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Sample records for neck clinicoplathologic correlation

  1. Correlation between Trunk Posture and Neck Reposition Sense among Subjects with Forward Head Neck Postures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Suk; Chung, Hyung Kuk; Park, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the correlation of abnormal trunk postures and reposition sense of subjects with forward head neck posture (FHP). Methods. In all, postures of 41 subjects were evaluated and the FHP and trunk posture including shoulder, scapular level, pelvic side, and anterior tilting degrees were analyzed. We used the head repositioning accuracy (HRA) test to evaluate neck position senses of neck flexion, neck extension, neck right and left side flexion, and neck right and left rotation and calculated the root mean square error in trials for each subject. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and regression analysis were used to assess the degree of correlation between the trunk posture and HRA value, and a significance level of ? = 0.05 was considered. Results. There were significant correlations between the HRA value of right side neck flexion and pelvic side tilt angle (p < 0.05). If pelvic side tilting angle increases by 1 degree, right side neck flexion increased by 0.76 degrees (p = 0.026). However, there were no significant correlations between other neck motions and trunk postures. Conclusion. Verifying pelvic postures should be prioritized when movement is limited due to the vitiation of the proprioceptive sense of neck caused by FHP. PMID:26583125

  2. Correlation between Trunk Posture and Neck Reposition Sense among Subjects with Forward Head Neck Postures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han Suk; Chung, Hyung Kuk; Park, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the correlation of abnormal trunk postures and reposition sense of subjects with forward head neck posture (FHP). Methods. In all, postures of 41 subjects were evaluated and the FHP and trunk posture including shoulder, scapular level, pelvic side, and anterior tilting degrees were analyzed. We used the head repositioning accuracy (HRA) test to evaluate neck position senses of neck flexion, neck extension, neck right and left side flexion, and neck right and left rotation and calculated the root mean square error in trials for each subject. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and regression analysis were used to assess the degree of correlation between the trunk posture and HRA value, and a significance level of α = 0.05 was considered. Results. There were significant correlations between the HRA value of right side neck flexion and pelvic side tilt angle (p < 0.05). If pelvic side tilting angle increases by 1 degree, right side neck flexion increased by 0.76 degrees (p = 0.026). However, there were no significant correlations between other neck motions and trunk postures. Conclusion. Verifying pelvic postures should be prioritized when movement is limited due to the vitiation of the proprioceptive sense of neck caused by FHP. PMID:26583125

  3. Correlation Between Femoral Neck Shaft Angle and Surgical Management in Trainees With Femoral Neck Stress Fractures.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Robyn L; Rivera, Jessica C; Tennent, David J; Johnson, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The most common overuse injury leading to medical discharge of military recruits is a stress fracture. One of the high-risk stress fractures is of the lateral femoral neck which risks osteonecrosis of the femoral head, the need for arthroplasty and permanent disability. To prevent fracture progression early surgical intervention is recommended. Surgical repairs are performed in about 25% of cases of femoral neck stress fractures at military treatment facilities. Hip geometry is an important intrinsic risk for stress fractures. Loads in the average loading direction will not cause a fracture, but loads of extreme magnitude or extreme orientation may. The purpose of this study was to determine if, in the presence of femoral neck stress fracture, there is a correlation between femoral neck shaft angle, surgical treatment and outcomes. The results of this study suggest there is no correlation between return to full military duty rates, treatment, femoral neck shaft angle or fracture grade on MRI. Patients who underwent surgical fixation had greater fracture grade and pain than those that did not have surgery. Individuals who did not return to duty tended to have higher pain scores at initial evaluation. PMID:26874089

  4. Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto; Vogels, Tim P.; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Most excitatory inputs in the mammalian brain are made on dendritic spines, rather than on dendritic shafts. Spines compartmentalize calcium, and this biochemical isolation can underlie input-specific synaptic plasticity, providing a raison d’etre for spines. However, recent results indicate that the spine can experience a membrane potential different from that in the parent dendrite, as though the spine neck electrically isolated the spine. Here we use two-photon calcium imaging of mouse neocortical pyramidal neurons to analyze the correlation between the morphologies of spines activated under minimal synaptic stimulation and the excitatory postsynaptic potentials they generate. We find that excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitudes are inversely correlated with spine neck lengths. Furthermore, a spike timing-dependent plasticity protocol, in which two-photon glutamate uncaging over a spine is paired with postsynaptic spikes, produces rapid shrinkage of the spine neck and concomitant increases in the amplitude of the evoked spine potentials. Using numerical simulations, we explore the parameter regimes for the spine neck resistance and synaptic conductance changes necessary to explain our observations. Our data, directly correlating synaptic and morphological plasticity, imply that long-necked spines have small or negligible somatic voltage contributions, but that, upon synaptic stimulation paired with postsynaptic activity, they can shorten their necks and increase synaptic efficacy, thus changing the input/output gain of pyramidal neurons. PMID:24982196

  5. Neck Strength Imbalance Correlates With Increased Head Acceleration in Soccer Heading

    PubMed Central

    Dezman, Zachary D.W.; Ledet, Eric H.; Kerr, Hamish A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Soccer heading is using the head to directly contact the ball, often to advance the ball down the field or score. It is a skill fundamental to the game, yet it has come under scrutiny. Repeated subclinical effects of heading may compound over time, resulting in neurologic deficits. Greater head accelerations are linked to brain injury. Developing an understanding of how the neck muscles help stabilize and reduce head acceleration during impact may help prevent brain injury. Hypothesis: Neck strength imbalance correlates to increasing head acceleration during impact while heading a soccer ball. Study Design: Observational laboratory investigation. Methods: Sixteen Division I and II collegiate soccer players headed a ball in a controlled indoor laboratory setting while player motions were recorded by a 14-camera Vicon MX motion capture system. Neck flexor and extensor strength of each player was measured using a spring-type clinical dynamometer. Results: Players were served soccer balls by hand at a mean velocity of 4.29 m/s (0.74 m/s). Players returned the ball to the server using a heading maneuver at a mean velocity of 5.48 m/s (1.18 m/s). Mean neck strength difference was positively correlated with angular head acceleration (rho = 0.497; P = 0.05), with a trend toward significance for linear head acceleration (rho = 0.485; P = 0.057). Conclusion: This study suggests that symmetrical strength in neck flexors and extensors reduces head acceleration experienced during low-velocity heading in experienced collegiate players. Clinical Relevance: Balanced neck strength may reduce head acceleration cumulative subclinical injury. Since neck strength is a measureable and amenable strength training intervention, this may represent a modifiable intrinsic risk factor for injury. PMID:24459547

  6. Endovascular occlusion of intracranial aneurysms with electrically detachable coils: Correlation of aneurysm neck size and treatment results

    SciTech Connect

    Zubillaga, A.F.; Guglielmi, G.; Vinuela, F.; Duckwiler, G.R.

    1994-05-01

    To devise a method to measure aneurysm neck size on angiographic films, and to correlate the sizes obtained with the extent of endovascular aneurysm occlusion, performed with electrically detachable coils. The angiograms of 79 intracranial aneurysms treated by endovascular occlusion using electrically detachable coils were retrospectively analyzed. A method using the average reported caliber of the major intracranial vessels was applied to determine the aneurysm neck sizes on the diagnostic angiograms. The cases were divided into two groups according to neck size, 4 mm being the discriminative value for small and wide necks. The posttreatment angiogram of each case was analyzed to evaluate the degree of occlusion achieved by the technique. Necks were successfully measured in 95% of the aneurysms. Complete aneurysm thrombosis was observed in 85% of the small-necked aneurysms and in 15% of the wide-necked aneurysms. Accurate angiographic measurements of neck diameter can be obtained in most aneurysms. The size of an aneurysm neck correlates well with the results of the endovascular treatment. Small-necked aneurysms can be satisfactorily occluded with this technique. In wide-necked aneurysms this technique should be reserved for lesions having a high surgical risk. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. CK8 correlates with malignancy in leukoplakia and carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Gires, Olivier . E-mail: olivier.gires@med.uni-muenchen.de; Mack, Brigitte; Rauch, Jens; Matthias, Christoph

    2006-04-28

    Screening of head and neck carcinoma patients with the proteomics-based AMIDA technology yielded a set of tumour-associated antigens, including the intermediate filament protein cytokeratin 8 (CK8). The expression pattern and specificity of CK8 was compared with those of the established markers pan-cytokeratins and CK13, and with that of the proliferation marker Ki67. Expression of CK8 correlated positively with malignancies of the head and neck areas. CK8 was not expressed in healthy epithelium, except for some rare cases of cells of the basal layer and laryngeal tissue. In contrast, the vast majority of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and metastases strongly expressed CK8. Interestingly, CK8 de novo expression correlated with dysplastic areas of oral leukoplakic lesions, while hyperplastic leukoplakia remained CK8-negative but strongly panCK and CK13 positive. Thus, CK8 is an attractive marker molecule for a differentiated diagnosis of leukoplakia and head and neck carcinomas, which possesses notedly improved specificity as compared with panCK and CK13.

  8. Sites of Basal Cell Carcinomas and Head and Neck Congenital Clefts: Topographic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Brenta, Federica; Malovini, Alberto; Jaber, Omar; Faga, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Background: The embryologic fusion planes might be related with the sites of onset of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), thus supporting an embryologic role for its pathogenesis. Methods: A study involving 495 patients with 627 BCCs of the head and neck was carried out over a period of 5 years by correlating the distribution of all BCCs with the sites of congenital clefts of the head and neck using (1) the original anatomic diagram of the Tessier classification of craniofacial clefts, (2) the anatomic diagram by Moore et al featuring the paths of the “hairline indicators” of craniofacial clefts that represent the cranial extensions of the Tessier classification, and (3) an anatomical diagram featuring the sites of congenital clefts of the neck. Results: The proportion of BCCs localized within a cleft site was significantly higher than those in the noncleft sites. The age of patients with BCCs localized within the Tessier cleft number 3 was the lowest among all cleft regions. Conclusions: A topographic correspondence between the sites of BCCs and the sites of congenital clefts was demonstrated in the head and neck. This evidence would support the hypothesis of an embryologic role for the pathogenesis of BCC. The existence of clusters of embryological stem cells in the sites of fusion and/or merging of embryonic processes might therefore be proposed. There may be special biology/physiology along these cleft lines that predispose BCC formation. PMID:25289357

  9. Dose-volume factors correlating with trismus following chemoradiation for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    RAO, SHYAM D.; SALEH, ZIAD H.; SETTON, JEREMY; TAM, MOSES; MCBRIDE, SEAN M.; RIAZ, NADEEM; DEASY, JOSEPH O.; LEE, NANCY Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the dose-volume factors in mastication muscles that are implicated as possible causes of trismus in patients following treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for head and neck cancers. Material and methods All evaluable patients treated at our institution between January 2004 and April 2009 with chemotherapy and IMRT for squamous cell cancers of the oropharynx, nasopharynx, hypopharynx or larynx were included in this analysis (N = 421). Trismus was assessed using CTCAE 4.0. Bi-lateral masseter, temporalis, lateral pterygoid and medial pterygoid muscles were delineated on axial computed tomography (CT) treatment planning images, and dose-volume parameters were extracted to investigate univariate and multimetric correlations. Results Forty-six patients (10.9%) were observed to have chronic trismus of grade 1 or greater. From analysis of baseline patient characteristics, toxicity correlated with primary site and patient age. From dose-volume analysis, the steepest dose thresholds and highest correlations were seen for mean dose to ipsilateral masseter (Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient Rs = 0.25) and medial pterygoid (Rs = 0.23) muscles. Lyman-Kutcher-Burman modeling showed highest correlations for the same muscles. The best correlation for multimetric logistic regression modeling was with V68Gy to the ipsilateral medial pterygoid (Rs = 0.29). Conclusion Chemoradiation-induced trismus remains a problem particularly for patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma. Strong dose-volume correlations support the hypothesis that limiting dose to the ipsilateral masseter muscle and, in particular, the medial pterygoid muscle may reduce the likelihood of trismus. PMID:25920361

  10. Extramedullary plasmacytoma of the head and neck region: clinicopathological correlation in 25 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Susnerwala, S. S.; Shanks, J. H.; Banerjee, S. S.; Scarffe, J. H.; Farrington, W. T.; Slevin, N. J.

    1997-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas (EMP) of head and neck are rare tumours. Between 1972 and 1993, 25 cases of EMP of head and neck were seen at our institute. The clinical and pathological features and response to treatment are presented. At initial presentation, 23 (92%) patients presented with disease confined to a single extramedullary site only and two patients had in addition clinical involvement of cervical lymph nodes. All except these two patients received radiotherapy to the primary site only as initial treatment. Initial primary control of local disease was obtained in 16 of 24 (67%) patients treated with radical intent. With salvage treatment of further radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, local disease control was achieved in 21 of 24 (88%) patients. One patient was treated with palliative intent. Conversion to multiple myeloma was seen in two patients (8%). Pathologically, the tumours were classified into low, intermediate and high grade, which correlated closely with outcome. This classification has been used for the first time in extramedullary plasmacytomas and is based on the multiple myeloma grading criteria devised by Bartl et al (1987). Fifteen of eighteen (83%) low-grade tumours and only one of six (17%) intermediate- and high-grade tumours were locally controlled after primary radiotherapy. This is statistically significant for local control (P= 0.0019) but not for overall survival (P= 0.12). The median survival and 5-year overall survival is 68 months and 58.9% respectively. We recommend consideration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with higher grade disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9062417

  11. Allelotype of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: fractional allele loss correlates with survival.

    PubMed Central

    Field, J. K.; Kiaris, H.; Risk, J. M.; Tsiriyotis, C.; Adamson, R.; Zoumpourlis, V.; Rowley, H.; Taylor, K.; Whittaker, J.; Howard, P.

    1995-01-01

    Allelic imbalance or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies have been used extensively to identify regions on chromosomes that may contain putative tumour-suppressor genes. We have undertaken an extensive allelotype of 80 specimens of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) using 145 polymorphic microsatellite markers on 39 chromosome arms. Allelic imbalances were found most frequently on chromosome arms 3p, 9p, 17p and 18q with over 45% LOH and imbalances on 1p, 1q, 2p, 5q, 6p, 6q, 8p, 8q, 9q, 11q, 13q, 17q and 19q were found in more than 20% of SCCHN. These LOH data were analysed against a range of clinicopathological parameters which included previously untreated and previously treated tumours; correlations were found between LOH on 9q and nodes at pathology (P = 0.02) and between histopathological grade and LOH on 12q (P = 0.02) and 13q (P = 0.01). In the group of previously untreated tumours, a correlation was found between site of tumour and LOH on 3p (P = 0.019), and 8p (P = 0.029), while TNM staging correlated with LOH on 3p (P = 0.019) and 17p (P = 0.016). Fractional allele loss (FAL) was calculated for 52 tumours with LOH data on nine or more chromosomal arms and found to have a median value of 0.22 (range 0.0-0.80). Correlations were found between FAL > median value and nodes at pathology (P = 0.01) and tumour grade (P = 0.06), demonstrating that advanced tumours with lymph node metastasis often had LOH at multiple sites. FAL > median value was found to correlate with a poor survival (P < 0.03) and, furthermore, FAL > median value correlated with poor survival in the previously untreated patients (P < 0.019). These results indicate that assessment of the accumulation of genetic damage, as provided by allelotype data, provides a useful molecular indicator of the tumour behaviour and clinical outcome. Images Figure 1 PMID:7577465

  12. Correlation of Positron Emission Tomography Standard Uptake Value and Pathologic Specimen Size in Cancer of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Burri, Ryan J. Rangaswamy, Balasubramanya; Kostakoglu, Lale; Hoch, Benjamin; Genden, Eric M.; Som, Peter M.; Kao, Johnny

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To correlate positron emission tomography (PET) standard uptake value (SUV) with pathologic specimen size in patients with head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with Stage II-IVB head-and-neck cancer with 27 tumors who underwent PET and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the head and neck followed by surgical resection were selected for this study. Various SUV thresholds were examined, including the software default (SUV{sub def}), narrowing the window by 1 standard deviation (SD) of the maximum (SUV-1SD), and SUV cutoff values of 2.5 or greater (SUV2.5) and 40% or greater maximum (SUV40). Volumetric pathologic data were available for 12 patients. Tumor volumes based on pathologic examination (gold standard), CT, SUV{sub def}, SUV-1SD, SUV2.5, and SUV40 were analyzed. Results: PET identified five tumors not seen on CT. The sensitivity of PET for identifying primary tumors was 94% (17 of 18). The Sensitivity of PET for staging the neck was 90% (9 of 10), whereas the specificity was 78% (7 of 9). The SUV2.5 method was most likely to overestimate tumor volume, whereas SUV{sub def} and SUV-1SD were most likely to underestimate tumor volume. Conclusions: The PET scan provides more accurate staging of primary tumors and nodal metastases for patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer than CT alone. Compared with the gold standard, significant variability exists in volumes obtained by using various SUV thresholds. A combination of clinical, CT, and PET data should continue to be used for optimal treatment planning. The SUV40 method appears to offer the best compromise between accuracy and reducing the risk of underestimating tumor extent.

  13. Body Mass Index May Positively Correlate with Bone Mineral Density of Lumbar Vertebra and Femoral Neck in Postmenopausal Females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shi-Feng; Du, Xin-Jie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our study aimed to explore the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar vertebra and femoral neck in postmenopausal females. MATERIAL AND METHODS From September 2012 to September 2014, 236 healthy postmenopausal females who underwent physical examinations at the Women & Children's Health Care Hospital of Linyi were enrolled into our study. These subjects were divided into 3 groups: underweight group, normal weight group, and overweight group. In addition, there were 2 age stratifications: <60 years old and ?60 years old. DPX-L type dual-energy X-ray bone densitometry (American Lunar Company) was used to measure the BMD of lumbar vertebra and femoral neck in the recruited subjects. Pearson test was used for correlation analysis. RESULTS BMDs and T-scores of lumbar vertebra (L1-L4), femoral neck, proximal femur, and Ward's triangle region among the groups were ranked as follows: underweight group < normal weight group < overweight group. There were significant differences in body weight and BMI among the underweight, normal weight, and overweight groups (P<0.05). The T-scores of all examined anatomic locations showed significant differences between the underweight group and normal weight group, as well as between the underweight group and overweight group (both P<0.05). Only the T-scores of lumbar vertebra L2-L4 had significant differences between the normal weight group and overweight group (P<0.05). The BMDs of all anatomic components under study showed statistical differences in both age stratifications between the overweight group and underweight group, as well as between the overweight group and normal weight group (both P<0.05). When stratified above 60 years old, the BMDs of lumbar vertebra (L1, L2 and L4) showed statistical differences between the normal weight group and underweight group (P<0.05). Various factors could be ranked according to the absolute values of correlation coefficients as below: body weight, BMI, height, and age. Body weight, BMI, and height were positively correlated with the BMDs of all examined anatomic locations (P<0.05). However, age was negatively correlated with the various components of the body (lumbar vertebra L1, L2 and L4, femoral neck, proximal femur, Ward's triangle region: P<0.05; lumbar vertebra L3: P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS Our study provides evidence that body weight and BMI are important factors affecting BMD. Postmenopausal females with low BMI are more likely to have osteopenia, and are likely to develop osteoporosis. BMI can be used as an important index to prevent osteoporosis. PMID:26766815

  14. Body Mass Index May Positively Correlate with Bone Mineral Density of Lumbar Vertebra and Femoral Neck in Postmenopausal Females

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shi-Feng; Du, Xin-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Our study aimed to explore the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar vertebra and femoral neck in postmenopausal females. Material/Methods From September 2012 to September 2014, 236 healthy postmenopausal females who underwent physical examinations at the Women & Children’s Health Care Hospital of Linyi were enrolled into our study. These subjects were divided into 3 groups: underweight group, normal weight group, and overweight group. In addition, there were 2 age stratifications: <60 years old and ≥60 years old. DPX-L type dual-energy X-ray bone densitometry (American Lunar Company) was used to measure the BMD of lumbar vertebra and femoral neck in the recruited subjects. Pearson test was used for correlation analysis. Results BMDs and T-scores of lumbar vertebra (L1–L4), femoral neck, proximal femur, and Ward’s triangle region among the groups were ranked as follows: underweight group < normal weight group < overweight group. There were significant differences in body weight and BMI among the underweight, normal weight, and overweight groups (P<0.05). The T-scores of all examined anatomic locations showed significant differences between the underweight group and normal weight group, as well as between the underweight group and overweight group (both P<0.05). Only the T-scores of lumbar vertebra L2–L4 had significant differences between the normal weight group and overweight group (P<0.05). The BMDs of all anatomic components under study showed statistical differences in both age stratifications between the overweight group and underweight group, as well as between the overweight group and normal weight group (both P<0.05). When stratified above 60 years old, the BMDs of lumbar vertebra (L1, L2 and L4) showed statistical differences between the normal weight group and underweight group (P<0.05). Various factors could be ranked according to the absolute values of correlation coefficients as below: body weight, BMI, height, and age. Body weight, BMI, and height were positively correlated with the BMDs of all examined anatomic locations (P<0.05). However, age was negatively correlated with the various components of the body (lumbar vertebra L1, L2 and L4, femoral neck, proximal femur, Ward’s triangle region: P<0.05; lumbar vertebra L3: P>0.05). Conclusions Our study provides evidence that body weight and BMI are important factors affecting BMD. Postmenopausal females with low BMI are more likely to have osteopenia, and are likely to develop osteoporosis. BMI can be used as an important index to prevent osteoporosis. PMID:26766815

  15. Genomic Correlate of Exceptional Erlotinib Response in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Lui, Vivian W. Y.; Egloff, Ann Marie; Goetz, Eva M.; Li, Hua; Johnson, Jonas T.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Bauman, Julie E.; Stransky, Nicolas; Zeng, Yan; Gilbert, Breean R.; Pendleton, Kelsey P.; Wang, Lin; Chiosea, Simion; Sougnez, Carrie; Wagle, Nikhil; Zhang, Fan; Du, Yu; Close, David; Johnston, Paul A.; McKenna, Aaron; Carter, Scott L.; Golub, Todd R.; Getz, Gad; Mills, Gordon B.; Garraway, Levi A.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Randomized clinical trials demonstrate no benefit for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors in unselected patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, a patient with stage IVA HNSCC received 13 days of neoadjuvant erlotinib and experienced a near-complete histologic response. OBJECTIVE To determine a mechanism of exceptional response to erlotinib therapy in HNSCC. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Single patient with locally advanced HNSCC who received erlotinib monotherapy in a window-of-opportunity clinical trial (patients scheduled to undergo primary cancer surgery are treated briefly with an investigational agent). Whole-exome sequencing of pretreatment tumor and germline patient samples was performed at a quaternary care academic medical center, and a candidate somatic variant was experimentally investigated for mediating erlotinib response. INTERVENTION A brief course of erlotinib monotherapy followed by surgical resection. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Identification of pretreatment tumor somatic alterations that may contribute to the exceptional response to erlotinib. Hypotheses were formulated regarding enhanced erlotinib response in preclinical models harboring the patient tumor somatic variant MAPK1 E322K following the identification of tumor somatic variants. RESULTS No EGFR alterations were observed in the pretreatment tumor DNA. Paradoxically, the tumor harbored an activating MAPK1 E322K mutation (allelic fraction 0.13), which predicts ERK activation and erlotinib resistance in EGFR-mutant lung cancer. The HNSCC cells with MAPK1 E322K exhibited enhanced EGFR phosphorylation and erlotinib sensitivity compared with wild-type MAPK1 cells. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Selective erlotinib use in HNSCC may be informed by precision oncology approaches. PMID:26181029

  16. p53 mutation, but not p53 overexpression, correlates with survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mineta, H.; Borg, A.; Dictor, M.; Wahlberg, P.; Akervall, J.; Wennerberg, J.

    1998-01-01

    Survival in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) was compared with overexpression and mutation of the p53 gene. Archival tissue from 77 tumours was analysed for protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC) with the monoclonal antibody Do-7, and for the presence of mutation in exons 5-8 using single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP), followed by DNA sequencing in SSCP-positive cases. p53 expression was scored as high (>70% nuclei stained) in 25 (32%) tumours, as intermediate (10-70% nuclei stained) in 19 (25%) tumours and as low (<10% nuclei stained) in 33 (43%) tumours. Twelve (18%) tumours exhibited gene mutation (ten missense and two nonsense mutations) and an additional five tumours contained changes that could not result in amino acid substitution or protein truncation. There was no correlation between gene expression and mutation, mutations being equally frequent in tumours with either high (4/25), intermediate (4/19) or low protein expression (4/33). Fifty-eight patients were eligible for survival analysis. There was a strong correlation between p53 mutation and cause-specific survival; median survival among mutated cases was 12.5 months compared with >160 months among non-mutated patients (P < 0.005). There was no correlation between p53 overexpression and survival. The results suggest that p53 mutation status is an important prognostic factor in HNSCC, and that IHC analysis of protein overexpression is an inadequate measure of gene mutation in these tumours. Images Figure 1 PMID:9792155

  17. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Minh Tam; Lee, Richard; Saito, Naoko; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Ozonoff, Al; Romesser, Paul B.; Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

  18. Expression of IL-1α correlates with distant metastasis in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    León, Xavier; Bothe, Carolina; García, Jacinto; Parreño, Matilde; Alcolea, Sonia; Quer, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    The presence of IL-1 in human cancers is associated with aggressive tumor biology but its prognostic value is unknown. We studied whether IL-1α expression is a prognostic marker of distant metastasis in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). IL-1α mRNA and protein levels were determined in tumor samples and cancer cell lines using RT-PCR and ELISA. The effects of constitutive IL-1α expression by tumor lines were characterized. IL-1α mRNA and protein secretion were higher in tumor samples from patients who later developed distant metastasis than in patients who did not. By using distant metastasis as a dependent variable, patients were classified into two categories of IL-1α transcript-levels. The high-IL-1α group had a significantly lower five-year distant metastasis-free survival than the low-IL-1α group [70.0% (CI 95%: 55.9-84.1%) vs 94.7% (CI 95%:90.2-99.2%)]. When IL-1α transcript-levels were combined with clinical factors related to tumor metastasis, the predictive power of the model increased significantly. Additionally, transcript levels of IL-1α correlated significantly with those of the IL-1 family genes and genes related to the metastatic process. IL-1 treatment of microvascular endothelial cells increased adhesion of HNSCC cells but no differences were found based on constitutive IL-1α expression by tumor cells. Nevertheless, IL-1α produced by tumor cells effectively increased their transmigration across the endothelium. We found a significant relationship between IL-1α expression and development of distant metastasis in HNSCC patients. IL-1α expression could help to define a subset of patients at high risk of distant metastasis who could benefit from adjuvant treatment. PMID:26460957

  19. Pretreatment anemia is correlated with the reduced effectiveness of radiation and concurrent chemotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Prosnitz, Robert G. . E-mail: robert.prosnitz@duke.edu; Yao, Bin M.S.; Farrell, Catherine L.; Clough, Robert; Brizel, David M.

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: Pretreatment anemia is an adverse prognostic variable in squamous cell head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone. Tumor hypoxia is an adverse parameter for treatment with RT alone or with RT and concurrent chemotherapy (CCT). Tumor hypoxia is more prevalent in patients who present with pretreatment hemoglobin (Hgb) concentrations less than 13 g/dL. RT/CCT improves survival over RT alone in advanced HNC, and its use is becoming more widespread. This study was performed to evaluate whether pretreatment Hgb less than 13 g/dL was correlated with treatment outcome in patients with advanced HNC treated with a uniform regimen of RT/CCT. Methods and materials: The study population consisted of patients with AJCC Stage III or IV, M0 HNC who were treated with 70 to 72.5 Gy accelerated hyperfractionated RT (1.25 Gy b.i.d.) and CCT consisting of 2 cycles of CDDP (12-20 mg/m{sup 2}/d x 5 days) and continuous infusion 5-FU (600 mg/m{sup 2}/d x 5 days) during Week 1 and Week 6. A planned break in RT occurred during Week 4. These patients were enrolled on the experimental arm of a prospective randomized trial that compared this regimen to hyperfractionated irradiation alone from 1990 to 1996. RT/CCT was delivered as standard therapy from 1996 to 2000. The primary endpoint was failure-free survival (FFS). Secondary endpoints included local-regional control and overall survival. Results: One hundred and fifty-nine patients were treated from 1990 to 2000. The median (25-75%) pretreatment Hgb was 13.6 (12.2-13.5) g/dL. Hgb was 13 g/dL or higher in 105 patients and less than 13 g/dL in 54 patients. Primary tumor sites included oropharynx (43%), hypopharynx/larynx (36%), oral cavity (9%), and nasopharynx (6%). Seventy-eight percent of the patients with Hgb 13 g/dL or higher and 92% of the patients with Hgb less than 13 g/dL had a primary tumor stage of T3 or T4 (p = 0.01). Node-positive disease was present in 74 of 105 (70%) of patients with Hgb 13 g/dL or higher patients and in 36/54 (67%) of patients with Hgb less than 13 g/dL patients. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 42 months (range, 4-128 months). Five-year FFS was 75% for patients with Hgb 13 g/dL or higher vs. 50% for patients with Hgb less than 13 g/dL had a (p < 0.01). A total of 49 failures occurred in both patient cohorts. The median (25-75%) decrease in Hgb during RT/CCT was 2.2 (1.3-3.1) g/dL, both in patients who failed and in those who remained disease-free. Conclusion: Pretreatment Hgb less than 13 g/dL is correlated with adverse outcomes in advanced HNC patients treated with RT/CCT. Whether anemia actually causes poor outcomes remains unknown. The therapeutic effect of anemia correction is being evaluated in prospective trials.

  20. In Vivo Correlation of Glucose Metabolism, Cell Density and Microcirculatory Parameters in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: Initial Results Using Simultaneous PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kubiessa, Klaus; Boehm, Andreas; Barthel, Henryk; Kluge, Regine; Kahn, Thomas; Sabri, Osama; Stumpp, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous acquisition of 18F-FDG-PET, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (T1w-DCE) in an integrated simultaneous PET/MRI in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and to investigate possible correlations between these parameters. Methods 17 patients that had given informed consent (15 male, 2 female) with biopsy-proven HNSCC underwent simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET/MRI including DWI and T1w-DCE. SUVmax, SUVmean, ADCmean, ADCmin and Ktrans, kep and ve were measured for each tumour and correlated using Spearmans ?. Results Significant correlations were observed between SUVmean and Ktrans (? = 0.43; p ? 0.05); SUVmean and kep (? = 0.44; p ? 0.05); Ktrans and kep (? = 0.53; p ? 0.05); and between kep and ve (? = -0.74; p ? 0.01). There was a trend towards statistical significance when correlating SUVmax and ADCmin (? = -0.35; p = 0.08); SUVmax and Ktrans (? = 0.37; p = 0.07); SUVmax and kep (? = 0.39; p = 0.06); and ADCmean and ve (? = 0.4; p = 0.06). Conclusion Simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET/MRI including DWI and T1w-DCE in patients with HNSCC is feasible and allows depiction of complex interactions between glucose metabolism, microcirculatory parameters and cellular density. PMID:26270054

  1. Correlation of Osteoradionecrosis and Dental Events With Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Estilo, Cherry L.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Shah, Jatin P.; Mechalakos, James G.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is a known complication of radiation therapy to the head and neck. However, the incidence of this complication with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dental sequelae with this technique have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Materials: From December 2000 to July 2007, 168 patients from our institution have been previously reported for IMRT of the oral cavity, nasopharynx, larynx/hypopharynx, sinus, and oropharynx. All patients underwent pretreatment dental evaluation, including panoramic radiographs, an aggressive fluoride regimen, and a mouthguard when indicated. The median maximum mandibular dose was 6,798 cGy, and the median mean mandibular dose was 3,845 cGy. Patient visits were retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of ORN, and dental records were reviewed for the development of dental events. Univariate analysis was then used to assess the effect of mandibular and parotid gland dosimetric parameters on dental endpoints. Results: With a median clinic follow-up of 37.4 months (range, 0.8-89.6 months), 2 patients, both with oral cavity primaries, experienced ORN. Neither patient had preradiation dental extractions. The maximum mandibular dose and mean mandibular dose of the 2 patients were 7,183 and 6,828 cGy and 5812 and 5335 cGy, respectively. In all, 17% of the patients (n = 29) experienced a dental event. A mean parotid dose of >26 Gy was predictive of a subsequent dental caries, whereas a maximum mandibular dose >70 Gy and a mean mandibular dose >40 Gy were correlated with dental extractions after IMRT. Conclusions: ORN is rare after head-and-neck IMRT, but is more common with oral cavity primaries. Our results suggest different mechanisms for radiation-induced caries versus extractions.

  2. Detection of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with diffusion weighted MRI after (chemo)radiotherapy: Correlation between radiologic and histopathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Vandecaveye, Vincent; Keyzer, Frederik de; Nuyts, Sandra; Deraedt, Karen; Dirix, Piet; Hamaekers, Pascal; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Delaere, Pierre; Hermans, Robert . E-mail: Robert.Hermans@uzleuven.be

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the value of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in differentiating persistent or recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) from nontumoral postradiotherapeutic alterations. Methods and Materials: In 26 patients with suspicion of persistent or recurrent HNSCC, MRI of the head and neck was performed, including routine turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences and an additional echo-planar DW-MRI sequence, using a large range of b-values (0-1000 s/mm{sup 2}). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated. In the suspect areas at the primary site and in the suspect lymph nodes, signal intensity was measured on the native b0 and b1000 images and ADC values were calculated for these tissues. The same was done for surrounding irradiated normal tissue. Imaging results were correlated to histopathology. Results: Signal intensity on native b0 images was significantly lower for HNSCC than for nontumoral postradiotherapeutic tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 66.2%, specificity of 60.8%, and accuracy of 62.4%. Signal intensity on native b1000 images was significantly higher for HNSCC than for nontumoral tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 71.6%, specificity of 71.3%, and accuracy of 71.4%. ADC values were significantly lower for HNSCC than for nontumoral tissue (p < 0.0001), resulting in a sensitivity of 94.6%, specificity of 95.9%, and accuracy of 95.5%. When compared with computed tomography, TSE-MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography, DW-MRI yielded fewer false-positive results in persistent primary site abnormalities and in persistent adenopathies, and aided in the detection of subcentimetric nodal metastases. Conclusions: Diffusion weighted-MRI accurately differentiates persistent or recurrent HNSCC from nontumoral tissue changes after (chemo)radiotherapy.

  3. Neck pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... causes of neck pain: Take over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB) or acetaminophen ( ... prescribe a muscle relaxant or a more powerful pain reliever. Over-the-counter medications often work as well ...

  4. Stiff Neck

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk X-Ray Exam: Neck Meningitis Infant Torticollis Torticollis Lyme Disease Meningitis Lyme Disease Burner (Stinger) Meningitis Lyme Disease ...

  5. PRAME expression in head and neck cancer correlates with markers of poor prognosis and might help in selecting candidates for retinoid chemoprevention in pre-malignant lesions

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.; DeLeo, Albert B.; ?uczak, Micha?; Molinska-Glura, Marta; Misiak, Jan; Szarzynska, Bronislawa; Dworacki, Grzegorz; Zagor, Mariola; Rozwadowska, Natalia; Kurpisz, Maciej; Krzeski, Antoni; Kruk-Zagajewska, Aleksandra; Kopec, Tomasz; Banaszewski, Jacek; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives PRAME (Preferentially Expressed Antigen in Melanoma) is a tumor-associated antigen recognized by immunocytes, and it induces cytotoxic T cell-mediated responses in melanoma. PRAME expression in tumors interferes with retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling thus promoting tumor progression. Here, we study PRAME expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) to determine its potential clinical significance. Materials and Methods PRAME expression in HNSCC was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays of primary tumors (n=53), metastatic lymph nodes (n=8) and normal oral mucosa (n=11). Biopsies of dysplastic oral lesions (n=12) were also examined. PRAME expression levels in tissues were correlated with markers of poor prognosis in HNSCC. PRAME mRNA in HNSCC cell lines and in normal immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cell line) was measured by qRT-PCR, and the protein expression by flow cytometry and western blots. Results PRAME was expressed in HNSCC cell lines and HNSCC lesions. PRAME expression in dysplastic mucosa was variable. No or only weak expression was found in normal cells or tissues. PRAME expression levels significantly correlated with the tumor grade, size, nodal involvement and the clinical status of HNSCC patients. Conclusions Elevated PRAME expression associates with clinicopathologic markers of poor outcome in HNSCC and might identify potential candidates with pre-cancerous lesions for chemoprevention with retinoids. PMID:22944049

  6. High level expression of AMAP1 protein correlates with poor prognosis and survival after surgery of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in cancer therapeutics in general, the survival of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) has not improved substantially over the past few decades. HNSCC cells often exhibit invasive and metastatic phenotypes, and expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and cortactin has been highly implicated in the development of malignancy in HNSCCs. We have shown previously that an Arf6 pathway, in which Arf6 is activated by GEP100 and employs AMAP1 (also called DDEF1 or ASAP1) as its downstream effector, is pivotal for the invasion and metastasis of different breast cancer cells. This pathway is activated by receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGFR; and moreover, AMAP1 physically associates with cortactin, in which inhibition of this binding effectively blocks invasion and metastasis. We here investigated whether the expression of Arf6 pathway components correlates with the poor prognosis of HNSCC patients. We have shown previously that AMAP1 protein levels are not correlated with its mRNA levels, and hence we here employed immunohistochemical staining of HNSCC clinical specimens to investigate AMAP1 protein levels. Results We found that high levels of AMAP1 protein expression on its own, as well as its co-overexpression with EGFR statistically correlates with poor disease-free survival and poor overall survival, while high levels of cortactin expression or its co-expression with EGFR did not. Conclusion Our identification of predictive biomarkers, together with our previous findings on the coherent signaling pathway that these biomarkers ultimately generate should be powerful information for the further development of HNSCC therapeutics. PMID:24621372

  7. Overview of Neck Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Back) > Overview of Neck Pain Overview of Neck Pain Page Content Developing a Program That's Right for ... activity? What Kinds of Problems Might Cause Neck Pain? Treatment for any neck condition is recommended as ...

  8. CTLA-4? Regulatory T Cells Increased in Cetuximab-Treated Head and Neck Cancer Patients Suppress NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Correlate with Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Jie, Hyun-Bae; Schuler, Patrick J; Lee, Steve C; Srivastava, Raghvendra M; Argiris, Athanassios; Ferrone, Soldano; Whiteside, Theresa L; Ferris, Robert L

    2015-06-01

    The EGFR-targeted antibody cetuximab is effective against head and neck cancer (HNSCC), but in only 15% to 20% of patients, and the variability and extent of cetuximab-mediated cellular immunity is not fully understood. We hypothesized that regulatory T cells (Treg) may exert a functional and clinical impact on antitumor immunity in cetuximab-treated individuals. The frequency, immunosuppressive phenotype, and activation status of Treg and natural killer (NK) cells were analyzed in the circulation and tumor microenvironment of cetuximab-treated patients with HNSCC enrolled in a novel neoadjuvant, single-agent cetuximab clinical trial. Notably, cetuximab treatment increased the frequency of CD4(+)FOXP3(+) intratumoral Treg expressing CTLA-4, CD39, and TGF?. These Treg suppressed cetuximab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and their presence correlated with poor clinical outcome in two prospective clinical trial cohorts. Cetuximab expanded CTLA-4(+)FOXP3(+) Treg in vitro, in part, by inducing dendritic cell maturation, in combination with TGF? and T-cell receptor triggering. Importantly, cetuximab-activated NK cells selectively eliminated intratumoral Treg but preserved effector T cells. In ex vivo assays, ipilimumab targeted CTLA-4(+) Treg and restored cytolytic functions of NK cells mediating ADCC. Taken together, our results argue that differences in Treg-mediated suppression contribute to the clinical response to cetuximab treatment, suggesting its improvement by adding ipilimumab or other strategies of Treg ablation to promote antitumor immunity. PMID:25832655

  9. Nuclear NF-κB Expression Correlates With Outcome Among Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Primary Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Michel, Yvonne; Wagenblast, Jens; Seitz, Oliver; Sipek, Florian; Rödel, Franz; Rödel, Claus; Fokas, Emmanouil

    2013-07-15

    Background: To examine whether nuclear NF-κB expression correlates with outcome in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 101 patients with locally advanced primary HNSCC were treated with definitive simultaneous CRT. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were analyzed for NF-κB p65 (RelA) nuclear immunoreactivity. A sample was assigned to be positive with more than 5% positive nuclear expression. The predictive relevance of NF-κB and clinicopathologic factors for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to age, sex, total radiation dose, fractionation mode, total chemotherapy applied, T stage or grading. Patients with p65 nuclear positive biopsy specimens showed significantly a higher rate of lymph node metastasis (cN2c or cN3 status, P=.034). Within a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range, 2.33-62.96 months) OS, PFS, and DMFS were significantly poorer in the p65 nuclear positive group (P=.008, P=.027, and P=.008, respectively). These correlations remained significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: NF-κB/p65 nuclear expression is associated with increased lymphatic and hematogenous tumor dissemination and decreased survival in HNSCC patients treated with primary CRT. Our results may foster further investigation of a predictive relevance of NF-κB/p65 and its role as a suitable target for a molecular-based targeted therapy in HNSCC cancer.

  10. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy, physical treatments, postural techniques (yoga, pilates, Alexander technique), pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatment, soft collars and special pillows, spray and stretch, surgery, traction, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). PMID:19445809

  11. C4.4A as a biomarker of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and correlated with epithelial mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Feng; Mao, Liang; Bu, Lin-Lin; Ma, Si-Rui; Huang, Cong-Fa; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    C4.4A, a member of the Ly6/uPAR family of membrane proteins, has been identified as a metastasis-associated molecule, but little is known about its actual expression and possible function in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). To explore diagnostic and prognostic roles of C4.4A in HNSCC, we investigated the expression of C4.4A in human HNSCC tissue array which contains 43 HNSCC, 6 epithelial dysplasia and 16 normal oral mucosa. Expression of C4.4A was significantly increased in epithelial dysplasia and HNSCC when compared with normal oral mucosa. Moreover, high C4.4A expression indicated a rather poor prognosis of HNSCC patients. To better understand the function of C4.4A in HNSCC progression, we investigated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated proteins including transforming growth factor (TGF-?1), Slug and CD147 in HNSCC. The expression of TGF-?1, Slug, and CD147 was significantly increased in HNSCC when compared with normal oral mucosa. Meanwhile, the expression of C4.4A was significantly correlated with TGF-?1, Slug, and CD147 in HNSCC tissue array. Furthermore, knockdown of C4.4A decreased the cell invasion and migration in CAL27 cell line and suppressed the EMT with increased E-cadherin and decreased N-cadherin and Slug. Our study demonstrated that C4.4A was a potential marker for prognosis of HNSCC, and C4.4A participated in EMT program in HNSCC progression.

  12. Pretreatment Apparent Diffusion Coefficient of the Primary Lesion Correlates With Local Failure in Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy or Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Yoshio; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Sunami, Shunya; Kamitani, Takeshi; Setoguchi, Taro; Yoshiura, Takashi; Nakashima, Torahiko; Nishikawa, Kei; Honda, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of a primary lesion correlates with local failure in primary head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 38 patients with primary HNSCC (12 oropharynx, 20 hypopharynx, 4 larynx, 2 oral cavity) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy with radiation dose to gross tumor volume equal to or over 60 Gy and who underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion-weighted imaging. Ten patients developed local failure during follow-up periods of 2.0 to 9.3 months, and the remaining 28 showed local control during follow-up periods of 10.5 to 31.7 months. The variables that could affect local failure (age, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, N stage, dose, treatment method, tumor location, and overall treatment time) were analyzed using logistic regression analyses for all 38 patients and for 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease. Results: In univariate logistic analysis for all 38 cases, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, and treatment method showed significant (p < 0.05) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC and T stage revealed significance (p < 0.01). In univariate logistic analysis for the 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease, ADC and dose showed significant (p < 0.01) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC alone showed significance (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results suggest that pretreatment ADC, along with T stage, is a potential indicator of local failure in HNSCC treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy.

  13. Correlating planned radiation dose to the cochlea with primary site and tumor stage in patients with head and neck cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jeanette; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine tumor characteristics that predict higher planned radiation (RT) dose to the cochlea in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). From 2004 to 2012, 99 patients with HNC underwent definitive IMRT to a median dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions, with the right and left cochlea-vestibular apparatus contoured for IMRT optimization as avoidance structures. If disease involvement was adjacent to the cochlea, preference was given to tumor coverage by prescription dose. Descriptive statistics were calculated for dose-volume histogram planning data, and mean planning dose to the cochlea (from left or right cochlea, receiving the greater amount of RT dose) was correlated to primary site and tumor stage. Mean (standard deviation) cochlear volume was 1.0 (0.60) cm{sup 3} with maximum and mean planned doses of 31.9 (17.5) Gy and 22.1 (13.7) Gy, respectively. Mean planned dose (Gy) to cochlea by tumor site was as follows: oral cavity (18.6, 14.4), oropharynx (21.7, 9.1), nasopharynx (36.3, 10.4), hypopharynx (14.9, 7.1), larynx (2.1, 0.62), others including the parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus (33.6, 24.0), and unknown primary (25.6, 6.7). Average mean planned dose (Gy) to the cochlea in T0-T2 and T3-T4 disease was 22.0 and 29.2 Gy, respectively (p = 0.019). By site, a significant difference was noted for nasopharynx and others (31.6 and 50.7, p = 0.012) but not for oropharynx, oral cavity, and hypopharynx. Advanced T category predicted for higher mean cochlear dose, particularly for nasopharyngeal, parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus HNC sites.

  14. Perfusion Estimated With Rapid Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlates Inversely With Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and Pimonidazole Staining in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, Stephanie B.; Betts, Guy; Bonington, Suzanne C.; Homer, Jarrod J.; Slevin, Nick J.; Kershaw, Lucy E.; Valentine, Helen; West, Catharine M.L.; Buckley, David L.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze, in a pilot study, rapidly acquired dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data with a general two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model and correlate parameters obtained with measurements of hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Eight patients were scanned before surgery. The DCE-MRI data were acquired with 1.5-s temporal resolution and analyzed using the two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model to obtain estimates of parameters including perfusion and permeability surface area. Twelve to 16 h before surgery, patients received an intravenous injection of pimonidazole. Samples taken during surgery were used to determine the level of pimonidazole staining using immunohistochemistry and VEGF expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Correlations between the biological and imaging data were examined. Results: Of the seven tumors fully analyzed, those that were poorly perfused tended to have high levels of pimonidazole staining (r = -0.79, p = 0.03) and VEGF expression (r = -0.82, p = 0.02). Tumors with low permeability surface area also tended to have high levels of hypoxia (r = -0.75, p = 0.05). Hypoxic tumors also expressed higher levels of VEGF (r = 0.82, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Estimates of perfusion obtained with rapid DCE-MRI data in patients with head-and-neck cancer correlate inversely with pimonidazole staining and VEGF expression.

  15. Neck curve polynomials in neck rupture model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurniadi, Rizal; Perkasa, Yudha S.; Waris, Abdul

    2012-06-06

    The Neck Rupture Model is a model that explains the scission process which has smallest radius in liquid drop at certain position. Old fashion of rupture position is determined randomly so that has been called as Random Neck Rupture Model (RNRM). The neck curve polynomials have been employed in the Neck Rupture Model for calculation the fission yield of neutron induced fission reaction of {sup 280}X{sub 90} with changing of order of polynomials as well as temperature. The neck curve polynomials approximation shows the important effects in shaping of fission yield curve.

  16. Immunohistochemical detection of osteopontin in advanced head-and-neck cancer: Prognostic role and correlation with oxygen electrode measurements, hypoxia-inducible-factor-1{alpha}-related markers, and hemoglobin levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bache, Matthias; Reddemann, Rolf; Said, Harun M.; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen; Taubert, Helge; Becker, Axel; Kuhnt, Thomas; Haensgen, Gabriele; Dunst, Juergen; Vordermark, Dirk . E-mail: vordermark_d@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: The tumor-associated glycoprotein osteopontin (OPN) is discussed as a plasma marker of tumor hypoxia. However, the association of immunohistochemical OPN expression in tumor sections with tumor oxygenation parameters (HF5, median pO{sub 2}), the hypoxia-related markers hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), or hemoglobin and systemic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels has not been investigated. Methods and Materials: Tumor tissue sections of 34 patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with radiotherapy were assessed by immunochemistry for the expression of OPN, HIF-1{alpha}, and CA IX. Relationship of OPN expression with tumor oxygenation parameters (HF5, median pO{sub 2}), HIF-1{alpha} and CA IX expression, hemoglobin and serum VEGF level, and clinical parameters was studied. Results: Bivariate analysis showed a significant correlation of positive OPN staining with low hemoglobin level (p = 0.02), high HIF-1{alpha} expression (p = 0.02), and high serum vascular endothelial growth factor level (p = 0.02) for advanced head-and-neck cancer. Furthermore, considering the 31 Stage IV patients, the median pO{sub 2} correlated significantly with the OPN expression (p = 0.02). OPN expression alone had only a small impact on prognosis. However, in a univariate Cox proportional hazard regression model, the expression of either OPN or HIF-1{alpha} or CA IX was associated with a 4.1-fold increased risk of death (p = 0.02) compared with negativity of all three markers. Conclusion: Osteopontin expression detected immunohistochemically is associated with oxygenation parameters in advanced head-and-neck cancer. When the results of OPN, HIF-1{alpha}, and CA IX immunohistochemistry are combined into a hypoxic profile, a strong and statistically significant impact on overall survival is found.

  17. Enhanced Response of Human Head and Neck Cancer Xenograft Tumors to Cisplatin Combined With 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Correlates With Increased {sup 18}F-FDG Uptake as Determined by PET Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, Andrean L.; Fath, Melissa A.; Mattson, David M.; Smith, Brian J.; Walsh, Susan A.; Graham, Michael M.; Hichwa, Richard D.; Buatti, John M.; Dornfeld, Ken; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the response of human head and neck cancer xenografts to cisplatin (CIS) could be enhanced with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG); whether 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake correlated with responses to this drug combination; and whether 2DG would enhance CIS-induced radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival responses to CIS + 2DG were determined in FaDu and Cal-27 cells and reduced/oxidized glutathione levels were monitored as parameters indicative of oxidative stress. The efficacy of CIS + 2DG was determined in FaDu and Cal-27 xenografts, and FDG uptake was determined by using positron emission tomography. Results: Use of CIS + 2DG enhanced cell killing of FaDu and Cal-27 cells compared with either drug alone while increasing the percentage of oxidized glutathione in vitro. Use of CIS + 2DG inhibited FaDu and Cal-27 tumor growth and increased disease-free survival compared with either drug alone. The Cal-27 tumors showed greater pretreatment FDG uptake and increased disease-free survival when treated with 2DG + CIS relative to FaDu tumors. Treatment with 2DG enhanced CIS-induced radiosensitization in FaDu tumor cells grown in vitro and in vivo and resulted in apparent cures in 50% of tumors. Conclusions: These results show the enhanced therapeutic efficacy of CIS + 2DG in human head and neck cancer cells in vitro and in vivo compared with either drug alone, as well as the potential for FDG uptake to predict tumor sensitivity to 2DG + CIS. These findings provide a strong rationale for evaluating 2DG + CIS in combined-modality head and neck cancer therapy with radiation in a clinical setting.

  18. Head and Neck Cancers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Mendenhall WM, Mancuso AA, Amdur RJ, et al. Squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the neck from an unknown head ... V, et al. Oral health and risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and esophagus: results ...

  19. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... increases your risk. In fact, 85 percent of head and neck cancers are linked to tobacco use, including smoking ...

  20. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain. Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing a cervical collar. You rarely need surgery.

  1. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  2. Correlational Analysis of neck/shoulder Pain and Low Back Pain with the Use of Digital Products, Physical Activity and Psychological Status among Adolescents in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jipeng; Li, Yangyang; Zhang, Yongxing; Zhao, Qinghua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study investigates the neck/shoulder pain (NSP) and low back pain (LBP) among current high school students in Shanghai and explores the relationship between these pains and their possible influences, including digital products, physical activity, and psychological status. Methods An anonymous self-assessment was administered to 3,600 students across 30 high schools in Shanghai. This questionnaire examined the prevalence of NSP and LBP and the level of physical activity as well as the use of mobile phones, personal computers (PC) and tablet computers (Tablet). The CES-D (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression) scale was also included in the survey. The survey data were analyzed using the chi-square test, univariate logistic analyses and a multivariate logistic regression model. Results Three thousand sixteen valid questionnaires were received including 1,460 (48.41%) from male respondents and 1,556 (51.59%) from female respondents. The high school students in this study showed NSP and LBP rates of 40.8% and 33.1%, respectively, and the prevalence of both influenced by the students grade, use of digital products, and mental status; these factors affected the rates of NSP and LBP to varying degrees. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that Gender, grade, soreness after exercise, PC using habits, tablet use, sitting time after school and academic stress entered the final model of NSP, while the final model of LBP consisted of gender, grade, soreness after exercise, PC using habits, mobile phone use, sitting time after school, academic stress and CES-D score. Conclusions High school students in Shanghai showed high prevalence of NSP and LBP that were closely related to multiple factors. Appropriate interventions should be implemented to reduce the occurrences of NSP and LBP. PMID:24147114

  3. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular head and ...

  4. Neck Swelling (Symptom Checker)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... t serious. Follow this chart if you have any swelling or lumps on your neck. SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS SELF-CARE Begin Here 1. Do you have lumps or swelling on both sides of your neck? No Go to Question 4.* Yes 2. Do you have a fever, sore throat, ...

  5. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a person’s risk of head and neck cancer. Marijuana use. Research suggests that people who have used marijuana may be at higher risk for head and ... head and neck cancer include: Avoiding alcohol Discussing marijuana as a risk factor with your doctor and ...

  6. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePLUS

    American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS History AHNS Leadership Past Presidents In Memory Professionalism & Ethics Find A Specialist Humanitarian Efforts AHNS ...

  7. Melanoma - neck (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    This melanoma on the neck is variously colored with a very darkly pigmented area found centrally. It has irregular ... be larger than 0.5 cm. Prognosis in melanoma is best defined by its depth on resection.

  8. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  9. Clinical impact of radiographic carotid artery involvement in neck metastases from head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Teymoortash, A; Rassow, S; Bohne, F; Wilhelm, T; Hoch, S

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of lymph node metastases involving the carotid artery is controversial. The aim of the present study was to determine the outcomes of head and neck cancer patients with radiographic carotid artery involvement in neck metastases. A total of 27 patients with head and neck cancer and radiologically diagnosed advanced metastases involving the common carotid artery or internal carotid artery were enrolled. All patients underwent a primary or salvage neck dissection and surgical carotid peeling. The oncological outcome and survival of all patients were analyzed. Loco-regional control was observed in 13 of the 27 patients (48.1%). During follow-up, five patients (18.5%) developed second primaries and 11 (40.7%) developed distant metastases. The survival time was poor independent of regional control. The median overall survival was 1.55 years and disease-free survival was 0.71 year. Radiographic carotid artery involvement in neck metastases in head and neck cancer appears to correlate with a poor long-term prognosis, with a high rate of distant metastases despite loco-regional control. PMID:26723499

  10. Crile's neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Silver, Carl E; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2007-11-01

    George Crile, after a long experience with treatment of head and neck cancer and study of a large number of cases, appreciated that these tumors almost always drained through the lymphatic pathways of the neck, rarely metastasized distantly, and were thus theoretically curable by resection of the primary tumor and its lymphatic draining shed. After evaluation of his early failures, he found that a block resection of all of the lymph node-bearing tissue of the neck in addition to resection of the primary tumor was the most effective means of obtaining a cure, particularly in patients with clinical evidence of spread of disease to the neck. Such radical surgery, at the time, was fraught with difficulty because of the lack of blood transfusion, antibiotics, and endotracheal anesthesia, but Crile devised several strategies for combating these obstacles. Crile performed 36 such block resections with a determinate 3-year survival of 75% compared with 19% 3-year survival in patients who had not undergone block resection. The surgical precepts developed by Crile laid the foundation for the effective modern surgical treatment of head and neck cancer. PMID:17828045

  11. US-guided Biopsy of Neck Lesions: The Head and Neck Neuroradiologist's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Learned, Kim O; Lev-Toaff, Anna S; Brake, Bonnie J; Wu, Roseann I; Langer, Jill E; Loevner, Laurie A

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonographically (US) guided percutaneous biopsy of a neck lesion is a cost-effective, safe, and diagnostically effective procedure without radiation exposure. The benefit of real-time visualization of the needle location allows for instantaneous maneuvering of the needle trajectory for safe and accurate tissue sampling with short procedural time. Effective US-guided biopsy requires technical experience, strong clinical acumen, and skillful biopsy technique. A neuroradiologist's knowledge of head and neck anatomy and pathology allows correlation with cross-sectional imaging and enhances the understanding of US imaging evaluation. Familiarity with a spectrum of neck surgeries and reconstructions and expertise in imaging evaluation of the treated neck are invaluable in accurate identification of the target for biopsy in patients with treatment-related altered anatomy using US guidance. After thyroid nodules, the common adult neck masses are lymphadenopathy, head and neck cancer, salivary neoplasms, nerve sheath tumors, and inflammatory and infectious pseudomasses. Diagnostic expertise in the imaging characteristics of these individual pathologic conditions and their differential diagnoses also play an important role in choosing the biopsy technique and in procuring an adequate sample for diagnosis, including material for ancillary laboratory testing. Using an anatomic zone approach, this article illustrates the practical considerations in patient selection, the methodical analysis of preprocedure cross-sectional imaging and its correlation with real-time US evaluation, general principles for optimizing US instrumentation, and biopsy technique. In skillful hands, the versatility and portability of US make it the valuable modality for histologic sampling of superficial head and neck lesions. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:26761538

  12. Head and Neck Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rotenberg, Dov

    1987-01-01

    Tumours of the head and neck show a wide spectrum of natural behaviour ranging from the most benign to the extremely lethal. Investigative techniques are of limited usefulness. History and physical examination are the foundations for diagnosis, though ultimate proof rests on surgical biopsy. The author of this article discusses the more common head and neck neoplasms. He gives brief descriptions of some tumours, highlighting their specific characteristics and their natural behaviour. He also suggests methods of investigation and gives brief overviews of modes of therapy. He discusses advances in management of head and neck neoplasms within the past decade and describes the technique of fine-needle cytologic aspirate. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:21263883

  13. Neck masses in children.

    PubMed

    Turkington, J R A; Paterson, A; Sweeney, L E; Thornbury, G D

    2005-01-01

    Infants and children with neck masses frequently present to the radiologist for further evaluation. The role of the radiologist is to differentiate between conditions using imaging modalities such as ultrasound with colour Doppler, CT and MRI. Where appropriate, the radiologist will also stage lesions for management purposes and aid in guiding aspiration or biopsy. This paper presents a pictorial review of paediatric neck masses and their imaging features. Particular emphasis is applied to the anatomical site of the mass to aid in differential diagnosis. It must be emphasised that the radiological findings should always be interpreted in conjunction with the patient's age, the clinical history and the findings on physical examination. PMID:15673538

  14. Head and neck melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shashanka, R; Smitha, B R

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma appears to be increasing at an alarming rate throughout the world over the past 30-40 years and continues to increase in the United States, Canada, Australia, Asia, and Europe. The behavior of head and neck melanoma is aggressive, and it has an overall poorer prognosis than that of other skin sites. The authors review the published literature and text books, intending to give an overall picture of malignant melanomas of the head and neck and a special emphasis on treatment considerations with controversies in treatment including biopsy, radiation therapy, sentinel node biopsy, and nodal dissection. PMID:22570796

  15. Bilateral neck paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Mumoli, N; Cei, M; Pauletti, M; Ferrito, G; Scazzeri, F

    2009-10-01

    Paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare neoplasms presented as cervical mass, generally bilateral, that arise from chemoreceptors located at the carotid bifurcation (carotid body tumors), along the vagus nerve (vagal paragangliomas), and in the jugular fossa and tympanic cavity (jugulotympanic paragangliomas). They are typically asymptomatic at the beginning, highly vascular, slow-growing and compressing the surrounding anatomic structures. Only radical surgery is the curative treatment for paragangliomas. We present a case of a 62- year-old woman with a diagnosis of bilateral neck paragangliomas where surgical removal was judged burdened by excessive risk because of the size of the tumor. PMID:19622673

  16. The Relationship Between Neck Pain and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Janice; Kajaks, Tara; MacDermid, Joy C.

