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Sample records for necropsy

  1. Feedlot Euthanasia and Necropsy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Dee

    2015-11-01

    Timely euthanasia of feeder cattle can minimize suffering of cattle that have little hope of recovery or pain abatement. Euthanasia techniques are described, including primary and secondary steps to ensure humane death. Considerations are discussed to ensure rendered product from euthanized cattle will be safe. A necropsy technique that is time efficient and thorough is outlined. An important aspect is minimizing the number of detached body organs, thereby making it easier to remove the necropsied animal. A necropsy data collection system is discussed that uses check-boxes to record findings. A link to a database that can be downloaded is included. PMID:26188549

  2. Health and safety at necropsy

    PubMed Central

    Burton, J L

    2003-01-01

    The postmortem room is a source of potential hazards and risks, not only to the pathologist and anatomical pathology technician, but also to visitors to the mortuary and those handling the body after necropsy. Postmortem staff have a legal responsibility to make themselves aware of, and to minimise, these dangers. This review focuses specifically on those hazards and risks associated with the necropsy of infected patients, with foreign objects present in the body, and with bodies that have been contaminated by chemicals or radioactive sources. PMID:12663635

  3. Necropsy study of mountaineering accidents in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, W A; Doyle, D; Richmond, H G; Galbraith, S L

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and twenty one people died in mountaineering accidents in Scotland between July 1978 and December 1983. Necropsies were carried out on 42, which form the basis of this report. In 21 cases head injury was major fatality factor, but in 11 of these there were also serious chest injuries. Focal brain damage (haematomas, contusions, or lacerations) was more common (n = 21) than diffuse brain damage (n = 18). Over half of the victims with severe head injury had few other injuries and would probably have survived had the head injury been prevented. Spinal injuries usually occurred with other major injuries. Chest injuries were common, being serious in 18 cases, but abdominal injuries were uncommon. Four climbers with only minor injuries died of hypothermia. PMID:3793938

  4. Cytogenetic studies: an essential part of the paediatric necropsy.

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, G R; Carter, R F

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome studies were attempted on 97% of necropsies carried out in the Department of Histopathology of the Adelaide Children's Hospital over the four-year period ending May 1981. Results were obtained from 89% of necropsies of which 7.5% had major chromosome abnormalities. The chromosome results are analysed according to the category of the necropsy and to primary cause of death. It is recommended that cytogenetic studies be performed on all stillbirths and infants dying at less than 28 days of age except in cases of isolated CNS malformation, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), trauma, or known single gene defects. PMID:6681820

  5. Renal findings in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical aspects of 132 necropsies.

    PubMed

    Boers, M; Croonen, A M; Dijkmans, B A; Breedveld, F C; Eulderink, F; Cats, A; Weening, J J

    1987-09-01

    Renal abnormalities in 132 necropsied patients with rheumatoid arthritis were studied. Clinical findings before death included extra-articular manifestations of the disease (86% of patients), systemic vasculitis (6%), and uraemia (23%). Necropsy findings included nephrosclerosis (90%), systemic vasculitis (14%) with kidney involvement in 8%, amyloidosis (11%), membranous glomerulopathy (8%), and focal glomerular disease (8%). Association with clinical data suggests that both rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid disease may play a part in the cause of these abnormalities. PMID:3675007

  6. The use of histopathology in the practice of necropsy.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J O; Goddard, M J; Gresham, G A; Wyatt, B A

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To examine current practice and to establish criteria for the use of histopathology in necropsy practice. METHODS: During an audit of necropsy reporting, consensus could not be reached about the use of routine histopathology. Therefore local guidelines were formulated and current practice was compared with these guidelines. Fifteen consecutive necropsies undertaken by each consultant were reviewed and the use of histopathology noted. RESULTS: In general, the standard of necropsy reporting was reasonably high. Tissue was retained for histopathology in 25% of necropsies and 72% of these necropsy reports included a histopathology report. Using the guidelines, the assessors judged that histopathology might have been valuable in a further 19%. It was felt that routine histopathology would not have been helpful in determining the cause of death in the remaining 56%. The importance of the pathologist's clinical judgement in individual cases was stressed. At reaudit, nearly two years later, there was no significant change in practice, reflecting the lack of consensus. CONCLUSIONS: Even when histopathology might contribute to finding the cause of death, it was not always done. However, the assumption that histology is invariably helpful in determining the cause of death is challenged. PMID:9301557

  7. Histological examination has a major impact on macroscopic necropsy diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, F D C; Saldiva, P H N; Mauad, T

    2005-01-01

    Background: Necropsy is the gold standard for clinicopathological discrepancy studies and epidemiological surveys. Inadequate sampling or lack of tissue may hamper the final interpretation and quality of the necropsy. Aim: To compare the histological and gross necropsy diagnoses of different organs. Methods: A retrospective comparison of the provisional reports (gross findings only) and the final reports (after histological examination) of the necropsies performed at the department of pathology of the Hospital das Clínicas, Sao Paulo University, Brazil, a large tertiary care complex, in 2001. The total number of diagnoses listed for the lungs, heart, liver, pancreas, kidneys, and spleen were calculated. Findings were categorised into concordant/refined diagnosis, discordant/additional diagnosis, histology needed, and inconclusive. Results: Three hundred and seventy one postmortem reports were analysed. There were 214 men and 157 women, with a mean age of 50.3 years, ranging from 1 to 92. The lung received the highest number (954) and the pancreas the lowest number (390) of diagnoses. The highest frequencies of discrepancies between the gross and microscopic findings were found in the lung and the liver: 38.7% and 35.1%, respectively. The brain had the lowest frequency of discrepancies. In a small number of cases, the final diagnosis could only be achieved through microscopic analysis, with the highest frequency being found in the kidneys (8.5%). Conclusions: Histological analysis has a major impact on previously performed gross diagnosis at necropsy, especially in the lungs, liver, and kidneys. Adequate sampling and histological analysis are important for necropsy quality. PMID:16311344

  8. Neuropathology of HIV infection in haemophiliacs: comparative necropsy study.

    PubMed Central

    Esiri, M. M.; Scaravilli, F.; Millard, P. R.; Harcourt-Webster, J. N.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To discover whether pathological and neuropathological findings at necropsy are different in haemophiliacs and other subjects positive for HIV. DESIGN--Pathological and neuropathological findings at necropsy were compared in haemophiliacs and non-haemophiliacs, most of them homosexual men. SETTING--Necropsies performed in the south of England. SUBJECTS--11 Haemophiliacs (mean age 41, range 15-69) and 31 non-haemophiliacs, 29 of whom were homosexual men (mean age 40, range 21-60). AIDS was diagnosed before death in four haemophiliacs and all but one of the non-haemophiliacs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Prevalence of various forms of neuropathology and systemic pathology in the haemophiliacs and non-haemophiliacs, compared with Fisher's exact test. RESULTS--The prevalences of opportunistic infections of the central nervous system were significantly higher in the non-haemophiliacs (cerebral toxoplasmosis 23% (7), progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy 10% (3), and cerebral cytomegalovirus infection 19% (6) in the non-haemophiliacs v no cases in the haemophiliacs). The prevalences of fresh and old intracranial haemorrhages and cirrhosis of the liver were significantly higher in the haemophiliacs (fresh intracranial haemorrhage 45% (5), old intracranial haemorrhage 36% (4), and cirrhosis of the liver 27% (3) in the haemophiliacs v no cases in the non-haemophiliacs). The prevalence of neuropathological changes in the non-haemophiliacs was similar to that found in other necropsy series. CONCLUSIONS--The main causes of death in haemophiliacs positive for HIV included intracranial haemorrhage and cirrhosis of the liver. The haemophiliacs died when the characteristic neuropathological changes associated with HIV infection were at a fairly early stage in their development. PMID:2513933

  9. Salmonella transmission through splash exposure during a bovine necropsy.

    PubMed

    Bemis, David A; Craig, Linden E; Dunn, John R

    2007-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from two adult cows and a veterinary pathologist who performed a necropsy examination on one of the cows. The isolates had indistinguishable phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. A splash exposure was the suspected means of transmission of the human infection. Veterinary practices and other at-risk occupations should establish site-specific infection control plans and review recommendations for use of facial protection measures during procedures that may produce splashes or aerosols. PMID:17883322

  10. Ultrasound and necropsy study of periventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Szymonowicz, W; Schafler, K; Cussen, L J; Yu, V Y

    1984-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of cerebral ultrasound for periventricular haemorrhage was determined by comparing this with necropsy findings in 30 preterm neonates of 30 weeks' gestation or less and birthweight under 1500 g. Ultrasound gave an accurate diagnosis of 85% in infants with germinal layer haemorrhage, 92% in intraventricular haemorrhage, and 97% in intracerebral haemorrhage. False positive errors were caused by vascular congestion; false negative errors occurred when the maximum dimension of haemorrhage was less than 3 mm. Cerebral ultrasound gave a diagnostic accuracy of 63% for periventricular leucomalacia. False negative errors occurred when periventricular leucomalacia was microscopic or when it was out of range of the scanner. The maximum width of the germinal layer was measured in 77 neonates of gestational age 23 to 36 weeks who died and had no periventricular haemorrhage at necropsy. The progressive involution of the germinal layer with increasing gestational age paralleled the steady decrease in incidence of periventricular haemorrhage diagnosed over the same gestational age range. Neonates of the youngest gestational age who had the most extensive germinal layers also had the highest risk for periventricular haemorrhage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 p640-b Fig. 4 PMID:6465933

  11. Ultrasound and necropsy study of periventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Szymonowicz, W; Schafler, K; Cussen, L J; Yu, V Y

    1984-07-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of cerebral ultrasound for periventricular haemorrhage was determined by comparing this with necropsy findings in 30 preterm neonates of 30 weeks' gestation or less and birthweight under 1500 g. Ultrasound gave an accurate diagnosis of 85% in infants with germinal layer haemorrhage, 92% in intraventricular haemorrhage, and 97% in intracerebral haemorrhage. False positive errors were caused by vascular congestion; false negative errors occurred when the maximum dimension of haemorrhage was less than 3 mm. Cerebral ultrasound gave a diagnostic accuracy of 63% for periventricular leucomalacia. False negative errors occurred when periventricular leucomalacia was microscopic or when it was out of range of the scanner. The maximum width of the germinal layer was measured in 77 neonates of gestational age 23 to 36 weeks who died and had no periventricular haemorrhage at necropsy. The progressive involution of the germinal layer with increasing gestational age paralleled the steady decrease in incidence of periventricular haemorrhage diagnosed over the same gestational age range. Neonates of the youngest gestational age who had the most extensive germinal layers also had the highest risk for periventricular haemorrhage. PMID:6465933

  12. 9 CFR 77.40 - Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy and slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.40 Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy... captive cervid was classified, and who is trained in tuberculosis necropsy procedures. (2) If, upon..., the captive cervid will be considered negative for tuberculosis. (3) Reactors, suspects, and...

  13. 9 CFR 77.40 - Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy and slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.40 Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy... captive cervid was classified, and who is trained in tuberculosis necropsy procedures. (2) If, upon..., the captive cervid will be considered negative for tuberculosis. (3) Reactors, suspects, and...

  14. 9 CFR 77.40 - Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy and slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.40 Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy... captive cervid was classified, and who is trained in tuberculosis necropsy procedures. (2) If, upon..., the captive cervid will be considered negative for tuberculosis. (3) Reactors, suspects, and...

  15. 9 CFR 77.40 - Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy and slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.40 Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy... captive cervid was classified, and who is trained in tuberculosis necropsy procedures. (2) If, upon..., the captive cervid will be considered negative for tuberculosis. (3) Reactors, suspects, and...

  16. 9 CFR 77.40 - Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy and slaughter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.40 Procedures for and interstate movement to necropsy... captive cervid was classified, and who is trained in tuberculosis necropsy procedures. (2) If, upon..., the captive cervid will be considered negative for tuberculosis. (3) Reactors, suspects, and...

  17. Follow-up studies by peroral gastric biopsies and necropsy in vomiting dogs.

    PubMed Central

    van der Gaag, I; Happé, R P

    1989-01-01

    The results of follow-up studies in 139 vomiting dogs are presented. Follow-up studies were performed by biopsies in 34 dogs, by biopsies and necropsy in six dogs and by necropsy only in 99 dogs. The times between the first and the last series of biopsies varied from three to 1042 days and from one to 656 days between the first series of biopsies and necropsy. From the 55 dogs with gastritis in the first series of biopsies, 35 also showed gastritis in the following biopsies or at necropsy. These were mainly severe types of gastritis such as diffuse, hypertrophic or atrophic. Ten dogs with superficial gastritis showed no gastric changes at necropsy, two dogs had edema only and three dogs had gastric changes other than gastritis, such as multiple polyps. In general, carcinoma and lymphosarcoma were found in the biopsies as well as at necropsy, but in three cases of terminal carcinoma only gastritis had been diagnosed initially. In 35 dogs the first series of gastric biopsies showed no pathological changes, but in 22 of these dogs gastritis, ulceration, fibrosis, atrophy, gastric dilation with local necrosis, and perforation or lymphosarcoma of the submucosa were found in the second series of biopsies or at necropsy. Several dogs which did not have gastric changes at necropsy had enteritis or intestinal lymphosarcoma. PMID:2590874

  18. Cartilage fibrillation on the lateral tibial plateau in Liverpool necropsies.

    PubMed Central

    Meachim, G

    1976-01-01

    A study has been made of the state at necropsy of the hyaline articular cartilage of the left tibial plateaux, with particular reference to the lateral plateau, in 47 adult white Europeans (24 men; 23 women) aged 21-88 years. The surface morphology and topographical distribution of the lesions is described for the bare area of the lateral plateau and its meniscus-covered segments, and quantitative point-counting data are presented for the amount, according to age, of overt fibrillation on the bare area. A variety of cartilage lesions was encountered: macroscopically apparent ' parallel linear' minimal fibrillation; other patterns of minimal fibrillation; 'ravines'; overt fibrillation; localized incomplete defects of the cartilage; and full-thickness cartilage loss with bone exposure. Sites of superficial fraying and splitting of the hyaline articular cartilage are a normal finding on adult human tibial plateaux. Especially in younger adults, such sites are often accompanied by large areas of cartilage surface which are still intact. On the lateral plateau, the bare area and the meniscus-covered posterior segment are more susceptible to overt fibrillation than are the meniscus-covered lateral and anterior segments. In contrast to the findings in other synovial joints, the peripheral rim of the upper tibial cartilage sheet is not particularly susceptible to overt fibrillation. Tangential extension of the changes on the lateral plateau leads to widespread involvement of the bare area and the meniscus-covered posterior segment in older subjects. However, vertical progression of the changes, sufficient to give full-thickness cartilage loss with tibio-femoral bone exposure, was seen in only a minority of persons aged over 80 years. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:946428

  19. Procedures for the salvage and necropsy of the dugong (Dugong dugon)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eros, Carole; Marsh, Helene; Bonde, Robert K.; O'Shea, Thomas A.; Beck, Cathy A.; Recchia, Cheri; Dobbs, Kirstin; Turner, Malcolm; Lemm, Stephanie; Pears, Rachel; Bowater, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Data and specimens collected from dugong carcasses and live stranded individuals provide vital information for research and management agencies. The ability to assign a cause of death (natural and/or human induced) to a carcass assists managers to identify major threats to a population in certain areas and to evaluate and adapt management measures. Data collectedfrom dugong carcasses have contributed to research in areas such as life history, feeding biology, investigating the stock structure/genetics of dugongs, contaminants studies, heavy metal analyses, parasitology, and the effects of habitat change. Adapted from the 'Manual of Procedures for the Salvage and Necropsy of Carcasses of the West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus),' this manual provides a detailed guide for dugong (Dugong dugon) carcass handling and necropsy procedures. It is intended to be used as a resource and training guide for anyone involved in dugong incidents who may lack dugong expertise.

  20. Chronic brainstem encephalitis with mental symptoms and ataxia: report of three cases with necropsy.

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, T; Takahata, N

    1978-01-01

    Three necropsied cases of chronic, sporadic brainstem encephalitis of unknown aetiology are presented. Since their outstanding symptoms were dementia and ataxia of a progressive nature, a noninflammatory disease of the central nervous system was suspected. Neuropathological studies showed chronic inflammatory changes mainly in the brainstem without the presence of inclusion bodies or viral particles. Compared to cases previously reported as brainstem encephalitis, the clinical and pathological findings observed in these cases have rather peculiar characteristics. Images PMID:671063

  1. Necropsy and histopathologic findings in 14 African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris): a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; White, M R

    1999-06-01

    From fiscal years 1992 through 1996, 14 African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) cases were submitted to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University. The most common diagnoses were splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis (91%), hepatic lipidosis (50%), renal disease (50%), and neoplastic disease (29%). Other less frequent necropsy findings were myocarditis (21%), colitis (14%), bacterial septicemia (14%), and pneumonia (14%). The data indicate that splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis, hepatic lipidosis, renal disease, and neoplasms are frequent postmortem findings in hedgehogs. PMID:10484145

  2. Quantitative scintigraphy: Relation to unperfused volume at necropsy, immediately and 1 week after coronary occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodenday, L.S.; Wilkerson, R.D.; Leighton, R.F.; Muswick, G.J.; Hire, N.E.; Nelson, A.D.; Brewster, P.; Yasnoff, W.A.

    1985-05-01

    Interventions such as thrombolytic therapy, designed to preserve jeopardized myocardium after coronary thrombosis, suffer from inadequate scientific validation because of present limitations in the ability to measure the cardiac volume at risk initially, or to predict the eventual volume of unperfused tissue in the absence of intervention. To determine whether the unimpeded change in perfused myocardial volume over time could be predicted accurately in vivo, Tl-201 quantitative scintigraphy was performed in 10 dogs at 5 minutes and at 1 week after closed-chest coronary artery occlusion (CAO). Initial and final ischemic cardiac volumes (ICV) were measured at necropsy by autoradiography: Initial ICV from Ce-141 microspheres injected into the left ventricle 5 minutes after CAO and final ICV from autoradiography of Tl-201 given 1 week after CAO. Planar scintigrams were computer-analyzed with a quantitative anatomically-referenced technique. Early scintigraphic perfusion defect (SPD) size was closely related to initial ICV measured at necropsy, r=.93. SPD size decreased predictably by 50% during 1 week. Late SPD size correlated with final ICV at necropsy, r=.92. Size of the SPD 5 minutes after CAO predicted both size of the SPD 1 week later, r=.87, and also final ICV, r=.92. These data demonstrate that: 1) after acute canine CAO without therapeutic intervention, SPD size becomes predictably smaller with time; 2) this change reflects a change in the volume of ischemic myocardium; 3) quantitative scintigraphy accurately predicts both early and late ischemic cardiac volume as confirmed at autopsy.

  3. Differentiation at necropsy between in vivo gas embolism and putrefaction using a gas score.

    PubMed

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Saavedra, Pedro; Møllerløkken, Andreas; Brubakk, Alf O; Jørgensen, Arve; González-Díaz, Oscar; Martín-Barrasa, Jose L; Fernández, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Gas bubble lesions consistent with decompression sickness in marine mammals were described for the first time in beaked whales stranded in temporal and spatial association with military exercises. Putrefaction gas is a post-mortem artifact, which hinders the interpretation of gas found at necropsy. Gas analyses have been proven to help differentiating putrefaction gases from gases formed after hyperbaric exposures. Unfortunately, chemical analysis cannot always be performed. Post-mortem computed tomography is used to study gas collections, but many different logistical obstacles and obvious challenges, like the size of the animal or the transport of the animal from the stranding location to the scanner, limit its use in stranded marine mammals. In this study, we tested the diagnostic value of an index-based method for characterizing the amount and topography of gas found grossly during necropsies. For this purpose, putrefaction gases, intravenously infused atmospheric air, and gases produced by decompression were evaluated at necropsy with increased post-mortem time in New Zealand White Rabbits using a gas score index. Statistical differences (P<0.001) were found between the three experimental models immediately after death. Differences in gas score between in vivo gas embolism and putrefaction gases were found significant (P<0.05) throughout the 67h post-mortem. The gas score-index is a new and simple method that can be used by all stranding networks, which has been shown through this study to be a valid diagnostic tool to distinguish between fatal decompression, iatrogenic air embolism and putrefaction gases at autopsies. PMID:27234535

  4. Electrocution of Raptors on Power Lines: A Review of Necropsy Methods and Findings.

    PubMed

    Kagan, R A

    2016-09-01

    Decades after the problem was first identified, power line electrocution continues to be a cause of avian mortality. Currently, several federal laws protect eagles and other migratory birds, meaning that utility companies may be liable for electrocution-related deaths. Veterinarians and veterinary pathologists called upon to diagnose and treat electrocuted birds should keep this in mind when conducting clinical and postmortem examinations. This review details necropsy findings and methods used to diagnose electrocution. A combination of gross, subgross, and radiographic examinations can aid in identification of subtle injury. Diagnosis is made based on the presence of skin and/or feather burns. Other necropsy findings may include skin lacerations, subcutaneous burns, bruising, limb avulsion, hemopericardium, and vascular rupture. At the US Fish and Wildlife Service's National Forensics Laboratory, from 2000 to 2015, 417 raptor deaths were determined to have been caused by electrocution. Bald eagles and golden eagles were the most commonly submitted species. In a retrospective review of 377 cases, for which whole bodies were submitted, 18% of the electrocuted birds had only a single, small (less than 3 cm in diameter) external burn. Small, isolated burns tended to occur on the undersides of the wings at and distal to the elbow and on the lower legs and feet. These areas should be most carefully examined in cases where electrocution injury is not immediately apparent. PMID:27154543

  5. Necropsies of eight horses infected with Strongylus equinus and Strongylus edentatus.

    PubMed

    Petty, D P; Lange, A L; Verster, A; Hattingh, J

    1992-06-01

    Ponies (n = 8) approximately 18 months old, were infected with 20,000 to 30,000 infective larvae of Strongylus equinus with less than 10% contamination with Strongylus edentatus larvae and necropsied 7 months post-infection. Lesions were present in the omentum, liver, pancreas, ventral colon, caecum and occasionally in the lungs. There were numerous intraabdominal adhesions and severe multiple granulomatous omentitis. Pancreatic damage, which characterises S. equinus, was exceptionally mild and was manifested mainly by slight periductular infiltration of eosinophils. Granulomas associated with larvae were found in the connective tissue associated with the pancreas. Larvae were recovered from the flanks, the peritoneum, the caecum and the kidney. Larval recovery was low, with a high percentage of the total number of larvae recovered in some of the carcasses being S. edentatus. PMID:1501210

  6. Frequency and significance of feline leukemia virus infection in necropsied cats.

    PubMed

    Reinacher, M; Theilen, G

    1987-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection was diagnosed immunohistologically on paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from 1,095 necropsied cats. Significant association of FeLV infection was demonstrated by chi 2 and Fisher's tests with various conditions and diseases (ie, anemia, tumors of the leukemia/lymphoma complex, feline infectious peritonitis, bacterial infections, emaciation, FeLV-associated enteritis, lymphatic hyperplasia, and hemorrhage). Unexpected findings associated with FeLV infection were icterus, several types of hepatitis, and liver degeneration. A negative association with FeLV infection was found for most parasitic and viral infections, including feline panleukopenia. Neither positive nor negative associations were established for FeLV infection and most forms of nephritis, including severe glomerulonephritis. Feline leukemia virus-infected cats were significantly (Kruskal-Wallis test) older than were FeLV-negative cats with the same nonneoplastic FeLV-associated diseases. PMID:3037951

  7. Incidence of disorders of spermatogenesis in middle aged finnish men, 1981-91: two necropsy series.

    PubMed Central

    Pajarinen, J.; Laippala, P.; Penttila, A.; Karhunen, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate if the incidence of disorders of spermatogenesis and testicular tissue morphology have changed in middle aged Finnish men over 10 years. DESIGN: Two necropsy series completed in 1981 and in 1991. SETTING: Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. SUBJECTS: 528 men, aged 35 to 69 years, subjected to medicolegal necropsy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Scoring of spermatogenesis and morphometric analysis of testicular tissue components. Individual risk factors for testicular disorders obtained by postmortem blind interviews with acquaintances. RESULTS: Normal spermatogenesis was found in 41.7% of the men (mean age 53.1 years). Between 1981 and 1991, the ratio of normal spermatogenesis decreased significantly (odds ratio 3.5; 95% confidence interval 2.5 to 5.1) from 56.4% to 26.9%, with a parallel increase in the incidence of partial and complete spermatogenic arrest (2.1; 1.4 to 2.9 and 2.9; 1.7 to 5.0, respectively). During this period, the size of seminiferous tubules decreased, the amount of fibrotic tissue increased, and the weight of testicles decreased significantly. Alterations in testicular characteristics over time could not be explained by changes in body mass index, smoking, alcohol drinking, or exposure to drugs. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of normal spermatogenesis decreased among middle aged Finnish men from 1981 to 1991, and the incidence of disorders of spermatogenesis and pathological alterations in testicles increased. Deteriorating spermatogenesis may thus be one important factor in the explanation of declining sperm counts observed worldwide. PMID:9001473

  8. Parasites in Kentucky Thoroughbreds at necropsy: emphasis on stomach worms and tapeworms.

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C; Drudge, J H; Swerczek, T W; Crowe, M W

    1983-05-01

    A total of 363 Thoroughbreds (62 males, 292 females, and 9 geldings), 1 to 26 years of age, were examined at necropsy for internal parasites for about a 12-month period from February 1981 through February 1982. Emphasis was on examining the stomach for nematodes and the small intestine and cecum for tapeworms. Parasites recovered from the stomach and infection rates were: Habronema spp--immature (24%), H muscae--adult (38%), Draschia megastoma--immature (13%), D megastoma--adult (62%), and Trichostrongylus axei--adult (4%); lesions caused by D megastoma were found upon gross observation in 58% of the stomachs. The tapeworm, Anoplocephala perfoliata, was recovered from 54% of the horses; A magna was not found. There was no obvious difference in infection rates of the stomach worms and tapeworms according to age or sex of the horses. Seasonal differences were apparent only for immature Habronema spp and immature D megastoma for which infection rates began increasing in June, peaking in October, and declining thereafter. Presence of 4 additional species of parasites was recorded, but only a cursory examination was made for them. These were the large strongyles, Strongylus vulgaris, S edentatus, and S equinus, from the cecum and a filariid, Setaria spp (probably S equina), from the abdominal cavity, for which recovery rates from the horses were 8%, 8%, 1%, and 7%, respectively. PMID:6869991

  9. Causes of mortality in sea ducks (Mergini) necropsied at the USGS-National Wildlife Health Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skerratt, L.F.; Franson, J.C.; Meteyer, C.U.; Hollmén, Tuula E.

    2005-01-01

    A number of factors were identified as causes of mortality in 254 (59%) of 431 sea ducks submitted for necropsy at the USGS-National Wildlife Health Center, Madison, Wisconsin from 1975 until 2003. Bacteria causing large outbreaks of mortality were Pasteurella multocida and Clostridium botulinum Type E. Starvation was responsible for large mortality events as well as sporadic deaths of individuals. Lead toxicity, gunshot and exposure to petroleum were important anthropogenic factors. Other factors that caused mortality were avian pox virus, bacteria (Clostridium botulinum Type C, Riemerella anatipestifer and Clostridium perfringens), fungi (Aspergillus fumigatus and an unidentified fungus), protozoans (unidentified coccidia), nematodes (Eustrongylides spp.), trematodes (Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Schistosoma spp.), acanthocephalans (Polymorphus spp.), predation, cyanide and trauma (probably due to collisions). There were also a number of novel infectious organisms in free-living sea ducks in North America, which were incidental to the death, including avipoxvirus and reovirus, bacteria Mycobacterium avium, protozoans Sarcocystis sp. and nematodes Streptocara sp. Apart from anthropogenic factors, the other important mortality factors listed here have not been studied as possible causes for the decline of sea ducks in North America.

  10. Psychological Autopsy and Necropsy of an Unusual Case of Suicide by Intravenous Toluene

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ranganath R.; Hemanth Kumar, RG; Kulkarni, Pratibha R.; Kotabagi, Raghavendra B.

    2015-01-01

    Toluene (methylbenzene; volatile hydrocarbon) is an industrial solvent that causes major injury to the lungs; the organ being the first capillary bed encountered. We report an unusual case of suicide by a 24-year-old male, paramedical professional, with fatal outcome within 16 h of intentional, intravenous self-administration of toluene, with clinical presentation of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Psychological autopsy revealed severe depressive disorder and solvent (inhalant) abuse, with marital disharmony as the precipitating stressor for suicide. Necropsy revealed diffuse congestion of internal organs like lungs and liver, epicardial petechial hemorrhages, and gastric hemorrhages. Treatment of toluene poisoning includes supportive care as no specific antidote is available. Early and aggressive management may be conducive to a favorable outcome with minimal residual pulmonary sequelae. Relevant literature of toluene poisoning was identified via PubMed, PubChem, ToxNet, Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), Embase, and PsycINFO. To our knowledge, this is the first case of suicide by intravenous administration of toluene in the literature. PMID:25969615

  11. Disinfection protocols for necropsy equipment in rabies laboratories: Safety of personnel and diagnostic outcome.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Roberta; Zecchin, Barbara; Tiozzo Caenazzo, Silvia; Cattoli, Giovanni; De Benedictis, Paola

    2016-08-01

    In the last decades, molecular techniques have gradually been adopted for the rapid confirmation of results obtained through gold standard methods. However, international organisations discourage their use in routine laboratory investigations for rabies post-mortem diagnosis, as they may lead to false positive results due to cross-contamination. Cleaning and disinfection are essential to prevent cross-contamination of samples in the laboratory environment. The present study evaluated the efficacy of selected disinfectants on rabies-contaminated necropsy equipment under organic challenge using a carrier-based test. The occurrence of detectable Rabies virus (RABV) antigen, viable virus and RNA was assessed through the gold standard Fluorescent Antibody Test, the Rabies Tissue Culture Infection Test and molecular techniques, respectively. None of the tested disinfectants proved to be effective under label conditions. Off label disinfection protocols were found effective for oxidizing agents and phenolic, only. Biguanide and quaternary ammonium compound were both ineffective under all tested conditions. Overall, discordant results were obtained when different diagnostic tests were compared, which means that in the presence of organic contamination common disinfectants may not be effective enough on viable RABV or RNA. Our results indicate that an effective disinfection protocol should be carefully validated to guarantee staff safety and reliability of results. PMID:27091100

  12. Histopathological Characteristics of Endometrosis in Thoroughbred Mares in Japan: Results from 50 Necropsy Cases

    PubMed Central

    HANADA, Michiko; MAEDA, Yousuke; OIKAWA, Masa-aki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Uteri from 50 necropsied nonpregnant Japanese Thoroughbred brood mares (1–30 years of age) were investigated to clarify the histopathological characteristics of endometrosis in Japanese Thoroughbred mares and the distribution pattern of endometrosis lesions in the uterus as a whole. Endometrosis was observed in all animals over 6 years of age and in all of the 21 mares aged over 12 years of age. The affected mares showed elastofibrosis of arteries, veins and lymphatic vessels in the uterine wall, atrophy of the uterine smooth muscle layers and hyperplasia of collagen fibers among the smooth muscle fascicles of the myometrium, in addition to pathomorphologic features of endometrosis such as stromal endometrial fibrosis accompanied by endometrial atrophy, periglandular fibrosis and reduction of uterine glands. The severity of the histopathological changes increased with advancing age. Lymphatic vessels with elastofibrosis showed marked lymph congestion, leading to lymphatic edema. With increasing age, the extent of the distribution of these lesions tended to expand from focal to diffuse involvement of the entire uterus. Based on these findings, we speculate that aging plays a role in the pathogenesis of endometrosis; circulatory disturbances due to intrauterine angiosis or angiopathy, particularly reduction of the arterial blood supply and disturbance of venous drainage, resulting in a reduction of lymphatic drainage (lymphatic edema), are closely related to the onset and progression of endometrial fibrosis and myometrial atrophy with fibroplasia may result in myometrial hypofunction during the peri-implantation or puerperal period. PMID:25013358

  13. SIV DNA vaccine trial in macaques: post-challenge necropsy in vaccine and control groups.

    PubMed

    Lu, S; Manson, K; Wyand, M; Robinson, H L

    1997-06-01

    In this study we describe the histopathologic findings from nine macaques in a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine trial evaluating the ability of a 5-plasmid DNA vaccine to protect against an uncloned SIVmac251 challenge (Lu et al., J. Virol. 1996, 70, 3978-3991). Three vaccinated and one control macaque developed disease and were euthanized in the first year following challenge. The other four vaccinated and one control macaque remained clinically normal and were euthanized at the end of the trial (60 weeks post-challenge). The necropsy data revealed that both diseased and clinically normal macaques had developed typical SIV-related lymphoid changes, inflammatory disorders and opportunistic infections. All animals had variable degrees of follicular and/or paracortical lymphoid hyperplasia suggesting immune activation. All but one vaccinated macaque and both control macaques had SIV-associated opportunistic infections. Within the small groups of animals, the ability to contain opportunistic infections was superior, and the overall lymphoid changes less severe, in the macaques that had received vaccine DNAs by three routes of inoculation (intravenous, intramuscular and gene gun) than in those that had received control DNAs or vaccine DNAs by gene gun only. In the future it will be important to further test how the route and method of DNA inoculation impact the efficacy of immunodeficiency virus vaccines. PMID:9234548

  14. Residues of environmental pollutants and necropsy data for Eastern United States ospreys, 1964-1973

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemeyer, S.N.; Lamont, T.G.; Locke, L.N.

    1980-09-01

    Thirty-three ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) that were found dead or moribund in the Eastern United States between 1964 and 1973 were necropsied. The brains and carcasses of 26 of these birds were analyzed for organochlorines. The livers of 18 and the kidneys of 7 were analyzed for selected metals. Most adults were recovered in April and May and most immatures were recovered in August through October. The adult sex ratio was highly unbalanced in favor of females. Major causes of mortality were impact injuries, emaciation, shooting, and respiratory infections. Of special interest were two birds with malignant tumors and one with steatitis. Many birds had undergone marked weight losses resulting in mobilization and redistribution of organochlorine residues. Organochlorines were detected in the birds at the following percentages: DDE 100%, PCB 96%, DDD 92%, dieldrin 88%, chlordanes (including nonachlors) 82%, DDT 65%, and heptachlor epoxide 38%. Organochlorine levels tended to be higher in adults than in immatures. One adult from South Carolina had a potentially dangerous level of dieldrin in its brain, which might have contributed to its death. Immature ospreys from Maryland had extremely elevated levels of copper in their livers compared with immatures from other areas and all adults. One immature from Maryland had an elevated level of arsenic in its liver, which might have contributed to its death. One adult from Florida that had died of impact injuries had potentially dangerous levels of mercury in both liver and kidney and slightly elevated levels of cadmium in these tissues. Additional birds appeared to have been exposed to contamination of the environment by arsenic and mercury. The levels of chromium, zinc, and lead in livers appeared normal.

  15. Environmental pollutant and necropsy data for ospreys from the eastern United States, 1975-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemeyer, S.N.; Schmeling, S.K.; Anderson, A.

    1987-04-01

    Twenty-three ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) found dead or moribund in the eastern United States during 1975-1982 were necropsied and selected tissues were analyzed for organochlorines and metals. Major causes or factors contributing to death were trauma, impact injuries, and emaciation. DDE was detected in 96% of the osprey carcases, DDD in 65%, DDT and heptachlor epoxide in 13%, dieldrin, oxychlordane, and cis-nonachlor in 35%, cis-chlordane in 52%, trans-nonachlor in 45%, and PCB's in 83%. Carcasses of immature ospreys from the Chesapeake Bay had significantly lower concentrations of DDE, DDD + DDT, cis-chlordane, and PCB's than carcasses of adults from the same area. Concentrations of some organochlorines in ospreys from the Chesapeake Bay declined significantly from 1971-1973 to 1975-1982. Significant differences in concentrations of certain metals in the ospreys' livers were noted between time periods, and sex and age groups for birds from the Chesapeake Bay. During 1975-1982, adults had significantly lower concentrations of chromium, copper, and arsenic than immatures and nestlings, and adult males had higher mercury concentrations than adult females. Adult females had lower zinc concentrations in 1975-1982 than in 1971-1973. Immatures and nestlings had higher concentrations of chromium and lead in 1975-1982 than in 1971-1973. A slightly elevated concentration of chromium (1.7 ppm) or arsenic (3.2 ppm) was found in the livers of individual ospreys. Several ospreys had elevated concentrations of mercury in their livers; two ospreys had more than 20 ppm which may have contributed to their deaths.

  16. Environmental pollutant and necropsy data for ospreys from the eastern United States, 1975-1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Schmeling, S.K.; Anderson, A.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-three ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) found dead or moribund in the eastern United States during 1975-1982 were necropsied and selected tissues were analyzed for organochlorines and metals. Major causes or factors contributing to death were trauma, impact injuries, and emaciation. DDE was detected in 96% of the osprey carcases, DDD in 65%, DDT and heptachlor epoxide in 13%, dieldrin, oxychlordane, and cis-nonachlor in 35%, cis-chlordane in 52%, trans-nonachlor in 45%, and PCB's in 83%. Carcasses of immature ospreys from the Chesapeake Bay had significantly lower concentrations of DDE, DDD + DDT, cis-chlordane, and PCB's than carcasses of adults from the same area. Concentrations of some organochlorines in ospreys from the Chesapeake Bay declined significantly from 1971-1973 to 1975-1982. Significant differences in concentrations of certain metals in the ospreys' livers were noted between time periods, and sex and age groups for birds from the Chesapeake Bay. During 1975-1982, adults had significantly lower concentrations of chromium, copper, and arsenic than immatures and nestlings, and adult males had higher mercury concentrations than adult females. Adult females had lower zinc concentrations in 1975-1982 than in 1971-1973. Immatures and nestlings had higher concentrations of chromium and lead in 1975-1982 than in 1971-1973. A slightly elevated concentration of chromium (1.7 ppm) or arsenic (3.2 ppm) was found in the livers of individual ospreys. Several ospreys had elevated concentrations of mercury in their livers; two ospreys had more than 20 ppm which may have contributed to their deaths.

  17. Residues of environmental pollutants and necropsy data for eastern United States ospreys, 1964-1973

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Lamont, T.G.; Locke, L.N.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-three ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) that were found dead or moribund in the Eastern United States between 1964 and 1973 were necropsied. The brains and carcasses of 26 of these birds were analyzed for organochlorines. The livers of 18 and the kidneys of 7 were analyzed for selected metals. Most adults were recovered in April and May and most immatures were recovered in August through October. The adult sex ratio was highly unbalanced in favor of females. Major causes of mortality were impact injuries, emaciation, shooting, and respiratory infections. Of special interest were two birds with malignant tumors and one with steatitis. Many birds had undergone marked weight losses resulting in mobilization and redistribution of organochlorine residues. Organochlorines were detected in the birds at the following percentages: DDE l00%, PCB 96%, DDD 92%, dieldrin 88%, chlordanes (including nonachlors) 82%, DDT 65%, and heptachlor epoxide 38%. Organochlorine levels tended to be higher in adults than in immatures. One adult from South Carolina had a potentially dangerous level of dieldrin in its brain, which might have contributed to its death. Immature ospreys from Maryland had extremely elevated levels of copper in their livers compared with immatures from other areas and all adults. One immature from Maryland had an elevated level of arsenic in its liver, which might have contributed to its death. One adult from Florida that had died of impact injuries had potentially dangerous levels of mercury in both liver and kidney and slightly elevated levels of cadmium in these tissues. Additional birds appeared to have been exposed to contamination of the environment by arsenic and mercury. The levels of chromium, zinc, and lead in livers appeared normal.

