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1

Neck rejuvenation--anatomy and clinical correlation.  

PubMed

The restoration of the aesthetic contour of the neck is a challenging but important component of facial rejuvenation. Numerous techniques have been developed to improve the aesthetic outcome. We plan to give an overview of anatomic principles and their clinical correlation. PMID:22418815

Huettner, Franziska; Vasconez, Luis O; de la Torre, Jorge I

2012-02-01

2

Morphological and endocrine correlates of dominance in male ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus).  

E-print Network

??An investigation of the correlation between a number of behavioral, morphological and physiological parameters and dominance status of male Ring-necked Pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) was undertaken.… (more)

Lumas, Kathy A.

1982-01-01

3

Neck Strength Imbalance Correlates With Increased Head Acceleration in Soccer Heading  

PubMed Central

Background: Soccer heading is using the head to directly contact the ball, often to advance the ball down the field or score. It is a skill fundamental to the game, yet it has come under scrutiny. Repeated subclinical effects of heading may compound over time, resulting in neurologic deficits. Greater head accelerations are linked to brain injury. Developing an understanding of how the neck muscles help stabilize and reduce head acceleration during impact may help prevent brain injury. Hypothesis: Neck strength imbalance correlates to increasing head acceleration during impact while heading a soccer ball. Study Design: Observational laboratory investigation. Methods: Sixteen Division I and II collegiate soccer players headed a ball in a controlled indoor laboratory setting while player motions were recorded by a 14-camera Vicon MX motion capture system. Neck flexor and extensor strength of each player was measured using a spring-type clinical dynamometer. Results: Players were served soccer balls by hand at a mean velocity of 4.29 m/s (±0.74 m/s). Players returned the ball to the server using a heading maneuver at a mean velocity of 5.48 m/s (±1.18 m/s). Mean neck strength difference was positively correlated with angular head acceleration (rho = 0.497; P = 0.05), with a trend toward significance for linear head acceleration (rho = 0.485; P = 0.057). Conclusion: This study suggests that symmetrical strength in neck flexors and extensors reduces head acceleration experienced during low-velocity heading in experienced collegiate players. Clinical Relevance: Balanced neck strength may reduce head acceleration cumulative subclinical injury. Since neck strength is a measureable and amenable strength training intervention, this may represent a modifiable intrinsic risk factor for injury. PMID:24459547

Dezman, Zachary D.W.; Ledet, Eric H.; Kerr, Hamish A.

2013-01-01

4

Correlation of perineal ultrasound and lateral chain urethrocystography in the anatomical evaluation of the bladder neck.  

PubMed

Although perineal ultrasound has been widely used, no standard values have been published. In 52 women with urinary stress incontinence the following parameters were measured during resting and straining: a) with ultrasound: distance (Dy) between bladder neck and central line of the symphysis, distance (Dx) between bladder neck and lower border of the symphysis, and retrovesical angle beta; b) with urethrocystography (UCG): distance H between the bladder neck and the SCIPP line, inclination angle alpha and retrovesical angle beta. Dy and H correlated during resting ( r = 0.608; p<0.001) and straining ( r = 0.575; p<0.001). The distance Dy of 11 mm corresponded to a bladder neck position on the SQIPP line. A rotational descent was detectable when Dx increased from 13 mm (+/- 6.5) during resting to 16 mm (+/-7.8) during straining ( p=0.009). It was concluded that perineal ultrasound is valuable for the anatomical evaluation of the bladder neck. This is the first report to better define the position of the bladder based on ultrasonographic measurements. PMID:14676997

Troeger, Carolyn; Gugger, Monika; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Wight, Edward

2003-12-01

5

Sites of Basal Cell Carcinomas and Head and Neck Congenital Clefts: Topographic Correlation  

PubMed Central

Background: The embryologic fusion planes might be related with the sites of onset of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), thus supporting an embryologic role for its pathogenesis. Methods: A study involving 495 patients with 627 BCCs of the head and neck was carried out over a period of 5 years by correlating the distribution of all BCCs with the sites of congenital clefts of the head and neck using (1) the original anatomic diagram of the Tessier classification of craniofacial clefts, (2) the anatomic diagram by Moore et al featuring the paths of the “hairline indicators” of craniofacial clefts that represent the cranial extensions of the Tessier classification, and (3) an anatomical diagram featuring the sites of congenital clefts of the neck. Results: The proportion of BCCs localized within a cleft site was significantly higher than those in the noncleft sites. The age of patients with BCCs localized within the Tessier cleft number 3 was the lowest among all cleft regions. Conclusions: A topographic correspondence between the sites of BCCs and the sites of congenital clefts was demonstrated in the head and neck. This evidence would support the hypothesis of an embryologic role for the pathogenesis of BCC. The existence of clusters of embryological stem cells in the sites of fusion and/or merging of embryonic processes might therefore be proposed. There may be special biology/physiology along these cleft lines that predispose BCC formation.

Brenta, Federica; Malovini, Alberto; Jaber, Omar; Faga, Angela

2014-01-01

6

Correlation between egfr expression and accelerated proliferation during radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Purpose To investigate the correlation between the expression of Epidermal Growth Factor receptor (EGFr) and the reduction of the effective doubling time (TD) during radiotherapy treatment and also to determine the dose per fraction to be taken into account when the overall treatment time (OTT) is reduced in accelerated radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods A survey of the published papers comparing 3-years of local regional control rate (LCR) for a total of 2162 patients treated with conventional and accelerated radiotherapy and with a pretreatment assessment of EGFr expression, was made. Different values of TD were obtained by a model incorporating the overall time corrected biologically effective dose (BED) and a 3-year clinical LCR for high and low EGFr groups of patients (HEGFr and LEGFr), respectively. By obtaining the TD from the above analysis and the sub-sites’ potential doubling time (Tpot) from flow cytometry and immunohistochemical methods, we were able to estimate the average TD for each sub-site included in the analysis. Moreover, the dose that would be required to offset the modified proliferation occurring in one day (Dprolif), was estimated. Results The averages of TD were 77 (27-90)95% days in LEGFr and 8.8 (7.3-11.0)95% days in HEGFr, if an onset of accelerated proliferation TK at day 21 was assumed. The correspondent HEGFr sub-sites’ TD were 5.9 (6.6), 5.9 (6.6), 4.6 (6.1), 14.3 (12.9) days, with respect to literature immunohistochemical (flow cytometry) data of Tpot for Oral-Cavity, Oro-pharynx, Hypo-pharynx, and Larynx respectively. The Dprolif for the HEGFr groups were 0.33 (0.29), 0.33 (0.29), 0.42 (0.31), 0.14 (0.15) Gy/day if ??=?0.3 Gy-1 and ?/??=?10 Gy were assumed. Conclusions A higher expression of the EGFr leads to enhanced proliferation. This study allowed to quantify the extent of the effect which EGFr expression has in terms of reduced TD and Dprolif for each head and neck sub-site. PMID:22920680

2012-01-01

7

Low appendicular muscle mass is correlated with femoral neck bone mineral density loss in postmenopausal women  

PubMed Central

Background After menopause, rapid bone mass loss occurs in response to hypoestrogenism. Several studies suggest that muscle mass and bone mineral density (BMD) are positively associated in postmenopausal women. Therefore, it may be assumed that postmenopausal low appendicular muscle mass (aMM) can increase BMD loss in a short period of time. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess relationship of aMM with femoral neck BMD in postmenopausal women. Methods Prospective, controlled clinical Trial including 64 women aged 45-70 years, who had not had their last menstruation for at least one year. Subjects were divided into two groups: low aMM (n = 32), and normal aMM (n-32). Femoral neck BMD and muscle mass were measured by DXA at baseline and after twelve months. Pairwise and independent t tests were used for data analysis. Results Baseline weight, BMI and muscle mass (total and appendicular) significantly differ between groups (p < 0.05). After twelve months, femoral neck BMD was significantly lower in the group with low aMM, whereas no significant difference was observed in the group with normal aMM (p < 0.05). Conclusion In postmenopausal women, low appendicular muscle mass is associated negatively with femoral neck BMD in a short period of time. PMID:21981859

2011-01-01

8

DNA Repair Biomarkers XPF and Phospho-MAPKAP Kinase 2 Correlate with Clinical Outcome in Advanced Head and Neck Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Induction chemotherapy is a common therapeutic option for patients with locoregionally-advanced head and neck cancer (HNC), but it remains unclear which patients will benefit. In this study, we searched for biomarkers predicting the response of patients with locoregionally-advanced HNC to induction chemotherapy by evaluating the expression pattern of DNA repair proteins. Methods Expression of a panel of DNA-repair proteins in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded specimens from a cohort of 37 HNC patients undergoing platinum-based induction chemotherapy prior to definitive chemoradiation were analyzed using quantitative immunohistochemistry. Results We found that XPF (an ERCC1 binding partner) and phospho-MAPKAP Kinase 2 (pMK2) are novel biomarkers for HNSCC patients undergoing platinum-based induction chemotherapy. Low XPF expression in HNSCC patients is associated with better response to induction chemoradiotherapy, while high XPF expression correlates with a worse response (p?=?0.02). Furthermore, low pMK2 expression was found to correlate significantly with overall survival after induction plus chemoradiation therapy (p?=?0.01), suggesting that pMK2 may relate to chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions We identified XPF and pMK2 as novel DNA-repair biomarkers for locoregionally-advanced HNC patients undergoing platinum-based induction chemotherapy prior to definitive chemoradiation. Our study provides insights for the use of DNA repair biomarkers in personalized diagnostics strategies. Further validation in a larger cohort is indicated. PMID:25019640

Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Wang, XiaoZhe; Heitmann, Jana; Villegas-Bergazzi, Vivian; Sprott, Kam; Finn, Stephen; O'Regan, Esther; Farrow, Allan D.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Lingen, Mark W.; Cohen, Ezra E. W.; Stenson, Kerstin; Weaver, David T.; Vokes, Everett E.

2014-01-01

9

Enhanced Expression of ANO1 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Causes Cell Migration and Correlates with Poor Prognosis  

PubMed Central

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has the potential for early metastasis and is associated with poor survival. Ano1 (Dog1) is an established and sensitive marker for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and has recently been identified as a Ca2+ activated Cl? channel. Although the ANO1 gene is located on the 11q13 locus, a region which is known to be amplified in different types of human carcinomas, a detailed analysis of Ano1 amplification and expression in HNSCC has not been performed. It is thus still unclear how Ano1 contributes to malignancy in HNSCC. We analyzed genomic amplification of the 11q13 locus and Ano1 together with Ano1-protein expression in a large collection of HNSCC samples. We detected a highly significant correlation between amplification and expression of Ano1 and showed that HNSCC patients with Ano1 protein expression have a poor overall survival. We further analyzed the expression of the Ano1 protein in more than 4?000 human samples from 80 different tumor types and 76 normal tissue types and detected that besides HNSCC and GISTs, Ano1 was rarely expressed in other tumor samples or healthy human tissues. In HNSCC cell lines, expression of Ano1 caused Ca2+ activated Cl? currents, which induced cell motility and cell migration in wound healing and in real time migration assays, respectively. In contrast, knockdown of Ano1 did not affect intracellular Ca2+ signaling and surprisingly did not reduce cell proliferation in BHY cells. Further, expression and activity of Ano1 strongly correlated with the ability of HNSCC cells to regulate their volume. Thus, poor survival in HNSCC patients is correlated with the presence of Ano1. Our results further suggest that Ano1 facilitates regulation of the cell volume and causes cell migration, which both can contribute to metastatic progression in HNSCC. PMID:22912841

Rudin, Florian; Schneider, Sandra; Dietsche, Tanja; Fischer, Claude A.; Tornillo, Luigi; Terracciano, Luigi M.; Schreiber, Rainer; Bubendorf, Lukas; Kunzelmann, Karl

2012-01-01

10

Correlation of a priori DCE-MRI and 1H-MRS data with molecular markers in neck nodal metastases: Initial analysis  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of the present study is to correlate non-invasive, pretreatment biological imaging (dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI [DCE-MRI] and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy [1H-MRS]) findings with specific molecular marker data in neck nodal metastases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. Materials and Methods Pretreatment DCE-MRI and 1H-MRS were performed on neck nodal metastases of 12 patients who underwent surgery. Surgical specimens were analyzed with immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays for: Ki-67 (reflecting cellular proliferation), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (the “endogenous marker” of tumor vessel growth), carbonic anhydrase (CAIX), hypoxia inducible transcription factor (HIF-1?), and human papillomavirus (HPV). Additionally, necrosis was estimated based on H&E staining. The Spearman correlation was used to compare DCE-MRI, 1H-MRS, and molecular marker data. Results A significant correlation was observed between DCE-MRI parameter std(kep) and VEGF IHC expression level (rho = 0.81, p = 0.0001). Furthermore, IHC expression levels of Ki-67 inversely correlated with std(Ktrans) and std(ve) (rho = ?0.71; p = 0.004, and rho = ?0.73; p = 0.003, respectively). Other DCE-MRI, 1H-MRS and IHC values did not show significant correlation. Conclusion The results of this preliminary study indicate that the level of heterogeneity of perfusion in metastatic HNSCC seems positively correlated with angiogenesis, and inversely correlated with proliferation. These results are preliminary in nature and are indicative, and not definitive, trends portrayed in HNSCC patients with nodal disease. Future studies with larger patient populations need to be carried out to validate and clarify our preliminary findings. PMID:22366441

Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Carlson, Diane L.; Lu, Yonggang; Stambuk, Hilda. E.; Moreira, Andre L.; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Patel, Snehal G.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Shah, Jatin P.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

2012-01-01

11

Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Saito, Naoko [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Qureshi, Muhammad M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Ozonoff, Al [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Romesser, Paul B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-02-01

12

Neck Pain  

MedlinePLUS

... Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease Sex and Arthritis Neck Pain PRINT Download PDF Description Saying, “It’s a pain ... requires expensive or uncomfortable tests. What is neck pain? Acute strain may occur after sleeping in an ...

13

Stiff Neck  

MedlinePLUS

... infectious illness that can result in stiff neck, headache , and fever . What to Do If your child has a stiff or sore neck but no ... if symptoms persist Seek Medical Care If Your Child Has a Stiff Neck and: ... headache vomiting eye sensitivity to light a skin rash ...

14

P53 expression in end-stage squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck prior to chemotherapy treatment - expression correlates with a very poor clinical outcome.  

PubMed

p53 expression was assessed immunohistochemically in 24 'end stage disease' patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, prior to selection for a chemotherapy trial. Twelve patients were assigned to each arm of the trial; cisplatinum arm or the cisplatinum and nifedipine arm. p53 expression was assessed using the CM-1 antibody in specimens from biopsies or surgically removed tissue at the time these patients were assessed as end stage disease. Sixty-six per cent had p53 positive nuclear staining but no correlation was found between p53 staining and age, sex, site of primary tumour, tumour stage, or site of the recurrence. Three patients responded to cisplatinum chemotherapy treatment, two of whom had p53 positive staining. p53 survival curves were calculated for these patients from the date they were assessed as 'end stage disease', p53 overexpression was found to correlate with a very poor clinical outcome (P<0.05). Survival curves for 109 head and neck patients calculated from the date the disease first presented showed no correlation with p53 expression. PMID:21573382

Field, J; Malliri, A; Butt, S; Gosney, J; Phillips, D; Spandidos, D; Jones, A

1993-09-01

15

A phase II trial of paclitaxel in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with correlative laboratory studies.  

PubMed

Head and neck cancer is a major cause of cancer-related deaths. In general, early stage head and neck cancers are effectively treated with either radiation or surgery. More advanced tumors often require combined-modality therapy with both radiation therapy and surgery. Recent investigations indicate that the addition of chemotherapy may be helpful. One of the newer chemotherapy agents that appears to have significant activity against head and neck cancer is paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ). Paclitaxel, originally derived from the western yew Taxus brevifolia, acts by increasing the stability of microtubules and preventing mitosis. Recent evidence indicates that the microtubule system is vital to the release of various cytokines and that modulation of cytokine release may play a major role in the drug's antitumor activity. We report a phase II trial of paclitaxel in patients with head and neck cancer, not only to evaluate its clinical effects, but also to study its effect on cytokine release. We assessed interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by using a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to assess the serum of patients receiving paclitaxel and to detect cytokine release in vitro. The objective response rate was 36%, with 12% complete responses and 24% partial responses. No IL-1 beta or tumor necrosis factor-alpha was detected in patient serum at any time during the infusion of paclitaxel or after overnight incubation with patient monocytes. No proIL-1 beta was detected in in vitro cultures of paclitaxel-treated patient monocytes. When monocytes were stimulated with endotoxin, IL-1 beta production was greatest at 48 hours, suggesting that paclitaxel can prime cells to produce greater quantities of cytokines after a second stimulus. PMID:7597432

Smith, R E; Thornton, D E; Allen, J

1995-06-01

16

Correlation of Radiographic and Pathologic Findings of Dermal Lymphatic Invasion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) that involves the skin is able to invade the dermal lymphatic system. Currently there is no way to identify patients with dermal lymphatic invasion preoperatively. The purpose of this study is to determine if CT can predict dermal lymphatic invasion. Medical records, CT scans, and corresponding histopathologic slides were reviewed of HNSCC patients with skin resected as part of their treatment. Dermal lymphatic invasion was defined radiographically as linear reticulations of the dermis and subcutaneous fat adjacent to the tumor. Twelve patients were identified with imaging suggestive of dermal lymphatic invasion. The corresponding pathology slides showed only one of the twelve patients had dermal lymphatic invasion, while the other eleven specimens showed peri-tumoral inflammation without evidence of tumor invasion. This study demonstrates that the linear areas of reticulation are most commonly caused by peri-tumoral inflammation and are not due to dermal lymphatic invasion. PMID:22116117

Spector, Matthew E.; Gallagher, K. Kelly; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Mukherji, Suresh K.

2013-01-01

17

Neck Influence on Fission Paths  

SciTech Connect

The neck region generates a microscopic potential, derived in correlation with the necking region within the fission-like shape on the potential theory basis. The whole microscopic potential is of the two-center type, yielding the evolution of proton and neutron level schemes from one parent to two completely separated fragment nuclei. The shell corrections are calculated using the neck in single-particle levels. The total deformation energy is obtained from the macroscopic-microscopic method. As an application, dynamic calculation is performed for the fission of {sup 236}Pu, using the multidimensional minimization within the total space of deformation of two spheroids joined by a smoothed necking region.

Gherghescu, Radu A.; Poenaru, D. N. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), P O Box MG-6, RO 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

2008-01-24

18

[Fiddler's neck].  

PubMed

The fiddler's neck is an uncommon variant of acne mechanica in violinists and violists. It is a single firm red-brown dermal nodule usually on the left side of neck. This special form of acne mechanica represents a therapeutic challenge since the triggering mechanical factors persist, unless they can be corrected by changes in positioning or modifications of the chin pad. A 72-year-old woman who had played the violin since childhood presented with a red-brown nodule on her neck for 18 months. Cushioning provided no relief. Excision of the affected area with primary closure represented one therapeutic option. Further supportive measures include improved posture to reduce the pressure between skin and instrument and interposing a neck cloth. PMID:23989244

Knierim, C; Goertz, W; Reifenberger, J; Homey, B; Meller, S

2013-10-01

19

Fitness, motor competence and body composition as correlates of adolescent neck/shoulder pain: an exploratory cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Adolescent neck/shoulder pain (NSP) is a common and sometimes debilitating problem. Several risk factors for this condition have been investigated, but no studies have previously evaluated associations between fitness, motor competence, body composition and adolescent NSP. Methods 1608 males and females of mean age 14 years answered questions on their history of NSP (4 measures), and were tested for aerobic fitness, upper and lower limb power, trunk endurance, grip strength, shoulder flexibility, motor competence and anthropometric factors. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to test for associations between NSP and physical variables. Results There were significant gender differences for most physical and pain variables. After multivariate analysis, males had lower odds of NSP if they had reduced back endurance [OR: 0.66 (95% CI: 0.46–0.97)], reduced persistent control [0.42 (0.19–0.95], and increased muscle power [0.33 (0.12–0.94)], and higher odds of NSP if they had a higher basketball throw [2.47 (1.22–5.00)] and jump performance [3.47 (1.55–7.74)]. Females had lower odds for NSP if they had a reduced jump performance [0.61(0.41–0.92)], a better basketball throw [0.60(0.40–0.90)], lower shoulder flexibility [0.54 (0.30–0.98)] and a higher aerobic capacity [0.61 (0.40–0.93)], and higher odds for NSP if they had greater abdominal endurance [1.57(1.07–2.31)] and greater bimanual dexterity [1.77(1.18–2.65)]. Females showed a U shaped relationship between NSP and back endurance [low: 2.12 (1.20–3.74); high 2.12 (1.18–3.83)]. Conclusion Adolescent NSP was associated with fitness and motor competence, although the associations varied with gender, and their strength was limited. PMID:18702827

Perry, Mark C; Straker, Leon M; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Smith, Anne J; Hands, Beth

2008-01-01

20

Nuclear NF-?B Expression Correlates With Outcome Among Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Primary Chemoradiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Background: To examine whether nuclear NF-?B expression correlates with outcome in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 101 patients with locally advanced primary HNSCC were treated with definitive simultaneous CRT. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were analyzed for NF-?B p65 (RelA) nuclear immunoreactivity. A sample was assigned to be positive with more than 5% positive nuclear expression. The predictive relevance of NF-?B and clinicopathologic factors for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to age, sex, total radiation dose, fractionation mode, total chemotherapy applied, T stage or grading. Patients with p65 nuclear positive biopsy specimens showed significantly a higher rate of lymph node metastasis (cN2c or cN3 status, P=.034). Within a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range, 2.33-62.96 months) OS, PFS, and DMFS were significantly poorer in the p65 nuclear positive group (P=.008, P=.027, and P=.008, respectively). These correlations remained significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: NF-?B/p65 nuclear expression is associated with increased lymphatic and hematogenous tumor dissemination and decreased survival in HNSCC patients treated with primary CRT. Our results may foster further investigation of a predictive relevance of NF-?B/p65 and its role as a suitable target for a molecular-based targeted therapy in HNSCC cancer.

Balermpas, Panagiotis [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Michel, Yvonne [Senckenberg Institute of Pathology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Senckenberg Institute of Pathology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Sipek, Florian; Rödel, Franz; Rödel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Fokas, Emmanouil, E-mail: emmanouil.fokas@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)

2013-07-15

21

Cytogenetic alterations and their molecular genetic correlates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A next generation window to the biology of disease.  

PubMed

Cytogenetic alterations underlie the development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), whether tobacco and alcohol use, betel nut chewing, snuff or human papillomavirus (HPV) causes the disease. Many of the molecular genetic aberrations in HNSCC result from these cytogenetic alterations. This review presents a brief introduction to the epidemiology of HNSCC, and discusses the role of HPV in the disease, cytogenetic alterations and their frequencies in HNSCC, their molecular genetic and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) correlates, prognostic implications, and possible therapeutic considerations. The most frequent cytogenetic alterations in HNSCC are gains of 5p14-15, 8q11-12, and 20q12-13, gains or amplifications of 3q26, 7p11, 8q24, and 11q13, and losses of 3p, 4q35, 5q12, 8p23, 9p21-24, 11q14-23, 13q12-14, 18q23, and 21q22. To understand their effects on tumor cell biology and response to therapy, the cytogenetic findings in HNSCC are increasingly being examined in the context of the biochemical pathways they disrupt. The goal is to minimize morbidity and mortality from HNSCC using cytogenetic abnormalities to identify valuable diagnostic biomarkers for HNSCC, prognostic biomarkers of tumor behavior, recurrence risk, and outcome, and predictive biomarkers of therapeutic response to identify the most efficacious treatment for each individual patient's tumor, all based on a detailed understanding of the next generation biology of HNSCC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25183546

Gollin, Susanne M

2014-12-01

22

Pretreatment Apparent Diffusion Coefficient of the Primary Lesion Correlates With Local Failure in Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy or Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of a primary lesion correlates with local failure in primary head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 38 patients with primary HNSCC (12 oropharynx, 20 hypopharynx, 4 larynx, 2 oral cavity) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy with radiation dose to gross tumor volume equal to or over 60 Gy and who underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion-weighted imaging. Ten patients developed local failure during follow-up periods of 2.0 to 9.3 months, and the remaining 28 showed local control during follow-up periods of 10.5 to 31.7 months. The variables that could affect local failure (age, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, N stage, dose, treatment method, tumor location, and overall treatment time) were analyzed using logistic regression analyses for all 38 patients and for 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease. Results: In univariate logistic analysis for all 38 cases, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, and treatment method showed significant (p < 0.05) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC and T stage revealed significance (p < 0.01). In univariate logistic analysis for the 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease, ADC and dose showed significant (p < 0.01) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC alone showed significance (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results suggest that pretreatment ADC, along with T stage, is a potential indicator of local failure in HNSCC treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy.

Hatakenaka, Masamitsu, E-mail: mhatake@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka City (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Yoshio; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Sunami, Shunya; Kamitani, Takeshi; Setoguchi, Taro; Yoshiura, Takashi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka City (Japan); Nakashima, Torahiko [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka City (Japan); Nishikawa, Kei [Radiology Center, Kyushu University Hospital, Kyushu University, Fukuoka City (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka City (Japan)

2011-10-01

23

Socio-demographic correlates of betel, areca and smokeless tobacco use as a high risk behavior for head and neck cancers in a squatter settlement of Karachi, Pakistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Head and neck cancers are a major cancer burden in Pakistan. They share a common risk factor profile including regular consumption of products of betel, areca and tobacco. Use of paan, chaalia, gutka, niswar and tumbaku is acceptable in Pakistan and is considered a normal cultural practice. This cross-sectional study was carried out to understand the relation of socio-demographic

Samia Mazahir; Rabia Malik; Maria Maqsood; Kanwal AliRaza Merchant; Farida Malik; Atif Majeed; Zafar Fatmi; Muhammad Rizwanulhaq Khawaja; Shehzad Ghaffar

2006-01-01

24

Neck curve polynomials in neck rupture model  

SciTech Connect

The Neck Rupture Model is a model that explains the scission process which has smallest radius in liquid drop at certain position. Old fashion of rupture position is determined randomly so that has been called as Random Neck Rupture Model (RNRM). The neck curve polynomials have been employed in the Neck Rupture Model for calculation the fission yield of neutron induced fission reaction of {sup 280}X{sub 90} with changing of order of polynomials as well as temperature. The neck curve polynomials approximation shows the important effects in shaping of fission yield curve.

Kurniadi, Rizal; Perkasa, Yudha S.; Waris, Abdul [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06

25

Is elective neck dissection indicated during salvage surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma?  

PubMed

Among patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with a negative neck who are initially treated with (chemo)radiotherapy, a number of cases will recur locally without obvious neck recurrence. There is little information available as to the most efficacious management of the neck in these cases. We have reviewed the literature to see what conclusions can be drawn from previous reports. We conducted a bibliography search on MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. Studies published in the English language and those on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, nasopharynx, oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx were included. Data related to neck management were extracted from the articles. Twelve studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. Five studies reported only one treatment plan (either neck dissection or observation), while the others compared neck dissection to observation. The rate of occult metastases ranged from 3.4 to 12 %. The studies included a variable distribution of primary sites and stages of the recurrent primary tumors. The risk of occult neck node metastasis in a clinically rN0 patient correlated with tumor site and T stage. Observation of the neck can be suggested for patients with T1-2 glottic tumors, who recurred with less advanced tumors (rT1-2). For patients with more advanced laryngeal recurrences or recurrence at other high-risk sites, neck dissection could be considered for the rN0 patient, particularly if the neck was not included in the previous radiation fields. PMID:24515917

Sanabria, Alvaro; Silver, Carl E; Olsen, Kerry D; Medina, Jesus E; Hamoir, Marc; Paleri, Vinidh; Mondin, Vanni; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Rodrigo, Juan P; Suárez, Carlos; Boedeker, Carsten C; Hinni, Michael L; Kowalski, Luiz P; Teymoortash, Afshin; Werner, Jochen A; Takes, Robert P; Ferlito, Alfio

2014-12-01

26

Site of disease and treatment protocol as correlates of swallowing function in patients with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract:,Background.,The relationship,between,type,of chemoradiation treatment, site of disease, and swallowing function,has,not been,sufficiently examined,in patients,with head,and,neck,cancer,treated primarily with chemoradiation. Methods.,Fifty-three patients,with,advanced-stage,head and,neck,cancer,were,evaluated,before,and,3 months,after chemoradiation,treatment,to define their swallowing,disorders and,characterize,their swallowing,physiology,by site of lesion and,chemoradiation,protocol. One hundred,forty normal,sub- jects were,also studied. Results. The most,common,disorders,at baseline,and 3 months after treatment were reduced tongue base retraction, reduced tongue strength, and slowed or delayed laryngeal vestibule closure.

Jeri A. Logemann; Alfred W. Rademaker; Barbara Roa Pauloski; Cathy L. Lazarus; Bharat B. Mittal; Bruce Brockstein; Ellen MacCracken; Daniel J. Haraf; Everett E. Vokes; Lisa A. Newman; Dachao Liu

2006-01-01

27

Correlation of Nuclear Morphometry and AgNOR Score with Radiation Response in Squamous Cell Cancers of the Head and Neck: A Preliminary Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Prediction of radiation response before the completion of the radiotherapy schedule is challenging. Information about radiation response could help oncologist to choose the appropriate combination and sequence of therapies in the multidisciplinary management of cancer. Methods: The study involved 26 patients with squamous cell cancers of the head and neck region who received radiotherapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions over a 2-week period as part of a split-course technique. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was performed on day 1 and day 5 of the schedule. The silver staining of the nuclear organiser region (AgNOR) and nuclear morphometric study were done on both days. Results: The median age of the patients was 44 years old. The primary tumours were distributed in the nasopharynx (n = 11), larynx and hypopharynx (n = 5), metastatic node (n = 4), and miscellaneous tumours were found in the head and neck sub sites (n = 6). The mean initial AgNOR score was 3.0, range 1.2–7.0. The median of nuclear and nucleolar diameters were 11.07 ?m, range 7.70–16.6 ?m, and 2.92 ?m, range 1.09–11.66 ?m, respectively. Patients with a pre-radiotherapy AgNOR score of greater than 2.5 were associated with disease progression and metastasis. However, the increased of nuclear diameter on day 5 compared with baseline predicted a good radiation response in patients (P = 0.016). Conclusion: Intra-radiotherapy nuclear morphometry combined with baseline AgNOR score could be a simple and useful tool for the prediction of radiation response in head and neck cancers. PMID:22135545

Biswal, Biswa Mohan; Othman, Nor Hayati

2010-01-01

28

Correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviews 16 publications (1913-1914) based on the problem of correlations. Correlation is viewed as a means of solving the problem of development and the traits that are affected. The uses of correlations are also discussed. A high correlation does not signify good quality of the two factors. A more intensive study of the factors influencing correlation is recommended. Cites a

James Burt Miner

1914-01-01

29

Correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviews 38 studies on statistical correlation (1913-1916). Several studies have tried to explain and investigate Spearman's theory of general and specific mental factors in terms of correlation. The interpretation of correlation through heredity has also been discussed by investigators. A number of methods such as partial and multiple correlations, variant difference correlation method, and several others have been devised. The

James Burt Miner

1916-01-01

30

Enhanced response of human head and neck cancer xenograft tumors to Cisplatin combined with 2-deoxy-D-glucose correlates with increased 18F-FDG uptake as determined by PET imaging  

PubMed Central

Purpose Determine if the response of human head and neck cancer xenografts to cisplatin (CIS) could be enhanced with 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and determine if 2-[F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake correlated with responses to this drug combination. Determine if 2DG would enhance CIS-induced radiosensitization. Experimental Design Clonogenic survival responses to CIS + 2DG were determined in FaDu and Cal-27 cells and GSH/GSSG levels were monitored as parameters indicative of oxidative stress. The efficacy of CIS + 2DG was determined in FaDu and Cal-27 xenografts and FDG uptake was determined with Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Results CIS + 2DG enhanced cell killing of FaDu and Cal-27 cells, compared to either drug alone, while increasing %GSSG in vitro. CIS + 2DG inhibited FaDu and Cal-27 tumor growth and increased disease free survival, compared to either drug alone. Cal-27 tumors demonstrated greater pretreatment FDG uptake and increased disease free survival when treated with 2DG + CIS, relative to FaDu tumors. 2DG treatment enhanced CIS-induced radiosensitization in FaDu tumor cells grown in vitro and in vivo and resulted in apparent cures in 50% of tumors. Conclusions These results demonstrate the enhanced therapeutic efficacy of CIS + 2DG in human head and neck cancer cells in vitro and in vivo when compared to either drug alone as well as demonstrating the potential for FDG uptake to predict tumor sensitivity to 2DG + CIS. These findings provide a strong rationale for evaluating 2DG + CIS in combined modality head and neck cancer therapy with radiation in a clinical setting. PMID:17967311

Simons, Andrean L.; Fath, Melissa A.; Mattson, David M.; Smith, Brian J.; Walsh, Susan A.; Graham, Michael M.; Hichwa, Richard D.; Buatti, John M.; Dornfeld, Ken; Spitz, Douglas R.

2007-01-01

31

Enhanced Response of Human Head and Neck Cancer Xenograft Tumors to Cisplatin Combined With 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Correlates With Increased {sup 18}F-FDG Uptake as Determined by PET Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether the response of human head and neck cancer xenografts to cisplatin (CIS) could be enhanced with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG); whether 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake correlated with responses to this drug combination; and whether 2DG would enhance CIS-induced radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival responses to CIS + 2DG were determined in FaDu and Cal-27 cells and reduced/oxidized glutathione levels were monitored as parameters indicative of oxidative stress. The efficacy of CIS + 2DG was determined in FaDu and Cal-27 xenografts, and FDG uptake was determined by using positron emission tomography. Results: Use of CIS + 2DG enhanced cell killing of FaDu and Cal-27 cells compared with either drug alone while increasing the percentage of oxidized glutathione in vitro. Use of CIS + 2DG inhibited FaDu and Cal-27 tumor growth and increased disease-free survival compared with either drug alone. The Cal-27 tumors showed greater pretreatment FDG uptake and increased disease-free survival when treated with 2DG + CIS relative to FaDu tumors. Treatment with 2DG enhanced CIS-induced radiosensitization in FaDu tumor cells grown in vitro and in vivo and resulted in apparent cures in 50% of tumors. Conclusions: These results show the enhanced therapeutic efficacy of CIS + 2DG in human head and neck cancer cells in vitro and in vivo compared with either drug alone, as well as the potential for FDG uptake to predict tumor sensitivity to 2DG + CIS. These findings provide a strong rationale for evaluating 2DG + CIS in combined-modality head and neck cancer therapy with radiation in a clinical setting.

Simons, Andrean L.; Fath, Melissa A.; Mattson, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Smith, Brian J. [Department of Biostatistics, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Walsh, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Graham, Michael M.; Hichwa, Richard D. [Department of Radiology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Buatti, John M.; Dornfeld, Ken [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Spitz, Douglas R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)], E-mail: douglas-spitz@uiowa.edu

2007-11-15

32

Questions about Neck Manipulation?  

MedlinePLUS

... to what they experience after some forms of exercise), headaches and tiredness. Some articles in the media ... A neck adjustment is a precise procedure, usually applied by hand, to the joints of the neck-- ...

33

Head and Neck Cancers  

MedlinePLUS

... Mendenhall WM, Mancuso AA, Amdur RJ, et al. Squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the neck from an unknown head ... V, et al. Oral health and risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and esophagus: results ...

34

Correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviews 7 studies in the area of interpretation of correlation from the psychological point of view. The limitations and meanings of correlation methods have also been given. The statistical methods of calculating correlation, as given by 8 psychologists have been reported. Presents 22 reports, given by various psychologists, who have evaluated the tests using various correlation methods. Six studies were

James Burt Miner

1919-01-01

35

Correlation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The applets, created by Virginia Tech's Department of Statistics, allow you to see how different bivariate data look under different correlation structures. The "Movie" applet either creates data for a particular correlation or animates a multitude data sets ranging correlations from -1 to 1. The "Creation" applet allows the user to create a data set by adding or deleting points from the screen.

Anderson-Cook, C.; Dorai-Raj, S.; Robinson, T.

2009-09-14

36

Correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviews 32 papers on correlation its methods, interpretation and application. Highlights the contributions of K. Pearson, B. Hart and C. Spearman, and W. H. Winch. W. Betz's publications concludes that correlation alone does not demonstrate a functional connection and serves the purpose of (1) describing educational or social descriptions of Large groups, and (2) discovering functional connections when used with

James Burt Miner

1912-01-01

37

Correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discusses: (1) the need for a general factor to explain the correlation between tested psychophysical processes and (2) the importance of multiple correlation in solving the complex problems. Reports the contributions of Thurstone, Ruml and Kelley to the methods of calculation of coefficients. Doll offers new ways of using corrections. Applications of this method in new fields other than applied

James Burt Miner

1917-01-01

38

American Head and Neck Society  

MedlinePLUS

American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS History AHNS Leadership Past Presidents In Memory Professionalism & ... Convention Center/Sheraton Boston Presenting the Best of Head & Neck Surgery from Both a Clinical & Research Perspective learn ...

39

Correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examines the use of various methods of correlations, for determining the diagnostic value of tests, used in analysis of abilities, in business psychology, mental development and school records. Also reviews a number of studies done in this regard.

James Burt Miner

1918-01-01

40

Correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A spirit of conservatism and caution in regard to intelligence test correlations animates numerous papers. Several writers urge the use of units of rank orders, in the estimating of mental abilities. (See, Boring, McEwen, Michael and the Scott Laboratory). Several others like Ruml, Myers, Mitchell, Thorndike and Thompson hold various views in favor of or in criticism against numerous concepts

J. B. Miner

1920-01-01

41

The use of the anatomic 'zones' of the neck in the assessment of penetrating neck injury.  

PubMed

The traditional classification of neck injuries uses an anatomic description of Zones I through III. The objective of this article was to characterize the association between external wounds and the corresponding internal injuries after penetrating neck trauma to identify the clinical use of the anatomic zones of the neck. Patients who sustained penetrating neck trauma from December 2008 to March 2011 were analyzed. All patients underwent structured clinical examination documenting the external zone where the wound(s) were located. All internal injuries were then correlated with the external wounds. An internal injury was defined as "unexpected" if it was located outside the borders of the neck zone corresponding to the external wound. In total, 146 patients sustaining a penetrating neck injury were analyzed; 126 (86%) male. The mechanism of injury was stab wounds in 74 (51%) and gunshot wounds in 69 (47%). Mean age was 31 years (range, nine to 62 years). Thirty-seven (25%) patients sustained had a total of 50 internal injuries. There was a high incidence of noncorrelation between the location of the external injury and the internal structures that were damaged in patients with hard signs of vascular or aerodigestive injury. The use of the anatomic zones and their role in the workup of penetrating neck injury are questionable. PMID:25264641

Low, Garren M I; Inaba, Kenji; Chouliaras, Konstantinos; Branco, Bernardino; Lam, Lydia; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Menaker, Jay; Demetriades, Demetrios

2014-10-01

42

NECK AND SHOULDER PAIN  

PubMed Central

Neck and shoulder pains are presenting or incidental symptoms in a large variety of conditions. There may be similarities in the anatomicophysiological mechanism of pain production and in the clinical picture in many of these conditions. Many of the vague and refractory cases of neck and shoulder pain and of migraine may be due to cervical disc disease. Scalenus anticus syndrome and cardiac disease can be diagnosed or differentiated from cervical disc syndrome only by thorough investigation. Proper treatment of neck and shoulder pain is dependent upon correct diagnosis through complete history, physical examination and laboratory tests, as described in this presentation. PMID:18131684

Fields, Albert; Hoesley, John

1949-01-01

43

Neck dissections: radical to conservative  

PubMed Central

Background Neck dissection is an important surgical procedure for the management of metastatic nodal disease in the neck. The gold standard of neck nodal management has been the radical neck dissection. Any modification in the neck dissection is always compared with this standard. Over the last few decades, in order to alleviate the morbidity of radical neck dissection, several modifications and conservative procedures have been advocated. These procedures retain certain lymphatic or non-lymphatic structures and have been shown not to compromise oncological safety. Methods A literature search of the Medline was carried out for all articles on neck dissections. The articles were systematically reviewed to analyze and trace the evolution of neck dissection. These were then categorized to address the nomenclature, management of node positive and node negative neck including those who had received chemoradiation. Results The present article discusses the neck nodal nomenclature, the radical neck dissection, its modifications and migration to more conservative procedures and possible advances in the near future. Conclusion Radical neck dissection is now replaced with modified radical neck dissections in most situations. Attempts are being made to replace modified radical neck dissections with selective neck dissections for early node positivity. Sentinel node biopsy is being studied to address the issue of node negative neck. More conservative surgeries are likely to replace the 'radical' surgeries of bygone era. This process is facilitated by earlier detection of the disease and better understanding of cancer biology. PMID:15836786

Harish, K

2005-01-01

44

Head and Neck Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... effectiveness and the patient’s quality of life. Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA). Used on a localized tumor that ... you would like additional information about the latest areas of research regarding head and neck cancer, explore ...

45

Talar neck fractures.  

PubMed

Clinical management of talar neck fractures is complex and fraught with complications. As Gaius Julius Caesar stated: "The die is cast"; often the outcome of a talar neck fracture is determined at the time of injury. The authors believe, however, that better results can be achieved by following some simple guidelines. The authors advocate prompt and precise anatomic surgical reduction, preferring the medial approach with secondary anterolateral approach. Preservation of blood supply can be achieved by a thorough understanding of vascular pathways and efforts to stay within appropriate surgical intervals. The authors advocate bone grafting of medial neck comminution (if present) to prevent varus malalignment and rigid internal fixation to allow for joint mobilization postoperatively. These guidelines may seem simple, but when dealing with the complexity of talar neck fractures, the foot and ankle surgeon needs to focus and rely on easily grasped concepts to reduce poor outcomes. PMID:11465133

Berlet, G C; Lee, T H; Massa, E G

2001-01-01

46

Where is the neck?  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose The alpha angle is the most used measurement to classify concavity of the femoral head-neck junction. It is not only used for treatment decisions for hip impingement, but also in cohort studies relating hip morphology and osteoarthritis. Alpha angle measurement requires identification of the femoral neck axis, the definition of which may vary between studies. The original “3-point method” uses 1 single point to construct the femoral neck axis, whereas the “anatomic method” uses multiple points and attempts to define the true anatomic neck axis. Depending on the method used, the alpha angle may or may not account for other morphological characteristics such as head-neck offset. Methods We compared 2 methods of alpha angle measurement (termed “anatomic” and “3-point”) in 59 cadaver femora and 83 cross-table lateral radiographs of asymptomatic subjects. Results were compared using Bland-Altman plots. Results Discrepancies of up to 13 degrees were seen between the methods. The 3-point method had an “equalizing effect” by disregarding femoral head position relative to the neck: in femora with high alpha angle, it resulted in lower values than anatomic measurement, and vice versa in femora with low alpha angles. Using the anatomic method, we derived a reference interval for the alpha angle in normal hips in the general population of 30–66 degrees. Interpretation We recommend the anatomic method because it also reflects the position of the femoral head on the neck. Consensus and standardization of technique of alpha angle measurement is warranted, not only for planar measurements but also for CT or MRI-based measurements. PMID:24650023

2014-01-01

47

Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Download PDF Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs This section has been ... and Neck Cancer - Diagnosis › f t g e + Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

48

Are neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting at work risk factors for neck pain? Results of a prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVETo study the relation between neck pain and work related neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting.METHODSA prospective cohort study was performed with a follow up of 3 years among 1334 workers from 34 companies. Work related physical load was assessed by analysing objectively measured exposure data (video recordings) of neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting posture. Neck pain was assessed

G. A. M. Ariens; P. M. Bongers; M. Douwes; M. C. Miedema; W. E. Hoogendoorn; G van der Wal; L. M. Bouter; W van Mechelen

2001-01-01

49

Endoscopic neck surgery  

PubMed Central

Endoscopic surgery in the neck was attempted in 1996 for performing parathyroidectomy. A similar surgical technique was used for performing thyroidectomy the following year. Most commonly reported endoscopic neck surgery studies in literature have been on thyroid and parathyroid glands. The approaches are divided into two types i.e., the total endoscopic approach using CO2 insufflation and the video-assisted approach without CO2 insufflation. The latter approach has been reported more often. The surgical access (port placements) may vary-the common sites are the neck, anterior chest wall, axilla, and periareolar region. The limiting factors are the size of the gland and malignancy. Few reports are available on endoscopic resection for early thyroid malignancy and cervical lymph node dissection. Endoscopic neck surgery has primarily evolved due to its cosmetic benefits and it has proved to be safe and feasible in suitable patients with thyroid and parathyroid pathologies. Application of this technique for approaching other cervical organs such as the submandibular gland and carotid artery are still in the early experimental phase. PMID:20668611

Chowbey, P K; Soni, Vandana; Khullar, R; Sharma, Anil; Baijal, M

2007-01-01

50

The neck mass.  

PubMed

Many head and neck disease processes are manifest as neck masses. These conditions are treated by surgical excision except for some inflammatory masses, and often those too must be excised before a diagnosis can be made. The real question is when to excise the lesion to expedite treatment in the most cost-effective manner. In general, when signs of inflammation are associated with the mass, antibiotic treatment with short-term observation is acceptable. Persistence of the mass or an increase in mass size during observation mandates for their evaluation. Biopsy of a mass is considered for progressive growth, isolated nature or asymmetry of the mass, location (supraclavicular), development of symptoms associated with lymphoma (fever and hypertrophy of the spleen, liver, or Waldeyer's ring), or static size (if > 3 cm). In the adult patient, a complete head and neck physical examination is mandatory before biopsy. Needle biopsy of the neck mass is the current standard of care if no cause of the mass is found on examination. Identified benign cystic lesions or lymphomas indicate a need for excision, either as definitive treatment or for diagnostic reasons. If results of the needle biopsy are positive, equivocal, or even negative in the presence of a high index of suspicion for metastatic squamous cell carcinoma, an endoscopic examination is mandatory before open excision. If no discrete lesion is seen, guided biopsy of the upper aerodigestive tract is performed. Open biopsy of the mass should be accompanied by a frozen-section examination of the mass. A concomitant definitive neck dissection should be performed if the mass proves to be metastatic carcinoma. PMID:9927971

McGuirt, W F

1999-01-01

51

Anatomy of neck configuration in fission decay  

E-print Network

The anatomy of neck configuration in the fission decay of Uranium and Thorium isotopes is investigated in a microscopic study using Relativistic mean field theory. The study includes $^{236}U$ and $^{232}Th$ in the valley of stability and exotic neutron rich isotopes $^{250}U$, $^{256}U$, $^{260}U$, $^{240}Th$, $^{250}Th$, $^{256}Th$ likely to play important role in the r-process nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution. Following the static fission path, the neck configurations are generated and their composition in terms of the number of neutrons and protons are obtained showing the progressive rise in the neutron component with the increase of mass number. Strong correlation between the neutron multiplicity in the fission decay and the number of neutrons in the neck is seen. The maximum neutron-proton ratio is about 5 for $^{260}$U and $^{256}$Th suggestive of the break down of liquid-drop picture and inhibition of the fission decay in still heavier isotopes. Neck as precursor of a new mode of fission decay li...

