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Sample records for necropsy

  1. Feedlot Euthanasia and Necropsy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Dee

    2015-11-01

    Timely euthanasia of feeder cattle can minimize suffering of cattle that have little hope of recovery or pain abatement. Euthanasia techniques are described, including primary and secondary steps to ensure humane death. Considerations are discussed to ensure rendered product from euthanized cattle will be safe. A necropsy technique that is time efficient and thorough is outlined. An important aspect is minimizing the number of detached body organs, thereby making it easier to remove the necropsied animal. A necropsy data collection system is discussed that uses check-boxes to record findings. A link to a database that can be downloaded is included. PMID:26188549

  2. Health and safety at necropsy

    PubMed Central

    Burton, J L

    2003-01-01

    The postmortem room is a source of potential hazards and risks, not only to the pathologist and anatomical pathology technician, but also to visitors to the mortuary and those handling the body after necropsy. Postmortem staff have a legal responsibility to make themselves aware of, and to minimise, these dangers. This review focuses specifically on those hazards and risks associated with the necropsy of infected patients, with foreign objects present in the body, and with bodies that have been contaminated by chemicals or radioactive sources. PMID:12663635

  3. Necropsy study of mountaineering accidents in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, W A; Doyle, D; Richmond, H G; Galbraith, S L

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and twenty one people died in mountaineering accidents in Scotland between July 1978 and December 1983. Necropsies were carried out on 42, which form the basis of this report. In 21 cases head injury was major fatality factor, but in 11 of these there were also serious chest injuries. Focal brain damage (haematomas, contusions, or lacerations) was more common (n = 21) than diffuse brain damage (n = 18). Over half of the victims with severe head injury had few other injuries and would probably have survived had the head injury been prevented. Spinal injuries usually occurred with other major injuries. Chest injuries were common, being serious in 18 cases, but abdominal injuries were uncommon. Four climbers with only minor injuries died of hypothermia. PMID:3793938

  4. Cytogenetic studies: an essential part of the paediatric necropsy.

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, G R; Carter, R F

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome studies were attempted on 97% of necropsies carried out in the Department of Histopathology of the Adelaide Children's Hospital over the four-year period ending May 1981. Results were obtained from 89% of necropsies of which 7.5% had major chromosome abnormalities. The chromosome results are analysed according to the category of the necropsy and to primary cause of death. It is recommended that cytogenetic studies be performed on all stillbirths and infants dying at less than 28 days of age except in cases of isolated CNS malformation, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), trauma, or known single gene defects. PMID:6681820

  5. Renal findings in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical aspects of 132 necropsies.

    PubMed

    Boers, M; Croonen, A M; Dijkmans, B A; Breedveld, F C; Eulderink, F; Cats, A; Weening, J J

    1987-09-01

    Renal abnormalities in 132 necropsied patients with rheumatoid arthritis were studied. Clinical findings before death included extra-articular manifestations of the disease (86% of patients), systemic vasculitis (6%), and uraemia (23%). Necropsy findings included nephrosclerosis (90%), systemic vasculitis (14%) with kidney involvement in 8%, amyloidosis (11%), membranous glomerulopathy (8%), and focal glomerular disease (8%). Association with clinical data suggests that both rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid disease may play a part in the cause of these abnormalities. PMID:3675007

  6. The use of histopathology in the practice of necropsy.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J O; Goddard, M J; Gresham, G A; Wyatt, B A

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To examine current practice and to establish criteria for the use of histopathology in necropsy practice. METHODS: During an audit of necropsy reporting, consensus could not be reached about the use of routine histopathology. Therefore local guidelines were formulated and current practice was compared with these guidelines. Fifteen consecutive necropsies undertaken by each consultant were reviewed and the use of histopathology noted. RESULTS: In general, the standard of necropsy reporting was reasonably high. Tissue was retained for histopathology in 25% of necropsies and 72% of these necropsy reports included a histopathology report. Using the guidelines, the assessors judged that histopathology might have been valuable in a further 19%. It was felt that routine histopathology would not have been helpful in determining the cause of death in the remaining 56%. The importance of the pathologist's clinical judgement in individual cases was stressed. At reaudit, nearly two years later, there was no significant change in practice, reflecting the lack of consensus. CONCLUSIONS: Even when histopathology might contribute to finding the cause of death, it was not always done. However, the assumption that histology is invariably helpful in determining the cause of death is challenged. PMID:9301557

  7. Histological examination has a major impact on macroscopic necropsy diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, F D C; Saldiva, P H N; Mauad, T

    2005-01-01

    Background: Necropsy is the gold standard for clinicopathological discrepancy studies and epidemiological surveys. Inadequate sampling or lack of tissue may hamper the final interpretation and quality of the necropsy. Aim: To compare the histological and gross necropsy diagnoses of different organs. Methods: A retrospective comparison of the provisional reports (gross findings only) and the final reports (after histological examination) of the necropsies performed at the department of pathology of the Hospital das Clínicas, Sao Paulo University, Brazil, a large tertiary care complex, in 2001. The total number of diagnoses listed for the lungs, heart, liver, pancreas, kidneys, and spleen were calculated. Findings were categorised into concordant/refined diagnosis, discordant/additional diagnosis, histology needed, and inconclusive. Results: Three hundred and seventy one postmortem reports were analysed. There were 214 men and 157 women, with a mean age of 50.3 years, ranging from 1 to 92. The lung received the highest number (954) and the pancreas the lowest number (390) of diagnoses. The highest frequencies of discrepancies between the gross and microscopic findings were found in the lung and the liver: 38.7% and 35.1%, respectively. The brain had the lowest frequency of discrepancies. In a small number of cases, the final diagnosis could only be achieved through microscopic analysis, with the highest frequency being found in the kidneys (8.5%). Conclusions: Histological analysis has a major impact on previously performed gross diagnosis at necropsy, especially in the lungs, liver, and kidneys. Adequate sampling and histological analysis are important for necropsy quality. PMID:16311344

  8. Neuropathology of HIV infection in haemophiliacs: comparative necropsy study.

    PubMed Central

    Esiri, M. M.; Scaravilli, F.; Millard, P. R.; Harcourt-Webster, J. N.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To discover whether pathological and neuropathological findings at necropsy are different in haemophiliacs and other subjects positive for HIV. DESIGN--Pathological and neuropathological findings at necropsy were compared in haemophiliacs and non-haemophiliacs, most of them homosexual men. SETTING--Necropsies performed in the south of England. SUBJECTS--11 Haemophiliacs (mean age 41, range 15-69) and 31 non-haemophiliacs, 29 of whom were homosexual men (mean age 40, range 21-60). AIDS was diagnosed before death in four haemophiliacs and all but one of the non-haemophiliacs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Prevalence of various forms of neuropathology and systemic pathology in the haemophiliacs and non-haemophiliacs, compared with Fisher's exact test. RESULTS--The prevalences of opportunistic infections of the central nervous system were significantly higher in the non-haemophiliacs (cerebral toxoplasmosis 23% (7), progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy 10% (3), and cerebral cytomegalovirus infection 19% (6) in the non-haemophiliacs v no cases in the haemophiliacs). The prevalences of fresh and old intracranial haemorrhages and cirrhosis of the liver were significantly higher in the haemophiliacs (fresh intracranial haemorrhage 45% (5), old intracranial haemorrhage 36% (4), and cirrhosis of the liver 27% (3) in the haemophiliacs v no cases in the non-haemophiliacs). The prevalence of neuropathological changes in the non-haemophiliacs was similar to that found in other necropsy series. CONCLUSIONS--The main causes of death in haemophiliacs positive for HIV included intracranial haemorrhage and cirrhosis of the liver. The haemophiliacs died when the characteristic neuropathological changes associated with HIV infection were at a fairly early stage in their development. PMID:2513933

  9. Salmonella transmission through splash exposure during a bovine necropsy.

    PubMed

    Bemis, David A; Craig, Linden E; Dunn, John R

    2007-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from two adult cows and a veterinary pathologist who performed a necropsy examination on one of the cows. The isolates had indistinguishable phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. A splash exposure was the suspected means of transmission of the human infection. Veterinary practices and other at-risk occupations should establish site-specific infection control plans and review recommendations for use of facial protection measures during procedures that may produce splashes or aerosols. PMID:17883322

  10. Ultrasound and necropsy study of periventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Szymonowicz, W; Schafler, K; Cussen, L J; Yu, V Y

    1984-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of cerebral ultrasound for periventricular haemorrhage was determined by comparing this with necropsy findings in 30 preterm neonates of 30 weeks' gestation or less and birthweight under 1500 g. Ultrasound gave an accurate diagnosis of 85% in infants with germinal layer haemorrhage, 92% in intraventricular haemorrhage, and 97% in intracerebral haemorrhage. False positive errors were caused by vascular congestion; false negative errors occurred when the maximum dimension of haemorrhage was less than 3 mm. Cerebral ultrasound gave a diagnostic accuracy of 63% for periventricular leucomalacia. False negative errors occurred when periventricular leucomalacia was microscopic or when it was out of range of the scanner. The maximum width of the germinal layer was measured in 77 neonates of gestational age 23 to 36 weeks who died and had no periventricular haemorrhage at necropsy. The progressive involution of the germinal layer with increasing gestational age paralleled the steady decrease in incidence of periventricular haemorrhage diagnosed over the same gestational age range. Neonates of the youngest gestational age who had the most extensive germinal layers also had the highest risk for periventricular haemorrhage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 p640-b Fig. 4 PMID:6465933

  11. Ultrasound and necropsy study of periventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Szymonowicz, W; Schafler, K; Cussen, L J; Yu, V Y

    1984-07-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of cerebral ultrasound for periventricular haemorrhage was determined by comparing this with necropsy findings in 30 preterm neonates of 30 weeks' gestation or less and birthweight under 1500 g. Ultrasound gave an accurate diagnosis of 85% in infants with germinal layer haemorrhage, 92% in intraventricular haemorrhage, and 97% in intracerebral haemorrhage. False positive errors were caused by vascular congestion; false negative errors occurred when the maximum dimension of haemorrhage was less than 3 mm. Cerebral ultrasound gave a diagnostic accuracy of 63% for periventricular leucomalacia. False negative errors occurred when periventricular leucomalacia was microscopic or when it was out of range of the scanner. The maximum width of the germinal layer was measured in 77 neonates of gestational age 23 to 36 weeks who died and had no periventricular haemorrhage at necropsy. The progressive involution of the germinal layer with increasing gestational age paralleled the steady decrease in incidence of periventricular haemorrhage diagnosed over the same gestational age range. Neonates of the youngest gestational age who had the most extensive germinal layers also had the highest risk for periventricular haemorrhage. PMID:6465933

  12. Follow-up studies by peroral gastric biopsies and necropsy in vomiting dogs.

    PubMed Central

    van der Gaag, I; Happé, R P

    1989-01-01

    The results of follow-up studies in 139 vomiting dogs are presented. Follow-up studies were performed by biopsies in 34 dogs, by biopsies and necropsy in six dogs and by necropsy only in 99 dogs. The times between the first and the last series of biopsies varied from three to 1042 days and from one to 656 days between the first series of biopsies and necropsy. From the 55 dogs with gastritis in the first series of biopsies, 35 also showed gastritis in the following biopsies or at necropsy. These were mainly severe types of gastritis such as diffuse, hypertrophic or atrophic. Ten dogs with superficial gastritis showed no gastric changes at necropsy, two dogs had edema only and three dogs had gastric changes other than gastritis, such as multiple polyps. In general, carcinoma and lymphosarcoma were found in the biopsies as well as at necropsy, but in three cases of terminal carcinoma only gastritis had been diagnosed initially. In 35 dogs the first series of gastric biopsies showed no pathological changes, but in 22 of these dogs gastritis, ulceration, fibrosis, atrophy, gastric dilation with local necrosis, and perforation or lymphosarcoma of the submucosa were found in the second series of biopsies or at necropsy. Several dogs which did not have gastric changes at necropsy had enteritis or intestinal lymphosarcoma. PMID:2590874

  13. 9 CFR 77.40 - Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy and slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.40 Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy... captive cervid was classified, and who is trained in tuberculosis necropsy procedures. (2) If, upon..., the captive cervid will be considered negative for tuberculosis. (3) Reactors, suspects, and...

  14. 9 CFR 77.40 - Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy and slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.40 Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy... captive cervid was classified, and who is trained in tuberculosis necropsy procedures. (2) If, upon..., the captive cervid will be considered negative for tuberculosis. (3) Reactors, suspects, and...

  15. 9 CFR 77.40 - Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy and slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.40 Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy... captive cervid was classified, and who is trained in tuberculosis necropsy procedures. (2) If, upon..., the captive cervid will be considered negative for tuberculosis. (3) Reactors, suspects, and...

  16. 9 CFR 77.40 - Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy and slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.40 Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy... captive cervid was classified, and who is trained in tuberculosis necropsy procedures. (2) If, upon..., the captive cervid will be considered negative for tuberculosis. (3) Reactors, suspects, and...

  17. 9 CFR 77.40 - Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy and slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.40 Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy... captive cervid was classified, and who is trained in tuberculosis necropsy procedures. (2) If, upon..., the captive cervid will be considered negative for tuberculosis. (3) Reactors, suspects, and...

  18. Cartilage fibrillation on the lateral tibial plateau in Liverpool necropsies.

    PubMed Central

    Meachim, G

    1976-01-01

    A study has been made of the state at necropsy of the hyaline articular cartilage of the left tibial plateaux, with particular reference to the lateral plateau, in 47 adult white Europeans (24 men; 23 women) aged 21-88 years. The surface morphology and topographical distribution of the lesions is described for the bare area of the lateral plateau and its meniscus-covered segments, and quantitative point-counting data are presented for the amount, according to age, of overt fibrillation on the bare area. A variety of cartilage lesions was encountered: macroscopically apparent ' parallel linear' minimal fibrillation; other patterns of minimal fibrillation; 'ravines'; overt fibrillation; localized incomplete defects of the cartilage; and full-thickness cartilage loss with bone exposure. Sites of superficial fraying and splitting of the hyaline articular cartilage are a normal finding on adult human tibial plateaux. Especially in younger adults, such sites are often accompanied by large areas of cartilage surface which are still intact. On the lateral plateau, the bare area and the meniscus-covered posterior segment are more susceptible to overt fibrillation than are the meniscus-covered lateral and anterior segments. In contrast to the findings in other synovial joints, the peripheral rim of the upper tibial cartilage sheet is not particularly susceptible to overt fibrillation. Tangential extension of the changes on the lateral plateau leads to widespread involvement of the bare area and the meniscus-covered posterior segment in older subjects. However, vertical progression of the changes, sufficient to give full-thickness cartilage loss with tibio-femoral bone exposure, was seen in only a minority of persons aged over 80 years. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:946428

  19. Procedures for the salvage and necropsy of the dugong (Dugong dugon)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eros, Carole; Marsh, Helene; Bonde, Robert K.; O'Shea, Thomas A.; Beck, Cathy A.; Recchia, Cheri; Dobbs, Kirstin; Turner, Malcolm; Lemm, Stephanie; Pears, Rachel; Bowater, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Data and specimens collected from dugong carcasses and live stranded individuals provide vital information for research and management agencies. The ability to assign a cause of death (natural and/or human induced) to a carcass assists managers to identify major threats to a population in certain areas and to evaluate and adapt management measures. Data collectedfrom dugong carcasses have contributed to research in areas such as life history, feeding biology, investigating the stock structure/genetics of dugongs, contaminants studies, heavy metal analyses, parasitology, and the effects of habitat change. Adapted from the 'Manual of Procedures for the Salvage and Necropsy of Carcasses of the West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus),' this manual provides a detailed guide for dugong (Dugong dugon) carcass handling and necropsy procedures. It is intended to be used as a resource and training guide for anyone involved in dugong incidents who may lack dugong expertise.

  20. Chronic brainstem encephalitis with mental symptoms and ataxia: report of three cases with necropsy.

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, T; Takahata, N

    1978-01-01

    Three necropsied cases of chronic, sporadic brainstem encephalitis of unknown aetiology are presented. Since their outstanding symptoms were dementia and ataxia of a progressive nature, a noninflammatory disease of the central nervous system was suspected. Neuropathological studies showed chronic inflammatory changes mainly in the brainstem without the presence of inclusion bodies or viral particles. Compared to cases previously reported as brainstem encephalitis, the clinical and pathological findings observed in these cases have rather peculiar characteristics. Images PMID:671063

  1. Necropsy and histopathologic findings in 14 African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris): a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; White, M R

    1999-06-01

    From fiscal years 1992 through 1996, 14 African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) cases were submitted to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University. The most common diagnoses were splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis (91%), hepatic lipidosis (50%), renal disease (50%), and neoplastic disease (29%). Other less frequent necropsy findings were myocarditis (21%), colitis (14%), bacterial septicemia (14%), and pneumonia (14%). The data indicate that splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis, hepatic lipidosis, renal disease, and neoplasms are frequent postmortem findings in hedgehogs. PMID:10484145

  2. Quantitative scintigraphy: Relation to unperfused volume at necropsy, immediately and 1 week after coronary occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodenday, L.S.; Wilkerson, R.D.; Leighton, R.F.; Muswick, G.J.; Hire, N.E.; Nelson, A.D.; Brewster, P.; Yasnoff, W.A.

    1985-05-01

    Interventions such as thrombolytic therapy, designed to preserve jeopardized myocardium after coronary thrombosis, suffer from inadequate scientific validation because of present limitations in the ability to measure the cardiac volume at risk initially, or to predict the eventual volume of unperfused tissue in the absence of intervention. To determine whether the unimpeded change in perfused myocardial volume over time could be predicted accurately in vivo, Tl-201 quantitative scintigraphy was performed in 10 dogs at 5 minutes and at 1 week after closed-chest coronary artery occlusion (CAO). Initial and final ischemic cardiac volumes (ICV) were measured at necropsy by autoradiography: Initial ICV from Ce-141 microspheres injected into the left ventricle 5 minutes after CAO and final ICV from autoradiography of Tl-201 given 1 week after CAO. Planar scintigrams were computer-analyzed with a quantitative anatomically-referenced technique. Early scintigraphic perfusion defect (SPD) size was closely related to initial ICV measured at necropsy, r=.93. SPD size decreased predictably by 50% during 1 week. Late SPD size correlated with final ICV at necropsy, r=.92. Size of the SPD 5 minutes after CAO predicted both size of the SPD 1 week later, r=.87, and also final ICV, r=.92. These data demonstrate that: 1) after acute canine CAO without therapeutic intervention, SPD size becomes predictably smaller with time; 2) this change reflects a change in the volume of ischemic myocardium; 3) quantitative scintigraphy accurately predicts both early and late ischemic cardiac volume as confirmed at autopsy.

  3. Differentiation at necropsy between in vivo gas embolism and putrefaction using a gas score.

    PubMed

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Saavedra, Pedro; Møllerløkken, Andreas; Brubakk, Alf O; Jørgensen, Arve; González-Díaz, Oscar; Martín-Barrasa, Jose L; Fernández, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Gas bubble lesions consistent with decompression sickness in marine mammals were described for the first time in beaked whales stranded in temporal and spatial association with military exercises. Putrefaction gas is a post-mortem artifact, which hinders the interpretation of gas found at necropsy. Gas analyses have been proven to help differentiating putrefaction gases from gases formed after hyperbaric exposures. Unfortunately, chemical analysis cannot always be performed. Post-mortem computed tomography is used to study gas collections, but many different logistical obstacles and obvious challenges, like the size of the animal or the transport of the animal from the stranding location to the scanner, limit its use in stranded marine mammals. In this study, we tested the diagnostic value of an index-based method for characterizing the amount and topography of gas found grossly during necropsies. For this purpose, putrefaction gases, intravenously infused atmospheric air, and gases produced by decompression were evaluated at necropsy with increased post-mortem time in New Zealand White Rabbits using a gas score index. Statistical differences (P<0.001) were found between the three experimental models immediately after death. Differences in gas score between in vivo gas embolism and putrefaction gases were found significant (P<0.05) throughout the 67h post-mortem. The gas score-index is a new and simple method that can be used by all stranding networks, which has been shown through this study to be a valid diagnostic tool to distinguish between fatal decompression, iatrogenic air embolism and putrefaction gases at autopsies. PMID:27234535

  4. Electrocution of Raptors on Power Lines: A Review of Necropsy Methods and Findings.

    PubMed

    Kagan, R A

    2016-09-01

    Decades after the problem was first identified, power line electrocution continues to be a cause of avian mortality. Currently, several federal laws protect eagles and other migratory birds, meaning that utility companies may be liable for electrocution-related deaths. Veterinarians and veterinary pathologists called upon to diagnose and treat electrocuted birds should keep this in mind when conducting clinical and postmortem examinations. This review details necropsy findings and methods used to diagnose electrocution. A combination of gross, subgross, and radiographic examinations can aid in identification of subtle injury. Diagnosis is made based on the presence of skin and/or feather burns. Other necropsy findings may include skin lacerations, subcutaneous burns, bruising, limb avulsion, hemopericardium, and vascular rupture. At the US Fish and Wildlife Service's National Forensics Laboratory, from 2000 to 2015, 417 raptor deaths were determined to have been caused by electrocution. Bald eagles and golden eagles were the most commonly submitted species. In a retrospective review of 377 cases, for which whole bodies were submitted, 18% of the electrocuted birds had only a single, small (less than 3 cm in diameter) external burn. Small, isolated burns tended to occur on the undersides of the wings at and distal to the elbow and on the lower legs and feet. These areas should be most carefully examined in cases where electrocution injury is not immediately apparent. PMID:27154543

  5. Frequency and significance of feline leukemia virus infection in necropsied cats.

    PubMed

    Reinacher, M; Theilen, G

    1987-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection was diagnosed immunohistologically on paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from 1,095 necropsied cats. Significant association of FeLV infection was demonstrated by chi 2 and Fisher's tests with various conditions and diseases (ie, anemia, tumors of the leukemia/lymphoma complex, feline infectious peritonitis, bacterial infections, emaciation, FeLV-associated enteritis, lymphatic hyperplasia, and hemorrhage). Unexpected findings associated with FeLV infection were icterus, several types of hepatitis, and liver degeneration. A negative association with FeLV infection was found for most parasitic and viral infections, including feline panleukopenia. Neither positive nor negative associations were established for FeLV infection and most forms of nephritis, including severe glomerulonephritis. Feline leukemia virus-infected cats were significantly (Kruskal-Wallis test) older than were FeLV-negative cats with the same nonneoplastic FeLV-associated diseases. PMID:3037951

  6. Necropsies of eight horses infected with Strongylus equinus and Strongylus edentatus.

    PubMed

    Petty, D P; Lange, A L; Verster, A; Hattingh, J

    1992-06-01

    Ponies (n = 8) approximately 18 months old, were infected with 20,000 to 30,000 infective larvae of Strongylus equinus with less than 10% contamination with Strongylus edentatus larvae and necropsied 7 months post-infection. Lesions were present in the omentum, liver, pancreas, ventral colon, caecum and occasionally in the lungs. There were numerous intraabdominal adhesions and severe multiple granulomatous omentitis. Pancreatic damage, which characterises S. equinus, was exceptionally mild and was manifested mainly by slight periductular infiltration of eosinophils. Granulomas associated with larvae were found in the connective tissue associated with the pancreas. Larvae were recovered from the flanks, the peritoneum, the caecum and the kidney. Larval recovery was low, with a high percentage of the total number of larvae recovered in some of the carcasses being S. edentatus. PMID:1501210

  7. Incidence of disorders of spermatogenesis in middle aged finnish men, 1981-91: two necropsy series.

    PubMed Central

    Pajarinen, J.; Laippala, P.; Penttila, A.; Karhunen, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate if the incidence of disorders of spermatogenesis and testicular tissue morphology have changed in middle aged Finnish men over 10 years. DESIGN: Two necropsy series completed in 1981 and in 1991. SETTING: Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. SUBJECTS: 528 men, aged 35 to 69 years, subjected to medicolegal necropsy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Scoring of spermatogenesis and morphometric analysis of testicular tissue components. Individual risk factors for testicular disorders obtained by postmortem blind interviews with acquaintances. RESULTS: Normal spermatogenesis was found in 41.7% of the men (mean age 53.1 years). Between 1981 and 1991, the ratio of normal spermatogenesis decreased significantly (odds ratio 3.5; 95% confidence interval 2.5 to 5.1) from 56.4% to 26.9%, with a parallel increase in the incidence of partial and complete spermatogenic arrest (2.1; 1.4 to 2.9 and 2.9; 1.7 to 5.0, respectively). During this period, the size of seminiferous tubules decreased, the amount of fibrotic tissue increased, and the weight of testicles decreased significantly. Alterations in testicular characteristics over time could not be explained by changes in body mass index, smoking, alcohol drinking, or exposure to drugs. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of normal spermatogenesis decreased among middle aged Finnish men from 1981 to 1991, and the incidence of disorders of spermatogenesis and pathological alterations in testicles increased. Deteriorating spermatogenesis may thus be one important factor in the explanation of declining sperm counts observed worldwide. PMID:9001473

  8. Disinfection protocols for necropsy equipment in rabies laboratories: Safety of personnel and diagnostic outcome.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Roberta; Zecchin, Barbara; Tiozzo Caenazzo, Silvia; Cattoli, Giovanni; De Benedictis, Paola

    2016-08-01

    In the last decades, molecular techniques have gradually been adopted for the rapid confirmation of results obtained through gold standard methods. However, international organisations discourage their use in routine laboratory investigations for rabies post-mortem diagnosis, as they may lead to false positive results due to cross-contamination. Cleaning and disinfection are essential to prevent cross-contamination of samples in the laboratory environment. The present study evaluated the efficacy of selected disinfectants on rabies-contaminated necropsy equipment under organic challenge using a carrier-based test. The occurrence of detectable Rabies virus (RABV) antigen, viable virus and RNA was assessed through the gold standard Fluorescent Antibody Test, the Rabies Tissue Culture Infection Test and molecular techniques, respectively. None of the tested disinfectants proved to be effective under label conditions. Off label disinfection protocols were found effective for oxidizing agents and phenolic, only. Biguanide and quaternary ammonium compound were both ineffective under all tested conditions. Overall, discordant results were obtained when different diagnostic tests were compared, which means that in the presence of organic contamination common disinfectants may not be effective enough on viable RABV or RNA. Our results indicate that an effective disinfection protocol should be carefully validated to guarantee staff safety and reliability of results. PMID:27091100

  9. Parasites in Kentucky Thoroughbreds at necropsy: emphasis on stomach worms and tapeworms.

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C; Drudge, J H; Swerczek, T W; Crowe, M W

    1983-05-01

    A total of 363 Thoroughbreds (62 males, 292 females, and 9 geldings), 1 to 26 years of age, were examined at necropsy for internal parasites for about a 12-month period from February 1981 through February 1982. Emphasis was on examining the stomach for nematodes and the small intestine and cecum for tapeworms. Parasites recovered from the stomach and infection rates were: Habronema spp--immature (24%), H muscae--adult (38%), Draschia megastoma--immature (13%), D megastoma--adult (62%), and Trichostrongylus axei--adult (4%); lesions caused by D megastoma were found upon gross observation in 58% of the stomachs. The tapeworm, Anoplocephala perfoliata, was recovered from 54% of the horses; A magna was not found. There was no obvious difference in infection rates of the stomach worms and tapeworms according to age or sex of the horses. Seasonal differences were apparent only for immature Habronema spp and immature D megastoma for which infection rates began increasing in June, peaking in October, and declining thereafter. Presence of 4 additional species of parasites was recorded, but only a cursory examination was made for them. These were the large strongyles, Strongylus vulgaris, S edentatus, and S equinus, from the cecum and a filariid, Setaria spp (probably S equina), from the abdominal cavity, for which recovery rates from the horses were 8%, 8%, 1%, and 7%, respectively. PMID:6869991

  10. Causes of mortality in sea ducks (Mergini) necropsied at the USGS-National Wildlife Health Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skerratt, L.F.; Franson, J.C.; Meteyer, C.U.; Hollmén, Tuula E.