  18. Notes on necropsy and herbage processing techniques for gastrointestinal nematodes of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Eysker, M; Kooyman, F N

    1993-02-01

    Necropsy techniques for the digestive tract of ruminants used at the University of Utrecht differ from those used elsewhere in three respects: (1) the abomasum is opened immediately after slaughter and the "contents" are treated separately from the "washings"; (2) the first 10 m of the small intestine are treated separately from the remainder of the intestine; (3) the aliquots are coloured with iodine before being examined for worms. The majority of the worms are found in the washings of the abomasum and the first part of the small intestine, whereas the contents of the abomasum and the remainder of the small intestine contain the bulk of the digesta. Because inhibited stages of Ostertagia, Haemonchus and, particularly, the very small third stage larvae (L3) of Trichostrongylus can be overlooked easily in digesta, these methods imply a more rapid and accurate enumeration of worms. This is more important in small ruminants than in cattle because a much higher proportion of the inhibited larvae will be washed out of the mucosa and because Trichostrongylus is more important in small ruminants. Herbage sampling methods for monitoring gastrointestinal nematode infections on cattle pastures in northwest Europe should also be suitable for lungworm. The agar-bile technique of Jørgensen is an elegant method, but disadvantages are that many gastrointestinal nematode larvae exsheath, resulting in identification difficulties, and recovery of lungworm larvae decreases as a result of ageing. A simple sucrose flotation method, based on the principle that a sucrose solution does not mix easily with water containing nematodes, has been tested at our laboratory.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8484211

  19. The sensitivity of gross necropsy, caudal fold and comparative cervical tests for the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Norby, Bo; Bartlett, Paul C; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Granger, Larry M; Bruning-Fann, Colleen S; Whipple, Diana L; Payeur, Janet B

    2004-03-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTb) was diagnosed in 22 cattle herds in the northeast comer of Michigan's lower peninsula. Of these 22 herds, 494 animals in 7 herds were examined by gross necropsy, histopathologic exam, mycobacterial culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay performed only on samples that were histologically compatible for bTb. Results of culture and PCR assay interpreted in parallel were used as the reference test for calculation of the sensitivity of 1) the caudal fold test (CFT), 2) the caudal fold and comparative cervical skin tests used in series (CFTCCTSER), and 3) gross necropsy. Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from 43 animals. Using all 7 herds, the sensitivities of the CFT, the CFTCCTSER, and gross necropsy were 93.02%, 88.37%, and 86.05%, respectively. When the data were stratified by low- and moderate-prevalence herds, the sensitivities were 83.33%, 75.0%, and 83.33% in low-prevalence herds and 96.77%, 93.55%, and 87.10% in moderate-prevalence herds. The sensitivities of the 2 skin tests were slightly higher when 2 or more gross lesions were present, and the sensitivity of gross necropsy was significantly higher (P = 0.049). The sensitivity of the CFT was found to be notably higher than most estimates in other studies; however, a direct comparison was not possible because the amount of purified protein derivative and the reference methods were different in this study compared with other published studies. Although the sensitivities are high, 2 of the 7 herds (29%) would have had 1 or more positive animals left in the herd if a test-and-removal program had been used. This suggests that when positive herds are identified, selective culling of skin test reactors is a less acceptable disease control strategy than is complete depopulation. PMID:15053363

  20. Gastrointestinal parasites of cats in Denmark assessed by necropsy and concentration McMaster technique.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi-Storm, N; Mejer, H; Al-Sabi, M N S; Olsen, C S; Thamsborg, S M; Enemark, H L

    2015-12-15

    The large population of feral cats in Denmark may potentially transmit pathogens to household cats and zoonotic parasites to humans. A total of 99 euthanized cats; feral cats (n=92) and household cats with outdoor access (n=7), were collected from March to May 2014 from the Zealand region, Denmark. The sedimentation and counting technique (SCT) was used to isolate helminths and coproscopy was done by concentration McMaster technique (c-McMaster). Overall, 90.1% of the cats were infected and a total of 10 species were recorded by SCT: 5 nematode species: Toxocara cati (84.8%), Ollulanus tricuspis (13.1%), Aonchotheca putorii (7.1%), Paersonema spp. (3.0%), Strongyloides spp. (1.0%); 3 cestodes: Hydatigera taeniaeformis (36.4%), Mesocestoides sp. (3.0%), Dipylidium caninum (1.0%); and 2 trematodes: Cryptocotyle spp. (5.1%) and Pseudamphistomum truncatum (1.0%). O. tricuspis was the second most common gastrointestinal nematode of cats but had the highest intensity of infection. For T. cati, prevalence and worm burden were significantly higher in feral than household cats. No juvenile cats were infected with H. taeniaeformis, and age thus had a significant effect on prevalence and worm burdens of this species. Rural cats had a higher prevalence and worm burden of A. putorii than urban cats. By c-McMaster, ascarid, capillarid, strongylid or taeniid type eggs were found in 77.9% of the cats while Cystoisospora felis was found in 2.1%. The sensitivity of the c-McMaster was 82.5% for T. cati but 26.5% for taeniid eggs, using the SCT as gold standard. A positive correlation between faecal egg counts and worm burdens was seen for T. cati, but not for taeniid eggs (assumed to be H. taeniaeformis). Coprological examination also detected the eggs of extraintestinal Capillariidae species including Eucoleus aerophilus and Eucoleus boehmi, but further necropsy studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26169220

  1. Importance and Repercussions of Renal and Cardiovascular Pathology on Stroke in Young Adults: An Anatomopathologic Study of 52 Clinical Necropsies

    PubMed Central

    Arismendi-Morillo, Gabriel; Fernández-Abreu, Mary; Cardozo-Duran, José; Vilchez-Barrios, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Stroke in young adults has seldom been studied in a necropsy series. The objective of the present clinical necropsy-based investigation was to analyze stroke and its relationship with cardiovascular and renal pathology in young adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS The protocols of 52 clinical necropsies with diagnoses of stroke in patients aged 18 – 49 years, performed between the years 1990–2006, were reviewed. RESULTS Hemorrhagic stroke was diagnosed in 36 patients (69.3%), whereas the remaining 16 (30.7%) had ischemic stroke. Hypertensive cardiopathy was evident in 88.4% of the cases. Chronic renal pathology, directly or indirectly related to hypertension, was observed in 55.7% of the patients. Ischemic stroke as a result of occlusive atherosclerotic disease was seen in 50% of cases. Cardiogenic emboli were found in 25% of the cadavers. Hemorrhagic stroke was associated with hypertension in 43% of the cases, with ruptured vascular malformations in 29%, and coagulopathies in 17% of the cases. Hypertensive cardiopathy was present in patients with either ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke (81.2% and 91.6%, respectively). The most frequently observed renal ailments were chronic pyelonephritis (23%) and nephrosclerosis (21.1%). These were associated with ischemic stroke in 43.7%, and 12.5% of the cases, respectively, and with 13.8% and 25% of the hemorrhagic stroke cases. DISCUSSION Hypertensive cardiopathy, occlusive atherosclerotic disease, chronic pyelonephritis and nephrosclerosis are among the pathophysiologycal mechanisms that apparently and eventually interact to induce a significant number of cases of stroke in young adults. A chronic systemic inflammatory state appears to be an important related condition because it possibly constitutes an accelerant of the pathophysiologycal process. PMID:18297202

  2. Pesticide, PCB, and lead residues and necropsy data for bald eagles from 32 states - 1978-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Schmeling, S.K.; Cromartie, E.; Kaiser, T.E.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.; Stafford, C.J.; Swineford, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    In 1978?81, 293 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from 32 states were necropsied and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and lead residues. DDE was found in all carcasses; PCB, DDD, trans-nonachlor, dieldrin and oxychlordane were next in order of percent frequency of detection. The median levels of DDE and PCB have declined when compared with previous collections. Five specimens contained high levels of dieldrin in their brains which may have contributed to their deaths. Seventeen eagles contained liver lead residues greater than 10 ppm and probably died of lead poisoning. Trauma and shooting are the most common causes of death.

  3. Pesticide, PCB, and lead residues and necropsy data for bald eagles from 32 states, 1978-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Schmeling, S.K.; Cromartie, E.; Kaiser, T.E.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.; Stafford, C.J.; Swineford, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    In 1978a??81, 293 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from 32 states were necropsied and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and lead residues. DDE was found in all carcasses; PCB, DDD, trans-nonachlor, dieldrin and oxychlordane were next in order of percent frequency of detection. The median levels of DDE and PCB have declined when compared with previous collections. Five specimens contained high levels of dieldrin in their brains which may have contributed to their deaths. Seventeen eagles contained liver lead residues greater than 10 ppm and probably died of lead poisoning. Trauma and shooting are the most common causes of death.

  4. Structure and evolution of echo dense lesions in the neonatal brain. A combined ultrasound and necropsy study.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, D I; Preston, P R; Durbin, G M

    1985-01-01

    Sixty seven of 216 infants weighing less than 2 kg at birth had cerebral lesions on ultrasonic scanning. Eight of 17 who had periventricular leukomalacia, with or without subependymal or intraventricular haemorrhage, or both, died. These and one larger baby were the subject of a combined ultrasound, and where appropriate, necropsy study. There was excellent correlation between the ultrasound and necropsy findings, only some of the earlier lesions of periventricular leukomalacia being missed by ultrasound. The data suggest it is now possible to distinguish periventricular leukomalacia and subependymal/intraventricular haemorrhage by ultrasound, that both lesions may be present in the same brain, that apparent parenchymal extension of an intraventricular haemorrhage is more probably the result of haemorrhage into ischaemic periventricular tissue, and that the term 'periventricular haemorrhage' should be abandoned since it confuses two lesions of differing aetiology and differing clinical importance. Future advances in neonatal brain ultrasound depend on accurate assessment of both the nature and site of lesions within the cerebral hemispheres and ventricular system since the interpretation of these parameters is of critical importance. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 p805-b PMID:3901932

  5. Methods used during gross necropsy to determine watercraft-related mortality in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Lightsey, Jessica D; Rommel, Sentiel A; Costidis, Alexander M; Pitchford, Thomas D

    2006-09-01

    Between 1993 and 2003, 713 (24%) of 2,940 dead Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) recovered from Florida waters and examined were killed by watercraft-induced trauma. It was determined that this mortality was the result of watercraft trauma because the external wound patterns and the internal lesions seen during gross necropsy are recognizable and diagnostic. This study documents the methods used in determining watercraft-related mortality during gross necropsy and explains why these findings are diagnostic. Watercraft can inflict sharp- and blunt-force trauma to manatees, and both types of trauma can lead to mortality. This mortality may be a direct result of the sharp and blunt forces or from the chronic effects resulting from either force. In cases in which death is caused by a chronic wound-related complication, the original incident is usually considered to be the cause of death. Once a cause of death is determined, it is recorded in an extensive database and is used by Federal and state managers in developing strategies for the conservation of the manatee. Common sequelae to watercraft-induced trauma include skin lesions, torn muscles, fractured and luxated bones, lacerated internal organs, hemothorax, pneumothorax, pyothorax, hydrothorax, abdominal hemorrhage and ascites, and pyoperitoneum. PMID:17319124

  6. Spectrum of congenital heart defects and extracardiac malformations associated with chromosomal abnormalities: results of a seven year necropsy study

    PubMed Central

    Tennstedt, C; Chaoui, R; Korner, H; Dietel, M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To analyse the spectrum of congenital heart malformations, the frequency of extracardiac malformations, and the proportion of chromosome aberrations among fetuses sent for necropsy.
MATERIAL—Necropsies were performed on 815 fetuses—448 induced abortions (55%), 220 spontaneous abortions (27%), and 147 stillbirths (18%)—during a seven year period (1991-97) in the department of pathology of the Charité Medical Centre in Berlin. A congenital heart defect was identified in 129 cases (16%). For all 129 fetuses, karyotyping and an ultrasound examination had been performed.
RESULTS—Congenital heart defects were present in 22% of induced abortions (99 cases), 9% of spontaneous abortions (20 cases), and 7% of stillbirths (10 cases). The heart malformations were classified into 13 categories. A fetus with more than one defect was included only in the category of the most serious defect. The malformations in order of frequency were: ventricular septal defect (VSD) (28%), atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) (16%), hypoplastic left heart (HLH) (16%), double outlet right ventricle (DORV) (12%), coarctation of the aorta (CoA) (6%), transposition of the great arteries (TGA) (4%), aortic valve stenosis (AoVS) (4%), tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) (3%), truncus arteriosus communis (TAC) (3%), pulmonary valve stenosis/pulmonary valve atresia (PaVS/PaVA) (3%), tricuspid atresia (TA) (3%), single ventricle (SV) (1.5%), and atrial septal defect (ASD) (0.5%). The most common congenital heart defects were VSD, AVSD, HLH, and DORV, which made up 72% of all the cases. In 11 cases the heart defect was isolated (no other cardiovascular or extracardiac malformations present), 85 cases (66%) were associated with additional cardiac malformations, 85 cases (66%) were associated with extracardiac malformations, and chromosome anomalies were detected in 43 cases (33%).
CONCLUSIONS—Fetal congenital heart malformations are common. These defects are often

  7. Asbestos lung burden and asbestosis after occupational and environmental exposure in an asbestos cement manufacturing area: a necropsy study

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, C.; Mollo, F.; Paoletti, L.; Bellis, D.; Bernardi, P.; Betta, P.; Botta, M.; Falchi, M.; Ivaldi, C.; Pavesi, M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The largest Italian asbestos cement factory had been active in Casale Monferrato until 1986: in previous studies a substantial increase in the incidence of pleural mesothelioma was found among residents without occupational exposure to asbestos. To estimate exposure to asbestos in the population, this study evaluated the presence of histological asbestosis and the lung burden of asbestos fibres (AFs) and asbestos bodies (ABs). METHODS: The study comprises the consecutive series of necropsies performed at the Hospital of Casale Monferrato between 1985 and 1988. A sample of lung parenchima was collected and stored for 48 out of 55 necropsies. The AF concentration was measured with a TEM electron microscope with x ray mineralogical analysis. The ABs were counted and fibrosis evaluated by optical microscopy. The nearest relative of each subject was interviewed on occupational and residential history. Mineralogical and histological analyses and interviews were conducted in 1993-4. RESULTS: Statistical analyses included 41 subjects with AF, AB count, and interview. Subjects without occupational exposure who ever lived in Casale Monferrato had an average concentration of 1500 AB/g dried weight (gdw); Seven of 18 presented with asbestosis or small airway lung disease (SAL). G2 asbestosis was diagnosed in two women with no occupational asbestos exposure. One of them had been teaching at a school close to the factory for 12 years. Ten subjects had experienced occupational asbestos exposure, seven in asbestos cement production: mean concentrations were 1.032 x 10(6) AF/gdw and 96,280 AB/gdw. Eight of the 10 had asbestosis or SAL. CONCLUSION: The high concentration of ABs and the new finding of environmental asbestosis confirm that high asbestos concentration was common in the proximity of the factory. Subjects not occupationally exposed and ever living in Casale Monferrato tended to have higher AB concentration than subjects never living in the town (difference not

  8. Necropsy findings in American alligator late-stage embryos and hatchlings from northcentral Florida lakes contaminated with organochlorine pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, M.S.; Del, Piero F.; Wiebe, J.J.; Rauschenberger, H.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    Increased American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) embryo and neonatal mortality has been reported from several northcentral Florida lakes contaminated with old-use organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). However, a clear relationship among these contaminants and egg viability has not been established, suggesting the involvement of additional factors in these mortalities. Thus, the main objective of this study was to determine the ultimate cause of mortality of American alligator late-stage embryos and hatchlings through the conduction of detailed pathological examinations, and to evaluate better the role of OCPs in these mortalities. Between 2000 and 2001, 236 dead alligators were necropsied at or near hatching (after ???65 days of artificial incubation and up to 1 mo of age posthatch). Dead animals were collected from 18 clutches ranging in viability from 0% to 95%. Total OCP concentrations in yolk ranged from ???100 to 52,000 ??g/kg, wet weight. The most common gross findings were generalized edema (34%) and organ hyperemia (29%), followed by severe emaciation (14%) and gross deformities (3%). Histopathologic examination revealed lesions in 35% of the animals, with over half of the cases being pneumonia, pulmonary edema, and atelectasis. Within and across clutches, dead embryos and hatchlings compared with their live cohorts were significantly smaller and lighter. Although alterations in growth and development were not related to yolk OCPs, there was an increase in prevalence of histologic lesions in clutches with high OCPs. Overall, these results indicate that general growth retardation and respiratory abnormalities were a major contributing factor in observed mortalities and that contaminants may increase the susceptibility of animals to developing certain pathologic conditions. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2006.

  9. The early development of medial coronoid disease in growing Labrador retrievers: radiographic, computed tomographic, necropsy and micro-computed tomographic findings.

    PubMed

    Lau, S F; Wolschrijn, C F; Hazewinkel, H A W; Siebelt, M; Voorhout, G

    2013-09-01

    Medial coronoid disease (MCD) encompasses lesions of the entire medial coronoid process (MCP), both of the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone. To detect the earliest signs of MCD, radiography and computed tomography were used to monitor the development of MCD in 14 Labrador retrievers, from 6 to 7 weeks of age until euthanasia. The definitive diagnosis of MCD was based on necropsy and micro-computed tomography findings. The frequency of MCD in the dogs studied was 50%. Radiographic findings did not provide evidence of MCD, ulnar subtrochlear sclerosis or blunting of the cranial edge of the MCP. Computed tomography was more sensitive (30.8%) than radiography (0%) in detecting early MCD, with the earliest signs detectable at 14 weeks of age. A combination of the necropsy and micro-computed tomography findings of the MCP showed that MCD was manifested as a lesion of only the subchondral bone in dogs <18 weeks of age. In all dogs (affected and unaffected), there was close contact between the base of the MCP and the proximal radial head in the congruent joints. Computed tomography and micro-computed tomography findings indicated that the lesions of MCD probably originated at the base of the MCP. PMID:23702281

  10. Proportional mortality: A study of 152 goats submitted for necropsy from 13 goat herds in Quebec, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenitis.

    PubMed

    Debien, Elaine; Hélie, Pierre; Buczinski, Sébastien; Lebœuf, Anne; Bélanger, Denise; Drolet, Richard

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the main causes of mortality, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenits as a cause of death or wasting in caprine herds from Quebec. Goats (n = 152) from 13 herds were submitted for necropsy; the cause of mortality, and the presence, location, and cause of abscesses (if present) were recorded. Proportional mortalities were distributed as: Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxemia (17.1%), pneumonia (13.8%), paratuberculosis (10.5%), listeriosis (6.6%), pregnancy toxemia (5.3%), caprine arthritis-encephalitis (4.6%), and caseous lymphadenitis (3.9%). Caseous lymphadenitis was diagnosed in 24.3% of the submitted goats, but was not a major cause of wasting or mortality. Abscesses were localized internally in 54.1% of the cases. Paratuberculosis was diagnosed in 29 goats (16 as cause of death) and was considered a major cause of wasting and/or mortality. PMID:24155449

  11. Proportional mortality: A study of 152 goats submitted for necropsy from 13 goat herds in Quebec, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenitis

    PubMed Central

    Debien, Elaine; Hélie, Pierre; Buczinski, Sébastien; Lebœuf, Anne; Bélanger, Denise; Drolet, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the main causes of mortality, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenits as a cause of death or wasting in caprine herds from Quebec. Goats (n = 152) from 13 herds were submitted for necropsy; the cause of mortality, and the presence, location, and cause of abscesses (if present) were recorded. Proportional mortalities were distributed as: Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxemia (17.1%), pneumonia (13.8%), paratuberculosis (10.5%), listeriosis (6.6%), pregnancy toxemia (5.3%), caprine arthritis-encephalitis (4.6%), and caseous lymphadenitis (3.9%). Caseous lymphadenitis was diagnosed in 24.3% of the submitted goats, but was not a major cause of wasting or mortality. Abscesses were localized internally in 54.1% of the cases. Paratuberculosis was diagnosed in 29 goats (16 as cause of death) and was considered a major cause of wasting and/or mortality. PMID:24155449

  12. Radiation heart disease: analysis of 16 young (aged 15 to 33 years) necropsy patients who received over 3500 rads to the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Brosius, F.C. III; Waller, B.F.; Roberts, W.C.

    1981-03-01

    Certain clinical and necropsy findings are described in 16 young (aged 15 to 33 years) patients who received greater than 3500 rads to the heart five to 144 months before death. All 16 had some radiation-induced damage to the heart: 15 had thickened pericardia (five of whom had evidence of cardiac tamponade); eight had increased interstitial myocardial fibrosis, particularly in the right ventricle; 12 had fibrous thickening of the mural endocardium and 13 of the valvular endocardium. Except for valvular thickening, the changes were more frequent in the right side of the heart than in the left, presumably because of higher radiation doses to the anterior surface of the heart. In six of the 16 study patients and in one of 10 control subjets, one or more major epicardial coronary arteries were narrowed from 76 to 100% in cross-sectional area by atherosclerotic plaque; one patient had a healed myocardial infarct at necropsy and one died suddenly. In 10 patients and in the 10 control subjects, the four major epicardial coronary arteries were examined quantitatively: 6% of the 469 five millimeter segments of coronary artery from the patients were narrowed from 76 to 100% (controls = 0.2%, p = 0.06) and 22% were narrowed from 51 to 75% (controls = 12%). The proximal portion of the arteries in the patients had significantly more narrowing than the distal portions. The arterial plaques in the patients were largely composed of fibrous tissue; the media were frequently replaced by fibrous tissue, and the adventitia were often densely thickened by fibrous tissue. In five patients, there was focal thickening (with or without luminal narrowing9 of the intramural coronary arteries. Thus, radiation to the heart may produce a wide spectrum of functinal and anatomic changes but particularly damage to the pericardia and the underlying epicardial coronary arteries.

  13. Prevalence of large endoparasites at necropsy in horses infected with Population B small strongyles in a herd established in Kentucky in 1966.

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C; Collins, S S

    2006-07-01

    Two closed horse herds (Old Lot 4 and Field 24), infected since 1966 with Population B small strongyles resistant to thiabendazole (TBZ) and phenothiazine (PTZ), were terminated in February, March, and May, 2005. At necropsy, only the large endoparasites were identified and counted. The number of horses on pasture was 14 (239 days of age to 23 years old) for Old Lot 4 and two (3 to 20 years old) for Field 24. The time of the last antiparasitic treatment, relative to the year (2005) of necropsy, was 26 years for Old Lot 4 and 9 years for Field 24 horses. Gasterophilus intestinalis third instars (three to 113 specimens/horse) were found in all 16 horses and second instars (one to two) in two horses. Gasterophilus nasalis third instars (one to three) were recovered from five horses. Parascaris equorum infections (23 to 144) were in four horses (239 days to 4 years old). Strongylus vulgaris were present in the large intestine (one to 155) of 13 horses from 239 days to 23 years old and in the cranial mesenteric artery (two to 79) in 10 horses from 239 days to 23 years old. Strongylus edentatus were in the large intestine (two to 101) of 12 horses, ranging in age from 2.5 to 23 years old and in the ventral abdominal wall (one to 53) of six horses from 239 days to 21 years old. Specimens (seven to 872) of Anoplocephala perfoliata were in all horses. Oxyuris equi (one to 129) were recovered from seven horses (330 days to 23 years old). Thelazia lacrymalis (one to 85) infected the eyes of five horses (317 days to 11 years old). PMID:16508764

  14. Common internal parasites found in the stomach, large intestine, and cranial mesenteric artery of thoroughbreds in Kentucky at necropsy (1985 to 1986).

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C; Drudge, J H; Swerczek, T W; Crowe, M W

    1987-02-01

    A total of 278 Thoroughbreds (less than 1 to 31 years old) were examined at necropsy (July 9, 1985, to Feb 2, 1986) in Kentucky for various internal parasites. Examination was not made of all the horses for each of the parasites. Specific parasites recovered from the stomach of foals (n = 30) and yearlings and older horses (n = 96) and percentage (in parentheses) of each age category infected, respectively, were as follows: Gasterophilus intestinalis 2nd instar (53% and 32%) and 3rd instar (37% and 24%); G nasalis 2nd instar (7% and 8%) and 3rd instar (7% and 10%); Habronema spp immature (7% and 13%); H muscae (3% and 8%); Draschia megastoma (3% and 5%) and lesions (0% and 2%); and Trichostrongylus axei (0% and 3%). Parasites in the large intestine included Anoplocephala perfoliata, which was found in the cecum of 30% of the foals (n = 87) and in 60% of the yearlings and older horses (n = 186). Probstmayria vivipara and immature Oxyuris equi were not found in the colon and rectum of any of the horses (n = 53 foals and n = 101 yearlings and older); mature O equi were not sought. Examination of the cranial mesenteric artery for Strongylus vulgaris revealed immature and/or mature specimens in 9% of foals (n = 87) and 14% of yearlings (n = 44); lesions of S vulgaris were present in 25% of foals (n = 87) and 34% of yearlings (n = 44). PMID:2950814

  15. [Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Necropsy series].

    PubMed

    Alba, D; Gómez-Cerezo, J; Cobo, J; Fachal, C; Molina, F; Vázquez, J J

    1995-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a severe infection which is usually diagnosed at postmortem examination. This infection occurs mainly in immunosuppressed patients, although it has also been reported in immunocompetent patients. Clinical records from patients diagnosed with IPA in our institution from 1983 to 1992 were retrospectively studied to analyse clinical and therapeutical characteristics of IPA. Sixteen episodes of IPA were recorded, all of them but one from necrotic specimens. A total of 18.7% of patients were immunocompetent, one patient had the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and the remaining patients had a classical immunosuppression. Fever and dyspnea were noted in all patients; hemoptysis was recorded in 12.5% of patients. The predominant radiological pattern was a bilateral alveolar infiltrate (75%). Diagnosis was made at postmortem examination in 15 cases (93.7%), and a clinical premortem suspicion was obtained only in 25% of patients. IPA can occur in immunocompetent patients more frequently than considered until now. The suspicion index for IPA is low, even in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:7878262

  16. Occurrence of strongyles (Strongylidae) in horses from small farms on the basis of necropsy.

    PubMed

    Kornaś, S; Skalska, M; Nowosad, B; Gawor, J; Kharchenko, V; Cabaret, J

    2009-01-01

    Three parts of the large intestine, i.e. the dorsal and ventral colon, and caecum in 41 working horses from small farms in southern Poland were examined. Five species of large strongyles (3 migratory species from genus Strongylus and 2 non-migratory from genus Triodontophorus) and as well as 17 species of cyathostomes were revealed. The prevalence of large strongyles was observed, accordingly: Strongylus vulgaris--80.5%, S. equinus--9.8%, S. edentatus--4.9%, Triodontophorus serratus--19.5% and T. brevicauda--7.3%. Among cyathostomes, 5 most prevalent species were Cyathostomum catinatum--31.7%, Coronocyclus coronatus--31.7%, Cylicostephanus calicatus--24.4%, Cylicocyclus nassatus--24.4% and C. ashworthi--19.5%. The highest prevalence of S. vulgaris among all Strongylidae isolated specimens suggests that the infection with this parasite should be taken into account in the diagnosis of colics in working horses kept in the small farming system. PMID:19645353

  17. Echocardiographic diagnosis and necropsy findings of a congenital ventricular septal defect in a stranded harbor porpoise.

    PubMed

    Szatmári, Viktor; Bunskoek, Paulien; Kuiken, Thijs; van den Berg, Annemarie; van Elk, Cornelis

    2016-03-30

    A live-stranded harbor porpoise Phocoena phocoena was found on the west coast of the Dutch island Texel (North Sea) and transported to a rehabilitation center for small cetaceans, where it underwent a veterinary health check. Cardiac auscultation revealed a systolic cardiac murmur with the point of maximal intensity in the right hemithorax with an intensity of IV out of VI. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a congenital ventricular septal defect with left-to-right shunting. Because the left atrium was not dilated according to the reference range of canine left atrium to aortic ratio, the presence of congestive heart failure was considered very unlikely. Therefore, this congenital cardiac anomaly was thought to be a clinically non-relevant incidental finding and would not explain the weakness, coughing, anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. Because the animal was still unable to swim or eat by itself after 2 wk of supportive care, it was euthanized. Post-mortem examination confirmed the presence of a ventricular septal defect. The weight of the heart relative to the animal's length was greater than expected, using linear regression analysis on the lengths and cardiac weights of 71 other stranded wild harbor porpoises without macroscopic cardiac pathologic changes. This finding suggests that the left ventricle had an eccentric hypertrophy because of volume overload resulting from the intracardiac shunt. This is the first report of a congenital cardiac anomaly and its ante-mortem diagnosis in this species. Data presented for the other 71 harbor porpoises may provide reference values for this species. PMID:27025305

  18. [Encephalometry on the medial face of the human brain hemisphere: a necropsy study].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Paula J; Cricenti V, Serafim V; Lancellotti, Carmen L P

    2005-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the dimensions of the human brain, specifically in the frontal cortex, helping the analysis of neuroimaging. A form was made to register and describe encephalic measurements and 81 cerebral hemispheres (CH) were analyzed. Male individuals showed larger CH length; wider superior frontal gyrus in the right CH; bigger encephalic weight and corpus callosum (CC) width. The proportion of measurement from the frontal pole to the most anterior part of the CC genu, related to the CH length gets smaller with aging, whereas the average distance from the most posterior part of the splenum of the CC to the occipital pole was bigger in both male CHs and there was a tendency of decrease in this difference with aging. PMID:16059594

  19. Sensitivity of partial carcass dissection for assessment of porcine cysticercosis at necropsy

    PubMed Central

    Lightowlers, M.W.; Assana, E.; Jayashi, C.M.; Gauci, C.G.; Donadeu, M.

    2015-01-01

    Many interventions against Taenia solium are evaluated by assessing changes in the prevalence of porcine cysticercosis ascertained by carcass dissection. Financial and logistical difficulties often prohibit dissection of entire pig carcasses. We assessed 209 pigs from rural areas of Cameroon and Peru for the presence of T. solium cysticerci and determined the distribution of parasites within the musculature of infected animals. Considering the presence of cysts in the tongue, masticatory muscles and heart, 31 of the 38 (81%) naturally infected animals were identified as having cysts. Dissection of only the tongue, masticatory muscles and heart provides a relatively sensitive and highly specific method for diagnosis of porcine cysticercosis. PMID:26385439

  20. Sensitivity of partial carcass dissection for assessment of porcine cysticercosis at necropsy.

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, M W; Assana, E; Jayashi, C M; Gauci, C G; Donadeu, M

    2015-11-01

    Many interventions against Taenia solium are evaluated by assessing changes in the prevalence of porcine cysticercosis ascertained by carcass dissection. Financial and logistical difficulties often prohibit dissection of entire pig carcasses. We assessed 209 pigs from rural areas of Cameroon and Peru for the presence of T. solium cysticerci and determined the distribution of parasites within the musculature of infected animals. Considering the presence of cysts in the tongue, masticatory muscles and heart, 31 of the 38 (81%) naturally infected animals were identified as having cysts. Dissection of only the tongue, masticatory muscles and heart provides a relatively sensitive and highly specific method for diagnosis of porcine cysticercosis. PMID:26385439

  1. An epizootic of common loons in coastal waters of North Carolina: Concentrations of elemental contaminants and results of necropsies

    SciTech Connect

    Augspurger, T.; Franson, J.C.; Converse, K.A.; Spitzer, P.R.; Miller, E.A.

    1998-02-01

    A 1993 die-off of common loons (Gavia immer) in the coastal waters of North Carolina was investigated with emphasis on comparing mercury, selenium, arsenic, and lead between birds from the epizootic and reference specimens. Die-off specimens were emaciated but contained no ingested foreign bodies and no lesions suggestive of infectious disease. Results of bacteriology, virology, parasitology, and botulism testing were unremarkable. The geometric mean concentrations (wet weight) of liver mercury and arsenic did not differ between specimens from the die-off and reference loons from the same area that died of other causes. The geometric mean liver selenium concentration of die-off specimens was significantly higher than that of reference loons. Liver lead concentrations were < 0.20 ppm in all but one sample (5.83 ppm). The geometric mean mercury concentration in the primary remiges of die-off specimens was significantly lower than in reference birds. Liver mercury significantly correlated with liver selenium on a molar concentration basis. The authors interpret the range of liver mercury concentrations in birds from the epizootic, similar liver mercury concentrations in reference loons, and higher mercury concentrations in reference loon feathers as evidence that factors other than mercury were primarily responsible for the emaciation diagnosed as the cause of mortality.

  2. GASTRO-INTESTINAL TRACT DISTRIBUTION AT NECROPSY OF SHIGA-TOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI O157 IN NATURALLY-INFECTED CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Healthy adult cattle with gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) transient luminal presence or mucosal colonization by Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC) O157:H7 are a primary zoonotic reservoir of this human pathogen, especially for meat-borne transmission. The GIT distribution of STEC O157 in various experimen...

  3. An epizootic of common loons in coastal waters of North Carolina: concentrations of elemental contaminants and results of necropsies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Augspurger, T.; Franson, J.C.; Converse, Kathryn A.; Spitzer, P.; Miller, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    A 1993 die-off of common loons (Gavia immer) in the coastal waters of North Carolina was investigated with emphasis on comparing mercury, selenium, arsenic, and lead between birds from the epizootic and reference specimens. Die-off specimens were emaciated but contained no ingested foreign bodies and no lesions suggestive of infectious disease. Results of bacteriology, virology, parasitology, and botulism testing were unremarkable. The geometric mean concentrations (wet weight) of liver mercury (10.9 ppm), and arsenic (0.96 ppm) did not differ between specimens from the die-off and reference loons from the same area that died of other causes. The geometric mean liver selenium concentration of die-off specimens (10.4 ppm) was significantly higher than that of reference loons. Liver lead concentrations were <0.20 ppm in all but one sample (5.83 ppm). The geometric mean mercury concentration in the primary remiges of die-off specimens (5.44 ppm dry weight) was significantly lower than in reference birds. Liver mercury significantly correlated with liver selenium on a molar concentration basis. We interpret the range of liver mercury concentrations in birds from the epizootic, similar liver mercury concentrations in reference loons, and higher mercury concentrations in reference loon feathers as evidence that factors other than mercury were primarily responsible for the emaciation diagnosed as the cause of mortality.

  4. Organochlorine pesticide, PCB, and PBB residues and necropsy data for bald eagles from 29 states--1975-77

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaiser, T.E.; Reichel, W.L.; Locke, L.N.; Cromartie, E.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.; Stafford, C.J.; Swineford, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    During 1975-77, 168 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found moribund or dead in 29 states were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); 32 specimens from 13 states were analyzed for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs). PCBs were present in 166 bald eagle carcasses and DDE was found in 165. TDE and dieldrin were identified in 137 samples, trans-nonachlor in 118, and oxychlordane in 90. Brains of five eagles contained possible lethal levels of dieldrin, and two eagles possibly died of endrin poisoning. Nine eagle livers, analyzed because of suspected lead poisoning, contained high levels of lead. Twenty percent of the eagles died from shooting, the most common cause of death; this cause of death, however, has declined.

  5. Distribution of Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli O157 in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Naturally O157-Shedding Cattle at Necropsy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli O157 (STEC O157) occurrence was determined along the entire gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of four naturally-infected cattle and at specific locations for 61 additional animals. STECO157 was recovered along the entire length of the GIT, though inter-animal distributio...

  6. PREVALENCE OF GIARDIA IN BEAVER AND MUSKRAT POPULATIONS IN NEW ENGLAND STATES AND MINNESOTA: DETECTION OF INTESTINAL TROPHOZOITES AT NECROPSY PROVIDES GREATER SENSITIVITY THAN DETECTION OF CYSTS IN FECAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys on the prevalence of Giardia in animal populations have relied on the detection of cysts in fecal samples. e have determined the prevalence of Giardia in beaver and muskrat in four New England states plus Minnesota using both the detection of trophozoites in mucosal scrap...

  7. Rhabdomyoma of the heart in a newborn infant. Diagnosis by echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Milner, S; Abramowitz, J A; Levin, S E

    1980-01-01

    An intracavitary right ventricular tumour was identified echocardiographically before operation in an infant with a rhabdomyoma of the heart. Necropsy showed associated tuberous sclerosis. Images PMID:7426178

  8. Acute, fatal Sarcocystis calchasi-associated hepatitis in Roller pigeons (Columbia livia f. dom.) at Philadelphia Zoo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four Roller pigeons (Columba livia f. dom.) at the Philadelphia Zoo died suddenly. Necropsy examination revealed macroscopic hepatitis. Microscopically, the predominant lesions were in liver, characterized with necrosis and mixed cell inflammatory response. Sarcocystis calchasi-like schizonts and fr...

  9. First Report of Protechinostoma mucronisertulatum (Echinostomatidae) in a Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) from Saskatchewan, Canada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report a new host record for Protechinostoma mucronisertulatum. These small trematode parasites were found in a debilitated, immature, male sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) during Autumn migration from the Canadian prairies. Necropsy examination identified fibrinonecrotizing and ulcerative jejuni...

  10. SYNOPSIS OF HISTOTECHNIQUES FOR AQUATIC ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This synopsis provides an overview of the necropsy, fixation, trimming, and processing of tissues from aquatic organisms for examination using light microscopy. The handling of animals, their tissues, uses of knives, and processing chemicals will be covered. Understanding the his...

  11. Purkinje cell heterotopy with cerebellar hypoplasia in two free-living American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two wild fledgling kestrels exhibited lack of motor coordination, postural reaction deficits, and abnormal propioception. At necropsy, the cerebellum and brainstem were markedly underdeveloped. Microscopically, there was Purkinje cells heterotopy, abnormal circuitry, and hypoplasia with defective fo...

  12. Bartonella spp. Exposure in Northern and Southern Sea Otters in Alaska and California

    PubMed Central

    Chomel, Bruno B.; Gill, Verena A.; Doroff, Angela M.; Miller, Melissa A.; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A.; Kasten, Rickie W.; Byrne, Barbara A.; Goldstein, Tracey; Mazet, Jonna A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Since 2002, an increased number of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from southcentral Alaska have been reported to be dying due to endocarditis and/or septicemia with infection by Streptococcus infantarius subsp. coli. Bartonella spp. DNA was also detected in northern sea otters as part of mortality investigations during this unusual mortality event (UME) in Kachemak Bay, Alaska. To evaluate the extent of exposure to Bartonella spp. in sea otters, sera collected from necropsied and live-captured northern sea otters, as well as necropsied southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) unaffected by the UME, were analyzed using an immunofluorescent antibody assay. Antibodies against Bartonella spp. were detected in sera from 50% of necropsied and 34% of presumed healthy, live-captured northern sea otters and in 16% of necropsied southern sea otters. The majority of sea otters with reactive sera were seropositive for B. washoensis, with antibody titers ranging from 1:64 to 1:256. Bartonella spp. antibodies were especially common in adult northern sea otters, both free-living (49%) and necropsied (62%). Adult stranded northern sea otters that died from infectious causes, such as opportunistic bacterial infections, were 27 times more likely to be Bartonella seropositive than adult stranded northern sea otters that died from noninfectious causes (p<0.001; 95% confidence interval 2.62–269.4). Because Bartonella spp. antibodies were detected in necropsied northern sea otters from southcentral (44%) and southwestern (86%) stocks of Alaska, as well as in necropsied southern sea otters (16%) in southcentral California, we concluded that Bartonella spp. exposure is widely distributed among sea otter populations in the Eastern Pacific, providing context for investigating future disease outbreaks and monitoring of Bartonella infections for sea otter management and conservation. PMID:25514118

  13. Bartonella spp. exposure in northern and southern sea otters in Alaska and California.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Sebastian E; Chomel, Bruno B; Gill, Verena A; Doroff, Angela M; Miller, Melissa A; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A; Kasten, Rickie W; Byrne, Barbara A; Goldstein, Tracey; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2014-12-01

    Since 2002, an increased number of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from southcentral Alaska have been reported to be dying due to endocarditis and/or septicemia with infection by Streptococcus infantarius subsp. coli. Bartonella spp. DNA was also detected in northern sea otters as part of mortality investigations during this unusual mortality event (UME) in Kachemak Bay, Alaska. To evaluate the extent of exposure to Bartonella spp. in sea otters, sera collected from necropsied and live-captured northern sea otters, as well as necropsied southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) unaffected by the UME, were analyzed using an immunofluorescent antibody assay. Antibodies against Bartonella spp. were detected in sera from 50% of necropsied and 34% of presumed healthy, live-captured northern sea otters and in 16% of necropsied southern sea otters. The majority of sea otters with reactive sera were seropositive for B. washoensis, with antibody titers ranging from 1:64 to 1:256. Bartonella spp. antibodies were especially common in adult northern sea otters, both free-living (49%) and necropsied (62%). Adult stranded northern sea otters that died from infectious causes, such as opportunistic bacterial infections, were 27 times more likely to be Bartonella seropositive than adult stranded northern sea otters that died from noninfectious causes (p<0.001; 95% confidence interval 2.62-269.4). Because Bartonella spp. antibodies were detected in necropsied northern sea otters from southcentral (44%) and southwestern (86%) stocks of Alaska, as well as in necropsied southern sea otters (16%) in southcentral California, we concluded that Bartonella spp. exposure is widely distributed among sea otter populations in the Eastern Pacific, providing context for investigating future disease outbreaks and monitoring of Bartonella infections for sea otter management and conservation. PMID:25514118

  14. Standardized method for the harvest of nonhuman primate tissue optimized for multiple modes of analyses.

    PubMed

    Davenport, April T; Grant, Kathleen A; Szeliga, Kendall T; Friedman, David P; Daunais, James B

    2014-03-01

    Appropriate animal models are critical to conduct translational studies of human disorders without variables that can confound clinical studies. Such analytic methods as patch-clamp electrophysiological and voltammetric recordings of neurons in brain slices require living brain tissue. In order to obtain viable tissue from nonhuman primate brains, tissue collection methods must be designed to preserve cardiovascular and respiratory functions for as long as possible. This paper describes a method of necropsy that has been used in three species of monkeys that satisfies this requirement. At necropsy, animals were maintained under a deep surgical plane of anesthesia while a craniotomy was conducted to expose the brain. Following the craniotomy, animals were perfused with ice-cold, oxygenated artificial cerebrospinal fluid to displace blood and to reduce the temperature of the entire brain. The brain was removed within minutes of death and specific brain regions were immediately dissected for subsequent in vitro electrophysiology or voltammetry experiments. This necropsy method also provided for the collection of tissue blocks containing all brain regions that were immediately frozen and stored for subsequent genomic, proteomic, autoradiographic and histological studies. An added benefit from the design of this necropsy method is that all major peripheral tissues were also collected and are now being utilized in a wide range of genomic, biochemical and histological assays. This necropsy method has resulted in the establishment and growth of a nonhuman primate alcohol tissue bank designed to distribute central nervous system and peripheral tissues to the larger scientific community. PMID:23709130

  15. DDT poisoning in a Cooper's hawk collected in 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prouty, R.M.; Pattee, O.H.; Schmeling, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    In April 1980, a Cooper's hawk (Accipiter cooperii) was found on the ground in Lakewood, Colorado, unable to fly and in convulsion. The bird died shortly thereafter. The hawk was packed in dry ice and shipped air express to the Fish and Wildlife Service, U. S. Department of the Interior, National Wildlife Health Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, for necropsy. Following necropsy, the brain, gastrointestinal tract, and remaining carcass except skin, feet, wings, liver, and kidney were packed in dry ice and shipped air express to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, for chemical residue analysis. Because the bird's behavior before death suggested some form of poisoning, the kidney was assayed for thallium, the liver for lead, and the gastrointestinal tract for strychnine, sodium fluoroacetate, and arsenic. When these assays proved negative, the bird was analyzed for organochlorine pesticides. Necropsy findings and pesticide residue analyses are reported here.