Patra, S K; Satpathy, L

2010-01-01

52

Anatomy of neck configuration in fission decay  

E-print Network

The anatomy of neck configuration in the fission decay of Uranium and Thorium isotopes is investigated in a microscopic study using Relativistic mean field theory. The study includes $^{236}U$ and $^{232}Th$ in the valley of stability and exotic neutron rich isotopes $^{250}U$, $^{256}U$, $^{260}U$, $^{240}Th$, $^{250}Th$, $^{256}Th$ likely to play important role in the r-process nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution. Following the static fission path, the neck configurations are generated and their composition in terms of the number of neutrons and protons are obtained showing the progressive rise in the neutron component with the increase of mass number. Strong correlation between the neutron multiplicity in the fission decay and the number of neutrons in the neck is seen. The maximum neutron-proton ratio is about 5 for $^{260}$U and $^{256}$Th suggestive of the break down of liquid-drop picture and inhibition of the fission decay in still heavier isotopes. Neck as precursor of a new mode of fission decay like multi-fragmentation fission may also be inferred from this study.

S. K. Patra; R. K. Choudhury; L. Satpathy

2010-05-10

53

The Relationship of Forward Head Posture and Rounded Shoulders with Neck Pain in Iranian Office Workers  

PubMed Central

Background Office workers spend a long period of time behind a computer during working hours. The relation between the posture of sitting during work with computer and neck pain is still debatable. Even though some researchers claim a significant difference in head posture between patients with neck pain and pain-free participants, the FHP (forward head posture) has not always been associated with neck pain in literature. So, the purpose of this study was to discover the relationship between neck pain and improper posture in the head, cervicothoracic spine and shoulders. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study to explore the relationships between neck pains, sagittal postures of cervical and thoracic spine and shoulders among office workers in two positions, straight looking forward and working position. 46 subjects without neck pain and 55 subjects with neck pain were evaluated using a photographic method. Thoracic and cervical postures were measured by the HT (High Thoracic), CV (Craniovertebral) angles respectively. Shoulder’s posture was evaluated in the sagittal plane by the acromion protrusion. Results: HT and CV angles were positively correlated with the presence of neck pain only in working position (p< 0.05). In straight looking forward position there was no significant difference between the two groups statistically (p>0.05). The difference of shoulder protrusion between symptomatic and asymptomatic groups was not significant. Conclusion: FHP and thoracic kyphosis were accompanied with neck pain. But shoulder posture was not correlated with neck pain.

Nejati, Parisa; Lotfian, Sara; Moezy, Azar; Moezy, Azar; Nejati, Mina

2014-01-01

54

Synovial sarcoma in the neck.  

PubMed

Synovial sarcomas are very uncommon and highly malignant tumours. This uncommon malignant tumour of mesenchymal origin may rarely present in the neck. Since 1954, nearly 80 cases of synovial sarcoma, located in the head and neck region have been reported. Synovial sarcoma is most prevalent in adolescents and young adults between 15 and 40 years of age. In this report we present a case of synovial sarcoma in the neck of a 10-year-old patient. PMID:8390971

Onerci, M; Sarioglu, T; Gedikoglu, G; Hosal, S; Ruacan, S

1993-05-01

55

Head & Neck Cancer Care Program  

E-print Network

OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER PROGRAM THYROID AND PARATHYROID PROGRAM · Alexander Colevas, MD · Vasu Divi, MD · ChrisHead & Neck Cancer Care Program NONPROFITORG. U.S.POSTAGE PAID PALOALTO,CA PERMITNO.188900BlakeWilburDrive PaloAlto,CA94304 Starting February 24, 2014, the Head & Neck Cancer Care Program is moving to a new

Bogyo, Matthew

56

Comparison of Neck Tension Palpation Rating Systems With Surface Electromyographic and  

E-print Network

Comparison of Neck Tension Palpation Rating Systems With Surface Electromyographic and Acoustic to determine in- terrater reliability and possible correlation with necksurface electromyography (s ratings and objective measures of sEMG (anterior neck) and the third formant for /a/ were assessed using

Stepp, Cara E.

57

The difficult neck in facelifting.  

PubMed

The management of the neck often presents the most challenging aspect of the facelift procedure. The aesthetic neck has a well-defined jaw line, a pleasing and adequate cervicomental angle, and visible definitions of the deeper lateral and midline structures, such as the sternocleidomastoid muscles and trachea. Several unfavorable anatomic characteristics will present that will compound the challenge. These characteristics are contrasted with ideal features and include the following: an excess of adipose tissue, an excess of either thin or thick inelastic skin, marked relaxation of the suspension structures of the neck with resultant platysma banding and jowling, and unfavorable skeletal features such as microgenia and hyoid malposition. These patients present for rhytidectomy with inadequate chin projection, an obtuse cervicomental angle, sagging skin, and a heavy neck. To maximize rhytidectomy results in these patients with difficult neck anatomy, special attention to the anatomy and application of recognized techniques in an individualized manner is recommended. This article reviews the issues encountered in the management of the difficult neck in facelifting, with special attention given to patients with a heavy neck. PMID:25076452

Fedok, Fred G; Chaikhoutdinov, Irina; Garritano, Frank

2014-08-01

58

Adjunctive procedures to neck rejuvenation.  

PubMed

Rejuvenation of the neck often requires more than just a neck lift. Various steps and procedures exist to enhance the surgical technique or overall result. Fibrin sealants can be used to improve the recovery process and obviate the need for drain placement. Chin augmentation can be a critical part of creating a more refined neckline. Submandibular gland excision has been put forth as helpful to the overall aesthetic result. A low and anteriorly positioned hyoid bone creates an unattractive neckline that is difficult to treat. This article focuses on techniques beyond lifting and resurfacing that may enhance neck rejuvenation. PMID:24745385

Hamilton, Mark M; Chan, David

2014-05-01

59

Comparison of PET/CT with conventional imaging modalities (USG, CECT) in evaluation of N0 neck in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background Evaluation of a clinically N0 neck is mandatory in cases of squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck region in order to determine the need to address the neck. The study was designed to compare the accuracy of PET/CT scan with that of USG and CECT Neck in assessing clinically N0 neck in cases of squamous cell carcinoma of upper aerodigestive tract. Methods Single center, prospective, study over a 2 year period. All Cases of squamous cell carcinoma of upper aerodigestive tract with no palpable neck lymphadenopathy and who were scheduled for surgery were evaluated with USG, CECT and 18F-FDG PET/CT, of the neck. Post operative histopathology was correlated with pre-operative nodal status. Statistical analysis was done using the chi square test. Results In the 49 patients enrolled, 51 neck sides underwent dissections. Sensitivity of USG, CECT and PET-CT was 4.76%, 23.80% and 71.43% respectively while the specificity was 93.33%, 93.33% and 96.67% respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) calculated for USG, CECT and PET-CT was 33.33%, 71%, 93.5% respectively while the negative predictive value (NPV) 58.33%, 63.63% and 82.85% respectively. Conclusions In N0 neck in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, though FDG-PET-CT is more accurate than either USG or CECT in staging of the neck, it is not accurate enough to alter the current treatment paradigm. PMID:24532898

Chauhan, Ashutosh; Kulshrestha, Pranjal; Kapoor, Sanjay; Singh, Harkirat; Jacob, M.J.; Patel, Maneel; Ganguly, Manomoy

2012-01-01

60

Head and Neck Cancer Prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Head and neck cancer (HNC) represents a broad spectrum of diseases that involves the nasal and oropharyngeal cavities, the\\u000a paranasal sinuses, the major and minor salivary glands, the larynx and the lymphatic tissues of the neck. The world-wide yearly\\u000a incidence exceeds over half a million cases. Tobacco (smoking and smokeless) and alcohol use are the principal risk factors,\\u000a however, a

Fausto Chiesa; Angelo Ostuni; Roberto Grigolato; Luca Calabrese

61

Comparison of neck tension palpation rating systems with surface electromyographic and acoustic measures in vocal hyperfunction  

PubMed Central

Objectives/Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to evaluate current neck tension palpation rating systems to determine inter-rater reliability and possible correlation with neck surface electromyography (sEMG, collected from three electrode recording locations) and measures of the third formant for /a/ during various vocal behaviors. Study Design This prospective study examined the neck muscle tension of 16 participants before and after a single session of voice therapy. Methods Inter-rater reliability and relationships between palpation ratings and objective measures of sEMG (anterior neck) and the third formant for /a/ were assessed using Pearson’s correlations (r). Results Inter-rater reliability was relatively low as measured by Pearson’s correlations, although Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test results were similar as those in a previous study. Correlations between palpation ratings and sEMG, and between ratings of laryngeal height and the third formant for /a/ were generally low. Correlations increased between anterior neck sEMG and ratings of suprahyoid muscle tension when examined in a reduced set of individuals with higher inter-rater reliability. Conclusions Palpation rating scales do not reliably capture changes that may occur in neck muscle tension of typical voice therapy patients over one session. Consequently, little can be concluded from correlations between sEMG and palpation ratings. PMID:20347260

Stepp, Cara E.; Heaton, James T.; Braden, Maia N.; Jette, Marie E.; Stadelman-Cohen, Tara K.; Hillman, Robert E.

2010-01-01

62

Tissue eosinophilia in head and neck squamous neoplasia: an update.  

PubMed

Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that play an imperative role in health and disease. They have also been found to be a crucial component of peri- and intratumoral inflammatory infiltrate. Tumor-associated tissue eosinophilia (TATE) has been observed and described in many tumors, including head and neck neoplasia. The process of eosinophil recruitment and its function in tumors has not been exactly defined yet. Correlation of tissue eosinophilia with prognosis has shown variable results ranging from favourable to unfavourable prognosis or even having no influence on patients outcome. Eosinophils are hypothesized to have tumor defensive as well as tumor promotive function. This dichotomous role of tissue eosinophilia with regard to prognosis has also been noted in head and neck neoplasia and premalignancies. So, the present review attempts to discuss TATE and its possible pros and cons in head and neck neoplasia. PMID:25265347

Jain, M; Kasetty, S; Khan, S; Jain, N K

2014-09-01

63

Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women  

PubMed Central

Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12%) to after childbirth (21 and 28%) in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women. PMID:20696633

2010-01-01

64

Palmitoylethanolamide and stearoylethanolamide levels in the interstitium of the trapezius muscle of women with chronic widespread pain and chronic neck-shoulder pain correlate with pain intensity and sensitivity.  

PubMed

Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a complex condition characterized by central hyperexcitability and altered descending control of nociception. However, nociceptive input from deep tissues is suggested to be an important drive. N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are endogenous lipid mediators involved in regulation of inflammation and pain. Previously we have reported elevated levels of the 2 NAEs, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type-? ligand N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) and N-stearoylethanolamine (SEA) in chronic neck/shoulder pain (CNSP). In the present study, the levels of PEA and SEA in women with CWP (n=18), CNSP (n=34) and healthy controls (CON, n=24) were investigated. All subjects went through clinical examination, pressure pain threshold measurements and induction of experimental pain in the tibialis anterior muscle. Microdialysis dialysate of the trapezius was collected before and after subjects performed a repetitive low-force exercise and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The levels of PEA and SEA in CNSP were significantly higher post exercise compared with CWP, and both pre and post exercise compared with CON. Levels of both NAEs decreased significantly pre to post exercise in CWP. Intercorrelations existed between aspects of pain intensity and sensitivity and the level of the 2 NAEs in CWP and CNSP. This is the first study demonstrating that CNSP and CWP differ in levels of NAEs in response to a low-force exercise which induces pain. Increases in pain intensity as a consequence of low-force exercise were associated with low levels of PEA and SEA in CNSP and CWP. These results indicate that PEA and SEA have antinociceptive roles in humans. PMID:23707281

Ghafouri, Nazdar; Ghafouri, Bijar; Larsson, Britt; Stensson, Niclas; Fowler, Christopher J; Gerdle, Björn

2013-09-01

65

49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Side Impact Hybrid Dummy 50th Percentile Male § 572.113 Neck assembly. The head/neck assembly consists of the parts...

2011-10-01

66

Initial conformation of kinesin's neck linker  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

How ATP binding initiates the docking process of kinesin's neck linker is a key question in understanding kinesin mechanisms. By exploiting a molecular dynamics method, we investigate the initial conformation of kinesin's neck linker in its docking process. We find that, in the initial conformation, the neck linker has interactions with ?0 and forms a ‘cover-neck bundle’ structure with ?0. From this initial structure, the formation of extra turns and the docking of the cover-neck bundle structure can be achieved. The motor head provides a forward force on the initial cover-neck bundle structure through ATP-induced rotation. This force, together with the hydrophobic interaction of ILE327 with the hydrophobic pocket on the motor head, drives the formation of the extra turn and initiates the neck linker docking process. Based on these findings, a pathway from ATP binding-induced motor head rotation to neck linker docking is proposed.

Geng, Yi-Zhao; Ji, Qing; Liu, Shu-Xia; Yan, Shi-Wei

2014-10-01

67

Pseudopathologic fracture of the femoral neck  

SciTech Connect

We have seen two cases of traumatic subcapital fractures of the femoral neck which resembled pathologic fractures on plain radiography. We have named this entity pseudopathologic fracture of the femoral neck and offer suggestions for why it occurs.

Pope, T.L. Jr.; Keats, T.E.; Goldner, R.; Stelling, C.B.; Logan, M.

1981-11-01

68

HEAD AND NECK CANCER 12. HEAD AND NECK CANCER  

E-print Network

malignant neoplasms, excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, in women and 4.0% in men (Table 12.1). The average excluding non-melanoma skin cancer 1.6% 4.0% 1.5% 3.9% 1.9% 4.3% average number of new cases per year 170HEAD AND NECK CANCER 105

Paxton, Anthony T.

69

A customized head and neck support system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To describe a customized head and neck immobilization system for patients receiving radiotherapy including a head support that conforms to the posterior contour of the head and neck.Methods: The system includes a customized headrest to support the posterior head and neck. This is fixed to a thermoplastic face mask that molds to the anterior head\\/face contours. The shape of

Gunilla C. Bentel; Lawrence B. Marks; George W. Sherouse; David P. Spencer

1995-01-01

70

Head and Neck Steering Committee  

Cancer.gov

The NCI Head and Neck Steering Committee (HNSC) was established in 2007. The HNSC is currently composed of the Steering Committee and three task forces. Members of HNSC include committee co-chairs, representatives from the Cooperative Groups, Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPOREs), community oncologists, biostatisticians, pathologists, patient advocates, and NCI staff.

71

A historical prospective cohort study of carotid artery stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine carotid artery stenosis incidence after radiotherapy for head-and-neck neoplasms. Methods and Materials: This historical prospective cohort study comprised 44 head-and-neck cancer survivors who received unilateral neck radiotherapy between 1974 and 1999. They underwent bilateral carotid duplex ultrasonography to detect carotid artery stenosis. Results: The incidence of significant carotid stenosis (8 of 44 [18%]) in the irradiated neck was higher than that in the contralateral unirradiated neck (3 of 44 [7%]), although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.13). The rate of significant carotid stenosis events increased as the time after radiotherapy increased. The risk of ipsilateral carotid artery stenosis was higher in patients who had undergone a neck dissection vs. those who had not. Patients with significant ipsilateral stenosis also tended to be older than those without significant stenosis. No other patient or treatment variables correlated with risk of carotid artery stenosis. Conclusions: For long-term survivors after neck dissection and irradiation, especially those who are symptomatic, ultrasonographic carotid artery screening should be considered.

Brown, Paul D. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)]. E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Foote, Robert L. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); McLaughlin, Mark P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Halyard, Michele Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Ballman, Karla V. [Division of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Collie, A. Craig [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Miller, Robert C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Flemming, Kelly D. [Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Hallett, John W. [Division of Vascular Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

2005-12-01

72

Complications/sequelae of neck rejuvenation.  

PubMed

Neck lift surgery performed in isolation or in conjunction with a facelift provides a more youthful cervicomental angle. Complications related to neck lift surgery vary from contour irregularities that may improve with time or conservative measures,to contour irregularities that persist and may benefit from delayed surgical intervention, to expanding hematomas that require immediate surgical intervention. This article reviews complications of neck lift surgery and their etiologies, methods to minimize the incidence of these complications, and management. PMID:24745390

Batniji, Rami K

2014-05-01

73

Objective classification of different head and neck positions and their influence on the radiographic pharyngeal diameter in sport horses  

PubMed Central

Background Various head and neck positions in sport horses are significant as they can interfere with upper airway flow mechanics during exercise. Until now, research has focused on subjectively described head and neck positions. The objective of this study was to develop an objective, reproducible method for quantifying head and neck positions accurately. Results Determining the angle between the ridge of the nose and the horizontal plane (ground angle) together with the angle between the ridge of nose and the line connecting the neck and the withers (withers angle) has provided values that allow precise identification of three preselected head and neck positions for performing sport horses. The pharyngeal diameter, determined on lateral radiographs of 35 horses, differed significantly between the established flexed position and the remaining two head and neck positions (extended and neutral). There was a significant correlation between the pharyngeal diameter and the ground angle (Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient ?0.769, p?correlation coefficient 0.774, p?neck positions in sport horses. The ground angle and the withers angle show significant correlation with the measured pharyngeal diameter in resting horses. Hence, these angles provide an appropriate method for assessing the degree of head and neck flexion. Further research is required to examine the influence of increasing head and neck flexion and the related pharyngeal diameter on upper airway function in exercising horses. PMID:24886564

2014-01-01

74

Sensory control of the initiation of hatching in chicks: effects of a local anesthetic injected into the neck.  

PubMed

Previous work shows that folding a posthatching chick into the hatching position results in the re-initiation of hatching. Furthermore, bending the neck to the right or left serves as a selective signal for turning on hatching behavior. The present study addresses the issue of whether sensory receptors located in the neck provide this signal. Three groups of chicks were folded into the hatching position and placed in glass eggs. In the experimental group, sensory input from the neck was eliminated with a local anesthetic, lidocaine. In these chicks, hatching was initiated only after a long latency, correlated with the time at which the anesthetic wore off. In the two control groups, in which saline was injected into the neck or lidocaine was injected into the thigh, the latency was much shorter. Therefore sensory receptors located in the neck appear to provide input that serves as a selective signal for initiating hatching. PMID:3678614

Bekoff, A; Sabichi, A L

1987-09-01

75

Plasmacytomas of the head and neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plasmacytomas are rare tumors that often appear in the head and neck region and are characterized by a monoclonal proliferation of plasma cells. On both clinical presentation and pathologic examination these tumors may be confused with more common tumors of the head and neck. The purpose of this article is to review our experience with these rare neoplasms, with emphasis

FRANK R. MILLER; PIERRE LAVERTU; JOHN R. WANAMAKER; JOSEPH BONAFEDE; BENJAMIN G. WOOD

1998-01-01

76

Isolated management of the aging neck.  

PubMed

The contour of the neck is a very important determinant of facial aesthetics. Precise knowledge of neck anatomy is essential for adequate planning and execution of this procedure. There are three anatomic and surgical planes involved in the management of the aging neck; the superficial plane (subcutaneous fat), the intermediate plane (platysma muscles and the fat between the two muscles), and the deep plane (subplatysmal fat, the anterior belly of the digastric muscles, and the submandibular glands). These planes need to be thoroughly evaluated in the preoperative assessment and dealt with according to each patient's needs. Even though this article focuses on isolated management of the aging neck, careful evaluation of the neck and its relationship to the lower third of the face is fundamental. If there is significant jowling and descent of the neck-face interface, an isolated neck-lift procedure will not address that problem and will lead to a suboptimal result. In these patients, a face and neck lift is a more appropriate operation. PMID:21037862

Mejia, Juan D; Nahai, Farzad R; Nahai, Foad; Momoh, Adeyiza O

2009-11-01

77

Use of Gold in Head and Neck  

E-print Network

Use of Gold in Head and Neck Cancer Treatments Q & A with Dr. Frank McCormick UCSF Helen Diller in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at UCSF, is working on several techniques to use gold nanoparticles to improve the identification of cancer. "Gold is very interesting because it has extraordinary

Walter, Peter

78

Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

Cancer.gov

Most head and neck cancers begin in the moist, mucus membranes lining the inside of the mouth, nose and throat. These membranes are made up of squamous cells and the head and neck cancers that grow in these cells are called squamous cell carcinomas.

79

Chronic neck pain and masticatory dysfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic nonspecific neck pain is a common problem in rheumatology and may resist conventional treatment. Pathophysiological links exist between the cervical spine and masticatory system. Occlusal disorders may cause neck pain and may respond to dental treatment. The estimated prevalence of occlusal disorders is about 45%, with half the cases being due to functional factors. Minor repeated masticatory dysfunction (MD)

Jean-François Catanzariti; Thierry Debuse; Bernard Duquesnoy

2005-01-01

80

Postoperative hypertension following radical neck dissection  

PubMed Central

Baroreflex failure results in wide excursions of blood pressure and heart rate. We report two cases that developed severe postoperative hypertension after radical neck dissection. Carotid sinus denervation during neck dissection may be the cause of the reflex hypertension once general anesthesia-induced vasodilatation has ended. PMID:22345960

Prakash, Smita; Rapsang, Amy; Kumar, Suresh S; Bhatia, Parminder S; Gogia, Anoop R

2012-01-01

81

Inter-Vertebral Flexibility of the Ostrich Neck: Implications for Estimating Sauropod Neck Flexibility  

PubMed Central

The flexibility and posture of the neck in sauropod dinosaurs has long been contentious. Improved constraints on sauropod neck function will have major implications for what we know of their foraging strategies, ecology and overall biology. Several hypotheses have been proposed, based primarily on osteological data, suggesting different degrees of neck flexibility. This study attempts to assess the effects of reconstructed soft tissues on sauropod neck flexibility through systematic removal of muscle groups and measures of flexibility of the neck in a living analogue, the ostrich (Struthio camelus). The possible effect of cartilage on flexibility is also examined, as this was previously overlooked in osteological estimates of sauropod neck function. These comparisons show that soft tissues are likely to have limited the flexibility of the neck beyond the limits suggested by osteology alone. In addition, the inferred presence of cartilage, and varying the inter-vertebral spacing within the synovial capsule, also affect neck flexibility. One hypothesis proposed that flexibility is constrained by requiring a minimum overlap between successive zygapophyses equivalent to 50% of zygapophyseal articular surface length (ONP50). This assumption is tested by comparing the maximum flexibility of the articulated cervical column in ONP50 and the flexibility of the complete neck with all tissues intact. It is found that this model does not adequately convey the pattern of flexibility in the ostrich neck, suggesting that the ONP50 model may not be useful in determining neck function if considered in isolation from myological and other soft tissue data. PMID:23967284

Cobley, Matthew J.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Barrett, Paul M.

2013-01-01

82

ES2 neck injury assessment reference values for lateral loading in side facing seats.  

PubMed

Injury assessment reference values (IARV) predicting neck injuries are currently not available for side facing seated aircraft passengers in crash conditions. The aircraft impact scenario results in inertial loading of the head and neck, a condition known to be inherently different from common automotive side impact conditions as crash pulse and seating configurations are different. The objective of this study is to develop these IARV for the European Side Impact Dummy-2 (ES-2) previously selected by the US-FAA as the most suitable ATD for evaluating side facing aircraft seats. The development of the IARV is an extended analysis of previously published PMHS neck loads by identifying the most likely injury scenarios, comparing head-neck kinematics and neck loads of the ES2 versus PMHS, and development of injury risk curves for the ES2. The ES2 showed a similar kinematic response as the PMHS, particularly during the loading phase. The ES2 exhibited a stiffer response than the PMHS in the thoracic region, resulting in a faster rebound and smaller excursions in the vertical direction. Neck loads were consistent with results from previous authors and served as the basis for the ES2 neck injury risk curve developed here. Regression analysis of the previously published PMHS neck loads indicated that the tension force at the occipital condyles was the only neck load component with a significant correlation (Pearson r2 = 0.9158) to AIS3+ classified injuries. Tension force in the ES2 upper neck showed a weaker but still significant correlation with injury severity (r2 = 0.72) and is proposed to be used as an IARV with a tolerance of 2094 N for 50% AIS3+ risk. Although the prime focus of this study is on loading conditions typical in an aircraft crash environment, it is expected that the proposed IARV's can be used as an extension of typical automotive conditions, particularly for military vehicles and public transport applications where side facing upright seating configurations are more common. PMID:20058563

Philippens, M; Wismans, J; Forbes, P A; Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A; Soltis, S J

2009-11-01

83

Cancers of the head and neck  

SciTech Connect

The information in this text demonstrates the marked progress being made in the treatment of head and neck cancer, diseases which are among the most morbid in all medicine. New and promising surgical and radiotherapeutic techniques are discussed, including brachytherapy, hyperthermia, laser therapy and nuclear magnetic resonance. The timing of chemotherapy and the future rate of biologic modifiers and immune therapy are included. Innovative and creative surgical techniques geared towards improving the quality of life for head and neck patients are described. A final section of the volume covers other management problems including rhabdomyosarcoma and lymphomas of extranodal head and neck sites.

Jacobs, C. (Ed.)

1987-01-01

84

Microbiologic investigations for head and neck infections.  

PubMed

A variety of methods, including direct examination of stained smears, antigen detection, routine and special cultures, and histopathologic evaluation are available for investigation of head and neck infections. Newer rapid molecular techniques with increased sensitivity and specificity are becoming available at many centers. Evaluation of specific causes in head and neck infections is complicated by the tendency for polymicrobial infections, difficulty in obtaining adequate specimens, and the presence of a diverse endogenous microflora at various mucosal sites that also can include true pathogens. These aspects of laboratory investigation for head and neck infections are reviewed in this article. PMID:17561072

Roscoe, Diane L; Hoang, Linda

2007-06-01

85

Pathology Case Study: Anterior Cervical Neck Mass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a head & neck pathology case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology in which a 55-year-old male has an increasing neck mass with a choking feeling. Visitors are given both the microscopic and gross descriptions, including images, and are given the opportunity to diagnose the patient. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in head and neck pathology.

Schubert, Eric

2007-08-31

86

Supraomohyoid neck dissection in cancer of the oral cavity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: In oral cavity cancer, supraomohyoid neck dissection (SOHND) is becoming more popular for patients with N0 and N1 disease in the neck. The aim of this study was to assess the value of this surgical procedure.Methods: The study included 237 previously untreated patients with oral cavity cancer. The neck treatment consisted of SOHND or functional neck dissection (FND). One

Claire Majoufre; Alain Faucher; Carine Laroche; Camille De Bonfils; François Siberchicot; Jean-Louis Renaud-Salis; Jacques Pinsolle

1999-01-01

87

Evaluation of document location during computer use in terms of neck muscle activity and neck movement.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the impact on neck movement and muscle activity of placing documents in three commonly used locations: in-line, flat desktop left of the keyboard and laterally placed level with the computer screen. Neck excursion during three standard head movements between the computer monitor and each document location and neck extensor and upper trapezius muscle activity during a 5 min typing task for each of the document locations was measured in 20 healthy participants. Results indicated that muscle activity and neck flexion were least when documents were placed laterally suggesting it may be the optimal location. The desktop option produced both the greatest neck movement and muscle activity in all muscle groups. The in-line document location required significantly more neck flexion but less lateral flexion and rotation than the laterally placed document. Evaluation of other holders is needed to guide decision making for this commonly used office equipment. PMID:24182889

Goostrey, Sonya; Treleaven, Julia; Johnston, Venerina

2014-05-01

88

Elective modified neck dissection for treatment of the clinically negative (N0) neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Radical neck dissection was the dominant surgical procedure for treatment of metastatic head and neck cancer in the cervical\\u000a lymph nodes for much of the 20th century. Proponents of radical neck dissection, such as George Crile, Sr. [1] and Hayes Martin [2], maintained the Halsteadian principle that oncologically sound surgical management of metastasis requires en bloc resection\\u000a of lymph nodes

David L. Callender; Randal S. Weber

89

Treatment for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer  

Cancer.gov

In this clinical trial, researchers seek to determine if giving concurrent radiation therapy and chemotherapy to patients with inoperable, recurrent head and neck cancer who were treated initially with radiation therapy will improve survival rates for these patients.

90

Head and neck mucosal melanoma: a review.  

PubMed

Head and neck mucosal melanoma (MM) is an aggressive and rare neoplasm of melanocytic origin. To date, few retrospective series and case reports have been reported on MM. This article reviews the current evidence on head and neck MM and the molecular pathways that mediate the pathogenesis of this disease. Head and neck MM accounts for 0.7%-3.8% of all melanomas and involve (in decreasing order of frequency) the sinonasal cavity, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, and upper esophagus. Although many studies have examined MM of the head and neck and the underlying molecular pathways, individual genetic and molecular alterations were less investigated. Further studies are needed to complement existing data and to increase our understanding of melanocytes tumorigenesis. PMID:24423929

Lourenço, Silvia V; Fernandes, Juliana D; Hsieh, Ricardo; Coutinho-Camillo, Claudia M; Bologna, Sheyla; Sangueza, Martin; Nico, Marcello M S

2014-07-01

91

Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer  

Cancer.gov

This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

92

Rehabilitation of head and neck cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Patients who are treated for head and neck cancer can present with some of the most significant posttreatment morbidity of\\u000a any cancer group [1–29]. Their eating, talking, respiration, and cosmesis can all be significantly altered by their treatment.\\u000a All these effects may be quite visible and may interfere with socialization and employment. Therefore, rehabilitation for\\u000a head and neck cancer patients

Jeri A. Logemann

93

Acupuncture for patients with chronic neck pain.  

PubMed

Acupuncture is widely used by patients with neck pain, but there is a lack of information about its effectiveness in routine medical care. The aim was to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture in addition to routine care in patients with chronic neck pain compared to treatment with routine care alone. We performed a randomized controlled multicentre trial plus non-randomized cohort in general practices in Germany. 14,161 patients with chronic neck pain (duration >6 months). Patients were randomly allocated to an acupuncture group or a control group receiving no acupuncture. Patients in the acupuncture group received up to 15 acupuncture sessions over three months. Patients who did not consent to randomization received acupuncture treatment. All subjects were allowed to receive usual medical care in addition to study treatment. Neck pain and disability (NPAD Scale by Wheeler) after three months. Of 14,161 patients (mean age 50.9+/-13.1 years, 68% female) 1880 were randomized to acupuncture and 1886 to control, and 10,395 included into the non-randomized acupuncture group. At three months, neck pain and disability improved by 16.2 (SE: 0.4) to 38.3 (SE: 0.4); and by 3.9 (SE: 0.4) to 50.5 (SE: 0.4), difference 12.3 (p<0.001) in the acupuncture and control group, respectively. Treatment success was essentially maintained through six months. Non-randomized patients had more severe symptoms at baseline and showed higher neck pain and disability improvement compared to randomized patients. Treatment with acupuncture added to routine care in patients with chronic neck pain was associated with improvements in neck pain and disability compared to treatment with routine care alone. PMID:16781068

Witt, Claudia M; Jena, Susanne; Brinkhaus, Benno; Liecker, Bodo; Wegscheider, Karl; Willich, Stefan N

2006-11-01

94

Neck and back pain in the elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  Surgical intervention for neck and back pain in elderly patients without significant comorbidities can significantly improve\\u000a a patient’s symptoms and quality of life when more conservative therapies fail. Current spine literature strongly supports\\u000a the paradigm of treating elderly patients with stable, chronic neck or back pain with conservative therapies first in order\\u000a to optimize the risks and benefits of

Steven N. Kalkanis; Lawrence Borges

2001-01-01

95

Head and Neck Cancer: An Overview  

PubMed Central

Ablative surgery for malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract is the most common reason why the reconstructive surgeon is called upon to reconstruct adult head and neck defects. An understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of head and neck malignancy is vital to the reconstructive surgeon so that restoration of both form and function can be achieved. It is important to understand the behavior of cancers of each head and neck subsite, as staging and ultimately the treatment of tumors from each subsite is different. Historically, the standard treatment of head and neck cancer was surgery and/or primary radiation therapy with surgical salvage for failure. Beginning in the 1980s, advances in chemotherapy and concurrent delivery with radiation offered new options to standard surgical therapy. Over the past two decades, the concept of organ preservation using chemotherapy together with radiation therapy has been definitively established. Yet, even with the strides made over these two decades with chemoradiation, surgical treatment of head and neck cancer and reconstruction thereof will be an important treatment option for the foreseeable future. Therefore, the relationship between the extirpative and reconstructive surgeon is vital, and a clear understanding of the biology and behavior of head and neck malignancy is crucial to successful patient outcomes. PMID:22550431

Stepnick, David; Gilpin, David

2010-01-01

96

Chronic neck pain and masticatory dysfunction.  

PubMed

Chronic nonspecific neck pain is a common problem in rheumatology and may resist conventional treatment. Pathophysiological links exist between the cervical spine and masticatory system. Occlusal disorders may cause neck pain and may respond to dental treatment. The estimated prevalence of occlusal disorders is about 45%, with half the cases being due to functional factors. Minor repeated masticatory dysfunction (MD) with craniocervical asymmetry is the most common clinical picture. The pain is usually located in the suboccipital region and refractory to conventional treatment. The time pattern may be suggestive, with nocturnal arousals or triggering by temporomandibular movements. MD should be strongly suspected in patients with at least two of the following: history of treated or untreated MD, unilateral temporomandibular joint pain and clicking, lateral deviation during mouth opening, and limitation of mouth opening (less than three fingerbreadths). Rheumatologists should consider MD among causes of neck pain, most notably in patients with abnormal craniocervical posture, signs linking the neck pain to mastication, and clinical manifestations of MD. Evidence suggesting that MD may cause neck pain has been published. However, studies are needed to determine whether treatment of MD can relieve neck pain. PMID:16226475

Catanzariti, Jean-François; Debuse, Thierry; Duquesnoy, Bernard

2005-12-01

97

Neck strength: a protective factor reducing risk for concussion in high school sports.  

PubMed

As the number of high school students participating in athletics continues to increase, so will the number of sports-related concussions unless effective concussion prevention programs are developed. We sought to develop and validate a cost-effective tool to measure neck strength in a high school setting, conduct a feasibility study to determine if the developed tool could be reliably applied by certified athletic trainers (ATs) in a high school setting, and conduct a pilot study to determine if anthropometric measurements captured by ATs can predict concussion risk. In the study's first phase, 16 adult subjects underwent repeated neck strength testing by a group of five ATs to validate the developed hand-held tension scale, a cost effective alternative to a hand-held dynamometer. In the second phase, during the 2010 and 2011 academic years, ATs from 51 high schools in 25 states captured pre-season anthropometric measurements for 6,704 high school athletes in boys' and girls' soccer, basketball, and lacrosse, as well as reported concussion incidence and athletic exposure data. We found high correlations between neck strength measurements taken with the developed tool and a hand-held dynamometer and the measurements taken by five ATs. Smaller mean neck circumference, smaller mean neck to head circumference ratio, and weaker mean overall neck strength were significantly associated with concussion. Overall neck strength (p < 0.001), gender (p < 0.001), and sport (p = 0.007) were significant predictors of concussions in unadjusted models. After adjusting for gender and sport, overall neck strength remained a significant predictor of concussion (p = 0.004). For every one pound increase in neck strength, odds of concussion decreased by 5 % (OR = 0.95, 95 % CI 0.92-0.98). We conclude that identifying differences in overall neck strength may be useful in developing a screening tool to determine which high school athletes are at higher risk of concussion. Once identified, these athletes could be targeted for concussion prevention programs. PMID:24930131

Collins, Christy L; Fletcher, Erica N; Fields, Sarah K; Kluchurosky, Lisa; Rohrkemper, Mary Kay; Comstock, R Dawn; Cantu, Robert C

2014-10-01

98

Factors associated with smoking and alcohol consumption following treatment for head and neck cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study aim was to investigate the correlates of smoking and alcohol drinking in post-therapeutic head and neck (H&N) cancer patients. A cross-sectional design was used with a sample of 191 patients. Data were collected by interview and chart review. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the correlates of dependent variables. Higher education, living with one’s partner, later

P. J Allison

2001-01-01

99

Comparison of electromyographic activity and range of neck motion in violin students with and without neck pain during playing.  

PubMed

Neck pain is common in violin students during a musical performance. The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in superficial neck muscles with neck motion when playing the violin as well as neck range of motion (ROM) at rest, between violin students with and without neck pain. Nine violin students with neck pain and nine age- and gender-matched subjects without neck pain were recruited. Muscle activity of the bilateral upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and superficial cervical extensor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Kinematic data on neck motion while playing and active neck ROM were also measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Independent t-tests were used to compare EMG activity with kinematic data between groups. These analyses revealed that while playing, both the angle of left lateral bending and leftward rotation of the cervical spine were significantly greater in the neck pain group than among those without neck pain. Similarly, EMG activity of the left upper trapezius, both cervical extensors, and both sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly greater in the neck pain group. The active ROM of left axial rotation was significantly lower in the neck pain group. These results suggest that an asymmetric playing posture and the associated increased muscle activity as well as decreased neck axial rotation may contribute to neck pain in violin students. PMID:23247874

Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Ha, Sung-min; Kim, Su-jung; Choi, Hyun-jung; Weon, Jong-hyuck

2012-12-01

100

The relationship between cervical flexor endurance, cervical extensor endurance, VAS, and disability in subjects with neck pain  

PubMed Central

Background Several tests have been suggested to assess the isometric endurance of the cervical flexor (NFME) and extensors (NEE) muscles. This study proposes to determine whether neck flexors endurance is related to extensor endurance, and whether cervical muscle endurance is related to disability, pain amount and pain stage in subjects with neck pain. Methods Thirty subjects (18 women, 12 men, mean?±?SD age: 43?±?12 years) complaining of neck pain filled out the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Neck Pain and Disability Scale-Italian version (NPDS-I). They also completed the timed endurance tests for the cervical muscles. Results The mean endurance was 246.7?±?150 seconds for the NEE test, and 44.9?±?25.3 seconds for the NMFE test. A significant correlation was found between the results of these two tests (r?=?0.52, p?=?0.003). A positive relationship was also found between VAS and NPDS-I (r?=?0.549, p?=?0.002). The endurance rates were similar for acute/subacute and chronic subjects, whereas males demonstrated significantly higher values compared to females in NFME test. Conclusions These findings suggest that neck flexors and extensors endurance are correlated and that the cervical endurance is not significantly altered by the duration of symptoms in subjects with neck pain. PMID:24581272

2014-01-01

101

Neck Rotation and Neck Mimic Docking in the Noncatalytic Kar3-associated Protein Vik1*  

PubMed Central

It is widely accepted that movement of kinesin motor proteins is accomplished by coupling ATP binding, hydrolysis, and product release to conformational changes in the microtubule-binding and force-generating elements of their motor domain. Therefore, understanding how the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Cik1 and Vik1 are able to function as direct participants in movement of Kar3Cik1 and Kar3Vik1 kinesin complexes presents an interesting challenge given that their motor homology domain (MHD) cannot bind ATP. Our crystal structures of the Vik1 ortholog from Candida glabrata may provide insight into this mechanism by showing that its neck and neck mimic-like element can adopt several different conformations reminiscent of those observed in catalytic kinesins. We found that when the neck is ?-helical and interacting with the MHD core, the C terminus of CgVik1 docks onto the central ?-sheet similarly to the ATP-bound form of Ncd. Alternatively, when neck-core interactions are broken, the C terminus is disordered. Mutations designed to impair neck rotation, or some of the neck-MHD interactions, decreased microtubule gliding velocity and steady state ATPase rate of CgKar3Vik1 complexes significantly. These results strongly suggest that neck rotation and neck mimic docking in Vik1 and Cik1 may be a structural mechanism for communication with Kar3. PMID:23043140

Duan, Da; Jia, Zhimeng; Joshi, Monika; Brunton, Jacqueline; Chan, Michelle; Drew, Doran; Davis, Darlene; Allingham, John S.

2012-01-01

102

Neck Rejuvenation with Fractional CO2 Laser  

PubMed Central

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of 10,600nm fractional CO2 laser for neck aging at one month and one year after treatment. Design/Setting/Participants/Measurement: Twenty patients underwent 10,600nm fractional CO2 laser treatment over the entire neck. Clinical features of the patients were classified according to Baker classification. The degrees of skin laxity, jowling, fat deposition, and horizontal neck lines were evaluated using a 9-point scale, prior to treatment at one month and one year after the treatment. The patients were independently assessed by the authors at two different times in a blinded fashion. Results: Skin laxity, jowling, fat deposition, and horizontal neck lines scores were significantly lower than the baseline values at one month and one year. One-year follow-up values of the same parameters were still significantly lower than the baseline. No persistent complication developed after treatment. Conclusion: The results of this study confirm that fractional CO2 neck rejuvenation is an effective treatment option with long-term efficacy for patients who mainly have skin laxity and jowling together with skin surface pigmentation. PMID:25161757

Oram, Yasemin

2014-01-01

103

RhoC Expression and Head and Neck Cancer Metastasis  

PubMed Central

RhoC protein, a known marker of metastases in aggressive breast cancers and melanoma, has also been found to be over-expressed in certain head and neck cancers, thus we investigated the correlation between RhoC expression and the metastatic behavior of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Selective inhibition of RhoC expression was achieved using lentiviral small hairpin RNA (shRNA) transduced and tracked with green fluorescent protein (GFP) to achieve 70-80% RhoC inhibition. Fluorescence microscopy of the RhoC knockdown stable clones showed strong green fluorescence in the majority of cells, signifying a high efficiency of transduction. Importantly, qRT-PCR showed no significant decrease in the mRNA expression levels of other members of the Ras superfamily. Cell motility and invasion were markedly diminished in RhoC depleted cell lines as compared to control transduced lines. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of lung tissue obtained from SCID mice which had been implanted with RhoC knockdown cells showed marked decrease in lung metastasis and inflammation of the blood vessels. The cultured lung tissue showed a significant decrease in cell growth in mice implanted with RhoC depleted cell lines as compared to shRNA scrambled sequence control lines. Microscopic studies of CD31 expression revealed substantial quantitative and qualitative differences in the primary tumor microvessel density as compared to parental and shRNA-scrambled controls. This study is the first of its kind to establish the involvement of RhoC specifically in head and neck metastasis. These findings suggest that RhoC warrants further investigation to delineate its robustness as a novel potentially therapeutic target. PMID:19861405

Islam, Mozaffarul; Lin, Giant; Brenner, John C.; Pan, Quintin; Merajver, Sofia D.; Hou, Yanjun; Kumar, Pawan; Teknos, Theodoros N.

2010-01-01

104

Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer  

PubMed Central

Treatment for patients with head and neck cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach. Radiotherapy is employed as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant to surgery. Each specific subsite dictates the appropriate radiotherapy techniques, fields, dose, and fractionation scheme. Quality of life is also an important issue in the management of head and neck cancer. The radiation-related complications have a tremendous impact on the quality of life. Modern radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy, can offer precise radiation delivery and reduce the dose to the surrounding normal tissues without compromise of target coverage. In the future, efforts should be made in the exploration of novel strategies to improve treatment outcome in patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:22550433

Yeh, Shyh-An

2010-01-01

105

Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Background: This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. Methods: Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox's proportional hazard model. Results: Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients, of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p < 0.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. Conclusions: With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge.

Thariat, Juliette [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology/IBDC CNRS UMR, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice, Cedex 2 (France); Ang, K. Kian; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ahamad, Anesa [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); University of the West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago); Williams, Michelle D. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Myers, Jeffrey N. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); El-Naggar, Adel K. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ginsberg, Lawrence E. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medicine, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Morrison, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S., E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-03-01

106

Radiation Pneumonitis after Radiotherapy of Neck Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Radiotherapy is still one of the effective means for treatment of malignant tumors up to now. Particularly, it is an indispensable effective measure for treatment of some lymphoma patients. In routine work, radiation pneumonitis (RP) is the most significant complication of acute treatment-related toxicities in lung cancer; however, serious radioactive pneumonia is rare for the radiotherapy of neck lymphoma because the volume of the lungs affected by radiation dose was very small. We report a lymphoma case, where the patient had undergone radiotherapy for the bilateral neck and bilateral supraclavicular/infraclavicular area. Following completion of radiotherapy, the patient developed severe radiation pneumonitis.

Wei, Min; Cai, Jun; Tong, Tao; Yu, Shihua; Yang, Yonghua; Zhang, Weijia; Yang, Jiyuan

2014-01-01

107

49 CFR 572.163 - Neck assembly and test procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.163 Neck assembly and test procedure. The neck assembly is...

2011-10-01

108

Comfort effects of a new car headrest with neck support.  

PubMed

This paper describes the design of a neck-/headrest to increase car comfort. Two studies were undertaken to create a new comfortable headrest with neck support. In experiment one, neck- and headrest data were gathered using 35 test subjects. The pressure distribution, stiffness of the foam material and position of the head and neck support were determined. In experiment two a full adjustable final headrest with adjustable neck support was constructed and tested with 12 subjects using a new adjustable headrest under virtual reality driving conditions. Experiment two showed that the headrest with the new/adjustable neck support was favoured by the majority of the subjects. 83% were satisfied with the stiffness of the material. 92% were satisfied with the size of the neck- and headrest. All subjects mentioned that the neck support is a comfort benefit in calm traffic conditions or on the motorway. PMID:21944482

Franz, M; Durt, A; Zenk, R; Desmet, P M A

2012-03-01

109

Neck circumference as a new anthropometric indicator for prediction of insulin resistance and components of metabolic syndrome in adolescents: Brazilian Metabolic Syndrome Study  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation between neck circumference and insulin resistance and components of metabolic syndrome in adolescents with different adiposity levels and pubertal stages, as well as to determine the usefulness of neck circumference to predict insulin resistance in adolescents. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 388 adolescents of both genders from ten to 19 years old. The adolescents underwent anthropometric and body composition assessment, including neck and waist circumferences, and biochemical evaluation. The pubertal stage was obtained by self-assessment, and the blood pressure, by auscultation. Insulin resistance was evaluated by the Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance. The correlation between two variables was evaluated by partial correlation coefficient adjusted for the percentage of body fat and pubertal stage. The performance of neck circumference to identify insulin resistance was tested by Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve. RESULTS: After the adjustment for percentage body fat and pubertal stage, neck circumference correlated with waist circumference, blood pressure, triglycerides and markers of insulin resistance in both genders. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the neck circumference is a useful tool for the detection of insulin resistance and changes in the indicators of metabolic syndrome in adolescents. The easiness of application and low cost of this measure may allow its use in Public Health services. PMID:25119754

da Silva, Cleliani de Cassia; Zambon, Mariana Porto; Vasques, Ana Carolina J.; Rodrigues, Ana Maria de B.; Camilo, Daniella Fernandes; Antonio, Maria Angela R. de G. M.; Cassani, Roberta Soares L.; Geloneze, Bruno

2014-01-01

110

Biomechanical aspects of occupational neck postures during dental work  

Microsoft Academic Search

A typical occupational risk factor for developing neck symptoms is prolonged flexion of the cervical spine. The present aim was to determine joint moments and muscle activity of the neck during forward flexion of the cervical spine to evaluate the load in the neck region. Three dimensional video (3-D) and surface electromyography (EMG) from the splenius muscles were recorded in

Lotte Finsen

1999-01-01

111

Rehabilitation of the head and neck cancer patient: Psychosocial aspects  

SciTech Connect

This book contains 42 chapters divided among six sections. Some of the chapter titles are: The Challenge of Cancer; Communicaton Needs of Head and Neck Cancer Patients; Normal Tissue Effects of the Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer; Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer; and Thyroid Cancer.