    2005-01-01

    A number of factors were identified as causes of mortality in 254 (59%) of 431 sea ducks submitted for necropsy at the USGS-National Wildlife Health Center, Madison, Wisconsin from 1975 until 2003. Bacteria causing large outbreaks of mortality were Pasteurella multocida and Clostridium botulinum Type E. Starvation was responsible for large mortality events as well as sporadic deaths of individuals. Lead toxicity, gunshot and exposure to petroleum were important anthropogenic factors. Other factors that caused mortality were avian pox virus, bacteria (Clostridium botulinum Type C, Riemerella anatipestifer and Clostridium perfringens), fungi (Aspergillus fumigatus and an unidentified fungus), protozoans (unidentified coccidia), nematodes (Eustrongylides spp.), trematodes (Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Schistosoma spp.), acanthocephalans (Polymorphus spp.), predation, cyanide and trauma (probably due to collisions). There were also a number of novel infectious organisms in free-living sea ducks in North America, which were incidental to the death, including avipoxvirus and reovirus, bacteria Mycobacterium avium, protozoans Sarcocystis sp. and nematodes Streptocara sp. Apart from anthropogenic factors, the other important mortality factors listed here have not been studied as possible causes for the decline of sea ducks in North America.

  11. Psychological Autopsy and Necropsy of an Unusual Case of Suicide by Intravenous Toluene

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ranganath R.; Hemanth Kumar, RG; Kulkarni, Pratibha R.; Kotabagi, Raghavendra B.

    2015-01-01

    Toluene (methylbenzene; volatile hydrocarbon) is an industrial solvent that causes major injury to the lungs; the organ being the first capillary bed encountered. We report an unusual case of suicide by a 24-year-old male, paramedical professional, with fatal outcome within 16 h of intentional, intravenous self-administration of toluene, with clinical presentation of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Psychological autopsy revealed severe depressive disorder and solvent (inhalant) abuse, with marital disharmony as the precipitating stressor for suicide. Necropsy revealed diffuse congestion of internal organs like lungs and liver, epicardial petechial hemorrhages, and gastric hemorrhages. Treatment of toluene poisoning includes supportive care as no specific antidote is available. Early and aggressive management may be conducive to a favorable outcome with minimal residual pulmonary sequelae. Relevant literature of toluene poisoning was identified via PubMed, PubChem, ToxNet, Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), Embase, and PsycINFO. To our knowledge, this is the first case of suicide by intravenous administration of toluene in the literature. PMID:25969615

  12. SIV DNA vaccine trial in macaques: post-challenge necropsy in vaccine and control groups.

    PubMed

    Lu, S; Manson, K; Wyand, M; Robinson, H L

    1997-06-01

    In this study we describe the histopathologic findings from nine macaques in a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine trial evaluating the ability of a 5-plasmid DNA vaccine to protect against an uncloned SIVmac251 challenge (Lu et al., J. Virol. 1996, 70, 3978-3991). Three vaccinated and one control macaque developed disease and were euthanized in the first year following challenge. The other four vaccinated and one control macaque remained clinically normal and were euthanized at the end of the trial (60 weeks post-challenge). The necropsy data revealed that both diseased and clinically normal macaques had developed typical SIV-related lymphoid changes, inflammatory disorders and opportunistic infections. All animals had variable degrees of follicular and/or paracortical lymphoid hyperplasia suggesting immune activation. All but one vaccinated macaque and both control macaques had SIV-associated opportunistic infections. Within the small groups of animals, the ability to contain opportunistic infections was superior, and the overall lymphoid changes less severe, in the macaques that had received vaccine DNAs by three routes of inoculation (intravenous, intramuscular and gene gun) than in those that had received control DNAs or vaccine DNAs by gene gun only. In the future it will be important to further test how the route and method of DNA inoculation impact the efficacy of immunodeficiency virus vaccines. PMID:9234548

  13. Histopathological Characteristics of Endometrosis in Thoroughbred Mares in Japan: Results from 50 Necropsy Cases

    PubMed Central

    HANADA, Michiko; MAEDA, Yousuke; OIKAWA, Masa-aki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Uteri from 50 necropsied nonpregnant Japanese Thoroughbred brood mares (1–30 years of age) were investigated to clarify the histopathological characteristics of endometrosis in Japanese Thoroughbred mares and the distribution pattern of endometrosis lesions in the uterus as a whole. Endometrosis was observed in all animals over 6 years of age and in all of the 21 mares aged over 12 years of age. The affected mares showed elastofibrosis of arteries, veins and lymphatic vessels in the uterine wall, atrophy of the uterine smooth muscle layers and hyperplasia of collagen fibers among the smooth muscle fascicles of the myometrium, in addition to pathomorphologic features of endometrosis such as stromal endometrial fibrosis accompanied by endometrial atrophy, periglandular fibrosis and reduction of uterine glands. The severity of the histopathological changes increased with advancing age. Lymphatic vessels with elastofibrosis showed marked lymph congestion, leading to lymphatic edema. With increasing age, the extent of the distribution of these lesions tended to expand from focal to diffuse involvement of the entire uterus. Based on these findings, we speculate that aging plays a role in the pathogenesis of endometrosis; circulatory disturbances due to intrauterine angiosis or angiopathy, particularly reduction of the arterial blood supply and disturbance of venous drainage, resulting in a reduction of lymphatic drainage (lymphatic edema), are closely related to the onset and progression of endometrial fibrosis and myometrial atrophy with fibroplasia may result in myometrial hypofunction during the peri-implantation or puerperal period. PMID:25013358

  14. Residues of environmental pollutants and necropsy data for Eastern United States ospreys, 1964-1973

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemeyer, S.N.; Lamont, T.G.; Locke, L.N.

    1980-09-01

    Thirty-three ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) that were found dead or moribund in the Eastern United States between 1964 and 1973 were necropsied. The brains and carcasses of 26 of these birds were analyzed for organochlorines. The livers of 18 and the kidneys of 7 were analyzed for selected metals. Most adults were recovered in April and May and most immatures were recovered in August through October. The adult sex ratio was highly unbalanced in favor of females. Major causes of mortality were impact injuries, emaciation, shooting, and respiratory infections. Of special interest were two birds with malignant tumors and one with steatitis. Many birds had undergone marked weight losses resulting in mobilization and redistribution of organochlorine residues. Organochlorines were detected in the birds at the following percentages: DDE 100%, PCB 96%, DDD 92%, dieldrin 88%, chlordanes (including nonachlors) 82%, DDT 65%, and heptachlor epoxide 38%. Organochlorine levels tended to be higher in adults than in immatures. One adult from South Carolina had a potentially dangerous level of dieldrin in its brain, which might have contributed to its death. Immature ospreys from Maryland had extremely elevated levels of copper in their livers compared with immatures from other areas and all adults. One immature from Maryland had an elevated level of arsenic in its liver, which might have contributed to its death. One adult from Florida that had died of impact injuries had potentially dangerous levels of mercury in both liver and kidney and slightly elevated levels of cadmium in these tissues. Additional birds appeared to have been exposed to contamination of the environment by arsenic and mercury. The levels of chromium, zinc, and lead in livers appeared normal.

  15. Environmental pollutant and necropsy data for ospreys from the eastern United States, 1975-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemeyer, S.N.; Schmeling, S.K.; Anderson, A.

    1987-04-01

    Twenty-three ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) found dead or moribund in the eastern United States during 1975-1982 were necropsied and selected tissues were analyzed for organochlorines and metals. Major causes or factors contributing to death were trauma, impact injuries, and emaciation. DDE was detected in 96% of the osprey carcases, DDD in 65%, DDT and heptachlor epoxide in 13%, dieldrin, oxychlordane, and cis-nonachlor in 35%, cis-chlordane in 52%, trans-nonachlor in 45%, and PCB's in 83%. Carcasses of immature ospreys from the Chesapeake Bay had significantly lower concentrations of DDE, DDD + DDT, cis-chlordane, and PCB's than carcasses of adults from the same area. Concentrations of some organochlorines in ospreys from the Chesapeake Bay declined significantly from 1971-1973 to 1975-1982. Significant differences in concentrations of certain metals in the ospreys' livers were noted between time periods, and sex and age groups for birds from the Chesapeake Bay. During 1975-1982, adults had significantly lower concentrations of chromium, copper, and arsenic than immatures and nestlings, and adult males had higher mercury concentrations than adult females. Adult females had lower zinc concentrations in 1975-1982 than in 1971-1973. Immatures and nestlings had higher concentrations of chromium and lead in 1975-1982 than in 1971-1973. A slightly elevated concentration of chromium (1.7 ppm) or arsenic (3.2 ppm) was found in the livers of individual ospreys. Several ospreys had elevated concentrations of mercury in their livers; two ospreys had more than 20 ppm which may have contributed to their deaths.

  16. Notes on necropsy and herbage processing techniques for gastrointestinal nematodes of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Eysker, M; Kooyman, F N

    1993-02-01

    Necropsy techniques for the digestive tract of ruminants used at the University of Utrecht differ from those used elsewhere in three respects: (1) the abomasum is opened immediately after slaughter and the "contents" are treated separately from the "washings"; (2) the first 10 m of the small intestine are treated separately from the remainder of the intestine; (3) the aliquots are coloured with iodine before being examined for worms. The majority of the worms are found in the washings of the abomasum and the first part of the small intestine, whereas the contents of the abomasum and the remainder of the small intestine contain the bulk of the digesta. Because inhibited stages of Ostertagia, Haemonchus and, particularly, the very small third stage larvae (L3) of Trichostrongylus can be overlooked easily in digesta, these methods imply a more rapid and accurate enumeration of worms. This is more important in small ruminants than in cattle because a much higher proportion of the inhibited larvae will be washed out of the mucosa and because Trichostrongylus is more important in small ruminants. Herbage sampling methods for monitoring gastrointestinal nematode infections on cattle pastures in northwest Europe should also be suitable for lungworm. The agar-bile technique of Jørgensen is an elegant method, but disadvantages are that many gastrointestinal nematode larvae exsheath, resulting in identification difficulties, and recovery of lungworm larvae decreases as a result of ageing. A simple sucrose flotation method, based on the principle that a sucrose solution does not mix easily with water containing nematodes, has been tested at our laboratory.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8484211

  17. Residues of environmental pollutants and necropsy data for eastern United States ospreys, 1964-1973

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Lamont, T.G.; Locke, L.N.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-three ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) that were found dead or moribund in the Eastern United States between 1964 and 1973 were necropsied. The brains and carcasses of 26 of these birds were analyzed for organochlorines. The livers of 18 and the kidneys of 7 were analyzed for selected metals. Most adults were recovered in April and May and most immatures were recovered in August through October. The adult sex ratio was highly unbalanced in favor of females. Major causes of mortality were impact injuries, emaciation, shooting, and respiratory infections. Of special interest were two birds with malignant tumors and one with steatitis. Many birds had undergone marked weight losses resulting in mobilization and redistribution of organochlorine residues. Organochlorines were detected in the birds at the following percentages: DDE l00%, PCB 96%, DDD 92%, dieldrin 88%, chlordanes (including nonachlors) 82%, DDT 65%, and heptachlor epoxide 38%. Organochlorine levels tended to be higher in adults than in immatures. One adult from South Carolina had a potentially dangerous level of dieldrin in its brain, which might have contributed to its death. Immature ospreys from Maryland had extremely elevated levels of copper in their livers compared with immatures from other areas and all adults. One immature from Maryland had an elevated level of arsenic in its liver, which might have contributed to its death. One adult from Florida that had died of impact injuries had potentially dangerous levels of mercury in both liver and kidney and slightly elevated levels of cadmium in these tissues. Additional birds appeared to have been exposed to contamination of the environment by arsenic and mercury. The levels of chromium, zinc, and lead in livers appeared normal.

  18. Environmental pollutant and necropsy data for ospreys from the eastern United States, 1975-1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Schmeling, S.K.; Anderson, A.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-three ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) found dead or moribund in the eastern United States during 1975-1982 were necropsied and selected tissues were analyzed for organochlorines and metals. Major causes or factors contributing to death were trauma, impact injuries, and emaciation. DDE was detected in 96% of the osprey carcases, DDD in 65%, DDT and heptachlor epoxide in 13%, dieldrin, oxychlordane, and cis-nonachlor in 35%, cis-chlordane in 52%, trans-nonachlor in 45%, and PCB's in 83%. Carcasses of immature ospreys from the Chesapeake Bay had significantly lower concentrations of DDE, DDD + DDT, cis-chlordane, and PCB's than carcasses of adults from the same area. Concentrations of some organochlorines in ospreys from the Chesapeake Bay declined significantly from 1971-1973 to 1975-1982. Significant differences in concentrations of certain metals in the ospreys' livers were noted between time periods, and sex and age groups for birds from the Chesapeake Bay. During 1975-1982, adults had significantly lower concentrations of chromium, copper, and arsenic than immatures and nestlings, and adult males had higher mercury concentrations than adult females. Adult females had lower zinc concentrations in 1975-1982 than in 1971-1973. Immatures and nestlings had higher concentrations of chromium and lead in 1975-1982 than in 1971-1973. A slightly elevated concentration of chromium (1.7 ppm) or arsenic (3.2 ppm) was found in the livers of individual ospreys. Several ospreys had elevated concentrations of mercury in their livers; two ospreys had more than 20 ppm which may have contributed to their deaths.

  19. The sensitivity of gross necropsy, caudal fold and comparative cervical tests for the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Norby, Bo; Bartlett, Paul C; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Granger, Larry M; Bruning-Fann, Colleen S; Whipple, Diana L; Payeur, Janet B

    2004-03-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTb) was diagnosed in 22 cattle herds in the northeast comer of Michigan's lower peninsula. Of these 22 herds, 494 animals in 7 herds were examined by gross necropsy, histopathologic exam, mycobacterial culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay performed only on samples that were histologically compatible for bTb. Results of culture and PCR assay interpreted in parallel were used as the reference test for calculation of the sensitivity of 1) the caudal fold test (CFT), 2) the caudal fold and comparative cervical skin tests used in series (CFTCCTSER), and 3) gross necropsy. Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from 43 animals. Using all 7 herds, the sensitivities of the CFT, the CFTCCTSER, and gross necropsy were 93.02%, 88.37%, and 86.05%, respectively. When the data were stratified by low- and moderate-prevalence herds, the sensitivities were 83.33%, 75.0%, and 83.33% in low-prevalence herds and 96.77%, 93.55%, and 87.10% in moderate-prevalence herds. The sensitivities of the 2 skin tests were slightly higher when 2 or more gross lesions were present, and the sensitivity of gross necropsy was significantly higher (P = 0.049). The sensitivity of the CFT was found to be notably higher than most estimates in other studies; however, a direct comparison was not possible because the amount of purified protein derivative and the reference methods were different in this study compared with other published studies. Although the sensitivities are high, 2 of the 7 herds (29%) would have had 1 or more positive animals left in the herd if a test-and-removal program had been used. This suggests that when positive herds are identified, selective culling of skin test reactors is a less acceptable disease control strategy than is complete depopulation. PMID:15053363

  20. Gastrointestinal parasites of cats in Denmark assessed by necropsy and concentration McMaster technique.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi-Storm, N; Mejer, H; Al-Sabi, M N S; Olsen, C S; Thamsborg, S M; Enemark, H L

    2015-12-15

    The large population of feral cats in Denmark may potentially transmit pathogens to household cats and zoonotic parasites to humans. A total of 99 euthanized cats; feral cats (n=92) and household cats with outdoor access (n=7), were collected from March to May 2014 from the Zealand region, Denmark. The sedimentation and counting technique (SCT) was used to isolate helminths and coproscopy was done by concentration McMaster technique (c-McMaster). Overall, 90.1% of the cats were infected and a total of 10 species were recorded by SCT: 5 nematode species: Toxocara cati (84.8%), Ollulanus tricuspis (13.1%), Aonchotheca putorii (7.1%), Paersonema spp. (3.0%), Strongyloides spp. (1.0%); 3 cestodes: Hydatigera taeniaeformis (36.4%), Mesocestoides sp. (3.0%), Dipylidium caninum (1.0%); and 2 trematodes: Cryptocotyle spp. (5.1%) and Pseudamphistomum truncatum (1.0%). O. tricuspis was the second most common gastrointestinal nematode of cats but had the highest intensity of infection. For T. cati, prevalence and worm burden were significantly higher in feral than household cats. No juvenile cats were infected with H. taeniaeformis, and age thus had a significant effect on prevalence and worm burdens of this species. Rural cats had a higher prevalence and worm burden of A. putorii than urban cats. By c-McMaster, ascarid, capillarid, strongylid or taeniid type eggs were found in 77.9% of the cats while Cystoisospora felis was found in 2.1%. The sensitivity of the c-McMaster was 82.5% for T. cati but 26.5% for taeniid eggs, using the SCT as gold standard. A positive correlation between faecal egg counts and worm burdens was seen for T. cati, but not for taeniid eggs (assumed to be H. taeniaeformis). Coprological examination also detected the eggs of extraintestinal Capillariidae species including Eucoleus aerophilus and Eucoleus boehmi, but further necropsy studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26169220

  1. Importance and Repercussions of Renal and Cardiovascular Pathology on Stroke in Young Adults: An Anatomopathologic Study of 52 Clinical Necropsies

    PubMed Central

    Arismendi-Morillo, Gabriel; Fernández-Abreu, Mary; Cardozo-Duran, José; Vilchez-Barrios, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Stroke in young adults has seldom been studied in a necropsy series. The objective of the present clinical necropsy-based investigation was to analyze stroke and its relationship with cardiovascular and renal pathology in young adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS The protocols of 52 clinical necropsies with diagnoses of stroke in patients aged 18 – 49 years, performed between the years 1990–2006, were reviewed. RESULTS Hemorrhagic stroke was diagnosed in 36 patients (69.3%), whereas the remaining 16 (30.7%) had ischemic stroke. Hypertensive cardiopathy was evident in 88.4% of the cases. Chronic renal pathology, directly or indirectly related to hypertension, was observed in 55.7% of the patients. Ischemic stroke as a result of occlusive atherosclerotic disease was seen in 50% of cases. Cardiogenic emboli were found in 25% of the cadavers. Hemorrhagic stroke was associated with hypertension in 43% of the cases, with ruptured vascular malformations in 29%, and coagulopathies in 17% of the cases. Hypertensive cardiopathy was present in patients with either ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke (81.2% and 91.6%, respectively). The most frequently observed renal ailments were chronic pyelonephritis (23%) and nephrosclerosis (21.1%). These were associated with ischemic stroke in 43.7%, and 12.5% of the cases, respectively, and with 13.8% and 25% of the hemorrhagic stroke cases. DISCUSSION Hypertensive cardiopathy, occlusive atherosclerotic disease, chronic pyelonephritis and nephrosclerosis are among the pathophysiologycal mechanisms that apparently and eventually interact to induce a significant number of cases of stroke in young adults. A chronic systemic inflammatory state appears to be an important related condition because it possibly constitutes an accelerant of the pathophysiologycal process. PMID:18297202

  2. Pesticide, PCB, and lead residues and necropsy data for bald eagles from 32 states - 1978-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Schmeling, S.K.; Cromartie, E.; Kaiser, T.E.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.; Stafford, C.J.; Swineford, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    In 1978?81, 293 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from 32 states were necropsied and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and lead residues. DDE was found in all carcasses; PCB, DDD, trans-nonachlor, dieldrin and oxychlordane were next in order of percent frequency of detection. The median levels of DDE and PCB have declined when compared with previous collections. Five specimens contained high levels of dieldrin in their brains which may have contributed to their deaths. Seventeen eagles contained liver lead residues greater than 10 ppm and probably died of lead poisoning. Trauma and shooting are the most common causes of death.

  3. Pesticide, PCB, and lead residues and necropsy data for bald eagles from 32 states, 1978-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Schmeling, S.K.; Cromartie, E.; Kaiser, T.E.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.; Stafford, C.J.; Swineford, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    In 1978a??81, 293 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from 32 states were necropsied and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and lead residues. DDE was found in all carcasses; PCB, DDD, trans-nonachlor, dieldrin and oxychlordane were next in order of percent frequency of detection. The median levels of DDE and PCB have declined when compared with previous collections. Five specimens contained high levels of dieldrin in their brains which may have contributed to their deaths. Seventeen eagles contained liver lead residues greater than 10 ppm and probably died of lead poisoning. Trauma and shooting are the most common causes of death.

  4. Structure and evolution of echo dense lesions in the neonatal brain. A combined ultrasound and necropsy study.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, D I; Preston, P R; Durbin, G M

    1985-01-01

    Sixty seven of 216 infants weighing less than 2 kg at birth had cerebral lesions on ultrasonic scanning. Eight of 17 who had periventricular leukomalacia, with or without subependymal or intraventricular haemorrhage, or both, died. These and one larger baby were the subject of a combined ultrasound, and where appropriate, necropsy study. There was excellent correlation between the ultrasound and necropsy findings, only some of the earlier lesions of periventricular leukomalacia being missed by ultrasound. The data suggest it is now possible to distinguish periventricular leukomalacia and subependymal/intraventricular haemorrhage by ultrasound, that both lesions may be present in the same brain, that apparent parenchymal extension of an intraventricular haemorrhage is more probably the result of haemorrhage into ischaemic periventricular tissue, and that the term 'periventricular haemorrhage' should be abandoned since it confuses two lesions of differing aetiology and differing clinical importance. Future advances in neonatal brain ultrasound depend on accurate assessment of both the nature and site of lesions within the cerebral hemispheres and ventricular system since the interpretation of these parameters is of critical importance. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 p805-b PMID:3901932

  5. Methods used during gross necropsy to determine watercraft-related mortality in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Lightsey, Jessica D; Rommel, Sentiel A; Costidis, Alexander M; Pitchford, Thomas D

    2006-09-01

    Between 1993 and 2003, 713 (24%) of 2,940 dead Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) recovered from Florida waters and examined were killed by watercraft-induced trauma. It was determined that this mortality was the result of watercraft trauma because the external wound patterns and the internal lesions seen during gross necropsy are recognizable and diagnostic. This study documents the methods used in determining watercraft-related mortality during gross necropsy and explains why these findings are diagnostic. Watercraft can inflict sharp- and blunt-force trauma to manatees, and both types of trauma can lead to mortality. This mortality may be a direct result of the sharp and blunt forces or from the chronic effects resulting from either force. In cases in which death is caused by a chronic wound-related complication, the original incident is usually considered to be the cause of death. Once a cause of death is determined, it is recorded in an extensive database and is used by Federal and state managers in developing strategies for the conservation of the manatee. Common sequelae to watercraft-induced trauma include skin lesions, torn muscles, fractured and luxated bones, lacerated internal organs, hemothorax, pneumothorax, pyothorax, hydrothorax, abdominal hemorrhage and ascites, and pyoperitoneum. PMID:17319124

  6. Spectrum of congenital heart defects and extracardiac malformations associated with chromosomal abnormalities: results of a seven year necropsy study

    PubMed Central

    Tennstedt, C; Chaoui, R; Korner, H; Dietel, M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To analyse the spectrum of congenital heart malformations, the frequency of extracardiac malformations, and the proportion of chromosome aberrations among fetuses sent for necropsy.
MATERIAL—Necropsies were performed on 815 fetuses—448 induced abortions (55%), 220 spontaneous abortions (27%), and 147 stillbirths (18%)—during a seven year period (1991-97) in the department of pathology of the Charité Medical Centre in Berlin. A congenital heart defect was identified in 129 cases (16%). For all 129 fetuses, karyotyping and an ultrasound examination had been performed.
RESULTS—Congenital heart defects were present in 22% of induced abortions (99 cases), 9% of spontaneous abortions (20 cases), and 7% of stillbirths (10 cases). The heart malformations were classified into 13 categories. A fetus with more than one defect was included only in the category of the most serious defect. The malformations in order of frequency were: ventricular septal defect (VSD) (28%), atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) (16%), hypoplastic left heart (HLH) (16%), double outlet right ventricle (DORV) (12%), coarctation of the aorta (CoA) (6%), transposition of the great arteries (TGA) (4%), aortic valve stenosis (AoVS) (4%), tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) (3%), truncus arteriosus communis (TAC) (3%), pulmonary valve stenosis/pulmonary valve atresia (PaVS/PaVA) (3%), tricuspid atresia (TA) (3%), single ventricle (SV) (1.5%), and atrial septal defect (ASD) (0.5%). The most common congenital heart defects were VSD, AVSD, HLH, and DORV, which made up 72% of all the cases. In 11 cases the heart defect was isolated (no other cardiovascular or extracardiac malformations present), 85 cases (66%) were associated with additional cardiac malformations, 85 cases (66%) were associated with extracardiac malformations, and chromosome anomalies were detected in 43 cases (33%).
CONCLUSIONS—Fetal congenital heart malformations are common. These defects are often

  7. Asbestos lung burden and asbestosis after occupational and environmental exposure in an asbestos cement manufacturing area: a necropsy study

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, C.; Mollo, F.; Paoletti, L.; Bellis, D.; Bernardi, P.; Betta, P.; Botta, M.; Falchi, M.; Ivaldi, C.; Pavesi, M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The largest Italian asbestos cement factory had been active in Casale Monferrato until 1986: in previous studies a substantial increase in the incidence of pleural mesothelioma was found among residents without occupational exposure to asbestos. To estimate exposure to asbestos in the population, this study evaluated the presence of histological asbestosis and the lung burden of asbestos fibres (AFs) and asbestos bodies (ABs). METHODS: The study comprises the consecutive series of necropsies performed at the Hospital of Casale Monferrato between 1985 and 1988. A sample of lung parenchima was collected and stored for 48 out of 55 necropsies. The AF concentration was measured with a TEM electron microscope with x ray mineralogical analysis. The ABs were counted and fibrosis evaluated by optical microscopy. The nearest relative of each subject was interviewed on occupational and residential history. Mineralogical and histological analyses and interviews were conducted in 1993-4. RESULTS: Statistical analyses included 41 subjects with AF, AB count, and interview. Subjects without occupational exposure who ever lived in Casale Monferrato had an average concentration of 1500 AB/g dried weight (gdw); Seven of 18 presented with asbestosis or small airway lung disease (SAL). G2 asbestosis was diagnosed in two women with no occupational asbestos exposure. One of them had been teaching at a school close to the factory for 12 years. Ten subjects had experienced occupational asbestos exposure, seven in asbestos cement production: mean concentrations were 1.032 x 10(6) AF/gdw and 96,280 AB/gdw. Eight of the 10 had asbestosis or SAL. CONCLUSION: The high concentration of ABs and the new finding of environmental asbestosis confirm that high asbestos concentration was common in the proximity of the factory. Subjects not occupationally exposed and ever living in Casale Monferrato tended to have higher AB concentration than subjects never living in the town (difference not

  8. Necropsy findings in American alligator late-stage embryos and hatchlings from northcentral Florida lakes contaminated with organochlorine pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, M.S.; Del, Piero F.; Wiebe, J.J.; Rauschenberger, H.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    Increased American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) embryo and neonatal mortality has been reported from several northcentral Florida lakes contaminated with old-use organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). However, a clear relationship among these contaminants and egg viability has not been established, suggesting the involvement of additional factors in these mortalities. Thus, the main objective of this study was to determine the ultimate cause of mortality of American alligator late-stage embryos and hatchlings through the conduction of detailed pathological examinations, and to evaluate better the role of OCPs in these mortalities. Between 2000 and 2001, 236 dead alligators were necropsied at or near hatching (after ???65 days of artificial incubation and up to 1 mo of age posthatch). Dead animals were collected from 18 clutches ranging in viability from 0% to 95%. Total OCP concentrations in yolk ranged from ???100 to 52,000 ??g/kg, wet weight. The most common gross findings were generalized edema (34%) and organ hyperemia (29%), followed by severe emaciation (14%) and gross deformities (3%). Histopathologic examination revealed lesions in 35% of the animals, with over half of the cases being pneumonia, pulmonary edema, and atelectasis. Within and across clutches, dead embryos and hatchlings compared with their live cohorts were significantly smaller and lighter. Although alterations in growth and development were not related to yolk OCPs, there was an increase in prevalence of histologic lesions in clutches with high OCPs. Overall, these results indicate that general growth retardation and respiratory abnormalities were a major contributing factor in observed mortalities and that contaminants may increase the susceptibility of animals to developing certain pathologic conditions. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2006.

