infectious complications associated with gunshot wounds are typically attributed to perforation of a hollow viscus with leakage of gastrointestinal contents causing peritonitis or intra-abdominal abscess. There are several reports of bacterial meningitis involving the spinal cord in gunshot wounds that perforate the intestine prior to involving the thoracic or lumbar vertebral column; however, there are no published reports of cerebral meningitis resulting from a retained projectile in the spinal canal in which there was no injury to the gastrointestinal tract. This manuscript describes a woman who died as a result of unsuspected acute bacterial meningitis which developed secondary to a gunshot wound of the neck. The projectile fractured the first thoracic vertebra, lacerated the dura and contused the spinal cord at the C7-T1 junction. Meningitis developed at the C7-T1 level and ascended along the cervical spinal cord to the brain. The infection caused acute neurologic deterioration and death four days following the initial injury. PMID:14640287

Spitz, Daniel J; Ouban, Abderrahman

2003-11-01

338

Two rare schwannomas of head and neck  

PubMed Central

Twenty-five to 45 percent of all schwannomas occur in the head and neck. Most of them arise along the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve (acoustic neurinoma). They rarely originate from the peripheral facial nerve or other nerves within the parotid gland. Less than 4% of schwannomas involve the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. They arise from the branches of the trigeminal nerve and autonomic nervous system. We report two cases of schwannomas arisng from intraparotid facial nerve and nasal cavity. The first case diagnosed in a 62-year-old-man presented with 2-year-history of painless mass of the parotid gland. The lesion was found to be cystic through the pre operative examinations and investigations. The histology of the specimen retained an intraparotid cystic schwannoma. The second case concerned a 75-year-old-man presented with episodes of nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea, anosmia and headache. Histological study of the specimen showed fusiform cells with strongly and diffusely immunostaining for S100 protein suggesting a schwannoma. Virtual Slides http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1098335216112242.

2014-01-01

339

Grease selection for sealed roll neck bearings  

SciTech Connect

During the 1990`s, a revolution took place in the steel industry with respect to lubricant usage, maintenance costs and the environment. The 4-row taper roller bearings that are used in rolling mills on the work roll necks have been historically lubricated with grease from a centralized grease system, pre-packed with grease at each roll change, or fed with oil from mist or air-oil system. Steel mills are being forced to reduce lubricant consumption to reduce maintenance costs, decrease the costs for the disposal of sludges created from the spent greases and reduce the amount of sludge that was created. The sealed bearing became an avenue for accomplishing these objectives. The open 4-row taper roller bearing was redesigned to accommodate seals. The bearing was pre-packed with grease and put into service without any grease replenishment for up to 22 months operation time. The selection of the grease to provide optimum operating characteristics for the lubricant and the bearing is one of the critical elements to the success of the bearing design. This paper reviews the critical properties that are necessary in the grease for the lubricant to provide the correct tribological functions in the bearing. This includes wear of the rollers and raceways, seal lip and surface wear, heat generation during rotation and under load, corrosion resistance, resistance to shearing during the working life of the grease and resistance to water contamination.

Schrama, R.C. [Dofasco Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Vickerman, R.T. [Brooks Technology Co., Cleveland, OH (United States); Bender, C.P. [Torrington Co., CT (United States)

1995-09-01

340

Hemodynamic Responses to Head and Neck Cooling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide head and neck cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objective of this study was to measure the scalp temperature and circulatory responses during use of one commercially available thermal control system. The Life Support Systems, Inc. Mark VII portable cooling system and a liquid cooling helmet were used in this study. Two EEG electrodes and one skin temperature transducer were placed on the anterior midline of the scalp to measure the scalp blood and temperature. Blood flow was measured using a bipolar impedance rheograph. Ten subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature, were tested at high, medium, moderate, moderate-low and low coolant temperatures. Scalp blood flow was recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 200 Hz. Scalp temperature and cooling helmet Inlet temperature was logged periodically during the test period. This study quantifies the effect of head cooling upon scalp temperature and blood flow. These data may also be used to select operational specifications of the head cooling system for biomedical applications such as the treatment of migraine headaches, scalp cooling during chemotherapy, and cooling of multiple sclerosis patients.

Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Carbo, Jorge E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.

1994-01-01

341

Preliminary study of neck muscle size and strength measurements in females with chronic non-specific neck pain and healthy control subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neck muscle weakness and atrophy are two common causes of pain and disability among office workers. The aim of this study was to compare the strength of the neck extensor and flexor muscles and the size of the semispinalis capitis muscle (SECM) in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain (CNNP) and healthy subjects. Twenty female office workers (10 patients with

Asghar Rezasoltani; Ahmadipor Ali-Reza; Khademi-Kalantari Khosro; Rahimi Abbass

2010-01-01

342

Does Choice of Head Size and Neck Geometry Affect Stem Migration in Modular Large-Diameter Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty? A Preliminary Analysis  

PubMed Central

Due to their theoretical advantages, hip systems combining modular necks and large diameter femoral heads have gradually gained popularity. However, among others, concerns regarding changes in the load transfer patterns were raised. Recent stress analyses have indeed shown that the use of modular necks and big femoral heads causes significant changes in the strain distribution along the femur. Our original hypothesis was that these changes may affect early distal migration of a modular stem. We examined the effect of head diameter and neck geometry on migration at two years of follow-up in a case series of 116 patients (125 hips), who have undergone primary Metal-on-Metal total hip arthroplasty with the modular grit-blasted Profemur®E stem combined with large-diameter heads (>36 mm). We found that choice of neck geometry and head diameter has no effect on stem migration. A multivariate regression analysis including the potential confounding variables of the body mass index, bone quality, canal fill and stem positioning revealed only a negative correlation between subsidence and canal fill in midstem area. Statistical analysis, despite its limitations, did not confirm our hypothesis that choice of neck geometry and/or head diameter affects early distal migration of a modular stem. However, the importance of correct stem sizing was revealed.

Georgiou, CS; Evangelou, KG; Theodorou, EG; Provatidis, CG; Megas, PD

2012-01-01

343

Altered Co-contraction of Cervical Muscles in Young Adults with Chronic Neck Pain during Voluntary Neck Motions  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] Muscle co-contraction is important in stabilizing the spine. The aim of this study was to compare cervical muscle co-contraction in adults with and without chronic neck pain during voluntary movements. [Subjects and Methods] Surface electromyography of three paired cervical muscles was measured in fifteen young healthy subjects and fifteen patients with chronic neck pain. The subjects performed voluntary neck movements in the sagittal and coronal plane at slow speed. The co-contraction ratio was defined as the normalized integration of the antagonistic electromyography activities divided by that of the total muscle activities. [Results] The results showed that the co-contraction ratio of patients was greater during flexion movement, lesser during extension movement, slightly greater during right lateral bending, and slightly lesser during left lateral bending compared with in the controls. [Conclusion] The results suggested that neck pain patients exhibit greater antagonistic muscle activity during flexion and dominate-side bending movements to augment spinal stability, while neuromuscular control provides relatively less protection in the opposite movements. This study helps to specify the changes of the stiffness of the cervical spine in neck pain patients and provides a useful tool and references for clinical assessment of neck disorders.

Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Lin, Kwan-Hwa; Liu, Wen-Yu; Wang, Shwu-Fen; Hsu, Wei-Li; Chuang, Yu-Fen

2014-01-01

344

Long-term functional donor site morbidity of the free radial forearm flap in head and neck cancer survivors  

PubMed Central

Background To assess the functional donor site morbidity of the forearm free flap in patients surviving at least 2 years after ablative head and neck cancer surgery in a tertiary care centre. Methods This study involved nine long-term survivors (2 year post-operative) who had forearm free flaps to reconstruct head and neck defects. All flaps were raised from the non-dominant arm. The non-donor side acted as a control for all patients. Objective measurements were as follows: grip, tip pinch and key pinch strength measured with dynamometers; flexion, extension, radial and ulnar deviation and pronation and supination range of motion at the wrist measured with goniometry; A timed manual dexterity task was performed with a grooved pegboard test, and sensation of the radial nerve was tested with Semmes Weinstein monofilaments. Subjective measurements included a validated patient questionnaire of hand function and opinions of scar appearance as well as a validated scar assessment from two different observers. Results Pronation at the wrist, manual dexterity and sensation were found to be significantly reduced in the donor side compared to the non-donor side. Inter-rater agreement between the two observers was found to be poor, except for an acceptable correlation between overall scar opinions. No correlations were found between any subjective or objective items or between the patient’s and the observers’ subjective evaluations. Conclusions Donor site morbidity can be demonstrated with objective testing however this is accepted and well tolerated by head and neck cancer patients.

2014-01-01

345

Clinimetric evaluation of methods to measure muscle functioning in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a significant health problem in modern society. There is evidence to suggest that neck muscle strength is reduced in patients with neck pain. This article provides a critical analysis of the research literature on the clinimetric properties of tests to measure neck muscle strength or endurance in patients with non-specific neck pain, which can be used

Chantal HP de Koning; SP van den Heuvel; J Bart Staal; Bouwien CM Smits-Engelsman; Erik JM Hendriks

2008-01-01

346

RELATION OF MUCOUS MEMBRANE ALTERATIONS TO ORAL INTAKE DURING THE FIRST YEAR AFTER TREATMENT FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER  

PubMed Central

Background Acute oral mucositis is associated with pain and impaired swallowing. Little information is available on the effects of chronic mucositis on swallowing. Methods Sixty patients treated for cancer of the head and neck were examined during the first year after their cancer treatment. Oral mucosa was rated with the Oral Mucositis Assessment Scale. Stimulated whole-mouth saliva, oral pain rating, percent of oral intake, and 2 subscales of the Performance Status Scale for Head and Neck (PSS-HN) cancer were also collected. Results Mucositis scores and pain ratings decreased over time while functional measures of eating improved over time. Reduction in chronic mucositis was correlated with improved oral intake and diet. Conclusion Lack of association with pain was attributed to the absence of ulcerations. Continued impairment of oral intake during the first year posttreatment may be related to oral mucosal changes and other factors.

Rademaker, Alfred W.; Logemann, Jerilyn A.; Lundy, Donna; Bernstein, Michelle; McBreen, Carrie; Santa, Daphne; Campanelli, Angela; Kelchner, Lisa; Klaben, Bernice; Discekici-Harris, Muveddet

2014-01-01

347

Smad4 loss in mice causes spontaneous head and neck cancer with increased genomic instability and inflammation  

PubMed Central

Smad4 is a central mediator of TGF-? signaling, and its expression is downregulated or lost at the malignant stage in several cancer types. In this study, we found that Smad4 was frequently downregulated not only in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) malignant lesions, but also in grossly normal adjacent buccal mucosa. To gain insight into the importance of this observation, we generated mice in which Smad4 was deleted in head and neck epithelia (referred to herein as HN-Smad4–/– mice) and found that they developed spontaneous HNSCC. Interestingly, both normal head and neck tissue and HNSCC from HN-Smad4–/– mice exhibited increased genomic instability, which correlated with downregulated expression and function of genes encoding proteins in the Fanconi anemia/Brca (Fanc/Brca) DNA repair pathway linked to HNSCC susceptibility in humans. Consistent with this, further analysis revealed a correlation between downregulation of Smad4 protein and downregulation of the Brca1 and Rad51 proteins in human HNSCC. In addition to the above changes in tumor epithelia, both normal head and neck tissue and HNSCC from HN-Smad4–/– mice exhibited severe inflammation, which was associated with increased expression of TGF-?1 and activated Smad3. We present what we believe to be the first single gene–knockout model for HNSCC, in which both HNSCC formation and invasion occurred as a result of Smad4 deletion. Our results reveal an intriguing connection between Smad4 and the Fanc/Brca pathway and highlight the impact of epithelial Smad4 loss on inflammation.