  16. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  17. Chronic renal disease in a captive two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with concurrent hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salas, Elisa; Wolf, Tiffany; Harris, Seth

    2014-06-01

    A 13-yr-old female two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with a prolonged history of worsening azotemia was necropsied shortly after euthanasia. On necropsy, the sloth had poor body condition, bilaterally shrunken kidneys, and a large neoplastic mass replacing the right liver lobe. Histologic examination demonstrated chronic renal disease with metastatic mineralization as the cause of morbidity. The liver mass was not associated with any known clinical signs and was diagnosed as a solitary and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed in a sloth and the first detailed description of chronic renal disease in this species. PMID:25000707

  18. Forensic pathology of companion animal abuse and neglect.

    PubMed

    Gerdin, J A; McDonough, S P

    2013-11-01

    Submission of cases of suspected animal abuse and neglect (AAN) to veterinary pathologists is increasingly frequent. These cases require modification of postmortem procedures and written reports, as the questions asked by courts typically differ from those asked in routine diagnostic cases. Here we review the practice of veterinary forensic pathology as it applies to cases of companion AAN, as well as the fundamental principles of forensic pathology, the components of a forensic necropsy, and the goals of the necropsy in cases of blunt-force trauma, projectile wounds, and starvation. Future directions and endeavors in veterinary forensic pathology are broached. PMID:23686766

  19. Group G streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome in three cats.

    PubMed

    Taillefer, Mylène; Dunn, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    Three 8-week-old kittens were presented with a history of acute, generalized weakness and severe fever. One cat was dead upon presentation, and necropsy findings were supportive of a group G Streptococcus spp. septicemia. During their clinical courses, two of the three kittens developed a progressive, marked swelling of one or more limbs. One moribund and severely hypothermic cat was euthanized a few hours after presentation, and necropsy was also supportive of a group G Streptococcus spp. septicemia. One kitten recovered. Group G streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome was suspected because of the fulminant progression of the septicemia. PMID:15347623

  20. Presumed Mycobacteriosis in Laboratory Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    PubMed Central

    Asfaw, Yohannes G; Sun, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    Husbandry staff noticed a research-naïve, young-adult, female finch tossing its head back intermittently. A second finch exhibiting similar signs was reported a few days later. Postmortem necropsy and histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin and acid-fast staining on the first finch revealed the presence of acid-fast organisms in several organs. After presumptive diagnosis of mycobacteriosis, all remaining finches housed in the same room as the first underwent necropsy and histology. Three additional finches were positive for Mycobacterium-like acid-fast organisms. Incidental findings of megabacteriosis were noted histopathologically on 2 other finches. PMID:20858369

  1. First Confirmation of Schmallenberg Virus in Cattle in Spain: Tissue Distribution and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, A; Royo, L J; Gómez Antona, A; García Marín, J F

    2015-10-01

    Between January and June 2013, nine stillborn bovine foetuses with congenital malformations from nine cattle herds located in Salamanca (central Spain) were detected. Necropsy was performed on two calves. Pathological lesions together with molecular genetics and serological results allowed a definitive diagnosis: first confirmation of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) infection in cattle in Spain. SBV was detected in different tissues and organic fluids in both animals including blood, suggesting a possible viraemia. The umbilical cord was also positive for the presence of SBV in both animals. The former tissue provides an easy to obtain sample and might be a sample of choice when necropsy is carried out in the field. PMID:24191854

  2. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  3. Inexpensive anti-cysticercosis vaccine: S3Pvac expressed in heat inactivated M13 filamentous phage proves effective against naturally acquired Taenia solium porcine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julio; Martínez, José Juan; Manoutcharian, Karen; Hernández, Marisela; Fleury, Agnes; Gevorkian, Goar; Acero, Gonzalo; Blancas, Abel; Toledo, Andrea; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Maza, Victor; Quet, Fabrice; Bonnabau, Henri; de Aluja, Aline S; Fragoso, Gladis; Larralde, Carlos; Sciutto, Edda

    2008-06-01

    In search of reducing vaccine production costs', a recombinant M13 phage version of the anti-cysticercosis tripeptide vaccine (S3Pvac) was developed. The efficacy of S3Pvac-Phage vs. placebo was evaluated in a randomized trial that included 1,047 rural pigs in 16 villages of Central Mexico. Three to five months after vaccination 530 pigs were examined by tongue inspection. At 5-27 months of age, 331 pigs (197 vaccinated/134 controls) were inspected at necropsy. Vaccination reduced 70% the frequency of tongue cysticercosis and, based on necropsy, 54% of muscle-cysticercosis and by 87% the number of cysticerci. PMID:18440675

  4. Urolithiasis in a Herd of Beef Cattle Associated with Oxalate Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Waltner-Toews, D.; Meadows, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An unusually high incidence of urinary calculi in a group of feeder cattle is described. Necropsy findings in one affected animal suggested that oxalates in the feed, specifically in fescue (Festuca spp.) seed screenings, may have been the cause. Low dietary calcium and decreased water intake by the cattle appear to have been predisposing factors. Control measures are discussed. PMID:7363261

  5. Gray wolf (Canis lupus) is a natural definitive host for Neospora caninum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gray wolf (Canis lupus) was found to be a new natural definitive host for Neospora caninum. This finding is based on the recovery of Neospora-like oocysts from the feces of 3 of 73 wolves from Minnesota examined at necropsy, and on successful amplification of N. caninum-specific sequences from ...

  6. Ectopic spleen presenting with anemia and an abdominal mass in a dog.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Kirsten J; Webb, Jinelle A; Hanselman, Beth A

    2013-11-01

    An 11.5-year-old, neutered male, golden retriever dog that had previously had a splenectomy for benign disease 2 years prior to presentation was diagnosed with anemia and a large abdominal mass. Necropsy and histopathology identified the abdominal mass as ectopic splenic tissue. PMID:24179243

  7. Ectopic spleen presenting with anemia and an abdominal mass in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Kirsten J.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Hanselman, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    An 11.5-year-old, neutered male, golden retriever dog that had previously had a splenectomy for benign disease 2 years prior to presentation was diagnosed with anemia and a large abdominal mass. Necropsy and histopathology identified the abdominal mass as ectopic splenic tissue. PMID:24179243

  8. Development of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique to diagnose white snakeroot (Ageratina altissima) poisoning in a cow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An 8-year-old, crossbred beef cow was referred to the Indiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University for a complete necropsy in October 2009. The cow was the sixth to die in a 7-day period. Affected cows were reportedly stumbling and became weak, excitable, and recumbent. Histolog...

  9. Bilateral congenital ureteral strictures in a young cat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Namsoon; Choi, Mihyun; Keh, Seoyeon; Oh, Yein; Seo, Jimin; Choi, Heeyeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Yoon, Junghee

    2014-01-01

    An 8-month-old cat was presented with bilateral hydronephrosis. Bilateral ureteral obstructions were identified by diagnostic imaging and confirmed by necropsy. Histopathologic findings revealed polypoid transitional epithelial hyperplasia with chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. This report documents congenital ureteral strictures as a cause of ureteral obstruction in a young cat. PMID:25183890

  10. Spontaneous External Endometriosis in a Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla)

    PubMed Central

    Doré, Monique; Lagacé, Andre

    1985-01-01

    The present report describes a case of external endometriosis in a 28 year old female gorilla (Gorilla gorilla). Microscopical examination of a pelvic mass observed at necropsy revealed ovarian tissue together with uterine glands and stroma, fibrous tissue and many siderophages. Theories of pathogenesis of external endometriosis are briefly reviewed. ImagesFigure 1 and 2. PMID:17422589

  11. Toxocara cati (Nematoda: Ascarididae) in Didelphis albiventris (Marsupialia: Didelphidae) from Brazil: a case of pseudoparasitism.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Hudson Alves; Mati, Vitor Luís Tenório; Melo, Alan Lane de

    2014-01-01

    Eggs of Toxocara cati were found in the feces of Didelphis albiventris from a peridomestic urban environment in Brazil. Negative fecal tests following short-term captivity of the opossums, as well as the absence of ascaridids during necropsy, suggest the occurrence of pseudoparasitism. Implications of the findings for the epidemiology of toxocariasis are discussed. PMID:25517533

  12. Fatal septicemia caused by the zoonotic bacterium Streptococcus iniae during an outbreak in Caribbean reef fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An outbreak of Streptococcus iniae occurred in the early months of 2008 among wild reef fish in the waters of the Federation of St.Kitts and Nevis, lasting almost 2 months. Moribund and dead fish were collected for gross, histological, bacteriological, and molecular analysis. Necropsy findings inclu...

  13. Congenital aganglionosis in a 3-day-old Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Necropsy of a 3-day-old Holstein heifer revealed proximal megacolon and distal colorectal hypoplasia. Histologically, the hypoplastic distal colon and rectum lacked submucosal and myenteric ganglia. Clinical history, physical examination, and pathologic findings were consistent with intestinal aganglionosis, a congenital anomaly well documented in humans and foals but not previously reported in cattle. PMID:15943121

  14. Caudal vena caval thrombosis following treatment of deep digital sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Katharine M.; Streeter, Robert N.; Cramer, Sarah; Lamm, Catherine G.; Love, Brenda C.

    2012-01-01

    A diagnosis of caudal vena caval thrombosis was made by ultrasonography of a Holstein cow presented for lethargy and poor milk production. Medical treatment was unsuccessful and the cow was euthanized. The diagnosis was confirmed at necropsy and Fusobacterium necrophorum was isolated from the thrombus. This paper discusses potential novel sources of caval thrombosis in this case. PMID:22851781

  15. Central nervous system blastomycosis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Gaunt, M. Casey; Taylor, Susan M.; Kerr, Moira E.

    2009-01-01

    An adult golden retriever was presented for progressive neurologic dysfunction. Clinical examination suggested brainstem disease. Blastomycosis was diagnosed based on fine-needle aspiration cytology of a normal sized lymph node and a positive blastomycosis urine antigen test. Systemic blastomycosis with neurologic involvement was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:19949557

  16. A prospective audit of pacemaker function, implant lifetime, and cause of death in the patient.

    PubMed Central

    Suvarna, S K; Start, R D; Tayler, D I

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To audit prospectively the reasons for pacemaker implantation, the duration of the pacemaker use, the cause of death, and pacemaker function after removal from the patient. METHODS: Pacemakers were removed at necropsy, or from the bodies of patients awaiting cremation, in three hospitals over a three year period. The cause of death was taken from the results of the necropsy or from the certified cause of death. Demographic data, including the time of implant and reasons for implantation, were checked. The pacemakers were analysed in terms of battery status, program, and output under a standard 470 ohm load. RESULTS: 69 patients were studied. Average age at death was 78 and 80 years for men and women, respectively. The average duration since pacemaker implantation was 46 months. Eleven patients had necropsies, showing that three died from ischaemic heart disease, six from cardiomyopathy, one from an aortic aneurysm, and one from disseminated neoplasia. From the necropsy results and death certificates, the distribution of causes of death in the group as a whole were ischaemic heart disease (21), cardiomyopathy (8), cerebrovascular disease (11), neoplasia (11), chest infection/chronic obstructive airways disease (8), and other causes (10). In all cases the pacemaker box function was within normal limits. CONCLUSIONS: Neither primary nor secondary pacemaker dysfunction was found. The study highlights the impact of arrhythmias in cardiomyopathy, and raises questions about the true role of ischaemic heart disease in these pacemaker requiring patients. The relatively short gap between pacemaker implantation and death requires further study. Images PMID:10655989

  17. Parvovirus associated cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus in day-old broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus were detected in day-old broiler chickens. Brains of chickens evaluated at necropsy appeared to be abnormal; some were disfigured and cerebellae appeared to be smaller than normal. Histopathologic examination of brains revealed cerebellar folia that were sho...

  18. Cerebral Larva Migrans Caused by Baylisascaris spp. in a Free-ranging North American Porcupine ( Erethizon dorsatum ).

    PubMed

    Roug, Annette; Clancy, Chad S; Detterich, Cassie; Van Wettere, Arnaud J

    2016-07-01

    A free-ranging North American porcupine ( Erethizon dorsatum ) from Utah, US, exhibited neurologic symptoms and was submitted for necropsy. Histologic examination of the brain revealed severe encephalitis with an intralesional nematode larva consistent with Baylisascaris spp. Neurologic larva migrans had not been reported in free-ranging porcupines, or from wildlife in Utah. PMID:27314480

  19. Identification of an intra-cranial intra-axial porcupine quill foreign body with computed tomography in a canine patient.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Christopher P; Sereda, Nikki C; Sereda, Colin W

    2012-02-01

    An intra-cranial intra-axial foreign body was diagnosed in a golden retriever dog through the use of computed tomography (CT). Confirmed by necropsy, a porcupine quill had migrated to the patient's left cerebral hemisphere, likely through the oval foramen. This case study demonstrates the efficacy of CT in visualizing a quill in the canine brain. PMID:22851782

  20. Paraquat induced pulmonary fibrosis in three survivors.

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, M; Patel, S B; Ewen, S W; Smith, C C; Friend, J A

    1991-01-01

    Pulmonary lesions following paraquat poisoning are believed to be almost invariably fatal. The three patients reports here survived despite persistent radiological change. One of the patients died after taking a larger dose of paraquat one year later, and at necropsy histological changes attributable to the two episodes of paraquat poisoning were apparent. Images PMID:2028434

  1. Bacterial sepsis resulting in severe systemic illness and euthanasia in a dog with cutaneous angiomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Sluiter, Kristi L.; Randell, Susan C.; Ramirez, Jessica R.; Farina, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    A Labrador retriever dog was euthanized after unsuccessful treatment for severe, progressive, lethargy, gastroenteritis, icterus, and swelling of a previously diagnosed cutaneous angiomatosis lesion. The body was submitted for necropsy. This is the first report that suggests that cutaneous angiomatosis lesions may have caused life-threatening systemic complications in a dog. PMID:24082170

  2. TEN- AND NINETY-DAY TOXICITY STUDIES OF 1,2-DICHLOROBENZENE ADMINISTERED BY ORAL GAVAGE TO SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subacute (10-day) and subchronic (90-day) toxicity studies of 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) were conducted in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. ,2-Dichlorobenzene was administered in corn oil by oral gavage; control animals received corn oil. t time of sacrifice, gross necropsies ...

  3. Meningoencephalitis associated with disseminated sarcocystosis in a free-ranging moose (Alces alces) calf.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Madhu; Patel, Jagdish; Pybus, Margo; Coleman, James K; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-08-01

    A wild moose (Alces alces) calf was presented for necropsy due to severe neurologic signs. Histopathologic examination revealed multisystemic inflammation with intralesional mature and immature schizonts. Schizonts in the brain reacted positively to Sarcocystis spp. polyclonal antibodies. Gene sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA identified the species as Sarcocystis alceslatrans. PMID:26246636

  4. Mycoplasma hominis ssp. associated endocarditis with myocardial necrosis in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos) in Manitoba in 2011

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Krzysztof M.; Copeland, Shelagh; Postey, Rosemary; Ngeleka, Musangu

    2015-01-01

    Severe endocarditis with myonecrosis, moderate to severe pleural and pericardial effusions, and mild ascites were found on necropsy in 3 alpacas. Mycoplasma hominis ssp. was detected on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of fresh affected endocardial tissue in 1 alpaca. PMID:25694661

  5. Occurrence of Camallanus trispinosus in a captive Indian star tortoise (Geochelone elegans).

    PubMed

    Jeyathilakan, N; Raman, M; Jayathangaraj, M G

    2015-03-01

    Camallanoids are spirurid round worms known to occur in stomach and intestine of lower vertebrate animals such as fishes and reptiles. This paper records the occurrence of Camallanus trispinosus in a captive Indian star tortoise of Guindy snake park, Chennai, India for the first time during necropsy and identified on the basis of morphology of male and female worms, including eggs. PMID:25698874

  6. Self-mutilation in rabbits following intramuscular ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine injections.

    PubMed Central

    Vachon, P

    1999-01-01

    Following hind leg intramuscular injections of ketamine, xylazine, and acepromazine, 4 of 6 rabbits exhibited self-mutilation of the digits. At necropsy, the affected sciatic nerve appeared enlarged. Lymphohistiocytic perineural inflammation and fibrosis were observed, together with nerve degeneration. Neuronal regeneration as the reason for self-mutilation is discussed. Images Figure 1. PMID:12001340

  7. Lymphosarcoma in an alpaca.

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, J A

    2001-01-01

    A 16-month-old, female alpaca presented with a 24-hour history of anorexia and depression. On necropsy, it was found that the liver was grossly enlarged and the cortices of both kidneys contained multifocal lesions. Histologic examination of these lesions and other tissues revealed infiltration with lymphocytic cells, a finding consistent with lymphosarcoma. PMID:11665431

  8. Meningoencephalitis associated with disseminated sarcocystosis in a free-ranging moose (Alces alces) calf

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Madhu; Patel, Jagdish; Pybus, Margo; Coleman, James K.; Childress, April L.; Wellehan, James F.X.

    2015-01-01

    A wild moose (Alces alces) calf was presented for necropsy due to severe neurologic signs. Histopathologic examination revealed multisystemic inflammation with intralesional mature and immature schizonts. Schizonts in the brain reacted positively to Sarcocystis spp. polyclonal antibodies. Gene sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA identified the species as Sarcocystis alceslatrans. PMID:26246636

  9. 21 CFR 600.12 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Records. 600.12 Section 600.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL.... A necropsy record shall be kept on each animal from which a biological product has been obtained...

  10. 21 CFR 600.12 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Records. 600.12 Section 600.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL.... A necropsy record shall be kept on each animal from which a biological product has been obtained...

  11. 21 CFR 600.12 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Records. 600.12 Section 600.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS BIOLOGICAL.... A necropsy record shall be kept on each animal from which a biological product has been obtained...

  12. Glioblastoma Multiforme in an HIV-Infected Patient: An Unexpected Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Victor Costa Morais de; Gomes, Thalita; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos Lima; Damian, Márcia Melo; Silva, Vera Márcia Fonseca Queiroz; Araújo, José Ribamar; Safe, Izabella Picinin; Ramasawmy, Rajendranath

    2014-01-01

    We reported a case of glioblastoma multiforme in a 42-year-old female patient with HIV infection, who had a rapid progression to AIDS. She was diagnosed with an intracerebral mass and treated as neurotoxoplasmosis with improvement in the first week of therapy. On the fourth week she had a clinical worsening evolving to death, receiving the diagnosis at necropsy. PMID:24935693

  13. Adverse outcome of using tilmicosin in a lamb with multiple ventricular septal defects

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulopoulos, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    A 15-day-old, 6.08 kg, lamb was injected subcutaneously with tilmicosin 15 mg/kg body weight. Approximately 15 min later, the lamb died. During necropsy, the heart was found to have multiple ventricular septal defects. Death was attributed to sudden heart failure due to the cardiac effects of tilmicosin in a heart having congenital defects. PMID:19337615

  14. 21 CFR 600.12 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... retained. (c) Records of sterilization of equipment and supplies. Records relating to the mode of sterilization, date, duration, temperature and other conditions relating to each sterilization of equipment and... the particular manufacturing process to which the sterilization relates. (d) Animal necropsy...

  15. THE 2000 CANINE DISTEMPER EPIDEMIC IN CASPIAN SEALS(PHOCA CASPICA): PATHOLOGY AND ANALYSIS OF CONTRIBUTORY FACTORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 10,000 Caspian seals (Phoca caspica) were reported dead in the Caspian Sea during spring and summer 2000. We performed necropsies and extensive laboratory analyses on 18 seals, as well as examination of the pattern of strandings and variation in weather in recent years, to identify the cau...

  16. Epidemiological study of non-systemic parasitism in dogs in southeast Mediterranean Spain assessed by coprological and post-mortem examination.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Carrasco, C; Berriatua, E; Garijo, M; Martínez, J; Alonso, F D; de Ybáñez, R Ruiz

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence and risk factors of non-systemic canine ecto- and endoparasitism and anthelminthic use in Murcia located at the centre of the Spanish Mediterranean coastal arch, was investigated by coprology and necropsy in up to 275 pet, city shelter and stray dogs in 2001-2004. Faecal parasite stages were detected in 25% of dogs. Species frequency was 6-10% for Toxocara canis, Ancylostomatidae spp., Toxascaris leonina and Isospora canis, and 0.4-1% for Trichuris vulpis, Giardia lamblia, and Dipylidium caninum. Logistic regression indicated that the risk of intestinal parasitism was highest for dogs necropsy findings; however, the degree of agreement between post-mortem and coprological examination for intestinal parasites was generally poor. Necropsy revealed 10%G. lamblia, 12%Taenia spp. 38%D. caninum infections. Fleas, ticks and lice were also found in 38%, 6% and 2% of necropsied stray dogs. These results demonstrate the need for an urgent parasite control programme at the city dog shelter and the need to improve the owner's education on zoonotic risks, the proper use of anthelminthics, and other parasite control practices. PMID:17542962

  17. Diagnostic Characterization of a Feral Swine Herd Enzootically Infected with Brucella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighty feral swine were trapped from a herd which had been documented to be seropositive for Brucella and which had been used for Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine trials on a 7,100 hectare tract of land in South Carolina. The animals were euthanized and complete necropsies were performed. Samples we...

  18. Metastatic transitional cell carcinoma in proximal humerus of a dog

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Sarah; Murphy, Kimberly A.; Nykamp, Stephanie G.; Allavena, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) was diagnosed in the proximal humerus of a dog that was presented with persistent right forelimb lameness with no clinical signs of urinary tract involvement. A diagnosis of TCC was made from surgical biopsy of the humeral lesion with subsequent necropsy revealing the prostatic urethra as the primary site of the tumor. PMID:22379204

  19. Isolation of Serratia fonticola from skin lesions in a Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) with an associated septicaemia.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marta E; Lanzarot, Pilar; Costas, Eduardo; Lopez Rodas, Victoria; Marín, Mercedes; Blanco, Jose L

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes the first isolation of Serratia fonticola in a Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). This organism was initially isolated from skin lesions and blood and subsequently from a variety of organs during necropsy. S. fonticola was confirmed as the pathogen causing the infection. PMID:17451977

  20. Diagnosis of toxoplasmosis-associated abortion in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos) fetus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A near full term alpaca (Vicugna pacos) was stillborn two days before expected date of delivery; necropsy examination was conducted within six hours of delivery. Gross lesions were enlarged liver and hydrocephalus. On histologic examination, mild inflammatory lesions were identified in the placenta,...

  1. DISSEMINATED TOXOPLASMOSIS IN A MEDITERRANEAN PREGNANT RISSO'S DOLPHIN (GRAMPUS GRISEUS) WITH TRANSPLACENTAL FETAL INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatal disseminated toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in a Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) dam and its fetus based on pathologic findings, immunohistochemistry, and the structure of the parasite. The dolphin was stranded alive on the Spanish Mediterranean coast, and died a few hrs later. At necropsy the ...

  2. Filaria taxideae in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) of Colorado, USA, and commonly associated filarial dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fox, Karen A; Martin, Laura E R; Baeten, Laurie A; Webb, Brett T; LeVan, Ivy K; Ballweber, Lora R; Wolfe, Lisa L

    2013-07-01

    During 2007-09, we necropsied striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) from Colorado, USA. Eight of 51 (16%) had severe infections with the subcutaneous filarid nematode Filaria taxideae, and four of the infected skunks (50%) had dermatitis that was histologically associated with parasite ova in the skin. PMID:23778634

  3. Idiopathic systemic AA-amyloidosis in a skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    PubMed

    Elhensheri, Mohamed; Linke, Reinhold P; Blankenburg, Anja; Beineke, Andreas

    2012-03-01

    This report describes a case of systemic amyloidosis in a captive striped skunk. At necropsy, bilateral alopecia, as well as reno-, hepato-, and splenomegaly were present. Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry revealed depositions of AA-amyloid in different organs. The lack of a predisposing disease is suggestive of idiopathic systemic AA-amyloidosis. PMID:22448530

  4. PILOT STUDY FOR ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS IN P53 HETEROZYGOTE DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    40 p53 heterozygous knockout mice and 40 p53 wild-type controls were exposed to 4 arsenicals in drinking water at a single dose, the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), in a chronic lifetime tumor bioassay, and animals were subjected to necropsy and limited pathologic examination of th...

  5. Pulmonary asbestos and dust content in East Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Stovin, P G; Partridge, P

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were made of the asbestos fibre and dust content of samples from 96 surgically excised lungs; 42 necropsies on patients with lung cancer, 11 necropsies on patients with non-pulmonary malignancies, and 59 necropsies on patients without any malignant disease. The patients' ages ranged from 45 to 74 years at the time of study. None of the patients had asbestosis. The distribution of fibres and dust content of the lungs showed a log-normal distribution. There was no significant difference in fibre counts or dust content between men and women, and between lung cancer and non-cancer patients. The only group with an association with a high asbestos fibre count was four necropsy cases of pleural mesothelioma. There was no significant relationship between asbestos fibre count and dust content of the lung. The present data suggest that asbestos fibre counts below 100,000 per gram of dried lung are not related to specific asbestos disease, although in the surgical cases who were closely questioned on their residential and occupational histories most of those with fibre counts above 30,000 per gram dried lung had had occasions of definite or very likely asbestos exposure. PMID:7101223

  6. Aberrant heartworm migration to the abdominal aorta and systemic arteriolitis in a dog presenting with vomiting and hemorrhagic diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Janet A.; Scott, Katherine D.; Edwards, John F.

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year-old Dachshund was presented for vomiting and diarrhea. Abdominal ultrasound revealed Dirofilaria immitis in the abdominal aorta and an avascular segment of small intestine. The dog was euthanized. Necropsy revealed D. immitis in the abdominal aorta and widespread necrotizing arteriolitis. This is a unique presentation of aberrant migration of D. immitis. PMID:26740703

  7. Neurotropic T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma in a 14-year-old Morgan gelding

    PubMed Central

    Westerman, Trina L.; Poulsen, Keith P.; Schlipf, John W.; Valentine, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    A 14-year-old Morgan gelding was presented for progressive weakness and muscle atrophy. The horse was initially diagnosed with equine protozoal myelitis based on history, physical examination, and laboratory diagnostics. Despite therapy, the horse declined clinically and was euthanized. Necropsy revealed a rare form of neurotropic lymphoma, described in this report. PMID:24688140

  8. Serotyping of Cryptococcus neoformans Isolates from Clinical and Environmental Sources in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Baró, Teresa; Torres-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Morera, Yolanda; Alía, Concepción; López, Olga; Méndez, Raul

    1999-01-01

    We determined biovars and serotypes of 154 isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans from clinical and environmental sources from different areas of Spain. All clinical isolates belonged to C. neoformans var. neoformans. Serotypes showed an irregular distribution. C. neoformans var. gattii serotype B was isolated from necropsy specimens from goats with pulmonary disease. PMID:10074545

  9. Enteritis associated with Clostridium perfringens type A in 9-month-old calves

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Bozidar; Prodanovic, Radisa; Ivetic, Vojin; Radanovic, Oliver; Bojkovski, Jovan

    2012-01-01

    Four 9-month-old Simmental male calves were presented with a history of sudden death. The necropsy and microscopic findings allowed a diagnosis of enteritis and severe intraluminal hemorrhage with blood clots in the jejunum, suggestive of jejunal hemorrhage syndrome. PMID:22851779

  10. Diabetes mellitus in a 6-month-old Charolais heifer calf.

    PubMed

    Clark, Zoe

    2003-11-01

    This unthrifty heifer calf was thin, weak and had a dull haircoat. Urinalysis and blood work revealed glycosuria, ketonuria, hypoproteinemia, and hyperglycemia. Euthanasia and necropsy were performed, revealing multifocal intersitial lymphocytic infiltration, an absence of islet cells, and a positive stain for bovine viral diarrhea virus in the pancreas. PMID:14664356

  11. Diabetes mellitus in a 6-month-old Charolais heifer calf

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Zoe

    2003-01-01

    This unthrifty heifer calf was thin, weak and had a dull haircoat. Urinalysis and blood work revealed glycosuria, ketonuria, hypoproteinemia, and hyperglycemia. Euthanasia and necropsy were performed, revealing multifocal intersitial lymphocytic infiltration, an absence of islet cells, and a positive stain for bovine viral diarrhea virus in the pancreas. PMID:14664356

  12. BVDV2-induced hypomyelinogenesis in a longhorn calf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newborn Longhorn heifer calf presented to the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital with generalized tremors, muscle fasciculations, ataxia and nystagmus. In utero infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) was suspected. The animal was euthanized and a necropsy was p...

  13. Hypomyelination Associated with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Type 2 Infection in a Longhorn Calf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newborn Longhorn heifer calf presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at Texas A&M University with generalized tremors, muscle fasciculations, ataxia, and nystagmus. At necropsy, gross central nervous system lesions were not observed. Histopathologic evaluation of the brain and spin...

  14. Identification of an intra-cranial intra-axial porcupine quill foreign body with computed tomography in a canine patient

    PubMed Central

    Sauvé, Christopher P.; Sereda, Nikki C.; Sereda, Colin W.

    2012-01-01

    An intra-cranial intra-axial foreign body was diagnosed in a golden retriever dog through the use of computed tomography (CT). Confirmed by necropsy, a porcupine quill had migrated to the patient’s left cerebral hemisphere, likely through the oval foramen. This case study demonstrates the efficacy of CT in visualizing a quill in the canine brain. PMID:22851782

  15. Omasal dilation and displacement in 4 Holstein dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Bicalho, Rodrigo C.; Mayers, Heather M.; Cheong, Soon Hon; Rosa, Brielle V.; Guard, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Cases of omasal dilation and displacement in 4 dairy cows are described. The disease was initially diagnosed by a combination of history and clinical signs that included right-sided abdominal distension, rectal palpation, and decreased milk production. The condition was confirmed by laparotomy or necropsy. PMID:19436447

  16. Myocardial ischaemia in infancy and childhood

    PubMed Central

    Berry, C. L.

    1967-01-01

    Examination of 135 consecutive necropsy specimens has shown that ischaemic myocardial injury is not uncommon in infancy and childhood. The extent of the myocardial change has been assessed by a technique of staining with acid fuchsin, first described by Selye (1958). The significance of the findings is discussed. Images PMID:4163355

  17. Gastrolobium spp. poisoning in sheep: A case report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes the history and investigation of a suspected plant poisoning event in Western Australia where fifteen sheep died. One of the poisoned sheep was necropsied and gross and microscopic pathology of the poisoned sheep is described. Monofluoroacetate was detected in rumen contents ...

  18. Airsac nematode Monopetalonema alcedinis in the Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sporadic and geographically widespread reports of parasites affecting the Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) have been published but few have described details of pathology. A female, adult kingfisher was found dead in a heavily wooded area of a zoo in Maryland, USA. At necropsy, numerous sexua...

  19. Congenital dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts with cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, P. J.; Millis, R. R.; Mitchinson, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas were found at necropsy in two previously reported cases of congenital dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. The nature of the developmental abnormality is discussed and compared with other forms of biliary dilatation. Slow-flowing bile for many years probably leads to cholangiocarcinoma. Images PMID:4343747

  20. Anthrax vaccine associated deaths in miniature horses.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, Bruce K

    2015-04-01

    During a widespread anthrax outbreak in Canada, miniature horses were vaccinated using a live spore anthrax vaccine. Several of these horses died from an apparent immune-mediated vasculitis temporally associated with this vaccination. During the course of the outbreak, other miniature horses from different regions with a similar vaccination history, clinical signs, and necropsy findings were found. PMID:25829553

  1. A degenerative encephalomyelopathy in 7 Kuvasz puppies.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, Murray J; Smith-Maxie, Laura L; de Lahunta, Alexander

    2005-05-01

    Seven Kuvasz puppies from 2 same-parentage litters developed weakness and ataxia. Six necropsied dogs had lesions in caudate nucleus, cerebellar nuclei and folia, and spinal cord. Lesions seen were felt to be familial or due to the effects of an amprolium-induced thiamine deficiency on the developing brains of these puppies. PMID:16018562

  2. Cutaneous metastases of a mammary carcinoma in a llama.

    PubMed Central

    Leichner, T L; Turner, O; Mason, G L; Barrington, G M

    2001-01-01

    An 8-year-old, female llama was evaluated for nonhealing, ulcerative, cutaneous lesions, which also involved the mammary gland. Biopsies of the lesions distant from and within the mammary gland area revealed an aggressive carcinoma. The tumor was confirmed at necropsy to be a mammary gland adenocarcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. Images Figure 1. PMID:11265189

  3. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not prevent disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chinese highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strain JXwn06 has been shown to produce high fevers, loss of body condition, respiratory distress and death in pigs. Necropsy reveals extensive interstitial pneumonia, multi-systemic pathology and a high occurrence of secondary bacterial infections. The ful...

  4. ATTACHMENT OF SHIGATOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 TO SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS IN CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) are commonly found in the gastrointestinal tracts of healthy cattle and spread into the environment by fecal shedding. The terminal rectal mucosa is a prominent colonization site for the human pathogen STEC O157:H7 in cattle. We have necropsied and histologic...

  5. SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS ARE EARLY ATTACHMENT SITES FOR SHIGATOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 IN CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) are commonly found in the gastrointestinal tracts of healthy cattle and spread into the environment by fecal shedding. The terminal rectal mucosa is a prominent colonization site for the human pathogen STEC O157:H7 in cattle. We have necropsied and examined 5...

  6. Diesel Exhaust Exposure Increases Susceptibility to Influenza Infection and Induces Dendritic Cell Migration and Maturation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mice were necropsied at day 1, 4, 8 and 14 post-infection and lung tissue was assessed for virus titers by TCID50, lung injury and inflammation. Lung and lymph node DC populations (CD11c+, MHCII, CD45+, CD80+ and CD86+) were identified ...

  7. Pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection in a Canadian cat.

    PubMed

    Knight, Cameron G; Davies, Jennifer L; Joseph, Tomy; Ondrich, Sarah; Rosa, Brielle V

    2016-05-01

    A cat was presented for necropsy after being found dead at home. Histologic findings suggested viral pneumonia. Polymerase chain reaction and viral typing revealed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. This is the first report of influenza in a Canadian cat and highlights the importance of considering influenza virus in the differential diagnosis for feline respiratory distress. PMID:27152036

  8. Severe gastric impaction secondary to a gastric polyp in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Furness, Mary Catherine; Snyman, Heindrich Nicolaas; Abrahams, Miranda; Moore, Alison; Vince, Andrew; Anderson, Maureen E.C.

    2013-01-01

    A 13-year-old Percheron gelding was presented for refractory gastric impaction. At necropsy a pedunculated 10 cm × 11 cm × 14 cm mass, histologically identified as an inflammatory polyp, was suspected to have been partly obstructing the pylorus. This is the first report of a polyp resulting in gastric outflow obstruction in a horse. PMID:24155420

  9. Senile systemic amyloidosis--a case report.

    PubMed

    Shah, V B; Pathak, A M; Mandke, J V; Kandalkar, B M; Chitale, A R

    1999-07-01

    An 85 years old female presented with acute pain and weakness in left lower extremity and doppler evidence of femoropopliteal block was made which subsequently proved fatal. Necropsy revealed extensive amyloid deposition in the heart and amyloid angiopathy in rest of the organs. PMID:10862300

  10. Renal amyloidosis--a clinicopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Shah, V B; Phatak, A M; Shah, B S; Kandalkar, B M; Haldankar, A R; Ranganathan, S

    1996-07-01

    A total of 19,075 necropsies and 1169 renal biopsies were scrutinised over a period of 20 years (1973-1992) retrospectively with an aim to study the incidence and pattern of renal amyloidosis in Nair Hospital. A total of 75 cases with amyloidosis were detected, 33 from the necropsy series (0.162%) and 42 from biopsies (3.59%). Secondary amyloidosis was seen in 82.66% and primary amyloidosis in 10.66%. Tuberculosis of various organs was the main cause of secondary amyloidosis (79.03%). Nephrotic syndrome was the common mode of presentation (52%). Besides kidney, which were involved in all cases, the liver, spleen and adrenals were other commonly involved organs at necropsy. Renal failure was the leading cause of death (51.51%). Thioflavine-T proved to be more sensitive technique than other conventional staining methods. The potassium permanganate test is a useful test to distinguish secondary amyloid fibrils from other amyloid fibrils. Abdominal fat aspiration may prove to be specific, sensitive and a routine procedure enabling the early diagnosis of amyloidosis leading to increased incidence of amyloidosis during life than at necropsy. PMID:8972145

  11. Glanders in donkeys (Equus Asinus) in the state of pernambuco, Brazil: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido; da Fonseca Oliveira, Andréa Alice; da Silva, Andréa Marques Vieira; Junior, José Wilton Pinheiro; da Silva, Leonildo Bento Galiza; de Farias Brito, Marilene; Rabelo, Silvana Suely Assis

    2010-01-01

    The clinical, anatomical and histopatological findings of glanders diagnosis in donkeys in the state of Pernambuco-Brazil are reported. The animals were euthanized and necropsied, and evaluated for lesions in respiratory and lymphatic systems, confirming the disease by isolation of Burkholderia mallei and Strauss test. PMID:24031474

  12. Detection and characterization of Histoplasma capsulatum in a German badger (Meles meles) by ITS sequencing and multilocus sequencing analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wild badger (Meles meles) with a severe nodular dermatitis was presented for post mortem examination. Numerous cutaneous granulomas with superficial ulceration were present especially on head, dorsum, and forearms were found at necropsy. Histopathological examination of the skin revealed a severe ...

  13. Disseminated toxoplasmosis in Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) from Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necropsies were conducted on four Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) that were stranded in single events on the coastal beaches of Puerto Rico from August 2010-August 2011. Three manatees were emaciated and the gastrointestinal tracts were devoid of digesta. Microscopically, all manat...

  14. Tuberculosis-like lesions arising from the use of Freund's complete adjuvant in an owl monkey (Aotus sp)

    SciTech Connect

    Malaga, Carlos A.; Weller, Richard E.; Broderson, J R.; Gozalo, Alfonso S.

    2004-04-01

    An apparently normal, non-tuberculin-reacting, splenectomized owl monkey presented tuberculosis-like lesions of the lung at necropsy. Histological and bacteriological examination failed to demonstrate the presence of acid-fast organisms. Retrospective inquiry showed the animal had been inoculated using complete Freund's Adjuvant during a malaria vaccine trial. Lesions observed were compatible with lipid embolism of the adjuvant in the lungs.

  15. Lead poisoning of a marbled godwit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, L.N.; Smith, M.R.; Windingstad, R.M.; Martin, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    A thin adult female marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa) found dead at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Montana, was found to have 17 ingested lead shot in its gizzard. Its liver contained 51.7 ppm lead (wet weight). Based on these necropsy findings a diagnosis of lead poisoning was made.

  16. Blastocystis tropism in the pig intestine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blastocystis subtype 5, a subtype known to infect humans, was detected by molecular methods in the feces of 36 naturally infected market age pigs. At necropsy, 6 heavily infected pigs were selected to determine the tropism of the infection within the gastrointestinal tract. Because so little is know...

  17. The rigid spine syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    van Munster, E T; Joosten, E M; van Munster-Uijtdehaage, M A; Kruls, H J; ter Laak, H J

    1986-01-01

    Four patients are reported, 3 females and 1 male, with (as a prominent symptom of muscle disease) limitation of flexion of cervical and dorsolumbar spine. The nosological classification of these cases is discussed. In two patients there was evidence of an inclusion body myositis. At necropsy one of these patients had a remarkable distribution of muscle changes. Images PMID:3025374

  18. Exertional myopathy in a pileated woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) subsequent to capture.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Out of 33 Pileated Woodpeckers (Dryocopus pileatus) captured and fitted with radio-transmitters, 12 were later found dead. Three carcasses were recovered and submitted for necropsy. One bird had large pale foci in multiple muscles. Microscopically, skeletal muscle in all three had evidence of severe...

  19. Silent oophoritis due to cytomegalovirus in a patient with advanced HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, R; Alampi, G; Talò, S; Calza, L; Tadolini, M; Martinelli, G N; Chiodo, F

    2000-06-01

    A case of isolated necrotizing cytomegalovirus (CMV) oophoritis disclosed only by necropsy studies in a patient with AIDS, is described. This unusual case report is discussed with a review of the literature dealing with CMV involvement of genital organs in the immunocompromised host, and in patients with HIV infection and AIDS. PMID:10872916

  20. Endocardial fibroelastosis in a quarterhorse mare.

    PubMed

    Cushing, T L

    2013-01-01

    A 4-year-old crossbred Quarterhorse mare was submitted to the Clemson Veterinary Diagnostic Center for necropsy examination with a chronic history of inappetence, weight loss and lethargy. Prior to death the horse had developed mild diarrhoea and began showing evidence of colic. Necropsy examination revealed a markedly enlarged heart due predominantly to marked dilation of the right atrium, tortuous congested mesenteric blood vessels, marked ascites, pleural effusion and pulmonary oedema. Further examination of the heart showed the endocardium of the left side of the heart, including the mitral valve leaflets, to be diffusely thickened. Microscopically, the endocardial thickening was due to deposition of fibrous connective tissue and elastin fibres. These findings are consistent with a diagnosis of endocardial fibroelastosis. PMID:23651694

  1. Use of Avian Bornavirus Isolates to Induce Proventricular Dilatation Disease in Conures

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Patricia; Hoppes, Sharman; Suchodolski, Paulette; Mirhosseini, Negin; Payne, Susan; Villanueva, Itamar; Shivaprasad, H.L; Honkavuori, Kirsi S.; Briese, Thomas; Reddy, Sanjay M.