  9. The early development of medial coronoid disease in growing Labrador retrievers: radiographic, computed tomographic, necropsy and micro-computed tomographic findings.

    PubMed

    Lau, S F; Wolschrijn, C F; Hazewinkel, H A W; Siebelt, M; Voorhout, G

    2013-09-01

    Medial coronoid disease (MCD) encompasses lesions of the entire medial coronoid process (MCP), both of the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone. To detect the earliest signs of MCD, radiography and computed tomography were used to monitor the development of MCD in 14 Labrador retrievers, from 6 to 7 weeks of age until euthanasia. The definitive diagnosis of MCD was based on necropsy and micro-computed tomography findings. The frequency of MCD in the dogs studied was 50%. Radiographic findings did not provide evidence of MCD, ulnar subtrochlear sclerosis or blunting of the cranial edge of the MCP. Computed tomography was more sensitive (30.8%) than radiography (0%) in detecting early MCD, with the earliest signs detectable at 14 weeks of age. A combination of the necropsy and micro-computed tomography findings of the MCP showed that MCD was manifested as a lesion of only the subchondral bone in dogs <18 weeks of age. In all dogs (affected and unaffected), there was close contact between the base of the MCP and the proximal radial head in the congruent joints. Computed tomography and micro-computed tomography findings indicated that the lesions of MCD probably originated at the base of the MCP. PMID:23702281

  10. Proportional mortality: A study of 152 goats submitted for necropsy from 13 goat herds in Quebec, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenitis.

    PubMed

    Debien, Elaine; Hélie, Pierre; Buczinski, Sébastien; Lebœuf, Anne; Bélanger, Denise; Drolet, Richard

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the main causes of mortality, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenits as a cause of death or wasting in caprine herds from Quebec. Goats (n = 152) from 13 herds were submitted for necropsy; the cause of mortality, and the presence, location, and cause of abscesses (if present) were recorded. Proportional mortalities were distributed as: Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxemia (17.1%), pneumonia (13.8%), paratuberculosis (10.5%), listeriosis (6.6%), pregnancy toxemia (5.3%), caprine arthritis-encephalitis (4.6%), and caseous lymphadenitis (3.9%). Caseous lymphadenitis was diagnosed in 24.3% of the submitted goats, but was not a major cause of wasting or mortality. Abscesses were localized internally in 54.1% of the cases. Paratuberculosis was diagnosed in 29 goats (16 as cause of death) and was considered a major cause of wasting and/or mortality. PMID:24155449

  11. Proportional mortality: A study of 152 goats submitted for necropsy from 13 goat herds in Quebec, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenitis

    PubMed Central

    Debien, Elaine; Hélie, Pierre; Buczinski, Sébastien; Lebœuf, Anne; Bélanger, Denise; Drolet, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the main causes of mortality, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenits as a cause of death or wasting in caprine herds from Quebec. Goats (n = 152) from 13 herds were submitted for necropsy; the cause of mortality, and the presence, location, and cause of abscesses (if present) were recorded. Proportional mortalities were distributed as: Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxemia (17.1%), pneumonia (13.8%), paratuberculosis (10.5%), listeriosis (6.6%), pregnancy toxemia (5.3%), caprine arthritis-encephalitis (4.6%), and caseous lymphadenitis (3.9%). Caseous lymphadenitis was diagnosed in 24.3% of the submitted goats, but was not a major cause of wasting or mortality. Abscesses were localized internally in 54.1% of the cases. Paratuberculosis was diagnosed in 29 goats (16 as cause of death) and was considered a major cause of wasting and/or mortality. PMID:24155449

  12. Radiation heart disease: analysis of 16 young (aged 15 to 33 years) necropsy patients who received over 3500 rads to the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Brosius, F.C. III; Waller, B.F.; Roberts, W.C.

    1981-03-01

    Certain clinical and necropsy findings are described in 16 young (aged 15 to 33 years) patients who received greater than 3500 rads to the heart five to 144 months before death. All 16 had some radiation-induced damage to the heart: 15 had thickened pericardia (five of whom had evidence of cardiac tamponade); eight had increased interstitial myocardial fibrosis, particularly in the right ventricle; 12 had fibrous thickening of the mural endocardium and 13 of the valvular endocardium. Except for valvular thickening, the changes were more frequent in the right side of the heart than in the left, presumably because of higher radiation doses to the anterior surface of the heart. In six of the 16 study patients and in one of 10 control subjets, one or more major epicardial coronary arteries were narrowed from 76 to 100% in cross-sectional area by atherosclerotic plaque; one patient had a healed myocardial infarct at necropsy and one died suddenly. In 10 patients and in the 10 control subjects, the four major epicardial coronary arteries were examined quantitatively: 6% of the 469 five millimeter segments of coronary artery from the patients were narrowed from 76 to 100% (controls = 0.2%, p = 0.06) and 22% were narrowed from 51 to 75% (controls = 12%). The proximal portion of the arteries in the patients had significantly more narrowing than the distal portions. The arterial plaques in the patients were largely composed of fibrous tissue; the media were frequently replaced by fibrous tissue, and the adventitia were often densely thickened by fibrous tissue. In five patients, there was focal thickening (with or without luminal narrowing9 of the intramural coronary arteries. Thus, radiation to the heart may produce a wide spectrum of functinal and anatomic changes but particularly damage to the pericardia and the underlying epicardial coronary arteries.

  13. Prevalence of large endoparasites at necropsy in horses infected with Population B small strongyles in a herd established in Kentucky in 1966.

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C; Collins, S S

    2006-07-01

    Two closed horse herds (Old Lot 4 and Field 24), infected since 1966 with Population B small strongyles resistant to thiabendazole (TBZ) and phenothiazine (PTZ), were terminated in February, March, and May, 2005. At necropsy, only the large endoparasites were identified and counted. The number of horses on pasture was 14 (239 days of age to 23 years old) for Old Lot 4 and two (3 to 20 years old) for Field 24. The time of the last antiparasitic treatment, relative to the year (2005) of necropsy, was 26 years for Old Lot 4 and 9 years for Field 24 horses. Gasterophilus intestinalis third instars (three to 113 specimens/horse) were found in all 16 horses and second instars (one to two) in two horses. Gasterophilus nasalis third instars (one to three) were recovered from five horses. Parascaris equorum infections (23 to 144) were in four horses (239 days to 4 years old). Strongylus vulgaris were present in the large intestine (one to 155) of 13 horses from 239 days to 23 years old and in the cranial mesenteric artery (two to 79) in 10 horses from 239 days to 23 years old. Strongylus edentatus were in the large intestine (two to 101) of 12 horses, ranging in age from 2.5 to 23 years old and in the ventral abdominal wall (one to 53) of six horses from 239 days to 21 years old. Specimens (seven to 872) of Anoplocephala perfoliata were in all horses. Oxyuris equi (one to 129) were recovered from seven horses (330 days to 23 years old). Thelazia lacrymalis (one to 85) infected the eyes of five horses (317 days to 11 years old). PMID:16508764

  14. Common internal parasites found in the stomach, large intestine, and cranial mesenteric artery of thoroughbreds in Kentucky at necropsy (1985 to 1986).

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C; Drudge, J H; Swerczek, T W; Crowe, M W

    1987-02-01

    A total of 278 Thoroughbreds (less than 1 to 31 years old) were examined at necropsy (July 9, 1985, to Feb 2, 1986) in Kentucky for various internal parasites. Examination was not made of all the horses for each of the parasites. Specific parasites recovered from the stomach of foals (n = 30) and yearlings and older horses (n = 96) and percentage (in parentheses) of each age category infected, respectively, were as follows: Gasterophilus intestinalis 2nd instar (53% and 32%) and 3rd instar (37% and 24%); G nasalis 2nd instar (7% and 8%) and 3rd instar (7% and 10%); Habronema spp immature (7% and 13%); H muscae (3% and 8%); Draschia megastoma (3% and 5%) and lesions (0% and 2%); and Trichostrongylus axei (0% and 3%). Parasites in the large intestine included Anoplocephala perfoliata, which was found in the cecum of 30% of the foals (n = 87) and in 60% of the yearlings and older horses (n = 186). Probstmayria vivipara and immature Oxyuris equi were not found in the colon and rectum of any of the horses (n = 53 foals and n = 101 yearlings and older); mature O equi were not sought. Examination of the cranial mesenteric artery for Strongylus vulgaris revealed immature and/or mature specimens in 9% of foals (n = 87) and 14% of yearlings (n = 44); lesions of S vulgaris were present in 25% of foals (n = 87) and 34% of yearlings (n = 44). PMID:2950814

  15. [Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Necropsy series].

    PubMed

    Alba, D; Gómez-Cerezo, J; Cobo, J; Fachal, C; Molina, F; Vázquez, J J

    1995-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a severe infection which is usually diagnosed at postmortem examination. This infection occurs mainly in immunosuppressed patients, although it has also been reported in immunocompetent patients. Clinical records from patients diagnosed with IPA in our institution from 1983 to 1992 were retrospectively studied to analyse clinical and therapeutical characteristics of IPA. Sixteen episodes of IPA were recorded, all of them but one from necrotic specimens. A total of 18.7% of patients were immunocompetent, one patient had the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and the remaining patients had a classical immunosuppression. Fever and dyspnea were noted in all patients; hemoptysis was recorded in 12.5% of patients. The predominant radiological pattern was a bilateral alveolar infiltrate (75%). Diagnosis was made at postmortem examination in 15 cases (93.7%), and a clinical premortem suspicion was obtained only in 25% of patients. IPA can occur in immunocompetent patients more frequently than considered until now. The suspicion index for IPA is low, even in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:7878262

  16. Sensitivity of partial carcass dissection for assessment of porcine cysticercosis at necropsy

    PubMed Central

    Lightowlers, M.W.; Assana, E.; Jayashi, C.M.; Gauci, C.G.; Donadeu, M.

    2015-01-01

    Many interventions against Taenia solium are evaluated by assessing changes in the prevalence of porcine cysticercosis ascertained by carcass dissection. Financial and logistical difficulties often prohibit dissection of entire pig carcasses. We assessed 209 pigs from rural areas of Cameroon and Peru for the presence of T. solium cysticerci and determined the distribution of parasites within the musculature of infected animals. Considering the presence of cysts in the tongue, masticatory muscles and heart, 31 of the 38 (81%) naturally infected animals were identified as having cysts. Dissection of only the tongue, masticatory muscles and heart provides a relatively sensitive and highly specific method for diagnosis of porcine cysticercosis. PMID:26385439

  17. Sensitivity of partial carcass dissection for assessment of porcine cysticercosis at necropsy.

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, M W; Assana, E; Jayashi, C M; Gauci, C G; Donadeu, M

    2015-11-01

    Many interventions against Taenia solium are evaluated by assessing changes in the prevalence of porcine cysticercosis ascertained by carcass dissection. Financial and logistical difficulties often prohibit dissection of entire pig carcasses. We assessed 209 pigs from rural areas of Cameroon and Peru for the presence of T. solium cysticerci and determined the distribution of parasites within the musculature of infected animals. Considering the presence of cysts in the tongue, masticatory muscles and heart, 31 of the 38 (81%) naturally infected animals were identified as having cysts. Dissection of only the tongue, masticatory muscles and heart provides a relatively sensitive and highly specific method for diagnosis of porcine cysticercosis. PMID:26385439

  18. Echocardiographic diagnosis and necropsy findings of a congenital ventricular septal defect in a stranded harbor porpoise.

    PubMed

    Szatmári, Viktor; Bunskoek, Paulien; Kuiken, Thijs; van den Berg, Annemarie; van Elk, Cornelis

    2016-03-30

    A live-stranded harbor porpoise Phocoena phocoena was found on the west coast of the Dutch island Texel (North Sea) and transported to a rehabilitation center for small cetaceans, where it underwent a veterinary health check. Cardiac auscultation revealed a systolic cardiac murmur with the point of maximal intensity in the right hemithorax with an intensity of IV out of VI. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a congenital ventricular septal defect with left-to-right shunting. Because the left atrium was not dilated according to the reference range of canine left atrium to aortic ratio, the presence of congestive heart failure was considered very unlikely. Therefore, this congenital cardiac anomaly was thought to be a clinically non-relevant incidental finding and would not explain the weakness, coughing, anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. Because the animal was still unable to swim or eat by itself after 2 wk of supportive care, it was euthanized. Post-mortem examination confirmed the presence of a ventricular septal defect. The weight of the heart relative to the animal's length was greater than expected, using linear regression analysis on the lengths and cardiac weights of 71 other stranded wild harbor porpoises without macroscopic cardiac pathologic changes. This finding suggests that the left ventricle had an eccentric hypertrophy because of volume overload resulting from the intracardiac shunt. This is the first report of a congenital cardiac anomaly and its ante-mortem diagnosis in this species. Data presented for the other 71 harbor porpoises may provide reference values for this species. PMID:27025305

  19. [Encephalometry on the medial face of the human brain hemisphere: a necropsy study].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Paula J; Cricenti V, Serafim V; Lancellotti, Carmen L P

    2005-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the dimensions of the human brain, specifically in the frontal cortex, helping the analysis of neuroimaging. A form was made to register and describe encephalic measurements and 81 cerebral hemispheres (CH) were analyzed. Male individuals showed larger CH length; wider superior frontal gyrus in the right CH; bigger encephalic weight and corpus callosum (CC) width. The proportion of measurement from the frontal pole to the most anterior part of the CC genu, related to the CH length gets smaller with aging, whereas the average distance from the most posterior part of the splenum of the CC to the occipital pole was bigger in both male CHs and there was a tendency of decrease in this difference with aging. PMID:16059594

  20. Occurrence of strongyles (Strongylidae) in horses from small farms on the basis of necropsy.

    PubMed

    Kornaś, S; Skalska, M; Nowosad, B; Gawor, J; Kharchenko, V; Cabaret, J

    2009-01-01

    Three parts of the large intestine, i.e. the dorsal and ventral colon, and caecum in 41 working horses from small farms in southern Poland were examined. Five species of large strongyles (3 migratory species from genus Strongylus and 2 non-migratory from genus Triodontophorus) and as well as 17 species of cyathostomes were revealed. The prevalence of large strongyles was observed, accordingly: Strongylus vulgaris--80.5%, S. equinus--9.8%, S. edentatus--4.9%, Triodontophorus serratus--19.5% and T. brevicauda--7.3%. Among cyathostomes, 5 most prevalent species were Cyathostomum catinatum--31.7%, Coronocyclus coronatus--31.7%, Cylicostephanus calicatus--24.4%, Cylicocyclus nassatus--24.4% and C. ashworthi--19.5%. The highest prevalence of S. vulgaris among all Strongylidae isolated specimens suggests that the infection with this parasite should be taken into account in the diagnosis of colics in working horses kept in the small farming system. PMID:19645353

  1. GASTRO-INTESTINAL TRACT DISTRIBUTION AT NECROPSY OF SHIGA-TOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI O157 IN NATURALLY-INFECTED CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Healthy adult cattle with gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) transient luminal presence or mucosal colonization by Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC) O157:H7 are a primary zoonotic reservoir of this human pathogen, especially for meat-borne transmission. The GIT distribution of STEC O157 in various experimen...

  2. An epizootic of common loons in coastal waters of North Carolina: concentrations of elemental contaminants and results of necropsies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Augspurger, T.; Franson, J.C.; Converse, Kathryn A.; Spitzer, P.; Miller, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    A 1993 die-off of common loons (Gavia immer) in the coastal waters of North Carolina was investigated with emphasis on comparing mercury, selenium, arsenic, and lead between birds from the epizootic and reference specimens. Die-off specimens were emaciated but contained no ingested foreign bodies and no lesions suggestive of infectious disease. Results of bacteriology, virology, parasitology, and botulism testing were unremarkable. The geometric mean concentrations (wet weight) of liver mercury (10.9 ppm), and arsenic (0.96 ppm) did not differ between specimens from the die-off and reference loons from the same area that died of other causes. The geometric mean liver selenium concentration of die-off specimens (10.4 ppm) was significantly higher than that of reference loons. Liver lead concentrations were <0.20 ppm in all but one sample (5.83 ppm). The geometric mean mercury concentration in the primary remiges of die-off specimens (5.44 ppm dry weight) was significantly lower than in reference birds. Liver mercury significantly correlated with liver selenium on a molar concentration basis. We interpret the range of liver mercury concentrations in birds from the epizootic, similar liver mercury concentrations in reference loons, and higher mercury concentrations in reference loon feathers as evidence that factors other than mercury were primarily responsible for the emaciation diagnosed as the cause of mortality.

  3. Organochlorine pesticide, PCB, and PBB residues and necropsy data for bald eagles from 29 states--1975-77

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaiser, T.E.; Reichel, W.L.; Locke, L.N.; Cromartie, E.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.; Stafford, C.J.; Swineford, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    During 1975-77, 168 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found moribund or dead in 29 states were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); 32 specimens from 13 states were analyzed for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs). PCBs were present in 166 bald eagle carcasses and DDE was found in 165. TDE and dieldrin were identified in 137 samples, trans-nonachlor in 118, and oxychlordane in 90. Brains of five eagles contained possible lethal levels of dieldrin, and two eagles possibly died of endrin poisoning. Nine eagle livers, analyzed because of suspected lead poisoning, contained high levels of lead. Twenty percent of the eagles died from shooting, the most common cause of death; this cause of death, however, has declined.

  4. An epizootic of common loons in coastal waters of North Carolina: Concentrations of elemental contaminants and results of necropsies

    SciTech Connect

    Augspurger, T.; Franson, J.C.; Converse, K.A.; Spitzer, P.R.; Miller, E.A.

    1998-02-01

    A 1993 die-off of common loons (Gavia immer) in the coastal waters of North Carolina was investigated with emphasis on comparing mercury, selenium, arsenic, and lead between birds from the epizootic and reference specimens. Die-off specimens were emaciated but contained no ingested foreign bodies and no lesions suggestive of infectious disease. Results of bacteriology, virology, parasitology, and botulism testing were unremarkable. The geometric mean concentrations (wet weight) of liver mercury and arsenic did not differ between specimens from the die-off and reference loons from the same area that died of other causes. The geometric mean liver selenium concentration of die-off specimens was significantly higher than that of reference loons. Liver lead concentrations were < 0.20 ppm in all but one sample (5.83 ppm). The geometric mean mercury concentration in the primary remiges of die-off specimens was significantly lower than in reference birds. Liver mercury significantly correlated with liver selenium on a molar concentration basis. The authors interpret the range of liver mercury concentrations in birds from the epizootic, similar liver mercury concentrations in reference loons, and higher mercury concentrations in reference loon feathers as evidence that factors other than mercury were primarily responsible for the emaciation diagnosed as the cause of mortality.

  5. Distribution of Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli O157 in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Naturally O157-Shedding Cattle at Necropsy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli O157 (STEC O157) occurrence was determined along the entire gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of four naturally-infected cattle and at specific locations for 61 additional animals. STECO157 was recovered along the entire length of the GIT, though inter-animal distributio...

  6. PREVALENCE OF GIARDIA IN BEAVER AND MUSKRAT POPULATIONS IN NEW ENGLAND STATES AND MINNESOTA: DETECTION OF INTESTINAL TROPHOZOITES AT NECROPSY PROVIDES GREATER SENSITIVITY THAN DETECTION OF CYSTS IN FECAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys on the prevalence of Giardia in animal populations have relied on the detection of cysts in fecal samples. e have determined the prevalence of Giardia in beaver and muskrat in four New England states plus Minnesota using both the detection of trophozoites in mucosal scrap...

  7. Rhabdomyoma of the heart in a newborn infant. Diagnosis by echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Milner, S; Abramowitz, J A; Levin, S E

    1980-01-01

    An intracavitary right ventricular tumour was identified echocardiographically before operation in an infant with a rhabdomyoma of the heart. Necropsy showed associated tuberous sclerosis. Images PMID:7426178

  8. First Report of Protechinostoma mucronisertulatum (Echinostomatidae) in a Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) from Saskatchewan, Canada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report a new host record for Protechinostoma mucronisertulatum. These small trematode parasites were found in a debilitated, immature, male sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) during Autumn migration from the Canadian prairies. Necropsy examination identified fibrinonecrotizing and ulcerative jejuni...

  9. Acute, fatal Sarcocystis calchasi-associated hepatitis in Roller pigeons (Columbia livia f. dom.) at Philadelphia Zoo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four Roller pigeons (Columba livia f. dom.) at the Philadelphia Zoo died suddenly. Necropsy examination revealed macroscopic hepatitis. Microscopically, the predominant lesions were in liver, characterized with necrosis and mixed cell inflammatory response. Sarcocystis calchasi-like schizonts and fr...

  10. SYNOPSIS OF HISTOTECHNIQUES FOR AQUATIC ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This synopsis provides an overview of the necropsy, fixation, trimming, and processing of tissues from aquatic organisms for examination using light microscopy. The handling of animals, their tissues, uses of knives, and processing chemicals will be covered. Understanding the his...

  11. Purkinje cell heterotopy with cerebellar hypoplasia in two free-living American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two wild fledgling kestrels exhibited lack of motor coordination, postural reaction deficits, and abnormal propioception. At necropsy, the cerebellum and brainstem were markedly underdeveloped. Microscopically, there was Purkinje cells heterotopy, abnormal circuitry, and hypoplasia with defective fo...

  12. Bartonella spp. Exposure in Northern and Southern Sea Otters in Alaska and California

    PubMed Central

    Chomel, Bruno B.; Gill, Verena A.; Doroff, Angela M.; Miller, Melissa A.; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A.; Kasten, Rickie W.; Byrne, Barbara A.; Goldstein, Tracey; Mazet, Jonna A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Since 2002, an increased number of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from southcentral Alaska have been reported to be dying due to endocarditis and/or septicemia with infection by Streptococcus infantarius subsp. coli. Bartonella spp. DNA was also detected in northern sea otters as part of mortality investigations during this unusual mortality event (UME) in Kachemak Bay, Alaska. To evaluate the extent of exposure to Bartonella spp. in sea otters, sera collected from necropsied and live-captured northern sea otters, as well as necropsied southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) unaffected by the UME, were analyzed using an immunofluorescent antibody assay. Antibodies against Bartonella spp. were detected in sera from 50% of necropsied and 34% of presumed healthy, live-captured northern sea otters and in 16% of necropsied southern sea otters. The majority of sea otters with reactive sera were seropositive for B. washoensis, with antibody titers ranging from 1:64 to 1:256. Bartonella spp. antibodies were especially common in adult northern sea otters, both free-living (49%) and necropsied (62%). Adult stranded northern sea otters that died from infectious causes, such as opportunistic bacterial infections, were 27 times more likely to be Bartonella seropositive than adult stranded northern sea otters that died from noninfectious causes (p<0.001; 95% confidence interval 2.62–269.4). Because Bartonella spp. antibodies were detected in necropsied northern sea otters from southcentral (44%) and southwestern (86%) stocks of Alaska, as well as in necropsied southern sea otters (16%) in southcentral California, we concluded that Bartonella spp. exposure is widely distributed among sea otter populations in the Eastern Pacific, providing context for investigating future disease outbreaks and monitoring of Bartonella infections for sea otter management and conservation. PMID:25514118

  13. Bartonella spp. exposure in northern and southern sea otters in Alaska and California.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Sebastian E; Chomel, Bruno B; Gill, Verena A; Doroff, Angela M; Miller, Melissa A; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A; Kasten, Rickie W; Byrne, Barbara A; Goldstein, Tracey; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2014-12-01

    Since 2002, an increased number of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from southcentral Alaska have been reported to be dying due to endocarditis and/or septicemia with infection by Streptococcus infantarius subsp. coli. Bartonella spp. DNA was also detected in northern sea otters as part of mortality investigations during this unusual mortality event (UME) in Kachemak Bay, Alaska. To evaluate the extent of exposure to Bartonella spp. in sea otters, sera collected from necropsied and live-captured northern sea otters, as well as necropsied southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) unaffected by the UME, were analyzed using an immunofluorescent antibody assay. Antibodies against Bartonella spp. were detected in sera from 50% of necropsied and 34% of presumed healthy, live-captured northern sea otters and in 16% of necropsied southern sea otters. The majority of sea otters with reactive sera were seropositive for B. washoensis, with antibody titers ranging from 1:64 to 1:256. Bartonella spp. antibodies were especially common in adult northern sea otters, both free-living (49%) and necropsied (62%). Adult stranded northern sea otters that died from infectious causes, such as opportunistic bacterial infections, were 27 times more likely to be Bartonella seropositive than adult stranded northern sea otters that died from noninfectious causes (p<0.001; 95% confidence interval 2.62-269.4). Because Bartonella spp. antibodies were detected in necropsied northern sea otters from southcentral (44%) and southwestern (86%) stocks of Alaska, as well as in necropsied southern sea otters (16%) in southcentral California, we concluded that Bartonella spp. exposure is widely distributed among sea otter populations in the Eastern Pacific, providing context for investigating future disease outbreaks and monitoring of Bartonella infections for sea otter management and conservation. PMID:25514118

  14. Standardized method for the harvest of nonhuman primate tissue optimized for multiple modes of analyses.

    PubMed

    Davenport, April T; Grant, Kathleen A; Szeliga, Kendall T; Friedman, David P; Daunais, James B

    2014-03-01

    Appropriate animal models are critical to conduct translational studies of human disorders without variables that can confound clinical studies. Such analytic methods as patch-clamp electrophysiological and voltammetric recordings of neurons in brain slices require living brain tissue. In order to obtain viable tissue from nonhuman primate brains, tissue collection methods must be designed to preserve cardiovascular and respiratory functions for as long as possible. This paper describes a method of necropsy that has been used in three species of monkeys that satisfies this requirement. At necropsy, animals were maintained under a deep surgical plane of anesthesia while a craniotomy was conducted to expose the brain. Following the craniotomy, animals were perfused with ice-cold, oxygenated artificial cerebrospinal fluid to displace blood and to reduce the temperature of the entire brain. The brain was removed within minutes of death and specific brain regions were immediately dissected for subsequent in vitro electrophysiology or voltammetry experiments. This necropsy method also provided for the collection of tissue blocks containing all brain regions that were immediately frozen and stored for subsequent genomic, proteomic, autoradiographic and histological studies. An added benefit from the design of this necropsy method is that all major peripheral tissues were also collected and are now being utilized in a wide range of genomic, biochemical and histological assays. This necropsy method has resulted in the establishment and growth of a nonhuman primate alcohol tissue bank designed to distribute central nervous system and peripheral tissues to the larger scientific community. PMID:23709130

  15. DDT poisoning in a Cooper's hawk collected in 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prouty, R.M.; Pattee, O.H.; Schmeling, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    In April 1980, a Cooper's hawk (Accipiter cooperii) was found on the ground in Lakewood, Colorado, unable to fly and in convulsion. The bird died shortly thereafter. The hawk was packed in dry ice and shipped air express to the Fish and Wildlife Service, U. S. Department of the Interior, National Wildlife Health Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, for necropsy. Following necropsy, the brain, gastrointestinal tract, and remaining carcass except skin, feet, wings, liver, and kidney were packed in dry ice and shipped air express to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, for chemical residue analysis. Because the bird's behavior before death suggested some form of poisoning, the kidney was assayed for thallium, the liver for lead, and the gastrointestinal tract for strychnine, sodium fluoroacetate, and arsenic. When these assays proved negative, the bird was analyzed for organochlorine pesticides. Necropsy findings and pesticide residue analyses are reported here.