    2013-01-01

    Neck pain is a significant societal burden due to its high prevalence and healthcare costs. While physical activity can help to manage other forms of chronic musculoskeletal pain, little data exists on the relationship between physical activity and neck pain. The purpose of this study was to compare physical activity levels between individuals with neck pain and healthy controls, and then to relate disability, fear of movement, and pain sensitivity measures to physical activity levels in each of the two participant groups. 21 participants were recruited for each of the two participant groups (n = 42). Data collection included the use of the Neck Disability Index, the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, electrocutaneous (Neurometer® CPT) and pressure stimulation (JTech algometer) for quantitative sensory testing, and 5 days of subjective (Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity) and objective (BioTrainer II) measurements of physical activity. Analysis of Variance and Pearson’s Correlation were used to determine if differences and relationships exist between dependent variables both within and between groups. The results show that individuals with mild neck pain and healthy controls do not differ in subjectively and objectively measured physical activity. While participants with neck pain reported higher neck disability and fear of movement, these factors did not significantly relate to physical activity levels. Perceived activity level was related to pain threshold and tolerance at local neck muscles sites (C2 paraspinal muscle and upper trapezius muscle), whereas measured activity was related to generalized pain sensitivity, as measured at the tibialis anterior muscle site. PMID:24133553

  17. Robotic approaches to the neck.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yoon Woo; Choi, Eun Chang

    2014-06-01

    This article introduces and evaluates the feasibility of robot-assisted neck dissection as well as robot-assisted neck surgery via a modified facelift or retroauricular approach. Robot-assisted neck surgery is feasible compared with conventional techniques and shows a clear cosmetic benefit. PMID:24882801

  18. Understanding selection for long necks in different taxa.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David M; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2012-08-01

    There has been recent discussion about the evolutionary pressures underlying the long necks of extant giraffes and extinct sauropod dinosaurs. Here we summarise these debates and place them in a wider taxonomic context. We consider the evolution of long necks across a wide range of (both living and extinct) taxa and ask whether there has been a common selective factor or whether each case has a separate explanation. We conclude that in most cases long necks can be explained in terms of foraging requirements, and that alternative explanations in terms of sexual selection, thermoregulation and predation pressure are not as well supported. Specifically, in giraffe, tortoises, and perhaps sauropods there is likely to have been selection for high browsing. It the last case there may also have been selection for reaching otherwise inaccessible aquatic plants or for increasing the energetic efficiency of low browsing. For camels, wading birds and ratites, original selection was likely for increased leg length, with correlated selection for a longer neck to allow feeding and drinking at or near substrate level. For fish-eating long-necked birds and plesiosaurs a small head at the end of a long neck allows fast acceleration of the mouth to allow capture of elusive prey. A swan's long neck allows access to benthic vegetation, for vultures the long neck allows reaching deep into a carcass. Geese may be an unusual case where anti-predator vigilance is important, but so may be energetically efficient low browsing. The one group for which we feel unable to draw firm conclusions are the pterosaurs, this is in keeping with the current uncertainty about the biology of this group. Despite foraging emerging as a dominant theme in selection for long necks, for almost every taxonomic group we have identified useful empirical work that would increase understanding of the selective costs and benefits of a long neck. PMID:22171805

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-30

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  20. Jaw Dysfunction Is Associated with Neck Disability and Muscle Tenderness in Subjects with and without Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, A.; Gadotti, I. C.; Armijo-Olivo, S.; Biasotto-Gonzalez, D. A.; Magee, D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Tender points in the neck are common in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). However, the correlation among neck disability, jaw dysfunction, and muscle tenderness in subjects with TMD still needs further investigation. This study investigated the correlation among neck disability, jaw dysfunction, and muscle tenderness in subjects with and without chronic TMD. Participants. Forty females between 19 and 49 years old were included in this study. There were 20 healthy controls and 20 subjects who had chronic TMD and neck disability. Methods. Subjects completed the neck disability index and the limitations of daily functions in TMD questionnaires. Tenderness of the masticatory and cervical muscles was measured using an algometer. Results. The correlation between jaw disability and neck disability was significantly high (r = 0.915, P < 0.05). The correlation between level of muscle tenderness in the masticatory and cervical muscles with jaw dysfunction and neck disability showed fair to moderate correlations (r = 0.320.65). Conclusion. High levels of muscle tenderness in upper trapezius and temporalis muscles correlated with high levels of jaw and neck dysfunction. Moreover, high levels of neck disability correlated with high levels of jaw disability. These findings emphasize the importance of considering the neck and its structures when evaluating and treating patients with TMD. PMID:25883963

  1. Gun shot wound neck.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, L K; Shukul, V K; Sharma, Rahul

    2004-01-01

    All penetrating neck wounds are potentially very dangerous and require emergency treatment. The choice of treatment for the stable patient remains controversial, a number of studies encouraging mandatory surgical exploration and a similar number encourage selective surgical exploration. Knowledge of the physical properties of the penetrating object or weapon can help to determine a treatment plan and predict the risk of injury- All tracheal and esophageal injuries with structural damage should be repaired primarily. A case of Gun Shot Wound Neck was air evacuated to Army Hospital R & R Delhi Cantt in a tracheostomised state. Patient was evaluated in detail, he had trachea esophageal fistula. The management of this case is discussed along with principles of management of war injuries. PMID:23120029

  2. Pediatric Head and Neck Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Qaisi, Mohammed; Eid, Issam

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck malignancies are rare in pediatric patients, and represent 12% of all pediatric malignancies. The incidence for these head and neck tumors is 1.49 cases per 1,000,000 person-years. Among the most common pediatric head and neck malignancies are lymphomas (27%), neural tumors including primitive neurectodermal tumors (23%), thyroid malignancies (21%), soft tissue sarcomas including rhabdomyosarcoma (12%), nasopharyngeal carcinoma, skeletal and odontogenic malignancies including osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and ameloblastic carcinoma. This article presents an overview of pediatric head and neck malignancies with emphasis on diagnosis and management. PMID:26614697

  3. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  4. Bladder neck contracture

    PubMed Central

    Simhan, Jay; Ramirez, Daniel; Morey, Allen F.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder neck contracture (BNC) is a well-described complication of the surgical treatment of benign and malignant prostate conditions. Nevertheless, etiologies of BNC development are highly dependent on the primary treatment modality undertaken with BNC also occurring after pelvic radiation. The treatment options for BNC can range from simple, office-based dilation procedures to more invasive, complex abdomino-perineal reconstructive surgery. Although numerous strategies have been described, a patient-specific approach is usually necessary in the management of these complex patients. In this review, we highlight various therapeutic maneuvers described for the management of BNC and further delineate a tailored approach utilized at our institution in these complicated patients. PMID:26816768

  5. Necking of Q&P steel during uniaxial tensile test with the aid of DIC technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Lin, Jianping; Min, Junying; Pang, Zheng; Ye, You

    2013-05-01

    A lot of research has been focused on the necking process during the plastic deformation of sheet metals, but the localized necking is rarely distinguished form diffused necking by experiments, due to the limit of measurement equipment and method. Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P) steel is a 3rd generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS). Its good combination of high strength and ductility ensures potential application in automobile industry. Uniaxial tensile tests of QP980 steel sheet at five strain rates are performed to investigate the necking process and the effect of strain rate on necking behavior of Q&P steel. Digital image correlation (DIC) method is applied during tensile tests, and evolutions of major strain, minor strain and normal strain distributions along gauge section of the tensile specimens are obtained. The diffused and localized necking strains are determined according to SWIFT necking theory and HILL necking theory respectively. The test results indicate that with the increasing of strain rate in the investigated range, the diffused necking strain decreases from 0.152 to 0.120 and localized necking strain decreases from 0.245 to 0.137. Meanwhile, the difference of the two strains decreases form 0.096 to 0.017. Thus it can be concluded that strain rate has an influence on both necking strains during the deformation of QP980 steel sheet. Diffused and localized necking strains are determined by uniaxial tensile tests with the aid of DIC technique and the effect of strain rate on necking strains is evaluated.

  6. Evolution of neck vertebral shape and neck retraction at the transition to modern turtles: an integrated geometric morphometric approach.

    PubMed

    Werneburg, Ingmar; Wilson, Laura A B; Parr, William C H; Joyce, Walter G

    2015-03-01

    The unique ability of modern turtles to retract their head and neck into the shell through a side-necked (pleurodiran) or hidden-necked (cryptodiran) motion is thought to have evolved independently in crown turtles. The anatomical changes that led to the vertebral shapes of modern turtles, however, are still poorly understood. Here we present comprehensive geometric morphometric analyses that trace turtle vertebral evolution and reconstruct disparity across phylogeny. Disparity of vertebral shape was high at the dawn of turtle evolution and decreased after the modern groups evolved, reflecting a stabilization of morphotypes that correspond to the two retraction modes. Stem turtles, which had a very simple mode of retraction, the lateral head tuck, show increasing flexibility of the neck through evolution towards a pleurodiran-like morphotype. The latter was the precondition for evolving pleurodiran and cryptodiran vertebrae. There is no correlation between the construction of formed articulations in the cervical centra and neck mobility. An increasing mobility between vertebrae, associated with changes in vertebral shape, resulted in a more advanced ability to retract the neck. In this regard, we hypothesize that the lateral tucking retraction of stem turtles was not only the precondition for pleurodiran but also of cryptodiran retraction. For the former, a kink in the middle third of the neck needed to be acquired, whereas for the latter modification was necessary between the eighth cervical vertebra and first thoracic vertebra. Our paper highlights the utility of 3D shape data, analyzed in a phylogenetic framework, to examine the magnitude and mode of evolutionary modifications to vertebral morphology. By reconstructing and visualizing ancestral anatomical shapes, we provide insight into the anatomical features underlying neck retraction mode, which is a salient component of extant turtle classification. PMID:25305281

  7. Cancer in the neck: Evaluation and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.L.; Ballantyne, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of melanoma; Basic principles of radiobiology in head and neck oncology; Head and neck cancer: Radiotherapeutic precepts in the management of the neck; and Morbidity of modified neck dissection.

  8. Analysis of deep tissue hypersensitivity to pressure pain in professional pianists with insidious mechanical neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether pressure pain hyperalgesia is a feature of professional pianists suffering from neck pain as their main playing-related musculoskeletal disorder. Methods Twenty-three active expert pianists, 6 males and 17 females (age: 36 ± 12 years) with insidious neck pain and 23 pianists, 9 males and 14 females (age: 38 ± 10 years) without neck pain the previous year were recruited. A numerical pain rate scale, Neck Disability Index, hand size and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, deltoid muscle, the second metacarpal and the tibialis anterior muscle in a blinded design. Results The results showed that PPT levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the second metacarpal and tibialis anterior muscles (P < 0.05), but not over C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint and deltoid muscle (P > 0.10), in pianists with neck pain as compared to healthy pianists. Pianists with neck pain had a smaller (P < 0.05) hand size (mean: 181.8 ± 11.8) as compared to pianists without neck pain (mean: 188. 6 ± 13.1). PPT over the tibialis anterior muscles was negatively correlated with the intensity of neck pain. Conclusions Our findings revealed pressure pain hypersensitivity over distant non-symptomatic distant points but not over the symptomatic areas in pianists suffering from neck pain. In addition, pianists with neck pain also had smaller hand size than those without neck pain. Future studies are needed to further determine the relevance of these findings in the clinical course of neck pain as playing-related musculoskeletal disorder in professional pianists. PMID:22111912

  9. Tissue eosinophilia in head and neck squamous neoplasia: an update.

    PubMed

    Jain, M; Kasetty, S; Khan, S; Jain, N K

    2014-09-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that play an imperative role in health and disease. They have also been found to be a crucial component of peri- and intratumoral inflammatory infiltrate. Tumor-associated tissue eosinophilia (TATE) has been observed and described in many tumors, including head and neck neoplasia. The process of eosinophil recruitment and its function in tumors has not been exactly defined yet. Correlation of tissue eosinophilia with prognosis has shown variable results ranging from favourable to unfavourable prognosis or even having no influence on patients outcome. Eosinophils are hypothesized to have tumor defensive as well as tumor promotive function. This dichotomous role of tissue eosinophilia with regard to prognosis has also been noted in head and neck neoplasia and premalignancies. So, the present review attempts to discuss TATE and its possible pros and cons in head and neck neoplasia. PMID:25265347

  10. Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12%) to after childbirth (21 and 28%) in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women. PMID:20696633

  11. Age-dependence of power spectral density and fractal dimension of bone mineralized matrix in atomic force microscope topography images: potential correlates of bone tissue age and bone fragility in female femoral neck trabeculae

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Petar; Djuric, Marija; Rakocevic, Zlatko

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in bone nano-structure, the ultimate goal being to reveal the basis of age-related bone fragility. In this study, power spectral density (PSD) data and fractal dimensions of the mineralized bone matrix were extracted from atomic force microscope topography images of the femoral neck trabeculae. The aim was to evaluate age-dependent differences in the mineralized matrix of human bone and to consider whether these advanced nano-descriptors might be linked to decreased bone remodeling observed by some authors and age-related decline in bone mechanical competence. The investigated bone specimens belonged to a group of young adult women (n = 5, age: 20–40 years) and a group of elderly women (n = 5, age: 70–95 years) without bone diseases. PSD graphs showed the roughness density distribution in relation to spatial frequency. In all cases, there was a fairly linear decrease in magnitude of the power spectra with increasing spatial frequencies. The PSD slope was steeper in elderly individuals (−2.374 vs. −2.066), suggesting the dominance of larger surface morphological features. Fractal dimension of the mineralized bone matrix showed a significant negative trend with advanced age, declining from 2.467 in young individuals to 2.313 in the elderly (r = 0.65, P = 0.04). Higher fractal dimension in young women reflects domination of smaller mineral grains, which is compatible with the more freshly remodeled structure. In contrast, the surface patterns in elderly individuals were indicative of older tissue age. Lower roughness and reduced structural complexity (decreased fractal dimension) of the interfibrillar bone matrix in the elderly suggest a decline in bone toughness, which explains why aged bone is more brittle and prone to fractures. PMID:22946475

  12. Head and Neck International Group (HNIG)

    Cancer.gov

    The Head and Neck International Group was established in 2014 with the mission to promote and conduct high quality head and neck cancer clinical trials worldwide to improve outcomes in patients diagnosed with these diseases.

  13. New Modelling of Localized Necking in Sheet Metal Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, José Divo

    2011-01-01

    Present work examines a new mathematical model to predict the onset of localized necking in the industrial processes of sheet metal forming such as biaxial stretching. Sheet metal formability is usually assessed experimentally by testing such as the Nakajima test to obtain the Forming Limit Curve, FLC, which is an essential material parameter necessary to numerical simulations by FEM. The Forming Limit Diagram or "Forming Principal Strain Map" shows the experimental FLC which is the plot of principal true strains in the sheet metal surface, ɛ1 and ɛ2, occurring at critical points obtained in laboratory formability tests or in the fabrication process. Two types of undesirable rupture mechanisms can occur in sheet metal forming products: localized necking and shear induced fracture. Therefore, two kinds of limit strain curves can be plotted: the local necking limit curve FLC-N and the shear fracture limit curve FLC-S. Localized necking is theoretically anticipated to initiate at a thickness defect ƒin = hib/hia inside the grooved sheet thickness hia, but only at the instability point of maximum load. The inception of grooving on the sheet surface evolves from instability point to localized necking and final rupture, during further sheet metal straining. Work hardening law is defined for a strain and strain rate material by the effective stress σ¯ = σo(1+βɛ¯)n???ɛM. The average experimental hardening law curve for tensile tests at 0°, 45° and 90°, assuming isotropic plasticity, was used to analyze the plasticity behavior during the biaxial stretching of sheet metals. Theoretical predicted curves of local necking limits are plotted in the positive quadrant of FPSM for different defect values ƒin and plasticity parameters. Limit strains are obtained from a software developed by the author. Some experimental results of forming limit curve obtained from experiments for IF steel sheets are compared with the theoretical predicted curves: the correlation is good.

  14. Trial of Postoperative Radiation, Cisplatin, and Panitumumab in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-14

    Cancer of Head; Cancer of Head and Neck; Cancer of Neck; Cancer of the Head; Cancer of the Head and Neck; Cancer of the Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Head Cancer; Head Neoplasms; Head, Neck Neoplasms; Neck Cancer; Neck Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Head; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Neoplasms, Neck; Neoplasms, Upper Aerodigestive Tract; UADT Neoplasms; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Neoplasms

  15. Neck Circumference May Be a Better Alternative to Standard Anthropometric Measures.

    PubMed

    Joshipura, Kaumudi; Muñoz-Torres, Francisco; Vergara, José; Palacios, Cristina; Pérez, Cynthia M

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates neck circumference as a metabolic risk marker. Overweight/obese, nondiabetic Hispanics, 40-65 years old, who are free of major cardiovascular diseases, were recruited for the San Juan Overweight Adults Longitudinal Study (SOALS). Baseline exams were completed by 1,206 participants. Partial correlation coefficients (r) and logistic models adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, and physical activity were computed. Neck circumference was significantly correlated with waist circumference (r = 0.64), BMI (r = 0.66), and body fat % (r = 0.45). Neck circumference, highest (compared to lowest) tertile, had higher association with prediabetes: multivariable OR = 2.30 (95% CI: 1.71-3.06) compared to waist circumference OR = 1.97 (95% CI: 1.48-2.66) and other anthropometric measures. Neck circumference showed higher associations with HOMA, low HDL-C, and triglycerides, multivariable OR = 8.42 (95% CI: 5.43-13.06), 2.41 (95% CI: 1.80-3.21), and 1.52 (95% CI: 1.14-2.03), but weaker associations with hs-CRP and hypertension, OR = 3.61 (95% CI: 2.66-4.90) and OR = 2.58 (95% CI: 1.90-3.49), compared to waist circumference. AIC for model fit was generally similar for neck or waist circumference. Neck circumference showed similar or better associations with metabolic factors and is more practicable than waist circumference. Hence, neck circumference may be a better alternative to waist circumference. PMID:26981543

  16. Multiple venous aneurysms of neck

    PubMed Central

    Swaika, Sweta; Basu, Sudipta; Bhadra, Ram C.; Maitra, Sujay

    2013-01-01

    Venous aneurysm of neck is a rare anomaly, usually presenting as a painless mass which increases in size on valsalva maneuver. A child with multiple aneurysms of the right common facial and external jugular veins diagnosed on Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance venography is reported. PMID:23599580

  17. Electrodeposited Nickel Reinforces Outlet Neck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Theodore C.; Larosa, William D.

    1990-01-01

    Selective plating with nickel used to reinforce outlet-neck assembly of combustion chamber of rocket engine. Plating cell built around part to be plated to enforce correct flow of plating solution. Provides relatively cheap way of thickening metal in affected regions to reduce stresses to acceptable levels.

  18. Treatment of advanced neck metastases

    PubMed Central

    Spriano, G; Pellini, R; Manciocco, V; Ruscito, P

    2006-01-01

    Summary Despite the use of aggressive single or multimodality treatment protocols, patients with advanced cervical metastases, N2 and N3, have a poor prognosis because of their high risk of regional and distal failure. Moreover, N3 class does not allow resectability and curability to be defined. Numerous trials have been carried out in order to improve the oncological outcomes of patients with advanced metastases to the neck using a variety of multimodality therapy. At present, there is a trend toward the use of a definitive radiochemotherapy followed, or not, by neck dissection. In order to offer a panoramic view of the treatment protocols in use, data available in the literature, regarding the management of advanced neck disease using surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, in different associations, have been reviewed and our experience reported. The presence of advanced cervical metastases is a very poor prognostic factor. The combined treatment modality offers better chances of cure than single modality treatment. Surgery followed by radiotherapy or chemo-radiation therapy is an effective and well standardized approach. The use of planned neck dissection following chemoradiation is still debated. PMID:17633156

  19. The Tip of the Iceberg: Clinical Implications of Genomic Sequencing Projects in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Ludwig, Megan L.; Meraj, Taha S.; Brenner, J. Chad; Prince, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genomic sequencing studies have provided valuable insight into genetic aberrations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite these great advances, certain hurdles exist in translating genomic findings to clinical care. Further correlation of genetic findings to clinical outcomes, additional analyses of subgroups of head and neck cancers and follow-up investigation into genetic heterogeneity are needed. While the development of targeted therapy trials is of key importance, numerous challenges exist in establishing and optimizing such programs. This review discusses potential upcoming steps for further genetic evaluation of head and neck cancers and implementation of genetic findings into precision medicine trials. PMID:26506389

  20. Material aspects of dynamic neck retardation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Z.; Vaziri, A.; Hutchinson, J. W.

    Neck retardation in stretching of ductile materials is promoted by strain hardening, strain-rate hardening and inertia. Retardation is usually beneficial because necking is often the precursor to ductile failure. The interaction of material behavior and inertia in necking retardation is complicated, in part, because necking is highly nonlinear but also because the mathematical character of the response changes in a fundamental way from rate-independent necking to rate-dependent necking, whether due to material constitutive behavior or to inertia. For rate-dependent behavior, neck development requires the introduction of an imperfection, and the rate of neck growth in the early stages is closely tied to the imperfection amplitude. When inertia is important, multiple necks form. In contrast, for rate-independent materials deformed quasi-statically, single necks are preferred and they can emerge in an imperfection-free specimen as a bifurcation at a critical strain. In this paper, the interaction of material properties and inertia in determining neck retardation is unraveled using a variety of analysis methods for thin sheets and plates undergoing plane strain extension. Dimensionless parameters are identified, as are the regimes in which they play an important role.

  1. The Relationship between Neck Pain and Cervical Alignment in Young Female Nursing Staff

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jang-Hun; Kim, Joo Han; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kwon, Taek-Hyun; Park, Yoon-Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Degenerative changes in the cervical spine are commonly accompanied by cervical kyphosis which can cause neck pain. This study examined the relationship between neck pain and cervical alignment. Methods A total of 323 female nursing staff from our hospital were enrolled. Sagittal radiographs of the cervical spine, Body Mass Index (BMI), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) measures of neck and arm pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI) and the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36 scores) were obtained and reviewed retrospectively. Global lordosis (GL) of the cervical spine was measured on radiograph images. Correlations between GL and questionnaire scores were investigated using the following three methods : 1) correlation between GL and questionnaire scores among the entire sample; 2) subgroup analysis of patients with "kyphosis (KYP) : GL scores<0" vs. those with "lordosis (LOR) : GL scores>0" on questionnaire measures; and 3) subgroup analysis of patients with pain vs. those without pain, on GL and questionnaire measures. Results There was no significant correlation between GL and any questionnaire measure. There was a significant difference between the mean GLs of the KYP and LOR groups, but there were no group differences in BMI, age or any questionnaire measures. There was no difference between the pain (n=92) and pain-free (n=231) groups in age, BMI or GL, but there were differences in neck, and arm pain, and physical function and NDI scores. Conclusions Our data suggest that kyphotic deformity was not associated with neck pain. PMID:26539266

  2. Immunotherapy With MK-3475 in Surgically Resectable Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Cancer of Head and Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Head and Neck

  3. A historical prospective cohort study of carotid artery stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Paul D. . E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Foote, Robert L.; McLaughlin, Mark P.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Ballman, Karla V.; Collie, A. Craig; Miller, Robert C.; Flemming, Kelly D.; Hallett, John W.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To determine carotid artery stenosis incidence after radiotherapy for head-and-neck neoplasms. Methods and Materials: This historical prospective cohort study comprised 44 head-and-neck cancer survivors who received unilateral neck radiotherapy between 1974 and 1999. They underwent bilateral carotid duplex ultrasonography to detect carotid artery stenosis. Results: The incidence of significant carotid stenosis (8 of 44 [18%]) in the irradiated neck was higher than that in the contralateral unirradiated neck (3 of 44 [7%]), although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.13). The rate of significant carotid stenosis events increased as the time after radiotherapy increased. The risk of ipsilateral carotid artery stenosis was higher in patients who had undergone a neck dissection vs. those who had not. Patients with significant ipsilateral stenosis also tended to be older than those without significant stenosis. No other patient or treatment variables correlated with risk of carotid artery stenosis. Conclusions: For long-term survivors after neck dissection and irradiation, especially those who are symptomatic, ultrasonographic carotid artery screening should be considered.

  4. Quantitation of intracranial aneurysm neck size from diagnostic angiograms based on a biomathematical model.

    PubMed

    Hademenos, G J; Massoud, T F; Viñuela, F

    1995-10-01

    Accurate measurement of the aneurysm neck size from diagnostic angiograms is crucial in the consideration and implementation of interventional embolotherapeutic procedures. Due to inherent problems in angiography, aneurysm morphology and location, and obstruction by overlying structures, accurate measurement of the aneurysm neck size is difficult. We are proposing a method for the angiographic measurement of aneurysm neck size based on a biomathematical model of an aneurysm. A biomathematical model of an intracranial saccular aneurysm was developed based on Laplace's law for a spherical elastic object, given by: Stress = Pressure x Radius/2 x Wall thickness. In addition, another biomechanical parameter used to describe an elastic sphere is the strain: Strain = delta R/Ri = (R-Ri)/Ri where R is the current aneurysm radius and Ri is the initial radius prior to aneurysm development. The stress and strain of an elastic structure are used to describe the elastic modulus, E: E = stress/strain = [PR/2h]/[(R-Ri)/Ri] = [PRRi]/[2hR-2hri]. It is assumed at this point that no additional tissue growth occurs through the developmental course of the aneurysm. The expression for E is now solved for Ri which, in essence, represents the radius of the aneurysm neck: Ri = [2hER]/[PR + 2hE]. Thus, the diameter of the neck, Dn, is given by Dn = 2 + i = 2 ([2hER]/[PR + 2hE]). During diagnostic angiography, the radius, R, and pressure, P, are easily obtained during the examination procedure. However, it is not possible to angiographically determine the elastic modulus, E, and the wall thickness, h. In this case, the following average values are used: E = 1.0 MPa and h = 50 microns. From the diagnostic angiograms and hospital records of 23 patients, the aneurysm neck size was determined using the biomathematical model and compared to the results obtained from the correlative relationship between the measured and accepted ratios of neck size to diameter of parent artery. The neck diameter as measured from the accepted ratios of neck size to parent artery diameter for the 23 patients ranged from 1.5 mm to 8.7 mm. The angiographically measured neck sizes were in excellent agreement with those obtained from the biomathematical model, particularly for the wide-necked aneurysms, as evidenced by the fact that all but two chi 2 values were < 1.0. We have described a simple yet accurate method for obtaining aneurysm neck size measurements from diagnostic angiograms using a biomathematical model. The model requires knowledge of only the aneurysm radius and blood pressure and becomes particularly important in characterizing wide-necked aneurysms. PMID:8584121

  5. Head and neck position sense.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Bridget; McNair, Peter; Taylor, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic minor cervical strains are common place in high-impact sports (e.g. tackling) and premature degenerative changes have been documented in sports people exposed to recurrent impact trauma (e.g. scrummaging in rugby) or repetitive forces (e.g. Formula 1 racing drivers, jockeys). While proprioceptive exercises have been an integral part of rehabilitation of injuries in the lower limb, they have not featured as prominently in the treatment of cervical injuries. However, head and neck position sense (HNPS) testing and re-training may have relevance in the management of minor sports-related neck injuries, and play a role in reducing the incidence of ongoing pain and problems with function. For efficacious programmes to be developed and tested, fundamental principles associated with proprioception in the cervical spine should be considered. Hence, this article highlights the importance of anatomical structures in the cervical spine responsible for position sense, and how their interaction with the CNS affects our ability to plan and execute effective purposeful movements. This article includes a review of studies examining position sense in subjects with and without pathology and describes the effects of rehabilitation programmes that have sought to improve position sense. In respect to the receptors providing proprioceptive information for the CNS, the high densities and complex arrays of spindles found in cervical muscles suggest that these receptors play a key role. There is some evidence suggesting that ensemble encoding of discharge patterns from muscle spindles is relayed to the CNS and that a pattern recognition system is used to establish joint position and movement. Sensory information from neck proprioceptive receptors is processed in tandem with information from the vestibular system. There are extensive anatomical connections between neck proprioceptive inputs and vestibular inputs. If positional information from the vestibular system is inaccurate or fails to be appropriately integrated in the CNS, errors in head position may occur, resulting in an inaccurate reference for HNPS, and conversely if neck proprioceptive information is inaccurate, then control of head position may be affected. The cerebellum and cortex also play a role in control of head position, providing feed-forward and modulatory influences depending on the task requirements. Position-matching tasks have been the most popular means of testing position sense in the cervical spine. These allow the appreciation of absolute, constant and variable errors in positioning and have been shown to be reliable. The results of such tests indicate that errors are relatively low (2-5 degrees). It is apparent that error is not consistently affected by age, a finding similar to studies undertaken in peripheral joints. Furthermore, the range of motion in which subjects are tested does not consistently affect accuracy in a predictable manner. However, it is evident that impairments in position sense are observed in individuals who have experienced whiplash-type injuries and individuals with chronic head and neck pain of non-traumatic origin (e.g. cervical spondylosis). While researchers advocate comprehensive retraining protocols, which include eye and neck motion targeting tasks and coordination exercises, as well as co-contraction exercises to reduce such impairments, some studies show that more general exercises and manipulation may be of benefit. Overall, there is limited information concerning the efficacy of treatment programmes. PMID:18201114

  6. Neck pain: manipulating the upper back helps lessen pain and improve neck motion.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Neck pain is very common. In the United States, between 30% and 50% of people suffer from an aching neck each year. Although neck pain can be caused by injury, most of this pain results from more gradual stresses, such as particular sitting, standing, or work postures, lifting patterns, or sleeping positions. Typical neck pain can also cause headaches, pain between your shoulders, or a feeling of knots in your neck and upper back muscles. Although manual therapy, sometimes called "manipulation," is a common treatment for many types of spine pain, some people are uncomfortable having their necks manipulated. Recently, though, researchers have tested the benefits of a thrust manipulation of the upper back to treat neck pain. A study published in the September 2011 issue of JOSPT provides new insight and an evidence-based summary of the benefits of manipulating the upper back to ease and eliminate neck pain. PMID:21885905

  7. LONG-TERM RESULTS OF BODY AND NECK TALUS FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Gomes de Sousa, Ricardo Jorge; Teixeira de Oliveira Massada, Marta Maria; Gonçalves Pereira, Manuel Alexandre Negrais Pinho; Gonçalves Costa, Isabel Maria; da Costa e Castro, José Fernando Souzellas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Talar neck and body fractures are unusual fractures. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of long term results. Material and Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out including 11 patients that underwent surgical treatment for body or neck talus fractures between January 1997 and December 2005. Final follow-up examination included a clinical evaluation (AOFAS score) and standard radiographs. Results: The mean follow-up time was 58.5 months. The prevalence of associated fractures was 60% (6/10). Overall AOFAS score averaged 72 [19-100]. Avascular necrosis and post-traumatic arthritis were present in half of the patients. Quality of surgical reduction, body fractures and absence of degenerative changes were correlated with better functional results. Neck fractures, osteonecrosis and posttraumatic arthritis led to inferior results. Conclusion: There is a great potential for long term functional impairment due to posttraumatic arthritis and chronic pain in this kind of fracture. Anatomic surgical reduction is the best chance to avoid them but it is not infallible. The avascular necrosis rate correlates with initial fracture displacement, but its occurrence in each specific case is unpredictable.

  8. Anatomic Variations in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bien-Keem; Wong, Chin-Ho; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck reconstruction is a technically challenging procedure. Variations encountered in the recipient vessels and commonly used flaps add to the complexity of surgery. This article reviews the commonly encountered variations in the recipient vessels in the neck with emphasis on alternatives and techniques to circumvent these variations. Flaps commonly used in head and neck reconstruction are also reviewed in detail. Furthermore, safety, potential pitfalls, and technical pearls are highlighted. PMID:22550436

  9. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Mukunth, R; Srivastava, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU) femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the Pubmed search with the keywords NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture. A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a) treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG), (b) closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c) open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d) miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective), classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu's staging) neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90% cases. However, in stage III with or without AVN, the results of osteosynthesis are poor and the choice of treatment is replacement arthroplasty (hemi or total). PMID:25593354

  10. Embolization of the neck lymphatic varix, causing periodic neck swelling.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Anthony K; Pukenas, Brian A; Yan, Yan; Newman, Jason G; Itkin, Maxim

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 44-year-old female patient, presented to us after years of recurrent intermittent episodes of unilateral left neck swelling. An MR lymphangiogram demonstrated a lymphatic varix at the confluence of the left upper extremity lymphatic ducts, confirmed by intranodal axillary lymphangiography. After successful catheterization of the feeding lymphatic vessels, the varix was successfully embolized with detachable microcoils and an autologous blood patch. The patient has been free from symptoms on subsequent outpatient follow-up. PMID:24352865

  11. Direct and remote constriction of membrane necks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Božič, Bojan; Guven, Jemal; Vázquez-Montejo, Pablo; Svetina, Saša

    2014-05-01

    The physical properties of membrane necks are relevant in vesiculation, a process that plays an essential role in cellular physiology. Because the neck's radius is, in general, finite, membrane scission and the consequent pinching off of the vesicle can only occur if it is narrowed to permit the necessary membrane topological reformation. Here we examine, in a simple single phase lipid vesicle, how external forces can promote neck constriction not only by direct compression at the neck but also, counterintuitively, by dilation at remote locations. These results provide a new perspective on the role played by actin polymerization in the process of endocytosis.

  12. Objective classification of different head and neck positions and their influence on the radiographic pharyngeal diameter in sport horses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Various head and neck positions in sport horses are significant as they can interfere with upper airway flow mechanics during exercise. Until now, research has focused on subjectively described head and neck positions. The objective of this study was to develop an objective, reproducible method for quantifying head and neck positions accurately. Results Determining the angle between the ridge of the nose and the horizontal plane (ground angle) together with the angle between the ridge of nose and the line connecting the neck and the withers (withers angle) has provided values that allow precise identification of three preselected head and neck positions for performing sport horses. The pharyngeal diameter, determined on lateral radiographs of 35 horses, differed significantly between the established flexed position and the remaining two head and neck positions (extended and neutral). There was a significant correlation between the pharyngeal diameter and the ground angle (Spearmans rank correlation coefficient ?0.769, p?correlation coefficient 0.774, p?neck positions in sport horses. The ground angle and the withers angle show significant correlation with the measured pharyngeal diameter in resting horses. Hence, these angles provide an appropriate method for assessing the degree of head and neck flexion. Further research is required to examine the influence of increasing head and neck flexion and the related pharyngeal diameter on upper airway function in exercising horses. PMID:24886564

  13. Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  14. Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Main Content Are ... Being Treated With Radiation for Cancer in Your Head or Neck? If so, this booklet can help you. While ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  16. General Information about Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  17. Stages of Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Home Page Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Metastatic Cancer For general cancer information and ... YYYY>. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/patient/metastatic-squamous-neck-treatment-pdq . Accessed

  18. Current philosophy in the surgical management of neck metastases for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Coskun, H Hakan; Medina, Jesus E; Robbins, K Thomas; Silver, Carl E; Strojan, Primo; Teymoortash, Afshin; Pellitteri, Phillip K; Rodrigo, Juan P; Stoeckli, Sandro J; Shaha, Ashok R; Surez, Carlos; Hartl, Dana M; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P; Hamoir, Marc; Pitman, Karen T; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2015-06-01

    Neck dissection is an important treatment for metastases from upper aerodigestive carcinoma; an event that markedly reduces survival. Since its inception, the philosophy of the procedure has undergone significant change from one of radicalism to the current conservative approach. Furthermore, nonsurgical modalities have been introduced, and, in many situations, have supplanted neck surgery. The refinements of imaging the neck based on the concept of neck level involvement has encouraged new philosophies to evolve that seem to benefit patient outcomes particularly as this relates to diminished morbidity. The purpose of this review was to highlight the new paradigms for surgical removal of neck metastases using an evidence-based approach. PMID:24623715

  19. Preventing head and neck injury.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport. PMID:15911597

  20. Preventable Sternocleidomastoid Muscular Atrophy after Neck Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Nao; Sawai, Natsuko Yoshimura; Ishimoto, Shunsuke; Ogura, Hide; Aikawa, Tomonao; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modified radical neck dissection (mRND) [preserving the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) and the spinal accessory nerve] and supraomohyoid neck dissection have become common surgical procedures for treating head and neck cancer. Postoperative severe asymmetry of the neck and severe atrophy of the SCM, however, have been demonstrated. Methods: Using computed tomographic images, cross-sectional areas of the SCMs were measured in 99 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity who underwent unilateral mRND or supraomohyoid neck dissection. An asymmetry index was used. Results: Innervation to the SCM was preserved in 91 patients. The spinal accessory nerve and the innervation were sacrificed in 3 patients; the innervation was repaired in 5 patients. Sacrifice of innervation to the SCM resulted in extremely severe asymmetry. Repair of the innervation prevented severe asymmetry in 40%. Preservation of the innervation prevented severe asymmetry in 75% at the middle portion of the neck and in 56% at the lower portion after mRND. Conclusion: Preserving innervation to the SCM and gentle handling of the nerve during neck dissection could prevent severe asymmetry after neck dissection. PMID:26495217

  1. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  2. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  3. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  4. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  5. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  6. Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Most head and neck cancers begin in the moist, mucus membranes lining the inside of the mouth, nose and throat. These membranes are made up of squamous cells and the head and neck cancers that grow in these cells are called squamous cell carcinomas.

  7. Anthropomorphic dummy neck modeling and injury considerations.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y C

    1989-02-01

    This study investigates the modeling of the Hybrid III dummy head and neck system and its response under impulsive loading. Two neck models were proposed, one rigid, one flexible; both give satisfactory head kinematics upon comparing to minisled test results. The flexible neck model provides a more detailed understanding of the Hybrid III neck structure behavior. It indicates that the Hybrid III neck has a torque response similar to a human neck but has higher shear response. During flexion whiplash, the torque at the occipital condyle reverses its direction at about 25 ms after impact. Since concussion may be related to the head angular acceleration, which reaches its peak value in the first 25 ms, it might be necessary to extend the existing human torque-rotation corridor to include the neck response in this region. For flexion whiplash impact, simulation results indicated that the neck injury threshold is reached before exceeding the head injury threshold as the impact velocity is increased. PMID:2930623

  8. Effects of neck flexion on contingent negative variation and anticipatory postural control during arm movement while standing.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Tomita, Hidehito; Maeda, Kaoru; Kunita, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the effects of neck flexion on contingent negative variation (CNV) and anticipatory postural control using an arm flexion task in standing. CNV was adopted to evaluate the state of activation of brain areas related to anticipatory postural control. Subjects were required to flex the arms in response to a sound stimulus preceded by a warning sound stimulus. Two different intervals (2.0 and 3.5s) between these two stimuli were used in neck position in quiet standing (neck resting) and neck position at 80% angle of maximal neck flexion. The mean amplitude of CNV 100-ms before the response stimulus, recorded from a Cz electrode, was calculated. Onset timing of activation of the postural muscles (lumbar paraspinal, biceps femoris and gastrocnemius) with respect to the anterior deltoid was analyzed. Reaction time at the anterior deltoid was significantly shorter in the 2.0s period than in the 3.5s period, and in the neck flexion than in the neck resting in both periods. In the 2.0s, but not in the 3.5s period, neck flexion resulted in an increased CNV amplitude and an increased duration of preceding activation of the postural muscles, and the correlation between these increases was significant. PMID:17884580

  9. ADC biomarker for head and neck tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Bravo, Irlanda; Hidalgo-Tobon, Silvia; Zaragoza, Kena; Reynoso-Noverón, Nancy; De Celis-Alonso, Benito; Delgado-Hernandez, Rosa

    2014-11-01

    According to the World Cancer Report, by 2020, global incidence of cancer may increase by 50%, which means 15 million new cases. In 2000, malignant tumors were the cause of 12% of the almost 56 million deaths worldwide due to all causes[1-4]. 18 men and 19 women, with an average age of 53 ± 14 years with diagnosis of head and neck cancer were scanned using a 1.5-T MR imaging unit (Signa HDxt; GE Medical Systems). Echo-planar DW imaging was performed in the transverse plane before the contrast material injection. Three b values were applied: 40, 100, and 800 sec/mm2. Primary tumors and nodes were evaluated, with diameters greater than 43 ± 15mm. In our study, ADC data for b-values of 40 showed correlation for identification of malignancy in primary tumors, and in the case of nodes there is a tendency toward malignancy in sequences in which a b-value of 800 is used.

  10. A pain in the neck

    PubMed Central

    Minns, Tania; Raj, Ray; Clark, Kate

    2011-01-01

    A 21-year-old man presented to the emergency department with pain and swelling to the right side of his neck and chest wall with associated shortness of breath. Two days earlier, while playing football, he had been involved in a minor collision with another player where he was struck on the right side of his head, but had managed to continue playing. On examination, the patient had extensive cervical surgical emphysema. There were no further positive findings on respiratory and general examination. A chest x-ray demonstrated no rib or clavicular fractures and no pneumothorax. Therefore, a CT was undertaken to ascertain the cause of the surgical emphysema. This demonstrated a pneumomediastinum, pneumopericardium and extradural air in the spinal column in addition to the subcutaneous air. The CT identified no bony trauma and no other injuries. The symptoms resolved spontaneously and follow-up radiography, 9 days later, showed no residual air. PMID:22675022

  11. A pain in the neck.

    PubMed

    Minns, Tania; Raj, Ray; Clark, Kate

    2011-01-01

    A 21-year-old man presented to the emergency department with pain and swelling to the right side of his neck and chest wall with associated shortness of breath. Two days earlier, while playing football, he had been involved in a minor collision with another player where he was struck on the right side of his head, but had managed to continue playing. On examination, the patient had extensive cervical surgical emphysema. There were no further positive findings on respiratory and general examination. A chest x-ray demonstrated no rib or clavicular fractures and no pneumothorax. Therefore, a CT was undertaken to ascertain the cause of the surgical emphysema. This demonstrated a pneumomediastinum, pneumopericardium and extradural air in the spinal column in addition to the subcutaneous air. The CT identified no bony trauma and no other injuries. The symptoms resolved spontaneously and follow-up radiography, 9 days later, showed no residual air. PMID:22675022

  12. Neck Circumference May Be a Better Alternative to Standard Anthropometric Measures

    PubMed Central

    Joshipura, Kaumudi; Muñoz-Torres, Francisco; Vergara, José; Palacios, Cristina; Pérez, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates neck circumference as a metabolic risk marker. Overweight/obese, nondiabetic Hispanics, 40–65 years old, who are free of major cardiovascular diseases, were recruited for the San Juan Overweight Adults Longitudinal Study (SOALS). Baseline exams were completed by 1,206 participants. Partial correlation coefficients (r) and logistic models adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, and physical activity were computed. Neck circumference was significantly correlated with waist circumference (r = 0.64), BMI (r = 0.66), and body fat % (r = 0.45). Neck circumference, highest (compared to lowest) tertile, had higher association with prediabetes: multivariable OR = 2.30 (95% CI: 1.71–3.06) compared to waist circumference OR = 1.97 (95% CI: 1.48–2.66) and other anthropometric measures. Neck circumference showed higher associations with HOMA, low HDL-C, and triglycerides, multivariable OR = 8.42 (95% CI: 5.43–13.06), 2.41 (95% CI: 1.80–3.21), and 1.52 (95% CI: 1.14–2.03), but weaker associations with hs-CRP and hypertension, OR = 3.61 (95% CI: 2.66–4.90) and OR = 2.58 (95% CI: 1.90–3.49), compared to waist circumference. AIC for model fit was generally similar for neck or waist circumference. Neck circumference showed similar or better associations with metabolic factors and is more practicable than waist circumference. Hence, neck circumference may be a better alternative to waist circumference. PMID:26981543

  13. ES2 neck injury assessment reference values for lateral loading in side facing seats.

    PubMed

    Philippens, M; Wismans, J; Forbes, P A; Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A; Soltis, S J

    2009-11-01

    Injury assessment reference values (IARV) predicting neck injuries are currently not available for side facing seated aircraft passengers in crash conditions. The aircraft impact scenario results in inertial loading of the head and neck, a condition known to be inherently different from common automotive side impact conditions as crash pulse and seating configurations are different. The objective of this study is to develop these IARV for the European Side Impact Dummy-2 (ES-2) previously selected by the US-FAA as the most suitable ATD for evaluating side facing aircraft seats. The development of the IARV is an extended analysis of previously published PMHS neck loads by identifying the most likely injury scenarios, comparing head-neck kinematics and neck loads of the ES2 versus PMHS, and development of injury risk curves for the ES2. The ES2 showed a similar kinematic response as the PMHS, particularly during the loading phase. The ES2 exhibited a stiffer response than the PMHS in the thoracic region, resulting in a faster rebound and smaller excursions in the vertical direction. Neck loads were consistent with results from previous authors and served as the basis for the ES2 neck injury risk curve developed here. Regression analysis of the previously published PMHS neck loads indicated that the tension force at the occipital condyles was the only neck load component with a significant correlation (Pearson r2 = 0.9158) to AIS3+ classified injuries. Tension force in the ES2 upper neck showed a weaker but still significant correlation with injury severity (r2 = 0.72) and is proposed to be used as an IARV with a tolerance of 2094 N for 50% AIS3+ risk. Although the prime focus of this study is on loading conditions typical in an aircraft crash environment, it is expected that the proposed IARV's can be used as an extension of typical automotive conditions, particularly for military vehicles and public transport applications where side facing upright seating configurations are more common. PMID:20058563

  14. The spine neck filters membrane potentials

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto; Jiang, Jiang; Eisenthal, Kenneth B.; Yuste, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic spines receive most synaptic inputs in the forebrain. Their morphology, with a spine head isolated from the dendrite by a slender neck, indicates a potential role in isolating inputs. Indeed, biochemical compartmentalization occurs at spine heads because of the diffusional bottleneck created by the spine neck. Here we investigate whether the spine neck also isolates inputs electrically. Using two-photon uncaging of glutamate on spine heads from mouse layer-5 neocortical pyramidal cells, we find that the amplitude of uncaging potentials at the soma is inversely proportional to neck length. This effect is strong and independent of the position of the spine in the dendritic tree and size of the spine head. Moreover, spines with long necks are electrically silent at the soma, although their heads are activated by the uncaging event, as determined with calcium imaging. Finally, second harmonic measurements of membrane potential reveal an attenuation of somatic voltages into the spine head, an attenuation directly proportional to neck length. We conclude that the spine neck plays an electrical role in the transmission of membrane potentials, isolating synapses electrically. PMID:17093040

  15. Determine the effect of neck muscle fatigue on dynamic visual acuity in healthy young adults

    PubMed Central

    Al Saif, Amer A.; Al Senany, Samira

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine whether neck muscle fatigue affects dynamic visual acuity in healthy young participants. [Subjects and Methods] This study was a double-blinded, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Thirty healthy young subjects (ages 21 to 30?years) participated in the study. Participants were randomly divided into an experimental group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). The experimental group performed an exercise designed to induce neck muscle fatigue and the control group preformed non-fatiguing sham exercises. [Results] There were significant differences in mean dynamic visual acuity between the two groups (0.260.11 LogMar versus 0.0030.02 LogMar). Subjects in the experimental group showed a significant decline in their dynamic visual acuity compared with the control group. Dynamic visual acuity strongly correlated with neck muscle fatigue (r = 0.79). No significant differences in joint position error were observed between the two groups and no significant correlations between joint position error and neck muscle fatigue were observed (r = 0.23). [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that neck muscle fatigue negatively impacts dynamic visual acuity. Although not statistically significant, cervical spine proprioception as measured by the joint position error in the experimental group was diminished after fatigue. PMID:25642087

  16. Cancers of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, C.

    1987-01-01

    The information in this text demonstrates the marked progress being made in the treatment of head and neck cancer, diseases which are among the most morbid in all medicine. New and promising surgical and radiotherapeutic techniques are discussed, including brachytherapy, hyperthermia, laser therapy and nuclear magnetic resonance. The timing of chemotherapy and the future rate of biologic modifiers and immune therapy are included. Innovative and creative surgical techniques geared towards improving the quality of life for head and neck patients are described. A final section of the volume covers other management problems including rhabdomyosarcoma and lymphomas of extranodal head and neck sites.

  17. Timely management of penetrating neck trauma: Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Kamil Hakan; Koç, Arzu Karaman; Uzut, Mahmut; Altintaş, Ahmet; Yeğin, Yakup; Sayın, İbrahim; Kayhan, Fatma Tülin

    2013-01-01

    In head and neck surgery, penetrating neck injuries are uncommon. The neck contains many important structures, so such trauma can cause significant morbidity and mortality. A patient with penetrating neck trauma should be examined promptly in the emergency room. If possible, damaged tissue and organ fragments should be preserved carefully. PMID:24339665

  18. Neck pain or spasms - self care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of physical therapy, you may receive massage and stretching exercises along with exercises to strengthen your neck. ... improve flexibility A complete exercise program should include: Stretching and strength training: Follow the instructions of your ...

  19. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. [Rhabdomyosarcoma of the neck in adults].

    PubMed

    Fernndez Prez, A; Moreno Len, J A; Fernndez-Nogueras Jimnez, F; Rub Ura, J

    1999-04-01

    The clinical case of a 59-year-old male with neck rhabdomyosarcoma is reported. The literature is reviewed for the epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of this infrequent sarcoma. PMID:10362865

  1. Aging small Canada geese by neck plumage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, K.F.; Schoonover, L.J.

    1969-01-01

    The neck plumage method, a new technique for separating immature from adult Canada geese (Branta canadensis) in the hand, was evaluated by comparison with the notched tail feather and cloacal examination methods. Two (1.4 percent) of 141 geese examined were misaged, resulting in a 6 percent error in the immature-adult ratio obtained by the neck plumage method. The neck plumage method is a rapid aging method and reasonable accuracy (94 percent) can be obtained. It can also be used to differentiate immatures from adults on the ground at distances up to 175 yards, but was almost impossible to use when geese were in flight. As yet, the neck plumage method has only been tested on the subspecies (B. c. hutchinsii-parvipes complex) in the Tall-Grass Prairie population of small Canada geese.

  2. Synergistic Approaches to Neck Rejuvenation and Lifting.

    PubMed

    Weinkle, Allison P; Sofen, Bryan; Emer, Jason

    2015-11-01

    There is an increasing trend shifting the aesthetic focus downward from the face with a significant number of new treatments aimed at the aging neck and below. Clinical characteristics of neck youth include clear skin texture and tone without laxity or fat, in addition to a well-defined cervicomental angle and distinct mandibular border. Similarly to treating facial aging, the neck requires a comprehensive assessment of all factors involved in the aging process--loss of volume, increased skin laxity, worsening texture and clarity, and crepe skin/wrinkling--as each requires a combination approach for improvement. It is essential to address each above factors for more than minimal improvement. A multitude of options including neuromodulators, energy based devices, surgery, and injectable agents for fat reduction are available in our armamentarium and understanding these options solo, or ideally in combination, is essential for best practice and optimal results. Herein, we describe synergic approaches to the treatment of neck aging. PMID:26580870

  3. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Zika & Pregnancy: What to Know Signing Kids Up ... neck X-ray by explaining the test in simple terms before the procedure. It may help to ...

  4. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sensor of the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor... My is the moment measured in lbs-ft by the “Y” axis moment sensor of the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor (Channel Class 600) of the six axis...

  5. Postoperative hypertension after radical neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Celikkanat, S; Akyol, M U; Ko, C; Oler, S; Ensari, S; Turgut, S; Ozdem, C

    1997-07-01

    Postoperative hypertension after radical neck dissection was detected in 20.2% of 109 neck dissections in our department between 1989 and 1993. It was probably caused by carotid sinus denervation and appeared after the vasodilation generated by anesthesia had subsided. If postoperative hypertension was encountered after the first operation, the risk of such hypertension after surgery on the contralateral side significantly increased. PMID:9230330

  6. Musculocutaneous flaps in head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A. G.

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of musculocutaneous flaps to head and neck reconstructive surgery is described. The flaps available are listed, and the most important ones described and illustrated. Both the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major flaps are felt to have a role in head and neck reconstruction, though they have largely been superseded by microvascular free flaps such as the radial forearm flap. Images fig. 1 fig. 2 fig. 3 fig. 4 fig. 5 fig. 6 fig. 7 fig. 8 PMID:2686511

  7. Head and Neck Cancer: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Stepnick, David; Gilpin, David

    2010-01-01

    Ablative surgery for malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract is the most common reason why the reconstructive surgeon is called upon to reconstruct adult head and neck defects. An understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of head and neck malignancy is vital to the reconstructive surgeon so that restoration of both form and function can be achieved. It is important to understand the behavior of cancers of each head and neck subsite, as staging and ultimately the treatment of tumors from each subsite is different. Historically, the standard treatment of head and neck cancer was surgery and/or primary radiation therapy with surgical salvage for failure. Beginning in the 1980s, advances in chemotherapy and concurrent delivery with radiation offered new options to standard surgical therapy. Over the past two decades, the concept of organ preservation using chemotherapy together with radiation therapy has been definitively established. Yet, even with the strides made over these two decades with chemoradiation, surgical treatment of head and neck cancer and reconstruction thereof will be an important treatment option for the foreseeable future. Therefore, the relationship between the extirpative and reconstructive surgeon is vital, and a clear understanding of the biology and behavior of head and neck malignancy is crucial to successful patient outcomes. PMID:22550431

  8. Sharp neck injuries in suicidal intention.

    PubMed

    Bitry, Damien; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis; Mller, Thomas; Zbren, Peter; Caversaccio, Marco; Arnold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Sharp neck injuries in suicidal intention often present as serious emergency situations with the need for an immediate diagnosis and treatment. We report our study of the clinical evolution of this emergency condition. This study investigates the cases of sharp neck injuries in suicidal intention treated at our institution between 2000 and 2010. Patient records were collected in a retrospectively reviewed and analyzed database. The current literature was compared to our findings. We found 36 cases (10 female and 26 male). The neck injuries were superficial and profound in 16 and 20 patients, respectively. Twenty-two patients were seen by the Head and Neck surgeon. A surgical neck exploration was necessary in 19 cases. Tracheal, laryngeal, pharyngeal and vascular injuries were found in one, five, three and three cases, respectively. The hospital stay ranged from 1 to 47days. All the patients underwent emergency psychiatric assessment and were subsequently referred for psychiatric treatment. One patient died in the emergency room from an additional arterial injury to the wrist. Sharp neck injuries in suicidal intention treated with an interdisciplinary medical, surgical and psychiatric emergency assessment and treatment have low mortality and morbidity. PMID:25543307

  9. Neck strength: a protective factor reducing risk for concussion in high school sports.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christy L; Fletcher, Erica N; Fields, Sarah K; Kluchurosky, Lisa; Rohrkemper, Mary Kay; Comstock, R Dawn; Cantu, Robert C

    2014-10-01

    As the number of high school students participating in athletics continues to increase, so will the number of sports-related concussions unless effective concussion prevention programs are developed. We sought to develop and validate a cost-effective tool to measure neck strength in a high school setting, conduct a feasibility study to determine if the developed tool could be reliably applied by certified athletic trainers (ATs) in a high school setting, and conduct a pilot study to determine if anthropometric measurements captured by ATs can predict concussion risk. In the study's first phase, 16 adult subjects underwent repeated neck strength testing by a group of five ATs to validate the developed hand-held tension scale, a cost effective alternative to a hand-held dynamometer. In the second phase, during the 2010 and 2011 academic years, ATs from 51 high schools in 25 states captured pre-season anthropometric measurements for 6,704 high school athletes in boys' and girls' soccer, basketball, and lacrosse, as well as reported concussion incidence and athletic exposure data. We found high correlations between neck strength measurements taken with the developed tool and a hand-held dynamometer and the measurements taken by five ATs. Smaller mean neck circumference, smaller mean neck to head circumference ratio, and weaker mean overall neck strength were significantly associated with concussion. Overall neck strength (p < 0.001), gender (p < 0.001), and sport (p = 0.007) were significant predictors of concussions in unadjusted models. After adjusting for gender and sport, overall neck strength remained a significant predictor of concussion (p = 0.004). For every one pound increase in neck strength, odds of concussion decreased by 5 % (OR = 0.95, 95 % CI 0.92-0.98). We conclude that identifying differences in overall neck strength may be useful in developing a screening tool to determine which high school athletes are at higher risk of concussion. Once identified, these athletes could be targeted for concussion prevention programs. PMID:24930131

  10. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the neck].