Blitzer, A.; Baredes, S.; Kutscher, A.; Seeland, I.B.; Barrett, V.W.; Mossman, K.L.

1985-01-01

112

Head and neck response of a finite element anthropomorphic test device and human body model during a simulated rotary-wing aircraft impact.  

PubMed

A finite element (FE) simulation environment has been developed to investigate aviator head and neck response during a simulated rotary-wing aircraft impact using both an FE anthropomorphic test device (ATD) and an FE human body model. The head and neck response of the ATD simulation was successfully validated against an experimental sled test. The majority of the head and neck transducer time histories received a CORrelation and analysis (CORA) rating of 0.7 or higher, indicating good overall correlation. The human body model simulation produced a more biofidelic head and neck response than the ATD experimental test and simulation, including change in neck curvature. While only the upper and lower neck loading can be measured in the ATD, the shear force, axial force, and bending moment were reported for each level of the cervical spine in the human body model using a novel technique involving cross sections. This loading distribution provides further insight into the biomechanical response of the neck during a rotary-wing aircraft impact. PMID:25085863

White, Nicholas A; Danelson, Kerry A; Gayzik, F Scott; Stitzel, Joel D

2014-11-01

113

Neck proprioceptors contribute to the modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity to the lower limbs of humans.  

PubMed

Several different strategies have now been used to demonstrate that the vestibular system can modulate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in humans and thereby contribute to the regulation of blood pressure during changes in posture. However, it remains to be determined how the brain differentiates between head-only movements that do not require changes in vasomotor tone in the lower limbs from body movements that do require vasomotor changes. We tested the hypothesis that neck movements modulate MSNA in the lower limbs of humans. MSNA was recorded in 10 supine young adult subjects, at rest, during sinusoidal stretching of neck muscles (100 cycles, 35° peak to peak at 0.37 ± 0.02 Hz) and during a ramp-and-hold (17.5° for 54 ± 9 s) static neck muscle stretch, while their heads were held fixed in space. Cross-correlation analysis revealed cyclical modulation of MSNA during sinusoidal neck muscle stretch (modulation index 45.4 ± 5.3 %), which was significantly less than the cardiac modulation of MSNA at rest (78.7 ± 4.2 %). Interestingly, cardiac modulation decreased significantly during sinusoidal neck displacement (63.0 ± 9.3 %). By contrast, there was no significant difference in MSNA activity during static ramp-and-hold displacements of the neck to the right or left compared with that with the head and neck aligned. These data suggest that dynamic, but not static, neck movements can modulate MSNA, presumably via projections of muscle spindle afferents to the vestibular nuclei, and may thus contribute to the regulation of blood pressure during orthostatic challenges. PMID:24691758

Bolton, P S; Hammam, E; Macefield, V G

2014-07-01

114

Reirradiation for Recurrent Neck Metastases of Head-and-Neck Tumors Using CT-Guided Interstitial 192 Ir HDR Brachytherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose:  To report the therapeutic results obtained with CT-guided interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT) as exclusive treatment for recurrent neck metastases of head-and-neck tumors.Patients and Methods:  Between 1995 and 1999, 49 patients with prior radiation therapy (RT) with or without surgery for primary head-and-neck tumors were treated for recurrent neck metastases located within previously irradiated volumes. All patients had fixed lymphadenopathy with a

Christos Kolotas; Nikolaos Tselis; Manon Sommerlad; Sandra Röddiger; Thomas Schnabel; Dimos Baltas; Anna Kalogera-Fountzila; George Fountzilas; Nikolaos Zamboglou

2007-01-01

115

Head and Neck Cancer: Altered Fractionation Schedules  

Microsoft Academic Search

Local control is paramount in the treatment of local- ized advanced head and neck cancer. Standard radio- therapy cures a high percentage of early tumors—more than 80% of the early laryngeal tumors—but fewer of the advanced tumors. Attempts have therefore been made to improve the therapeutic ratio by: A) hyperfractionation: reducing the dose per fraction to reduce late morbidity; the

M. I. SAUNDERS; Marie Curie

116

Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of

S. Krishnamurthy; J. E. Nör

2012-01-01

117

Economic burden of head and neck cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

This literature review presents the economics of head and neck cancer (HNC), the world's sixth most common neoplasm. HNC economics is complicated by the involvement of multiple body sites, multiple medical specialties, and multiple treatment modalities. Economic analyses of HNC published in English between 1990 and 2002 were identified from electronic data sources. Additional studies were identified manually from bibliographies

Jennifer M. Lee; Marco Turini; Marc F. Botteman; Jennifer M. Stephens; Chris L. Pashos

2004-01-01

118

Management of penetrating wounds of the neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management policies for penetrating wounds of the neck vary from mandatory surgical exploration to selective surgical exploration following extensive or minimal imaging investigation. In order to review the treatment protocol at Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel, we retrospectively studied 21 patients who were treated between the years 1984 and 1989. Thirteen had gunshot injuries and eight had stab wounds.

M. Luntz; S. Nusem; J. Kronenberg

1993-01-01

119

Head and Neck Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Head and Neck Steering Committee Roster Co-chairs Ezra Cohen, M.D.University of Chicago Chicago, IL John "Drew" Ridge, M.D., Ph.D.Fox Chase Cancer CenterPhiladelphia, PA Brian O'Sullivan, M.B.University of Toronto, Princess Margaret HospitalToronto, Ontario Members David

120

49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 3.4±0.1 m/s measured at...with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Neck Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

2011-10-01

121

49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 3.4±0.1 m/s measured at...with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Neck Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

2010-10-01

122

49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 3.4±0.1 m/s measured at...with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Neck Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

2013-10-01

123

49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 3.4±0.1 m/s measured at...with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Neck Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

2012-10-01

124

Scapular neck fracture – the influence of permanent malalignment of the glenoid neck on clinical outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

A scapular neck fracture is considered unstable if it is associated with an ipsilateral clavicular fracture or an acromioclavicular\\u000a (AC) joint dislocation. Currently, it is recommended that stabilization of a disrupted shoulder girdle must be achieved through\\u000a open reduction and internal fixation of the clavicular fracture or by reduction of the AC joint, without addressing the scapular\\u000a neck. However, if

J. Romero; P. Schai; A. B. Imhoff

2001-01-01

125

The chameleon in the neck: Nodular fasciitis mimicking malignant neck mass of unknown primary  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Difficulties with the correct diagnosis and treatment of nodular fasciitis in head and neck region has been reported in the literature. Nodular fasciitis was mistaken for sarcoma, papillary thyroid carcinoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, pleomorphic adenoma, or as a vascular lesion. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a patient with a single node in the neck with accelerated growth, which clinically appeared as a malignant epithelial tumor with unknown primary. The en bloc removal of the tumor and selective neck dissection was performed with bilateral tonsillectomy and biopsy of the tongue base. The histopathology revealed the tumor to be nodular fasciitis. No malignant cells were detected. DISCUSSION Due to very rapid growth, its rich cellularity and high mitotic activity, nodular fasciitis can be mistaken as a malignant tumor. Trauma and/or infection is advocated to be a trigger for the formation of nodular fasciitis, although the exact aetiopathogenesis still remains unknown. Our patient admitted to regularly practicing martial arts with his opponent performing a specific combat maneuver applying pressure into the neck and submental region, which might have triggered the formation of the nodular fasciitis. CONCLUSION Nodular fasciitis is a benign and often overlooked diagnosis in the head and neck region, that can be misinterpreted as a malignant tumor both clinically and histologically. A comprehensive medical history may help to avoid unnecessary radical treatment. If a malignancy cannot be confidently ruled out, the en bloc resection of the tumor with selective neck dissection may offer a safe option with low morbidity. PMID:22858790

Borumandi, Farzad; Cascarini, Luke; Mallawaarachchi, Ranjan; Sandison, Ann

2012-01-01

126

Neck dissection with cervical sensory preservation in thyroid cancer  

PubMed Central

Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Recently, controversy has focused on the management of lymph node metastases, which represent approximately 90% of disease recurrences and may require considerable time, effort, and resources to diagnose and treat. Neck dissections play an essential role in the management of head and neck cancer. A modified radical neck dissection (MND) refers to resection of the lymph nodes in levels II through V and often including the central nodes in level VI. When performing modified neck dissection, we recommend to protect more reserved cervical plexus. The purpose is to better protect patient’s neck skin feeling. PMID:25083485

Xue, Shuai; Wang, Peisong

2013-01-01

127

Signals in intra-sexual competition between ring-necked pheasant males  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many sexual ornaments are signals commonly used in both sexual selection contexts: mate choice and intra-sexual competition. Previous studies show that female choice in ring-necked pheasants,Phasianus colchicus, is influenced by features of some male ornaments. Experiments and correlational data were used in this study to investigate the role of male ornaments in male–male agonistic encounters. Some traits used by females

CONCHA MATEOS; JUAN CARRANZA

1997-01-01

128

Prediction of Difficult Laryngoscopy in Obese Patients by Ultrasound Quantification of Anterior Neck Soft Tissue1  

PubMed Central

Prediction of difficult laryngoscopy in obese patients is challenging. In 50 morbidly obese patients, we quantified the neck soft tissue from skin to anterior aspect of trachea at the vocal cords using ultrasound. Thyromental distance <6 cm, mouth opening <4 cm, limited neck mobility, Mallampati score >2, abnormal upper teeth, neck circumference >45 cm, and sleep apnoea were considered predictors of difficult laryngoscopy. Of the nine (18%) difficult laryngoscopy cases, seven had obstructive sleep apnoea history; whereas, only 2 of the 41 easy laryngoscopy patients did (P<0.001). Difficult laryngoscopy patients had larger neck circumference [50 (3.8) vs. 43.5 (2.2) cm; P<0.001] and more pre-tracheal soft tissue [28 (2.7) mm vs. 17.5 (1.8) mm; P<0.001] [mean (SD)]. Soft tissue values completely separated difficult and easy laryngoscopies. None of the other predictors correlated with difficult laryngoscopy. Thus, an abundance of pretracheal soft tissue at the level of vocal cords is a good predictor of difficult laryngoscopy in obese patients. PMID:14616599

Ezri, T.; Gewurtz, G.; Sessler, D.I.; Medalion, B.; Szmuk, P.; Hagberg, C.; Susmallian, S.

2005-01-01

129

Retrospective Study of Selective Submandibular Neck Dissection versus Radical Neck Dissection for N0 or N1 Necks in Level I Patients with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of selective submandibular neck dissection (SMND) in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with or without nodal metastasis. Patients. From a total of 384 patients with untreated OSCC who underwent radical excision, we identified 229 with clinically N0 necks and 68 with clinically N1 necks in level I. Main Outcome Measures. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year regional control and 5-year disease specific survival (DSS) were compared for SMND, radical neck dissection (RND), and modified radical neck dissection (MRND). Results. In clinically node-negative necks, the regional control rates were 85.2% with SMND and 83.3% with MRND (P = 0.89), and 5-year DSS rates were 86.5% and 87.0%, respectively, (P = 0.94). In clinically N1 necks, the regional control rates were 81.3% with SMND and 83.0% with RND (P = 0.72), and the DSS rates were 81.3% and 80.0%, respectively, (P = 0.94). Type of neck dissection was not significantly associated with regional control or DSS on either univariate or multivariate analysis using Cox's proportional hazard model. Conclusions. SMND can be effectively applied in elective and therapeutic management to patients with OSCC that are clinically assessed as N0 or N1 to level I of the neck. PMID:22690218

Yanai, Yuta; Sugiura, Tsuyoshi; Imajyo, Ikumi; Yoshihama, Naoya; Akimoto, Naonari; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Hayashi, Kohei; Fujinaga, Takahiro; Shirasuna, Kanemitsu; Takenoshita, Yasuharu; Mori, Yoshihide

2012-01-01

130

Effect of neck strength training on health-related quality of life in females with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled 1-year follow-up study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Chronic neck pain is a common condition associated not only with a decrease in neck muscle strength, but also with decrease in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). While neck strength training has been shown to be effective in improving neck muscle strength and reducing neck pain, HRQoL among patients with neck pain has been reported as an outcome in

Petri K Salo; Arja H Häkkinen; Hannu Kautiainen; Jari J Ylinen

2010-01-01

131

Embryology of the Head and Neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The skeleton of the head and neck represents a very complex set of bones whose development is both complicated and precise.\\u000a It is by now impossible to write a precise and thorough chapter to account for the tremendous amount of new data gained by\\u000a experimental embryology. So, I will focus my presentation on: (1) some elements of descriptive embryology that

Martin Catala

132

Head and neck cancer: a step forward  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Head and neck cancers have for a long time been orphan cancers for any trials of individualized treatment, at least in part\\u000a because the number of active cytotoxic drugs has been for a long time rather restricted. Histology did not influence treatment\\u000a modality and the use of particular cytotoxic drugs. Undifferentiated carcinoma of the nasopharynx was the first tumour type

S. Jelic; I. Popov; V. H. Schartinger; G. M. Sprinzl

2010-01-01

133

Significance of Circulating Tumor Cells in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck  

PubMed Central

Objectives To present and discuss a high-performance negative depletion method for the isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of patients with head and neck cancer and to determine the correlation between the presence of CTCs and early clinical outcome in these patients. Design Prospective clinical follow-up study of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) undergoing surgical intervention, who had peripheral blood examined for the presence of CTCs. Patients The study population comprised 48 patients diagnosed as having SCCHN and undergoing surgical intervention. Intervention A negative depletion process to isolate and quantify CTCs from the blood of patients with SCCHN using immunomagnetic separation was developed and validated. Immunostaining for cytokeratin was performed on the enriched samples to determine the number of CTCs extracted from each patient’s blood sample. Correlation of the presence of CTCs, tumor stage, nodal status, clinical characteristics, and outcome was made. Main Outcome Measure Disease-free survival. Results Our initial data, that have a mean follow-up of 19.0 months, suggest that patients with no detectable CTCs per milliliter of blood had a significantly higher probability of disease-free survival (P=.01). There was no correlation between the presence of CTCs with regard to age, sex, tumor site, stage, or nodal involvement. Conclusions Our enrichment technology, based on the removal of normal cells, has been used on the peripheral blood of patients with head and neck cancer for which follow-up data were collected. If no CTCs were present, a statistically significant improved disease-free survival was observed in SCCHN. A blood test with such a prognostic capability could have important implications in the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:21173379

Jatana, Kris R.; Balasubramanian, Priya; Lang, Jas C.; Yang, Liying; Jatana, Courtney A.; White, Elisabeth; Agrawal, Amit; Ozer, Enver; Schuller, David E.; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.

2013-01-01

134

Head and Neck Cancers in Developing Countries  

PubMed Central

Head and neck cancers are the most common cancers in developing countries, especially in Southeast Asia. Head and neck cancers are more common in males compared to females. This is mainly attributed to tobacco, areca nut, alcohol, etc. Oral cancers are most common amongst all head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC). HNSCC in the developing world differ from those in the Western world in terms of age, site of disease, etiology, and molecular biology. Poverty, illiteracy, advanced stage at presentation, lack of access to health care, and poor treatment infrastructure pose a major challenge in management of these cancers. The annual GDP (gross domestic product) spent on health care is very low in developing countries compared to the developed countries. Cancer treatment leads to a significant financial burden on the cancer patients and their families. Several health programs have been implemented to curb this rising burden of disease. The main aims of these health programs are to increase awareness among people regarding tobacco and to improve access to health care facilities, early diagnosis, treatment, and palliative care. PMID:24808947

Joshi, Poonam; Dutta, Sourav; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Nair, Sudhir

2014-01-01

135

Animal bites to the head and neck.  

PubMed

There is controversy regarding the timing of repair and the use of prophylactic antibiotics in patients with animal bites to the head and neck. In this paper we review our experience with such wounds, and address surgical management and the use of prophylactic antibiotic therapy. A retrospective review of the medical records of 29 patients with animal bites to the head and neck was conducted. All patients were seen and treated at a large teaching hospital in Houston, Texas over an 18-month period. Seventy-six percent of our patients were 12 years old or younger. Most came to the emergency room soon after sustaining their injuries, and their wounds were repaired primarily with favorable results. There were no cases of wound infection. Ninety percent were treated with prophylactic antibiotics. The wounds of the 10% of patients who did receive antibiotics were similar to those of the other patients and healed well without infection. Wounds resulting from animal bites to the head and neck can be repaired primarily when treated shortly after injury. Further prospective, randomized studies are recommended to evaluate the effectiveness and necessity of prophylactic antibiotic therapy in this patient population. PMID:9557412

Kountakis, S E; Chamblee, S A; Maillard, A A; Stiernberg, C M

1998-03-01

136

Bladder neck sparing in radical prostatectomy  

PubMed Central

The role of a bladder neck sparing (BNS) technique in radical prostatectomy (RP) remains controversial. The potential advantages of improved functional recovery must be weighed against oncological outcomes. We performed a literature review to evaluate the current knowledge regarding oncological and functional outcomes of BNS and bladder neck reconstruction (BNr) in RP. A systematic literature review using on-line medical databases was performed. A total of 33 papers were identified evaluating the use of BNS in open, laparoscopic and robotic-assisted RP. The majority were retrospective case series, with only one prospective, randomised, blinded study identified. The majority of papers reported no significant difference in oncological outcomes using a BNS or BNr technique, regardless of the surgical technique employed. Quoted positive surgical margin rates ranged from 6% to 32%. Early urinary continence (UC) rates were ranged from 36% to 100% at 1 month, with long-term UC rate reported at 84-100% at 12 months if the bladder neck (BN) was spared. BNS has been shown to improve early return of UC and long-term UC without compromising oncological outcomes. Anastomotic stricture rate is also lower when using a BNS technique. PMID:24235797

Smolski, Michal; Esler, Rachel C.; Turo, Rafal; Collins, Gerald N.; Oakley, Neil; Brough, Richard

2013-01-01

137

Inverted drop testing and neck injury potential.  

PubMed

Inverted drop testing of vehicles is a methodology that has long been used by the automotive industry and researchers to test roof integrity and is currently being considered by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration as a roof strength test. In 1990 a study was reported which involved 8 dolly rollover tests and 5 inverted drop tests. These studies were conducted with restrained Hybrid III instrumented Anthropometric Test Devices (ATD) in production and rollcaged vehicles to investigate the relationship between roof strength and occupant injury potential. The 5 inverted drop tests included in the study provided a methodology producing "repeatable roof impacts" exposing the ATDs to the similar impact environment as those seen in the dolly rollover tests. Authors have conducted two inverted drop test sets as part of an investigation of two real world rollover accidents. Hybrid-III ATD's were used in each test with instrumented head and necks. Both test sets confirm that reduction of roof intrusion and increased headroom can significantly enhance occupant protection. In both test pairs, the neck force of the dummy in the vehicle with less crush and more survival space was significantly lower. Reduced roof crush and dynamic preservation of the occupant survival space resulted in only minor occupant contact and minimal occupant loading, establishing a clear causal relationship between roof crush and neck injuries. PMID:12724903

Forrest, Stephen; Herbst, Brian; Meyer, Steve; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam

2003-01-01

138

Experimental Injury Biomechanics of the Pediatric Neck  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motor vehicle related crashes rank as the most common cause of spinal related injuries in the pediatric population (Platzer et al. 2007; Brown et al. 2001; Kokoska et al. 2001; Eleraky et al. 2000; Hamilton and Myles 1992a; Bonadio 1993; Babcock 1975). Pediatric spinal related trauma accounts for between 1 and 12 % of all spinal related injuries (Hamilton and Myles 1992a; Hadley et al. 1988; Aufdermaur 1974). Cervical spine trauma in children accounts for approximately 2 % of all cervical spinal injuries (Henrys et al. 1977). Approximately 1-2 % of all children admitted for traumatic injury are related to injuries to the cervical spine (Platzer et al. 2007; Brown et al. 2001; Kokoska et al. 2001; Orenstein et al. 1994; Rachesky et al. 1987). Overall, pediatric neck injury rates are significantly lower than adult rates; however, the neck injury rate in children between the ages of 11 and 15 years approaches the adult rate of 18.8 per 100,000 (McGrory et al 1993; Myers and Winkelstein 1995). For children less than 11 years of age, neck injuries are relatively rare (1.2 per 100,000), but have particularly devastating consequences (McGrory et al. 1993). The overall mortality rate amongst victims of pediatric spinal trauma is approximately 16-41 % but considerably higher for the youngest ages (Platzer et al. 2007; Brown et al. 2001; Kokoska et al. 2001; Eleraky et al. 2000; Givens et al. 1996; Orenstein et al. 1994; Hamilton and Myles 1992b).

Nightingale, Roger W.; Luck, Jason F.

139

Evolution and development of the vertebrate neck.  

PubMed

Muscles of the vertebrate neck include the cucullaris and hypobranchials. Although a functional neck first evolved in the lobe-finned fishes (Sarcopterygii) with the separation of the pectoral/shoulder girdle from the skull, the neck muscles themselves have a much earlier origin among the vertebrates. For example, lampreys possess hypobranchial muscles, and may also possess the cucullaris. Recent research in chick has established that these two muscles groups have different origins, the hypobranchial muscles having a somitic origin but the cucullaris muscle deriving from anterior lateral plate mesoderm associated with somites 1-3. Additionally, the cucullaris utilizes genetic pathways more similar to the head than the trunk musculature. Although the latter results are from experiments in the chick, cucullaris homologues occur in a variety of more basal vertebrates such as the sharks and zebrafish. Data are urgently needed from these taxa to determine whether the cucullaris in these groups also derives from lateral plate mesoderm or from the anterior somites, and whether the former or the latter represent the basal vertebrate condition. Other lateral plate mesoderm derivatives include the appendicular skeleton (fins, limbs and supporting girdles). If the cucullaris is a definitive lateral plate-derived structure it may have evolved in conjunction with the shoulder/limb skeleton in vertebrates and thereby provided a greater degree of flexibility to the heads of predatory vertebrates. PMID:22697305

Ericsson, Rolf; Knight, Robert; Johanson, Zerina

2013-01-01

140

X-pinch dynamics: Neck formation and implosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a model that describes the neck formation and implosion in an X-pinch. The process is simulated to go in two stages. The first stage is neck formation. This stage begins with an electrical explosion of the wires forming the X-pinch, and at the end of the stage, a micropinch (neck) is formed in the region where the wires are crossed. The second stage is neck implosion. The implosion is accompanied by outflow of matter from the neck region, resulting in the formation of a "hot spot". Analytical estimates obtained in the study under consideration indicate that these stages are approximately equal in duration. Having analyzed the neck implosion dynamics, we have verified a scaling which makes it possible to explain the observed dependences of the time of occurrence of an x-ray pulse on the X-pinch current and mass.

Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Artyomov, A. P.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Fedunin, A. V.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.

2014-10-01

141

Isolated head drop triggered by neck surgery following concomitant chemoradiotherapy.  

PubMed

Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is characterized by severe weakness of neck extension that occurs in isolation or association with a generalized neuromuscular disorder. Multietiologies may be responsible for DHS, including radiotherapy, which may cause a delayed form of DHS. However, DHS acutely triggered by neck surgery after chemoradiotherapy is rare. The author reports a case of acute onset of isolated DHS following selective neck dissection surgery after concomitant chemoradiotherapy for laryngeal cancer. PMID:18344717

Luo, Jin Jun

2008-03-01

142

Effect of neck pain on verticality perception: A cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Grod JP, Diakow PR. Effect of neck pain on verticality perception: a cohort study. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2002;83:412-5. Objective: To use the Rod-and-Frame Test (RFT) as a quantification of the perception of verticality in subjects with and without neck pain. Design: Cohort study comparing perception of verticality in symptomatic subjects with neck pain versus a control group. Setting: Both

Jaroslaw P. Grod; Peter R. Diakow

2002-01-01

143

Corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks compared to titanium modular necks in a simulator test.  

PubMed

This study compared the corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks with that of titanium alloy modular necks at their junction to titanium-alloy femoral stem. Tests were performed in a dry assembly and two wet assemblies, one contaminated with calf serum and the other contaminated with calf serum and bone particles. Whereas the titanium modular neck tested in the dry assembly showed no signs of corrosion, the titanium modular necks tested in both wet assemblies showed marked depositions and corrosive attacks. By contrast, the tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks showed no traces of corrosion or chemical attack in any of the three assemblies. This study confirms the protective effect of tantalum coating the taper region of cobalt-chromium modular neck components, suggesting that the use of tantalum may reduce the risk of implant failure due to corrosion. PMID:24099841

Dorn, Ulrich; Neumann, Daniel; Frank, Mario

2014-04-01

144

The association between malnutrition and psychological distress in patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer  

PubMed Central

Objective Malnutrition and psychological distress are often seen in patients with head-and-neck cancer, but little is known about the interrelationships between those two symptoms. The present study examined the relationship between malnutrition and psychological distress in patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods Using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment, 99 patients with advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer were screened for nutrition status. The patients were also screened for psychosocial distress (using the Distress Thermometer) and for psychosocial issues (using the Problem Checklist). Any relationship between malnutrition and psychosocial distress was determined by regression and correlation analysis. We also used t-tests to compare distress levels for patients with and without specific nutrition-related symptoms. Results The study group included 80 men and 19 women [mean age: 58.4 ± 10.9 years (range: 23–85 years)]. The correlation between poorer nutrition status and level of psychological distress was significant r = 0.37 (p < 0.001). Specifically, reduced food intake and symptoms were both positively associated with distress: r = 0.27 and r = 0.29 respectively, both significant at p < 0.01. After controlling for the effects of psychosocial problems and pain, nutrition status remained a significant predictor of distress, explaining 3.8% of the variance in the distress scores of the patients (p < 0.05). Conclusions Malnutrition and symptoms were strongly related to distress in patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer. Our results suggest the need for further research into the complex relationship between nutrition status and distress and into the management of both nutrition and distress in cancer care. PMID:24311956

Ma, L.; Poulin, P.; Feldstain, A.; Chasen, M.R.

2013-01-01

145

Head and neck position for direct laryngoscopy.  

PubMed

The sniffing position (SP) has traditionally been considered the optimal head position for direct laryngoscopy (DL). Its superiority over other head positions, however, has been questioned during the last decade. We reviewed the scarce literature on the subject to examine the evidence either in favor or against the routine use of the SP. A standard definition for the position should be used (e.g., 35° neck flexion and 15° head extension) to avoid confusion about what constitutes a proper SP and to compare the results from different studies. Although several theories were proposed to explain the superiority of the SP, the three axes alignment theory is still considered a valid anatomical explanation. Although head elevation is needed to achieve the desired neck flexion, the elevation height may vary from one patient to another depending on head and neck anatomy and size of the chest. In infants and small children, for example, no head elevation is needed because the size and shape of the head allow axes approximation in the head-flat position. Horizontal alignment of the external auditory meatus with the sternum, in both obese and non-obese patients, indicates, and can be used as a marker for, proper positioning. Analysis of the available literature supports the use of the SP for DL. To achieve a proper SP in obese patients, the "ramped" (or the back-up) position should be used. The SP does not guarantee adequate exposure in all patients, because many other anatomical factors control the final degree of visualization. However, it should be the starting head position for DL because it provides the best chance at adequate exposure. Attention to details during positioning and avoidance of minor technical errors are essential to achieve the proper position. DL should be a dynamic procedure and position adjustment should be instituted in case poor visualization is encountered in the SP. PMID:21596871

El-Orbany, Mohammad; Woehlck, Harvey; Salem, M Ramez

2011-07-01

146

Palliative Hypo-fractionated Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer with Fixed Neck Nodes  

PubMed Central

Background The locally advanced head and neck cancer with fixed nodes are incurable and has a short survival. This study aims to evaluate the symptom relief, disease response and acute toxicity after palliative hypo-fractionated radiotherapy. Methods Between December 2010 to June 2011, previously untreated 50 patients who had histopathologically proved of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with fixed node of stage IV, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 2-3 were offered palliative radiotherapy (20 Gy/5Fr/5 Days). Patients were evaluated at 15th and 30th day after completion of treatment for disease response (WHO), palliation of symptoms using symptomatic response grading and acute toxicities (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTOG). Results The most common presenting complaint was pain followed by dysphagia. Majority of patients (60-70%) had appreciable relief in their presenting symptom. In our study, we observed Partial Response (PR) in majority of patients (92 %); no patient had progressive or stable disease. None of the patients experienced radiation toxicities that required hospital admission. Almost all patients showed grade one and two acute skin and mucosal toxicities one month after completion of treatment. Conclusion Advanced head and neck cancer with fixed neck node should be identified for suitable palliative hypo-fractionated radiotherapy to achieve acceptable symptom relief in great proportion of patients.

Paliwal, Rajan; Kumar-Patidar, Arvind; Walke, Rahul; Hirapara, Pushpendra; Jain, Sandeep; Raj-Bardia, Megh

2012-01-01

147

What a Pain in the Neck! Good Habits to Remember to Prevent Neck Pain  

MedlinePLUS

... on the arm of a couch. On the phone a lot? Use a speakerphone or headsets -- do not cradle the phone in your neck. Exercise. Treat your body to ... Bryn Mawr Ave., Ste 200 Rosemont, Illinois 60018 phone (847) 737-6000 fax (847) 737-6001 © 2014 ...

148

The extended SMAS approach to neck rejuvenation.  

PubMed

Jowling, submental lipoptosis, and platysmal banding can affect self-image and reduce quality of life, leading one to seek facial and neck rejuvenation. With realistic expectations, a facelift can provide the desired improvement in appearance and sense of well-being. Before any intervention, a detailed history, focused examination, communication of expected outcomes with the assistance of preoperative digital imaging, and discussion of perioperative instructions are of utmost importance. Although many techniques exist, the modified deep plane extended superficial muscular aponeurotic system rhytidectomy with submentoplasty reliably delivers a significant improvement with lasting results. PMID:24745387

Perkins, Stephen W; Waters, Heather H

2014-05-01

149

Pathology Case Study: Left Neck Mass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology in which six-year-old girl has neck mass five years after a liver transplant for biliary atresia. Visitors are given both the microscopic and gross descriptions, including images, and are given the opportunity to diagnose the patient. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in pediatric pathology.

Cohen, Lance; Dickman, Paul S.; Richert, Charles A.

2007-09-07

150

Pathology Case Study: Right Neck Mass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology in which an elderly woman developed a right parotid gland tumor, and experienced regrowth after its removal. Visitors are given both the microscopic and gross descriptions, including images, and are given the opportunity to diagnose the patient. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in head and neck pathology.

Bastacky, Sheldon; Dhir, Rajiv; Mnuskin, Anna

2008-10-30

151

[Brachytherapy for head and neck cancers].  

PubMed

The main indications of brachytherapy for head and neck cancers are limited tumours of the oral cavity, the oropharynx and the nasopharynx. This technique can be exclusive, associated with external radiotherapy or postoperative. This is also a treatment for second localizations in previously irradiated areas. If low-dose rate brachytherapy is the reference, the pulse dose rate brachytherapy by control of the dose rate and optimisation of the dose distribution is the technique to be preferred. High-dose rate brachytherapy is an option. The major prognosis factors of local control and complications are the use of a leaded protection of the mandible, the intersource spacing (1.2-1.4 cm), the volume treated (30 cm(3), i.e. three loops), the safety margin (5 mm), the dose rate (0.5 Gy/h), the total dose (65 Gy in case of exclusive brachytherapy, 25 Gy in case of a combination of external beam irradiation [50 Gy] and brachytherapy in the oropharyngeal carcinomas, 35 Gy in case of a combination of external beam irradiation [40 Gy] and brachytherapy in the oral cavity carcinomas, 60 Gy in case of a second localization in previous irradiated tissues), the delay between external irradiation and brachytherapy (<20 days), the dose per fraction and the treated volume for high-dose rate brachytherapy. Brachytherapy, when possible, is the optimal method of irradiation of head and neck carcinomas with limited volume. PMID:23498590

Lapeyre, M; Coche-Dequéant, B; Moreira, J-F; Le Bourhis, J; Peiffert, D

2013-04-01

152

A Modified Dissection Method to Preserve Neck Structures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The neck is not only one of the more challenging anatomical regions to dissect but also has important application to clinical conditions, diseases, and procedures. In this study, we describe two simple modifications for dissection of the neck that (1) aid in the identification and preservation of the cutaneous branches of the cervical plexus and…

Hankin, Mark H.; Stoller, Jeremy L.

2009-01-01

153

Paragangliomas of the head and neck: diagnosis and treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paragangliomas of the head and neck (HNP) represent rare tumors of neural crest origin. They are highly vascular neoplasms that are benign in the majority of cases. The site of origin defines the name given those tumors. In the head and neck, they most commonly occur at the carotid bifurcation, where they are referred to as carotid body tumors (CBT).

C. C. Boedeker; G. J. Ridder; J. Schipper

2005-01-01

154

Neck Proprioception Shapes Body Orientation and Perception of Motion  

PubMed Central

This review article deals with some effects of neck muscle proprioception on human balance, gait trajectory, subjective straight-ahead (SSA), and self-motion perception. These effects are easily observed during neck muscle vibration, a strong stimulus for the spindle primary afferent fibers. We first remind the early findings on human balance, gait trajectory, SSA, induced by limb, and neck muscle vibration. Then, more recent findings on self-motion perception of vestibular origin are described. The use of a vestibular asymmetric yaw-rotation stimulus for emphasizing the proprioceptive modulation of motion perception from the neck is mentioned. In addition, an attempt has been made to conjointly discuss the effects of unilateral neck proprioception on motion perception, SSA, and walking trajectory. Neck vibration also induces persistent aftereffects on the SSA and on self-motion perception of vestibular origin. These perceptive effects depend on intensity, duration, side of the conditioning vibratory stimulation, and on muscle status. These effects can be maintained for hours when prolonged high-frequency vibration is superimposed on muscle contraction. Overall, this brief outline emphasizes the contribution of neck muscle inflow to the construction and fine-tuning of perception of body orientation and motion. Furthermore, it indicates that tonic neck-proprioceptive input may induce persistent influences on the subject’s mental representation of space. These plastic changes might adapt motion sensitiveness to lasting or permanent head positional or motor changes.

Pettorossi, Vito Enrico; Schieppati, Marco

2014-01-01

155

Simulation of necking using a damage coupled finite element method  

Microsoft Academic Search

Necking is a strain localization phenomenon that can cause catastrophic fracture in metal forming. Therefore, the prediction of necking is important. In the present work, an elasto-plastic constitutive equation accounting for isotropic hardening coupled with damage is implemented in the finite element code ABAQUS. A damage variable, that provides a mesoscopic description of material degradation, is used to quantify the

C. Y. Tang; J. P. Fan; T. C. Lee

2003-01-01

156

Management of common problems of the head and neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the companion article to Part 1 of the Journal of Nurse-Midwifery (JNM) series on “Primary Care for Women: Comprehensive Assessment of the Head and Neck”, the pertinent primary care management steps involved in the prevention and treatment of problems of the head and neck in women are addressed. Emphasis is placed on the diagnosis and management of the most

Linda Paine Phillips; Lorne R. Campbell; Mary K. Barger

1996-01-01

157

Neck ligament strength is decreased following whiplash trauma  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Previous clinical studies have documented successful neck pain relief in whiplash patients using nerve block and radiofrequency ablation of facet joint afferents, including capsular ligament nerves. No previous study has documented injuries to the neck ligaments as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash. The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic mechanical properties

Yasuhiro Tominaga; Anthony B Ndu; Marcus P Coe; Arnold J Valenson; Paul C Ivancic; Shigeki Ito; Wolfgang Rubin; Manohar M Panjabi

2006-01-01

158

A Rare Presentation of Pellet Injury in the Neck  

PubMed Central

Penetrating neck injuries are dangerous and deserve emergency treatment by virtue of the vital structures present underneath. There is a potential risk of unrecognized vascular injury and retained foreign bodies with their associated complications in these wounds. Therefore, an early diagnostic workup to localize the site of injury and an immediate neck exploration are important. PMID:22084752

Gupta, Bulbul; Gulati, Achal; Gupta, Divya

2011-01-01

159

Computed tomography of the infrahyoid neck. Part I: normal anatomy  

SciTech Connect

The normal gross and computed tomographic (CT) anatomy of the infrahyoid neck is reviewed. Special emphasis is given to the location of major lymph node chains. Key anatomical levels in the neck are identified, enabling the interpreter of CT scans to place any lesion accurately in space.

Reede, D.L.; Whelan, M.A.; Bergeron, R.T.

1982-11-01

160

Head and Neck Answers - MP/H Rules  

Cancer.gov

Answers and Rationale Head and Neck Case # Primary Data Item Name Preferred Answer Rationale Head/Neck 1 Is this a multiple primary? Yes/No Yes Tumors in sites with IC D-O-3 topography codes that are different at the second character are multiple

161

AN IMPROVED METHOD OF SEXING RING-NECKED PHEASANT CHICKS  

E-print Network

AN IMPROVED METHOD OF SEXING RING-NECKED PHEASANT CHICKS By EUGENE E. WOEHLER AND JOHN M. GATES. J, January 1970 Pl'. 228-231 20-W #12;AN IMPROVED METHOD OF SEXING RING·NECKED PHEASANT CHICKSl of Naturol Resources, Modison Abstract: Sex of newly hatched pheasants (Phasianus colchicm) can be easily

162

Cervical range of movement in relation to neck dimension  

PubMed Central

The authors investigated the effect of neck dimension upon cervical range of motion. Data relating to 100 healthy subjects, aged between 20 and 40 years, were recorded with respect to age, gender and range of motion in three planes. Additionally, two widely used methods of measuring neck motion, chin-sternal distance and uniplanar goniometer, were assessed against a validated measurement tool, the ‘CROM goniometer’. Using multiple linear regression analysis it was determined that sagittal flexion (P = 0.002) and lateral rotation (P < 0.0001) were most closely related to neck circumference alone whereas lateral flexion (P < 0.0001) was most closely related to a ratio of circumference and length of neck. Hence, assessing cervical range of motion as outcome variable or as a measure at posttreatment follow-up, neck circumference was shown to be one of the factors influencing total neck motion, particularly sagittal flexion and lateral tilt. Comparison of cervical range of motion assessed with a validated measurement tool, the CROM goniometer, with results of both frequently applied clinician’s instruments, the uniplanar goniometer and measurement of chin-sternal distance, showed low reliability with the latter techniques, and motion values measured with these techniques should be interpreted with caution if using them for comparison of cervical range of motion of alike groups. We demonstrated that neck dimension should be incorporated into cervical functional outcome assessment and one should be wary about recorded values for neck motion from non-validated measurement tools. PMID:19352730

Marsh, D.; Koller, Heiko; Zenenr, Juliane; Bannister, G.

2009-01-01

163

Views You Can Use Fig. 2 Transverse PET neck  

E-print Network

This 65-year-old man presented with a right neck mass and no other symptoms. A neck and chest CT with contrast (Fig.1) showed a soft tissue tumor (arrow head) posterior to the carotid artery and anterior to the jugular vein. Initial diagnostic considerations on CT were glomus vagale paraganglioma, carotid body paraganglioma and glomus jugularis paraganglioma. No other abnormalities were reported. A PET scan was obtained which showed: • Several contiguous foci of markedly increased FDG uptake in the neck, laterally to the right (Fig. 2 & 3, arrow heads) corresponding to the right neck mass described on CT (Fig. 1, arrow head), and suggestive of matted malignant lymph nodes. Intense FDG uptake (max SUV: 26.3) in the region of the epiglottis (Fig. 2 & 3, arrow) suggestive of a primary epiglottic cancer. FNA of the neck mass was positive for squamous cell carcinoma. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy revealed a small erythematous mass on the anterior surface of the epiglottis. The patient was taken to surgery. The epiglottic mass was biopsied. Bilateral neck dissection was then performed. The biopsy of the epiglottic tumor was positive for infiltrating, moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The specimen from the right neck showed multiple metastatic lymph nodes. The left neck content was free of tumor.

Incidental Lung Cancer

164

Intervertebral Neck Injury Criterion for Simulated Frontal Impacts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The Intervertebral Neck Injury Criterion (IV-NIC) is based on the hypothesis that dynamic intervertebral motion beyond physiological limits may injure soft tissues. In contrast, the Neck Injury Criterion (NIC) hypothesizes that sudden change in spinal fluid pressure may cause neural injuries. The goals of this study, using the biofidelic whole human cervical spine model with muscle force replication, were

Paul C. Ivancic; Shigeki Ito; Manohar M. Panjabi; Adam M. Pearson; Yasuhiro Tominaga; Jaw-Lin Wang; S. Elena Gimenez

2005-01-01

165

OTOLARYNGOLOGY DEPARTMENT Head and Neck Surgery, Strong Audiology & Speech Pathology  

E-print Network

Benjamin T. Crane, M.D., Ph.D. Otology / Neurotology Vertigo / Meniere's Acoustic Neuroma Cochlear Implant and Neck Surgery Clinton Woods Paul O. Dutcher, M.D. Otology / Neurotology Vertigo / Meniere's Acoustic Neuroma Cochlear Implant Clinton Woods Ronald S. Pulli, M.D. General Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery

Goldman, Steven A.

166

Achalasia Cardia: An Interesting Variation as a Large Neck Swelling  

PubMed Central

In this report we present a case of large neck swelling that turned out to be achalasia cardia, not a very common presentation of this disease. An elderly female presented with complain of progressive dysphagia, aspiration and regurgitation of food along with right sided neck swelling measuring 10x5 cm. It was associated with weight loss. X-ray chest depicted an unusually large mass in paramediastinal region parallel to right mediastinal border showing central lucencies. A CT scan of neck revealed a gross dilatation of cervical and thoracic oesophagus. Oesophagus enlargement was enormous to the extent that it could be palpated in the neck compressing airway. This presentation of large neck swelling turning out to be a huge dilatation of esophagus on CT, depicts one of the many interesting variations that this condition can present as. PMID:25177584

Qadri, Haris Manzoor; Dehadaray, Arun Y.; Kaushik, Maitri

2014-01-01

167

Role of infectious agents in the carcinogenesis of brain and head and neck cancers  

PubMed Central

This review concentrates on tumours that are anatomically localised in head and neck regions. Brain cancers and head and neck cancers together account for more than 873,000 cases annually worldwide, with an increasing incidence each year. With poor survival rates at late stages, brain and head and neck cancers represent serious conditions. Carcinogenesis is a multi-step process and the role of infectious agents in this progression has not been fully identified. A major problem with such research is that the role of many infectious agents may be underestimated due to the lack of or inconsistency in experimental data obtained globally. In the case of brain cancer, no infection has been accepted as directly oncogenic, although a number of viruses and parasites are associated with the malignancy. Our analysis of the literature showed the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in distinct types of brain tumour, namely glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and medulloblastoma. In particular, there are reports of viral protein in up to 100% of GBM specimens. Several epidemiological studies reported associations of brain cancer and toxoplasmosis seropositivity. In head and neck cancers, there is a distinct correlation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Considering that almost every undifferentiated NPC is EBV-positive, virus titer levels can be measured to screen high-risk populations. In addition there is an apparent association between human papilloma virus (HPV) and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); specifically, 26% of HNSCCs are positive for HPV. HPV type 16 was the most common type detected in HNSCCs (90%) and its dominance is even greater than that reported in cervical carcinoma. Although there are many studies showing an association of infectious agents with cancer, with various levels of involvement and either a direct or indirect causative effect, there is a scarcity of articles covering the role of infection in carcinogenesis of brain and head and neck cancers. We review recent studies on the infectious origin of these cancers and present our current understanding of carcinogenic mechanisms, thereby providing possible novel approaches to cancer treatment. PMID:23374258

2013-01-01

168

A head-neck-eye system that learns fault-tolerant saccades to 3-D targets using a self-organizing neural model.  

PubMed

This paper describes a head-neck-eye camera system that is capable of learning to saccade to 3-D targets in a self-organized fashion. The self-organized learning process is based on action perception cycles where the camera system performs micro saccades about a given head-neck-eye camera position and learns to map these micro saccades to changes in position of a 3-D target currently in view of the stereo camera. This motor babbling phase provides self-generated movement commands that activate correlated visual, spatial and motor information that are used to learn an internal coordinate transformation between vision and motor systems. The learned transform is used by resulting head-neck-eye camera system to accurately saccade to 3-D targets using many different combinations of head, neck, and eye positions. The interesting aspect of the learned transform is that it is robust to a wide variety of disturbances including reduced degrees of freedom of movement for the head, neck, one eye, or any combination of two of the three, movement of head and neck as a function of eye movements, changes in the stereo camera separation distance and changes in focal lengths of the cameras. These disturbances were not encountered during motor babbling phase. This feature points to general nature of the learned transform in its ability to control autonomous systems with redundant degrees of freedom in a very robust and fault-tolerant fashion. PMID:18775642

Srinivasa, Narayan; Grossberg, Stephen

2008-11-01

169

Effects of different head-neck positions on the larynges of ridden horses.  

PubMed

Hyperflexion, that is the strong deflection of the horse's head, poll and neck, is a prevalent training technique in equitation. Hyperflexion has come under criticism in recent years for being suspected of affecting the horses' well-being contrary to animal welfare. The goal of the present study is a comparison between the impacts of different poll-neck positions on findings in the upper respiratory tract of ridden horses. For this purpose, video recordings of the larynges of 14 horses were taken using an overground endoscope. The videos were recorded at rest and during three different riding phases: firstly, in a stretching posture, secondly, in a working position and, thirdly, in hyperflexion. A comparison between the analyses of the working position and hyperflexion phases revealed a significant reduction in the laryngeal opening area (p = 0.001) with a value of 8.2 ± 5.0%. Furthermore, other parameters of the larynx evaluated also showed a significant diminishment. These changes did not correlate with the age of the horses or their level of education, and they were independent of the individual anatomical conditions of the poll-neck region. In summary, it can be stated that hyperflexion causes a considerable compression of the larynx. PMID:24329611

Zebisch, A; May, A; Reese, S; Gehlen, H

2014-10-01

170

Dynamic tensile failure mechanics of the musculoskeletal neck using a cadaver model.  