  16. Group G streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome in three cats.

    PubMed

    Taillefer, Mylène; Dunn, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    Three 8-week-old kittens were presented with a history of acute, generalized weakness and severe fever. One cat was dead upon presentation, and necropsy findings were supportive of a group G Streptococcus spp. septicemia. During their clinical courses, two of the three kittens developed a progressive, marked swelling of one or more limbs. One moribund and severely hypothermic cat was euthanized a few hours after presentation, and necropsy was also supportive of a group G Streptococcus spp. septicemia. One kitten recovered. Group G streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome was suspected because of the fulminant progression of the septicemia. PMID:15347623

  17. Presumed Mycobacteriosis in Laboratory Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    PubMed Central

    Asfaw, Yohannes G; Sun, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    Husbandry staff noticed a research-naïve, young-adult, female finch tossing its head back intermittently. A second finch exhibiting similar signs was reported a few days later. Postmortem necropsy and histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin and acid-fast staining on the first finch revealed the presence of acid-fast organisms in several organs. After presumptive diagnosis of mycobacteriosis, all remaining finches housed in the same room as the first underwent necropsy and histology. Three additional finches were positive for Mycobacterium-like acid-fast organisms. Incidental findings of megabacteriosis were noted histopathologically on 2 other finches. PMID:20858369

  18. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  19. Chronic renal disease in a captive two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with concurrent hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salas, Elisa; Wolf, Tiffany; Harris, Seth

    2014-06-01

    A 13-yr-old female two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with a prolonged history of worsening azotemia was necropsied shortly after euthanasia. On necropsy, the sloth had poor body condition, bilaterally shrunken kidneys, and a large neoplastic mass replacing the right liver lobe. Histologic examination demonstrated chronic renal disease with metastatic mineralization as the cause of morbidity. The liver mass was not associated with any known clinical signs and was diagnosed as a solitary and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed in a sloth and the first detailed description of chronic renal disease in this species. PMID:25000707

  20. Forensic pathology of companion animal abuse and neglect.

    PubMed

    Gerdin, J A; McDonough, S P

    2013-11-01

    Submission of cases of suspected animal abuse and neglect (AAN) to veterinary pathologists is increasingly frequent. These cases require modification of postmortem procedures and written reports, as the questions asked by courts typically differ from those asked in routine diagnostic cases. Here we review the practice of veterinary forensic pathology as it applies to cases of companion AAN, as well as the fundamental principles of forensic pathology, the components of a forensic necropsy, and the goals of the necropsy in cases of blunt-force trauma, projectile wounds, and starvation. Future directions and endeavors in veterinary forensic pathology are broached. PMID:23686766

  1. First Confirmation of Schmallenberg Virus in Cattle in Spain: Tissue Distribution and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, A; Royo, L J; Gómez Antona, A; García Marín, J F

    2015-10-01

    Between January and June 2013, nine stillborn bovine foetuses with congenital malformations from nine cattle herds located in Salamanca (central Spain) were detected. Necropsy was performed on two calves. Pathological lesions together with molecular genetics and serological results allowed a definitive diagnosis: first confirmation of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) infection in cattle in Spain. SBV was detected in different tissues and organic fluids in both animals including blood, suggesting a possible viraemia. The umbilical cord was also positive for the presence of SBV in both animals. The former tissue provides an easy to obtain sample and might be a sample of choice when necropsy is carried out in the field. PMID:24191854

  2. Inexpensive anti-cysticercosis vaccine: S3Pvac expressed in heat inactivated M13 filamentous phage proves effective against naturally acquired Taenia solium porcine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julio; Martínez, José Juan; Manoutcharian, Karen; Hernández, Marisela; Fleury, Agnes; Gevorkian, Goar; Acero, Gonzalo; Blancas, Abel; Toledo, Andrea; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Maza, Victor; Quet, Fabrice; Bonnabau, Henri; de Aluja, Aline S; Fragoso, Gladis; Larralde, Carlos; Sciutto, Edda

    2008-06-01

    In search of reducing vaccine production costs', a recombinant M13 phage version of the anti-cysticercosis tripeptide vaccine (S3Pvac) was developed. The efficacy of S3Pvac-Phage vs. placebo was evaluated in a randomized trial that included 1,047 rural pigs in 16 villages of Central Mexico. Three to five months after vaccination 530 pigs were examined by tongue inspection. At 5-27 months of age, 331 pigs (197 vaccinated/134 controls) were inspected at necropsy. Vaccination reduced 70% the frequency of tongue cysticercosis and, based on necropsy, 54% of muscle-cysticercosis and by 87% the number of cysticerci. PMID:18440675

  3. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  4. Pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection in a Canadian cat.

    PubMed

    Knight, Cameron G; Davies, Jennifer L; Joseph, Tomy; Ondrich, Sarah; Rosa, Brielle V

    2016-05-01

    A cat was presented for necropsy after being found dead at home. Histologic findings suggested viral pneumonia. Polymerase chain reaction and viral typing revealed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. This is the first report of influenza in a Canadian cat and highlights the importance of considering influenza virus in the differential diagnosis for feline respiratory distress. PMID:27152036

  5. Airsac nematode Monopetalonema alcedinis in the Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sporadic and geographically widespread reports of parasites affecting the Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) have been published but few have described details of pathology. A female, adult kingfisher was found dead in a heavily wooded area of a zoo in Maryland, USA. At necropsy, numerous sexua...

  6. Anthrax vaccine associated deaths in miniature horses.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, Bruce K

    2015-04-01

    During a widespread anthrax outbreak in Canada, miniature horses were vaccinated using a live spore anthrax vaccine. Several of these horses died from an apparent immune-mediated vasculitis temporally associated with this vaccination. During the course of the outbreak, other miniature horses from different regions with a similar vaccination history, clinical signs, and necropsy findings were found. PMID:25829553

  7. A degenerative encephalomyelopathy in 7 Kuvasz puppies.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, Murray J; Smith-Maxie, Laura L; de Lahunta, Alexander

    2005-05-01

    Seven Kuvasz puppies from 2 same-parentage litters developed weakness and ataxia. Six necropsied dogs had lesions in caudate nucleus, cerebellar nuclei and folia, and spinal cord. Lesions seen were felt to be familial or due to the effects of an amprolium-induced thiamine deficiency on the developing brains of these puppies. PMID:16018562

  8. Meningoencephalitis associated with disseminated sarcocystosis in a free-ranging moose (Alces alces) calf

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Madhu; Patel, Jagdish; Pybus, Margo; Coleman, James K.; Childress, April L.; Wellehan, James F.X.

    2015-01-01

    A wild moose (Alces alces) calf was presented for necropsy due to severe neurologic signs. Histopathologic examination revealed multisystemic inflammation with intralesional mature and immature schizonts. Schizonts in the brain reacted positively to Sarcocystis spp. polyclonal antibodies. Gene sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA identified the species as Sarcocystis alceslatrans. PMID:26246636

  9. 21 CFR 600.12 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Records. 600.12 Section 600.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL.... A necropsy record shall be kept on each animal from which a biological product has been obtained...

  10. 21 CFR 600.12 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Records. 600.12 Section 600.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL.... A necropsy record shall be kept on each animal from which a biological product has been obtained...

  11. 21 CFR 600.12 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Records. 600.12 Section 600.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL.... A necropsy record shall be kept on each animal from which a biological product has been obtained...

  12. Glioblastoma Multiforme in an HIV-Infected Patient: An Unexpected Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Victor Costa Morais de; Gomes, Thalita; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos Lima; Damian, Márcia Melo; Silva, Vera Márcia Fonseca Queiroz; Araújo, José Ribamar; Safe, Izabella Picinin; Ramasawmy, Rajendranath

    2014-01-01

    We reported a case of glioblastoma multiforme in a 42-year-old female patient with HIV infection, who had a rapid progression to AIDS. She was diagnosed with an intracerebral mass and treated as neurotoxoplasmosis with improvement in the first week of therapy. On the fourth week she had a clinical worsening evolving to death, receiving the diagnosis at necropsy. PMID:24935693

  13. Adverse outcome of using tilmicosin in a lamb with multiple ventricular septal defects

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulopoulos, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    A 15-day-old, 6.08 kg, lamb was injected subcutaneously with tilmicosin 15 mg/kg body weight. Approximately 15 min later, the lamb died. During necropsy, the heart was found to have multiple ventricular septal defects. Death was attributed to sudden heart failure due to the cardiac effects of tilmicosin in a heart having congenital defects. PMID:19337615

  14. 21 CFR 600.12 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... retained. (c) Records of sterilization of equipment and supplies. Records relating to the mode of sterilization, date, duration, temperature and other conditions relating to each sterilization of equipment and... the particular manufacturing process to which the sterilization relates. (d) Animal necropsy...

  15. THE 2000 CANINE DISTEMPER EPIDEMIC IN CASPIAN SEALS(PHOCA CASPICA): PATHOLOGY AND ANALYSIS OF CONTRIBUTORY FACTORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 10,000 Caspian seals (Phoca caspica) were reported dead in the Caspian Sea during spring and summer 2000. We performed necropsies and extensive laboratory analyses on 18 seals, as well as examination of the pattern of strandings and variation in weather in recent years, to identify the cau...

  16. Epidemiological study of non-systemic parasitism in dogs in southeast Mediterranean Spain assessed by coprological and post-mortem examination.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Carrasco, C; Berriatua, E; Garijo, M; Martínez, J; Alonso, F D; de Ybáñez, R Ruiz

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence and risk factors of non-systemic canine ecto- and endoparasitism and anthelminthic use in Murcia located at the centre of the Spanish Mediterranean coastal arch, was investigated by coprology and necropsy in up to 275 pet, city shelter and stray dogs in 2001-2004. Faecal parasite stages were detected in 25% of dogs. Species frequency was 6-10% for Toxocara canis, Ancylostomatidae spp., Toxascaris leonina and Isospora canis, and 0.4-1% for Trichuris vulpis, Giardia lamblia, and Dipylidium caninum. Logistic regression indicated that the risk of intestinal parasitism was highest for dogs necropsy findings; however, the degree of agreement between post-mortem and coprological examination for intestinal parasites was generally poor. Necropsy revealed 10%G. lamblia, 12%Taenia spp. 38%D. caninum infections. Fleas, ticks and lice were also found in 38%, 6% and 2% of necropsied stray dogs. These results demonstrate the need for an urgent parasite control programme at the city dog shelter and the need to improve the owner's education on zoonotic risks, the proper use of anthelminthics, and other parasite control practices. PMID:17542962

  17. Diagnostic Characterization of a Feral Swine Herd Enzootically Infected with Brucella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighty feral swine were trapped from a herd which had been documented to be seropositive for Brucella and which had been used for Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine trials on a 7,100 hectare tract of land in South Carolina. The animals were euthanized and complete necropsies were performed. Samples we...

  18. Metastatic transitional cell carcinoma in proximal humerus of a dog

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Sarah; Murphy, Kimberly A.; Nykamp, Stephanie G.; Allavena, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) was diagnosed in the proximal humerus of a dog that was presented with persistent right forelimb lameness with no clinical signs of urinary tract involvement. A diagnosis of TCC was made from surgical biopsy of the humeral lesion with subsequent necropsy revealing the prostatic urethra as the primary site of the tumor. PMID:22379204

  19. Isolation of Serratia fonticola from skin lesions in a Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) with an associated septicaemia.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marta E; Lanzarot, Pilar; Costas, Eduardo; Lopez Rodas, Victoria; Marín, Mercedes; Blanco, Jose L

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes the first isolation of Serratia fonticola in a Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). This organism was initially isolated from skin lesions and blood and subsequently from a variety of organs during necropsy. S. fonticola was confirmed as the pathogen causing the infection. PMID:17451977

  20. Diagnosis of toxoplasmosis-associated abortion in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos) fetus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A near full term alpaca (Vicugna pacos) was stillborn two days before expected date of delivery; necropsy examination was conducted within six hours of delivery. Gross lesions were enlarged liver and hydrocephalus. On histologic examination, mild inflammatory lesions were identified in the placenta,...

  1. DISSEMINATED TOXOPLASMOSIS IN A MEDITERRANEAN PREGNANT RISSO'S DOLPHIN (GRAMPUS GRISEUS) WITH TRANSPLACENTAL FETAL INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatal disseminated toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) dam and its fetus based on pathologic findings, immunohistochemistry, and the structure of the parasite. The dolphin was stranded alive on the Spanish Mediterranean coast, and died a few hrs later. At necropsy the ...

  2. Filaria taxideae in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) of Colorado, USA, and commonly associated filarial dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fox, Karen A; Martin, Laura E R; Baeten, Laurie A; Webb, Brett T; LeVan, Ivy K; Ballweber, Lora R; Wolfe, Lisa L

    2013-07-01

    During 2007-09, we necropsied striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) from Colorado, USA. Eight of 51 (16%) had severe infections with the subcutaneous filarid nematode Filaria taxideae, and four of the infected skunks (50%) had dermatitis that was histologically associated with parasite ova in the skin. PMID:23778634

  3. Idiopathic systemic AA-amyloidosis in a skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    PubMed

    Elhensheri, Mohamed; Linke, Reinhold P; Blankenburg, Anja; Beineke, Andreas

    2012-03-01

    This report describes a case of systemic amyloidosis in a captive striped skunk. At necropsy, bilateral alopecia, as well as reno-, hepato-, and splenomegaly were present. Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry revealed depositions of AA-amyloid in different organs. The lack of a predisposing disease is suggestive of idiopathic systemic AA-amyloidosis. PMID:22448530

  4. PILOT STUDY FOR ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS IN P53 HETEROZYGOTE DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    40 p53 heterozygous knockout mice and 40 p53 wild-type controls were exposed to 4 arsenicals in drinking water at a single dose, the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), in a chronic lifetime tumor bioassay, and animals were subjected to necropsy and limited pathologic examination of th...

  5. Pulmonary asbestos and dust content in East Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Stovin, P G; Partridge, P

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were made of the asbestos fibre and dust content of samples from 96 surgically excised lungs; 42 necropsies on patients with lung cancer, 11 necropsies on patients with non-pulmonary malignancies, and 59 necropsies on patients without any malignant disease. The patients' ages ranged from 45 to 74 years at the time of study. None of the patients had asbestosis. The distribution of fibres and dust content of the lungs showed a log-normal distribution. There was no significant difference in fibre counts or dust content between men and women, and between lung cancer and non-cancer patients. The only group with an association with a high asbestos fibre count was four necropsy cases of pleural mesothelioma. There was no significant relationship between asbestos fibre count and dust content of the lung. The present data suggest that asbestos fibre counts below 100,000 per gram of dried lung are not related to specific asbestos disease, although in the surgical cases who were closely questioned on their residential and occupational histories most of those with fibre counts above 30,000 per gram dried lung had had occasions of definite or very likely asbestos exposure. PMID:7101223

  6. Aberrant heartworm migration to the abdominal aorta and systemic arteriolitis in a dog presenting with vomiting and hemorrhagic diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Janet A.; Scott, Katherine D.; Edwards, John F.

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year-old Dachshund was presented for vomiting and diarrhea. Abdominal ultrasound revealed Dirofilaria immitis in the abdominal aorta and an avascular segment of small intestine. The dog was euthanized. Necropsy revealed D. immitis in the abdominal aorta and widespread necrotizing arteriolitis. This is a unique presentation of aberrant migration of D. immitis. PMID:26740703

  7. Neurotropic T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma in a 14-year-old Morgan gelding

    PubMed Central

    Westerman, Trina L.; Poulsen, Keith P.; Schlipf, John W.; Valentine, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    A 14-year-old Morgan gelding was presented for progressive weakness and muscle atrophy. The horse was initially diagnosed with equine protozoal myelitis based on history, physical examination, and laboratory diagnostics. Despite therapy, the horse declined clinically and was euthanized. Necropsy revealed a rare form of neurotropic lymphoma, described in this report. PMID:24688140

  8. Severe gastric impaction secondary to a gastric polyp in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Furness, Mary Catherine; Snyman, Heindrich Nicolaas; Abrahams, Miranda; Moore, Alison; Vince, Andrew; Anderson, Maureen E.C.

    2013-01-01

    A 13-year-old Percheron gelding was presented for refractory gastric impaction. At necropsy a pedunculated 10 cm × 11 cm × 14 cm mass, histologically identified as an inflammatory polyp, was suspected to have been partly obstructing the pylorus. This is the first report of a polyp resulting in gastric outflow obstruction in a horse. PMID:24155420

  9. Senile systemic amyloidosis--a case report.

    PubMed

    Shah, V B; Pathak, A M; Mandke, J V; Kandalkar, B M; Chitale, A R

    1999-07-01

    An 85 years old female presented with acute pain and weakness in left lower extremity and doppler evidence of femoropopliteal block was made which subsequently proved fatal. Necropsy revealed extensive amyloid deposition in the heart and amyloid angiopathy in rest of the organs. PMID:10862300

  10. Renal amyloidosis--a clinicopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Shah, V B; Phatak, A M; Shah, B S; Kandalkar, B M; Haldankar, A R; Ranganathan, S

    1996-07-01

    A total of 19,075 necropsies and 1169 renal biopsies were scrutinised over a period of 20 years (1973-1992) retrospectively with an aim to study the incidence and pattern of renal amyloidosis in Nair Hospital. A total of 75 cases with amyloidosis were detected, 33 from the necropsy series (0.162%) and 42 from biopsies (3.59%). Secondary amyloidosis was seen in 82.66% and primary amyloidosis in 10.66%. Tuberculosis of various organs was the main cause of secondary amyloidosis (79.03%). Nephrotic syndrome was the common mode of presentation (52%). Besides kidney, which were involved in all cases, the liver, spleen and adrenals were other commonly involved organs at necropsy. Renal failure was the leading cause of death (51.51%). Thioflavine-T proved to be more sensitive technique than other conventional staining methods. The potassium permanganate test is a useful test to distinguish secondary amyloid fibrils from other amyloid fibrils. Abdominal fat aspiration may prove to be specific, sensitive and a routine procedure enabling the early diagnosis of amyloidosis leading to increased incidence of amyloidosis during life than at necropsy. PMID:8972145

  11. Urolithiasis in a Herd of Beef Cattle Associated with Oxalate Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Waltner-Toews, D.; Meadows, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An unusually high incidence of urinary calculi in a group of feeder cattle is described. Necropsy findings in one affected animal suggested that oxalates in the feed, specifically in fescue (Festuca spp.) seed screenings, may have been the cause. Low dietary calcium and decreased water intake by the cattle appear to have been predisposing factors. Control measures are discussed. PMID:7363261

  12. Gray wolf (Canis lupus) is a natural definitive host for Neospora caninum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gray wolf (Canis lupus) was found to be a new natural definitive host for Neospora caninum. This finding is based on the recovery of Neospora-like oocysts from the feces of 3 of 73 wolves from Minnesota examined at necropsy, and on successful amplification of N. caninum-specific sequences from ...

  13. Ectopic spleen presenting with anemia and an abdominal mass in a dog.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Kirsten J; Webb, Jinelle A; Hanselman, Beth A

    2013-11-01

    An 11.5-year-old, neutered male, golden retriever dog that had previously had a splenectomy for benign disease 2 years prior to presentation was diagnosed with anemia and a large abdominal mass. Necropsy and histopathology identified the abdominal mass as ectopic splenic tissue. PMID:24179243

  14. Ectopic spleen presenting with anemia and an abdominal mass in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Kirsten J.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Hanselman, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    An 11.5-year-old, neutered male, golden retriever dog that had previously had a splenectomy for benign disease 2 years prior to presentation was diagnosed with anemia and a large abdominal mass. Necropsy and histopathology identified the abdominal mass as ectopic splenic tissue. PMID:24179243

  15. Development of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique to diagnose white snakeroot (Ageratina altissima) poisoning in a cow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An 8-year-old, crossbred beef cow was referred to the Indiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University for a complete necropsy in October 2009. The cow was the sixth to die in a 7-day period. Affected cows were reportedly stumbling and became weak, excitable, and recumbent. Histolog...

  16. Bilateral congenital ureteral strictures in a young cat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Namsoon; Choi, Mihyun; Keh, Seoyeon; Oh, Yein; Seo, Jimin; Choi, Heeyeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Yoon, Junghee

    2014-01-01

    An 8-month-old cat was presented with bilateral hydronephrosis. Bilateral ureteral obstructions were identified by diagnostic imaging and confirmed by necropsy. Histopathologic findings revealed polypoid transitional epithelial hyperplasia with chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. This report documents congenital ureteral strictures as a cause of ureteral obstruction in a young cat. PMID:25183890

  17. Spontaneous External Endometriosis in a Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla)

    PubMed Central

    Doré, Monique; Lagacé, Andre

    1985-01-01

    The present report describes a case of external endometriosis in a 28 year old female gorilla (Gorilla gorilla). Microscopical examination of a pelvic mass observed at necropsy revealed ovarian tissue together with uterine glands and stroma, fibrous tissue and many siderophages. Theories of pathogenesis of external endometriosis are briefly reviewed. ImagesFigure 1 and 2. PMID:17422589

  18. Toxocara cati (Nematoda: Ascarididae) in Didelphis albiventris (Marsupialia: Didelphidae) from Brazil: a case of pseudoparasitism.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Hudson Alves; Mati, Vitor Luís Tenório; Melo, Alan Lane de

    2014-01-01

    Eggs of Toxocara cati were found in the feces of Didelphis albiventris from a peridomestic urban environment in Brazil. Negative fecal tests following short-term captivity of the opossums, as well as the absence of ascaridids during necropsy, suggest the occurrence of pseudoparasitism. Implications of the findings for the epidemiology of toxocariasis are discussed. PMID:25517533

  19. Fatal septicemia caused by the zoonotic bacterium Streptococcus iniae during an outbreak in Caribbean reef fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An outbreak of Streptococcus iniae occurred in the early months of 2008 among wild reef fish in the waters of the Federation of St.Kitts and Nevis, lasting almost 2 months. Moribund and dead fish were collected for gross, histological, bacteriological, and molecular analysis. Necropsy findings inclu...

  20. Congenital aganglionosis in a 3-day-old Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Necropsy of a 3-day-old Holstein heifer revealed proximal megacolon and distal colorectal hypoplasia. Histologically, the hypoplastic distal colon and rectum lacked submucosal and myenteric ganglia. Clinical history, physical examination, and pathologic findings were consistent with intestinal aganglionosis, a congenital anomaly well documented in humans and foals but not previously reported in cattle. PMID:15943121

  1. Caudal vena caval thrombosis following treatment of deep digital sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Katharine M.; Streeter, Robert N.; Cramer, Sarah; Lamm, Catherine G.; Love, Brenda C.

    2012-01-01

    A diagnosis of caudal vena caval thrombosis was made by ultrasonography of a Holstein cow presented for lethargy and poor milk production. Medical treatment was unsuccessful and the cow was euthanized. The diagnosis was confirmed at necropsy and Fusobacterium necrophorum was isolated from the thrombus. This paper discusses potential novel sources of caval thrombosis in this case. PMID:22851781

  2. Central nervous system blastomycosis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Gaunt, M. Casey; Taylor, Susan M.; Kerr, Moira E.

    2009-01-01

    An adult golden retriever was presented for progressive neurologic dysfunction. Clinical examination suggested brainstem disease. Blastomycosis was diagnosed based on fine-needle aspiration cytology of a normal sized lymph node and a positive blastomycosis urine antigen test. Systemic blastomycosis with neurologic involvement was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:19949557

  3. A prospective audit of pacemaker function, implant lifetime, and cause of death in the patient.

    PubMed Central

    Suvarna, S K; Start, R D; Tayler, D I

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To audit prospectively the reasons for pacemaker implantation, the duration of the pacemaker use, the cause of death, and pacemaker function after removal from the patient. METHODS: Pacemakers were removed at necropsy, or from the bodies of patients awaiting cremation, in three hospitals over a three year period. The cause of death was taken from the results of the necropsy or from the certified cause of death. Demographic data, including the time of implant and reasons for implantation, were checked. The pacemakers were analysed in terms of battery status, program, and output under a standard 470 ohm load. RESULTS: 69 patients were studied. Average age at death was 78 and 80 years for men and women, respectively. The average duration since pacemaker implantation was 46 months. Eleven patients had necropsies, showing that three died from ischaemic heart disease, six from cardiomyopathy, one from an aortic aneurysm, and one from disseminated neoplasia. From the necropsy results and death certificates, the distribution of causes of death in the group as a whole were ischaemic heart disease (21), cardiomyopathy (8), cerebrovascular disease (11), neoplasia (11), chest infection/chronic obstructive airways disease (8), and other causes (10). In all cases the pacemaker box function was within normal limits. CONCLUSIONS: Neither primary nor secondary pacemaker dysfunction was found. The study highlights the impact of arrhythmias in cardiomyopathy, and raises questions about the true role of ischaemic heart disease in these pacemaker requiring patients. The relatively short gap between pacemaker implantation and death requires further study. Images PMID:10655989

  4. Parvovirus associated cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus in day-old broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus were detected in day-old broiler chickens. Brains of chickens evaluated at necropsy appeared to be abnormal; some were disfigured and cerebellae appeared to be smaller than normal. Histopathologic examination of brains revealed cerebellar folia that were sho...