    PubMed

    Kovaci?, Marijan; Kovaci?, Ivan; Delalija, Boris

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and rapidly progressive infection characterized by necrosis of the superficial fascia and spread on the surrounding skin or muscles, which can be fatal. It usually occurs in the limbs, abdominal wall and perineum. In this retrospective review, the authors present 15 patients with cervical necrotizing fasciitis. The patient mean age was 54.7 years and they had one or more comorbid health problems. Five of them had descending necrotizing mediastinitis and three had progressive sepsis with toxic shock syndrome. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotic therapy was administered to all patients immediately, and in three of them we used five-day intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for the signs of toxic shock syndrome. After positive computed tomography imaging for necrotizing fasciitis, we used surgical exploration and debridement of necrotic tissue. In five patients, the initial surgery also included mediastinal transcervical drainage. Preoperative tracheotomy was performed in six patients and delayed tracheotomy in one patient. Histopathologically, all cases showed extensive necrosis of debrided fascia and vascular thrombosis of the neck soft tissue. The mortality rate was 6.7% (1/15). The authors point to the importance of early diagnosis and timely surgical management, broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy when patients are too unstable to undergo surgery. PMID:24279256

  11. Lessons learned from next-generation sequencing in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loyo, Myriam; Li, Ryan J.; Bettegowda, Chetan; Pickering, Curtis R.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Agrawal, Nishant

    2013-01-01

    Scientific innovation has enabled whole exome capture and massively parallel sequencing of cancer genomes. In head and neck cancer, next-generation sequencing has granted us further understanding of the mutational spectrum of squamous cell carcinoma. As a result of these new technologies, frequently occurring mutations were identified in NOTCH1, a gene that had not previously been implicated in head and neck cancer. The current review describes the most common mutations in head and neck cancer: TP53, NOTCH1, HRAS, PIK3CA, and CDKN2A. Emphasis is placed on the involved cellular pathways, clinical correlations, and potential therapeutic interventions. Additionally, the implications of human papillomavirus on mutation patterns are discussed. PMID:22907887

  12. Femoral neck shortening after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Stephanie M; Keijsers, Noël L; Praet, Stephan F E; Heetveld, Martin J; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2013-07-01

    This study assesses femoral neck shortening and its effect on gait pattern and muscle strength in patients with femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation. Seventy-six patients from a multicenter randomized controlled trial participated. Patient characteristics and Short Form 12 and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were collected. Femoral neck shortening, gait parameters, and maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured and differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Variables of patients with little or no shortening, moderate shortening, and severe shortening were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Median femoral neck shortening was 1.1 cm. Subtle changes in gait pattern, reduced gait velocity, and reduced abductor muscle strength were observed. Age, weight, and Pauwels classification were risk factors for femoral neck shortening. Femoral neck shortening decreased gait velocity and seemed to impair gait symmetry and physical functioning. In conclusion, internal fixation of femoral neck fractures results in permanent physical limitations. The relatively young and healthy patients in our study seem capable of compensating. Attention should be paid to femoral neck shortening and proper correction with a heel lift, as inadequate correction may cause physical complaints and influence outcome. PMID:23823040

  13. MRI of cerebrum and cervical columna within two days after whiplash neck sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Borchgrevink, G; Smevik, O; Haave, I; Haraldseth, O; Nordby, A; Lereim, I

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate if MRI within 2 days of a motor vehicle accident could reveal pathology of importance for understanding long-term disability after whiplash neck-sprain injuries. As part of a prospective study cervical and cerebral MRI was performed on 40 neck sprain patients with whiplash injury after car accidents. The imaging was done within 2 days of the injury to make sure that any neck muscle bleeding, oedema or other soft tissue injuries could be detected. The MRI findings from the patients were both correlated to reported symptoms 6 months after the accident and compared to a control group of 20 volunteers. The MRI of both brain and neck revealed no significant differences between the patients and the control group. When the patients were grouped according to the main MRI findings at intake and compared according to the development of subjective symptoms reported by the patients, the only significant difference was more headaches at 6 months in the groups with disk pathology or spondylosis when compared to the group with no pathology. In conclusion, MRI within 2 days of the whiplash neck-sprain injury could not detect pathology connected to the injury nor predict symptom development and outcome. PMID:9764227

  14. Treatment of Neck Pain: Noninvasive Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Carragee, Eugene J.; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Carroll, Linda J.; Nordin, Margareta; Guzman, Jaime; Peloso, Paul M.; Holm, Lena W.; Ct, Pierre; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Cassidy, J. David; Haldeman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Study Design. Best evidence synthesis. Objective. To identify, critically appraise, and synthesize literature from 1980 through 2006 on noninvasive interventions for neck pain and its associated disorders. Summary of Background Data. No comprehensive systematic literature reviews have been published on interventions for neck pain and its associated disorders in the past decade. Methods. We systematically searched Medline and screened for relevance literature published from 1980 through 2006 on the use, effectiveness, and safety of noninvasive interventions for neck pain and associated disorders. Consensus decisions were made about the scientific merit of each article; those judged to have adequate internal validity were included in our best evidence synthesis. Results. Of the 359 invasive and noninvasive intervention articles deemed relevant, 170 (47%) were accepted as scientifically admissible, and 139 of these related to noninvasive interventions (including health care utilization, costs, and safety). For whiplash-associated disorders, there is evidence that educational videos, mobilization, and exercises appear more beneficial than usual care or physical modalities. For other neck pain, the evidence suggests that manual and supervised exercise interventions, low-level laser therapy, and perhaps acupuncture are more effective than no treatment, sham, or alternative interventions; however, none of the active treatments was clearly superior to any other in either the short-or long-term. For both whiplash-associated disorders and other neck pain without radicular symptoms, interventions that focused on regaining function as soon as possible are relatively more effective than interventions that do not have such a focus. Conclusion. Our best evidence synthesis suggests that therapies involving manual therapy and exercise are more effective than alternative strategies for patients with neck pain; this was also true of therapies which include educational interventions addressing self-efficacy. Future efforts should focus on the study of noninvasive interventions for patients with radicular symptoms and on the design and evaluation of neck pain prevention strategies.

  15. Modelling fluid accumulation in the neck using simple baseline fluid metrics: implications for sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Vena, Daniel; Yadollahi, A; Bradley, T Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common respiratory disorder among adults. Recently we have shown that sedentary lifestyle causes an increase in diurnal leg fluid volume (LFV), which can shift into the neck at night when lying down to sleep and increase OSA severity. The purpose of this work was to investigate various metrics that represent baseline fluid retention in the legs and examine their correlation with neck fluid volume (NFV) and to develop a robust model for predicting fluid accumulation in the neck. In 13 healthy awake non-obese men, LFV and NFV were recorded continuously and simultaneously while standing for 5 minutes and then lying supine for 90 minutes. Simple regression was used to examine correlations between baseline LFV, baseline neck circumference (NC) and change in LFV with the outcome variables: change in NC (ΔNC) and in NFV (ΔNFV90) after lying supine for 90 minutes. An exhaustive grid search was implemented to find combinations of input variables which best modeled outcomes. We found strong positive correlations between baseline LFV (supine and standing) and ΔNFV90. Models developed for predicting ΔNFV90 included baseline standing LFV, baseline NC combined with change in LFV after lying supine for 90 minutes. These correlations and the developed models suggest that a greater baseline LFV might contribute to increased fluid accumulation in the neck. These results give more evidence that sedentary lifestyle might play a role in the pathogenesis of OSA by increasing the baseline LFV. The best models for predicting ΔNC include baseline LFV and NC; they improved accuracies of estimating ΔNC over individual predictors, suggesting that a combination of baseline fluid metrics is a good predictor of the change in NC while lying supine. Future work is aimed at adding additional baseline demographic features to improve model accuracy and eventually use it as a screening tool to predict severity of OSA prior to sleep. PMID:25569948

  16. Neck Rejuvenation with Fractional CO2 Laser

    PubMed Central

    Oram, Yasemin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of 10,600nm fractional CO2 laser for neck aging at one month and one year after treatment. Design/Setting/Participants/Measurement: Twenty patients underwent 10,600nm fractional CO2 laser treatment over the entire neck. Clinical features of the patients were classified according to Baker classification. The degrees of skin laxity, jowling, fat deposition, and horizontal neck lines were evaluated using a 9-point scale, prior to treatment at one month and one year after the treatment. The patients were independently assessed by the authors at two different times in a blinded fashion. Results: Skin laxity, jowling, fat deposition, and horizontal neck lines scores were significantly lower than the baseline values at one month and one year. One-year follow-up values of the same parameters were still significantly lower than the baseline. No persistent complication developed after treatment. Conclusion: The results of this study confirm that fractional CO2 neck rejuvenation is an effective treatment option with long-term efficacy for patients who mainly have skin laxity and jowling together with skin surface pigmentation. PMID:25161757

  17. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. PMID:26488776

  18. Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Shyh-An

    2010-01-01

    Treatment for patients with head and neck cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach. Radiotherapy is employed as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant to surgery. Each specific subsite dictates the appropriate radiotherapy techniques, fields, dose, and fractionation scheme. Quality of life is also an important issue in the management of head and neck cancer. The radiation-related complications have a tremendous impact on the quality of life. Modern radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy, can offer precise radiation delivery and reduce the dose to the surrounding normal tissues without compromise of target coverage. In the future, efforts should be made in the exploration of novel strategies to improve treatment outcome in patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:22550433

  19. The prognostic value of cyclin D1 expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gioacchini, Federico M; Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Kaleci, Shaniko; Magliulo, Giuseppe; Presutti, Livio; Re, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The correlation between cyclin D1 overexpression and the clinical outcome of head and neck cancer is not defined. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the prognostic value of cyclin D1 in patients with head and neck cancer. A search thorough Ovid MEDLINE was performed to enroll all eligible articles. Twenty-two studies comprising a total of 1,929 patients with different head and neck cancers were included. Cyclin D1 overexpression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis [OR 2.25; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.76-2.87] and worse disease-free survival (OR 3.06; 95 % CI 2.42-3.87]. Subgroup analysis revealed that cyclin D1 overexpression correlated significantly with nodal metastasis for laryngeal cancer (OR 2.26; 95 % CI 1.61-3.16) and was a significant poor predictor for nasopharyngeal cancer (OR 4.44; 95 % CI 1.89-10.42). Our meta-analysis suggests that cyclin D1 overexpression could represent an important prognostic indicator for patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:25516222

  20. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture. PMID:26696712

  1. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture. PMID:26696712

  2. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Thariat, Juliette; Ahamad, Anesa; Williams, Michelle D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Rosenthal, David I.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2012-03-01

    Background: This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. Methods: Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox's proportional hazard model. Results: Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients, of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p < 0.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. Conclusions: With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge.

  3. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thariat, Juliette; Ang, K. Kian; Allen, Pamela K.; Ahamad, Anesa; Williams, Michelle D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Rosenthal, David I.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Morrison, William H.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation, and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. METHODS Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox analyses. RESULTS Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p <.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. CONCLUSIONS With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge. PMID:22284033

  4. Facial palsy after neck arteriovenous fistula embolization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lim, Sang Chul; Kim, Tae Sun

    2015-09-01

    Facial palsy after embolization of neck arteriovenous fistula is an extremely rare complication. In our case, complete facial palsy occurred after embolization and was successfully treated with superficial parotidectomy, vessel ligation, and plug removal. We report the first case of unusual facial palsy that developed 13 days after neck arteriovenous fistula embolization. As a result of our findings, we recommend, when a patient suffers from acute ipsilateral facial palsy after arteriovenous fistula embolization, the clinician should consider the possibility of complications of embolization, and immediate and appropriate management should be performed. PMID:26154368

  5. Approach to intensely enhancing neck nodes

    PubMed Central

    Karandikar, Amit; Gummalla, Krishna Mohan; Loke, Siu Cheng; Goh, Julian; Tan, Tiong Yong

    2016-01-01

    Cervical node evaluation is one of the most common problems encountered by a radiologist. Here, we present a pictorial review of intensely enhancing neck nodes. While enhancement in a cervical node is a common radiologic finding on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan, only few conditions cause intense enhancement in cervical nodes. We discuss the common causes of intensely enhancing neck nodes along with pertinent radiologic features and key differentiating points that aid radiologists in reaching a diagnosis. In addition, we discuss certain potential non-nodal mimics, which need to be excluded. PMID:26782154

  6. Hyperparathyroidism following head and neck irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.D.; Frame, B.; Miller, M.J.; Kleerskoper, M.; Block, M.A.; Parfitt, A.M.

    1980-02-01

    A history of head and neck irradiation in childhood or adolescence was found in 22 of 130 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism compared with only 12 of 400 control patients. Among 200 patients with a known history of childhood irradiation, biochemical or surgical evidence of hyperparathyroidism was found in ten, a prevalence of 5%. This is at least 30 times the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism in the general population. The data indicate that head and neck irradiation should be regarded as an important risk factor in the subsequent development of hyperparathyroidism.

  7. [Unusual suicide by mechanical neck compression].

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Sven

    2008-01-01

    A 36-year-old man was found dead with his neck being jammed between the hydraulic tail lift and the side wall of a truck. Based on the investigations, the technical facilities of the tail lift, the results of the postmortem examination and the autopsy it could be demonstrated that the victim, who suffered drom depression, had intentionally brought himself into this position and committed suicide by compression of the neck. The pathomorphological findings and the technical reconstruction of this unusual death are presented. PMID:18389864

  8. Comfort effects of a new car headrest with neck support.

    PubMed

    Franz, M; Durt, A; Zenk, R; Desmet, P M A

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a neck-/headrest to increase car comfort. Two studies were undertaken to create a new comfortable headrest with neck support. In experiment one, neck- and headrest data were gathered using 35 test subjects. The pressure distribution, stiffness of the foam material and position of the head and neck support were determined. In experiment two a full adjustable final headrest with adjustable neck support was constructed and tested with 12 subjects using a new adjustable headrest under virtual reality driving conditions. Experiment two showed that the headrest with the new/adjustable neck support was favoured by the majority of the subjects. 83% were satisfied with the stiffness of the material. 92% were satisfied with the size of the neck- and headrest. All subjects mentioned that the neck support is a comfort benefit in calm traffic conditions or on the motorway. PMID:21944482

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... Reviewed January 2015 What is head and neck squamous cell carcinoma? Squamous cell carcinoma is a cancer that arises ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma On this page: Description Genetic ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed January 2015 What is head and neck squamous cell carcinoma? Squamous cell carcinoma is a ...

  11. Complete corset platysmaplasty: evolution of addressing the aging neck.

    PubMed

    LaFerriere, Keith A; Paik, Young S

    2014-08-01

    Various techniques have been used to address the aging changes of the neck. This article reviews this evolution and describes the complete corset platysmaplasty procedure as the choice for optimal improvements in neck rejuvenation, especially when dealing with a "difficult neck." Evaluation and treatment of the aging neck must always be individualized and when the complete corset platysmaplasty is performed for those that are candidates, our experience shows greater immediate as well as long term satisfaction with less recurrence. PMID:25076451

  12. Evidence of a hypermineralised calcified fibrocartilage on the human femoral neck and lesser trochanter

    PubMed Central

    SHEA, J. E.; VAJDA, E. G.; BLOEBAUM, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    Femoral neck fractures are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly humans. In addition to the age-related loss of cancellous bone, changes to the microstructure and morphology of the metaphyseal cortex may be a contributing factor in osteoporotic hip fractures. Recent investigations have identified a hypermineralised tissue on the neck of the femur and trochanteric region that increases in fractional area with advancing age in both males (Boyce & Bloebaum, 1993) and females (Vajda & Bloebaum, 1999). The aim of this study was to determine if the hypermineralised tissue previously observed on the proximal femur is calcified fibrocartilage. Regional variations in the fractional area of hypermineralised tissue, cortical bone, and porosity of the cortical bone along the neck of the femur and lesser trochanter were also quantified. Comparison of back scattered electron and light microscope images of the same area show that regions of hypermineralised tissue correlate with the regions of calcified fibrocartilage from tendon and capsular insertions. The hypermineralised tissue and calcified fibrocartilage had similar morphological features such as the interdigitations of the calcified fibrocartilage into the bone, lacunar spaces, and distinctly shaped pores adjacent to the 2 tissues. Regions of the neck that did not contain insertions were covered with periosteum. There were no regional differences (P > 0.05) on the superior and inferior femoral neck in terms of the percentage area of hypermineralised calcified fibrocartilage, cortical bone, or cortical bone porosity. The lesser trochanter exhibited regional differences in the fractional area of hypermineralised calcified fibrocartilage (P = 0.007) and cortical bone (P = 0.007) but not porosity of the cortical bone (P > 0.05). The effects of calcified fibrocartilage on femoral neck periosteal expansion, repair, and mechanics are unknown, but may play a role in osteoporotic fractures and intracapsular fracture healing. PMID:11273040

  13. Muscle Function, Dynamic Loading, and Femoral Neck Structure in Pediatric Females

    PubMed Central

    Dowthwaite, Jodi N.; Rosenbaum, Paula F.; Sames, Carol A.; Scerpella, Tamara A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Muscle forces influence development of bone mass and structure, but dynamic loading via impact exercise is considered particularly osteogenic. We hypothesized that indices of local muscle function AND physical activity exposure would predict femoral neck structure in pre-menarcheal females. Methods We tested this hypothesis in 76 healthy, pre-menarcheal girls (46 gymnasts, 30 non-gymnasts). Height, weight, Tanner breast stage (TB) and prior year non-aquatic, organized physical activity (PAL) were recorded semi-annually. Hologic DXA scans (whole body, left femoral neck (FN)) yielded total body non-bone lean mass and bone outcomes, including narrow neck (NN) hip structural analysis data. Dynamometers assessed non-dominant hand grip (GR) and left hip flexion/extension indices. Parsimonious regression models tested the following as predictors of bone outcomes: local muscle function, PAL, gymnast status and lean mass, accounting for Tanner breast stage and height, as appropriate. Results Hip flexion indices were significantly correlated with indices of femoral neck mass, density, structure and strength (p<0.05). However, entry of PAL, gymnast status and lean mass into regression models supplanted local muscle function explanatory value. In contrast, for many variables, the significant association of gymnast status persisted after accounting for physical maturity, body size/lean mass and PAL. For all skeletal indices except FNArea, NNwidth, NN endosteal diameter and NN buckling ratio, gymnast status was more strongly associated with bone outcomes than PAL. Conclusion Greater activity doses and exposure to extreme dynamic loading provide independent benefits to femoral neck structure during growth. Furthermore, weight-bearing activity and high-impact exercise exposure appear superior to local muscle force measures for prediction of femoral neck structure. PMID:24743106

  14. The relationship between survival and socio-economic status for head and neck cancer in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papilloma virus (HPV) is emerging as the primary cause for some head and neck cancers. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between head and neck cancer (HNC) survival and socioeconomic status (SES) in Canada, and to investigate changes in the relationship between HNC survival and SES from 1992 to 2005. Methods Cases were drawn from the Canadian Cancer Registry (1992–2005), and were categorized into three subsites: oropharynx, oral cavity, and “other” (hypopharynx, larynx, and nasopharynx). Demographic and socioeconomic information were extracted from the Canadian Census of Population data for the study period, which included three census years: 1991, 1996 and 2001. We linked cases to income quintiles (InQs) according to patients’ postal codes. Results Overall survival, without controlling for smoking, for oropharyngeal cancer increased dramatically from 1992–2005 in Canada. This increase in survival for oropharynx cancer was eliminated by the introduction of controls for smoking. Survival for all head and neck cancer subsites was strongly correlated with SES, as measured by income quintile, with lower InQ’s having lower survival than higher. Lastly, the magnitude of the difference in survival between the highest and lowest income quintiles increased significantly over the time period studied for oropharynx cancer, but did not statistically significantly change for oral cavity cancer or other head and neck cancers. Conclusions These data confirm a significant impact of socioeconomic deprivation on overall survival for head and neck cancers in Canada, and may provide indirect evidence that HPV-positive head and neck cancers are more common in higher socioeconomic groups. PMID:24422754

  15. Micromotions at the taper interface between stem and neck adapter of a bimodular hip prosthesis during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Jauch, Sabrina Yvonne; Huber, Gerd; Sellenschloh, Kay; Haschke, Henning; Baxmann, Marc; Grupp, Thomas M; Morlock, Michael M

    2013-08-01

    The stem-neck taper interface of bimodular hip endoprostheses bears the risk of micromotions that can result in ongoing corrosion due to removal of the passive layer and ultimately cause implant fracture. We investigated the extent of micromotions at the stem-neck interface and the seating behavior of necks of one design made from different alloys during daily activities. Modular hip prostheses (n?=?36, Metha, Aesculap AG, Germany) with neck adapters (CoCr29Mo6 or Ti6Al4V) were embedded in PMMA (ISO 7206-4) and exposed to cyclic loading with peak loads ranging from walking (Fmax ?=?2.3?kN) to stumbling (Fmax ?=?5.3?kN). Translational and rotational micromotions at the taper interface and seating characteristics during assembly and loading were determined using four eddy-current sensors. Seating during loading after implant assembly was dependent on load magnitude but not on material coupling. Micromotions in the stem-neck interface correlated positively with load levels (CoCr: 2.6-6.3?m, Ti: 4.6-13.8?m; p?neck adapters exhibiting significantly larger micromotions than CoCr (p?

  16. Neck circumference as a new anthropometric indicator for prediction of insulin resistance and components of metabolic syndrome in adolescents: Brazilian Metabolic Syndrome Study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Cleliani de Cassia; Zambon, Mariana Porto; Vasques, Ana Carolina J.; Rodrigues, Ana Maria de B.; Camilo, Daniella Fernandes; Antonio, Maria Ângela R. de G. M.; Cassani, Roberta Soares L.; Geloneze, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation between neck circumference and insulin resistance and components of metabolic syndrome in adolescents with different adiposity levels and pubertal stages, as well as to determine the usefulness of neck circumference to predict insulin resistance in adolescents. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 388 adolescents of both genders from ten to 19 years old. The adolescents underwent anthropometric and body composition assessment, including neck and waist circumferences, and biochemical evaluation. The pubertal stage was obtained by self-assessment, and the blood pressure, by auscultation. Insulin resistance was evaluated by the Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance. The correlation between two variables was evaluated by partial correlation coefficient adjusted for the percentage of body fat and pubertal stage. The performance of neck circumference to identify insulin resistance was tested by Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve. RESULTS: After the adjustment for percentage body fat and pubertal stage, neck circumference correlated with waist circumference, blood pressure, triglycerides and markers of insulin resistance in both genders. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the neck circumference is a useful tool for the detection of insulin resistance and changes in the indicators of metabolic syndrome in adolescents. The easiness of application and low cost of this measure may allow its use in Public Health services. PMID:25119754

  17. Neck injury tolerance under inertial loads in side impacts.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Andrew S; Kallieris, Dimitrios; Frechede, Bertrand

    2007-03-01

    Neck injury remains a major issue in road safety. Current side impact dummies and side impact crashworthiness assessments do not assess the risk of neck injury. These assessments are limited by biofidelity and knowledge regarding neck injury criteria and tolerance levels in side impacts. Side impact tests with PMHS were performed at the Heidelberg University in the 1980s and 1990s to improve primarily the understanding of trunk dynamics, injury mechanisms and criteria. In order to contribute to the definition of human tolerances at neck level, this study presents an analysis of the head/neck biomechanical parameters that were measured in these tests and their relationship to neck injury severity. Data from 15 impact tests were analysed. Head accelerations, and neck forces and moments were calculated from 9-accelerometer array head data, X-rays and anthropometric data. Statistically significant relationships were observed between resultant head acceleration and neck force and neck injury severity. The average resultant head acceleration for AIS 2 neck injuries was 112 g, while resultant neck force was 4925 N and moment 241 Nm. The data compared well to other test data on cadavers and volunteers. It is hoped that the paper will assist in the understanding of neck injuries and the development of tolerance criteria. PMID:17049471

  18. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  19. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  20. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  1. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  2. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  3. Neck proprioceptors contribute to the modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity to the lower limbs of humans.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P S; Hammam, E; Macefield, V G

    2014-07-01

    Several different strategies have now been used to demonstrate that the vestibular system can modulate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in humans and thereby contribute to the regulation of blood pressure during changes in posture. However, it remains to be determined how the brain differentiates between head-only movements that do not require changes in vasomotor tone in the lower limbs from body movements that do require vasomotor changes. We tested the hypothesis that neck movements modulate MSNA in the lower limbs of humans. MSNA was recorded in 10 supine young adult subjects, at rest, during sinusoidal stretching of neck muscles (100 cycles, 35° peak to peak at 0.37 ± 0.02 Hz) and during a ramp-and-hold (17.5° for 54 ± 9 s) static neck muscle stretch, while their heads were held fixed in space. Cross-correlation analysis revealed cyclical modulation of MSNA during sinusoidal neck muscle stretch (modulation index 45.4 ± 5.3 %), which was significantly less than the cardiac modulation of MSNA at rest (78.7 ± 4.2 %). Interestingly, cardiac modulation decreased significantly during sinusoidal neck displacement (63.0 ± 9.3 %). By contrast, there was no significant difference in MSNA activity during static ramp-and-hold displacements of the neck to the right or left compared with that with the head and neck aligned. These data suggest that dynamic, but not static, neck movements can modulate MSNA, presumably via projections of muscle spindle afferents to the vestibular nuclei, and may thus contribute to the regulation of blood pressure during orthostatic challenges. PMID:24691758

  4. International Federation of Head Neck Oncology Society 5th World Congress/American Head Neck Society 2014 update

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shilpi; Chaukar, Devendra A.

    2014-01-01

    Head neck cancer is an important health problem with high morbidity and mortality. Early detection and adequate treatment improve prognosis significantly. Thus creating awareness among clinicians is an important step toward control of head neck cancer and reducing its overall burden. We here provide an update on the International Federation of Head Neck Oncology Society/American Head Neck Society 2014 held between July 26, 2014 and July 30, 2014 in New York. PMID:25336796

  5. Isolated Enteric Cyst in the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Mahore, Amit; Sankhe, Shilpa; Tikeykar, Vishakha

    2014-01-01

    We report an extremely rare case of isolated enteric cyst in the neck region which was diagnosed on the histopathological examination. It was suspected to be duplication cyst on radiology. We have also evaluated the differential diagnosis and management issues. PMID:24868475

  6. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49 CFR 572.33) in either the left or right lateral impact orientations, respectively, so that...

  7. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49 CFR 572.33) in either the left or right lateral impact orientations, respectively, so that...

  8. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49 CFR 572.33) in either the left or right lateral impact orientations, respectively, so that...

  9. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49 CFR 572.33) in either the left or right lateral impact orientations, respectively, so that...

  10. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49 CFR 572.33) in either the left or right lateral impact orientations, respectively, so that...

  11. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Nör, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signaling events are critical for the survival and self-renewal of these stem cells. Markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), CD133, and CD44 have been successfully used to identify highly tumorigenic cancer stem cells in HNSCC. This review briefly describes the orosphere assay, a method for in vitro culture of undifferentiated head and neck cancer stem cells under low attachment conditions. Notably, recent evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are exquisitely resistant to conventional therapy and are the “drivers” of local recurrence and metastatic spread. The emerging understanding of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas might have a profound impact on the treatment paradigms for this malignancy. PMID:21933937

  12. Characterisation of explosive fragments injuring the neck.

    PubMed

    Breeze, J; Leason, J; Gibb, I; Allanson-Bailey, L; Hunt, N; Hepper, A; Spencer, P; Clasper, J

    2013-12-01

    Penetrating explosive fragments are the most common cause of neck injuries sustained by UK service personnel deployed to Afghanistan. Analysis of these fragments will enable future ballistic protective materials to be tested with appropriate projectiles. However, only a small number of fragments excised from the neck have been available for analysis and they are potentially unrepresentative. We analysed computed tomograms (CTs) of 110 consecutive UK soldiers whose necks were wounded by explosive fragments. Fragments were classified according to shape, and their dimensions used to estimate volume and mass. These calculations were then compared with the actual measurements of the excised fragments using a general linear model. The 2 most common shapes were cylinders (52%) and spheres (21%). Known and estimated masses were not significantly different (p=0.64). A fragment-simulating projectile of 0.49 g represented 85% of fragments retained in the neck. CT can accurately delineate the shape and mass of fragments, which increases the number from which the most appropriate simulated projectile can be designed. We think that this methodology should be applied to fragments retained in other parts of the body to enable broader recommendations to be made regarding the testing of ballistic materials used to protect service personnel. PMID:24012051

  13. Disseminated cryptococcosis involving the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Lazzara, Matthew; Joshi, Arjun

    2014-01-01

    A middle-aged patient with HIV presented with very distinctive maculopapular cutaneous lesions involving the face and lymphadenopathy confined to the neck. A diagnosis of disseminated cryptococcosis was made based on pathological analysis of lymph node and skin lesions. PMID:24495975

  14. Neck Circumference as an Anthropometric Measure of Obesity in Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Aswathappa, Jagadamba; Garg, Sumit; Kutty, Karthiyanee; Shankar, Vinutha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Insulin resistance is associated with visceral subcutaneous fat content. Neck circumference (NC) is a marker of upper body subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare NC in diabetics and non-diabetics and to correlate NC with other anthropometric measures. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 350 type 2 diabetics and 350 non-diabetics of >30 years of age. Anthropometric parameters like body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference, and NC were measured. Independent t-test and Pearson's correlation were the tests of significance done to analyze quantitative data. Results: There was positive correlation of NC, BMI, and index of central obesity. The NC in diabetics was significantly higher than in non-diabetics (P < 0.001). NC >36 cm in diabetics and >37 cm in non-diabetics was the best cutoff value to determine subjects with central obesity. Conclusion: The findings indicated that NC may be used both in clinical practice and in epidemiologic studies as a straightforward and reliable index. It is an economical easy to use test with less consumption of time and correlates well with other standard anthropometric parameters. PMID:23378952

  15. Is Planned Neck Dissection Necessary for Head and Neck Cancer After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Min |. E-mail: min-yao@uiowa.edu; Hoffman, Henry T.; Funk, Gerry F. |; Chang, Kristi; Smith, Russell B. |; Tan Huaming; Clamon, Gerald H.; Dornfeld, Ken |; Buatti, John M. |

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine regional control of local regional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), along with the role and selection criteria for neck dissection after IMRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 90 patients with stage N2A or greater HNSCC were treated with definitive IMRT from December 1999 to July 2005. Three clinical target volumes were defined and were treated to 70 to 74 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy, respectively. Neck dissection was performed for selected patients after IMRT. Selection criteria evolved during this period with emphasis on post-IMRT [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in recent years. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 29 months (range, 0.2-74 months). All living patients were followed at least 9 months after completing treatment. Thirteen patients underwent neck dissection after IMRT because of residual lymphadenopathy. Of these, 6 contained residual viable tumor. Three patients with persistent adenopathy did not undergo neck dissection: 2 refused and 1 had lung metastasis. Among the remaining 74 patients who were observed without neck dissection, there was only 1 case of regional failure. Among all 90 patients in this study, the 3-year local and regional control was 96.3% and 95.4%, respectively. Conclusions: Appropriately delivered IMRT has excellent dose coverage for cervical lymph nodes. A high radiation dose can be safely delivered to the abnormal lymph nodes. There is a high complete response rate. Routine planned neck dissection for patients with N2A and higher stage after IMRT is not necessary. Post-IMRT [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is a useful tool in selecting patients appropriate for neck dissection.

  16. Quantitative Ultrasonic Nakagami Imaging of Neck Fibrosis After Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Yoshida, Emi; Cassidy, Richard J.; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Yu, David S.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of ultrasound Nakagami imaging to quantitatively assess radiation-induced neck fibrosis, a common sequela of radiation therapy (RT) to the head and neck. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study, 40 study participants were enrolled and classified into 3 subgroups: (1) a control group of 12 healthy volunteers; (2) an asymptomatic group of 11 patients who had received intensity modulated RT for head and neck cancer and had experienced no neck fibrosis; and (3) a symptomatic group of 17 post-RT patients with neck fibrosis. Each study participant underwent 1 ultrasound study in which scans were performed in the longitudinal orientation of the bilateral neck. Three Nakagami parameters were calculated to quantify radiation-induced tissue injury: Nakagami probability distribution function, shape, and scaling parameters. Physician-based assessments of the neck fibrosis were performed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring scheme, and patient-based fibrosis assessments were rated based on symptoms such as pain and stiffness. Results: Major discrepancies existed between physician-based and patient-based assessments of radiation-induced fibrosis. Significant differences in all Nakagami parameters were observed between the control group and 2 post-RT groups. Moreover, significant differences in Nakagami shape and scaling parameters were observed among asymptomatic and symptomatic groups. Compared with the control group, the average Nakagami shape parameter value increased by 32.1% (P<.001), and the average Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 55.7% (P<.001) for the asymptomatic group, whereas the Nakagami shape parameter increased by 74.1% (P<.001) and the Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 83.5% (P<.001) for the symptomatic group. Conclusions: Ultrasonic Nakagami imaging is a potential quantitative tool to characterize radiation-induced asymptomatic and symptomatic neck fibrosis.

  17. Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Muscle use evoked by exercise was determined by quantifying shifts in signal relaxation times of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Images were collected at rest and after exercise at each of two intensities (moderate and intense) for each of four head movements: 1) extension, 2) flexion, 3) rotation, and 4) lateral flexion. OBJECTIVE. This study examined the intensity and pattern of neck muscle use evoked by various movements of the head. The results will help elucidate the pathophysiology, and thus methods for treating disorders of the cervical musculoskeletal system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in T2 has been shown to indicate muscle use during the activity. The noninvasive nature of magnetic resonance imaging appears to make it an ideal approach for studying the function of the complex neuromuscular system of the neck. METHODS. The extent of T2 increase was examined to gauge how intensely nine different neck muscles or muscle pairs were used in seven subjects. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation was assessed to infer the pattern of use among and within individual neck muscles or muscle pairs. RESULTS. Signal relaxation increased with exercise intensity for each head movement. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation also increased with exercise load. Neck muscles or muscle pairs extensively used to perform each head movement were: extension--semispinalis capitis and cervicis and splenius capitis; flexion--sternocleidomastoid and longus capitis and colli; rotation--splenius capitis, levator scapulae, scalenus, semispinalis capitis ipsilateral to the rotation, and sternocleidomastoid contralateral; and lateral flexion--sternocleidomastoid CONCLUSION. The results of this study, in part, agree with the purported functions of neck muscles derived from anatomic location. This also was true for the few selected muscles that have been examined in human electromyographic studies. Neck muscle function and morphology can be studied at a detailed level using exercise-induced shifts in magnetic resonance images.

  18. Apoptotic cell clearance in chronic inflammation of lateral neck cysts.

    PubMed

    Dobros, Wieslaw; Burda, Karolina; Guzik, Krzysztof; Koziel, Joanna; Potempa, Jan

    2012-03-01

    The mechanism driving accumulation of large numbers of apoptotic and necrotic neutrophils in inflamed lateral neck cysts (LNC), in the absence of infection, remains obscure. The cellular content of cysts obtained from 17 patients was co-cultured with human macrophages. Phagocytosis levels of cyst-derived neutrophils were determined and compared to the uptake of spontaneously apoptotic neutrophils. Simultaneously, the expression of cytokines in macrophages exposed to cyst contents was measured. In comparison to spontaneously apoptotic neutrophils, the phagocytosis of LNC-derived neutrophils by macrophages was inefficient. An inverse correlation between neutrophil content in LNC and their uptake was observed. Macrophages co-cultured with cyst contents responded with variable expression of IL-6, TNF-? and IL-10. The hindered clearance of apoptotic neutrophils in LNC may lead to secondary necrosis of these cells and stimulation of the inflammatory reaction. Together with local production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, this may fuel chronic inflammation in the cysts. PMID:21755330

  19. Why sauropods had long necks; and why giraffes have short necks.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael P; Wedel, Mathew J

    2013-01-01

    The necks of the sauropod dinosaurs reached 15 m in length: six times longer than that of the world record giraffe and five times longer than those of all other terrestrial animals. Several anatomical features enabled this extreme elongation, including: absolutely large body size and quadrupedal stance providing a stable platform for a long neck; a small, light head that did not orally process food; cervical vertebrae that were both numerous and individually elongate; an efficient air-sac-based respiratory system; and distinctive cervical architecture. Relevant features of sauropod cervical vertebrae include: pneumatic chambers that enabled the bone to be positioned in a mechanically efficient way within the envelope; and muscular attachments of varying importance to the neural spines, epipophyses and cervical ribs. Other long-necked tetrapods lacked important features of sauropods, preventing the evolution of longer necks: for example, giraffes have relatively small torsos and large, heavy heads, share the usual mammalian constraint of only seven cervical vertebrae, and lack an air-sac system and pneumatic bones. Among non-sauropods, their saurischian relatives the theropod dinosaurs seem to have been best placed to evolve long necks, and indeed their necks probably surpassed those of giraffes. But 150 million years of evolution did not suffice for them to exceed a relatively modest 2.5 m. PMID:23638372

  20. Why sauropods had long necks; and why giraffes have short necks

    PubMed Central

    Wedel, Mathew J.

    2013-01-01

    The necks of the sauropod dinosaurs reached 15 m in length: six times longer than that of the world record giraffe and five times longer than those of all other terrestrial animals. Several anatomical features enabled this extreme elongation, including: absolutely large body size and quadrupedal stance providing a stable platform for a long neck; a small, light head that did not orally process food; cervical vertebrae that were both numerous and individually elongate; an efficient air-sac-based respiratory system; and distinctive cervical architecture. Relevant features of sauropod cervical vertebrae include: pneumatic chambers that enabled the bone to be positioned in a mechanically efficient way within the envelope; and muscular attachments of varying importance to the neural spines, epipophyses and cervical ribs. Other long-necked tetrapods lacked important features of sauropods, preventing the evolution of longer necks: for example, giraffes have relatively small torsos and large, heavy heads, share the usual mammalian constraint of only seven cervical vertebrae, and lack an air-sac system and pneumatic bones. Among non-sauropods, their saurischian relatives the theropod dinosaurs seem to have been best placed to evolve long necks, and indeed their necks probably surpassed those of giraffes. But 150 million years of evolution did not suffice for them to exceed a relatively modest 2.5 m. PMID:23638372

  1. The impact of tissue glue in wound healing of head and neck patients undergoing neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Che-Wei; Wang, Chen-Chi; Jiang, Rong-San; Huang, Yu-Chia; Ho, Hui-Ching; Liu, Shih-An

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the impact of fibrin glue on postoperative drainage amount and duration in head and neck cancer patients who underwent neck dissection. This study was a prospective randomized controlled trial. Patients who were scheduled to undergo neck dissection due to head and neck cancer were eligible for this study. After receiving a detailed explanation, all patients signed an informed consent form before enrollment. Patients were then randomly assigned to the study group (fibrin glue) or control group. In the study group, 2ml of fibrin glue (Tissucol(); Duploject, Baxter AG) was applied on the surface of the surgical wound before closure. Basic demographic data along with tumor-related features, operation-related variables, postoperative drainage amount/duration, postoperative pain, and analgesic usage were collected and analyzed. A total of 15 patients were included in the final analyses, with eight patients in the study group and seven patients in the control group. No significant differences were found between the two groups in age, gender, primary site, clinical N stage, neck dissection levels, perioperative bleeding, postoperative drainage amount/duration, hospitalization duration, and postoperative pain status. The application of 2ml fibrin glue by the method described herein did not reduce the postoperative drainage amount/duration nor the postoperative pain status in patients who underwent neck dissection. PMID:26156227

  2. Quantitative measures of sagittal plane head-neck control: a test-retest reliability study.

    PubMed

    Popovich, John M; Reeves, N Peter; Priess, M Cody; Cholewicki, Jacek; Choi, Jongeun; Radcliffe, Clark J

    2015-02-01

    Determining the reliability of measurements used to quantify head-neck motor control is necessary before they can be used to study the effects of injury or treatment interventions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the within- and between-day reliability of position tracking, position stabilization and force tracking tasks to quantify head-neck motor control. Ten asymptomatic subjects performed these tasks on two separate days. Position and force tracking tasks required subjects to track a pseudorandom square wave input signal by controlling their head-neck angular position (position tracking) or the magnitude of isometric force generated against a force sensor by the neck musculature (force tracking) in the sagittal plane. Position stabilization required subjects to maintain an upright head position while pseudorandom perturbations were applied to the upper body using a robotic platform. Within-day and between-day reliability of the frequency response curves were assessed using coefficients of multiple correlations (CMC). Root mean square error (RMSE) and mean bandpass signal energy, were computed for each task and between-day reliability was calculated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). Within- and between-day CMCs for the position and force tracking tasks were all ?0.96, while CMCs for position stabilization ranged from 0.72 to 0.82. ICCs for the position and force tracking tasks were all ?0.93. For position stabilization, ICCs for RMSE and mean bandpass signal energy were 0.66 and 0.72, respectively. Measures of sagittal plane head-neck motor control using position tracking, position stabilization and force tracking tasks were demonstrated to be reliable. PMID:25553673

  3. Osteotomies of the Talar Neck for Posttraumatic Malalignment.

    PubMed

    Barg, Alexej; Suter, Thomas; Nickisch, Florian; Wegner, Nicholas J; Hintermann, Beat

    2016-03-01

    A talar neck malunion is one of the major complications following operative or nonoperative treatment of talar neck fractures. The most common posttraumatic talar malunion results in varus malalignment of the talar neck and can lead to painful overload of the lateral foot and substantial impairment of hindfoot function. Secondary procedures in patients with painful malunited talar neck fracture include salvage procedures and anatomic reconstruction procedures. Anatomic reconstruction of the talar neck is a reliable surgical treatment to regain function, decrease pain, and restore hindfoot alignment and range of motion. PMID:26915780

  4. Oral and head and neck cancer. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-03

    The Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Diagnostic and prognostic studies of oral and head and neck cancers; Treatment of oral and head and neck cancers; Rehabilitation and other support following treatment of oral and head and neck cancers; Etiology, epidemiology, and follow-up studies of patients with oral and head and neck cancers; Training programs for dental professions; Broad clinical programs for treatment of head and neck cancers; Salivary gland pathology.

  5. Femoral neck anteversion measurement using linear slot scanning radiography.

    PubMed

    Chimhundu, Chipo; Sivarasu, Sudesh; Steiner, Stefan; Smit, Julian; Douglas, Tania S

    2016-02-01

    Measurements between anatomical landmarks on radiographs are useful for diagnosis and treatment planning in the orthopedic field. Direct measurement on single radiographic images, however, does not truly reflect spatial relationships, as depth information is lost. We used stereo images from a slot scanning X-ray machine to estimate coordinates of three-dimensional (3D) bony landmarks for femoral neck anteversion (FNA) measurement. A set of 7 landmarks consisting of the centre of the femoral head; the centre of the base of the femoral neck; the medial and lateral condyles; the medial and lateral posterior condyles; and finally the centre of the knee; were found to be identifiable and suitable for radiographic measurement. The reconstructed 3D coordinates were then used to define the 3D geometry of the anatomical axes required to estimate FNA. Stereophotogrammetric measurements on a sample of 30 dry right adult femurs were compared to reference values obtained using the Kingsley Olmstead method applied to photographic images. A strong positive correlation (0.998) was found and the mean ± standard deviation of the stereophotogrammetric approach (13.08 ± 6.87)° was comparable to that of the Kingsley Olmstead method (13.14 ± 6.88)°. Intra- and inter-observer reliability were high, with the lower bound of the 95% confidence interval above 0.98 for the intra-class correlation coefficient. The results merit further validation against three dimensional imaging technology such as computed tomography, to confirm stereophotogrammetry as a suitable alternative for FNA measurement. PMID:26776374

  6. Novel Treatment of Neck Wrinkles with an Intradermal Radiofrequency Device

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Moo Yeol; Li, Kapsok; Kim, Myeung Nam; Hong, Chang Kwun; Kim, Hyuk; Koh, Hyun-Ju; Park, Won-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Neck wrinkles commonly develop owing to the aging process. However, recently, the number of patients with neck wrinkles has been increasing. Also, an increasing number of young patients have presented with this condition, possibly because of the effect of the head-down posture that they adopt when using their computer or smartphone. We report two cases of young adults with a prominent neck wrinkle. In case 1, a 29-year-old woman with a neck wrinkle was treated with six intradermal radiofrequency (RF) procedures. Her neck wrinkle was significantly improved with the RF treatment. In case 2, a 32-year-old woman with a wrinkle and generalized light brownish tiny papules on the neck was treated with three intradermal RF procedures simultaneously with 30% glycolic acid peeling. Her wrinkle and skin tone were improved dramatically. We conclude that intradermal RF has a considerable efficacy for reducing neck wrinkles. PMID:25673937

  7. Prediction of Difficult Laryngoscopy in Obese Patients by Ultrasound Quantification of Anterior Neck Soft Tissue1

    PubMed Central

    Ezri, T.; Gewürtz, G.; Sessler, D.I.; Medalion, B.; Szmuk, P.; Hagberg, C.; Susmallian, S.

    2005-01-01

    Prediction of difficult laryngoscopy in obese patients is challenging. In 50 morbidly obese patients, we quantified the neck soft tissue from skin to anterior aspect of trachea at the vocal cords using ultrasound. Thyromental distance <6 cm, mouth opening <4 cm, limited neck mobility, Mallampati score >2, abnormal upper teeth, neck circumference >45 cm, and sleep apnoea were considered predictors of difficult laryngoscopy. Of the nine (18%) difficult laryngoscopy cases, seven had obstructive sleep apnoea history; whereas, only 2 of the 41 easy laryngoscopy patients did (P<0.001). Difficult laryngoscopy patients had larger neck circumference [50 (3.8) vs. 43.5 (2.2) cm; P<0.001] and more pre-tracheal soft tissue [28 (2.7) mm vs. 17.5 (1.8) mm; P<0.001] [mean (SD)]. Soft tissue values completely separated difficult and easy laryngoscopies. None of the other predictors correlated with difficult laryngoscopy. Thus, an abundance of pretracheal soft tissue at the level of vocal cords is a good predictor of difficult laryngoscopy in obese patients. PMID:14616599

  8. A study of neck and shoulder morbidity following neck dissection: The benefits of cervical plexus preservation.

    PubMed

    Garzaro, Massimiliano; Riva, Giuseppe; Raimondo, Luca; Aghemo, Laura; Giordano, Carlo; Pecorari, Giancarlo

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate the hypothesis that the preservation of cervical root branches of the cervical plexus is associated with greater shoulder mobility, less loss of face and neck sensation, and better quality of life (QoL) following functional neck dissection in which the spinal accessory nerve is spared. We also investigated the impact of postoperative physiotherapy on these three outcomes. Our study population was made up of 54 patients-47 men and 7 women, aged 34 to 78 years (mean: 53.4)-who had undergone functional neck dissection as a treatment for head and neck cancer over a 3-year period at our institution. Patients were divided into two groups: 23 patients whose cervical root branches were preserved during surgery (preservation group) and 31 whose branches were removed (removal group). Shoulder mobility was measured by the Arm Abduction Test (AAT), face and neck sensation was assessed by fingertip touch in eight areas of the head and neck, and QoL was determined by the University of Washington-Quality of Life questionnaire (UW-QoL4). The AAT revealed that the preservation group had significantly better shoulder mobility. The fingertip touch evaluation revealed significantly less loss of sensation in Saffold regions A and D. Analysis of the UW-QoL4 results revealed that the preservation group experienced significantly less pain, significantly fewer shoulder complaints, and significantly fewer limitations on activities and recreation, as well as significantly better health-related and overall QoL. The preservation group also had a significantly better composite score, global score, social function score, and mood and anxiety score on the UW-QoL4 assessment. Finally, we found that physiotherapy improved both QoL and shoulder mobility, although these improvements were not statistically significant. We conclude that preservation of the cervical root branches significantly improves outcomes in patients who undergo functional neck dissection. PMID:26322451

  9. Neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis after neck dissection and postoperative radiotherapy for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinu; Shin, Eun Seow; Kim, Jeong Eon; Yoon, Sang Pil

    2015-01-01

    Late complications of head and neck cancer survivors include neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis. We present an autopsy case of neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis (sternocleidomastoid, omohyoid, digastric, sternohyoid, sternothyroid, and platysma muscles) within the radiation field after modified radical neck dissection type I and postoperative radiotherapy for floor of mouth cancer. A 70-year-old man underwent primary tumor resection of the left floor of mouth, left marginal mandibulectomy, left modified radical neck dissection type I, and reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy. The dose to the primary tumor bed and involved neck nodes was 63 Gy in 35 fractions over 7 weeks. Areas of subclinical disease (left lower neck) received 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Adjuvant chemotherapy was not administered. PMID:26756035

  10. Neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis after neck dissection and postoperative radiotherapy for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinu; Shin, Eun Seow; Kim, Jeong Eon; Yoon, Sang Pil; Kim, Young Suk

    2015-12-01

    Late complications of head and neck cancer survivors include neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis. We present an autopsy case of neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis (sternocleidomastoid, omohyoid, digastric, sternohyoid, sternothyroid, and platysma muscles) within the radiation field after modified radical neck dissection type I and postoperative radiotherapy for floor of mouth cancer. A 70-year-old man underwent primary tumor resection of the left floor of mouth, left marginal mandibulectomy, left modified radical neck dissection type I, and reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy. The dose to the primary tumor bed and involved neck nodes was 63 Gy in 35 fractions over 7 weeks. Areas of subclinical disease (left lower neck) received 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Adjuvant chemotherapy was not administered. PMID:26756035

  11. Melioidosis of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Lim, W K; Gurdeep, G S; Norain, K

    2001-12-01

    Melioidosis is a potentially deadly infection that can affect any organ system. Reports of melioidosis of the ENT/head and neck region are relatively uncommon. Four cases are presented: (i) parotid abscess evolving into necrotising fasciitis, (ii) acute sinusitis and parapharyngeal cellulitis resulting in upper airway obstruction, (iii) acute suppurative lymphadenitis (iv) and chronic suppurative otitis media causing meningoencephalitis. Three of the four cases are believed to be unique, as a literature review of melioidosis in ENT/head and neck is also presented. Some practical issues of management are also discussed. Not suspecting melioidosis does not change contemporary empirical broadspectrum antibiotic therapy. The value of suspicion or on confirmation of diagnosis lies in anticipating and planning for rapid change. PMID:12014768

  12. Neck and back pain in bicycling.

    PubMed

    Mellion, M B

    1994-01-01

    Back and neck problems in bicyclists should be managed by a combination of bicycle adjustment or modification, technique change, and medical treatment. The bicycle should be checked for proper fit. Often it is necessary to relieve the rider's extended position by using handlebars with less drop, using a stem with a shorter extension, raising the stem, or moving the seat forward. Changing hand positions on the handlebars frequently, riding with the elbows "unlocked," varying head position, using padded gloves and handlebars, and riding on wider tires all reduce the effects of road shock. Initial medical management includes ice, massage stretching, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or acetaminophen. Definitive treatment is neck and back rehabilitation based on dynamic muscular stabilization. It involves three progressive and overlapping parts: (1) establishing range of motion, (2) finding and stabilizing the neutral position, and (3) adapting the neutral position to exercise. PMID:8111848

  13. HPV-Associated Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vokes, Everett E; Agrawal, Nishant; Seiwert, Tanguy Y

    2015-12-01

    Over the last two decades, it has been recognized that head and neck cancers, primarily in the oropharynx, can be a distinct entity that is causally related to human papilloma virus (HPV). Fakhry et al. established in 2008 that such tumors have a strikingly better prognosis with improved responsiveness to chemotherapy as well as chemoradiotherapy and favorable survival rates. Since then, new studies have contributed to our increased understanding of this new entity, ranging from a detailed understanding of the genetic fingerprint and risk modifiers such as smoking to successful early attempts to personalize therapy with de-escalation in the definitive intent treatment setting and specific evaluation of targeted therapies in this patient population. This Commentary seeks to summarize the state of the art of our understanding of HPV-associated head and neck cancers that has emerged since the publication of seminal findings by Fakhry et al. PMID:26656751

  14. Head, neck, and brain tumor embolization guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Duffis, E Jesus; Prestigiacomo, Charles Joseph; Abruzzo, Todd; Albuquerque, Felipe; Bulsara, Ketan R; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fraser, Justin F; Hirsch, Joshua A; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Do, Huy M; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Meyers, Philip M; Narayanan, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Background Management of vascular tumors of the head, neck, and brain is often complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Peri-operative embolization of vascular tumors may help to reduce intra-operative bleeding and operative times and have thus become an integral part of the management of these tumors. Advances in catheter and non-catheter based techniques in conjunction with the growing field of neurointerventional surgery is likely to expand the number of peri-operative embolizations performed. The goal of this article is to provide consensus reporting standards and guidelines for embolization treatment of vascular head, neck, and brain tumors. Summary This article was produced by a writing group comprised of members of the Society of Neurointerventional Surgery. A computerized literature search using the National Library of Medicine database (Pubmed) was conducted for relevant articles published between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2010. The article summarizes the effectiveness and safety of peri-operative vascular tumor embolization. In addition, this document provides consensus definitions and reporting standards as well as guidelines not intended to represent the standard of care, but rather to provide uniformity in subsequent trials and studies involving embolization of vascular head and neck as well as brain tumors. Conclusions Peri-operative embolization of vascular head, neck, and brain tumors is an effective and safe adjuvant to surgical resection. Major complications reported in the literature are rare when these procedures are performed by operators with appropriate training and knowledge of the relevant vascular and surgical anatomy. These standards may help to standardize reporting and publication in future studies. PMID:22539531

  15. Marfanoid habitus, dysmorphic features, and web neck.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y C; Wilson, C J; Winship, I M; Veale, A G

    2000-12-01

    Bilateral pneumothoraces and aortic dilatation developed in a 25-year-old white man with marfanoid habitus, dysmorphic features, web neck, and intellectual impairment. He had physical features suggestive of Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. We review the common characteristics of Marfan and Shprintzen-Goldberg syndromes and compare them with our case. Physicians should beware of potential cardiovascular abnormalities in patients with marfanoid habitus and dysmorphic features. PMID:11142456

  16. [Two cases of neck region Kimura's disease].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peijun; Tian, Xiufen

    2015-06-01

    Kimura's disease is a rare, benign, slow-growing chronic inflammatory swelling with a predilection for the head and neck region and is almost always with peripheral blood eosinophilia and elevated serum IgE levels. It is endemic in Asian males and rare in Western people. Surgical excision of the lesion is the first line therapy. Drug and radiation therapy have to be considered for the refractory lesions. PMID:26536716

  17. Evolution and development of the vertebrate neck.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Rolf; Knight, Robert; Johanson, Zerina

    2013-01-01

    Muscles of the vertebrate neck include the cucullaris and hypobranchials. Although a functional neck first evolved in the lobe-finned fishes (Sarcopterygii) with the separation of the pectoral/shoulder girdle from the skull, the neck muscles themselves have a much earlier origin among the vertebrates. For example, lampreys possess hypobranchial muscles, and may also possess the cucullaris. Recent research in chick has established that these two muscles groups have different origins, the hypobranchial muscles having a somitic origin but the cucullaris muscle deriving from anterior lateral plate mesoderm associated with somites 1-3. Additionally, the cucullaris utilizes genetic pathways more similar to the head than the trunk musculature. Although the latter results are from experiments in the chick, cucullaris homologues occur in a variety of more basal vertebrates such as the sharks and zebrafish. Data are urgently needed from these taxa to determine whether the cucullaris in these groups also derives from lateral plate mesoderm or from the anterior somites, and whether the former or the latter represent the basal vertebrate condition. Other lateral plate mesoderm derivatives include the appendicular skeleton (fins, limbs and supporting girdles). If the cucullaris is a definitive lateral plate-derived structure it may have evolved in conjunction with the shoulder/limb skeleton in vertebrates and thereby provided a greater degree of flexibility to the heads of predatory vertebrates. PMID:22697305

  18. Inverted drop testing and neck injury potential.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Stephen; Herbst, Brian; Meyer, Steve; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam

    2003-01-01

    Inverted drop testing of vehicles is a methodology that has long been used by the automotive industry and researchers to test roof integrity and is currently being considered by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration as a roof strength test. In 1990 a study was reported which involved 8 dolly rollover tests and 5 inverted drop tests. These studies were conducted with restrained Hybrid III instrumented Anthropometric Test Devices (ATD) in production and rollcaged vehicles to investigate the relationship between roof strength and occupant injury potential. The 5 inverted drop tests included in the study provided a methodology producing "repeatable roof impacts" exposing the ATDs to the similar impact environment as those seen in the dolly rollover tests. Authors have conducted two inverted drop test sets as part of an investigation of two real world rollover accidents. Hybrid-III ATD's were used in each test with instrumented head and necks. Both test sets confirm that reduction of roof intrusion and increased headroom can significantly enhance occupant protection. In both test pairs, the neck force of the dummy in the vehicle with less crush and more survival space was significantly lower. Reduced roof crush and dynamic preservation of the occupant survival space resulted in only minor occupant contact and minimal occupant loading, establishing a clear causal relationship between roof crush and neck injuries. PMID:12724903

  19. Experimental Injury Biomechanics of the Pediatric Neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, Roger W.; Luck, Jason F.

    Motor vehicle related crashes rank as the most common cause of spinal related injuries in the pediatric population (Platzer et al. 2007; Brown et al. 2001; Kokoska et al. 2001; Eleraky et al. 2000; Hamilton and Myles 1992a; Bonadio 1993; Babcock 1975). Pediatric spinal related trauma accounts for between 1 and 12 % of all spinal related injuries (Hamilton and Myles 1992a; Hadley et al. 1988; Aufdermaur 1974). Cervical spine trauma in children accounts for approximately 2 % of all cervical spinal injuries (Henrys et al. 1977). Approximately 1-2 % of all children admitted for traumatic injury are related to injuries to the cervical spine (Platzer et al. 2007; Brown et al. 2001; Kokoska et al. 2001; Orenstein et al. 1994; Rachesky et al. 1987). Overall, pediatric neck injury rates are significantly lower than adult rates; however, the neck injury rate in children between the ages of 11 and 15 years approaches the adult rate of 18.8 per 100,000 (McGrory et al 1993; Myers and Winkelstein 1995). For children less than 11 years of age, neck injuries are relatively rare (1.2 per 100,000), but have particularly devastating consequences (McGrory et al. 1993). The overall mortality rate amongst victims of pediatric spinal trauma is approximately 16-41 % but considerably higher for the youngest ages (Platzer et al. 2007; Brown et al. 2001; Kokoska et al. 2001; Eleraky et al. 2000; Givens et al. 1996; Orenstein et al. 1994; Hamilton and Myles 1992b).