    2010-01-01

    Avian bornavirus (ABV) is a newly discovered member of the family Bornaviridae that has been associated with the development of a lethal neurologic syndrome in birds, termed proventricular dilatation disease (PDD). We successfully isolated and characterized ABV from the brains of 8 birds with confirmed PDD. One isolate was passed 6 times in duck embryo fibroblasts, and the infected cells were then injected intramuscularly into 2 healthy Patagonian conures (Cyanoliseus patagonis). Clinical PDD developed in both birds by 66 days postinfection. PDD was confirmed by necropsy and histopathologic examination. Reverse transcription–PCR showed that the inoculated ABV was in the brains of the 2 infected birds. A control bird that received uninfected tissue culture cells remained healthy until it was euthanized at 77 days. Necropsy and histopathologic examinations showed no abnormalities; PCR did not indicate ABV in its brain tissues. PMID:20202423

  2. Acp. Best practice no 155. Pathological investigation of deaths following surgery, anaesthesia, and medical procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Start, R D; Cross, S S

    1999-01-01

    The pathological investigation of deaths following surgery, anaesthesia, and medical procedures is discussed. The definition of "postoperative death" is examined and the classification of deaths following procedures detailed. The review of individual cases is described and the overall approach to necropsy and interpretation considered. There are specific sections dealing with the cardiovascular system (including air embolism, perioperative myocardial infarction, cardiac pacemakers, central venous catheters, cardiac surgery, heart valve replacement, angioplasty, and vascular surgery); respiratory system (postoperative pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, pneumothorax); central nervous system (dissection of cervical spinal cord), hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal system; musculoskeletal system; and head and neck region. Deaths associated with anaesthesia are classified and the specific problems of epidural anaesthesia and malignant hyperthermia discussed. The article concludes with a section on the recording of necropsy findings and their communication to clinicians and medicolegal authorities. PMID:10655984

  3. Human schistosomiasis: Schistosoma mansoni antigen detection in renal glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Hoshino-Shimizu, S; De Brito, T; Kanamura, H Y; Canto, A L; Silva, A O; Campos, A R; Penna, D O; Da Silva, L C

    1976-01-01

    Twelve kidney, five biopsy and seven necropsy specimens, all from schistosomiasis mansoni patients were studied by light and immunoflurescent microscopy in an attempt to detect antigen in the glomerular walls. Deposits of IgM, IgG,I gA, IgE, complement C3 and fibrinogen were observered in most cases. Antigen was successfully detected in two cases(one biopsy and one necropsy specimen), both exhibiting proliferative glomerulonephritis. The only clinical manifestation was a slight proteinuria. IgG antibodies eluted from the sutopsy kidney homogenates showed specific binding mostly to Schistosoma mansoni gut, thus spggesting that the fixed antibodies (eluates) are, at least partially, consituted by antibodies similar to the anti-circulating antigen. These data reinfroce the hypothesis that renal injury in schistosomiasis is mediated through an immune complex disease. PMID:65811

  4. Intramedullary spinal cord damage associated with intervertebral disk material in a dog.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Sean G; Bagley, Rodney S; Gavin, Patrick R

    2002-12-01

    Intervertebral disk extrusions into the spinal cord are rarely reported in veterinary medicine, and only necropsy findings are described in previous reports. It is hypothesized that a disk lesion results in forceful injection of disk material into the spinal cord. In the 3-year-old Miniature Doberman Pinscher of our report, acute clinical signs and results of magnetic resonance imaging were consistent with this disease and helped determine the extent and character of the lesions. Alteration in the appearance of the nucleus pulposus was important in determining that intervertebral disk disease may have been present in this dog. However, a definitive diagnosis of intramedullary disk extrusion can be made only via histologic examination of a biopsy specimen or at necropsy. The dog improved substantially after surgical decompression of the spinal cord, and histologic findings in a biopsy specimen of material found within the spinal cord were consistent with mature degenerate intervertebral disk material. PMID:12479331

  5. Pathologic changes induced by an euthanasia agent.

    PubMed

    Port, C D; Garvin, P J; Ganote, C E; Sawyer, D C

    1978-08-01

    Dogs and cats killed by intravenous injection of either 0.3 ml/kg body weight T-61 or 100 mg/kg body weight pentoarbital and necropsied at less than 5 minutes or at 15 minutes after injection did not have gross or microscopic pathological changes. However, dogs and cats killed with T-61 at a dose of 1.0--1.5 ml/kg body weight and necropsied at 15 minutes after injection had significant gross and microscopic pathological lesions. Grossly, the lungs were severely edematous, did not collapse, and were deep red. Microscopically, the lungs had severe pulmonary edema and endothelial necrosis. Endothelial swelling of glomerular tuft vessels was also present. These lung and kidney lesions are classified as an euthanasia artefact. PMID:703253

  6. Hypereosinophilic syndrome in cats: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    McEwen, S A; Valli, V E; Hulland, T J

    1985-07-01

    The clinical, clinicopathological and pathological findings in three cats with hypereosinophilic syndrome are described. The cats chosen for the study had marked eosinophilia and evidence of tissue infiltration by eosinophils. Necropsies were performed on two cats, biopsy and blood samples were provided for the third cat. At necropsy, there was diffuse reddening of femoral bone marrow with ulceration and thickening of the duodenum. The livers had an enhanced lobular pattern with multiple, white, 1-3 mm nodules throughout the parenchyma. One cat had splenomegaly and the other had several enlarged, white, firm lymph nodes. Histopathologically, there was eosinophil infiltration of intestine, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, adrenal medulla and beneath the endocardium. Ultrastructurally, the eosinophils from lymph node and bone marrow of cat II were morphologically normal. The rigid criteria for eosinophilic leukemia were not fulfilled by these cases and the etiology of the eosinophilia in each case is not known. Possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:4041970

  7. European brown hare syndrome in wild European brown hares from Greece.

    PubMed

    Billinis, Charalambos; Psychas, Vassilios; Tontis, Dimitrios K; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Birtsas, Periklis K; Sofia, Marina; Likotrafitis, Fotios; Maslarinou, Olga M; Kanteres, Dimitrios

    2005-10-01

    From 1999 to mid-2003, 97 European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) found dead throughout Greece were examined by necropsy, histopathology, and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the presence of European brown hare syndrome (EBHS) and EBHS virus (EBHSV), respectively. Hare losses were sporadic, starting in the cold season and lasting for many months (December to May). The most prominent gross lesions were observed in the liver and included swelling and discoloration; congestion and hemorrhages were present mainly in lungs and tracheal mucosa. Necropsy findings were suggestive of EBHS, which was confirmed by histopathology and RT-PCR. This study documents, for the first time, EBHS in Greece. PMID:16456168

  8. A novel case of Fusarium oxysporum infection in an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Staggs, Lydia; St Leger, Judy; Bossart, Gregory; Townsend, Forrest I; Hicks, Christie; Rinaldi, Michael

    2010-06-01

    A necropsy was performed on a captive-born, 10-yr-old male Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) after it died acutely. Gross necropsy findings revealed hemorrhage within the right cerebrum, right cerebellum, and right eye. Histopathologic findings revealed a moderate multifocal acute necrotizing meningoencephalitis with intralesional fungal hyphae. Several pieces of cerebrum and cerebellum and cerebrospinal fluid were sent to the Fungus Testing Laboratory in San Antonio, Texas (U.S.A.). The culture yielded Fusarium oxysporum, which was confirmed by internal transcribed spacer and D1-D2 sequencing. Fusarium oxysporum infection has been reported in marine mammals. No cases of noncutaneous F. oxysporum infection in a cetacean that was not on long-term antimicrobials have been reported in the literature. PMID:20597220

  9. Gill trematodes (flukes) in wild-caught killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Goulding, David R; Blankenship-Paris, Terry L; Lewbart, Gregory A; Myers, Page H; Demianenko, Tracy K; Clark, James A; Forsythe, Diane B

    2004-03-01

    Three wild caught killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) on an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee-approved protocol were found dead within 2 days after being received. The fish were housed in two separate aquaria. Aquarium water was evaluated, and pH, salinity, ammonia, nitrate, and nitrite levels were within acceptable parameters. Several remaining fish appeared to be slow-moving and were presented for necropsy. Multiple, scattered, ulcerated skin lesions (diameter, 1 to 5 mm) were noted at necropsy and were cultured. No pathogenic bacteria were isolated. Wet-mount samples of the gills revealed multiple cysts at the gill margins, each containing a motile organism. No other gill parasites were detected. A diagnosis of trematodiasis was made. The cysts were identified as encysted metacercariae of a digenetic trematode. We surmise that the large numbers of gill flukes combined with the stress of recent shipment likely caused the observed morbidity and mortality. PMID:15053506

  10. Effects of dietary nickel on mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eastin, W.C.; O'Shea, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty breeding pairs of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were randomly assigned to one of five treatment groups and were fed breeder mash containing 0, 12.5, 50.0, 200.0, or 800.0 ppm Ni (as the sulfate) for 90 d. Ni ingestion had no effect on egg production, hatchability, or survival of ducklings. After 90 d birds were bled, sacrificed, and necropsied. There were no significant differences in hematocrit; concentrations of hemoglobin, plasma triglyceride, and cholesterol; of plasma activities of ornithine carbamoyltransferase and alanine aminotransferase. A black tarry feces was noted in the high Ni dose group at necropsy, but no gross or histopathologic lesions were observed. Although absolute concentrations of Ni in tissues were low, there were significant accumulations in kidneys of birds fed Ni at all dietary levels and in feathers, blood, and livers of birds fed high doses of Ni compared with controls.

  11. Recurrent pulmonary embolism due to hydatid disease of heart. Study of 3 cases, one with intermittent tricuspid valve obstruction (atrial pseudomyxoma).

    PubMed Central

    Gilsanz, V; Campo, C; Cue, R; Estella, J; Estrada, R V; Perez-oteiza, C; Rabago, G; Rebollar, J L; Zarco, P

    1977-01-01

    Three cases of pulmonary hypertension caused by hydatid emboli from the right side of the heart are described; cardiac catheterisation was performed in 2. One case was confirmed at operation and 2 at necropsy. The pulmonary emboli were caused by hydatid vesicles in all 3 cases and in none was there pulmonary thrombosis; free scolices were found in the pulmonary alveoli in 2. In 1 patient with repeated syncopal attacks there was a pedunculated cyst in the right atrium which was though to have intermittently obstructed the tricuspid valve. Gamma radiography, angiocardiography, and necropsy suggested a mechanical cause for the pulmonary hypertenion with no vasoconstrictive element. The surgical patient was alive and well 18 months later. Images PMID:861098

  12. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in yaks (Bos grunniens).

    PubMed

    Van Campen, Hana; Davis, Charlie; Flinchum, John D; Bishop, Jeanette V; Schiebel, Anita; Duncan, Colleen; Spraker, Terry

    2013-05-01

    An epizootic of hemorrhagic disease associated with Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 2 (EHDV-2) infections in yaks from 5 herds occurred in Colorado between August 21 and October 3, 2012. Affected yaks presented with fever, lethargy, anorexia, dyspnea, and swollen conjunctivae. Ulcerated dental pads, mucoid sanguineous nasal discharge, petechial hemorrhages in multiple organs, pulmonary edema, and serosanguinous fluid in the thorax, abdomen, and pericardial sac were observed at necropsy. Blood and tissue samples from 8 yaks with similar clinical signs and necropsy findings were positive for EHDV-2 by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and 5 yaks were seropositive for EHDV. Tests for malignant catarrhal fever (Ovine herpesvirus 2), Bovine viral diarrhea virus, Bovine herpesvirus 1, Foot-and-mouth disease virus, and Vesicular stomatitis virus were negative. The findings indicate that yaks are susceptible to infection with EHDV-2 and exhibit the clinical signs, and gross and histologic lesions of hemorrhagic disease observed in other ruminant species. PMID:23572453

  13. Etiology, forms, and prognosis of gastrointestinal dysfunction resembling vagal indigestion occurring after surgical correction of right abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Sattler, N; Fecteau, G; Hélie, P; Lapointe, J M; Chouinard, L; Babkine, M; Desrochers, A; Couture, Y; Dubreuil, P

    2000-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the etiology and types of vagal indigestion (VI) occurring after right displacement of the abomasum or abomasal volvulus (RDA/AV), and the prognosis for each type. Data of cows presented for RDA/AV from a retrospective (n = 288) and a prospective (n = 132) study were used. Vagal indigestion occurred in 39 and 22 cows in each study, respectively. A necropsy was performed in 29 cases. Gastric compartment dilation compatible with VI type III or IV occurred in 23 cases. An abnormal gastric wall was detected in 22 cases. Peritonitis was present in 18 cows. Vagal nerve lesions were present in 5 out of 13 cases studied. Clinical, hematological, and necropsy results suggested a classification of VI with respect to presence or absence of peritonitis. Gastric wall damage, peritonitis and vagal nerve lesions appear important in the etiology. Considering peritonitis occurrence, antimicrobial therapy appears necessary in the treatment of RDA/AV. PMID:11062835

  14. Probable reason why small strongyle EPG counts are returning "early" after ivermectin treatment of horses on a farm in Central Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C; Collins, S S

    2009-02-01

    Critical tests were carried out in 2008 in four yearling horses (H-2, H-4, H-10, and H-11) born and raised together on a farm (MC) in Central Kentucky. These horses were treated intraorally with ivermectin paste at the dose rate of 200 microg/kg. The main interest was to try and determine more precisely, from posttreatment (PT) worm count data, the current activity of ivermectin against small strongyles in a horse herd. These horses had been treated repeatedly with this compound and counts of small strongyle eggs per gram of feces (EPGs) of these parasites have been returning sooner than previously in field tests (Lyons et al. Parasitol Res 103:209-215, 2008a). Data from the four horses revealed that a total of 3237 (nonfactored number) specimens of small strongyles was recovered from aliquot samples of feces passed PT and in the large intestinal contents at necropsy; all specimens were examined and identified. Thirteen species of adult small strongyles were recorded. Cylicocyclus (Cyc.) insigne was the predominant species. Three of the yearlings (H-2, H-4, and H-11) were necropsied at 6 days PT with ivermectin, and removals of small strongyles were: 50%, 80%, and 36% of fourth stages (L4), respectively, and 100%, 99%, and 100% of adults, respectively. As indicated, the only incomplete removal of adults from the three horses was for H-4. They consisted of two species: (1) young Cyc. insigne (those passed in the feces were fully developed); removal of this species was 89% and (2) fully developed Cylicostephanus longibursatus; 99% were removed. The fourth yearling (H-10), necropsied at 25 days PT, harbored 19,150 adult small strongyles in the large intestinal contents. Most of the species were Cyc. insigne; all were fifth stage but not sexually mature. Comparing the percentage of adult small strongyles found at necropsy relative to the total number present (those passed in the feces and at necropsy), only 0% to 1% were in the contents of the large intestines of the

  15. Virtopsy in a red kangaroo with oral osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Ja; Sasaki, Motoki; Miyauchi, Aki; Kishimoto, Miori; Shimizu, Junichiro; Iwasaki, Toshiroh; Miyake, Yoh-Ichi; Yamada, Kazutaka

    2011-03-01

    This report describes the use of computed tomography (CT) in a nondomestic species. Postmortem CT was performed on a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and a diagnosis of oral osteomyelitis was made. CT examination revealed bony remodeling of the right mandible, an intraosseous lesion of the right temporal bone, muscle necrosis around the right mandible, and the absence of the right, first, upper molar tooth. Cardiac and intrahepatic gas and a distended intestine due to postmortem gas accumulation were also seen. All the lesions identified with CT were also identified by conventional necropsy, except the cardiac and intrahepatic gases. Virtopsy may be a useful procedure for the noninvasive identification of cause of death and as a guide for necropsy in animals. PMID:22946383

  16. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF MAMMARY MASSES IN CAPTIVE LIONS (PANTHERA LEO).

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Craig, Linden E; Ramsay, Edward C; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin; Garner, Michael M

    2016-03-01

    A multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 330 pathology accessions from 285 different lions found 15 captive, female African lions (Panthera leo) with confirmed mammary masses. Aside from the presence of a mammary mass, the most common initial clinical sign was inappetence. Histologic diagnoses were predominantly adenocarcinoma (n = 12), though two benign masses (mammary hyperplasia and a mammary cyst) and one squamous cell carcinoma were identified. Nine of 13 malignant tumors had metastasized to lymph nodes or viscera at the time of necropsy. Six lions with adenocarcinoma and two lions with benign mammary masses had received hormonal contraception, though little evidence of mammary lobular hyperplasia was seen in association with the adenocarcinomas. The most common concurrent disease processes found at necropsy were chronic urinary tract disease and other malignancies. These cases demonstrate that mammary malignancies occur in captive lions and frequently metastasize. PMID:27010273

  17. Efficacy of clorsulon and albendazole against Fascioloides magna in naturally infected white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Foreyt, W J; Drawe, D L

    1985-12-01

    The efficacy of clorsulon and of albendazole against Fascioloides magna were evaluated in 36 naturally infected white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in southern Texas. A single oral dose of clorsulon suspension (12 to 30 mg/kg of body weight; mean = 24 mg/kg) was given to each deer and killed 153 (92%) of 167 mature flukes and 4 (80%) of 5 immature flukes recovered at necropsy. A single oral dose of albendazole paste (17 to 46 mg/kg; mean = 26 mg/kg) was given to each deer and killed 148 (89%) of 167 mature flukes and 4 (67%) of 6 immature flukes recovered at necropsy. In 82 nontreated control deer, 271 live flukes were recovered; dead flukes were not recovered. PMID:4077630

  18. Congenital jaundice in bovine aborted foetuses: an emerging syndrome in southern Belgium.

    PubMed

    Delooz, L; Mori, M; Petitjean, T; Evrard, J; Czaplicki, G; Saegerman, C

    2015-04-01

    Southern Belgium faces an unusual recent increase of icteric bovine aborted foetuses. In the necropsy room, the majority of foetuses presented jaundice and splenomegaly. Despite a wide range of analyses, no definitive cause of abortion has yet been established but some analysis results support the leptospirosis hypothesis. This first description of cases will help veterinary practitioners to recognize more cases and to conduct those to the laboratory for future investigations. PMID:25620571

  19. Convulsion of the lung: an historical analysis of the cause of Dr Johnson's fatal emphysema.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, J M

    1994-01-01

    Of Johnson's fatal emphysema, it appears probable, on available historical and anatomic evidence, that it resulted from bronchiectasis, a diagnosis favoured by the pattern of illness: a protracted and severe respiratory infection succeeded by annual episodes of severe winter bronchitis, remitting in summer, and culminating in respiratory insufficiency; and by the findings of pleural adhesion and cor pulmonale at necropsy. That is resulted from chronic bronchitis is a proposition both plausible and irrefutable without the specimen. PMID:7853296

  20. Radiographic appearance of maxillary sinus feed impaction in a horse.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, James E; Carmalt, James L

    2013-01-01

    A 15-year-old Belgian gelding presented in respiratory distress, with bilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge, and right-sided epistaxis. The horse had a 5-year history of dental disease and had been recently losing weight. Radiographs indicated tooth root abscessation of the right maxillary third molar tooth and probable maxillary sinus feed impaction. These findings were confirmed at surgery and necropsy. The stippled, granular radiographic appearance described here is highly characteristic of sinus feed impaction. PMID:24371923

  1. Human Exposure following Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Multiple Animal Species in a Metropolitan Zoo

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Peter; Granich, Reuben; Scott, Jim; Sun, Ben; Joseph, Michael; Stringfield, Cynthia; Thisdell, Susan; Staley, Jothan; Workman-Malcolm, Donna; Borenstein, Lee; Lehnkering, Eleanor; Ryan, Patrick; Soukup, Jeanne; Nitta, Annette

    2002-01-01

    From 1997 to 2000, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in two Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), three Rocky Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), and one black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) in the Los Angeles Zoo. DNA fingerprint patterns suggested recent transmission. An investigation found no active cases of tuberculosis in humans; however, tuberculin skin-test conversions in humans were associated with training elephants and attending an elephant necropsy. PMID:12453358

  2. First record of a Polypodium sp. parasitizing eggs of shovelnose sturgeon from the Wabash River, Indiana.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Maria S; Stefanavage, Tom; Goforth, Reuben

    2010-03-01

    This article reports the presence of an endocellular parasite, Polypodium sp., in the eggs of shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus from the Wabash River, Indiana. The parasite was detected in 18% (2/11) of adult female sturgeon necropsied in April 2008. This constitutes the first record of this parasite in this host and in Indiana. The implications for the quality of the caviar remain unknown at this time. PMID:20575363

  3. Salmonella Persistence within the Peripheral Lymph Nodes of Cattle following Experimental Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Edrington, T S; Loneragan, G H; Genovese, K J; Hanson, D L; Nisbet, D J

    2016-06-01

    Utilizing a transdermal method of inoculation developed in our laboratory, the duration of infection of Salmonella in the peripheral lymph nodes of steers was examined. Thirty-six Holstein steers (mean body weight of 137 kg) were inoculated with Salmonella Montevideo (day 0) on each lower leg and both sides of the back and abdomen. Calves were euthanized beginning at 6 h and subsequently on each of days 1, 2, 4, 7, 9, 11, 14, and 21 postinoculation (four animals each time). The subiliac, popliteal, and superficial cervical (prescapular) lymph nodes were collected and cultured (quantitatively and qualitatively) for the challenge strain of Salmonella. The challenge strain was detected via direct culture within the lymph nodes at 6 h postinoculation and on each subsequent necropsy date. Salmonella levels in lymph node were 0.8 to 1.8 log CFU/g. Lymph nodes were generally positive after enrichment culture throughout the experiment. Salmonella elimination appeared to begin approximately 14 days postinoculation. However, elimination was not completed by day 21; therefore, a second experiment was conducted identical to the first except that the time from inoculation to necropsy was extended. Salmonella was recovered via direct culture on each of the necropsy days, and results in general were similar to those of experiment I, except that on days 20, 24, and 28 isolates from serogroups C2 and E1 were identified in addition to the inoculation strain C1 in multiple animals. The data from both experiments indicate that after a single inoculation event, Salmonella would be completely cleared by approximately 28 days. Further research with expanded times between inoculation and necropsy is required for verification. PMID:27296609

  4. [Sonographic diagnosis of a case of type 1 achondrogenesis in the 2d trimester].

    PubMed

    Schramm, T; Nerlich, A

    1989-10-01

    The authors report on a prenatal ultrasonic diagnosis of lethal osteochondrodysplasia achondrogenesis type I (Parenti-Fraccaro) in the 17th week of pregnancy. The prenatal findings were confirmed by necropsy after termination of the pregnancy. The possibility to recognize lethal skeletal disorders early in pregnancy is discussed as well as the patho-anatomical criteria and possible patho-physiological mechanisms of achondrogenesis. PMID:2684730

  5. Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus associated with presumed autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome in a mare

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Jill K.; Magdesian, K. Gary; Gaffney, Patricia M.

    2011-01-01

    A 5-year-old Thoroughbred-cross mare was diagnosed with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Partial glycemic control and clinical improvement were achieved with daily insulin administration for 18 mo. The mare subsequently developed evidence of hypoadrenocorticism and died. Necropsy findings included lymphocytic infiltration of the pancreas, adrenal cortex, adrenal medulla, and thyroid glands, suggestive of an immune-mediated polyendocrinopathy. PMID:22043070

  6. Hemangiosarcoma in a geriatric Labrador retriever.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Diya

    2012-08-01

    A geriatric Labrador retriever dog was presented for acute collapse. The dog was conscious but lethargic, tachypneic, tachycardic with weak femoral pulses, occasional pulse deficits, and pale mucous membranes. Radiography, ultrasonography, quick assessment tests, and a complete blood (cell) count (CBC)/biochemistry panel indicated internal hemorrhage and potential problems with hemostasis. The dog was euthanized. A necropsy, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry for CD31 and Factor VIII-related antigen cell markers supported a diagnosis of splenic hemangiosarcoma. PMID:23372199

  7. Primary peri-aortic hemangiosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Guinan, Justin; Fischetti, Anthony; Garate, Ana Paula; Chalhoub, Serge

    2012-11-01

    A 10-year-old intact male Norwich terrier dog was evaluated for progressive, intermittent increased respiratory effort. Thoracic radiographs, ultrasonography, and computed tomography were used to identify a caudodorsal thoracic extrapulmonary mass and the presence of pulmonary metastasis. Blood transfusion and stabilization measures were not successful and the patient died. Necropsy confirmed the origin of the mass to be the adventitial layer of the aorta and determined it to be hemangiosarcoma. This is a rare site for the primary lesion. PMID:23633719

  8. Case report: epithelial intracytoplasmic herpes viral inclusions associated with an outbreak of duck virus enteritis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, B.C.; Jessup, David A.; Docherty, Douglas E.; Lownestine, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Several muscovy ducks from a free-roaming flock of 65 muscovy and mallard ducks died over a 3-week period. Three muscovy ducks were necropsied. Gross and microscopic changes were compatible with duck virus enteritis, and the virus was isolated. In addition to intranuclear viral inclusion bodies in several tissues, intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were present in esophageal and cloacal epithelium, By electron microscopy, the membrane-bound intracytoplasmic inclusions were found to contain enveloped herpesvirus, and nuclei contained herpes viral nucleocapsids.

  9. PubMed Central

    Breton, L.; Gosselin, Y.; Therriault, P.

    1981-01-01

    Lymphoid leukemia in two dogs This report describes lymphoid leukemia in two young dogs. For each, there is a description of the clinical and radiological signs in both animals, and a discussion of the lesions from the biopsies and the necropsy of one of the dogs. Both cases were diagnosed in young animals. The first one was an 18 month old Greyhound and the second was a 13 month old Boxer. ImagesFigures 1 et 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:7340920

  10. Dual infection with Pythium insidiosum and Blastomyces dermatitidis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Sara L; Frank, Chad; Thompson, Craig A; Van Alstine, William G; Gelb, Hylton; Heng, Hock Gan; Klosterman, Emily; Kiupel, Matti; Grooters, Amy M

    2012-09-01

    A 4-year-old male neutered Labrador Retriever with severe gastrointestinal signs, but no respiratory signs, was diagnosed with multifocal pyogranulomatous gastritis, enteritis, and lymphadenitis with intralesional hyphae and multifocal pyogranulomatous pneumonia with intralesional yeast. Based on cytologic evaluation, histologic examination with special stains, and immunohistochemical analysis of tissues collected antemortem or at necropsy, dual infections with Pythium insidiosum and Blastomyces dermatitidis were detected and are reported for the first time. PMID:22747656

  11. Patent ductus arteriosus in an adult amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis).

    PubMed

    Douay, Guillaume; Drut, Amandine; Ribas, Thibault; Gomis, David; Graille, Mélanie; Lemberger, Karin; Bublot, Isabelle

    2013-03-01

    A clinically healthy 16-yr-old female leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) was diagnosed with a patent ductus arteriosus on echocardiography and later confirmed on necropsy A murmur was heard on auscultation during a routine examination, and the congenital defect was an incidental finding. The animal had been asymptomatic its entire life. This deformity is rarely observed in nondomestic felids and may be asymptomatic, as has been described in domestic cats. PMID:23505729

  12. A retrospective study of pathologic findings in the Amazon and Orinoco river dolphin (Inia geoffrensis) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Bonar, Christopher J; Boede, Ernesto O; Hartmann, Manuel García; Lowenstein-Whaley, Joanne; Mujica-Jorquera, Esmeralda; Parish, Scott V; Parish, James V; Garner, Michael M; Stadler, Cynthia K

    2007-06-01

    River dolphins are especially susceptible to negative human impacts. For their conservation, attempts of relocation or procreation ex situ may become important in the future to avoid their extinction. Additional knowledge and medical experiences of river dolphin management in captivity may aid such conservation efforts. The medical records and necropsy and histopathology reports on 123 captive Amazon River dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) were re-viewed. Of these 123 animals, 105 were necropsied and 70 necropsies were supported with histopathology. Eighteen animals were not necropsied. Among wild-born animals, mortality was highest in the first 2 mo immediately postcapture and transport, accounting for 32 of 123 deaths. Pneumonia and skin lesions (cutaneous and subcutaneous ulcerations and abscesses) were the most common findings, found in 44 of 105 (42%) and 38 of 105 (36%) of gross diagnoses, respectively. At least 10 of 44 cases of pneumonia diagnosed grossly included a verminous component. Cachexia, from a variety of causes, was a major gross finding in 21 animals. Fifteen animals had histologic evidence of significant renal pathology, and this was the primary cause of death in 13 cases. Hepatic pathology was found in 18 cases, and bacterial sepsis was confirmed via histology in 16 cases. Based on these findings, it may be concluded that keys to successful maintenance of this species include 1) prophylactic anthelminthic and antibiotic therapy immediately post-capture; 2) maintenance of animals in larger enclosures than in past attempts, in compatible groups, and in facilities capable of separating aggressive animals; 3) maintenance in microbiologically hygienic water quality at all times; and 4) a proactive program of preventive medicine during the immediate postcapture, quarantine, and maintenance period of captivity. PMID:17679501

  13. Columbid herpesvirus-1 mortality in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) from Calgary, Alberta.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicole; Warren, Amy L; Whiteside, Douglas; Bidulka, Julie; Robinson, John H; Illanes, Oscar; Brookfield, Caroline

    2012-03-01

    Four cases of Columbid herpesvirus-1 infection in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were identified in Calgary, Alberta. Necropsy findings included severe multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis, pharyngeal ulceration and necrosis, and gastrointestinal necrosis. Occasional eosinophilic intranuclear viral inclusion bodies were associated with the foci of necrosis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing confirmed a diagnosis of herpesvirus-induced disease. The sequence of a PCR amplicon had 99.7% homology to Columbid herpesvirus-1. PMID:22942441

  14. Detecting West Nile Virus in Owls and Raptors by an Antigen-capture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Douglas G.; Barker, Ian K.; Lindsay, Robbin; Hunter, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a rapid antigen-capture assay (VecTest) for detection of West Nile virus in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs, collected at necropsy from owls (N = 93) and raptors (N = 27). Sensitivity was 93.5%–95.2% for northern owl species but <42.9% for all other species. Specificity was 100% for owls and 85.7% for raptors. PMID:15663862

  15. Columbid herpesvirus-1 mortality in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) from Calgary, Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Nicole; Warren, Amy L.; Whiteside, Douglas; Bidulka, Julie; Robinson, John H.; Illanes, Oscar; Brookfield, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Four cases of Columbid herpesvirus-1 infection in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were identified in Calgary, Alberta. Necropsy findings included severe multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis, pharyngeal ulceration and necrosis, and gastrointestinal necrosis. Occasional eosinophilic intranuclear viral inclusion bodies were associated with the foci of necrosis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing confirmed a diagnosis of herpesvirus-induced disease. The sequence of a PCR amplicon had 99.7% homology to Columbid herpesvirus-1. PMID:22942441

  16. Dental disease in slender lorises (Loris tardigradus).

    PubMed

    Plesker, Roland; Schulze, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Necropsies were performed in 25 slender lorises (Loris tardigradus) from a colony at Bochum University. In seven adult individuals, teeth were missing, loose, or severely affected by dental calculus. In one of these cases, a severe periodontal disease was seen without abscess formation. In another four lorises purulent/gangrenous inflammation was found next to the teeth either in the maxillary or the mandibular region. PMID:23740522

  17. Visual reactions in a case of long-lasting cortical blindness

    PubMed Central

    Braak, J. W. G. Ter; Schenk, V. W. D.; Vliet, A. G. M. Van

    1971-01-01

    A case is described of long-lasting cortical blindness in a 71 year old man showing no other visual reactions than pupillary narrowing to light and (only after some months) optokinetic nystagmus of the `passive' type. Necropsy demonstrated total bilateral destruction of the striate area of the cortex caused by bilateral softening in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery, and nearly total loss of ganglion cells in both lateral geniculate bodies. Images

  18. Aflatoxicosis in cattle pastured in a field of sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Hall, R F; Harrison, L R; Colvin, B M

    1989-04-01

    Aflatoxicosis was diagnosed in a small herd of cattle having access to moldy, unharvested sweet corn. Necropsy of 1 cow that died revealed anasarca and a pale tan liver. In this cow, microscopic examination revealed edema of all soft tissues and liver lesions consistent with aflatoxicosis. Samples of corn taken from the field contained 2,365 ng of aflatoxin/g of corn. Weather conditions were conducive to the formation of aflatoxins by Aspergillus flavus and A parasiticus. PMID:2703428

  19. Pedunculated islet-cell tumour of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Britt, R P

    1966-05-01

    An unusual islet-cell tumour found at necropsy in a patient who had died from a myocardial infarction is described. Of particular interest were the pedunculated nature and large size of the tumour. The clinical features of the case are considered. Four islet-cell tumours in the duodenum have previously been reported and it seems probable that such tumours arise in heterotopic pancreas. PMID:4287114

  20. Traumatic tricuspid insufficiency in a kitten.

    PubMed

    Closa, J M; Font, A

    1999-01-01

    A four-month-old, male, common European kitten developed pleural effusion and ascites after falling from a fourth-floor flat. Radiographic, bidimensional echocardiography and color-flow Doppler findings were compatible with right-sided atrioventricular valve insufficiency. Necropsy confirmed the diagnosis that tricuspid insufficiency resulted from the rupture of the chordae tendineae of the nonseptal cusp of the valve at the level of the cranial papillary muscle insertion in the right ventricle. PMID:9934923

  1. Systemic xanthomatosis associated with hyperchylomicronaemia in a cat.

    PubMed

    Chanut, F; Colle, M-A; Deschamps, J-Y; Albaric, O; Wyers, M

    2005-08-01

    We report a case of systemic xanthomatosis in a 4-month-old domestic cat. The kitten presented with multiple cutaneous lesions and 'cream tomato soup' coloured blood. Necropsy revealed multiple, whitish, nodular lesions, compatible with xanthomas, on most of the abdominal organs (liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal glands, mesentery and colon). The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination. This is the first report of granulomatous colitis associated with feline xanthomatosis. PMID:16050907

  2. Senile plaques and other senile changes in the brain of an aged American black bear.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Yoshino, T; Yamaguchi, R; Tateyama, S; Kimoto, Y; Nakayama, H; Goto, N

    1995-07-01

    A female American black bear (Euarctos ursus americanus) over 20 years old had shown epileptiform neurologic signs starting in March 1992 and was found dead unexpectedly 8 months later. At necropsy, pulmonary and intrabronchial hemorrhage was noted. In the brain, the leptomeninges exhibited slight thickening, and petechiae were evident in the hippocampus. Histopathologic examination of the brain revealed several senile changes: numerous senile plaques, amyloid deposition in cerebromeningeal arterioles, mineral deposition in the pallidum, and numerous corpora amylacea in the cerebellum. PMID:7483216

  3. The occurance of Pterygodermatites nycticebi (Nematoda: Rictulariidae) in a captive slow loris, Nycticebus coucang

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuggle, B.N.; Beehler, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    Adult and immature rictulariid nematodes were recovered at necropsy from the small intestine of an adult slow loris, Nycticebus coucang, from the Milwaukee County Zoo in Wisconsin. The lumen of the entire small intestine was packed with more than 100 nematodes, the intestinal wall appeared thickened and the mucosal surface contained numerous petechial hemorrhagic foci. The cause of death was diagnosed as a septicemia and possible lupus erythematosis.

  4. Abortion caused by Brucella abortus biovar 1 in a free-ranging bison (Bison bison) from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Rhyan, J C; Quinn, W J; Stackhouse, L S; Henderson, J J; Ewalt, D R; Payeur, J B; Johnson, M; Meagher, M

    1994-07-01

    A near-term aborted bison (Bison bison) fetus was collected near Old Faithful geyser in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming (USA). On necropsy, the fetus liver had a small capsular tear, and there was a small quantity of blood in the peritoneal cavity. Microscopic lesions included mild, purulent bronchopneumonia and mild, multifocal, interstitial pneumonia. Brucella abortus biovar 1 was isolated from fetal abomasal contents, lung, and heart blood. PMID:7933293

  5. Septicemic pasteurellosis in elk (Cervus elaphus) on the United States National Elk Refuge, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Smith, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    Septicemic pasteurellosis caused by Pasteurella multocida is believed responsible for the deaths of 48 elk (Cervus elaphus) on the National Elk Refuge near Jackson, Wyoming (USA) during 1986 and 1987. Clinical signs included depression and salivation; necropsy findings included congestion and petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages in lymph nodes, diaphragm, lungs and endocardium. Pasteurella multocida was isolated from femur marrow of eight carcasses and a variety of tissues from eight others.

  6. Animal Models of Mycobacteria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, Diane J.; Orme, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the infection of mice and guinea pigs with mycobacteria via various routes, as well as necropsy methods for the determination of mycobacterial loads within target organs. Additionally, methods for cultivating mycobacteria and preparing stocks are described. The protocols outlined are primarily used for M. tuberculosis, but can also be used for the study of other non-tuberculosis mycobacterial species. PMID:18432756

  7. Diagnosis of enteric disease in small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Van Metre, D C; Tyler, J W; Stehman, S M

    2000-03-01

    Diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease in small ruminants requires integration of information obtained in the signalment, history, physical or necropsy examination, and ancillary diagnostic tests. The purpose of this article is to provide the practitioner with a review of the clinical features of several common gastrointestinal diseases of sheep and goats. Rumen acidosis, enterotoxemia, gastrointestinal parasitism, neonatal diarrhea, and salmonellosis are discussed, and where appropriate, reviews of the pathophysiology, prevention, and control of these diseases are cited for further reading. PMID:10707415

  8. Oxalosis in wild desert tortoises, Gopherus agassizii.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Elliott R; Berry, Kristin H; Stacy, Brian; Huzella, Louis M; Kalasinsky, Victor F; Fleetwood, Michelle L; Mense, Mark G

    2009-10-01

    We necropsied a moribund, wild adult male desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) with clinical signs of respiratory disease and elevated plasma biochemical analytes indicative of renal disease (blood urea nitrogen [415 mg/dl], uric acid [11.8 mg/dl], sodium [>180 mmol/l] and chloride [139 mmol/l]). Moderate numbers of birefringent oxalate crystals, based on infrared and electron microscopy, were present within renal tubules; small numbers were seen in colloid within thyroid follicles. A retrospective analysis of 66 additional cases of wild desert tortoises was conducted to determine whether similar crystals were present in thyroid and kidney. The tortoises, from the Mojave and Sonoran deserts, were necropsied between 1992 and 2003 and included juveniles and adults. Tortoises were classified as healthy (those that died due to trauma and where no disease was identified after necropsy and evaluation by standard laboratory tests used for other tortoises) or not healthy (having one or more diseases or lesions). For all 67 necropsied tortoises, small numbers of crystals of similar appearance were present in thyroid glands from 44 of 54 cases (81%) and in kidneys from three of 65 cases (5%). Presence of oxalates did not differ significantly between healthy and unhealthy tortoises, between age classes, or between desert region, and their presence was considered an incidental finding. Small numbers of oxalate crystals seen within the kidney of two additional tortoises also were considered an incidental finding. Although the source of the calcium oxalate could not be determined, desert tortoises are herbivores, and a plant origin seems most likely. Studies are needed to evaluate the oxalate content of plants consumed by desert tortoises, and particularly those in the area where the tortoise in renal failure was found. PMID:19901374

  9. Lead poisoning and other mortality factors in trumpeter swans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Stroud, R.K.; Reiswig, B.; McEneaney, T.

    1989-01-01

    Lead poisoning and other causes of mortality of trumpeter swans were investigated. Necropsies or Pb concentrations in livers were available for 72 trumpeter swans found dead in seven western states from 1976 to 1987; data from other published and unpublished sources also are summarized. Ingestion of lead artifacts accounted for about 20% of the known mortality of trumpeter swans in the tri-state area of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, where the population has been declining for several decades.

  10. Atherosclerosis associated with pericardial effusion in a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Schilliger, Lionel; Lemberger, Karin; Chai, Norin; Bourgeois, Aude; Charpentier, Maud

    2010-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a common disease in pet birds, particularly in psittacines, and is frequently found when performing postmortem examinations on adult and old dogs, in which it is mainly associated with endocrine diseases, such as hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus. However, atherosclerosis is poorly documented in reptiles and consequently poorly understood. In the current case report, atherosclerosis and pericardial effusion were diagnosed in a 2-year-old male central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) based on ultrasound visualization, necropsy, and histologic examination. PMID:20807945

  11. Clinical biochemical aspects of glutaminase toxicity in rabbits and Rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hambleton, P.; Benbough, J. E.; Baskerville, A.; Harris-Smith, P. W.

    1980-01-01

    Treatment with a chemically modified glutaminase was lethal to rabbits and Rhesus monkeys at all but the lowest doses. Changes in the serum levels of triglycerides, glucose, creatinine, urea, cholesterol and protein and in the activities of some serum enzymes were the probable result of the development of lesions in liver, kidney and intestine observed at necropsy. Treatment with unmodified glutaminase induced similar changes in rabbits but not in Rhesus monkeys. PMID:6775664

  12. Thymic lymphosarcoma in three heifers.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, C E; Rebhun, W C; Dill, S G

    1986-12-15

    Three heifers with the thymic form of lymphosarcoma were examined. In each of the 3 cases, fever, bloat, and jugular venous distention had developed. Detectable antibody to bovine leukosis virus was not found on agar gel immunodiffusion testing in any of the cases. Thymic lymphosarcoma was confirmed by necropsy and histologic examination. Thymic lymphosarcoma must be considered in the differential diagnosis in heifers with fever, bloat, and jugular venous distention. PMID:3793601

  13. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Éden Sartor; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; Corrêa, Isaac José Felippe; Robles, Laercio; Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumors are extremely rare neoplasms derived from hormone-producing neuroendocrine cells. It is difficult to make their diagnosis before biopsy, surgical resection or necropsy. A recent publication described only 94 cases of these tumors. There is no sex predilection and apparently it has no association with cirrhosis or preexisting hepatic disease. The most effective treatment is hepatectomy, and resection is determined by size and location of the lesions. PMID:25628206

  14. Validation of the BrockTB Stat-Pak Assay for Detection of Tuberculosis in Eurasian Badgers (Meles meles) and Influence of Disease Severity on Diagnostic Accuracy▿

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Mark A.; Crawshaw, Tim; Waterhouse, Sue; Delahay, Richard; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.