  5. Cerebral Larva Migrans Caused by Baylisascaris spp. in a Free-ranging North American Porcupine ( Erethizon dorsatum ).

    PubMed

    Roug, Annette; Clancy, Chad S; Detterich, Cassie; Van Wettere, Arnaud J

    2016-07-01

    A free-ranging North American porcupine ( Erethizon dorsatum ) from Utah, US, exhibited neurologic symptoms and was submitted for necropsy. Histologic examination of the brain revealed severe encephalitis with an intralesional nematode larva consistent with Baylisascaris spp. Neurologic larva migrans had not been reported in free-ranging porcupines, or from wildlife in Utah. PMID:27314480

  6. Identification of an intra-cranial intra-axial porcupine quill foreign body with computed tomography in a canine patient.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Christopher P; Sereda, Nikki C; Sereda, Colin W

    2012-02-01

    An intra-cranial intra-axial foreign body was diagnosed in a golden retriever dog through the use of computed tomography (CT). Confirmed by necropsy, a porcupine quill had migrated to the patient's left cerebral hemisphere, likely through the oval foramen. This case study demonstrates the efficacy of CT in visualizing a quill in the canine brain. PMID:22851782

  7. Paraquat induced pulmonary fibrosis in three survivors.

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, M; Patel, S B; Ewen, S W; Smith, C C; Friend, J A

    1991-01-01

    Pulmonary lesions following paraquat poisoning are believed to be almost invariably fatal. The three patients reports here survived despite persistent radiological change. One of the patients died after taking a larger dose of paraquat one year later, and at necropsy histological changes attributable to the two episodes of paraquat poisoning were apparent. Images PMID:2028434

  8. Bacterial sepsis resulting in severe systemic illness and euthanasia in a dog with cutaneous angiomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Sluiter, Kristi L.; Randell, Susan C.; Ramirez, Jessica R.; Farina, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    A Labrador retriever dog was euthanized after unsuccessful treatment for severe, progressive, lethargy, gastroenteritis, icterus, and swelling of a previously diagnosed cutaneous angiomatosis lesion. The body was submitted for necropsy. This is the first report that suggests that cutaneous angiomatosis lesions may have caused life-threatening systemic complications in a dog. PMID:24082170

  9. TEN- AND NINETY-DAY TOXICITY STUDIES OF 1,2-DICHLOROBENZENE ADMINISTERED BY ORAL GAVAGE TO SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subacute (10-day) and subchronic (90-day) toxicity studies of 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) were conducted in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. ,2-Dichlorobenzene was administered in corn oil by oral gavage; control animals received corn oil. t time of sacrifice, gross necropsies ...

  10. Meningoencephalitis associated with disseminated sarcocystosis in a free-ranging moose (Alces alces) calf.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Madhu; Patel, Jagdish; Pybus, Margo; Coleman, James K; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-08-01

    A wild moose (Alces alces) calf was presented for necropsy due to severe neurologic signs. Histopathologic examination revealed multisystemic inflammation with intralesional mature and immature schizonts. Schizonts in the brain reacted positively to Sarcocystis spp. polyclonal antibodies. Gene sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA identified the species as Sarcocystis alceslatrans. PMID:26246636

  11. Mycoplasma hominis ssp. associated endocarditis with myocardial necrosis in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos) in Manitoba in 2011

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Krzysztof M.; Copeland, Shelagh; Postey, Rosemary; Ngeleka, Musangu

    2015-01-01

    Severe endocarditis with myonecrosis, moderate to severe pleural and pericardial effusions, and mild ascites were found on necropsy in 3 alpacas. Mycoplasma hominis ssp. was detected on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of fresh affected endocardial tissue in 1 alpaca. PMID:25694661

  12. Occurrence of Camallanus trispinosus in a captive Indian star tortoise (Geochelone elegans).

    PubMed

    Jeyathilakan, N; Raman, M; Jayathangaraj, M G

    2015-03-01

    Camallanoids are spirurid round worms known to occur in stomach and intestine of lower vertebrate animals such as fishes and reptiles. This paper records the occurrence of Camallanus trispinosus in a captive Indian star tortoise of Guindy snake park, Chennai, India for the first time during necropsy and identified on the basis of morphology of male and female worms, including eggs. PMID:25698874

  13. Self-mutilation in rabbits following intramuscular ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine injections.

    PubMed Central

    Vachon, P

    1999-01-01

    Following hind leg intramuscular injections of ketamine, xylazine, and acepromazine, 4 of 6 rabbits exhibited self-mutilation of the digits. At necropsy, the affected sciatic nerve appeared enlarged. Lymphohistiocytic perineural inflammation and fibrosis were observed, together with nerve degeneration. Neuronal regeneration as the reason for self-mutilation is discussed. Images Figure 1. PMID:12001340

  14. Lymphosarcoma in an alpaca.

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, J A

    2001-01-01

    A 16-month-old, female alpaca presented with a 24-hour history of anorexia and depression. On necropsy, it was found that the liver was grossly enlarged and the cortices of both kidneys contained multifocal lesions. Histologic examination of these lesions and other tissues revealed infiltration with lymphocytic cells, a finding consistent with lymphosarcoma. PMID:11665431

  15. The rigid spine syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    van Munster, E T; Joosten, E M; van Munster-Uijtdehaage, M A; Kruls, H J; ter Laak, H J

    1986-01-01

    Four patients are reported, 3 females and 1 male, with (as a prominent symptom of muscle disease) limitation of flexion of cervical and dorsolumbar spine. The nosological classification of these cases is discussed. In two patients there was evidence of an inclusion body myositis. At necropsy one of these patients had a remarkable distribution of muscle changes. Images PMID:3025374

  16. Exertional myopathy in a pileated woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) subsequent to capture.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Out of 33 Pileated Woodpeckers (Dryocopus pileatus) captured and fitted with radio-transmitters, 12 were later found dead. Three carcasses were recovered and submitted for necropsy. One bird had large pale foci in multiple muscles. Microscopically, skeletal muscle in all three had evidence of severe...

  17. Myocardial ischaemia in infancy and childhood

    PubMed Central

    Berry, C. L.

    1967-01-01

    Examination of 135 consecutive necropsy specimens has shown that ischaemic myocardial injury is not uncommon in infancy and childhood. The extent of the myocardial change has been assessed by a technique of staining with acid fuchsin, first described by Selye (1958). The significance of the findings is discussed. Images PMID:4163355

  18. Cutaneous metastases of a mammary carcinoma in a llama.

    PubMed Central

    Leichner, T L; Turner, O; Mason, G L; Barrington, G M

    2001-01-01

    An 8-year-old, female llama was evaluated for nonhealing, ulcerative, cutaneous lesions, which also involved the mammary gland. Biopsies of the lesions distant from and within the mammary gland area revealed an aggressive carcinoma. The tumor was confirmed at necropsy to be a mammary gland adenocarcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. Images Figure 1. PMID:11265189

  19. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not prevent disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chinese highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strain JXwn06 has been shown to produce high fevers, loss of body condition, respiratory distress and death in pigs. Necropsy reveals extensive interstitial pneumonia, multi-systemic pathology and a high occurrence of secondary bacterial infections. The ful...

  20. ATTACHMENT OF SHIGATOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 TO SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS IN CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) are commonly found in the gastrointestinal tracts of healthy cattle and spread into the environment by fecal shedding. The terminal rectal mucosa is a prominent colonization site for the human pathogen STEC O157:H7 in cattle. We have necropsied and histologic...

  1. SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS ARE EARLY ATTACHMENT SITES FOR SHIGATOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 IN CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) are commonly found in the gastrointestinal tracts of healthy cattle and spread into the environment by fecal shedding. The terminal rectal mucosa is a prominent colonization site for the human pathogen STEC O157:H7 in cattle. We have necropsied and examined 5...

  2. Diesel Exhaust Exposure Increases Susceptibility to Influenza Infection and Induces Dendritic Cell Migration and Maturation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mice were necropsied at day 1, 4, 8 and 14 post-infection and lung tissue was assessed for virus titers by TCID50, lung injury and inflammation. Lung and lymph node DC populations (CD11c+, MHCII, CD45+, CD80+ and CD86+) were identified ...

  3. Gastrolobium spp. poisoning in sheep: A case report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes the history and investigation of a suspected plant poisoning event in Western Australia where fifteen sheep died. One of the poisoned sheep was necropsied and gross and microscopic pathology of the poisoned sheep is described. Monofluoroacetate was detected in rumen contents ...

  4. Disseminated toxoplasmosis in Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) from Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necropsies were conducted on four Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) that were stranded in single events on the coastal beaches of Puerto Rico from August 2010-August 2011. Three manatees were emaciated and the gastrointestinal tracts were devoid of digesta. Microscopically, all manat...

  5. Tuberculosis-like lesions arising from the use of Freund's complete adjuvant in an owl monkey (Aotus sp)

    SciTech Connect

    Malaga, Carlos A.; Weller, Richard E.; Broderson, J R.; Gozalo, Alfonso S.

    2004-04-01

    An apparently normal, non-tuberculin-reacting, splenectomized owl monkey presented tuberculosis-like lesions of the lung at necropsy. Histological and bacteriological examination failed to demonstrate the presence of acid-fast organisms. Retrospective inquiry showed the animal had been inoculated using complete Freund's Adjuvant during a malaria vaccine trial. Lesions observed were compatible with lipid embolism of the adjuvant in the lungs.

  6. Lead poisoning of a marbled godwit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, L.N.; Smith, M.R.; Windingstad, R.M.; Martin, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    A thin adult female marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa) found dead at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Montana, was found to have 17 ingested lead shot in its gizzard. Its liver contained 51.7 ppm lead (wet weight). Based on these necropsy findings a diagnosis of lead poisoning was made.

  7. Blastocystis tropism in the pig intestine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blastocystis subtype 5, a subtype known to infect humans, was detected by molecular methods in the feces of 36 naturally infected market age pigs. At necropsy, 6 heavily infected pigs were selected to determine the tropism of the infection within the gastrointestinal tract. Because so little is know...

  8. Congenital dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts with cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, P. J.; Millis, R. R.; Mitchinson, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas were found at necropsy in two previously reported cases of congenital dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. The nature of the developmental abnormality is discussed and compared with other forms of biliary dilatation. Slow-flowing bile for many years probably leads to cholangiocarcinoma. Images PMID:4343747

  9. Identification of an intra-cranial intra-axial porcupine quill foreign body with computed tomography in a canine patient

    PubMed Central

    Sauvé, Christopher P.; Sereda, Nikki C.; Sereda, Colin W.

    2012-01-01

    An intra-cranial intra-axial foreign body was diagnosed in a golden retriever dog through the use of computed tomography (CT). Confirmed by necropsy, a porcupine quill had migrated to the patient’s left cerebral hemisphere, likely through the oval foramen. This case study demonstrates the efficacy of CT in visualizing a quill in the canine brain. PMID:22851782

  10. Omasal dilation and displacement in 4 Holstein dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Bicalho, Rodrigo C.; Mayers, Heather M.; Cheong, Soon Hon; Rosa, Brielle V.; Guard, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Cases of omasal dilation and displacement in 4 dairy cows are described. The disease was initially diagnosed by a combination of history and clinical signs that included right-sided abdominal distension, rectal palpation, and decreased milk production. The condition was confirmed by laparotomy or necropsy. PMID:19436447

  11. Silent oophoritis due to cytomegalovirus in a patient with advanced HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, R; Alampi, G; Talò, S; Calza, L; Tadolini, M; Martinelli, G N; Chiodo, F

    2000-06-01

    A case of isolated necrotizing cytomegalovirus (CMV) oophoritis disclosed only by necropsy studies in a patient with AIDS, is described. This unusual case report is discussed with a review of the literature dealing with CMV involvement of genital organs in the immunocompromised host, and in patients with HIV infection and AIDS. PMID:10872916

  12. Glanders in donkeys (Equus Asinus) in the state of pernambuco, Brazil: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido; da Fonseca Oliveira, Andréa Alice; da Silva, Andréa Marques Vieira; Junior, José Wilton Pinheiro; da Silva, Leonildo Bento Galiza; de Farias Brito, Marilene; Rabelo, Silvana Suely Assis

    2010-01-01

    The clinical, anatomical and histopatological findings of glanders diagnosis in donkeys in the state of Pernambuco-Brazil are reported. The animals were euthanized and necropsied, and evaluated for lesions in respiratory and lymphatic systems, confirming the disease by isolation of Burkholderia mallei and Strauss test. PMID:24031474

  13. Detection and characterization of Histoplasma capsulatum in a German badger (Meles meles) by ITS sequencing and multilocus sequencing analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wild badger (Meles meles) with a severe nodular dermatitis was presented for post mortem examination. Numerous cutaneous granulomas with superficial ulceration were present especially on head, dorsum, and forearms were found at necropsy. Histopathological examination of the skin revealed a severe ...

  14. Serotyping of Cryptococcus neoformans Isolates from Clinical and Environmental Sources in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Baró, Teresa; Torres-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Morera, Yolanda; Alía, Concepción; López, Olga; Méndez, Raul

    1999-01-01

    We determined biovars and serotypes of 154 isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans from clinical and environmental sources from different areas of Spain. All clinical isolates belonged to C. neoformans var. neoformans. Serotypes showed an irregular distribution. C. neoformans var. gattii serotype B was isolated from necropsy specimens from goats with pulmonary disease. PMID:10074545

  15. Enteritis associated with Clostridium perfringens type A in 9-month-old calves

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Bozidar; Prodanovic, Radisa; Ivetic, Vojin; Radanovic, Oliver; Bojkovski, Jovan

    2012-01-01

    Four 9-month-old Simmental male calves were presented with a history of sudden death. The necropsy and microscopic findings allowed a diagnosis of enteritis and severe intraluminal hemorrhage with blood clots in the jejunum, suggestive of jejunal hemorrhage syndrome. PMID:22851779

  16. Diabetes mellitus in a 6-month-old Charolais heifer calf.

    PubMed

    Clark, Zoe

    2003-11-01

    This unthrifty heifer calf was thin, weak and had a dull haircoat. Urinalysis and blood work revealed glycosuria, ketonuria, hypoproteinemia, and hyperglycemia. Euthanasia and necropsy were performed, revealing multifocal intersitial lymphocytic infiltration, an absence of islet cells, and a positive stain for bovine viral diarrhea virus in the pancreas. PMID:14664356

  17. Diabetes mellitus in a 6-month-old Charolais heifer calf

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Zoe

    2003-01-01

    This unthrifty heifer calf was thin, weak and had a dull haircoat. Urinalysis and blood work revealed glycosuria, ketonuria, hypoproteinemia, and hyperglycemia. Euthanasia and necropsy were performed, revealing multifocal intersitial lymphocytic infiltration, an absence of islet cells, and a positive stain for bovine viral diarrhea virus in the pancreas. PMID:14664356

  18. BVDV2-induced hypomyelinogenesis in a longhorn calf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newborn Longhorn heifer calf presented to the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital with generalized tremors, muscle fasciculations, ataxia and nystagmus. In utero infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) was suspected. The animal was euthanized and a necropsy was p...

  19. Hypomyelination Associated with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Type 2 Infection in a Longhorn Calf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newborn Longhorn heifer calf presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at Texas A&M University with generalized tremors, muscle fasciculations, ataxia, and nystagmus. At necropsy, gross central nervous system lesions were not observed. Histopathologic evaluation of the brain and spin...

  20. Effects of dietary nickel on mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eastin, W.C.; O'Shea, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty breeding pairs of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were randomly assigned to one of five treatment groups and were fed breeder mash containing 0, 12.5, 50.0, 200.0, or 800.0 ppm Ni (as the sulfate) for 90 d. Ni ingestion had no effect on egg production, hatchability, or survival of ducklings. After 90 d birds were bled, sacrificed, and necropsied. There were no significant differences in hematocrit; concentrations of hemoglobin, plasma triglyceride, and cholesterol; of plasma activities of ornithine carbamoyltransferase and alanine aminotransferase. A black tarry feces was noted in the high Ni dose group at necropsy, but no gross or histopathologic lesions were observed. Although absolute concentrations of Ni in tissues were low, there were significant accumulations in kidneys of birds fed Ni at all dietary levels and in feathers, blood, and livers of birds fed high doses of Ni compared with controls.

  1. Virtopsy in a red kangaroo with oral osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Ja; Sasaki, Motoki; Miyauchi, Aki; Kishimoto, Miori; Shimizu, Junichiro; Iwasaki, Toshiroh; Miyake, Yoh-Ichi; Yamada, Kazutaka

    2011-03-01

    This report describes the use of computed tomography (CT) in a nondomestic species. Postmortem CT was performed on a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and a diagnosis of oral osteomyelitis was made. CT examination revealed bony remodeling of the right mandible, an intraosseous lesion of the right temporal bone, muscle necrosis around the right mandible, and the absence of the right, first, upper molar tooth. Cardiac and intrahepatic gas and a distended intestine due to postmortem gas accumulation were also seen. All the lesions identified with CT were also identified by conventional necropsy, except the cardiac and intrahepatic gases. Virtopsy may be a useful procedure for the noninvasive identification of cause of death and as a guide for necropsy in animals. PMID:22946383

  2. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF MAMMARY MASSES IN CAPTIVE LIONS (PANTHERA LEO).

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Craig, Linden E; Ramsay, Edward C; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin; Garner, Michael M

    2016-03-01

    A multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 330 pathology accessions from 285 different lions found 15 captive, female African lions (Panthera leo) with confirmed mammary masses. Aside from the presence of a mammary mass, the most common initial clinical sign was inappetence. Histologic diagnoses were predominantly adenocarcinoma (n = 12), though two benign masses (mammary hyperplasia and a mammary cyst) and one squamous cell carcinoma were identified. Nine of 13 malignant tumors had metastasized to lymph nodes or viscera at the time of necropsy. Six lions with adenocarcinoma and two lions with benign mammary masses had received hormonal contraception, though little evidence of mammary lobular hyperplasia was seen in association with the adenocarcinomas. The most common concurrent disease processes found at necropsy were chronic urinary tract disease and other malignancies. These cases demonstrate that mammary malignancies occur in captive lions and frequently metastasize. PMID:27010273

  3. Acp. Best practice no 155. Pathological investigation of deaths following surgery, anaesthesia, and medical procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Start, R D; Cross, S S

    1999-01-01

    The pathological investigation of deaths following surgery, anaesthesia, and medical procedures is discussed. The definition of "postoperative death" is examined and the classification of deaths following procedures detailed. The review of individual cases is described and the overall approach to necropsy and interpretation considered. There are specific sections dealing with the cardiovascular system (including air embolism, perioperative myocardial infarction, cardiac pacemakers, central venous catheters, cardiac surgery, heart valve replacement, angioplasty, and vascular surgery); respiratory system (postoperative pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, pneumothorax); central nervous system (dissection of cervical spinal cord), hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal system; musculoskeletal system; and head and neck region. Deaths associated with anaesthesia are classified and the specific problems of epidural anaesthesia and malignant hyperthermia discussed. The article concludes with a section on the recording of necropsy findings and their communication to clinicians and medicolegal authorities. PMID:10655984

  4. Human schistosomiasis: Schistosoma mansoni antigen detection in renal glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Hoshino-Shimizu, S; De Brito, T; Kanamura, H Y; Canto, A L; Silva, A O; Campos, A R; Penna, D O; Da Silva, L C

    1976-01-01

    Twelve kidney, five biopsy and seven necropsy specimens, all from schistosomiasis mansoni patients were studied by light and immunoflurescent microscopy in an attempt to detect antigen in the glomerular walls. Deposits of IgM, IgG,I gA, IgE, complement C3 and fibrinogen were observered in most cases. Antigen was successfully detected in two cases(one biopsy and one necropsy specimen), both exhibiting proliferative glomerulonephritis. The only clinical manifestation was a slight proteinuria. IgG antibodies eluted from the sutopsy kidney homogenates showed specific binding mostly to Schistosoma mansoni gut, thus spggesting that the fixed antibodies (eluates) are, at least partially, consituted by antibodies similar to the anti-circulating antigen. These data reinfroce the hypothesis that renal injury in schistosomiasis is mediated through an immune complex disease. PMID:65811

  5. Intramedullary spinal cord damage associated with intervertebral disk material in a dog.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Sean G; Bagley, Rodney S; Gavin, Patrick R

    2002-12-01

    Intervertebral disk extrusions into the spinal cord are rarely reported in veterinary medicine, and only necropsy findings are described in previous reports. It is hypothesized that a disk lesion results in forceful injection of disk material into the spinal cord. In the 3-year-old Miniature Doberman Pinscher of our report, acute clinical signs and results of magnetic resonance imaging were consistent with this disease and helped determine the extent and character of the lesions. Alteration in the appearance of the nucleus pulposus was important in determining that intervertebral disk disease may have been present in this dog. However, a definitive diagnosis of intramedullary disk extrusion can be made only via histologic examination of a biopsy specimen or at necropsy. The dog improved substantially after surgical decompression of the spinal cord, and histologic findings in a biopsy specimen of material found within the spinal cord were consistent with mature degenerate intervertebral disk material. PMID:12479331

  6. Pathologic changes induced by an euthanasia agent.

    PubMed

    Port, C D; Garvin, P J; Ganote, C E; Sawyer, D C

    1978-08-01

    Dogs and cats killed by intravenous injection of either 0.3 ml/kg body weight T-61 or 100 mg/kg body weight pentoarbital and necropsied at less than 5 minutes or at 15 minutes after injection did not have gross or microscopic pathological changes. However, dogs and cats killed with T-61 at a dose of 1.0--1.5 ml/kg body weight and necropsied at 15 minutes after injection had significant gross and microscopic pathological lesions. Grossly, the lungs were severely edematous, did not collapse, and were deep red. Microscopically, the lungs had severe pulmonary edema and endothelial necrosis. Endothelial swelling of glomerular tuft vessels was also present. These lung and kidney lesions are classified as an euthanasia artefact. PMID:703253

  7. Endocardial fibroelastosis in a quarterhorse mare.

    PubMed

    Cushing, T L

    2013-01-01

    A 4-year-old crossbred Quarterhorse mare was submitted to the Clemson Veterinary Diagnostic Center for necropsy examination with a chronic history of inappetence, weight loss and lethargy. Prior to death the horse had developed mild diarrhoea and began showing evidence of colic. Necropsy examination revealed a markedly enlarged heart due predominantly to marked dilation of the right atrium, tortuous congested mesenteric blood vessels, marked ascites, pleural effusion and pulmonary oedema. Further examination of the heart showed the endocardium of the left side of the heart, including the mitral valve leaflets, to be diffusely thickened. Microscopically, the endocardial thickening was due to deposition of fibrous connective tissue and elastin fibres. These findings are consistent with a diagnosis of endocardial fibroelastosis. PMID:23651694

  8. Use of Avian Bornavirus Isolates to Induce Proventricular Dilatation Disease in Conures

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Patricia; Hoppes, Sharman; Suchodolski, Paulette; Mirhosseini, Negin; Payne, Susan; Villanueva, Itamar; Shivaprasad, H.L; Honkavuori, Kirsi S.; Briese, Thomas; Reddy, Sanjay M.

    2010-01-01

    Avian bornavirus (ABV) is a newly discovered member of the family Bornaviridae that has been associated with the development of a lethal neurologic syndrome in birds, termed proventricular dilatation disease (PDD). We successfully isolated and characterized ABV from the brains of 8 birds with confirmed PDD. One isolate was passed 6 times in duck embryo fibroblasts, and the infected cells were then injected intramuscularly into 2 healthy Patagonian conures (Cyanoliseus patagonis). Clinical PDD developed in both birds by 66 days postinfection. PDD was confirmed by necropsy and histopathologic examination. Reverse transcription–PCR showed that the inoculated ABV was in the brains of the 2 infected birds. A control bird that received uninfected tissue culture cells remained healthy until it was euthanized at 77 days. Necropsy and histopathologic examinations showed no abnormalities; PCR did not indicate ABV in its brain tissues. PMID:20202423

  9. A novel case of Fusarium oxysporum infection in an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Staggs, Lydia; St Leger, Judy; Bossart, Gregory; Townsend, Forrest I; Hicks, Christie; Rinaldi, Michael

    2010-06-01

    A necropsy was performed on a captive-born, 10-yr-old male Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) after it died acutely. Gross necropsy findings revealed hemorrhage within the right cerebrum, right cerebellum, and right eye. Histopathologic findings revealed a moderate multifocal acute necrotizing meningoencephalitis with intralesional fungal hyphae. Several pieces of cerebrum and cerebellum and cerebrospinal fluid were sent to the Fungus Testing Laboratory in San Antonio, Texas (U.S.A.). The culture yielded Fusarium oxysporum, which was confirmed by internal transcribed spacer and D1-D2 sequencing. Fusarium oxysporum infection has been reported in marine mammals. No cases of noncutaneous F. oxysporum infection in a cetacean that was not on long-term antimicrobials have been reported in the literature. PMID:20597220

  10. Gill trematodes (flukes) in wild-caught killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Goulding, David R; Blankenship-Paris, Terry L; Lewbart, Gregory A; Myers, Page H; Demianenko, Tracy K; Clark, James A; Forsythe, Diane B

    2004-03-01

    Three wild caught killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) on an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee-approved protocol were found dead within 2 days after being received. The fish were housed in two separate aquaria. Aquarium water was evaluated, and pH, salinity, ammonia, nitrate, and nitrite levels were within acceptable parameters. Several remaining fish appeared to be slow-moving and were presented for necropsy. Multiple, scattered, ulcerated skin lesions (diameter, 1 to 5 mm) were noted at necropsy and were cultured. No pathogenic bacteria were isolated. Wet-mount samples of the gills revealed multiple cysts at the gill margins, each containing a motile organism. No other gill parasites were detected. A diagnosis of trematodiasis was made. The cysts were identified as encysted metacercariae of a digenetic trematode. We surmise that the large numbers of gill flukes combined with the stress of recent shipment likely caused the observed morbidity and mortality. PMID:15053506

  11. Recurrent pulmonary embolism due to hydatid disease of heart. Study of 3 cases, one with intermittent tricuspid valve obstruction (atrial pseudomyxoma).

    PubMed Central

    Gilsanz, V; Campo, C; Cue, R; Estella, J; Estrada, R V; Perez-oteiza, C; Rabago, G; Rebollar, J L; Zarco, P

    1977-01-01

    Three cases of pulmonary hypertension caused by hydatid emboli from the right side of the heart are described; cardiac catheterisation was performed in 2. One case was confirmed at operation and 2 at necropsy. The pulmonary emboli were caused by hydatid vesicles in all 3 cases and in none was there pulmonary thrombosis; free scolices were found in the pulmonary alveoli in 2. In 1 patient with repeated syncopal attacks there was a pedunculated cyst in the right atrium which was though to have intermittently obstructed the tricuspid valve. Gamma radiography, angiocardiography, and necropsy suggested a mechanical cause for the pulmonary hypertenion with no vasoconstrictive element. The surgical patient was alive and well 18 months later. Images PMID:861098

  12. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in yaks (Bos grunniens).