  20. Head and Neck Cancers in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Poonam; Dutta, Sourav; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Nair, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancers are the most common cancers in developing countries, especially in Southeast Asia. Head and neck cancers are more common in males compared to females. This is mainly attributed to tobacco, areca nut, alcohol, etc. Oral cancers are most common amongst all head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC). HNSCC in the developing world differ from those in the Western world in terms of age, site of disease, etiology, and molecular biology. Poverty, illiteracy, advanced stage at presentation, lack of access to health care, and poor treatment infrastructure pose a major challenge in management of these cancers. The annual GDP (gross domestic product) spent on health care is very low in developing countries compared to the developed countries. Cancer treatment leads to a significant financial burden on the cancer patients and their families. Several health programs have been implemented to curb this rising burden of disease. The main aims of these health programs are to increase awareness among people regarding tobacco and to improve access to health care facilities, early diagnosis, treatment, and palliative care. PMID:24808947

  1. [Brachytherapy of head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Takácsi Nagy, Zoltán; Kásler, Miklós

    2008-06-01

    In the non-surgical treatment of head and neck tumours, the "organ preserving" modalities have become more and more important. At present radiotherapy is the most important means of this kind of treatment. In the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer local dose escalation is an important factor in increasing local tumour control. However, with sole external beam irradiation it is difficult to spare adjacent normal tissues. Interstitial brachytherapy (BT) is ideally suited to deliver a high dose limited to the volume of the primary tumour, thus maximizing tumour control while minimizing complications. Low-dose-rate (LDR) BT, which has been applied for a long time in the treatment of these tumours, is now challenged by high-dose-rate (HDR) and pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) BT. The purpose of this work is to show the role and the indications of BT in tumours of the head and neck region and to offer general and site-specific recommendations based upon the available information from the literature. PMID:18640890

  2. Talar Neck Fracture after United Tibiotalar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Platt, W.; Welck, M.; Rudge, B.

    2015-01-01

    Tibiotalar arthrodesis is a well-established treatment for tibiotalar arthritis, for example, in younger high demand patients. Talar neck fractures are less common though well-recognised sequelae of foot ankle trauma. Here we present the clinical case of a 69-year-old male who presented to our institution with a nonunion of a talar neck fracture, having undergone a left tibiotalar fusion 24 years previously. To the authors' knowledge, this injury has only been described once previously in the literature. However, the original case described a fracture sustained in the very early postoperative period following tibiotalar fusion, postulated to be secondary to postimmobilisation osteopaenia or stress risers from metalwork. The aetiology in this case is likely due to axial compression transmitted to the talar neck via the calcaneus. The predisposing factors for nonunion are discussed, highlighting the importance of vigilance for this injury in any patient with concomitant tibiotalar fusion and foot trauma. The management of this patient is discussed. PMID:26491589

  3. Acoustic estimation of neck fluid volume.

    PubMed

    Yadollahi, A; Rudzicz, F; Mahallati, S; Coimbra, M; Bradley, T D

    2014-10-01

    Recently we showed that fluid accumulation in the neck can narrow the upper airway (UA) and increase its collapsibility, which may exacerbate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the available methods for measuring neck fluid volume (NFV) are inconvenient and expensive. Narrowing of the UA due to fluid accumulation could change acoustic characteristics of respiratory sounds. In this study, we developed a novel approach for non-invasive estimation of NFV from acoustic measurements. Twenty-eight healthy subjects lay awake and supine for 90 min while NFV and tracheal sounds were measured simultaneously using bioimpedance and a microphone, respectively. Sets of tracheal sound features were calculated in time and frequency domains and were reduced using methods based on regression and minimum-redundancy-maximum-relevance. The resulting feature sets were applied to a multi-linear regression and a mixture-density neural network to estimate NFV. Our results show very small relative estimation errors of 1.25 and 3.23%, based on the regression and neural network methods, respectively. These results support the practical application of this technology in diagnosing fluid accumulation in the neck and its possible contributions to the pathogenesis of OSA. PMID:25103604

  4. [PET in head and neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Talbot, Jean-Nol; Pri, Sophie; Kerrou, Khaldoun; Montravers, Franoise; Balogova, Sona; Grahek, Dany; Gutman, Fabrice; Saint Guily, Jean Lacau

    2006-09-01

    FDG PET is useful when cancer in the head or neck (except for tumors of the salivary glands, which cannot be characterized accurately) is diagnosed or suspected but not confirmed by biopsy. It can, for example, find evidence of suspicious lymph nodes in clinically N0 necks, detect foci suggestive of distant metastases or second cancers, and provide useful prognostic information. Because it can be very difficult to identify anatomical structures and landmarks on PET images in the head and neck region, PET/CT fusion is very helpful in this area. In early assessment of chemotherapy, the absence of a significant reduction in FDG uptake after one or two cycles predicts lack of efficacy and thus indicates the need to modify the regimen. Conversely, the disappearance of FDG foci indicates effective treatment and good prognosis but cannot rule out the persistence of any malignant tissue at the end of treatment, especially neoadjuvant. Diagnostic impact is probably greatest in monitoring for recurrence and restaging known recurrence: FDG PET should be performed - perhaps routinely - early enough that curative options are still open, but long enough after the end of treatment to avoid false positive results from inflammation. The strategy and timing of FDG PET during follow-up should be determined in more detail in the future, as should the role (if any) of fluorotyrosine (FET) PET in squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:16969332

  5. Incorporation of lower neck shear forces to predict facet joint injury risk in low-speed automotive rear impacts.

    PubMed

    Stemper, Brian D; Storvik, Steven G

    2010-06-01

    Lower neck shear force remains a viable candidate for a low-velocity automotive rear-impact injury criterion. Data were previously reported to demonstrate high correlations between the magnitude of lower neck shear force and lower cervical spine facet joint motions. The present study determined the ability of lower neck shear force to predict soft-tissue injury risk in simulated automotive rear impacts. Rear-impact tests were conducted at two velocities and with two seatback orientations using a Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD) and stock automobile seats from 2007 model year vehicles. Higher velocities and more vertical seatback orientations were associated with higher injury risk based on computational modeling simulations performed in this study. Six cervical spine injury criteria including NIC, Nij, Nkm, LNL, and lower neck shear force and bending moment, increased with impact velocity. NIC, Nij, and shear force were most sensitive to changes in impact velocity. Four metrics, including Nkm, LNL, and lower neck shear force and bending moment, increased for tests with more vertical seatback orientations. Shear force was most sensitive to changes in seatback orientation. Peak values for shear force, NIC, and Nij occurred approximately at the time of head restraint contact for all four test conditions. Therefore, of the six investigated metrics, lower neck shear force was the only metric to demonstrate consistency with regard to injury risk and timing of peak magnitudes. These results demonstrate the ability of lower neck shear force to predict injury risk during low velocity automotive rear impacts and warrant continued investigation into the sensitivity and applicability of this metric for other rear-impact conditions. PMID:20544575

  6. Influence of excisional or incisional biopsy of metastatic neck nodes on the management of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, J.T.; Million, R.R.; Cassisi, N.J.

    1985-08-01

    Between November 1964 and December 1981, 80 patients who had undergone an open biopsy of a cervical lymph node containing squamous cell carcinoma were treated with curative intent in the University of Florida Division of Radiation Therapy. Irradiation was the initial step in the definitive treatment of all patients, followed by neck dissection and/or primary resection, as indicated. The patients were divided into two groups. (a) NX (no gross residual neck disease) (25 patients). No neck dissections were added following irradiation in this group of patients. The absolute 5 year disease-free survival in the NX group was 79%, and the rate of neck disease control was 96%. (b) Gross residual neck disease (55 patients). The absolute 5 year disease-free survival in this group of patients was 31%, and the rate of neck disease control was 64%. The more consistent addition of a neck dissection in recent years has resulted in improved neck control rates in this group. There are some differences in the rates of neck control, control above the clavicles, survival, distant metastasis, and complications between this series and other reported series in which open neck-node biopsy preceded definitive treatment. Possible reasons for these differences are discussed.

  7. X-pinch dynamics: Neck formation and implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Artyomov, A. P.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Fedunin, A. V.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.

    2014-10-15

    We propose a model that describes the neck formation and implosion in an X-pinch. The process is simulated to go in two stages. The first stage is neck formation. This stage begins with an electrical explosion of the wires forming the X-pinch, and at the end of the stage, a micropinch (neck) is formed in the region where the wires are crossed. The second stage is neck implosion. The implosion is accompanied by outflow of matter from the neck region, resulting in the formation of a hot spot. Analytical estimates obtained in the study under consideration indicate that these stages are approximately equal in duration. Having analyzed the neck implosion dynamics, we have verified a scaling which makes it possible to explain the observed dependences of the time of occurrence of an x-ray pulse on the X-pinch current and mass.

  8. Massive myiasis in an advanced metastatic neck tumor.

    PubMed

    Rowicki, Tomasz; Pietniczka-Za??ska, Miros?awa

    2015-01-01

    Only a small number of cases of myiasis have been previously reported in patients with a head and neck malignancy; most of these occurred in patients with primary or metastatic skin cancer. We report a case of massive Lucilia sericata myiasis in the neck of a 57-year-old man with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx that metastasized to the neck lymph nodes. The neck disease manifested as necrosis and skin involvement. Clinical examination revealed an extensive wound within the neck tumor at levels II and V on the right that was heavily infested with maggot larvae. Removal of larvae clusters was performed, and the isolated larvae were subsequently identified as L sericata. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an infestation of L sericata myiasis in a metastasis to the neck lymph nodes. PMID:25923281

  9. Effect of Occupant and Impact Factors on Forces within Neck: II. Analysis of Specific Subsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaibani, Saami J.

    2000-03-01

    The forces generated in the cervical spine were evaluated for a substantial number of motor-vehicle occupants in an associated study.[1] Correlation between these forces and various occupant- and impact-related parameters was generally not high for the broad groupings of the population considered at that time. In this research, smaller subsets with more elements in common were extracted from the data to try to detect any underlying relationships that might exist for the neck force. Although correlation coefficients for these subsets were higher than those for the previous groupings in more than three-quarters of the matches undertaken, the values still did not indicate consistently good fits. This suggests that there is no simple relationship for the force within the cervical spine and this, in turn, means that the potential for neck injury has to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. 1. Effect of Occupant and Impact Factors on Forces within Neck: I. Overview of Large Population, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. in press (2000).

  10. Effects of neck pain on reaching overhead and reading: a case–control study of long and short neck flexion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Reaching overhead and reading are tasks that many individuals encounter daily. The level of difficulty of these tasks increases if an individual has neck pain. This study determined the neck movement patterns during these two tasks by comparing neck flexion of individuals with and without neck pain. Methods This case control study used the portable video technology, Dartfish ProSuite 5.5 Video Software, to analyse neck flexion movement patterns. Healthy individuals and individuals with neck pain were videotaped while they completed two tasks: reaching overhead from a standing position and reading from a sitting position. A single position of interest was selected for analysis from both tasks. The degree of neck flexion presented by the participant in this position at the beginning and end of the task was recorded. The angle change between these two time points was calculated for each participant. Differences between groups were determined by comparing the average flexion angle changes in groups by t-tests. Results The average angle change experienced by controls and neck pain participants during the overhead reaching tasks were very similar and a significant difference was not observed. The average angle changes experienced by the two groups during the reading task were more variable, but not significantly different. A t-test comparing average neck flexion angle change during dominant arm elevation for controls (m = −5.28˚, sd = 31.14) and neck pain participants (m = 5.07˚, sd = 32.41) revealed a mean between group difference of −10.34˚ (t17 = −0.688, p = 0.5003). The average neck flexion angle change during long neck flexion was not statistically different between controls (m = 10.08˚, sd = 18.89) and neck pain participants (m = 4˚, sd = 18.18); although the mean between group difference was 6.08˚ (t17 = 0.6856, p = 0.5022). Conclusions Task performance is highly variable between individuals making it difficult to assess the impact of neck pain on small samples even with detailed motion analysis. Despite this, there was a difference in neck posture during reaching activities between controls and patients with neck pain. Neck pain can therefore influence the movement patterns used during daily activities. This has implications for primary and secondary prevention. PMID:24119534

  11. Longitudinal evaluation of time related femoral neck narrowing after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenbao; Geller, Jeffrey A; Hasija, Rohit; Choi, Jung Keun; Patrick, David A Jr.; Macaulay, William

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To track the short-term neck narrowing changes in Birmingham metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MOMHR) patients. METHODS: Since 2001, the Center for Hip and Knee Replacement started a registry to prospectively collect data on hip and knee replacement patients. From June 2006 to October 2008, 139 MOMHR were performed at our center by two participate surgeons using Birmingham MOMHR prosthesis (Smith Nephew, United States). It is standard of care for patients to obtain low, anteriorposterior (LAP) pelvis radiographs immediately after MOMHR procedure and then at 3 mo, 1 year and 2 year follow up office visits. Inclusion criteria for the present study included patients who came back for follow up office visit at above mentioned time points and got LAP radiographs. Exclusion criteria include patients who missed more than two follow up time points and those with poor-quality X-rays. Two orthopaedic residency trained research fellows reviewed the X-rays independently at 4 time points, i.e., immediate after surgery, 3 mo, 1 year and 2 year. Neck-to-prosthesis ratio (NPR) was used as main outcome measure. Twenty cases were used as subjects to identify the reliability between two observers. An intraclass correlation coefficient at 0.8 was considered as satisfied. A paired t-test was used to evaluate the significant difference between different time points with P < 0.05 considered to be statistically significant. RESULTS: The mean NPRs were 0.852 ± 0.056, 0.839 ± 0.052, 0.835 ± 0.051, 0.83 ± 0.04 immediately, 3 mo, 1 year and 2 years post-operatively respectively. At 3 mo, NPR was significantly different from immediate postoperative X-ray (P < 0.001). There was no difference between 3 mo and 1 year (P = 0.14) and 2 years (P = 0.53). Femoral neck narrowing (FNN) exceeding 10% of the diameter of the neck was observed in only 4 patients (5.6%) at two years follow up. None of these patients developed a femoral neck fracture (FNF). CONCLUSION: Femoral neck narrowing after MOMHR occurred as early as 3 mo postoperatively, and stabilized thereafter. Excessive FNN was not common in patients within the first two years of surgery and was not correlated with risk of FNF. PMID:23610755

  12. Neck muscle activity in skydivers during parachute opening shock.

    PubMed

    Lo Martire, R; Gladh, K; Westman, A; Lindholm, P; Nilsson, J; Äng, B O

    2016-03-01

    This observational study investigated skydiver neck muscle activity during parachute opening shock (POS), as epidemiological data recently suggested neck pain in skydivers to be related to POS. Twenty experienced skydivers performed two terminal velocity skydives each. Surface electromyography quantified muscle activity bilaterally from the anterior neck, the upper and lower posterior neck, and the upper shoulders; and two triaxial accelerometers sampled deceleration. Muscle activity was normalized as the percentage of reference maximum voluntary electrical activity (% MVE); and temporal muscle activity onset was related to POS onset. Our results showed that neck muscle activity during POS reached mean magnitudes of 53-104% MVE, often exceeding reference activity in the lower posterior neck and upper shoulders. All investigated muscle areas' mean temporal onsets occurred <50 ms after POS onset (9-34 ms latencies), which is consistent with anticipatory motor control. The high muscle activity observed supports that the neck is under substantial strain during POS, while temporal muscle activation suggests anticipatory motor control to be a strategy used by skydivers to protect the cervical spine from POS. This study's findings contribute to understanding the high rates of POS-related neck pain, and further support the need for evaluation of neck pain preventative strategies. PMID:25754941

  13. Corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks compared to titanium modular necks in a simulator test.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Ulrich; Neumann, Daniel; Frank, Mario

    2014-04-01

    This study compared the corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks with that of titanium alloy modular necks at their junction to titanium-alloy femoral stem. Tests were performed in a dry assembly and two wet assemblies, one contaminated with calf serum and the other contaminated with calf serum and bone particles. Whereas the titanium modular neck tested in the dry assembly showed no signs of corrosion, the titanium modular necks tested in both wet assemblies showed marked depositions and corrosive attacks. By contrast, the tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks showed no traces of corrosion or chemical attack in any of the three assemblies. This study confirms the protective effect of tantalum coating the taper region of cobalt-chromium modular neck components, suggesting that the use of tantalum may reduce the risk of implant failure due to corrosion. PMID:24099841

  14. Early-onset dropped head syndrome after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: dose constraints for neck extensor muscles

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Koji; Nakamura, Satoshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kashihara, Tairo; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Murakami, Naoya; Ito, Yoshinori; Igaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a famous but unusual late complication of multimodality treatment for head and neck carcinoma. We reported this early-onset complication and analyzed the dose to the neck extensor muscles. We examined the records of three patients with DHS after radiotherapy. The doses to the neck extensor muscles were compared between three patients with DHS and nine patients without DHS. The mean dose to the neck extensor muscles of the three patients with DHS were 58.5 Gy, 42.3 Gy and 60.9 Gy, while the dose was <50 Gy in all nine patients in the control group. The onset of this syndrome was 5 months, 6 months and 15 months. The early-onset DHS may have something to do with dose to the neck extensor muscles. The proposed dose to the neck extensor muscles might be <46 Gy (or at least <50 Gy). PMID:26684338

  15. The effect of cocontraction of the masticatory muscles during neck stabilization exercises on thickness of the neck flexors

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyun-Ju; Goo, Bong-Oh; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the cocontraction of masticatory muscles during neck stabilization exercises on changes in the thickness of the neck flexors. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty subjects performed neck stabilization only exercise and neck stabilization exercise with simultaneous contraction of the masticatory muscles. Changes in the thickness of the longus colli and sternocleidomastoid were then measured by ultrasound. [Results] The thickness of the longus colli increased significantly fallowing cocontraction of the masticatory muscles and neck stabilization exercise, whereas the exercise method used had no significant effect on the thickness of the sternocleidomastoid. [Conclusion] Cocontraction of the masticatory muscles during neck stabilization exercise is helpful in increasing the thickness of longus colli muscle. PMID:25931702

  16. Neck and Back Pain in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Kalkanis, Steven N.; Borges, Lawrence

    2001-05-01

    Surgical intervention for neck and back pain in elderly patients without significant comorbidities can significantly improve a patient's symptoms and quality of life when more conservative therapies fail. Current spine literature strongly supports the paradigm of treating elderly patients with stable, chronic neck or back pain with conservative therapies first in order to optimize the risks and benefits of all available treatment options. If less-invasive methods fail to achieve satisfactory outcomes, more aggressive surgical options can, at that time, typically be implemented with excellent results in elderly patients without significant comorbidities. Clinical scenarios threatening to result in spine instability or nerve root or spinal cord compression require immediate intervention, especially in elderly patients, who, in general, have a higher risk of developing such conditions either through falls or trauma or acquired degenerative disease processes or malignancies. When an elderly patient enters a physician's office and asks "doctor, I've had pain for years, but it's getting worse. At my age, is it really worth having surgery?" The answer is a qualified "yes," if conservative treatments have failed and if the patient is otherwise in reasonably good health. Because the vast majority of these patients first interact with the medical system through their primary care doctors and neurologists, early recognition of situations requiring immediate attention, and those requiring referrals to spine specialists, can greatly expedite the appropriate use of scarce healthcare resources. Furthermore, knowledge of the various treatment options available to elderly patients complaining of the very common symptoms of neck or back pain can significantly improve patient care, especially in this new century when older patients will increasingly become a larger and more active force in all aspects of our society. PMID:11282037

  17. What a Pain in the Neck! Good Habits to Remember to Prevent Neck Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on the arm of a couch. On the phone a lot? Use a speakerphone or headsets -- do not cradle the phone in your neck. Exercise. Treat your body to ... Bryn Mawr Ave., Ste 200 Rosemont, Illinois 60018 phone (847) 737-6000 fax (847) 754-4368 2015 ...

  18. Approaches of robot-assisted neck dissection for head and neck cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shanghui; Zhang, Chenping; Li, Daqing

    2016-04-01

    Robot-assisted surgery is being increasingly used by surgeons because of its enhancement of visualization, precision, and articulation compared with conventional minimally invasive techniques. In recent years, robot-assisted neck dissection (RAND) has begun to be used as an alternative method of neck dissection, one of the classic surgical procedures in the area of head and neck surgery. Currently, there are four kinds of approaches for RAND: (1) modified facelift or retroauricular incision, (2) combined transaxillary and retroauricular incision, (3) transaxillary incision, and (4) transoral incision. RAND may help perform minimally invasive surgery and achieve excellent cosmetic results as well as the desired oncologic outcomes, and this requires selecting an appropriate approach based on the different needs of neck dissections. Although experienced surgeons wishing to avoid large cervical incisions in patients can safely perform RAND, there are still quite a few limitations; in particular, surgical morbidity and oncologic outcomes should be verified by further prospective clinical trials with longer follow-up periods. Also, RAND needs to be standardized and its use disseminated. In this review, we introduce the applications of different approaches for RAND and their indications and determine whether RAND can be more beneficial compared with conventional surgeries. PMID:26768074

  19. Current surgical management of metastases in the neck from mucosal squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Green, Ben; Bisase, Brian; Godden, Daryl; Mitchell, David A; Brennan, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    Neck dissection, which is an important method of treatment for metastases from mucosal (and other) squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the head and neck, is also useful for staging disease. Since its inception it has changed from a radical to a more conservative procedure, and vital structures are preserved wherever possible. Refinements in methods of imaging to assess involvement in the neck have encouraged alternative approaches that can improve outcomes and reduce morbidity. We look at the reported evidence for the surgical management of metastases in the neck from mucosal SCC. PMID:26432197

  20. Airgun pellet injuries of the neck.

    PubMed

    Cook, J A; Dawkins, R S

    1989-04-01

    Penetrating injuries of the neck are a cause of retropharyngeal abscess. Should a foreign body become lodged in the retropharyngeal tissues its removal may avoid this complication, but surgery can in itself be hazardous. Between 10 and 15 per cent of cases of retropharyngeal cellulitis resulting from whatever cause do not progress to abscess formation if treated conservatively. Consequently, it is important to have evidence of abscess formation before surgery is undertaken, as illustrated by this paper in the form of a case report and a review of the current literature. PMID:2715705

  1. The Conservative Management of Neck Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Harold

    1964-01-01

    Previously a list of treatments which might be avoided in the care of simple neck sprains was published. The present discussion is with regard to treatment which may be used safely. The original discussion was to the effect that treatment should be avoided which aggravates the patient's pain. Now suggestions are made for treatment which should not produce iatrogenic trauma. This treatment has the advantage of reducing the financial cost to the injured person plus the medical advantage of shortening the period of treatment, reducing cost and disability. PMID:14201237

  2. Imaging for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jesty

    2015-07-01

    Imaging is an essential tool in the management of head and neck cancer. Oral, oropharyngeal, laryngeal, and hypopharyngeal lesions are initially imaged with computed tomography (CT) because it allows rapid image acquisition and reduces artifacts related to respiration and swallowing, which can degrade image quality and limit evaluation. Sinonasal, nasopharyngeal, and salivary gland tumors are better approached with MRI because it allows for better delineation of tumor extent. PET/CT is usually reserved for advanced disease to evaluate for distant metastatic disease and posttreatment residual and recurrent disease. Imaging is best used in combination with expert clinical and physical examination. PMID:25979394

  3. Cutaneous malignancy of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Mydlarz, Wojciech K; Weber, Randal S; Kupferman, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Most skin cancers of the head and neck are nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs). Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most frequent types of NMSCs. Treatment options including wide local excision, Mohs surgery, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and cervical lymphadenectomy and adjuvant radiation when warranted offer a high cure rate, while balancing excellent functional and cosmetic outcomes. Evaluation by a multidisciplinary team is highly recommended with advanced and aggressive lesions. Avoidance of sunburns and acute sun damage, sunscreen protection, and early identification and evaluation of suspicious lesions remain the first line of defense against skin cancers. PMID:25979402

  4. 78 FR 65451 - Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire... oira_submission@omb.eop.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-- NEW (Neck (Cervical Spine...- ] NEW (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire).'' SUPPLEMENTARY...

  5. Diagnosis and management of neck metastases from an unknown primary

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, L; Jereczek-Fossa, BA; Jassem, J; Rocca, A; Bruschini, R; Orecchia, R; Chiesa, F

    2005-01-01

    Summary Neck lymph node metastases from occult primary constitute about 5%-10% of all patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site. Metastases in the upper and middle neck (levels I-II-III-V) are generally attributed to head and neck cancers, whereas the lower neck (level IV) involvement is often associated with primaries below the clavicles. Diagnostic procedures include a careful clinical evaluation and a fiberoptic endoscopic examination of the head and neck mucosa, biopsies from all suspicious sites or blindly from the sites of possible origin of the primary, computerized tomography scan, and magnetic resonance. The most frequent histological finding is Squamous Cell Carcinoma, particularly when the upper neck is involved. In these cases, a systematic tonsillectomy in the absence of suspicious lesions is discussed since up to 25% of primary tumours can be detected in this site. Thoracic, and abdominal primaries (especially from lung, oesophagus, stomach, ovary or pancreas) should be sought in the case of adenocarcinoma and involvement of the lower neck. Positron emission tomography with fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose allows detection of primary tumour in about 25% of cases, but this procedure is still considered investigational. Therapeutic approaches include surgery (neck dissection), with or without post-operative radiotherapy, radiotherapy alone and radiotherapy followed by surgery as reported by several guide-lines. In early stages (N1), neck dissection and radiotherapy seem to have similar efficacy, whereas more advanced cases (N2, N3) require combined approaches. The extent of radiotherapy (irradiation of bilateral neck and mucosa versus ipsilateral neck radiotherapy) remains debatable. A potential benefit from extensive radiotherapy should be weighed against its acute and late morbidity and difficulties in re-irradiation in the case of subsequent primary emergence. The role of other methods, such as chemotherapy and hyperthermia, remains to be determined. PMID:16080309

  6. p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression specifically identifies transformed cells in the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Prigge, Elena-Sophie; Toth, Csaba; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Wagner, Steffen; Mller, Franziska; Wittekindt, Claus; Freier, Kolja; Plinkert, Peter; Hoffmann, Jrgen; Vinokurova, Svetlana; Klussmann, Jens Peter; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Reuschenbach, Miriam

    2015-04-01

    p16(INK4a) immunohistochemical overexpression is an overall reliable surrogate marker of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). However, cases of ambiguous p16(INK4a) overexpression are regularly detected in the head and neck: p16(INK4a) expression can be observed in non-malignant tissue, such as tonsillar crypt epithelium and a proportion of branchial cleft cysts. Additionally, diverse patterns of p16(INK4) expression can complicate interpretation of "p16(INK4a) -positivity". These aspects impede the unrestricted application of p16(INK4a) as a diagnostic marker in the head and neck. We hypothesized that combined detection of p16(INK4a) and the proliferation marker Ki-67 could support clarification of ambiguous p16(INK4a) expression in the head and neck by specifically indicating p16(INK4a) -expressing cells with proliferative activity. p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression in a combined staining procedure was correlated to distinct p16(INK4a) expression patterns and HPV status (HPV DNA followed by E6*I oncogene mRNA detection) in 147 HNSCC and 50 non-malignant head and neck samples. p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression only occurred in transformed cells of the head and neck. Co-expression was never detected in non-transformed cells. Combined p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 expression was stringently associated with a diffuse p16(INK4a) expression pattern. All HPV oncogene-expressing HNSCC showed p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression. We demonstrate that p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression occurs exclusively in transformed cells of the head and neck. Our findings indicate a substantial impact of combined p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 expression in the assessment of ambiguous p16(INK4a) expression in the head and neck by specifically identifying p16(INK4a) -expressing cells with proliferative activity. This property will be of considerable significance for head and neck histo- and cytopathology. PMID:25104331

  7. Phenylbutyrate interferes with the Fanconi anemia and BRCA pathway and sensitizes head and neck cancer cells to cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Burkitt, Kyunghee; Ljungman, Mats

    2008-01-01

    Background Cisplatin has been widely used to treat head and neck cancer. One of the clinical limitations with this treatment, however, is that tumors that are initially responsive to cisplatin later acquire resistance. We have recently shown that a subset of head and neck cancer cell lines has a defective Fanconi anemia DNA damage response pathway and this defect correlates to cisplatin sensitivity. We have also shown that the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate sensitize human cells to cisplatin. In this study we explored whether phenylbutyrate may sensitize head and neck cancer cells by interfering with the Fanconi anemia pathway. Results We found that the phenylbutyrate sensitizes head and neck cancer cell lines to cisplatin. This sensitization by phenylbutyrate correlated to a significant decrease in the formation of cisplatin-induced FANCD2 nuclear foci, which is a functional read out of the Fanconi anemia and BRCA (FA/BRCA) pathway. This abrogation of the FA/BRCA pathway by phenylbutyrate was not due to loss of FANCD2 monoubiquitylation but rather correlated to a phenylbutyrate-mediated reduction in the expression of the BRCA1 protein. Furthermore, we found that cancer cells defective in the FA pathway were also sensitized to cisplatin by phenylbutyrate suggesting that phenylbutyrate targets additional pathways. Conclusion The results from this study suggest that phenylbutyrate may have therapeutic utility as a cisplatin sensitizer in head and neck cancer by inhibiting the FA/BRCA pathway through the down regulation of BRCA1 as well as by an FA/BRCA-independent mechanism. PMID:18325101

  8. Fatigue During Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy: Prospective Study on 117 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja . E-mail: barbara.fossa@ieo.it; Santoro, Luigi; Alterio, Daniela; Franchi, Benedetta; Fiore, Maria Rosaria; Fossati, Piero; Kowalczyk, Anna; Canino, Paola; Ansarin, Mohssen; Orecchia, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: Fatigue is an underevaluated cancer-related and treatment-related symptom. We analyzed fatigue in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 117 patients were enrolled (mean age, 58 years). Radiation therapy (median dose, 66 Gy) was given with either exclusive or postoperative intent in 52 and 65 patients, respectively. Chemotherapy (CT) was added before and/or during RT in 61 patients. The patients completed a 20-item questionnaire (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory [MFI-20]) before, during (weekly), and after RT. The impact of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on fatigue was evaluated with unifactorial and multifactorial tests. Results: Fatigue level increased during RT reaching a maximum at Week 6 and then slowly decreased. In multivariate stepwise regression analysis age (inversely related, p < 0.05), psychologic disorders (p < 0.005), and previous head-and-neck surgery (inversely related, p < 0.005) were correlated with higher pre-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p = 0.035), need of cortisone during RT (p = 0.005), and thyroid disorders (p = 0.032) were correlated with higher during-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p < 0.001), and need of cortisone during RT (p < 0.005) were correlated with higher post-RT fatigue level. No impact of gender, performance status, comorbidities other than psychologic and thyroid, tumor stage/site, RT intent, dose, volume, duration, or toxicity was observed. Conclusion: Fatigue affects all patients undergoing RT for head-and-neck cancer, reaches maximum score at the 6th week of RT, and slowly decreases thereafter. Age, thyroid dysfunction, psychologic disorders, pre-RT fatigue score, CT, and cortisone use are correlated with RT-related fatigue levels.

  9. A case of neck ectopic meningioma.

    PubMed

    Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Berjis, Nezamaldin; Mahzouni, Parvin; Naimi, Azar

    2008-04-01

    Primary extra cranial and extra spinal meningioma is rare and is usually limited to the head and neck region or to the paravertebral soft tissues. Histologic diagnosis (in particular for fresh specimens) is often difficult. A 16-year-old girl with a cervical mass is presented. It was a relatively large mass with an approximate diameter of 5 cm. It was diagnosed in fine needle aspiration as a pleomorphic adenoma. Intra-operative diagnosis was paraganglioma and frozen section suggested an infiltrative tumor. Histologically, the lesion showed uniform spindle cell proliferation separated by hyalinized collagen bundles. The cells were often arranged in sweeping fascicles and concentrically wrapped in tight whorls. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for epithelial membrane antigen and vimentin, while showing no reaction for cytokeratin, chromogranin, neuron-specific enolase and thyroglobulin. A diagnosis of ectopic meningioma was established based on microscopic appearance and immunohistochemical profile of the tumor. Despite its rarity, ectopic meningioma should be considered in differential diagnosis of any mass lesion in head and neck regions, containing spindle cells. PMID:18179413

  10. Neurofibromatosis of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Maceri, D R; Saxon, K G

    1984-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis (von Recklinghausen's disease) is an autosomal dominant disease that affects one in 2,500-3,000 births. Because the head and neck is unique in its anatomical compartmentalization of the central and peripheral nervous systems, the potential for involvement of these areas with neurofibromas is substantial and accounts for a myriad of clinicopathologic presentations. In the present study, the incidence of involvement in the head and neck is 37%. We found 81% of the patients had caf au lait spots, 63% had positive family histories, and 66% had multiple cutaneous nodules. An incidence of malignant transformation was documented in 3.5% of the cases. Management of benign neurofibromatosis must be individualized for each patient and ranges from incisional biopsy to wide local excision. In every case, the risk of severe neurologic deficit must be weighted against the benefits of surgical resection, which is usually incomplete. Genetic counseling is advised for all patients with this disease, since no cure is available. PMID:6423572

  11. Phalangeal neck fractures with concurrent vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, M M

    2009-02-01

    The outcome in 16 consecutive paediatric cases of phalangeal neck fractures with concurrent vascular injury was investigated. The study group had a mean age of 5 (range 3-11) years. At final follow-up, the outcome was assessed according to Al-Qattan's grading system. The study population was divided into three groups. In group A (n = 3), there was circumferential skin laceration with disruption of both digital arteries and all three patients ended up with an amputation. In group B (n = 11), there was skin laceration on one side of the digit with one disrupted digital artery, and the outcome following surgery was considered good in six, fair in four and poor in the remaining patient. Group C (n = 2) presented with "congested" digits and conservative management resulted in one good and one poor result. Reasons for failure to obtain a single excellent result are discussed. Phalangeal neck fractures with concurrent vascular injury should raise a "red flag" and outcomes may be limited, despite management in a specialist hand surgery facility. PMID:18936122

  12. Giant Arteriovenous Malformation of the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Dieng, P. A.; Ba, P. S.; Gaye, M.; Diatta, S.; Diop, M. S.; Sene, E.; Ciss, A. G.; Ndiaye, A.; Ndiaye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) have a wide range of clinical presentations. Operative bleeding is one of the most hazardous complications in the surgical management of high-flow vascular malformations. In the cervical region, the presence of vital vascular structures, such as the carotid artery and jugular vein, may increase this risk. This is a case of massive arteriovenous malformation deforming the neck and the face aspect of this aged lady and growing for several years. A giant mass of the left neck occupied the carotid region and the subclavian region. The AVM was developed between the carotid arteries, jugular veins, and vertebral and subclavian vessels, with arterial and venous flux. The patient underwent surgery twice for the cure of that AVM. The first step was the ligation of the external carotid. Seven days later, the excision of the mass was done. In postoperative period the patient presented a peripheral facial paralysis which completely decreased within 10 days. The first ligation of the external carotid reduces significantly the blood flow into the AVM. It permitted secondarily the complete ablation of the AVM without major bleeding even though multiple ligations were done. PMID:26347847

  13. Cancer of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, collectively known as head and neck cancers, arise from a multiplicity of sites. In the West, excess tobacco and alcohol consumption are the most important of the known predisposing factors; elsewhere in the world, notably in India and China, the aetiology, pattern of primary sites, and clinical behaviour are different. Clinically these tumours pose exceptional problems in management, and skilled multidisciplinary teams are necessary in order to achieve the highest level of service and research. Historically, surgery and radiotherapy have been the most important treatment modalities; chemotherapy is now increasingly employed but not yet fully established. Successful rehabilitation of patients with head and neck cancers requires access to high quality speech therapists and other support staff with training in functional pharyngeal disorders. Current research efforts are largely directed towards defining the proper role of chemotherapy and assessing the possible advantage of unconventional radiation approaches. In recent years the roles of primary, reconstructive, and salvage surgery have also become better defined. Many patients are suitable for randomisation into ongoing prospective clinical trials which have been specifically designed to address these issues. Images FIG 3 FIG 4 FIG 5 PMID:8173406

  14. [Imaging of the head and neck region].

    PubMed

    Lell, M; Mantsopoulos, K; Uder, M; Wuest, W

    2016-02-01

    Tumors of the head and neck are predominantly squamous cell carcinomas and those of the salivary glands are predominantly adenocarcinomas, adenoid cystic carcinomas and mucoepidermoid carcinomas. In 2011 the incidence of tumors of the oral cavity and pharynx in Germany was 6839 (5026 male and 1813 female) and of the larynx 1878 (1642 male and 236 female). The incidence of tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses (467) and salivary glands (470) were much lower ( www.krebsdaten.de/abfrage ). The primary aim of imaging in head and neck cancer is staging of the disease and a precise assessment of tumor invasion. This information is essential for therapy decision-making (i.e. surgery or radiochemotherapy), planning of the extent of resection and subsequent reconstructive measures and also estimation of functional deficits after therapy. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the imaging modalities of choice but both have specific advantages and disadvantages. In certain cases both CT and MRI need to be performed for accurate treatment planning. PMID:26825063

  15. Photodynamic therapy of head and neck tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoulovskaya, Elena G.; Shental, Victor V.; Abdoullin, N. A.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Tabolinovskaia, T. D.; Edinak, N. J.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Lioubaev, V. L.; Boikov, V. P.; Kondratjeva, T. T.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Agafonov, Valery V.

    1996-12-01

    This paper deals with the results of stage 1 clinical trials for sulfated aluminum phthalocyanine (PHS) (Photosens, Russia) in 1994-1996. The results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of head and neck tumors (HNT), side effects and ways of their correction and prevention, as well as changes in doses of injected photosensitizer (PS), regimes of light irradiation, choice of laser and type of irradiation (surface or interstitial) are discussed. PDT have been provided in 42 patients (93 tumor sites) with different head and neck tumors. Fluorescent diagnostics of tumor, accumulation of PS in tumor, adjacent tissue has been fulfilled. Total 78 PDT sessions have been done. As a source of light we used: quantoscope, solid laser, krypton laser, tunable dye laser, He-Ne-laser. In 38 tumor sites (21 patients) -- 40.8% -- we had clinical response, in 27 tumor sites (16 patients) -- 29.0% -- we had partial response, in 28 tumor sites (8 patients) -- 30.2% -- we had no response. Our experience shows pronounced efficacy of PDT for HNT, except of melanoma. Providing PDT twice with the interval 24 - 72 hours when retention of PS is sufficient for treatment, did additive effect to the tumor, but didn't increase adjacent tissue damage.

  16. [Immunotherapy in head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Kansy, B; Hussain, T; Mattheis, S; Wollenberg, B; Brandau, S; Lang, S

    2015-11-01

    The physiological immune response to malignant cells is based on the interaction of antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages, with T and B lymphocytes. CD8(+) effector and natural killer cells are primarily responsible for tumor cell lysis. Tumor cells exploit several mechanisms to influence the body's immune system and promote development and progress of solid head and neck malignancies. Via regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and cancer-associated fibroblasts, tumor cells promote development of suppressive signaling pathways that enable tumor progression. Novel immune therapeutics aim to influence these signaling pathways. Current studies are investigating agents which influence immune-stimulating or immune-suppressive cytokines, as well as drug-based Toll-like receptor activation and vaccination in head and neck cancer. Development of monoclonal antibodies allows for direct and highly specific binding of therapeutics to cell receptors - recently discovered immune checkpoint receptors are particularly intriguing targets. Monoclonal antibodies directed specifically toward T cell-stimulating receptors such as CD28 and CD134, or immunosuppressive receptors CTLA-4 and PD-1, are currently under investigation and have shown promising results. PMID:26452491

  17. [Imaging of the head and neck region].

    PubMed

    Lell, M; Mantsopoulos, K; Uder, M; Wuest, W

    2016-03-01

    Tumors of the head and neck are predominantly squamous cell carcinomas and those of the salivary glands are predominantly adenocarcinomas, adenoid cystic carcinomas and mucoepidermoid carcinomas. In 2011 the incidence of tumors of the oral cavity and pharynx in Germany was 6839 (5026 male and 1813 female) and of the larynx 1878 (1642 male and 236 female). The incidence of tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses (467) and salivary glands (470) were much lower ( www.krebsdaten.de/abfrage ). The primary aim of imaging in head and neck cancer is staging of the disease and a precise assessment of tumor invasion. This information is essential for therapy decision-making (i.e. surgery or radiochemotherapy), planning of the extent of resection and subsequent reconstructive measures and also estimation of functional deficits after therapy. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the imaging modalities of choice but both have specific advantages and disadvantages. In certain cases both CT and MRI need to be performed for accurate treatment planning. PMID:26923486

  18. A Rare Presentation of Pellet Injury in the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bulbul; Gulati, Achal; Gupta, Divya

    2011-01-01

    Penetrating neck injuries are dangerous and deserve emergency treatment by virtue of the vital structures present underneath. There is a potential risk of unrecognized vascular injury and retained foreign bodies with their associated complications in these wounds. Therefore, an early diagnostic workup to localize the site of injury and an immediate neck exploration are important. PMID:22084752

  19. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-01-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that

  20. Sagittal alignment of the cervical spine after neck injury.

    PubMed

    Beltsios, Michail; Savvidou, Olga; Mitsiokapa, Evanthia A; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kaspiris, Angelos; Efstathopoulos, Nikolaos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2013-07-01

    The normal sagittal alignment of the cervical spine is lordotic and is affected by the posture of the head and neck. The question of whether loss of cervical lordosis is the result of muscle spasm after injury or a normal variation, and the clinical significance of such changes in sagittal profile of the cervical spine has been an issue of several studies. The purpose of this paper is to study the incidence of normal cervical lordosis and its changes after neck injury compared to the healthy population. We studied the lateral radiographs of the cervical spine of 60 patients with neck injury compared to 100 patients without a neck injury. Lateral radiographs were obtained in the standing or sitting position, and the curvature of the cervical spine was measured using the angle formed between the inferior end plates of the C2 and C7 vertebrae. In the patients without neck injury, lordotic and straight cervical spine sagittal alignment was observed in 36.5% each, double curvature in 17%, and kyphotic in 10%. In the patients with neck injury, lordotic sagittal alignment was observed in 36%, straight in 34%, double curvature in 26% and kyphotic in 4%. No significant difference between the two groups regarding all types of sagittal alignment of the cervical spine was found (p > 0.100). The alterations in normal cervical lordosis in patients with neck injury must be considered coincidental. These alterations should not be associated with muscle spasm caused by neck pain. PMID:23412281

  1. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-01-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that…

  2. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Washington Birthplace. 9.109 Section 9.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Viticultural Areas 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (b) Approved maps....

  3. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Washington Birthplace. 9.109 Section 9.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Viticultural Areas 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (b) Approved maps....

  4. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Washington Birthplace. 9.109 Section 9.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Viticultural Areas 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (b) Approved maps....

  5. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Washington Birthplace. 9.109 Section 9.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Viticultural Areas 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (b) Approved maps....

  6. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Washington Birthplace. 9.109 Section 9.109 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Viticultural Areas 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (b) Approved maps....

  7. Neck schwannoma diagnosed by core needle biopsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nasrollah, N; Trimboli, P; Bianchi, D; Taccogna, S

    2015-12-01

    Here we present a case of a 58 year old man referred to our hospital to undergo neck and thyroid ultrasonography (US) following palpable neck mass. US revealed a solid hypoechoic nodule in right thyroid lobe, and a solid lesion on the right laterocervical neck region with ultrasound suspicious features of neoplastic lymph node. In order to achieve a diagnosis of the neck mass and to get a proper evaluation of the thyroid nodule, we decided to perform a fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of both lesions. At cytopathologic examination the thyroid nodule appeared as benign, while cytologic sampling of the neck lesion was inadequate for a proper evaluation. Thus, we performed core needle biopsy (CNB) of the neck lesion like recently proposed for thyroid lesions; also, to definitively exclude malignancy of thyroid nodule, this also underwent CNB. Histologic report of CNB confirmed benign thyroid nodule, while the neck lesion revealed a proliferation of neuronal type consistent with schwannoma. The patient has been addressed to clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up. CNB appears as a safe and minimally-invasive approach to diagnose indeterminate neck masses and avoid unnecessary diagnostic surgery. PMID:26550065

  8. Neck Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Are Here: Home ? Multiple Languages ? All Health Topics ? Neck Injuries and Disorders URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Neck Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  9. A Modified Dissection Method to Preserve Neck Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankin, Mark H.; Stoller, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    The neck is not only one of the more challenging anatomical regions to dissect but also has important application to clinical conditions, diseases, and procedures. In this study, we describe two simple modifications for dissection of the neck that (1) aid in the identification and preservation of the cutaneous branches of the cervical plexus and

  10. Contemporary use of imaging modalities in neck mass evaluation.

    PubMed

    St J Blythe, John N; Pearce, Oliver J; Tilley, Elizabeth A; Brennan, Peter A

    2015-03-01

    The effective and efficient management of a patient with a neck mass in a 1-stop clinic requires a collaborative and harmonious partnership among surgeon, radiologist, and pathologist. In this article, theoretic and practical issues are addressed to optimize patient care when prescribing, planning, performing, and interpreting imaging for neck disease. PMID:25707560

  11. Conversation about Necks--and Minds and Bodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Carol S.

    2000-01-01

    States that by considering necks in a literal sense it may be possible to envision new metaphors for understanding minds, bodies, and ways of knowing. Discusses necks as important signs for such ideas as beauty or fragility. Focuses on views of epistemology, such as the disembodied way of knowing. (CMK)

  12. 33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mill Neck Creek. 117.800 Section 117.800 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New...

  13. Necrotizing fasciitis in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Malik, Akshat; Chakrabarty, Swagnik; Nair, Sudhir; Nair, Deepa; Chaturvedi, Pankaj

    2015-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe polybacterial infection characterized by necrosis of the fascia and adjacent soft tissues with rapid expansion of the infection along the fascial planes. It is a rare and potentially fatal entity in the head and neck region. We present 2 patients with head and neck cancers who developed necrotizing fasciitis during the postoperative period. PMID:25721060

  14. Head and Neck Cases - MP/H Rules

    Cancer.gov

    Head and Neck Case 1 PATIENT HISTORY Patient History May 7, 2007 Otolaryngology Head & Neck Subjective: Patient was recently seen by a dentist, who noted a roughness in his lower alveolus, and wanted to have this evaluated prior to denture fitting.

  15. Neck Proprioception Shapes Body Orientation and Perception of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Pettorossi, Vito Enrico; Schieppati, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This review article deals with some effects of neck muscle proprioception on human balance, gait trajectory, subjective straight-ahead (SSA), and self-motion perception. These effects are easily observed during neck muscle vibration, a strong stimulus for the spindle primary afferent fibers. We first remind the early findings on human balance, gait trajectory, SSA, induced by limb, and neck muscle vibration. Then, more recent findings on self-motion perception of vestibular origin are described. The use of a vestibular asymmetric yaw-rotation stimulus for emphasizing the proprioceptive modulation of motion perception from the neck is mentioned. In addition, an attempt has been made to conjointly discuss the effects of unilateral neck proprioception on motion perception, SSA, and walking trajectory. Neck vibration also induces persistent aftereffects on the SSA and on self-motion perception of vestibular origin. These perceptive effects depend on intensity, duration, side of the conditioning vibratory stimulation, and on muscle status. These effects can be maintained for hours when prolonged high-frequency vibration is superimposed on muscle contraction. Overall, this brief outline emphasizes the contribution of neck muscle inflow to the construction and fine-tuning of perception of body orientation and motion. Furthermore, it indicates that tonic neck-proprioceptive input may induce persistent influences on the subject’s mental representation of space. These plastic changes might adapt motion sensitiveness to lasting or permanent head positional or motor changes. PMID:25414660

  16. The equine neck and its function during movement and locomotion.

    PubMed

    Zsoldos, Rebeka R; Licka, Theresia F

    2015-10-01

    During both locomotion and body movements at stance, the head and neck of the horse are a major craniocaudal and lateral balancing mechanism employing input from the visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems. The function of the equine neck has recently become the focus of several research groups; this is probably also feeding on an increase of interest in the equine neck in equestrian sports, with a controversial discussion of specific neck positions such as maximum head and neck flexion. The aim of this review is to offer an overview of new findings on the structures and functions of the equine neck, illustrating their interplay. The movement of the neck is based on intervertebral motion, but it is also an integral part of locomotion; this is illustrated by the different neck conformations in the breeds of horses used for various types of work. The considerable effect of the neck movement and posture onto the whole trunk and even the limbs is transmitted via bony, ligamentous and muscular structures. Also, the fact that the neck position can easily be influenced by the rider and/or by the employment of training aids makes it an important avenue for training of new movements of the neck as well as the whole horse. Additionally, the neck position also affects the cervical spinal cord as well as the roots of the spinal nerves; besides the commonly encountered long-term neurological effects of cervical vertebral disorders, short-term changes of neural and muscular function have also been identified in the maximum flexion of the cranial neck and head position. During locomotion, the neck stores elastic energy within the passive tissues such as ligaments, joint capsules and fasciae. For adequate stabilisation, additional muscle activity is necessary; this is learned and requires constant muscle training as it is essential to prevent excessive wear and tear on the vertebral joints and also repetitive or single trauma to the spinal nerves and the spinal cord. The capability for this stabilisation decreases with age in the majority of horses due to changes in muscle tissue, muscle coordination and consequently muscle strength. PMID:26163862

  17. Blindness after bilateral neck dissection: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Pazos, G A; Leonard, D W; Blice, J; Thompson, D H

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this review of the literature is to identify the probable causes of blindness after bilateral radical neck dissections. This case report and literature review also discusses possible preventive measures that may avert this catastrophic outcome. Cases of blindness after bilateral radical neck dissection were identified by an electronic literature search, as well as cross-checking all references of the above-identified papers. Eleven previous cases of blindness after bilateral neck dissection were identified. The most common cause was posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION), which was permanent. We present the only case in the literature in which blindness occurred after radical neck dissections separated by a span of 9 years. The cause of blindness in our patient was posterior ischemic optic neuropathy. Contributing factors included anemia, hypotension, and disruption of collateral venous return from the neck. PMID:10512147

  18. A Pilot Study of the Inability to Fit Hands Around Neck as a Predictor of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Peter J; Edmonds, Lee C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the high estimates of undiagnosed and untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), there is a need for simple and accurate diagnostic tests. Neck circumference has long been correlated with OSA, but its usefulness as a diagnostic tool has been limited. Aims: We proposed to evaluate the value of a simple neck grasp test to help identify OSA. We hypothesized that the inability of a patient in a sleep clinic to fit their hands around their neck is predictive of OSA. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of patients evaluated in a general sleep clinic was performed. Easy sleep apnea predictor (ESAP) positive was defined as the inability to place the hands around the neck with digits touching in the anterior and posterior. ESAP negative was the ability to place hands around the neck. Positive for OSA in this symptomatic sleep clinic population was defined as an apneahypopnea index (AHI) of ?5. Results: A total of 47 subjects (36% female) had ESAP data available, which were reviewed. The mean age was 51.6 years (SD 14.4, range 29-81 years). The mean body mass index (BMI) was 38.8 (SD 9.9, range 20.4-69.5). Review showed 87.2% (N = 41) tested positive for OSA by AHI of ?5. The sensitivity and specificity of ESAP were 68.3% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive power was 100% and the negative predictive power was 31.6%. Conclusion: As we hypothesized, ESAP positive (inability to span neck) was predictive of OSA in a population of sleep clinic patients. An ESAP positive test was 100% predictive of the presence of OSA (AHI of ?5). ESAP shows promise for ease of clinical use to predict the presence of OSA in a general sleep clinic population. PMID:26942131

  19. A head-neck-eye system that learns fault-tolerant saccades to 3-D targets using a self-organizing neural model.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa, Narayan; Grossberg, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes a head-neck-eye camera system that is capable of learning to saccade to 3-D targets in a self-organized fashion. The self-organized learning process is based on action perception cycles where the camera system performs micro saccades about a given head-neck-eye camera position and learns to map these micro saccades to changes in position of a 3-D target currently in view of the stereo camera. This motor babbling phase provides self-generated movement commands that activate correlated visual, spatial and motor information that are used to learn an internal coordinate transformation between vision and motor systems. The learned transform is used by resulting head-neck-eye camera system to accurately saccade to 3-D targets using many different combinations of head, neck, and eye positions. The interesting aspect of the learned transform is that it is robust to a wide variety of disturbances including reduced degrees of freedom of movement for the head, neck, one eye, or any combination of two of the three, movement of head and neck as a function of eye movements, changes in the stereo camera separation distance and changes in focal lengths of the cameras. These disturbances were not encountered during motor babbling phase. This feature points to general nature of the learned transform in its ability to control autonomous systems with redundant degrees of freedom in a very robust and fault-tolerant fashion. PMID:18775642

  20. Swing of the Surgical Pendulum: A Return to Surgery for Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in the 21st Century?

    SciTech Connect

    Holsinger, F. Christopher Weber, Randal S.

    2007-10-01

    Treatment for head and neck cancer has evolved significantly during the past 100 years. Beginning with Bilroth's total laryngectomy on New Year's Day in 1873, 'radical' surgery remained the only accepted treatment for head and neck cancer when optimal local and regional control was the goal. Bigger was still better when it came to managing the primary tumor and the neck. The 'commando' procedure and radical neck dissection were the hallmarks of this first generation of treatments of head-and-neck cancer. With the advent of microvascular reconstructive techniques, larger and more comprehensive resections could be performed. Despite these large resections and their 'mutilating' sequelae, overall survival did not improve. Even for intermediate-stage disease in head-and-neck cancer, the 5-year survival rate did not improve >50%. Many concluded that more than the scalpel was needed for optimal local and regional control, especially for intermediate- and advanced-stage disease. Most important, the multidisciplinary teams must identify and correlate biomarkers in the tumor and host that predict for a response to therapy and for optimal functional recovery. As the pendulum swings back, a scientific approach using tissue biomarkers for the response to treatment in the setting of multidisciplinary trials must emerge as the new paradigm. In the postgenomic era, treatment decisions should be made based on functional and oncologic parameters-not just to avoid perceived morbidity.

  1. Necking and notch strengthening in metallic glass with symmetric sharp-and-deep notches

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Z. D.; Pei, Q. X.; Liu, Z. S.; Zhang, Y. W.; Wang, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Notched metallic glasses (MGs) have received much attention recently due to their intriguing mechanical properties compared to their unnotched counterparts, but so far no fundamental understanding of the correlation between failure behavior and notch depth/sharpness exists. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we report necking and large notch strengthening in MGs with symmetric sharp-and-deep notches. Our work reveals that the failure mode and strength of notched MGs are strongly dependent on the notch depth and notch sharpness. By increasing the notch depth and the notch sharpness, we observe a failure mode transition from shear banding to necking, and also a large notch strengthening. This necking is found to be caused by the combined effects of large stress gradient at the notch roots and the impingement and subsequent arrest of shear bands emanating from the notch roots. The present study not only shows the failure mode transition and the large notch strengthening in notched MGs, but also provides significant insights into the deformation and failure mechanisms of notched MGs that may offer new strategies for the design and engineering of MGs. PMID:26022224

  2. Dynamic tensile failure mechanics of the musculoskeletal neck using a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Yliniemi, Eno M; Pellettiere, Joseph A; Doczy, Erica J; Nuckley, David J; Perry, Chris E; Ching, Randal P

    2009-05-01

    Although the catapult phase of pilot ejections has been well characterized in terms of human response to compressive forces, the effect of the forces on the human body during the ensuing ejection phases (including windblast and parachute opening shock) has not been thoroughly investigated. Both windblast and parachute opening shock have been shown to induce dynamic tensile forces in the human cervical spine. However, the human tolerance to such loading is not well known. Therefore, the main objective of this research project was to measure human tensile neck failure mechanics to provide data for computational modeling, anthropometric test device development, and improved tensile injury criteria. Twelve human cadaver specimens, including four females and eight males with a mean age of 50.1+/-9 years, were subjected to dynamic tensile loading through the musculoskeletal neck until failure occurred. Failure load, failure strain, and tensile stiffness were measured and correlated with injury type and location. The mean failure load for the 12 specimens was 3100+/-645 N, mean failure strain was 16.7+/-5.4%, and mean tensile stiffness was 172+/-54.5 N/mm. The majority of injuries (8) occurred in the upper cervical spine (Oc-C3), and none took place in the midcervical region (C3-C5). The results of this study assist in filling the existing void in dynamic tensile injury data and will aid in developing improved neck injury prevention strategies. PMID:19388771

  3. Full-field OCT for fast diagnostic of head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leeuw, Frederic; Casiraghi, Odile; Ben Lakhdar, Aïcha; Abbaci, Muriel; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne

    2015-02-01

    Full-Field OCT (FFOCT) produces optical slices of tissue using white light interferometry providing in-depth 2D images, with an isotropic resolution around 1 micrometer. These optical biopsy images are similar to those obtained with established histological procedures, but without tissue preparation and within few minutes. This technology could be useful when diagnosing a lesion or at the time of its surgical management. Here we evaluate the clinical value of FFOCT imaging in the management of patients with Head and Neck cancers by assessing the accuracy of the diagnosis done on FFOCT images from resected specimen. FFOCT images from Head and Neck samples were first compared to the gold standard (HES-conventional histology). An image atlas dedicated to the training of pathologists was built and diagnosis criteria were identified. Then, we performed a morphological correlative study: both healthy and cancerous samples from patients who undergo Head and Neck surgery of oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx were imaged. Images were interpreted in a random way by two pathologists and the FFOCT based diagnostics were compared with HES (gold standard) of the same samples. Here we present preliminary results showing that FFOCT provides a quick assessment of tissue architecture at microscopic level that could guide surgeons for tumor margin delineation during intraoperative procedure.

  4. True stress-strain curve acquisition for irradiated stainless steel including the range exceeding necking strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Kitsunai, Yuji; Koshiishi, Masato

    2015-10-01

    True stress-strain curves were obtained for irradiated 316L stainless steel by a tensile test and by a curve estimation procedure. In the tensile test, the digital image correlation technique together with iterative finite element analysis was applied in order to identify curves for strain larger than the necking strain. The true stress-strain curves were successfully obtained for the strain of more than 0.4 whereas the necking strain was about 0.2 in the minimum case. The obtained true stress-strain curves were approximated well with the Swift-type equation including the post-necking strain even if the exponential constant n was fixed to 0.5. Then, the true stress-strain curves were estimated by a curve estimation procedure, which was referred to as the K-fit method. Material properties required for the K-fit method were the yield and ultimate strengths or only the yield strength. Some modifications were made for the K-fit method in order to improve estimation accuracy for irradiated stainless steels.