PubMed

Although the catapult phase of pilot ejections has been well characterized in terms of human response to compressive forces, the effect of the forces on the human body during the ensuing ejection phases (including windblast and parachute opening shock) has not been thoroughly investigated. Both windblast and parachute opening shock have been shown to induce dynamic tensile forces in the human cervical spine. However, the human tolerance to such loading is not well known. Therefore, the main objective of this research project was to measure human tensile neck failure mechanics to provide data for computational modeling, anthropometric test device development, and improved tensile injury criteria. Twelve human cadaver specimens, including four females and eight males with a mean age of 50.1+/-9 years, were subjected to dynamic tensile loading through the musculoskeletal neck until failure occurred. Failure load, failure strain, and tensile stiffness were measured and correlated with injury type and location. The mean failure load for the 12 specimens was 3100+/-645 N, mean failure strain was 16.7+/-5.4%, and mean tensile stiffness was 172+/-54.5 N/mm. The majority of injuries (8) occurred in the upper cervical spine (Oc-C3), and none took place in the midcervical region (C3-C5). The results of this study assist in filling the existing void in dynamic tensile injury data and will aid in developing improved neck injury prevention strategies. PMID:19388771

Yliniemi, Eno M; Pellettiere, Joseph A; Doczy, Erica J; Nuckley, David J; Perry, Chris E; Ching, Randal P

2009-05-01

171

The Impact of Use of Dual Monitor Screens on 3D Head–Neck Posture and Activity of Neck Muscles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computers with dual monitor screens are being increasingly used at many workplaces. Altered screen layout and increased viewing space associated with dual monitor screens may affect head–neck working postures and the activity of neck muscles. However, this problem has not been investigated in the past, and standard guidelines based on empirical data are not available for setting up a computer

Ashish D. Nimbarte; Rabab T. Alabdulmohsen; Steve E. Guffey; John R. Etherton

2012-01-01

172

Is a lifetime history of neck injury in a traffic collision associated with prevalent neck pain, headache and depressive symptomatology?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study is to determine whether independent associations exist between a history of neck injury related to a motor vehicle collision and: (1) graded neck pain in the past 6 months; (2) headaches in the past 6 months and; (3) depressive symptomatology during the past week. We used data from the Saskatchewan Health and Back Pain Survey,

Pierre Côté; J. David Cassidy; Linda Carroll

2000-01-01

173

Modelling of Local Necking and Fracture in Aluminium Alloys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Non-linear Finite Element simulations are extensively used in forming and crashworthiness studies of automotive components and structures in which fracture need to be controlled. For thin-walled ductile materials, the fracture-related phenomena that must be properly represented are thinning instability, ductile fracture and through-thickness shear instability. Proper representation of the fracture process relies on the accuracy of constitutive and fracture models and their parameters that need to be calibrated through well defined experiments. The present study focuses on local necking and fracture which is of high industrial importance, and uses a phenomenological criterion for modelling fracture in aluminium alloys. As an accurate description of plastic anisotropy is important, advanced phenomenological constitutive equations based on the yield criterion YLD2000/YLD2003 are used. Uniaxial tensile tests and disc compression tests are performed for identification of the constitutive model parameters. Ductile fracture is described by the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion and an in-plane shear tests is performed to identify the fracture parameter. The reason is that in a well designed in-plane shear test no thinning instability should occur and it thus gives more direct information about the phenomenon of ductile fracture. Numerical simulations have been performed using a user-defined material model implemented in the general-purpose non-linear FE code LS-DYNA. The applicability of the model is demonstrated by correlating the predicted and experimental response in the in-plane shear tests and additional plane strain tension tests.

Achani, D.; Eriksson, M.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Lademo, O.-G.

2007-05-01

174

Role of Anterior Neck Soft Tissue Quantifications by Ultrasound in Predicting Difficult Laryngoscopy  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to determine if ultrasound (US) measurements of anterior neck soft tissue thickness at hyoid bone (DSHB), thyrohyoid membrane (DSEM), and anterior commissure (DSAC) levels can be used to predict difficult laryngoscopy. Material/Methods We included 203 patients age 20–65 years scheduled to undergo general anesthesia in this prospective observational study. Correlation analysis and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis were used to determine the roles of screening tests [interincisor gap (IIG), thyromental distance (TMD), modified Mallampati score (MMS)] and US measurements (DSHB, DSEM, DSAC) in predicting difficult laryngoscopy. Results There were 28 out of 203 patients categorized as difficult laryngoscopy. DSHB, DSEM, DSAC, and MMS were greater in the difficult laryngoscopy group (P<0.0001). There was a strong positive correlation between DSEM and DSHB (r=0.74); moderate positive correlations between DSEM and DSAC (r=0.60), DSHB and DSAC (r=0.69); small positive correlations between MMS and DSHB (r=0.32), MMS and DSEM (r=0.27), MMS and DSAC (r=0.32), all P values ?0.0001; very small positive correlation between TMD and IIG (r=0.18, P=0.0089); small negative correlation between IIG and MMS (r=?0.27, P=0.0001); and very small negative correlations between MMS and TMD (r=?0.20, P=0.004), IIG and DSAC (r=?0.18, P=0.011), IIG and DSHB (r=?0.15, P=0.034). The areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of MMS, DSHB, DSEM, and DSAC were significantly larger compared with the reference line (P<0.0001). Conclusions Anterior neck soft tissue thicknesses measured by US at hyoid bone, thyrohyoid membrane, and anterior commissure levels are independent predictors of difficult laryngoscopy. Combinations of those screening tests or risk factors with US measurements might increase the ability to predict difficult laryngoscopy. PMID:25403231

Wu, Jinhong; Dong, Jing; Ding, Yingchun; Zheng, Jijian

2014-01-01

175

Lipofibromatosis presenting as a pediatric neck mass.  

PubMed

Lipofibromatosis is a recently described, benign neoplasm that presents in the pediatric population [J.F. Fetsch, M. Miettinen, W.B. Laskin, M. Michal, F.M. Enzinger, A clinicopathologic study of 45 pediatric soft tissue tumors with an admixture of adipose tissue and fibroblastic elements, and a proposal for classification as lipofibromatosis, Am. J. Surg. Pathol. 24 (2000) 1491-1500]. It is a rare soft tissue tumor histologically distinct from other fibromatoses such as juvenile fibromatosis, fibrous hamartoma of infancy, calcifying aponeurotic fibroma, and lipoblastoma. Distinguishing histopathologic features of lipofibromatosis include abundant and disorganized adipose lobules traversed by bundles of spindled fibroblast-like cells. It most commonly presents in the extremities. We present a case involving a young girl, which we believe represents the first report of lipofibromatosis involving the neck. PMID:15533569

Herrmann, B W; Dehner, L P; Forsen, J W

2004-12-01

176

Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck  

SciTech Connect

The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

1985-02-01

177

Giant cell tumor of the talar neck.  

PubMed

We describe a patient with a giant cell tumor in the talar head and neck of the left foot who was diagnosed as having osteochondritis dissecans and treated with arthroscopic drilling in this same location 3 years earlier. Giant cell tumors can be confused with several conditions, including giant cell reparative granulomas, brown tumors, and aneurysmal bone cysts. Giant cell tumors of bone typically occur in the epiphysis of long bones, including the distal femur and proximal tibia. They are uncommonly found in the small bones of the foot or ankle, and talar involvement is rare. Despite this rarity, the radiographic appearance and clinical signs of talar lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nontraumatic conditions in the foot. PMID:17507533

Selek, Hakan; Ozer, Hamza; Turanli, Sacit; Erdem, Ozlem

2007-01-01

178

Rhabdomyosarcoma of the head and neck  

SciTech Connect

Rhabdomyosarcoma is an uncommon neoplasm that is seen in the head and neck area. Since the symptoms of rhabdomyosarcoma, such as aural discharge and nasal obstruction, mimic common disease states, the clinical diagnosis is often delayed. Case reports and a literature review are presented to emphasize the clinical and roentgenological findings in rhabdomyosarcoma. Misinterpretation of microscopic findings can delay the histological diagnosis. Cross-striations, the hallmark of rhabdomyosarcoma, are not always found, while racquet and spindle cells may be seen. Special stains and electron microscopy can assist the pathologist. The pathological findings of the different variants of rhabdomyosarcoma and a review of cases accessioned by the A.F.I.P. Otolaryngic Registry are presented. Early diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma is important because the disease, once inevitably fatal, can now be controlled and apparently cured in most cases by a combination of surgery, radiation, and multidrug chemotherapy. This therapeutic approach, its results, complications, and support measures are considered.

Feldman, B.A.

1982-04-01

179

Pathology Case Study: Neck and Back Pain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology, which describes a 28-year-old female who, after a car accident, complained of a sharp pain of the anterior and posterior base of the neck on expiration and with exertion. Visitors are given patient history, radiology results, along with gross and microscopic descriptions, including images, and are given the opportunity to diagnose the patient. A "Final Diagnosis" section provides a discussion of the findings as well as references. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in pathology.

Benjamin, Vallo; Hummel-Levine, Pascale; Zagzag, David

2009-03-16

180

Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary: Neck Dissection and Radiotherapy or Definitive Radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Background Management of head and neck carcinoma from unknown primary (HNCUP) remains controversial, with neck dissection and radiotherapy (ND+RT) or definitive RT both commonly used. We aimed to characterize HNCUP and retrospectively compare outcomes for patients treated with ND+RT versus definitive RT. Methods From 1994-2009, 41 HNCUP patients underwent either ND+RT (n=22) or definitive RT+ concurrent chemotherapy (n=19) at our institution. Treatment outcomes were compared using Kaplan-Meier methods and log-rank test. Results There were no differences between patients treated with ND+RT and definitive RT in overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), or locoregional-relapse-free survival, freedom-from-locoregional failure, or freedom-from-distant failure. Among 17 ND+RT patients for whom human papillomavirus (HPV) status could be determined, HPV(+) patients trended towards improved OS (p=0.06)and PFS (p=0.15). Conclusions Neck dissection and post-op RT resulted in similar outcome as definitive RT. The prognostic implications of HPV(+) nodes in HNCUP are similar to those in oropharyngeal primary cancers. PMID:23996575

Koukourakis, Georgios V.; Gutfeld, Orit; Prince, Mark E.; Bradford, Carol R.; Wolf, Gregory T.; McLean, Scott; Worden, Francis P.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Schipper, Matthew J.; McHugh, Jonathan B.

2014-01-01

181

[Stereotactic irradiation in head and neck cancers].  

PubMed

Stereotactic radiotherapy is increasingly used in head and neck tumours, either as a boost for dose escalation/early salvage, or in the reirradiation setting. We aimed to assess the level of evidence for each clinical setting and to discuss the different dose and frationation regimens. A search of the French and English literature was performed on PubMed until December 2013. Stereotactic reirradiation of locally recurrent squamous cell carcinomas can be performed with overall survival rates of about 12 months with good quality of life, and acceptable toxicity, based on several phase 2 trials and retrospective studies. Nasopharyngeal carcinomas may be irradiated with even better control rates. Late severe toxicities yield up to 20-30%. Patient and tumour selection criteria (limited volume) and dose constraints to the carotids (cumulative dose 110 Gy or less, to avoid the risk of potentially lethal carotid blowout) must be carefully chosen. Fractionated regimens (at least five fractions) should be preferred (30 Gy in five fractions to 36 Gy in six fractions). Methods derived from stereotactic, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may be used with conventional fractionation for larger tumours. Stereotactic irradiation may be associated with cetuximab; data with chemotherapy or other targeted therapies are still lacking. Stereotactic irradiation is also used as a boost after 46 Gy IMRT in several institutions or for early salvage (8 to 10 weeks following full dose irradiation with evidence of residual tumour) in squamous or nasopharyngeal carcinomas. Such indications should be evaluated prospectively in clinical trials. Data in salivary gland and sinonasal neoplasms are still scarce. In conclusion, stereotactic body radiation therapy has the potential as a boost or in the reirradiation setting to improve local control in head and neck tumours. Careful hypofractionation with planning caring for the dose to the main vessels is highly recommended. Prospective studies with prolonged follow-up (at least 2 years) should be encouraged. PMID:25059767

Benhaïm, C; Lapeyre, M; Thariat, J

2014-01-01

182

The Articulation of Sauropod Necks: Methodology and Mythology  

PubMed Central

Sauropods are often imagined to have held their heads high atop necks that ascended in a sweeping curve that was formed either intrinsically because of the shape of their vertebrae, or behaviorally by lifting the head, or both. Their necks are also popularly depicted in life with poses suggesting avian flexibility. The grounds for such interpretations are examined in terms of vertebral osteology, inferences about missing soft tissues, intervertebral flexibility, and behavior. Osteologically, the pronounced opisthocoely and conformal central and zygapophyseal articular surfaces strongly constrain the reconstruction of the cervical vertebral column. The sauropod cervico-dorsal vertebral column is essentially straight, in contrast to the curvature exhibited in those extant vertebrates that naturally hold their heads above rising necks. Regarding flexibility, extant vertebrates with homologous articular geometries preserve a degree of zygapophyseal overlap at the limits of deflection, a constraint that is further restricted by soft tissues. Sauropod necks, if similarly constrained, were capable of sweeping out large feeding surfaces, yet much less capable of retracting the head to explore the enclosed volume in an avian manner. Behaviorally, modern vertebrates generally assume characteristic neck postures which are close to the intrinsic curvature of the undeflected neck. With the exception of some vertebrates that can retract their heads to balance above their shoulders at rest (e.g., felids, lagomorphs, and some ratites), the undeflected neck generally predicts the default head height at rest and during locomotion. PMID:24205266

Stevens, Kent A.

2013-01-01

183

Sauropod Necks: Are They Really for Heat Loss?  

PubMed Central

Three-dimensional digital models of 16 different sauropods were used to examine the scaling relationship between metabolism and surface areas of the whole body, the neck, and the tail in an attempt to see if the necks could have functioned as radiators for the elimination of excess body heat. The sauropod taxa sample ranged in body mass from a 639 kg juvenile Camarasaurus to a 25 t adult Brachiosaurus. Metabolism was assumed to be directly proportional to body mass raised to the ¾ power, and estimates of body mass accounted for the presence of lungs and systems of air sacs in the trunk and neck. Surface areas were determined by decomposing the model surfaces into triangles and their areas being computed by vector methods. It was found that total body surface area was almost isometric with body mass, and that it showed negative allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. In contrast, neck area showed positive allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. Tail area show negative allometry with respect to metabolic rate. The many uncertainties about the biology of sauropods, and the variety of environmental conditions that different species experienced during the groups 150 million years of existence, make it difficult to be absolutely certain about the function of the neck as a radiator. However, the functional combination of the allometric increase of neck area, the systems of air sacs in the neck and trunk, the active control of blood flow between the core and surface of the body, changing skin color, and strategic orientation of the neck with respect to wind, make it plausible that the neck could have functioned as a radiator to avoid over-heating. PMID:24204747

Henderson, Donald M.

2013-01-01

184

Press-fit hemiarthroplasty for elderly with femoral neck fracture: high complication rates in operations performed by younger surgeons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Press-fit un-cemented hemiarthroplasty used in the treatment of elderly osteoporotic patients with femoral neck fracture requires\\u000a technical skills in order to avoid iatrogenic complications. This study was performed in order to correlate the complication\\u000a rate and the grade of the operating surgeon (middle-grade residents as compared to consultants). In this comparative retrospective\\u000a study, 75 consecutive patients (mean age 80.5 years) were

Adnan A. Faraj; Nina N. Drakau

2007-01-01

185

Neonatal neck mass in identical twins: an unusual presentation.  

PubMed

Identical twins were noted to have a soft asymptomatic neck mass, each on the opposite side, at 1 week of age. The mass took a dramatic course 1 week later to present as a neck abscess, yet without systemic symptoms. Ultrasonography was highly suggestive of an infected lymphatic malformation (cystic hygroma). Intravenous antibiotics and drainage (aspiration/incision and drainage) resulted in resolution of the mass and no recurrence at 18 months follow-up. The concept of spontaneous involution of lymphatic malformation (cystic hygroma) is discussed as well as the management of neck abscesses in infancy. PMID:16118719

Bitar, Mohamed A; Dbaibo, Ghassan S

2005-08-01

186

Mononuclear phagocytes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

The head and neck squamous cell carcinoma microenvironments contain many immune cells and their secretory products. Many of these cells belong to the mononuclear phagocyte system. The aim of this review is to study the interactions between mononuclear phagocytes and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tissue. The role of inflammation in tumours and the cytokine interleukin-6 will be highlighted. Future therapy strategies in the treatment of head and neck cancer might be directed towards mononuclear phagocytes and their cytokine production. PMID:19967383

Kross, Kenneth Wilfried; Heimdal, John-Helge; Aarstad, Hans Jørgen

2010-03-01

187

The Burden and Determinants of Neck Pain in Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Study Design  Systematic review and best evidence synthesis.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objectives  To describe the prevalence and incidence of neck pain and disability in workers; to identify risk factors for neck pain in\\u000a workers; to propose an etiological diagram; and to make recommendations for future research.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Summary of Background Data  Previous reviews of the etiology of neck pain in workers relied on cross-sectional evidence. Recently published

Pierre Côté; Gabrielle van der Velde; J. David Cassidy; Linda J. Carroll; Sheilah Hogg-Johnson; Lena W. Holm; Eugene J. Carragee; Scott Haldeman; Margareta Nordin; Eric L. Hurwitz; Jaime Guzman; Paul M. Peloso

2008-01-01

188

Impact of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression on Survival and Pattern of Relapse in Patients with Advanced Head and Neck Carcinoma1  

Microsoft Academic Search

A correlative study was performed to address the impact of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression on survival and pattern of failure in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) enrolled in a Phase III trial and randomized to receive con- ventional radiotherapy. The study population comprised 155 of 268 (58%) randomized patients with sufficient pretreatment biopsy

K. Kian Ang; Brian A. Berkey; Xiaoyu Tu; Hua-Zhong Zhang; Ruth Katz; Elizabeth H. Hammond; Karen K. Fu; Luka Milas

2002-01-01

189

Advances in otolaryngology-Head and neck surgery. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This book consists of 14 sections. The section titles are: The impact of AIDS on otolaryngology--head and neck surgery; The management of sleep apneas and snoring; Antimicrobial agents for infections in the ear, nose, and throat--head and neck; Nasal allergy: Medical and surgical treatment; Uses of computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in temporal bone imaging; Surgical management of otitis media with effusion; middle ear reconstruction: Current status; Cochlear implants: an overview; Diagnosis and management of acute facial paralysis; The use of the laser in head and neck surgery; The management and prevention of subglottic stenosis in infants and children; Management of the mass in the thyroid; Suction-assisted lipectomy of the head and neck area; and Ambulatory surgery.

Myers, E.N. (Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (US)); Bluestone, C.D. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (US))

1987-01-01

190

Chiropractic and Neck Pain: Conservative Care of Cervical Pain, Injury  

MedlinePLUS

... or neck in any direction and the resulting “rebound” in the opposite direction is known as whiplash. ... treatment plan may include mobilization, massage or rehabilitative exercises, or something else. Research Supporting Chiropractic Care One ...

191

49 CFR 572.133 - Neck assembly and test procedure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.133 Neck assembly and test procedure. (a) The...

2011-10-01

192

Salmonella Neck Abscess as an Opportunistic Infection in Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Salmonella neck infections represent an uncommon cause of focal salmonellosis. While the incidence of nontyphoid salmonellosis is estimated at over 2 million cases annually, extraintestinal manifestations account for less than 1% of cases. This paper describes two patients with Salmonella neck abscesses as the initial presentation of diabetes mellitus. The first patient was diagnosed as having Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis sternocleidomastoid pyomyositis and the second patient Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium parapharyngeal abscess. Both patients had elevated hemoglobin A1c levels and had not been previously diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Salmonella spp. should be on the differential as a causative pathogen in patients presenting with neck abscesses and poorly controlled glucose levels. Diabetes may be a risk factor for salmonellosis due to decreased gastric acidity and prolonged gastric transit time. Prompt incision and drainage accompanied by antibiotics remains the treatment of choice for infected neck abscesses. PMID:24307959

Jenkins, Stephen G.

2013-01-01

193

Multi-atlas segmentation in head and neck CT scans  

E-print Network

We investigate automating the task of segmenting structures in head and neck CT scans, to minimize time spent on manual contouring of structures of interest. We focus on the brainstem and left and right parotids. To generate ...

Arbisser, Amelia M

2012-01-01

194

50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Head and Neck Cancer most commonly refers to squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, throat, and voice box. However, ... in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is squamous cell carcinoma. It makes up a little over a half ...

195

The Mutational Landscape of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

E-print Network

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a common, morbid, and frequently lethal malignancy. To uncover its mutational spectrum, we analyzed whole-exome sequencing data from 74 tumor-normal pairs. The majority ...

Lander, Eric S.

196

Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®)  

Cancer.gov

Expert-reviewed information summary about oral complications, such as mucositis and salivary gland dysfunction, that occur in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy to the head and neck.

197

Intracranial Hypotension Causing Headache and Neck Pain: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe purpose of this study is to discuss the presentation, examination, diagnosis, and treatment of a case of intracranial hypotension presenting to a chiropractic office as acute severe headache and neck pain.

Gary A. Knutson

2006-01-01

198

The pattern and significance of the calcifications of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma presented in preoperative neck ultrasonography  

PubMed Central

Purpose To analyze the incidence and patterns of calcification of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) on neck ultrasonography (NUS) and assess the clinical implications of calcification, especially for neck node metastasis. Methods The clinical data of 379 patients with PTMC who underwent thyroidectomy between January and December 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. PTMC lesions were classified into four subgroups according to their calcification patterns on preoperative NUS: microcalcification, macrocalcification, rim calcification, and noncalcification. The clinicopathologic characteristics were compared between the patients with and without calcification, and among the four subgroups. Results Calcifications were detected on NUS in 203 patients (53.5%) and central neck node metastasis was observed in 119 patients (31.3%). Calcification was associated with larger tumor size (0.68 cm vs. 0.54 cm), higher rate of lymph node metastasis (38.6% vs. 23.2%) and higher lymph node ratio (0.11 vs. 0.06) compared to noncalcification (All P < 0.05). In addition, the extent of calcification correlated with lesion size (0.67 cm vs. 0.69 cm vs. 0.85 cm). Further, the likelihood of lymph node metastasis also correlated with the extent of calcification in the order of non-, micro- and macrocalcification (23.3%, 36.8%, and 44.1%, respectively). The calcification rate was higher in patients with lymph node metastasis than those without it (65.5% vs.47.7%) (All P < 0.05). Conclusion PTMC patients positive for calcification on NUS had a higher rate of lymph node metastasis, and a higher lymph node ratio compared to noncalcification patients. Calcification patterns should be assessed carefully in patients with PTMC by preoperative NUS. PMID:24761419

Oh, Eun Mee; Chung, Yoo Seung; Song, Won Jong

2014-01-01

199

1112 Consecutive Bilateral Neck Explorations for Primary Hyperparathyroidism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Bilateral neck exploration has been the standard approach for patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Improved localization\\u000a studies and the availability of intraoperative parathyroid hormone monitoring have challenged the necessity of four-gland\\u000a exploration. In this series we report a single surgeon’s experience with bilateral neck exploration for primary hyperparathyroidism\\u000a in an effort to establish benchmark outcomes from which to evaluate minimally invasive

John Allendorf; Mary DiGorgi; Kathryn Spanknebel; William Inabnet; John Chabot; Paul LoGerfo

2007-01-01

200

Cancer of the head and neck...45 Chapter 05  

E-print Network

.0% for oral cancer. o At the end of 2004 3,151 people were living in Ireland having been diagnosedNICR/NCRI Cancer of the head and neck...45 Chapter 05: Cancer of the head and neck (C00-C14, C30-C between 1994-1996 and 1997-1999. o For patients diagnosed during 1997-1999 survival depended upon cancer

Paxton, Anthony T.

201

Regional differences in cortical porosity in the fractured femoral neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although bone mass is a contributory risk factor for intracapsular hip fracture, its distribution and porosity within the femoral neck is also important for bone strength. In femoral neck biopsies from 13 women with intracapsular hip fracture (mean ±SEM: 75.4 ± 2.1 years, OP) and 19 cadaveric samples (9 men and 10 women [control], aged 79.4 ± 1.7 years), a

K. L Bell; N Loveridge; J Power; N Garrahan; B. F Meggitt; J Reeve

1999-01-01

202

Neck pain and anxiety do not always go together  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic pain and psychosocial distress are generally thought to be associated in chronic musculoskeletal disorders such as non-specific neck pain. However, it is unclear whether a raised level of anxiety is necessarily a feature of longstanding, intense pain amongst patient and general population sub-groups. In a cohort of 70 self-selected female, non-specific neck pain sufferers, we observed relatively high levels

Corrie Myburgh; Kirsten K Roessler; Anders H Larsen; Jan Hartvigsen

2010-01-01

203

Surgical errors and risks - the head and neck cancer patient  

PubMed Central

Head and neck surgery is one of the basic principles of head and neck cancer therapy. Surgical errors and malpractice can have fatal consequences for the treated patients. It can lead to functional impairment and has impact in future chances for disease related survival. There are many risks for head and neck surgeons that can cause errors and malpractice. To avoid surgical mistakes, thorough preoperative management of patients is mandatory. As there are ensuring operability, cautious evaluation of preoperative diagnostics and operative planning. Moreover knowledge of anatomical structures of the head and neck, of the medical studies and data as well as qualification in modern surgical techniques and the surgeons ability for critical self assessment are basic and important prerequisites for head and neck surgeons in order to make out risks and to prevent from mistakes. Additionally it is important to have profound knowledge in nutrition management of cancer patients, wound healing and to realize and to be able to deal with complications, when they occur. Despite all precaution and surgical care, errors and mistakes cannot always be avoided. For that it is important to be able to deal with mistakes and to establish an appropriate and clear communication and management for such events. The manuscript comments on recognition and prevention of risks and mistakes in the preoperative, operative and postoperative phase of head and neck cancer surgery. PMID:24403972

Harreus, Ulrich

2013-01-01

204

History of head and neck radiology: past, present, and future.  

PubMed

Head and neck radiology has evolved during the century since the discovery of the x ray in 1895 by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen. In the first few decades, conventional radiography was the diagnostic modality for evaluation of head and neck diseases. Special radiographic projections were designed to demonstrate abnormal processes in the paranasal sinuses, temporal bones, base of the skull, and neck. Barium examination with fluoroscopy was used for assessment of the pharynx and esophagus. Linear tomography, introduced in 1932, allowed the acquisition of sections that depicted abnormalities that were not clearly defined at conventional radiography. Linear tomography was further enhanced with the introduction of thin-section polytomography, especially of the temporal bone, in 1954. Computed tomography in 1972 and magnetic resonance imaging in 1982 improved our diagnostic capabilities by enabling location and characterization of tumors, cysts, and inflammatory processes in the head and neck and aiding in earlier diagnosis and treatment. Teaching of residents and fellows by an expanding staff of head and neck radiologists developed. The formation of the American Society of Head and Neck Radiology in 1977 provided a forum for postgraduate education and scientific exchange. PMID:11152774

Weber, A L

2001-01-01

205

Spinal Cord Injury Incurred by Neck Massage  

PubMed Central

Massage is generally accepted as a safe and a widely used modality for various conditions, such as pain, lymphedema, and facial palsy. However, several complications, some with devastating results, have been reported. We introduce a case of a 43-year-old man who suffered from tetraplegia after a neck massage. Imaging studies revealed compressive myelopathy at the C6 level, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), and a herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) at the C5-6 level. After 3 years of rehabilitation, his motor power improved, and he is able to walk and drive with adaptation. OPLL is a well-known predisposing factor for myelopathy in minor trauma, and it increases the risk of HNP, when it is associated with the degenerative disc. Our case emphasizes the need for additional caution in applying manipulation, including massage, in patients with OPLL; patients who are relatively young (i.e., in the fifth decade of life) are not immune to minor trauma. PMID:23185737

Cheong, Hyun Suk; Ko, Yeong-A; Lim, Seong Hoon; Kim, Joon Sung

2012-01-01

206

Enhanced Recovery for Fractured Neck of Femur  

PubMed Central

Enhanced recovery is now a standard model of care in most UK elective surgical units. For hip and knee arthroplasty this approach typically includes opioid-sparing anesthesia (OSA), local infiltration analgesia (LIA), and day of surgery mobilization. There is evidence that these interventions shorten hospital stay and improve outcomes, without increasing complications or readmissions. These interventions may also benefit patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck (hip) fractures. This group of patients are frail and elderly, and are at high risk from surgery, anesthesia, and opioid and bed rest-related complications. Hip fractures are also a major public health concern. They are common, expensive to treat, and associated with poor outcomes. Despite this there are no published descriptions of the use of OSA and LIA to enable day of surgery mobilization in patients with hip fractures. We present 3 patients who underwent hip fracture surgery according to an enhanced recovery protocol that incorporated all 3 interventions. In each case day of surgery mobilization was achieved safely and comfortably, without requirement for strong opioids postoperatively. The cases demonstrate that these interventions can be well tolerated by patients with hip fracture, including those with impaired mobility or cognitive function. The protocol is compatible with all common operations for hip fracture, and with spinal or general anesthesia. It is inexpensive and requires minimal expertise. It may have the potential to improve care and shorten hospital stay, while reducing cost. Further investigation is required. PMID:25360329

Rees, David; Kendrick, Emily; Bradshaw, Charlotte; Flavell, Esther; Deglurkar, Mukund

2014-01-01

207

Transurethral Incision of the Bladder Neck Using KTP in the Treatment of Bladder Neck Obstruction in Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To study the results and complications of the potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP, green) laser during transurethral incision of the bladder neck in the treatment of female voiding dysfunction due to bladder neck obstruction. Methods: A total of 40 women (43–79 years of age) with obstruction were identified. Patients with neurogenic, traumatic, or iatrogenic causes of obstruction were excluded. Preoperative investigations included

Qiang Fu; Yue-Min Xu

2009-01-01

208

Morphometric Analysis of the Taiwan Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus formosanus)and Imported Ring-necked Pheasant  

Microsoft Academic Search

(Abstract)Debates occur frequently over the problems of distinguishing the Taiwan native ring-necked pheasant from imported ring-necked pheasant. The purpose of the present study was to establish a discrimination technique of the two groups based on morphological comparisons. We col- lected 116 samples (56 males and 60 females) with 16 characteristics for male and 9 characteristics for female in this study.

Mei-Hui Chen; Hsiao-Wei Yuan

2004-01-01

209

Combined neck dissection and postoperative radiation therapy in the management of the high-risk neck: A matched-pair analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy with regard to reducing the rate of recurrence in the neck, cancer-related death, and death from any cause in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region metastatic to neck nodes.Methods: This was retrospective review of patients with pathologically confirmed nodal

Robert E. Lundahl; Robert L. Foote; James A. Bonner; Vera J. Suman; Jean E. Lewis; Jan L. Kasperbauer; Thomas V. McCaffrey; Kerry D. Olsen

1998-01-01

210

Altered Co-contraction of Cervical Muscles in Young Adults with Chronic Neck Pain during Voluntary Neck Motions  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] Muscle co-contraction is important in stabilizing the spine. The aim of this study was to compare cervical muscle co-contraction in adults with and without chronic neck pain during voluntary movements. [Subjects and Methods] Surface electromyography of three paired cervical muscles was measured in fifteen young healthy subjects and fifteen patients with chronic neck pain. The subjects performed voluntary neck movements in the sagittal and coronal plane at slow speed. The co-contraction ratio was defined as the normalized integration of the antagonistic electromyography activities divided by that of the total muscle activities. [Results] The results showed that the co-contraction ratio of patients was greater during flexion movement, lesser during extension movement, slightly greater during right lateral bending, and slightly lesser during left lateral bending compared with in the controls. [Conclusion] The results suggested that neck pain patients exhibit greater antagonistic muscle activity during flexion and dominate-side bending movements to augment spinal stability, while neuromuscular control provides relatively less protection in the opposite movements. This study helps to specify the changes of the stiffness of the cervical spine in neck pain patients and provides a useful tool and references for clinical assessment of neck disorders. PMID:24764639

Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Lin, Kwan-Hwa; Liu, Wen-Yu; Wang, Shwu-Fen; Hsu, Wei-Li; Chuang, Yu-Fen

2014-01-01

211

The relationship between weight loss and health-related quality of life in persons treated for head and neck cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose This study explores the relationship between weight loss, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and symptom burden in patients treated for head and neck cancers. Methods Participants completed the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy—Head and Neck (FACT-H&N) and the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS) pre-treatment, mid-treatment, and post-treatment. Weights were recorded prior to treatment and at the post-treatment follow-up visit, and percentage weight loss was tabulated. Relationships between weight loss, HRQOL, and symptom burden were evaluated using the nonparametric Spearman rho. A simple linear regression model was developed to examine the influence weight loss has on HRQOL in a predictive manner. Results Average weight loss per patient was 12 lb with a modal value of 19. Weight loss was found to be significantly correlated with decreases in physical well-being, functional well-being, the Head and Neck specific subscale, and composite QOL scores. No significant correlations were found between weight loss and symptom burden as measured by the MSAS. Linear regression suggested that a 10% decrease in baseline weight resulted in a 19% decrease in the FACT-H&N score. Conclusion The strong association between weight loss and HRQOL supports the importance of efforts to prevent weight loss via patient education, aggressive monitoring, and immediate intervention to stop or reverse weight loss during treatment. New approaches to the weight loss and wasting experienced by patients should be developed and tested. PMID:20730547

Heitz, Luke; Keeney, Cynthia; Myers, John; Appana, Savitri N.; Studts, Jamie L.; Bumpous, Jeffrey; Pfeifer, Mark

2014-01-01

212

Validity and Reliability of the Korean Version of the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory for Head and Neck Cancer Patients  

PubMed Central

Objective To translate the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) which is a self-administered questionnaire that assesses effect of dysphagia on the quality of life for patients with head and neck cancer, into Korean and to verify the validity and reliability of the Korean version of MDADI. Methods We performed 6 steps for the cross-cultural adaptation which consisted of translation, synthesis, back translation, review by an expert committee, cognitive debriefing, and final proof reading. A total of 34 dysphagia patients with head and neck cancers from Seoul National University Hospital answered the translated version of the questionnaire for the pre-testing. The patients answered the same questionnaire 2 weeks later to verify the test-retest reliability. Results One patient was excluded at second survey because he changed his feeding strategy. Overall, 33 patients completed the study. Linguistic validations were achieved by each step of cross-cultural adaptation. We gathered statistically strong construct validity (Spearman rho for subdomain scores to total score correlation range from 0.852 to 0.927), internal consistency for subdomains (Cronbach's alpha coefficients range from 0.785 to 0.889) and test-retest reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient range from 0.820 to 0.955) Conclusion The Korean version of the MDADI achieved linguistic validations and demonstrated good construct validity and reliability. It can be a useful tool for screening and treatment planning for the dysphagia of patients with head and neck cancers. PMID:24020028

Kwon, Chan-Hyuk; Kim, Yeo Hyung; Park, Jae Hyeon; Han, Tai Ryoon

2013-01-01

213

The nature of detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia in non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction.  

PubMed

There have been two major opinions on the pathology or nature of the bladder neck contracture. One is an organic fibrosis, and the other is an accentuated sympathetic nervous function, or detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia. The existence of active detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia in neurogenic bladder was reported in a urodynamical manner using microtip transducer catheters. However, it has not been confirmed whether or not detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia is responsible for bladder neck contracture in patient without neurogenic bladder. The present study was designed to determine by means of video urodynamic study whether or not bladder neck contracture would be of the same nature as detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia in non-neurogenic bladder subjects. The study included 32 male subjects of 16-84 years old (average 52.3): 17 bladder neck contracture subjects including 7 subjects associated with minimum complications (4 with trapped benign prostatic hyperplasia and 3 with incomplete neurological lesion) and 15 non-bladder neck contracture subjects (10 healthy volunteers, 2 chronic prostatitis, 3 prostatodynia). A 5-microtip transducer catheter was used to measure the pressure in the bladder and at the bladder neck, the external urethral sphincter and the bulbous urethra during voiding. Proper localization of the transducers was done with an image intensifier. Bladder outlet obstruction localized at the bladder neck (diameters smaller than 0.75 cm) on voiding cystourethrogram was defined as bladder neck contracture. Detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia was defined where pressures were higher at the level of bladder neck than in the bladder during detrusor contraction. An alpha-blocker, terazosin hydrochloride (0.5 mg, b.i.d., two weeks), was orally administered to subjects judged to have detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia by the above methods for the purpose of confirming whether detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia was really due to accentuated sympathetic nervous function. Detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia was found in seven cases with bladder neck contracture: 6 cases with bladder neck contracture with minimum complications and only 1 case with bladder neck contracture without complications (p < 0.01). Detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia was found at the beginning and ending of micturition, but not at maximum flow. In six cases with detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia, the condition disappeared after terazosin. In conclusion, detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia was not thought to be a major factor of voiding dysfunction in bladder neck contracture in non-neurogenic bladder. In the presence of sympathetic hyperactivity or in cases with increased number of alphareceptors, detrusor bladder neck dyssynergia occurs, being predominantly noted in trapped benign prostatic hyperplasia and neurological disorder patients. PMID:9406121

Yamanishi, T; Yasuda, K; Sakakibara, R; Hattori, T; Tojo, M; Ito, H

1997-10-13

214

Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Microenvironment Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in Neck Nodal Metastases  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess noninvasively the tumor microenvironment of neck nodal metastases in patients with head-and-neck cancer by investigating the relationship between tumor perfusion measured using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and hypoxia measured by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole ({sup 18}F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: Thirteen newly diagnosed head-and-neck cancer patients with metastatic neck nodes underwent DCE-MRI and {sup 18}F-FMISO PET imaging before chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The matched regions of interests from both modalities were analyzed. To examine the correlations between DCE-MRI parameters and standard uptake value (SUV) measurements from {sup 18}F-FMISO PET, the nonparametric Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated. Furthermore, DCE-MRI parameters were compared between nodes with {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake and nodes with no {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: For the 13 patients, a total of 18 nodes were analyzed. The nodal size strongly correlated with the {sup 18}F-FMISO SUV ({rho} = 0.74, p < 0.001). There was a strong negative correlation between the median k{sub ep} (redistribution rate constant) value ({rho} = -0.58, p = 0.042) and the {sup 18}F-FMISO SUV. Hypoxic nodes (moderate to severe {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake) had significantly lower median K{sup trans} (volume transfer constant) (p = 0.049) and median k{sub ep} (p = 0.027) values than did nonhypoxic nodes (no {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake). Conclusion: This initial evaluation of the preliminary results support the hypothesis that in metastatic neck lymph nodes, hypoxic nodes are poorly perfused (i.e., have significantly lower K{sup trans} and k{sub ep} values) compared with nonhypoxic nodes.

Jansen, Jacobus [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Schoeder, Heiko [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wang Ya [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2010-08-01

215

Random Positional Variation Among the Skull, Mandible, and Cervical Spine With Treatment Progression During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: With 54{sup o} of freedom from the skull to mandible to C7, ensuring adequate immobilization for head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT) is complex. We quantify variations in skull, mandible, and cervical spine movement between RT sessions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head-and-neck RT patients underwent serial computed tomography. Patients underwent planned rescanning at 11, 22, and 33 fractions for a total of 93 scans. Coordinates of multiple bony elements of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine were used to calculate rotational and translational changes of bony anatomy compared with the original planning scan. Results: Mean translational and rotational variations on rescanning were negligible, but showed a wide range. Changes in scoliosis and lordosis of the cervical spine between fractions showed similar variability. There was no correlation between positional variation and fraction number and no strong correlation with weight loss or skin separation. Semi-independent rotational and translation movement of the skull in relation to the lower cervical spine was shown. Positioning variability measured by means of vector displacement was largest in the mandible and lower cervical spine. Conclusions: Although only small overall variations in position between head-and-neck RT sessions exist on average, there is significant random variation in patient positioning of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine elements. Such variation is accentuated in the mandible and lower cervical spine. These random semirigid variations in positioning of the skull and spine point to a need for improved immobilization and/or confirmation of patient positioning in RT of the head and neck.

Ahn, Peter H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)], E-mail: phahn@mdanderson.org; Ahn, Andrew I. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY (United States); Lee, C. Joe; Shen Jin; Miller, Ekeni; Lukaj, Alex; Milan, Elissa; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

2009-02-01

216

Correlation Introduction  

E-print Network

Correlation 43.2 Introduction While medical researchers might be interested in knowing, tests exist which allow us to interpret the meaning of a calculated correlation coefficient. 9 8 6 7 on a random error component say e and we have Y = mx + c + e In some situations, both X and Y are random

Vickers, James

217

Acetabular Retroversion in Military Recruits with Femoral Neck Stress Fractures  

PubMed Central

Acetabular retroversion (AR) alters load distribution across the hip and is more prevalent in pathologic conditions involving the hip. We hypothesized the abnormal orientation and mechanical changes may predispose certain individuals to stress injuries of the femoral neck. We retrospectively reviewed the anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs of 54 patients (108 hips) treated for a femoral neck stress fracture (FNSF) and compared these radiographs with those for a control group of patients with normal pelvic radiographs. We determined presence of a crossover sign (COS), femoral neck abnormalities, and neck shaft angle. The prevalence of a positive COS was greater in patients with stress fractures than in the control subjects (31 of 54 [57%] versus 17 of 54 [31%], respectively) and higher than for control subjects reported in the literature. Thirteen patients had radiographic changes of the femoral neck consistent with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). These radiographic abnormalities were seen more commonly in retroverted hips. A greater incidence of AR was noted in patients with FNSF. Potential implications include more aggressive screening of military recruits with AR and the new onset of hip pain. Finally, we present an algorithm we use to diagnose and treat these relatively rare FNSFs. Level of Evidence: Level II, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19588210

Kuhn, Kevin M.; Saldua, Nelson S.; Cassidy, Jeffrey

2009-01-01

218

The neck mass. 2. Inflammatory and neoplastic causes.  

PubMed

Several inflammatory processes can cause nodules or swelling in the neck. A complete physical examination and, usually, laboratory testing are required to establish the diagnosis. Common infections include cervical lymphadenitis and tuberculous lymphadenitis, cat-scratch disease, infection in the neck spaces, infectious mononucleosis, and syphilis. Primary or metastatic cancer may also be the cause. Cervical metastasis often presents as a neck mass. Although a primary tumor may not be found immediately when a neck mass is being evaluated, one is often discovered later. Other types of malignancy that may be present are histiocytic lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, rhabdomyosarcoma, thyroid cancer, and a salivary (most often parotid) gland tumor. Symptomatic treatment is sometimes adequate for infectious disease, but administration of antituberculous drugs or antibiotics may also be necessary. Incision and drainage are required for some nodes and abscesses. For neck masses caused by neoplasms, fine-needle aspiration cytology or biopsy is performed. Depending on the diagnosis, treatment consists of dissection, radiation therapy, and/or chemotherapy. PMID:3554201

Damion, J; Hybels, R L

1987-05-01

219

Role of EGFR degradation in cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in head and neck cancer  

PubMed Central

Cisplatin and its analogues are the most commonly used agents in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In this study, we investigated a possible role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), phosphorylation and degradation in cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. Cisplatin treatment led to an increase in initial EGFR phosphorylation at the Y1045, the binding site of ubiquitin ligase, Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (c-Cbl), followed by ubiquitination in the relatively cisplatin-sensitive cell lines. However, cisplatin-resistant cell lines underwent minimal EGFR phosphorylation at the Y1045 site and minimal ubiquitination. We found that EGFR degradation in response to cisplatin was highly correlated with cytotoxicity in seven head and neck cancer cell lines. Pretreatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF), enhanced cisplatin-induced EGFR degradation and cytotoxicity, whereas erlotinib pretreatment blocked EGFR phosphorylation, degradation, and cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. Expression of a mutant Y1045F EGFR, which is relatively resistant to c-Cbl mediated degradation, in Chinese hamster ovary cells and the UMSCC11B human head and neck cancer cell line protected EGFR from cisplatin-induced degradation and enhanced cell survival compared to WT-EGFR. Transfection of WT-c-Cbl enhanced EGFR degradation and cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity compared to control vector. These results demonstrate that cisplatin-induced EGFR phosphorylation and subsequent ubiquitination and degradation is an important determinant of cisplatin sensitivity. Our findings suggest that treatment with an EGFR inhibitor before cisplatin would be antagonistic, as EGFR inhibition would protect EGFR from cisplatin-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent ubiquitination and degradation, which may explain the negative results of several recent clinical trials. Furthermore, they suggest that EGFR degradation is worth exploring as an early biomarker of response and as a target to improve outcome. PMID:20215522

Ahsan, A; Hiniker, SM; Ramanand, SG; Nyati, S; Hegde, A; Helman, A; Menawat, R; Bhojani, MS; Lawrence, TS; Nyati, MK

2010-01-01

220

Biopsy diagnoses of clinically atypical pigmented lesions of the head and neck in adults.  

PubMed

A subset of facial melanoma in situ has histological features that overlap with those of "dysplastic" nevi. The authors evaluated this important diagnostic pitfall by assessing the frequency of melanoma as the final diagnosis in skin biopsies submitted over a 1-year period with a clinical impression of "atypical" or dysplastic nevus from the head or neck of adults. A total of 1998 biopsies met inclusion criteria. Final diagnoses included both melanocytic and nonmelanocytic processes. Clear trends were noted based on the age of the patient with benign nevi encompassing nearly 70% of specimens in patients aged 21-29 years and <10% in patients aged 70 years and above. The incidence of atypical nevi decreased with age (16% in 21-29 years, 3% in age 70+ years). Nineteen of the 180 (10%) atypical nevi in our series were located on the face (7, cheek; 6, forehead; 3, jawline; and 3, temple), a location not traditionally associated with atypical nevi. Facial atypical nevi were found in all age groups. Malignant melanoma accounted for 1.8% of all specimens increasing from 0% in the patients aged 21-29 years to 5% in patients aged 70 years and above. Caution is warranted when evaluating skin biopsies from sun-damaged skin of the head or neck of an older adult submitted with a clinical diagnosis of atypical nevus. However, the authors' findings suggest that atypical nevi with histological features of dysplastic nevi occur on the head and neck of adults, including elderly adults. The incidence of such lesions decreases with age as the incidence of melanoma increases, and careful clinicopathologic correlation is vital. PMID:25247672

Udovenko, Olga; Griffin, John R; Elston, Dirk M

2014-10-01

221

Impact of warm ischemia on phosphorylated biomarkers in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To quantitatively and visually characterize changes in phosphorylated biomarker expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma specimens from excision through 90 minutes of warm ischemia. Materials and Methods: Tissue biospecimens were procured prospectively. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma specimens from 5 patients were subdivided into three parts upon excision, exposed to warm ischemia of 15, 30, or 90 minutes, and routinely biobanked. Relative change in biomarker expression of p-Akt, p-ERK, and p-Stat3 was measured by immunoblot densitometry. Immunofluorescent stains were performed to visually supplement the quantitative analysis. Results: From 15 to 30 minutes of ex vivo ischemia, there was a significant decrease in p-Akt (p = 0.045) as the mean intensity fell by 44.9%. This decrease in p-Akt remained significant at the 90 minute time point (p = 0.015). From 15 to 30 minutes of ischemia, there was a trend toward a decline in p-ERK, which became significant by 90 minutes of ex vivo warm ischemia (p = 0.008). These changes were supported by qualitative differences in p-ERK fluorescence at 0 and 90 minutes warm ischemia. Conclusion: Some phosphorylated biomarkers of HNSCC remain highly dynamic during the period of ex vivo warm ischemia after surgical excision but before biobanking. These findings have critical implications for studies that attempt to correlate protein phosphorylation with clinical outcome. We conclude that ex vivo warm ischemia time is a major determinant of tissue quality that may explain inconsistent results from biomarker research in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25360219

Tower, Jacob I; Lingen, Mark W; Seiwert, Tanguy Y; Langerman, Alexander

2014-01-01

222

[Late neck metastasis in esthesioneuroblastoma: a case report].  