    PubMed

    Van Campen, Hana; Davis, Charlie; Flinchum, John D; Bishop, Jeanette V; Schiebel, Anita; Duncan, Colleen; Spraker, Terry

    2013-05-01

    An epizootic of hemorrhagic disease associated with Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 2 (EHDV-2) infections in yaks from 5 herds occurred in Colorado between August 21 and October 3, 2012. Affected yaks presented with fever, lethargy, anorexia, dyspnea, and swollen conjunctivae. Ulcerated dental pads, mucoid sanguineous nasal discharge, petechial hemorrhages in multiple organs, pulmonary edema, and serosanguinous fluid in the thorax, abdomen, and pericardial sac were observed at necropsy. Blood and tissue samples from 8 yaks with similar clinical signs and necropsy findings were positive for EHDV-2 by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and 5 yaks were seropositive for EHDV. Tests for malignant catarrhal fever (Ovine herpesvirus 2), Bovine viral diarrhea virus, Bovine herpesvirus 1, Foot-and-mouth disease virus, and Vesicular stomatitis virus were negative. The findings indicate that yaks are susceptible to infection with EHDV-2 and exhibit the clinical signs, and gross and histologic lesions of hemorrhagic disease observed in other ruminant species. PMID:23572453

  13. Etiology, forms, and prognosis of gastrointestinal dysfunction resembling vagal indigestion occurring after surgical correction of right abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Sattler, N; Fecteau, G; Hélie, P; Lapointe, J M; Chouinard, L; Babkine, M; Desrochers, A; Couture, Y; Dubreuil, P

    2000-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the etiology and types of vagal indigestion (VI) occurring after right displacement of the abomasum or abomasal volvulus (RDA/AV), and the prognosis for each type. Data of cows presented for RDA/AV from a retrospective (n = 288) and a prospective (n = 132) study were used. Vagal indigestion occurred in 39 and 22 cows in each study, respectively. A necropsy was performed in 29 cases. Gastric compartment dilation compatible with VI type III or IV occurred in 23 cases. An abnormal gastric wall was detected in 22 cases. Peritonitis was present in 18 cows. Vagal nerve lesions were present in 5 out of 13 cases studied. Clinical, hematological, and necropsy results suggested a classification of VI with respect to presence or absence of peritonitis. Gastric wall damage, peritonitis and vagal nerve lesions appear important in the etiology. Considering peritonitis occurrence, antimicrobial therapy appears necessary in the treatment of RDA/AV. PMID:11062835

  14. Probable reason why small strongyle EPG counts are returning "early" after ivermectin treatment of horses on a farm in Central Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C; Collins, S S

    2009-02-01

    Critical tests were carried out in 2008 in four yearling horses (H-2, H-4, H-10, and H-11) born and raised together on a farm (MC) in Central Kentucky. These horses were treated intraorally with ivermectin paste at the dose rate of 200 microg/kg. The main interest was to try and determine more precisely, from posttreatment (PT) worm count data, the current activity of ivermectin against small strongyles in a horse herd. These horses had been treated repeatedly with this compound and counts of small strongyle eggs per gram of feces (EPGs) of these parasites have been returning sooner than previously in field tests (Lyons et al. Parasitol Res 103:209-215, 2008a). Data from the four horses revealed that a total of 3237 (nonfactored number) specimens of small strongyles was recovered from aliquot samples of feces passed PT and in the large intestinal contents at necropsy; all specimens were examined and identified. Thirteen species of adult small strongyles were recorded. Cylicocyclus (Cyc.) insigne was the predominant species. Three of the yearlings (H-2, H-4, and H-11) were necropsied at 6 days PT with ivermectin, and removals of small strongyles were: 50%, 80%, and 36% of fourth stages (L4), respectively, and 100%, 99%, and 100% of adults, respectively. As indicated, the only incomplete removal of adults from the three horses was for H-4. They consisted of two species: (1) young Cyc. insigne (those passed in the feces were fully developed); removal of this species was 89% and (2) fully developed Cylicostephanus longibursatus; 99% were removed. The fourth yearling (H-10), necropsied at 25 days PT, harbored 19,150 adult small strongyles in the large intestinal contents. Most of the species were Cyc. insigne; all were fifth stage but not sexually mature. Comparing the percentage of adult small strongyles found at necropsy relative to the total number present (those passed in the feces and at necropsy), only 0% to 1% were in the contents of the large intestines of the

  15. European brown hare syndrome in wild European brown hares from Greece.

    PubMed

    Billinis, Charalambos; Psychas, Vassilios; Tontis, Dimitrios K; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Birtsas, Periklis K; Sofia, Marina; Likotrafitis, Fotios; Maslarinou, Olga M; Kanteres, Dimitrios

    2005-10-01

    From 1999 to mid-2003, 97 European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) found dead throughout Greece were examined by necropsy, histopathology, and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the presence of European brown hare syndrome (EBHS) and EBHS virus (EBHSV), respectively. Hare losses were sporadic, starting in the cold season and lasting for many months (December to May). The most prominent gross lesions were observed in the liver and included swelling and discoloration; congestion and hemorrhages were present mainly in lungs and tracheal mucosa. Necropsy findings were suggestive of EBHS, which was confirmed by histopathology and RT-PCR. This study documents, for the first time, EBHS in Greece. PMID:16456168

  16. Hypereosinophilic syndrome in cats: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    McEwen, S A; Valli, V E; Hulland, T J

    1985-07-01

    The clinical, clinicopathological and pathological findings in three cats with hypereosinophilic syndrome are described. The cats chosen for the study had marked eosinophilia and evidence of tissue infiltration by eosinophils. Necropsies were performed on two cats, biopsy and blood samples were provided for the third cat. At necropsy, there was diffuse reddening of femoral bone marrow with ulceration and thickening of the duodenum. The livers had an enhanced lobular pattern with multiple, white, 1-3 mm nodules throughout the parenchyma. One cat had splenomegaly and the other had several enlarged, white, firm lymph nodes. Histopathologically, there was eosinophil infiltration of intestine, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, adrenal medulla and beneath the endocardium. Ultrastructurally, the eosinophils from lymph node and bone marrow of cat II were morphologically normal. The rigid criteria for eosinophilic leukemia were not fulfilled by these cases and the etiology of the eosinophilia in each case is not known. Possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:4041970

  17. Efficacy of clorsulon and albendazole against Fascioloides magna in naturally infected white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Foreyt, W J; Drawe, D L

    1985-12-01

    The efficacy of clorsulon and of albendazole against Fascioloides magna were evaluated in 36 naturally infected white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in southern Texas. A single oral dose of clorsulon suspension (12 to 30 mg/kg of body weight; mean = 24 mg/kg) was given to each deer and killed 153 (92%) of 167 mature flukes and 4 (80%) of 5 immature flukes recovered at necropsy. A single oral dose of albendazole paste (17 to 46 mg/kg; mean = 26 mg/kg) was given to each deer and killed 148 (89%) of 167 mature flukes and 4 (67%) of 6 immature flukes recovered at necropsy. In 82 nontreated control deer, 271 live flukes were recovered; dead flukes were not recovered. PMID:4077630

  18. Dual infection with Pythium insidiosum and Blastomyces dermatitidis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Sara L; Frank, Chad; Thompson, Craig A; Van Alstine, William G; Gelb, Hylton; Heng, Hock Gan; Klosterman, Emily; Kiupel, Matti; Grooters, Amy M

    2012-09-01

    A 4-year-old male neutered Labrador Retriever with severe gastrointestinal signs, but no respiratory signs, was diagnosed with multifocal pyogranulomatous gastritis, enteritis, and lymphadenitis with intralesional hyphae and multifocal pyogranulomatous pneumonia with intralesional yeast. Based on cytologic evaluation, histologic examination with special stains, and immunohistochemical analysis of tissues collected antemortem or at necropsy, dual infections with Pythium insidiosum and Blastomyces dermatitidis were detected and are reported for the first time. PMID:22747656

  19. Patent ductus arteriosus in an adult amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis).

    PubMed

    Douay, Guillaume; Drut, Amandine; Ribas, Thibault; Gomis, David; Graille, Mélanie; Lemberger, Karin; Bublot, Isabelle

    2013-03-01

    A clinically healthy 16-yr-old female leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) was diagnosed with a patent ductus arteriosus on echocardiography and later confirmed on necropsy A murmur was heard on auscultation during a routine examination, and the congenital defect was an incidental finding. The animal had been asymptomatic its entire life. This deformity is rarely observed in nondomestic felids and may be asymptomatic, as has been described in domestic cats. PMID:23505729

  20. A retrospective study of pathologic findings in the Amazon and Orinoco river dolphin (Inia geoffrensis) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Bonar, Christopher J; Boede, Ernesto O; Hartmann, Manuel García; Lowenstein-Whaley, Joanne; Mujica-Jorquera, Esmeralda; Parish, Scott V; Parish, James V; Garner, Michael M; Stadler, Cynthia K

    2007-06-01

    River dolphins are especially susceptible to negative human impacts. For their conservation, attempts of relocation or procreation ex situ may become important in the future to avoid their extinction. Additional knowledge and medical experiences of river dolphin management in captivity may aid such conservation efforts. The medical records and necropsy and histopathology reports on 123 captive Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) were re-viewed. Of these 123 animals, 105 were necropsied and 70 necropsies were supported with histopathology. Eighteen animals were not necropsied. Among wild-born animals, mortality was highest in the first 2 mo immediately postcapture and transport, accounting for 32 of 123 deaths. Pneumonia and skin lesions (cutaneous and subcutaneous ulcerations and abscesses) were the most common findings, found in 44 of 105 (42%) and 38 of 105 (36%) of gross diagnoses, respectively. At least 10 of 44 cases of pneumonia diagnosed grossly included a verminous component. Cachexia, from a variety of causes, was a major gross finding in 21 animals. Fifteen animals had histologic evidence of significant renal pathology, and this was the primary cause of death in 13 cases. Hepatic pathology was found in 18 cases, and bacterial sepsis was confirmed via histology in 16 cases. Based on these findings, it may be concluded that keys to successful maintenance of this species include 1) prophylactic anthelminthic and antibiotic therapy immediately post-capture; 2) maintenance of animals in larger enclosures than in past attempts, in compatible groups, and in facilities capable of separating aggressive animals; 3) maintenance in microbiologically hygienic water quality at all times; and 4) a proactive program of preventive medicine during the immediate postcapture, quarantine, and maintenance period of captivity. PMID:17679501

  1. Columbid herpesvirus-1 mortality in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) from Calgary, Alberta.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicole; Warren, Amy L; Whiteside, Douglas; Bidulka, Julie; Robinson, John H; Illanes, Oscar; Brookfield, Caroline

    2012-03-01

    Four cases of Columbid herpesvirus-1 infection in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were identified in Calgary, Alberta. Necropsy findings included severe multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis, pharyngeal ulceration and necrosis, and gastrointestinal necrosis. Occasional eosinophilic intranuclear viral inclusion bodies were associated with the foci of necrosis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing confirmed a diagnosis of herpesvirus-induced disease. The sequence of a PCR amplicon had 99.7% homology to Columbid herpesvirus-1. PMID:22942441

  2. Detecting West Nile Virus in Owls and Raptors by an Antigen-capture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Douglas G.; Barker, Ian K.; Lindsay, Robbin; Hunter, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a rapid antigen-capture assay (VecTest) for detection of West Nile virus in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs, collected at necropsy from owls (N = 93) and raptors (N = 27). Sensitivity was 93.5%–95.2% for northern owl species but <42.9% for all other species. Specificity was 100% for owls and 85.7% for raptors. PMID:15663862

  3. Columbid herpesvirus-1 mortality in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) from Calgary, Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Nicole; Warren, Amy L.; Whiteside, Douglas; Bidulka, Julie; Robinson, John H.; Illanes, Oscar; Brookfield, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Four cases of Columbid herpesvirus-1 infection in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were identified in Calgary, Alberta. Necropsy findings included severe multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis, pharyngeal ulceration and necrosis, and gastrointestinal necrosis. Occasional eosinophilic intranuclear viral inclusion bodies were associated with the foci of necrosis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing confirmed a diagnosis of herpesvirus-induced disease. The sequence of a PCR amplicon had 99.7% homology to Columbid herpesvirus-1. PMID:22942441

  4. Dental disease in slender lorises (Loris tardigradus).

    PubMed

    Plesker, Roland; Schulze, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Necropsies were performed in 25 slender lorises (Loris tardigradus) from a colony at Bochum University. In seven adult individuals, teeth were missing, loose, or severely affected by dental calculus. In one of these cases, a severe periodontal disease was seen without abscess formation. In another four lorises purulent/gangrenous inflammation was found next to the teeth either in the maxillary or the mandibular region. PMID:23740522

  5. Visual reactions in a case of long-lasting cortical blindness

    PubMed Central

    Braak, J. W. G. Ter; Schenk, V. W. D.; Vliet, A. G. M. Van

    1971-01-01

    A case is described of long-lasting cortical blindness in a 71 year old man showing no other visual reactions than pupillary narrowing to light and (only after some months) optokinetic nystagmus of the `passive' type. Necropsy demonstrated total bilateral destruction of the striate area of the cortex caused by bilateral softening in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery, and nearly total loss of ganglion cells in both lateral geniculate bodies. Images

  6. Aflatoxicosis in cattle pastured in a field of sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Hall, R F; Harrison, L R; Colvin, B M

    1989-04-01

    Aflatoxicosis was diagnosed in a small herd of cattle having access to moldy, unharvested sweet corn. Necropsy of 1 cow that died revealed anasarca and a pale tan liver. In this cow, microscopic examination revealed edema of all soft tissues and liver lesions consistent with aflatoxicosis. Samples of corn taken from the field contained 2,365 ng of aflatoxin/g of corn. Weather conditions were conducive to the formation of aflatoxins by Aspergillus flavus and A parasiticus. PMID:2703428

  7. Pedunculated islet-cell tumour of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Britt, R P

    1966-05-01

    An unusual islet-cell tumour found at necropsy in a patient who had died from a myocardial infarction is described. Of particular interest were the pedunculated nature and large size of the tumour. The clinical features of the case are considered. Four islet-cell tumours in the duodenum have previously been reported and it seems probable that such tumours arise in heterotopic pancreas. PMID:4287114

  8. Traumatic tricuspid insufficiency in a kitten.

    PubMed

    Closa, J M; Font, A

    1999-01-01

    A four-month-old, male, common European kitten developed pleural effusion and ascites after falling from a fourth-floor flat. Radiographic, bidimensional echocardiography and color-flow Doppler findings were compatible with right-sided atrioventricular valve insufficiency. Necropsy confirmed the diagnosis that tricuspid insufficiency resulted from the rupture of the chordae tendineae of the nonseptal cusp of the valve at the level of the cranial papillary muscle insertion in the right ventricle. PMID:9934923

  9. Systemic xanthomatosis associated with hyperchylomicronaemia in a cat.

    PubMed

    Chanut, F; Colle, M-A; Deschamps, J-Y; Albaric, O; Wyers, M

    2005-08-01

    We report a case of systemic xanthomatosis in a 4-month-old domestic cat. The kitten presented with multiple cutaneous lesions and 'cream tomato soup' coloured blood. Necropsy revealed multiple, whitish, nodular lesions, compatible with xanthomas, on most of the abdominal organs (liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal glands, mesentery and colon). The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination. This is the first report of granulomatous colitis associated with feline xanthomatosis. PMID:16050907

  10. Senile plaques and other senile changes in the brain of an aged American black bear.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Yoshino, T; Yamaguchi, R; Tateyama, S; Kimoto, Y; Nakayama, H; Goto, N

    1995-07-01

    A female American black bear (Euarctos ursus americanus) over 20 years old had shown epileptiform neurologic signs starting in March 1992 and was found dead unexpectedly 8 months later. At necropsy, pulmonary and intrabronchial hemorrhage was noted. In the brain, the leptomeninges exhibited slight thickening, and petechiae were evident in the hippocampus. Histopathologic examination of the brain revealed several senile changes: numerous senile plaques, amyloid deposition in cerebromeningeal arterioles, mineral deposition in the pallidum, and numerous corpora amylacea in the cerebellum. PMID:7483216

  11. The occurance of Pterygodermatites nycticebi (Nematoda: Rictulariidae) in a captive slow loris, Nycticebus coucang

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuggle, B.N.; Beehler, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    Adult and immature rictulariid nematodes were recovered at necropsy from the small intestine of an adult slow loris, Nycticebus coucang, from the Milwaukee County Zoo in Wisconsin. The lumen of the entire small intestine was packed with more than 100 nematodes, the intestinal wall appeared thickened and the mucosal surface contained numerous petechial hemorrhagic foci. The cause of death was diagnosed as a septicemia and possible lupus erythematosis.

  12. Abortion caused by Brucella abortus biovar 1 in a free-ranging bison (Bison bison) from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Rhyan, J C; Quinn, W J; Stackhouse, L S; Henderson, J J; Ewalt, D R; Payeur, J B; Johnson, M; Meagher, M

    1994-07-01

    A near-term aborted bison (Bison bison) fetus was collected near Old Faithful geyser in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming (USA). On necropsy, the fetus liver had a small capsular tear, and there was a small quantity of blood in the peritoneal cavity. Microscopic lesions included mild, purulent bronchopneumonia and mild, multifocal, interstitial pneumonia. Brucella abortus biovar 1 was isolated from fetal abomasal contents, lung, and heart blood. PMID:7933293

  13. Septicemic pasteurellosis in elk (Cervus elaphus) on the United States National Elk Refuge, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Smith, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    Septicemic pasteurellosis caused by Pasteurella multocida is believed responsible for the deaths of 48 elk (Cervus elaphus) on the National Elk Refuge near Jackson, Wyoming (USA) during 1986 and 1987. Clinical signs included depression and salivation; necropsy findings included congestion and petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages in lymph nodes, diaphragm, lungs and endocardium. Pasteurella multocida was isolated from femur marrow of eight carcasses and a variety of tissues from eight others.

  14. Validation of the BrockTB Stat-Pak Assay for Detection of Tuberculosis in Eurasian Badgers (Meles meles) and Influence of Disease Severity on Diagnostic Accuracy▿

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Mark A.; Crawshaw, Tim; Waterhouse, Sue; Delahay, Richard; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.

    2008-01-01

    A lateral-flow immunoassay (BrockTB Stat-Pak) for detecting tuberculosis in Eurasian badgers was 49% sensitive and 93% specific against culture for M. bovis (n = 1,464) at necropsy. However, the sensitivity was significantly higher (66 to 78%) in animals with more severe tuberculosis, indicating that the BrockTB Stat-Pak may be useful for the detection of badgers with the greatest risk of transmitting disease. PMID:18272706

  15. Congenital jaundice in bovine aborted foetuses: an emerging syndrome in southern Belgium.

    PubMed

    Delooz, L; Mori, M; Petitjean, T; Evrard, J; Czaplicki, G; Saegerman, C

    2015-04-01

    Southern Belgium faces an unusual recent increase of icteric bovine aborted foetuses. In the necropsy room, the majority of foetuses presented jaundice and splenomegaly. Despite a wide range of analyses, no definitive cause of abortion has yet been established but some analysis results support the leptospirosis hypothesis. This first description of cases will help veterinary practitioners to recognize more cases and to conduct those to the laboratory for future investigations. PMID:25620571

  16. Convulsion of the lung: an historical analysis of the cause of Dr Johnson's fatal emphysema.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, J M

    1994-01-01

    Of Johnson's fatal emphysema, it appears probable, on available historical and anatomic evidence, that it resulted from bronchiectasis, a diagnosis favoured by the pattern of illness: a protracted and severe respiratory infection succeeded by annual episodes of severe winter bronchitis, remitting in summer, and culminating in respiratory insufficiency; and by the findings of pleural adhesion and cor pulmonale at necropsy. That is resulted from chronic bronchitis is a proposition both plausible and irrefutable without the specimen. PMID:7853296

  17. Radiographic appearance of maxillary sinus feed impaction in a horse.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, James E; Carmalt, James L

    2013-01-01

    A 15-year-old Belgian gelding presented in respiratory distress, with bilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge, and right-sided epistaxis. The horse had a 5-year history of dental disease and had been recently losing weight. Radiographs indicated tooth root abscessation of the right maxillary third molar tooth and probable maxillary sinus feed impaction. These findings were confirmed at surgery and necropsy. The stippled, granular radiographic appearance described here is highly characteristic of sinus feed impaction. PMID:24371923

  18. Human Exposure following Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Multiple Animal Species in a Metropolitan Zoo

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Peter; Granich, Reuben; Scott, Jim; Sun, Ben; Joseph, Michael; Stringfield, Cynthia; Thisdell, Susan; Staley, Jothan; Workman-Malcolm, Donna; Borenstein, Lee; Lehnkering, Eleanor; Ryan, Patrick; Soukup, Jeanne; Nitta, Annette

    2002-01-01

    From 1997 to 2000, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in two Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), three Rocky Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), and one black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) in the Los Angeles Zoo. DNA fingerprint patterns suggested recent transmission. An investigation found no active cases of tuberculosis in humans; however, tuberculin skin-test conversions in humans were associated with training elephants and attending an elephant necropsy. PMID:12453358

  19. First record of a Polypodium sp. parasitizing eggs of shovelnose sturgeon from the Wabash River, Indiana.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Maria S; Stefanavage, Tom; Goforth, Reuben

    2010-03-01

    This article reports the presence of an endocellular parasite, Polypodium sp., in the eggs of shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus from the Wabash River, Indiana. The parasite was detected in 18% (2/11) of adult female sturgeon necropsied in April 2008. This constitutes the first record of this parasite in this host and in Indiana. The implications for the quality of the caviar remain unknown at this time. PMID:20575363

  20. Salmonella Persistence within the Peripheral Lymph Nodes of Cattle following Experimental Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Edrington, T S; Loneragan, G H; Genovese, K J; Hanson, D L; Nisbet, D J

    2016-06-01

    Utilizing a transdermal method of inoculation developed in our laboratory, the duration of infection of Salmonella in the peripheral lymph nodes of steers was examined. Thirty-six Holstein steers (mean body weight of 137 kg) were inoculated with Salmonella Montevideo (day 0) on each lower leg and both sides of the back and abdomen. Calves were euthanized beginning at 6 h and subsequently on each of days 1, 2, 4, 7, 9, 11, 14, and 21 postinoculation (four animals each time). The subiliac, popliteal, and superficial cervical (prescapular) lymph nodes were collected and cultured (quantitatively and qualitatively) for the challenge strain of Salmonella. The challenge strain was detected via direct culture within the lymph nodes at 6 h postinoculation and on each subsequent necropsy date. Salmonella levels in lymph node were 0.8 to 1.8 log CFU/g. Lymph nodes were generally positive after enrichment culture throughout the experiment. Salmonella elimination appeared to begin approximately 14 days postinoculation. However, elimination was not completed by day 21; therefore, a second experiment was conducted identical to the first except that the time from inoculation to necropsy was extended. Salmonella was recovered via direct culture on each of the necropsy days, and results in general were similar to those of experiment I, except that on days 20, 24, and 28 isolates from serogroups C2 and E1 were identified in addition to the inoculation strain C1 in multiple animals. The data from both experiments indicate that after a single inoculation event, Salmonella would be completely cleared by approximately 28 days. Further research with expanded times between inoculation and necropsy is required for verification. PMID:27296609

  1. [Sonographic diagnosis of a case of type 1 achondrogenesis in the 2d trimester].

    PubMed

    Schramm, T; Nerlich, A

    1989-10-01

    The authors report on a prenatal ultrasonic diagnosis of lethal osteochondrodysplasia achondrogenesis type I (Parenti-Fraccaro) in the 17th week of pregnancy. The prenatal findings were confirmed by necropsy after termination of the pregnancy. The possibility to recognize lethal skeletal disorders early in pregnancy is discussed as well as the patho-anatomical criteria and possible patho-physiological mechanisms of achondrogenesis. PMID:2684730

  2. Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus associated with presumed autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome in a mare

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Jill K.; Magdesian, K. Gary; Gaffney, Patricia M.

    2011-01-01

    A 5-year-old Thoroughbred-cross mare was diagnosed with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Partial glycemic control and clinical improvement were achieved with daily insulin administration for 18 mo. The mare subsequently developed evidence of hypoadrenocorticism and died. Necropsy findings included lymphocytic infiltration of the pancreas, adrenal cortex, adrenal medulla, and thyroid glands, suggestive of an immune-mediated polyendocrinopathy. PMID:22043070

  3. Hemangiosarcoma in a geriatric Labrador retriever.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Diya

    2012-08-01

    A geriatric Labrador retriever dog was presented for acute collapse. The dog was conscious but lethargic, tachypneic, tachycardic with weak femoral pulses, occasional pulse deficits, and pale mucous membranes. Radiography, ultrasonography, quick assessment tests, and a complete blood (cell) count (CBC)/biochemistry panel indicated internal hemorrhage and potential problems with hemostasis. The dog was euthanized. A necropsy, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry for CD31 and Factor VIII-related antigen cell markers supported a diagnosis of splenic hemangiosarcoma. PMID:23372199

  4. Primary peri-aortic hemangiosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Guinan, Justin; Fischetti, Anthony; Garate, Ana Paula; Chalhoub, Serge

    2012-11-01

    A 10-year-old intact male Norwich terrier dog was evaluated for progressive, intermittent increased respiratory effort. Thoracic radiographs, ultrasonography, and computed tomography were used to identify a caudodorsal thoracic extrapulmonary mass and the presence of pulmonary metastasis. Blood transfusion and stabilization measures were not successful and the patient died. Necropsy confirmed the origin of the mass to be the adventitial layer of the aorta and determined it to be hemangiosarcoma. This is a rare site for the primary lesion. PMID:23633719

  5. Case report: epithelial intracytoplasmic herpes viral inclusions associated with an outbreak of duck virus enteritis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, B.C.; Jessup, David A.; Docherty, Douglas E.; Lownestine, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Several muscovy ducks from a free-roaming flock of 65 muscovy and mallard ducks died over a 3-week period. Three muscovy ducks were necropsied. Gross and microscopic changes were compatible with duck virus enteritis, and the virus was isolated. In addition to intranuclear viral inclusion bodies in several tissues, intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were present in esophageal and cloacal epithelium, By electron microscopy, the membrane-bound intracytoplasmic inclusions were found to contain enveloped herpesvirus, and nuclei contained herpes viral nucleocapsids.

  6. PubMed Central

    Breton, L.; Gosselin, Y.; Therriault, P.

    1981-01-01

    Lymphoid leukemia in two dogs This report describes lymphoid leukemia in two young dogs. For each, there is a description of the clinical and radiological signs in both animals, and a discussion of the lesions from the biopsies and the necropsy of one of the dogs. Both cases were diagnosed in young animals. The first one was an 18 month old Greyhound and the second was a 13 month old Boxer. ImagesFigures 1 et 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:7340920

  7. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Éden Sartor; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; Corrêa, Isaac José Felippe; Robles, Laercio; Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumors are extremely rare neoplasms derived from hormone-producing neuroendocrine cells. It is difficult to make their diagnosis before biopsy, surgical resection or necropsy. A recent publication described only 94 cases of these tumors. There is no sex predilection and apparently it has no association with cirrhosis or preexisting hepatic disease. The most effective treatment is hepatectomy, and resection is determined by size and location of the lesions. PMID:25628206

  8. Clinical biochemical aspects of glutaminase toxicity in rabbits and Rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hambleton, P.; Benbough, J. E.; Baskerville, A.; Harris-Smith, P. W.