    2008-01-01

    A lateral-flow immunoassay (BrockTB Stat-Pak) for detecting tuberculosis in Eurasian badgers was 49% sensitive and 93% specific against culture for M. bovis (n = 1,464) at necropsy. However, the sensitivity was significantly higher (66 to 78%) in animals with more severe tuberculosis, indicating that the BrockTB Stat-Pak may be useful for the detection of badgers with the greatest risk of transmitting disease. PMID:18272706

  15. Occurrence of fruiting structures allows determination of Purpureocillium lilacinum as an inciting agent of pleuritis and pneumonia in a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) by histopathologic correlation to culture

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, V.L.; Mangold, B.; Lenzycki, J.; Hinckley, L.; Sutton, D.A.; Frasca, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpureocillium lilacinum and Beauveria bassiana were isolated from lung sampled at necropsy of a 12 year-old female loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) that had displayed abnormal buoyancy. Histopathologic evaluation revealed pleuritis and pneumonia with non-melanized, septate hyphae and fruiting structures identical to those of P. lilacinum. This case emphasizes the importance of a histological correlate to fungal culture when environmental fungi are isolated and demonstrates the infrequent phenomenon of fruiting or conidial production in tissue. PMID:25379399

  16. Diagnostic testing patterns of natural Mycobacterium paratuberculosis infection in pygmy goats

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Elizabeth J.B.; Steinberg, Howard; Krebs, Vernon; Collins, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Thirteen pygmy goats (Capra hircus) from a herd naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium ss. paratuberculosis (MPTB) were monitored with 4 diagnostic assays for 2 to 15 mo. Cellular and humoral immune responses to the infection were assessed with assays of gamma interferon (IFNγ), serum antibody [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel diffusion (AGID)], and radiometric fecal culture. Microscopic examination and radiometric culture of tissue from 12 sites were performed at necropsy. Goats were considered infected if MPTB was isolated from any tissue sample collected at necropsy. Mycobacterial isolates were confirmed as MPTB with an IS900 polymerase chain reaction assay. Ten goats whose antemortem tests indicated infection carried heavy organism burdens at necropsy, both within and beyond the gastrointestinal system. False-negative ELISA, AGID, and/or culture results were obtained in 5 of the 10 confirmed cases during the study period. In 3 goats with sporadic fecal shedding of MPTB or detectable IFNγ response, or both, no abnormalities were detected at necropsy and no MPTB was isolated from the tissue samples; the antemortem fecal-culture and IFNγ results were thus considered false-positive. Diagnosticians should be alert to the possibility of both false-positive and false-negative test results for Johne's disease in goats. False-positive fecal-culture results may occur when a high prevalence of infection exists in the herd and the premises are likely to be heavily contaminated. The diverse antemortem testing patterns seen in these goats underscore the importance of using varied diagnostic assays serially or in parallel to increase the likelihood of identifying all infected goats. PMID:12889728

  17. Nonhunting mortality in sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Records of 170 sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) necropsied at the National Wildlife Health Research Center, Wisconsin, from 1976 through 1985 were reviewed as representative samples to determine causes of nonhunting mortality in the mid-continent and Rocky Mountain populations of sandhill cranes. Avian cholera, avian botulism, and ingestion of mycotoxins were leading causes of nonhunting mortality. Hailstorms, lightning, lead poisoning, predation, avian tuberculosis, and collisions with power lines also killed cranes.

  18. Postmortem bacteriology: a re‐evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J A; Harrison, L M; Partridge, S M

    2006-01-01

    Aim To assess the value of postmortem bacteriology in necropsy practice, with specific emphasis on bacterial invasion of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Methods A review of published articles on postmortem bacteriology. Studies were selected to cover the full range of necropsy practice including adults, the perinatal period, and infancy. The review covers over 5000 necropsies, mainly in adults, but including 1108 perinatal cases and 468 cases of sudden unexpected death in infancy. Data are available on 4992 blood cultures, 1168 specimens of CSF, and 743 cultures of spleen. Results Studies in which careful precautions have been taken to reduce contamination show that approximately two thirds of blood cultures are negative, two in nine yield a single isolate, and one in nine have a mixed growth. The postmortem interval has only a small effect on the isolation rate. A pure growth of a known pathogen has a more than 50% likelihood of being found in association with genuine infection in adults and in the perinatal period. Conclusions The main postmortem artefact is contamination, but this can be considerably reduced by careful technique. Agonal spread is less common than is often assumed. Postmortem translocation is not a problem if the body is appropriately stored. A pure growth of a pathogen in blood or CSF should be regarded as a possible contributing factor to death at all ages. PMID:16394274

  19. Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24 h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12 h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO2, suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism. PMID:22675306

  20. First report of parasitism by Hexametra boddaertii (Nematoda: Ascaridae) in Oxyrhopus guibei (Serpentes: Colubridae).

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María E; Sánchez, Matías N; López, Ariel; Salas, Martín; Rivero, María R; Teibler, Pamela; Toledo, Gislayne de Melo; Tavares, Flávio L

    2016-07-15

    The current study summarizes the postmortem examination of a specimen of Oxyrhopus guibei (Serpentes, Colubridae) collected in Iguazu National Park (Argentina), and found deceased a week following arrival to the serpentarium of the National Institute of Tropical Medicine (Argentina). Although the snake appeared to be in good health, a necropsy performed following its death identified the presence of a large number of roundworms in the coelomic cavity, with indications of peritonitis and serosal adherence. Additional observations from the necropsy revealed small calcifications in the mesothelium of the coelomic cavity; solid and expressive content in the gallbladder; massive gastrointestinal obstruction due to nematodes; and lung edema and congestion. Histopathological analyses of lung sections also showed proliferative heterophilic and histiocytic pneumonia. Parasites isolated from both the intestine and coelomic cavity were identified as Hexametra boddaertii by a combination of light and scanning electron microscopic examination. Results from this necropsy identify O. guibei as a new host for H. boddaertii, and is the first report of a natural infection by Hexametra in Argentina. Since Hexametra parasites may contribute to several pathological conditions in humans, and with the recent availability of O. guibei specimens through the illegal pet trade, it is necessary to consider the possibility of zoonotic helminth transmission of Hexametra from snake to human. PMID:27270391

  1. Successful Antiparasitic Treatment for Cysticercosis is Associated with a Fast and Marked Reduction of Circulating Antigen Levels in a Naturally Infected Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Armando E; Bustos, Javier A; Garcia, Hector H; Rodriguez, Silvia; Zimic, Mirko; Castillo, Yesenia; Praet, Nicolas; Gabriël, Sarah; Gilman, Robert H; Dorny, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is a common parasitic infection of humans and pigs. We evaluated the posttreatment evolution of circulating parasite-specific antigen titers in 693 consecutive blood samples from 50 naturally infected cysticercotic pigs, which received different regimes of antiparasitic drugs (N = 39, 7 groups), prednisone (N = 5), or controls (N = 6). Samples were collected from baseline to week 10 after treatment, when pigs were euthanized and carefully dissected at necropsy. Antigen levels decreased proportionally to the efficacy of treatment and correlated with the remaining viable cysts at necropsy (Pearson's p = 0.67, P = 0.000). A decrease of 5 times in antigen levels (logarithmic scale) compared with baseline was found in 20/26 pigs free of cysts at necropsy, compared with 1/24 of those who had persisting viable cysts (odds ratio [OR] = 76.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.1-3308.6, P < 0.001). Antigen monitoring reflects the course of infection in the pig. If a similar correlation exists in infected humans, this assay may provide a minimally invasive and easy monitoring assay to assess disease evolution and efficacy of antiparasitic treatment in human neurocysticercosis. PMID:26392159

  2. Loss of neurovirulence is associated with reduction of cerebral capillary sequestration during acute Babesia bovis infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe neurological signs that develop during acute infection by virulent strains of Babesia bovis are associated with sequestration of infected erythrocytes in cerebral capillaries. Serial passage of virulent strains in cattle results in attenuated derivatives that do not cause neurologic disease. We evaluated whether serial passage also results in a loss of cerebral capillary sequestration by examining brain biopsies during acute disease and at necropsy. Findings Cerebral biopsies of spleen intact calves inoculated intravenously with a virulent or attenuated strain pair of B. bovis were evaluated for capillary sequestration at the onset of babesiosis and during severe disease. In calves infected with the virulent strain, there was a significant increase in sequestration between the first and second biopsy timepoint. The attenuated strain was still capable of sequestration, but at a reduced level, and did not change significantly between the first and second biopsy. Necropsy examination confirmed the second biopsy results and demonstrated that sequestration identified at necropsy reflects pathologic changes occurring in live animals. Conclusions Loss of neurovirulence after serial in vivo passage of the highly virulent T2Bo strain of B. bovis in splenectomized animals is associated with a significant reduction of cerebral capillary sequestration. Previous genomic analysis of this and two other strain pairs suggests that this observation could be related to genomic complexity, particularly of the ves gene family, rather than consistent gene specific differences. Additional experiments will examine whether differential gene expression of ves genes is also associated with reduced cerebral sequestration and neurovirulence in attenuated strains. PMID:23777713

  3. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF PATHOLOGIC FINDINGS IN CAPTIVE ROCK HYRAX (PROCAVIA CAPENSIS) IN THE UNITED STATES.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Tamara N; Garner, Michael M; Bonar, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    A retrospective examination of gross and histologic reports was performed to find common lesions in young and adult captive rock hyrax ( Procavia capensis ) from multiple zoo populations. One hundred and thirty-seven reports were analyzed from specimens that were submitted to Northwest ZooPath from 1997 to 2013. Histologic findings from necropsy and biopsy reports and causes of mortality only from necropsy reports were compiled to determine the most common findings. Within the study population, 41 (30%) were male, 62 (45%) were female, and the remainder (34, 25%) were of undetermined sex. Of the 111 necropsies, 87 (78%) died naturally, and 24 (22%) were euthanatized. There were 26 (19%) biopsies with no known status of the animal. The most frequent causes of death or reason for euthanasia were bacterial septicemia (n = 29, 21%) and degenerative cardiomyopathy (n = 29, 21%). The other most prevalent lesions were hemosiderosis (n = 55, 40%), pancreatic islet and interstitial fibrosis (n = 36, 26%), pneumonia of undetermined cause (n = 26, 19%), enteritis/colitis (n = 24, 18%), and renal tubular necrosis (n = 20, 15%). In many animals of this study population (n = 115, 84%), multiple lesions affecting multiple organs were found. PMID:26667536

  4. Quality assessment of perinatal and infant postmortem examinations in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Pakis, Isil; Karapirli, Mustafa; Karayel, Ferah; Turan, Arzu; Akyildiz, Elif; Polat, Oguz

    2008-09-01

    An autopsy examination is important in identifying the cause of death and as a means of auditing clinical and forensic practice; however, especially in perinatal and infantile age groups determining the cause of death leads to some difficulties in autopsy practice. In this study, 15,640 autopsies recorded during the years 2000-2004 in the Mortuary Department of the Council of Forensic Medicine were reviewed. Autopsy findings of 510 cases between 20 completed weeks of gestation and 1 year of age were analyzed retrospectively. The quality of each necropsy report was assessed using a modification of the system gestational age assessment described by Rushton, which objectively scores aspects identified by the Royal College of Pathologists as being part of a necropsy. According to their ages, the cases were subdivided into three groups. Intrauterine deaths were 31% (158 cases), neonatal deaths were 24% (123 cases), and infantile deaths were 45% (229 cases) of all cases. Scores for the quality of the necropsy report were above the minimum acceptable score with 44% in intrauterine, 88% in neonatal and infantile deaths. PMID:18637051

  5. Experimental induction of abdominal tympany, abomasitis, and abomasal ulceration by intraruminal inoculation of Clostridium perfringens type A in neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Roeder, B L; Chengappa, M M; Nagaraja, T G; Avery, T B; Kennedy, G A

    1988-02-01

    The etiologic role of Clostridum perfringens type A in the acute abdominal syndrome characterized by abomasal and rumen tympany, abomasitis, and abomasal ulceration was investigated in neonatal calves. Eight calves, 4 to 12 days old, were inoculated intraruminally with toxigenic C perfringens type A. Before and after C perfringens inoculation, blood samples were collected from all calves for blood gas and serum biochemical analysis and for determination of serum copper concentration; ruminal fluid was obtained for isolation of C perfringens. Calves were monitored daily for clinical signs of the syndrome and, depending on the severity of clinical signs, they were either euthanatized or redosed within 4 to 7 days. After necropsy, specimens obtained from the abomasum and rumen for macroscopic and microscopic examination and for anaerobic bacteriologic culture were processed in routine manner. Intraruminal inoculation of C perfringens type A into healthy calves induced anorexia, depression, bloat, diarrhea, and in some calves, death. Serum copper concentration was within normal range. Necropsy revealed variable degrees of abomasitis, petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages, and ulcers (ranging from pinpoint to nearly perforate) in the abomasum. Seven of those calves also had multiple trichobezoars in the rumen. These necropsy findings were not seen in calves (controls) given distilled H2O only. In affected calves, acute abdominal syndrome was unrelated to copper deficiency, and C perfringens type A given intraruminally was able to induce clinical signs similar to those of the naturally acquired disease. PMID:2894790

  6. Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24 h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12 h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO(2), suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism. PMID:22675306

  7. Distribution of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in Naturally and Experimentally Infected Western Gray Squirrels (Sciurus griseus)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kelly; Salkeld, Daniel J.; Lane, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The dynamics of Borrelia burgdorferi infections within its natural hosts are poorly understood. We necropsied four wild-caught western gray squirrels (Sciurus griseus) that were acquired during a previous study that evaluated the reservoir competence of this rodent for the Lyme disease spirochete. One animal was infected experimentally, whereas the others were infected in the wild before capture. To investigate dissemination of B. burgdorferi and concurrent histopathologic lesions in different tissues, blood specimens, synovial and cerebrospinal fluid, ear-punch biopsies, and diverse tissue samples from skin and various organs were taken and examined by culture, polymerase chain reaction, and histology. Borrelia-positive cultures were obtained from three of the squirrels, that is, from skin biopsies (7 of 20 samples), ear-punch biopsies (2 of 8), and one (1 of 5) lymph node. Sequencing of amplicons confirmed B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) infection in 9 of 10 culture-positive samples and in DNA extracted from all 10 positive cultures. The experimentally infected squirrel yielded most of the positive samples. In contrast, bodily fluids, all other organ specimens from these animals, and all samples from one naturally infected squirrel were negative for Borrelia for both assays. None of the necropsied squirrels exhibited specific clinical signs associated with B. burgdorferi. Similarly, necropsy and histological examination of tissues indicated the presence of underlying infectious processes, none of which could be ascribed conclusively to B. burgdorferi infection. Based on these results, obtained from a small number of animals investigated at a single time point, we suggest that B. burgdorferi s.s. infection in S. griseus may result in rather localized dissemination of spirochetes, and that mild or nonclinical disease might be more common after several months of infection duration. Since spirochetes could be detected in squirrels 7–21 months

  8. MRI as a Novel In Vivo Approach for Assessing Structural Changes of Chlamydia Pathology in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shubing; Meng, Xiangjun; Skinner, Julie M.; Heinrichs, Jon H.; Smith, Jeffrey G.; Boddicker, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is among the most prevalent of sexually transmitted diseases. While Chlamydia infection is a reportable event and screening has increased over time, enhanced surveillance has not resulted in a reduction in the rate of infections, and Chlamydia infections frequently recur. The development of a preventative vaccine for Chlamydia may be the only effective approach for reducing infection and the frequency of pathological outcomes. Current vaccine research efforts involve time consuming and/or invasive approaches for assessment of disease state, and MRI presents a clinically translatable method for assessing infection and related pathology both quickly and non-invasively. Longitudinal T2-weighted MRI was performed over 63 days on both control or Chlamydia muridarum challenged mice, either with or without elementary body (EB) immunization, and gross necropsy was performed on day 65. A scoring system was developed to assess the number of regions affected by Chlamydia pathology and was used to document pathology over time and at necropsy. The scoring system documented increasing incidence of pathology in the unimmunized and challenged mice (significantly greater compared to the control and EB immunized-challenged groups) by 21 days post-challenge. No differences between the unchallenged and EB immunized-challenged mice were observed. MRI scores at Day 63 were consistently higher than gross necropsy scores at Day 65, although two of the three groups of mice showed no significant differences between the two techniques. In this work we describe the application of MRI in mice for the potential evaluation of disease pathology and sequelae caused by C. muridarum infection and this technique’s potential for evaluation of vaccines for Chlamydia. PMID:27467585

  9. Longitudinal study on morbidity and mortality in white veal calves in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mortality and morbidity are hardly documented in the white veal industry, despite high levels of antimicrobial drug use and resistance. The objective of the present study was to determine the causes and epidemiology of morbidity and mortality in dairy, beef and crossbred white veal production. A total of 5853 calves, housed in 15 production cohorts, were followed during one production cycle. Causes of mortality were determined by necropsy. Morbidity was daily recorded by the producers. Results The total mortality risk was 5,3% and was significantly higher in beef veal production compared to dairy or crossbreds. The main causes of mortality were pneumonia (1.3% of the calves at risk), ruminal disorders (0.7%), idiopathic peritonitis (0.5%), enterotoxaemia (0.5%) and enteritis (0.4%). Belgian Blue beef calves were more likely to die from pneumonia, enterotoxaemia and arthritis. Detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus at necropsy was associated with chronic pneumonia and pleuritis. Of the calves, 25.4% was treated individually and the morbidity rate was 1.66 cases per 1000 calf days at risk. The incidence rate of respiratory disease, diarrhea, arthritis and otitis was 0.95, 0.30, 0.11 and 0.07 cases per 1000 calf days at risk respectively. Morbidity peaked in the first three weeks after arrival and gradually declined towards the end of the production cycle. Conclusions The present study provided insights into the causes and epidemiology of morbidity and mortality in white veal calves in Belgium, housed in the most frequent housing system in Europe. The necropsy findings, identified risk periods and differences between production systems can guide both veterinarians and producers towards the most profitable and ethical preventive and therapeutic protocols. PMID:22414223

  10. Temporal localization of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in reproductive tissues of experimentally infected boars.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Cinta; García, Carlos; Simarro, Isabel; Castro, José M

    2003-11-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been reported to be shed in the semen of infected boars. To determine whether the reproductive tissues could be a persistent source of virus and the possible origin of PRRSV found in semen of infected boars, 20 PRRSV-seronegative boars were intranasally inoculated with 5 x 10(6) median tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of PRRSV and necropsied at different times post-inoculation (p.i.) from Day 2 to Day 37 p.i. Blood samples were collected before experimental inoculation, at necropsy and at different times p.i. At necropsy, epididymal semen and reproductive tissues were collected and the presence of the virus determined by virus isolation. The infection of the boars was demonstrated by the isolation of the virus from the sera of all inoculated boars and by seroconversion. PRRSV was detected in serum samples from Day 2 to Day 23 p.i., although the viremic period was largely dependent on the individual response to infection. Viral replication was proven within different reproductive tissues from Day 2 to Day 23 p.i., being most consistently found in the epididymus. In addition, PRRSV was isolated in semen from Day 4 to Day 10 p.i. The correlation of a diminished viremia and the inability to isolate PRRSV from semen or reproductive tissues may be due to one of two possibilities. First, viremia is responsible for most of the virus isolated from reproductive tissues due to the movement of PRRSV-infected cells out of the blood and into the tissues. Second, viremia may initially seed the reproductive tissues with PRRSV, and then the virus is produced into the reproductive tract and shed into semen at low levels. PMID:14519471

  11. Effects of capture-related injury on postcapture movement of white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Dechen Quinn, Amy C; Williams, David M; Porter, William F; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Hynes, Kevin

    2014-04-01

    Capture-related injuries or deaths of wildlife study subjects pose concerns to researchers, from considerations for animal welfare to inflated project costs and biased data. Capture myopathy (CM) is an injury that can affect an animal's survival ≤ 30 days postrelease, but is often difficult to detect without close monitoring and immediate necropsy. We evaluated the influence of capture and handling on postcapture movement in an attempt to characterize movement rates of animals suffering from CM. We captured and global positioning system-collared 95 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in central and northern New York during 2006-2008. Six juveniles died within 30 days postrelease, and necropsy reports indicated that two suffered CM (2%). We compared postcapture movement rates for juveniles that survived >30 days with those that died ≤ 30 days postcapture. Survivor movement rates (43.74 m/hr, SD = 3.53, n = 28) were significantly higher than rates for deer that died within 30 days (17.70 m/hr, SD = 1.57, n = 6) (P<0.01). Additionally, movement rates of juveniles that died of CM (15.1 m/hr) were 5.1 m/hr lower than those for juveniles that died of other causes ≤ 30 days postcapture (20.2 m/hr), but we were unable to evaluate this statistically because of insufficient sample size. We found no difference in vital rates (temperature, heart rate, respiration rate) during handling between survivors and juveniles that died within 30 days postcapture but observed that survivors were in better body condition at capture. These results suggest that deer likely to die within the 30-day CM window can be identified soon after capture, provided that intensive movement data are collected. Further, even if necropsy reports are unavailable, these animals should be censored from analysis because their behavior is not representative of movements of surviving animals. PMID:24484502

  12. Enteric disease in postweaned beef calves associated with Bovine coronavirus clade 2.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Robert W; Herd, Heather R; Sorensen, Nicholas J; Confer, Anthony W; Ritchey, Jerry W; Ridpath, Julia F; Burge, Lurinda J

    2015-01-01

    Bovine coronavirus (BoCV; Betacoronavirus 1) infections are associated with varied clinical presentations including neonatal diarrhea, winter dysentery in dairy cattle, and respiratory disease in various ages of cattle. The current report presents information on BoCV infections associated with enteric disease of postweaned beef cattle in Oklahoma. In 3 separate accessions from a single herd, 1 in 2012 and 2 in 2013, calves were observed with bloody diarrhea. One calf in 2012 died and was necropsied, and 2 calves from this herd died in 2013 and were necropsied. A third calf from another herd died and was necropsied. The gross and histologic diagnosis was acute, hemorrhagic colitis in all 4 cattle. Colonic tissues from all 4 animals were positive by fluorescent antibody testing and/or immunohistochemical staining for BoCV antigen. Bovine coronavirus was isolated in human rectal tumor cells from swabs of colon surfaces of all animals. The genomic information from a region of the S envelope region revealed BoCV clade 2. Detection of BoCV clade 2 in beef cattle in Oklahoma is consistent with recovery of BoCV clade 2 from the respiratory tract of postweaned beef calves that had respiratory disease signs or were healthy. Further investigations on the ecology of BoCV in cattle are important, as BoCV may be an emerging disease beyond the initial descriptions. Challenge studies are needed to determine pathogenicity of these strains, and to determine if current BoCV vaccines are efficacious against the BoCV clade 2 strains. PMID:25428188

  13. Acquisition of resistance after continuous infection with Ascaridia galli in chickens.

    PubMed

    Ferdushy, T; Schou, T W; Norup, L R; Dalgaard, T S; Thamsborg, S M; Nejsum, P; Permin, A; Juul-Madsen, H R; Kyvsgaard, N C

    2014-07-01

    SUMMARY Acquired resistance against Ascaridia galli infection was studied in seventy-two 18-week-old white Leghorn chickens allocated to six groups (G1-G6). In order to understand the population dynamics following trickle-infection (100 eggs per chicken twice weekly), chickens of subgroups of G1 were necropsied 3 days after 1, 6 or 12 inoculations (G1A, G1B and G1C respectively), while G2-G4 were inoculated for 6 weeks. G2 was necropsied 4 weeks after the last inoculation. The number of established larvae increased initially (between G1A and G1B) but decreased after repeated inoculations (G1C, G2). G3, G4 and G5 were used to measure the efficacy of anthelminthic treatment and to monitor the acquisition of resistance following a challenge infection. At week 7 G3, G4 and G5 were treated with flubendazole for 7 days in the feed. Two weeks after treatment the chickens in G4 and G5 were challenged with 500 eggs. G6 was left as uninfected control. Necropsy at week 10 after first inoculation revealed a lower establishment rate, an impaired development and a more posterior localization of the larvae in G4 (trickle-infected-treated-challenged) compared with G5 (treated-challenged). IgY level in serum reached noticeable level at 14 dpi in G2 and G4 chickens, and in G4 chickens IgY level further increased after challenge infection. The study provides evidence that acquired resistance against A. galli in chickens leads to a significant yet incomplete protection against re-infection. PMID:25003836

  14. Experimentally induced vitamin E-selenium deficiency in the growing dog.

    PubMed

    Van Vleet, J F

    1975-04-15

    Eight 5-to 8-week-old Beagle pups were allotted to 4 groups of 2 dogs each. For 55 to 70 days, they were fed either a semisynthetic basal diet (BD) deficient in vitamin E and selenium (Se) (group 1) or the BD supplemented with either 30 IU alpha-tocopherol/kg (group 2), 0.5 ppm Se as selenite (group 3), or 1.0 ppm Se as selenite (group 4). In the dogs fed the BD, clinical signs of vitamin E-Se deficiency developed after 40 to 60 days. These signs were accompanied by increased plasma activity of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT). The dogs were euthanatized after 10 to 15 days of progressive clinical signs, including muscular weakness, subcutaneous edema, anorexia, depression, dyspnea, and eventual coma. Gross lesions seen at necropsy included ventral subcutaneous edema, generalized skeletal muscular pallor and edema with scattered white longitudinal streaking, prominent brownish yellow discoloration of the intestinal musculature, and a layer of white chalky material at the renal corticomedullary junction. Microscopically, there was evidence of extensive skeletal muscular degeneration and regeneration, focal subendocardial necrosis in the ventricular myocardium, intestinal lipofuscinosis, and renal mineralization. Mean hepatic Se content in the dogs fed the BD was 0.10 ppm (wet weight basis) at necropsy. In the dogs fed the 3 supplemented diets, clinical signs of deficiency did not develop. At necropsy, mild skeletal myopathy was evident histologically in the dogs fed BD and 0.5 ppm Se (group 3) but not in the dogs fed the other supplemented diets. Intestinal lipofuscinosis was found in the dogs fed the 3 supplemented diets but was less severe in the dogs fed the diet supplemented with vitamin E than in those fed diets supplemented with Se. PMID:1120735

  15. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging with neuropathological findings in the diagnosis of HIV and CMV associated CNS disease in AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R F; Lucas, S B; Hall-Craggs, M A; Brink, N S; Scaravilli, F; Chinn, R J; Kendall, B E; Williams, I G; Harrison, M J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the results of clinical assessment and MRI with neuropathological findings in the diagnosis of HIV and cytomegalovirus (CMV) associated CNS disease. METHODS: A retrospective study of 35 patients infected with HIV who were examined at necropsy between four and 70 (median 20) days after neurological assessment and MRI. RESULTS: Of the 35 patients, 19 had diffuse white matter hyperintensity on T2 weighted MRI, six of whom also had focal lesions. Nine other patients had focal white matter lesions and seven had changes in cortical atrophy only. Necropsy in the 19 with diffuse white matter hyperintensity showed HIV leukoencephalopathy (HIVLEP) with encephalitis in 10, CMV encephalitis in three, both HIVLEP/HIV encephalitis and CMV encephalitis in one, lymphoma in three, and non-specific inflammation in two. Necropsy in the 16 other patients without diffuse white matter hyperintensity showed CMV encephalitis in six, HIV encephalitis (without HIVLEP) in two, CMV encephalitis and HIVLEP/HIV encephalitis in one, non-HIV associated abnormalities in five, herpes simplex encephalitis in one, and lymphoma in one. CMV DNA was detected in CSF of five of seven patients with CMV encephalitis and in two of two with CMV associated polyradiculopathy but without CMV encephalitis. Diffuse white matter hyperintensity on MRI had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 66.6%, and a positive predictive value of 58% for diagnosis of HIVLEP. CONCLUSION: Diffuse white matter hyperintensity on MRI can be due to either HIV or CMV associated pathology or non-specific abnormalities. Images PMID:9120446

  16. Experimentally induced cartilaginous fractures (osteochondritis dissecans) in foals fed low-copper diets.

    PubMed

    Bridges, C H; Harris, E D

    1988-07-15

    Four Thoroughbred foals were weaned from their dams when they were 1 day old and were fed a liquid milk-replacer diet containing approximately 1.7 micrograms of copper/g from plastic buckets for 4 to 7 months. They were kept in stalls with fiberglass walls and asphalt floors covered with rubber pads. Serum copper and zinc concentrations were determined 3 times/week by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and liver copper and zinc concentrations were determined similarly after acid digestion of tissues taken at necropsy. The amount of soluble collagen in articular cartilage and aortic tissue was determined after necropsy. Clinical signs of illness, particularly evidence of lameness, were monitored daily. The foals were weighed weekly, and growth rate was monitored by measurement of height at the withers. Packed cell volumes and total and differential WBC counts were measured each time blood was drawn for copper and zinc concentration determinations. The foals were examined by necropsy at the end of the experiment, and the tissues were examined histologically. The foals developed intermittent, but nondebilitating, diarrhea with the onset of low serum copper concentrations. Considering the totally liquid diet, the foals grew well. Serum copper concentrations decreased to less than 0.1 micrograms/ml in 13 to 16 weeks. Lameness was evident 2 to 6 weeks after serum copper concentrations decreased to their lowest value (less than 0.1 micrograms/ml). All foals developed stilted gaits and ultimately walked on the front of their hooves. Major hematologic changes and alterations of hair color were not evident. Soluble collagen of articular cartilage and aortic tissue increased from 340 to 600% greater than that of control foals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3403350

  17. Septicemic pasteurellosis in free-ranging neonatal pronghorn in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunbar, Michael R.; Wolcott, Mark J.; Rimler, R.B.; Berlowski, Brenda M.

    2000-01-01

    As part of a study to determine the cause(s) of population decline and low survival of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) neonates on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge (HMNAR), Oregon (USA), 55 of 104 neonates captured during May 1996 and 1997 were necropsied (n = 28, 1996; n = 27, 1997) to determine cause of death. Necropsies were conducted on fawns that died during May, June, or July of each year. The objectives of this study were to report the occurrence and pathology of pasteurellosis in neonates and determine if the isolated strain of Pasteurella multocida was unique. Septicemic pasteurellosis, caused by P. multocida, was diagnosed as the cause of death for two neonates in May and June 1997. Necropsy findings included widely scattered petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages found over a large portion of the subcutaneous tissue, meninges of the brain, epicardium, skeletal muscle, and serosal surface of the thorasic and abdominal cavities. Histological examination of lung tissues revealed diffuse congestion and edema and moderate to marked multifocal infiltrate of macrophages, neutrophils, and numerous bacteria within many terminal bronchioles and alveoli. Pasteurella multocida serotypes A:3,4, and B:1 were isolated from several tissues including lung, intestinal, thorasic fluid, and heart blood. Each B:1 isolate had DNA restriction endonuclease fingerprint profiles distinct from isolates previously characterized from domestic cattle, swan (Olor spp.), moose (Alces alces), and pronghorn from Montana (USA). This is the first report of pasteurellosis in pronghorn from Oregon and the B:1 isolates appear to be unique in comparison to DNA fingerprint profiles from selected domestic and wild species.

  18. Treatment of Baylisascaris procyonis infections in dogs with milbemycin oxime.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Dwight D; Ulrich, Michael A; Gregory, Dawn E; Neumann, Norwood R; Legg, Walter; Stansfield, David

    2005-05-15

    An examination was made as to the ability of Sentinel Flavor Tabs (milbemycin oxime/lufenuron) to treat Baylisascaris procyonis infections in dogs. The study was designed as a critical trial and included five naturally infected dogs and two dogs that were experimentally infected. Another dog from a prior clinical trial that was treated with Sentinel Flavor Tabs as part of the original FDA submission package for intestinal nematode infections was also included with the treated dogs. Of the five naturally infected dogs treated as part of the critical trial, three were cleared of their infections. These five dogs passed a total of 52 worms after treatment; one dog retained 23 worms and the other retained 1 worm at necropsy 7 days after treatment. Two of five experimentally infected Beagle dogs that had been given mice that had been fed 200 infectious eggs, developed patent infections with the parasite. These dogs were treated, and one of the dogs passed one worm and the other passed two worms after treatment with no worms being detected at necropsy 7 days after treatment. The one dog that was treated with milbemycin oxime as part of the FDA submission was clear of worms at necropsy. Overall, the mean efficacy of Sentinel Flavor Tabs was found to be 91.0%. Of the eight dogs that were treated, six were totally cleared of their infections, a cure rate of 75%. The two dogs that did not clear their infections had very large numbers of adult B. procyonis within their intestinal tracts at the time of treatment, one dog had 40 worms (23 remaining) and the other had 26 worms (1 remaining). It is suggested that the treatment of dogs with monthly Sentinel Flavor Tabs could markedly reduce the chance of infected dogs contaminating the environment. Also, additional monthly treatments are highly likely to clear dogs of any worms not killed with the initial treatment. PMID:15845284

  19. Anthelmintic efficacy of ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for seven consecutive days (100 µg/kg/day), against nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Teixeira, Weslen Fabricio Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Buzulini, Carolina; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Fávero, Flávia Carolina; Gomes, Lucas Vinicius Costa; Prando, Luciana; Bichuette, Murilo A; Dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate ivermectin and abamectin, both administered orally in naturally infected domestic swine, as well as analysing if the EPG (eggs per gram of faeces) values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. The animals were randomly selected based on the average of three consecutive EPG counts of Strongylida, Ascaris suum and Trichuris for experiment I, and of Strongylida and Trichuris for experiment II. After the random draw, eight animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day ivermectin (Ivermectina® premix, Ouro Fino Agronegócios), eight other animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day abamectin (Virbamax® premix - Virbac do Brasil Indústria e Comércio Ltda.), and eight pigs were kept as controls. EPG counts were performed for each individual animal at 14th day post-treatment (DPT). All animals (control and treatment) were necropsied at the 14th DPT. The results from both experiments demonstrate that both ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for a continuous period of seven days, at a daily dosage of 100 µg/kg, were highly effective (>95%) against Hyostrongylus rubidus, Strongyloides ransomi, Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus salmi. Against Oesophagostomum dentatum, abamectin presented over 95% efficacy against both evaluated strains, while ivermectin reached other strain as resistant. Regarding T. suis, both ivermectin and abamectin were effective (efficacies >90%) against one of the tested strains, while the other one was classified as resistant. Furthermore, the EPG values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. PMID:25278142

  20. Coccidioidomycosis and other systemic mycoses of marine mammals stranding along the central California, USA coast: 1998-2012.

    PubMed

    Huckabone, Sara E; Gulland, Frances M D; Johnson, Suzanne M; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Dodd, Erin M; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Dunkin, Robin C; Casper, David; Carlson, Erin L; Sykes, Jane E; Meyer, Weiland; Miller, Melissa A

    2015-04-01

    A wide range of systemic mycoses have been reported from captive and wild marine mammals from North America. Examples include regionally endemic pathogens such as Coccidioides and Blastomyces spp., and novel pathogens like Cryptococcus gattii, which appear may have been introduced to North America by humans. Stranding and necropsy data were analyzed from three marine mammal stranding and response facilities on the central California coast to assess the prevalence, host demographics, and lesion distribution of systemic mycoses affecting locally endemic marine mammals. Between 1 January 1998 and 30 June 2012, >7,000 stranded marine mammals were necropsied at the three facilities. Necropsy and histopathology records were reviewed to identify cases of locally invasive or systemic mycoses and determine the nature and distribution of fungal lesions. Forty-one animals (0.6%) exhibited cytological, culture- or histologically confirmed locally invasive or systemic mycoses: 36 had coccidioidomycosis, two had zygomycosis, two had cryptococcosis, and one was systemically infected with Scedosporium apiospermum (an Ascomycota). Infected animals included 18 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), 20 southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis), two Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi), one Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli), and one northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris). Coccidioidomycosis was reported from 15 sea lions, 20 sea otters, and one harbor seal, confirming that Coccidioides spp. is the most common pathogen causing systemic mycosis in marine mammals stranding along the central California coast. We also report the first confirmation of C. gattii infection in a wild marine mammal from California and the first report of coccidioidomycosis in a wild harbor seal. Awareness of these pathogenic fungi during clinical care and postmortem examination is an important part of marine mammal population health surveillance and human health protection

  1. EFFECTS OF TOPICAL TREATMENT WITH EUPHORBIA TIRUCALLI LATEX ON THE SURVIVAL AND INTESTINAL ADHESIONS IN RATS WITH EXPERIMENTAL PERITONITIS

    PubMed Central

    de ARAÚJO, Lilhian Alves; MRUÉ, Fátima; NEVES, Roberpaulo Anacleto; ALVES, Maxley Martins; da SILVA-JÚNIOR, Nelson Jorge; SILVA, Marcelo Seixo de Brito; de MELO-REIS, Paulo Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of plants of the family Euphorbiaceae, particularly Euphorbia tirucalli (avelós) has been popularly widespread for treating a variety of diseases of infectious, tumoral, and inflammatory. Aim: To demonstrated antimicrobial and immunomodulatory effects of these extracts, evaluating the effect of a topical treatment with an aqueous solution of avelós latex on the survival and on intestinal adhesions in rats with experimental peritonitis. Methods: Peritonitis was induced in 24 Wistar rats, that were randomized into four groups of six as follows: (1) Control group (n=6), no treatment; (2) Antibiotic group (n=6), treatment with a single intramuscular dose of antibiotic Unasyn; (3) Saline group (n=6), the abdominal cavity was washed with 0.9% saline; and (4) E.tirucalli group (n=6), the abdominal cavity was washed with E. tirucalli at a concentration of 12 mg/ml. The animals that died were necropsied, and the time of death was recorded. The survivors were killed on postoperative day 11, and necropsy was subsequently performed for evaluation of the intestinal adhesions. Results: Significant differences were observed in the control and antibiotic groups (p<0.01) with respect to the survival hours when compared with the saline and E. tirucalli groups. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the survival of animals in the saline andE. tirucalli groups; however, one animal died in the saline group. Necropsy of the animals in the saline and E. tirucalligroups showed strong adhesions resistant to manipulation, between the intestinal loops and abdominal wall. The remaining groups did not show any adhesions. Conclusions: Topical treatment with E. tirucalli latex stimulated an increased formation of intestinal adhesions and prevented the death of all animals with peritonitis. PMID:26734792

  2. Supplemental oxygen attenuates the increase in wound bacterial growth during simulated aeromedical evacuation in goats

    PubMed Central

    Earnest, Ryan E.; Sonnier, Dennis I.; Makley, Amy T.; Campion, Eric M.; Wenke, Joseph C.; Bailey, Stephanie R.; Dorlac, Warren C.; Lentsch, Alex B.; Pritts, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial growth in soft tissue and open fractures is a known risk factor for tissue loss and complications in contaminated musculoskeletal wounds. Current care for battlefield casualties with soft tissue and musculoskeletal wounds includes tactical and strategic aeromedical evacuation (AE). This exposes patients to a hypobaric, hypoxic environment. In the present study, we sought to determine whether exposure to AE alters bacterial growth in contaminated complex musculoskeletal wounds and whether supplemental oxygen had any effect on wound infections during simulated AE. Methods A caprine model of a contaminated complex musculoskeletal wound was employed. Complex musculoskeletal wounds were created and inoculated with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Goats were divided into three experimental groups: ground control, simulated aeromedical evacuation (AE), and simulated AE with supplemental oxygen (AE+O2). Simulated AE was induced in a hypobaric chamber pressurized to 8800 feet for 7 hours. Bacterial luminescence was measured using a photon counting camera at three timepoints: preflight (20 hours post surgery), postflight (7 hours from preflight and 27 hours post-surgery), and necropsy (24 hours from preflight and 44 hours post surgery). Results There was a significant increase in bacterial growth in the AE group compared to the ground control group measured postflight and at necropsy. Simulated AE induced hypoxia with oxygen saturation less than 93%. Supplemental oxygen corrected the hypoxia and significantly reduced bacterial growth in wounds at necropsy. Conclusions Hypoxia induced during simulated AE enhances bacterial growth in complex musculoskeletal wounds which can be prevented with the application of supplemental oxygen to the host. PMID:22743376

  3. Echinococcus in the wild carnivores and stray dogs of northern Tunisia: the results of a pilot survey.

    PubMed

    Lahmar, S; Boufana, B S; Lahmar, S; Inoubli, S; Guadraoui, M; Dhibi, M; Bradshaw, H; Craig, P S

    2009-06-01

    Echinococcus granulosus is endemic throughout Tunisia and E. multilocularis has previously been reported as the cause of two cases of human alveolar echinococcosis in the north-west of the country. The aim of the present study was to screen wild carnivores from the north-western Jendouba governorate and semi-stray dogs from the Siliana and Sejnane regions of northern Tunisia for these two zoonotic cestodes. The results of the coproscopy, coproELISA and coproPCR that were undertaken were compared with those of necropsy, where possible. Overall, 111 faecal samples (51 from wild carnivores and 60 from stray dogs) were tested by coproELISA for Echinococcus antigen and by coproPCR for E. granulosus and E. multilocularis species-specific DNA. All 60 dogs and seven of the wild carnivores were necropsied. Eleven (18.4%) of the dogs and one golden jackal (Canis aureus) were found positive for E. granulosus at necropsy. The jackal was found to be carrying 72 E. granulosus tapeworms, which were confirmed to be of the common sheep-dog (G1) genotype. Faecal samples from 10 (19.6%) of the wild carnivores--putatively, four golden jackals, two red foxes (Vulpes vulpes atlantica), one hyaena (Hyaena hyaena) and three genets (Genetta genetta)--gave a positive result in the Echinococcus coproELISA. In the coproPCR-based follow-up, E. granulosus DNA was detected in faecal samples from five jackals, two foxes and six stray dogs. The DNA of E. multilocularis was not, however, detected in any of the faecal samples investigated. This is the first report from Tunisia of (coproPCR-)confirmed E. granulosus infections in golden jackals and red foxes. The possible role of such wild hosts in the transmission of E. granulosus in Tunisia should be investigated further. The possibility of the active transmission of E. multilocularis in Tunisia still remains an open question. PMID:19508750