PubMed

Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare malignancy of olfactory neuroepithelium arising from sinonasal region. It has biologically an aggressive behavior. The tumor is characterised by common local recurrence, atypic distant metastasis and poor long-term prognosis. Cervical metastasis accounts for 20-30% of the patients. Late metastases are seen particularly six months or later following primary treatment. In this article, we present a 43-year-old female case with Kadish B stage esthesioneuroblastoma who underwent extracranial tumor resection and postoperative radiotherapy. Eleven years later (at 132 months) right neck cervical metastasis was occurred and we applied right functional neck dissection and adjuvant radiotherapy to treat. We also review the treatment of late neck metastasis in the light of the current literature data. PMID:22770259

Damar, Murat; Ba?erer, Nermin; Ozkara, Selvinaz; Y?lmazer, Rasim

2012-01-01

223

Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies  

PubMed Central

Necessity is the mother of all inventions. This is also true in case of cancer therapy. With increasing incidence of head and neck malignancies, remarkable developments have been made towards cancer development and treatment which continues to be a major challenge. Approximately fifty percent of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy which contributes towards forty percent of curative treatment for cancer. New developments in radiation oncology have helped to improve outlook for patients and find more effective treatment. With the advent of new technologies, radiotherapy seems to be promising in patients with head and neck malignancies these advancements include Altered fractionation, Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, Image Guided Radiotherapy, Stereotactic radiation, Charged-particle radiotherapy, and Intraoperative radiotherapy. How to cite this article: Roopashri G, Baig M. Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):119-23 . PMID:24453456

Roopashri, G; Baig, Muqeet

2013-01-01

224

The neck mass. 1. General concepts and congenital causes.  

PubMed

A carefully taken history and thorough physical examination are the first steps in establishing the cause of a neck mass. Location, size, consistency, and mobility of the mass provide clues and are useful for comparison during follow-up. Further studies are ordered on the basis of the impressions gathered from this evaluation. Congenital neck masses can be found in patients of any age. Thyroglossal duct and branchial cleft cysts and fistulas are formed by incomplete obliteration of the thyroglossal duct and branchial clefts during embryonic development. Other congenital causes include lymphangiomas, cystic hygromas, dermoid cysts, and hemangiomas. Laryngoceles are acquired cysts that arise from an anatomic remnant, the laryngeal ventricle. Treatment for these neck masses is nearly always surgical removal. PMID:3575200

Damion, J; Hybels, R L

1987-05-01

225

Tumour budding in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma - a systematic review.  

PubMed

Tumour budding is a specific type of invasive growth in carcinomas characterized by invading single tumour cells or small clusters of tumour cells (<5 cells) at the invasive front (IF). It has been documented in numerous publications during the past few decades, but its value as a prognostic marker in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has been analysed only recently. In this review we aimed to address the question of whether or not tumour budding has an impact upon the progression and prognosis of HNSCC. We systematically reviewed the databases of PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science for articles that studied tumour budding in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. The search was limited to articles published in the English literature before March 2014. A total of 122 hits were retrieved; however, only five reports met the inclusion criteria. The findings of these reports suggested a strong association between tumour budding and tumour progression, in addition to strong correlation with patient prognosis. Standardization of the scoring method and the risk stratification cut-off point is necessary before the inclusion of tumour budding in pathological reports during daily practice. PMID:24897954

Almangush, Alhadi; Salo, Tuula; Hagström, Jaana; Leivo, Ilmo

2014-11-01

226

Early clinical experience with volumetric modulated arc therapy in head and neck cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Background To report about early clinical experience in radiation treatment of head and neck cancer of different sites and histology by volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc technology. Methods During 2009, 45 patients were treated at Istituto Clinico Humanitas with RapidArc (28 males and 17 females, median age 65 years). Of these, 78% received concomitant chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients were treated as exclusive curative intent (group A), three as postoperative curative intent (group B) and six with sinonasal tumours (group C). Dose prescription was at Planning Target Volumes (PTV) with simultaneous integrated boost: 54.45Gy and 69.96Gy in 33 fractions (group A); 54.45Gy and 66Gy in 33 fractions (group B) and 55Gy in 25 fractions (group C). Results Concerning planning optimization strategies and constraints, as per PTV coverage, for all groups, D98% > 95% and V95% > 99%. As regards organs at risk, all planning objectives were respected, and this was correlated with observed acute toxicity rates. Only 28% of patients experienced G3 mucositis, 14% G3 dermitis 44% had G2 dysphagia. Nobody required feeding tubes to be placed during treatment. Acute toxicity is also related to chemotherapy. Two patients interrupted the course of radiotherapy because of a quick worsening of general clinical condition. Conclusions These preliminary results stated that volumetric modulated arc therapy in locally advanced head and neck cancers is feasible and effective, with acceptable toxicities. PMID:20950429

2010-01-01

227

3D Variation in delineation of head and neck organs at risk  

PubMed Central

Background Consistent delineation of patient anatomy becomes increasingly important with the growing use of highly conformal and adaptive radiotherapy techniques. This study investigates the magnitude and 3D localization of interobserver variability of organs at risk (OARs) in the head and neck area with application of delineation guidelines, to establish measures to reduce current redundant variability in delineation practice. Methods Interobserver variability among five experienced radiation oncologists was studied in a set of 12 head and neck patient CT scans for the spinal cord, parotid and submandibular glands, thyroid cartilage, and glottic larynx. For all OARs, three endpoints were calculated: the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), the Concordance Index (CI) and a 3D measure of variation (3D SD). Results All endpoints showed largest interobserver variability for the glottic larynx (ICC = 0.27, mean CI = 0.37 and 3D SD = 3.9 mm). Better agreement in delineations was observed for the other OARs (range, ICC = 0.32-0.83, mean CI = 0.64-0.71 and 3D SD = 0.9-2.6 mm). Cranial, caudal, and medial regions of the OARs showed largest variations. All endpoints provided support for improvement of delineation practice. Conclusions Variation in delineation is traced to several regional causes. Measures to reduce this variation can be: (1) guideline development, (2) joint delineation review sessions and (3) application of multimodality imaging. Improvement of delineation practice is needed to standardize patient treatments. PMID:22414264

2012-01-01

228

Increased salivary gland density on contrast-enhanced CT after head and neck radiation  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to determine whether radiation therapy leads to an increased density of salivary glands on subsequent contrast-enhanced CT, 109 CT scans from 78 patients with head and neck tumors were reviewed. The density of parotid and submandibular glands was subjectively evaluated (compared with adjacent muscle) and correlated with treatment including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Density of the parotid and/or submandibular glands was found to be significantly associated with previous irradiation on contrast-enhanced scans (p less than .05). One or both glands were denser than normal in seven (44%) of 16 patients who received only radiation therapy and in eight (38%) of 21 who received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, compared with only two (10%) of 20 patients who received chemotherapy alone and two (4%) of 52 patients who received neither. The type or amount of irradiation, type of chemotherapy, or timing of the CT scan after the initiation of treatment was not found to be significant. We conclude that the density of the parotid and/or submandibular glands on contrast-enhanced CT is frequently increased after radiation therapy for tumors of the head and neck.

Bronstein, A.D.; Nyberg, D.A.; Schwartz, A.N.; Shuman, W.P.; Griffin, B.R.

1987-12-01

229

Head and Neck Cancer: An Evolving Treatment Paradigm  

PubMed Central

Since the inception of this journal in 1948, the understanding of etiologic factors that contribute to and the treatment of head and neck cancer has evolved dramatically. Advances in surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have improved locoregional control, survival, and quality of life. The outcomes of these treatment modalities have shifted the focus of curative efforts from radical ablation to preservation and restoration of function. This evolution has been documented in the pages of Cancer for the past 6 decades. This review focuses on the evolution of treatment approaches for head and neck cancer and future directions while recognizing the historic contributions recorded within this journal. PMID:18798532

Cognetti, David M.; Weber, Randal S.; Lai, Stephen Y.

2009-01-01

230

Pitfalls in determining head and neck surgical margins.  

PubMed

Accurate assessment of surgical margins in the head and neck is a challenge. Multiple factors may lead to inaccurate margin assessment such as tissue shrinkage, nonstandardized nomenclature, anatomic constraints, and complex three dimensional specimen orientation. Excision method and standard histologic processing techniques may obscure distance measurements from the tumor front to the normal tissue edge. Arbitrary definitions of what constitutes a "close" margin do not consider the prognostic significance of resection dimensions. In this article we review some common pitfalls in determining margin status in head and neck resection specimens as well as highlight newer techniques of molecular margin assessment. PMID:24794264

Weinstock, Y Etan; Alava, Ibrahim; Dierks, Eric J

2014-05-01

231

Flow visualization in long neck Helmholtz resonators with grazing flow  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Both oscillating and steady flows were applied to a single plexiglass resonator cavity with colored dyes injected in both the orifice and grazing flow field to record the motion of the fluid. For oscillatory flow, the instantaneous dye streamlines were similar for both the short and long-neck orifices. The orifice flow blockage appears to be independent of orifice length for a fixed amplitude of flow oscillation and magnitude of the grazing flow. The steady flow dye studies showed that the acoustic and steady flow resistances do not necessarily correspond for long neck orifices.

Baumeister, K. J.; Rice, E. J.

1976-01-01

232

Genetic diversity predicts outcomes in head and neck cancer  

Cancer.gov

A new measure of the heterogeneity – the variety of genetic mutations – of cells within a tumor appears to predict treatment outcomes of patients with the most common type of head and neck cancer. In the May 20 issue of the journal Cancer, investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (a component of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute) and Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary describe how their measure was a better predictor of survival than most traditional risk factors in a small group of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

233

Neck myoclonia with absence seizures in an Indian girl.  

PubMed

Absence seizures associated with myoclonic phenomena have been associated with 4 seizure types. Recently, a new seizure type of neck myoclonia with absences was described. We present a case of 9-year-old girl who presented with abnormal head shaking and vacant stare for the past 5 months with an ictal electroencephalograph (EEG) record showing 3-Hz spike-and-wave discharges. The seizures were easily controlled with valproate and clobazam. Neck myoclonia with absences might be a new idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndrome in development. PMID:24556548

Jain, Puneet; Sharma, Suvasini; Aneja, Satinder

2014-11-01

234

Questionable necessity to remove the submandibular gland in neck dissection.  

PubMed

Saliva is of major importance in taste, speech, swallowing, and protection against dental caries. Neck dissection surgery and/or radiotherapy may impair the function of the submandibular glands. Over the years, there has been a trend toward more conservative approaches to neck dissection. Metastasis to the submandibular gland itself is extremely rare and if removal of the lymph nodes of sublevel IB is imperative, it seems feasible to preserve the submandibular gland, unless it is involved by direct tumor extension of the primary tumor or the adjacent metastatic lymph nodes. Clinical studies to validate this concept are needed. PMID:20629090

Takes, Robert P; Robbins, K Thomas; Woolgar, Julia A; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Silver, Carl E; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

2011-05-01

235

Treatment of swan neck deformity in cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Swan neck deformity in patients with cerebral palsy can result from hand intrinsic muscle spasticity or overpull of the digital extensors. After accurate identification of the etiology of the deformity, surgical treatment is directed at correcting the underlying muscle imbalance. Intrinsic lengthening can be used to treat intrinsic muscle spasticity, whereas central slip tenotomy is employed when digital extensor overpull is the deforming force. Accurate diagnosis and application of the proper surgical technique are essential when treating swan neck deformity in patients with cerebral palsy. PMID:24613587

Carlson, Erik J; Carlson, Michelle Gerwin

2014-04-01

236

Anaesthetic challenges in a patient presenting with huge neck teratoma.  

PubMed

Paediatric airway management is a great challenge even for an experienced anaesthesiologist. Difficult airway in huge cervical teratoma further exaggerates the complexity. This case report is intended at describing the intubation difficulties that were confronted during the airway management of a three year old girl presenting with huge neck teratoma and respiratory distress. This patient was successfully intubated with uncuffed endotracheal tubes in second attempt under inhalational anaesthesia with halothane and spontaneous ventilation. This case exemplifies the importance of careful preoperative workup of an anticipated difficult airway in paediatric patients with neck swelling to minimize any perioperative complications. PMID:23956728

Jain, Gaurav; Varshney, Rohit

2013-04-01

237

Molecular techniques and genetic alterations in head and neck cancer  

PubMed Central

It is well known that cellular DNA alterations can lead to the formation of cancer, and there has been much discovery in the pathways involved in the development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). With novel genome-wide molecular assays, our ability to detect these abnormalities has increased. We now have a better understanding of the molecular complexity of HNSCC, but there is still much research to be done. In this review, we discuss the well described genetic alterations and touch on the newer findings, as well as some of the future directions of head and neck cancer research. PMID:18674960

Ha, Patrick K; Chang, Steven S; Glazer, Chad A; Califano, Joseph A; Sidransky, David

2009-01-01

238

Morphometric parameters of the radial neck: an anatomical study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomy of the intramedullary canal of the radial neck for stem design of radial\\u000a head prostheses.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Radial neck measurement was performed from the proximal edge of the radial tuberosity to the distal border of the articular\\u000a surface on 40 macerated proximal radii using X-rays and Optosil imprints of the intramedullary canal.

T. C. Koslowsky; F. Beyer; I. Germund; K. Mader; M. Jergas; J. Koebke

2007-01-01

239

Framework for advancing otolaryngology: head and neck surgery in ethiopia.  

PubMed

The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and its members have shown continuing commitment to improving global otolaryngology care through humanitarian and international outreach programs. These efforts, based on a surgical mission model, have produced only modest improvements in otolaryngologic care in Ethiopia. In cooperation with the Ethiopian Ministry of Health and 2 Ethiopian medical schools, we present a framework for otolaryngology education for the next decade. It recognizes the limitations of the current didactic paradigm and aims to use available domestic and international resources to improve the quality and availability of head and neck surgical and medical services. PMID:25052514

Isaacson, Glenn

2014-10-01

240

Complications of Head and Neck Reconstruction and Their Treatment  

PubMed Central

Head and neck reconstruction is an intensive multistep process that requires attention to detail to achieve a successful result. The knowledge and prevention of complications as well as their management is an essential part of the training of the surgeon participating in head and neck reconstruction. This article explores the general complications, including free flap failure, carotid artery blowout, hardware exposure, and ectropion, as well as regional complications relating to operations of the scalp, cranium, base of skull, midface, mandible, and pharyngoesophagus. PMID:22550450

Tan, Bien-Keem; Por, Yong-Chen; Chen, Hung-Chi

2010-01-01

241

Coping and psychological distress among head and neck cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Few studies have described the relationship between the psychological distress associated with head and neck cancer and how\\u000a patients cope with their disease.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Purpose  The purpose of this study is to investigate how head and neck cancer patients 6–12 months after their diagnosis cope with\\u000a their disease and how their coping skills are related to their anxiety and depression levels.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We conducted

Hawazin W. Elani; Paul J. Allison

242

HPV & head and neck cancer: a descriptive update  

E-print Network

Statistics Review, 1975-2006. 1975 [http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2006/]. 4. Shah JP, Lydiatt W: Treatment of cancer of the head and neck. CA Cancer J Clin 1995, 45(6):352-68. 5. Poschl G, Seitz HK: Alcohol and cancer. Alcohol Alcohol 2004, 39... lifetime." Sir Paul Nurse, Cancer Research UK Your research papers will be: available free of charge to the entire biomedical community peer reviewed and published immediately upon acceptance cited in PubMed and archived on PubMed Central Head & Neck...

Goon, Peter K C; Stanley, Margaret A; Ebmeyer, Jorg; Steinstraesser, Lars; Upile, Tahwinder; Jerjes, Waseem; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Gorner, Martin; Sudhoff, Holger H

2009-10-14

243

Multiple 60-Minute Massages per Week Offer Relief for Chronic Neck Pain  

MedlinePLUS

... 60-Minute Massages per Week Offer Relief for Chronic Neck Pain Results of an NCCAM-funded study found that ... than fewer or shorter sessions for people with chronic neck pain, suggesting that several hour-long massages per week ...

244

Correlation between the ossification of nuchal ligament and clinical cervical disorders.  

PubMed

This is a correlation analysis between severity of the ossification of the nuchal ligament (ONL) and clinical cervical disorders including neck dysfunction, cervical malalignment, and morphologic changes of the cervical neural foramen (CNF). The clinical effects of ONL on active range of motion (AROM) of neck, cervical radiculopathy, abnormal cervical curvature, and the degree of CNF stenosis in patients with painful neck stiffness are investigated. Studies have investigated the predisposing factors to cervical dysfunction and degenerative disorders; however, few studies have examined the influence of the ONL on neck function and cervical spine. A total of 31 participants with painful neck stiffness were recruited. They accepted measurement of cervical AROM and serial cervical radiographs at anterior-posterior view, lateral view, and bilateral oblique views. Parameters of radiographs measurement included cervical lordotic curve, and cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the ONL and CNF (C2-C3, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels). The ratio of CSA of the lower CNF (C4-C5, C5-C6, C6-C7) to CSA of the upper CNF (C2-C3) was used as a CNF stenosis ratio. The correlations of ONL size, neck symptoms, cervical AROM, lordotic curve, and CNF stenosis ratio were analyzed. More than half of all patients were positive in cervical root signs and prone to have larger ONL. Neck AROM of all participants was significantly below normal average in all directions, and a moderate negative association was found between the ONL CSA and AROM in flexion-extension. Most patients had moderate loss of cervical lordotic curve despite there being no significant correlation between ONL CSA and cervical curvature. Moreover, CNF stenosis ratio significantly negatively correlated with ONL CSA. Patients with larger ONL had more severe cervical radiculopathy, more stiffness in flexion-extension direction, more complex degenerative change of spine, and worse CNF stenosis. PMID:23089319

Tsai, Yu-Lin; Weng, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Tien-Wen; Hsieh, Yi-Lun; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Chen, Chia-Shin; Huang, Mao-Hsiung

2012-10-01

245

Environmental Tobacco Smoking, Mutagen Sensitivity, and Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although active tobacco smoking has been considered a major risk factor for head and neck cancer, few studies have evaluated environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and its interaction with mutagen sensitivity on the risk of head 'and neck cancer . We investigated the relationship between ETS and head and neck cancer in a case-control study of 173 previously untreated cases with

Zuo-Feng Zhang; Hal Morgenstern; Margaret R. Spitz; Donald P. Tashkin; Guo-Pei Yu; Tao C. Hsu; Stimson P

246

Neck surface electromyography as a measure of vocal hyperfunction before and after injection laryngoplasty  

E-print Network

Neck surface electromyography as a measure of vocal hyperfunction before and after injection Objectives--The goal of this preliminary study was to determine if neck surface electromyography (s hyperfunction. Prior studies have suggested that neck surface electromyography (sEMG) may provide an objective

Stepp, Cara E.

247

Nest Site Characteristics of Ring-necked Pheasants in Eastern South Dakota  

E-print Network

Nest Site Characteristics of Ring-necked Pheasants in Eastern South Dakota JON R. PURVIS·, ANDY E. Key words: Nest site characteristics, Phasianus co/chicus, Ring-necked pheasant. South Dakota. Past 1979, Penrod et al. 1986, Riley et al. 1994) of the nesting ecology of ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus

248

SURVIVAL AND HABITAT USE BY RING-NECKED PHEASANTS DURING TWO DISPARATE WINTERS IN SOUTH DAKOTA  

E-print Network

31tf.-U) SURVIVAL AND HABITAT USE BY RING-NECKED PHEASANTS DURING TWO DISPARATE WINTERS IN SOUTH: habitat lise. lIlortality. l'''/l.~i{l/II/s colchiCIIs. predation. ring-necked pheasant. South Dakota. sur and radiomarked -18 female ring-necked pheasants at the onset of tht' 1996- 97 \\\\inter and monitored suni

249

[Case of toxic shock-like syndrome affecting the neck].  

PubMed

Toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS) is a form of rapidly progressing septic shock that can lead to multiple organ failure and has a high mortality rate of 30%. We report a rare case of TSLS affecting the head and neck. A 40-year-old man complained of redness and swelling of the neck with vomiting and diarrhea. His blood pressure dropped, and multiple organ failure occurred. Streptcoccus pyogenes, Group A, was identified in a blood culture, and he was diagnosed as having TSLS. He was treated with high-dose carbapenem, clindamysin, and gamma globulin. Continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) and PMX-DHP was applied to prevent sepsis and multiple organ failure. Debridement of the neck was performed on day 16. He recovered gradually and was discharged from hospital on day 45. A total resection is required to treat TSLS, but such a procedure is difficult to perform in the head and neck region. Our case improved without resection but after debridement and general control. TSLS should be first treated by medication and then by surgery, consisting of either debridement or resection. PMID:17025221

Saka, Naoki; Seo, Toru; Kashiba, Keiko; Nishida, Takaya

2006-09-01

250

Injuries to the neck and upper extremities of dancers.  

PubMed

In general, injuries to dancers involving the cervical spine and upper extremities are quite mild and cause only limited disability. When such injuries do not involve specific elements of the musculoskeletal system, their origin may be in the more subtle neurovascular structures of the neck. The importance of a thorough examination is emphasized. PMID:6652697

Nixon, J E

1983-11-01

251

Preventing Mucositis in Head and Neck Cancer Patients  

Cancer.gov

In this trial, patients undergoing combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiotherapy) for advanced head and neck cancer will receive intravenous palifermin or placebo before and during cancer treatment to prevent mucositis, a common but serious side effect of chemoradiotherapy for this type of cancer.

252

Use of surface electromyography to estimate neck muscle activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the literature concerning the use of surface electromyography (sEMG) for the study of the neck musculature in response to work and workplace design during light work and semi-static tasks. The paper also draws upon basic research and biomechanical modeling in order to provide methodological recommendations for the use of surface electromyography in this region of the body

Carolyn M Sommerich; Sharon M. B Joines; Veerle Hermans; Samuel D Moon

2000-01-01

253

33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m., from May 1 through October 31, and between...

2013-07-01

254

33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m., from May 1 through October 31, and between...

2010-07-01

255

33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m., from May 1 through October 31, and between...

2012-07-01

256

33 CFR 117.800 - Mill Neck Creek.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.800 Mill Neck Creek. The draw of the Bayville Bridge, mile 0.1, at Oyster Bay, New York, shall open on signal between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m., from May 1 through October 31, and between...

2011-07-01

257

Level V in therapeutic neck dissections for papillary thyroid carcinoma.  

PubMed

Neck dissection for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the standard of care for patients with clinical evidence of regional metastases. However, the extent of neck dissection is debatable. The purpose of the current study was to develop evidence-based recommendations for when to include level V, or 1 of its sublevels, among patients with PTC undergoing neck dissection. A literature review of all studies evaluating the occurrence of metastases in level V in patients with regional metastases from PTC undergoing neck dissection was performed. Occurrence of metastases at level V is low in most series (5% to 10%), although a wide range was noticed. In cases in which metastases were found at level V, they occurred almost exclusively at sublevel VB. Sublevel VA was rarely, if ever, involved with metastatic lymph nodes. However, only recently have investigators begun to specify which sublevels of level V are at risk. Therapeutic dissection of level V is indicated when there is clinical evidence of disease involving this zone. Elective dissection of sublevel VB is indicated when there is involvement of level IV, or possibly multiple nodes at levels II and III. Under these circumstances, dissection of sublevel VB is indicated but sublevel VA may be spared. PMID:22287259

Khafif, Avi; Medina, Jesus E; Robbins, K Thomas; Silver, Carl E; Weber, Randal S; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Owen, Randall P; Shaha, Ashok R; Ferlito, Alfio

2013-04-01

258

Immunotherapy of HPV-associated head and neck cancer  

PubMed Central

Various arguments support the development of a vaccine targeting human papillomavirus (HPV) for the treatment of HPV-associated head and neck cancer. However, the mucosal localization of this tumor, the HPV-driven downregulation of MHC Class I molecules and various other immunosuppressive mechanisms must be carefully considered to improve the clinical efficacy of such an immunotherapeutic strategy. PMID:23894716

Nizard, Mevyn; Sandoval, Federico; Badoual, Cecile; Pere, Helene; Terme, Magali; Hans, Stephane; Benhamouda, Nadine; Granier, Clemence; Brasnu, Daniel; Tartour, Eric

2013-01-01

259

Lens dose in IMRT treatment of the head and neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is used to treat lesions in the head and neck where conventional delivery techniques can not adequately treat the tumor. Dose to the lens is a concern in IMRT treatments because very often the planner chooses unconventional beam angles in the planning process, where beams either enter or exit through the eye and\\/or lens. Additionally,

T. Pawlicki; Q. Le; D. Findley; G. Luxton; C. M. Ma

2001-01-01

260

27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace viticultural area are 2 U.S.G.S. 1:250,000 scale maps. They are entitled: (1) Washington, DC; Maryland; Virginia, 1957 (Revised 1979); and (2) Richmond, VA; MD., 1973. (c)...

2012-04-01

261

27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace viticultural area are 2 U.S.G.S. 1:250,000 scale maps. They are entitled: (1) Washington, DC; Maryland; Virginia, 1957 (Revised 1979); and (2) Richmond, VA; MD., 1973. (c)...

2010-04-01

262

27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace viticultural area are 2 U.S.G.S. 1:250,000 scale maps. They are entitled: (1) Washington, DC; Maryland; Virginia, 1957 (Revised 1979); and (2) Richmond, VA; MD., 1973. (c)...

2013-04-01

263

27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace viticultural area are 2 U.S.G.S. 1:250,000 scale maps. They are entitled: (1) Washington, DC; Maryland; Virginia, 1957 (Revised 1979); and (2) Richmond, VA; MD., 1973. (c)...

2011-04-01

264

27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.  

The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace viticultural area are 2 U.S.G.S. 1:250,000 scale maps. They are entitled: (1) Washington, DC; Maryland; Virginia, 1957 (Revised 1979); and (2) Richmond, VA; MD., 1973. (c)...

2014-04-01

265

Progression of head and neck squamous cell cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Squamous cell cancer in the head and neck region (HNSC) is unique concerning its progression since it remains locoregional for long time and visceral metastases develop only in a later stage of the disease. Accordingly, molecular markers of the local invasion and the lymphatic dissemination both have critical importance. HNSC progression is associated with deregulated control of cell proliferation and

József Tímár; Orsolya Csuka; Éva Remenár; Gábor Répássy; Miklós Kásler

2005-01-01

266

Dental management of patients irradiated for head and neck cancer.  

PubMed

Patients undergoing radiation therapy as either primary, adjuvant, combination therapy or palliative management of head and neck malignancies are prone to a range of dental complications. Strategies for prevention and management of such complications may be controversial. This article aims to highlight the current understanding and management of the dental needs for patients before, during and after radiation therapy. PMID:24495127

Beech, N; Robinson, S; Porceddu, S; Batstone, M

2014-03-01

267

Osteoid osteoma of the talar neck: a diagnostic challenge  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a case of 25-year-old male patient affected by a subperiostal osteoid osteoma of the talar neck diagnosed 3 years after pain onset. Imaging studies (five standard radiographs, one bone scintigraphy, one CT, five MRI) lead to diagnose bone contusion, localized reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome and stress fracture (treated surgically). A seventh MRI suggested the correct diagnosis confirmed by

Olfa Mazlout; Marc Saudan; Mohamed Fethi Ladeb; Jean François Garcia; Stefano Bianchi

2004-01-01

268

Minimal Residual Disease in Head and Neck Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) is a complex disease. Patients with more advanced stages are treated with curative intent by a combination of surgery and radiotherapy, but still about 50% develop a relapse: locally, regionally and at distant sites. This clinical outcome strongly indicates that small histologically undetectable tumor deposits remain at these sites: ‘minimal residual

Hans J. Gath; Ruud H. Brakenhoff

1999-01-01

269

Sexual selection in the ring-necked pheasant: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The common pheasant, Phasianus colchicus, is now considered a classic example of the difficulty of establishing a clear distinction between inter- and intrasexual selection since a role for male spurs as cues used by females in mate choice has been reported. Field and experimental studies on sexual selection in the ring-necked pheasant show that the dimorphic morphological (and behavioural) male

Concha Mateos

1998-01-01

270

AN AUDIBILITY CURVE FOR TWO RING-NECKED PHEASANTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

It was observed during World War I that ring-necked pheasants, Phasianus colchicus Linnaeus, seemed to be greatly disturbed by sounds which were inaudible to human ears (Leedy and Hicks, 1945). This observation suggested that per- haps an ultrasonic sound could be used to flush these birds ahead of the mowing machine. During 1953 an experiment was conducted in the Ornithological

PAUL A. STEWART

271

Ectoparasites of Ring-necked Pheasants in Nebraska  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1971, 1983 and 1984, ectoparasites were identified on 61 ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) from Nebraska. Birds were collected throughout the state from 11 of 93 counties. Four species of chewing lice (Mallophaga) were collected: Lipeurus maculosus, Goniodes colchici, Lagopoecus coichicus and Amyrsidea megalosoma. One species of analgid mite, Megninia sp. was collected. Apparently, this species is new and undescribed.

William R. Payne; David W. Oates; Glen E. Dappen

1990-01-01

272

The molecular biology of head and neck cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) are caused by tobacco and alcohol consumption and by infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV). Tumours often develop within preneoplastic fields of genetically altered cells. The persistence of these fields after treatment presents a major challenge, because it might lead to local recurrences and second primary tumours that are responsible for

Boudewijn J. M. Braakhuis; Ruud H. Brakenhoff; C. René Leemans

2010-01-01

273

FACTORS AFFECTING NESTING SUCCESS OF RING-NECKED PHEASANTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

HROUGH the spring and early summer of 1964, 11 Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) nests were discovered in Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio. The determinate factors affecting nesting success, including interesting behavioral patterns in response to different stimuli, are reported. The earliest nest was located on 3 May and the latest on 15 June. The habitat varied considerably; nests were found in

LARRY C. HOLCOMB

274

A Simulation Model for Ring-Necked Pheasants  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most important game birds in the United States is the ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus). This Asian refugee has provided recreation for untold numbers of sportsmen. Its presence has meant millions of dollars for state game agency coffers, not to mention its impact on local economies. Pheasant populations have fluctuated widely in past years, but the overall trend

Melvin W. Taylor

1978-01-01

275

Severe and Catastrophic Neck Injuries Resulting from Tackle Football  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Use of the spring-loaded blocking and tackling devices should be discontinued due to severe neck injuries resulting from their use; employment of the head and helmet as the primary assault weapon in blocking, tackling, and head butting should be condemned for the same reason. (MJB)

Torg, Joseph S.; And Others

1977-01-01

276

Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and radiotherapy-induced carotid atherosclerosis in subjects with head and neck cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Radiotherapy (RT) is a risk factor for accelerated carotid artery atherosclerotic disease in subjects with head and neck cancer. However, the risk factors of RT-induced carotid artery remodeling are not established. This study aimed to investigate the effects of RT on carotid and popliteal arteries in subjects with head and neck cancer and to evaluate the relationship between baseline clinical and laboratory features and the progression of RT-induced atherosclerosis. Findings Eleven men (age?=?57.9?±?6.2years) with head and neck cancer who underwent cervical bilateral irradiation were prospectively examined by clinical and laboratory analysis and by carotid and popliteal ultrasound before and after treatment (mean interval between the end of RT and the post-RT assessment?=?181?±?47 days). No studied subject used hypocholesterolemic medications. Significant increases in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) (0.95?±?0.08 vs. 0.87?±?0.05 mm; p?correlation with RT-induced carotid IMT change (r?=?0.66; p?=?0.027), while no other studied variable exhibited a significant relationship with carotid IMT change. Conclusions These results indicate that RT-induced atherosclerosis is limited to the irradiated area and also suggest that it may be predicted by low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in subjects with head and neck cancer. PMID:24919963

2014-01-01

277

Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The use of altered fractionation radiotherapy (RT) regimens, as well as concomitant chemotherapy and RT, to intensify therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer can lead to increased rates of long-term dysphagia. Methods and Materials: We identified 122 patients who had undergone definitive RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, after excluding those who had been treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary, had Stage I-II disease, developed locoregional recurrence, had <12 months of follow-up, or had undergone postoperative RT. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were correlated with a composite of 3 objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence at the last follow-up visit; aspiration on a modified barium swallow study or a clinical diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia; or the presence of a pharyngoesophageal stricture. Results: A composite dysphagia outcome occurred in 38.5% of patients. On univariate analysis, the primary site (p = 0.01), use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), RT schedule (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of composite long-term dysphagia. The use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), primary site (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.02) remained significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent chemotherapy to RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer resulted in increased long-term dysphagia. Early intervention using swallowing exercises, avoidance of nothing-by-mouth periods, and the use of intensity-modulated RT to reduce the dose to the uninvolved swallowing structures should be explored further in populations at greater risk of long-term dysphagia.

Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Meredith, Ruby F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Locher, Julie L. [Department of Medicine, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Nabell, Lisle M. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Carroll, William R.; Magnuson, J. Scott [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Spencer, Sharon A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bonner, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)], E-mail: jabonner@uabmc.edu

2009-02-01

278

Adaptive Planning in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancers: Single-Institution Experience and Clinical Implications  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Anatomic changes and positional variability during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer can lead to clinically significant dosimetric changes. We report our single-institution experience using an adaptive protocol and correlate these changes with anatomic and positional changes during treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head and neck IMRT patients underwent serial computed tomography (CT) scans during their radiation course. After undergoing the planning CT scan, patients underwent planned rescans at 11, 22, and 33 fractions; a total of 89 scans with 129 unique CT plan combinations were thus analyzed. Positional variability and anatomic changes during treatment were correlated with changes in dosimetric parameters to target and avoidance structures between planning CT and subsequent scans. Results: A total of 15/23 patients (65%) benefited from adaptive planning, either due to inadequate dose to gross disease or to increased dose to organs at risk. Significant differences in primary and nodal targets (planning target volume, gross tumor volume, and clinical tumor volume), parotid, and spinal cord dosimetric parameters were noted throughout the treatment. Correlations were established between these dosimetric changes and weight loss, fraction number, multiple skin separations, and change in position of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine. Conclusions: Variations in patient positioning and anatomy changes during IMRT for head and neck cancer can affect dosimetric parameters and have wide-ranging clinical implications. The interplay between random positional variability and gradual anatomic changes requires careful clinical monitoring and frequent use of CT- based image-guided radiation therapy, which should determine variations necessitating new plans.

Ahn, Peter H.; Chen, Chin-Cheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Ahn, Andrew I. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Hong, Linda; Scripes, Paola G.; Shen Jin; Lee, Chen-Chiao; Miller, Ekeni; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Garg, Madhur K., E-mail: mgarg@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States)

2011-07-01

279

Prescribed dose versus calculated dose of spinal cord in standard head and neck irradiation assessed by 3-D plan  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose: Spinal cord toxicity can be dreaded complication while treating head and neck cancer by conventional radiotherapy. Cord sparing approach is applied by two phase planning in conventional head neck radiotherapy. In spite of cord sparing approach spinal cord still receives considerable scatter dose. Our study aims to do the volumetric analysis of spinal cord dosimetry and to correlate with the clinical findings. Materials and Methods: Treatment planning was done in two phases. First phase treatment fields include gross disease- both tumor and involved nodes. in the second phase, treatment field shrinkage was done to cover the gross disease sparing the spinal cord. These fields are termed as off-cord fields. 42 patients with histological proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region were analysed with two groups. In Group A, 46 Gy was given in 23 fractions, and then tumor-boost with off-cord field received 24 Gy in 12 fractions. In Group B 50 Gy was prescribed in 25 fractions initially, then off-cord field given 20 Gy in 10 fractions to analyze theoutcome. Planning Computed tomography (CT) scan was done Philips Brilliance 16 slice CT scan machine, and contouring and dose calculation were done at ASHA treatment planning software. Results: Maximum dose and dose at 1 cm3, 2 cm3, and 5 cm3 were calculated. Maximum dose to cord was 52.6 Gy (range 48.1-49.7 Gy) in Group A and 54.3 Gy (range 51.48-52.33 Gy) in Group B initially. Off-cord fields received mean dose 8.07 Gy (85.85% of maximum) in Group A and 5.47 Gy (86.84% of maximum) in Group B. At the end of 6 months from the last date of radiotherapy, grade 1 spinal cord toxicity found in two patients in Group A and one patient in Group B respectively (P = 0.55). Both groups received additional dose, which are higher than the prescribed dose, but no patients show significant spinal cord toxicity after 6 month of follow-up. Conclusion: Spinal cord received scatter dose which much higher than the predicted dose in conventional radiotherapy of head neck cancer. Short term follow up failed to establish clinical correlation with volumetric dose of spinal cord. Two phase cord sparing head neck radiation planning if practiced should be used with caution. PMID:24665442

Majumder, Dipanjan; Patra, Niladri Bihari; Chatterjee, Debashis; Mallick, Swapan Kumar; Kabasi, Apurba Kumar; Majumder, Anjali

2014-01-01

280

Effect of Occupant and Impact Factors on Forces within Neck: I. Overview of Large Population  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific and medical data have been gathered for nearly 500 motor-vehicle occupants, whose dynamic response[1-2] was calculated to determine the forces generated at all potential injury sites. Particular attention was paid to the load within the cervical spine to examine the influence of certain variables relating to the occupant (height, weight, sex), the impact (magnitude, direction), and the neck itself (local vector, anatomical level). Exhaustive efforts were made to match the force with each variable using linear and logarithmic fits, but correlation coefficients were generally not high. These results might be influenced by the emphasis in this research to obtain the best statistics with large groupings of patients. Hence, a separate study with more detail is proposed as a significant continuation of this effort. 1. Proper Treatment of Complex Human Structures, Announcer 27 (4), 100 (1997); 2. Physics as a Key Element in the Complete Description of Dichotomies in Injury Distribution, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 274 (1999).

Shaibani, Saami J.

2000-03-01

281

Recurrence patterns of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma after 3D conformal (chemo)-radiotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  To establish recurrence patterns among locally advanced head and neck non-nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients\\u000a treated with radical (chemo-) radiotherapy and to correlate the sites of loco-regional recurrence with radiotherapy doses\\u000a and target volumes\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  151 locally advanced HNSCC patients were treated between 2004-2005 using radical three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.\\u000a Patients with prior surgery to the primary tumour site were excluded.

Didem C Oksuz; Robin J Prestwich; Brendan Carey; Stuart Wilson; Mustafa S Senocak; Ananya Choudhury; Karen Dyker; Catherine Coyle; Mehmet Sen

2011-01-01

282

Prospective Imaging Assessment of Mortality Risk After Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The optimal roles for imaging-based biomarkers in the management of head-and-neck cancer remain undefined. Unresolved questions include whether functional or anatomic imaging might improve mortality risk assessment for this disease. We addressed these issues in a prospective institutional trial. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight patients with locally advanced pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell cancer were enrolled. Each underwent pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging. Imaging parameters were correlated with survival outcomes. Results: Low post-radiation primary tumor FDG avidity correlated with improved survival on multivariate analysis; so too did complete primary tumor response by CT alone. Although both imaging modalities lacked sensitivity, each had high specificity and negative predictive value for disease-specific mortality risk assessment. Kaplan-Meier estimates confirmed that both CT and FDG-PET/CT stratify patients into distinct high- and low-probability survivorship groups on the basis of primary tumor response to radiotherapy. Subset analyses demonstrated that the prognostic value for each imaging modality was primarily derived from patients at high risk for local treatment failure (human papillomavirus [HPV]-negative disease, nonoropharyngeal primary disease, or tobacco use). Conclusions: CT alone and FDG-PET/CT are potentially useful tools in head-and-neck cancer-specific mortality risk assessment after radiotherapy, particularly for selective use in cases of high-risk HPV-unrelated disease. Focus should be placed on corroboration and refinement of patient selection for imaging-based biomarkers in future studies.

Moeller, Benjamin J.; Rana, Vishal; Cannon, Blake A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Williams, Michelle D. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ginsberg, Lawrence E. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Macapinlac, Homer A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lee, J. Jack [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ang, K. Kian; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Chronowski, Gregory M.; Frank, Steven J.; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lippman, Scott M. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Schwartz, David L., E-mail: docdls@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2010-11-01

283

Postradiation Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To explore the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume measured on postradiation {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with head-and-neck cancer who received pretreatment and posttreatment PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging along with definitive chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. The PET/CT parameters evaluated include the maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub 2.0}-MTV{sub 4.0}; where MTV{sub 2.0} refers to the volume above a standardized uptake value threshold of 2.0), and integrated tumor volume. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models were used to test for association between PET endpoints and disease-free survival and overall survival. Results: Multiple postradiation PET endpoints correlated significantly with outcome; however, the most robust predictor of disease progression and death was MTV{sub 2.0}. An increase in MTV{sub 2.0} of 21cm{sup 3} (difference between 75th and 25th percentiles) was associated with an increased risk of disease progression (hazard ratio [HR]= 2.5, p = 0.0001) and death (HR = 2.0, p = 0.003). In patients with nonnasopharyngeal carcinoma histology (n = 34), MTV{sub 2.0} <18 cm{sup 3} and MTV{sub 2.0} {>=}18 cm{sup 3} yielded 2-year disease-free survival rates of 100% and 63%, respectively (p = 0.006) and 2-year overall survival rates of 100% and 81%, respectively (p = 0.009). There was no correlation between MTV{sub 2.0} and disease-free survival or overall survival with nasopharyngeal carcinoma histology (n = 13). On multivariate analysis, only postradiation MTV{sub 2.0} was predictive of disease-free survival (HR = 2.47, p = 0.0001) and overall survival (HR = 1.98, p = 0.003). Conclusions: Postradiation metabolic tumor volume is an adverse prognostic factor in head-and-neck cancer. Biomarkers such as MTV are important for risk stratification and will be valuable in the future with risk-adapted therapies.

Murphy, James D.; La, Trang H.; Chu, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Quon, Andrew [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Fischbein, Nancy J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Maxim, Peter G.; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu, E-mail: qle@stanford.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

2011-06-01

284

Post-Radiation Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head-and-Neck Cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose To explore the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume measured on post-radiation 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials Forty-seven head-and-neck cancer patients who received pre- and post-treatment PET/CT imaging along with definitive chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. PET/CT parameters evaluated include the maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume (MTV2.0-MTV4.0; where MTV2.0 refers to the volume above an SUV threshold of 2.0), and integrated tumor volume. Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression models were used to test for association between PET endpoints and disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Multiple post-radiation PET endpoints correlated significantly with outcome, however the most robust predictor of disease progression and death was MTV2.0. An increase in MTV2.0 of 21cm3 (difference between 75th and 25th percentile) was associated with an increased risk of disease progression (hazard ratio [HR]=2.5, p=0.0001) and death (HR=2.0, p=0.003). In patients with non-nasopharyngeal carcinoma (non-NPC) histology (n=34), MTV2.0<18cm3 and MTV2.0?18cm3 yielded 2-year DFS rates of 100% and 63%, respectively (p=0.006) and 2-year OS rates of 100% and 81%, respectively (p=0.009). There was no correlation between MTV2.0 and DFS or OS with NPC histology (n=13). On multivariate analysis only post-radiation MTV2.0 was predictive of DFS (HR=2.47, p=0.0001) and OS (HR=1.98, p=0.003). Conclusions Post-radiation metabolic tumor volume is an adverse prognostic factor in head-and-neck cancer. Biomarkers such as MTV are important for risk stratification, and will be valuable in the future with risk-adapted therapies. PMID:20646870

Murphy, James D; La, Trang H.; Chu, Karen; Quon, Andrew; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Maxim, Peter G.; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Le, Quynh-Thu

2010-01-01

285

Radial Neck Fractures in Children: Results When Open Reduction Is Indicated  

PubMed Central

Background: Radial neck fractures in children are rare, representing 5% of all elbow pediatric fractures. Most are minimally displaced or nondisplaced. Severely displaced or angulated radial neck fractures often have poor outcomes, even after open reduction, and case series reported in literature are limited. The aim of the study is to analyze the outcomes of patients with a completely displaced and angulated fracture who underwent open reduction when closed reduction failed. Methods: Between 2000 and 2009, 195 patients with radial neck fractures were treated in our institute. Twenty-four cases satisfied all the inclusion criteria and were evaluated clinically and radiologically at a mean follow-up of 7 years. At follow-up, the carrying angle in full elbow extension and the range of motion of the elbow and forearm were measured bilaterally. We recorded clinical results as good, fair, or poor according to the range of movement and the presence of pain. Radiographic evaluation documented the size of the radial head, the presence of avascular necrosis, premature physeal closure, and cubitus valgus. Results: Statistical analysis showed that fair and poor results are directly correlated with loss of pronation-supination (P=0.001), reduction of elbow flexion-extension (P=0.001), increase of elbow valgus angle (P=0.002), necrosis of the radial head (P=0.001), premature physeal closure (P=0.01), and associated lesions (olecranon fracture with or without dislocation of the elbow) (P=0.002). Discussion: In our cases, residual radial head deformity due to premature closure of the growth plate and avascular necrosis were correlated with a functional deficit. Associated elbow injury was coupled with a negative prognosis. In our series, about 25% of patients had fair and 20% had poor results. Outcomes were good in 55% and felt to represent a better outcome than if the fracture remained nonanatomically reduced with residual angulation and/or displacement of the radial head. This study reports the largest series of these fractures with a combination of significant angulation and displacement of the fracture requiring open reduction. We feel that open reduction is indicated when the head of the radius is completely displaced and without contact with the rim of the metaphysis. PMID:25171679

Giordano, Marco; Aulisa, Angelo G.; Di Lazzaro, Antonio; Guzzanti, Vincenzo

2014-01-01

286

Bladder exstrophy: Comparison of anatomical bladder neck repair with innervation preserving sphincteroplasty versus Young-Dees-Leadbetter bladder neck reconstruction  

PubMed Central

Aim: To evaluate the outcome of innervation preserving sphincteroplasty along with anatomical bladder neck reconstruction (IPS-ABNR) compared to classic Young-Dees-Leadbetter (YDL) bladder neck reconstruction in exstrophy with insufficient bladder capacity requiring detubularized-ileocystoplasty. Materials and Methods: Sixteen male patients of exstrophy bladder who required ileocystoplasty from 2004 to 2010 were randomized into group A (n = 7) and group B (n = 9). After detubularized-ileocystoplasty with Mitrofanoff stoma and ureteric reimplantation in all, group A received YDL bladder neck repair while group B received IPS-ABNR repair through a midline scrotoperineal approach. Outcome measurement included operative and postoperative problems, continence, and upper tract status. Results: In group A, two had incompetent bladder neck with gross incontinence, while four had a dry interval of more than 3 h without the ability of voiding per urethra. In group B, seven patients had dry interval of more than 3 h with an ability of urethral voiding and midstream holding in five. Conclusions: Exstrophy patients requiring augmentation cystoplasty and repaired with IPS-ABNR can achieve dynamic bladder outlet resistance with adequate leak point pressure and ability to void voluntarily with midstream holding capability. The children had the satisfaction of voiding per urethra with ability to stop in midstream similar to that in normal children. PMID:23798810

Gupta, Archika; Kureel, Shiv Narain; Wakhlu, Ashish; Rawat, Jiledar

2013-01-01

287

BUTIER CLAMS OR UTILE NECK CLAMS Butter clanlS (Saxidornus nuttali) and little-neck clams (Tapes  

E-print Network

SHELLFISH CLAMS BUTIER CLAMS OR UTILE NECK CLAMS Butter clanlS (Saxidornus nuttali) and little Coast can- nery for butter clams. (From Pacific Fisherman.) NOTE.-[FL-84. Canning clrums, oysters, sea m butter clams are canned as minced clams. The dressed and washed meats are gr(\\und in a grinder with a lis

288

A Planned Neck Dissection Is Not Necessary in All Patients With N2-3 Head-and-Neck Cancer After Sequential Chemoradiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the role of a planned neck dissection (PND) after sequential chemoradiotherapy for patients with head-and-neck cancer with N2-N3 nodal disease. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 90 patients with N2-N3 head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1991 and 2001 on two sequential chemoradiotherapy protocols. All patients received induction and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorocuracil, with or without tirapazamine. Patients with less than a clinical complete response (cCR) in the neck proceeded to a PND after chemoradiation. The primary endpoint was nodal response. Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up durations for living and all patients were 8.3 years (range, 1.5-16.3 year) and 5.4 years (range, 0.6-16.3 years), respectively. Of the 48 patients with nodal cCR whose necks were observed, 5 patients had neck failures as a component of their recurrence [neck and primary (n = 2); neck, primary, and distant (n = 1); neck only (n = 1); neck and distant (n = 1)]. Therefore, PND may have benefited only 2 patients (4%) [neck only failure (n = 1); neck and distant failure (n = 1)]. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for those with a clinical partial response (cPR) undergoing PND (n = 30) was 53%. The 5-year neck control rates after cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR were 90%, 93%, and 78%, respectively (p = 0.36). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for the cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR groups were 53%, 75%, and 42%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusion: In our series, patients with N2-N3 neck disease achieving a cCR in the neck, PND would have benefited only 4% and, therefore, is not recommended. Patients with a cPR should be treated with PND. Residual tumor in the PND specimens was associated with poor outcomes; therefore, aggressive therapy is recommended. Studies using novel imaging modalities are needed to better assess treatment response.