  5. Necking and notch strengthening in metallic glass with symmetric sharp-and-deep notches.

    PubMed

    Sha, Z D; Pei, Q X; Liu, Z S; Zhang, Y W; Wang, T J

    2015-01-01

    Notched metallic glasses (MGs) have received much attention recently due to their intriguing mechanical properties compared to their unnotched counterparts, but so far no fundamental understanding of the correlation between failure behavior and notch depth/sharpness exists. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we report necking and large notch strengthening in MGs with symmetric sharp-and-deep notches. Our work reveals that the failure mode and strength of notched MGs are strongly dependent on the notch depth and notch sharpness. By increasing the notch depth and the notch sharpness, we observe a failure mode transition from shear banding to necking, and also a large notch strengthening. This necking is found to be caused by the combined effects of large stress gradient at the notch roots and the impingement and subsequent arrest of shear bands emanating from the notch roots. The present study not only shows the failure mode transition and the large notch strengthening in notched MGs, but also provides significant insights into the deformation and failure mechanisms of notched MGs that may offer new strategies for the design and engineering of MGs. PMID:26022224

  6. Towards automatic measurement of anteversion and neck-shaft angles in human femurs using CT images.

    PubMed

    Casciaro, Mariano E; Craiem, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Automatic assessment of human femur morphology may provide useful clinical information with regard to hip and knee surgery, prosthesis design and management of hip instability. To this end, neck-shaft and anteversion angles are usually used. We propose a full automatic method to estimate these angles in human femurs. Multislice CT images from 18 dried bones were analysed. The algorithm fits 3D cylinders to different regions of the bone to estimate the angles. A manual segmentation and a conventional angle assessment were used for validation. We found anteversion angle as 20 ± 7° and neck-shaft angle as 130 ± 9°. Mean distances from femur surface to cylinders were 5.5 ± 0.6, 3.5 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.4 mm for condyles, diaphysis and neck regions, respectively. Automatic and conventional angles were positively correlated (r(2)>0.85). Manual and automatic segmentations did not differ. The method was fast and 100% reproducible. A robust in vivo segmentation algorithm should be integrated to advance towards a clinically compliant methodology. PMID:22463682

  7. Effects of different head-neck positions on the larynges of ridden horses.

    PubMed

    Zebisch, A; May, A; Reese, S; Gehlen, H

    2014-10-01

    Hyperflexion, that is the strong deflection of the horse's head, poll and neck, is a prevalent training technique in equitation. Hyperflexion has come under criticism in recent years for being suspected of affecting the horses' well-being contrary to animal welfare. The goal of the present study is a comparison between the impacts of different poll-neck positions on findings in the upper respiratory tract of ridden horses. For this purpose, video recordings of the larynges of 14 horses were taken using an overground endoscope. The videos were recorded at rest and during three different riding phases: firstly, in a stretching posture, secondly, in a working position and, thirdly, in hyperflexion. A comparison between the analyses of the working position and hyperflexion phases revealed a significant reduction in the laryngeal opening area (p=0.001) with a value of 8.25.0%. Furthermore, other parameters of the larynx evaluated also showed a significant diminishment. These changes did not correlate with the age of the horses or their level of education, and they were independent of the individual anatomical conditions of the poll-neck region. In summary, it can be stated that hyperflexion causes a considerable compression of the larynx. PMID:24329611

  8. Statistical analysis of 4 types of neck whiplash injuries based on classical meridian theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yemeng; Zhao, Yan; Xue, Xiaolin; Li, Hui; Wu, Xiuyan; Zhang, Qunce; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Tianfang

    2015-01-01

    As one component of the Chinese medicine meridian system, the meridian sinew (Jingjin, (see text), tendino-musculo) is specially described as being for acupuncture treatment of the musculoskeletal system because of its dynamic attributes and tender point correlations. In recent decades, the therapeutic importance of the sinew meridian has become revalued in clinical application. Based on this theory, the authors have established therapeutic strategies of acupuncture treatment in Whiplash-Associated Disorders (WAD) by categorizing four types of neck symptom presentations. The advantage of this new system is to make it much easier for the clinician to find effective acupuncture points. This study attempts to prove the significance of the proposed therapeutic strategies by analyzing data collected from a clinical survey of various WAD using non-supervised statistical methods, such as correlation analysis, factor analysis, and cluster analysis. The clinical survey data have successfully verified discrete characteristics of four neck syndromes, based upon the range of motion (ROM) and tender point location findings. A summary of the relationships among the symptoms of the four neck syndromes has shown the correlation coefficient as having a statistical significance (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), especially with regard to ROM. Furthermore, factor and cluster analyses resulted in a total of 11 categories of general symptoms, which implies syndrome factors are more related to the Liver, as originally described in classical theory. The hypothesis of meridian sinew syndromes in WAD is clearly supported by the statistical analysis of the clinical trials. This new discovery should be beneficial in improving therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25980049

  9. Outcome With Neck Dissection After Chemoradiation for N3 Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Igidbashian, Levon; Fortin, Bernard; Guertin, Louis; Soulieres, Denis; Coulombe, Genevieve; Belair, Manon; Charpentier, Danielle; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of neck dissection (ND) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with N3 disease. Methods and Materials: From March 1998 to September 2006, 70 patients with HNSCC and N3 neck disease were treated with concomitant CRT as primary therapy. Response to treatment was assessed using clinical examination and computed tomography 6 to 8 weeks posttreatment. Neck dissection was not routinely performed and considered for those with less than complete response. Of the patients, 26 (37.1%) achieved clinical complete response (cCR) after CRT. A total of 31 (44.3%) underwent ND after partial response (cPR-ND). Thirteen patients (29.5%) did not achieve cCR and did not undergo ND for the following reasons: incomplete response/progression at primary site, refusal/contraindication to surgery, metastatic progression, or death. These patients were excluded from the analysis. Outcomes were computed using Kaplan-Meier curves and were compared with log rank tests. Results: Comparing the cCR and cPR-ND groups at 2 years, the disease-free survival was respectively 62.7% and 84.9% (p = 0.048); overall survival was 63.0% and 79.4% (p = 0.26), regional relapse-free survival was 87.8% and 96.0% (p = 0.21); and distant disease-free survival was 67.1% and 92.6% (p = 0.059). In the cPR-ND group, 71.0% had no pathologic evidence of disease (PPV of 29.0%). Conclusions: Patients with N3 disease achieving regional cPR and primary cCR who underwent ND seemed to have better outcomes than patients achieving global cCR without ND. Clinical assessment with computed tomography is not adequate for evaluating response to treatment. Because of the inherent limitations of our study, further confirmatory studies are warranted.

  10. Myxedema megacolon after external neck irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Borrie, M.J.; Cape, R.D.; Troster, M.M.; Fung, S.T.

    1983-04-01

    Myxedema megacolon is a rare manifestation of hypothyroidism. It may respond to appropriate treatment but is sometimes irreversible, resulting in fatal complications. Two possible mechanisms to explain the colonic atony include (1) myxomatous infiltration of the submucosa with separation of the muscular fibers from the ganglia of Auerbach's plexus, and (2) severe autonomic neuropathy affecting the extrinsic nerves to the colon and the myenteric plexus. Histology from our case supports the first proposed mechanism. Urecholine challenge and manometric measure response may help predict reversibility of colonic atony. Treatment should be individualized and should include factors such as age, duration of symptoms, and other medical illness. Low-dose oral or intravenous triiodothyronine is effective. Hypothyroidism following external radiation of the neck for lymphoma is not uncommon, and the risk increases following one or more lymphangiograms. Such patients should be followed up with regular TSH estimations for at least three years.

  11. Head and neck manifestations of neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Muecke, M; Amedee, R G

    1994-05-01

    The neurofibromatoses are one of four neurocutaneous syndromes inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and characterized by generalized cutaneous neurofibromas. They are often associated with central and peripheral nervous system tumors, caf-au-lait spots, skeletal abnormalities, and a myriad of associated abnormalities. Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF-1) and neurofibromatosis 2 (NF-2) are clinically and genetically distinct diseases. The diseased gene for NF-1 is the long arm of chromosome 17 and for NF-2 it is the long arm of chromosome 22. Universal signs for NF-1 include Lisch nodules (melanocytic iris hamartomas), optic nerve gliomas, and axillary freckling. The hallmark of NF-2 is bilateral acoustic neuromas. The incidence of head and neck lesions in NF-1 and NF-2 is approximately 37% with a 3.5% malignant transformation rate. A team approach is essential for management of both NF-1 and NF-2 due to multiple organ system involvement. PMID:8027629

  12. [Brachytherapy in head and neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, J J; Noël, G; Simon, J M; Racadot, S; Jauffret, E

    2003-02-01

    Experience accumulated over several decades with radiation of Head and Neck tumours by irradiation has demonstrated the need for a high tumour dose to achieve local control. With external beam irradiation alone, it is difficult to spare adjacent normal tissues, resulting in undesirable late effects on the salivary glands, mandible, and muscles of mastication. Interstitial implantation is ideally suited to deliver a high dose limited to the volume of the primary tumor, thus minimizing sequels. A large experience has been accumulated with low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in treatment of carcinoma of oral cavity, oropharynx, and nasopharynx. Recent analysis of large clinical series provided data indicating that modalities of low dose rate brachytherapy should be optimized in treating these tumors for increasing therapeutic ratio. Low dose rate brachytherapy is now challenged by high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy. Preliminary results obtained with these two last modalities are discussed regarding to those of low dose rate brachytherapy. PMID:12648718

  13. Head and neck cancer: metronomic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Francesca; Musio, Daniela; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a critical oncologic topic. Conventional chemotherapy regimens consist of drugs administration in cycles near or at the maximum tolerated dose (MDT), followed by a long drug-free period to permit the patient to recover from acute toxicities. Despite this strategy is successful in controlling the cancer process at the beginning, a significant number of HNSCC patients tend to recurred or progress, especially those patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease. The repertoire of drugs directed against tumor cells has greatly increased and metronomic chemotherapy (MC) could be an effective treatment option.It is the purpose of this article to review the concept of MC and describe its potential use in HNSCC. We provide an update of ongoing progress and current challenges related to this issue. PMID:26459302

  14. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-02-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  15. Treatment of Hostile Proximal Necks During Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Tulio Pinho; Bernardes, Rodrigo de Castro; Procopio, Ricardo Jayme; Leite, Jose Oyama; Dardik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a therapy that continues to evolve rapidly as advances in technology are incorporated into new generations of devices and surgical practice. Although EVAR has emerged as a safe and effective treatment for patients with favorable anatomy, treatment of patients with unfavorable anatomy remains controversial and is still an off-label indication for endovascular treatment with some current stent-grafts. The proximal neck of the aneurysm remains the most hostile anatomic barrier to successful endovascular repair with long-term durability. Open surgery for unfavorable necks is still considered the gold standard treatment in contemporary practice, despite the increased mortality and morbidity attributed to suprarenal cross-clamping, particularly in high-risk patients. Evolving technology may overcome the obstacles preventing endovascular treatment of unfavorable proximal neck anatomy; current approaches include purely endovascular as well as hybrid approaches, and generally include strategies that either extend the length of the short neck, move the proximal neck more proximally, or keep the short neck intact. These approaches include the use of debranching techniques, banding, chimneys, fenestrated and branched devices, filling the sac with endobags, endoanchors, and other novel devices. These newer-generation devices appear to have promising short- and midterm results. However, lack of good evidence of efficacy with long-term results for these newer approaches still precludes wide dissemination of endovascular solutions for the hostile proximal neck. PMID:26798712

  16. The articulation of sauropod necks: methodology and mythology.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kent A

    2013-01-01

    Sauropods are often imagined to have held their heads high atop necks that ascended in a sweeping curve that was formed either intrinsically because of the shape of their vertebrae, or behaviorally by lifting the head, or both. Their necks are also popularly depicted in life with poses suggesting avian flexibility. The grounds for such interpretations are examined in terms of vertebral osteology, inferences about missing soft tissues, intervertebral flexibility, and behavior. Osteologically, the pronounced opisthocoely and conformal central and zygapophyseal articular surfaces strongly constrain the reconstruction of the cervical vertebral column. The sauropod cervico-dorsal vertebral column is essentially straight, in contrast to the curvature exhibited in those extant vertebrates that naturally hold their heads above rising necks. Regarding flexibility, extant vertebrates with homologous articular geometries preserve a degree of zygapophyseal overlap at the limits of deflection, a constraint that is further restricted by soft tissues. Sauropod necks, if similarly constrained, were capable of sweeping out large feeding surfaces, yet much less capable of retracting the head to explore the enclosed volume in an avian manner. Behaviorally, modern vertebrates generally assume characteristic neck postures which are close to the intrinsic curvature of the undeflected neck. With the exception of some vertebrates that can retract their heads to balance above their shoulders at rest (e.g., felids, lagomorphs, and some ratites), the undeflected neck generally predicts the default head height at rest and during locomotion. PMID:24205266

  17. The relationship between occupations and head and neck cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Pinar, Tevfik; Akdur, Recep; Tuncbilek, Arslan; Altundag, Kadri; Cengiz, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between occupation and head and neck cancers. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this case-control study, 206 Turkish patients with head and neck cancers comprised the case group. The control group consisted of 206 age- and sex-matched patients without malignant disease. All patients completed a questionnaire regarding occupation; tobacco and alcohol consumption; educational status; and history of any systemic disease, benign head and neck disease, and cancer among family members. High-risk jobs were considered those in the industries of construction, wood, mining, metal, chemistry and agriculture. RESULTS: Patients with head and neck cancers worked in high-risk occupations more frequently than did controls [odds ratio (OR): 3.42, p<0.05]. Cancer risk decreased with the increase in time interval between quitting the high-risk job and time of interview. Smokers were at higher risk than nonsmokers (OR: 3.33, p<0.05). The risk was also higher in patients who drank alcohol regularly (OR: 1.59, p<0.05). However, occupation was found to be an independent high-risk factor for head and neck cancers in regression analysis. Frequency of benign head and neck disease and family history of cancer were not significant risk factors (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Our analysis showed that occupation and smoking were significant independent risk factors for the development of head and neck cancers among workers. PMID:17304970

  18. The Articulation of Sauropod Necks: Methodology and Mythology

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kent A.

    2013-01-01

    Sauropods are often imagined to have held their heads high atop necks that ascended in a sweeping curve that was formed either intrinsically because of the shape of their vertebrae, or behaviorally by lifting the head, or both. Their necks are also popularly depicted in life with poses suggesting avian flexibility. The grounds for such interpretations are examined in terms of vertebral osteology, inferences about missing soft tissues, intervertebral flexibility, and behavior. Osteologically, the pronounced opisthocoely and conformal central and zygapophyseal articular surfaces strongly constrain the reconstruction of the cervical vertebral column. The sauropod cervico-dorsal vertebral column is essentially straight, in contrast to the curvature exhibited in those extant vertebrates that naturally hold their heads above rising necks. Regarding flexibility, extant vertebrates with homologous articular geometries preserve a degree of zygapophyseal overlap at the limits of deflection, a constraint that is further restricted by soft tissues. Sauropod necks, if similarly constrained, were capable of sweeping out large feeding surfaces, yet much less capable of retracting the head to explore the enclosed volume in an avian manner. Behaviorally, modern vertebrates generally assume characteristic neck postures which are close to the intrinsic curvature of the undeflected neck. With the exception of some vertebrates that can retract their heads to balance above their shoulders at rest (e.g., felids, lagomorphs, and some ratites), the undeflected neck generally predicts the default head height at rest and during locomotion. PMID:24205266

  19. Interfractional Displacement Analysis of the Spinal Cord for 21 Head & Neck Cases in Radiation Therapy Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Armin; Giske, Kristina; Stoiber, Eva; Bendl, Rolf

    A monomodal slice-based displacement analysis of the spinal cord for three-dimensional computer tomography imaging in radiation therapy planning is presented. In total, 21 head and neck cases with tumor indications close to the spinal cord are studied and evaluated. Two-dimensional cross-correlation is applied to propagate manually segmented contours of the spinal cord from a high-resolution planning CT to subsequently acquired control CTs. The method and the fully automatic implementation turned out to be reliable and robust. A very few manual corrections on the resulting contours remained necessary in single transversal slices.

  20. Characteristics of visual disturbances reported by subjects with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Treleaven, Julia; Takasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Visual symptoms are often reported by patients with neck pain. The aim of the study was to report on the prevalence and most troublesome visual disturbances in subjects with neck pain. Seventy subjects with neck pain and seventy healthy control subjects answered questions about the presence and magnitude (/12) - product of frequency (0-4) and intensity (0-3) of each of 16 visual symptoms noted to be associated with neck pain and other possible causes. A visual complaint index (VCI) (/168) was generated from the sum of the magnitude rating of 14 significant symptoms. The neck pain group had significantly (P > 0.05) greater prevalence and magnitude of 14/16 visual complaints and VCI (mean 27.4) compared to control subjects (mean 6.2). The most prevalent symptoms were 'need to concentrate to read' (70%) and 'sensitivity to light' (58.6%). The least prevalent were 'double vision' (28.6%) and 'dizzy reading' (38.6%). The most troublesome symptoms (greatest magnitude) were 'need to concentrate to read' (3.4/12), 'visual fatigue' (3/12), 'difficulty judging distances' (2.1/12) and 'sensitivity to light' (2.1/12) while the least troublesome complaints were 'double vision' (0.5/12), 'red eyes' (1/12) and 'spots and words moving' (1/12). The characteristics of the visual symptoms were mostly consistent for those previously associated with neck pain. Subjects with traumatic neck pain had a significantly higher VCI compared to those with idiopathic neck pain. The results could help with differential diagnosis. The visual symptoms might be related to eye movement control disturbances in neck pain, however further research is required. PMID:24521926

  1. Sauropod Necks: Are They Really for Heat Loss?

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional digital models of 16 different sauropods were used to examine the scaling relationship between metabolism and surface areas of the whole body, the neck, and the tail in an attempt to see if the necks could have functioned as radiators for the elimination of excess body heat. The sauropod taxa sample ranged in body mass from a 639 kg juvenile Camarasaurus to a 25 t adult Brachiosaurus. Metabolism was assumed to be directly proportional to body mass raised to the ¾ power, and estimates of body mass accounted for the presence of lungs and systems of air sacs in the trunk and neck. Surface areas were determined by decomposing the model surfaces into triangles and their areas being computed by vector methods. It was found that total body surface area was almost isometric with body mass, and that it showed negative allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. In contrast, neck area showed positive allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. Tail area show negative allometry with respect to metabolic rate. The many uncertainties about the biology of sauropods, and the variety of environmental conditions that different species experienced during the groups 150 million years of existence, make it difficult to be absolutely certain about the function of the neck as a radiator. However, the functional combination of the allometric increase of neck area, the systems of air sacs in the neck and trunk, the active control of blood flow between the core and surface of the body, changing skin color, and strategic orientation of the neck with respect to wind, make it plausible that the neck could have functioned as a radiator to avoid over-heating. PMID:24204747

  2. Sauropod necks: are they really for heat loss?

    PubMed

    Henderson, Donald M

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional digital models of 16 different sauropods were used to examine the scaling relationship between metabolism and surface areas of the whole body, the neck, and the tail in an attempt to see if the necks could have functioned as radiators for the elimination of excess body heat. The sauropod taxa sample ranged in body mass from a 639 kg juvenile Camarasaurus to a 25 t adult Brachiosaurus. Metabolism was assumed to be directly proportional to body mass raised to the ¾ power, and estimates of body mass accounted for the presence of lungs and systems of air sacs in the trunk and neck. Surface areas were determined by decomposing the model surfaces into triangles and their areas being computed by vector methods. It was found that total body surface area was almost isometric with body mass, and that it showed negative allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. In contrast, neck area showed positive allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. Tail area show negative allometry with respect to metabolic rate. The many uncertainties about the biology of sauropods, and the variety of environmental conditions that different species experienced during the groups 150 million years of existence, make it difficult to be absolutely certain about the function of the neck as a radiator. However, the functional combination of the allometric increase of neck area, the systems of air sacs in the neck and trunk, the active control of blood flow between the core and surface of the body, changing skin color, and strategic orientation of the neck with respect to wind, make it plausible that the neck could have functioned as a radiator to avoid over-heating. PMID:24204747

  3. Influence of haemoglobin concentration and peripheral muscle pO2 on tumour oxygenation in advanced head and neck tumours.

    PubMed

    Clavo, Bernardino; Prez, Juan L; Lpez, Laura; Surez, Gerardo; Lloret, Marta; Morera, Jess; Macas, David; Martnez, Jos C; Santana, Maite; Hernndez, Mara A; Robaina, Francisco; Gnderoth, Martina

    2003-01-01

    Haemoglobin concentrations and tumour-pO(2) were evaluated pre-therapy in 30 patients with head and neck cancers. Anterior tibialis muscle-pO(2) was additionally measured in 16 of these patients. Tumour-pO(2) was lower in the most anaemic patients (P=0.032) and correlated with muscle-pO(2) (r=0.809, P<0.001). These results suggest that haemoglobin concentration influences tumour-oxygenation. PMID:12559523

  4. Pocket atlas of head and neck MRI anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lufkin, R.B.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    This pocket atlas depicts the anatomy of the head and neck as seen in magnetic resonance (MR) images. The collection of 140 high-resolution images covers all major areas - neck, larynx, oropharynx, tongue, nasopharynx, skull base, sinuses, and temporal bone - displayed in sagittal, axial, and coronal MR image planes. The images show maximum fat/muscle contrast for better visualization of fascial planes. In certain areas of the anatomy, such as the neck and temporal bone, surface coils were used to achieve significant advantages in image quality over standard head or body coils.

  5. A Triassic aquatic protorosaur with an extremely long neck.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Rieppel, Olivier; LaBarbera, Michael C

    2004-09-24

    By Middle Triassic time, a number of reptile lineages had diversified in shallow epicontinental seas and intraplatform basins along the margins of parts of Pangea, including the giraffe-necked protorosaurid reptile Tanystropheus from the Western Tethys (Europe and the Middle East), which grew to approximately 5 to 6 m long. Here we report another long-necked fossil, Dinocephalosaurus, from southwestern China, recently collected in Middle Triassic marine deposits approximately 230 million years old. This taxon represents unambiguous evidence for a fully aquatic protorosaur. Its extremely elongated neck is explained as an adaptation for aquatic life, perhaps for an increase in feeding efficiency. PMID:15448262

  6. Examination of the patient with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Rachel; Liu, Jeffrey C

    2015-07-01

    Head and neck cancer typically refers to epithelial malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract and may include neoplasms of the thyroid, salivary glands, and soft tissue, bone sarcomas, and skin cancers. Two-thirds of patients present with advanced disease involving regional lymph nodes at the time of diagnosis. A thorough history and detailed examination are integral to oncologic staging and treatment planning. This article begins with an overview of the head and neck examination (with special attention to detailed findings with clinical implications), followed by a discussion of the major head and neck subsites, and clinical pearls surrounding the examination. PMID:25979391

  7. Decreased Bone Mineral Density at the Femoral Neck and Lumbar Spine in South Indian Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mathen, Pratheesh George; Zachariah, Bobby; Das, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background With prevalence of diabetes in India reaching epidemic proportions and increase in the population of geriatric age group and risks of falls, it is important to understand the effect that diabetes has on bone health. Aim The objective was to assess bone mineral density (BMD) of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to study factors contributing to BMD in patients with T2DM. Materials and Methods This was a prospective cross-sectional study on 150 patients with T2DM (diagnosed at age > 30 years) and an equal number (n=150) of age and sex matched healthy controls from September 2012 to July 2014 at a tertiary care center located in Southern India. BMD was measured at the femoral neck and lumbar spine (L2L4) by dual energy absorptiometry (DXA) in cases and controls. Serum total calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and 25-OH- vitamin D3 was measured in patient group. Results Mean age (SD) was 51.29 (8.05) and 51 (8.3) years in cases and controls, respectively. The femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD was significantly lower in T2DM cases compared to controls. Also the femoral neck and lumbar spine T-score was significantly lower in T2DM cases compared to controls. Femoral neck BMD among male patients with T2DM was significantly lower compared to controls (men). Among women, BMD at femoral neck as well as lumbar spine was significantly lower in cases when compared to controls. Ninety six out of 150 (64%) T2DM cases had Vitamin D values <20 ng/mL. There was weak negative correlation between age of patient, duration of diabetes and HbA1C with femoral neck BMD. There was weak negative correlation between HbA1C and lumbar spine BMD. Conclusion Indian subjects with type 2 diabetes have significantly lower BMD at both femoral neck and lumbar spine compared to age and sex matched healthy controls. We conclude that osteopenia and osteoporosis are overlooked complications of diabetes. Longitudinal studies are needed to see for actual incidence of fractures among this high risk group. PMID:26500934

  8. Microsatellite alteration in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients from a betel quid-prevalent region.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jin-Ching; Wang, Chen-Chi; Jiang, Rong-San; Wang, Wen-Yi; Liu, Shih-An

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the frequency of microsatellite alteration and their impact on survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients from an endemic betel quid chewing area. We collected 116 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma specimens along with corresponding surgical margins which were confirmed by pathological examination. Ten oligonucleotide markers were chosen for the assessment of microsatellite alteration. The specimens were amplified by polymerase chain reaction followed by automatic fragment analysis. There were 44 specimens (37.9%) with microsatellite instability (MSI) in at least one marker while more than half of the specimens (n = 68, 58.6%) had loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in at least one marker. Though MSI/LOH was not correlated with the survival of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients, presence of MSI in the tumor-free surgical margins was associated with local recurrence (odds ratio: 15.14; 95% confidence interval: 6.451 ~ 35.53; P < 0.001). Genomic assessment of surgical margin can help surgeons to identify head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients who are at risk of developing local recurrence in a betel quid-prevalent region. PMID:27009367

  9. Microsatellite alteration in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients from a betel quid-prevalent region

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jin-Ching; Wang, Chen-Chi; Jiang, Rong-San; Wang, Wen-Yi; Liu, Shih-An

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the frequency of microsatellite alteration and their impact on survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients from an endemic betel quid chewing area. We collected 116 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma specimens along with corresponding surgical margins which were confirmed by pathological examination. Ten oligonucleotide markers were chosen for the assessment of microsatellite alteration. The specimens were amplified by polymerase chain reaction followed by automatic fragment analysis. There were 44 specimens (37.9%) with microsatellite instability (MSI) in at least one marker while more than half of the specimens (n = 68, 58.6%) had loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in at least one marker. Though MSI/LOH was not correlated with the survival of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients, presence of MSI in the tumor-free surgical margins was associated with local recurrence (odds ratio: 15.14; 95% confidence interval: 6.451 ~ 35.53; P < 0.001). Genomic assessment of surgical margin can help surgeons to identify head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients who are at risk of developing local recurrence in a betel quid-prevalent region. PMID:27009367

  10. The effects of a neck musculoskeletal intervention on neck pain levels and depression in post-traumatic stress disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seong Hun; Park, Seong Doo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To identify the effects of a neck intervention on neck pain and depression in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). [Subjects] Thirty-one patients with neck pain and a diagnosis of PTSD were enrolled. [Methods] Neck exercise training was performed with the experimental group and neck self-exercise (using a modification of the McKenzie exercise) was used with the control group. Both groups performed their exercises for 30 minutes at a time, three times per week. To compare the effects of the interventions, the threshold of neck tenderness and depression levels were measured at each period. [Results] The pain threshold of both sides of the trapezius showed a significant difference between the two groups at the three measurement periods. In the experimental group, the threshold increased by 19.7% on the left and 18.3% on the right after the intervention compared to before. Depression levels significantly differed in the experimental group between the three measurements. [Conclusion] This study has important implications for therapeutic strategies, as it provides strong evidence for a method of improving symptoms of neck pain; furthermore, it is effective for subjects with psychological problems such as PTSD. PMID:26180361

  11. Evaluation of neck circumference as a predictor of central obesity and insulin resistance in Chinese adults

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuhong; Zhang, Ning; Yu, Caiguo; Ji, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate whether neck circumference (NC) could be used as a valid and effective method for identifying obesity and insulin resistance (IR) in Chinese adults. Methods: A total of 3307 adults aged 20-65 years were randomly recruited from two communities of Tongzhou, Beijing. Height, weight, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), neck circumference (NC), blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), total cholesterol (TC), serum triglyceride (TG), High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and Urinary albumin (UAlb) were measured. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to explore the relationship between NC and other measurements. Furthermore, the best cutoff values of NC for central obesity identification were determined by applying the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: NC correlated positively with BMI, SBP and WC In both sexes. Both WC and NC correlated significantly positively with IR. A positive correlation between NC and FPG as well as a negative correlation between NC and HDL were found in obese men. NC≥38.5 cm for men and ≥34.5 cm for women were determined to be the best cutoff levels for identifying subjects with central obesity, with 82.9% accuracy for men and 79.9% accuracy for women. Conclusions: NC correlated positively with BMI and WC in both genders, indicating that NC could be used as a valid marker for both overall obesity and central obesity. In addition, measuring NC was shown to be a useful test for IR identification. Large number of NC is suggested to be associated with high risk of developing metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and dyslipidemia. PMID:26770540

  12. 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Head and Neck Cancer most commonly refers to squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, throat, and voice box. However, ... in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is squamous cell carcinoma. It makes up a little over a half ...

  13. Metastases to the Head and Neck: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the more common tumors to metastasize to 12 anatomic subsites of the head and neck, exclusive of cervical lymph nodes. Emphasis is placed on clinical rather than subclinical metastases discovered at autopsy. PMID:20596975

  14. Genome Study Yields Clues to Head and Neck Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have surveyed the genetic changes in nearly 300 head and neck cancers, revealing some previously unknown alterations that may play a role in the disease, including in patients whose cancer is associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  15. Add Neck Problems to Reasons Not to Smoke

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157335.html Add Neck Problems to Reasons Not to Smoke Tobacco ... Spine health is no different, and this study adds to existing studies that have looked at blood ...

  16. Lhermitte's Sign Developing after IMRT for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dong C.; Gagnon, Patrick J.; Meranvil, Sophia; Kaurin, Darryl; Lipp, Linda; Holland, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Lhermitte's sign (LS) is a benign form of myelopathy with neck flexion producing an unpleasant electric-shock sensation radiating down the extremities. Although rare, it can occur after head and neck radiotherapy. Results. We report a case of Lhermitte's developing after curative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for a patient with locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. IMRT delivers a conformal dose of radiation in head and neck cancer resulting in a gradient of radiation dose throughout the spinal cord. Using IMRT, more dose is delivered to the anterior spinal cord than the posterior cord. Conclusions. Lhermitte's sign can develop after IMRT for head and neck cancer. We propose an anterior spinal cord structure, the spinothalamic tract to be the target of IMRT-caused LS. PMID:20628529

  17. Advances in otolaryngology-Head and neck surgery. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, E.N. ); Bluestone, C.D. )

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 14 sections. The section titles are: The impact of AIDS on otolaryngology--head and neck surgery; The management of sleep apneas and snoring; Antimicrobial agents for infections in the ear, nose, and throat--head and neck; Nasal allergy: Medical and surgical treatment; Uses of computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in temporal bone imaging; Surgical management of otitis media with effusion; middle ear reconstruction: Current status; Cochlear implants: an overview; Diagnosis and management of acute facial paralysis; The use of the laser in head and neck surgery; The management and prevention of subglottic stenosis in infants and children; Management of the mass in the thyroid; Suction-assisted lipectomy of the head and neck area; and Ambulatory surgery.

  18. Acupuncture May Ease Neck Pain Over Long Term

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155500.html Acupuncture May Ease Neck Pain Over Long Term 'Alexander ... Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two alternative therapies -- acupuncture and the Alexander technique -- appear equally beneficial for ...

  19. Superadditive correlation.

    PubMed

    Giraud, B G; Heumann, J M; Lapedes, A S

    1999-05-01

    The fact that correlation does not imply causation is well known. Correlation between variables at two sites does not imply that the two sites directly interact, because, e.g., correlation between distant sites may be induced by chaining of correlation between a set of intervening, directly interacting sites. Such "noncausal correlation" is well understood in statistical physics: an example is long-range order in spin systems, where spins which have only short-range direct interactions, e.g., the Ising model, display correlation at a distance. It is less well recognized that such long-range "noncausal" correlations can in fact be stronger than the magnitude of any causal correlation induced by direct interactions. We call this phenomenon superadditive correlation (SAC). We demonstrate this counterintuitive phenomenon by explicit examples in (i) a model spin system and (ii) a model continuous variable system, where both models are such that two variables have multiple intervening pathways of indirect interaction. We apply the technique known as decimation to explain SAC as an additive, constructive interference phenomenon between the multiple pathways of indirect interaction. We also explain the effect using a definition of the collective mode describing the intervening spin variables. Finally, we show that the SAC effect is mirrored in information theory, and is true for mutual information measures in addition to correlation measures. Generic complex systems typically exhibit multiple pathways of indirect interaction, making SAC a potentially widespread phenomenon. This affects, e.g., attempts to deduce interactions by examination of correlations, as well as, e.g., hierarchical approximation methods for multivariate probability distributions, which introduce parameters based on successive orders of correlation. PMID:11969452

  20. Superadditive correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, B. G.; Heumann, John M.; Lapedes, Alan S.

    1999-05-01

    The fact that correlation does not imply causation is well known. Correlation between variables at two sites does not imply that the two sites directly interact, because, e.g., correlation between distant sites may be induced by chaining of correlation between a set of intervening, directly interacting sites. Such ``noncausal correlation'' is well understood in statistical physics: an example is long-range order in spin systems, where spins which have only short-range direct interactions, e.g., the Ising model, display correlation at a distance. It is less well recognized that such long-range ``noncausal'' correlations can in fact be stronger than the magnitude of any causal correlation induced by direct interactions. We call this phenomenon superadditive correlation (SAC). We demonstrate this counterintuitive phenomenon by explicit examples in (i) a model spin system and (ii) a model continuous variable system, where both models are such that two variables have multiple intervening pathways of indirect interaction. We apply the technique known as decimation to explain SAC as an additive, constructive interference phenomenon between the multiple pathways of indirect interaction. We also explain the effect using a definition of the collective mode describing the intervening spin variables. Finally, we show that the SAC effect is mirrored in information theory, and is true for mutual information measures in addition to correlation measures. Generic complex systems typically exhibit multiple pathways of indirect interaction, making SAC a potentially widespread phenomenon. This affects, e.g., attempts to deduce interactions by examination of correlations, as well as, e.g., hierarchical approximation methods for multivariate probability distributions, which introduce parameters based on successive orders of correlation.

  1. Incidence of sarcoidosis in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Galiil, K; Anand, R; Sharma, S; Brennan, P A; Ramchandani, P L; Ilankovan, V

    2008-01-01

    Sarcoidosis and sarcoid-like reactions have been reported to be associated with malignancies, particularly testicular cancer and lymphoma. They occur either synchronously or metachronously, and may also occur after chemotherapy. We know of only two other case reports of granulomatous reactions in head and neck cancer. The present case highlights the association of sarcoidosis with head and neck cancer, and the importance of considering the diagnosis in patients who may have metastatic disease. PMID:17174454

  2. Neck incision planning for total laryngectomy: A finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Allen L; Clark, James H; Agrawal, Nishant; Moussa, Walied; Richmon, Jeremy D

    2015-11-26

    Post-operative complications can be attributed to technical aspects of surgery, yet no studies have investigated the mechanics behind commonly used incisions for total laryngopharyngectomies (TLP). This procedure, seen in head and neck cancer patients, necessitates free tissue transfer to construct a neo-pharynx, creating an inherently greater risk of complications. We sought to investigate the impact of neck incision location on these post-operative complications for TLP using finite element analysis (FEA). A nonlinear hyperelastic 2-D finite element model was used to evaluate the stress and strain along the incision line of two separate neck incision models commonly used for TLP: low-neck apron (LNA) incisions that incorporate the patient?s tracheostoma and mid-neck apron (MNA) incisions that do not communicate with the tracheostoma. A constant displacement was applied to the incision to simulate normal neck extension experienced during the post-operative phase. Each neck incision was also modeled at varying strain energy densities to simulate various stages of wound healing. For a constant displacement of 40mm, the principal von Mises stress of the LNA incision varied between 5.87 and 6.41MPa, depending on the hyperelastic properties of the healing incision. This stress was concentrated at the junction of the incision and the fixed tracheostomal edge. The MNA model demonstrated a principal von Mises stress that varied between 0.558 and 0.711MPa and was concentrated along the midline of the neck incision. MNA incisions for TL patients result in principal von Mises stresses which are up to 11 times lower than those seen in LNA incisions. These results coincided with clinical observations from a concurrent study that showed a decrease in rate of wound dehiscence for patients undergoing TLP with an MNA incision. PMID:26556716

  3. Penetrating nontorso trauma: the head and the neck

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Acute penetrating injuries to the head and neck cause considerable anxiety for most clinicians owing to concern for airway control and neurologic injury and to limited clinician experience in most centres. This article discusses an organized approach to the evaluation and initial treatment of penetrating injuries to the head and neck based on regional anatomy and clinical examination. The approach is particularly helpful in the context of ongoing hemorrhage and/or airway compromise. PMID:26022154

  4. Reconstructive Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hanasono, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades. Microvascular free flap reconstructions largely replaced other techniques. More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance. The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible. PMID:26556426

  5. Arthroscopic Femoral Neck Osteoplasty in the Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Roxanne M.; Kuzma, Scott A.; Krych, Aaron J.; Levy, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Femoral neck osteoplasty is an integral component for successful treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Current techniques allow this to be performed arthroscopically, and results are equivalent to those of open procedures when typical anterior and anterosuperior lesions are considered. The arthroscopic procedure is dependent on obtaining adequate visualization through capsular management and proper leg positioning, and it requires fluoroscopy to guide and verify an adequate resection. We present our preferred technique for arthroscopic femoral neck osteoplasty. PMID:24749017

  6. Surgical Technique Refinements in Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jeffrey C.; Shah, Jatin P.

    2010-01-01

    The head and neck region poses a challenging arena for oncologic surgery. Diseases and their treatment can affect a myriad of functions, including sight, hearing, taste, smell, breathing, speaking, swallowing, facial expression and appearance. This review discusses several areas where refinements in surgical techniques have led to improved patient outcomes. This includes surgical incisions, neck lymphadenectomy, transoral laser microsurgery, minimally invasive thyroid surgery, and the use of vascularized free flaps for oromandibular reconstruction. PMID:20512941

  7. Femoral neck structure and function in early hominins.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Christopher B; Higgins, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    All early (Pliocene-Early Pleistocene) hominins exhibit some differences in proximal femoral morphology from modern humans, including a long femoral neck and a low neck-shaft angle. In addition, australopiths (Au. afarensis, Au. africanus, Au. boisei, Paranthropus boisei), but not early Homo, have an "anteroposteriorly compressed" femoral neck and a small femoral head relative to femoral shaft breadth. Superoinferior asymmetry of cortical bone in the femoral neck has been claimed to be human-like in australopiths. In this study, we measured superior and inferior cortical thicknesses at the middle and base of the femoral neck using computed tomography in six Au. africanus and two P. robustus specimens. Cortical asymmetry in the fossils is closer overall to that of modern humans than to apes, although many values are intermediate between humans and apes, or even more ape-like in the midneck. Comparisons of external femoral neck and head dimensions were carried out for a more comprehensive sample of South and East African australopiths (n = 17) and two early Homo specimens. These show that compared with modern humans, femoral neck superoinferior, but not anteroposterior breadth, is larger relative to femoral head breadth in australopiths, but not in early Homo. Both internal and external characteristics of the australopith femoral neck indicate adaptation to relatively increased superoinferior bending loads, compared with both modern humans and early Homo. These observations, and a relatively small femoral head, are consistent with a slightly altered gait pattern in australopiths, involving more lateral deviation of the body center of mass over the stance limb. PMID:23341246

  8. Cosmetic face, neck, and brow lifts with local anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Huq, Nasim S; Nakhooda, Tariq I

    2013-10-01

    The sections on the face, neck, and brow include descriptions of facelift, neck lift, and open brow lift techniques, anesthesia, treatment goals, procedural approaches, complications, management, preoperative and postoperative care, rehabilitation, recovery, and outcomes. The approach to facial rejuvenation the midface and periorbital area is detailed. These operations are often and easily performed entirely with the use of local anesthesia and mild oral sedation. There are very high satisfaction rates. PMID:24093659

  9. History of head and neck radiology: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Weber, A L

    2001-01-01

    Head and neck radiology has evolved during the century since the discovery of the x ray in 1895 by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen. In the first few decades, conventional radiography was the diagnostic modality for evaluation of head and neck diseases. Special radiographic projections were designed to demonstrate abnormal processes in the paranasal sinuses, temporal bones, base of the skull, and neck. Barium examination with fluoroscopy was used for assessment of the pharynx and esophagus. Linear tomography, introduced in 1932, allowed the acquisition of sections that depicted abnormalities that were not clearly defined at conventional radiography. Linear tomography was further enhanced with the introduction of thin-section polytomography, especially of the temporal bone, in 1954. Computed tomography in 1972 and magnetic resonance imaging in 1982 improved our diagnostic capabilities by enabling location and characterization of tumors, cysts, and inflammatory processes in the head and neck and aiding in earlier diagnosis and treatment. Teaching of residents and fellows by an expanding staff of head and neck radiologists developed. The formation of the American Society of Head and Neck Radiology in 1977 provided a forum for postgraduate education and scientific exchange. PMID:11152774

  10. Prenatal diagnosis and management of a fetal neck mass

    PubMed Central

    Do?er, Emek; Ceylan, Yasin; ak?ro?lu, Ahmet Yi?it; al??kan, Eray

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a benign mesenchymal spindle-cell tumor located on fetal neck, diagnosed during prenatal ultrasound and magnetic resonance investigation. A 30-year-old woman (gravida 2, para 1) was referred to our perinatology unit for evaluation of a fetal neck mass that had been identified on ultrasonography at 29 weeks gestation. A right lateral neck mass was observed (size: 4240 mm) that extended from the preauricular region to right clavicula. Fetal MRI revealed a solid heterogeneous mass arising from the right lateral neck and there was no invasion around tissue and no extension of the mass into the chest. At 37 weeks after birth, we observed that the mass was subcutaneous and there was no invasion to the surrounding tissue. The trachea was not compressed and there was no extension of the mass into the chest. Then, the neck mass was completely resected after birth without any complications. Histopathological examination of tumor was consistent with mesenchymal spindle-cell tumor. Immunohistochemical staining with CD34 and actin was positive; however, caldesmone, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), and S-100 was negative. Fetal MRI performed during the pregnancy for investigation of fetal neck masses detected on ultrasound gives compatible results observed in the neonate after birth and maintains adequate findings for follow-up and planning of treatment. PMID:26097396

  11. Lymphedema Outcomes in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Little, Leila G.; Skoracki, Roman J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Lewin, Jan S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to describe the presentation of external head and neck lymphedema in patients treated for head and neck cancer and examine their initial response to complete decongestive therapy. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. Subjects and Methods Patients evaluated for head and neck cancer at MD Anderson Cancer Center after treatment 01/2007-01/2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Response to complete decongestive therapy was evaluated per changes in lymphedema severity rating or surface tape measures. Predictors of therapy response were examined using regression models. Results 1,202 patients were evaluated. Most patients (62%) had soft, reversible pitting edema (MDACC Stage 1b). Treatment response was evaluated in 733 patients after receiving therapy; 439 (60%) improved after complete decongestive therapy. Treatment adherence independently predicted complete decongestive therapy response (p<0.001). Conclusions These data support the effectiveness of a head and neck cancer-specific regimen of lymphedema therapy for cancer patients with external head and neck lymphedema. Our findings suggest that head and neck lymphedema is distinct from lymphedema that affects other sites, requiring adaptations in traditional methods of management and measurement. PMID:25389318

  12. A Septin-Dependent Diffusion Barrier at Dendritic Spine Necks

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Jennifer D.; Racz, Bence; Sheng, Morgan; Choquet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory glutamatergic synapses at dendritic spines exchange and modulate their receptor content via lateral membrane diffusion. Several studies have shown that the thin spine neck impedes the access of membrane and solute molecules to the spine head. However, it is unclear whether the spine neck geometry alone restricts access to dendritic spines or if a physical barrier to the diffusion of molecules exists. Here, we investigated whether a complex of septin cytoskeletal GTPases localized at the base of the spine neck regulates diffusion across the spine neck. We found that, during development, a marker of the septin complex, Septin7 (Sept7), becomes localized to the spine neck where it forms a stable structure underneath the plasma membrane. We show that diffusion of receptors and bulk membrane, but not cytoplasmic proteins, is slower in spines bearing Sept7 at their neck. Finally, when Sept7 expression was suppressed by RNA interference, membrane molecules explored larger membrane areas. Our findings indicate that Sept7 regulates membrane protein access to spines. PMID:25494357

  13. The cervical anatomy of Samotherium, an intermediate-necked giraffid

    PubMed Central

    Danowitz, Melinda; Domalski, Rebecca; Solounias, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    Giraffidae are represented by many extinct species. The only two extant taxa possess diametrically contrasting cervical morphology, as the okapi is short-necked and the giraffe is exceptionally long-necked. Samotherium major, known from the Late Miocene of Samos in Greece and other Eurasian localities, is a key extinct giraffid; it possesses cervical vertebrae that are intermediate in the evolutionary elongation of the neck. We describe detailed anatomical features of the cervicals of S. major, and compare these characteristics with the vertebrae of the two extant giraffid taxa. Based on qualitative morphological characters and a quantitative analysis of cervical dimensions, we find that the S. major neck is intermediate between that of the okapi and the giraffe. Specifically, the more cranial (C2–C3) vertebrae of S. major represent a mosaic of features shared either with the giraffe or with the okapi. The more caudal (C5–C7) S. major vertebrae, however, appear transitional between the two extant taxa, and hence are more unique. Notably, the C6 of S. major exhibits a partially excavated ventral lamina that is strong cranially but completely absent on the caudal half of the ventral vertebral body, features between those seen in the giraffe and the okapi. Comprehensive anatomical descriptions and measurements of the almost-complete cervical column reveal that S. major is a truly intermediate-necked giraffid. Reconstructions of the neck display our findings. PMID:26716010

  14. The cervical anatomy of Samotherium, an intermediate-necked giraffid.

    PubMed

    Danowitz, Melinda; Domalski, Rebecca; Solounias, Nikos

    2015-11-01

    Giraffidae are represented by many extinct species. The only two extant taxa possess diametrically contrasting cervical morphology, as the okapi is short-necked and the giraffe is exceptionally long-necked. Samotherium major, known from the Late Miocene of Samos in Greece and other Eurasian localities, is a key extinct giraffid; it possesses cervical vertebrae that are intermediate in the evolutionary elongation of the neck. We describe detailed anatomical features of the cervicals of S. major, and compare these characteristics with the vertebrae of the two extant giraffid taxa. Based on qualitative morphological characters and a quantitative analysis of cervical dimensions, we find that the S. major neck is intermediate between that of the okapi and the giraffe. Specifically, the more cranial (C2-C3) vertebrae of S. major represent a mosaic of features shared either with the giraffe or with the okapi. The more caudal (C5-C7) S. major vertebrae, however, appear transitional between the two extant taxa, and hence are more unique. Notably, the C6 of S. major exhibits a partially excavated ventral lamina that is strong cranially but completely absent on the caudal half of the ventral vertebral body, features between those seen in the giraffe and the okapi. Comprehensive anatomical descriptions and measurements of the almost-complete cervical column reveal that S. major is a truly intermediate-necked giraffid. Reconstructions of the neck display our findings. PMID:26716010

  15. An integrated approach towards future ballistic neck protection materials selection.

    PubMed

    Breeze, John; Helliker, Mark; Carr, Debra J

    2013-05-01

    Ballistic protection for the neck has historically taken the form of collars attached to the ballistic vest (removable or fixed), but other approaches, including the development of prototypes incorporating ballistic material into the collar of an under body armour shirt, are now being investigated. Current neck collars incorporate the same ballistic protective fabrics as the soft armour of the remaining vest, reflecting how ballistic protective performance alone has historically been perceived as the most important property for neck protection. However, the neck has fundamental differences from the thorax in terms of anatomical vulnerability, flexibility and equipment integration, necessitating a separate solution from the thorax in terms of optimal materials selection. An integrated approach towards the selection of the most appropriate combination of materials to be used for each of the two potential designs of future neck protection has been developed. This approach requires evaluation of the properties of each potential material in addition to ballistic performance alone, including flexibility, mass, wear resistance and thermal burden. The aim of this article is to provide readers with an overview of this integrated approach towards ballistic materials selection and an update of its current progress in the development of future ballistic neck protection. PMID:23637268

  16. Neck afferent involvement in cardiovascular control during movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, P. S.; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that labyrinth and neck afferent information contributes to the regulation of somatomotor function during movement and changes in posture. There is also convincing evidence that the vestibular system participates in the modulation of sympathetic outflow and cardiovascular function during changes in posture, presumably to prevent orthostatic hypotension. However, the labyrinth organs do not provide any signals concerning body movements with respect to the head. In contrast, the neck receptors, particularly muscle spindles, are well located and suited to provide information about changes in body position with respect to the head and vestibular signals. Studies in the cat suggest that neck afferent information may modulate the vestibulosympathetic reflex responses to head-neck movements. There is some evidence in the cat to suggest involvement of low threshold mechanoreceptors. However, human studies do not indicate that low threshold mechanoreceptors in the neck modulate cardiovascular responses. The human studies are consistent with the studies in the cat in that they demonstrate the importance of otolith activation in mediating cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to changes in posture. This paper briefly reviews the current experimental evidence concerning the involvement of neck afferent information in the modulation of cardiovascular control during movement and changes in posture.

  17. Radial Neck Osteotomy for Malunion of Radial Neck Fracture in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Vandergugten, Simon; Troussel, Serge; Lefebvre, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In a case of a neglected radial neck fracture in childhood, the management of initial fracture and its complications are subjected to discussion. In children, open reduction should be avoided but an angulation less than 30° must be obtained. Several techniques exist to manage symptomatic malunion in adults, including resection, prosthesis, and osteotomy. When performing an osteotomy, it is important first to preserve an intact osseous hinge to avoid avascular necrosis and second to align the edge of the radial head articular surface with the lateral edge of the coronoid process, in order to avoid overstuffing elbow joint. PMID:26347364

  18. Osteoid Osteoma of the Femoral Neck in Athletes: Two Case Reports Differentiating From Femoral Neck Stress Injuries.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Christopher B; Dembowski, Scott C; Johnson, Michael R; Combs, John J; Svoboda, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma can be a challenging and lengthy process, with reports of delayed diagnosis of greater than 2 years. In the young, athletic patient with an atraumatic onset of groin pain, an overuse injury or muscle strain is the most likely etiology. However, an overuse injury of femoral neck stress fracture must be identified because of the potentially disastrous outcome of fracture completion. The similar clinical presentation of a femoral neck stress fracture and intra-articular osteoid osteoma of the femoral neck can further delay the diagnosis of the osteoid osteoma. In a patient with these differential diagnoses that do not improve with a period of nonweightbearing activity, a more intensive workup must ensue. The purpose of this case report is to describe the initial presentations, subsequent follow-up, and imaging findings leading to the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma as well as to differentiate an osteoid osteoma from femoral neck stress injuries. PMID:26517936

  19. Washington Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David M.; Boboltz, David

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Washington Correlator for 2012. The Washington Correlator provides up to 80 hours of attended processing per week plus up to 40 hours of unattended operation, primarily supporting Earth Orientation and astrometric observations. In 2012, the major programs supported include the IVS-R4, IVS-INT, APSG, and CRF observing sessions.

  20. Enhanced Recovery for Fractured Neck of Femur

    PubMed Central

    Rees, David; Kendrick, Emily; Bradshaw, Charlotte; Flavell, Esther; Deglurkar, Mukund

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced recovery is now a standard model of care in most UK elective surgical units. For hip and knee arthroplasty this approach typically includes opioid-sparing anesthesia (OSA), local infiltration analgesia (LIA), and day of surgery mobilization. There is evidence that these interventions shorten hospital stay and improve outcomes, without increasing complications or readmissions. These interventions may also benefit patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck (hip) fractures. This group of patients are frail and elderly, and are at high risk from surgery, anesthesia, and opioid and bed rest-related complications. Hip fractures are also a major public health concern. They are common, expensive to treat, and associated with poor outcomes. Despite this there are no published descriptions of the use of OSA and LIA to enable day of surgery mobilization in patients with hip fractures. We present 3 patients who underwent hip fracture surgery according to an enhanced recovery protocol that incorporated all 3 interventions. In each case day of surgery mobilization was achieved safely and comfortably, without requirement for strong opioids postoperatively. The cases demonstrate that these interventions can be well tolerated by patients with hip fracture, including those with impaired mobility or cognitive function. The protocol is compatible with all common operations for hip fracture, and with spinal or general anesthesia. It is inexpensive and requires minimal expertise. It may have the potential to improve care and shorten hospital stay, while reducing cost. Further investigation is required. PMID:25360329

  1. Spinal cord injury incurred by neck massage.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Hyun Suk; Hong, Bo Young; Ko, Yeong-A; Lim, Seong Hoon; Kim, Joon Sung

    2012-10-01

    Massage is generally accepted as a safe and a widely used modality for various conditions, such as pain, lymphedema, and facial palsy. However, several complications, some with devastating results, have been reported. We introduce a case of a 43-year-old man who suffered from tetraplegia after a neck massage. Imaging studies revealed compressive myelopathy at the C6 level, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), and a herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) at the C5-6 level. After 3 years of rehabilitation, his motor power improved, and he is able to walk and drive with adaptation. OPLL is a well-known predisposing factor for myelopathy in minor trauma, and it increases the risk of HNP, when it is associated with the degenerative disc. Our case emphasizes the need for additional caution in applying manipulation, including massage, in patients with OPLL; patients who are relatively young (i.e., in the fifth decade of life) are not immune to minor trauma. PMID:23185737

  2. Bladder neck incompetence at posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2015-01-01

    The finding of an incompetent bladder neck (BN) at the time of posterior urethroplasty will necessarily exacerbate the already difficult situation. In such cases the aim of the treatment is not only to restore urethral continuity by end-to-end urethral anastomosis, but also to restore the function of the BN to maintain urinary continence. Fortunately, the incidence of incompetence of the BN at posterior urethroplasty is uncommon, usually ?4.5%. It seems that pelvic fracture-related BN injuries, in contrast to urethral injuries which result from a shearing force, are due to direct injury by the sharp edge of the fractured and displaced pubic bone. The risk of injuries to the BN is greater in children, in patients with a fracture involving both superior and inferior pubic rami on the same side, and in those managed initially by primary realignment. An incompetent BN is suspected by finding an open rectangular BN on cystography, and a fixedly open BN on suprapubic cystoscopy. An incompetent BN can be treated either subsequent to or concomitant with the urethral repair, according to whether a perineal or a perineo-abdominal urethroplasty is used, respectively. Several options have been reported to treat pelvic fracture-related BN incompetence, including reconstructing the BN, forming a new sphincter by tubularisation of a rectangular flap of the anterior bladder wall, and mechanical occlusion by an artificial sphincter or collagen injection. Reconstruction of the BN by the Young-Dees-Leadbetter?? procedure probably provides the most successful results. PMID:26019982

  3. Hemodynamic Responses to Head and Neck Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Carbo, Jorge E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1994-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide head and neck cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objective of this study was to measure the scalp temperature and circulatory responses during use of one commercially available thermal control system. The Life Support Systems, Inc. Mark VII portable cooling system and a liquid cooling helmet were used in this study. Two EEG electrodes and one skin temperature transducer were placed on the anterior midline of the scalp to measure the scalp blood and temperature. Blood flow was measured using a bipolar impedance rheograph. Ten subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature, were tested at high, medium, moderate, moderate-low and low coolant temperatures. Scalp blood flow was recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 200 Hz. Scalp temperature and cooling helmet Inlet temperature was logged periodically during the test period. This study quantifies the effect of head cooling upon scalp temperature and blood flow. These data may also be used to select operational specifications of the head cooling system for biomedical applications such as the treatment of migraine headaches, scalp cooling during chemotherapy, and cooling of multiple sclerosis patients.

  4. Association between injury to the retinacula of Weitbrecht and femoral neck fractures: anatomical and clinical observations

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Jiong; Ni, Ming; Wang, Guoliang; Jia, Guangyao; Liu, Shiwei; Cui, Xueliang; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Hua; Dai, Yahui; Quan, Kun; Chen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no objective indicator for surgical procedures in elderly patients with femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to determine the severity of damage to the retinacula of Weitbrecht based on the type of femoral neck fracture, anatomical and clinical observations. Data from 44 patients treated with artificial femoral head replacement were analyzed for the association between Garden type fracture and severity of injury to Weitbrechts retinacula. Additionally, 18 cases (Pauwels type III fracture) after Watson-Jones surgical approach and internal fixations were used to investigate the bone healing and femoral head necrosis. Among 44 patients (Garden type was III-IV, 79.6%), significant associations were found between Garden type fracture and lateral (P < 0.001), anterior (P = 0.045), and medial (P = 0.004) retinacular injury. Significant positive Spearman correlation coefficients between Garden type and the severity of injury to Weitbrechts retinacula were ? = 0.561 with P < 0.001 for lateral, ? = 0.338 with P = 0.025 for anterior, and ? = 0.469 with P = 0.001 for medial retinacula. Additionally, 4 out of 18 Pauwels type III fracture cases were observed severe damages on Weitbrechts retinacula and resulting bone necrosis. In conclusion, this study provided the anatomical and histological correlations between fracture displacement and degree of retinacula injury. PMID:26770357

  5. Dynamic Hip Screw for the Treatment of Femoral Neck Fractures: A Prospective Study with 96 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Jacobus, Lucas Senger; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonalves, Ramiro Zilles; Ypez, Anthony Kerbes; Barreto, Rodrigo Py Gonalves; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To study the correlation between avascular necrosis and the demographics, time elapsed from fracture to surgery, quality of reduction, Garden classification, and the position of the screw following use of the dynamic hip screw (DHS) in the treatment of subcapital neck fractures. Methods. A prospective study of 96 patients with subcapital neck fractures was carried out in a faculty hospital. Patients underwent surgery with closed reduction and internal fixation with DHS. Results. There were 58% male and 42% female patients, with a mean age of 53 years (+/?14). In terms of Garden classification, 60% were Garden IV, 26% were Garden III, and 14% were Garden II. Nonunion was observed in three cases (3%) and was treated with valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy, in all cases leading to successful healing. Avascular necrosis was observed in 16% of patients. The positioning of the screw into the femoral head showed a significant correlation with necrosis. Conclusions. The incidence of necrosis in patients under the age of 50 years is twice as high as that in older patients. Displacement is a predictive factor regarding osteonecrosis and is associated with a high and anterior position of the screw in the femoral head. Level II of evidence. Study Type: therapeutic study. PMID:24967124

  6. Melanoma Metastases to the Neck Nodes: Role of Adjuvant Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Strojan, Primoz; Jancar, Boris; Cemazar, Maja; Perme, Maja Pohar; Hocevar, Marko

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To review experiences in the treatment of regionally advanced melanoma to the neck and/or parotid with emphasis on the role of adjuvant radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Clinical and histopathologic data, treatment details, and outcomes in patients treated during the period 2000-2006 at the Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana, Slovenia, were reviewed. Results: A total of 40 patients with 42 dissections underwent surgery, and 43 patients with 45 dissections received irradiation postoperatively to a median equivalent dose (eqTD{sub 2}: 2 Gy/fraction, 1 fraction/day, 5 fractions/week) of 60 Gy (range, 47.8-78.8). Regional control 2 years after surgery was 56% (95% confidence interval [CI] 40-72%) and after postoperative radiotherapy 78% (CI 63-92%) (p = 0.015). On multivariate analysis, postoperative radiotherapy (yes vs. no: hazard ratio [HR] 6.3, CI 2.0-20.6) and sum of the risk factors present (i.e., risk factor score; HR 1.7 per score point, CI 1.2-2.6) were predictive for regional control. On logistic regression testing, the number of involved nodes was associated with the probability of distant metastases (p = 0.021). The incidence of late toxicity did not correlate with the mode of therapy, eqTD{sub 2}, or fractionation pattern. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy has the potential to compensate effectively for the negative impact of adverse histopatologic features to disease control in a dissected nodal basin. More conventionally fractionated radiotherapy regimens using fraction doses of 2-2.5 Gy, with cumulative eqTD{sub 2{>=}}60 Gy, are recommended. The number of involved lymph nodes is proposed as an additional criterion for limiting the implementation of adjuvant irradiation.