  4. MRI as a Novel In Vivo Approach for Assessing Structural Changes of Chlamydia Pathology in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Hines, Catherine D G; Wang, Shubing; Meng, Xiangjun; Skinner, Julie M; Heinrichs, Jon H; Smith, Jeffrey G; Boddicker, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is among the most prevalent of sexually transmitted diseases. While Chlamydia infection is a reportable event and screening has increased over time, enhanced surveillance has not resulted in a reduction in the rate of infections, and Chlamydia infections frequently recur. The development of a preventative vaccine for Chlamydia may be the only effective approach for reducing infection and the frequency of pathological outcomes. Current vaccine research efforts involve time consuming and/or invasive approaches for assessment of disease state, and MRI presents a clinically translatable method for assessing infection and related pathology both quickly and non-invasively. Longitudinal T2-weighted MRI was performed over 63 days on both control or Chlamydia muridarum challenged mice, either with or without elementary body (EB) immunization, and gross necropsy was performed on day 65. A scoring system was developed to assess the number of regions affected by Chlamydia pathology and was used to document pathology over time and at necropsy. The scoring system documented increasing incidence of pathology in the unimmunized and challenged mice (significantly greater compared to the control and EB immunized-challenged groups) by 21 days post-challenge. No differences between the unchallenged and EB immunized-challenged mice were observed. MRI scores at Day 63 were consistently higher than gross necropsy scores at Day 65, although two of the three groups of mice showed no significant differences between the two techniques. In this work we describe the application of MRI in mice for the potential evaluation of disease pathology and sequelae caused by C. muridarum infection and this technique's potential for evaluation of vaccines for Chlamydia. PMID:27467585

  5. Epidemiology of fishborne trematodiasis in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Sultanov, A; Abdybekova, A; Abdibaeva, A; Shapiyeva, Z; Yeshmuratov, T; Torgerson, P R

    2014-10-01

    Fish borne trematodes are an important cause of morbidity in Kazakhstan. The number of human cases of opisthorchiidosis (infection with parasites of the family opisthorchiidae) reached a peak of 2521 recorded cases (17 cases per 100,000) in 2002 with a gradual decline to 1225 cases (7.4 cases per 100,000) in 2011. Most human cases are found in the north and north east part of Kazakhstan in areas drained by the Irtysh River and it tributaries. A further focus is found in the north west in the Ural river basin in the European part of Kazakhstan. The most common occupations of patients with opisthorchiidosis included the manual laborers, those employed in the home or unemployed. Necropsy investigations of village dogs in an endemic region revealed 37 of 51 (72%) village dogs infected with either Opisthorchis felineus or Methorchis bilis. Likewise an investigation of 242 cats consisting of strays, village, suburban and city cats revealed 79 (33%) animals infected with O. felineus. Higher prevalences were seen in strays and village cats compared to suburban cats. No urban cats, which lived in apartments, were found to be infected. Other important zoonoses included Echinococcus granulosus, detected in 2 of the 51 necropsied village dogs and E. multilocularis was found in 2 out of 124 necropsied stray cats. Investigations of locally caught fish revealed 10 of 107 (9%) roach (Rutilus rutilus), 49 of 68(72%) ide (Leuciscus idus) and 2 of 79 (2.5%) bream (Abramis brama) infested with trematode metacercariae. No metacercariae were found in 609 crucian carp (Carassius carassius), 35 tench (Tinca tinca), 79 carp (Cyprinus carpio), 46 perch (Perca fluviatilis) or 20 zander (Sander lucioperca). PMID:24943190

  6. Left ventricular dysfunction in the fetus: relation to aortic valve anomalies and endocardial fibroelastosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sharland, G K; Chita, S K; Fagg, N L; Anderson, R H; Tynan, M; Cook, A C; Allan, L D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the relation between a characteristic form of left ventricular dysfunction in the fetus and abnormalities of the aortic valve and endocardial fibroelastosis of the left ventricle. DESIGN--A retrospective study to examine the correlation between echocardiographic findings in the fetus and postnatal or necropsy findings. SETTING--Tertiary referral centre for fetal echocardiography. PATIENTS--Thirty fetuses showing a characteristic echocardiographic picture of left ventricular dysfunction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The relation between the prenatal echocardiographic features and the postnatal and necropsy findings. RESULTS--At presentation the size of the left ventricular cavity was normal or enlarged in all cases. The measurements of the orifice of the aortic root and mitral valve were either normal or small for the gestational age. The echocardiographic diagnosis made at presentation was critical aortic stenosis in all cases. At necropsy or postnatal examination the aortic valve was dysplastic and stenotic in 15 cases and the left ventricle had become hypoplastic in one of these. Aortic atresia was present in seven patients, three of whom had a hypoplastic left ventricle. In six patients the aortic valve was bicuspid although not obstructive. One of these patients had hypoplasia of the aortic arch and one had a hypoplastic left ventricle but in the remaining four patients endocardial fibroelastosis of the left ventricle was the only abnormality found. No follow up information was available in two. Of 26 patients for whom there was postmortem information, 24 had evidence of some degree of endocardial fibroelastosis of the left ventricle. Sequential observations showed that five cases developed into the hypoplastic left heart syndrome. CONCLUSIONS--This type of left ventricular dysfunction in the fetus is the result of an overlap of diseases, including primary left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis, critical aortic stenosis, and the hypoplastic

  7. Patent ductus arteriosus in a lamb: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jafari Dehkordi, Afshin; Hoseini, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a persistent patency of a vessel normally present in the fetus that connects the pulmonary arterial system to the aorta. The ductus arteriosus fails to close at birth when breathing commences and placental blood circulation is removed. Closure of the ductus arteriosus arises in response to decline pulmonary vascular resistance and increased systemic vascular resistance. This report describes a case of PDA in a two-month-old male lamb with clinical signs of machinery murmur, tachycardia, increase respiratory rate, weakness and ill thrift. Echocardiographic examination and necropsy finding confirmed PDA. PMID:27226893

  8. Multiple sclerosis in research workers studying swayback in lambs: an updated report.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, G; McDougall, E I; Elian, M

    1985-01-01

    Four out of seven research workers into swayback disease, a neurological disease of lambs, developed symptoms and signs of multiple sclerosis, and were reported in 1947. A further worker later joined the group. All of the original seven have died and two at necropsy had multiple areas of demyelination in the brain and spinal cord. The chance of four or more out of a random group of eight men developing multiple sclerosis is about one in a thousand million. Multiple sclerosis has not occurred in other workers on swayback disease elsewhere. Images PMID:4045479

  9. Effects of polybrominated biphenyl on milk production, reproduction, and health problems in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Wastell, M E; Moody, D L; Plog, J F

    1978-04-01

    PBB found in relatively low levels among animals present on a cross-section of Michigan farms during the time PBB was inadvertantly added to dairy feeds had no effect upon these animals' milk production, body weight, weight gain, breeding and reproduction performance, incidence of commonly experienced health problems, calving rate, and the health of their calves. No significant differences in these vital areas could be seen between Michigan animals exposed to PBB and equivalent Wisconsin animals which had not been exposed to PBB when both groups were subjected to equivalent management practices. No pattern of gross of histopathological lesions was seen upon necropsy between test animals and control animals. PMID:210008

  10. High-risk coronary atheroma: the interplay between ischemia, plaque burden, and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rishi; Nicholls, Stephen J; Ellis, Stephen G; Tuzcu, E Murat; Kapadia, Samir R

    2014-04-01

    Necropsy studies have outlined the morphological characteristics of high-risk, or "vulnerable," coronary plaque segments, demonstrating the presence of inflammatory infiltrate and various compositional elements in patients who succumbed to fatal intracoronary thrombosis. However, accumulating evidence in vivo relates the overall burden of atherosclerosis, its rate of progression, and its subsequent ischemic potential with the risk for incident clinical events. These observations, coupled with the efficacy of contemporary medical therapies in reducing clinical event rates, have important implications for trial design of future human in vivo evaluations of vulnerable coronary plaque. PMID:23994415

  11. Acinic cell carcinoma in an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Fukuzawa, Kazuhiro; Abe, Hitoshi; Nagai, Toshihiro; Kameyama, Kaori

    2004-01-01

    A male African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris), estimated to be 3 years old, presented with exophthalmos and fixed abduction of the right eye. Radiographic examination revealed a retrobulbar tumor in the right orbital cavity. The mass was surgically resected but recurred 3 months later and the hedgehog died. There was no gross or microscopic evidence of salivary or lacrimal gland involvement of the tumor at surgery or at necropsy. The histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings were those of acinic cell carcinoma, the origin of which was unknown. This is the first known case of acinic cell carcinoma in an African hedgehog. PMID:15048626

  12. Chronic eosinophilic pancreatitis and ulcerative colitis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Breider, M A; Kiely, R G; Edwards, J F

    1985-04-15

    A generalized debilitating disease in a horse was believed to be related to hypersensitivity to migrating strongyle larvae. The clinical signs included weight loss, diarrhea, and ulcers on all 4 coronary bands. The mare's condition deteriorated rapidly, so the mare was euthanatized and necropsied. The major histopathologic findings were chronic multifocal eosinophilic pancreatitis, hepatic portal fibrosis, biliary hyperplasia, and chronic ulcerative eosinophilic colitis. This case was similar to previously reported cases of chronic eosinophilic gastroenteritis in horses. Although the etiologic agent was not evident, the distribution and character of the lesions were consistent with a hypersensitivity response to migrating parasitic larvae, most probably Strongylus equinus. PMID:3997643

  13. Phenotypical and Genotypical Properties of an Arcanobacterium pluranimalium Strain Isolated from a Juvenile Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata).

    PubMed

    Risse, Karin; Schlez, Karen; Eisenberg, Tobias; Geiger, Christina; Balbutskaya, Anna; Sammra, Osama; Lämmler, Christoph; Abdulmawjood, Amir

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to characterize phenotypically and genotypically an Arcanobacterium pluranimalium strain (A. pluranimalium 4868) following necropsy from a juvenile giraffe. The species identity could be confirmed by phenotypical investigations and by MALDI-TOF MS analysis, by sequencing the 16S rDNA, pluranimaliumlysin encoding gene pla, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase encoding gene gap with sequence similarities to A. pluranimalium reference strain DSM 13483(T) of 99.2%, 89.9%, and 99.1%, respectively. To our knowledge, the present study is the first phenotypic and genotypic characterization of an A. pluranimalium strain isolated from a giraffe. PMID:26464930

  14. Ruptured aortic aneurysm in a coyote (Canis latrans) from South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Debra, Lee; Schrecengost, Joshua; Kilgo, John; Ray, Scott; Miller, Karl V.

    2007-07-01

    Abstract – A radio-collared adult female coyote (Canis latrans) from South Carolina was found dead with no apparent signs of trauma or struggle. Necropsy revealed a ruptured aortic aneurysm within the thoracic cavity as well as severe heartworm infection, with paracites present in the caudal vena cava. Histologically, inflammatory cell infiltrates were frequent in the aneurysm and consisted of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages. Bacteria, fungi, and paracites were not found in the aneurysm. Death was due to exsanguinations. This represents a first report of an aneurysm in a coyote.

  15. Endocarditis associated with Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in a fat-tailed ram

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, M. R; Ebrahimi Kahrisangi, A; Baghban, F; Kazemi, A; Heidari, M; Salehi, N

    2015-01-01

    Endocarditis is rarely reported in sheep and information presented for ovine endocarditis is based mostly on comparative findings in the cattle. Infective vegetative endocarditis of the right heart was diagnosed in a 3-year-old fat-tailed ram. Clinical findings included tachycardia, marked brisket edema, jugular veins distention and pulsation and pale mucous membranes. Hematologic abnormality included neutrophilic leukocytosis. Necropsy confirmed severe right atrioventricular and pulmonary valves vegetative endocarditis with evidence of right heart failure. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae was isolated from those vegetative lisions. PMID:27175196

  16. Clostridium perfringens type A fatal acute hemorrhagic gastroenteritis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Ben J; Van Dreumel, Tony; Slavić, Durda; Prescott, John F

    2012-05-01

    The morning after participating in a dog show, a 2-year-old Pomeranian dog was found dead in a pool of bloody feces. Necropsy revealed hemorrhagic gastroenteritis of the entire gastrointestinal tract, with many Gram-positive bacilli on the surface and in the lumen and crypts of the intestine. Enterotoxin-positive type A Clostridium perfringens were isolated in large numbers. This dramatic case of fatal C. perfringens gastroenteritis highlights the need to better understand the role of this bacterium in enteric disease of dogs. PMID:23115371

  17. Beta 2 toxigenic Clostridium perfringens type A colitis in a three-day-old foal.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, Murray J; Kircanski, Jasmina; Slavic, Durda; Prescott, John F

    2011-03-01

    Beta 2 (β2)-toxigenic Clostridium perfringens type A was recovered in large numbers from the intestine of a neonatal foal with colitis. The foal had been treated with gentamicin. Necropsy revealed marked distension of cecum and colon with watery, rust-colored homogeneous fluid and gastric infarction. Microscopic colonic lesions were superficial necrosis of 50% of the colonic mucosal surface and scattered 1-3-mm ulcers with subjacent neutrophilic infiltration and large Gram-positive bacilli in the necrotic mucosa. Beta-2 toxin was demonstrated in the lesions by immunohistochemical staining. PMID:21398467

  18. Mycotic aneurysm caused by Graphium species in a dog

    PubMed Central

    MURATA, Yousuke; CHAMBERS, James Kenn; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki; NAKASHIMA, Ko; HANAFUSA, Yasuko; IKEZAWA, Mitsutaka; SUGITA, Takashi; NAKAYAMA, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    A 10-year-old castrated male mixed-breed dog exhibited vomiting, lethargy and anorexia. An abdominal ultrasound examination revealed a focal dilation of the abdominal aorta. The dog died 2 days after examination, and necropsy revealed a ruptured aneurysm at the abdominal aorta between the kidneys. Histological examination revealed severe granulomatous and necrotizing pan-arteritis with fungal organisms. Graphium species was identified through DNA sequence analysis of the PCR product from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report of aortic aneurysm caused by Graphium species in a dog. PMID:25947562

  19. Industrial halide wastes cause acute mortality of snow geese in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andreasen, J.K.; Stroud, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    An examination of 97 dead migratory waterfowl collected at an industrial facility showed that the birds had had severe gastric and intestinal hemorrhaging. Water samples taken at on-site waste lagoons contained 6,750 mg/L fluoride, 4,500 mg/L bromine and 1,500 mg/L boron. Brain and liver tissues contained high levels of fluoride, as compared with tissues of birds collected at a control site. From the necropsy results, the high concentration of fluoride in the water samples and the elevated tissue residues, we conclude that the birds died from acute fluoride poisoning.

  20. Bronchiectasis following pulmonary ammonia burn

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeffler, H.B.; Schweppe, H.I.; Greenberg, S.D.

    1982-12-01

    Long-term follow-up of the pulmonary lesions of severe exposure to ammonia in humans has seldom been documented, and development of bronchiectasis continues to be of concern. We studied a previously healthy 30-year-old woman whose lungs at time of necropsy, three years after massive exposure to ammonia fumes, had extensive cylindrical and saccular bronchiectasis. We concluded that massive exposure to ammonia can lead to bronchiectasis. It is not known, however, whether the bronchiectasis resulted from chemical injury by ammonia or from a superimposed bacterial bronchitis.

  1. Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris)

    PubMed Central

    HAMANO, Takahisa; TERASAWA, Fumio; TACHIKAWA, Yoshiharu; MURAI, Atsuko; MORI, Takashi; EL-DAKHLY, Khaled; SAKAI, Hiroki; YANAI, Tokuma

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 4-year and 2-month-old male capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) was diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma on the buttocks after chronic recurrent dermatosis. The capybara was euthanized, examined by computed tomography and necropsied; the tumor was examined histologically. Computed tomography showed a dense soft tissue mass with indistinct borders at the buttocks. Histological examination of the tumor revealed islands of invasive squamous epithelial tumor cells with a severe desmoplastic reaction. Based on the pathological findings, the mass was diagnosed as a squamous cell carcinoma. This is the first study to report squamous cell carcinoma in a capybara. PMID:24909968

  2. Olivopontocerebellar atrophy of neonatal onset and disialotransferrin developmental deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Horslen, S P; Clayton, P T; Harding, B N; Hall, N A; Keir, G; Winchester, B

    1991-01-01

    Two brothers presented with olivopontocerebellar atrophy of neonatal onset. The clinical features (failure to thrive, hypotonia, liver disease, effusions, and visual inattention) were similar to those of the four cases already reported, as were the necropsy findings of olivopontocerebellar atrophy, hepatic steatosis and fibrosis, and microcystic renal changes. The clinical similarities between this and the disialotransferrin developmental deficiency syndrome were noted. The characteristic abnormality of serum transferrin found in the latter syndrome was also found in the two cases reported here. We suggest that both syndromes are caused by the same, or related, defects in glycoprotein metabolism. Images Figure 2 p1028-b Figure 3 p1029-b Figure 4 PMID:1929507

  3. The rsR′ pattern in left surface leads in ventricular aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherif, Nabil

    1970-01-01

    A characteristic rsR′ pattern or its variants (rSr′ or rSR′) with normal or prolonged QRS duration in left surface leads including the apex lead and the orthogonal scalar X lead was described in 18 patients with coronary heart disease; in 17 of them a ventricular aneurysm was present. Necropsy in 12 patients showed the ventricular aneurysm to be secondary to an extensive confluent scarring of the anterior and antero-lateral portions of the left ventricle. Explanation of the genesis of the electrocardiographic pattern was attempted and its clinical value was suggested. Images PMID:5433304

  4. Fatal obstructive lung disease after haploidentical sibling cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, K; Toyoda, Y; Ishida, Y; Honda, K; Nagao, T; Ijiri, R; Tanaka, Y; Goto, K; Hiroki, K; Kigasawa, H; Nishihira, H

    1998-05-01

    We report the case of a patient with fatal obstructive lung disease after an HLA-haploidentical sibling cord blood transplant (CBT), with severe acute GVHD. A 2-year-old girl developed expiratory air trapping gradually with acute and chronic GVHD after CBT for the treatment of ALL. Anti-CMV and immunosuppressive therapy were ineffective, and the patient died of progressive respiratory acidosis. Necropsy of the lung revealed severe bronchiolitis obliterans with cytomegalic inclusion cells in the granulation tissues of the bronchiolitis. Thus, immunologic and GVHD problems can occur even in CBT. PMID:9613788

  5. New data on the internal organs of a frozen Yukagir bison mummy (Bison priscus Bojanus, 1827), Yakutia, Russia.

    PubMed

    Serdyuk, N V; Potapova, O R; Kharlamova, A S; Maschenko, E N; Kirikov, K S; Pavlov, I S; Protopopov, A V; Plotnikov, V V; Kolesov, S D; Klimovskii, A I

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the first morphological description of the internal organs of a frozen corpse of the steppe bison Bison priscus (Bojanus, 1827) from the Holocene of northern Yakutia. Necropsy revealed that most of the internal organs, including the brain, heart with the main vessels, and reproductive system were well preserved. It demonstrated that the anatomy of this bison was close to that of the genera Bos and Bison. Trauma or pathological changes in the organs were not detected. The cause of death of the bison remains unknown. PMID:27193884

  6. Upregulation of growth signaling and nutrient transporters in cotyledons of early to mid-gestational nutrient restricted ewes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Zhu, Mei J.; Uthlaut, Adam B.; Nijland, Mark J.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Hess, Bret W.; Ford, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Multiparous ewes received 100% (control, C, n=13) or 50% (nutrient restricted, NR, n=14) of NRC dietary requirements from d28-d78 of gestation. On d78, 5 C and 6 NR ewes were necropsied. The remaining 8 C and 8 NR ewes were fed to 100% of NRC from d78-d135 and necropsied. Maternal blood was collected at both necropsies and at weekly intervals for assay of glucose, insulin and leptin. Fetal blood was collected at d78 and d135 necropsies for assay of glucose and lipids. Cotyledonary (COT) tissue was evaluated for protein and mRNA expression [fatty acid transporter (FATP)1, FATP4, CD36, glucose transporter (GLUT)1 and GLUT3], mRNA expression only [placenta fatty acid binding protein (FABPpm) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL)], or expression of phosphorylated and total protein forms [AMP kinase (AMPK)α, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk)1/2, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and protein kinase B (Akt)]. On d78, but not d135, placental and fetal weights were reduced (P < 0.05) in NR vs. C ewes. Maternal circulating glucose, insulin and leptin levels were decreased in NR vs. C ewes on d78 (P < 0.05) but similar at d135. Fetal blood glucose and triglyceride levels were lower in NR vs. C ewes (P < 0.05) on d78, but similar on d135. On d78, GLUT1, FATP4, CD36 mRNA and protein expression levels, FABPpm mRNA level, and leptin protein level were all increased (P < 0.05) in COT of NR vs. C ewes. AMPK, ACC, and Erk1/2 activities were also increased (P < 0.05) in NR vs. C COT on d78. In contrast, only FATP4 was increased (P < 0.05) at both the mRNA and protein levels in COT of NR realimented vs. C ewes on d135. These data demonstrate placental adaptation to maternal NR through increasing nutrient transporter production and growth signaling activity. PMID:21292322

  7. Disseminated T-cell lymphoma in a Brazilian porcupine (Coendou prehensilis).

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Marina Rios; Luppi, Marcela Miranda; Malta, Marcelo de Campos Cordeiro; Assumpção, Anna Luiza Facchetti Vinhaes; Langohr, Ingeborg Maria; Ecco, Roselene

    2011-01-01

    The current study describes the clinical, gross, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical findings of a T-cell lymphoma in a captive porcupine (Coendou prehensilis), a species typically seen in the tropical forests of Brazil. At necropsy, extensive neoplastic involvement was observed in the cervical lymph nodes, with extension into the salivary gland. The spleen was mildly enlarged, and neoplastic nodules were grossly evident in the liver and right kidney. Histologically, sheets of large and markedly pleomorphic round cells were observed in the cervical lymph nodes, lung, liver, spleen, and kidney. The neoplastic cells were positive for cluster of differentiation (CD)3 and negative for CD79a by immunohistochemistry. PMID:21217044

  8. Mortality of passerines adjacent to a North Carolina corn field treated with granular carbofuran.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Augspurger, Tom; Smith, Milton R.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Converse, Kathryn A.

    1996-01-01

    Red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) were collected during an epizootic in southeastern North Carolina (USA). Activity of brain cholinesterase (ChE) was inhibited by 14 to 48% in three of five specimens, and returned to normal levels after incubation. Gastrointestinal tracts were analyzed for 30 anti-ChE agents. Carbofuran, the only compound detected, was present in all specimens at levels from 5.44 to 72.7 μg/g wet weight. Application of granular carbofuran in an adjacent corn field, results of necropsy examinations, and chemical analyses are consistent with a diagnosis of carbofuran poisoning in these specimens.

  9. Hypoadrenocorticism in beagles exposed to aerosols of plutonium-238 dioxide by inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.; Buschbom, R.L.; Dagle, G.E.

    1996-12-01

    Hypoadrenocorticism, known as Addison`s disease in humans, was diagnosed in six beagles after inhalation of at least 1.7 kBq/g lung of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}. Histological examination of adrenal gland specimens obtained at necropsy revealed marked adrenal cortical atrophy in all cases. Autoadiographs showed only slight {alpha}-particle activity. Although the pathogenesis of adrenal cortical atrophy in these dogs is unclear, there is evidence to suggest an automimmune disorder linked to damage resulting from {alpha}-particle irradiation to the lymphatic system.

  10. Haemangiosarcoma in a captive Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica)

    PubMed Central

    Vercammen, F.; Brandt, J.; Brantegem, L. Van; Bosseler, L.; Ducatelle, R.

    2015-01-01

    A 2.7-year-old male captive Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica) died unexpectedly without preceding symptoms. Gross necropsy revealed liver and lung tumours, which proved to be haemangiosarcomas by histopathology. Some of the liver tumours were ruptured, leading to massive intra-abdominal haemorrhage and death. Haemangiosarcomas are rare in domestic and exotic felids, occurring in skin, thoracic-abdominal cavity and bones. Although these tumours mainly appear to be occurring in older cats, they are sometimes observed in younger animals, as in the present case. This is the first description of haemangiosarcoma in a young Asiatic lion. PMID:26623366

  11. A new species of myxosporean (Sphaeromyxidae), a parasite of lined seahorses, Hippocampus erectus, from the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sears, B F; Anderson, P; Greiner, E C

    2011-08-01

    Sphaeromyxa cannolii sp. n. is described from the bile ducts of aquaria-maintained lined seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) from the Gulf of Mexico. Spores of the new species are linear, 17-18 µm long and 5-6 µm wide, with flattened tips; polar capsules measure 4 × 3 µm. Routine necropsies of H. erectus following planned death revealed liver inflammation, bile duct obstruction, bile accumulation, and myxozoan parasites in the bile ducts of 11 of 40 animals sampled (27.5%). The presence of S. cannolii in an aquaculture setting should prompt keepers to carefully quarantine new animals and exclude annelid fauna, a potential intermediate host of myxozoans. PMID:21506813

  12. Neonatal urological ultrasound: diagnostic inaccuracies and pitfalls.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, N W; Gough, D C; Cohen, S J

    1989-01-01

    Ninety one patients with urinary tract abnormalities diagnosed before birth were reviewed. Diagnoses based on prenatal and postnatal ultrasound scans alone were compared with the final diagnoses after full urological investigations, with operative or necropsy confirmation in 79 cases. The results confirmed that ultrasound examination before birth usually detects nonspecific abnormalities and although scanning after birth is more accurate it is not absolutely reliable. A diagnosis of "multicystic kidney' made on ultrasound scan alone is especially prone to error. Such mistakes can be avoided if full urological investigation is undertaken in every case. PMID:2665660

  13. Primary diffuse malignant peritoneal mesothelioma in a striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis)

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Su-Min; OH, Yeonsu; OH, Suk-Hun; HAN, Jeong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    A 10-year-old female striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) was admitted with severe abdominal distension and lethargy. Cytological examination of the peritoneal fluid revealed activated mesothelial cells. At necropsy, numerous growing together, projecting, 2 to 20 mm in diameter tawny to white masses were scattered throughout the peritoneum including the mesentery, omentum and intestinal serosa. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of prominent papillo-tubular structures, and immunohistochemically, the spindle to polygonal-shaped tumor cells with nuclear polymorphism were strongly reactive for calretinin. Based on those diagnostic features, the neoplasia was diagnosed as malignant mesothelioma. This is the first case report of mesothelioma in the skunk. PMID:26568187

  14. Pleuroscopic diagnosis of disseminated hemangiosarcoma in a horse.

    PubMed

    Rossier, Y; Sweeney, C R; Heyer, G; Hamir, A N

    1990-05-15

    A 7-year-old Thoroughbred mare was examined because of persistent bilateral epistaxis and respiratory distress. Evidence of bilateral pleural effusion was found during physical examination, and a large amount of serosanguineous fluid was drained from the right side of the thorax. Cytologic examination and bacteriologic culture of the transtracheal aspirate and pleural fluid did not yield evidence of sepsis. A coagulation profile was unremarkable. Radiographic and echographic changes were seen in the lung parenchyma. Pleuroscopy, with the horse standing, revealed numerous dark nodules on the pleura, diaphragm, and lung surface. On the basis of biopsy and necropsy findings, the histopathologic diagnosis was disseminated hemangiosarcoma. PMID:2347759

  15. Costal Mesenchymal Chondrosarcoma with Diffuse Pleural and Pericardial Explantation in a Pygmy Goat

    PubMed Central

    Lombardini, Eric D.; de la Concha, Andres; Pierce, Virginia; Pool, Roy R.

    2014-01-01

    A 3 year old intact male pygmy goat developed progressive weakness and eventual recumbancy over the course of 1 week, while maintaining its ability to eat and drink. The animal died and at necropsy, the parietal pleural surfaces and the pericardial surface were noted to be covered with firm, white, variably sized nodules that often formed linear arrays or coalesced into larger clumped aggregates. The visceral pleural surfaces of the ventral lung lobes were also covered with similar nodules. Histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of the submitted tissues revealed a diagnosis of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma with extensive seeding throughout the thoracic cavity. PMID:24791071

  16. Biological and molecular characterizations of Toxoplasma gondii strains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, R.A.; Lindsay, D.S.; Howe, D.K.; Roderick, Constance L.; Dubey, J.P.; Thomas, N.J.; Baeten, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from brain or heart tissue from 15 southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) in cell cultures. These strains were used to infect mice that developed antibodies to T. gondii as detected in the modified direct agglutination test and had T. gondii tissue cysts in their brains at necropsy. Mouse brains containing tissue cysts from 4 of the strains were fed to 4 cats. Two of the cats excreted T. gondii oocysts in their feces that were infectious for mice. Molecular analyses of 13 strains indicated that they were all type II strains, but that they were genetically distinct from one another.

  17. latrogenic lipoid pneumonia in an adult horse.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Lucy; Cummins, Carolyn; Maischberger, Eva; Katz, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    A 20-year-old gelding presented with a history of acute respiratory distress which began immediately after administration of a mineral oil and water mix, via nasogastric intubation, for treatment of suspected gastrointestinal dysfunction. An initial presumptive diagnosis of acute lipoid pneumonia was made; this was further supported by evidence of arterial hypoxaemia and oxygen desaturation on arterial blood gas analysis, ultrasonographic signs of bilateral ventral lung consolidation and a mixed bronchoalveolar-interstitial lung pattern seen on thoracic radiographs. Despite intensive supportive therapy the horse's condition continued to deteriorate and the decision was made for humane euthanasia. Gross necropsy findings supported the clinical diagnosis of lipoid pneumonia. PMID:21851746

  18. Clostridium perfringens type A enteritis in blue and yellow macaw (Ara ararauna).

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Marta Brito; Torres, Luciana Neves; Mesquita, Ramon Gomes; Ampuero, Fernanda; Cunha, Marcos Paulo Vieira; Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; Ferreira, Antonio José Piantino; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Moreno, Andrea Micke; Knöbl, Terezinha

    2014-12-01

    This study describes an outbreak of necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens type A in captive macaws (Ara ararauna). Two psittacine birds presented a history of prostration and died 18 hr after manifestation of clinical signs. The necropsy findings and histopathologic lesions were indicative of necrotic enteritis. Microbiologic assays resulted in the growth of large gram-positive bacilli that were identified as C. perfringens. PCR was used to identify clostridium toxinotypes and confirmed the identification of isolated strains as C pefringens type A, positive to gene codifying beta 2 toxin. The infection source and predisposing factors could not be ascertained. PMID:25619013

  19. Glomerular Polycystic Kidney Disease in a Dog (Blue Merle Collie)

    PubMed Central

    Chalifoux, A.; Phaneuf, J. -B.; Olivieri, M.; Gosselin, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Glomerular polycystic kidney disease was diagnosed in an 11 month old, female, Blue Merle Collie. Clinical signs (polyuria, polydipsia, vomiting, diarrhea, partial anorexia) and laboratory work (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum phosphorus, specific gravity, proteinuria, nonregenerative anemia) indicated chronic renal failure. However, after the study of a biopsy specimen, a definitive diagnosis was reached and the prognosis was determined. Necropsy findings and histopathological studies revealed: presence of glomerular cysts, atrophy of glomerular tufts and sclerosis of the interstitial tissue. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:17422209

  20. Tetrameres grusi (Nemotoda: Tetrameridae) from foster-raised whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuggle, B.N.

    1983-01-01

    A juvenile whooping crane (Grus americana) that had been raised by greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida) foster parents was attacked and killed by a golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) southwest of Rangely, Colorado (Windingstad et al., 1981, Auk 98:393-394). Since 1975, whooping crane eggs have been placed in the nests of sandhill cranes in an effort to increase the population of this endangered species. This bird was hatched at Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Idaho and was attacked while migrating to wintering grounds in New Mexico. The bird was sent to the National Wildlife Health Laboratory for a detailed necropsy.

  1. Trace element analysis by PIXE in liver samples from dogs with chronic active hepatitis and liver cirrhosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Marianne; Ekholm, Ann-Kristin; Sevelius, Ewa

    1990-04-01

    Trace element levels of liver samples obtained from necropsied dogs suffering from hepatitis and/or liver cirrhosis were determined by PIXE. Two different techniques for preparation of the samples were compared: the pellet press method and wet digestion. Both methods gave similar results, but the pellet press method was chosen for the subsequent routine analyses because of its simplicity due to few preparation steps and little risk of contamination. Preliminary results indicate elevated levels of Cu in chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis. In hereditary copper-induced hepatitis (Bedlington hepatitis) Fe and Br levels were increased as well.

  2. Plasmodium spp. In a captive raptor collection of a Safaripark in northwest Italy.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, F E; Cannizzo, F T; Chiappino, L; Sereno, A; Ripepi, M; Salamida, S; Manuali, E; Bollo, E

    2016-02-01

    Blood parasites infect all vertebrates (Clayton and Moore 1997). Avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp., Plasmodiidae) are cosmopolitan in their distribution and are responsible for severe diseases in domestic and wild birds.In September 2009, nine raptorial birds that either arrived recently or were maintained as permanent residents at the Safaripark Pombia (northwest Italy) showed loss of stamina, developing listlessness, anorexia and regurgitation. Within one month three animals died and were necropsied.Following the diagnosis of Plasmodium infection all other raptorial birds were treated: clinical improvement was observed in all birds, and blood smears made after one month resulted negative for parasites. PMID:26850550

  3. Membranous nephropathy in the cat and dog: a renal biopsy and follow-up study of sixteen cases.

    PubMed

    Wright, N G; Nash, A S; Thompson, H; Fisher, E W

    1981-09-01

    A morphologic study of biopsy specimens from 16 cases of membranous nephropathy in the cat (11 cases) and dog (five cases) was carried out using conventional light microscopy, immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Depending on the degree of membranous change of the capillary loops and glomerular scarring, each case was graded "mild," "moderately severe," or "advanced." Clinically, most cases were presented showing the nephrotic syndrome, although two cases were presented in chronic renal failure. Most cases were followed through to necropsy after an interval ranging between 2 days and 3 years. In some cases, repeated biopsies were taken during this period. PMID:7024632

  4. Carbofuran affects wildlife on Virginia corn fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stinson, E.R.; Hayes, L.E.; Bush, P.B.; White, D.H.

    1994-01-01

    Forty-four Virginia corn fields on 11 farms were searched for evidence of dead or debilitated wildlife following in-furrow application of granular carbofuran (Furadan 15G) during April and May 1991. Evidence of pesticide poisoned wildlife, including dead animals, debilitated animals, feather spots, and fur spots was found on 33 fields on 10 farms. Carcasses of 61 birds, 4 mammals, and 1 reptile were recovered. Anticholinesterase poisoning was confirmed or suspected as the cause of most wildlife deaths based on the circumstances surrounding kills, necropsies of Carcasses, residue analyses, and brain ChE assays.

  5. Histoplasmosis of the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, V; Wilkins, P; Badve, S; Coppen, M; Lucas, S; Hay, R; Schon, F

    1992-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum infection of the central nervous system is extremely rare in the United Kingdom partly because the organism is not endemic. However, because the organism can remain quiescent in the lungs or the adrenal glands for over 40 years before dissemination, it increasingly needs to be considered in unexplained neurological disease particularly in people who lived in endemic areas as children. In this paper a rapidly progressive fatal myelopathy in an English man brought up in India was shown at necropsy to be due to histoplasmosis. The neurological features of this infection are reviewed. Images PMID:1640242

  6. EAR AND TAIL LESIONS ON CAPTIVE WHITE-TAILED DEER FAWNS (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS): A CASE STUDY.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Treena L; Demarais, Stephen; Cooley, Jim; Fleming, Sherrill; Michel, Eric S; Flinn, Emily

    2016-06-01

    During the 2008-2011 time period, undiagnosed lesions were observed in 21 of 150 white-tailed deer fawns (Odocoileus virginianus) that were part of a captive deer herd at Mississippi State University. Clinical findings in healthy and diseased fawns from 0 to 90 days of age included bite and scratch marks followed by moderate to severe ear and tail necrosis. Gross necropsy findings of necrotizing ulcerative dermatitis correlated with histopathologic findings that included focally severe multifocal vasculitis, vascular necrosis, and thrombosis. This article is a clinical description of these previously unreported lesions associated with tissue necrosis in young captive white-tailed deer. PMID:27468041

  7. Inclusion body disease in a great horned owl.

    PubMed

    Sileo, L; Carlson, H C; Crumley, S C

    1975-01-01

    The carcass of a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus), which had been found moribund in southern Ontario, was presented for necropsy. Throughout the liver and spleen were numerous white foci 1-2 mm in diameter; also noted were white plaques in the mucosae of the pharyngeal papillae and intestine. Results of light and electron microscopic studies and experimental transmission to two captive great horned owls suggested that this was a herpvirus disease similar and possibly indentical to the owl disease reported by other workers in Wiconsin and Australia. PMID:163384

  8. Occurrence of Prosthenorchis elegans in Free-living Primates from the Atlantic Forest of Southern Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Catenacci, Lilian S; Colosio, Adriana C; Oliveira, Leonardo C; De Vleeschouwer, Kristel M; Munhoz, Alexandre D; Deem, Sharon L; Pinto, Jaqueline M S

    2016-04-28

    Parasite prevalence and abundance are important factors affecting species' conservation. During necropsies on a free-living golden-headed lion tamarin ( Leontopithecus chrysomelas ) and two Wied's marmosets ( Callithrix kuhlii ) in the Atlantic Forest of southern Bahia, Brazil, we collected a large number of adult intestinal parasites that we identified as Prosthenorchis elegans. This parasite is pathogenic for neotropical primates. Prosthenorchis spp. infestation is influenced by diet with increased risk of exposure from ingesting invertebrate intermediate hosts. The biological similarities and sympatric nature of these two nonhuman primates support that they may harbor similar infectious and parasitic agents. PMID:26981688

  9. Acanthocephala Larvae parasitizing Ameiva ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758) (Squamata: Teiidae).

    PubMed

    Macedo, Lilian Cristina; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Ávila-Pires, Teresa Cristina Sauer; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge concerning the taxonomy and biology of species of Acanthocephala, helminth parasites of the helminth species of the phylum Acanthocephala, parasites of lizards in Brazilian Amazonia, is still insufficient, but reports of Acanthocephala in reptiles are becoming increasingly common in the literature. Cystacanth-stage Acanthocephalan larvae have been found in the visceral peritoneum during necropsy of Ameiva ameiva ameivalizards from the "Osvaldo Rodrigues da Cunha" Herpetology Collection of the Emílio Goeldi Museum, Belém, Pará, Brazil. The aim of this study was to present the morphological study of the Acanthocephala larvae found in A. ameiva ameiva lizard. PMID:27027551

  10. Experimental infection of nontarget species of rodents and birds with Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Januszewski, M.C.; Olsen, S.C.; McLean, R.G.; Clark, L.; Rhyan, Jack C.

    2001-01-01

    The Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 (SRB51) is being considered for use in the management of bnucellosis in wild bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus) populations in the Greater Yellowstone Area (USA). Evaluation of the vaccines safety in non-target species was considered necessary prior to field use. Between June 1998 and December 1999, ground squirrels (Spermophilus richardsonii, n = 21), deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus, n = 14), prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster, n = 21), and ravens (Corvus corax, n = 13) were orally inoculated with SRB51 or physiologic saline. Oral and rectal swabs and blood samples were collected for bacteriologic evaluation. Rodents were necropsied at 8 to 10 wk and 12 to 21 wk post inoculation (PI), and ravens at 7 and 11 wk PI. Spleen, liver and reproductive tissues were collected for bacteriologic and histopathologic evaluation. No differences in clinical signs, appetite, weight loss or gain, or activity were observed between saline- and SRB51-inoculated animals in all four species. Oral and rectal swabs from all species were negative throughout the study. In tissues obtained from SRB51-inoculated animals, the organism was isolated from six of seven (86%) ground squirrels, one of six (17%) deer mice, none of seven voles, and one of five (20%) ravens necropsied at 8, 8, 10, and 7 wk PI, respectively. Tissues from four of seven (57%) SRB51-inoculated ground squirrels were culture positive for the organism 12 wk PI; SRB51 was not recovered from deer mice, voles. or ravens necropsied 12, 21, or 11 wk, respectively, PI. SRB51 was not recovered from saline-inoculated ground squirrels, deer mice, or voles at any time but was recovered from one saline-inoculated raven at necropsy, 7 wk PI, likely attributable to contact with SRB51-inoculated ravens in an adjacent aviary room. Spleen was time primary tissue site of colonization in ground squirrels, followed by the liver and reproductive organs. The results indicate oral exposure to

  11. Preventive Medicine and Management in Beef Feedlots

    PubMed Central

    Church, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of beef feedlot preventive medicine are to reduce morbidity, mortality and culling rates, maximize feed efficiency and optimize expenditures for biologicals and pharmaceuticals. The veterinarian must provide regular inspection of all areas of the feedlot and constantly monitor disease incidence. The provision of advice on vaccination, treatment schedules, necropsies on all dead cattle and the regular analysis of disease and production records are all part of feedlot preventive medicine. All of this is aimed at improving net economical gain for the producer. PMID:7427851

  12. Gastrointestinal and external parasites of the white-crested elaenia Elaenia albiceps chilensis (Aves, Tyrannidae) in Chile.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Danny; Reyes, Jaime; Sepúlveda, María Soledad; Kinsella, Mike; Mironov, Sergey; Cicchino, Armando; Moreno, Lucila; Landaeta-Aqueveque, Carlos; Troncoso, Ignacio; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the ectoparasites and helminths of the white-crested elaenia, Elaenia albiceps chilensis. Feather mites Anisophyllodes elaeniae, Trouessartia elaeniae, and Analges sp. were detected in 51% of birds (n=106), whereas 24% were infected with lice (Tyranniphilopterus delicatulus, Menacanthus cfr. distinctus, and Ricinus cfr. invadens). Helminths Viguiera sp. and Capillaria sp. were found in five of the birds that were necropsied (n=20). With the exception of A. elaeniae, T. elaeniae, and T. delicatulus, all parasites represented new records found for the white-crested elaenia, and therefore for the Chilean repertoire of biodiversity. PMID:26444059

  13. Cranial mediastinal liposarcoma in a horse.

    PubMed

    Kondo, H; Wickins, S C; Conway, J A; Mallicote, M F; Sanchez, L C; Agnew, D W; Farina, L L; Abbott, J R

    2012-11-01

    A 23-year-old Anglo-Arabian mare was presented with tachypnea, dyspnea, and pitting edema of the ventral thoracic subcutis. On necropsy, a tan to red, friable, irregularly shaped mass (23 × 20 × 18 cm) occupied the cranial mediastinum. Histologically, the mass was classified as a liposarcoma and was composed of short interlacing bundles of spindle-shaped to irregularly rounded cells with discrete, variably sized, clear cytoplasmic vacuoles, which were stained with oil red O in frozen sections of formalin-fixed tissue. PMID:22287648

  14. Suspected fusariomycotoxicosis in sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis): clinical and pathological findings.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, Thomas J.; Stroud, Richard K.; Windingstad, Ronald M.