Bornstein, Sophia; White, Ruth; Malkoski, Stephen; Oka, Masako; Han, Gangwen; Cleaver, Timothy; Reh, Douglas; Andersen, Peter; Gross, Neil; Olson, Susan; Deng, Chuxia; Lu, Shi-Long; Wang, Xiao-Jing

2009-01-01

348

Random Positional Variation Among the Skull, Mandible, and Cervical Spine With Treatment Progression During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: With 54{sup o} of freedom from the skull to mandible to C7, ensuring adequate immobilization for head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT) is complex. We quantify variations in skull, mandible, and cervical spine movement between RT sessions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head-and-neck RT patients underwent serial computed tomography. Patients underwent planned rescanning at 11, 22, and 33 fractions for a total of 93 scans. Coordinates of multiple bony elements of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine were used to calculate rotational and translational changes of bony anatomy compared with the original planning scan. Results: Mean translational and rotational variations on rescanning were negligible, but showed a wide range. Changes in scoliosis and lordosis of the cervical spine between fractions showed similar variability. There was no correlation between positional variation and fraction number and no strong correlation with weight loss or skin separation. Semi-independent rotational and translation movement of the skull in relation to the lower cervical spine was shown. Positioning variability measured by means of vector displacement was largest in the mandible and lower cervical spine. Conclusions: Although only small overall variations in position between head-and-neck RT sessions exist on average, there is significant random variation in patient positioning of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine elements. Such variation is accentuated in the mandible and lower cervical spine. These random semirigid variations in positioning of the skull and spine point to a need for improved immobilization and/or confirmation of patient positioning in RT of the head and neck.

Ahn, Peter H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)], E-mail: phahn@mdanderson.org; Ahn, Andrew I. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY (United States); Lee, C. Joe; Shen Jin; Miller, Ekeni; Lukaj, Alex; Milan, Elissa; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

2009-02-01

349

[Lymph nodes of the neck. Diagnosis using magnetic resonance with gradient-echo technique].  

PubMed

As for the pathologic conditions of neck lymph nodes, the clinician needs to know if the involved node is reactive, phlogistic, or neoplastic in nature. If accurate tumor staging is required, imaging techniques play a fundamental role. Our study was aimed at assessing the actual role of MR imaging in the evaluation of neck lymph node involvement. The study was performed using an MR Max Plus by General Electrics operating with an 0.5 T superconductive magnet. We employed gradient-echo (GE) pulse sequences with TR 500, TE 15 ms and 90 degrees flip angle for T1-weighted images, and with TR 500, TE 30 ms and 25-30 degrees flip angles for T2-weighted images; for Pd-T2-weighted images, TR was 520, TE 30 ms, and flip angles were 40-45 degrees. The results were correlated with histopathologic findings obtained at biopsy. The advantages of GE sequences were: 1) whole neck imaging--thus saving time, and reducing radiation dose and contrast media; 2) optimal anatomical and topographic evaluation of the lesion; 3) imaging of the longitudinal diameter of the node; 4) higher sensitivity for lymph node tissue modifications; 5) imaging of necrosis, hemorrhage, and/or fibrosis. GE sequences were especially useful for accurate tumor staging, in the follow-up, and to verify response to therapy. However, even though MR imaging has proven to have high sensitivity, its specificity was similar to that of contrast-enhanced CT. Further studies with the use of paramagnetic contrast media are needed to solve these problems. PMID:2028032

Andreula, C F; Farchi, G; Pavone, V; Racanelli, A; Carella, A

1991-04-01

350

Molecular Targeting of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agent for Detection of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the feasibility of ultrasonographic (US) imaging of head and neck cancer with targeted contrast agents both in vitro and in vivo. We hypothesize that conjugation of microbubble contrast agent to tumor-specific antibodies may improve US detection of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Design Preclinical blinded assessment of anti-EGFR and anti-CD147 microbubble contrast agents for US imaging of HNSCC. Setting Animal study. Subjects Immunodeficient mice. Intervention Injection of targeted microbubbles. Main Outcome Measure Microbubble uptake in tumors as detected by US. Results In vitro assessment of anti–epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anti-CD147–targeted micro-bubbles in 6 head and neck cancer cell lines yielded a 6-fold improvement over normal dermal fibroblasts (P<.001). Binding of targeted agents had a positive correlation to both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (R2=0.81) and CD147 (R2=0.72) expression among all cell lines. In vivo imaging of flank tumors in nude mice (N=8) yielded enhanced resolution of anti-EGFR– and anti-CD147–targeted microbubble agents over IgG control (P<.001), while dual-targeted contrast agents offered enhanced imaging over single-targeted contrast agents (P=.02 and P=.05, respectively). In a blinded in vivo assessment, targeted contrast agents increased intratumoral enhancement of flank tumors over controls. Targeted US contrast agents to both EGFR and CD147 were 100% sensitive and 87% specific in the detection of flank tumors. Conclusion This preclinical study demonstrates feasibility of using molecular US to target HNSCC for contrast-enhanced imaging of HNSCC tumor in vivo.

Knowles, Joseph A.; Heath, Cara H.; Saini, Reshu; Umphrey, Heidi; Warram, Jason; Hoyt, Kenneth; Rosenthal, Eben L.

2012-01-01

351

Pattern of injuries to neck structures in hanging-an autopsy study.  

PubMed

One hundred eighty-nine cases of known dead bodies brought for medicolegal autopsy with alleged history of hanging were studied at the Department of Forensic Medicine, State Medico Legal Institute, Government Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. All the findings noticed during detailed external examination and flap dissection of the neck were analyzed with special emphasis on correlation between the external and internal injuries on neck.There was a preponderance of males in the study group (70.9%), majority of them being middle-aged (64.9%). Among females, the major group was composed of adolescents and young adults (72.8%). Easily available materials were used as ligature materials. Soft materials such as saree, shawl, lungie, and so on were used as ligature by 47% of victims and hard materials such as coir rope, plastic rope, telephone cable, and so on were used by 29% of victims. Oblique ligature mark was noted in 94.2% of cases. The ligature mark was noncontinuous in 78% of cases. Horizontal ligature marks were noted in cases of partial hanging.Rupture of muscle fibers at the lower attachment of sternomastoid was seen in 19.6%, and carotid intimal tear was seen in 1.1% of cases. Fracture of hyoid bone at their greater horns was seen in 2.7% and thyroid cartilage in 5.3% of cases. Vertebral fracture and dislocation were noted between third and fourth cervical vertebrae in 1.6% of cases. Neck skeleton injuries were noted in persons older than 38 years. PMID:22922547

Jayaprakash, Sharija; Sreekumari, Kuttikatti

2012-12-01

352

A review of direct neck measurement in occupational settings.  

PubMed

No guidelines are available to orient researchers on the availability and applications of equipment and sensors for recording precise neck movements in occupational settings. In this study reports on direct measurements of neck movements in the workplace were reviewed. Using relevant keywords two independent reviewers searched for eligible studies in the following databases: Cinahal, Cochrane, Embase, Lilacs, PubMed, MEDLINE, PEDro, Scopus and Web of Science. After applying the inclusion criteria, 13 articles on direct neck measurements in occupational settings were retrieved from among 33,666 initial titles. These studies were then methodologically evaluated according to their design characteristics, exposure and outcome assessment, and statistical analysis. The results showed that in most of the studies the three axes of neck movement (flexion-extension, lateral flexion and rotation) were not simultaneously recorded. Deficiencies in available equipment explain this flaw, demonstrating that sensors and systems need to be improved so that a true understanding of real occupational exposure can be achieved. Further studies are also needed to assess neck movement in those who perform heavy-duty work, such as nurses and electricians, since no report about such jobs was identified. PMID:22163507

Carnaz, Letícia; Batistao, Mariana V; Coury, Helenice J C Gil

2010-01-01

353

Defining the fat compartments in the neck: a cadaver study.  

PubMed

Background: Cervicoplasty is an important component of aesthetic facial and neck surgery, but the fat content in this area has not been described. Objectives: The authors identify anatomic compartments of fat in the neck (specifically the areas relevant to surgical management), quantify the fat in each compartment, and describe the relationships between each compartment and the submandibular glands. Methods: The skin was removed from 10 fresh cadaver heads. Each compartment of fat was weighed, along with the submandibular gland. Supraplatysmal fat was found between the skin and the platysma muscle, and it was compartmentalized into suprahyoid and infrahyoid fat. Subplatysmal fat was found deep to the platysma and between the medial edges of the anterior digastric in the midline; this fat also fell into suprahyoid and infrahyoid compartments. The "very deep" fat was deep to the anterior digastric muscles and submandibular gland, and adherent to the strap muscles. Results: On average, supraplatysmal fat represented 44.7% of the fat in the neck, the subplatysmal fat represented 30.7%, and the submandibular gland represented 24.5%. The very deep fat was scant, representing less than 1% of the fat in the neck. Conclusions: This anatomic study provides a comprehensive review of fat in the neck, and the results should serve as an additional guide as surgeons approach this challenging area in surgical rejuvenation. PMID:24633742

Larson, Jeffrey D; Tierney, William S; Ozturk, Cemile Nurdan; Zins, James E

2014-05-01

354

Neck posture and head movement in four rescue stretchers.  