  7. Identification of women with reduced bone density at the lumbar spine and femoral neck using BMD at the os calcis.

    PubMed

    Fordham, J N; Chinn, D J; Kumar, N

    2000-01-01

    We assessed the clinical usefulness of bone density measurements at the os calcis as a screening tool to identify patients with low bone density at the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Bone mineral density (BMD) was recorded in 443 women (mean age 60 years) referred to a bone densitometry service. Measurements were made at the lumbar spine and femoral neck using a Lunar DPXL and at the right os calcis using a Peripheral Instantaneous X-ray Imaging (PIXI) dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry system. Average T-scores derived using the manufacturer's data were: 1.59 for the lumbar spine, -1.41 for the femoral neck and -0.87 for the os calcis. The prevalence of osteoporosis using WHO criteria (T-scores of -2.5 or less) was 36% for the lumbar spine or femoral neck but only 9.7% for the os calcis. BMD of the os calcis correlated with that at the lumbar spine (r = 0.69, p < 0.001) and femoral neck (r = 0.67, p < 0.001). The area under the receiver operator characteristics curve was 0.836 (standard error 0.020) for the os calcis related to osteoporosis at the lumbar spine or femoral neck. Optimal accuracy was obtained at a T-score of < or = -1.3 (BMD 0.39 g/cm2) when the sensitivity was 69.6% (95% confidence interval 65.3, 73.9%) and specificity 82.6% (95% confidence interval 79.1, 86.1%). However, the probability of diagnosing low bone density from a given BMD at the os calcis varied by age and site scanned. Accordingly, for informing management strategies, the choice of a single cutoff BMD at the os calcis may not be appropriate and several thresholds may be adopted based on age, the site of interest (lumbar spine or femoral neck) and consideration of associated clinical features. Thus, the use of heel bone density scanners could reduce the number of axial bone density measurements required. The advantages of portability, low cost and shorter scan times should reduce the cost of detection and provide a greater opportunity for identification of women at risk of fracture. PMID:11148807

  8. Does Choice of Head Size and Neck Geometry Affect Stem Migration in Modular Large-Diameter Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty? A Preliminary Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, CS; Evangelou, KG; Theodorou, EG; Provatidis, CG; Megas, PD

    2012-01-01

    Due to their theoretical advantages, hip systems combining modular necks and large diameter femoral heads have gradually gained popularity. However, among others, concerns regarding changes in the load transfer patterns were raised. Recent stress analyses have indeed shown that the use of modular necks and big femoral heads causes significant changes in the strain distribution along the femur. Our original hypothesis was that these changes may affect early distal migration of a modular stem. We examined the effect of head diameter and neck geometry on migration at two years of follow-up in a case series of 116 patients (125 hips), who have undergone primary Metal-on-Metal total hip arthroplasty with the modular grit-blasted ProfemurE stem combined with large-diameter heads (>36 mm). We found that choice of neck geometry and head diameter has no effect on stem migration. A multivariate regression analysis including the potential confounding variables of the body mass index, bone quality, canal fill and stem positioning revealed only a negative correlation between subsidence and canal fill in midstem area. Statistical analysis, despite its limitations, did not confirm our hypothesis that choice of neck geometry and/or head diameter affects early distal migration of a modular stem. However, the importance of correct stem sizing was revealed. PMID:23284597

  9. Pretreatment performance status and nutrition are associated with early mortality of locally advanced head and neck cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Huang, Jen-Seng; Lai, Chien-Hong; Wu, Tsung-Han; Lan, Yii-Jenq; Tsai, Jason Chien-Sheng; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Yang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Hsu

    2013-05-01

    Unexpected fatal events in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy are a clinical concern. Malnutrition, which is reported frequently in head and neck cancer patients, are associated with immunity derangement. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for early death of patients undergoing chemoradiation. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 194 stage III, IVA, and IVB head and neck cancer patients who were treated with chemoradiation between 2007 and 2009. We defined early death as death while receiving chemoradiation or within 60 days of treatment completion. Risk factors for early death were tested using univariate and multivariate analyses. Fourteen patients (7.2 %) experienced early death, 78.6 % of whom died of infection. Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between early death and several pretreatment variables, including Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS) >1, hemoglobin <10 g/dL, albumin <3 g/dL, body mass index (BMI) <19 kg/m(2), and peripheral blood total lymphocyte count <700/?L. Multivariate analysis showed that PS >1, BMI <19 kg/m(2), and peripheral blood total lymphocyte count <700/?L were independent variables associated with early death. Poor performance status and malnutrition before chemoradiation independently predict early death in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation. Cautious management of head and neck cancer patients with these risk factors is required throughout chemoradiation period. PMID:23188165

  10. Characteristics of a new episode of neck pain.

    PubMed

    Leaver, Andrew M; Maher, Christopher G; McAuley, James H; Jull, Gwendolen A; Refshauge, Kathryn M

    2013-06-01

    We report on the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients seeking manual therapy care for a new episode of non-specific neck pain and report on characteristics associated with higher levels of pain and disability in these patients. Demographic and clinical data were collected from patients who enrolled in a clinical trial of manipulation for neck pain. A profile of these patients was formulated using descriptive statistics. Multivariate linear regression models were used to describe the relationship between patient characteristics and severity of pain and disability. Patients with a new episode of non-specific neck pain reported pain intensity of 6.1 2.0 (mean SD) on a 0-10 numerical scale and disability scores of 15.7 7.4 (Neck Disability Index/50). Sixty-three percent had a prior history of neck pain. Concomitant symptoms were highly prevalent including upper limb pain (80%), headache (65%), upper back pain (64%), lower back pain (39%), dizziness (31%) and nausea (23%). There was a strong association between pain intensity and disability (p < 0.01). More severe pain was also associated with not having concomitant back pain (p = 0.01) More severe disability was also associated with poor general health (p < 0.01), nausea (p < 0.01), smoking, (p = 0.02) low SF-12 mental health score (p = 0.02), and shorter duration of symptoms (p = 0.03). Patients with a new episode of neck pain, and deemed suitable for treatment with neck manipulation reported moderately high intensity pain and disability with widespread and frequent concomitant symptoms. PMID:22703902

  11. Effectiveness of a tailored neck training program on neck strength, movement, and fatigue in under-19 male rugby players: a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Matthew D; McLoughlin, Terence F; Gallagher, Kieran R; Gatherer, Don; Parratt, Michael TR; Perera, Jonathan R; Briggs, Tim WR

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of a tailored neck muscle conditioning program on neck muscle strength, neck muscle fatigue, and range of neck movement in 16–18-year-old male rugby players. Materials and methods Thirty-four male rugby players were divided into forward and back playing positions and randomized within these groups. Seventeen players were randomly assigned to each group. The test group was given a tailored 6-week exercise regime based on their baseline measurements to be performed three times a week in addition to their normal training and playing. The control group trained and played as normal. The outcome measures used were cervical spine range of movement, neck strength, and neck muscle fatigability. Results There were no clinically relevant statistically significant differences between the two groups. Trends identified between the two groups suggest that a tailored neck exercise program increases neck strength, particularly neck extension, and increases resistance to fatigue, as well as influencing right- and left-sided neck muscle balance. A reduction in range of movement was also demonstrated in the test group. There was a great deal of variability in range of movement and strength within this age group. No previously undiagnosed neck conditions were detected, and there were no adverse events reported. Conclusion This study has shown that neck strength, range of movement, and susceptibility of the neck muscles to fatigue can be influenced using a focused neck training regime. It forms an important basis for a larger, multicenter study to ensure the neck is given due attention in rugby training and receives the same focus of conditioning as other parts of the body. PMID:25999771

  12. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Microenvironment Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in Neck Nodal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Jacobus; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Wang Ya

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess noninvasively the tumor microenvironment of neck nodal metastases in patients with head-and-neck cancer by investigating the relationship between tumor perfusion measured using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and hypoxia measured by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole ({sup 18}F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: Thirteen newly diagnosed head-and-neck cancer patients with metastatic neck nodes underwent DCE-MRI and {sup 18}F-FMISO PET imaging before chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The matched regions of interests from both modalities were analyzed. To examine the correlations between DCE-MRI parameters and standard uptake value (SUV) measurements from {sup 18}F-FMISO PET, the nonparametric Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated. Furthermore, DCE-MRI parameters were compared between nodes with {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake and nodes with no {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: For the 13 patients, a total of 18 nodes were analyzed. The nodal size strongly correlated with the {sup 18}F-FMISO SUV ({rho} = 0.74, p < 0.001). There was a strong negative correlation between the median k{sub ep} (redistribution rate constant) value ({rho} = -0.58, p = 0.042) and the {sup 18}F-FMISO SUV. Hypoxic nodes (moderate to severe {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake) had significantly lower median K{sup trans} (volume transfer constant) (p = 0.049) and median k{sub ep} (p = 0.027) values than did nonhypoxic nodes (no {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake). Conclusion: This initial evaluation of the preliminary results support the hypothesis that in metastatic neck lymph nodes, hypoxic nodes are poorly perfused (i.e., have significantly lower K{sup trans} and k{sub ep} values) compared with nonhypoxic nodes.

  13. Postoperative IMRT in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Studer, Gabriela; Furrer, Katrin; Davis, Bernard J; Stoeckli, Sandro S; Zwahlen, Roger A; Luetolf, Urs M; Glanzmann, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    Background Aim of this work was to assess loco-regional disease control in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (pIMRT). For comparative purposes, risk features of our series have been analysed with respect to histopathologic adverse factors. Results were compared with an own historic conventional radiation (3DCRT) series, and with 3DCRT and pIMRT data from other centres. Between January 2002 and August 2006, 71 patients were consecutively treated with pIMRT for a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx (32), oral cavity (22), hypopharynx (7), larynx (6), paranasal sinus (3), and an unknown primary, respectively. Mean and median follow up was 19 months (248), and 17.6 months. 83% were treated with IMRT-chemotherapy. Mean prescribed dose was 66.3 Gy (6070), delivered with doses per fraction of 22.3 Gy, respectively. Results 2-year local, nodal, and distant control rates were 95%, 91%, and 96%, disease free and overall survival 90% and 83%, respectively. The corresponding survival rates for the subgroup of patients with a follow up time >12 months (n = 43) were 98%, 95%, 98%, 93%, and 88%, respectively. Distribution according to histopathologic risk features revealed 15% and 85% patients with intermediate and high risk, respectively. All loco-regional events occurred in the high risk subgroup. Conclusion Surgery followed by postoperative IMRT in patients with substantial risk for recurrence resulted in high loco-regional tumor control rates compared with large prospective 3DCRT trials. PMID:17052346

  14. Targeted therapy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Kundu, S K; Nestor, M

    2012-06-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) of multi-factorial etiopathogenesis is rising worldwide. Treatment-associated toxicity problems and treatment failure in advanced disease stages with conventional therapies have necessitated a focus on alternative strategies. Molecular targeted therapy, with the potential for increased selectivity and fewer adverse effects, hold promise in the treatment of HNSCC. In an attempt to improve outcomes in HNSCC, targeted therapeutic strategies have been developed. These strategies are focusing on the molecular biology of HNSCC in an attempt to target selected pathways involved in carcinogenesis. Inhibiting tumor growth and metastasis by focusing on specific protein or signal transduction pathways or by targeting the tumor microenvironment or vasculature are some of the new approaches. Targeted agents for HNSCC expected to improve the effectiveness of current therapy include EGFR inhibitors (Cetuximab, Panitumumab, Zalutumumab), EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (Gefitinib, Erloitinib), VEGFR inhibitors (Bevacizumab, Vandetanib), and various inhibitors of, e.g., Src-family kinase, PARP, proteasome, mTOR, COX, and heat shock protein. Moreover, targeted molecular therapy can also act as a complement to other existing cancer therapies. Several studies have demonstrated that the combination of targeting techniques with conventional current treatment protocols may improve the treatment outcome and disease control, without exacerbating the treatment related toxicities. Some of the targeted approaches have been proved as promising therapeutic potentials and are already in use, whereas remainder exhibits mixed result and necessitates further studies. Identification of predictive biomarkers of resistance or sensitivity to these therapies remains a fundamental challenge in the optimal selection of patients most likely to benefit from targeted treatment. PMID:22373581

  15. Misconceived Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis during Management of Myofascial Neck Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Youn; Lim, Jin Hun; Kim, Yong Seok; Kwon, Young Eun; Yu, Jae Yong; Lee, Jun Hak

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of posterior neck pain is very challenging based on symptoms and physical examination only. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is a rare and frequently misdiagnosed entity in various causes of neck pain. It results from calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscle which is characterized by severe neck pain, painful restriction of neck movement, dysphagia, and odynophagia. We herein report a case of a patient with acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis, who complained of posterior neck pain, initially diagnosed and treated as a myofascial neck pain syndrome. PMID:26839671

  16. Misconceived Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis during Management of Myofascial Neck Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Youn; Lim, Jin Hun; Kim, Yong Seok; Kwon, Young Eun; Yu, Jae Yong

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of posterior neck pain is very challenging based on symptoms and physical examination only. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is a rare and frequently misdiagnosed entity in various causes of neck pain. It results from calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscle which is characterized by severe neck pain, painful restriction of neck movement, dysphagia, and odynophagia. We herein report a case of a patient with acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis, who complained of posterior neck pain, initially diagnosed and treated as a myofascial neck pain syndrome. PMID:26839671

  17. Random Positional Variation Among the Skull, Mandible, and Cervical Spine With Treatment Progression During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Peter H. Ahn, Andrew I.; Lee, C. Joe; Shen Jin; Miller, Ekeni; Lukaj, Alex; Milan, Elissa; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: With 54{sup o} of freedom from the skull to mandible to C7, ensuring adequate immobilization for head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT) is complex. We quantify variations in skull, mandible, and cervical spine movement between RT sessions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head-and-neck RT patients underwent serial computed tomography. Patients underwent planned rescanning at 11, 22, and 33 fractions for a total of 93 scans. Coordinates of multiple bony elements of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine were used to calculate rotational and translational changes of bony anatomy compared with the original planning scan. Results: Mean translational and rotational variations on rescanning were negligible, but showed a wide range. Changes in scoliosis and lordosis of the cervical spine between fractions showed similar variability. There was no correlation between positional variation and fraction number and no strong correlation with weight loss or skin separation. Semi-independent rotational and translation movement of the skull in relation to the lower cervical spine was shown. Positioning variability measured by means of vector displacement was largest in the mandible and lower cervical spine. Conclusions: Although only small overall variations in position between head-and-neck RT sessions exist on average, there is significant random variation in patient positioning of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine elements. Such variation is accentuated in the mandible and lower cervical spine. These random semirigid variations in positioning of the skull and spine point to a need for improved immobilization and/or confirmation of patient positioning in RT of the head and neck.

  18. Biodynamic simulations of the effect of a neck-mounted air bag on the head/neck response during high G acceleration.

    PubMed

    Lee, C M; Freivalds, A; Lee, S Y

    1991-08-01

    New helmet-mounted devices (such as night-vision goggles, laser eye protection, etc.) have created new safety hazards for pilots during ejection or high G maneuvering. In order to prevent the resulting head/neck injuries, this study extends the air-bag protection system developed for ground vehicles to a neck mounted system for aircrew personnel. Results, carried out by computer biodynamic simulations using the Articulated Total Body Model (ATB), showed that: 1) helmet weight had little effect on head/neck torque, contact force and flexion angle; 2) initial head/neck position and center of gravity offsets of the helmet-mounted devices had significant effects on head-neck torques, contact forces, and neck flexion angles; and 3) the neck mounted air bag significantly reduced neck torques, contact forces, and neck flexion angles. We conclude that the neck-mounted air bag system could significantly reduce the severity of head/neck injuries to pilots during ejection or high G maneuvering. PMID:1930056

  19. Femoral neck shaft angle in men with fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Tuck, S P; Rawlings, D J; Scane, A C; Pande, I; Summers, G D; Woolf, A D; Francis, R M

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Femoral neck shaft angle (NSA) has been reported to be an independent predictor of hip fracture risk in men. We aimed to assess the role of NSA in UK men. Methods. The NSA was measured manually from the DXA scan printout in men with hip (62, 31 femoral neck and 31 trochanteric), symptomatic vertebral (91), and distal forearm (67) fractures and 389 age-matched control subjects. Age, height, weight, and BMD (g/cm(2): lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total femur) measurements were performed. Results. There was no significant difference in mean NSA between men with femoral neck and trochanteric hip fractures, so all further analyses of hip fractures utilised the combined data. There was no difference in NSA between those with hip fractures and those without (either using the combined data or analysing trochanteric and femoral neck shaft fractures separately), nor between fracture subjects as a whole and controls. Mean NSA was smaller in those with vertebral fractures (129.2 versus 131: P = 0.001), but larger in those with distal forearm fractures (129.8 versus 128.5: P = 0.01). Conclusions. The conflicting results suggest that femoral NSA is not an important determinant of hip fracture risk in UK men. PMID:22013546

  20. Therapeutic applications of botulinum neurotoxins in head and neck disorders

    PubMed Central

    Alshadwi, Ahmad; Nadershah, Mohammed; Osborn, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this article is to review the mechanism of action, physiological effects, and therapeutic applications of botulinum neurotoxins in the head and neck area. Study design An extensive literature search was performed using keywords. The resulting articles were analyzed for relevance in four areas: overview on botulinum neurotoxins, the role of botulinum neurotoxins in the management of salivary secretory disorders, the role of botulinum neurotoxins in the management of facial pain, and the role of botulinum neurotoxins in head and neck movement disorders. Institutional review board approval was not needed due the nature of the study. Results Botulinum neurotoxin therapy was demonstrated to be a valuable alternative to conventional medical therapy for many conditions affecting the head and neck area in terms of morbidly, mortality, and patient satisfaction with treatment outcomes. Conclusion Botulinum neurotoxin therapy provides viable alternatives to traditional treatment modalities for some conditions affecting the head and neck region that have neurological components. This therapy can overcome some of the morbidities associated with conventional therapy. More research is needed to determine the ideal doses of botulinum neurotoxin to treat different diseases affecting the head and neck regions. PMID:25544809

  1. Femoral head-neck junction reconstruction, after iatrogenic bone resection

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Alvarez, Alberto; Lash, Nicholas; Beck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic over-resection of the head-neck junction during the treatment of a cam deformity can be a devastating complication and is difficult to treat. Large defects of the femoral head-neck junction (FHNJ) increase the risk of femoral neck fracture and can also affect hip biomechanics. We describe a case of an iatrogenic defect of the FHNJ due to excessive bone resection, and a previously non-described treatment using iliac crest autograft to restore femoral head-neck sphericity and hip joint stability. After protecting the femoral neck with an angled blade plate, the large anterior FHNJ defect was reconstructed using autogenous iliac crest bone graft; sphericity was restored by contouring the graft using spherical templates. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed up to 2 years. Results at 2 years showed no residual groin pain and normal range of motion. The Oxford Hip Score was 46/48, rated as excellent. Computed tomography (CT) scanning showed union of bone graft without resorption, and CT arthrogram indicating retained sphericity of the FHNJ without evidence of degenerative changes in the articular surface. This novel surgical technique can be used to restore the structural integrity and contour of the FHNJ that contains a significant anterior defect.

  2. Airway management in patients with burn contractures of the neck.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Smita; Mullick, Parul

    2015-12-01

    Airway management of patients with burn contracture of the neck (PBC neck) is a challenge to the anesthesiologist. Patient evaluation includes history, physical and airway examination. A safe approach in the airway management of a patient with moderate to severe PBC neck is to secure the airway with the patient awake. The anesthesiologist should have a pre-planned strategy for intubation of the difficult airway. The choices advocated for airway management of such patients include awake fiberoptic-guided intubation, use of intubating laryngeal mask airway, intubation without neuromuscular blocking agents, intubation with neuromuscular blocking agents after testing the ability to ventilate by mask, pre-induction neck scar release under local anesthesia and ketamine or sedation followed by direct laryngoscopy and intubation and video-laryngoscope guided intubation, amongst others. Preparation of the patient includes an explanation of the proposed procedure, sedation, administration of antisialogogues and regional anesthesia of the airway. The various options for intubation of patients with PBC neck, intraoperative concerns and safe extubation are described. Back-up plans, airway rescue strategies and a review of literature on this subject are presented. PMID:25868969

  3. Role of drugs in fractures of the femoral neck.

    PubMed Central

    Rashiq, S; Logan, R F

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the role of drugs in the rising incidence of fractures of the femoral neck in the elderly a case-control study inquiring about the use of prescribed drugs was carried out. The drug histories of 102 patients with femoral neck fractures were obtained from general practice records and compared with those of 204 controls matched for age and sex from the same practices. At the time of fracture 41 patients with fractures and 126 controls were receiving at least one prescription (relative risk of fracture of the femoral neck in patients taking drugs = 0.42, p = 0.0006). For all types of prescribed drugs except antibiotics the risk of fracture of the femoral neck was less in patients taking drugs than in those not doing so, and this was true at all times in the year before fracture. Six patients with fractures were receiving thiazide diuretics compared with 37 controls (relative risk 0.28, p = 0.004). These results indicate that, contrary to popular belief, drugs that sedate or that impair postural control are not important factors in fractures of the femoral neck. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the hypocalciuria induced by thiazides protects against fracture, but the degree of protection is not significantly greater than that associated with other drugs. PMID:3083912

  4. Irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic neck/body adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Irreversible electroporation (IRE) of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck has been used to palliate appropriate stage 3 pancreatic cancers without evidence of metastasis and who have undergone appropriate induction therapy. Currently there has not been a standardized reported technique for pancreatic mid-body tumors for patient selection and intra-operative technique. Patients Subjects are patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck who have undergone appropriate induction chemotherapy for a reasonable duration. Main outcome measures Technique of open IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck/body is described, with the emphasis on intra-operative ultrasound and intra-operative electroporation management. Results The technique of open IRE of the pancreatic neck/body with bracketing of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery with continuous intraoperative ultrasound imaging and consideration of intraoperative navigational system is described. Conclusions IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck is feasible for appropriate patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26029461

  5. A liquid biopsy for head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Henri; Kulasinghe, Arutha; Perry, Chris; Nelson, Colleen; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck cancer patients often present with advanced metastatic disease resulting in a poor 5-year survival. Therefore, there is a need for non-invasive diagnostic tools that could complement conventional imaging to inform clinicians of patient outcomes and treatment responses. A liquid biopsy addresses this unmet clinical need; a simple peripheral blood draw could provide information about the disseminated disease in terms of circulating tumor cells and circulating tumor DNA. Moreover, detectable tumor DNA in the saliva of head and neck cancer patients could signify the early signs of the disease and present an opportunity for clinical intervention. This review provides an overview of the current literature with regard to the feasibility of such a test in the head and neck cancer field and highlights the need for such a test. PMID:26631411

  6. Raising the sauropod neck: it costs more to get less

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Roger S.

    2009-01-01

    The long necks of gigantic sauropod dinosaurs are commonly assumed to have been used for high browsing to obtain enough food. However, this analysis questions whether such a posture was reasonable from the standpoint of energetics. The energy cost of circulating the blood can be estimated accurately from two physiological axioms that relate metabolic rate, blood flow rate and arterial blood pressure: (i) metabolic rate is proportional to blood flow rate and (ii) cardiac work rate is proportional to the product of blood flow rate and blood pressure. The analysis shows that it would have required the animal to expend approximately half of its energy intake just to circulate the blood, primarily because a vertical neck would have required a high systemic arterial blood pressure. It is therefore energetically more feasible to have used a more or less horizontal neck to enable wide browsing while keeping blood pressure low. PMID:19364714

  7. Massive Plexiform Neurofibroma of the Neck and Larynx

    PubMed Central

    Mobashir, Mohammad Kamal; Mohamed, Abd ElRaof Said; El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; El Sayed, Ahmad Ebrahim; Fouad, Mouhamad A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction?Laryngeal neurofibromas are extremely rare, accounting for only 0.03 to 0.1% of benign tumors of the larynx. Objectives?To report the first case of massive neck plexiform neurofibroma with intralaryngeal (supraglottic) extension in a 5-year-old boy with neurofibromatosis type 1 and to describe its treatment. Resumed Report?This massive plexiform neurofibroma was surgically removed, relieving its significant respiratory obstructive symptoms without recurrence to date. Conclusion?Massive neck plexiform neurofibroma with supraglottic part was found in a child with neurofibromatosis type 1; it should be included in differential diagnosis of stridor and neck mass in children. It was diagnosed and removed in early in childhood without recurrence. PMID:26491483

  8. Acute soft tissue neck injury from unexpected acceleration.

    PubMed

    Green, Nicholas D

    2003-10-01

    Recent evidence has identified a risk of neck injury resulting from exposure to high sustained G force during operation of fast jet military aircraft. This review considers the risk of acute soft tissue neck injury when exposure to acceleration is unexpected by the individual. In a military jet, this might occur to a back seat occupant such as an instructor or weapons operator/navigator, but unexpected forces may also be encountered by roller coaster riders and human centrifuge users under certain conditions. The mechanisms of injury in this situation are examined, the effect of acceleration axes (Gx, Gy, and Gz) are considered, and relevant experimental data are evaluated. These data are used to determine what influence the unexpected nature of the acceleration exposure has on the risk of neck injury. Injury below previously established 'tolerance' limits is possible, with some individuals being at risk from unexpected acceleration exposure above around +2 to . PMID:14556572

  9. Neck stoma patients: is vital information displayed at the bedside?

    PubMed

    Darr, Adnan; Siddiq, Somiah; Jolly, Karan; Spinou, Catherine

    2016-03-10

    Tracheostomies are common procedures in head and neck and critical care practice, with 50% of airway-related deaths attributable to complications such as occlusion or displacement. The National Tracheostomy Safety Project (NTSP) published guidance regarding emergency management of neck stoma patients. A prospective multicentre regional audit of all neck stoma inpatients (ward and intensive care unit (ICU) settings) was conducted. Bed spaces were assessed for tracheostomy care bundles and essential stoma information, as recommended by the NTSP guidelines. The results demonstrate inadequate ward compliance across all three trusts, with ICU compliance greater in comparison to a ward environment. Of note, crucial information regarding the nature of stoma and whom to contact in the event of an emergency, was not displayed in the majority of cases. A greater awareness of the NTSP guidance and implementation of vital information is a necessity across all disciplines in order to reduce stoma complication-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:26972996

  10. Sleep apnea syndrome after irradiation of the neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, J.P.; Whitlock, W.L.; Dietrich, R.A.; Shaw, T. )

    1989-12-01

    After irradiation of the neck for a squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar pillar and vocal cord, a 71-year-old man presented with a rapidly progressive sleep apnea syndrome. Previous reports describe the condition of patients with obstructive sleep apnea that developed after neck irradiation and secondary to supraglottic edema. Our patient had an obstructive component to his apnea similar to that described in previous cases, but, in addition, he had hypothyroidism. Myxedema is a well-described cause of both obstructive and central apnea. We believe both contributed to his condition. He was successfully treated by placement of a tracheostomy and by thyroid supplementation. In patients who present with sleep apnea after neck irradiation, especially with acute or severe symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include both a central cause from hypothyroidism as well as a peripheral obstructive cause from laryngeal edema.

  11. Designing biomarker studies for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kelly Y.; McShane, Lisa M.; Conley, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    While there is ample literature reporting on the identification of molecular biomarkers for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, none is currently recommended for routine clinical use. A major reason for this lack of progress is the difficulty in designing studies in head and neck cancer to clearly establish the clinical utility of biomarkers. Consequently, biomarker studies frequently stall at the initial discovery phase. In this paper, we focus on biomarkers for use in clinical management, including selection of therapy. Using several contemporary examples, we identify some of the common deficiencies in study design that hinder success in biomarker development for this disease area, and we suggest some potential solutions. The goal of this article is to provide guidance that can assist investigators to more efficiently move promising biomarkers in head and neck cancer from discovery to clinical practice. PMID:25072057

  12. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Injections into the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Jeffrey W.; Layzer, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Three cases of longitudinally extensive cervical myelopathies temporally associated with neck injections are presented. The spinal cord injury was similar radiographically, despite a number of different needle approaches and substances injected. In recent years, there have been reports of an acute cervical myelopathy immediately following an injection procedure in the neck. Various explanations have been offered for this unfortunate complication, including (1) direct injection into the cord leading to traumatic injury, (2) injection of particulate matter into the arterial supply of the cord causing microvascular embolism and spinal cord infarction, and (3) intraneural injection of the chemical with centripetal spread of the injectant from the nerve trunk to the substance of the cord. The merits of each of these 3 mechanisms in explaining these cases are discussed. Albeit rare, acute cervical myelopathy should be considered a potential complication from any deep injection of chemicals into the neck. PMID:26425248

  13. Acute suppurative thyroiditis with deep neck infection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tien, Kai-Jen; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Hsieh, Ming-Chia; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hsiao, Jeng-Yueh; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Hsin, Shih-Chieh

    2007-05-01

    Thyroid gland suppuration is a rare condition with nonspecific features. For this reason, diagnosis is often delayed, which may lead to a life-threatening situation. Causative agents are often gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. With appropriate antibiotics and drainage of the abscess, the prognosis is usually excellent. Herein, we describe a unique case of acute suppurative thyroiditis in an adult male presenting with nonspecific sore throat after a fish bone injury to the throat. The patient had a history of essential hypertension and gouty arthritis. In the emergency room, fever, chills, and neck swelling were noted. Thyroid echo and computed tomography of the neck revealed the thyroid abscess with deep neck infection. The culture of the abscess showed Streptococcus viridans. He recovered gradually after parenteral antibiotics and surgical intervention. PMID:17542677

  14. Rhabdomyoblastic Differentiation in Head and Neck Malignancies Other Than Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Thompson, Lester D R; Cardesa, Antonio; Barnes, Leon; Lewis, James S; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Hellquist, Henrik; Stenman, Goran; Hunt, Jennifer L; Williams, Michelle D; Slootweg, Pieter J; Devaney, Kenneth O; Gnepp, Douglas R; Wenig, Bruce M; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2015-12-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common soft tissue sarcoma that frequently affects children and adolescents and may involve the head and neck. Rhabdomyosarcoma is defined by skeletal muscle differentiation which can be suggested by routine histology and confirmed by immunohistochemistry for the skeletal muscle-specific markers myogenin or myoD1. At the same time, it must be remembered that when it comes to head and neck malignancies, skeletal muscle differentiation is not limited to rhabdomyosarcoma. A lack of awareness of this phenomenon could lead to misdiagnosis and, subsequently, inappropriate therapeutic interventions. This review focuses on malignant neoplasms of the head and neck other than rhabdomyosarcoma that may exhibit rhabdomyoblastic differentiation, with an emphasis on strategies to resolve the diagnostic dilemmas these tumors may present. Axiomatically, no primary central nervous system tumors will be discussed. PMID:25757816

  15. Standardization of Head and Neck Contouring Using the Acanthiomeatal Line

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Snehal; Teh, Bin S. Hinojosa, Jose; Bell, Bent C.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Butler, E. Brian

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived and actual chin position(s) used for radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancers in a variety of clinical settings. Dosimetrists were asked to describe the external landmarks used to set the chin position. The lateral treatment planning radiographic figures in Ang's textbook, Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancers: Indications and Techniques, were analyzed for chin position by drawing a horizontal line from the tip of the chin to the cervical spine. The physicians at 7 departments were asked to rate the chin positions used in their departments for head-and-neck simulations. Choices included: (1) mildly flexed, (2) neutral, (3) mildly extended, and (4) hyperextended. In addition, each center was asked to select 2 representative cases to show routine chin position. The dosimetrists fixed the chin in neutral position by placing a virtual plane defined by 3 points (the base of the nasal septum [acanthus] and the external auditory canals) perpendicular to the table top. The type of head holder was irrelevant. Eighty-two percent (31/38) of the figures in Ang's text showed positioning in the neutral position (tip of the chin intersected the cervical spine between C2-3/C3-4). Most (71.4%) of the radiotherapists thought their patients were treated in the hyperextended neck position but, in fact, 85.7% (12/14) of the simulations showed a neural neck position. Reproducible chin positioning can be obtained by using the acanthiomeatal line. Consistent use of this technique will create a uniformly positioned set of axial co-images that have consistent appearance of avoidance and lymphatic areas. This will simplify contouring on axial computed tomography (CT) images of the neck. Standardizing the chin position is an important step to developing a standardized atlas and developing an information tool for automated contouring.

  16. Relationship between Neck Length, Sleep, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tae Seung; Kim, Su Min; Yang, Hyun Ju; Lee, Bum Soon; Park, Soon Yeob; Lee, Won Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background Neck circumference, as a predicator of obesity, is a well-known risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular diseases. However, little research exists on neck length associated with these factors. This study explored the association of neck length with sleep and cardiovascular risk factors by measuring midline neck length (MNL) and lateral neck length (LNL). Methods We examined 240 patients aged 30 to 75 years who visited a health check-up center between January 2012 and July 2012. Patients with depressive disorder or sleep disturbance were excluded from this study. MNL from the upper margin of the hyoid bone to the jugular notch and LNL from the mandibular angle to the mid-portion of the ipsilateral clavicle were measured twice and were adjusted by height to determine their relationship with sleep and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Results Habitual snorers had shorter LNL height ratios (P = 0.011), MNL height ratios in men (P = 0.062), and MNL height ratios in women (P = 0.052). Those snoring bad enough to annoy others had shorter MNL height ratios in men (P = 0.083) and women (P = 0.035). Men with objective sleep apnea had longer distances from the mandible to the hyoid bone to the mandible (P = 0.057). Men with metabolic syndrome had significantly shorter LNL height ratios (P = 0.021), and women with diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and metabolic syndrome had shorter MNL height ratios (P < 0.05). Conclusion This study shows that a short neck by measuring the MNL is probably associated with snoring. In addition, MNL is related to cardiovascular disease risk factors in women. PMID:25780512

  17. Correlative Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques.

  18. Correlative Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

  19. Cognitive Functioning After Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Hui K.; Bernstein, Lori J.; Brown, Jennifer; Ringash, Jolie; Vakilha, Mehrdad; Wang, Lisa; Goldstein, David; Kim, John; Hope, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Abdul Razak, Albiruni R.; Chen, Eric X.; Siu, Lillian L.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive cognitive function (CF) assessment in patients who were relapse free after curative intent radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent neuropsychological tests to assess their objective CF; completed questionnaires to assess subjective CF, quality of life, and affect; and underwent blood tests to assess hematologic, biochemical, endocrine, and cytokine status. Retrospectively, the dosimetry of incidental radiation to the brain was determined for all patients, and the dose intensity of cisplatin was determined in those who had undergone chemoradiotherapy. Results: A total of 10 patients were enrolled (5 treated with radiotherapy only and 5 with radiotherapy and cisplatin). The mean time from the end of treatment was 20 months (range, 9-41). All patients were able to complete the assessment protocol. Of the 10 patients, 9 had impaired objective CF, with memory the most severely affected. The severity of memory impairment correlated significantly with the radiation dose to the temporal lobes, and impaired dexterity correlated significantly with the radiation dose to the cerebellum, suggesting that these deficits might be treatment related. Patients receiving cisplatin appeared to have poorer objective CF than patients receiving only RT, although this difference did not achieve statistical significance, likely owing to the small sample size. Consistent with the published data, objective CF did not correlate with subjective CF or quality of life. No association was found between objective CF and patients' affect, hematologic, biochemical, endocrine, and cytokine status. Conclusion: Neuropsychological testing is feasible in squamous cell carcinoma of the head-and-neck survivors. The findings were suggestive of treatment-related cognitive dysfunction. These results warrant additional investigation.

  20. Nomogram for predicting symptom severity during radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Tommy; Fuller, Clifton David; Mendoza, Tito R.; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Beadle, Beth, M.; Phan, Jack; Frank, Steven J.; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Lu, Charles; Cleeland, Charles S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Objective Radiation therapy (RT), with or without chemotherapy, can cause significant acute toxicity among patients treated for head & neck cancer (HNC), but predicting, before treatment, who will experience a particular toxicity or symptom is difficult. We created and evaluated two multivariate models and generated a nomogram to predict symptom severity during RT based on a patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument, the MD Anderson Symptom InventoryHead&Neck Module (MDASI-HN). Study Design This was a prospective, longitudinal, questionnaire-based study. Setting Tertiary cancer care center. Subjects and Methods Subjects were 264 patients with HNC (mostly oropharyngeal) who had completed the MDASI-HN before and during therapy. Pretreatment variables were correlated with MDASI-HN symptom scores during therapy with multivariate modeling and then correlated with composite MDASI-HN score during week 5 of therapy. Results A multivariate model incorporating pretreatment PROs better predicted MDASI-HN symptom scores during treatment than did a model based on clinical variables and physician-rated patient performance status alone (Aikake information criterion=1442.5 vs. 1459.9). In the most parsimonious model, pretreatment MDASI-HN symptom severity (P<0.001), concurrent chemotherapy (P=0.006), primary tumor site (P=0.016), and receipt of definitive (rather than adjuvant) RT (P=0.044) correlated with MDASI-HN symptom scores during week 5. That model was used to construct a nomogram. Conclusion Our model demonstrates the value of incorporating baseline PROs, in addition to disease and treatment characteristics, to predict patient symptom burden during therapy. Although additional investigation and validation are required, PRO-inclusive prediction tools can be useful for improving symptom interventions and expectations for patients being treated for HNC. PMID:25104816

  1. Evaluation of Head and Neck Tumors with Functional MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jacobus F A; Parra, Carlos; Lu, Yonggang; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. MR imaging-based diffusion and perfusion techniques enable the noninvasive assessment of tumor biology and physiology, which supplement information obtained from standard structural scans. Diffusion and perfusion MR imaging techniques provide novel biomarkers that can aid monitoring in pretreatment, during treatment, and posttreatment stages to improve patient selection for therapeutic strategies; provide evidence for change of therapy regime; and evaluate treatment response. This review discusses pertinent aspects of the role of diffusion and perfusion MR imaging and computational analysis methods in studying head and neck cancer. PMID:26613878

  2. Survivorship and Quality of Life in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ringash, Jolie

    2015-10-10

    Head and neck cancer is becoming more common, and survival rates are improving. Human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal cancer, in particular, is increasing in incidence and is associated with an excellent prognosis. However, toxicity from disease and treatment leads to long-term impairment, disability, and handicap. Currently, more than 60% of survivors have unmet needs. As the numbers of survivors increase, current models of care will be increasingly inadequate to meet their needs. Exploration of new strategies and models of care to better address quality-of-life issues and meet the needs of survivors of head and neck cancer is urgently required. PMID:26351336

  3. Tracheoinnominate fistula: a rare acute complication of penetrating neck injury.

    PubMed

    Kulyapina, Alena; Díaz, Dolores Pérez; Rodríguez, Teresa Sanchez; Fuentes, Fernando Turegano

    2015-05-01

    Penetrating injuries in the base of the neck are considered to be the most dangerous due to the potential combination of vascular and intrathoracic lesions. We describe an extremely rare case of combined injury of the trachea and innominate artery, which resulted in formation of a traumatic acute tracheoinnominate fistula. Previously, these fistulas have been described as an iatrogenic complication of tracheostomy, presenting with massive peristomal bleed or hemoptysis. This case demonstrates that a combination of lesions to vital anatomical structures in the neck can change their clinical presentation, making them extremely difficult to diagnose. PMID:24948779

  4. A rare cystic lesion of the neck: parathyroid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kaplanoglu, Veysel; Kaplanoglu, Hatice; C?l?z, Deniz Szmen; Duran, Semra

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid cysts are rarely observed neck masses. Their physical examination is not specific and preoperative diagnosis is usually difficult. Imaging findings and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration with hormone analysis evaluation are important diagnostic criteria. A 48-year-old female patient admitted to our hospital with a symptom of swelling on the left side of the neck was diagnosed with parathyroid cyst by imaging methods (ultrasonography, MRI, parathyroid scintigraphy) and laboratory findings. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy was performed and because of relapse on the follow-up sclerotherapy was planned. Our aim in this study was to present the radiological findings of this case of parathyroid cyst. PMID:24121814

  5. Rapidly enlarging neck mass in a neonate causing airway compromise

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Kyra; Leal, Andres; McGill, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Up to 20% of all congenital pediatric head and neck masses are branchial cleft cysts. Second branchial cleft cysts account for 95% of branchial anomalies, and fourth branchial cleft cysts are the rarest type. Their typical presentations include non–life-threatening symptoms, such as drainage, skin irritations, minor swelling, and tenderness. We describe a 5-week-old neonate with increasing stridor secondary to a rapidly growing neck mass. Imaging and surgical excision confirmed the mass to be an infected fourth branchial cleft cyst.

  6. Fusion, deep-inelastic collisions, and neck formation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, C.E.; Barbosa, V.C.; Canto, L.F.; Donangelo, R.

    1988-07-01

    We use the liquid drop model to calculate the cross section for neck formation in a heavy-ion collision and show that for the recently measured /sup 58/Ni+/sup 124/Sn case this cross section is strongly related to the sum of the fusion and deep-inelastic cross sections. We note that the observation of deep-inelastic collisions at sub-Coulomb barrier energies may be classically understood by the effective barrier lowering obtained when the neck degree of freedom is considered.

  7. Bilateral hypopharyngeal perforations caused by penetrating trauma to the neck.

    PubMed

    zbilen Acar, Gl; Tekin, Muhammet; Karata?, Mehmet; zdamar, Osman ?lkay

    2015-01-01

    External laryngeal trauma is a relatively rare-encountered and sometimes life-threatening emergency condition. Recognition of laryngeal injury related to either blunt or penetrating trauma is important for both initial preservation of life as well as long-term airway and vocal function. Treatment options include medical management with observation and open surgical treatment with or without tracheotomy. We, herein, describe a 23-year-old male case who sustained external penetrating trauma to lateral aspect of neck. The etiology, clinical manifestations, investigation modalities and management of penetrating neck trauma were discussed in the light of the literature data. PMID:25935065

  8. Head and neck cancer in two American presidents: Case reports.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Mea A; Wang, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Two former U.S. presidents, Ulysses S. Grant and Grover Cleveland, were diagnosed with head and neck cancer in 1884 and 1893, respectively. A historical review of the risk factors, diagnoses, and treatments is examined and compared with modern-day interpretations. A comparison was made using the original diagnoses with today's equivalent diagnosis. Different treatment outcomes at the time of the original diagnoses relative to today's treatment are reviewed. Clinicians must be familiar with risk factors, signs, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of head and neck cancer. PMID:22313921

  9. Pancreatic ampullary carcinoma with neck metastases: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background An 18-year-old Turkish woman was referred with a 6-week history of rapidly enlarging cervical mass at the left side. Case report She was diagnosed of ampullary carcinoma for which pancreatoduodenectomy was performed 14 months ago. In our patient with a history of malignancy, a rapidly enlarging neck mass was considered a metastasis to the neck. Tumor resection was performed. Histopathological examination revealed the metastasis of the precedent ampullary adenocarcinoma. Conclusion Surgery does not improve survival for advanced metastatic ampullary cancer however, it can be mandatory in specific conditions as our patient. PMID:19946517

  10. Alternative PET tracers in head and neck cancer. A review.

    PubMed

    Wedman, Jan; Pruim, Jan; Roodenburg, Jan L N; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Langedijk, Johannes A; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; van der Laan, Bernard F A M

    2013-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a standard in staging Head and Neck cancer. While (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the most frequently used radiopharmaceutical, glycolysis is not the only metabolic process that can be visualized. Different PET tracers can also be used to visualize other metabolic processes and in this manner, the disadvantages of FDG PET can be avoided. In this review, we describe a comprehensive overview of alternatives to FDG that can be used in identifying head and neck cancer. The potential advantages and disadvantages of these radiopharmaceuticals are discussed. PMID:23269395

  11. Oral microbiome, periodontitis and risk of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Galvão-Moreira, Leonardo Victor; da Cruz, Maria Carmen Fontoura Nogueira

    2016-02-01

    A wide range of studies has been successfully exploring the association between the human microenvironment, sustained inflammation, and cancer. Growing evidence has then emerged in this field over the past few years. Nevertheless, reliable data addressing the impact of the oral microbiome and periodontitis on the pathogenesis and risk of head and neck malignancies remain scarce. Hence, this communication focuses on briefly discuss the relationship between the oral microbiome, periodontitis and head and neck cancer based on the current understanding of such a disease-associated scenario. PMID:26684542

  12. Rehabilitation of Dysphagia Following Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pauloski, Barbara R.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Patients with cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx or larynx may be treated with surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Each treatment type may have a negative impact on posttreatment swallowing function; these effects are presented in this chapter. The clinician has a number of rehabilitative procedures available to reduce or eliminate swallowing disorders in patients treated for cancer of the head and neck. The various procedures--including postures, maneuvers, modifications to bolus volume and viscosity, range of motion exercises, and strengthening exercises--and their efficacy in treated head and neck cancer patients are discussed. PMID:18940647

  13. Complications of Head and Neck Reconstruction and Their Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bien-Keem; Por, Yong-Chen; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck reconstruction is an intensive multistep process that requires attention to detail to achieve a successful result. The knowledge and prevention of complications as well as their management is an essential part of the training of the surgeon participating in head and neck reconstruction. This article explores the general complications, including free flap failure, carotid artery blowout, hardware exposure, and ectropion, as well as regional complications relating to operations of the scalp, cranium, base of skull, midface, mandible, and pharyngoesophagus. PMID:22550450

  14. [Delineation of the lymph nodes for head neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Miroir, J; Biau, J

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this article is to present the determination and delineation of nodal target volumes for head and neck cancers treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The delineation on computerized tomography scanner (CT scan) requires a precise methodology. Different elements are necessary: clinical examination, diagram of the initially involved lymph nodes, surgical and pathological reports and medical imagings (CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography). The different clinical target volumes are approached and the concept of selectivity of neck nodal targets is specified according to current literature. PMID:25179252

  15. Flow visualization in long neck Helmholtz resonators with grazing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Rice, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Both oscillating and steady flows were applied to a single plexiglass resonator cavity with colored dyes injected in both the orifice and grazing flow field to record the motion of the fluid. For oscillatory flow, the instantaneous dye streamlines were similar for both the short and long-neck orifices. The orifice flow blockage appears to be independent of orifice length for a fixed amplitude of flow oscillation and magnitude of the grazing flow. The steady flow dye studies showed that the acoustic and steady flow resistances do not necessarily correspond for long neck orifices.

  16. Displaced femoral neck fractures: is there a standard of care?

    PubMed

    Macaulay, William; Yoon, Richard S; Parsley, Brian; Nellans, Kate W; Teeny, Steven M

    2007-09-01

    Many factors must be considered in treating displaced femoral neck fractures. For younger patients, ORIF is preferred, whereas arthroplasty is the better option for elderly patients. For institutionalized elderly patients with a low activity level or impaired mental status, the choice should be hemiarthroplasty (either unipolar or bipolar). For high-demand, active patients, evidence continues to mount toward THA as the favored treatment option. However, there is a need for larger clinical trials to demonstrate the most cost-effective way to treat sub-populations of an ever-growing number of patients with displaced femoral neck fractures. PMID:17899921

  17. Head and Neck Cancer: An Evolving Treatment Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Cognetti, David M.; Weber, Randal S.; Lai, Stephen Y.

    2009-01-01

    Since the inception of this journal in 1948, the understanding of etiologic factors that contribute to and the treatment of head and neck cancer has evolved dramatically. Advances in surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have improved locoregional control, survival, and quality of life. The outcomes of these treatment modalities have shifted the focus of curative efforts from radical ablation to preservation and restoration of function. This evolution has been documented in the pages of Cancer for the past 6 decades. This review focuses on the evolution of treatment approaches for head and neck cancer and future directions while recognizing the historic contributions recorded within this journal. PMID:18798532

  18. Implant/bone constructs in femoral neck osteotomy. An autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Benterud, J G; Alho, A; Hiseth, A

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that three rather than two screws may give better results in the treatment of femoral neck fractures. In the present study, the strength of various screw/bone constructs in femoral neck osteotomy was analyzed. Transverse osteotomies on 65 cadaver femora were fixed with two or three screws of two types: one with a shank diameter of 6 mm and thread diameter of 8 mm, and a prototype screw with equal shank and thread diameter of 7 mm. The femoral heads were subjected to static and cyclic loads in the one-legged stance position. Single-energy quantitative computed tomography measurements were correlated to load. The two experimental models resulted in different patterns of failure of the bone/implant constructs, otherwise the results were similar. Three of the prototype screws gave the strongest construct, while two of the other screw type were stronger than three. The explanations for the diverging properties of the different bone/implant constructs may be that large threads destroy too much of the bone trabeculae, and that screw threads larger than the shank may destroy the drill canal and produce an unstable situation compared with screws with equal shank and thread diameter. PMID:8186057

  19. Gene Expression Profiling to Predict Outcome After Chemoradiation in Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pramana, Jimmy; Brekel, Michiel van den; Velthuysen, Marie-Louise F. van; Wessels, Lodewijk F.A.; Nuyten, Dimitry S.; Hofland, Ingrid; Atsma, Douwe; Pimentel, Nuno; Hoebers, Frank J.P.; Rasch, Coen; Begg, Adrian C.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: The goal of the present study was to improve prediction of outcome after chemoradiation in advanced head and neck cancer using gene expression analysis. Materials and Methods: We collected 92 biopsies from untreated head and neck cancer patients subsequently given cisplatin-based chemoradiation (RADPLAT) for advanced squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). After RNA extraction and labeling, we performed dye swap experiments using 35k oligo-microarrays. Supervised analyses were performed to create classifiers to predict locoregional control and disease recurrence. Published gene sets with prognostic value in other studies were also tested. Results: Using supervised classification on the whole series, gene sets separating good and poor outcome could be found for all end points. However, when splitting tumors into training and validation groups, no robust classifiers could be found. Using Gene Set Enrichment analysis, several gene sets were found to be enriched in locoregional recurrences, although with high false-discovery rates. Previously published signatures for radiosensitivity, hypoxia, proliferation, 'wound,' stem cells, and chromosomal instability were not significantly correlated with outcome. However, a recently published signature for HNSCC defining a 'high-risk' group was shown to be predictive for locoregional control in our dataset. Conclusion: Gene sets can be found with predictive potential for locoregional control after combined radiation and chemotherapy in HNSCC. How treatment-specific these gene sets are needs further study.

  20. Epidemiology of Oropharyngeal Candida Colonization and Infection in Patients Receiving Radiation for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Spencer W.; Zellars, Richard C.; Kirkpatrick, William R.; McAtee, Robert K.; Caceres, Marta A.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Bailey, Cliff W.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Patterson, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    Oral mucosal colonization and infection with Candida are common in patients receiving radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Infection is marked by oral pain and/or burning and can lead to significant patient morbidity. The purpose of this study was to identify Candida strain diversity in this population by using a chromogenic medium, subculturing, molecular typing, and antifungal susceptibility testing of clinical isolates. These results were then correlated with clinical outcome in patients treated with fluconazole for infection. Specimens from 30 patients receiving radiation therapy for head and neck cancer were cultured weekly for Candida. Patients exhibiting clinical infection were treated with oral fluconazole. All isolates were plated on CHROMagar Candida and RPMI medium, subcultured, and submitted for antifungal susceptibility testing and molecular typing. Infections occurred in 27% of the patients and were predominantly due to Candida albicans (78%). Candida carriage occurred in 73% of patients and at 51% of patient visits. Yeasts other than C. albicans predominated in carriage, as they were isolated from 59% of patients and at 52% of patient visits. All infections responded clinically, and all isolates were susceptible to fluconazole. Molecular typing showed that most patients had similar strains throughout their radiation treatment. One patient, however, did show the acquisition of a new strain. With this high rate of infection (27%), prophylaxis to prevent infection should be evaluated for these patients. PMID:10565903

  1. Increased salivary gland density on contrast-enhanced CT after head and neck radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bronstein, A.D.; Nyberg, D.A.; Schwartz, A.N.; Shuman, W.P.; Griffin, B.R.

    1987-12-01

    In an attempt to determine whether radiation therapy leads to an increased density of salivary glands on subsequent contrast-enhanced CT, 109 CT scans from 78 patients with head and neck tumors were reviewed. The density of parotid and submandibular glands was subjectively evaluated (compared with adjacent muscle) and correlated with treatment including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Density of the parotid and/or submandibular glands was found to be significantly associated with previous irradiation on contrast-enhanced scans (p less than .05). One or both glands were denser than normal in seven (44%) of 16 patients who received only radiation therapy and in eight (38%) of 21 who received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, compared with only two (10%) of 20 patients who received chemotherapy alone and two (4%) of 52 patients who received neither. The type or amount of irradiation, type of chemotherapy, or timing of the CT scan after the initiation of treatment was not found to be significant. We conclude that the density of the parotid and/or submandibular glands on contrast-enhanced CT is frequently increased after radiation therapy for tumors of the head and neck.

  2. Neck-band retention for Canada geese in the Mississippi (USA) flyway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Weiss, N.T.; Rusch, D.H.; Craven, S.R.; Trost, R.E.; Caswell, F.D.

    1990-01-01

    We used capture, harvest, and observation histories of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) banded in the Mississippi flyway, 1974-88, to examine the problem of neck-band retention. Methods for the analysis of survival data were used to estimate rates of neck-band retention and to evaluate factors associated with neck-band loss. Sex, age of bird at banding, rivet use, and neck-band type significantly influenced neck-band retention. For most of the resulting cohorts (e.g., sex, age, rivet, and neck-band type categories), neck-band retention rates decreased through time. We caution against using small samples or data collected during short-term studies to determine retention rates. We suggest that observation data be used in neck-band retention studies to increase the efficiency of estimating retention time.

  3. Virus Analysis in Head and Neck and Bladder Cancers - Michael Parfenov, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Virus Analysis in Head and Neck and Bladder Cancers - Michael Parfenov Virus Analysis in Head and Neck and Bladder Cancers - Michael Parfenov, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012 You will need Adobe Flash

  4. Head, Neck Cancer Patients May Be at Higher Risk for Suicide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155697.html Head, Neck Cancer Patients May Be at Higher Risk for ... online Nov. 12 in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery . "While there is a considerable body of ...

  5. A rare differential diagnosis to occupational neck pain: bilateral stylohyoid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Gertrud; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Buhmann, Sonja; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Lenz, Miriam; Vogel, Tobias; Kichhoff, Rainer Maria

    2006-01-01

    Chronic neck pain is widely prevalent and a common source of disability in the working-age population. Etiology of chronic neck pain includes neck sprain, mechanical or muscular neck pain, myofascial pain syndrome, postural neck pain as well as pain due to degenerative changes. We report the case of a 42 year old secretary, complaining about a longer history of neck pain and limited movement of the cervical spine. Surprisingly, the adequate radiologic examination revealed a bilateral ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex. Her symptoms remained intractable from conservative treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory medication as well as physical therapy. Hence the patient was admitted to surgical resection of the ossified stylohyoid ligament complex. Afterwards she was free of any complaints and went back to work. Therefore, ossification of the stylohyoid ligament complex causing severe neck pain and movement disorder should be regarded as a rare differential diagnosis of occupational related neck pain. PMID:16800878

  6. Cardiovascular functional disorder and stress among patients having neck-shoulder symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Gockel, M; Lindholm, H; Alaranta, H; Viljanen, A; Lindquist, A; Lindholm, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate if autonomic nervous system function, reflected in cardiovascular variables, among patients with neck-shoulder symptoms (tension neck group (T)) differed from that in a symptom free control group (C), and to establish its relation with pain and psychological stress. METHODS--Twelve women with tension neck and nine controls in secretarial jobs were studied. They underwent an orthostatic test, deep breathing test, Valsalva manoeuvre, isometric handgrip test, and muscular endurance test. Pain was measured using visual analogue scales, and psychological stress by the Modified Somatic Perception Questionnaire (MSPQ). Plasma endothelin-1 (ET-1) was measured using high pressure liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay. RESULTS--Signs of psychological stress were significantly (p < 0.001) more common in group T than in group C. Mean resting heart rate in group T (77.8 (SE 2.9) beats/min; range 64-100) was significantly greater than that in group C (63.8 (3.1) beats/min; range 52-80) (p < 0.01). In the orthostatic test, the overall changes in R-R intervals during the first 40 heart beats after standing up and during seven minutes of testing differed significantly between the groups (p < 0.001, < 0.05, respectively). The increase in diastolic blood pressure in the three minute isometric handgrip test was significantly less in group T (19.4 (3.5) mm Hg; range -5 to 35) than in group C (30 (3.4) mm Hg; range 15-50) (p < 0.05). The MSPQ score in the study group (n = 21) correlated positively with resting heart rate (r = 0.462, p < 0.05) and negatively with increase in diastolic blood pressure (r = -0.514, p < 0.05). Plasma concentrations of ET-1 did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSION--Increased sympathetic activity was found among patients having neck-shoulder symptoms. Local mechanisms may have influenced the cardiovascular changes observed during isometric testing in these patients. PMID:7632093

  7. Using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device to assess head repositioning accuracy in individuals with cervical radiculopathy in comparison to neck- healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Wibault, Johanna; Vaillant, Jacques; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Dedering, sa; Peolsson, Anneli

    2013-10-01

    This study had two purposes: to compare head repositioning accuracy (HRA) using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device between individuals with cervical radiculopathy caused by disc disease (CDD; n = 71) and neck- healthy individuals (n = 173); and to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the CROM device in individuals with CDD, and criterion validity between the CROM device and a laser in neck-healthy individuals, with quantification of measurement errors. Parameters of reliability and validity were expressed with intra- class- correlation coefficients (ICCs), and measurement errors with standard error of measurement (SEM) and Bland Altman limits of agreement. HRA (Mdn, IQR) differed significantly between individuals with CDD and neck- healthy individuals after rotation right 2.7 (6.0), 1.7 (2.7); and rotation left 2.7 (3.3), 1.3 (2.7) (p < = 0.021); 31% of individuals with CDD were classified as having impairment in HRA. The test-retest reliability of the CROM device in individuals with CDD showed ICCs of 0.79- 0.85, and SEMs of 1.4- 2. The criterion validity between the CROM device and the laser in neck-healthy individuals showed ICCs of 0.43- 0.91 and SEMs of 0.8- 1.3. The results support the use of the CROM device for quantifying HRA impairment in individuals with CDD in clinical practice; however, criterion validity between the CROM device and a laser in neck-healthy individuals was questionable. HRA impairment in individuals with CDD may be important to consider during rehabilitation and evaluated with the criterion established with the CROM device in neck-healthy individuals. PMID:23473752

  8. Exploring patient satisfaction: a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of spinal manipulation, home exercise, and medication for acute and subacute neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Brent D; Evans, Roni; Bronfort, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess satisfaction with specific aspects of care for acute neck pain and explore the relationship between satisfaction with care, neck pain and global satisfaction. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of patient satisfaction from a randomized trial of spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) delivered by doctors of chiropractic, home exercise and advice (HEA) delivered by exercise therapists, and medication (MED) prescribed by a medical physician for acute/subacute neck pain. Differences in satisfaction with specific aspects of care were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The relationship between specific aspects of care and 1) change in neck pain (primary outcome of the randomized trial) and 2) global satisfaction were assessed using Pearsons correlation and multiple linear regression. Results Individuals receiving SMT or HEA were more satisfied with the information and general care received than MED group participants. SMT and HEA groups reported similar satisfaction with information provided during treatment; however, the SMT group was more satisfied with general care. Satisfaction with general care (r=?0.75 to ?0.77, R2= 0.55 to 0.56) had a stronger relationship with global satisfaction compared to satisfaction with information provided (r=?0.65 to 0.67, R2=0.39 to 0.46). The relationship between satisfaction with care and neck pain was weak (r=0.17 to 0.38, R2=0.08 to 0.21). Conclusions Individuals with acute/subacute neck pain were more satisfied with specific aspects of care from SMT delivered by doctors of chiropractic or HEA interventions compared to MED prescribed by a medical physician. PMID:25199824

  9. Neutron beam therapy in the treatment of advanced head and neck malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.; Hendrix, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Patients with advanced head and neck cancer continue to present a difficult management problem for the otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeon. This paper discusses the principles of radiation therapy with emphasis on neutron beam therapy as an effective treatment option for advanced malignancy of the head and neck other than squamous cell carcinoma. 6 references.