Soltys, Scott G., E-mail: sgsoltys@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Choi, Clara Y.H. [Department of Neurosugery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Fee, Willard E. [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Pinto, Harlan A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Veterans Affairs, Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States)

2012-07-01

289

Long-term functional donor site morbidity of the free radial forearm flap in head and neck cancer survivors  

PubMed Central

Background To assess the functional donor site morbidity of the forearm free flap in patients surviving at least 2 years after ablative head and neck cancer surgery in a tertiary care centre. Methods This study involved nine long-term survivors (2 year post-operative) who had forearm free flaps to reconstruct head and neck defects. All flaps were raised from the non-dominant arm. The non-donor side acted as a control for all patients. Objective measurements were as follows: grip, tip pinch and key pinch strength measured with dynamometers; flexion, extension, radial and ulnar deviation and pronation and supination range of motion at the wrist measured with goniometry; A timed manual dexterity task was performed with a grooved pegboard test, and sensation of the radial nerve was tested with Semmes Weinstein monofilaments. Subjective measurements included a validated patient questionnaire of hand function and opinions of scar appearance as well as a validated scar assessment from two different observers. Results Pronation at the wrist, manual dexterity and sensation were found to be significantly reduced in the donor side compared to the non-donor side. Inter-rater agreement between the two observers was found to be poor, except for an acceptable correlation between overall scar opinions. No correlations were found between any subjective or objective items or between the patient’s and the observers’ subjective evaluations. Conclusions Donor site morbidity can be demonstrated with objective testing however this is accepted and well tolerated by head and neck cancer patients. PMID:24418459

2014-01-01

290

Non-invasive label-free investigation and typing of head and neck cancers by multimodal nonlinear microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Early detection and typing of tumors is pressing matter in clinical research with important impacts for prognosis and successful treatment. Currently, staining is the golden standard in histopathology but requires surgical removal of tissue. In order to avoid resection of non-diseased tissue a non-invasive real-time imaging method is required which can be applied ideally intrasurgically. In this proceeding a combination of second harmonic generation (SHG), two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) imaging has been employed to investigate tissue sections of head and neck carcinomas focussing on laryngeal carcinoma. Primary laryngeal and other head and neck carcinomas consist to 99% of squamous cell carcinoma. By fusing the various imaging methods it is possible to measure the thickness of the epithelial cell layer as a marker for dysplastic or cancerous tissue degradation and to differentiate keratinizing and nonkeratininzing squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). As nonkeratinizing SCCs of the oropharynx correlate with a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as a subentity of head and neck cancer, and HPV related tumors are associated with a better clinical prognosis, the differentiation between keratinizing and non-keratinizing forms of SCCs is of high diagnostic value. TPEF is capable of displaying cell nuclei, therefore, morphologic information as cell density, cell to cytoplasm ratio, size and shape of cell nuclei can be obtained. SHG - on the other hand - selectively reveals the collagen matrix of the connective tissue, which is useful for determination of tumor-islets boundaries within epithelial tissue - a prerequisite for precise resection. Finally CARS in the CH-stretching region visualizes the lipid content of the tissue, which can be correlated with the dysplastic grade of the tissue.

Meyer, Tobias; Vogler, Nadine; Dietzek, Benjamin; Akimov, Denis; Inhestern, Johanna; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Popp, Jürgen

2012-06-01

291

Diffusion-Weighted MRI for Nodal Staging of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Impact on Radiotherapy Planning  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) for nodal staging and its impact on radiotherapy (RT) planning. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), as well as MRI (with routine and DW sequences) prior to neck dissection. After topographic correlation, lymph nodes were evaluated microscopically with prekeratin immunostaining. Pathology results were correlated with imaging findings and an RT planning study was performed for these surgically treated patients. One set of target volumes was based on conventional imaging only, and another set was based on the corresponding DW-MRI images. A third reference set was contoured based solely on pathology results. Results: A sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 97% per lymph node were found for DW-MRI. Nodal staging agreement between imaging and pathology was significantly stronger for DW-MRI (kappa = 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.00) than for conventional imaging (kappa = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.16-0.96; p = 0.019, by McNemar's test). For both imaging modalities, the absolute differences between RT volumes and those obtained by pathology were calculated. Using an exact paired Wilcoxon test, the observed difference was significantly larger for conventional imaging than for DW-MRI for nodal gross tumor volume (p = 0.0013), as well as for nodal clinical target volume (p = 0.0415) delineation. Conclusions: These results suggest that DW-MRI is superior to conventional imaging for preradiotherapy nodal staging of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and provides a potential impact on organsparing and tumor control.

Dirix, Piet, E-mail: piet.dirix@uzleuven.b [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut (LKI), University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Vandecaveye, Vincent; De Keyzer, Frederik; Op de beeck, Katya [Department of Radiology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut (LKI), University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Poorten, Vincent Vander; Delaere, Pierre [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Leuvens Kankerinstituut (LKI), University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Verbeken, Eric [Department of Pathology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut (LKI), University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Hermans, Robert [Department of Radiology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut (LKI), University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Nuyts, Sandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut (LKI), University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)

2010-03-01

292

Iridescence in the neck feathers of domestic pigeons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We conducted structural characterizations, reflection measurements, and theoretical simulations on the iridescent green and purple neck feathers of domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica). We found that both green and purple barbules are composed of an outer keratin cortex layer surrounding a medullary layer. The thickness of the keratin cortex layer shows a distinct difference between green and purple barbules. Green barbules vary colors from green to purple with the observing angle changed from normal to oblique, while purple barbules from purple to green in an opposite way. Both the experimental and theoretical results suggest that structural colors in green and purple neck feathers should originate from the interference in the top keratin cortex layer, while the structure beyond acts as a poor mirror.

Yin, Haiwei; Shi, Lei; Sha, Jing; Li, Yizhou; Qin, Youhua; Dong, Biqin; Meyer, Serge; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhao, Li; Zi, Jian

2006-11-01

293

BNCT for advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer.  

PubMed

The therapeutic effect of surgery and/or combination of conventional chemoradiotherapy is limited in the patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and locally advanced non-squamous cell carcinoma without malignant melanoma (non-SCC) of the head and neck. Currently, clinical trials of BNCT for head and neck cancers are being conducted in some institutes to verify its the effectiveness. BNCT was performed in 10 patients with recurrent SCC, 7 patients with recurrent non-SCC and 3 patients with newly diagnosed non-SCC in our university between October 2003 and September 2007. Eleven patients showed complete remission and 7 patients showed partial remission of irradiated site. The effective rate [(CR+PR)/total cases] was 90%. No severe acute or chronic normal-tissue reactions were observed in any patients. BNCT is effective and safe in the patients with recurrent SCC and locally advanced non-SCC. PMID:24799334

Aihara, Teruhito; Morita, Norimasa; Kamitani, Nobuhiko; Kumada, Hiroaki; Ono, Koji; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Harada, Tamotsu

2014-06-01

294

Huge Facial Desmoid Tumors with Neck Extension: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Desmoid tumors are very rare, benign fibrous neoplasms arise from the musculoaponeurotic structures throughout the body. Case Report: The patient was a seven-year old boy with a large mandibular mass growing over a period of six months. His CT-scan showed a large mass, 13 cm in diameter in the cheek area extending to the neck and trachea. Biopsy was compatible with desmoid fibromatosis. He was given neoadjovant treatment with vinblastin and methotrexate. The patient underwent a tracheostomy. Then a complete hemimandibulectomy and submandibular gland excision was performed. Finally reconstruction with latisimus dorsi free flap was performed. Conclusion: Despite rarity desmoid tumors should be kept in mind of an otorhinolaryngologist as a differential diagnosis in children with head and neck mass. PMID:25009811

Ghazipour, Ali; Ghavami Lahiji, Shervin; Bradd, Bassel; Saleheh, Fariborz

2014-01-01

295

Hip arthroscopy for excision of osteoid osteoma of femoral neck.  

PubMed

Osteoid osteoma (OO) is the most commonly seen benign bone-forming lesion. It can occur anywhere, including the metaphyseal regions of small and large bones. We present 2 cases that underwent an arthroscopic technique for removal of OO of the femoral neck. The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography in addition to magnetic resonance imaging. The lesions were accessed arthroscopically and excised by unroofing and curettage. The clinical and radiographic findings are presented, along with the surgical management. The patients improved dramatically postoperatively. OO of the femoral neck should be included in the differential diagnosis of hip pain in young patients. Arthroscopic excision and curettage provide a good choice for management, with low morbidity and rapid recovery. PMID:24749036

Said, Hatem Galal; Abdulla Babaqi, Abdulrahman; Abdelsalam El-Assal, Maher

2014-02-01

296

Systematic screening and treatment evaluation of hereditary neck paragangliomas.  

PubMed

Familial paragangliomas of the neck are often bilateral and more aggressive than spontaneous forms. Tumors appear earlier (2nd-4th decade) often with diffuse, multifocal involvement. Without treatment, these tumors can lead to significant morbidity. Three families with succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) germline mutations underwent clinical and genetic evaluation. Patients were screened using ultrasound and evaluated further with conventional and functional imaging. Tumors with a diameter >1.5 cm were surgically removed. Multicentric and bilateral tumors were detected in 9/13 (69%) and 8/13 (62%) patients, respectively. Surgical morbidity occurred in 64% of patients. Local recurrence was 57%, although this was lower in tumors with a diameter <2 cm. We recommend an algorithm for a systematic approach to the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of familial head and neck paragangliomas. Operative treatment in advanced stages often leads to unwanted morbidity, such that earlier detection and treatment of smaller tumors seems to be of benefit. PMID:17563904

Fish, John H; Klein-Weigel, Peter; Biebl, Matthias; Janecke, Andreas; Tauscher, Thomas; Fraedrich, Gustav

2007-09-01

297

[Epidemiology and anatomy of head and neck cancers].  

PubMed

Oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers account for 75% of head and neck cancers and are the fourth most spread cancer in men. Their incidence has decreased since 1980 in men (incidence from 2011 gives 13,930 for lip, oral cavity, pharyngeal and laryngeal carcinomas) but has increased in women, linked to the more recent smoking or alcohol intoxication in women. In addition to the smoking or alcohol consumption risk factors, the EBV role in nasopharyngeal carcinomas, HPV in the oropharyngeal carcinomas and professional exposures in paranasal sinuses cancers are recognized. Head and neck cancers are the fifth most common cancer in men mortality in France. Extended anatomical sites reflect the diagnostic's complexity specific to some locations (sinuses, nasopharynx), possible therapies and prognosis depending on the affected site. PMID:24886890

Périé, Sophie; Meyers, Marie; Mazzaschi, Olivia; De Crouy Chanel, Olivier; Baujat, Bertrand; Lacau St Guily, Jean

2014-05-01

298

Moving Toward Bioadjuvant Approaches to Head and Neck Cancer Prevention  

SciTech Connect

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma affects >45,000 Americans annually. Patients who are successfully treated for their primary tumor are at high risk of developing a second primary tumor, making effective preventive strategies highly desirable for this disease. Although a landmark study in 1990 suggested some benefit of high-dose retinoids in head and neck cancer prevention, subsequent trials using more tolerable doses have shown limited clinical success. Newer preventive strategies have included bioadjuvant therapy combining retinoids with interferon and {alpha}-tocopherol, combinations of molecularly targeted agents, and oncolytic viruses. Furthermore, considerable evidence has supported a cancer protective role for several nutrients, including green tea and curcumin analogs. Natural compounds such as these with favorable long-term safety profiles might be particularly suited to the cancer prevention setting, in which patients will usually tolerate only moderate risk and toxicity.

Saba, Nabil F.; Hammond, Anthea; Shin, Dong M. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Khuri, Fadlo R. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)], E-mail: fkhuri@emory.edu

2007-10-01

299

Migration of a swallowed blunt foreign body to the neck.  

PubMed

Ingestion of foreign bodies is a common problem in the otolaryngology practice. Reports of extraluminal migration of the foreign bodies from the upper aerodigestive tract are rare. Penetration and extraluminal migration of ingested foreign bodies may cause severe vascular and suppurative complications, even death. We report a 4-year-old girl who presented with a mass and partial extrusion of a foreign body in the neck. She had a history of ingesting the plastic top piece of a knitting needle approximately 1 year ago. She had been asymptomatic until the present time. The examination revealed a red, blunt, rectangular plastic foreign body half embedded in the skin of the right neck. Esophagography with barium swallow, cervical X-rays, and computed tomography scans were obtained. The foreign body was easily removed under general anesthesia. Primary closure and direct laryngoscopy was also performed. The patient recovered very well without any complications. PMID:24592347

Ozturk, Kerem; Turhal, Goksel; Gode, Sercan; Yavuzer, Atilla

2014-01-01

300

Migration of a Swallowed Blunt Foreign Body to the Neck  

PubMed Central

Ingestion of foreign bodies is a common problem in the otolaryngology practice. Reports of extraluminal migration of the foreign bodies from the upper aerodigestive tract are rare. Penetration and extraluminal migration of ingested foreign bodies may cause severe vascular and suppurative complications, even death. We report a 4-year-old girl who presented with a mass and partial extrusion of a foreign body in the neck. She had a history of ingesting the plastic top piece of a knitting needle approximately 1 year ago. She had been asymptomatic until the present time. The examination revealed a red, blunt, rectangular plastic foreign body half embedded in the skin of the right neck. Esophagography with barium swallow, cervical X-rays, and computed tomography scans were obtained. The foreign body was easily removed under general anesthesia. Primary closure and direct laryngoscopy was also performed. The patient recovered very well without any complications. PMID:24592347

Ozturk, Kerem; Turhal, Goksel; Gode, Sercan; Yavuzer, Atilla

2014-01-01

301

Emerging applications for OCT in the head and neck  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Objectives: To describe the current and promising new applications of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) as a helpful tool when imaging the different sites in the head and neck. We used the OCT Niris system, which is the first commercially available OCT device for applications outside the field of ophthalmology. Methods: OCT images were obtained of normal, benign, premalignant and malignant lesions in different areas of the head and neck. The OCT imaging system has a tissue penetration depth of approximately 1-2mm, a scanning range of 2mm and a spatial depth resolution of approximately 10-20?m. Imaging was performed using a flexible probe in two different settings, the outpatient clinic and the operating room. Results: High-resolution cross-sectional images from the larynx were obtained with the patient awake, without the need for general anesthesia, under direct visualization with a flexible fiberoptic endoscope. The OCT probe was inserted through the nasal cavity and placed in slight contact with the laryngeal tissue. In the ears, cholesteatoma was differentiated from inflamed middle ear mucosa by the different hyperintensity. In the neck, normal as well as different pathologies of the thyroid were identified. Conclusions: This system is non invasive and easy to incorporate into the operating room setting as well as the outpatient clinic. It requires minimal set-up and only one person is required to operate the system. OCT has the distinctive capability to obtain highresolution images, and the microanatomy of different sites can be observed. OCT technology has the potential to offer a quick, efficient and reliable imaging method to help the surgeon not only in the operating room but also in the clinical setting to guide surgical biopsies and aid in clinical decision making of different head and neck pathologies, especially those arising form the larynx.

Rubinstein, Marc; Kim, Jason H.; Armstrong, William B.; Djalilian, Hamid R.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

2010-02-01

302

Delayed union of an operated fracture of the femoral neck  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fracture of the femoral neck continues to be a vexing clinical and therapeutic challenge for the orthopedic surgeon. The fracture\\u000a has a propensity for non-union and avascular necrosis. It is a challenge for the orthopedic surgeon to decide when to intervene\\u000a in a case with non-union where the implant continues to be in place. We present a case with persistent

Shabir Ahmed Dhar; Naseem U. Gani; Mohammed F. Butt; Munir Farooq; Mohammed Ramzan Mir

2008-01-01

303

Isolated Castleman Disease of the Neck: MR Findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: Castleman disease in an 11-year-old girl appeared as a neck mass that grew despite antibiotic treatment. MR showed a well-defined solid mass, isointense with muscle on short- repetition-time\\/short-echo-time images, with a stellate area of central hypointensity on long-repetition-time\\/long-echo-time images, that did not enhance with gadolinium. Castleman disease is a benign lymphoid neo- plasm that usually is found in the

Mark Glazer; Vijay M. Rao; David Reiter; Peter McCue

304

Urodynamic Evaluation after Endoscopic Modified Bladder Neck Suspension  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 45 simplified double-needle bladder neck suspensions for genuine stress incontinence were clinically and urodynamically evaluated pre- and postoperatively. After a mean follow-up of 26 months, the subjective cure rate was 82.2% and the objective cure rate was 86.6%. Comparison of the pre- and postoperative urodynamic parameters showed a significant change in the maximum urethral closure pressure, functional

T. Ahmet Serel; Mete Güngör

1999-01-01

305

Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated with Chemoradiotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dysphagia is a very common complaint of head and neck cancer patients and can exist before, during, and after chemoradiotherapy.\\u000a It leads to nutritional deficiency, weight loss, and prolonged unnatural feeding and also has a major potential risk for aspiration.\\u000a This has a significant negative impact on the patient’s entire quality of life. Because treatment of dysphagia in this setting

Nele Platteaux; Piet Dirix; Eddy Dejaeger; Sandra Nuyts

2010-01-01

306

Competent gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was performed to evaluate the efficiency and patient satisfaction with a modified Janeway gastrostomy for patients\\u000a with head and neck cancer and cancer of the upper GI tract and involved 24 consecutive patients with serious malnutrition\\u000a caused by advanced cancer of these sites. All underwent surgery during which a tube was constructed from the anterior gastric\\u000a wall with

P. P. Vassilopoulos; E. Filopoulos; N. Kelessis; M. Gontikakis; G. Plataniotis

1998-01-01

307

Radiation recall supraglottitis. A hazard in head and neck chemotherapy  

SciTech Connect

The enhanced effects of chemotherapy on previously irradiated tissue have been well demonstrated. When chemotherapy is given some time after irradiation and elicits a tissue reaction in the radiation field, the reaction is termed radiation recall. We review known interactions between chemotherapy and radiotherapy and report, to our knowledge, the first case of a supraglottitis radiation recall reaction. Familiarity with this phenomenon and potential complications of chemotherapy following head and neck irradiation may expedite early diagnosis and appropriate lifesaving treatment.

Wallenborn, P.A.; Postma, D.S.

1984-09-01

308

Internal fixation of femoral neck fractures with posterior comminution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and purpose  Internal fixation is a therapeutic mainstay for treatment of undisplaced femoral neck fractures and fractures without posterior\\u000a comminution. The best treatment for unstable and comminuted fractures, however, remains controversial, especially in older\\u000a patients. The present study was designed to assess the utility of the Intertan Nail® (IT) for stabilization of comminuted\\u000a Pauwels type III fractures compared to dynamic

Martin Rupprecht; Lars Grossterlinden; Kai Sellenschloh; Michael Hoffmann; Klaus Püschel; Michael Morlock; Johannes M. Rueger; Wolfgang Lehmann

309

Modified Transurethral Incision of the Bladder Neck Treating Primary Bladder Neck Obstruction in Young Men: A Method to Improve Voiding Function and to Preserve Antegrade Ejaculation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To evaluate the voiding function, ejaculation status and sexual function after the novel modification of transurethral incision of the bladder neck (TIBN) treating young men with primary bladder neck obstruction (PBNO). Methods: Using a videourodynamic study, PBNO was diagnosed in 33 young men 27–50 years of age who presented with chronic lower urinary tract symptoms and low urinary flow.

Stephen Shei-Dei Yang; Yao-Chou Tsai; Jen-Jih Chen; Chung-Hsin Peng; Jui-Hsiang Hsieh; Chung Cheng Wang

2008-01-01

310

Nonunion of fractures of the femoral neck in children  

PubMed Central

The authors present the prospective clinical outcome of nine pseudoarthroses resulting from surgical treatment carried out in nine children, whose ages varied from 6 years and 2 months to 14 years and 2 months (mean 10 years and 2 months), who had fractures of the femoral neck. Five were classified as type II, according to the Delbet classification modified by Colonna, and four were type III. The initial fractures were caused by high-energy traumas, such as trampling, bicycle falls, and car accidents. Treatment of choice was valgus osteotomy of the femoral neck associated or not with insertion of bony graft. The mean time of follow-up was 38 months, ranging from 23 to 71 months, and the mean time of pseudoarthrosis consolidation after osteotomy was 76.6 days, varying from 45 to 240 days. In this study, all the pseudoarthroses consolidated. For final analysis of clinical and radiographic results, the Ratliff’s classification was used. We obtained three cases as good results, five as fair and one as poor. The authors concluded that valgus osteotomy is a good option for treatment of pseudoarthrosis in the femoral neck fractures in children. PMID:19308588

Neto, Pedro F. Tucci; dos Reis, Fernando Baldy; Filho, Jose Laredo; Fernandes, Helio J. A.; Fujiki, Edison Noboru; Bensahel, Henri

2008-01-01

311

Determinants of head and neck cancer survival according to race  

PubMed Central

Background Several factors contribute to the documented racial disparity in head and neck cancer (HNSCC), among which are socioeconomic status, access to care and biologic factors. Methods Clinical characteristics of 87 African-American head and neck cancer patients and a random sample of 261 White patients matched on age and smoking dose were associated to outcome. Results Black oral cavity and larynx patients were more likely diagnosed with advanced stages than Whites, after adjusting for socioeconomic and insurance status and other confounding factors. There was a significant difference in relapse-free survival between Blacks and Whites with larynx tumors (Hazard Ratio = 3.36, 95% CI: 1.62-7.00), but not with oral cavity or pharynx tumors. Conclusion Differences in disease outcome may be attributed to a combination of tumor stage, socioeconomic status and access to health care. The inclusion of biological markers such as Human Papillomavirus status is needed in future studies to further evaluate racial disparities in head and neck cancer outcomes. PMID:20967872

Ragin, Camille C.; Langevin, Scott M.; Marzouk, Mark; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Taioli, Emanuela

2012-01-01

312

The Role of Lymphedema Management in Head and Neck Cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review Head and neck lymphedema (HNL) is a common and often debilitating cancer treatment effect that is under-researched and ill defined. We examined current literature and reviewed historical treatment approaches. We propose a model for evaluation and treatment of HNL used at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent findings Despite the morbidity associated with HNL in patients with HNC, to our knowledge, no article has been published within the past 18 months whose primary focus is HNL. Eight publications included HNL but only as a secondary focus related to treatment effect, risk of dysphagia, prognostic indicator of underlying disease, and quality of life. A potential benefit of Selenium treatment to reduce HNL was reported. Summary This article highlights the recent literature regarding HNL in patients treated for HNC. Although HNL is reported as a potential complication of HNC treatment, no clear definition of the disease or its management are published. Our early experience using an objective evaluation and treatment protocol holds promise for a better understanding of HNL in patients treated for head and neck malignancy. PMID:20463478

Smith, Brad G.; Lewin, Jan S.

2014-01-01

313

Pediatric gunshot wounds to the head and neck.  

PubMed

Gunshot wounds to the head and neck in the pediatric population have become alarmingly common. They often result in death of the victim, devastate families, and inflict a considerable financial burden to hospitals and society. We present a retrospective study of cases treated at a level I trauma center in Houston, Texas, from July 1990 to July 1993. We identified 115 cases of gunshot wounds in children, 32 of which were exclusively confined to the head and neck region. There were 26 male and 6 female patients. Ages ranged from 3 to 17 years. The cranial cavity was involved in 13 cases, leading to 9 deaths and 1 institutionalization. The shootings took place at home in 11 cases, and they involved play in 12 cases. The shooter was known to 14 of the victims, and the wounds were self-inflicted in 7 cases. The most common type of weapon was the .22 caliber pistol, which caused four of the deaths. Two of our cases involved BB air rifles, one of which mandated a craniotomy for the evacuation of an epidural hematoma. Our findings indicate that gunshot wounds to head and neck in children are in most instances preventable and result in high fatality rates because of common intracranial involvement, even when low-energy missiles are used. PMID:8643299

Kountakis, S E; Rafie, J J; Ghorayeb, B; Stiernberg, C M

1996-06-01

314

A multicentric prospective open trial on the quality of life and oxidative stress in patients affected by advanced head and neck cancer treated with a new benzoquinone-rich product derived from fermented wheat germ (Avemar)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and aim  Anorexia\\/cachexia syndrome is frequently correlated with increased oxidative stress (OS). A fermented wheat-germ extract with\\u000a a standardized benzoquinone content (brand name Avemar) has been shown to exert an intense antioxidant activity with no side\\u000a effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Avemar in patients affected by head and neck cancer, correlating\\u000a the variations

Samir G. Sukkar; Franca Cella; Giuseppe M. Rovera; Michele Nichelatti; Giuseppe Ragni; Giovanni Chiavenna; Antonello Giannoni; Giovanni Ronzani; Claudia Ferrari

2008-01-01

315

Evaluation of Driver-vehicle Matching using Neck Muscle Activity and Vehicle Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Objective measurement of a car driver's feeling has been a subject of automobile researches. In the present study, we aimed at quantifying the matching between the physiological response of a driver and the vehicle motion. Assuming that the performance of a head stabilization mechanism, the vestibulo-collic reflex, affects driving feeling, we recorded the activity of neck muscles that help maintain the head position. Electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) using active electrodes and a compact amplifier. Vehicle acceleration and gas pedal movement were recorded with small accelerometers. Subjects were required to perform straight-line acceleration. Four road cars with different characteristics were used. EMG signals were filtered, full-wave rectified and averaged across trials. Main results are summarized as follows. First, the EMG response of a driver's neck muscle depended not only on vehicle acceleration but on its time derivative, jerk. A quantitative analysis showed that, for the data obtained with the four cars, the EMG profile can be reproduced by a linear sum of acceleration and jerk. The correlation coefficient, an index of goodness of matching, ranged from ~0.8 to ~0.95. Second, our analysis indicated that the relationship between the muscle response and the vehicle motion can be characterized by two parameters: the optimal weight for the jerk term and the optimal time lag. The current study proposes a method for characterizing a physiological response of a driver to dynamic vehicle motion. It remains to be investigated whether these parameters are related to the driving feeling.

Iwamoto, Yoshiki; Umetsu, Daisuke; Ozaki, Shigeru

316

Evaluation of Thyroid Disorders During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy by Using Functional Analysis and Ultrasonography  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate thyroid function and vascular changes during radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients treated with primary or postoperative radiotherapy for various cancers in the head and neck region were prospectively evaluated. The serum samples (triiodothyronine [T3], thyroxine [T4], thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free triiodothyronine [FT3], and free thyroxine [FT4]), the echo level of the thyroid gland, and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) parameters of the right inferior thyroid artery (RITA) of the patients were measured before and at regular intervals during radiotherapy. The thyroid gland dose-volume histograms of the patients were derived from their computed tomography-based treatment plans. Results: There was a significant fall in TSH level (p < 0.0001) but an increase in FT4 (p < 0.0001) and T4 (p < 0.022) levels during the radiotherapy course. The threshold dose required to produce significant changes was 12 Gy (Biologically Effective Dose in 2-Gy fractions, BED{sub 2}). There were significant rises in the patients' pulsatility index, resistive index, peak systolic velocity, blood volume flow levels, and RITA diameter (p < 0.0001), as detected by CDU during radiotherapy, compared to those parameters measured before the treatment. Hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns (p < 0.0001) were seen during radiotherapy compared to those before treatment. There was significant Pearson's correlation between the CDU parameters and T4, FT4, and TSH levels. Conclusions: Radiation-induced thyroiditis is regarded as primary damage to the thyroid gland. Thyroiditis can subsequently result in hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Our results demonstrated that changes in thyroid vessels occur during radiotherapy delivered to patients. Vessel changes also can be attributed to the late effect of radiation on the thyroid gland. The hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns observed in patients may result from the increase in intrathyroidal flow.

Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Edraki, Hamid Reza [Department of Radiology, Panzdahe-Khordad Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-05-01

317

FGFR1 as a novel prognostic and predictive biomarker in squamous cell cancers of the lung and the head and neck area  

PubMed Central

FGFR1 amplification is a genomic aberration recently identified in various types of cancer. Especially squamous cell carcinomas of the lung and the head and neck show this genetic alteration in high frequencies. In these cancers FGFR1 is not only a therapeutic target but does also serve as a biomarker that correlates with parameters of worse outcome. However, since FGFR1 amplification does not always correlate with high protein expression defining the best predictive biomarker for a FGFR1 targeted therapy is of great importance. PMID:25332967

von Massenhausen, Anne; Franzen, Alina; Heasley, Lynn

2013-01-01

318

Correlating EGFR Expression with Receptor-Binding Properties and Internalization of  

E-print Network

Correlating EGFR Expression with Receptor- Binding Properties and Internalization of 64Cu, Missouri The anti�epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) antibody cetuximab is clinically approved for the treatment of EGFR- expressing metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced head and neck cancer. Overexpression

Pike, Linda J.

319

[Physiological metals in the serum, hair and nails of patients with head and neck cancer].  

PubMed

Cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol drinking result in the rise of numbers of patients suffering from the head and neck cancer. Addiction to any of these stimulants carry a risk of developing a cancerogenesis process. Using them simultaniously lead not to a summary of each of those risks but multiplies them. Scientific research also indicates the important difference in the incidence of cancer in people who have never smoked cigarettes or drunk alcohol in comparison to those, whose exposure to these stimulatns was longterm - in such case, the former group had a lower percentage of developing the disease. Human body burdened with the ongoing cancer shows disturbances on various levels of the system. One of such disturbances is change of the concetration levels of physiological metals, such as calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, zinc or mangenese. They play key roles in maintaing the hormonal and ionic stability, they act as cofactors in many enzymes in metabolic processes. Diagnostic research of any deviations in levels of those essential elements enables a full estimation of a patient condition. The aim of this study was physiological metal levels evaluation in different kinds of biological material in patients with tumors of larynx, salivary glands and oral cavity and tongue. Hair and nail samples were used as examples of alternative material, beside the serum samples, which is a standard material and often used. Subjects were patients of Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology Clinic of Poznan University of Medical Sciences (Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Kliniczny nr 2 im. Heliodora Swiecickiego Uniwersytetu Medycznego im. Karola Marcinkowskiego w Poznaniu) and The Head and Neck Surgery Ward of The Greater Poland Cancer Centre in Poznan. Subjects were 41 men and 18 women with tumors of larynx, salivary glands and oral cavity and tongue. The control group consisted of patients from the Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology Clinic of Poznan University of Medical Sciences (Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Kliniczny nr 2 im. Heliodora Swiecickiego Uniwersytetu Medycznego im. Karola Marcinkowskiego w Poznaniu), The Head and Neck Surgery Ward of The Greater Poland Cancer Centre in Poznan and patients of Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Internal Medicine of Poznan University of Medical Sciences (Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Kliniczny nr 2 im. Heliodora Swiecickiego Uniwersytetu Medycznego im. Karola Marcinkowskiego w Poznaniu) and Department of Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology Pozna? University of Medical Sciences. They gave answers to the questionnaire concerning smoking habits, alcohol consumption and dietary habits, Then the samples of their serum, hair and nails were collected. After careful preparations the biological material has underwent the process of digestion, and then calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, zinc, mangenese were determined quantitatively using the method of ICP-MS. Profile of the patients who took part in the research displayed a strong correlation between tobacco smoking with alcohol drinking and appearance of larynx, salivary gland and oral cavity and tongue cancer as well as between exclusively tobacco smoking and appearance of these types of cancer. There is a higher incidence of larynx, salivary gland and oral cavity and tongue cancer when there is a deficiency of grain products or fibre in everyday diet. A higher level of calcium, magnesium, iron and manganese was found in patients' hair and nails who suffered from salivary gland cancer. According to applied Chemometric Analysis of Principal Component 1 - concentrations of iron, copper and manganese with magnesium and zinc in patients' nail samples showed strong correlation between measured variables. In patiens' hair samples measured correlation between variables was decreased - concentrations of calcium and magnesium as well as of iron and manganese were highlighted as two groups of variables which showed some correlation in this type of biological material. Further research is required to indicate which of alternativ

Wo?niak, Anna; Kujawa, Anita; Se?czuk-Przyby?owska, Monika; Kulza, Maksymilian; Gawecki, Wojciech; Szybiak, Bartosz; Herman, Ma?gorzata; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Kurha?ska-Flisykowska, Anna; Chesy, Paulina; Szyfter, Witold; Walas, Stanis?aw; Golusi?ski, Wojciech; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Parczewski, Andrzej; Florek, Ewa

2012-01-01

320

The Effect of Pressure Pain Sensitivity and Patient Factors on Self-Reported Pain-Disability in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain  

PubMed Central

The study was conducted to estimate the extent to which pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) and patient factors predict pain-related disability in patients with neck pain (NP), and to determine if PPS differs by gender. Forty-four participants with a moderate level of chronic NP were recruited for this cross sectional study. All participants were asked to complete self-reported assessments of pain, disability and comorbidity and then underwent PPS testing at 4-selected body locations. Pearson`s r w was computed to explore relationships between the PPS measures and the self-reported assessments. Regression models were built to identify predictors of pain and disability. An independent sample t-test was done to identify gender-related differences in PPS, pain-disability and comorbidity. In this study, greater PPS (threshold and tolerance) was significantly correlated to lower pain-disability (r = -.30 to -.53, p?0.05). Age was not correlated with pain or disability but comorbidity was (r= 0.42-.43, p?0.01). PPS at the 4-selected body locations was able to explain neck disability (R2=25-28%). Comorbidity was the strongest predictor of neck disability (R2 =30%) and pain (R2=25%). Significant mean differences for gender were found in PPS, disability and comorbidity, but not in pain intensity or rating. This study suggests that PPS may play a role in outcome measures of pain and disability but between-subject comparisons should consider gender and comorbidity issues.

Uddin, Zakir; MacDermid, Joy C.; Woodhouse, Linda J.; Triano, John J.; Galea, Victoria; Gross, Anita R.

2014-01-01

321

Post-Radical-Prostatectomy Urinary Incontinence: The Management of Concomitant Bladder Neck Contracture  

PubMed Central

Urinary incontinence postradical prostatectomy is a common problem which adversely affects quality of life. Concomitant bladder neck contracture in the setting of postprostatectomy incontinence represents a challenging clinical problem. Postprostatectomy bladder neck contracture is frequently recurrent and makes surgical management of incontinence difficult. The aetiology of bladder neck contracture and what constitutes the optimum management strategy are controversial. Here we review the literature and also present our approach. PMID:22611382

King, Thomas; Almallah, Y. Zaki

2012-01-01

322

The Complex Interplay between the Neck and Hinge Domains in Kinesin1 Dimerization and Motor Activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kinesin-1 dimerizes via the coiled-coil neck domain. In contrast to animal kinesins, neck dimerization of the fungal kinesin-1 NcKin requires additional residues from the hinge. Using chimeric constructs containing or lacking fungal- specific elements, the proximal part of the hinge was shown to stabilize the neck coiled-coil conformation in a complex manner. The conserved fungal kinesin hinge residue W384 caused

Friederike Bathe; Katrin Hahlen; Renate Dombi; Lucia Driller; Manfred Schliwa; Guenther Woehlke

2005-01-01

323

Head and neck cancers, version 2.2013. Featured updates to the NCCN guidelines.  

PubMed

These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on nutrition and supportive care for patients with head and neck cancers. This topic was a recent addition to the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Head and Neck Cancers. The NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on major updates to the NCCN Guidelines and discuss the new updates in greater detail. The complete version of the NCCN Guidelines for Head and Neck Cancers is available on the NCCN Web site (NCCN.org). PMID:23946171

Pfister, David G; Ang, Kie-Kian; Brizel, David M; Burtness, Barbara A; Busse, Paul M; Caudell, Jimmy J; Cmelak, Anthony J; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Dunphy, Frank; Eisele, David W; Gilbert, Jill; Gillison, Maura L; Haddad, Robert I; Haughey, Bruce H; Hicks, Wesley L; Hitchcock, Ying J; Kies, Merrill S; Lydiatt, William M; Maghami, Ellie; Martins, Renato; McCaffrey, Thomas; Mittal, Bharat B; Pinto, Harlan A; Ridge, John A; Samant, Sandeep; Schuller, David E; Shah, Jatin P; Spencer, Sharon; Weber, Randal S; Wolf, Gregory T; Worden, Frank; Yom, Sue S; McMillian, Nicole R; Hughes, Miranda

2013-08-01

324

Outcomes of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. The principal anatomic contraindication to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR) is an unfavorable proximal aortic neck. With increasing experience, a greater proportion of patients with unfavorable neck anatomy are being offered EVR. This study aimed to evaluate outcomes in patients with challenging proximal aortic neck anatomy. Methods. Prospectively collected data from 147 consecutive patients who underwent EVR between December 1997 and April 2005 were supplemented with a retrospective review of medical records and radiological images. Unfavorable anatomic features were defined as neck diameter >28 mm, angulation >60 deg., circumferential thrombus >50%, and length <10 mm. Eighty-seven patients with 0 adverse features (good necks) were compared with 60 patients with one or more adverse features (hostile necks). Results. Comparing the good neck with the hostile neck group, there were no significant differences in the incidence of primary technical success (p = 0.15), intraoperative adjunctive procedures (p = 0.22), early proximal type I endoleak (<30 days) (p = 1.0), late proximal type I endoleak (>30 days) (p = 0.57), distal type I endoleak (p = 0.40), type III endoleak (p 0.51), secondary interventions (p = 1.0), aneurysm sac expansion (p = 0.44), or 30 day mortality (p = 0.70). The good neck group had a significantly increased incidence of type II endoleak (p = 0.023). By multivariate analysis, the incidence of intraoperative adjunctive procedures was significantly increased in the presence of severe angulation (p = 0.041, OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.05-9.04). Conclusion. Patients with severely hostile proximal aortic neck anatomy may be treated with EVR, although severely angulated necks require additional intraoperative procedures. Early outcomes are encouraging and suggest that indications for EVR may be expanded to include patients with hostile neck anatomy.

Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Loftus, Ian; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M. [St. George's Hospital, Vascular Institute (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Matt.Thompson@stgeorges.nhs.uk

2006-12-15

325

Skin toxicity due to intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To investigate the cause of acute skin toxicity observed in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer with extended-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (EF-IMRT).Methods and Materials: EF-IMRT was used to treat head-and-neck cancer, with the gross target volume receiving 70 Gy and the clinical target volume 60 Gy. A thermoplastic mask covering the head, neck, and shoulder was used for immobilization. Dosimetric studies

Nancy Lee; Cynthia Chuang; Jeanne M Quivey; Theodore L Phillips; Pam Akazawa; Lynn J Verhey; Ping Xia

2002-01-01

326

Surgical emphysema and pneumomediastinum in a child following minor blunt injury to the neck  

PubMed Central

Largyngotracheal and pharyngoesophageal tears following minor blunt trauma to the neck are uncommon. A child with such an injury is reported and the modes of diagnosis and management are discussed. Patients may initially present with minimal signs and symptoms, but their condition may deteriorate rapidly or insidiously. In the absence of respiratory compromise, conservative management is appropriate, but all patients with significant blunt neck trauma should undergo early direct laryngoscopy under a general anaesthetic.???Keywords: blunt injury; neck; emphysema; pneumomediastinum PMID:10616690

Back, G; Banfield, G

1999-01-01

327

Accuracy of (18F)FDG PET after Surgery and Radiotherapy in Head and Neck Cancers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of (18F)FDG PET in th diagnosis of recurrent head and neck cancer after the completion of surgery and radiotherapy in patien with head and neck cancers. Materials and Methods: In fifty-nine patients with head and neck cancer whole body (18F)FDG PET studies were performed. According to the different

Weon Il Yang; Chang Woon Choi; Yong Sik Lee; Byeung Il Kim; Jae Sung Lee; Sang Moo Lim; Yoon Sang Shim; Sung Woon Hong

328

Neural and muscular factors associated with motor impairment in neck pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical neck pain is associated with impairment of muscle performance, assessable at a functional level. Functional deficiencies\\u000a reflect altered mechanisms of muscle control and changed muscle properties. The basic physiologic mechanisms of pain have\\u000a been extensively investigated, and the functional impairments associated with neck pain are well documented. However, the\\u000a cause-effect relationships between neck pain and motor control are poorly

Deborah Falla; Dario Farina

2007-01-01

329

Fascin upregulation in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is associated with lymphatic metastasis  

PubMed Central

Fascin is an actin-bundling protein that is associated with cellular motility and cancer-cell invasion. The present study aimed to examine the expression of fascin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and its potential use as a biomarker. In a prospective study with a median follow-up time of 48.8 months, tumor tissues, adjacent healthy tissues and cervical lymph node metastases were collected from 25 patients and analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The specimens were scored according to the intensity of fascin staining and the percentage of tumor cells stained using a semi-quantitative scoring approach; the data were analyzed and correlated with clinical follow-up observations. All of the investigators were blinded to the origin of the specimens. The expression levels of fascin were significantly increased in the tumor tissues (P=0.03) and lymph node metastases (P=0.03) compared with that of the normal tissues. The high expression level of fascin in the tumor tissues was correlated with the N-status, however, not with overall survival. Therefore, fascin may be a suitable marker for the prediction of regional lymphatic metastasis in HNSCC. PMID:24932286

PAPASPYROU, KONSTANTINOS; BROCHHAUSEN, CHRISTOPH; SCHMIDTMANN, IRENE; FRUTH, KAI; GOUVERIS, HARALAMPOS; KIRCKPATRICK, JAMES; MANN, WOLF; BRIEGER, JUERGEN

2014-01-01

330

Radiation-induced changes in serum lipidome of head and neck cancer patients.  

PubMed

Cancer radiotherapy (RT) induces response of the whole patient's body that could be detected at the blood level. We aimed to identify changes induced in serum lipidome during RT and characterize their association with doses and volumes of irradiated tissue. Sixty-six patients treated with conformal RT because of head and neck cancer were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were collected before, during and about one month after the end of RT. Lipid extracts were analyzed using MALDI-oa-ToF mass spectrometry in positive ionization mode. The major changes were observed when pre-treatment and within-treatment samples were compared. Levels of several identified phosphatidylcholines, including (PC34), (PC36) and (PC38) variants, and lysophosphatidylcholines, including (LPC16) and (LPC18) variants, were first significantly decreased and then increased in post-treatment samples. Intensities of changes were correlated with doses of radiation received by patients. Of note, such correlations were more frequent when low-to-medium doses of radiation delivered during conformal RT to large volumes of normal tissues were analyzed. Additionally, some radiation-induced changes in serum lipidome were associated with toxicity of the treatment. Obtained results indicated the involvement of choline-related signaling and potential biological importance of exposure to clinically low/medium doses of radiation in patient's body response to radiation. PMID:24747595

Jelonek, Karol; Pietrowska, Monika; Ros, Malgorzata; Zagdanski, Adam; Suchwalko, Agnieszka; Polanska, Joanna; Marczyk, Michal; Rutkowski, Tomasz; Skladowski, Krzysztof; Clench, Malcolm R; Widlak, Piotr

2014-01-01

331

Nicotine dependence and smoking habits in patients with head and neck cancer*  

PubMed Central

Objective: To assess smoking habits and nicotine dependence (ND) in patients with head and neck cancer Methods: This study involved 71 smokers or former smokers with squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx who were treated at a university hospital in the city of São Paulo between January and May of 2010. We used the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence to evaluate smoking habits and ND in the sample. Data regarding cancer treatment were collected from medical records. Depending on the variables studied, we used the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t-test, or Spearman's correlation test. Results: Of the 71 patients, 47 (66.2%) presented with high or very high ND, 40 (56.3%) smoked more than 20 cigarettes/day, and 32 (45.1%) smoked their first cigarette within 5 min of awakening. Advanced disease stage correlated significantly with the number of cigarettes smoked per day (p = 0.011) and with smoking history (p = 0.047). We found that ND did not correlate significantly with gender, disease stage, smoking cessation, or number of smoking cessation attempts, nor did the number of cigarettes smoked per day correlate with smoking cessation or gender. Treatment for smoking cessation was not routinely offered. Conclusions: In most of the patients studied, the level of ND was high or very high. The prevalence of heavy smoking for long periods was high in our sample. A diagnosis of cancer is a motivating factor for smoking cessation. However, intensive smoking cessation treatment is not routinely offered to smoking patients diagnosed with cancer. PMID:25029652

de Almeida, Adriana Avila; Bandeira, Celso Muller; Goncalves, Antonio Jose; Araujo, Alberto Jose

2014-01-01

332

Review of ultrasonography of malignant neck nodes: greyscale, Doppler, contrast enhancement and elastography  

PubMed Central

Abstract Assessment of neck lymph nodes is essential in patients with head and neck cancers for predicting the patient’s prognosis and selecting the appropriate treatment. Ultrasonography is a useful imaging tool in the assessment of neck lymph nodes. Greyscale ultrasonography assesses the size, distribution, and internal architecture of lymph nodes. Doppler ultrasonography evaluates the intranodal vascular pattern and resistance of lymph nodes. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography provides information on lymph node parenchymal perfusion. Elastography allows qualitative and quantitative assessment of lymph node stiffness. This article reviews the value of greyscale, Doppler and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography as well as elastography in the assessment of malignant nodes in the neck. PMID:24434158

Ying, M.; Bhatia, K.S.S.; Lee, Y.P.; Yuen, H.Y.

2013-01-01

333

Management of head and neck melanoma: results of a national survey.  