PubMed

Neck posture and head movements were measured in four rescue stretchers: the Neil Robertson stretcher, which has been in service in the Royal Navy for almost 100 years, and three potential replacements. A repeated measures laboratory study was carried out to quantify neck posture and head movements while subjects reclined in the stretchers. Stretchers were compared on the basis of this critical aspect of their performance to complement the findings of ship-based usability trials. When the subjects were secured in each of the stretchers, wearing cervical collars and any restraints integral to that stretcher, the resting posture of the neck and the range of voluntary movement in flexion/extension, lateral flexion, and rotation were measured. In all of the stretchers, the neck was in an extended posture. The collars restricted head movements but they did not immobilize the neck. Stretcher 3, which had all of the functionality of the Neal Robertson stretcher, but with integral backboard and head blocks, limited head movements the most. PMID:15605941

Bridger, Robert; Bilzon, Emma; Green, Andrew; Chamberlain, Richard; Pickering, John

2004-11-01

355

Minimizing Liability Risks of Head and Neck Injuries in Football  

PubMed Central

Although catastrophic head and neck injuries in football occur infrequently, their occurrence is almost always followed by litigation. The athletic trainer has to be sure he/she has adequate liability insurance to cover the costs of a defense and a possible judgment. General claims filed against athletic staffs usually deal with instruction, equipment, matching of participants, supervision, and/or postinjury care. The defenses to these claims include: statutory immunity, assumption of risk, releases or waivers, and the reckless disregard standard. The athletic trainer plays a key role in head and neck injury prevention and care, and must be aware of litigation possibilities, along with methods of risk management. We present recommendations aimed at minimizing the risk of head and neck injuries and the risk of liability. The areas covered are: preparing for head and neck lawsuits, preventing head and neck injuries, and postcatastrophic injury care. We base these recommendations on principles that the athletic trainer can easily apply to other areas, broadening the risk management concept presented. ImagesFig 1.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7.

Heck, Jonathan F.; Weis, Michael P.; Gartland, James M.; Weis, Craig R.

1994-01-01

356

Collegiate and high school athlete neck strength in neutral and rotated postures.  

PubMed

A knowledge of neck strength is important for developing conditioning protocols and for evaluating the relationship between neck strength and head and neck injury, but very few studies have examined neck strength in relationship to athletic participation. The purpose of this study was to quantify isometric neck strength in collegiate and high school athletes. We hypothesized that (a) male athletes would have significantly greater neck strength than females; (b) collegiate athletes would be significantly stronger than high school athletes; and (c) neck strength would vary significantly with head posture. A total of 149 subjects participated (77 men and 72 women; 90 college and 59 high school level). Flexion, extension, and lateral flexion neck strength were measured in neutral and rotated head and neck postures. Neck strength varied significantly according to participants' sex, age, and posture (p < 0.05). Male college students were stronger than those in all other groups (female college students, male high school students, and female high school students). The average female neck strength was 61, 54, and 56% of the average male neck strength for extension, flexion, and lateral flexion, respectively. High school athletes' neck strength was 75, 68, and 65% of collegiate athletes' neck strength for extension, flexion, and lateral flexion, respectively. On average, neck strength was the greatest for extension compared with other force directions. The subjects showed large variation in neck strength with posture, but in general, there were no consistent trends among the subjects. This finding suggests that those whose neck strength was considerably lower in nonneutral postures may consider training to increase strength in rotated postures. These data provide important baseline information for future studies evaluating injury risk or training protocols. PMID:23439331

Hildenbrand, Kasee J; Vasavada, Anita N

2013-11-01

357

Neck and waist circumference biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in a cohort of predominantly African-American college students: a preliminary study.  

PubMed

Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to assess the value of measuring neck and waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) as biomarkers of metabolic syndrome in college students (18 to 25 years of age). Participants (n=109) were 92% black, 62.4% female, 45.9% overweight or obese, and 20.2% prehypertensive or hypertensive. Overall, 41 (37.6%) students had one or more risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Percent body fat, assessed using whole-body air-displacement plethysmography, was positively correlated (P<0.0001) with neck and waist circumference (as measured at the midpoint between the right lower rib and suprailiac crest; hereafter "midpoint"). Neck circumference correlated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P ? 0.02) and both neck circumference and waist circumference-midpoint correlated with insulin (P ? 0.001) and triglycerides (P ? 0.002). The best-fit cutoffs were ? 83 cm waist circumference-midpoint and ? 88 cm waist circumference measured at the suprailiac crest for percent body fat in men and ? 75 cm waist circumference-midpoint for metabolic syndrome in women. The proportion of overweight and prehypertensive individuals among self-described healthy students underscores the need for screening tools that identify those who might benefit most from health interventions. Waist circumference-midpoint provides a simple yet sensitive method for the estimation of percent body fat and metabolic syndrome risk in primarily African-American college students. The novel use of neck circumference should be further investigated. PMID:24051106

Arnold, Thaddeus J; Schweitzer, Amy; Hoffman, Heather J; Onyewu, Chiatogu; Hurtado, Maria Eugenia; Hoffman, Eric P; Klein, Catherine J

2014-01-01

358

Necrotizing fasciitis of the neck: considerations about two cases.  

PubMed

Background and Aim: Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressing life-threatening infection of the deep fat and fascial layers which rarely occurs in the neck. The aim of the paper is to report the management of this rare condition pointing out the role of multimodality in achieving the cure of the patient.Methods: we report our experience regarding management of two cases of necrotising fasciitis of the neck successfully treated with medical and surgical therapy.Discussion: Early diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis of the neck plays a central role in preventing progression of the disease. Multimodal treatment should be mandatory. Conclusions: Immediate aggressive surgical debridement, securing of the airway, and anti-bacterial agents represent the only effective treatment in preventing progression of the disease. Intensive care support should be considered integral part of treatment. PMID:24897970

Giordano, Davide; Pernice, Carmine; Pedroni, Corrado; Barbieri, Verter

2014-01-01

359

Primary Bladder Neck Obstruction in Men and Women  

PubMed Central

Primary bladder neck obstruction (PBNO) is a condition in which the bladder neck does not open appropriately or completely during voiding. Although the true prevalence of PBNO is difficult to ascertain, studies in both men and women with voiding dysfunction demonstrate a marked prevalence of the condition. Symptoms caused by PBNO include storage symptoms (frequency, urgency, urge incontinence, nocturia) and voiding symptoms (decreased force of stream, hesitancy, incomplete emptying). There are multiple theories as to the etiology of PBNO, including muscular and neurologic dysfunction and fibrosis. The diagnosis of PBNO can be made precisely with videourodynamics, urodynamic testing with simultaneous pressure-flow measurement, and visualization of the bladder neck during voiding. Treatments vary from watchful waiting to medical therapy to surgery, depending on the severity of symptoms, urodynamic findings, and response to therapy. This article reviews the current state of the art with respect to the prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of PBNO.

Nitti, Victor W

2005-01-01

360

Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies.  

PubMed

Necessity is the mother of all inventions. This is also true in case of cancer therapy. With increasing incidence of head and neck malignancies, remarkable developments have been made towards cancer development and treatment which continues to be a major challenge. Approximately fifty percent of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy which contributes towards forty percent of curative treatment for cancer. New developments in radiation oncology have helped to improve outlook for patients and find more effective treatment. With the advent of new technologies, radiotherapy seems to be promising in patients with head and neck malignancies these advancements include Altered fractionation, Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, Image Guided Radiotherapy, Stereotactic radiation, Charged-particle radiotherapy, and Intraoperative radiotherapy. How to cite this article: Roopashri G, Baig M. Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):119-23 . PMID:24453456

Roopashri, G; Baig, Muqeet

2013-12-01

361

Bilateral chylothorax following neck dissection: a case report  

PubMed Central

Background Chylothorax is an extremely rare but potentially life-threatening complication after radical neck dissection. We report the case of a bilateral chylothorax after total thyroidectomy and cervico-central and cervico-lateral lymphadenectomy for thyroid carcinoma. Case presentation A 40-year-old European woman underwent total thyroidectomy and neck dissection for papillary thyroid carcinoma. Postoperatively she developed dyspnoea and pleural effusion. A chylothorax was found and the initial conservative therapy was not successful. She had to be operated on again and the thoracic duct was legated. Conclusion The case presentation reports a very rare complication after total thyroidectomy and neck dissection, but it has to be kept in mind to prevent dangerous complications.

2014-01-01

362

Cystic benign teratoma of the neck in adult.  

PubMed

Teratomas are embryonal neoplasms that arise when totipotential germ cells escape the developmental control of primary organizers and give rise to tumors containing tissue derived from all three blastodermic layers. Teratomas have been reported to occur in various sites and organs. Teratoma of the cervical neck are relatively rare in adulthood. It usually extends from the neck to the thoracic cavity causing local mass effect. In most of the cases intrauterine diagnosis is possible by ultrasound. Because of dyspnea due to mass effect, this condition is treated promptly after birth. However cases of teratoma in adulthood with supraclavicular localization have been reported rarely in the literature. The presented case is of a 25-year-old female with a cervical mass. Histological examination revealed a benign mature teratoma. The patient has been disease free for more than nine years after surgical removal of a neck teratoma. PMID:24303501

Alimehmeti, Mehdi; Alimehmeti, Ridvan; Ikonomi, Majlinda; Saraci, Myfit; Petrela, Mentor

2013-09-16

363

Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck  

PubMed Central

Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is an epidemic that reaches all parts of the world. Making the diagnosis relies on the acumen of the clinician and pathologist. Various pathologic subtypes exist and differ in histology and prognosis. High-risk tumors need aggressive treatment and vigilant surveillance to monitor for recurrence. Large tumors, deep tissue invasion, perineural involvement, recurrence, location in high-risk areas, and immunosuppression are implicated in worsening prognosis. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment with adjuvant radiation therapy as needed for aggressive tumors; however, other modalities are potentially useful for low-risk lesions. The use of Mohs surgery has become increasingly useful and has shown high success rates. Involvement of parotid and neck lymph nodes significantly affects outcomes and the physician should be comfortable with management of this complex disease. This paper examines the diagnosis, pathology, clinical course, and treatment options for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

Gurudutt, Vivek V.; Genden, Eric M.

2011-01-01

364

Cognitive Functioning After Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To perform a comprehensive cognitive function (CF) assessment in patients who were relapse free after curative intent radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent neuropsychological tests to assess their objective CF; completed questionnaires to assess subjective CF, quality of life, and affect; and underwent blood tests to assess hematologic, biochemical, endocrine, and cytokine status. Retrospectively, the dosimetry of incidental radiation to the brain was determined for all patients, and the dose intensity of cisplatin was determined in those who had undergone chemoradiotherapy. Results: A total of 10 patients were enrolled (5 treated with radiotherapy only and 5 with radiotherapy and cisplatin). The mean time from the end of treatment was 20 months (range, 9-41). All patients were able to complete the assessment protocol. Of the 10 patients, 9 had impaired objective CF, with memory the most severely affected. The severity of memory impairment correlated significantly with the radiation dose to the temporal lobes, and impaired dexterity correlated significantly with the radiation dose to the cerebellum, suggesting that these deficits might be treatment related. Patients receiving cisplatin appeared to have poorer objective CF than patients receiving only RT, although this difference did not achieve statistical significance, likely owing to the small sample size. Consistent with the published data, objective CF did not correlate with subjective CF or quality of life. No association was found between objective CF and patients' affect, hematologic, biochemical, endocrine, and cytokine status. Conclusion: Neuropsychological testing is feasible in squamous cell carcinoma of the head-and-neck survivors. The findings were suggestive of treatment-related cognitive dysfunction. These results warrant additional investigation.