    1989-01-01

    In 1985 and 1986, large-scale natural die-offs of sandhill cranes in Texas were attributed to fusariomycotoxicosis. These birds demonstrated a progressive loss of motor control to the neck, wings, and legs. Based on necropsy and/or histopathology of 31 cranes, the most common lesions involved skeletal muscle and included hemorrhages, granulomatous myositis, thrombosis, and vascular degeneration. Serum chemistry results revealed that levels of creatinine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase were above published normals. However, only alanine aminotransferase was higher in clinically affected cranes than in normal cranes collected from the same area.

  15. Necrotizing hepatitis in pet birds associated with Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M K; Phillips, S N

    1996-01-01

    Six pet birds, from a flock of 100 birds of various species, died within a 2-day period. Drinking water had recently been changed from potable water to irrigation water. Three birds submitted for necropsy had hepatic necrosis with numerous gram-negative rodshaped bacteria present in necrotic areas and Kuppfer cells. Pseudomonas fluorescens was isolated in pure culture from the livers of all three birds and from other organs. This is the first report of naturally occurring disease in which P. fluorescens was the sole etiologic agent identified. PMID:8790902

  16. Increase in Cardiac Troponin I in a Lamb with Tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    NEUWALD, Elisa Barp; SOARES, Frederico Aécio Carvalho; DREYER, Cristina Terres; CARNESELLA, Samuel; WOUTERS, Angelica Terezinha Barth; GONZÁLEZ, Félix Hilario Diaz; DRIEMEIER, David

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study describes a case of tetralogy of Fallot in a lamb showing failure to thrive and signs of respiratory distress. Physical examination, electrocardiography, thoracic radiographies, echocardiography and cardiac troponin I evaluation were performed. The value of cardiac troponin I was compared with the values of 10 healthy lambs of the same age and breed, and the affected animal demonstrated an increase in cardiac troponin I. Due to the poor prognosis, euthanasia was indicated, and necropsy confirmed the diagnosis. This is the first report of an increase in cardiac troponin I in a lamb with tetralogy of Fallot. PMID:23685750

  17. DDE poisoning in an adult bald eagle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcelon, D.K.; Thomas, N.J.

    1997-01-01

    A 12-year-old female bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was found in May 1993 on Santa Catalina Island, California (USA), in a debilitated condition, exhibiting ataxia and tremors; it died within hours. On necropsy, the bird was emaciated but had no evidence of disease or physical injury. Chemical analyses were negative for organophosphorus pesticides and lead poisoning. High concentrations of DDE (wet weight basis) were found in the brain (212 ppm), liver (838 ppm), and serum (53 ppm). Mobilization of DDE, from depleted fat deposits, probably resulted in the lethal concentration in the eagle's brain.

  18. Chronic Sarcocystis infections in slaughtered cattle.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Mizusawa, K; Itagaki, H

    1993-10-01

    Parasitological, histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations were carried out on three slaughtered cattle with many nodules in all the striated muscles. At necropsy, many yellowish green rice-grain sized nodules including cheesy contents were observed in all the striated muscles. Histopathologically the nodules were granuloma principally consisting of eosinophiles. No Sarcocystis cysts nor bradyzoites were found in the nodules, but intact sarcocysts were found in the normal tissues surrounding the nodules. The central necrotic focus of nodules showed intense positive responses against anti-Sarcocystis cruzi rabbit serum by immunohistochemical examination. From the above findings the slaughtered cattle were diagnosed as chronic sarcocystiasis. PMID:8286527

  19. Probable herpesvirus infection in an eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S P; Bates, G N; Lewandoski, P J

    1992-10-01

    One wild eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus) from Milwaukee County, Wisconsin was necropsied. The lungs contained numerous multifocal, circumscribed, tan foci; the spleen was markedly enlarged and had a mottled reddish tan color; and the brain had a red to tan friable tract in the left hemisphere. Microscopically, the lung had a severe bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The bronchiolitis was characterized by epithelial cells containing eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. The encephalomalacia of the left cerebral cortex featured tissue disruption and astrocytes or neurons containing intranuclear inclusion bodies. Herpesvirus particles were found within the bronchiolar epithelial cells. Based on histopathological and ultrastructural findings, a herpesvirus seemed the most likely etiologic agent. PMID:1335521

  20. Primary diffuse malignant peritoneal mesothelioma in a striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Min; Oh, Yeonsu; Oh, Suk-Hun; Han, Jeong-Hee

    2016-03-01

    A 10-year-old female striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) was admitted with severe abdominal distension and lethargy. Cytological examination of the peritoneal fluid revealed activated mesothelial cells. At necropsy, numerous growing together, projecting, 2 to 20 mm in diameter tawny to white masses were scattered throughout the peritoneum including the mesentery, omentum and intestinal serosa. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of prominent papillo-tubular structures, and immunohistochemically, the spindle to polygonal-shaped tumor cells with nuclear polymorphism were strongly reactive for calretinin. Based on those diagnostic features, the neoplasia was diagnosed as malignant mesothelioma. This is the first case report of mesothelioma in the skunk. PMID:26568187

  1. Alien hand sign in association with Alzheimer's histopathology.

    PubMed Central

    Ball, J A; Lantos, P L; Jackson, M; Marsden, C D; Scadding, J W; Rossor, M N

    1993-01-01

    A 68 year old man is described with an alien left hand, cortical myoclonus, bilateral parietal lobe dysfunction and memory impairment but preserved language skills. The clinical diagnosis was of corticobasal degeneration but at necropsy, four years after the onset of symptoms, the pathology was of Alzheimer's disease together with some scattered chromatolytic pale neurons in the cerebral cortex. The alien hand sign has not previously been described in Alzheimer's dementia and is an illustration of the clinical heterogeneity that may occur in association with Alzheimer histopathology. Images PMID:8410026

  2. Reversible pulmonary hypertension associated with lungworm infection in a young cat.

    PubMed

    Dirven, Mark; Szatmári, Viktor; van den Ingh, Ted; Nijsse, Rolf

    2012-09-01

    Two ten-week-old kittens presented with dyspnea. Two weeks later dyspnea had worsened and both kittens had developed a heart murmur. One kitten died and necropsy showed severe granulomatous pneumonia and moderate bronchi(oli)tis and peribronchi(oli)tis caused by Aelurostrongylus abstrusus. The results from echocardiography, thoracic radiography and the other kitten's fecal examination were interpreted as severe parasitic pneumonia caused by A. abstrusus infection with pulmonary hypertension. Repeated administration of milbemycine-oxime and praziquantel resulted in cessation of larvae shedding and resolution of clinical, radiographic and echocardiographic signs of bronchopneumonia and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22877978

  3. Quadrigeminal arachnoid cysts in a kitten and a dog.

    PubMed

    Reed, Scott; Cho, Doo Youn; Paulsen, Dan

    2009-09-01

    Two quadrigeminal arachnoid cysts with different pathogenesis are described in 2 different species. A 10-week-old male Persian kitten with a progressively decreasing level of consciousness died spontaneously. At necropsy, mild internal hydrocephalus, caudal cerebellar coning, and cerebellar herniation through the foramen magnum were associated with a congenital quadrigeminal arachnoid cyst compressing the rostral cerebellum and shifting the entire cerebellum caudally. In contrast, a possibly acquired quadrigeminal cyst was observed in a 2-year-old male neutered Yorkshire Terrier in association with necrotizing encephalitis. Quadrigeminal arachnoid cysts have been rarely reported in dogs and humans. PMID:19737770

  4. MANDIBULAR SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA IN A BOBCAT (LYNX RUFUS).

    PubMed

    Sladakovic, Izidora; Burnum, Anne; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Kelly, Lisa S; Garner, Bridget C; Holmes, Shannon P; Divers, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    A 23-yr-old female spayed bobcat (Lynx rufus) presented with a 1-wk history of hypersalivation. On examination, the right mandible was markedly thickened, the right mandibular dental arcade was missing, and the oral mucosa over the right mandible was ulcerated and thickened. Skull radiographs and fine needle aspirate cytology were supportive of squamous cell carcinoma. The bobcat was euthanized as a result of its poor prognosis. Necropsy confirmed a diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma of the mandible. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of oral squamous cell carcinoma in a bobcat. PMID:27010306

  5. Pulmonary scar carcinoma: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, B Y; Guerra, J; Cagir, B; Madden, R E; Greene, J G

    1995-10-01

    Pulmonary scar carcinoma was described as a distinct clinicopathological entity over 50 years ago. There are many theories on the formation of this entity. We present three cases of pulmonary scar carcinoma with a high ratio of adenocarcinoma. One patient had a favorable postoperative course despite a 14-month delay in treatment. Necropsy specimen of another patient showed two primary scar carcinomas unrelated to each other. Literature review and discussion of etiology, diagnosis, and treatment modalities of pulmonary scar carcinoma were done. Pathogenesis and prognosis of the neoplasms associated with apical scars are not clearly understood. PMID:7501207

  6. Disseminated granulomas caused by an unidentified protozoan in sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Spraker, T.R.; Gardiner, C.H.; Novilla, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    Oral granulomas were observed in 31 (33%) of 95 captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Necropsy of six of the afflicted cranes revealed granulomatous nodules throughout many of their organ systems. Intracellular protozoan organisms morphologically resembling schizogonic stages were observed within the granulomas by light and electron microscopy. Sexual and asexual stages of coccidia were seen in sections of the intestines of 4 of 5 cranes examined microscopically, and Eimerian oocysts were seen in fecal flotation specimens from 3 of 4 birds.

  7. Haemoproteus balearicae and other blood parasites of free-ranging Florida sandhill crane chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusek, R.J.; Spalding, M.G.; Forrester, Donald J.; Greiner, E.C.

    2004-01-01

    We obtained blood smears from 114 Florida sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pratensis) chicks in Osceola and Lake Counties, Florida, USA, during 1998-2000. Leucocytozoon grusi was observed in 11 (10%) chicks; Haemoproteus antigonis was observed in eight (7%) chicks; and three (3%) chicks were infected with Haemoproteus balearicae. One chick infected with H. balearicae suffered from severe anemia (packed cell volume=13%) and was later found moribund. At necropsy this bird also had severe anemia and damage to the heart possibly due to hypoxia. This is the first report of H. balearicae in free-ranging North American cranes. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2004.

  8. Detection of mediastinitis after heart transplantation by gallium-67 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Quirce, R.; Serano, J.; Arnal, C.; Banzo, I.; Carril, J.M. )

    1991-05-01

    We report the findings of a patient with post-cardiac transplant mediastinitis detected by {sup 67}Ga-citrate imaging. Fever and leukocytosis were the first clinical signs suggesting infection. The usual diagnostic modalities, including CT and ultrasound, failed to identify the site of infection. A {sup 67}Ga scan showed intense abnormal uptake behind the sternum. The site of uptake was shown by necropsy to be necrotic tissue involving cardiac sutures, pulmonary arteries, and the aorta due to infection with Haemophilus aphrophilus.

  9. Cretinism in a North American black bear (Ursus americanus).

    PubMed

    Duncan, Robert B; Jones, Jeryl C; Moll, H David; Moon, Martha M; Blodgett, Dennis J; Vaughan, Michael R

    2002-01-01

    Congenital hyperplastic goiter and cretinism were documented in a 16 month-old male North American black bear (Ursus americanus). The cub was captured at approximately 8 months of age and maintained for an additional 8 months in captivity. Clinical signs included growth retardation, clumsiness, and facial dysmorphism. Hypothyroidism was documented by determining serum triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) levels. Lysosomal storage disease was ruled out by measuring various lysosomal enzyme activities. Serologic, radiographic, computed tomographic, necropsy, and histopathologic findings were consistent with congenital hypothyroidism and cretinism. PMID:11866041

  10. Extradural spinal liposarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D D; Kim, D Y; Paulsen, D B; Kerwin, S C

    1991-12-01

    An 8-year-old female Doberman Pinscher was examined because of progressive, asymmetric, ambulatory caudal paraparesis. Myelography revealed extradural left ventrolateral spinal cord compression over the first and second lumbar vertebral bodies. A left hemilaminectomy, extending from the thirteenth thoracic to the second lumbar vertebrae, was done, and an extradural mass was removed. The tumor was identified histologically as myxoid liposarcoma. The dog's neurologic function improved gradually after surgery; however, at 7 months after surgery, hind limb neurologic function deteriorated rapidly over a 5-week period, presumably because of local recurrence of the tumor. The dog was euthanatized; necropsy was not permitted. PMID:1778745

  11. Acute, fatal Sarcocystis calchasi-associated hepatitis in Roller pigeons (Columba livia f. dom.) at Philadelphia Zoo.

    PubMed

    Trupkiewicz, J G; Calero-Bernal, R; Verma, S K; Mowery, J; Davison, S; Habecker, P; Georoff, T A; Ialeggio, D M; Dubey, J P

    2016-01-30

    Four Roller pigeons (Columba livia f. dom.) at the Philadelphia Zoo died suddenly. Necropsy examination revealed macroscopic hepatitis. Microscopically, the predominant lesions were in liver, characterized with necrosis and mixed cell inflammatory response. Sarcocystis calchasi-like schizonts and free merozoites were identified in liver. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed that schizonts were in hepatocytes. A few schizonts were in spleen. PCR using S. calchasi-specific primers confirmed the diagnosis. Neither lesions nor protozoa were found in brain and muscles. This is the first report of acute visceral S. calchasi-associated sarcocystosis in naturally infected avian hosts. PMID:26801595

  12. DISSEMINATED OPHIDIOMYCES OPHIODIICOLA INFECTION IN A CAPTIVE EASTERN MASSASAUGA (SISTRURUS CATENATUS CATENATUS).

    PubMed

    Robertson, Jessica; Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Woodburn, Daniel B; Adkesson, Michael J; Landolfi, Jennifer A

    2016-03-01

    An adult, captive-born eastern massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus catenatus) was examined for a subcutaneous abscess and fistula cranial to the vent. The wound improved initially with lavage and systemic antibiotic therapy, but multiple, scattered, small subcutaneous nodules later developed over the ventrum and lateral aspects of the body. Examination of fine needle aspirates from these nodules revealed granulomatous inflammation and fungal elements morphologically consistent with Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola. The animal died before antifungal therapy could be implemented. At necropsy, fungal granulomas were also present in the kidneys, liver, lung, air sac, ovary, and spleen. This case report describes an atypical presentation of systemic ophidiomycosis in a captive-born snake. PMID:27010298

  13. [Case report: lymphosarcoma in a cow].

    PubMed

    Schell, M; Heckert, H P; Müller, K E

    2004-01-01

    A case of sporadic lymphosarcoma in a cow is described. The animal showed a tumorous mass in the area of the right orbita accompanied by conjunctival oedema. Clinical investigation showed an enlargement of a number of internal and external lymph nodes. Haematological and clinicochemical investigations revealed no alterations besides a slight shift to the right in the white blood picture. Blood serum was negative for antibodies directed against bovine leucosis virus. Necropsy showed leucotic and tumorous alterations in a number of organs. PMID:14983754

  14. Efficacy of a benzenedisulfonamide against experimental Fasciola hepatica infections in calves.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, J H; Bradley, R E

    1983-11-01

    The anthelmintic efficacy of a benzenedisulfonamide was evaluated by administering the drug parenterally at dosage levels of 2, 4, 8, and 16 mg/kg of body weight to crossbred Brahman calves with experimental Fasciola hepatica infections. In the 3-week period after treatment, fluke ova counts of treated calves were markedly reduced from counts obtained just before treatment. At necropsy, the mean fluke recovery for all 4 benzenedisulfonamide dosages were significantly (P less than 0.01) reduced. The efficacy of benzenedisulfonamide against F hepatica at dosage levels of 2, 4, 8, and 16 mg/kg was 97.5%, 99.5%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. PMID:6650967

  15. [Coenurosis in a sheep in Santa Catarina State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    De Souza, Antonio Pereira; Gava, Aldo; Bellato, Valdomiro; Sartor, Amélia Aparecida; De Moura, Anderson Barbosa

    2008-09-01

    Coenurus cerebralis infection is commonly occurring parasite in small ruminants worldwide. A ewe showed head inclination to the left, equilibrium loss, impetuous movement to the high, falling in left lateral recumbency and recovering movement later. Seven days later, the animal remained in permanent lateral recumbency and nystagmus. Euthanasia was carried out and a routine necropsy examination was performed. A large volume was found on the right side of the cerebellum due to a cystic cavity, with approximately 1.5 cm of diameter and it was identified as Coenurus cerebralis. PMID:20059838

  16. PAS-Positive Extracellular Deposits within Germinal Centers of Hyperplastic Follicles during SIV infection in a Rhesus Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jung Joo; Villinger, Francois; Courtney, Cynthia L

    2014-01-01

    Background Lymphoid tissue remodeling is characteristic of chronic SIV infection. Methods A rhesus macaque infected with SIVmac239 was necropsied and its lymphoid tissues subjected to histopathology characterization. Results Germinal centers in spleen and lymph nodes contained PAS-positive, non-amyloid extracellular deposits, decreased T follicular helper cells, and normal density of Ki67+ B cells. Conclusions A possible mechanism for PAS-positive deposits includes exaggerated involution of SIV-induced follicular hyperplasia secondary to virus-associated immune reaction. PMID:24628065

  17. Effects of polybrominated biphenyl on milk production, reproduction, and health problems in Holstein cows.

    PubMed Central

    Wastell, M E; Moody, D L; Plog, J F

    1978-01-01

    PBB found in relatively low levels among animals present on a cross-section of Michigan farms during the time PBB was inadvertantly added to dairy feeds had no effect upon these animals' milk production, body weight, weight gain, breeding and reproduction performance, incidence of commonly experienced health problems, calving rate, and the health of their calves. No significant differences in these vital areas could be seen between Michigan animals exposed to PBB and equivalent Wisconsin animals which had not been exposed to PBB when both groups were subjected to equivalent management practices. No pattern of gross of histopathological lesions was seen upon necropsy between test animals and control animals. PMID:210008

  18. Phenotypical and Genotypical Properties of an Arcanobacterium pluranimalium Strain Isolated from a Juvenile Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata)

    PubMed Central

    Risse, Karin; Schlez, Karen; Eisenberg, Tobias; Geiger, Christina; Balbutskaya, Anna; Sammra, Osama; Lämmler, Christoph; Abdulmawjood, Amir

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to characterize phenotypically and genotypically an Arcanobacterium pluranimalium strain (A. pluranimalium 4868) following necropsy from a juvenile giraffe. The species identity could be confirmed by phenotypical investigations and by MALDI-TOF MS analysis, by sequencing the 16S rDNA, pluranimaliumlysin encoding gene pla, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase encoding gene gap with sequence similarities to A. pluranimalium reference strain DSM 13483T of 99.2%, 89.9%, and 99.1%, respectively. To our knowledge, the present study is the first phenotypic and genotypic characterization of an A. pluranimalium strain isolated from a giraffe. PMID:26464930

  19. First record of a digenean from invasive lionfish, Pterois cf. volitans, (Scorpaeniformes: Scorpaenidae) in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Bullard, S A; Barse, A M; Curran, S S; Morris, J A

    2011-10-01

    Adults of Lecithochirium floridense (Digenea: Hemiuridae) parasitized the stomach in each of 22 necropsied lionfish, Pterois cf. volitans (Scorpaeniformes: Scorpaenidae) (prevalence  =  100%, mean intensity  =  11), captured in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean off Beaufort, North Carolina (34°14.83'N, 76°35.25'W). This is the first report of a digenean from the invasive lionfish and that of L. floridense from a species of Pterois. The leech specimen previously identified as Myzobdella lugubris from P. volitans in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean is re-identified as Trachelobdella lubrica based on a study of the original voucher specimen. PMID:21506808

  20. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS-SCLEROSING ENCAPSULATING PERITONITIS IN A DOG.

    PubMed

    Veiga-Parga, Tamara; Hecht, Silke; Craig, Linden

    2015-01-01

    An approximately 5-month-old American Staffordshire terrier was presented with a history of recurrent peritoneal effusion. Abdominal radiographs and ultrasound showed a loculated effusion in the ventral abdomen with dorsal displacement of abdominal organs, hepatomegaly and rounding of liver and splenic margins. Computed tomography demonstrated centrally located gastrointestinal segments surrounded by a thin soft tissue band and a thickened peritoneal lining. At necropsy a fibrous membrane continuous with liver and splenic capsules encapsulated all abdominal organs. Microscopically the abdominal wall and fibrous capsule consisted of an irregular thick layer of hypocellular connective tissue. The final diagnosis was sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis. PMID:26095283

  1. Malignant mesenchymal tumors in two white-tailed jack rabbits (Lepus townsendii).

    PubMed

    Jardine, Claire; Wobeser, Gary A; Simko, Elemir

    2004-10-01

    Two white-tailed jack rabbits (Lepus townsendii) with proliferative lesions in their internal organs were submitted to the Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada) for necropsy because of concern that dogs that had contact with the hares might have been exposed to an infectious disease. In both hares, the primary diagnosis was neoplasia. One hare had metastatic leiomyosarcoma and uterine fibroma, the other had metastatic mesenchymal tumors involving the liver and mesentery. These cases represent the only reports of malignant mesenchymal tumors in white-tailed jack rabbits that we have found in the literature. PMID:15650095

  2. Isolation of Leptospira interrogans serovar grippotyphosa from the skin of a dog.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J F; Miller, D A; Post, J E; Johnson, R C; Magnarelli, L A; Andreadis, T G

    1993-12-01

    Leptospira interrogans serovar grippotyphosa was isolated from the skin of a 14-year-old male dog with deteriorating health. Necropsy revealed numerous lesions characteristic of aged dogs, but no evidence of acute hepatitis or nephritis, which are common features of pathogenic Leptospira infections. Antibody to Leptospira was not detected in the dog's serum by microagglutination. Leptospires grew slowly in Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly medium, a medium commonly used to isolate Borrelia, but then grew abundantly in Tween 80-bovine albumin leptospire medium. The isolate was pathogenic to a hamster and was identified by microagglutination and restriction endonuclease analysis. PMID:8288477

  3. Bacteremia and vegetative endocarditis associated with a heart murmur in a blue-and-gold macaw.

    PubMed

    Isaza, R; Buergelt, C; Kollias, G V

    1992-01-01

    A 6-year-old male blue-and-gold macaw (Ara ararauna) was presented with severe weakness, anorexia, and weight loss of 2 weeks duration. Cardiac auscultation revealed a soft systolic murmur. Blood cultures collected both antemortem and postmortem yielded pure isolates of Enterobacter cloacae. At necropsy, vegetative endocarditis was found involving the left atrioventricular valve. Microscopically, the lesion on the valve was characterized by a mixture of necrotic material, colonies of gram-negative bacteria, fibrosis, and inflammatory infiltrate consisting primarily of heterophils. PMID:1485868

  4. Effects of Seismic Air Guns on Pallid Sturgeon and Paddlefish.

    PubMed

    Popper, Arthur N; Carlson, Thomas J; Gross, Jackson A; Hawkins, Anthony D; Zeddies, David; Powell, Lynwood; Young, John

    2016-01-01

    Pallid sturgeon and paddlefish were placed at different distances from a seismic air gun array to determine the potential effects on mortality and nonauditory body tissues from the sound from a single shot. Fish were held 7 days postexposure and then necropsied. No fish died immediately after sound exposure or over the postexposure period. Statistical analysis of injuries showed no differences between the experimental and control animals in either type or severity of injuries. There was also no difference in injuries between fish exposed closest to the source compared with those exposed furthest from the source. PMID:26611044

  5. Causes of mortality in laying hens in different housing systems in 2001 to 2004

    PubMed Central

    Fossum, Oddvar; Jansson, Désirée S; Etterlin, Pernille Engelsen; Vågsholm, Ivar

    2009-01-01

    Background The husbandry systems for laying hens were changed in Sweden during the years 2001 – 2004, and an increase in the number of submissions for necropsy from laying hen farms was noted. Hence, this study was initiated to compare causes of mortality in different housing systems for commercial laying hens during this change. Methods Based on results from routine necropsies of 914 laying hens performed at the National Veterinary Institute (SVA) in Uppsala, Sweden between 2001 and 2004, a retrospective study on the occurrence of diseases and cannibalism, i.e., pecking leading to mortality, in different housing systems was carried out. Using the number of disease outbreaks in caged flocks as the baseline, the expected number of flocks with a certain category of disease in the other housing systems was estimated having regard to the total number of birds in the population. Whether the actual number of flocks significantly exceeded the expected number was determined using a Poisson distribution for the variance of the baseline number, a continuity correction and the exact value for the Poisson distribution function in Excel 2000. Results Common causes of mortality in necropsied laying hens included colibacillosis, erysipelas, coccidiosis, red mite infestation, lymphoid leukosis and cannibalism. Less common diagnoses were Newcastle Disease, pasteurellosis and botulism. Considering the size of the populations in the different housing systems, a larger proportion of laying hens than expected was submitted for necropsy from litter-based systems and free range production compared to hens in cages (P < 0.001). The study showed a significantly higher occurrence of bacterial and parasitic diseases and cannibalism in laying hens kept in litter-based housing systems and free-range systems than in hens kept in cages (P < 0.001). The occurrence of viral diseases was significantly higher in indoor litter-based housing systems than in cages (P < 0.001). Conclusion The results

  6. Hepatic hemosiderosis and Klebsiella bacteremia in a green aracari (Pteroglossus viridis).

    PubMed

    Wilson, R B

    1994-01-01

    A green aracari (Pteroglossus viridis) was presented for necropsy after being found dead; no previous clinical signs had been noted. Microscopic examination revealed multifocal necrosis of the liver, spleen, and lung compatible with an acute bacteremia. Klebsiella pneumoniae was isolated from the liver, kidney, and intestine. Histopathological and toxicological findings also reflected a concurrent hepatopathy due to excess iron accumulation. Hepatic hemosiderosis has been reported in mynahs, birds of paradise, and quetzals but has not previously been reported in the green aracari. PMID:7832728

  7. Primary central nervous system T-cell lymphoma in a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis).

    PubMed

    Arbelo, M; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Herráez, P; Suárez-Bonnet, A; Andrada, M; Rivero, M; Grau-Bassas, E R; Fernández, A

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the pathological findings in an adult female short-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) stranded alive in the Canary Islands. Necropsy examination revealed the presence of a nodular neoplastic growth in the central nervous system (CNS) at the level of the thalamus. Microscopical examination revealed the mass to be a lymphoma and immunohistochemical labelling demonstrated a T-cell origin. No significant lesions were observed in other organs, including lymphoid organs. This is the first report of a primary T-cell lymphoma in the CNS in cetaceans. PMID:24650893

  8. Natural Unusual Myeloblastosis in a Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus): Histopathologic Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Khordadmehr, M; Ashrafi-Helana, J; Madadi, M S; Jarolmasjed, S H

    2016-03-01

    The subgroup J avian leukosis virus favors the myelocytic series cells and causes myeloid leukosis (myeloblastosis and myelocytomatosis). Natural cases of myeloblastosis (myeloblastic myeloid leukosis) are uncommon and usually occur in adult chickens. This paper describes clinical signs and gross and histopathologic features of myeloblastosis in an adult female budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) that was infected naturally. At necropsy, the spleen was greatly enlarged (enlarged seven or eight times normal) while the other visceral organs were normal. Histologic examination of the spleen indicated a massive intravascular and extravascular accumulation of myeloblasts with a variable proportion of promyelocytes and myelocytes in the red pulp of the spleen. PMID:26953949

  9. Residues of petroleum hydrocarbons in tissues of sea turtles exposed to the IXTOC I oil spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.J.; Belisle, A.A.; Sileo, L.

    1983-01-01

    Sea turtles found dead when the Ixtoc I oil spill reached Texas waters were necropsied and tissues were analyzed for residues of petroleum hydrocarbons. Two of the three turtles were in poor flesh, but had no apparent oil-caused lesions. There was evidence of oil in all tissues examined and indications that the exposure had been chronic. Comparisons with results of studies done on birds indicate consumption of 50,000 ppm or more of oil in the diet. Some possible mechanisms of mortality are suggested.

  10. Waterbird Susceptibility to Avian Cholera at Hayward Marsh, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Wray, Amy K; Bell, Douglas A; Dramer, Peter; Taylor, Mark

    2016-07-01

    We characterized past avian cholera outbreaks in waterbirds at Hayward Marsh, California, US. In 2013, we surveyed populations and determined the presence of disease using several diagnostic methods, including behavioral and physical observations, field necropsy, and bacterial culture. We compiled this information with data from previous outbreaks from 1990-2012 to compare waterbird abundance to various measures of mortality, including percentage of mortality and percentage of difference between abundance and mortality by species. We suggest that Ruddy Duck ( Oxyura jamaicensis ) have consistently suffered greater mortality from this disease than have other species at this site. PMID:27258407

  11. Early-onset dementia and extrapyramidal disease: clinicopathological variant of Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker or Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Hart, J; Gordon, B

    1990-01-01

    A case of progressive dementia and extrapyramidal signs beginning at age 29, with a ten year course until death, is presented. Necropsy examination showed an assortment of plaque types (including striatal plaques), neurofibrillary tangles, granulovacuolar degeneration, and depigmentation of the substantia nigra and locus ceruleus. This case had pathological features found in both Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease and in Alzheimer's disease. While somewhat similar to several other cases with features of both diseases, it differs in the presence of dystonia and striatal plaques. Although such cases may be difficult to categorize at present, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of early onset dementia. Images PMID:2283522

  12. Diphtheroid colitis in a Boa constrictor infected with amphibian Entamoeba sp.

    PubMed

    Richter, Barbara; Kübber-Heiss, Anna; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2008-05-01

    A female boa (Boa constrictor) from a zoological collection was submitted for necropsy after sudden death. Prominent pathological findings included a diphtheroid colitis, endoparasitism, focal pneumonia and inclusion bodies typical for inclusion body disease (IBD). In the colon entamoebae were identified, which differed in size and distribution from Entamoeba invadens. Gene sequence analysis of the 18S ribosomal RNA revealed 100% similarity with an Entamoeba species from the African bullfrog (Pyxicephalus adspersus), probably Entamoeba ranarum. The snake was possibly immunosuppressed, and the source of infection remains unclear. This is the first report of an infection with an amphibian Entamoeba species associated with colitis in a snake. PMID:18291588

  13. Diseases of yearling feedlot cattle in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R; Pierson, R E; Braddy, P M; Saari, D A; Lauerman, L H; England, J J; Horton, D P; McChesney, A E

    1976-09-01

    During all of 1974 we surveyed, for illnesses and deaths, about 407,000 yearling feedlot cattle. The morbidity was 5.1%, with a case mortality of 18.9% and a population mortality of 1.0%. Both morbidity and mortality were higher during fall and winter than during spring and summer. Of the 3,943 dead cattle, 1,988 were necropsied. The most prevalent diseases were: pneumonia, 48%; diphtheria, 6%; brisket disease, 6%; hemorrhagic colitis, 5%; riding injury, 4%; bloat, 3%; calculosis, 2%; endocarditis, 2%; abomasal ulcers, 2%; bovine viral diarrhea, 2%; embolic pulmonary aneurysm, 1%; and pulmonary edema, 1%. PMID:956027

  14. Thymic and mammary lymphosarcoma in a three-year-old heifer.

    PubMed

    Matthews, H K; Hunt, E; Duncan, D E

    1992-03-01

    Ventral edema, dyspnea, fever, tachycardia, bloat and muffled heart sounds were identified in a 3-year-old heifer. Attempts to relieve the bloat by passing an orogastric tube were unsuccessful. The heifer was bovine leukemia virus-negative by the agar gel immunodiffusion test, and had normocytic, normochromic anemia, mature neutrophilia, and hyperproteinemia. Pleural effusion was identified by thoracic ultrasonography. Cytologic examination of pleural fluid revealed an increased number of atypical lymphocytes. The heifer died, and at necropsy, thymic and metastatic mammary lymphosarcoma was confirmed. PMID:1568914

  15. Perforated Duodenal Ulcer in a Cow

    PubMed Central

    Fatimah, I.; Butler, D. G.; Physick-Sheard, P. W.

    1982-01-01

    A case report of perforated duodenal ulcer in a ten year old Holstein cow is presented. On three occasions, sudden anorexia and rapidly progressing abdominal fluid distension were associated with metabolic alkalosis, hypochloremia and hypokalemia. Rumen fluid at the time of the second episode was acidic and contained an excessive amount of chloride ion. An abdominal mass dorsal to the abomasum involving the pylorus and several loops of small bowel was identified but not corrected at surgery. Necropsy confirmed a 1.5 cm diameter duodenal ulcer 6 cm distal to the pylorus. PMID:17422146

  16. Role of ligamentum flavum in the symptomatology of prolapsed lumbar intervertebral discs.

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, P S; Perry, R H; Tomlinson, B E

    1975-01-01

    Hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum has been reported to occur in the prolapsed intervertebral disc syndrome. The ligaments from 28 patients were compared with a necropsy control group (18). Only minor histological anomalies were noted in two patients and the ligament was not thickened in cases of disc prolapse. In addition, there was no evidence to suggest previous trauma to the ligaments associated with disc protrusion or that the elastic fibres in the ligament degenerate with age, although some degeneration of the collagen fibres had apparently occurred in the two oldest control cases. Images PMID:1151422

  17. Subependymal glioneuronal hamartoma in the mesencephalic aqueduct of a giraffe.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Jennifer; Cox, Nancy; Passler, Thomas; Wolfe, Dwight

    2012-09-01

    A 1-day-old male giraffe calf (Giraffa camelopardalis) was submitted for necropsy examination after sustaining postnatal head trauma from the cow. In addition to the expected findings of severe cerebral edema and epidural and subarachnoid hemorrhage, there also was present an incidental finding of a subependymal glioneuronal aqueductal hamartoma. Reports of this type of congenital lesion are rare in the human literature, and the lesion has not, to the authors' knowledge, previously been reported in this or any other veterinary species. PMID:23082530

  18. Reproduction of raccoons (Procyon lotor) in North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fritzell, E.K.

    1978-01-01

    Necropsies and observations of captive and radio-equipped individuals provided reproductive data from a raccoon population in the northern prairies. The mean parturition date of adult females was 8 May and the mean litter size was 4.8. Only two of the 14 yearling females examined prior to 1 July were pregnant; they had estimated parturition dates of 20 May and 22 June. Penes of most yearling males became extrusible in July or August. Testes weights and sperm smears suggest that yearling males in North Dakota are not reproductively active. Reproductive patterns of raccoons near the northern periphery of their range and those at lower latitudes are compared and discussed.

  19. Clinical and echocardiographic findings in an 8 year old Brown Swiss cow with myocardial abscess.

    PubMed

    Gerspach, C; Schwarzwald, C C; Hilbe, M; Buczinski, S

    2016-06-01

    Intramyocardial abscesses are rare in cattle and may lead to unspecific clinical signs. This case report describes the clinical and echocardiographic findings in an 8 year old Brown Swiss cow presented with an intramural myocardial abscess. The main clinical findings were anorexia, drop in milk yield, fever, tachycardia, and hyperfibrinogenemia. Neither heart murmurs nor cardiac arrhythmias were present on auscultation. Transthoracic echocardiographic examination revealed a prominent intramural mass embedded in the left ventricular free wall and bulging into the lumen of the left ventricle. Diagnosis was confirmed at necropsy. A culture of the abscess grew Trueperella pyogenes. PMID:26900053

  20. Holoprosencephaly and Pure Red Cell Aplasia in a Feline Leukaemia Virus-Positive Kitten.

    PubMed

    Southard, T L; Rodriguez-Ramos Fernandez, J; Priest, H; Stokol, T

    2016-01-01

    A 9-month-old, female, domestic longhair cat with severe anaemia tested positive for feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and was humanely destroyed and submitted for necropsy examination. Gross findings included a non-divided rostral telencephalon, consistent with semilobar holoprosencephaly. Histological examination of the bone marrow revealed an almost complete absence of erythroid precursor cells, consistent with pure red cell aplasia, and mild to moderate myelofibrosis. This case demonstrates a very unusual central nervous system defect, as well as an atypical presentation of pure red cell aplasia, in a FeLV-positive kitten. PMID:26897097

  1. Neosporosis in a captive Parma wallaby (Macropus parma).

    PubMed

    Cronstedt-Fell, A; Richter, B; Voracek, T; Kübber-Heiss, A

    2012-01-01

    Infection with Neospora caninum has been diagnosed in a variety of animal species; however, reports in marsupials are rare. A captive Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) died suddenly and was subjected to necropsy examination. The main finding was necrotizing myocarditis associated with protozoan parasites. The protozoa were identified as N. caninum by use of immunohistochemistry and partial gene sequence analysis. Neospora and Toxoplasma should be considered a possible cause of disease in captive marsupials. Further work is required to determine whether marsupials are an accidental or terminal host of this protozoan in order to better understand the host-parasite relationship. PMID:21689827

  2. Lead shot poisoning of a Pacific loon in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, H.M.; Oyen, J.L.; Sileo, L.

    2004-01-01

    Lead poisoning, associated with ingestion of spent lead shot, was diagnosed in an adult female Pacific loon (Gavia pacifica) observed with partial paralysis on 13 June 2002 and found dead on 16 June 2002 on Kigigak Island, Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge, western Alaska, USA. A necropsy revealed three pellets of ingested lead shot in the loona??s gizzard and a lead liver concentration of 31 ppm wet weight, which was consistent with metallic lead poisoning. This is the first report of lead poisoning in a Pacific loon and is the only account of lead toxicosis associated with ingestion of lead shot in any loon species breeding in Alaska.

  3. Collaborative work on evaluation of ovarian toxicity. 4) Effects of fertility study of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide in female rats.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Terutaka; Yoshida, Junichi; Miwa, Tadashi; Hasegawa, Daiki; Masuyama, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    As part of a collaborative project, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD), an ovarian toxicant, was intraperitoneally administered to female Sprague-Dawley rats at 0, 5, 20 or 80 mg/kg from 2 weeks prior to mating to Day 7 of gestation. At necropsy, the number of implanted embryos, rate of implantation decreased and the rate of preimplantation loss showed an increasing tendency in the 80 mg/kg group. As for organ weight, decreases in absolute and relative ovary weight were observed in the 80 mg/kg group. Histopathologically, the ovaries showed a decrease in number of small follicles at 80 mg/kg PMID:19265290

  4. Causes of Mississippi sandhill crane mortality in captivity 1984-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Gee, G.F.

    1997-01-01

    During 1984-95, 111 deaths were documented in the captive flock of Mississippi sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis pulla) housed at the Paluxent Wildlife Research Center. Trauma was the leading cause of death (37%), followed by infectious/parasitic diseases (25%), anatomic abnormalities (15%), and miscellaneous (8%). No positive diagnosis of cause of death was found in 19% of the necropsies. Chicks < 2 months old suffered 76% of captive deaths. Trauma, the greatest cause of deaths of captive juveniles anti adults, is likely Iimited to collisions in the wild. lnfectious/parasitic diseases and anatomic abnormalities could affect wild chick survival at similar rates to those of captive chicks.

  5. Certain progress in the treatment of coronary heart disease with traditional medicinal plants in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, K J

    1981-01-01

    A case of coronary heart disease in China was confirmed by the necropsy of a female body unearthed from the tomb at Changsha. It proved that such a case existed about 2,100 years ago. Research in reducing the frequency of myocardial infarction by traditional medicinal plants showed the effect of several herbs. The traditional aromatic and warm herbal medicines may have the possibility of relieving coronary arterial spasm. The clinical and experimental observations proved that the Huoxue-huayu plants' action against blood platelet aggregation and against attack was effective. PMID:6307037

  6. Studies on dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate toxicity: clinical, gross and microscopic pathology in the horse and guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, R E; Kramer, L L; Lerner, D; Jones, R

    1975-10-01

    Concentrations of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DSS) ranging from three to five times the recommended dosage produced severe diarrhea, rapid dehydration and death in seven horses and 66 guinea pigs when administered experimentally per os. Clinicopathological findings indicated hemoconcentration in both horses and guinea pigs. There was a leucocytosis in the guinea pigs given the highest dosages. In all cases the principal finding at necropsy was extreme fluid distention of the intestinal tract. There was histopathological evidence of epithelial denudation and vascular stasis. The LD50 in the guinea pig was approximately 0.65 g DSS/kg body weight. PMID:1175077

  7. Mucinous gastric hyperplasia in a colony of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) induced by polychlorinated biphenyl (Aroclor 1254)

    SciTech Connect

    Geistfeld, J.G.; Bond, M.G.; Bullock, B.C.; Varian, M.C.