PubMed

We recently reported on the safety of minimally invasive parotid region sentinel node biopsy and level I-sparing radical neck dissection for head and neck melanoma. We therefore wished to assess the state of practice in the United States through a survey of specialists in head and neck surgery. We hypothesized that there would be significant variation in the management of these facets of head and neck melanoma. To test this hypothesis, a 10-question online survey on management of head and neck melanoma was distributed to the members of the American Head and Neck Society. Responses were matched to Internet Protocol addresses to ensure that each respondent completed the survey only once. Eighty-eight respondents completed the survey. For sentinel lymph nodes within the parotid gland, nearly half (47.7%) of surgeons surveyed perform a superficial parotidectomy, 13.6% perform a total parotidectomy, and only 38.6% perform parotid-sparing surgery; 71.6% of surgeons remove the submandibular nodes when carrying out a functional radical neck dissection. In conclusion, approaches to the management of head and neck melanoma vary widely, with only a minority of surgeons using morbidity-sparing surgical approaches. This study highlights the need for further randomized controlled trials in the surgical management of head and neck melanoma. PMID:24667883

Sawh-Martinez, Rajendra; Douglas, Stephanie; Pavri, Sabrina; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak

2014-12-01

334

Salmonella in broiler carcass bone marrow and neck skin: potential sources for ground chicken contamination.  

E-print Network

??Possible routes for Salmonella contamination of ground chicken are through grinding chicken parts containing contaminated neck skin and bone marrow internalized with Salmonella. The objective… (more)

Wu, Diezhang

2013-01-01

335

Amide proton transfer-weighted imaging of the head and neck at 3?T: a feasibility study on healthy human subjects and patients with head and neck cancer.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility and repeatability of amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) MRI for the head and neck on clinical MRI scanners. Six healthy volunteers and four patients with head and neck tumors underwent APTw MRI scanning at 3?T. The APTw signal was quantified by the asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) at 3.5?ppm. Z spectra of normal tissues in the head and neck (masseter muscle, parotid glands, submandibular glands and thyroid glands) were analyzed in healthy volunteers. Inter-scan repeatability of APTw MRI was evaluated in six healthy volunteers. Z spectra of patients with head and neck tumors were produced and APTw signals in these tumors were analyzed. APTw MRI scanning was successful for all 10 subjects. The parotid glands showed the highest APTw signal (~7.6% average), whereas the APTw signals in other tissues were relatively moderate. The repeatability of APTw signals from the masseter muscle, parotid gland, submandibular gland and thyroid gland of healthy volunteers was established. Four head and neck tumors showed positive mean APTw ranging from 1.2% to 3.2%, distinguishable from surrounding normal tissues. APTw MRI was feasible for use in the head and neck regions at 3?T. The preliminary results on patients with head and neck tumors indicated the potential of APTw MRI for clinical applications. PMID:25137521

Yuan, Jing; Chen, Shuzhong; King, Ann D; Zhou, Jinyuan; Bhatia, Kunwar S; Zhang, Qinwei; Yeung, David Ka Wei; Wei, Juan; Mok, Greta Seng Peng; Wang, Yi-Xiang

2014-10-01

336

Dosimetric Comparison of Split Field and Fixed Jaw Techniques for Large IMRT Target Volumes in the Head and Neck  

SciTech Connect

Some treatment planning systems (TPSs), when used for large-field (>14 cm) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), create split fields that produce excessive multiple-leaf collimator segments, match-line dose inhomogeneity, and higher treatment times than nonsplit fields. A new method using a fixed-jaw technique (FJT) forces the jaw to stay at a fixed position during optimization and is proposed to reduce problems associated with split fields. Dosimetric comparisons between split-field technique (SFT) and FJT used for IMRT treatment is presented. Five patients with head and neck malignancies and regional target volumes were studied and compared with both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on an Eclipse TPS using beam data generated for Varian 2100C linear accelerator. A standard beam arrangement consisting of nine coplanar fields, equally spaced, was used in both techniques. Institutional dose-volume constraints used in head and neck cancer were kept the same for both techniques. The dosimetric coverage for the target volumes between SFT and FJT for head and neck IMRT plan is identical within {+-}1% up to 90% dose. Similarly, the organs at risk (OARs) have dose-volume coverage nearly identical for all patients. When the total monitor unit (MU) and segments were analyzed, SFT produces statistically significant higher segments (17.3 {+-} 6.3%) and higher MU (13.7 {+-} 4.4%) than the FJT. There is no match line in FJT and hence dose uniformity in the target volume is superior to the SFT. Dosimetrically, SFT and FJT are similar for dose-volume coverage; however, the FJT method provides better logistics, lower MU, shorter treatment time, and better dose uniformity. The number of segments and MU also has been correlated with the whole body radiation dose with long-term complications. Thus, FJT should be the preferred option over SFT for large target volumes.

Srivastava, Shiv P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Reid Hospital and Health Care Services Richmond, IN (United States); Das, Indra J., E-mail: Idas@IUpui.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Kumar, Arvind [Department of Radiation Oncology, Reid Hospital and Health Care Services Richmond, IN (United States); Johnstone, Peter A.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

2011-04-01

337

Systemic therapy strategies for head-neck carcinomas: Current status  

PubMed Central

Head and neck cancers, most of which are squamous cell tumours, have an unsatisfactory prognosis despite intensive local treatment. This can be attributed, among other factors, to tumour recurrences inside or outside the treated area, and metastases at more distal locations. These tumours therefore require not only the standard surgical and radiation treatments, but also effective systemic modalities. The main option here is antineoplastic chemotherapy, which is firmly established in the palliative treatment of recurrent or metastatic stages of disease, and is used with curative intent in the form of combined simultaneous or adjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with inoperable or advanced tumour stages. Neoadjuvant treatment strategies for tumour reduction before surgery have yet to gain acceptance. Induction chemotherapy protocols before radiotherapy have to date been used in patients at high risk of distant metastases or as an aid for decision-making (“chemoselection”) in those with extensive laryngeal cancers, prior to definitive chemoradiotherapy or laryngectomy. Triple-combination induction therapy (taxanes, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) shows high remission rates with significant toxicity and, in combination with (chemo-)radiotherapy, is currently being compared with simultaneous chemoradiotherapy; the current gold standard with regards to efficacy and long-term toxicity. A further systemic treatment strategy, called “targeted therapy”, has been developed to help increase specificity and reduce toxicity. An example of targeted therapy, EGFR-specific antibodies, can be used in palliative settings and, in combination with radiotherapy, to treat advanced head and neck cancers. A series of other novel biologicals such as signal cascade inhibitors, genetic agents, or immunotherapies, are currently being evaluated in large-scale clinical studies, and could prove useful in patients with advanced, recurring or metastatic head and neck cancers. When developing a lasting, individualised systemic tumour therapy, the critical evaluation criteria are not only efficacy and acute toxicity but also (long-term) quality-of-life and the identification of dedicated predictive biomarkers. PMID:23320055

Hoffmann, Thomas K.

2012-01-01

338

HPV vaccination in head and neck HPV-related pathologies.  

PubMed

Recent data demonstrate that human papilloma virus (HPV) plays a role in pathologies other than ano-genital cancers, specifically head and neck malignancies, and non-cancerous conditions such as recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). High-risk HPV16 and 18, and low risk HPV6 and 11 play the main role in HPV-related pathologies. As more and more information about the role of HPV infection in non-cervical diseases is amassed, additional questions about whether prophylactic HPV vaccines will effectively prevent these conditions are raised. HPV vaccination programs for the cervical pathology are being implemented worldwide. In the United States, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the quadrivalent HPV vaccine for girls in 2006 and for boys in 2011. These vaccination programs were aimed at the genital, HPV-related lesions, and there was not much recognition at that time of how HPV vaccination programs might affect oral HPV infection, which is a risk factor for the development of HPV-related head and neck cancers. Vaccination has proved to be a successful policy, and an extant recommendation is aimed at preventing HPV and associated cervical and other anogenital cancers with the routine use of HPV vaccines for males and females. However, HPV vaccines are presently not recommended for preventing oropharyngeal cancer (OPC), although they have been shown to be highly effective against the HPV strains that are most commonly found in the oropharynx. This review is aimed at presenting the evidence-based knowledge concerning HPV vaccination and highlighting the trials and strategies for vaccine administration in HPV-dependent head and neck pathologies. PMID:24981297

Wierzbicka, Ma?gorzata; Józefiak, Agata; Jackowska, Joanna; Szyd?owski, Jaros?aw; Go?dzicka-Józefiak, Anna

2014-01-01

339

Effect of yoga on the Myofascial Pain Syndrome of neck  

PubMed Central

Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) refers to pain attributed to muscle and its surrounding fascia, which is associated with “myofascial trigger points” (MTrPs). MTrPs in the trapezius has been proposed as the main cause of temporal and cervicogenic headache and neck pain. Literature shows that the prevalence of various musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) among physiotherapists is high. Yoga has traditionally been used to treat MSDs in various populations. But there is scarcity of literature which explains the effects of yoga on reducing MPS of the neck in terms of various physical parameters and subjective responses. Therefore, a pilot study was done among eight physiotherapists with minimum six months of experience. A structured yoga protocol was designed and implemented for five days in a week for four weeks. The outcome variables were Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hands (DASH) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) for Trigger Points, Cervical Range of Motion (CROM) - active & passive, grip and pinch strengths. The variables were compared before and after the intervention. Finally, the result revealed that all the variables (DASH: P<0.00, NDI: P<0.00, VAS: P<0.00, PPT: Left: P<0.00, PPT: Right: P<0.00, Grip strength: left: P<0.00, Grip strength: right: P<0.01, Key pinch: left: P<0.01, Key pinch: right: P<0.01, Palmar pinch: left: P<0.01, Palmar pinch: right: P<0.00, Tip pinch: left: P<0.01, Tip pinch: Right: P<0.01) improved significantly after intervention. PMID:25035608

Sharan, D; Manjula, M; Urmi, D; Ajeesh, PS

2014-01-01

340

Football head and neck injuries--an update.  

PubMed

In the last 5 years there has been a dramatic decrease in the deaths directly related to football participation. The incidence of serious spinal cord injuries, however, appears to be increasing. The number of quadriplegic athletes varies from an estimated 1 per 7,000 to 1 per 58,000 participants per year in different areas of the country. The majority of catastrophic head and neck injuries occurs while tackling or blocking, and defensive players are much more liable to sustain these injuries than offensive players. In addition to permanent and irreversible spinal cord damage, football players may suffer spinal concussions as well as spinal contusions. The latter may be manifested by severe burning paresthesias and dysesthesias in the extremities as the only symptoms. Furthermore, fracture-dislocations with ligamentous tears may be present in this syndrome, with no complaint of cervical pain. Adequate preconditioning and strengthening of the head and neck musculature prior to football participation are essential for the prevention of catastrophic head and neck injury. Furthermore, proper blocking and tackling techniques must be taught, and such punishing maneuvers as spearing, goring, and butt-blocking and tackling must be eliminated. Arbitrarily, most physicians discourage further football participation if an athlete has suffered three cerebral concussions. Strong consideration must be given, however, not only to the number and severity of the concussion, but also to any CAT scan evidence of cerebral edema, contusion, or hemorrhage. With this incredibly sensitive diagnostic tool, one concussion, which is associated with radiographic evidence of structural brain damage, may be enough to strongly discourage or forbid further football participation. PMID:6268346

Maroon, J C; Steele, P B; Berlin, R

1980-01-01

341

TGF? signaling in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Transforming growth factor beta (TGF?) is a key regulator of epithelial cell proliferation, immune function and angiogenesis. Because TGF? signaling maintains epithelial homeostasis, dysregulated TGF? signaling is common in many malignancies, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Defective TGF? signaling in epithelial cells causes hyperproliferation, reduced apoptosis and increased genomic instability, and the compensatory increase in TGF? production by tumor epithelial cells with TGF? signaling defects further promotes tumor growth and metastases by increasing angiogenesis and inflammation in tumor stromal cells. Here, we review the mouse models that we used to study TGF? signaling in HNSCC. PMID:20676130

White, RA; Malkoski, SP; Wang, X-J

2014-01-01

342

Treatment-related dysgeusia in head and neck cancer patients.  

PubMed

Head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy agents may develop altered taste acuity. This, together with radiation induced xerostomia and dysphagia, is a major contributory factor to the anorexia and concomitant morbidity often seen in this group of patients. This paper examines the existing literature in order to assess the prevalence of clinician and patient-reported dysgeusia in HNC patients undergoing oncological treatment. We also describe the temporal manifestations of the same and its reported impact on QOL. PMID:25064135

Irune, Ekpemi; Dwivedi, Raghav C; Nutting, Christopher M; Harrington, Kevin J

2014-10-01

343

Head and neck cancers, version 2.2014.  

PubMed

This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Head and Neck Cancers focuses on glottic laryngeal cancer, which is the most common type of laryngeal cancer and has an excellent cure rate. The lymphatic drainage of the glottis is sparse, and early stage primaries rarely spread to regional nodes. Because hoarseness is an early symptom, most glottic laryngeal cancer is early stage at diagnosis. Updates to these guidelines for 2014 include revisions to "Principles of Radiation Therapy" for each site and "Principles of Surgery," and the addition of a new section on "Principles of Dental Evaluation and Management." PMID:25313184

Pfister, David G; Spencer, Sharon; Brizel, David M; Burtness, Barbara; Busse, Paul M; Caudell, Jimmy J; Cmelak, Anthony J; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Dunphy, Frank; Eisele, David W; Gilbert, Jill; Gillison, Maura L; Haddad, Robert I; Haughey, Bruce H; Hicks, Wesley L; Hitchcock, Ying J; Jimeno, Antonio; Kies, Merrill S; Lydiatt, William M; Maghami, Ellie; Martins, Renato; McCaffrey, Thomas; Mell, Loren K; Mittal, Bharat B; Pinto, Harlan A; Ridge, John A; Rodriguez, Cristina P; Samant, Sandeep; Schuller, David E; Shah, Jatin P; Weber, Randal S; Wolf, Gregory T; Worden, Frank; Yom, Sue S; McMillian, Nicole R; Hughes, Miranda

2014-10-01

344

Dynamic necking in materials with strain induced martensitic transformation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work investigates the interplay between inertia and strain induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) on necking inception and energy absorption in dynamically stretched cylindrical rods. For that task a linear stability technique, derived within a quasi-1D framework and specifically accounting for SIMT, has been developed. Likewise, finite element simulations have been performed, using a specific constitutive equation to consider SIMT. Stability analysis and numerical simulations demonstrate that, at high strain rates, inertia may take the dominant role in stabilizing the material, on top of the transformation hardening effects. Furthermore, under certain loading conditions the martensitic transformation may penalize either ductility or energy absorption capacity.

Zaera, R.; Rodríguez-Martínez, J. A.; Vadillo, G.; Fernández-Sáez, J.

2014-03-01

345

Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of head and neck lesions.  

PubMed

Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to improve the detection of tumors, to determine the tumor extension, and to make differential diagnosis. Most malignant lesions of the head and neck show early enhancement and early washout of contrast media on dynamic MRI, but the tumor characterization remains unclear. Pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic MRI can provide information about the permeability of Gd-DTPA in the tumor that may reflect the oxygen concentration of the tumor and the amount of drug delivered to the tumor. This information may be useful in the prediction of radiation and/or chemotherapy response of the tumor. PMID:10551627

Baba, Y; Yamashita, Y; Onomichi, M; Murakami, R; Takahashi, M

1999-04-01

346

Intravascular small cell neuroendocrine tumor in the neck.  

PubMed

A 40-year-old man presented with a painless enlarging right neck mass over several weeks without a history of trauma or infection. Ultrasound, contrast-enhanced CT, and MRI showed a mass in an expanded vein extending into the parotid gland. Blood-stained fine-needle aspiration biopsy demonstrated atypical lymphoid cells, but there was insufficient material for a diagnosis. The mass was intensely avid on F-FDG PET/CT and was suggestive of a neoplasm. Excision confirmed a mass within the external jugular vein with areas of invasion through the vessel wall. A diagnosis of small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma was made on histology. PMID:24978335

Chang, Chian A; Jong, Ian; Nowicki, Anna; Ramdave, Shakher

2014-11-01

347

Postauricular and Axillary Approach Endoscopic Neck Surgery: A New Technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  While the bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) to endoscopic neck surgery resolves various benign and malignant thyroid\\u000a and parathyroid diseases with minimal adverse effects and excellent cosmetic outcomes, it involves circumareolar incisions.\\u000a Many patients, especially young female patients, are reluctant to have their breast involved. Consequently, we developed the\\u000a postauricular and axillary approach (PAA) that uses postauricular incisions.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  From June 2006

Kyu Eun Lee; Hoon Yub Kim; Won Seo Park; Jun-Ho Choe; Mi Ra Kwon; Seung Keun Oh; Yeo-Kyu Youn

2009-01-01

348

Sternoclavicular osteoradionecrosis following treatment for head and neck cancer.  

PubMed

Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is a well described complication of radiation therapy (RT) for head and neck cancer (HNC), with a past reported incidence as high as 10-18% [1,4] mostly involving the mandible. ORN rarely involves the sternoclavicular complex in HNC patients treated with RT. Here, we present a case of HNC treated with combined (cytotoxic) chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CCRT) complicated by ORN and osteomyelitis of the sternoclavicular complex involving large segments of both clavicles, the sternum, and the trachea. PMID:24054779

Gehani, Neal; Ludin, Adir; Baskin, Jonathan Z

2013-01-01

349

Acute neck pain, an atypical presentation of subarachnoid haemorrhage  

PubMed Central

Subarachnoid haemorrhage can be a massively debilitating condition with long?term repercussions. The “classic” presentation of sudden?onset severe headache normally raises suspicions. However, if the presentation is atypical, the diagnosis may be missed. We report on a 52?year?old man who presented with a 1?day history of progressively worsening right?sided neck pain spreading to the chest with associated symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. After initial stabilisation, the patient's Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score declined, with subsequent CT scan showing an extensive subarachnoid haemorrhage. PMID:17384369

Ahmed, Julian; Blakeley, Chris; Sakar, Ramy; Aktar, Khalida; Hashemi, Kambiz

2007-01-01

350

Acute neck pain, an atypical presentation of subarachnoid haemorrhage.  

PubMed

Subarachnoid haemorrhage can be a massively debilitating condition with long-term repercussions. The "classic" presentation of sudden-onset severe headache normally raises suspicions. However, if the presentation is atypical, the diagnosis may be missed. We report on a 52-year-old man who presented with a 1-day history of progressively worsening right-sided neck pain spreading to the chest with associated symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. After initial stabilisation, the patient's Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score declined, with subsequent CT scan showing an extensive subarachnoid haemorrhage. PMID:17384369

Ahmed, Julian; Blakeley, Chris; Sakar, Ramy; Aktar, Khalida; Hashemi, Kambiz

2007-04-01

351

[Recurrent syncope in head and neck cancer: a case report].  

PubMed

The repeated syncopes in case of head and neck cancer are a complication rarely described in the literature. They occur when the tumor invade the carotid sinus or the afferent fibers of the glossopharyngeal nerve. We report the case of a 62-year-old man presented episodes of syncope synchronous of a recurrent hypopharyngeal tumor scheduled for chemotherapy and gastrostomy. A computerized tomography showed a voluminous tumor expanded to the carotid and parapharyngeal spaces. After treatment by isporenaline chlorhydrate in intensive care unit, a pacemaker was implanted to prevent syncopes and allowed the beginning of the chemotherapy. PMID:24878060

Bordenave, L; Moya-Plana, A; Motamed, C; Bourgain, J-L

2014-06-01

352

A Phase Ib/II Study of BYL719 and Cetuximab in Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (RM HNSCC) Patients Who Are Resistant or Ineligible/Intolerant to Platinum-based Chemotherapy.; Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

2014-08-08

353

Resistance Training and Head-Neck Segment Dynamic Stabilization in Male and Female Collegiate Soccer Players  

PubMed Central

Context: Cervical resistance training has been purported to aid in reducing the severity of brain injuries in athletes. Objective: To determine the effect of an 8-week resistance-training program on head-neck segment dynamic stabilization in male and female collegiate soccer players. Design: Pretest and posttest control group design. Setting: University research laboratory and fitness center. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-six National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate soccer players (17 men, 19 women). Intervention(s): The resistance training group underwent an 8-week cervical resistance training program that consisted of 3 sets of 10 repetitions of neck flexion and extension at 55% to 70% of their 10-repetition maximum 2 times a week. Participants in the control group performed no cervical resistance exercises. Main Outcome Measure(s): Head-neck segment kinematics and stiffness, electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles during force application to the head, and neck flexor and extensor isometric strength. Results: No kinematic, electromyographic, or stiffness training effects were seen. The posttest resistance training group isometric neck flexor strength was 15% greater than the pretest measurement. Isometric neck extensor strength in the female resistance training group was 22.5% greater at the posttest than at the pretest. Women's neck girth increased 3.4% over time regardless of training group level. Women exhibited 7% less head-neck segment length and 26% less head-neck segment mass than men. Conclusions: Despite increases in isometric strength and girth, the 8-week isotonic cervical resistance training did not enhance head-neck segment dynamic stabilization during force application in collegiate soccer players. Future researchers should examine the effect of head-neck segment training protocols that include traditional and neuromuscular activities (eg, plyometrics) with the focus of reducing head acceleration on force application. PMID:16404453

Mansell, Jamie; Tierney, Ryan T; Sitler, Michael R; Swanik, Kathleen A; Stearne, David

2005-01-01

354

Elective management of the neck in oral cavity squamous carcinoma: current concepts supported by prospective studies.  

PubMed

The incidence of occult cervical metastasis in oral cavity cancer, even in early stages, is significant, necessitating elective treatment of the neck in a majority of cases. There is no method of imaging or other examination that will detect microscopic foci of metastatic disease in cervical lymph nodes. Immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of neck specimens reveals the incidence of occult metastases to be higher than revealed by light microscopy with ordinary hematoxylin and eosin staining. The neck may be treated electively by surgery or irradiation. Surgery has the advantage of permitting pathological staging of the neck, avoiding unnecessary radiation treatment and indicating cases where adjuvant therapy should be employed. As oral cavity cancer rarely metastasizes to level V, a radical or modified radical neck dissection of all five node levels is not necessary. Selective dissection of levels I-III ("supraomohyoid neck dissection") is the usual procedure of choice for elective dissection of the neck. Most of the relatively small number of isolated metastasis to level IV are from primary tumours of the tongue, which are known to produce "skip" metastases. Thus an "extended supraomohyoid neck dissection" of levels I-IV is recommended by some authors for elective treatment of the neck in tongue cancer. A number of recent prospective multi-institutional studies have demonstrated that sublevel IIB is rarely involved with isolated metastasis from oral cavity primary tumours, except from some tongue cancers. Thus it is justifiable to omit dissection of sublevel IIB in elective treatment of most cases of oral cavity cancer. Bilateral neck dissection should be performed in elective treatment of tumours involving midline structures, and in patients with ipsilateral neck metastasis. PMID:19121878

Ferlito, Alfio; Silver, Carl E; Rinaldo, Alessandra

2009-01-01

355

Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain  

PubMed Central

Background Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Methods Clinical neck/shoulder examination at two large office workplaces in Copenhagen, Denmark. 174 women and 24 men (aged 25-65 years) with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain for a duration of at least 30 days during the previous year and a pain intensity of at least 2 on a modified VAS-scale of 0-10 participated. Exclusion criteria were traumatic injuries or other serious chronic disease. Using a standardized finger pressure of 2 kg, palpable tenderness were performed of eight anatomical neck/shoulder locations in the left and right side on a scale of 'no tenderness', 'some tenderness' and 'severe tenderness'. Results In women, the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus showed the highest prevalence of severe tenderness (18-30%). In comparison, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the upper trapezius, occipital border and supraspinatus was 13-19%. Severe tenderness of the medial deltoid was least prevalent (0-1%). In men, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the levator scapulae was 13-21%, and ranged between 0-8% in the remainder of the examined anatomical locations. Conclusions A high prevalence of tenderness exists in several anatomical locations of the neck/shoulder complex among adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Future research should focus on several neck/shoulder muscles, including the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus, and not only the upper trapezius. Trial Registration ISRCTN60264809 PMID:21777478

2011-01-01

356

The Relationship Between Human Papillomavirus Status and Other Molecular Prognostic Markers in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) status and known prognostic makers for head and neck cancers including tumor hypoxia, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and intratumoral T-cell levels and to determine the prognostic impact of these markers by HPV status. Methods and Materials: HPV status in 82 evaluable head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients was determined by pyrosequencing and related to p16{sup INK4a} staining and treatment outcomes. It was correlated with tumor hypoxia (tumor pO{sub 2} and carbonic anhydrase [CAIX] staining), EGFR status, and intratumoral lymphocyte expression (CD3 staining). Results: Forty-four percent of evaluable tumors had strong HPV signal by pyrosequencing. There was a significant relationship between strong HPV signal and p16{sup INK4a} staining as well as oropharynx location. The strong HPV signal group fared significantly better than others, both in time to progression (TTP, p = 0.008) and overall survival (OS, p = 0.004) for all patients and for the oropharyngeal subset. Positive p16{sup INK4a} staining was associated with better TTP (p = 0.014) and OS (p = 0.00002). There was no relationship between HPV status and tumor pO{sub 2} or CAIX staining. However, HPV status correlated inversely with EGFR reactivity (p = 0.0006) and directly with CD3(+) T-lymphocyte level (p = 0.03). Whereas CAIX and EGFR overexpression were negative prognostic factors regardless of HPV status, CD3(+) T-cell levels was prognostic only in HPV(-) tumors. Conclusion: HPV status was a prognostic factor for progression and survival. It correlated inversely with EGFR expression and directly with T-cell infiltration. The prognostic effect of CAIX and EGFR expression was not influenced by HPV status, whereas intratumoral T-cell levels was significant only for HPV(-) tumors.

Kong, Christina S. [Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Narasimhan, Balasubramanian [Department of Statistics, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Cao Hongbin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Kwok, Shirley [Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Erickson, Julianna P. [Biochemistry-Genome Center, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Koong, Albert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Pourmand, Nader [Biochemistry-Genome Center, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Department of Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)], E-mail: qle@stanford.edu

2009-06-01

357

Successful management of simple fractures of the femoral neck with femoral head and neck excision arthroplasty in two free-living avian species.  

PubMed

A red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) and a Canada goose (Branta canadensis) were evaluated for unilateral pelvic limb lameness. Physical examination findings and results of diagnostic imaging revealed femoral neck fractures in both birds. Both birds were treated with a femoral head and neck excision arthroplasty. The affected legs were not immobilized, and the birds were encouraged to use the legs immediately after surgery to encourage formation of a pseudoarthrosis. Within 2 weeks, both birds were using the affected limb well enough to be either successfully released or transferred to a wildlife rehabilitation facility. Femoral head and neck excision arthroplasty without immobilization of the limb is recommended for managing avian femoral neck fractures, especially in free-ranging species in which a rapid and complete or near complete return to function is vital for survival in the wild. PMID:22216722

Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Whittington, Julia K; Bennett, R Avery; McFadden, Mike; Mitchell, Mark; O'Brien, Robert

2011-09-01

358

Vascular Priming Enhances Chemotherapeutic Efficacy against Head and Neck Cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose The need to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy against head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) is well recognized. In this study, we investigated the potential of targeting the established tumor vasculature in combination with chemotherapy in head and neck cancer. Methods Experimental studies were carried out in multiple human HNSCC xenograft models to examine the activity of the vascular disrupting agent (VDA) 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) in combination with chemotherapy. Multimodality imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, bioluminescence) in conjunction with drug delivery assessment (fluorescence microscopy), histopathology and microarray analysis was performed to characterize tumor response to therapy. Long-term treatment outcome was assessed using clinically-relevant end points of efficacy. Results Pretreatment of tumors with VDA prior to administration of chemotherapy increased intratumoral drug delivery and treatment efficacy. Enhancement of therapeutic efficacy was dependent on the dose and duration of VDA treatment but was independent of the chemotherapeutic agent evaluated. Combination treatment resulted in increased tumor cell kill and improvement in progression-free survival and overall survival in both ectopic and orthotopic HNSCC models. Conclusion Our results show that preconditioning of the tumor microenvironment with an antivascular agent primes the tumor vasculature and results in enhancement of chemotherapeutic delivery and efficacy in vivo. Further investigation into the activity of antivascular agents in combination with chemotherapy against HNSCC is warranted. PMID:23890930

Folaron, Margaret; Kalmuk, James; Lockwood, Jaimee; Frangou, Costakis; Vokes, Jordan; Turowski, Steven G.; Merzianu, Mihai; Rigual, Nestor R.; Sullivan-Nasca, Maureen; Kuriakose, Moni A.; Hicks, Wesley L.; Singh, Anurag K.; Seshadri, Mukund

2013-01-01

359

Adult Head and Neck Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Treatment and Outcome  

PubMed Central

We have retrospectively analysed the experience of a musculoskeletal oncological unit in the management of adult head and neck soft tissue sarcomas from 1990 to 2005. Thirty-six patients were seen, of whom 24 were treated at this unit, the remainder only receiving advice. The median age of the patients was 46 years. Most of the sarcomas were deep and of high or intermediate grade with a median size of 5.5?cm. Eleven different histological subtypes were identified. Wide excision was possible only in 21% of the cases. 42% of the patients developed local recurrence and 42% developed metastatic disease usually in the lungs. Overall survival was 49% at 5 years. Tumour size was the most important prognostic factor. Adult head and neck soft tissue sarcomas have a high mortality rate with a high risk of local recurrence and metastatic disease. The rarity of the disease would suggest that centralisation of care could lead to increased expertise and better outcomes. PMID:18382622

Singh, Rabindra P.; Grimer, Robert J.; Bhujel, Nabina; Carter, Simon R.; Tillman, Roger M.; Abudu, Adesegun

2008-01-01

360

Harnessing massively parallel sequencing in personalized head and neck oncology.  

PubMed

Advances in the management of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have not significantly changed the prognosis of this tumor over the past five decades. Molecular heterogeneity of HNSCC and its association with HPV, in addition to the increase in the number of cancers arising in traditionally low-risk patients, are among some of the obstacles to the successful management of this group of tumors. Massively parallel sequencing, otherwise known as next-generation sequencing (NGS), is rapidly changing conventional patient management by providing detailed information about each patient's genome and transcriptome. Despite major advances in technology and a significant reduction in the cost of sequencing, NGS remains mainly limited to research facilities. In addition, there are only a few published studies that have utilized this technology in HNSCC. This paper aims to report briefly on current commercially available NGS platforms and discuss their clinical applications, ethical considerations, and utilization in personalized patient care, particularly as this relates to head and neck cancer. PMID:24557572

Jessri, M; Farah, C S

2014-05-01

361

Simulation of haemodynamic flow in head and neck cancer chemotherapy  

PubMed Central

Background In recent years, intra arterial chemotherapy has become an important component in head and neck cancer treatment. However, therapy success can vary significantly and consistent treatment guidelines are missing. The purpose of this study was to create a computer simulation of the chemical agent injection in the head and neck arteries to investigate the distribution and concentration of the chemical. Methods Realistic three dimensional patient specific geometry was created from image scan data. Pulsatile blood flow, turbulence, the chemical agent injection via a catheter, and the mixture between blood and the chemical were then simulated through the arterial network by computational fluid dynamics software. Results The results show a consistent chemical distribution throughout all the arteries and this is ineffective. In addition, due to high wall shear stress and turbulence at the inner bifurcation wall, serious complications during the treatment could occur, for instance haemolysis or thrombosis. Conclusions The modelled catheter position is insufficient to provide a high chemical agent concentration in the desired tumour feeding artery, which is vital for therapy success. PMID:22136408

2011-01-01

362

[Application of color Doppler to the head and neck region].  

PubMed

In the diagnosis of the head and neck region it is important to investigate the relationship between the lesions and surrounding vessels, including their hemodynamics, pre- and/or postoperatively. For this purpose color Doppler has been used in recent years. However, there is little information on the use of color Doppler in this region. This report describes an attempt to apply this examination to the region of the head and neck. Standard methods of detection of the main arteries and internal jugular vein have been devised, and the blood velocity and flow of those arteries were measured using SSA-270A convex (3.75 MHz) and linear (3.75 MHz, 2.5 MHz) array probes (Toshiba Co., Ltd.). This technique was also applied to several clinical cases. The results of these investigation were as follows. 1) The middle cerebral, vertebral and basilar, and carotid arteries and their branches could be studied. 2) Blood velocity and flow of the main arteries were reasonable when compared with the results of scintigraphy and electromagnetic studies. 3) The vessels surrounding the tumors were easy to detect. The location or hemodynamics of metastatic tumors, pseudoaneurysm, and tongue hemangioma could also be displayed. The technique was also useful for the blood flow estimation in the portion of vascular anastomosis. PMID:1744795

Takeuchi, Y

1991-09-01

363

Femoral neck stress fracture in a military trainee.  

PubMed

The patient was a 21-year-old female who was currently enrolled in a military security forces training program. She had a 1-month history of worsening left anterior hip pain that was insidious in nature and limiting her ability to run. The patient was diagnosed as having a left hip strain, prescribed a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication,given a reduced activity waiver, and referred to a physical therapist. Despite previous radiographs of the pelvis and hips that were interpreted as normal, the history and physical examination findings led the physical therapist to be concerned about the presence of a possible femoral neck stress fracture. Immediate magnetic resonance imaging of the left hip was obtained, which revealed a stress fracture of the basicervical portion of the left femoral neck. The patient was referred to an orthopaedic surgeon for an expedited consultation and underwent open reduction internal fixation of the left hip later that day. After a period of convalescence and completion of a comprehensive rehabilitation program, the patient successfully returned to full military duty without limitations. PMID:21169721

Duquette, Thomas L; Watson, Daniel J

2010-12-01

364

Body composition analysis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

Direct bioimpedance measures [resistance, reactance, phase angle] determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) detect changes in tissue electrical properties. Bioelectrical impedance analysis vector (BIVA) technique is a promising tool, using the pure data obtained by BIA evaluation for the screening and monitoring of nutrition and hydration status. BIVA has the potential to be used as a routine method in the clinical setting for the assessment and management of body fluids. The study was conducted to evaluate soft tissue hydration and mass through pattern analysis of vector plots as height, normalized resistance, and reactance measurements by bioelectric impedance vector analysis in patients with head and neck cancer. Whole body measurements were made with ImpediMed bioimpedance analysis in 134 adult, white, male subjects 22-87 years old: 67 patients with head and neck cancer (H&NC) and 67 healthy volunteers matched by sex, age and BMI as a control group. All patients were previously untreated and without active nutritional interventions. Mean vectors of H&NC group versus the control group were characterized by an increased normalized resistance component with a reduced reactance component (separate 95% confidence limits, P < 0.05). BIVA may offer objective measures to improve clinical decision-making and predict outcomes. In patients with H&NC to reduce post-operational complications monitoring bioimpedance vector trajectory may support therapy planning of individual patients before surgery. PMID:24264763

Malecka-Massalska, Teresa; Smolen, Agata; Morshed, Kamal

2014-10-01

365

Assessment of pain during head and neck irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Radiation therapy for patients with head and neck malignancies frequently results in painful mucositis, which is usually poorly controlled with standard analgesics or topical anesthetics. To better understand the temporal development of radiation-induced pain and the effects of this pain on activities of daily living, 14 patients undergoing radiation therapy for a newly diagnosed head and neck malignancy completed daily pain diaries during the course of irradiation. All patients developed painful mucositis, usually beginning during the second or third week of radiation. Despite the use of analgesics/anesthetics, pain was rated as moderate or severe on 37% of treatment days and was noted to be constant or present throughout most of the day on 58% of treatment days. Eating and sleep disturbances related to pain occurred on 55% and 34% of treatment days, respectively. Eight patients had greater than a 2-kg weight loss. Radiation induces a predictable pattern of pain and comorbidity, which may be amenable to earlier and more aggressive analgesic treatment.

Weissman, D.E.; Janjan, N.; Byhardt, R.W.

1989-06-01

366

Participatory ergonomics and new work: reducing neck complaints in assembling.  

PubMed

A participatory ergonomics approach is used to create a new work environment, which is aimed at reducing neck complaints in a cell phone assembly. The participatory ergonomics program included an initiative, problem identification, a selection of solutions, an implementation and evaluation. Twenty-eight women, all operators on an assembly line of cell phone boards, voluntarily participated in the design and evaluation of a device before implementing the device to all 215 employees performing that job. Prior to and after the intervention, RULA, comfort experiences and interviews were used. After introducing an adjustable angled small counter, these measurements showed both posture and comfort improvements. 90% of the 215 workers preferred the new work station and the neck complaints were reduced in 75% of the group. It also showed that the initial prototype needed to be modified as to reduce its sharp edges/compression points for the forearm. This project shows the importance of iterative testing and that an initiative by workers enlarges the chance of successful implementation. PMID:22317512

Miguez, S A; Hallbeck, M S; Vink, P

2012-01-01

367

Guidelines for the treatment of head and neck venous malformations  

PubMed Central

Venous malformation is one of the most common benign vascular lesions, with approximately 40% of cases appearing in the head and neck. They can affect a patient’s appearance and functionality and even cause life-threatening bleeding or respiratory tract obstruction. The current methods of treatment include surgery, laser therapy, sclerotherapy, or a combined. The treatment of small and superficial venous malformations is relatively simple and effective; however, the treatment of deep and extensive lesions involving multiple anatomical sites remains a challenge for the physicians. For complex cases, the outcomes achieved with one single treatment approach are poor; therefore, individualized treatment modalities must be formulated based on the patient’s condition and the techniques available. Comprehensive multidisciplinary treatments have been adapted to achieve the most effective results. In this paper, based on the national and international literature, we formulated the treatment guidelines for head and neck venous malformations to standardize clinical practice. The guideline will be renewed and updated in a timely manner to reflect cutting-edge knowledge and to provide the best treatment modalities for patients. PMID:23724158

Zheng, Jia Wei; Mai, Hua Ming; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yan An; Fan, Xin Dong; Su, Li Xin; Qin, Zhong Ping; Yang, Yao Wu; Jiang, Yin Hua; Zhao, Yi Fang; Suen, James Y

2013-01-01

368

Necking down of sausages in current-carrying plasma pinches  

SciTech Connect

The evolution of long-wave perturbations is shown to be equivalent, for various unstable media, to the dynamics of a gas with a negative adiabatic index ..gamma... This evolution is described (for various values at N) by the quasi-Chaplygin system of equations Several examples of such media are considered, including a ''Chaplygin gas'' (N = 3), drops on a ceiling or ''solitons which have broken'' (N = 0), necks in a current-carrying plasma pinch with a skin effect, for both incompressible and compressible models (N = 2), and the breakup of liquid jets into drops (N = 3/2). A principle for selecting evolutionary solutions corresponding to the absence of perturbations in the limit t ..-->.. -infinity is formulated. In the cases N = 0 and N = 2, a hodograph transformation reduces system (1) to a magnetostatic equation (..delta..A)/sub phi/ = -(4..pi../c)j/sub phi/ and all the instability modes are equivalent to multipoles of circular currents which are localized on a circle. Exact solutions are given for periodic and isolated (localized) perturbations. The breakup of a medium into distinct blobs, in particular, the rupture of necks in a current-carrying plasma pinch, is demonstrated.

Trubnikov, B.A.; Zhdanov, S.K.

1986-07-01

369

Dumbbell-shaped lymphangioma of neck and thorax  

PubMed Central

Vascular malformations consist of a spectrum of lesions involving all parts of the body. They have different terminologies like vascular tumors, vascular malformations, vascular anomalies, and so on, which create a lot of confusion in understanding and treating these pathologies. Of late, classification on the basis of cellular kinetics and clinical behavior has been devised. Hemangioma is the most common vascular tumor. Vascular malformations are of either lymphatic or capillary and venous origin. Sometimes they are of a mixed origin. Lymphangiomas are common in the face and neck area. They are also not unusual in the mediastinum. We present a case where a huge lymphangioma occupied the right supraclavicular area of the neck, extending to nearly the entire right thoracic cavity, compressing the whole lung. The patient had occasional symptoms of cough. Ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) images clearly described the lesion as cystic, occupying both the supraclavicular and thoracic cavity compressing the lung parenchyma. Surgical excision was planned and we approached the lesion via both cervical and thoracotomy incisions. Complete excision was done, and the lung expended fully after the surgery.

Kumar, Shailendra; Kumar, Sanjeev; Kumar, Surender; Prakash, Ved; Kumar, Vijay

2014-01-01

370

Transoral robotic surgery in head and neck cancer.  

PubMed

Robots have invaded industry and, more recently, the field of medicine. Following the development of various prototypes, Intuitive Surgical® has developed the Da Vinci surgical robot. This robot, designed for abdominal surgery, has been widely used in urology since 2000. The many advantages of this transoral robotic surgery (TORS) are described in this article. Its disadvantages are essentially its high cost and the absence of tactile feedback. The first feasibility studies in head and neck cancer, conducted in animals, dummies and cadavers, were performed in 2005, followed by the first publications in patients in 2006. The first series including more than 20 patients treated by TORS demonstrated the feasibility for the following sites: oropharynx, supraglottic larynx and hypopharynx. However, these studies did not validate the oncological results of the TORS technique. TORS decreases the number of tracheotomies, and allows more rapid swallowing rehabilitation and a shorter length of hospital stay. Technical improvements are expected. Smaller, more ergonomic, new generation robots, therefore more adapted to the head and neck, will probably be available in the future. PMID:22154206

Hans, S; Delas, B; Gorphe, P; Ménard, M; Brasnu, D

2012-02-01

371

Further observations on mechanisms of bone destruction by squamous carcinomas of the head and neck: the role of host stroma.  

PubMed Central

Mechanisms of bone invasion by squamous carcinomas of the head and neck have been investigated using fresh tumours and established tumour cell lines in an in vitro bone resorption assay with 45Ca-labelled mouse calvaria. Fresh tumours regularly resorb bone in vitro. Activity is consistently reduced by indomethacin. The tumours release E2 prostaglandins (PGE2) in amounts sufficient to account for approximately 50% of the bone resorption observed. Small amounts of non-prostaglandin (indomethacin-resistant) osteolytic factors are also produced. Control non-neoplastic tissues show a variable capacity to resorb bone in vitro; PGE2 levels in these tissues may be related to their content of inflammatory cells. Tumour cell lines also resorb bone in vitro but, for most lines, activity is not significantly blocked by indomethacin and PGE2 levels are generally insufficient to account for the osteolysis observed. Non-prostaglandin bone resorbing factors thus predominate. It is concluded that most squamous cancers of the head and neck are osteolytic in vitro and release a mixture of prostaglandin and non-prostaglandin factors which stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption. These factors are derived from both neoplastic and stromal elements, and are "tumour-associated" rather than "tumour-specific". In vitro bone resorption and prostaglandin release does not correlate with pathological features of the tumour or with post-operative survival. PMID:6580033

Tsao, S. W.; Burman, J. F.; Pittam, M. R.; Carter, R. L.

1983-01-01

372

Relation between human papillomavirus positivity and p16 expression in head and neck carcinomas--a tissue microarray study.  

PubMed

Overexpression of p16 has been demonstrated to be strongly related to the presence of HPV16, 18. Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck has been shown to be associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. The main aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between HPV presence and p16 expression in a representative collection of 60 head and neck carcinomas by tissue microarrays. The presence of HPV (HPV6, 11-low risk, HPV16, 18-high risk) was detected by applying in situ hybridisation. P-16 protein expression was detected immunohistochemically. HPV6, 11 positivity was observed in 10 out of 60 carcinomas. HPV16, 18 presence was found in 30 out of 60 tumours. P-16 expression was detected in 35 out of 60 tumours. A statistically significant relationship was demonstrated between HPV16, 18 presence and increased expression of p16. Also the HPV6, 11 presence was significantly correlated with p16 immunoreactivity. Additionally, this study demonstrates that it is possible to analyse p16 expression and HPV presence by tissue microarrays. PMID:17352245

König, Frank; Krekeler, Gisbert; Hönig, Johannes F; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Fischer, Gösta; Korabiowska, Monika

2007-01-01

373

Fusion hindrance of heavy ions: role of the neck David Boilley  

E-print Network

Fusion hindrance of heavy ions: role of the neck David Boilley and Hongliang L¨u GANIL, CEA'Etudes-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91191, France Fusion of heavy ions is largely hindered because of the appearance. In this paper we stress the importance of the neck of the composite system on the hindrance of the fusion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

374

Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans Amelia M. Arbisser  

E-print Network

Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M. Arbisser B.S., Computer Science of Engineering Thesis Committee #12;2 #12;Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M of the requirements for the degree of Master of Engineering Abstract We investigate automating the task of segmenting

Golland, Polina

375

33 CFR 334.120 - Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.120 Section 334.120 Navigation and Navigable...120 Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular area of one...

2010-07-01

376

PET Monitoring of Therapy Response in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Western world, more than 90% of head and neck cancers are head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). The most appropriate treatment approach for HNSCC varies with thediseasestage anddiseasesiteintheheadandneck.Concur- rentchemoradiotherapyhasbecomeawidelyusedmeansforthe definitive treatment of locoregionally advanced HNSCC. Al- though this multimodality treatment provides higher response rates than radiotherapy alone, the detection of residual viable tu- mor after the end

Heiko Sch; Matthew Fury; Nancy Lee; Dennis Kraus

2009-01-01

377

Long-term efficacy of electroacupuncture for chronic neck pain: a randomised controlled trial.  

PubMed

Electroacupuncture is a safe treatment for chronic neck pain. Nonetheless, one month after treatment, improvement of neck pain is similar to that in placebo-treated controls. This suggests that the efficacy may not be due to specific effect of the treatment procedure. PMID:24473589

Zhang, S P; Chiu, T T W; Chiu, S N

2013-12-01

378

Taste dysfunction and eating behaviors in survivors of head and neck cancer treatment.  