Gan, Hui K. [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bernstein, Lori J. [Department of Psychosocial Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Brown, Jennifer [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ringash, Jolie; Vakilha, Mehrdad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wang, Lisa [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Goldstein, David [Department of Otolaryngology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Kim, John; Hope, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Abdul Razak, Albiruni R.; Chen, Eric X. [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Siu, Lillian L., E-mail: lillian.siu@uhn.on.ca [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2011-09-01

365

Standardization of Head and Neck Contouring Using the Acanthiomeatal Line  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived and actual chin position(s) used for radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancers in a variety of clinical settings. Dosimetrists were asked to describe the external landmarks used to set the chin position. The lateral treatment planning radiographic figures in Ang's textbook, Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancers: Indications and Techniques, were analyzed for chin position by drawing a horizontal line from the tip of the chin to the cervical spine. The physicians at 7 departments were asked to rate the chin positions used in their departments for head-and-neck simulations. Choices included: (1) mildly flexed, (2) neutral, (3) mildly extended, and (4) hyperextended. In addition, each center was asked to select 2 representative cases to show routine chin position. The dosimetrists fixed the chin in neutral position by placing a virtual plane defined by 3 points (the base of the nasal septum [acanthus] and the external auditory canals) perpendicular to the table top. The type of head holder was irrelevant. Eighty-two percent (31/38) of the figures in Ang's text showed positioning in the neutral position (tip of the chin intersected the cervical spine between C2-3/C3-4). Most (71.4%) of the radiotherapists thought their patients were treated in the hyperextended neck position but, in fact, 85.7% (12/14) of the simulations showed a neural neck position. Reproducible chin positioning can be obtained by using the acanthiomeatal line. Consistent use of this technique will create a uniformly positioned set of axial co-images that have consistent appearance of avoidance and lymphatic areas. This will simplify contouring on axial computed tomography (CT) images of the neck. Standardizing the chin position is an important step to developing a standardized atlas and developing an information tool for automated contouring.

Desai, Snehal [Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Section of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Teh, Bin S. [Methodist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: bteh@tmhs.org; Hinojosa, Jose [ABC Medical Center, Mexico City (Mexico); Bell, Bent C.; Paulino, Arnold C. [Methodist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Butler, E. Brian [Methodist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States)

2009-10-01

366

Physical activity and head and neck cancer risk  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the relation of physical activity to head and neck cancer. Methods We prospectively examined the association between physical activity and head and neck cancer in 487,732 men and women who, at baseline in 1995–1996, were 50–71 years old and free of cancer and emphysema. Follow-up occurred through December 31, 2003. Results During follow-up, 1,249 participants developed head and neck cancer, of which 42.0%, 18.9%, and 32.5% were located in the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx, respectively. In analyses adjusted for age and gender, the relative risks (RR) of head and neck cancer for increasing frequency of physical activity (0, < 1, 1–2, 3–4, and ? 5 times per week) were 1.0 (reference), 0.76, 0.66, 0.57, and 0.62 (95%-CI=0.52–0.74), respectively (p for trend<0.001). After multivariate adjustment including smoking, the relation was attenuated and became statistically non-significant (RR comparing extreme physical activity categories=0.89, 95%-CI=0.74–1.06; p for trend=0.272). In analyses of head and neck cancer subtypes, the corresponding RRs for cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx were 0.98 (95%-CI=0.75–1.29), 0.70 (95%-CI=0.45–1.08), and 0.82 (95%-CI=0.59–1.13), respectively. Conclusions Our findings suggest that physical activity is unlikely to play an important role in the prevention of head and neck cancer.

Leitzmann, Michael F.; Koebnick, Corinna; Freedman, Neal D.; Park, Yikyung; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Schatzkin, Arthur; Abnet, Christian C.

2012-01-01

367

Standardization of head and neck contouring using the acanthiomeatal line.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived and actual chin position(s) used for radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancers in a variety of clinical settings. Dosimetrists were asked to describe the external landmarks used to set the chin position. The lateral treatment planning radiographic figures in Ang's textbook, Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancers: Indications and Techniques, were analyzed for chin position by drawing a horizontal line from the tip of the chin to the cervical spine. The physicians at 7 departments were asked to rate the chin positions used in their departments for head-and-neck simulations. Choices included: (1) mildly flexed, (2) neutral, (3) mildly extended, and (4) hyperextended. In addition, each center was asked to select 2 representative cases to show routine chin position. The dosimetrists fixed the chin in neutral position by placing a virtual plane defined by 3 points (the base of the nasal septum [acanthus] and the external auditory canals) perpendicular to the table top. The type of head holder was irrelevant. Eighty-two percent (31/38) of the figures in Ang's text showed positioning in the neutral position (tip of the chin intersected the cervical spine between C2-3/C3-4). Most (71.4%) of the radiotherapists thought their patients were treated in the hyperextended neck position but, in fact, 85.7% (12/14) of the simulations showed a neural neck position. Reproducible chin positioning can be obtained by using the acanthiomeatal line. Consistent use of this technique will create a uniformly positioned set of axial co-images that have consistent appearance of avoidance and lymphatic areas. This will simplify contouring on axial computed tomography (CT) images of the neck. Standardizing the chin position is an important step to developing a standardized atlas and developing an information tool for automated contouring. PMID:19647633

Desai, Snehal; Teh, Bin S; Hinojosa, Jose; Bell, Bent C; Paulino, Arnold C; Butler, E Brian

2009-01-01

368

Diagnostic possibilities with multidimensional images in head and neck area using efficient registration and visualization methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For several diseases in the head and neck area different imaging modalities are applied to the same patient.Each of these image data sets has its specific advantages and disadvantages. The combination of different methods allows to make the best use of the advantageous properties of each method while minimizing the impact of its negative aspects. Soft tissue alterations can be judged better in an MRI image while it may be unrecognizable in the relating CT. Bone tissue, on the other hand, is optimally imaged in CT. Inflammatory nuclei of the bone can be detected best by their increased signal in SPECT. Only the combination of all modalities let the physical come to an exact statement on pathological processes that involve multiple tissue structures. Several surfaces and voxel based matching functions we have tested allowed a precise merging by means of numerical optimization methods like e.g. simulated annealing without the complicated assertion of fiducial markers or the localization landmarks in 2D cross sectional slice images. The quality of the registration depends on the choice of the optimization procedure according to the complexity of the matching function landscape. Precise correlation of the multimodal head and neck area images together with its 2D and 3D presentation techniques provides a valuable tool for physicians.

Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Krol, Zdzislaw; Sader, Robert; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Gerhardt, Paul; Schweiger, Markus; Horch, Hans-Henning

1997-05-01

369

Exploring the Dynamic Core Microbiome of Plaque Microbiota during Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy Using Pyrosequencing  

PubMed Central

Radiotherapy is the primary treatment modality used for patients with head-and-neck cancers, but inevitably causes microorganism-related oral complications. This study aims to explore the dynamic core microbiome of oral microbiota in supragingival plaque during the course of head-and-neck radiotherapy. Eight subjects aged 26 to 70 were recruited. Dental plaque samples were collected (over seven sampling time points for each patient) before and during radiotherapy. The V1–V3 hypervariable regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified, and the high-throughput pyrosequencing was performed. A total of 140 genera belonging to 13 phyla were found. Four phyla (Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria) and 11 genera (Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Veillonella, Capnocytophaga, Derxia, Neisseria, Rothia, Prevotella, Granulicatella, Luteococcus, and Gemella) were found in all subjects, supporting the concept of a core microbiome. Temporal variation of these major cores in relative abundance were observed, as well as a negative correlation between the number of OTUs and radiation dose. Moreover, an optimized conceptual framework was proposed for defining a dynamic core microbiome in extreme conditions such as radiotherapy. This study presents a theoretical foundation for exploring a core microbiome of communities from time series data, and may help predict community responses to perturbation as caused by exposure to ionizing radiation.

Wang, Qian; Jiang, Yun-tao; Ma, Rui; Tang, Zi-sheng; Liu, Zheng; Liang, Jing-ping; Huang, Zheng-wei

2013-01-01

370

Increased salivary gland density on contrast-enhanced CT after head and neck radiation  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to determine whether radiation therapy leads to an increased density of salivary glands on subsequent contrast-enhanced CT, 109 CT scans from 78 patients with head and neck tumors were reviewed. The density of parotid and submandibular glands was subjectively evaluated (compared with adjacent muscle) and correlated with treatment including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Density of the parotid and/or submandibular glands was found to be significantly associated with previous irradiation on contrast-enhanced scans (p less than .05). One or both glands were denser than normal in seven (44%) of 16 patients who received only radiation therapy and in eight (38%) of 21 who received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, compared with only two (10%) of 20 patients who received chemotherapy alone and two (4%) of 52 patients who received neither. The type or amount of irradiation, type of chemotherapy, or timing of the CT scan after the initiation of treatment was not found to be significant. We conclude that the density of the parotid and/or submandibular glands on contrast-enhanced CT is frequently increased after radiation therapy for tumors of the head and neck.

Bronstein, A.D.; Nyberg, D.A.; Schwartz, A.N.; Shuman, W.P.; Griffin, B.R.

1987-12-01

371

Early clinical experience with volumetric modulated arc therapy in head and neck cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Background To report about early clinical experience in radiation treatment of head and neck cancer of different sites and histology by volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc technology. Methods During 2009, 45 patients were treated at Istituto Clinico Humanitas with RapidArc (28 males and 17 females, median age 65 years). Of these, 78% received concomitant chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients were treated as exclusive curative intent (group A), three as postoperative curative intent (group B) and six with sinonasal tumours (group C). Dose prescription was at Planning Target Volumes (PTV) with simultaneous integrated boost: 54.45Gy and 69.96Gy in 33 fractions (group A); 54.45Gy and 66Gy in 33 fractions (group B) and 55Gy in 25 fractions (group C). Results Concerning planning optimization strategies and constraints, as per PTV coverage, for all groups, D98% > 95% and V95% > 99%. As regards organs at risk, all planning objectives were respected, and this was correlated with observed acute toxicity rates. Only 28% of patients experienced G3 mucositis, 14% G3 dermitis 44% had G2 dysphagia. Nobody required feeding tubes to be placed during treatment. Acute toxicity is also related to chemotherapy. Two patients interrupted the course of radiotherapy because of a quick worsening of general clinical condition. Conclusions These preliminary results stated that volumetric modulated arc therapy in locally advanced head and neck cancers is feasible and effective, with acceptable toxicities.