    1980-01-01

    Treatment with a chemically modified glutaminase was lethal to rabbits and Rhesus monkeys at all but the lowest doses. Changes in the serum levels of triglycerides, glucose, creatinine, urea, cholesterol and protein and in the activities of some serum enzymes were the probable result of the development of lesions in liver, kidney and intestine observed at necropsy. Treatment with unmodified glutaminase induced similar changes in rabbits but not in Rhesus monkeys. PMID:6775664

  9. Thymic lymphosarcoma in three heifers.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, C E; Rebhun, W C; Dill, S G

    1986-12-15

    Three heifers with the thymic form of lymphosarcoma were examined. In each of the 3 cases, fever, bloat, and jugular venous distention had developed. Detectable antibody to bovine leukosis virus was not found on agar gel immunodiffusion testing in any of the cases. Thymic lymphosarcoma was confirmed by necropsy and histologic examination. Thymic lymphosarcoma must be considered in the differential diagnosis in heifers with fever, bloat, and jugular venous distention. PMID:3793601

  10. Oxalosis in wild desert tortoises, Gopherus agassizii.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Elliott R; Berry, Kristin H; Stacy, Brian; Huzella, Louis M; Kalasinsky, Victor F; Fleetwood, Michelle L; Mense, Mark G

    2009-10-01

    We necropsied a moribund, wild adult male desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) with clinical signs of respiratory disease and elevated plasma biochemical analytes indicative of renal disease (blood urea nitrogen [415 mg/dl], uric acid [11.8 mg/dl], sodium [>180 mmol/l] and chloride [139 mmol/l]). Moderate numbers of birefringent oxalate crystals, based on infrared and electron microscopy, were present within renal tubules; small numbers were seen in colloid within thyroid follicles. A retrospective analysis of 66 additional cases of wild desert tortoises was conducted to determine whether similar crystals were present in thyroid and kidney. The tortoises, from the Mojave and Sonoran deserts, were necropsied between 1992 and 2003 and included juveniles and adults. Tortoises were classified as healthy (those that died due to trauma and where no disease was identified after necropsy and evaluation by standard laboratory tests used for other tortoises) or not healthy (having one or more diseases or lesions). For all 67 necropsied tortoises, small numbers of crystals of similar appearance were present in thyroid glands from 44 of 54 cases (81%) and in kidneys from three of 65 cases (5%). Presence of oxalates did not differ significantly between healthy and unhealthy tortoises, between age classes, or between desert region, and their presence was considered an incidental finding. Small numbers of oxalate crystals seen within the kidney of two additional tortoises also were considered an incidental finding. Although the source of the calcium oxalate could not be determined, desert tortoises are herbivores, and a plant origin seems most likely. Studies are needed to evaluate the oxalate content of plants consumed by desert tortoises, and particularly those in the area where the tortoise in renal failure was found. PMID:19901374

  11. Lead poisoning and other mortality factors in trumpeter swans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Stroud, R.K.; Reiswig, B.; McEneaney, T.

    1989-01-01

    Lead poisoning and other causes of mortality of trumpeter swans were investigated. Necropsies or Pb concentrations in livers were available for 72 trumpeter swans found dead in seven western states from 1976 to 1987; data from other published and unpublished sources also are summarized. Ingestion of lead artifacts accounted for about 20% of the known mortality of trumpeter swans in the tri-state area of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, where the population has been declining for several decades.

  12. Occurrence of fruiting structures allows determination of Purpureocillium lilacinum as an inciting agent of pleuritis and pneumonia in a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) by histopathologic correlation to culture

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, V.L.; Mangold, B.; Lenzycki, J.; Hinckley, L.; Sutton, D.A.; Frasca, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpureocillium lilacinum and Beauveria bassiana were isolated from lung sampled at necropsy of a 12 year-old female loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) that had displayed abnormal buoyancy. Histopathologic evaluation revealed pleuritis and pneumonia with non-melanized, septate hyphae and fruiting structures identical to those of P. lilacinum. This case emphasizes the importance of a histological correlate to fungal culture when environmental fungi are isolated and demonstrates the infrequent phenomenon of fruiting or conidial production in tissue. PMID:25379399

  13. Animal Models of Mycobacteria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, Diane J.; Orme, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the infection of mice and guinea pigs with mycobacteria via various routes, as well as necropsy methods for the determination of mycobacterial loads within target organs. Additionally, methods for cultivating mycobacteria and preparing stocks are described. The protocols outlined are primarily used for M. tuberculosis, but can also be used for the study of other non-tuberculosis mycobacterial species. PMID:18432756

  14. Diagnosis of enteric disease in small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Van Metre, D C; Tyler, J W; Stehman, S M

    2000-03-01

    Diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease in small ruminants requires integration of information obtained in the signalment, history, physical or necropsy examination, and ancillary diagnostic tests. The purpose of this article is to provide the practitioner with a review of the clinical features of several common gastrointestinal diseases of sheep and goats. Rumen acidosis, enterotoxemia, gastrointestinal parasitism, neonatal diarrhea, and salmonellosis are discussed, and where appropriate, reviews of the pathophysiology, prevention, and control of these diseases are cited for further reading. PMID:10707415

  15. Atherosclerosis associated with pericardial effusion in a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Schilliger, Lionel; Lemberger, Karin; Chai, Norin; Bourgeois, Aude; Charpentier, Maud

    2010-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a common disease in pet birds, particularly in psittacines, and is frequently found when performing postmortem examinations on adult and old dogs, in which it is mainly associated with endocrine diseases, such as hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus. However, atherosclerosis is poorly documented in reptiles and consequently poorly understood. In the current case report, atherosclerosis and pericardial effusion were diagnosed in a 2-year-old male central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) based on ultrasound visualization, necropsy, and histologic examination. PMID:20807945

  16. Nonhunting mortality in sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Records of 170 sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) necropsied at the National Wildlife Health Research Center, Wisconsin, from 1976 through 1985 were reviewed as representative samples to determine causes of nonhunting mortality in the mid-continent and Rocky Mountain populations of sandhill cranes. Avian cholera, avian botulism, and ingestion of mycotoxins were leading causes of nonhunting mortality. Hailstorms, lightning, lead poisoning, predation, avian tuberculosis, and collisions with power lines also killed cranes.

  17. Diagnostic testing patterns of natural Mycobacterium paratuberculosis infection in pygmy goats

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Elizabeth J.B.; Steinberg, Howard; Krebs, Vernon; Collins, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Thirteen pygmy goats (Capra hircus) from a herd naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium ss. paratuberculosis (MPTB) were monitored with 4 diagnostic assays for 2 to 15 mo. Cellular and humoral immune responses to the infection were assessed with assays of gamma interferon (IFNγ), serum antibody [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel diffusion (AGID)], and radiometric fecal culture. Microscopic examination and radiometric culture of tissue from 12 sites were performed at necropsy. Goats were considered infected if MPTB was isolated from any tissue sample collected at necropsy. Mycobacterial isolates were confirmed as MPTB with an IS900 polymerase chain reaction assay. Ten goats whose antemortem tests indicated infection carried heavy organism burdens at necropsy, both within and beyond the gastrointestinal system. False-negative ELISA, AGID, and/or culture results were obtained in 5 of the 10 confirmed cases during the study period. In 3 goats with sporadic fecal shedding of MPTB or detectable IFNγ response, or both, no abnormalities were detected at necropsy and no MPTB was isolated from the tissue samples; the antemortem fecal-culture and IFNγ results were thus considered false-positive. Diagnosticians should be alert to the possibility of both false-positive and false-negative test results for Johne's disease in goats. False-positive fecal-culture results may occur when a high prevalence of infection exists in the herd and the premises are likely to be heavily contaminated. The diverse antemortem testing patterns seen in these goats underscore the importance of using varied diagnostic assays serially or in parallel to increase the likelihood of identifying all infected goats. PMID:12889728

  18. Successful Antiparasitic Treatment for Cysticercosis is Associated with a Fast and Marked Reduction of Circulating Antigen Levels in a Naturally Infected Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Armando E; Bustos, Javier A; Garcia, Hector H; Rodriguez, Silvia; Zimic, Mirko; Castillo, Yesenia; Praet, Nicolas; Gabriël, Sarah; Gilman, Robert H; Dorny, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is a common parasitic infection of humans and pigs. We evaluated the posttreatment evolution of circulating parasite-specific antigen titers in 693 consecutive blood samples from 50 naturally infected cysticercotic pigs, which received different regimes of antiparasitic drugs (N = 39, 7 groups), prednisone (N = 5), or controls (N = 6). Samples were collected from baseline to week 10 after treatment, when pigs were euthanized and carefully dissected at necropsy. Antigen levels decreased proportionally to the efficacy of treatment and correlated with the remaining viable cysts at necropsy (Pearson's p = 0.67, P = 0.000). A decrease of 5 times in antigen levels (logarithmic scale) compared with baseline was found in 20/26 pigs free of cysts at necropsy, compared with 1/24 of those who had persisting viable cysts (odds ratio [OR] = 76.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.1-3308.6, P < 0.001). Antigen monitoring reflects the course of infection in the pig. If a similar correlation exists in infected humans, this assay may provide a minimally invasive and easy monitoring assay to assess disease evolution and efficacy of antiparasitic treatment in human neurocysticercosis. PMID:26392159

  19. Loss of neurovirulence is associated with reduction of cerebral capillary sequestration during acute Babesia bovis infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe neurological signs that develop during acute infection by virulent strains of Babesia bovis are associated with sequestration of infected erythrocytes in cerebral capillaries. Serial passage of virulent strains in cattle results in attenuated derivatives that do not cause neurologic disease. We evaluated whether serial passage also results in a loss of cerebral capillary sequestration by examining brain biopsies during acute disease and at necropsy. Findings Cerebral biopsies of spleen intact calves inoculated intravenously with a virulent or attenuated strain pair of B. bovis were evaluated for capillary sequestration at the onset of babesiosis and during severe disease. In calves infected with the virulent strain, there was a significant increase in sequestration between the first and second biopsy timepoint. The attenuated strain was still capable of sequestration, but at a reduced level, and did not change significantly between the first and second biopsy. Necropsy examination confirmed the second biopsy results and demonstrated that sequestration identified at necropsy reflects pathologic changes occurring in live animals. Conclusions Loss of neurovirulence after serial in vivo passage of the highly virulent T2Bo strain of B. bovis in splenectomized animals is associated with a significant reduction of cerebral capillary sequestration. Previous genomic analysis of this and two other strain pairs suggests that this observation could be related to genomic complexity, particularly of the ves gene family, rather than consistent gene specific differences. Additional experiments will examine whether differential gene expression of ves genes is also associated with reduced cerebral sequestration and neurovirulence in attenuated strains. PMID:23777713

  20. Postmortem bacteriology: a re‐evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J A; Harrison, L M; Partridge, S M

    2006-01-01

    Aim To assess the value of postmortem bacteriology in necropsy practice, with specific emphasis on bacterial invasion of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Methods A review of published articles on postmortem bacteriology. Studies were selected to cover the full range of necropsy practice including adults, the perinatal period, and infancy. The review covers over 5000 necropsies, mainly in adults, but including 1108 perinatal cases and 468 cases of sudden unexpected death in infancy. Data are available on 4992 blood cultures, 1168 specimens of CSF, and 743 cultures of spleen. Results Studies in which careful precautions have been taken to reduce contamination show that approximately two thirds of blood cultures are negative, two in nine yield a single isolate, and one in nine have a mixed growth. The postmortem interval has only a small effect on the isolation rate. A pure growth of a known pathogen has a more than 50% likelihood of being found in association with genuine infection in adults and in the perinatal period. Conclusions The main postmortem artefact is contamination, but this can be considerably reduced by careful technique. Agonal spread is less common than is often assumed. Postmortem translocation is not a problem if the body is appropriately stored. A pure growth of a pathogen in blood or CSF should be regarded as a possible contributing factor to death at all ages. PMID:16394274

  1. Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24 h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12 h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO2, suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism. PMID:22675306

  2. First report of parasitism by Hexametra boddaertii (Nematoda: Ascaridae) in Oxyrhopus guibei (Serpentes: Colubridae).

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María E; Sánchez, Matías N; López, Ariel; Salas, Martín; Rivero, María R; Teibler, Pamela; Toledo, Gislayne de Melo; Tavares, Flávio L

    2016-07-15

    The current study summarizes the postmortem examination of a specimen of Oxyrhopus guibei (Serpentes, Colubridae) collected in Iguazu National Park (Argentina), and found deceased a week following arrival to the serpentarium of the National Institute of Tropical Medicine (Argentina). Although the snake appeared to be in good health, a necropsy performed following its death identified the presence of a large number of roundworms in the coelomic cavity, with indications of peritonitis and serosal adherence. Additional observations from the necropsy revealed small calcifications in the mesothelium of the coelomic cavity; solid and expressive content in the gallbladder; massive gastrointestinal obstruction due to nematodes; and lung edema and congestion. Histopathological analyses of lung sections also showed proliferative heterophilic and histiocytic pneumonia. Parasites isolated from both the intestine and coelomic cavity were identified as Hexametra boddaertii by a combination of light and scanning electron microscopic examination. Results from this necropsy identify O. guibei as a new host for H. boddaertii, and is the first report of a natural infection by Hexametra in Argentina. Since Hexametra parasites may contribute to several pathological conditions in humans, and with the recent availability of O. guibei specimens through the illegal pet trade, it is necessary to consider the possibility of zoonotic helminth transmission of Hexametra from snake to human. PMID:27270391

  3. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF PATHOLOGIC FINDINGS IN CAPTIVE ROCK HYRAX (PROCAVIA CAPENSIS) IN THE UNITED STATES.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Tamara N; Garner, Michael M; Bonar, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    A retrospective examination of gross and histologic reports was performed to find common lesions in young and adult captive rock hyrax ( Procavia capensis ) from multiple zoo populations. One hundred and thirty-seven reports were analyzed from specimens that were submitted to Northwest ZooPath from 1997 to 2013. Histologic findings from necropsy and biopsy reports and causes of mortality only from necropsy reports were compiled to determine the most common findings. Within the study population, 41 (30%) were male, 62 (45%) were female, and the remainder (34, 25%) were of undetermined sex. Of the 111 necropsies, 87 (78%) died naturally, and 24 (22%) were euthanatized. There were 26 (19%) biopsies with no known status of the animal. The most frequent causes of death or reason for euthanasia were bacterial septicemia (n = 29, 21%) and degenerative cardiomyopathy (n = 29, 21%). The other most prevalent lesions were hemosiderosis (n = 55, 40%), pancreatic islet and interstitial fibrosis (n = 36, 26%), pneumonia of undetermined cause (n = 26, 19%), enteritis/colitis (n = 24, 18%), and renal tubular necrosis (n = 20, 15%). In many animals of this study population (n = 115, 84%), multiple lesions affecting multiple organs were found. PMID:26667536

  4. Quality assessment of perinatal and infant postmortem examinations in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Pakis, Isil; Karapirli, Mustafa; Karayel, Ferah; Turan, Arzu; Akyildiz, Elif; Polat, Oguz

    2008-09-01

    An autopsy examination is important in identifying the cause of death and as a means of auditing clinical and forensic practice; however, especially in perinatal and infantile age groups determining the cause of death leads to some difficulties in autopsy practice. In this study, 15,640 autopsies recorded during the years 2000-2004 in the Mortuary Department of the Council of Forensic Medicine were reviewed. Autopsy findings of 510 cases between 20 completed weeks of gestation and 1 year of age were analyzed retrospectively. The quality of each necropsy report was assessed using a modification of the system gestational age assessment described by Rushton, which objectively scores aspects identified by the Royal College of Pathologists as being part of a necropsy. According to their ages, the cases were subdivided into three groups. Intrauterine deaths were 31% (158 cases), neonatal deaths were 24% (123 cases), and infantile deaths were 45% (229 cases) of all cases. Scores for the quality of the necropsy report were above the minimum acceptable score with 44% in intrauterine, 88% in neonatal and infantile deaths. PMID:18637051

  5. Experimental induction of abdominal tympany, abomasitis, and abomasal ulceration by intraruminal inoculation of Clostridium perfringens type A in neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Roeder, B L; Chengappa, M M; Nagaraja, T G; Avery, T B; Kennedy, G A

    1988-02-01

    The etiologic role of Clostridum perfringens type A in the acute abdominal syndrome characterized by abomasal and rumen tympany, abomasitis, and abomasal ulceration was investigated in neonatal calves. Eight calves, 4 to 12 days old, were inoculated intraruminally with toxigenic C perfringens type A. Before and after C perfringens inoculation, blood samples were collected from all calves for blood gas and serum biochemical analysis and for determination of serum copper concentration; ruminal fluid was obtained for isolation of C perfringens. Calves were monitored daily for clinical signs of the syndrome and, depending on the severity of clinical signs, they were either euthanatized or redosed within 4 to 7 days. After necropsy, specimens obtained from the abomasum and rumen for macroscopic and microscopic examination and for anaerobic bacteriologic culture were processed in routine manner. Intraruminal inoculation of C perfringens type A into healthy calves induced anorexia, depression, bloat, diarrhea, and in some calves, death. Serum copper concentration was within normal range. Necropsy revealed variable degrees of abomasitis, petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages, and ulcers (ranging from pinpoint to nearly perforate) in the abomasum. Seven of those calves also had multiple trichobezoars in the rumen. These necropsy findings were not seen in calves (controls) given distilled H2O only. In affected calves, acute abdominal syndrome was unrelated to copper deficiency, and C perfringens type A given intraruminally was able to induce clinical signs similar to those of the naturally acquired disease. PMID:2894790

  6. Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24 h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12 h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO(2), suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism. PMID:22675306

  7. Epidemiology of fishborne trematodiasis in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Sultanov, A; Abdybekova, A; Abdibaeva, A; Shapiyeva, Z; Yeshmuratov, T; Torgerson, P R

    2014-10-01

    Fish borne trematodes are an important cause of morbidity in Kazakhstan. The number of human cases of opisthorchiidosis (infection with parasites of the family opisthorchiidae) reached a peak of 2521 recorded cases (17 cases per 100,000) in 2002 with a gradual decline to 1225 cases (7.4 cases per 100,000) in 2011. Most human cases are found in the north and north east part of Kazakhstan in areas drained by the Irtysh River and it tributaries. A further focus is found in the north west in the Ural river basin in the European part of Kazakhstan. The most common occupations of patients with opisthorchiidosis included the manual laborers, those employed in the home or unemployed. Necropsy investigations of village dogs in an endemic region revealed 37 of 51 (72%) village dogs infected with either Opisthorchis felineus or Methorchis bilis. Likewise an investigation of 242 cats consisting of strays, village, suburban and city cats revealed 79 (33%) animals infected with O. felineus. Higher prevalences were seen in strays and village cats compared to suburban cats. No urban cats, which lived in apartments, were found to be infected. Other important zoonoses included Echinococcus granulosus, detected in 2 of the 51 necropsied village dogs and E. multilocularis was found in 2 out of 124 necropsied stray cats. Investigations of locally caught fish revealed 10 of 107 (9%) roach (Rutilus rutilus), 49 of 68(72%) ide (Leuciscus idus) and 2 of 79 (2.5%) bream (Abramis brama) infested with trematode metacercariae. No metacercariae were found in 609 crucian carp (Carassius carassius), 35 tench (Tinca tinca), 79 carp (Cyprinus carpio), 46 perch (Perca fluviatilis) or 20 zander (Sander lucioperca). PMID:24943190

  8. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging with neuropathological findings in the diagnosis of HIV and CMV associated CNS disease in AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R F; Lucas, S B; Hall-Craggs, M A; Brink, N S; Scaravilli, F; Chinn, R J; Kendall, B E; Williams, I G; Harrison, M J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the results of clinical assessment and MRI with neuropathological findings in the diagnosis of HIV and cytomegalovirus (CMV) associated CNS disease. METHODS: A retrospective study of 35 patients infected with HIV who were examined at necropsy between four and 70 (median 20) days after neurological assessment and MRI. RESULTS: Of the 35 patients, 19 had diffuse white matter hyperintensity on T2 weighted MRI, six of whom also had focal lesions. Nine other patients had focal white matter lesions and seven had changes in cortical atrophy only. Necropsy in the 19 with diffuse white matter hyperintensity showed HIV leukoencephalopathy (HIVLEP) with encephalitis in 10, CMV encephalitis in three, both HIVLEP/HIV encephalitis and CMV encephalitis in one, lymphoma in three, and non-specific inflammation in two. Necropsy in the 16 other patients without diffuse white matter hyperintensity showed CMV encephalitis in six, HIV encephalitis (without HIVLEP) in two, CMV encephalitis and HIVLEP/HIV encephalitis in one, non-HIV associated abnormalities in five, herpes simplex encephalitis in one, and lymphoma in one. CMV DNA was detected in CSF of five of seven patients with CMV encephalitis and in two of two with CMV associated polyradiculopathy but without CMV encephalitis. Diffuse white matter hyperintensity on MRI had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 66.6%, and a positive predictive value of 58% for diagnosis of HIVLEP. CONCLUSION: Diffuse white matter hyperintensity on MRI can be due to either HIV or CMV associated pathology or non-specific abnormalities. Images PMID:9120446

  9. Experimentally induced cartilaginous fractures (osteochondritis dissecans) in foals fed low-copper diets.

    PubMed

    Bridges, C H; Harris, E D

    1988-07-15

    Four Thoroughbred foals were weaned from their dams when they were 1 day old and were fed a liquid milk-replacer diet containing approximately 1.7 micrograms of copper/g from plastic buckets for 4 to 7 months. They were kept in stalls with fiberglass walls and asphalt floors covered with rubber pads. Serum copper and zinc concentrations were determined 3 times/week by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and liver copper and zinc concentrations were determined similarly after acid digestion of tissues taken at necropsy. The amount of soluble collagen in articular cartilage and aortic tissue was determined after necropsy. Clinical signs of illness, particularly evidence of lameness, were monitored daily. The foals were weighed weekly, and growth rate was monitored by measurement of height at the withers. Packed cell volumes and total and differential WBC counts were measured each time blood was drawn for copper and zinc concentration determinations. The foals were examined by necropsy at the end of the experiment, and the tissues were examined histologically. The foals developed intermittent, but nondebilitating, diarrhea with the onset of low serum copper concentrations. Considering the totally liquid diet, the foals grew well. Serum copper concentrations decreased to less than 0.1 micrograms/ml in 13 to 16 weeks. Lameness was evident 2 to 6 weeks after serum copper concentrations decreased to their lowest value (less than 0.1 micrograms/ml). All foals developed stilted gaits and ultimately walked on the front of their hooves. Major hematologic changes and alterations of hair color were not evident. Soluble collagen of articular cartilage and aortic tissue increased from 340 to 600% greater than that of control foals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3403350

  10. Septicemic pasteurellosis in free-ranging neonatal pronghorn in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunbar, Michael R.; Wolcott, Mark J.; Rimler, R.B.; Berlowski, Brenda M.

    2000-01-01

    As part of a study to determine the cause(s) of population decline and low survival of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) neonates on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge (HMNAR), Oregon (USA), 55 of 104 neonates captured during May 1996 and 1997 were necropsied (n = 28, 1996; n = 27, 1997) to determine cause of death. Necropsies were conducted on fawns that died during May, June, or July of each year. The objectives of this study were to report the occurrence and pathology of pasteurellosis in neonates and determine if the isolated strain of Pasteurella multocida was unique. Septicemic pasteurellosis, caused by P. multocida, was diagnosed as the cause of death for two neonates in May and June 1997. Necropsy findings included widely scattered petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages found over a large portion of the subcutaneous tissue, meninges of the brain, epicardium, skeletal muscle, and serosal surface of the thorasic and abdominal cavities. Histological examination of lung tissues revealed diffuse congestion and edema and moderate to marked multifocal infiltrate of macrophages, neutrophils, and numerous bacteria within many terminal bronchioles and alveoli. Pasteurella multocida serotypes A:3,4, and B:1 were isolated from several tissues including lung, intestinal, thorasic fluid, and heart blood. Each B:1 isolate had DNA restriction endonuclease fingerprint profiles distinct from isolates previously characterized from domestic cattle, swan (Olor spp.), moose (Alces alces), and pronghorn from Montana (USA). This is the first report of pasteurellosis in pronghorn from Oregon and the B:1 isolates appear to be unique in comparison to DNA fingerprint profiles from selected domestic and wild species.