PubMed

Radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery result in eating problems for patients with head and neck cancer. Eating is essential to physical and social functioning. Strategies for head and neck cancer survivors to cope with eating and taste impairments are reported in this study. PMID:25137792

McLaughlin, Laura

2014-01-01

379

A comparative evaluation of two head and neck immobilization devices using electronic portal imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was performed to compare the positioning reproducibility and the cost efficiency for two head and neck immobilization devices: the Uvex' (Uvex Safety, Smithfield, USA) plastic mask system and the Finesse Frame with Ultraplast System' (PLANET Medical, Svendborg, Denmark). 20 patients treated with 3D conformal radiation therapy for head and neck cancers were randomly selected (10 for each of

K Donato; K LESZCZYNSKI; K FLEMING

2006-01-01

380

Role of Nitric Oxide in Angiogenesis and Tumor Progression in Head and Neck Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels) is associated with tumor growth and metastasis in patients with solid tumors, including those of the head and neck. Nitric oxide (NO) production may contribute to these pro- cesses. We assessed the role of the NO pathway in angiogen- esis and tumor progression in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods: Biochemical assays

Oreste Gallo; Emanuela Masini; Lucia Morbidelli; Alessandro Franchi; Isabella Fini-Storchi; William A. Vergari; Marina Ziche

1998-01-01

381

Relevance of sentinel node procedures in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

The management of the clinically and radiologically negative neck (cN0) in patients with early oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is still a matter of debate, though most centers favor an active policy and perform END for staging of the neck and removal of occult disease. In the past decade SNB has been successfully implemented in early stage head and neck carcinomas. A large number of validation studies have shown an excellent safety profile with good sensitivity for the identification of occult neck metastases. The status of the neck is more accurately assessed by step-serial sectioning (SSS) and immunhistochemistry (IHC) of the sentinel lymph nodes (SN) compared to routine histopathologic work up of a comprehensive lymph node dissection specimen. Gain in experience as well as technical developments have lead to a wider use of SNB even in the complex lymphatic system of the Head and Neck region. First observational trials have documented its oncological accuracy and safety with success rates in controlling the neck comparable to END. The role of small tumor deposits only detectable by the extensive histopathologic work-up of the SNB-protocol is controversial. The overview comprises an introduction of the sentinel node procedure and indications in the head and neck region. The methodology as well as the histological work up and reporting of SNB is described. Finally, the clinical application, prognostic significance and future perspectives of SNB are summarized. PMID:22019708

Broglie, M A; Stoeckli, S J

2011-10-01

382

Inpatient falls and injuries in older patients treated for femoral neck fracture  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective inpatient study was performed at the Orthopedic and Geriatric Departments at the Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, to study inpatient falls, fall-related injuries, and risk factors for falls following femoral neck fracture surgery. Ninety-seven patients with femoral neck fracture aged 70 years or older were included, background characteristics, falls, injuries, and other postoperative complications were assessed and registered during

Michael Stenvall; Birgitta Olofsson; Maria Lundström; Olle Svensson; Lars Nyberg; Yngve Gustafson

2006-01-01

383

Changes in head and neck position affect elbow joint position sense  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in the position of the head and neck have been shown to introduce a systematic deviation in the end-point error of an upper limb pointing task. Although previous authors have attributed this to alteration of perceived target location, no studies have explored the effect of changes in head and neck position on the perception of limb position. This study

Joanna J. Knox; Paul W. Hodges

2005-01-01

384

NUTRITIONAL MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCER: INTEGRATING RESEARCH INTO PRACTICE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Malnutrition is known to be a problem in head and neck cancer throughout all phases of treatment and rehabilitation. Nutrition interventions have demonstrated beneficial intermediate outcomes. Despite this, nutrition services for this patient group are not consistent across Australia. Routine screening procedures should be implemented in multidisciplinary head and neck clinics and treatment areas to identify patients who are at

Wendy Davidson; Elisabeth Isenring; Teresa Brown; Bena Riddle

385

Tobacco and alcohol and the risk of head and neck cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

We carried out two case-control studies on the relative risk of head and neck cancer in association with tobacco and alcohol consumption. The first study carried out at the ENT Department of the University hospitals of Heidelberg and Giessen (FRG) comprised 200 male patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck and 800 control subjects matched for sex,

H. Maier; A. Dietz; U. Gewelke; W. D. Heller; H. Weidauer

1992-01-01

386

Multidimensional prognostic index in the elderly with hip or neck femur fracture.  

PubMed

Hip and neck femur fracture surgery was associated with high post-operative mortality and poor functional results. The decision-making process with regards to the elderly with hip or neck femur fractures was of great importance, requiring consideration of ethical, medico legal and economic factors in addition to the purely medical ones. An important component in the decision-making process was the precise knowledge of the expected mortality. We considered here several articles from 1 January 2002 to 31 August 2010 that identified the possible scoring system to predict mortality in the elderly undergoing hip or neck femur fracture surgery. We found seven studies which included a total of 12,177 patients that were assigned to hip/neck femur fracture surgery. Each study identified the possible scoring system to predict mortality in the elderly undergoing hip/neck femur fracture surgery. By reviewing the literature available, it was shown that there were more multidimensional prognostic indexes in the elderly after hospitalization than multidimensional prognostic indexes with hip or neck femur fracture which could be used as a simple point scoring system at the bedside to predict mortality in the elderly undergoing hip or neck femur fracture surgery. Although, all the prognostic indexes searched worked well for a general population, but they were of limited validity in the specific, relatively homogeneous population of hip/neck femur fracture patients. PMID:22802983

Vitale, Elsa; Notarnicola, Angela; Moretti, Lorenzo; Antonio, Esposito; Pesce, Vito; Moretti, Biagio

2012-05-01

387

FOOD FLIGHTS OF RED-NECKED GREBES DURING THE BREEDING SEASON  

Microsoft Academic Search

Red-necked Grebes (Podiceps grisegena) nested behind a dyke at Creston, British Columbia, and flew up to 2.5 km to an adjacent lake to forage for their young. Other Red- necked Grebes nested on the same lake and swam to foraging areas accompanied by their young. There were significant differences in size of prey chosen for chicks by \\

BWL A. OHANJANIAN

388

ASSESSMENT OF HEALTH AND GROWTH OF RING-NECKED PHEASANTS FOLLOWING CONSUMPTION OF INFECTED  

E-print Network

ASSESSMENT OF HEALTH AND GROWTH OF RING-NECKED PHEASANTS FOLLOWING CONSUMPTION OF INFECTED INSECTS os challenge from fungus-infected food items. Male and female ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus treatments (18 male and 18 female birds per treatment group). Pheasants were weighed at 9, 17, and 25 d

Johnson, Dan L.

389

Penetrating neck trauma: a review of management strategies and discussion of the 'No Zone' approach.  

PubMed

The evaluation and management of hemodynamically stable patients with penetrating neck injury has evolved considerably over the previous four decades. Algorithms developed in the 1970s focused on anatomic neck "zones" to distinguish triage pathways resulting from the operative constraints associated with very high or very low penetrations. During that era, mandatory endoscopy and angiography for Zone I and III penetrations, or mandatory neck exploration for Zone II injuries, became popularized, the so-called "selective approach." Currently, modern sensitive imaging technology, including computed tomographic angiography (CTA), is widely available. Imaging triage can now accomplish what operative or selective evaluation could not: a safe and noninvasive evaluation of critical neck structures to identify or exclude injury based on trajectory, the key to penetrating injury management. In this review, we discuss the use of CTA in modern screening algorithms introducing a "No Zone" paradigm: an evidence-based method eliminating "neck zone" differentiation during triage and management. We conclude that a comprehensive physical examination, combined with CTA, is adequate for triage to effectively identify or exclude vascular and aerodigestive injury after penetrating neck trauma. Zone-based algorithms lead to an increased reliance on invasive diagnostic modalities (endoscopy and angiography) with their associated risks and to a higher incidence of nontherapeutic neck exploration. Therefore, surgeons evaluating hemodynamically stable patients with penetrating neck injuries should consider departing from antiquated, invasive algorithms in favor of evidence-based screening strategies that use physical examination and CTA. PMID:23317595

Shiroff, Adam M; Gale, Stephen C; Martin, Niels D; Marchalik, Daniel; Petrov, Dmitriy; Ahmed, Hesham M; Rotondo, Michael F; Gracias, Vicente H

2013-01-01

390

Comparative nesting success of sympatric Lesser Scaup and Ring-necked Ducks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the fact that Lesser Scaup and Ring-necked Ducks are closely related and nest in similar habitats, the two species have inverse population trends. To evaluate the hypothesis that the difference in trends could be related to differences in reproduction, we compared nesting success of sympatric Lesser Scaup and Ring- necked Ducks in parkland habitat near Erickson, Manitoba. Data supported

D. N. Koons; J. J. Rotella

2003-01-01

391

Discovery of a short-necked sauropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic period of Patagonia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sauropod dinosaurs are one of the most conspicuous groups of Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrates. They show general trends towards an overall increase in size and elongation of the neck, by means of considerable elongation of the length of individual vertebrae and a cervical vertebra count that, in some cases, increases to 19 (ref. 1). The long neck is a particular hallmark

Oliver W. M. Rauhut; Kristian Remes; Regina Fechner; Gerardo Cladera; Pablo Puerta

2005-01-01

392

Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery  

E-print Network

Goals & Objectives : Skills & Knowledge 10 General Surgery Rotation 10 Stanford Head and Neck Team PGY2 Appendix F: Palo Alto Veteran's Affairs Rotation Checklist Documentation Policies Scheduling Surgery CasesStanford University School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery Resident

Kay, Mark A.

393

A Damage-coupled Criterion of Localized Necking Based on Acoustic Tensor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of a localized necking criterion for strain-softening materials is presented. The criterion is applicable to materials with anisotropic damage and anisotropic plasticity. The critical condition of damage evolution leading to localized necking is of primary interest in this investigation. As a consequence of plastic instability, the singularity of acoustic tensor is taken as the critical condition for localized

C. L. Chow; M. Jie; X. Wu

2007-01-01

394

Head and neck injuries in college football: An eight-year analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study documented head and neck injuries in a study group of 342 college football players at a single institution for a period of 8 years. All freshmen players were screened for evidence of: (1) past history of head and neck injuries, and (2) abnormalities of the cervical spine on physical examination and x-ray film. By recording all head

John P. Albright; Edward Mcauley; Robert K. Martin; Edward T. Crowley; Danny T. Foster

1985-01-01

395

Comprehensive Genomic Characterization of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck - David Neil Hayes, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012  

Cancer.gov

Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Characterization of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck - David Neil Hayes Comprehensive Genomic Characterization of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck - David Neil Hayes, TCGA Scientific

396

Alcohol Drinking in Never Users of Tobacco, Cigarette Smoking in Never Drinkers, and the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer: Pooled Analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background At least 75% of head and neck cancers are attributable to a combination of cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking. A precise understanding of the independent association of each of these factors in the absence of the other with the risk of head and neck cancer is needed to elucidate mechanisms of head and neck carcinogenesis and to assess the

Mia Hashibe; Paul Brennan; Simone Benhamou; Xavier Castellsague; Chu Chen; Maria Paula Curado; Luigino Dal Maso; Alexander W. Daudt; Eleonora Fabianova; Victor Wünsch-Filho; Silvia Franceschi; Richard B. Hayes; Rolando Herrero; Sergio Koifman; Carlo La Vecchia; Philip Lazarus; Fabio Levi; Dana Mates; Elena Matos; Ana Menezes; Joshua Muscat; Jose Eluf-Neto; Andrew F. Olshan; Peter Rudnai; Stephen M. Schwartz; Elaine Smith; Erich M. Sturgis; Neonilia Szeszenia-Dabrowska; Renato Talamini; Qingyi Wei; Deborah M. Winn; David Zaridze; Witold Zatonski; Zuo-Feng Zhang; Julien Berthiller; Paolo Boffetta

397

Selective versus comprehensive neck dissection in the treatment of patients with a pathologically node-positive neck with or without microscopic extracapsular spread in oral squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to compare the prognosis and complications between selective neck dissection (SND) and comprehensive neck dissection (CND) for patients with a pathologically node-positive neck in squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and the floor of the mouth. This was a retrospective cohort study. There was no significant difference between the SND group and the CND group in 3-year neck control rate (86.2% vs. 85.9%, P=0.797) or disease-specific survival (DSS) rate (64.6% vs. 61.9%, P=0.646). Further analyses of the respective 3-year DSS rates in the SND and CND subgroups were as follows: pN1 without extracapsular spread (ECS), 67.7% vs. 72.2%, P=0.851; pN2b without ECS, 64.7% vs. 68.8%, P=0.797; and pN+ with ECS, 57.1% vs. 60.0%, P=0.939. Of note, there were significantly fewer complications in the SND group compared with the CND group (7.3% vs. 20.0%, P=0.032). Multivariate analysis showed that the modality of neck treatment, pN+ status, and microscopic ECS did not serve as independent prognostic factors. SND plus adjuvant radiotherapy is a management strategy of high efficiency and minor morbidity for selected oral cancer patients with a pN+ neck with or without microscopic ECS. PMID:24938417

Feng, Z; Gao, Y; Niu, L X; Peng, X; Guo, C B

2014-10-01

398

Development of the clinical use of distant flaps for head and neck reconstruction.  

PubMed

The reconstruction of hard and soft tissue defects, mainly after ablative oncologic surgery in the head and neck area, is an evolving field. The use of free flaps for reconstruction of the head and neck is considered to be the surgical standard. In our analysis of more than 1000 free flaps we give an overview of the development of the use of different types of free tissue transfer to the head and neck area over the last 25 years. We show that the evolving field of head and neck reconstruction raises new possibilities with new types of flaps, whereas other types of flaps disappear in the everyday clinical use. The spectrum of reconstruction possibilities broadens with the number of different flap types available to the head and neck surgeon. PMID:23522831

Thiele, Oliver C; Seeberger, Robin; Engel, Michael; Freier, Kolja; Hoffmann, Jürgen

2014-01-01

399

Range of motion in a modular femoral stem system with a variety of neck options.  

PubMed

Modular femoral stem systems decouple leg length, offset, and version. The hip ROM and type of impingement for 162 femoral head/neck combinations were measured at four extreme hip positions in a Sawbones pelvis and femur to identify constructs that lead to early impingement. Hip ROM increased in all positions with increasing head size and neck length. We identified a new type of impingement created by the build-up of the proximal femoral stem: femoral stem on acetabular liner impingement. Seventy percent of neutral neck options achieved our definition of acceptable ROM. In general, when utilizing a modular femoral stem, surgeons can minimize impingement by choosing the longest femoral neck that does not over-lengthen the limb, using the largest femoral head accommodated by the cup, and avoiding neck version unless the cup or stem is malaligned. PMID:23886407

Hariri, Sanaz; Chun, Sungwook; Cowan, James B; Bragdon, Charles; Malchau, Henrik; Rubash, Harry E

2013-10-01

400

Recent innovations in head and neck oncology: a report from the ICHNO.  

PubMed

The International Conference on Innovative Approaches in Head and Neck Oncology is a biennial joint meeting under the auspices of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology, the European Head and Neck Society and the European Society of Medical Oncology. The conference focuses on recent developments in head and neck oncology. The main topics of this year were new insights in the epidemiology of head and neck cancer, the emerging role of human papillomavirus in head and neck cancer, update on randomized trials and new management approaches. The format of the meeting included invited key note lectures, interactive symposia, updates on large randomized trials, proffered paper sessions, poster presentations and tumor boards. The meeting was very well balanced, with abundant information and opportunities for interdisciplinary interaction. PMID:23617345

Stoeckli, Sandro J; Broglie, Martina A

2013-05-01

401

Mental disorders among persons with chronic back or neck pain: Results from the world mental health surveys  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports cross-national data concerning back or neck pain comorbidity with mental disorders. We assessed (a) the prevalence of chronic back\\/neck pain, (b) the prevalence of mental disorders among people with chronic back\\/neck pain, (c) which mental disorder had strongest associations with chronic back\\/neck pain, and (d) whether these associations are consistent across countries. Population surveys of community-dwelling adults

Koen Demyttenaere; Ronny Bruffaerts; Sing Lee; José Posada-Villa; Vivianne Kovess; Matthias C. Angermeyer; Daphna Levinson; Giovanni de Girolamo; Hideyuki Nakane; Zeina Mneimneh; Carmen Lara; Ron de Graaf; Kate Margaret Scott; Oye Gureje; Dan J. Stein; Josep Maria Haro; Evelyn J. Bromet; Ronald C. Kessler; Jordi Alonso; Michael Von Korff

2007-01-01

402

Isolation and Enumeration of Coliform Bacteria and Salmonella spp. from Short Necked Clam Orbicularia orbiculata at East Coast, Malaysia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shellfish including short necked clam Orbicularia orbiculata are filter feeders. The present study were carried out to estimate the total coliform and to identify bacteria species present in short-necked clams. The short necked clam locally known as lala were sold at wet markets at East Coast, Malaysia. They were screened for coliform bacteria and Salmonella spp. via Most Probable Number

Ruhil Hayati Hamdan; Najiah Musa; Nadirah Musa; Lee Seong Wei; Aliuddin Sarman

403

Modern imaging techniques and ultrasound-guided aspiration cytology for the assessment of neck node metastases: a prospective comparative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although palpation has proved to be an unreliable staging procedure, the indications for and the implications of more reliable radiologic staging methods for the neck in patients with a primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck remain controversial. Only a very accurate imaging technique can replace neck dissection in clinical NO disease. This study compares the value of

M. W. M. van den Brekel; J. A. Castelijns; H. V. Stel; R. P. Golding; C. J. L. Meyer; G. B. Snow

1993-01-01

404

Role of human papillomavirus and its detection in potentially malignant and malignant head and neck lesions: updated review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Head and neck malignancies are characterized by a multiphasic and multifactorial etiopathogenesis. Tobacco and alcohol consumption are the most common risk factors for head and neck malignancy. Other factors, including DNA viruses, especially human papilloma virus (HPV), may also play a role in the initiation or development of these lesions. The pathways of HPV transmission in the head and neck

Ajay Kumar Chaudhary; Mamta Singh; Shanthy Sundaram; Ravi Mehrotra

2009-01-01

405

Interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-6 release by peripheral blood monocytes in head and neck cancer.  

PubMed Central

In patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSC), evidence of cell-mediated immunity and monocyte functional abnormalities has been reported. We studied the production of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) by peripheral blood monocytes from 22 patients with HNSC (12 larynx and ten oral cavity cancers) in comparison with monocyte cytokine production of age-matched healthy subjects. Pure monocytes were incubated with and without lipopolysaccharides (LPS) (10 micrograms ml-1) for 4 h at 37 degrees C and IL-1 beta and IL-6 concentrations were determined in supernatants by specific ELISA. There was no significant difference in IL-1 beta levels in monocyte supernatants from cancer in comparison to control subjects; conversely, a higher IL-6 production by unstimulated and LPS-activated cells from HNSC patients than from controls was found. No relationship was observed between cytokine production and cancer stage. The regression analysis evidenced a significant correlation between IL-1 beta and IL-6 monocyte-release in HNSC patients and in controls, so suggesting a possible autocrine control of IL-6 production by other cytokines. PMID:8353036

Gallo, O.; Gori, A. M.; Attanasio, M.; Martini, F.; Giusti, B.; Boddi, M.; Gallina, E.; Fini, O.; Abbate, R.

1993-01-01

406

Molecular Characterization of Head and Neck Cancer: How Close to Personalized Targeted Therapy?  

PubMed Central

Molecular targeted therapy in squamous head and neck cancer (HNSCC) continues to make strides and holds much promise. Cetuximab remains the sole FDA-approved molecular targeted therapy available for HNSCC, though there are several new biological agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and other pathways in the regulatory approval pipeline. While targeted therapies have the potential to be personalized, their current use in HNSCC is not personalized. This is illustrated for EGFR targeted drugs, where EGFR as a molecular target has yet to be individualized for HNSCC. Future research needs to identify factors that correlate with response (or lack of one) and the underlying genotype-phenotype relationship that dictates this response. Comprehensive exploration of genetic and epigenetic landscapes in HNSCC is opening new frontiers to further enlighten, mechanistically inform, and set a course for eventually translating these discoveries into therapies for patients. This opinion offers a snap shot of the evolution of molecular subytping in HNSCC, its current clinical applicability, as well as new emergent paradigms with implications for controlling this disease in the future. PMID:22873739

Worsham, Maria J.; Ali, Haythem; Dragovic, Jadranka; Schweitzer, Vanessa P.

2013-01-01

407

Investigation of Conditions that Affect Neck Compression- Flexion Injuries Using Numerical Techniques.  

PubMed

A Finite Element (FE) model of isolated head and neck complex was developed aiming to investigate the mechanisms of injury from axial impacts, in the sagittal plane, and the injury thresholds from experimental studies reported in the literature. The model was validated on a local and a global level, showing a significant correlation with experimental investigations and thereby having the potential to predict both reported injuries and dynamic buckling modes. The frequently reported Hangmans' fracture was predicted to occur at an axial load of about 3.5 kN and at a local injury threshold of 191 MPa in the compact bone of C2. Also, when analyzing an experimentally designed inner roof of a vehicle, the FE model showed that an induced anterior translation of the head reduced both stress and forces of the cervical spine bone. Moreover, the recent FE model suggests that combined compression/flexion may result in less severe injuries compared to pure compression or compression extension. PMID:17458723

Halldin, P H; Brolin, K; Kleiven, S; von Holst, H; Jakobsson, L; Palmertz, C

2000-11-01

408

The Impact of Sphingosine Kinase-1 in Head and Neck Cancer  

PubMed Central

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has a high reoccurrence rate and an extremely low survival rate. There is limited availability of effective therapies to reduce the rate of recurrence, resulting in high morbidity and mortality of advanced cases. Late presentation, delay in detection of lesions, and a high rate of metastasis make HNSCC a devastating disease. This review offers insight into the role of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1), a key enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism, in HNSCC. Sphingolipids not only play a structural role in cellular membranes, but also modulate cell signal transduction pathways to influence biological outcomes such as senescence, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis. SphK1 is a critical regulator of the delicate balance between proliferation and apoptosis. The highest expression of SphK1 is found in the advanced stage of disease, and there is a positive correlation between SphK1 expression and recurrent tumors. On the other hand, silencing SphK1 reduces HNSCC tumor growth and sensitizes tumors to radiation-induced death. Thus, SphK1 plays an important and influential role in determining HNSCC proliferation and metastasis. We discuss roles of SphK1 and other sphingolipids in HNSCC development and therapeutic strategies against HNSCC. PMID:24970177

Tamashiro, Paulette M.; Furuya, Hideki; Shimizu, Yoshiko; Iino, Kayoko; Kawamori, Toshihiko

2013-01-01

409

Establishment and Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of a Cell Culture Model of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC)  

PubMed Central

Cytogenetic analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) established several biomarkers that have been correlated to clinical parameters during the past years. Adequate cell culture model systems are required for functional studies investigating those potential prognostic markers in HNSCC. We have used a cell line, CAL 33, for the establishment of a cell culture model in order to perform functional analyses of interesting candidate genes and proteins. The cell line was cytogenetically characterized using array CGH, spectral karyotyping (SKY) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). As a starting point for the investigation of genetic markers predicting radiosensitivity in tumor cells, irradiation experiments were carried out and radiation responses of CAL 33 have been determined. Radiosensitivity of CAL 33 cells was intermediate when compared to published data on tumor cell lines. PMID:24710094

Bauer, Verena L.; Hieber, Ludwig; Schaeffner, Quirin; Weber, Johannes; Braselmann, Herbert; Huber, Reinhard; Walch, Axel; Zitzelsberger, Horst

2010-01-01

410

Imaging of scleroma in the head and neck  

PubMed Central

We review the appearance of scleroma in the head and neck on imaging. Scleroma is a chronic granulomatous disease that primarily affects the nasal cavity, but the pharynx and larynx may also be involved. On imaging, nasal scleroma appears as bilateral or unilateral expanded homogeneous nasal masses that may exhibit hyperintense signal on T1 weighted images. Pharyngeal scleroma commonly narrows the pharyngeal lumen and may involve the soft and hard palate. Imaging is essential to detect the extent of subglottic stenosis in patients with laryngeal scleroma. Rarely, scleroma may involve the orbit or the middle ear. Imaging is essential for the early diagnosis of scleroma and for differentiating it from other granulomatous and neoplastic lesions. Also, imaging is important for treatment planning and follow-up of patients after therapy. PMID:22898154

Abdel Razek, A A K

2012-01-01

411

Structural Color of Rock Dove’s Neck Feather  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well known that some kinds of animal have surprisingly brilliant colors showing beautiful iridescence. These colors are called structural colors, and are thought to originate from optical interference caused by periodic microstructures that have sizes comparable with the wavelength of light. However, much larger structural modifications can also play an important role in the coloration mechanism. In this paper, we show through careful optical and structural investigations that the structural color of the neck feather of rock dove, Columba livia, has a very comprehensive mechanism: the thin-layer optical interference phenomenon fundamentally produces the iridescence, while the layer structure is accompanied by various kinds of larger-size structural modifications that control the angular range of the reflection. Further, it is found that the granules containing melanin pigment exist in a localized manner to effectively enhance the contrast of the color caused by optical interference.

Nakamura, Eri; Yoshioka, Shinya; Kinoshita, Shuichi

2008-12-01

412

Champagne bottle neck sign in a patient with Moyamoya syndrome  

PubMed Central

The champagne bottle neck (CBN) sign refers to a reduction in the diameter of the proximal portion of the internal carotid artery that resembles a CBN, and is a characteristic feature of Moyamoya disease. A 43-year-old woman with an infarction of the posterior limb of the left internal capsule was diagnosed with Moyamoya syndrome associated with Graves’ disease. The CBN sign was observed bilaterally. Cerebral revascularization surgery was performed, including left-sided superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery anastomosis. During four years of follow-up, she maintained a euthyroid state and did not have any further cerebral ischemic events. The CBN signs remained unchanged on both sides during this time. This is the first report of the CBN sign in a patient with Moyamoya syndrome associated with Graves’ disease.

Shimogawa, Takafumi; Morioka, Takato; Sayama, Tetsuro; Hamamura, Takeshi; Yasuda, Chiharu; Arakawa, Shuji

2014-01-01

413

The mutational landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a common, morbid, and frequently lethal malignancy. To uncover its mutational spectrum, we analyzed whole-exome sequencing data from 74 tumor-normal pairs. The majority exhibited a mutational profile consistent with tobacco exposure; human papillomavirus was detectable by sequencing DNA from infected tumors. In addition to identifying previously known HNSCC genes (TP53, CDKN2A, PTEN, PIK3CA, and HRAS), our analysis revealed many genes not previously implicated in this malignancy. At least 30% of cases harbored mutations in genes that regulate squamous differentiation (for example, NOTCH1, IRF6, and TP63), implicating its dysregulation as a major driver of HNSCC carcinogenesis. More generally, the results indicate the ability of large-scale sequencing to reveal fundamental tumorigenic mechanisms. PMID:21798893

Stransky, Nicolas; Egloff, Ann Marie; Tward, Aaron D; Kostic, Aleksandar D; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Kryukov, Gregory V; Lawrence, Michael S; Sougnez, Carrie; McKenna, Aaron; Shefler, Erica; Ramos, Alex H; Stojanov, Petar; Carter, Scott L; Voet, Douglas; Cortés, Maria L; Auclair, Daniel; Berger, Michael F; Saksena, Gordon; Guiducci, Candace; Onofrio, Robert C; Parkin, Melissa; Romkes, Marjorie; Weissfeld, Joel L; Seethala, Raja R; Wang, Lin; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Winckler, Wendy; Ardlie, Kristin; Gabriel, Stacey B; Meyerson, Matthew; Lander, Eric S; Getz, Gad; Golub, Todd R; Garraway, Levi A; Grandis, Jennifer R

2011-08-26

414

[Secondary malignant lymphedema in head and neck tumors].  

PubMed

The occurrence of edema is a serious problem of patients suffering from cancer and may have various causes. Particularly, the secondary malignant lymphedema poses a special threat to patients. In some cases, it indicates the progression of illness, and in fact also results in mutilating physical changes, which add to the already existing impairments caused by the cancer disease. So far therapeutic interventions are limited. Current management consists of physical therapy and pharmacological interventions. There are few powerful studies concerning the efficiency and hardly any concerning combined or comparative treatment in the literature. Most of them focus on the management of lymphedema in breast cancer patients. Preventive measures and supportive therapy are rarely being discussed. In this case report, we describe the successful use of Selen and Sandostatin in treating a facial edema of a patient with advanced head-neck cancer. PMID:19165449

Hammerl, Bernhard; Döller, Walter

2008-01-01

415

Trismus in head and neck oncology: a systematic review.  

PubMed

The aim of this review was to identify systematically, criteria for trismus in head and neck cancer, the evidence for risk factors for trismus and the interventions to treat trismus. Three databases were searched (time period 1966 to June 2003) for the text "trismus" or "restricted mouth opening". Included in the review were clinical studies (> or = 10 patients). Two observers independently assessed the papers identified. In 12 studies nine different criteria for trismus were found without justifying these criteria. Radiotherapy (follow-up: 6-12 months) involving the structures of the temporomandibular joint and or pterygoid muscles reduces mouth opening with 18% (sd: 17%). Exercises using a therabite device or tongue blades increase mouth opening significantly (no follow-up), effect sizes (ES) 2.6 and 1.5 respectively. Microcurrent electrotherapy (follow-up 3 months) and pentoxifylline (no follow-up) increases mouth opening significantly (ES for both: 0.3). PMID:15380165

Dijkstra, P U; Kalk, W W I; Roodenburg, J L N

2004-10-01

416

[Lateral cysts and fistulas of the neck. Diagnosis and treatment].  

PubMed

Lateral neck cysts and fistulae are considered to be a well-defined clinical entity which needs a precise knowledge of the development of the branchial system to have an appropriate and subsequent successful treatment. According to the recent classification cysts of I and II type and fistulae of I, II and III type can be recognized. In the former ultrasonography and Computerized Tomography represent the most appropriate diagnostic tools, while in the latter fistulography is preferred. An elective surgical excision seem to be resolutive in the majority of cases: on the contrary emergency surgery is related to a certain relapse of this pathology. 45 cases of branchial pathology are reported; diagnostic and therapeutic choices are then discussed. PMID:8532201

Ragni, B; De Toma, G; Adami, E A; Gabriele, R; Plocco, M; Campli, M; Miele, V

1995-01-01

417

Interventional Management of Head and Neck Emergencies: Carotid Blowout  

PubMed Central

Involvement of the carotid artery by malignant processes of the head and neck with compromise of vessel integrity and rupture—“carotid blowout syndrome” (CBS)—is one of the most devastating complications of malignancy. Most often, it is associated with squamous cell cancer and almost always in patients who have undergone prior radiation therapy. CBS is classified as threatened, impending, or acute. Bleeding into the oral cavity or from areas of skin breakdown is a frightening experience for patients and their families and often a terminal event. Prognosis is poor with up to 50% mortality and morbidity, and surgical options are limited and risky. Endovascular management with vessel sacrifice or stent placement has become the principle treatment option in this patient population, though still associated with procedural complications, often neurologic, that can occur acutely or in a delayed fashion. This article reviews techniques and outcomes associated with endovascular treatment of CBS. PMID:24436546

Haas, Richard A.; Ahn, Sun Ho

2013-01-01

418

Reinnervated radial forearm free flaps in head and neck reconstruction.  

PubMed

The radial forearm flap has proved to be a reliable free flap for intraoral reconstruction after major head and neck ablative surgery for cancer. In contrast to the myocutaneous flap, it is thin and flexible, and as a result, it is better suited to conforming to the irregular surface which remains over an intact or restored mandible. A criticism of both techniques however, is that while the flap effectively fills the defect, it serves as an insensate reservoir in which food and saliva can collect. A modification of the reinnervated radial forearm free flap is presented, with discussion of its use in three patients, following extensive resection of the floor of the mouth and tongue. PMID:1453373

Dubner, S; Heller, K S

1992-11-01

419

Pathology Case Study: Aortic Dissection and Neck Pain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Department of Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has compiled a wide range of pathology case studies to aid students and instructors in the medical/health science field. This case documents the neck and back pain of a 71-year-old female patient. The patient's history is provided, and includes documentation of her condition throughout the duration of her treatment. The pathologic findings include images and descriptions of the gross and microscopic evaluation. In the "Final Diagnosis" section the official conclusion of the doctor is accompanied by a discussion of the diagnosis and references. Students will find this resource especially helpful, as it provides experience with patient history, lab results, and diagnostics.

Klatt, Edward C., 1951-; Monnin, Kimberly

2007-09-21

420

Salt transport in a tidal canal, West Neck Creek, Virginia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flow and stability were monitored during 1989-92 in West Neck Creek, Virginia, which provides a direct hydraulic connection between the saline waters of Chesapeake Bay and the relatively fresh waters of Currituck Sound, North Carolina. Flow in the tidal creek was to the south 64 percent of the time, but 80 percent of the southward flows were less than 40 cubic feet per second. The highest flows were associated with rain storms. Salinity ranged from 0.1 parts per thousand to 24.5 per thousand, and the highest salinities were observed during periods of sustained, strong northerly winds. Salt loads ranged from 302 tons per day to the north to 4,500 tons per day to the south.

Bales, Jerad, D.; Skrobialowski, Stanley, C.

1993-01-01

421

Ateriovenous subclavia-shunt for head and neck reconstruction.  

PubMed

Reconstruction of the facial hard- and soft tissues is of special concern for the rehabilitation of patients especially after ablative tumor surgery has been performed. Impaired soft and hard tissue conditions as a sequelae of extensive surgical resection and/or radiotherapy may impede common reconstruction methods. Even free flaps may not be used without interposition of a vein graft as recipient vessels are not available as a consequence of radical neck dissection. We describe the reconstruction of the facial hard- and soft tissues with a free parasacpular flap in a patient who had received ablative tumor surgery and radical cervical lymphadenectomy as a treatment regimen for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To replace the missing cervical blood vessels an arteriovenous subclavia-shunt using a saphena magna graft was created. Microvascular free flap transfer was performed as a 2-stage procedure two weeks after the shunt operation. The microvascular reconstructive technique is described in detail. PMID:19025619

Depprich, Rita A; Naujoks, Christian D; Meyer, Ulrich; Kübler, Norbert R; Handschel, Jörg G

2008-01-01

422

Human head-neck computational model for assessing blast injury.  

PubMed

A human head finite element model (HHFEM) was developed to study the effects of a blast to the head. To study both the kinetic and kinematic effects of a blast wave, the HHFEM was attached to a finite element model of a Hybrid III ATD neck. A physical human head surrogate model (HSHM) was developed from solid model files of the HHFEM, which was then attached to a physical Hybrid III ATD neck and exposed to shock tube overpressures. This allowed direct comparison between the HSHM and HHFEM. To develop the temporal and spatial pressures on the HHFEM that would simulate loading to the HSHM, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the HHFEM in front of a shock tube was generated. CFD simulations were made using loads equivalent to those seen in experimental studies of the HSHM for shock tube driver pressures of 517, 690 and 862 kPa. Using the selected brain material properties, the peak intracranial pressures, temporal and spatial histories of relative brain-skull displacements and the peak relative brain-skull displacements in the brain of the HHFEM compared favorably with results from the HSHM. The HSHM sensors measured the rotations of local areas of the brain as well as displacements, and the rotations of the sensors in the sagittal plane of the HSHM were, in general, correctly predicted from the HHFEM. Peak intracranial pressures were between 70 and 120 kPa, while the peak relative brain-skull displacements were between 0.5 and 3.0mm. PMID:23010219

Roberts, J C; Harrigan, T P; Ward, E E; Taylor, T M; Annett, M S; Merkle, A C

2012-11-15

423

Lymphatic Vessel Function in Head and Neck Inflammation  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Serious infections of the head and neck cause lymphedema that can lead to airway compromise and oropharyngeal obstruction. Lymphangiogenesis occurs in the head and neck during infection and after immunization. The goal of this project was to develop tools to image lymphatic vessels in living animals and to be able to isolate individual lymphatic endothelial cells in order to quantify changes in single cells caused by inflammation. Methods The ProxTom transgenic red-fluorescent reporter mouse was developed specifically for the purpose of imaging lymphatic vessels in vivo. Prox1 is a transcription factor that is necessary for lymphangiogenesis in development and for the maintenance of lymphatics in adulthood. Mice were immunized and their lymphatic vessels in lymph nodes were imaged in vivo. Individual lymphatic endothelial cells were isolated by means of their fluorescence. Results The ProxTom transgene has the red-fluorescent reporter td-Tomato under the control of Prox1 regulatory elements. tdTomato was faithfully expressed in lymphatic vessels coincident with endogenous Prox1 expression. We show lymphangiogenesis in vivo after immunization and demonstrate a method for the isolation of lymphatic endothelial cells by their tdTomato red-fluorescence. Conclusions The faithful expression of the red-fluorescent reporter in the lymphatic vessels of ProxTom means that these mice have proven utility for in vivo study of lymphatic vessels in the immune response. ProxTom has been made available for distribution from the Jackson Laboratory: http://jaxmice.jax.org/strain/018128.html. PMID:24044758

Truman, Lucy A.; A-Gonzalez, Noelia; Bentley, Kevin L.

2013-01-01

424

Salvage Re-Irradiation for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To present a retrospective review of treatment outcomes for recurrent head and neck (HN) cancer patients treated with re-irradiation (re-RT) at a single medical center. Methods and Materials: From July 1996-September 2005, 105 patients with recurrent HN cancer underwent re-RT at our institution. Sites included were: the neck (n = 21), nasopharynx (n 21), paranasal sinus (n = 18), oropharynx (n = 16), oral cavity (n = 9), larynx (n = 10), parotid (n = 6), and hypopharynx (n = 4). The median prior RT dose was 62 Gy. Seventy-five patients received chemotherapy with their re-RT (platinum-based in the majority of cases). The median re-RT dose was 59.4 Gy. In 74 (70%), re-RT utilized intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Results: With a median follow-up of 35 months, 18 patients were alive with no evidence of disease. The 2-year loco-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival rates were 42% and 37%, respectively. Patients who underwent IMRT, compared to those who did not, had a better 2-year LRPF (52% vs. 20%, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, non-nasopharynx and non-IMRT were associated with an increased risk of loco-regional (LR) failure. Patients with LR progression-free disease had better 2-year overall survival vs. those with LR failure (56% vs. 21%, p < 0.001). Acute and late Grade 3-4 toxicities were reported in 23% and 15% of patients. Severe Grade 3-4 late complications were observed in 12 patients, with a median time to development of 6 months after re-RT. Conclusions: Based on our data, achieving LR control is crucial for improved overall survival in this patient population. The use of IMRT predicted better LR tumor control. Future aggressive efforts in maximizing tumor control in the recurrent setting, including dose escalation with IMRT and improved chemotherapy, are warranted.

Lee, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)]. E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org; Chan, Kelvin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Zhung, Joanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mechalakos, James [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Narayana, Ashwatha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wolden, Suzanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Venkatraman, Ennapadam S. [Department of Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Pfister, David [Divisions of Head and Neck Oncology, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kraus, Dennis [Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shah, Jatin [Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2007-07-01

425

Mechanism of loss of consciousness during vascular neck restraint.  

PubMed

Vascular neck restraint (VNR) is a technique that police officers may employ to control combative individuals. As the mechanism of unconsciousness is not completely understood, we tested the hypothesis that VNR simply compresses the carotid arteries, thereby decreasing middle cerebral artery blood flow. Twenty-four healthy police officers (age 35 ± 4 yr) were studied. Heart rate (HR), arterial pressure, rate of change of pressure (dP/dt), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using infrared finger photoplethysmography. Bilateral mean middle cerebral artery flow velocity (MCAVmean) was measured by using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Neck pressure was measured using flat, fluid-filled balloon transducers positioned over both carotid bifurcations. To detect ocular fixation, subjects were asked to focus on a pen that was moved from side to side. VNR was released 1-2 s after ocular fixation. Ocular fixation occurred in 16 subjects [time 9.5 ± 0.4 (SE) s]. Pressures over the right (R) and left (L) carotid arteries were 257 ± 22 and 146 ± 18 mmHg, respectively. VNR decreased MCAVmean (R 45 ± 3 to 8 ± 4 cm/s; L 53 ± 2 to 10 ± 3 cm/s) and SV (92 ± 4 to 75 ± 4 ml; P < 0.001). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), dP/dt, and HR did not change significantly. We conclude that the most important mechanism in loss of consciousness was decreased cerebral blood flow caused by carotid artery compression. The small decrease in CO (9.6 to 7.5 l/min) observed would not seem to be important as there was no change in MAP. In addition, with no significant change in HR, ventricular contractility, or MAP, the carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex appears to contribute little to the response to VNR. PMID:22096121

Mitchell, Jamie R; Roach, Dan E; Tyberg, John V; Belenkie, Israel; Sheldon, Robert S

2012-02-01

426

Safety of fenbendazole in Chinese ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus).  

PubMed

Ring-necked pheasants raised on propagation farms can be severely parasitized with Syngamus trachea (gapeworm) and other parasitic worms. Fenbendazole is a highly effective benzimidazole-class anthelmintic that is not currently approved for game bird species in the United States. The objective of this work was to provide target animal safety data to support a label claim for fenbendazole in pheasants at 100 parts per million (ppm) in the feed for 7 consecutive days. Demonstration of safety in young pheasants and a separate demonstration of reproductive safety in adult birds were required. In the young bird study, 160 Chinese ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus, 80 males and 80 females) were fed a commercial game bird starter ration containing no antibiotics, growth promoters, or coccidiostats until day 0 of the study (approximately 21 days of age). On day 0 the birds were placed on their respective study diets containing fenbendazole at 0, 100, 300, and 500 ppm for 21 days (three times the normal treatment duration). Clinical observations were recorded twice daily. Feed consumption, feed conversion rate, and body weights were determined for each pen. Three birds from each pen were randomly selected for necropsy, histopathology, and clinical pathology. Birds were carefully examined for feathering abnormalities immediately following euthanasia. The remaining birds in each pen were submitted for drug concentration analysis so that concentrations (for low vs. high treatment levels) could be correlated with clinical observations, clinical pathology, and histologic findings. There no morbidities or mortalities after study day--1. There were no statistically significant treatment-related differences in feed consumption, feed conversion rates, body weights, serum biochemistry profiles, hematologic profiles, gross necropsy findings, histopathologic examination, and feathering. Allowable liver and muscle concentrations of fenbendazole sulfone in turkeys are 6 and 2 ppm, respectively, with a 6-hr feed withdrawal. Analysis of fenbendazole concentrations in kidney, liver, leg/thigh, and breast muscle and skin with associated fat revealed that, even at the highest dose level used and with no feed withdrawal, fenbendazole concentrations were relatively low in these tissues. These findings indicate that fenbendazole has a relatively wide margin of safety in young pheasants and that the proposed dose of 100 ppm in the feed for 7 consecutive days is well within the margin of safety. In the reproductive safety study, two large game bird farms fed fendbendazole at 100 ppm for 7 days and collected data on hatching percentage of pheasant eggs before and after treatment. Reproductive performance in hen pheasants was not adversely affected. PMID:24758107

Griffith, R; Yaeger, M; Hostetter, S; Tell, L A; Wetzlich, S; Vickroy, T; Lillie, B; MacFarlane, W; Laudenslager, T; Whitley, E; Dzikamunhenga, R; Larson, W

2014-03-01

427

Identification of mutations in the PYRIN-containing NLR genes (NLRP) in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.  

PubMed

Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) encompasses malignancies that arise in the mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract. Recent high throughput DNA sequencing revealed HNSCC genes mutations that contribute to several cancer cell characteristics, including dysregulation of cell proliferation and death, intracellular proinflammatory signaling, and autophagy. The PYRIN-domain containing NLR (Nucleotide-binding domain, Leucine rich Repeats - containing) proteins have recently emerged as pivotal modulators of cell death, autophagy, inflammation, and metabolism. Their close physiologic association with cancer development prompted us to determine whether mutations within the NLRP (PYRIN-containing NLR) gene family were associated with HNSCC genome instability and their clinicopathologic correlations. Catastrophic mutational events underlie cancer cell genome instability and mark a point-of-no-return in cancer cell development and generation of heterogeneity. The mutation profiles of 62 patients with primary conventional type HNSCC excluding other histologic variants were analyzed. Associations were tested using Fisher's Exact test or Mann-Whitney U test. Mutations in NLRP were associated with elevated genome instability as characterized by higher mutation rates. Clinically, NLRP mutations were more frequently found in HNSCC arising in the floor of mouth (50.0%) in comparison with HNSCC at other head and neck locations (14.8%). These mutations were clustered at the leucine rich repeats region of NLRP proteins, and affected NLRP genes were mostly localized at chromosomes 11p15.4 and 19q13.42-19q13.43. Twenty novel NLRP mutations were identified in HNSCC, and mutations in this group of genes were correlated with increased cancer cell genome mutation rates, and such features could be a potential molecular biomarker of HNSCC genome instability. PMID:24465623

Lei, Yu; Lui, Vivian W Y; Grandis, Jennifer R; Egloff, Ann Marie

2014-01-01

428

Soluble interleukin-2 receptor and metalloproteinase-9 expression in head and neck cancer: prognostic value and analysis of their relationships  

PubMed Central

In a series of 84 head and neck patients, a statistically significant correlation was observed between high serum soluble interleukin (IL)-2 receptor alpha (sIL-2R?) (P = 0·034) and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentrations (P = 0·036) at diagnosis and a shorter survival of these patients. As MMP-9 has been shown to mediate cleavage of IL-2R? (CD25) by preactivated T cells, we looked for a relationship between MMP-9 expression and soluble IL-2R? serum concentrations in these cancer patients. We did not find any correlation between intratumoral expression of MMP-9 or serum MMP-9 concentrations and serum sIL-2R? levels. These results led us to reassess the role of MMP-9 in the release of sIL-2R?. Treatment of Kit225 leukaemic cells with recombinant MMP-9 slightly decreased membrane CD25 expression and was associated with an increased concentration of sIL-2R? in the supernatants. However, using a selective inhibitor of MMP-9 we did not succeed in specifically inhibiting the release of sIL-2R? by the Kit225 cell line or by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, in a preclinical mouse model, basal serum sIL-2R? concentrations and sIL-2R? production by activated cells were not altered in MMP-9-deficient mice compared to wild-type mice. Interestingly, a broad spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor inhibited the release of sIL-2R? by PHA-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, suggesting that in contrast with current views concerning the major role of MMP-9 in the cleavage of membrane IL-2R?, other proteases are involved in the shedding of sIL-2R?. MMP-9 and sIL-2R? appear therefore as independent prognostic markers in head and neck cancers. PMID:17680822

El Houda Agueznay, N; Badoual, C; Hans, S; Gey, A; Vingert, B; Peyrard, S; Quintin-Colonna, F; Ravel, P; Bruneval, P; Roncelin, S; Lelongt, B; Bertoglio, J; Fridman, W H; Brasnu, D; Tartour, E

2007-01-01

429

Thorium dioxide granuloma of the neck: a report of four cases.  

PubMed

Four patients with Thorotrast granuloma are reported. The first patient had a radical neck dissection performed; however, postoperative hemorrhage and fistula occurred with a six-month delay in healing. The granuloma in this patient had totally occluded his carotid system with a greatly enlarged vertebral artery. A second patient presented with spontaneous bleeding in the neck from a granuloma followed by encephalomalacia, hemiparesis and aphasia. The third and fourth patients presented as hoarseness with a hard mass in the neck. All four patients had Thorotrast in the liver and spleen. The latter three had laryngoscopies and incisional neck biopsies as their only surgical treatment. Neck malignancy from Thorotrast is very rare. Despite legal decisions suggesting removal and similar suggestions in the literature, the authors feel only small extravasations have had uncomplicated operations. Neck dissection is rarely indicated. Hoarseness can be improved by vocal cord injection. These patients, of course, must be followed periodically as any other tumor, checking the neck mass, liver, and carotid circulation. PMID:979489

Trible, W M; Small, A

1976-11-01

430

Lamb waves in two-dimensional phononic crystal slabs with neck structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, a new structure of two-dimensional phononic crystals consisting of one or more rows of parallel rectangular rods placed periodically in a homogenous slab, in which the rods are not connected directly but linked through neck structures with the slab, is proposed, and the Lamb wave propagation in this structure is investigated with numerical analysis. The dispersion relations and the power transmission spectra are studied using the finite-element method. In contrast to the phononic crystals where the rods and the slab are completely in contact, the proposed structure with necks are proved to display band gaps at much lower frequencies. The displacement fields of the eigenmodes of the band edges are computed and analyzed to clarify the mechanism for the generation of the low-frequency band gaps. It is found that the low-frequency band gaps are attributed to the interaction between the local resonance of the rod inclusion connected with the neck and the Lamb modes of the four plates which are formed by the introduction of the neck. Furthermore, the influences of the geometry parameters of the neck on the band gaps are discussed. Numerical results show that band gaps are significantly dependent upon the width and the position of the necks while insensitive to the neck length. These properties of Lamb waves can potentially be applied to optimize band gaps, generate filters, and design acoustic devices.<