2010-01-01

372

Neck circumference as an independent predictive contributor to cardio-metabolic syndrome  

PubMed Central

Background The predictive potentials of neck circumference (NC) for cardio-metabolic risks remain uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether NC independently contributes to the prediction of cardio-metabolic risks beyond body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist to hip ratio (WHpR) in a large Chinese population. Methods A total of 4201 participants (2508 men and 1693 women) aged 20-85 were recruited from the Health Examination Centre between May 2009 and April 2010, anthropometric indices, biochemical and clinical parameters were measured. Receiver operating characteristic, partial correlation and logistic regression analyses were employed to evaluate the association of the anthropometric indices to cardio-metabolic risks separately by gender. Results Neck circumference was positively correlated with SBP and DBP (r=0.250 and 0.261), fasting blood glucose (FBP) (r=0.177), TG (r=0.240), TC (r=0.143) and LDL-C (r=0.088) and negatively correlated with HDL-C (r=-0.202) in males (all P<0.01). Similar results were found in females with the exception of TC. The AUCs of NC for metabolic abnormalities ranged from 0.558 (Increased LDL-C) to 0.683 (MS-rf) in men and 0.596 (Increased LDL-C) to 0.703 (MS-rf) in women (P<0.01). The NC of ?37 cm for men and ?33 cm for women were the best cut-off points for metabolic syndrome. The adjusted ORs (95% CIs) of NC in men and women respectively were 1.29 (1.12-1.48) and 1.44 (1.20-1.72) for metabolic syndrome risk factors (MS-rf), 1.15 (1.01-1.32) and 1.22 (1.03-1.46) for high BP, 1.16 (1.02-1.33) and 1.42 (1.18-1.71) for increased TG, and 1.26 (1.06-1.50) and 1.32 (1.06-1.65) for increased FBP; the adjusted OR of NC in women for decreased HDL-C was 1.29 (1.10-1.51). Conclusions Neck circumference was significantly associated with cardio-metabolic risk factors and independently contributed to the prediction of cardio-metabolic risks beyond the classical anthropometric indices in adults of China.

2013-01-01

373

42 CFR 84.139 - Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. 84...RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.139 Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements....

2012-10-01

374

Multiple 60-Minute Massages per Week Offer Relief for Chronic Neck Pain  

MedlinePLUS

... University published their findings in the Annals of Family Medicine . Researchers enrolled 228 people with chronic neck pain ... therapeutic massage for chronic neck pain. Annals of Family Medicine. 2014;12(2):112–120. Additional Resources Massage ...

375

A MODIFICATION FOR BLADDER NECK RECONSTRUCTION IN THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH EXSTROPHY AND INCONTINENCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeWe present a modification of bladder neck reconstruction which resulted in improved continence and voiding compared to other techniques of bladder neck repairs in patients with exstrophy and complete incontinence.

SAVAS DEMIRBILEK; HALIL FARUK ATAYURT

1999-01-01

376

Conservative Management of Uncomplicated Mechanical Neck Pain in a Military Aviator.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Non-radicular neck pain arising from local musculoskeletal structures, known as mechanical neck pain or somatic dysfunction, is highly prevalent in the fighter jet aviator population. The management of this problem includes both therapeutic and aeromedica...

A. S. Dunn B. N. Green C. D. Johnson S. M. Pearce

2010-01-01

377

49 CFR 572.153 - Neck-headform assembly and test procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES CRABI 12-Month-Old Infant, Alpha Version § 572.153 Neck-headform assembly and test procedure. (a) The neck and headform assembly (refer...

2013-10-01

378

Virus Analysis in Head and Neck and Bladder Cancers - Michael Parfenov, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012  

Cancer.gov

Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Virus Analysis in Head and Neck and Bladder Cancers - Michael Parfenov Virus Analysis in Head and Neck and Bladder Cancers - Michael Parfenov, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012 You will need Adobe Flash

379

Role of autologous bladder-neck slings: a urogynecology perspective.  

PubMed

The concept of the autologous pubovaginal sling involves supporting the proximal urethra and bladder neck with a piece of graft material, achieving continence either by providing a direct compressive force on the urethra/bladder outlet or by reestablishing a reinforcing platform or hammock against which the urethra is compressed during transmission of increased abdominal pressure. Pubovaginal slings using a biological sling material (whether autologous, allograft, or xenograft) can be used successfully to manage primary or recurrent stress incontinence. This article addresses the indications for the use of an autologous bladder-neck sling, describes the surgical techniques, and discusses outcomes and technical considerations. PMID:22877713

Zoorob, Dani; Karram, Mickey

2012-08-01

380

Radiation-Induced trismus in head and neck cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To determine the incidence of trismus in patients who had previously received curative doses of radiation therapy (RT) for\\u000a head and neck cancer. In addition, we assessed if trismus was associated with quality of life deficits and radiation toxicity.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods and materials  Between February, 2005 and December, 2006, 40 patients with histologically confirmed head and neck cancer who had received\\u000a curative

M. Louise Kent; Michael T. Brennan; Jenene L. Noll; Philip C. Fox; Stuart H. Burri; Jane C. Hunter; Peter B. Lockhart

2008-01-01

381

Rehabilitation of Dysphagia Following Head and Neck Cancer  

PubMed Central

SYNOPSIS Patients with cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx or larynx may be treated with surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Each treatment type may have a negative impact on posttreatment swallowing function; these effects are presented in this chapter. The clinician has a number of rehabilitative procedures available to reduce or eliminate swallowing disorders in patients treated for cancer of the head and neck. The various procedures--including postures, maneuvers, modifications to bolus volume and viscosity, range of motion exercises, and strengthening exercises--and their efficacy in treated head and neck cancer patients are discussed.

Pauloski, Barbara R.

2008-01-01

382

An overview of gene therapy in head and neck cancer  

PubMed Central

Gene therapy is a new treatment modality in which new gene is introduced or existing gene is manipulated to cause cancer cell death or slow the growth of the tumor. In this review, we have discussed the different treatment approaches for cancer gene therapy; gene addition therapy, immunotherapy, gene therapy using oncolytic viruses, antisense ribonucleic acid (RNA) and RNA interference-based gene therapy. Clinical trials to date in head and neck cancer have shown evidence of gene transduction and expression, mediation of apoptosis and clinical response including pathological complete responses. The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the current available gene therapies for head and neck cancer.

Bali, Amit; Bali, Deepika; Sharma, Ashutosh

2013-01-01

383

Necrotizing fasciitis of the neck associated with Lemierre syndrome  

PubMed Central

Summary Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck is a rare, life-threatening, soft tissue infection rapidly involving superficial fat and fascia with necrosis of the overlying skin. If septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein complicates a parapharyngeal abscess, the clinical condition is referred to as Lemierre syndrome, also known as post-anginal sepsis. A lethal case of necrotizing fasciitis of the neck is herewith reported that developed following tooth extraction and was complicated by thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and superior vena cava in an elderly diabetic patient.

Deganello, A; Gallo, O; Gitti, G; De Campora, E

2009-01-01

384

Pitfalls in determining head and neck surgical margins.  

PubMed

Accurate assessment of surgical margins in the head and neck is a challenge. Multiple factors may lead to inaccurate margin assessment such as tissue shrinkage, nonstandardized nomenclature, anatomic constraints, and complex three dimensional specimen orientation. Excision method and standard histologic processing techniques may obscure distance measurements from the tumor front to the normal tissue edge. Arbitrary definitions of what constitutes a "close" margin do not consider the prognostic significance of resection dimensions. In this article we review some common pitfalls in determining margin status in head and neck resection specimens as well as highlight newer techniques of molecular margin assessment. PMID:24794264

Weinstock, Y Etan; Alava, Ibrahim; Dierks, Eric J

2014-05-01

385

Anaesthetic challenges in a patient presenting with huge neck teratoma  

PubMed Central

Paediatric airway management is a great challenge even for an experienced anaesthesiologist. Difficult airway in huge cervical teratoma further exaggerates the complexity. This case report is intended at describing the intubation difficulties that were confronted during the airway management of a three year old girl presenting with huge neck teratoma and respiratory distress. This patient was successfully intubated with uncuffed endotracheal tubes in second attempt under inhalational anaesthesia with halothane and spontaneous ventilation. This case exemplifies the importance of careful preoperative workup of an anticipated difficult airway in paediatric patients with neck swelling to minimize any perioperative complications.

Jain, Gaurav; Varshney, Rohit

2013-01-01

386

Treatment of swan neck deformity in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Swan neck deformity in patients with cerebral palsy can result from hand intrinsic muscle spasticity or overpull of the digital extensors. After accurate identification of the etiology of the deformity, surgical treatment is directed at correcting the underlying muscle imbalance. Intrinsic lengthening can be used to treat intrinsic muscle spasticity, whereas central slip tenotomy is employed when digital extensor overpull is the deforming force. Accurate diagnosis and application of the proper surgical technique are essential when treating swan neck deformity in patients with cerebral palsy. PMID:24613587

Carlson, Erik J; Carlson, Michelle Gerwin

2014-04-01

387

Course and Prognostic Factors for Neck Pain in Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Study Design  Best-evidence synthesis.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  To perform a best evidence synthesis on the course and prognostic factors for neck pain and its associated disorders in workers.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Summary of Background Data  Knowledge of the course of neck pain in workers guides expectations for recovery. Identifying prognostic factors assists in\\u000a planning effective workplace policies, formulating interventions and promoting lifestyle changes to decrease the frequency\\u000a and

Linda J. Carroll; Sheilah Hogg-Johnson; Pierre Côté; Gabrielle van der Velde; Lena W. Holm; Eugene J. Carragee; Eric L. Hurwitz; Paul M. Peloso; J. David Cassidy; Jaime Guzman; Margareta Nordin; Scott Haldeman

2008-01-01

388

Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases Masquerading as Head and Neck Malignancy.  

PubMed

Lesions of the head and neck and upper respiratory tract can be quite difficult to diagnose at times when presenting symptoms and signs appear out of character or biopsy of affected tissue reveals nonspecific results. A heightened awareness of important historical facts such as place of birth and residence, travel and occupation may provide important clues to narrow the differential diagnosis. Not all destructive ulcers and tumors of the head and neck are malignant. Inflammatory and infectious diseases that mimic cancer are presented. PMID:10886947

Greene; Sandin; Hiemenz; Toney

1994-01-01

389

Genetic diversity predicts outcomes in head and neck cancer  

Cancer.gov

A new measure of the heterogeneity – the variety of genetic mutations – of cells within a tumor appears to predict treatment outcomes of patients with the most common type of head and neck cancer. In the May 20 issue of the journal Cancer, investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (a component of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute) and Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary describe how their measure was a better predictor of survival than most traditional risk factors in a small group of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

390

Fusion, deep-inelastic collisions, and neck formation  

SciTech Connect

We use the liquid drop model to calculate the cross section for neck formation in a heavy-ion collision and show that for the recently measured /sup 58/Ni+/sup 124/Sn case this cross section is strongly related to the sum of the fusion and deep-inelastic cross sections. We note that the observation of deep-inelastic collisions at sub-Coulomb barrier energies may be classically understood by the effective barrier lowering obtained when the neck degree of freedom is considered.

Aguiar, C.E.; Barbosa, V.C.; Canto, L.F.; Donangelo, R.

1988-07-01

391

Computed tomography of the infrahyoid neck. Part II: pathology  

SciTech Connect

The computed tomographic (CT) scans of 44 patients who presented with nonthyroid/parathyroid lesions involving the soft tissues of the neck were analyzed. Among these patients, there were 26 with nodal masses, 6 with vascular lesions, 5 with neural lesions, and 8 with disease involving the connective tissues. One patient had both connective-tissue and vascular disease.CT allowed accurate determination of the extent of disease, while certain CT features added specificity to the diagnosis. It is concluded that CT is the procedure of choice in examining patients with neck lesions.