  11. Treatment of Baylisascaris procyonis infections in dogs with milbemycin oxime.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Dwight D; Ulrich, Michael A; Gregory, Dawn E; Neumann, Norwood R; Legg, Walter; Stansfield, David

    2005-05-15

    An examination was made as to the ability of Sentinel Flavor Tabs (milbemycin oxime/lufenuron) to treat Baylisascaris procyonis infections in dogs. The study was designed as a critical trial and included five naturally infected dogs and two dogs that were experimentally infected. Another dog from a prior clinical trial that was treated with Sentinel Flavor Tabs as part of the original FDA submission package for intestinal nematode infections was also included with the treated dogs. Of the five naturally infected dogs treated as part of the critical trial, three were cleared of their infections. These five dogs passed a total of 52 worms after treatment; one dog retained 23 worms and the other retained 1 worm at necropsy 7 days after treatment. Two of five experimentally infected Beagle dogs that had been given mice that had been fed 200 infectious eggs, developed patent infections with the parasite. These dogs were treated, and one of the dogs passed one worm and the other passed two worms after treatment with no worms being detected at necropsy 7 days after treatment. The one dog that was treated with milbemycin oxime as part of the FDA submission was clear of worms at necropsy. Overall, the mean efficacy of Sentinel Flavor Tabs was found to be 91.0%. Of the eight dogs that were treated, six were totally cleared of their infections, a cure rate of 75%. The two dogs that did not clear their infections had very large numbers of adult B. procyonis within their intestinal tracts at the time of treatment, one dog had 40 worms (23 remaining) and the other had 26 worms (1 remaining). It is suggested that the treatment of dogs with monthly Sentinel Flavor Tabs could markedly reduce the chance of infected dogs contaminating the environment. Also, additional monthly treatments are highly likely to clear dogs of any worms not killed with the initial treatment. PMID:15845284

  12. Anthelmintic efficacy of ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for seven consecutive days (100 µg/kg/day), against nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Teixeira, Weslen Fabricio Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Buzulini, Carolina; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Fávero, Flávia Carolina; Gomes, Lucas Vinicius Costa; Prando, Luciana; Bichuette, Murilo A; Dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate ivermectin and abamectin, both administered orally in naturally infected domestic swine, as well as analysing if the EPG (eggs per gram of faeces) values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. The animals were randomly selected based on the average of three consecutive EPG counts of Strongylida, Ascaris suum and Trichuris for experiment I, and of Strongylida and Trichuris for experiment II. After the random draw, eight animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day ivermectin (Ivermectina® premix, Ouro Fino Agronegócios), eight other animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day abamectin (Virbamax® premix - Virbac do Brasil Indústria e Comércio Ltda.), and eight pigs were kept as controls. EPG counts were performed for each individual animal at 14th day post-treatment (DPT). All animals (control and treatment) were necropsied at the 14th DPT. The results from both experiments demonstrate that both ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for a continuous period of seven days, at a daily dosage of 100 µg/kg, were highly effective (>95%) against Hyostrongylus rubidus, Strongyloides ransomi, Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus salmi. Against Oesophagostomum dentatum, abamectin presented over 95% efficacy against both evaluated strains, while ivermectin reached other strain as resistant. Regarding T. suis, both ivermectin and abamectin were effective (efficacies >90%) against one of the tested strains, while the other one was classified as resistant. Furthermore, the EPG values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. PMID:25278142

  13. Distribution of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in Naturally and Experimentally Infected Western Gray Squirrels (Sciurus griseus)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kelly; Salkeld, Daniel J.; Lane, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The dynamics of Borrelia burgdorferi infections within its natural hosts are poorly understood. We necropsied four wild-caught western gray squirrels (Sciurus griseus) that were acquired during a previous study that evaluated the reservoir competence of this rodent for the Lyme disease spirochete. One animal was infected experimentally, whereas the others were infected in the wild before capture. To investigate dissemination of B. burgdorferi and concurrent histopathologic lesions in different tissues, blood specimens, synovial and cerebrospinal fluid, ear-punch biopsies, and diverse tissue samples from skin and various organs were taken and examined by culture, polymerase chain reaction, and histology. Borrelia-positive cultures were obtained from three of the squirrels, that is, from skin biopsies (7 of 20 samples), ear-punch biopsies (2 of 8), and one (1 of 5) lymph node. Sequencing of amplicons confirmed B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) infection in 9 of 10 culture-positive samples and in DNA extracted from all 10 positive cultures. The experimentally infected squirrel yielded most of the positive samples. In contrast, bodily fluids, all other organ specimens from these animals, and all samples from one naturally infected squirrel were negative for Borrelia for both assays. None of the necropsied squirrels exhibited specific clinical signs associated with B. burgdorferi. Similarly, necropsy and histological examination of tissues indicated the presence of underlying infectious processes, none of which could be ascribed conclusively to B. burgdorferi infection. Based on these results, obtained from a small number of animals investigated at a single time point, we suggest that B. burgdorferi s.s. infection in S. griseus may result in rather localized dissemination of spirochetes, and that mild or nonclinical disease might be more common after several months of infection duration. Since spirochetes could be detected in squirrels 7–21 months

  14. MRI as a Novel In Vivo Approach for Assessing Structural Changes of Chlamydia Pathology in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shubing; Meng, Xiangjun; Skinner, Julie M.; Heinrichs, Jon H.; Smith, Jeffrey G.; Boddicker, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is among the most prevalent of sexually transmitted diseases. While Chlamydia infection is a reportable event and screening has increased over time, enhanced surveillance has not resulted in a reduction in the rate of infections, and Chlamydia infections frequently recur. The development of a preventative vaccine for Chlamydia may be the only effective approach for reducing infection and the frequency of pathological outcomes. Current vaccine research efforts involve time consuming and/or invasive approaches for assessment of disease state, and MRI presents a clinically translatable method for assessing infection and related pathology both quickly and non-invasively. Longitudinal T2-weighted MRI was performed over 63 days on both control or Chlamydia muridarum challenged mice, either with or without elementary body (EB) immunization, and gross necropsy was performed on day 65. A scoring system was developed to assess the number of regions affected by Chlamydia pathology and was used to document pathology over time and at necropsy. The scoring system documented increasing incidence of pathology in the unimmunized and challenged mice (significantly greater compared to the control and EB immunized-challenged groups) by 21 days post-challenge. No differences between the unchallenged and EB immunized-challenged mice were observed. MRI scores at Day 63 were consistently higher than gross necropsy scores at Day 65, although two of the three groups of mice showed no significant differences between the two techniques. In this work we describe the application of MRI in mice for the potential evaluation of disease pathology and sequelae caused by C. muridarum infection and this technique’s potential for evaluation of vaccines for Chlamydia. PMID:27467585

  15. Longitudinal study on morbidity and mortality in white veal calves in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mortality and morbidity are hardly documented in the white veal industry, despite high levels of antimicrobial drug use and resistance. The objective of the present study was to determine the causes and epidemiology of morbidity and mortality in dairy, beef and crossbred white veal production. A total of 5853 calves, housed in 15 production cohorts, were followed during one production cycle. Causes of mortality were determined by necropsy. Morbidity was daily recorded by the producers. Results The total mortality risk was 5,3% and was significantly higher in beef veal production compared to dairy or crossbreds. The main causes of mortality were pneumonia (1.3% of the calves at risk), ruminal disorders (0.7%), idiopathic peritonitis (0.5%), enterotoxaemia (0.5%) and enteritis (0.4%). Belgian Blue beef calves were more likely to die from pneumonia, enterotoxaemia and arthritis. Detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus at necropsy was associated with chronic pneumonia and pleuritis. Of the calves, 25.4% was treated individually and the morbidity rate was 1.66 cases per 1000 calf days at risk. The incidence rate of respiratory disease, diarrhea, arthritis and otitis was 0.95, 0.30, 0.11 and 0.07 cases per 1000 calf days at risk respectively. Morbidity peaked in the first three weeks after arrival and gradually declined towards the end of the production cycle. Conclusions The present study provided insights into the causes and epidemiology of morbidity and mortality in white veal calves in Belgium, housed in the most frequent housing system in Europe. The necropsy findings, identified risk periods and differences between production systems can guide both veterinarians and producers towards the most profitable and ethical preventive and therapeutic protocols. PMID:22414223

  16. Temporal localization of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in reproductive tissues of experimentally infected boars.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Cinta; García, Carlos; Simarro, Isabel; Castro, José M

    2003-11-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been reported to be shed in the semen of infected boars. To determine whether the reproductive tissues could be a persistent source of virus and the possible origin of PRRSV found in semen of infected boars, 20 PRRSV-seronegative boars were intranasally inoculated with 5 x 10(6) median tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of PRRSV and necropsied at different times post-inoculation (p.i.) from Day 2 to Day 37 p.i. Blood samples were collected before experimental inoculation, at necropsy and at different times p.i. At necropsy, epididymal semen and reproductive tissues were collected and the presence of the virus determined by virus isolation. The infection of the boars was demonstrated by the isolation of the virus from the sera of all inoculated boars and by seroconversion. PRRSV was detected in serum samples from Day 2 to Day 23 p.i., although the viremic period was largely dependent on the individual response to infection. Viral replication was proven within different reproductive tissues from Day 2 to Day 23 p.i., being most consistently found in the epididymus. In addition, PRRSV was isolated in semen from Day 4 to Day 10 p.i. The correlation of a diminished viremia and the inability to isolate PRRSV from semen or reproductive tissues may be due to one of two possibilities. First, viremia is responsible for most of the virus isolated from reproductive tissues due to the movement of PRRSV-infected cells out of the blood and into the tissues. Second, viremia may initially seed the reproductive tissues with PRRSV, and then the virus is produced into the reproductive tract and shed into semen at low levels. PMID:14519471

  17. Effects of capture-related injury on postcapture movement of white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Dechen Quinn, Amy C; Williams, David M; Porter, William F; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Hynes, Kevin

    2014-04-01

    Capture-related injuries or deaths of wildlife study subjects pose concerns to researchers, from considerations for animal welfare to inflated project costs and biased data. Capture myopathy (CM) is an injury that can affect an animal's survival ≤ 30 days postrelease, but is often difficult to detect without close monitoring and immediate necropsy. We evaluated the influence of capture and handling on postcapture movement in an attempt to characterize movement rates of animals suffering from CM. We captured and global positioning system-collared 95 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in central and northern New York during 2006-2008. Six juveniles died within 30 days postrelease, and necropsy reports indicated that two suffered CM (2%). We compared postcapture movement rates for juveniles that survived >30 days with those that died ≤ 30 days postcapture. Survivor movement rates (43.74 m/hr, SD = 3.53, n = 28) were significantly higher than rates for deer that died within 30 days (17.70 m/hr, SD = 1.57, n = 6) (P<0.01). Additionally, movement rates of juveniles that died of CM (15.1 m/hr) were 5.1 m/hr lower than those for juveniles that died of other causes ≤ 30 days postcapture (20.2 m/hr), but we were unable to evaluate this statistically because of insufficient sample size. We found no difference in vital rates (temperature, heart rate, respiration rate) during handling between survivors and juveniles that died within 30 days postcapture but observed that survivors were in better body condition at capture. These results suggest that deer likely to die within the 30-day CM window can be identified soon after capture, provided that intensive movement data are collected. Further, even if necropsy reports are unavailable, these animals should be censored from analysis because their behavior is not representative of movements of surviving animals. PMID:24484502

  18. Enteric disease in postweaned beef calves associated with Bovine coronavirus clade 2.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Robert W; Herd, Heather R; Sorensen, Nicholas J; Confer, Anthony W; Ritchey, Jerry W; Ridpath, Julia F; Burge, Lurinda J

    2015-01-01

    Bovine coronavirus (BoCV; Betacoronavirus 1) infections are associated with varied clinical presentations including neonatal diarrhea, winter dysentery in dairy cattle, and respiratory disease in various ages of cattle. The current report presents information on BoCV infections associated with enteric disease of postweaned beef cattle in Oklahoma. In 3 separate accessions from a single herd, 1 in 2012 and 2 in 2013, calves were observed with bloody diarrhea. One calf in 2012 died and was necropsied, and 2 calves from this herd died in 2013 and were necropsied. A third calf from another herd died and was necropsied. The gross and histologic diagnosis was acute, hemorrhagic colitis in all 4 cattle. Colonic tissues from all 4 animals were positive by fluorescent antibody testing and/or immunohistochemical staining for BoCV antigen. Bovine coronavirus was isolated in human rectal tumor cells from swabs of colon surfaces of all animals. The genomic information from a region of the S envelope region revealed BoCV clade 2. Detection of BoCV clade 2 in beef cattle in Oklahoma is consistent with recovery of BoCV clade 2 from the respiratory tract of postweaned beef calves that had respiratory disease signs or were healthy. Further investigations on the ecology of BoCV in cattle are important, as BoCV may be an emerging disease beyond the initial descriptions. Challenge studies are needed to determine pathogenicity of these strains, and to determine if current BoCV vaccines are efficacious against the BoCV clade 2 strains. PMID:25428188

  19. Acquisition of resistance after continuous infection with Ascaridia galli in chickens.

    PubMed

    Ferdushy, T; Schou, T W; Norup, L R; Dalgaard, T S; Thamsborg, S M; Nejsum, P; Permin, A; Juul-Madsen, H R; Kyvsgaard, N C

    2014-07-01

    SUMMARY Acquired resistance against Ascaridia galli infection was studied in seventy-two 18-week-old white Leghorn chickens allocated to six groups (G1-G6). In order to understand the population dynamics following trickle-infection (100 eggs per chicken twice weekly), chickens of subgroups of G1 were necropsied 3 days after 1, 6 or 12 inoculations (G1A, G1B and G1C respectively), while G2-G4 were inoculated for 6 weeks. G2 was necropsied 4 weeks after the last inoculation. The number of established larvae increased initially (between G1A and G1B) but decreased after repeated inoculations (G1C, G2). G3, G4 and G5 were used to measure the efficacy of anthelminthic treatment and to monitor the acquisition of resistance following a challenge infection. At week 7 G3, G4 and G5 were treated with flubendazole for 7 days in the feed. Two weeks after treatment the chickens in G4 and G5 were challenged with 500 eggs. G6 was left as uninfected control. Necropsy at week 10 after first inoculation revealed a lower establishment rate, an impaired development and a more posterior localization of the larvae in G4 (trickle-infected-treated-challenged) compared with G5 (treated-challenged). IgY level in serum reached noticeable level at 14 dpi in G2 and G4 chickens, and in G4 chickens IgY level further increased after challenge infection. The study provides evidence that acquired resistance against A. galli in chickens leads to a significant yet incomplete protection against re-infection. PMID:25003836

  20. Experimentally induced vitamin E-selenium deficiency in the growing dog.

    PubMed

    Van Vleet, J F

    1975-04-15

    Eight 5-to 8-week-old Beagle pups were allotted to 4 groups of 2 dogs each. For 55 to 70 days, they were fed either a semisynthetic basal diet (BD) deficient in vitamin E and selenium (Se) (group 1) or the BD supplemented with either 30 IU alpha-tocopherol/kg (group 2), 0.5 ppm Se as selenite (group 3), or 1.0 ppm Se as selenite (group 4). In the dogs fed the BD, clinical signs of vitamin E-Se deficiency developed after 40 to 60 days. These signs were accompanied by increased plasma activity of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT). The dogs were euthanatized after 10 to 15 days of progressive clinical signs, including muscular weakness, subcutaneous edema, anorexia, depression, dyspnea, and eventual coma. Gross lesions seen at necropsy included ventral subcutaneous edema, generalized skeletal muscular pallor and edema with scattered white longitudinal streaking, prominent brownish yellow discoloration of the intestinal musculature, and a layer of white chalky material at the renal corticomedullary junction. Microscopically, there was evidence of extensive skeletal muscular degeneration and regeneration, focal subendocardial necrosis in the ventricular myocardium, intestinal lipofuscinosis, and renal mineralization. Mean hepatic Se content in the dogs fed the BD was 0.10 ppm (wet weight basis) at necropsy. In the dogs fed the 3 supplemented diets, clinical signs of deficiency did not develop. At necropsy, mild skeletal myopathy was evident histologically in the dogs fed BD and 0.5 ppm Se (group 3) but not in the dogs fed the other supplemented diets. Intestinal lipofuscinosis was found in the dogs fed the 3 supplemented diets but was less severe in the dogs fed the diet supplemented with vitamin E than in those fed diets supplemented with Se. PMID:1120735

  1. Echinococcus in the wild carnivores and stray dogs of northern Tunisia: the results of a pilot survey.

    PubMed

    Lahmar, S; Boufana, B S; Lahmar, S; Inoubli, S; Guadraoui, M; Dhibi, M; Bradshaw, H; Craig, P S

    2009-06-01

    Echinococcus granulosus is endemic throughout Tunisia and E. multilocularis has previously been reported as the cause of two cases of human alveolar echinococcosis in the north-west of the country. The aim of the present study was to screen wild carnivores from the north-western Jendouba governorate and semi-stray dogs from the Siliana and Sejnane regions of northern Tunisia for these two zoonotic cestodes. The results of the coproscopy, coproELISA and coproPCR that were undertaken were compared with those of necropsy, where possible. Overall, 111 faecal samples (51 from wild carnivores and 60 from stray dogs) were tested by coproELISA for Echinococcus antigen and by coproPCR for E. granulosus and E. multilocularis species-specific DNA. All 60 dogs and seven of the wild carnivores were necropsied. Eleven (18.4%) of the dogs and one golden jackal (Canis aureus) were found positive for E. granulosus at necropsy. The jackal was found to be carrying 72 E. granulosus tapeworms, which were confirmed to be of the common sheep-dog (G1) genotype. Faecal samples from 10 (19.6%) of the wild carnivores--putatively, four golden jackals, two red foxes (Vulpes vulpes atlantica), one hyaena (Hyaena hyaena) and three genets (Genetta genetta)--gave a positive result in the Echinococcus coproELISA. In the coproPCR-based follow-up, E. granulosus DNA was detected in faecal samples from five jackals, two foxes and six stray dogs. The DNA of E. multilocularis was not, however, detected in any of the faecal samples investigated. This is the first report from Tunisia of (coproPCR-)confirmed E. granulosus infections in golden jackals and red foxes. The possible role of such wild hosts in the transmission of E. granulosus in Tunisia should be investigated further. The possibility of the active transmission of E. multilocularis in Tunisia still remains an open question. PMID:19508750

  2. MRI as a Novel In Vivo Approach for Assessing Structural Changes of Chlamydia Pathology in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Hines, Catherine D G; Wang, Shubing; Meng, Xiangjun; Skinner, Julie M; Heinrichs, Jon H; Smith, Jeffrey G; Boddicker, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is among the most prevalent of sexually transmitted diseases. While Chlamydia infection is a reportable event and screening has increased over time, enhanced surveillance has not resulted in a reduction in the rate of infections, and Chlamydia infections frequently recur. The development of a preventative vaccine for Chlamydia may be the only effective approach for reducing infection and the frequency of pathological outcomes. Current vaccine research efforts involve time consuming and/or invasive approaches for assessment of disease state, and MRI presents a clinically translatable method for assessing infection and related pathology both quickly and non-invasively. Longitudinal T2-weighted MRI was performed over 63 days on both control or Chlamydia muridarum challenged mice, either with or without elementary body (EB) immunization, and gross necropsy was performed on day 65. A scoring system was developed to assess the number of regions affected by Chlamydia pathology and was used to document pathology over time and at necropsy. The scoring system documented increasing incidence of pathology in the unimmunized and challenged mice (significantly greater compared to the control and EB immunized-challenged groups) by 21 days post-challenge. No differences between the unchallenged and EB immunized-challenged mice were observed. MRI scores at Day 63 were consistently higher than gross necropsy scores at Day 65, although two of the three groups of mice showed no significant differences between the two techniques. In this work we describe the application of MRI in mice for the potential evaluation of disease pathology and sequelae caused by C. muridarum infection and this technique's potential for evaluation of vaccines for Chlamydia. PMID:27467585

  3. Left ventricular dysfunction in the fetus: relation to aortic valve anomalies and endocardial fibroelastosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sharland, G K; Chita, S K; Fagg, N L; Anderson, R H; Tynan, M; Cook, A C; Allan, L D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the relation between a characteristic form of left ventricular dysfunction in the fetus and abnormalities of the aortic valve and endocardial fibroelastosis of the left ventricle. DESIGN--A retrospective study to examine the correlation between echocardiographic findings in the fetus and postnatal or necropsy findings. SETTING--Tertiary referral centre for fetal echocardiography. PATIENTS--Thirty fetuses showing a characteristic echocardiographic picture of left ventricular dysfunction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The relation between the prenatal echocardiographic features and the postnatal and necropsy findings. RESULTS--At presentation the size of the left ventricular cavity was normal or enlarged in all cases. The measurements of the orifice of the aortic root and mitral valve were either normal or small for the gestational age. The echocardiographic diagnosis made at presentation was critical aortic stenosis in all cases. At necropsy or postnatal examination the aortic valve was dysplastic and stenotic in 15 cases and the left ventricle had become hypoplastic in one of these. Aortic atresia was present in seven patients, three of whom had a hypoplastic left ventricle. In six patients the aortic valve was bicuspid although not obstructive. One of these patients had hypoplasia of the aortic arch and one had a hypoplastic left ventricle but in the remaining four patients endocardial fibroelastosis of the left ventricle was the only abnormality found. No follow up information was available in two. Of 26 patients for whom there was postmortem information, 24 had evidence of some degree of endocardial fibroelastosis of the left ventricle. Sequential observations showed that five cases developed into the hypoplastic left heart syndrome. CONCLUSIONS--This type of left ventricular dysfunction in the fetus is the result of an overlap of diseases, including primary left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis, critical aortic stenosis, and the hypoplastic

  4. Supplemental oxygen attenuates the increase in wound bacterial growth during simulated aeromedical evacuation in goats

    PubMed Central

    Earnest, Ryan E.; Sonnier, Dennis I.; Makley, Amy T.; Campion, Eric M.; Wenke, Joseph C.; Bailey, Stephanie R.; Dorlac, Warren C.; Lentsch, Alex B.; Pritts, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial growth in soft tissue and open fractures is a known risk factor for tissue loss and complications in contaminated musculoskeletal wounds. Current care for battlefield casualties with soft tissue and musculoskeletal wounds includes tactical and strategic aeromedical evacuation (AE). This exposes patients to a hypobaric, hypoxic environment. In the present study, we sought to determine whether exposure to AE alters bacterial growth in contaminated complex musculoskeletal wounds and whether supplemental oxygen had any effect on wound infections during simulated AE. Methods A caprine model of a contaminated complex musculoskeletal wound was employed. Complex musculoskeletal wounds were created and inoculated with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Goats were divided into three experimental groups: ground control, simulated aeromedical evacuation (AE), and simulated AE with supplemental oxygen (AE+O2). Simulated AE was induced in a hypobaric chamber pressurized to 8800 feet for 7 hours. Bacterial luminescence was measured using a photon counting camera at three timepoints: preflight (20 hours post surgery), postflight (7 hours from preflight and 27 hours post-surgery), and necropsy (24 hours from preflight and 44 hours post surgery). Results There was a significant increase in bacterial growth in the AE group compared to the ground control group measured postflight and at necropsy. Simulated AE induced hypoxia with oxygen saturation less than 93%. Supplemental oxygen corrected the hypoxia and significantly reduced bacterial growth in wounds at necropsy. Conclusions Hypoxia induced during simulated AE enhances bacterial growth in complex musculoskeletal wounds which can be prevented with the application of supplemental oxygen to the host. PMID:22743376

  5. Coccidioidomycosis and other systemic mycoses of marine mammals stranding along the central California, USA coast: 1998-2012.

    PubMed

    Huckabone, Sara E; Gulland, Frances M D; Johnson, Suzanne M; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Dodd, Erin M; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Dunkin, Robin C; Casper, David; Carlson, Erin L; Sykes, Jane E; Meyer, Weiland; Miller, Melissa A

    2015-04-01

    A wide range of systemic mycoses have been reported from captive and wild marine mammals from North America. Examples include regionally endemic pathogens such as Coccidioides and Blastomyces spp., and novel pathogens like Cryptococcus gattii, which appear may have been introduced to North America by humans. Stranding and necropsy data were analyzed from three marine mammal stranding and response facilities on the central California coast to assess the prevalence, host demographics, and lesion distribution of systemic mycoses affecting locally endemic marine mammals. Between 1 January 1998 and 30 June 2012, >7,000 stranded marine mammals were necropsied at the three facilities. Necropsy and histopathology records were reviewed to identify cases of locally invasive or systemic mycoses and determine the nature and distribution of fungal lesions. Forty-one animals (0.6%) exhibited cytological, culture- or histologically confirmed locally invasive or systemic mycoses: 36 had coccidioidomycosis, two had zygomycosis, two had cryptococcosis, and one was systemically infected with Scedosporium apiospermum (an Ascomycota). Infected animals included 18 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), 20 southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis), two Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi), one Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli), and one northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris). Coccidioidomycosis was reported from 15 sea lions, 20 sea otters, and one harbor seal, confirming that Coccidioides spp. is the most common pathogen causing systemic mycosis in marine mammals stranding along the central California coast. We also report the first confirmation of C. gattii infection in a wild marine mammal from California and the first report of coccidioidomycosis in a wild harbor seal. Awareness of these pathogenic fungi during clinical care and postmortem examination is an important part of marine mammal population health surveillance and human health protection

  6. EFFECTS OF TOPICAL TREATMENT WITH EUPHORBIA TIRUCALLI LATEX ON THE SURVIVAL AND INTESTINAL ADHESIONS IN RATS WITH EXPERIMENTAL PERITONITIS

    PubMed Central

    de ARAÚJO, Lilhian Alves; MRUÉ, Fátima; NEVES, Roberpaulo Anacleto; ALVES, Maxley Martins; da SILVA-JÚNIOR, Nelson Jorge; SILVA, Marcelo Seixo de Brito; de MELO-REIS, Paulo Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of plants of the family Euphorbiaceae, particularly Euphorbia tirucalli (avelós) has been popularly widespread for treating a variety of diseases of infectious, tumoral, and inflammatory. Aim: To demonstrated antimicrobial and immunomodulatory effects of these extracts, evaluating the effect of a topical treatment with an aqueous solution of avelós latex on the survival and on intestinal adhesions in rats with experimental peritonitis. Methods: Peritonitis was induced in 24 Wistar rats, that were randomized into four groups of six as follows: (1) Control group (n=6), no treatment; (2) Antibiotic group (n=6), treatment with a single intramuscular dose of antibiotic Unasyn; (3) Saline group (n=6), the abdominal cavity was washed with 0.9% saline; and (4) E.tirucalli group (n=6), the abdominal cavity was washed with E. tirucalli at a concentration of 12 mg/ml. The animals that died were necropsied, and the time of death was recorded. The survivors were killed on postoperative day 11, and necropsy was subsequently performed for evaluation of the intestinal adhesions. Results: Significant differences were observed in the control and antibiotic groups (p<0.01) with respect to the survival hours when compared with the saline and E. tirucalli groups. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the survival of animals in the saline andE. tirucalli groups; however, one animal died in the saline group. Necropsy of the animals in the saline and E. tirucalligroups showed strong adhesions resistant to manipulation, between the intestinal loops and abdominal wall. The remaining groups did not show any adhesions. Conclusions: Topical treatment with E. tirucalli latex stimulated an increased formation of intestinal adhesions and prevented the death of all animals with peritonitis. PMID:26734792

  7. Causes of Mississippi sandhill crane mortality in captivity 1984-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Gee, G.F.

    1997-01-01

    During 1984-95, 111 deaths were documented in the captive flock of Mississippi sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis pulla) housed at the Paluxent Wildlife Research Center. Trauma was the leading cause of death (37%), followed by infectious/parasitic diseases (25%), anatomic abnormalities (15%), and miscellaneous (8%). No positive diagnosis of cause of death was found in 19% of the necropsies. Chicks < 2 months old suffered 76% of captive deaths. Trauma, the greatest cause of deaths of captive juveniles anti adults, is likely Iimited to collisions in the wild. lnfectious/parasitic diseases and anatomic abnormalities could affect wild chick survival at similar rates to those of captive chicks.

  8. Certain progress in the treatment of coronary heart disease with traditional medicinal plants in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, K J

    1981-01-01

    A case of coronary heart disease in China was confirmed by the necropsy of a female body unearthed from the tomb at Changsha. It proved that such a case existed about 2,100 years ago. Research in reducing the frequency of myocardial infarction by traditional medicinal plants showed the effect of several herbs. The traditional aromatic and warm herbal medicines may have the possibility of relieving coronary arterial spasm. The clinical and experimental observations proved that the Huoxue-huayu plants' action against blood platelet aggregation and against attack was effective. PMID:6307037

  9. Waterbird Susceptibility to Avian Cholera at Hayward Marsh, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Wray, Amy K; Bell, Douglas A; Dramer, Peter; Taylor, Mark

    2016-07-01

    We characterized past avian cholera outbreaks in waterbirds at Hayward Marsh, California, US. In 2013, we surveyed populations and determined the presence of disease using several diagnostic methods, including behavioral and physical observations, field necropsy, and bacterial culture. We compiled this information with data from previous outbreaks from 1990-2012 to compare waterbird abundance to various measures of mortality, including percentage of mortality and percentage of difference between abundance and mortality by species. We suggest that Ruddy Duck ( Oxyura jamaicensis ) have consistently suffered greater mortality from this disease than have other species at this site. PMID:27258407

  10. Early-onset dementia and extrapyramidal disease: clinicopathological variant of Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker or Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Hart, J; Gordon, B

    1990-01-01

    A case of progressive dementia and extrapyramidal signs beginning at age 29, with a ten year course until death, is presented. Necropsy examination showed an assortment of plaque types (including striatal plaques), neurofibrillary tangles, granulovacuolar degeneration, and depigmentation of the substantia nigra and locus ceruleus. This case had pathological features found in both Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease and in Alzheimer's disease. While somewhat similar to several other cases with features of both diseases, it differs in the presence of dystonia and striatal plaques. Although such cases may be difficult to categorize at present, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of early onset dementia. Images PMID:2283522