  10. 76 FR 59153 - Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, VA, and Featherstone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck (Mason Neck) and Featherstone National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs; refuges). In... Fish and Wildlife Service Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, VA, and Featherstone National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, VA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...

  11. Between-day reliability of electromechanical delay of selected neck muscles during performance of maximal isometric efforts

    PubMed Central

    Almosnino, Sivan; Pelland, Lucie; Pedlow, Samuel V; Stevenson, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the between-day reliability of the electromechanical delay (EMD) of selected neck muscles during the performance of maximal isometric contractions in five different directions. Methods Twenty-one physically active males participated in two testing sessions separated by seven to eight days. Using a custom-made fixed frame dynamometer, cervical force and surface electromyography (EMG) were recorded bilaterally from the splenius capitis, upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles during the performance of efforts in extension, flexion, left and right lateral bending, and protraction. The EMD was extracted using the Teager-Kaiser Energy Operator. Reliability indices calculated for each muscle in each testing direction were: the difference in scores between the two testing sessions and corresponding 95% confidence intervals, the standard error of measurement (SEM) and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). Results EMD values showed no evidence of systematic difference between the two testing sessions across all muscles and testing directions. The SEM for extension, flexion and lateral bending efforts ranged between 2.5 ms to 4.8 ms, indicating a good level of measurement precision. For protraction, SEM values were higher and considered to be imprecise for research and clinical purposes. ICC values for all muscles across all testing directions ranged from 0.23 to 0.79. Conclusion EMD of selected neck muscles can be measured with sufficient precision for the assessment of neck muscle function in an athletic population in the majority of directions tested. PMID:19775461

  12. Towards the prediction of multiple necking during dynamic extension of round bar : linear stability approach versus finite element calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Maï, S.; Mercier, S.; Petit, J.; Molinari, A.

    2014-05-01

    The fragmentation of structures subject to dynamic conditions is a matter of interest for civil industries as well as for Defence institutions. Dynamic expansions of structures, such as cylinders or rings, have been performed to obtain crucial information on fragment distributions. Many authors have proposed to capture by FEA the experimental distribution of fragment size by introducing in the FE model a perturbation. Stability and bifurcation analyses have also been proposed to describe the evolution of the perturbation growth rate. In the proposed contribution, the multiple necking of a round bar in dynamic tensile loading is analysed by the FE method. A perturbation on the initial flow stress is introduced in the numerical model to trigger instabilities. The onset time and the dominant mode of necking have been characterized precisely and showed power law evolutions, with the loading velocities and moderately with the amplitudes and the cell sizes of the perturbations. In the second part of the paper, the development of linear stability analysis and the use of salient criteria in terms of the growth rate of perturbations enabled comparisons with the numerical results. A good correlation in terms of onset time of instabilities and of number of necks is shown.

  13. Intrasession and interrater reliability of rehabilitative ultrasound imaging measures of the deep neck flexors: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    McGaugh, Janna; Ellison, Jennifer

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the intrasession and interrater reliability of rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) to measure the deep neck flexors (DNF). Two investigators traced the DNF muscle borders in eight female subjects aged 33??11.2 years. Of the eight subjects, five subjects reported a greater than 6-month history of neck pain, and three subjects were asymptomatic healthy controls. Cross-sectional area (CSA) (cm(2)) of right and left muscle groups were calculated. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for CSA measures were 0.67 (95% CI: 0.27-0.87) for rater 1 with a standard error of measurement (SEM) of 0.06?cm(2); 0.87 (95% CI: 0.65-0.96) for rater 2 with an SEM of 0.09?cm(2); and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.44-0.87) for interrater reliability between rater 1 and rater 2 with an SEM of 0.11?cm(2). The mean difference between CSA (cm(2)) measures were 0.00??0.10?cm(2) for rater 1 and 0.09??0.13?cm(2) for rater 2. The mean differences for CSA were 0.04??0.12?cm(2). This pilot investigation suggests that RUSI could be used to reliably assess the size of the deep neck flexors. PMID:21682580

  14. Fibular strut grafting for fibrous dysplasia of the femoral neck.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, D. D.; Grant, R. E.; Tang, D.

    1992-01-01

    When fibrous dysplasia affects the femoral neck, normal bone is replaced by fibro-osseous dysplastic bone that is both mechanically weakened and biomechanically abnormal. Surgical management is recommended for persistent pain, progressive deformity, or impending fracture. Surgical options include curettage and cancellous bone grafting, osteotomy and nail-plate fixation, intramedullary rodding, and cortical bone grafting. We present the case of a patient with a painful, dysplastic lesion of the femoral neck who underwent cortical bone grafting using dual fibular strut grafts. To ensure long-term graft incorporation, the fibular cortical grafts bridged the lesion in the femoral neck and were securely anchored to the normal bone of the lateral femoral cortex and a head of the femur. No supplemental internal fixation was required. The biological basis for success of the fibular strut grafting procedure is that creeping substitution of the cortical graft necrotic bone does not replace the interstitial lamellae, which persist to lend structural support. Fibular strut grafting is an excellent procedure for fibrous dysplasia of the femoral neck. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1404469

  15. Why does necking ignore notches in dynamic tension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotbaum, Y.; Osovski, S.; Rittel, D.

    2015-09-01

    Recent experimental work has revealed that necking of tensile specimens, subjected to dynamic loading, is a deterministic phenomenon, governed by the applied boundary conditions. Furthermore it was shown that the potential sited, dictated by the boundary conditions, may prevail even in the presence of a notch, thus necking may occur away of the notched region. The present paper combines experimental and numerical work to address this issue. Specifically, it is shown that the dynamic tensile failure locus is dictated by both the applied velocity boundary condition and the material mechanical properties, specifically strain-rate sensitivity and strain-rate hardening. It is shown that at sufficiently high impact velocities, the flows stress in the notch vicinity becomes quite higher than in the rest of the specimen, so that while the former resists deformation, it transfers the load to the latter, resulting in the formation of a local neck and failure away from the notch. Small local perturbations in the material properties are shown to be sufficient to stabilize the structure under local failure until a neck forms elsewhere. While the physical observations are quite counterintuitive with respect to the engineering views of stress concentrator's effect, the present work rationalizes those observations and also provides information for the designers of dynamically tensioned structures that may contain notches or similar flaws.

  16. Associations Between Dietary Patterns and Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Patrick T.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Campbell, Marci; Weissler, Mark C.; Funkhouser, William K.; Olshan, Andrew F.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have examined the associations between dietary patterns and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or whether they differ by race. This was evaluated using data from a population-based case-control study (2002–2006) including 1,176 cases of head and neck SCC and 1,317 age-, race-, and gender-matched controls from central and eastern North Carolina whose diets had been assessed by food frequency questionnaire. Factor analysis identified 2 patterns of intake: 1) high consumption of fruits, vegetables, and lean protein and 2) high consumption of fried foods, high-fat and processed meats, and sweets. Associations were estimated using logistic regression, adjusting for matching factors and confounders. Heterogeneity by tumor site (oral/pharyngeal vs. laryngeal) and effect-measure modification were also evaluated. Reduced odds of head and neck SCC were found for the fruit, vegetable, and lean protein pattern (for highest quartile vs. lowest, odds ratio = 0.53, 95% confidence interval: 0.39, 0.71). The fried foods, high-fat and processed meats, and sweets pattern was positively associated only with laryngeal cancer (odds ratio = 2.12, 95% confidence interval: 1.21, 3.72). These findings underline the importance of a dietary pattern rich in fruits and vegetables and low in high-fat and processed meats and sweets for prevention of head and neck cancer. PMID:22575416

  17. Neural Crest Origins of the Neck and Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Ahlberg, Per E.; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Iannarelli, Palma; Dennehy, Ulla; Richardson, William D.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Koentges, Georgy

    2005-01-01

    Summary The neck and shoulder region of vertebrates has undergone a complex evolutionary history. In order to identify its underlying mechanisms we map the destinations of embryonic neural crest and mesodermal stem cells using novel Cre-recombinase mediated transgenesis. The single-cell resolution of this genetic labelling reveals cryptic cell boundaries traversing seemingly homogeneous skeleton of neck and shoulders. Within this complex assembly of bones and muscles we discern a precise code of connectivity that mesenchymal stem cells of neural crest and mesodermal origin both obey as they form muscle scaffolds. Neural crest anchors the head onto the anterior lining of the shoulder girdle, while a Hox gene controlled mesoderm links trunk muscles to the posterior neck and shoulder skeleton. The skeleton that we identify as neural crest is specifically affected in human Klippel-Feil syndrome, Sprengels deformity and Arnold-Chiari I/II malformation, providing first insights into their likely aetiology. We identify genes involved in the cellular modularity of neck and shoulder skeleton and propose a new methodology for determining skeletal homologies that is based on muscle attachments. This has allowed us to trace the whereabouts of the cleithrum, the major shoulder bone of extinct land vertebrate ancestors which appears to survive as the scapular spine in living mammals. PMID:16034409

  18. [Spontaneous disappearance of herniation pit on the femoral neck].

    PubMed

    Lerais, J M; Jacob, D; Thibaud, J C; Fourrer, C; Cercueil, J P; Krause, D; Laredo, J D; Baudrillard, J C

    1995-09-01

    The authors present a case of a 39 years old patient who had a herniation pit of the left femoral neck, 5 years ago. This lesion disappeared spontaneously. To our knowledge, no report of healing of a herniation pit has been previously described. PMID:7473400

  19. Severe and Catastrophic Neck Injuries Resulting from Tackle Football

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torg, Joseph S.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Use of the spring-loaded blocking and tackling devices should be discontinued due to severe neck injuries resulting from their use; employment of the head and helmet as the primary assault weapon in blocking, tackling, and head butting should be condemned for the same reason. (MJB)

  20. 33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m.,...

  1. 33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m.,...

  2. 33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m.,...

  3. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Castleman Disease of the Neck.

    PubMed

    Shams, Alexandra A; Ahmed, Mostafa M; Scalzitti, Nicholas J; Howell, Della L; Hall, Jordan M; Ritter, John L; Maturo, Stephen C

    2016-02-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder that occurs in adults and rarely in the pediatric population. The disease is characterized by slowly enlarging masses that can form anywhere within the lymphatic system. It is an uncommon cause of a neck mass in both children and adults that presents insidiously and nonspecifically. A 21-year-old woman was referred to the otolaryngology service because of an asymptomatic neck mass found incidentally on computed tomographic imaging 15 months earlier. On repeat imaging, the lesion was characterized as a homogenously enhancing soft tissue mass and appeared stable in size compared with previous studies. Given the nondiagnostic radiologic features, tissue sampling was pursued, first using fine-needle aspiration and ultimately excisional biopsy. The excision revealed histopathology consistent with unicentric, hyaline-vascular CD. Excision is the gold standard for treatment of this variant of CD. The patient was referred to the hematology/oncology service but was subsequently lost to follow-up. This case illustrates a rare cause of a neck mass in a young adult and exemplifies the extremely broad differential in this setting. In addition, it highlights the importance of a systematic and thorough approach to diagnosing neck masses in children and adults. PMID:26840960

  4. Sporadic Multifocal Venous Malformations of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Michael V.; Patel, Neha A.; Hu, Shirley; Pantelides, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To report a case of unusually widespread sporadic venous malformations of the head and neck associated with normal D-dimer levels and, due to the protean clinical manifestations and increased risk of coagulopathy of these lesions, to review their diagnosis and clinical management. Case Report. A 25-year-old man presented with a one-year history of intermittent right-sided neck swelling and tongue swelling. Physical exam revealed additional lesions present throughout the head and neck. There was no family history suggestive of heritable vascular malformations. Radiographic imaging demonstrated 15 lesions located in various tissue layers consistent with venous malformations. A coagulation screen showed a normal prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio, D-dimer level, and fibrinogen level. It was determined that the patient was not at increased risk for intraoperative coagulopathy and preoperative heparin administration would not be necessary. The patient's buccal and tongue lesions were subsequently excised with no complications. The patient also underwent sclerotherapy evaluation for his neck mass. Conclusion. This case describes a unique presentation of sporadic multifocal venous malformations. It also emphasizes the importance of prompt diagnosis and workup when multiple venous malformations are present to prevent morbidity during surgical excision secondary to intravascular coagulopathy. PMID:26483982

  5. The nutritional assessment of head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Magnano, Mauro; Mola, Patrizia; Machetta, Giacomo; Maffeis, Paola; Forestiero, Ilenia; Cavagna, Roberta; Artino, Elena; Boffano, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Patients affected by head and neck cancer are particularly at risk for nutritional depletion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status of patients affected by head and neck cancer at diagnosis. All adult patients with head and neck cancer between January 2009 and December 2013 were included. The following data were recorded: demographics, tobacco and/or alcohol consumption, weight, height, the reference weight 6months before the diagnosis, tumor site, tumor stage, and laboratory data. Then, Body mass index (BMI), and Buzby nutrition risk index (NRI) were calculated. Statistical analysis was used to search for associations among multiple variables. 122 men and 22 women were enrolled. As for reference BMI, 77 patients were overweight, whereas just 7 subjects were underweight. At diagnosis, 72 subjects were overweight according to BMI, whereas 52 patients were underweight. Instead, according to NRI, 96 patients were severely malnourished, 42 patients were moderately malnourished, whereas just 6 patients had a normal value of NRI. The assessment of nutrition by BMI excluded from a thorough consideration all overweight and obese patients with head and neck cancer. Instead, NRI correctly identified both undernourished and overweight/obese patients as "malnourished" subjects. PMID:25534287

  6. A value framework in head and neck cancer care.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Jonas A; Seiwert, Tanguy Y

    2014-01-01

    The care of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has greatly evolved over the past 30 years. From single modality to a multidisciplinary care, there has also been a concurrent increase in treatment intensity, resulting, at many times, in more zealous regimens that patients must endure. In this article, we apply Porter's value model as a framework to balance survival, toxicities, cost, and trade-offs from a patient's perspective in head and neck cancer. This model defines value as the health outcome per dollar achieved. Domains and outcomes that are important to patients, including not only survival or short-term quality of life, but also functional outcomes, recovery, sustainability of recovery, and the lasting consequences of therapy are included in this framework. Other outcomes that are seldom measured in head and neck cancer, such as work disability and financial toxicities, are also included and further discussed. Within this value model and based on evidence, we further discuss de-escalation of care, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, newer surgical methods, and enhancements in the process of care as potential approaches to add value for patients. Finally, we argue that knowing the patient's preferences is essential in the value discussion, as the attribute that will ultimately provide the most value to the individual patient with head and neck cancer. PMID:24857117

  7. Venous air embolism from head and neck wounds.

    PubMed

    Adams, V I; Hirsch, C S

    1989-05-01

    Air emboli in the chambers of the right side of the heart and in the pulmonary artery were documented in 16 autopsies representing shotgun and gunshot wounds of the head, traffic fatalities with head trauma, and one neck incision. The pathology of venous air embolism and its interpretation in the context of death investigation are discussed. PMID:2653272

  8. [Psychological care of patients with head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Moya, Mélanie

    2015-09-01

    Treatments for head and neck cancers are generally complex and debilitating. Surgery, often mutilating, profoundly affects the relationship between oneself and others and causes verbal communication, breathing and swallowing difficulties. The functional and aesthetic sequelae are a constant reminder to the patient of the disease and make them conscious of their appearance. PMID:26369747

  9. Pediatric Vascular Tumors of the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Carl; Peacock, Zachary S; Troulis, Maria J

    2016-02-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are often involved in the diagnosis and treatment of vascular neoplasms of the head and neck. An incorrect diagnosis may lead to improper or unnecessary treatment. This article reviews the diagnosis and management of vascular tumors. PMID:26293330

  10. Intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Homma, Akihiro; Onimaru, Rikiya; Matsuura, Kazuto; Robbins, K Thomas; Fujii, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Intra-arterial chemotherapy has been used to treat localized malignant neoplasms in patients with head and neck cancer for over 50 years as the head and neck region is particularly well suited to regional chemotherapy. Early intra-arterial chemotherapy did not prove its efficacy. In addition, the additional complications associated with establishing and maintaining arterial access have further dampened enthusiasm for this approach. Subsequent significant advances in vascular radiology techniques and the development of new devices, such as fluoroscopy units and angiographic catheters, have made possible safe, accurate and repeated superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy. Intra-arterial infusion of high-dose cisplatin with systemic neutralization by intravenous sodium thiosulfate (RADPLAT) is a theoretically attractive approach to the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer. However, a Dutch trial comparing intra-arterial and intravenous chemoradiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer showed that RADPLAT was not superior to intravenous chemoradiotherapy. Therefore, further investigation of RADPLAT, including the refinement of the indications for its application, is needed. PMID:26486825

  11. 33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m.,...

  12. Noninvasive intraoperative angiography for reconstruction of head and neck defects.

    PubMed

    Daram, Shiva P; Sacks, Justin M; Kupferman, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of head and neck defects after cancer resection involves the use of local, pedicled musculocutaneous, and free flaps. Flap failure is often caused by vascular insufficiency, and it is associated with the presence of cardiovascular or peripheral vascular disease, a history of smoking, and previous radiation and/or surgery. Failure rates may be reduced by the use of indocyanine green near-infrared fluorescence laser angiography, which detects perfusion deficits intraoperatively. Although this technology has been validated in other fields, there is limited experience in the head and neck region. We present 3 cases in which different head and neck flaps were used along with this technology in patients at high risk for flap failure. All flaps were successfully implanted without perioperative or long-term complications. The increasing complexity, age, and comorbidities of the head and neck cancer population pose significant reconstructive challenges. This report demonstrates the feasibility of employing intraoperative angiography for local, pedicled, and free flaps. This noninvasive tool optimizes intraoperative planning and assesses viability, potentially lowering failure rates in high-risk patients. Identification of patients who most benefit from this technology warrants further investigation. PMID:26535829

  13. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-02-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that qualitatively undergoes the same forces acting in whiplash and shows the same behavior is used to analyze the kinematics of both the head and the cervical spine and the resulting neck loads. The rapid acceleration during a whiplash event causes the extension and flexion of the cervical spine, which in turn can cause dislocated vertebrae, torn ligaments, intervertebral disc herniation, and other trauma that appear to be the likely causes of subsequent painful headache or neck pain symptoms. Thus, whiplash provides a connection between the dynamics of the human body and physics. Its treatment can enliven the usual teaching in kinematics, and both theoretical and experimental approaches provide an interesting biological context to teach introductory principles of mechanics.

  14. [Wooly-necked stork, a new bird record of China].

    PubMed

    Han, Lian-Xian; Han, Ben; Den, Zhang-Wen; Yu, Hong-Zhong; Zhao, Jian-Lin

    2011-10-01

    A new record species-the woolly-necked stork (Ciconia episcopus)-for China has been detected during a field survey of Shangri-La county, Diqing Tibetan autonomous prefecture, Yunnan province, June 10th, 2011. Ciconia episcopus is the least concern spices according to IUCN. PMID:22006814

  15. Head and neck lesions commonly found in musicians.

    PubMed

    Zimmers, P L; Gobetti, J P

    1994-11-01

    Common problems in playing musical instruments include soft tissue lesions, tooth mobility, malocclusion, TMD and endodontic pathoses. This article illustrates the basic playing positions of the instruments and their effects on head and neck structures to help dentists provide appropriate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:7963100

  16. The effects of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy on head, neck, shoulder, low back and knee pain of female patients

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Tuğrul; Oruç, Mehmet Tahir; Aslaner, Arif; Duygun, Fatih; Yardımcı, Erdem Can; Mayir, Burhan; Bülbüller, Nurullah

    2015-01-01

    As the rise on the prevalence of obesity, it is related with physical impairment of joints, especially in the lumbar spine and knee joints. Losing body weight can reduce or eliminate pain of head, neck, shoulder, lumbar spine and knees. By performing a laparoscopic bariatric surgery we demonstrated a significant improvement on the pain by body weight reduction. In this study we aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) on the relief of pain on head and neck, shoulder, low back and knee among the severely morbid obese female patients. A total of 39 morbidly obese female patients who underwent LSG for morbid obesity were included in this study. Body weight, height, body mass index (BMI), head and neck, shoulder, low back and knee pain intensity were measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS) before and after LSG at the 6th month. 39 morbidly obese female patients were enrolled to this study. The mean age of the patients was 37.69 ± 11.33 years. Preoperative and postoperative body weights were 127.3 kg and 91.21 kg, respectively. Mean height was 165.23 ± 5.78 cm. Preoperative and postoperative BMIs were 46.49 kg/m2 and 32.33 kg/m2, respectively. A significant correlation between preoperative and postoperative parameters was found according to BMI. Our data showed that LSG is an efficient and safe procedure on severely obese patients and showed a predictive remission of head and neck, shoulder, low back and knee pain intensity of female patients by analyzing with VAS during the first 6 months. PMID:25932217

  17. Quality of information available via the internet for patients with head and neck cancer: are we improving?

    PubMed

    Best, James; Muzaffar, Jameel; Mitchell-Innes, Alistair

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the type, content, accessibility and quality of information available via the internet for patients with head and neck cancer. The Google search engine was used to generate lists of the first 100 websites for general head and neck cancer and the first ten for head and neck cancers by anatomical location (160 total). Websites were evaluated with the validated DISCERN and LIDA instruments, the SMOG (Simple measure of gobbledygook) readability score and against the JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) criteria. 40 of the 160 websites ranked by Google were suitable for analysis. Seven websites (17.5%) partially or fully achieved all four JAMA benchmarks and only one (2.5%) site achieved none. 28 (70%) included reference to quality of life factors. Correlations were identified between Google site rank and all four of our appraisal tools; LIDA (-0.966, p = 0.006), JAMA (-5.93, p = 0.028), DISCERN (-0.568, p = 0.037) and SMOG (4.678, p = 0.04). Google site rank and both government run sites (-35.38, p = 0.034) and sites run by universities or hospitals (-27.32, p = 0.016) also showed an association. Comparing our observations with those of Riordain in 2008, there has been little improvement in the quality of head and neck cancer information available online over this time. Given the variability in quality of information online, patients would benefit from being directed to reliable websites by clinicians. PMID:25370600

  18. Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Locher, Julie L.; Nabell, Lisle M.; Carroll, William R.; Magnuson, J. Scott; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The use of altered fractionation radiotherapy (RT) regimens, as well as concomitant chemotherapy and RT, to intensify therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer can lead to increased rates of long-term dysphagia. Methods and Materials: We identified 122 patients who had undergone definitive RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, after excluding those who had been treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary, had Stage I-II disease, developed locoregional recurrence, had <12 months of follow-up, or had undergone postoperative RT. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were correlated with a composite of 3 objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence at the last follow-up visit; aspiration on a modified barium swallow study or a clinical diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia; or the presence of a pharyngoesophageal stricture. Results: A composite dysphagia outcome occurred in 38.5% of patients. On univariate analysis, the primary site (p = 0.01), use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), RT schedule (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of composite long-term dysphagia. The use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), primary site (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.02) remained significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent chemotherapy to RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer resulted in increased long-term dysphagia. Early intervention using swallowing exercises, avoidance of nothing-by-mouth periods, and the use of intensity-modulated RT to reduce the dose to the uninvolved swallowing structures should be explored further in populations at greater risk of long-term dysphagia.

  19. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 amplification is a common event in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Gke, Friederike; Bode, Maike; Franzen, Alina; Kirsten, Robert; Goltz, Diane; Gke, Antonia; Sharma, Rakesh; Boehm, Diana; Vogel, Wenzel; Wagner, Patrick; Lengerke, Claudia; Kristiansen, Glen; Kirfel, Jutta; Van Bremen, Tobias; Bootz, Friedrich; Heasley, Lynn E; Schrck, Andreas; Perner, Sven

    2013-10-01

    Recently, we characterized fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 amplification as a target for a rational therapy in lung squamous cell carcinoma. Patients harboring this genetic event are currently eligible for treatment with antifibroblast growth factor receptor small-molecule inhibitors in phase I clinical trials. This has the potential to significantly improve standard therapy for lung squamous cell carcinoma patients. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 amplification is also a common genetic event in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. For this purpose, we assembled a cohort of 555 patients, including 264 with metastatic disease and 147 with recurrent disease. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material of primary tumors, metastases and recurrences were assessed for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 copy number status using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Human papilloma virus status was detected by p16 immunohistochemistry staining and PCR-ELISA. Molecular parameters were correlated with each other and with clinicopathological data. We found 15% of primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to display a fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 amplification. In nearly all cases, metastatic and recurrent tumor samples shared the same amplification status as the corresponding primary tumor. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 amplification was associated with nicotine and alcohol consumption, but was mutually exclusive with human papilloma virus infection. Amplification of the gene was associated with parameters of worse outcome. Our data identify fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 amplification as a frequent event in primary and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and represents a potential biomarker for more aggressive disease. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1-amplified tumors could potentially comprise a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma against which targeted small-molecule inhibitors hold therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23619603

  20. Adaptive Planning in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancers: Single-Institution Experience and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Peter H.; Chen, Chin-Cheng; Ahn, Andrew I.; Hong, Linda; Scripes, Paola G.; Shen Jin; Lee, Chen-Chiao; Miller, Ekeni; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Anatomic changes and positional variability during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer can lead to clinically significant dosimetric changes. We report our single-institution experience using an adaptive protocol and correlate these changes with anatomic and positional changes during treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head and neck IMRT patients underwent serial computed tomography (CT) scans during their radiation course. After undergoing the planning CT scan, patients underwent planned rescans at 11, 22, and 33 fractions; a total of 89 scans with 129 unique CT plan combinations were thus analyzed. Positional variability and anatomic changes during treatment were correlated with changes in dosimetric parameters to target and avoidance structures between planning CT and subsequent scans. Results: A total of 15/23 patients (65%) benefited from adaptive planning, either due to inadequate dose to gross disease or to increased dose to organs at risk. Significant differences in primary and nodal targets (planning target volume, gross tumor volume, and clinical tumor volume), parotid, and spinal cord dosimetric parameters were noted throughout the treatment. Correlations were established between these dosimetric changes and weight loss, fraction number, multiple skin separations, and change in position of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine. Conclusions: Variations in patient positioning and anatomy changes during IMRT for head and neck cancer can affect dosimetric parameters and have wide-ranging clinical implications. The interplay between random positional variability and gradual anatomic changes requires careful clinical monitoring and frequent use of CT- based image-guided radiation therapy, which should determine variations necessitating new plans.

  1. Effect of Occupant and Impact Factors on Forces within Neck: I. Overview of Large Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaibani, Saami J.

    2000-03-01

    Scientific and medical data have been gathered for nearly 500 motor-vehicle occupants, whose dynamic response[1-2] was calculated to determine the forces generated at all potential injury sites. Particular attention was paid to the load within the cervical spine to examine the influence of certain variables relating to the occupant (height, weight, sex), the impact (magnitude, direction), and the neck itself (local vector, anatomical level). Exhaustive efforts were made to match the force with each variable using linear and logarithmic fits, but correlation coefficients were generally not high. These results might be influenced by the emphasis in this research to obtain the best statistics with large groupings of patients. Hence, a separate study with more detail is proposed as a significant continuation of this effort. 1. Proper Treatment of Complex Human Structures, Announcer 27 (4), 100 (1997); 2. Physics as a Key Element in the Complete Description of Dichotomies in Injury Distribution, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 274 (1999).

  2. Targeting EGF-receptor-signalling in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, C W M; Morgan, M A; Eckardt, A

    2007-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the use of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy to treat squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), prognosis has improved little over the past 30 years. There is a clear need for novel, more effective therapies to prevent relapse, control metastases and improve overall survival. Improved understanding of SCCHN disease biology has led to the introduction of molecularly targeted treatment strategies in these cancers. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is expressed at much higher levels in SCCHN tumours than in normal epithelial tissue, and EGFR expression correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, much effort is currently directed toward targeting aberrant EGFR activity (e.g. cell signalling) in SCCHN. This review discusses the efficacy of novel therapies targeting the EGFR (e.g. anti-EGFR antibodies and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors) that are currently tested in SCCHN patients. PMID:17224925

  3. Neck-cooling improves repeated sprint performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Caroline; Stevens, Ryan; Everson, Bethan; Tyler, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of neck-cooling during exercise on repeated sprint ability in a hot environment. Seven team-sport playing males completed two experimental trials involving repeated sprint exercise (5 6 s) before and after two 45 min bouts of a football specific intermittent treadmill protocol in the heat (33.0 0.2C; 53 2% relative humidity). Participants wore a neck-cooling collar in one of the trials (CC). Mean power output and peak power output declined over time in both trials but were higher in CC (540 99 v 507 122 W, d = 0.32; 719 158 v 680 182 W, d = 0.24 respectively). The improved power output was particularly pronounced (d = 0.51-0.88) after the 2nd 45 min bout but the CC had no effect on % fatigue. The collar lowered neck temperature and the thermal sensation of the neck (P < 0.001) but had no effect on heart rate, fluid loss, fluid consumption, lactate, glucose, plasma volume change, cortisol, or thermal sensation (P > 0.05). There were no trial differences but interaction effects were demonstrated for prolactin concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Prolactin concentration was initially higher in the collar cold trial and then was lower from 45 min onwards (interaction trial time P = 0.04). RPE was lower during the football intermittent treadmill protocol in the collar cold trial (interaction trial time P = 0.01). Neck-cooling during exercise improves repeated sprint performance in a hot environment without altering physiological or neuroendocrinological responses. RPE is reduced and may partially explain the performance improvement. PMID:26594177

  4. Post Burn Contracture Neck: Clinical Profile and Management

    PubMed Central

    Bankar, Sanket S.; Patil, Avinash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Morbidity related to hypertrophic scars and contractures which are well known sequel after burns remains high and in fact has increased as more severely burned patients are surviving. This study was undertaken in order to assess the varied clinical presentation, precipitating factors, preventive measures, treatment modalities of neck contractures and evaluate the results after surgical procedures. Materials and Methods: This hospital based study was conducted on patients admitted in our institution with proven cases of Post burn neck contracture from 1st August 2009 to 31st July 2011. Twenty two patients of post burn neck contracture who underwent operative treatment were included. Observation: 10 of 22 cases were in the middle age group i.e. between 21-30 years. There were 5 males and 17 females. Accidental flame burn was the commonest aetiology. Fourteen patients were treated within 1 year of burns for functional disability. Excisional release was performed in 13 and incisional release in 9 of our patients. Resurfacing with STSG (split thickness skin graft) was carried out in 19 cases and a local or regional flap with or without a graft in 3 patients. Hypertrophy and recontracture were the commonest late complications and occurred in 3 cases. Good to fair results were obtained in 19 patients Conclusion: Local flaps have many advantages and are to be used whenever possible. It is preferable to place the grafts if used in the area surrounding the neck (donor site of flap) or at least in the non-visible area of the neck (submental area). When a combination of flap & graft is used, its preferable to place the flap in a horizontal intersecting fashion in between the two patches of the graft. A follow up program for reasonable period is highly desired. PMID:25478392

  5. Neck-cooling improves repeated sprint performance in the heat

    PubMed Central

    Sunderland, Caroline; Stevens, Ryan; Everson, Bethan; Tyler, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of neck-cooling during exercise on repeated sprint ability in a hot environment. Seven team-sport playing males completed two experimental trials involving repeated sprint exercise (5 × 6 s) before and after two 45 min bouts of a football specific intermittent treadmill protocol in the heat (33.0 ± 0.2°C; 53 ± 2% relative humidity). Participants wore a neck-cooling collar in one of the trials (CC). Mean power output and peak power output declined over time in both trials but were higher in CC (540 ± 99 v 507 ± 122 W, d = 0.32; 719 ± 158 v 680 ± 182 W, d = 0.24 respectively). The improved power output was particularly pronounced (d = 0.51–0.88) after the 2nd 45 min bout but the CC had no effect on % fatigue. The collar lowered neck temperature and the thermal sensation of the neck (P < 0.001) but had no effect on heart rate, fluid loss, fluid consumption, lactate, glucose, plasma volume change, cortisol, or thermal sensation (P > 0.05). There were no trial differences but interaction effects were demonstrated for prolactin concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Prolactin concentration was initially higher in the collar cold trial and then was lower from 45 min onwards (interaction trial × time P = 0.04). RPE was lower during the football intermittent treadmill protocol in the collar cold trial (interaction trial × time P = 0.01). Neck-cooling during exercise improves repeated sprint performance in a hot environment without altering physiological or neuroendocrinological responses. RPE is reduced and may partially explain the performance improvement. PMID:26594177

  6. Correlation spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B. (Albuquerque, NM); Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Flemming, Jeb H. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Gary D. (Tijeras, NM); Tigges, Chris P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  7. Anthropometric Assessment of Neck Adipose Tissue and Airway Volume Using Multidetector Computed Tomography: An Imaging Approach and Association With Overall Mortality.

    PubMed

    Maresky, Hillel S; Sharfman, Zachary; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Gomori, J M; Copel, Laurian; Tal, Sigal

    2015-11-01

    Neck adiposity tissue volume (NATV) accumulation is an indicator for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Neck circumference is a poor measure of NATV, and a quantifier for this entity has not yet been established. To evaluate volumetric quantification by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as a reproducible anthropometric tool to measure NATV and airway volume (AWV). A total of 519 patients, including a subset of 70 random patients who underwent head and neck CT scanning in our hospital within 1 year (2013), were studied. Included patients were all those undergoing nonenhanced CT (NECT) or CT angiography (CTA). Neck cross-sectional areas (NCSA) were measured at 2 separate levels of the neck, and 3D postprocessing tissue reconstruction was performed, and NATV and AWVs were quantified volumetrically for all patients within the year. The average NCSA at the level of the soft palate and thyroid cartilage was 22,579 and 14,500?mm, respectively. NATV when compared to the upper and lower levels of NCSA showed correlations of 0.64 and 0.79, respectively (P?correlation between NATV and body mass index (BMI) was found (r?=?0.658, P?

  8. Deep neck abscess in neonatal period: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Mehmet; Dereci, Selim; Aslan, Yakup

    2014-04-01

    Deep neck abscess is very rare in neonatal period. We reported a deep neck abscess caused by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection (MSSA) in a neonate. A 10-day male infant was admitted to our neonatal unit with the complaints of fever, irritability, and refused to food intake. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed as an abscess in the neck. Needle aspiration from abscess revealed pus. Antibiotics and drainage were applied. We also reviewed the neonatal deep neck abscess reported in English literature and clinical presentation, risk factors, causing microorganisms, treatment, complication and outcome of deep neck abscesses were discussed. PMID:24512784

  9. Innovative perspectives of immunotherapy in head and neck cancer. From relevant scientific rationale to effective clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lalami, Y; Awada, A

    2016-02-01

    It is now well established that head and neck cancer carcinogenesis is characterized by genetic instability and several immune defects, leading to unique host-tumor interactions. In such condition, recent improved comprehension and relevant findings could lead to identification of innovative molecular therapeutic targets, achieving considerable clinical and translational research. This review aims to summarize and to highlight most recent and relevant scientific rationale in this era of immunotherapy revival, and to correlate it to the near future clinical practice for the management of this challenging disease. PMID:26827699

  10. Refining Measurement of Social Cognitive Theory Factors Associated with Exercise Adherence in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Laura Q; Fogleman, Amanda; Verhulst, Steven; Bhugra, Mudita; Rao, Krishna; Malone, James; Robbs, Randall; Robbins, K Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Social cognitive theory (SCT) measures related to exercise adherence in head and neck cancer (HNCa) patients were developed. Enrolling 101 HNCa patients, psychometric properties and associations with exercise behavior were examined for barriers self-efficacy, perceived barriers interference, outcome expectations, enjoyment, and goal setting. Cronbach's alpha ranged from.84 to.95; only enjoyment demonstrated limited test-retest reliability. Subscales for barriers self-efficacy (motivational, physical health) and barriers interference (motivational, physical health, time, environment) were identified. Multiple SCT constructs were cross-sectional correlates and prospective predictors of exercise behavior. These measures can improve the application of the SCT to exercise adherence in HNCa patients. PMID:26177345

  11. DXA femoral neck strength analysis in Chinese overweight and normal weight adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jian; Xu, Yi; Guo, Bin; Xu, Hao

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare femoral neck (FN) strength in Chinese overweight adolescents with gender-matched normal weight controls and investigate the relationship of total body soft tissue composition (lean and fat masses) to indices of FN strength. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements of the proximal femur and total body were made in 65 Chinese overweight adolescents and 89 gender-matched normal weight controls using Lunar Prodigy DXA bone densitometer (GE Healthcare, Madison, WI). FN bone mineral density (BMD), total body lean mass, fat mass, and bone mineral content (BMC) were measured. Using FN BMD values derived from DXA measurements, hip structural analysis (HSA) was performed using Lunar enCORE (GE Healthcare), version 10.5 software. Structural parameters derived by HSA were bone cross-sectional area (CSA), cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI), and the section modulus (Z). Data were analyzed by Student's t-test, Pearson correlation coefficients (r), and one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Overweight boys and girls had higher body weight, lean mass, fat mass, and body mass index (p<0.001) than normal controls. CSA, CSMI, and Z were higher in overweight groups compared with controls (p<0.05). Lean mass correlated well with all HSA parameters (range of r: 0.501--0.714) for both genders. ANCOVA test showed no significant differences between overweight and normal weight groups regarding HSA variables in both genders after adjustment for lean mass. However, the differences remain significant after adjustment for fat mass in boys but not in girls. This study supports the conclusion that overweight individuals have greater hip neck strength in comparison with normal weight controls in Chinese adolescents. Lean mass is a major determinant for FN strength. PMID:22402117

  12. Noninvasive diffuse optical monitoring of head and neck tumor blood flow and oxygenation during radiation delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lixin; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; Cheng, Ran; Shang, Yu; Johnson, Ellis L.; Stevens, Scott D.; Shelton, Brent J.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-01-01

    This study explored using a novel diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) flow-oximeter to noninvasively monitor blood flow and oxygenation changes in head and neck tumors during radiation delivery. A fiber-optic probe connected to the DCS flow-oximeter was placed on the surface of the radiologically/clinically involved cervical lymph node. The DCS flow-oximeter in the treatment room was remotely operated by a computer in the control room. From the early measurements, abnormal signals were observed when the optical device was placed in close proximity to the radiation beams. Through phantom tests, the artifacts were shown to be caused by scattered x rays and consequentially avoided by moving the optical device away from the x-ray beams. Eleven patients with head and neck tumors were continually measured once a week over a treatment period of seven weeks, although there were some missing data due to the patient related events. Large inter-patient variations in tumor hemodynamic responses were observed during radiation delivery. A significant increase in tumor blood flow was observed at the first week of treatment, which may be a physiologic response to hypoxia created by radiation oxygen consumption. Only small and insignificant changes were found in tumor blood oxygenation, suggesting that oxygen utilizations in tumors during the short period of fractional radiation deliveries were either minimal or balanced by other effects such as blood flow regulation. Further investigations in a large patient population are needed to correlate the individual hemodynamic responses with the clinical outcomes for determining the prognostic value of optical measurements. PMID:22312579

  13. Prospective Imaging Assessment of Mortality Risk After Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Benjamin J.; Rana, Vishal; Cannon, Blake A.; Williams, Michelle D.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Macapinlac, Homer A.; Lee, J. Jack; Ang, K. Kian; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Chronowski, Gregory M.; Frank, Steven J.; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.; Lippman, Scott M.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: The optimal roles for imaging-based biomarkers in the management of head-and-neck cancer remain undefined. Unresolved questions include whether functional or anatomic imaging might improve mortality risk assessment for this disease. We addressed these issues in a prospective institutional trial. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight patients with locally advanced pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell cancer were enrolled. Each underwent pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging. Imaging parameters were correlated with survival outcomes. Results: Low post-radiation primary tumor FDG avidity correlated with improved survival on multivariate analysis; so too did complete primary tumor response by CT alone. Although both imaging modalities lacked sensitivity, each had high specificity and negative predictive value for disease-specific mortality risk assessment. Kaplan-Meier estimates confirmed that both CT and FDG-PET/CT stratify patients into distinct high- and low-probability survivorship groups on the basis of primary tumor response to radiotherapy. Subset analyses demonstrated that the prognostic value for each imaging modality was primarily derived from patients at high risk for local treatment failure (human papillomavirus [HPV]-negative disease, nonoropharyngeal primary disease, or tobacco use). Conclusions: CT alone and FDG-PET/CT are potentially useful tools in head-and-neck cancer-specific mortality risk assessment after radiotherapy, particularly for selective use in cases of high-risk HPV-unrelated disease. Focus should be placed on corroboration and refinement of patient selection for imaging-based biomarkers in future studies.

  14. Postradiation Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James D.; La, Trang H.; Chu, Karen; Quon, Andrew; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Maxim, Peter G.; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To explore the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume measured on postradiation {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with head-and-neck cancer who received pretreatment and posttreatment PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging along with definitive chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. The PET/CT parameters evaluated include the maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub 2.0}-MTV{sub 4.0}; where MTV{sub 2.0} refers to the volume above a standardized uptake value threshold of 2.0), and integrated tumor volume. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models were used to test for association between PET endpoints and disease-free survival and overall survival. Results: Multiple postradiation PET endpoints correlated significantly with outcome; however, the most robust predictor of disease progression and death was MTV{sub 2.0}. An increase in MTV{sub 2.0} of 21cm{sup 3} (difference between 75th and 25th percentiles) was associated with an increased risk of disease progression (hazard ratio [HR]= 2.5, p = 0.0001) and death (HR = 2.0, p = 0.003). In patients with nonnasopharyngeal carcinoma histology (n = 34), MTV{sub 2.0} <18 cm{sup 3} and MTV{sub 2.0} {>=}18 cm{sup 3} yielded 2-year disease-free survival rates of 100% and 63%, respectively (p = 0.006) and 2-year overall survival rates of 100% and 81%, respectively (p = 0.009). There was no correlation between MTV{sub 2.0} and disease-free survival or overall survival with nasopharyngeal carcinoma histology (n = 13). On multivariate analysis, only postradiation MTV{sub 2.0} was predictive of disease-free survival (HR = 2.47, p = 0.0001) and overall survival (HR = 1.98, p = 0.003). Conclusions: Postradiation metabolic tumor volume is an adverse prognostic factor in head-and-neck cancer. Biomarkers such as MTV are important for risk stratification and will be valuable in the future with risk-adapted therapies.

  15. [Mycetoma of the neck and the nape of the neck due to Madurella mycetomatis. Apropos of a case in Mauritania].

    PubMed

    Nozais, J P; Canel, M A; Datry, A; Danis, M

    1995-01-01

    Fungous mycetoma of the nape of the neck due to Madurella mycetomatis is an unusual localisation (four cases in mondial literature) and severe affection. This reports deals with a case occurred after traumatism. Despite five months of itraconazole and chirurgical treatment, the therapeutic escape was evident. PMID:8555761

  16. Inorganic Contaminants, Nutrient Reserves and Molt Intensity in Autumn Migrant Red-Necked Grebes (Podiceps grisegena) at Georgian Bay.

    PubMed

    Holman, Katie L; Schummer, Michael L; Petrie, Scott A; Chen, Yu-Wei; Belzile, Nelson

    2015-11-01

    Red-necked grebes (Podiceps grisegena) are piscivorous waterbirds that breed on freshwater lakes in northwestern Canada and stop-over at the Great Lakes during autumn migration to molt feathers and replenish lipid and protein reserves. The objectives of this study were to (1) describe concentrations of, and correlations among, inorganic contaminants in a sample of autumn migrant red-necked grebes from the Great Lakes, (2) compare concentrations of inorganic contaminants to those in autumn migrant common loons from Schummer et al. (Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 62:704, 2011a), (3) evaluate if the inorganic elements are negatively associated with lipid and protein reserves, and (4) determine if nutrient reserves and molt intensity were correlated. None of the 14 contaminants analyzed were above threshold levels known to cause acute health problems in piscivorous birds. Body masses of plucked birds were within the normal reported range. Lipid reserves varied positively with hepatic concentrations of arsenic, copper, iron, nickel, lead, and selenium and negatively with mercury and magnesium. Protein reserves variety negatively with hepatic concentrations of arsenic, calcium, nickel, lead, and zinc and positively with aluminum, cadmium, and iron. A negative correlation was observed between chest molt and lipid reserves but not between nutrient reserves and other feather tracts. The relationships between lipid reserves and both mercury and selenium were consistent with current research on other piscivorous waterbirds at the Great Lakes and justify continued work to determine interactions of these contaminants in waterbirds that breed, stage, and winter in the region. PMID:26250452

  17. A comparison of bladder neck preservation and bladder neck reconstruction for urinary incontinence after radical retro pubic prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanahi, Mohammad Hossein; Honarmand, Ramin; Khorrami, Mohammad Hataf; Najarzadegan, Mohammad Reza; Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Alizadeh, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and will include about 30% of all malignancies in men. Since the initial report of the anatomic radical prostatectomy, refinements in the surgical technique have been made. Several studies show that bladder neck preservation (BNP) during radical prostatectomy makes improve early return of urinary continence, erectile function or both. However, some clinical trials have suggested little difference between the return of continence while using modifications. In this study, we compared outcomes of BNP and bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) during radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). Materials and Methods: This prospective study was performed on 60 patients at a referral university hospital from March 2010 to March 2012. Study population was all patients candidate for RRP (RRP in this period. All patients divided into two groups, A and B (30 patients in each group). Group A (n = 30) who preserved bladder neck (BNP) and Group B (n = 30) who had BNR. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) before and at 2, 6, 9, 12 and18 months after surgery, anastomotic stricture symptoms, positive bladder neck margin, Gleason score and urine incontinence were compared between two groups. Also, we compared bladder neck contracture, urinary continence and positive surgical margin rates after BNP and BNR while retropubic prostatectomy in 24 months period follow-up. Results: The mean age of the patients was 61.81 7.15 years (range, 50-74 years). After a follow-up period of 24 months, the PSA rising was not different between the two groups. After 2 months, 19 (63.33%) of patients in A group and the same number in B group were continent (P = 0.78). Stricture of the bladder neck at the anastomosis site requiring transurethral dilation occurred in 7 (23.33%) and 3 (10.0%) patients in groups A and B, respectively (P = 0.04). Conclusion: Although there was no difference in prevalence and duration of return of urinary continence after the operation between two groups, but results of our study showed that stenosis of the bladder neck was lower in BNP. Hence in the group of BNP, need for further operation and overflow incontinency due to the obstruction of urinary tract will be less likely than BNR and patients have better long time (24 months) urinary continence. PMID:25709654

  18. Does posture of the cervical spine influence dorsal neck muscle activity when lifting?

    PubMed

    Peolsson, Anneli; Marstein, Eivind; McNamara, Timothy; Nolan, Damien; Sjaaberg, Espen; Peolsson, Michael; Jull, Gwendolen; O'Leary, Shaun

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that postural orientations of the neck, such as flexed or forward head postures, are associated with heightened activity of the dorsal neck muscles. While these studies describe the impact of variations in neck posture alone, there is scant literature regarding the effect of neck posture on muscle activity when combined with upper limb activities such as lifting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three different neck postures on the activity of the different layers of the dorsal neck muscles during a lifting task. Ultrasound measurements of dorsal neck muscle deformation were compared over two time points (rest, during lift) during a lifting task performed in three different neck postural conditions (neutral, flexed and forward head posture) in 21 healthy subjects. Data were analysed by post-process speckle tracking analysis. Results demonstrated significantly greater muscle deformation induced by flexed and forward head postures, compared to the neutral posture, for all dorsal neck muscles at rest (p<0.05). Significant condition by time interactions associated with the lift was observed for four out of the five dorsal muscles (p<0.02). These findings demonstrate that posture of the cervical spine influenced the level of muscle deformation not only at rest, but also when lifting. The findings of the study suggest that neck posture should be considered during the evaluation or design of lifting activities as it may contribute to excessive demands on dorsal neck muscles with potential detrimental consequences. PMID:23880061

  19. Radiographic anatomy of the proximal femur: correlation with the occurrence of fractures

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Prata, Eric Fontes; Gibram, Athos Vilela; Santos, Leandro Emilio Nascimento; Loureno, Paulo Roberto Barbosa de Toledo; Belloti, Joo Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the correlation between radiographic parameters of the proximal femur anatomy and fractures. Methods Three hundred and five digital x-rays of the pelvis were analyzed in the anteroposterior view. Of these x-rays, twenty-seven showed femoral neck or transtrochanteric fractures. The anatomical parameters analyzed were: femoral neck width (FNW), femoral neck length (FNL), femoral axis length (FAL), cervicodiaphyseal angle (CDA), acetabular tear-drop distance (ATD) and great trochanter-pubic symphysis distance (GTPSD). The analysis was performed by comparing the results of the x-rays with and without proximal femoral fracture, to establish a correlation between them. Results No differences were found between the anatomical parameters of the groups with and without proximal femoral fracture. Conclusion There was no association between anatomical changes in the proximal femur and greater susceptibility to fractures. Level of evidence IV, Cross-sectional Study. PMID:24453585

  20. Matching Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy to an Anterior Low Neck Field

    SciTech Connect

    Amdur, Robert J. Liu, Chihray; Li, Jonathan; Mendenhall, William; Hinerman, Russell

    2007-10-01

    When using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to treat head and neck cancer with the primary site above the level of the larynx, there are two basic options for the low neck lymphatics: to treat the entire neck with IMRT, or to match the IMRT plan to a conventional anterior 'low neck' field. In view of the potential advantages of using a conventional low neck field, it is important to look for ways to minimize or manage the problems of matching IMRT to a conventional radiotherapy field. Treating the low neck with a single anterior field and the standard larynx block decreases the dose to the larynx and often results in a superior IMRT plan at the primary site. The purpose of this article is to review the most applicable studies and to discuss our experience with implementing a technique that involves moving the position of the superior border of the low neck field several times during a single treatment fraction.

  1. 75 FR 27497 - Determination That Children's Upper Outerwear in Sizes 2T to 12 With Neck or Hood Drawstrings and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... prohibition of hood and neck area drawstrings, even though the ASTM standard prohibits head and neck... With Neck or Hood Drawstrings and Children's Upper Outerwear in Sizes 2T to 16 With Certain Waist or... neck or hood drawstrings, and in sizes 2T to 16 or the equivalent that have waist or bottom...

  2. Neck pain and postural balance among workers with high postural demands - a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neck pain is related to impaired postural balance among patients and is highly prevalent among workers with high postural demands, for example, cleaners. We therefore hypothesised, that cleaners with neck pain suffer from postural dysfunction. This cross-sectional study tested if cleaners with neck pain have an impaired postural balance compared with cleaners without neck pain. Methods Postural balance of 194 cleaners with (n = 85) and without (N = 109) neck pain was studied using three different tests. Success or failure to maintain the standing position for 30 s in unilateral stance was recorded. Participants were asked to stand on a force platform for 30 s in the Romberg position with eyes open and closed. The centre of pressure of the sway was calculated, and separated into a slow (rambling) and fast (trembling) component. Subsequently, the 95% confidence ellipse area (CEA) was calculated. Furthermore a perturbation test was performed. Results More cleaners with neck pain (81%) failed the unilateral stance compared with cleaners without neck pain (61%) (p < 0.01). However, the risk of failure in unilateral stance was statistically elevated in cleaners with concurrent neck/low back pain compared to cleaners without neck/low back pain (p < 0.01), whereas pain at only neck or only low back did not increase the risk. Impaired postural balance, measured as CEA (p < 0.01), rambling (p < 0.05) and trembling (p < 0.05) was observed among cleaners with neck pain in comparison with cleaners without neck pain in the Romberg position with eyes closed, but not with eyes open. Conclusions Postural balance is impaired among cleaners with neck pain and the current study suggests a particular role of the slow component of postural sway. Furthermore, the unilateral stance test is a simple test to illustrate functional impairment among cleaners with concurrent neck and low back pain. Trial registration ISRCTN96241850 PMID:21806796

  3. The Burden and Determinants of Neck Pain in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    van der Velde, Gabrielle; Carroll, Linda J.; Holm, Lena W.; Cassidy, J. David; Guzman, Jamie; Ct, Pierre; Haldeman, Scott; Ammendolia, Carlo; Carragee, Eugene; Hurwitz, Eric; Nordin, Margareta; Peloso, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Study Design Best evidence synthesis. Objective To undertake a best evidence synthesis of the published evidence on the burden and determinants of neck pain and its associated disorders in the general population. Summary of Background Data The evidence on burden and determinants of neck has not previously been summarized. Methods The Bone and Joint Decade 2000?2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders performed a systematic search and critical review of literature published between 1980 and 2006 to assemble the best evidence on neck pain. Studies meeting criteria for scientific validity were included in a best evidence synthesis. Results We identified 469 studies on burden and determinants of neck pain, and judged 249 to be scientifically admissible; 101 articles related to the burden and determinants of neck pain in the general population. Incidence ranged from 0.055 per 1000 person years (disc herniation with radiculopathy) to 213 per 1000 persons (self-reported neck pain). Incidence of neck injuries during competitive sports ranged from 0.02 to 21 per 1000 exposures. The 12-month prevalence of pain typically ranged between 30% and 50%; the 12-month prevalence of activity-limiting pain was 1.7% to 11.5%. Neck pain was more prevalent among women and prevalence peaked in middle age. Risk factors for neck pain included genetics, poor psychological health, and exposure to tobacco. Disc degeneration was not identified as a risk factor. The use of sporting gear (helmets, face shields) to prevent other types of injury was not associated with increased neck injuries in bicycling, hockey, or skiing. Conclusion Neck pain is common. Nonmodifiable risk factors for neck pain included age, gender, and genetics. Modifiable factors included smoking, exposure to tobacco, and psychological health. Disc degeneration was not identified as a risk factor. Future research should concentrate on longitudinal designs exploring preventive strategies and modifiable risk factors for neck pain.