Reede, D.L.; Whelan, M.A.; Bergeron, R.T.

1982-11-01

392

Mutation takes ‘brakes’ off neck and head cancers  

Cancer.gov

The increased activation of a key oncogene in head and neck cancers could be the result of mutation and dysfunction of regulatory proteins that are supposed to keep the gene, which has the potential to cause cancer, in check, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (home of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute). The findings, published in the early online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest a new target for drugs to treat head and neck tumors, as well as other cancers.

393

Head and Neck Cancer: An Evolving Treatment Paradigm  

PubMed Central

Since the inception of this journal in 1948, the understanding of etiologic factors that contribute to and the treatment of head and neck cancer has evolved dramatically. Advances in surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have improved locoregional control, survival, and quality of life. The outcomes of these treatment modalities have shifted the focus of curative efforts from radical ablation to preservation and restoration of function. This evolution has been documented in the pages of Cancer for the past 6 decades. This review focuses on the evolution of treatment approaches for head and neck cancer and future directions while recognizing the historic contributions recorded within this journal.

Cognetti, David M.; Weber, Randal S.; Lai, Stephen Y.

2009-01-01

394

Preliminary study of neck muscle size and strength measurements in females with chronic non-specific neck pain and healthy control subjects.  

PubMed

Neck muscle weakness and atrophy are two common causes of pain and disability among office workers. The aim of this study was to compare the strength of the neck extensor and flexor muscles and the size of the semispinalis capitis muscle (SECM) in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain (CNNP) and healthy subjects. Twenty female office workers (10 patients with CNNP and 10 healthy subjects) participated in this study. The strength of the neck extensor and flexor muscles was measured by an isometric device and the SECM size was measured by ultrasonography. Neck muscle strength, size of the SECM and the ratios of neck strength to body weight, neck extensor strength to SECM size, SECM size to body weight and neck flexor to extensor strength were all significantly lower in patients compared to controls (P < 0.05). In conclusion, neck strength, the size of the SECM and the ratio of neck muscle strength to SECM size appear to be useful parameters in appraising patients with CNNP. PMID:20430684

Rezasoltani, Asghar; Ali-Reza, Ahmadipor; Khosro, Khademi-Kalantari; Abbass, Rahimi

2010-08-01

395

Correlative Tomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques.

Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

2014-04-01

396

Correlative tomography.  

PubMed

Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

Burnett, T L; McDonald, S A; Gholinia, A; Geurts, R; Janus, M; Slater, T; Haigh, S J; Ornek, C; Almuaili, F; Engelberg, D L; Thompson, G E; Withers, P J

2014-01-01

397

Correlative Tomography  

PubMed Central

Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques.

Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

2014-01-01

398

Prevalence and risk factor of neck pain in elderly Korean community residents.  

PubMed

Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal condition, which causes substantial medical cost. In Korea, prevalence of neck pain in community based population, especially in elderly subjects, has scarcely been reported. We evaluated the prevalence, the severity and the risk factors of neck pain in elderly Korean community residents. Data for neck pain were collected for 1,655 subjects from a rural farming community. The point, 6-months and cumulative lifetime prevalence of neck pain was obtained in addition to the measurement of the severity of neck pain. The mean age of the study subjects was 61 yr and 57% were females. The lifetime prevalence of neck pain was 20.8% with women having a higher prevalence. The prevalence did not increase with age, and the majority of individuals had low-intensity/low-disability pain. Subjects with neck pain had a significantly worse SF-12 score in all domains except for mental health. The prevalence of neck pain was significantly associated with female gender, obesity and smoking. This is the first large-scale Korean study estimating the prevalence of neck pain in elderly population. Although the majority of individuals had low-intensity/low-disability pain, subjects with neck pain had a significantly worse SF-12 score indicating that neck pain has significant health impact. PMID:23678258

Son, Kyeong Min; Cho, Nam H; Lim, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyun Ah

2013-05-01

399

Vertically Oriented Femoral Neck Fractures: Mechanical Analysis of Four Fixation Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Femoral neck fractures inyoung individuals are typically high angled shear fractures. These injuries are difficult to stabilize due to a strong varus displacement force across the hip with weight bearing. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability of four differing fixation techniques for stabilizing vertical shear femoral neck fractures. Methods: Vertical femoral neck fracture stability

Arash Aminian; Fan Gao; Wasyl W. Fedoriw; Li-Qun Zhang; David M. Kalainov; Bradley R. Merk

2007-01-01

400

Thermomechanical coupling and self-excited oscillation in the neck propagation of PET films  

Microsoft Academic Search

The self-excited oscillation of neck propagation during cold drawing of polymer films has been examined experimentally. On the basis of Barenblatt's model considering a thermo-mechanical coupling at the neck, the temperature rise at the neck has been studied with an infrared camera. The temperature began to rise in a range showing a negative velocity dependence of the applied load. The

Akihiko Toda; Chiyoko Tomita; Masamichi Hikosaka; Yu Hibino; Hideki Miyaji; Chisato Nonomura; Toshitake Suzuki; Hideaki Ishihara

2002-01-01

401

Development of a low motion-noise humanoid neck: Statics analysis and experimental validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents our recently developed humanoid neck system that can effectively mimic motion of human neck with very low motion noises. The feature of low motion noises allows our system to work like a real human head\\/neck. Thus the level of acoustic noises from wearable equipments, such as donning respirators or chemical-resistant jackets, induced by human head motion can

Bingtuan Gao; Ning Xi; Yantao Shen; Jianguo Zhao; Ruiguo Yang

2010-01-01

402

Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The use of altered fractionation radiotherapy (RT) regimens, as well as concomitant chemotherapy and RT, to intensify therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer can lead to increased rates of long-term dysphagia. Methods and Materials: We identified 122 patients who had undergone definitive RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, after excluding those who had been treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary, had Stage I-II disease, developed locoregional recurrence, had <12 months of follow-up, or had undergone postoperative RT. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were correlated with a composite of 3 objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence at the last follow-up visit; aspiration on a modified barium swallow study or a clinical diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia; or the presence of a pharyngoesophageal stricture. Results: A composite dysphagia outcome occurred in 38.5% of patients. On univariate analysis, the primary site (p = 0.01), use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), RT schedule (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of composite long-term dysphagia. The use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), primary site (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.02) remained significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent chemotherapy to RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer resulted in increased long-term dysphagia. Early intervention using swallowing exercises, avoidance of nothing-by-mouth periods, and the use of intensity-modulated RT to reduce the dose to the uninvolved swallowing structures should be explored further in populations at greater risk of long-term dysphagia.

Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Meredith, Ruby F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Locher, Julie L. [Department of Medicine, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Nabell, Lisle M. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Carroll, William R.; Magnuson, J. Scott [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Spencer, Sharon A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bonner, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)], E-mail: jabonner@uabmc.edu

2009-02-01

403

Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and radiotherapy-induced carotid atherosclerosis in subjects with head and neck cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Radiotherapy (RT) is a risk factor for accelerated carotid artery atherosclerotic disease in subjects with head and neck cancer. However, the risk factors of RT-induced carotid artery remodeling are not established. This study aimed to investigate the effects of RT on carotid and popliteal arteries in subjects with head and neck cancer and to evaluate the relationship between baseline clinical and laboratory features and the progression of RT-induced atherosclerosis. Findings Eleven men (age?=?57.9?±?6.2years) with head and neck cancer who underwent cervical bilateral irradiation were prospectively examined by clinical and laboratory analysis and by carotid and popliteal ultrasound before and after treatment (mean interval between the end of RT and the post-RT assessment?=?181?±?47 days). No studied subject used hypocholesterolemic medications. Significant increases in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) (0.95?±?0.08 vs. 0.87?±?0.05 mm; p?correlation with RT-induced carotid IMT change (r?=?0.66; p?=?0.027), while no other studied variable exhibited a significant relationship with carotid IMT change. Conclusions These results indicate that RT-induced atherosclerosis is limited to the irradiated area and also suggest that it may be predicted by low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in subjects with head and neck cancer.

2014-01-01

404

Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 amplification is a common event in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.  

PubMed

Recently, we characterized fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 amplification as a target for a rational therapy in lung squamous cell carcinoma. Patients harboring this genetic event are currently eligible for treatment with antifibroblast growth factor receptor small-molecule inhibitors in phase I clinical trials. This has the potential to significantly improve standard therapy for lung squamous cell carcinoma patients. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 amplification is also a common genetic event in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. For this purpose, we assembled a cohort of 555 patients, including 264 with metastatic disease and 147 with recurrent disease. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material of primary tumors, metastases and recurrences were assessed for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 copy number status using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Human papilloma virus status was detected by p16 immunohistochemistry staining and PCR-ELISA. Molecular parameters were correlated with each other and with clinicopathological data. We found 15% of primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to display a fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 amplification. In nearly all cases, metastatic and recurrent tumor samples shared the same amplification status as the corresponding primary tumor. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 amplification was associated with nicotine and alcohol consumption, but was mutually exclusive with human papilloma virus infection. Amplification of the gene was associated with parameters of worse outcome. Our data identify fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 amplification as a frequent event in primary and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and represents a potential biomarker for more aggressive disease. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1-amplified tumors could potentially comprise a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma against which targeted small-molecule inhibitors hold therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23619603

Göke, Friederike; Bode, Maike; Franzen, Alina; Kirsten, Robert; Goltz, Diane; Göke, Antonia; Sharma, Rakesh; Boehm, Diana; Vogel, Wenzel; Wagner, Patrick; Lengerke, Claudia; Kristiansen, Glen; Kirfel, Jutta; Van Bremen, Tobias; Bootz, Friedrich; Heasley, Lynn E; Schröck, Andreas; Perner, Sven

2013-10-01

405

Adaptive Planning in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancers: Single-Institution Experience and Clinical Implications  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Anatomic changes and positional variability during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer can lead to clinically significant dosimetric changes. We report our single-institution experience using an adaptive protocol and correlate these changes with anatomic and positional changes during treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head and neck IMRT patients underwent serial computed tomography (CT) scans during their radiation course. After undergoing the planning CT scan, patients underwent planned rescans at 11, 22, and 33 fractions; a total of 89 scans with 129 unique CT plan combinations were thus analyzed. Positional variability and anatomic changes during treatment were correlated with changes in dosimetric parameters to target and avoidance structures between planning CT and subsequent scans. Results: A total of 15/23 patients (65%) benefited from adaptive planning, either due to inadequate dose to gross disease or to increased dose to organs at risk. Significant differences in primary and nodal targets (planning target volume, gross tumor volume, and clinical tumor volume), parotid, and spinal cord dosimetric parameters were noted throughout the treatment. Correlations were established between these dosimetric changes and weight loss, fraction number, multiple skin separations, and change in position of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine. Conclusions: Variations in patient positioning and anatomy changes during IMRT for head and neck cancer can affect dosimetric parameters and have wide-ranging clinical implications. The interplay between random positional variability and gradual anatomic changes requires careful clinical monitoring and frequent use of CT- based image-guided radiation therapy, which should determine variations necessitating new plans.

Ahn, Peter H.; Chen, Chin-Cheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Ahn, Andrew I. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Hong, Linda; Scripes, Paola G.; Shen Jin; Lee, Chen-Chiao; Miller, Ekeni; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Garg, Madhur K., E-mail: mgarg@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States)

2011-07-01

406

Systematic dental management in head and neck irradiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preservation of teeth has been possible in 528 head and neck patients treated with irradiation at Centre Georges Leclerc, University of Dijon, by careful adherence to precise dental care. Careful initial dental evaluation with appropriate x rays, restoration of oral hygiene, atraumatic extraction technique where indicated, and institution of a program of topical fluoridation has resulted in an overall incidence

Jean C. Horiot; Marie C. Bone; Ezzat Ibrahim; Joseph R. Castro

1981-01-01

407

Epidemiology of head and neck cancer: Magnitude of the problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Head and neck cancer comprises squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract. There are similarities in their natural history, epidemiology and control. For these cancers premalignant changes can be identified. Smoking and drinking are the major risk factors. The geographical variations in incidence and mortality are indicative of differences in the prevalence of risk factors between countries. The dramatic

Lajos Döbróssy

2005-01-01

408

Cancers by Body Location/System: Head and Neck  

Cancer.gov

In English En español In English En español Cancers by Body Location/System: Head and Neck To find a cancer: select a body location or system — AIDS-RelatedBreastDigestive/GastrointestinalEndocrine and NeuroendocrineEye GenitourinaryGerm CellGynecologicHead

409

A value framework in head and neck cancer care.  

PubMed

The care of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has greatly evolved over the past 30 years. From single modality to a multidisciplinary care, there has also been a concurrent increase in treatment intensity, resulting, at many times, in more zealous regimens that patients must endure. In this article, we apply Porter's value model as a framework to balance survival, toxicities, cost, and trade-offs from a patient's perspective in head and neck cancer. This model defines value as the health outcome per dollar achieved. Domains and outcomes that are important to patients, including not only survival or short-term quality of life, but also functional outcomes, recovery, sustainability of recovery, and the lasting consequences of therapy are included in this framework. Other outcomes that are seldom measured in head and neck cancer, such as work disability and financial toxicities, are also included and further discussed. Within this value model and based on evidence, we further discuss de-escalation of care, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, newer surgical methods, and enhancements in the process of care as potential approaches to add value for patients. Finally, we argue that knowing the patient's preferences is essential in the value discussion, as the attribute that will ultimately provide the most value to the individual patient with head and neck cancer. PMID:24857117

de Souza, Jonas A; Seiwert, Tanguy Y

2014-01-01

410

Severe and Catastrophic Neck Injuries Resulting from Tackle Football  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Use of the spring-loaded blocking and tackling devices should be discontinued due to severe neck injuries resulting from their use; employment of the head and helmet as the primary assault weapon in blocking, tackling, and head butting should be condemned for the same reason. (MJB)

Torg, Joseph S.; And Others

1977-01-01

411

Functional bladder neck obstruction in females--a revisit.  

PubMed

Functional bladder neck obstruction is supposed to be nonexistent or a very rare clinical disorder. In the past two and a half years, detailed synchronous, video pressure flow EMG studies were done in all the female patients who had evidence of obstructed voiding, poor flow and acute or chronic retention. The subjects of this study are nine females who had high sustained detrusor pressure, high opening pressure, low uroflow and silent sphincter during pressure-flow EMG study. A simultaneous urovideo recording showed either a closed bladder neck, inadequate funneling, intermittent or improper opening during voiding (when Pdet was high and sustained). These patients did not have any anatomical urethral obstruction, neurogenic disorder or systemic disease (like diabetes) affecting voiding. This stringent criteria of functional bladder neck obstruction was observed in nine patients. Five patients had acute or chronic retention and three patients had varying degree of renal failure. Initially all patients were managed by clean intermittent self catheterisation (CIC). Alpha blockers were empirically tried in six patients and had shown variable results. Bladder neck incision (BNI) was performed in two patients with rewarding success. PMID:1687802

Kumar, A; Mishra, V K; Kapoor, R; Dalela, D; Bhandari, M

1991-12-01

412

Reliability of normalisation methods for EMG analysis of neck muscles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acceptable reliability of normalisation contractions in electromyography (EMG) is paramount for testing conducted over a number of days or if normal laboratory strength testing equipment is unavailable. This study examined the reliability of maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) and sub-maximal (60%) isometric contractions for use in neck muscle EMG studies. Surface EMG was recorded bilaterally from eight sites around the

Kevin Netto; Angus F Burnett

2006-01-01

413

Central neck dissection in differentiated thyroid cancer: technical notes.  

PubMed

Differentiated thyroid cancers may be associated with regional lymph node metastases in 20-50% of cases. The central compartment (VIupper VII levels) is considered to be the first echelon of nodal metastases in all differentiated thyroid carcinomas. The indication for central neck dissection is still debated especially in patients with cN0 disease. For some authors, central neck dissection is recommended for lymph nodes that are suspect preoperatively (either clinically or with ultrasound) and/or for lymph node metastases detected intra-operatively with a positive frozen section. In need of a better definition, we divided the dissection in four different areas to map localization of metastases. In this study, we present the rationale for central neck dissection in the management of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, providing some anatomical reflections on surgical technique, oncological considerations and analysis of complications. Central neck dissection may be limited to the compartments that describe a predictable territory of regional recurrences in order to reduce associated morbidities. PMID:24711677

Giugliano, G; Proh, M; Gibelli, B; Grosso, E; Tagliabue, M; De Fiori, E; Maffini, F; Chiesa, F; Ansarin, M

2014-02-01

414

Diffusion-weighted MRI in head and neck cancer  

PubMed Central

Abstract Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an imaging technique showing molecular diffusion. Cell size, density and integrity influence the signal intensity seen on diffusion-weighted images. This technique is a helpful complementary tool to distinguish tumoral from non-tumoral tissue, and has several interesting applications in the evaluation of head and neck cancer.

Vandecaveye, Vincent

2007-01-01

415

Extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma of the head and neck in women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extranasopharengeal angiofibroma of the head and neck in women is very rare, and clinical characteristics do not confirm to that of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. We present clinical characteristics, etiology, preoperative evaluation, and management of 3 unusual cases of angiofibroma, 1 case originating from larynx and the other 2 cases from nasal septum in women. Endolaryngeal endoscopic excision for laryngeal and local

Yucel Akbas; Yucel Anadolu

2003-01-01

416

Pictorial essay: Vascular interventions in extra cranial head and neck  

PubMed Central

Medicine is an ever changing field and interventional radiology (IR) procedures are becoming increasingly popular because of high efficacy and its minimally invasive nature of the procedure. Management of disease processes in the extra cranial head and neck (ECHN) has always been a challenge due to the complex anatomy of the region. Cross sectional imaging of the ECHN has grown and evolved tremendously and occupies a pivotal and integral position in the clinical management of variety of head and neck pathologies. Advances in angiographic technologies including flat panel detector systems, biplane, and 3-dimensional rotational angiography have consolidated and expanded the role of IR in the management of various ECHN pathologies. The ECHN is at cross roads between the origins of great vessels and the cerebral vasculature. Thorough knowledge of functional and technical aspects of neuroangiography is essential before embarking on head and neck vascular interventions. The vessels of the head and neck can be involved by infectious and inflammatory conditions, get irradiated during radiotherapy and injured due to trauma or iatrogenic cause. The ECHN is also a common site for various hypervascular neoplasms and vascular malformations, which can be treated with endovascular and percutaneous embolization. This pictorial essay provides a review of variety of ECHN pathologies which were managed by various IR procedures using different approaches.

Kulkarni, Suyash S; Shetty, Nitin S; Dharia, Tejas P; Polnaya, Ashwin M

2012-01-01

417

Minimal Residual Disease in Head and Neck Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) is a complex disease. Patients with more advanced stages are treated with curative intent by a combination of surgery and radiotherapy, but still about 50% develop a relapse: locally, regionally and at distant sites. This clinical outcome strongly indicates that small histologically undetectable tumor deposits remain at these sites: ‘minimal residual

Hans J. Gath; Ruud H. Brakenhoff

1999-01-01

418

Neural crest origins of the neck and shoulder.  

PubMed

The neck and shoulder region of vertebrates has undergone a complex evolutionary history. To identify its underlying mechanisms we map the destinations of embryonic neural crest and mesodermal stem cells using Cre-recombinase-mediated transgenesis. The single-cell resolution of this genetic labelling reveals cryptic cell boundaries traversing the seemingly homogeneous skeleton of the neck and shoulders. Within this assembly of bones and muscles we discern a precise code of connectivity that mesenchymal stem cells of both neural crest and mesodermal origin obey as they form muscle scaffolds. The neural crest anchors the head onto the anterior lining of the shoulder girdle, while a Hox-gene-controlled mesoderm links trunk muscles to the posterior neck and shoulder skeleton. The skeleton that we identify as neural crest-derived is specifically affected in human Klippel-Feil syndrome, Sprengel's deformity and Arnold-Chiari I/II malformation, providing insights into their likely aetiology. We identify genes involved in the cellular modularity of the neck and shoulder skeleton and propose a new method for determining skeletal homologies that is based on muscle attachments. This has allowed us to trace the whereabouts of the cleithrum, the major shoulder bone of extinct land vertebrate ancestors, which seems to survive as the scapular spine in living mammals. PMID:16034409

Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Ahlberg, Per E; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Iannarelli, Palma; Dennehy, Ulla; Richardson, William D; McMahon, Andrew P; Koentges, Georgy

2005-07-21

419

Management of chyle fistulization in association with neck dissection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chylous fistula after neck dissection is a relatively rare but potentially lethal complication. Sequelae range from severe fluid, electrolyte, and protein loss to fistula formation, skin-flap necrosis, and carotid blowout. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy is essential to avoid injury to the thoracic duct or right lymph duct. After surgery, drainage of large amounts of fluid, particularly if milky,

R. T. GREGOR

2000-01-01

420

Factors influencing the incidence of reoperation after femoral neck fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This investigation compares two groups of patients with fractures of the femoral neck: 22 required a further operation and 72 did not. Special attention was paid to osteoporosis, the displacement of the fracture, viability of the femoral head, operative impaction and osteosynthesis with a Thornton nail or three Scand hip pins. There was a significant (p<0.01) difference between the two

N. Dalen; B. Jacobsson

1985-01-01

421

Neural Crest Origins of the Neck and Shoulder  

PubMed Central

Summary The neck and shoulder region of vertebrates has undergone a complex evolutionary history. In order to identify its underlying mechanisms we map the destinations of embryonic neural crest and mesodermal stem cells using novel Cre-recombinase mediated transgenesis. The single-cell resolution of this genetic labelling reveals cryptic cell boundaries traversing seemingly homogeneous skeleton of neck and shoulders. Within this complex assembly of bones and muscles we discern a precise code of connectivity that mesenchymal stem cells of neural crest and mesodermal origin both obey as they form muscle scaffolds. Neural crest anchors the head onto the anterior lining of the shoulder girdle, while a Hox gene controlled mesoderm links trunk muscles to the posterior neck and shoulder skeleton. The skeleton that we identify as neural crest is specifically affected in human Klippel-Feil syndrome, Sprengel’s deformity and Arnold-Chiari I/II malformation, providing first insights into their likely aetiology. We identify genes involved in the cellular modularity of neck and shoulder skeleton and propose a new methodology for determining skeletal homologies that is based on muscle attachments. This has allowed us to trace the whereabouts of the cleithrum, the major shoulder bone of extinct land vertebrate ancestors which appears to survive as the scapular spine in living mammals.

Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Ahlberg, Per E.; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Iannarelli, Palma; Dennehy, Ulla; Richardson, William D.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Koentges, Georgy

2005-01-01

422

[Crystallization test in patients with head and neck neoplasms].  

PubMed

The authors try to estimate a clinical value of crystallization test with cupric chloride solution. 21 patients with planoepithelial cancer of the head and neck, and 10 healty volunteers underwent the test. 71.5% of positive results was obtained in cases with the cancer, what suggest a high sensitivity of the analyzed test. PMID:9454116

Kuczkowski, J; Zaorski, P; Betlejewski, A

1995-01-01

423

Cytoprotection in Head and Neck Cancer: Issues in Oral Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Efforts to enhance the therapeutic index in the treatment of head and neck cancer by improving efficacy and limiting toxicity involve both physical and cytoprotective approaches. Although intensity-mod- ulated radiation therapy is moderately effective for reducing damage to the parotid glands and protecting the part of salivary activity produced by those glands, it has not proven effective for protecting the

Michael A. Samuels

424

Hemiarthroplasty for Femoral Neck Fracture in the Elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

The elderly patient with a displaced femoral neck fracture is commonly treated via hemiarthroplasty. The objectives of this study were to: 1) determine the rates of in-hospital mortality, complications, and prolonged length of stay (LOS) in such patients; 2) elucidate the patient characteristics that predict these occurrences; and 3) investigate the influence of surgeon and hospital volumes on these outcomes.

Steven N. Shah; Reid M. Wainess; Madhav A. Karunakar

2005-01-01

425

Femoral neck fractures complicating gaucher disease in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

In normal children, fractures of the femoral neck are uncommon and accompany severe trauma and multiple injuries elsewhere in the skeleton [16, 17]. In children with Gaucher disease, a rare hereditary disorder of lipid metabolism, midcervical or basicervical fractures can occur with minor or no trauma and without other injury to the skeleton. Three children with Gaucher disease who developed

Amy Beth Goldman; Bernard Jacobs

1984-01-01

426

Cemented or uncemented hemiarthroplasty for displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to establish whether or not to cement the hemiarthroplasty for displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures in the elderly. Consecutive patients treated by hemiarthroplasty in adjacent hospitals were reviewed. The same monoblock prosthesis was used; in hospital A they were uncemented (121 patients), and in hospital B they were cemented (123 patients). Notes were reviewed

R. Khan; A. MacDowell; P. Crossman; A. Datta; N. Jallali; B. Arch; G. Keene

2002-01-01

427

Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that qualitatively undergoes the same forces acting in whiplash and shows the same behavior is used to analyze the kinematics of both the head and the cervical spine and the resulting neck loads. The rapid acceleration during a whiplash event causes the extension and flexion of the cervical spine, which in turn can cause dislocated vertebrae, torn ligaments, intervertebral disc herniation, and other trauma that appear to be the likely causes of subsequent painful headache or neck pain symptoms. Thus, whiplash provides a connection between the dynamics of the human body and physics. Its treatment can enliven the usual teaching in kinematics, and both theoretical and experimental approaches provide an interesting biological context to teach introductory principles of mechanics.

Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

2008-02-01

428

Rocky Mountain Arsenal Contamination Survey. Basin A Neck Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to document the findings of work tasks performed in the BANA (Basin A Neck Area) of the Rocky Mountain Arsenal. The results of physical laboratory tests on 'undisturbed' samples are incomplete, and will be forwarded as an add...

1979-01-01

429

Soft tissue neck lumps in rugby union players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dorsal neck masses are well recognised in front row rugby union players. Previously undescribed in the medical literature, they may present in the primary or secondary care setting when they become symptomatic. Often misdiagnosed as lipomata, they may in fact be fibrous and deeply connected, with the consequences of embarking on surgery subsequently underestimated. This paper describes an epidemiological study

J Dearing

2006-01-01

430

Immunotherapy of HPV-associated head and neck cancer  

PubMed Central

Various arguments support the development of a vaccine targeting human papillomavirus (HPV) for the treatment of HPV-associated head and neck cancer. However, the mucosal localization of this tumor, the HPV-driven downregulation of MHC Class I molecules and various other immunosuppressive mechanisms must be carefully considered to improve the clinical efficacy of such an immunotherapeutic strategy.

Nizard, Mevyn; Sandoval, Federico; Badoual, Cecile; Pere, Helene; Terme, Magali; Hans, Stephane; Benhamouda, Nadine; Granier, Clemence; Brasnu, Daniel; Tartour, Eric

2013-01-01

431

Heterotopic Salivary Gland Tissue in the Lower Neck.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The clinical and pathologic features in 11 cases of heterotopic salivary gland tissue in the lower anterolateral neck were studied in order to define the characteristics of this rare lesion and to gain an understanding of the embryogenesis. The constant a...

L. A. Youngs H. H. Scofield

1966-01-01

432

Human Head and Neck Response to Impact Acceleration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A methodical investigation and measurement of human dynamic response to impact acceleration was conducted. Linear accelerations were measured on the top of the head, at the mouth, and at the base of the neck. Angular velocity was also measured at the base...

C. L. Ewing D. J. Thomas

1972-01-01

433

Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Defects of the Head and Neck  

PubMed Central

Patients afflicted with head and neck cancer, traumatic injuries to the head and neck, or those with congenital or developmental defects benefit from multidisciplinary team management. The head and neck region participates in complex physiologic processes that can often be impeded by these circumstances. Evaluation of the patient by the maxillofacial prosthodontist can assist the other members of the team in providing treatment planning options for the patients. Intraoral defects arising from these circumstances can be treated with prosthodontics that serve to assist with speech, swallowing, and to some degree mastication. If chemotherapeutic or radiation modalities are also used to treat the head and neck, assessment of the patient by the maxillofacial prosthodontist may prove to identify factors that may predispose to undesirable sequelae. Preventive treatment by elective tooth extraction, prosthodontic assessment, and patient education prove to assist in predictable management of these oftentimes complex presenting conditions. Facial defects arising from similar circumstances can be an alternative or adjunct to plastic surgical reconstruction and offer the added advantage of tumor surveillance in susceptible patients.

Salinas, Thomas J.

2010-01-01

434

Application of basic principles of physics to head and neck MR angiography: troubleshooting for artifacts.  

PubMed

Neurovascular imaging studies are routinely used for the assessment of headaches and changes in mental status, stroke workup, and evaluation of the arteriovenous structures of the head and neck. These imaging studies are being performed with greater frequency as the aging population continues to increase. Magnetic resonance (MR) angiographic imaging techniques are helpful in this setting. However, mastering these techniques requires an in-depth understanding of the basic principles of physics, complex flow patterns, and the correlation of MR angiographic findings with conventional MR imaging findings. More than one imaging technique may be used to solve difficult cases, with each technique contributing unique information. Unfortunately, incorporating findings obtained with multiple imaging modalities may add to the diagnostic challenge. To ensure diagnostic accuracy, it is essential that the radiologist carefully evaluate the details provided by these modalities in light of basic physics principles, the fundamentals of various imaging techniques, and common neurovascular imaging pitfalls. PMID:23674781

Pandey, Shilpa; Hakky, Michael; Kwak, Ellie; Jara, Hernan; Geyer, Carl A; Erbay, Sami H

2013-05-01

435

Effect of Occupant and Impact Factors on Forces within Neck: I. Overview of Large Population  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific and medical data have been gathered for nearly 500 motor-vehicle occupants, whose dynamic response[1-2] was calculated to determine the forces generated at all potential injury sites. Particular attention was paid to the load within the cervical spine to examine the influence of certain variables relating to the occupant (height, weight, sex), the impact (magnitude, direction), and the neck itself (local vector, anatomical level). Exhaustive efforts were made to match the force with each variable using linear and logarithmic fits, but correlation coefficients were generally not high. These results might be influenced by the emphasis in this research to obtain the best statistics with large groupings of patients. Hence, a separate study with more detail is proposed as a significant continuation of this effort. 1. Proper Treatment of Complex Human Structures, Announcer 27 (4), 100 (1997); 2. Physics as a Key Element in the Complete Description of Dichotomies in Injury Distribution, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 274 (1999).

Shaibani, Saami J.

2000-03-01

436

Prospective Imaging Assessment of Mortality Risk After Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The optimal roles for imaging-based biomarkers in the management of head-and-neck cancer remain undefined. Unresolved questions include whether functional or anatomic imaging might improve mortality risk assessment for this disease. We addressed these issues in a prospective institutional trial. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight patients with locally advanced pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell cancer were enrolled. Each underwent pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging. Imaging parameters were correlated with survival outcomes. Results: Low post-radiation primary tumor FDG avidity correlated with improved survival on multivariate analysis; so too did complete primary tumor response by CT alone. Although both imaging modalities lacked sensitivity, each had high specificity and negative predictive value for disease-specific mortality risk assessment. Kaplan-Meier estimates confirmed that both CT and FDG-PET/CT stratify patients into distinct high- and low-probability survivorship groups on the basis of primary tumor response to radiotherapy. Subset analyses demonstrated that the prognostic value for each imaging modality was primarily derived from patients at high risk for local treatment failure (human papillomavirus [HPV]-negative disease, nonoropharyngeal primary disease, or tobacco use). Conclusions: CT alone and FDG-PET/CT are potentially useful tools in head-and-neck cancer-specific mortality risk assessment after radiotherapy, particularly for selective use in cases of high-risk HPV-unrelated disease. Focus should be placed on corroboration and refinement of patient selection for imaging-based biomarkers in future studies.

Moeller, Benjamin J.; Rana, Vishal; Cannon, Blake A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Williams, Michelle D. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ginsberg, Lawrence E. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Macapinlac, Homer A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lee, J. Jack [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ang, K. Kian; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Chronowski, Gregory M.; Frank, Steven J.; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lippman, Scott M. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Schwartz, David L., E-mail: docdls@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2010-11-01