  4. Ultrastructure of Dendritic Spines: Correlation Between Synaptic and Spine Morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Jon I.; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic spines are critical elements of cortical circuits, since they establish most excitatory synapses. Recent studies have reported correlations between morphological and functional parameters of spines. Specifically, the spine head volume is correlated with the area of the postsynaptic density (PSD), the number of postsynaptic receptors and the ready-releasable pool of transmitter, whereas the length of the spine neck is proportional to the degree of biochemical and electrical isolation of the spine from its parent dendrite. Therefore, the morphology of a spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. To better understand the natural variability of neocortical spine morphologies, we used a combination of gold-toned Golgi impregnations and serial thin-section electron microscopy and performed three-dimensional reconstructions of spines from layer 2/3 pyramidal cells from mouse visual cortex. We characterized the structure and synaptic features of 144 completed reconstructed spines, and analyzed their morphologies according to their positions. For all morphological parameters analyzed, spines exhibited a continuum of variability, without clearly distinguishable subtypes of spines or clear dependence of their morphologies on their distance to the soma. On average, the spine head volume was correlated strongly with PSD area and weakly with neck diameter, but not with neck length. The large morphological diversity suggests an equally large variability of synaptic strength and learning rules. PMID:18982124

  5. Altered motor control patterns in whiplash and chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Woodhouse, Astrid; Vasseljen, Ottar

    2008-01-01

    Background Persistent whiplash associated disorders (WAD) have been associated with alterations in kinesthetic sense and motor control. The evidence is however inconclusive, particularly for differences between WAD patients and patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain. The aim of this study was to investigate motor control deficits in WAD compared to chronic non-traumatic neck pain and healthy controls in relation to cervical range of motion (ROM), conjunct motion, joint position error and ROM-variability. Methods Participants (n = 173) were recruited to three groups: 59 patients with persistent WAD, 57 patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain and 57 asymptomatic volunteers. A 3D motion tracking system (Fastrak) was used to record maximal range of motion in the three cardinal planes of the cervical spine (sagittal, frontal and horizontal), and concurrent motion in the two associated cardinal planes relative to each primary plane were used to express conjunct motion. Joint position error was registered as the difference in head positions before and after cervical rotations. Results Reduced conjunct motion was found for WAD and chronic neck pain patients compared to asymptomatic subjects. This was most evident during cervical rotation. Reduced conjunct motion was not explained by current pain or by range of motion in the primary plane. Total conjunct motion during primary rotation was 13.9 (95% CI; 12.215.6) for the WAD group, 17.9 (95% CI; 16.119.6) for the chronic neck pain group and 25.9 (95% CI; 23.728.1) for the asymptomatic group. As expected, maximal cervical range of motion was significantly reduced among the WAD patients compared to both control groups. No group differences were found in maximal ROM-variability or joint position error. Conclusion Altered movement patterns in the cervical spine were found for both pain groups, indicating changes in motor control strategies. The changes were not related to a history of neck trauma, nor to current pain, but more likely due to long-lasting pain. No group differences were found for kinaesthetic sense. PMID:18570647

  6. Recurrent neck lesions secondary to pyriform sinus fistula.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peijun; Tian, Xiufen

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent neck lesions associated with third or fourth branchial arch fistula are much less common than those of second arch and usually present with acute suppurative thyroiditis or neck abscess. Our aim is to describe clinical features, management and treatment outcomes of 64 cases of congenital pyriform sinus fistula (PSF). Medical record of these 64 patients (33 males, 31 females) treated at the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from 2011 to 2014 were reviewed. The patients comprised 33 males and 31 females, and their ages ranged from 18 months to 47 years (median 10 years, mean 12.7 years). Neck abscess and recurrent infection was the mode of presentation in 37 cases (57.8 %), 4 patients (6.3 %) presented with acute suppurative thyroiditis, neck mass was the mode of presentation in 17 cases (26.6 %), 2 patients (3.1 %) presented with neck mass with respiratory distress, and cutaneous discharging fistula was the mode of presentation in 1 cases (1.6 %). The remaining 3 patients (4.7 %) presented with cutaneous discharging fistula with neck infection. Investigations performed include barium swallow, CT scan, and ultrasound which were useful in delineating PSF tract preoperatively. Barium swallow was taken as the gold standard for diagnosis. Our patients were treated by fistulectomy with hemithyroidectomy, fistulectomy, fistulectomy with endoscopic electric cauterization, endoscopic electric cauterization or endoscopic coblation cauterization, respectively. Histopathologic examination of the surgical specimens revealed that they were lined with ciliated epithelium, stratified cuboid epithelium with chronic inflammatory cell infiltration and fibrosis. Voice hoarseness occurred after operation in seven patients, but disappeared 1 week later. PSF recurred in 6 patients, 4 of them were cured by a successful re-excision. One patient was cured by successful endoscopic electric cauterization. The other 1 has remained asymptomatic for 5 months. In our series, mean follow-up period was 13.3 months and median follow-up period was 12.5 months (range 2-40 months). Presence of congenital PSF should be suspected when intra-thyroidal abscess formation occurs as the gland is resistant to infection. Strong clinical suspicion, barium swallow study, CT scan and ultrasound are the key to diagnosis. Both fistulectomy with hemithyroidectomy and endoscopic treatment have comparable success rate. Endoscopic coblation cauterization may prove a useful and equally effective method of treatment for PSF in future. PMID:25708412

  7. A Planned Neck Dissection Is Not Necessary in All Patients With N2-3 Head-and-Neck Cancer After Sequential Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Soltys, Scott G.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Fee, Willard E.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of a planned neck dissection (PND) after sequential chemoradiotherapy for patients with head-and-neck cancer with N2-N3 nodal disease. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 90 patients with N2-N3 head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1991 and 2001 on two sequential chemoradiotherapy protocols. All patients received induction and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorocuracil, with or without tirapazamine. Patients with less than a clinical complete response (cCR) in the neck proceeded to a PND after chemoradiation. The primary endpoint was nodal response. Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up durations for living and all patients were 8.3 years (range, 1.5-16.3 year) and 5.4 years (range, 0.6-16.3 years), respectively. Of the 48 patients with nodal cCR whose necks were observed, 5 patients had neck failures as a component of their recurrence [neck and primary (n = 2); neck, primary, and distant (n = 1); neck only (n = 1); neck and distant (n = 1)]. Therefore, PND may have benefited only 2 patients (4%) [neck only failure (n = 1); neck and distant failure (n = 1)]. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for those with a clinical partial response (cPR) undergoing PND (n = 30) was 53%. The 5-year neck control rates after cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR were 90%, 93%, and 78%, respectively (p = 0.36). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for the cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR groups were 53%, 75%, and 42%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusion: In our series, patients with N2-N3 neck disease achieving a cCR in the neck, PND would have benefited only 4% and, therefore, is not recommended. Patients with a cPR should be treated with PND. Residual tumor in the PND specimens was associated with poor outcomes; therefore, aggressive therapy is recommended. Studies using novel imaging modalities are needed to better assess treatment response.

  8. Effect of neck strength training on health-related quality of life in females with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled 1-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic neck pain is a common condition associated not only with a decrease in neck muscle strength, but also with decrease in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). While neck strength training has been shown to be effective in improving neck muscle strength and reducing neck pain, HRQoL among patients with neck pain has been reported as an outcome in only two short-term exercise intervention studies. Thus, reports on the influence of a long-term neck strength training intervention on HRQoL among patients with chronic neck pain have been lacking. This study reports the effect of one-year neck strength training on HRQoL in females with chronic neck pain. Methods One hundred eighty female office workers, 25 to 53 years of age, with chronic neck pain were randomized to a strength training group (STG, n = 60), endurance training group (ETG, n = 60) or control group (CG, n = 60). The STG performed high-intensity isometric neck strengthening exercises with an elastic band while the ETG performed lighter dynamic neck muscle training. The CG received a single session of guidance on stretching exercises. HRQoL was assessed using the generic 15D questionnaire at baseline and after 12 months. Statistical comparisons among the groups were performed using bootstrap-type analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with baseline values as covariates. Effect sizes were calculated using the Cohen method for paired samples. Results Training led to statistically significant improvement in the 15D total scores for both training groups, whereas no changes occurred for the control group (P = 0.012, between groups). The STG improved significantly in five of 15 dimensions, while the ETG improved significantly in two dimensions. Effect size (and 95% confidence intervals) for the 15D total score was 0.39 (0.13 to 0.72) for the STG, 0.37 (0.08 to 0.67) for the ETG, and -0.06 (-0.25 to 0.15) for the CG. Conclusions One year of either strength or endurance training seemed to moderately enhance the HRQoL. Neck and upper body training can be recommended to improve HRQoL of females with neck pain if they are motivated for long-term regular exercise. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01057836 PMID:20465854

  9. Diffusion-Weighted MRI for Nodal Staging of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Impact on Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Vandecaveye, Vincent; De Keyzer, Frederik; Op de beeck, Katya; Poorten, Vincent Vander; Delaere, Pierre; Verbeken, Eric; Hermans, Robert; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) for nodal staging and its impact on radiotherapy (RT) planning. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), as well as MRI (with routine and DW sequences) prior to neck dissection. After topographic correlation, lymph nodes were evaluated microscopically with prekeratin immunostaining. Pathology results were correlated with imaging findings and an RT planning study was performed for these surgically treated patients. One set of target volumes was based on conventional imaging only, and another set was based on the corresponding DW-MRI images. A third reference set was contoured based solely on pathology results. Results: A sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 97% per lymph node were found for DW-MRI. Nodal staging agreement between imaging and pathology was significantly stronger for DW-MRI (kappa = 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.00) than for conventional imaging (kappa = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.16-0.96; p = 0.019, by McNemar's test). For both imaging modalities, the absolute differences between RT volumes and those obtained by pathology were calculated. Using an exact paired Wilcoxon test, the observed difference was significantly larger for conventional imaging than for DW-MRI for nodal gross tumor volume (p = 0.0013), as well as for nodal clinical target volume (p = 0.0415) delineation. Conclusions: These results suggest that DW-MRI is superior to conventional imaging for preradiotherapy nodal staging of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and provides a potential impact on organsparing and tumor control.

  10. Non-invasive label-free investigation and typing of head and neck cancers by multimodal nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Tobias; Vogler, Nadine; Dietzek, Benjamin; Akimov, Denis; Inhestern, Johanna; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    Early detection and typing of tumors is pressing matter in clinical research with important impacts for prognosis and successful treatment. Currently, staining is the golden standard in histopathology but requires surgical removal of tissue. In order to avoid resection of non-diseased tissue a non-invasive real-time imaging method is required which can be applied ideally intrasurgically. In this proceeding a combination of second harmonic generation (SHG), two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) imaging has been employed to investigate tissue sections of head and neck carcinomas focussing on laryngeal carcinoma. Primary laryngeal and other head and neck carcinomas consist to 99% of squamous cell carcinoma. By fusing the various imaging methods it is possible to measure the thickness of the epithelial cell layer as a marker for dysplastic or cancerous tissue degradation and to differentiate keratinizing and nonkeratininzing squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). As nonkeratinizing SCCs of the oropharynx correlate with a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as a subentity of head and neck cancer, and HPV related tumors are associated with a better clinical prognosis, the differentiation between keratinizing and non-keratinizing forms of SCCs is of high diagnostic value. TPEF is capable of displaying cell nuclei, therefore, morphologic information as cell density, cell to cytoplasm ratio, size and shape of cell nuclei can be obtained. SHG - on the other hand - selectively reveals the collagen matrix of the connective tissue, which is useful for determination of tumor-islets boundaries within epithelial tissue - a prerequisite for precise resection. Finally CARS in the CH-stretching region visualizes the lipid content of the tissue, which can be correlated with the dysplastic grade of the tissue.

  11. Photodynamic therapy of head and neck cancer with different sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoulovskaya, Elena G.; Shental, Victor V.; Abdoullin, N. A.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Tabolinovskaia, T. D.; Edinak, N. J.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kondratjeva, T. T.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Agafonov, Valery V.

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with the results of clinical trials for sulfated aluminum phthalocyanine (PHS) (Photosens, Russia; Photogeme (PG) in Russia. The results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of head and neck tumors (HNT), side effects and ways of their correction and prevention, as well as possibility to work out less toxic regimes of PDT with photosense, choice of laser and type of irradiation are discussed. PDT have been provided in 79 patients with different head and neck tumors. Efficacy of PDT depended on tumor size and its histological type. Undesirable changes in plasma content of antioxidants by means of high pressure liquid chromatography (HLPC) have been found in patients after PHS injection. Influence of short-term and long-term supplementation with beta-carotene and vitamin E on this parameters are discussed.

  12. The Current State of Head and Neck Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sufi Mary

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of head and neck cancer continues to increase worldwide, with tobacco exposure and human papillomavirus type 16 infections being the major etiological factors. Current therapeutic options are ineffective in approximately half of the individuals afflicted with this malignancy. Developments in the identification of molecules that sustain head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) growth and survival have made molecular targeting by gene therapy approaches a feasible therapeutic strategy. Although gene therapy was originally designed to correct single gene defects, it has now evolved to encompass all forms of therapeutic interventions involving engineered cells and nucleic acids that modify the overall pattern of gene expression within target tissues. Several preclinical studies and clinical trials have tested the efficacy of targeting specific molecules in patients with HNSCC, using genetic therapy approaches. This review discusses promising preclinical and clinical approaches and new directions for HNSCC gene therapy. PMID:19747066

  13. Hip Arthroscopy for Excision of Osteoid Osteoma of Femoral Neck

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hatem Galal; Abdulla Babaqi, AbdulRahman; AbdelSalam El-Assal, Maher

    2014-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is the most commonly seen benign bone-forming lesion. It can occur anywhere, including the metaphyseal regions of small and large bones. We present 2 cases that underwent an arthroscopic technique for removal of OO of the femoral neck. The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography in addition to magnetic resonance imaging. The lesions were accessed arthroscopically and excised by unroofing and curettage. The clinical and radiographic findings are presented, along with the surgical management. The patients improved dramatically postoperatively. OO of the femoral neck should be included in the differential diagnosis of hip pain in young patients. Arthroscopic excision and curettage provide a good choice for management, with low morbidity and rapid recovery. PMID:24749036

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neck. Part II. Pathologic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Moss, A.A.; Gamsu, G.; Clark, O.H.; Gooding, G.A.W.; Webb, W.R.

    1984-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the neck were obtained in 14 patients with thyroid, parathyroid, lymph node, or laryngeal lesions. Tumors and lymph nodes were more easily differentiated from muscle and blood vessels with MR than with CT because of the superior soft tissue contrast of MR. Tissue characterization allowed MR differentiation of thyroid nodules, thyroid cysts, and parathyroid tumors from normal thyroid tissue; however, nonspecifically increased T1 and T2 relaxation times overlapped for a variety of neoplastic and inflammatory conditions. Thyroid cyst fluid had the greatest water content and longest T1 and T2 times of all tissues studied. Parathyroid hyperplasia could not be differentiated from parathyroid adenoma; however, parathyroid tumors had slightly longer T1 and T2 times than thyroid nodules or lymph nodes. With further experience, MR tissue characterization may become a useful technique for evaluating neck masses.

  15. What's in a name? Eponyms in head and neck imaging.

    PubMed

    Hoang, J K; Eastwood, J D; Glastonbury, C M

    2010-03-01

    Head and neck (H&N) eponyms serve to honour physicians who have made important contributions. Compared with more descriptive diagnostic names, eponyms can sometimes be confusing, especially to the novice. Adding to the confusion, eponyms are sometimes applied incorrectly. Nevertheless, their use remains common in the medical literature and clinical practice. Familiarity with H&N eponyms is important for accurate communication with radiology colleagues and clinicians. Some eponyms describe potentially fatal infections and their urgency should be appreciated. Other eponyms, such as those for inner ear congenital anomalies, are probably best avoided as they can be used imprecisely and cause confusion. This review summarizes the clinical and imaging findings of some common and important H&N eponyms under the following categories of disease: (1) neck infections, (2) diseases in the temporal bone, (3) orbital diseases, and (4) sinus disease. PMID:20152281

  16. Pneumoperitoneum in a patient with pneumothorax and blunt neck trauma

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Suhail Yaqoob; Abdelrahman, Husham; Mudali, Insolvisagan Natesa; El-Menyar, Ayman; Peralta, Ruben; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Blunt trauma as a cause of pneumoperitoneum is less frequent and its occurrence without a ruptured viscus is rarely seen. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of blunt neck trauma in which a motorcycle rider hit a fixed object causing severe laryngotracheal injury. The patient developed pneumothorax bilaterally and had pneumoperitoneum despite no injury to the internal viscus. Bilateral chest tube drainage and abdominal exploratory laparotomy was performed. CONCLUSION Free air in the abdomen after blunt traumatic neck injury is very rare. If pneumoperitoneum is suspected in the presence of pneumothorax, exploratory laparotomy should be performed to rule out intraabdominal injury. As, there is no consensus for this plan yet, further prospective studies are warrant. Conservative management for pneumoperitoneum in the absence of viscus perforation is still a safe option in carefully selected cases. PMID:25460486

  17. Perivascular stem cell niche in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Kathryn E.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2012-01-01

    Cancers may contain a small sub-population of uniquely tumorigenic cells that exhibit self-renewal and multipotency, i.e. cancer stem cells (CSC). These cells reside in invasive fronts in close proximity to blood vessels in many tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Recent evidence suggests that CSC resist chemotherapy and “drive” local recurrence and metastatic spread. Notably, endothelial cell-initiated signaling is critical for the survival and self-renewal of CSC and may play a role in resistance to therapy. Therefore, patients with head and neck cancer might benefit from therapies that target the CSC directly or their supportive perivascular niche. PMID:22842095

  18. Moving Toward Bioadjuvant Approaches to Head and Neck Cancer Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Saba, Nabil F.; Hammond, Anthea; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2007-10-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma affects >45,000 Americans annually. Patients who are successfully treated for their primary tumor are at high risk of developing a second primary tumor, making effective preventive strategies highly desirable for this disease. Although a landmark study in 1990 suggested some benefit of high-dose retinoids in head and neck cancer prevention, subsequent trials using more tolerable doses have shown limited clinical success. Newer preventive strategies have included bioadjuvant therapy combining retinoids with interferon and {alpha}-tocopherol, combinations of molecularly targeted agents, and oncolytic viruses. Furthermore, considerable evidence has supported a cancer protective role for several nutrients, including green tea and curcumin analogs. Natural compounds such as these with favorable long-term safety profiles might be particularly suited to the cancer prevention setting, in which patients will usually tolerate only moderate risk and toxicity.

  19. Management of Jehovah's Witnesses in otolaryngology, head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Adelola, Olubukola A; Ahmed, Ishtiaque; Fenton, John E

    2008-01-01

    It is imperative that surgeons should have some knowledge and understanding of the beliefs of Jehovah's Witnesses to respect the patient's wishes and effectively minimize and manage blood loss. The objective of this review was to provide a management strategy for Jehovah's Witness patients undergoing otolaryngology, head and neck surgery, because there is paucity of information regarding this within our literature. A systematic review of medical literature was conducted. Articles were identified using MEDLINE (1966-2007). The search strategy used Medical Subject Heading terms Jehovah's Witnesses, Beliefs, Ethical and Legal issues, Blood transfusion alternatives, ENT, Head and Neck surgery in Jehovah' witnesses. There is a broad range of nonblood surgical management strategies available in other specialities, making major surgery possible within this population. This review suggests recommendations in elective surgery, trauma, and emergencies. PMID:18598840

  20. Vertebral artery dissection after a chiropractor neck manipulation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremy; Jones, Catherine; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis for ischemic central nervous system infarcts in young patients includes paradoxic emboli through cardiac shunts, vasculitis, and vascular trauma. We report a young woman who developed headache, vomiting, diplopia, dizziness, and ataxia following neck manipulation by her chiropractor. A computed tomography scan of the head revealed an infarct in the inferior half of the left cerebellar hemisphere and compression of the fourth ventricle causing moderate acute obstructive hydrocephalus. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed severe narrowing and low flow in the intracranial segment of the left distal vertebral artery. The patient was treated with mannitol and a ventriculostomy and had an excellent functional recovery. This report illustrates the potential hazards associated with neck trauma, including chiropractic manipulation. The vertebral arteries are at risk for aneurysm formation and/or dissection, which can cause acute stroke. PMID:25552813

  1. Vertebral artery dissection after a chiropractor neck manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeremy; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis for ischemic central nervous system infarcts in young patients includes paradoxic emboli through cardiac shunts, vasculitis, and vascular trauma. We report a young woman who developed headache, vomiting, diplopia, dizziness, and ataxia following neck manipulation by her chiropractor. A computed tomography scan of the head revealed an infarct in the inferior half of the left cerebellar hemisphere and compression of the fourth ventricle causing moderate acute obstructive hydrocephalus. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed severe narrowing and low flow in the intracranial segment of the left distal vertebral artery. The patient was treated with mannitol and a ventriculostomy and had an excellent functional recovery. This report illustrates the potential hazards associated with neck trauma, including chiropractic manipulation. The vertebral arteries are at risk for aneurysm formation and/or dissection, which can cause acute stroke. PMID:25552813

  2. Calcified Amyloid Tumor of Neck with Exuberant Giant Cell Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Arghya; Bhattacharya, Shubham; Maiti, Barnali; Bose, Koushik

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a group of disorders characterized by an extracellular deposition of an abnormal amount of proteins in a variety of organs resulting from abnormal folding of protein. It typically presents as disseminated deposits. Tumor like localized presentation of amyloidosis in the absence of systemic amyloidosis is referred to as amyloidoma or amyloid tumor. Amyloidoma is the least common presentation of tissue amyloid deposition. Amyloidoma of soft tissue is again a very rare entity, especially in the neck region. Calcification and minimum giant cell reaction can occur in amyloidoma. However, extensive calcification and exuberant giant cell reaction in amyloidoma of soft tissue neck make it difficult to diagnose. In this report, we discuss such a rare case with its differential diagnoses. PMID:25949063

  3. Dementia Risk in Irradiated Patients With Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Chang, Chia-Lun; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer are treated through surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy (CT). Carotid artery damage and neurotoxicity were previously observed in these patients. This study estimated the dementia risk associated with different treatment modalities in a head and neck cancer population with long-term follow-up. Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database and a cancer registry database from the Collaboration Center of Health Information Application were linked for the present analysis. Patients with head and neck cancer, treated from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2010, were included in the study. The follow-up duration was the period from the index date to December 31, 2012. Inclusion criteria were head and neck cancer; an age >20 years; and having undergone surgery, CT, concurrent CT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. Exclusion criteria were another cancer diagnosed before the head and neck cancer, death or being diagnosed with dementia within 2 years after the treatment of the head and neck cancer, stroke before the index date, distant metastasis, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, head and neck cancer recurrence, an unknown sex, and an age <20 years. In total, 20,135 patients were included. In patient groups that underwent surgery alone, surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, and chemoradiotherapy alone, the dementia incidence per 1000 person-years was 1.44, 1.04, and 1.98, respectively. The crude hazard ratio (HR) of dementia was 1.84 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-2.81) in the RT with or without CT group. After adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage, and comorbidity, the HR was 1.92 (95% CI 1.14-3.24). Examining the dementia risk in patients who received different treatment modalities according to the Cox proportional-hazard model revealed that an age >65 years and having undergone RT with or without CT were risk factors (P?6660 cGy exhibited a 1.69-fold (95% CI 0.97-2.95, P?=?0.063) higher dementia risk compared with those who received a total radiation dose <6660 cGy. Receiving a higher radiation dose increased the dementia risk and persistently escalated the dementia incidence even 9 years after RT. Younger (<65 y) patients have a high risk of dementia after RT. The selection of young patients for dose de-escalation requires improvement for reducing irradiation to the neck and areas near brain tissues, particularly in Taiwan, where the median patient age is 53 years. PMID:26559280

  4. Head-Neck Taper Corrosion in Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hussenbocus, S.; Kosuge, D.; Solomon, L. B.; Howie, D. W.; Oskouei, R. H.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity at the head-neck junction of the femoral component in THA became popular as a design feature with advantages of decreasing implant inventory and allowing adjustment of leg length, offset, and soft tissue balancing through different head options. The introduction of a new modular interface to femoral stems that were previously monoblock, or nonmodular, comes with the potential for corrosion at the taper junction through mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. The incidence of revision hip arthroplasty is on the rise and along with improved wear properties of polyethylene and ceramic, use of larger femoral head sizes is becoming increasingly popular. Taper corrosion appears to be related to all of its geometric parameters, material combinations, and femoral head size. This review article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical assessment, and management of taper corrosion at the head-neck junction. PMID:25954757

  5. Humeral Neck Fracture after Electrocution - Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Zbuchea, A

    2015-01-01

    A case of left humeral neck fracture following electrocution is reported in a 56-year old man, associated with partial thickness burns on his left hand. A fracture after accidental electrical shock injury represents a very unusual situation, due to muscle contractions. Surgeons involved in the management of the electrocuted patients should be aware of the possibility of musculoskeletal injuries. Neglecting these injuries can lead to delay in diagnosis and to detrimental complications. PMID:26531798

  6. Comprehensive management of head and neck tumors, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Thawley, S.E.; Panje, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 14 parts, each containing several papers. The parts are: General Considerations in the Management of Patients with Head and Neck Tumors, Tumors of the Ear, Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses, Tumors of the Oral Cavity, Tumors of the Pharynx, Tumors of the Larynx, Tumors of the Skin, Dental and Jaw Tumors, Tumors of the Thyroid and Parathyroid Glands, Tumors of the Trachea, Tumors of the Eye, Orbit, and Lacrimal Apparatus, and Special Topics.

  7. Diagnostic yield of a one-stop neck lump clinic.

    PubMed

    Al Hamarneh, Osama; Liew, Lenny; Shortridge, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Diagnostic clinics for patients with neck lumps were established across the UK in response to NICE guidance on cancer services. The guidance stated that a surgeon and a cytopathologist among its other key recommendations should staff each clinic. The aim of this study was to establish the diagnostic yield of this clinic at Wolverhampton. A prospective cohort study was conducted of patients attending a one-stop neck lump clinic over a period of 30 months. Patients' characteristics, diagnostic tests and outcomes were recorded and the data analysed. Of 333 patients, n = 65 (20 %) had no lump, n = 214 (64 %) had a benign lump and n = 54 (16 %) had a malignant lump. Older age of patients and a history of smoking were found to be significantly higher when a malignant lump was diagnosed when compared with a benign lump. In the benign lump group, freehand FNAC had an accuracy of 87 % (n = 48/55), while USS-guided FNAC had an accuracy of 74 % (n = 32/43). Diagnosis was confirmed on the same day for the majority of patients (n = 178, 84 %). In the malignant lump group, freehand FNAC had an accuracy of 82 % (n = 28/34), while USS-guided FNAC had an accuracy of 81 % (n = 17/21). Diagnosis on the same day was confirmed for 74 % of the patients (n = 40). The clinic in our unit achieved an overall diagnostic yield of 84 %. Outcomes regarding age, sex, smoking, size and site of neck lumps and accuracy of FNAC were in line with published data. The study showed that this one-stop neck lump clinic was better at excluding malignancy than diagnosing it. PMID:23053379

  8. [Lymphatic malformations in the head and neck area].

    PubMed

    Wiegand, S; Werner, J A

    2016-02-01

    Lymphatic malformations are congenital malformations of the lymphatic system. They are mainly located in the head and neck area, and grow proportional to the patients' body growth. Depending on the morphology, it can be distinguished between macrocystic, microcystic and mixed lymphatic malformations. Due to their infiltrative growth, microcystic lymphatic malformations are particularly difficult to treat. Therapeutic approaches include conventional surgical resection, laser therapy, sclerotherapy and systemic drug therapies. PMID:26820157

  9. Esthesioneuroblastoma: Is There a Need for Elective Neck Treatment?

    SciTech Connect

    Demiroz, Candan; Gutfeld, Orit; Aboziada, Mohamed; Brown, Doris; Marentette, Lawrence J.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the risk of cervical lymph node metastases after definitive treatment for esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) that did not include elective neck therapy. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 26 ENB patients treated at University of Michigan between 1995 and 2007. Tumor stage was Kadish A in 1 patient, B in 19, C in 5, and unknown in 1. Craniofacial or subcranial resection was performed in 24 patients (92%), with negative margins in 22 (92%). Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) to the primary site was given in 12 patients (46%), and 14 patients (54%) had surgery alone. All patients had clinically N0 disease, and no patient underwent elective neck dissection or radiation. Median follow-up was 72 months. Results: Local relapse-free survival was significantly better for patients who received postoperative RT compared with those who had surgery alone: 100% vs. 29% at 5 years, respectively (p = 0.005). Five-year disease-free survival was 87.5% in the RT group vs. 31% in the surgery-alone group (p = 0.05). Regional failure was observed in 7 patients (27%), 6 with Kadish Stage B and 1 with Stage C disease. The most common site of nodal failure was Level II, and 3 patients failed in the contralateral neck. Only 3 patients with regional failure were successfully salvaged. Conclusion: The high rate of regional failures when the neck is not electively treated justifies elective nodal RT in patients with both Kadish Stages B and C. In addition, our experience confirms the beneficial effect on local control of adjuvant RT to the tumor bed.

  10. Pediatric infectious disease: unusual head and neck infections.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Kathryn S

    2012-08-01

    Infections in children in the head and neck regions are common, leading to frequent use and overuse of antibiotics. This review includes common as well as diverse and unusual infectious diseases, such as PFAPA (Periodic Fever Aphthous stomatitis, Pharyngitis, Adenitis) syndrome, Lemierre Syndrome, Arcanobacterium infection, and tuberculous and nontuberculous adenitis, which occur in infants, children, and adolescents. In addition, the first pediatric vaccines available with the potential to prevent oropharyngeal cancers are reviewed. PMID:22739434

  11. Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

    1983-07-01

    Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

  12. 49 CFR 572.173 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., defined in paragraph (b) of this section, on the pendulum described in Figure 22 of 49 CFR part 572 so... − (0.01778) × (FX). (iii) My is the moment about the y-axis in Newton-meters, FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11) in Newtons, and 0.01778 is the distance in meters...

  13. 49 CFR 572.173 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., defined in paragraph (b) of this section, on the pendulum described in Figure 22 of 49 CFR part 572 so... − (0.01778) × (FX). (iii) My is the moment about the y-axis in Newton-meters, FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11) in Newtons, and 0.01778 is the distance in meters...

  14. 49 CFR 572.173 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., defined in paragraph (b) of this section, on the pendulum described in Figure 22 of 49 CFR part 572 so... − (0.01778) × (FX). (iii) My is the moment about the y-axis in Newton-meters, FX is the shear force measured by the neck transducer (drawing SA572-S11) in Newtons, and 0.01778 is the distance in meters...

  15. Dynamic modeling of the neck muscles during horizontal head movement.

    PubMed

    Haapala, Stephenie A; Enderle, John D

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents modeling and simulation of superficial neck muscle movement in the horizontal plane (yaw). The parametric muscle model was constructed using Pro/Engineer 2000i Student Edition, Parametric Technologies Corp, and simulated using Pro/Mechanica. Pennation angles, force-tension, force-generation and rate of muscle activation data were obtained from anatomic and physiological studies. Saccadic eye movement models developed by G. Alexander Korentis and John Enderle also provided the basis for this model. PMID:12085608

  16. Cortical and trabecular load sharing in the human femoral neck.

    PubMed

    Nawathe, Shashank; Nguyen, Bich Phuong; Barzanian, Nasim; Akhlaghpour, Hosna; Bouxsein, Mary L; Keaveny, Tony M

    2015-03-18

    The relative role of the cortical vs trabecular bone in the load-carrying capacity of the proximal femur-a fundamental issue in both basic-science and clinical biomechanics-remains unclear. To gain insight into this issue, we performed micro-CT-based, linear elastic finite element analysis (61.5-micron-sized elements; ~280 million elements per model) on 18 proximal femurs (5M, 13F, ages 61-93 years) to quantify the fraction of frontal-plane bending moment shared by the cortical vs trabecular bone in the femoral neck, as well as the associated spatial distributions of stress. Analyses were performed separately for a sideways fall and stance loading. For both loading modes and across all 18 bones, we found consistent patterns of load-sharing in the neck: most proximally, the trabecular bone took most of the load; moving distally, the cortical bone took increasingly more of the load; and more distally, there was a region of uniform load-sharing, the cortical bone taking the majority of the load. This distal region of uniform load-sharing extended more for fall than stance loading (77 8% vs 51 6% of the neck length for fall vs. stance; mean SD) but the fraction of total load taken by the cortical bone in that region was greater for stance loading (88 5% vs. 64 9% for stance vs. fall). Locally, maximum stress levels occurred in the cortical bone distally, but in the trabecular bone proximally. Although the distal cortex showed qualitative stress distributions consistent with the behavior of an Euler-type beam, quantitatively beam theory did not apply. We conclude that consistent and well-delineated regions of uniform load-sharing and load-transfer between the cortical and trabecular bone exist within the femoral neck, the details of which depend on the external loading conditions. PMID:25582355

  17. Emerging applications for OCT in the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Marc; Kim, Jason H.; Armstrong, William B.; Djalilian, Hamid R.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2010-02-01

    Objectives: To describe the current and promising new applications of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) as a helpful tool when imaging the different sites in the head and neck. We used the OCT Niris system, which is the first commercially available OCT device for applications outside the field of ophthalmology. Methods: OCT images were obtained of normal, benign, premalignant and malignant lesions in different areas of the head and neck. The OCT imaging system has a tissue penetration depth of approximately 1-2mm, a scanning range of 2mm and a spatial depth resolution of approximately 10-20?m. Imaging was performed using a flexible probe in two different settings, the outpatient clinic and the operating room. Results: High-resolution cross-sectional images from the larynx were obtained with the patient awake, without the need for general anesthesia, under direct visualization with a flexible fiberoptic endoscope. The OCT probe was inserted through the nasal cavity and placed in slight contact with the laryngeal tissue. In the ears, cholesteatoma was differentiated from inflamed middle ear mucosa by the different hyperintensity. In the neck, normal as well as different pathologies of the thyroid were identified. Conclusions: This system is non invasive and easy to incorporate into the operating room setting as well as the outpatient clinic. It requires minimal set-up and only one person is required to operate the system. OCT has the distinctive capability to obtain highresolution images, and the microanatomy of different sites can be observed. OCT technology has the potential to offer a quick, efficient and reliable imaging method to help the surgeon not only in the operating room but also in the clinical setting to guide surgical biopsies and aid in clinical decision making of different head and neck pathologies, especially those arising form the larynx.

  18. Head and Neck Sarcomas: Analysis of the SEER Database

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kevin A.; Grogan, Tristan; Wang, Marilene B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To summarize the epidemiology of sarcomas occurring in the head and neck and identify prognostic factors for patient survival. Study Design and Setting Cross-sectional analysis of the National Cancer Institutes Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program. Methods The SEER 18 registries, comprising sarcoma diagnoses made from 1973 to 2010, were queried for sarcomas arising in the head and neck. Pediatric and adult patients were analyzed separately, and multivariate and propensity-matched analyses were performed to identify predictors of disease-specific survival. Results In all, 11,481 adult cases and 1244 pediatric cases were identified. In adults, the most common histologic subtypes were malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), Kaposi sarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma, while in the pediatric cohort, the most common histologic subtypes were rhabdomyosar-coma, MFH, and osteosarcoma. Cause-specific 2-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 76%, 66%, and 61% for adults and 84%, 73%, and 71% for pediatric patients. Multivariate analysis performed for adults revealed that male gender, absence of radiation therapy, and stage I disease were associated with improved cause-specific survival reaching statistical significance. However, a propensity-matched model demonstrated no significant difference in cause-specific survival between patients who received radiation and those who did not. Conclusion Sarcomas, a heterogeneous group of malignant mesenchymal tumors, are uncommonly found in the head and neck. This study represents the largest analysis of patients with head and neck sarcomas in the literature and demonstrates the impact of age, gender, primary site, histology, and radiation status on overall prognosis. PMID:25135525

  19. Aggressive fibromatosis of head and neck in a child.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Atul; Nair, Satish; Nilakantan, Ajith; Sood, Amit

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a broad group of benign fibrous tissue proliferations of similar microscopic appearance that are intermediate in their biological behavior between benign fibrous tissues and fibrosarcomas. They are rare lesions accounting for less than 3% of all soft tissue tumours. Usual site is extremity whereas head and neck fibromatosis is a rare occurrence. We present a case of aggressive fibromatosis of the infratemporal fossa in a child, which was treated by surgical excision with adjuvant hormonal therapy. PMID:25621275

  20. External jugular vein hemangioma occurring as a lateral neck mass.

    PubMed

    Sarteschi, L M; Bonanomi, G; Mosca, F; Ferrari, M

    1999-10-01

    Hemangioma is an extremely frequent tumor, accounting for 7% of all benign neoplasms. In contrast, hemangioma arising in blood vessels is rare and should be differentiated from other neoplasms of vascular origin, such as hemangioendothelioma, hemangiopericytoma, hemangiosarcoma, and leiomyosarcoma. The case we report has the peculiarity of occurring as a lateral neck mass in which color-coded duplex sonography contributed significantly to diagnosis. PMID:10511307

  1. [Research, design and application of model NSE-1 neck muscle training machine for pilots].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Haiping; Wang, Zhijie; Liu, Songyang; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Guang; Cong, Hong; Han, Xueping; Liu, Min; Yu, Mengsun

    2011-04-01

    Pain in the cervical region of air force pilots, who are exposed to high G-forces, is a specifically occupational health problem. To minimize neck problems, the cervical muscles need specific strength exercise. It is important that the training for the neck must be carried out with optimal resistance in exercises. The model NSE-1 neck training machine for pilots was designed for neck strengthening exercises under safe and effective conditions. In order to realize the functions of changeable velocity and resistant (CVR) training and neck isometric contractive exercises, the techniques of adaptive hydraulics, sensor, optic and auditory biological feedback, and signal processing were applied to this machine. The training system mainly consists of mechanical parts (including the chair of flexion and extension, the chair of right and left lateral flexion, the components of hydraulics and torque transformer, etc.), and the software of signal processing and biological feedback. Eleven volunteers were selected for the experiments of neck isometric contractive exercises, three times a week for 6 weeks, where CVR training (flexion, extension, right, left lateral flexion) one time a week. The increase in relative strength of the neck (flexion, extension, left and right lateral flexion) was 70.8%, 83.7%, 78.6% and 75.2%, respectively after training. Results show that the strength of the neck can be increased safely, effectively and rapidly with NSE-1 neck training machine to perform neck training. PMID:21604507

  2. Development and Evaluation of a Proposed Neck Shield for the 5 Percentile Hybrid III Female Dummy.

    PubMed

    Banglmaier, Richard F; Pecoraro, Katie M; Feustel, Jim R; Scherer, Risa D; Rouhana, Stephen W

    2005-11-01

    Frontal airbag interaction with the head and neck of the Hybrid III family of dummies may involve a non-biofidelic interaction. Researchers have found that the deploying airbag may become entrapped in the hollow cavity behind the dummy chin. This study evaluated a prototype neck shield design, the Flap Neck Shield, for biofidelic response and the ability to prevent airbag entrapment in the chin/jaw cavity. Neck pendulum calibration tests were conducted for biofidelity evaluation. Static and dynamic airbag deployments were conducted to evaluate neck shield performance. Tests showed that the Flap Neck Shield behaved in a biofidelic manner with neck loads and head motion within established biofidelic limits. The Flap Neck Shield did not alter the neck loads during static or dynamic airbag interactions, but it did consistently prevent the airbag from penetrating the chin/jaw cavity. Use of the Flap Neck Shield with the 5(th) percentile Hybrid III female dummy is recommended for frontal airbag deployments given its acceptable biofidelic response and repeatable performance. PMID:17096287

  3. WE-E-BRE-09: Investigation of the Association Between Radiation-Induced Pain and Radiation Dose in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, H; Dyk, P; Mullen, D; Eschen, L; Fergus, S; Chin, R; Thorstad, W; Oh, J; Apte, A; Deasy, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer who undergo radiotherapy often experience several undesirable side-effects, including xerostomia, trismus, and pain in the head and neck area, but little is know about the dose-volume predictors of such pain. We investigated the association between radiation dose and both throat and esophagus pain during radiotherapy. Methods: We analyzed 124 head and neck patients who received radiotherapy at the Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. For these patients, weekly PROs were recorded, including 16 pain and anatomical location questions. In addition, 17 observational symptoms were recorded. Patients were asked to describe their pain at each site according to a four-level scale: none (0), mild (1), moderate (2), and severe (3). We explored the association between throat pain and the mean dose received in oral cavity and between esophageal pain and the mean dose received in the esophagus. The severity of pain was determined by the difference between the baseline (week 1) pain score and the maximum pain score during treatment. The baseline pain score was defined as the first available pain score before receiving 10 Gy because radiotherapy pain originates later during treatment. Dose-volume metrics were extracted from treatment plans using CERR. To evaluate the correlation between pain and radiation dose, Spearman's correlation coefficient (Rs) was used. Results: The associations between throat pain and the mean dose to the oral cavity, and between esophagus pain and the mean dose to the esophagus, were both statistically significant, with Rs=0.320 (p=0.003) and Rs=0.424 (p<0.0001), respectively. Mean dose, for each structure, was a better predictor of pain than total integral dose. Conclusion: We demonstrated that pain during radiotherapy in head and neck patients highly correlates with the dose delivered. We will further investigate the association between other pain locations and relevant normal tissue dose characteristics.

  4. Identifying the Best Treatment Among Common Nonsurgical Neck Pain Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Bayoumi, Ahmed M.; Cassidy, J. David; Ct, Pierre; Boyle, Eleanor; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Chan, Stella; Subrata, Peter; Hoving, Jan Lucas; Hurwitz, Eric; Bombardier, Claire; Krahn, Murray

    2008-01-01

    Study Design Decision analysis. Objective To identify the best treatment for nonspecific neck pain. Summary of Background Data In Canada and the United States, the most commonly prescribed neck pain treatments are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), exercise, and manual therapy. Deciding which treatment is best is difficult because of the trade-offs between beneficial and harmful effects, and because of the uncertainty of these effects. Methods (Quality-adjusted) life expectancy associated with standard NSAIDs, Cox-2 NSAIDs, exercise, mobilization, and manipulation were compared in a decision-analytic model. Estimates of the course of neck pain, background risk of adverse events in the general population, treatment effectiveness and risk, and patient-preferences were input into the model. Assuming equal effectiveness, we conducted a baseline analysis using risk of harm only. We assessed the stability of the baseline results by conducting a second analysis that incorporated effectiveness data from a high-quality randomized trial. Results There were no important differences across treatments. The difference between the highest and lowest ranked treatments predicted by the baseline model was 4.5 days of life expectancy and 3.4 quality-adjusted life-days. The difference between the highest and lowest ranked treatments predicted by the second model was 7.3 quality-adjusted life-days. Conclusion When the objective is to maximize life expectancy and quality-adjusted life expectancy, none of the treatments in our analysis were clearly superior.

  5. Peripheral glutamate signaling in head and neck areas.

    PubMed

    Haas, Helga Susanne; Linecker, Alexander; Pfragner, Roswitha; Sadjak, Anton

    2010-11-01

    The major excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate is also found in the periphery in an increasing number of nonexcitable cells. In line with this it became apparent that glutamate can regulate a broad array of peripheral biological responses, as well. Of particular interest is the discovery that glutamate receptor reactive reagents can influence tumor biology. However, the knowledge of glutamate signaling in peripheral tissues is still incomplete and, in the case of head and neck areas, is almost lacking. The roles of glutamate signaling pathways in these regions are manifold and include orofacial pain, periodontal bone production, skin and airway inflammation, as well as salivation. Furthermore, the interrelations between glutamate and cancers in the oral cavity, thyroid gland, and other regions are discussed. In summary, this review shall strengthen the view that glutamate receptor reagents may also be promising targets for novel therapeutic concepts suitable for a number of diseases in peripheral tissues. The contents of this review cover the following sections: Introduction; The "Glutamate System"; The Taste of Glutamate; Glutamate Signaling in Dental Regions; Glutamate Signaling in Head and Neck Areas; Glutamate Signaling in Head and Neck Cancer; A Brief Overview of Glutamate Signaling in Other Cancers; and Conclusion. PMID:20848447

  6. Why does necking ignore notches in dynamic tension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotbaum, Y.; Osovski, S.; Rittel, D.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experimental work has revealed that notched tensile specimens, subjected to dynamic loading, may fail by growing a neck outside of the notched region. This apparent lack of sensitivity to a classical stress concentration case was reported but not explained or modeled. The present paper combines experimental and numerical work to address this issue. Specifically, it is shown that the dynamic tensile failure locus is dictated by both the applied velocity boundary condition and the material mechanical properties, specifically strain-rate sensitivity and strain-rate hardening. It is shown that at sufficiently high impact velocities, the flows stress in the notch vicinity becomes quite higher than in the rest of the specimen, so that while the former resists deformation, it transfers the load to the latter. The result will be the formation of a local neck and failure away from the notch. This effect is shown to be active when the material properties are perturbed only at the local level, as in the case of machining of the notch, which in itself may again be sufficient to stabilize the structure under local failure until a neck forms elsewhere. While the physical observations are quite counterintuitive with respect to the engineering views of stress concentrator's effect, the present work rationalizes those observations and also provides information for the designers of dynamically tensioned structures that may contain notches or similar flaws.

  7. Radiotherapy in nonlentiginous melanoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, A.R.; Dancuart, I.; Fitzpatrick, P.J.; Brown, T.

    1981-12-15

    Thirty-seven patients with superficial spreading or nodular melanoma of the head and neck treated with irradiation are reviewed. Twenty-one patients were referred within three months of surgery. Six had an incisional biopsy followed by postoperative irradiation, 4 were locally controlled (1 dying of metastatic melanoma, 2 dying of intercurrent disease and 1 is alive and well), and 2 were not (both dead of melanoma). Fifteen patients had a local excisional biopsy (11 having tumor to the limits of the excision) followed by postoperative irradiation. Fourteen of the 15 had local control (3 had lymph node metastases and died, 3 died of distant metastases from melanoma, 7 are alive and well from 1-14 years following treatment, and one is dead of intercurrent disease), and 1 had a local recurrence and subsequently died of metastatic melanoma. Sixteen patients were irradiated for local and/or regionally recurrent disease following unsuccessful surgery, and only two were successfully controlled by irradiation and are alive and well at four and five years, respectively. Local control was 70% when a dose per fraction of greater than 400 rads was used, compared with 25% when a dose per fraction of less than 400 rads was used. It is concluded that nonlentiginous melanoma of the head and neck is not a radioresistant tumor and that local excision followed by high dose per fraction radiotherapy deserves further study in the management of melanomas of the head and neck.

  8. Management of femoral neck fractures in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Thuan V; Swiontkowski, Marc F

    2008-01-01

    Femoral neck fractures in young adults are uncommon and often the result of high-energy trauma. They are associated with higher incidences of femoral head osteonecrosis and nonunion. Multiple factors can play a significant role in preventing these devastating complications and contribute to a good outcome. While achieving an anatomic reduction and stable internal fixation are imperative, other treatment variables, such as time to surgery, the role of capsulotomy and the fixation methods remain debatable. Open reduction and internal fixation through a Watson-Jones exposure is the recommended approach. Definitive fixation can be accomplished with three cannulated or noncannulated cancellous screws. Capsulotomy in femoral neck fractures remains a controversial issue and the practice varies by trauma program, region and country. Until there is conclusive data (i.e. prospective and controlled) we recommend performing a capsulotomy. The data available is inconclusive on whether this fracture should be operated emergently, urgently or can wait until the next day. Until there is conclusive data available, we recommend that surgery should be done on an urgent basis. The key factors in treating femoral neck fractures should include early diagnosis, early surgery, anatomic reduction, capsular decompression and stable internal fixation. PMID:19823648

  9. Status quo and directions in deep head and neck hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Paulides, Margarethus M; Verduijn, Gerda M; Van Holthe, Netteke

    2016-01-01

    The benefit of hyperthermia as a potent modifier of radiotherapy has been well established and more recently also the combination with chemotherapy was shown beneficial. Also for head and neck cancer, the impact of hyperthermia has been clinically demonstrated by a number of clinical trials. Unfortunately, the technology applied in these studies provided only limited thermal dose control, and the devices used only allowed treatment of target regions close to the skin. Over the last decade, we developed the technology for deep and controlled hyperthermia that allows treatment of the entire head and neck region. Our strategy involves focused microwave heating combined with 3D patient-specific electromagnetic and thermal simulations for conformal, reproducible and adaptive hyperthermia application. Validation of our strategy has been performed by 3D thermal dose assessment based on invasively placed temperature sensors combined with the 3D patient specific simulations. In this paper, we review the phase III clinical evidence for hyperthermia in head and neck tumors, as well as the heating and dosimetry technology applied in these studies. Next, we describe the development, clinical implementation and validation of 3D guided deep hyperthermia with the HYPERcollar, and its second generation, i.e. the HYPERcollar3D. Lastly, we discuss early clinical results and provide an outlook for this technology. PMID:26868027

  10. Ruxolitinib Associated Tuberculosis Presenting as a Neck Lump

    PubMed Central

    Shamil, Eamon; Cunningham, David; Wong, Billy L. K.; Jani, Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is an opportunistic infection with protean clinical manifestations. We describe a case of Ruxolitinib induced miliary tuberculosis presenting as a neck lump. A 78-year-old female presented with a two-month history of right-sided neck lump associated with fever, night sweats, and significant weight loss. She had a past medical history that included myelofibrosis, being treated with Ruxolitinib. Examination demonstrated 4 × 4 cm right-sided cervical lymphadenopathy. A chest radiograph showed extensive shadowing in both lungs. CT scan demonstrated perilymphatic nodes in addition to the cervical mass. An ultrasound-guided biopsy of a cervical lymph node demonstrated confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. It was hypothesized that use of Ruxolitinib through its selective inhibition of Janus-activated kinases 1 and 2 resulted in immunosuppression and miliary tuberculosis in this patient. The medication was stopped and a 12-month regime of antituberculosis therapy commenced. She remained well at one-year follow-up with resolution of lung involvement. Clinicians should consider tuberculosis as a differential diagnosis for patients presenting with a neck lump, particularly in those taking immunosuppressant medication such as Ruxolitinib. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to promptly treat the tuberculosis and consider discontinuation of Ruxolitinib. PMID:26788384

  11. Imaging findings of vascular lesions in the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Gneyli, Serkan; Ceylan, Naim; Bayraktaro?lu, Selen; Acar, Trker; Sava?, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the head and neck include vascular neoplasms, vascular malformations, and hypervascular lesions, derived from nonvascular soft-tissue elements. We retrospectively evaluated magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography images of vascular lesions located in the head and neck. Twelve patients (seven males, five females) aged 168 years (mean age, 35.25 years) were included in this study. Most of the vascular lesions in our study were histologically diagnosed. The lesions were as follows: a hemangioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangioendothelioma located in the parotid space (n=1); a hemangiopericytoma located in the larynx (n=1); a juvenile angiofibroma located in the nasopharynx (n=1); a glomus tumor located in the carotid bifurcation (n=1); venous malformations located in the parapharyngeal space, the pterygoid area, the orbital space, and the larynx (n=4); lymphatic malformations located in the parotid space and the supraclavicular area (n=2); and an arteriovenous malformation located in the infratemporal fossa (n=1). We present rare vascular lesions of the head and neck, which have typical radiological findings. PMID:25010372

  12. Updated overview of current biomarkers in head and neck carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Kiran; Dhankhar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell cancer is the most common type of malignancy arising from the epithelial cells of the head and neck region. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the predominant causes of cancer related casualties worldwide. Overall prognosis in this disease has improved to some extent with the advancements in therapeutic modalities but detection of primary tumor at its initial stage and prevention of relapse are the major targets to be achieved for further improvement in terms of survival rate of patients. Latest achievements in basic research regarding molecular characterization of the disease has helped in better perception of the molecular mechanisms involved in HNSCC progression and also in recognizing and targeting various molecular biomarkers associated with HNSCC. In the present article, we review the information regarding latest and potential biomarkers for the early detection of HNSCC. A detailed molecular characterization, ultimately, is likely to improve the development of new therapeutic strategies, potentially relevant to diagnosis and prognosis of head and neck cancers. The need for more accurate and timely disease prediction has generated enormous research interests in this field.

  13. Updated overview of current biomarkers in head and neck carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Kiran; Dhankhar, Rakesh

    2016-03-26

    Squamous cell cancer is the most common type of malignancy arising from the epithelial cells of the head and neck region. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the predominant causes of cancer related casualties worldwide. Overall prognosis in this disease has improved to some extent with the advancements in therapeutic modalities but detection of primary tumor at its initial stage and prevention of relapse are the major targets to be achieved for further improvement in terms of survival rate of patients. Latest achievements in basic research regarding molecular characterization of the disease has helped in better perception of the molecular mechanisms involved in HNSCC progression and also in recognizing and targeting various molecular biomarkers associated with HNSCC. In the present article, we review the information regarding latest and potential biomarkers for the early detection of HNSCC. A detailed molecular characterization, ultimately, is likely to improve the development of new therapeutic strategies, potentially relevant to diagnosis and prognosis of head and neck cancers. The need for more accurate and timely disease prediction has generated enormous research interests in this field. PMID:27018324

  14. Visual response properties of neck motor neurons in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Hung, Y-S; van Kleef, J P; Ibbotson, M R

    2011-12-01

    Recent behavioural studies have demonstrated that honeybees use visual feedback to stabilize their gaze. However, little is known about the neural circuits that perform the visual motor computations that underlie this ability. We investigated the motor neurons that innervate two neck muscles (m44 and m51), which produce stabilizing yaw movements of the head. Intracellular recordings were made from five (out of eight) identified neuron types in the first cervical nerve (IK1) of honeybees. Two motor neurons that innervate muscle 51 were found to be direction-selective, with a preference for horizontal image motion from the contralateral to the ipsilateral side of the head. Three neurons that innervate muscle 44 were tuned to detect motion in the opposite direction (from ipsilateral to contralateral). These cells were binocularly sensitive and responded optimally to frontal stimulation. By combining the directional tuning of the motor neurons in an opponent manner, the neck motor system would be able to mediate reflexive optomotor head turns in the direction of image motion, thus stabilising the retinal image. When the dorsal ocelli were covered, the spontaneous activity of neck motor neurons increased and visual responses were modified, suggesting an ocellar input in addition to that from the compound eyes. PMID:21909972

  15. Complications of sclerotherapy for 75 head and neck venous malformations.

    PubMed

    Castrn, Eeva; Aronniemi, Johanna; Klockars, Tuomas; Pekkola, Johanna; Lappalainen, Kimmo; Vuola, Pia; Salminen, Pivi; Pitkranta, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Sclerotherapy is one treatment option for head and neck venous malformations (VMs). Evaluation of complication risks is, however, essential to improve its safety. We aimed to systematically report sclerotherapy complications by means of the Clavien-Dindo classification and to distinguish factors predisposing to complications. We identified our institution's head and neck VM patients who received sclerotherapy between 1 January 2007 and 31 August 2013, analyzed patient reports retrospectively, and applied to them the Clavien-Dindo classification. Our 75 VM patients underwent a total of 150 sclerotherapy sessions. The most common sclerosants were 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate and polidocanol. Complications occurred in 13 patients (17.3%) and in 15 sessions (10.0%); 3 complications required extensive postprocedural treatment and caused permanent morbidity, whereas 12 received conservative treatment. Patients with sclerotherapy complications underwent more treatments (p=0.009) and more often needed further surgery (p=0.007). We thus consider sclerotherapy a relatively safe treatment modality for head and neck VMs. To avoid complications, evaluation of VM characteristics and optimal treatment technique in a multidisciplinary team is vital. PMID:25731642

  16. Nonunion of fractures of the femoral neck in children

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Pedro F. Tucci; dos Reis, Fernando Baldy; Filho, Jos Laredo; Fernandes, Helio J. A.; Fujiki, Edison Noboru; Bensahel, Henri

    2008-01-01

    The authors present the prospective clinical outcome of nine pseudoarthroses resulting from surgical treatment carried out in nine children, whose ages varied from 6years and 2months to 14years and 2months (mean 10years and 2months), who had fractures of the femoral neck. Five were classified as type II, according to the Delbet classification modified by Colonna, and four were type III. The initial fractures were caused by high-energy traumas, such as trampling, bicycle falls, and car accidents. Treatment of choice was valgus osteotomy of the femoral neck associated or not with insertion of bony graft. The mean time of follow-up was 38months, ranging from 23 to 71months, and the mean time of pseudoarthrosis consolidation after osteotomy was 76.6days, varying from 45 to 240days. In this study, all the pseudoarthroses consolidated. For final analysis of clinical and radiographic results, the Ratliffs classification was used. We obtained three cases as good results, five as fair and one as poor. The authors concluded that valgus osteotomy is a good option for treatment of pseudoarthrosis in the femoral neck fractures in children. PMID:19308588

  17. Extracranial non-vestibular head and neck schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoxin; Yuan, Junjie; Chen, Xinwei; Xu, Hongming; Zhou, Yuan; Dong, Pin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To retrospectively describe our 10-year experience with extracranial non-vestibular head and neck schwannomas by presenting their clinical features, diagnostic methods, surgical decisions, and treatment outcomes. Methods: This is a retrospective study conducted at the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai, China. The medical records of 46 patients diagnosed with schwannoma in the extracranial head and neck region as confirmed on paraffin-embedded sections from January 2003 to December 2012 were reviewed. Results: All tumors were benign, and 52% presented as asymptomatic palpable solitary masses. Compressive symptoms, which can represent meaningful indicators of the nerve of origin were commonly noted. The most common nerve of origin was the brachial plexus (n=13, 28.3%). Conclusion: While postoperative histopathologic examination is still the gold standard, fine needle aspiration cytology, CT scan, and magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the diagnosis of schwannomas. As schwannomas are radioresistant, and as, despite their benign nature, can cause severe secondary symptoms, the best treatment of choice is complete excision with preservation of functions. PMID:26593174

  18. Observations of benefit finding in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cavell, Sandra; Broadbent, Elizabeth; Donkin, Liesje; Gear, Kim; Morton, Randall P

    2016-02-01

    The management of head and neck cancer (HNC) can lead to potentially severe physical, functional and psychological disturbances. As a result, many HNC patients develop symptoms of depression following diagnosis and treatment. Finding benefit in a disease and its treatment can reduce the symptoms of depression and enhance quality of life (QOL). 92 patients from the Head and Neck Cancer Clinic at Auckland Hospital completed measures of unmet needs and quality of life at diagnosis, and completed measures of benefit finding, coping, fear of recurrence and depression 12-18months later. Patients reported at least moderate benefit finding in the majority of areas. More benefit finding was predicted by the presence of more advanced disease, Maori/Pacific Island ethnicity, lower baseline QOL, and the use of active coping strategies. These findings support the view that screening for QOL at diagnosis and facilitating the development of coping skills may lead to improved benefit finding and psychological adjustment in people with head and neck cancer. Identification of the factors that facilitate benefit finding may assist management of patients after treatment for HNC. PMID:25634065

  19. Pancreaticogastrostomy: A Salvage Procedure for Pancreatic Body and Neck Resection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ang; Prasoon, Pankaj; Hong, Wu; Lu, Hui Min; Zhang, Zhao Da; Zhaoda, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the technological viability, basic safety and consequence of central pancreatectomy (CP) with pancreaticogastrostomy in properly chosen sufferers with noncancerous central pancreatic pathology. This research is centered on the infirmary charts of West China hospital. We recruited 20 individuals from 2007 to 2009 diagnosed with benign cancerous growth of pancreatic body and neck. They underwent pancreatic body and neck resection adhering to pancreaticogastrostomy. We carried out central pancreatectomy following pancreaticogastrostomy in 20 patients: 8 with serous cyst adenomas, 11 with mucinous cystadenomas, and 1 with neuroendocrine tumor. The position of all tumors was restricted to body and neck of the pancreas, measuring a mean standard deviation of 2.61.3cm. The mean post-operative hospital stay was 7 days (ranging from 6 to 16 days).There was no intraoperative additional complications. From a technical perspective, CP is a safe and sound, pancreas-preserving pancreatectomy for non-enucleable non-cancerous pancreatic pathology restricted to the pancreatic body. PMID:23396710

  20. Update on primary head and neck mucosal melanoma.

    PubMed

    López, Fernando; Rodrigo, Juan P; Cardesa, Antonio; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Devaney, Kenneth O; Mendenhall, William M; Haigentz, Missak; Strojan, Primož; Pellitteri, Phillip K; Bradford, Carol R; Shaha, Ashok R; Hunt, Jennifer L; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    Primary mucosal melanomas (PMMs) of the head and neck are uncommon malignancies that arise mainly in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, followed by the oral cavity. The mainstay of treatment is radical surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy in selected patients with high-risk features. Multimodality therapy has not been well studied and is not standardized. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems to improve locoregional control but does not improve overall survival (OS). Elective neck dissection is advocated in patients with oral PMM. Systemic therapy should be considered only for patients with metastatic or unresectable locoregional disease. Despite improvements in the field of surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapy, patients with PMM still face a very unfavorable prognosis (5-year disease-free survival [DFS] <20%) with high rates of locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis. The present review aims to summarize the current state of knowledge on the molecular biology, pathological diagnosis, and management of this disease. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 147-155, 2016. PMID:25242350