    1982-02-01

    Since 1971, 45 of 259 male rhesus monkeys housed in a primate building have died of a chronic and progressive disease characterized by diarrhea, dehydration, weakness, gingivitis, emaciation, and alopecia. The principal necropsy finding in these monkeys, and in eight others killed for experimental purposes, was hypertrophic and hyperplastic mucinous gastropathy involving both the mucosa and submucosa. The toxic agent involved was identified as the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), Aroclor 1254. The suspected source of the toxic agent was a concrete sealer used during building construction.

  8. The pathology of the acute and chronic stages of farmer's lung

    PubMed Central

    Seal, R. M. E.; Hapke, E. J.; Thomas, G. O.; Meek, J. C.; Hayes, M.

    1968-01-01

    The pathology of five patients who had a biopsy in the acute stage is described; interstitial pneumonia, sarcoid-like granulomata, bronchiolitis, and vasculitis were found. Three of these patients progressed to the chronic stage, when the one with the most extensive bronchiolar involvement had lung function findings of airway obstruction. One progressed to the chronic stage with lung function findings of a transfer defect, and another had radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis with normal lung function tests at rest. The pathology of the chronic stage is described in six patients, with necropsy findings in five. Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, cystic change, and pulmonary hypertensive changes were the principal findings. Images PMID:5680234

  9. Case report: epizootic of coccidiosis in free-flying lesser scaup (Aythya affinis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; McDonald, M.E.; Locke, L.N.; Kerr, S.M.; Sinn, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A coccidiosis epizootic has occurred in lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) at Bluestem Reservoir in eastern Nebraska during the spring in each of three recent years: 1976-1978. Losses peaked during the period from mid-March through April. As much as 29% of the peak population of scaup using the reservoir died. Necropsies of 72 of the nearly 1390 scaup that died revealed destruction and sloughing of the intestinal mucosa and associated hemorrhaging. Fibrinonecrotic cores were frequently found in the intestinal lumens. Scrapings from the intestinal mucosal contained massive numbers of oocysts of the coccidian Eimeria aythyae. This is the first report of recurrent epizootics of coccidiosis in freeflying waterfowl.

  10. Diffuse cerebrospinal gliomatosis presenting as motor neuron disease for two years.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidbauer, M; Müller, C; Podreka, I; Mamoli, B; Sluga, E; Deecke, L

    1989-01-01

    A patient with symptoms and signs of motor neuron disease for 2 years finally developed sensory disturbances and increased intracranial pressure. MRI and CT showed enlargement of the right side of the cerebellum, the brainstem and parts of the cerebral hemisphere with focal hyperperfusion demonstrated by SPECT. Necropsy revealed a diffuse cerebrospinal gliomatosis with loss of spinal motor neurons in tumour infiltration of the anterior horns. This type of spinal cord involvement is considered responsible for the unusual clinical presentation of the neoplasm. Images PMID:2703845

  11. Brain shrinkage in chronic alcoholics: a pathological study.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, C G; Kril, J J; Holloway, R L

    1985-01-01

    A quantitative neuropathological necropsy study of 22 control and 22 chronic alcoholic subjects showed a statistically significant loss of brain tissue in the chronic alcoholic group. The loss of tissue appeared to be from the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres rather than the cerebral cortex. This may reflect a primary alteration in the composition or structure of the white matter or it may be secondary to loss of nerve cells from the cortex with subsequent degeneration of the axons in the white matter. Further morphometric analyses including cortical neuronal counts will be necessary to clarify this issue. PMID:3918649

  12. Suspected lead toxicosis in a bald eagle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, E.; Carpenter, J.W.; Novilla, M.

    1977-01-01

    An immature bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was submitted to the University of Maryland, College Park, for clinical examination. The bird was thin, had green watery feces, and was unable to maintain itself in upright posture. Following radiography, the bird went into respiratory distress and died. Numerous lead shot were recovered from the gizzard, and chemical analysis of liver and kidney tissue revealed 22.9 and 11.3 ppm lead, respectively. The clinical signs, necropsy findings, and chemical analysis of the eagle were compatible with lead toxicosis.

  13. Pulmonary vascular lesions in the toxic oil syndrome in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Segoviano, P; Esteban, A; Martínez-Cabruja, R

    1983-01-01

    A histological study was made of pulmonary arteries at the necropsies of nine patients who died after the ingestion of denatured rapeseed oil during the epidemic which occurred in Spain in May 1981. Lesions found in the elastic pulmonary arteries were characterised by pronounced intimal proliferation of an oedematous nature, accumulation of large vacuolated cells within the media, and loss of vascular smooth muscle. In muscular pulmonary arteries there was pronounced medial hypertrophy and intimal proliferation, which was so severe in one case that it completely occluded the arterial lumen. Foamy cells were found in the intima. Muscularisation was seen in the walls of pulmonary arterioles. Images PMID:6648850

  14. Spontaneous and experimental intoxication of cattle by Simarouba versicolor A. St.-Hill (Simaroubaceae).

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Nilton M; Bacha, Flavia B; Santos, Ariany C; Carvalho, Amanda Q; Faccin, Tatiane C; Pott, Arnildo; Lemos, Ricardo A A

    2013-03-15

    This study describes an outbreak of Simarouba versicolor intoxication in cattle from Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, and reproduces it experimentally. Clinical signs of the affected animals were weakness, tremors, hind limbs incoordination, reluctance to move, sternal and lateral recumbency and death. The main necropsy findings, observed in the abomasum and in segments of the small and large intestines, were diffuse redness and mucosal and serosal swelling. Histological examination revealed necrosis of lymphoid tissues and necrotizing enterocolitis. One experiment was carried out using 3 male calves to test the toxicity of a single dose of S. versicolor leaves at 15 g/kg, 5 g/kg and 2.5 g/kg. Clinical signs, necropsy findings and histological examination of calves receiving 15 g/kg and 5 g/kg leaves were similar to those of cattle from the intoxication outbreak. The calf fed 2.5 g/kg leaves developed clinical symptoms of poisoning and recovered naturally. In a second experiment, two male calves received daily administration of S. versicolor leaves at 1.5 g/kg and 2.5 g/kg for 10 days. They developed clinical signs of intoxication within 24 h and recovered eight to nine days after the leaves were administered. These findings suggest that S. versicolor was responsible for the outbreak studied, although this plant does not have cumulative intoxication effects on cattle. PMID:23319076

  15. Apparent tolerance of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Whitehead, M.A.; Gasper, G.; Meteyer, C.U.; Link, W.A.; Taggart, M.A.; Meharg, A.A.; Pattee, O.H.; Pain, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac is extremely toxic to Old World Gyps vultures (median lethal dose 0.1?0.2 mg/kg), evoking visceral gout, renal necrosis, and mortality within a few days of exposure. Unintentional secondary poisoning of vultures that fed upon carcasses of diclofenac-treated livestock decimated populations in the Indian subcontinent. Because of the widespread use of diclofenac and other cyclooxygenase-2 inhibiting drugs, a toxicological study was undertaken in turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) as an initial step in examining sensitivity of New World scavenging birds. Two trials were conducted entailing oral gavage of diclofenac at doses ranging from 0.08 to 25 mg/kg body weight. Birds were observed for 7 d, blood samples were collected for plasma chemistry (predose and 12, 24, and 48 h and 7 d postdose), and select individuals were necropsied. Diclofenac failed to evoke overt signs of toxicity, visceral gout, renal necrosis, or elevate plasma uric acid at concentrations greater than 100 times the estimated median lethal dose reported for Gyps vultures. For turkey vultures receiving 8 or 25 mg/kg, the plasma half-life of diclofenac was estimated to be 6 h, and it was apparently cleared after several days as no residues were detectable in liver or kidney at necropsy. Differential sensitivity among avian species is a hallmark of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and despite the tolerance of turkey vultures to diclofenac, additional studies in related scavenging species seem warranted.

  16. Proliferative Hemorrhagic Enteropathy in Swine: An Outbreak and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yates, W. D. G.; Clark, E. G.; Osborne, A. D.; Enweani, C. C.; Radostits, O. M.; Theede, A.

    1979-01-01

    An account is given of an acute outbreak of hemorrhagic enteric disease in 34 young adult boars of primarily Yorkshire breeding at a performance testing station in Western Canada. Two of the boars died. A diagnosis of proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy was made on the basis of clinical signs, gross necropsy and histopathological lesions. Campylobacter-like bacteria were seen in the apical cytoplasm of epithelial cells of the ileal mucosa by Warthin-Faulkner stain on histological sections, but were not isolated on culture. Treatment with several drugs simultaneously was associated with termination of the outbreak, but the therapeutic effect was not controlled by leaving some animals untreated. Reported sequelae, such as porcine intestinal adenomatosis, were not present at necropsy or slaughter of pigs surviving the outbreak, but all were killed no longer than two months after the first case was observed. This outbreak is discussed in the context of previously reported hemorrhagic enteric conditions of pigs. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:396978

  17. PATHOLOGY AND MOLECULAR DETECTION OF RABIES VIRUS IN FERRET BADGERS ASSOCIATED WITH A RABIES OUTBREAK IN TAIWAN.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Hue-Ying; Jeng, Chian-Ren; Wang, Hurng-Yi; Inoue, Satoshi; Chan, Fang-Tse; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Chiou, Ming-Tang; Pang, Victor Fei

    2016-01-01

    Until Rabies virus (RABV) infection in Taiwan ferret badgers (TWFB; Melogale moschata subaurantiaca) was diagnosed in mid-June 2013, Taiwan had been considered rabies free for >50 yr. Although rabies has also been reported in ferret badgers in China, the pathologic changes and distribution of viral antigens of ferret badger-associated rabies have not been described. We performed a comprehensive pathologic study and molecular detection of rabies virus in three necropsied rabid TWFBs and evaluated archival paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of six other TWFBs necropsied during 2004 and 2012. As in other RABV-infected species, the characteristic pathologic changes in TWFBs were nonsuppurative meningoencephalomyelitis, ganglionitis, and the formation of typical intracytoplasmic Negri bodies, with the brain stem most affected. There was also variable spongiform degeneration, primarily in the perikaryon of neurons and neuropil, in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, and brain stem. In nonnervous system tissues, representative lesions included adrenal necrosis and lymphocytic interstitial sialadenitis. Immunohistochemical staining and fluorescent antibody test demonstrated viral antigens in the perikaryon of the neurons and axonal or dendritic processes throughout the nervous tissue and in the macrophages in various tissues. Similar to raccoons (Procyon lotor) and skunks (Mephitidae), the nervous tissue of rabid TWFBs displayed widely dispersed lesions, RABV antigens, and large numbers of Negri bodies. We traced the earliest rabid TWFB case back to 2004. PMID:26560756

  18. Clinical pathology alterations in pregnant and non-pregnant rats following scorpion envenomation.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Hmed Ben; Bolon, Brad; Hammami, Serria Turky; Sahnoun, Zouhier; Jamoussi, Kamel; Lahyani, Amina; Zeghal, Khaled Mounir

    2009-10-01

    Scorpion envenomation is a growing problem in many countries, especially among women and children. Existing diagnostic criteria are not sufficiently specific to allow antivenin administration in the absence of a confirmed scorpion sting. This study was performed to evaluate conventional haematological and serum chemical measurements as potential indices of scorpion envenomation. Adult, cycling nulliparous and near-term primiparous, white Wistar rats received a single subcutaneous injection of crude venom (600 µg/kg) from the Buthidae scorpion (Buthus occitanus tunetanus). All envenomed rats were observed for external signs and symptoms of toxicity until necropsy, which entailed terminal blood collection at either 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 hr after venom administration (n = 6 per reproductive state per time-point) for evaluation of selected clinical chemistry and haematological analytes. Control cohorts (matched for age and reproductive state) received saline injections subcutaneously and were necropsied at 0.5 hr. Almost all envenomed rats but no control animals displayed physical symptoms of intoxication, including agitation, mastication with hypersalivation, and/or vocalizing. Reproducible alterations in clinical pathology parameters were lacking in venom-treated rats regardless of reproductive status, although modest but significant Rho correlations suggested that mild haemoconcentration, haemolysis, renal function deficits and possibly coagulation difficulties developed over time. PMID:19663823

  19. Poisoning of wild birds from exposure to anticholinesterase compounds and lead: diagnostic methods and selected cases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Smith, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    Organophosphorus and carbamate compounds have largely replaced chlorinated hydrocarbons for pesticidal use in the United States, and many cases of poisoning resulting from exposure to these anticholinesterase agents have occurred in free-living birds. Although lead shot has been prohibited for waterfowl hunting throughout the United States since 1991, lead poisoning from the ingestion of spent lead shot is still occasionally seen in wild birds, and lead poisoning from the ingestion of fishing sinkers is an emerging issue of concern. A thorough history, a complete necropsy evaluation, and appropriate laboratory analysis of tissues are required to diagnose toxicoses in wild birds, including those caused by anticholinesterase compounds and lead. The interpretation of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity results depends on the methods of analysis and comparison with expected normal enzyme activities in brain tissue from the same species. Although lead residues in tissues vary among species, many lead poisoned birds have tissue residues that are much higher than the lower threshold commonly accepted for a diagnosis of lead poisoning. We review histories, necropsy findings, and analytical methodologies and results for selected anticholinesterase and lead poisoning cases diagnosed in wild raptors, waterfowl, and loons.

  20. Patterns of Natural and Human-Caused Mortality Factors of a Rare Forest Carnivore, the Fisher (Pekania pennanti) in California.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Mourad W; Woods, Leslie W; Wengert, Greta M; Stephenson, Nicole; Higley, J Mark; Thompson, Craig; Matthews, Sean M; Sweitzer, Rick A; Purcell, Kathryn; Barrett, Reginald H; Keller, Stefan M; Gaffney, Patricia; Jones, Megan; Poppenga, Robert; Foley, Janet E; Brown, Richard N; Clifford, Deana L; Sacks, Benjamin N

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife populations of conservation concern are limited in distribution, population size and persistence by various factors, including mortality. The fisher (Pekania pennanti), a North American mid-sized carnivore whose range in the western Pacific United States has retracted considerably in the past century, was proposed for threatened status protection in late 2014 under the United States Endangered Species Act by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service in its West Coast Distinct Population Segment. We investigated mortality in 167 fishers from two genetically and geographically distinct sub-populations in California within this West Coast Distinct Population Segment using a combination of gross necropsy, histology, toxicology and molecular methods. Overall, predation (70%), natural disease (16%), toxicant poisoning (10%) and, less commonly, vehicular strike (2%) and other anthropogenic causes (2%) were causes of mortality observed. We documented both an increase in mortality to (57% increase) and exposure (6%) from pesticides in fishers in just the past three years, highlighting further that toxicants from marijuana cultivation still pose a threat. Additionally, exposure to multiple rodenticides significantly increased the likelihood of mortality from rodenticide poisoning. Poisoning was significantly more common in male than female fishers and was 7 times more likely than disease to kill males. Based on necropsy findings, suspected causes of mortality based on field evidence alone tended to underestimate the frequency of disease-related mortalities. This study is the first comprehensive investigation of mortality causes of fishers and provides essential information to assist in the conservation of this species. PMID:26536481

  1. Pathology and causes of death of stranded cetaceans in the Canary Islands (1999-2005).

    PubMed

    Arbelo, Manuel; Los Monteros, Antonio Espinosa de; Herráez, Pedro; Andrada, Marisa; Sierra, Eva; Rodríguez, Francisco; Jepson, Paul D; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-03-26

    Between 1999 and 2005, 233 stranded cetaceans (comprising 19 species) were reported in the waters of the Canary Islands. Of these, 138/233 (59.2%) were subjected to a complete or partial standardized necropsy, including 4 Balaenopteridae, 9 Physeteridae, 8 Kogiidae, 27 Ziphiidae and 90 Delphinidae. Of these, 46/138 (33.3%) cetaceans were diagnosed with anthropogenic pathological categories (i.e. the cause of death was anthropogenic). These included fishing interaction (bycatch) (19 individuals), 'atypical' mass stranding events linked to naval exercises (13), ship collisions (8) and other anthropogenic-related pathology (6). 'Natural' (i.e. non-anthropogenic) causes of death accounted for another 82/138 (59.4%) cases, including infectious and non-infectious diseases (63), neonatal pathology (8), intra- and interspecific interactions (6) and mass strandings (5). The cause(s) of death could not be determined in 10/138 (7.3%) necropsied animals. The most common causes of death were ship collisions in 6/9 (66.6%) Physeteridae, 'atypical' mass stranding linked to naval exercises in 13/27 (48.1%) Ziphiidae, and 'natural' infectious and non-infectious diseases in 55/90 (61.1%) Delphinidae. Interaction with fishing activities was established as cause of death in 15/90 (16.7%) Delphinidae. These data show that a range of anthropogenic and natural single and mass mortality events occur in multiple cetacean species stranded in the Canary Islands. PMID:23548359

  2. Dolphin Morbillivirus and Toxoplasma gondii coinfection in a Mediterranean fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although Morbillivirus and Toxoplasma gondii have emerged as important pathogens for several cetaceans populations over the last 20 years, they have never been identified together in a Mysticete. In particular, morbilliviral infection has been never described in the Mediterranean fin whale population. Case presentation On January 2011 an adult male of fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) stranded along the Tyrrhenian coastline of Italy. During necropsy, tissue samples from heart, skeletal muscle, mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney were collected and subsequently analyzed for Morbillivirus and Toxoplasma gondii by microscopic and molecular methods. Following the detailed necropsy carried out on this whale, molecular analysis revealed, for the first time, the simultaneous presence of a Dolphin Morbillivirus (DMV) and T. gondii infection coexisting with each other, along with high organochlorine pollutant concentrations, with special reference to DDT. Conclusion This report, besides confirming the possibility for Mysticetes to be infected with DMV, highlights the risk of toxoplasmosis in sea water for mammals, already immunodepressed by concurrent factors as infections and environmental contaminants. PMID:22397492

  3. Effect of management interventions on the helminth parasites recovered from donkeys in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Matthee, Sonja; Krecek, Rosina C; Guthrie, Alan J

    2002-02-01

    The helminth burdens and biodiversity of 9 randomly selected donkeys (Equus asinus) were examined after necropsy. Prior to necropsy, 8 of the animals were subjected to 1 of 3 management interventions (monthly fecal removal, prewinter moxidectin treatment, and a combination of both treatments) or a control for a 16-mo period. The remaining animal was killed earlier in the study. Quantitative samples were collected from the gastrointestinal tract for helminth recovery. The intestinal walls were examined with transmural illumination and thereafter digested with a HCl-peptic method for identification of the mucosal larval stages of cyathostomes. In this study, 37 helminth species belonging to the Ascarididae, Atractidae, Dictyocaulidae. Habronematidae, Onchocercidae, Oxyuridae, Strongylidae, and Trichostrongylidae, 1 cestode species of the Anoplocephalidae, and 1 trematode species in the Paramphistomatidae were recovered. In addition, 1 species of oestrid fly of the Gasterophilidae was identified. The results obtained in the present study support the application of several intervention methods to reduce the helminth burdens in donkeys. PMID:12053959

  4. Isolation of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae associated with enteric disease of herbivores in western Colorado.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J B; Schweitzer, D; Ogg, J E

    1985-10-01

    Non-O1 Vibrio cholerae was isolated from a horse (Equus caballus), a lamb (genus Ovis), and two American buffalo (Bison bison) suffering from enteric disease in the western part of Colorado. In 1981, a foal died of apparent respiratory failure. Necropsy findings included heart failure and gastroenteritis. V. cholerae serovar 347 (Smith) was isolated from the colon of this animal. V. cholerae serovar 27 (Smith) was isolated in 1983 from the intestine of a feedlot lamb suffering from pneumonia and severe watery diarrhea. In 1984, an enteric disease occurred in a herd of American bison. The sick animals were depressed and separated from the herd, dying in about 3 days. Of approximately 100 adult bison, 7 died. Necropsy of one animal revealed that gross lesions were limited to the gastrointestinal tract. V. cholerae serovar 27 (Smith) was isolated from the abomasum, duodenum, and colon of this animal. A swab specimen from the intestine of another dead bison also yielded V. cholerae serovar 27 (Smith). PMID:4077968

  5. Toxicological assessment of enzyme-treated asparagus extract in rat acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies and genotoxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomohiro; Ono, Tomoko; Sato, Atsuya; Goto, Kazunori; Miura, Takehito; Wakame, Koji; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Maeda, Takahiro

    2014-03-01

    The safety of enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) developed as a novel anti-stress functional material was assessed in acute and subchronic studies and genotoxicity assays. In the acute oral dose toxicity study, all rats survived during the test period and ETAS did not influence clinical appearance, body weight gain and necropsy findings at a dosage of 2000mg/kg body weight. Thus, the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of ETAS was determined to be greater than 2000mg/kg. The 90-day subchronic study (500, 1000 and 2000mg/kg body weight, delivered by gavage) in rats reported no significant adverse effects in food consumption, body weight, mortality, urinalysis, hematology, biochemistry, necropsy, organ weight and histopathology. In the micronucleus test of mice, the incidence of micronuclei in ETAS-administered groups (500, 1000 and 2000mg/kg/day, injected twice) was equivalent to that of the negative control group, while the positive control group receiving mitomycin C showed a high incidence. The potential of ETAS to induce gene mutation was tested using four Salmonella typhimurium strains and Escherichia coli WP2uvrA. The test sample was not mutagenic to the test strains. These results support the safety of ETAS as food and dietary supplement. PMID:24389363

  6. Hepatic Lipidosis in a Research Colony of Big Brown Bats (Eptesicus fuscus)

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Jessica M; Treuting, Piper M; Brabb, Thea; Miller, Kimberly E; Covey, Ellen; Lencioni, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    During a nearby construction project, a sudden decrease in food intake and guano production occurred in an outdoor colony of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), and one animal was found dead. Investigation revealed that the project was generating a large amount of noise and vibration, which disturbed the bats’ feeding. Consequently the bats were moved into an indoor enclosure away from the construction noises, and the colony resumed eating. Over the next 3 wk, additional animals presented with clinical signs of lethargy, weight loss, ecchymoses, and icterus and were necropsied. Gross necropsy of the affected bats revealed large, pale yellow to tan, friable livers with rounded edges that floated when placed in 10% neutral-buffered formalin. Some bats had ecchymoses on the webbing and skin and gross perirenal hemorrhage. Histologic examination showed hepatic and renal tubular lipidosis. The clinical and pathologic signs of hemorrhage and icterus were suggestive of hepatic failure. Hepatic lipidosis was attributed to stress and inappetence associated with environmental perturbations. Once the environmental stressor was removed, the colony morbidity and mortality decreased. However, 2 y later, a series of new environmental stressors triggered additional deaths associated with hepatic lipidosis. Over a 9-y period, 21 cases of hepatic lipidosis were diagnosed in this bat colony. PMID:25926399

  7. Paraparesis in a Golden Retriever.

    PubMed

    Aschenbroich, S; Woolcock, A; Rissi, D R

    2014-09-01

    A 7-year-old female spayed Golden Retriever dog presented with fever and a 10-day history of neurological signs, including ambulatory paraparesis and pelvic limb ataxia. Neurological examination initially revealed a T3-L3 myelopathy. Thoracic radiographs revealed a diffuse miliary pulmonary pattern. Endotracheal washes and fine-needle aspirates from several organs aimed at identifying a potential infectious agent or neoplastic process were all unsuccessful. Due to worsening of the clinical signs, euthanasia was elected. Necropsy findings included multifocal, pale to dark red, firm nodules infiltrating the lungs, heart, mesentery, pancreas, small intestine, brain, and spinal cord. Cytological examination of impression smears obtained from the pulmonary nodules during necropsy revealed clusters of epithelioid cells admixed with fewer spindle cells, erythrocytes, and scattered leukocytes. Clinical signs and cytological findings initially suggested the possibility of a widespread granulomatous disease or a metastatic epithelial neoplasm as possible clinical differentials in this case. The final diagnosis was based on the gross and histological findings, with confirmation following histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. PMID:24193142

  8. The efficacy of monepantel against naturally acquired inhibited and developing fourth-stage larvae of Teladorsagia circumcincta in sheep in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Ramage, C; Bartley, D J; Jackson, F; Cody, R; Hosking, B C

    2012-05-25

    The inhibition of Teladorsagia and other nematode genera at the early fourth-stage is a biological process that allows the parasites to survive in their host in a dormant state when prevailing conditions may otherwise kill them or prevent their progeny from surviving in the external environment. A study was conducted in Scotland to evaluate the efficacy of monepantel, an amino-acetonitrile derivative, against natural infections of inhibited fourth-stage Teladorsagia spp. larvae. At necropsy it was determined that the untreated control sheep were additionally infected with developing fourth-stage Teladorsagia spp. larvae and this is the first published evidence on the efficacy of monepantel against natural infections of this parasite and stage. The study sheep, which had grazed on naturally contaminated pastures since birth, were transferred to indoor housing after a subset of animals was examined to confirm the presence of inhibited larvae within the study population prior to the experiment. After 14 days of housing, monepantel was orally administered at 2.5 mg/kg to half of the animals. The sheep were necropsied seven days later and their parasite burdens recovered for the determination of efficacy, which was 99.7% for the inhibited stages and 99.3% for the developing fourth-stages. In conclusion, monepantel dosed orally at 2.5 mg/kg is a highly effective treatment against naturally acquired infections of inhibited and developing fourth-stage larvae of Teladorsagia spp. PMID:22177334

  9. Salmonella aortitis treated with endovascular aortic repair: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Salmonella is a typical cause of aortitis, which is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In infrarenal disease, besides open surgery, endovascular aortic repair as an alternative treatment has been reported. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first successful endovascular aortic repair documented by necropsy to date. Case presentation A 67-year-old Caucasian man presented with low back pain, fever and positive blood cultures for Salmonella Enteritidis. A computed tomography scan showed an enlargement and intramural hematoma of the infrarenal aortic wall; a Salmonella aortitis was suspected and antimicrobial therapy initiated. Because of substantial comorbidities, endovascular aortic repair was favored over open surgery; postoperatively the antibiotic treatment was continued for 12 months. Post-mortem there were neither macroscopic nor microscopic signs of aortitis or graft infection. Conclusions We could demonstrate by necropsy that endovascular aortic repair of infrarenal aortitis with prolonged pre- and postinterventional antibiotic therapy for 12 months was a minimally invasive alternative and should be considered in selected clinically stable patients with substantial co-morbidities. PMID:22894684

  10. Patterns of Natural and Human-Caused Mortality Factors of a Rare Forest Carnivore, the Fisher (Pekania pennanti) in California

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Mourad W.; Stephenson, Nicole; Higley, J. Mark; Thompson, Craig; Matthews, Sean M.; Sweitzer, Rick A.; Purcell, Kathryn; Barrett, Reginald H.; Keller, Stefan M.; Gaffney, Patricia; Jones, Megan; Poppenga, Robert; Foley, Janet E.; Brown, Richard N.; Clifford, Deana L.; Sacks, Benjamin N.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife populations of conservation concern are limited in distribution, population size and persistence by various factors, including mortality. The fisher (Pekania pennanti), a North American mid-sized carnivore whose range in the western Pacific United States has retracted considerably in the past century, was proposed for threatened status protection in late 2014 under the United States Endangered Species Act by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service in its West Coast Distinct Population Segment. We investigated mortality in 167 fishers from two genetically and geographically distinct sub-populations in California within this West Coast Distinct Population Segment using a combination of gross necropsy, histology, toxicology and molecular methods. Overall, predation (70%), natural disease (16%), toxicant poisoning (10%) and, less commonly, vehicular strike (2%) and other anthropogenic causes (2%) were causes of mortality observed. We documented both an increase in mortality to (57% increase) and exposure (6%) from pesticides in fishers in just the past three years, highlighting further that toxicants from marijuana cultivation still pose a threat. Additionally, exposure to multiple rodenticides significantly increased the likelihood of mortality from rodenticide poisoning. Poisoning was significantly more common in male than female fishers and was 7 times more likely than disease to kill males. Based on necropsy findings, suspected causes of mortality based on field evidence alone tended to underestimate the frequency of disease-related mortalities. This study is the first comprehensive investigation of mortality causes of fishers and provides essential information to assist in the conservation of this species. PMID:26536481

  11. Histopathologic evaluation of postmortem autolytic changes in bluegill (Lepomis macrohirus) and crappie (Pomoxis anularis) at varied time intervals and storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    George, Jami; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; Michaels, Blayk B; Crain, Debbi; Lewbart, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Information is lacking on preserving fish carcasses to minimize postmortem autolysis artifacts when a necropsy cannot be performed immediately. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively identify and score histologic postmortem changes in two species of freshwater fish (bluegill-Lepomis macrochirus; crappie-Pomoxis annularis), at varied time intervals and storage temperatures, to assess the histologic quality of collected samples. A pooled sample of 36 mix sex individuals of healthy bluegill and crappie were euthanized, stored either at room temperature, refrigerated at 4 °C, or frozen at -20 °C, and then necropsied at 0, 4, 24, and 48 h intervals. Histologic specimens were evaluated by light microscopy. Data showed that immediate harvesting of fresh samples provides the best quality and refrigeration would be the preferred method of storage if sample collection had to be delayed for up to 24 h. When sample collection must be delayed more than 24 h, the preferred method of storage to minimize autolysis artifacts is freezing if evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is most important, or refrigeration if gill histology is most important. The gill arch, intestinal tract, followed by the liver and kidney were the most sensitive organs to autolysis. PMID:27114885

  12. Veterinary Forensic Pathology: The Search for Truth.

    PubMed

    McDonough, S P; McEwen, B J

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary forensic pathology is emerging as a distinct discipline, and this special issue is a major step forward in establishing the scientific basis of the discipline. A forensic necropsy uses the same skill set needed for investigations of natural disease, but the analytical framework and purpose of forensic pathology differ significantly. The requirement of legal credibility and all that it entails distinguishes the forensic from routine diagnostic cases. Despite the extraordinary depth and breadth of knowledge afforded by their training, almost 75% of veterinary pathologists report that their training has not adequately prepared them to handle forensic cases. Many veterinary pathologists, however, are interested and willing to develop expertise in the discipline. Lessons learned from tragic examples of wrongful convictions in medical forensic pathology indicate that a solid foundation for the evolving discipline of veterinary forensic pathology requires a commitment to education, training, and certification. The overarching theme of this issue is that the forensic necropsy is just one aspect in the investigation of a case of suspected animal abuse or neglect. As veterinary pathologists, we must be aware of the roles filled by other veterinary forensic experts involved in these cases and how our findings are an integral part of an investigation. We hope that the outcome of this special issue of the journal is that veterinary pathologists begin to familiarize themselves with not only forensic pathology but also all aspects of veterinary forensic science. PMID:27515387

  13. Fatal venous air embolism during anesthesia in an apparently healthy adult chihuahua.

    PubMed

    Mouser, Pamela J; Wilson, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    An apparently healthy adult female Chihuahua was presented for elective ovariohysterectomy. After induction of general anesthesia, but prior to the start of the surgery, air was inadvertently administered to the patient via the IV fluid line. The patient convulsed, became apneic, arrested, and died despite attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation. At necropsy, the pericardial sac was incised and filled with water to entirely submerge the intact heart. The right ventricular free wall was punctured, releasing several air bubbles from the right ventricle. Death was attributed to venous air embolism based on the clinical history, gross findings, and paucity of underlying gross and microscopic pathology that might have predisposed the dog to an anesthetic-related death. The discussion of this case includes a review of previously reported veterinary cases of fatal venous air embolism, including the varied mechanisms of embolus formation, the potential impact of pre-existing cardiopulmonary disease, and the methods used to detect emboli. This report outlines the events of fatal iatrogenic venous air embolization and emphasizes the importance of considering this entity in the case of sudden death of a patient with an indwelling catheter in order to pursue either appropriate diagnostic tests or necropsy techniques to aid in the diagnosis. PMID:25955143

  14. Comparative efficacy of flubendazole and a commercially available herbal wormer against natural infections of Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum and intestinal Capillaria spp. in chickens.

    PubMed

    Squires, S; Fisher, M; Gladstone, O; Rogerson, S; Martin, P; Martin, S; Lester, H; Sygall, R; Underwood, N

    2012-04-30

    The efficacy of a commercially available flubendazole-based product and a commercially available herbal product were compared against three species of helminth parasites of chickens: Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum and Capillaria spp. A total of 48 naturally infected chickens were used in the study with 16 birds in each of three treatment groups (untreated control; flubendazole; and a herbal product). One bird from each treatment group was necropsied on Day 0 prior to first treatment to confirm the parasite species present in the birds. Treatments were administered as labelled and the 45 remaining birds were necropsied on Day 12 and worm counts performed. Average worm counts in the two treated groups were compared to the untreated controls to calculate efficacy. Flubendazole (Group A) achieved an overall efficacy of 99.4% for the three parasite species. The herbal product (Group B) achieved efficacies ranging from less than zero to 11.6% for the three parasites, with worm counts not significantly different to the untreated controls. At present, commercially available herbal products claiming anthelmintic properties do not require licencing as veterinary medicinal products (Directive 2004/28/EC: see Article 17 and 33-38) and thus are not required to meet specific efficacy thresholds. Products which do not appear to deliver acceptable anthelmintic efficacy, are obviously a concern from many aspects but specifically from an animal welfare perspective. PMID:22024017

  15. Lymphadenopathy and non-suppurative meningo-encephalitis in calves experimentally infected with bovine immunodeficiency-like virus (FL112).

    PubMed

    Munro, R; Lysons, R; Venables, C; Horigan, M; Jeffrey, M; Dawson, M

    1998-08-01

    In an experiment on bovine immunodeficiency-like virus (BIV), the virological and serological aspects of which were reported in an earlier paper, three groups (A, B and C) of three calves were inoculated subcutaneously with a recently isolated strain (FL112). For group B and group C, the virus was suspended in milk, and for group C (controls) the viral suspension was subjected to pasteurization before inoculation. The calves were killed for necropsy 12 months later. Clinical assessment revealed subtle ataxia in two group A calves, which took the form of an intermittent "shifting" (from one leg to another) lameness, and palpable enlargement of the pre-scapular lymph nodes in one group B animal. At necropsy, haemal lymph nodes (0.1 to 0.5 cm in diameter), occurring singly, were observed in all animals. However, in groups A and B (but not C), enlarged haemal lymph nodes (< or = 2 cm in diameter) were also seen, occurring singly and in chains; and in one group A animal they occurred in grape-like clusters. In groups A and B (but not C), histopathological examination revealed generalized hyperplastic changes in lymph nodes, especially the haemal lymph nodes. This finding was particularly striking in the two clinically ataxic animals from group A, which also showed a non-suppurative meningo-encephalitis; the latter was possibly the cause of the subtle clinical signs. This study supports previous findings on lymphadenopathy resulting from experimental infection with BIV. PMID:9749357

  16. Characterization of an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae seeder pig challenge-exposure model.

    PubMed

    Lechtenberg, K F; Shryock, T R; Moore, G

    1994-12-01

    Five strains of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 were used to intranasally infect 5 groups of pigs. Using each bacterial strain, infected pigs (termed seeder pigs) were commingled for 48 hours with 5 groups of noninfected test pigs, then were removed. Seeder and test pigs were maintained in isolation and were observed for 14 days. Seeder pigs had mortality that was threefold greater than that of test pigs (24% vs 8%). Rectal temperature in excess of 40.3 C was achieved for 84% of test pigs and 88% of seeder pigs. Neither of these 2 variables was statistically different between the 2 groups of pigs. Clinical impression scores > or = 2 (on a 0 to 3 scale) were three-fold (64% vs 20%) greater for seeder than for test pigs (P < 0.05). The total number of bacterial isolations or nonrecoverable isolates was tabulated for test and seeder pigs' lungs at necropsy, irrespective of the amount of lesions. The number of A pleuropneumoniae isolations was not statistically different between test and seeder pig populations. Recovery of Pasteurella multocida or other bacteria was greater from the seeder pigs (P < 0.05), whereas the number of non-recoverable isolates was greater from test pigs than from seeder pigs (P < 0.05). Assessment of lung lesions at necropsy by either visual estimation or on a weight basis were in agreement.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7887514

  17. Cardiovascular malformations in DiGeorge syndrome (congenital absence of hypoplasia of the thymus).

    PubMed Central

    Moerman, P; Goddeeris, P; Lauwerijns, J; Van der Hauwaert, L G

    1980-01-01

    Partial or complete absence of the thymus (DiGeorge syndrome, III-IV pharyngeal pouch syndrome) is often associated with agenesis or hypoplasia of the parathyroid glands and, almost invariably, with cardiovascular malformations. The clinical and pathologcial findings in 10 cases proven at necropsy are presented. All patients presented with cardiac symptoms and signs in the first weeks of life and, with one exception, all died of a cardiac cause. Major cardiovascular malformations were found in all 10 cases. Four had, in association with a ventricular septal defect of the infundibular type, an interrupted aortic arch, which was left-sided in two and right-sided in two other cases. Four patients had truncus arteriosus type I, in two of them associated with a right-sided aortic arch. Two patients with tetralogy of Fallot had a right-sided aortic arch. Only two of the 10 had a normally developed left aortic arch. Aberrant subclavian arteries were found in five cases. From our observations and a survey of the previously published patients it appears that 90 per cent of the necropsy-proven cases of DiGeorge syndrome have cardiovascular malformations and that 95 per cent of these malformations can be classified as aortic arch anomalies, truncus ateriosus, or tetralogy of Fallot. Images PMID:7426208

  18. Pathologic and physiologic effects associated with long-term intracoelomic transmitters in captive Siberian sturgeon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, S. Shaun; Divers, Stephen J.; Camus, Alvin C.; Peterson, Douglas C.; Jennings, Cecil A.; Shelton, James L.; Hernandez, Sonia M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracoelomic transmitters are commonly used to evaluate migratory patterns, distribution, and habitat use of many species of fish. Currently, transmitter implantation relies mostly on the assumption that transmitters do not cause any adverse physiological or pathological effects on the animal. To investigate these effects, we surgically implanted 60 Siberian Sturgeon Acipenser baeri with transmitters that weighed less than 2% of their body weight. Postoperative assessments were conducted at 1, 2, 8, 12, 26, and 55 weeks to evaluate surgical healing and transmitter retention. Blood samples were collected before and after the 55-week study for serum cortisol analysis. Overall transmitter loss was 32%. Minor to moderate adhesions were noted at necropsy but did not appear to affect organ function. One fish was noted to have an intraintestinal transmitter at necropsy, but the fish was in overall good health. Long-term transmitter presence does not appear to increase serum cortisol levels or affect overall growth more than nontransmitter fish. Although long-term telemetry studies can be undertaken with minimal concern for negative physiological or pathological effects from transmitters, researchers should be aware that transmitter loss rates may be higher than previously thought. Mechanisms for transmitter loss may include expulsion through the surgical incision, expulsion through the mucocutaneous junction between the large intestine and the vent, or intraintestinal capture and expulsion through the vent. Received February 10, 2013; accepted June 10, 2013

  19. Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) infection in a leopard (Panthera pardus pardus) housed in a zoological park in north-eastern Italy.

    PubMed

    Mazzariol, Sandro; Cassini, Rudi; Voltan, Laura; Aresu, Luca; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Canine heartworm (cHW) disease is now recognised as potential cause of serious disease in cats and other felids, especially in endemic areas. In March 2009, a 23-years-old male African leopard (Panthera pardus pardus) housed in a zoological park located in the Province of Padova (Veneto Region), a cHW endemic area of the north-eastern Italy, died and was immediately necropsied. A cloth completely occluding the pyloric lumen was considered the presumptive cause of death. During necropsy, six nematodes (4 males and 2 females) were found within the right ventricle of the heart and the pulmonary artery. Diagnosis of HW (Dirofilaria immitis) infection was carried out by morphological features of adult worms and microfilariae, and then confirmed by detection of circulating HW antigens using a commercial SNAP kit (IDEXX Laboratories inc., USA). D. immitis infection was also confirmed by PCR amplification of the 5S ribosomal spacer region, performed on worm fragments and microfilaraemic blood samples obtained from the right ventricle of the heart. A glomerulonephritis of immuno-mediated origin and most likely associated with the HW infection is also reported. HW chemoprophylaxis and annual serological testing on wild felids housed outdoors in endemic cHW disease areas are recommended. This is the first diagnosis of D. immitis infection in an exotic felid in Italy. PMID:20377859

  20. Three spontaneous lymphomas in a colony of cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus).

    PubMed

    Hofmann, P; Kahnt, K; Mätz-Rensing, K; Brack, M; Kaup, F J

    2001-12-01

    Cotton-top tamarins are well known for their prevalence to idiopathic colitis and adenocarcinomas. At the same time, information on the incidence of spontaneous lymphomas in this highly endangered species is rare. Records, 212 in total, of cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) necropsied at the German Primate Centre between 1979 and 1998 were viewed to establish the prevalence of lymphoid neoplasms. Neoplastic lymphoid cell growth was mentioned in three necropsy records. Immunohistology was performed in all three cases on the remaining formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue using antibodies against CD20, CD3, lysozyme, Ki-67, IgM, IgG, kappa, lambda and EBNA-2. Combining histological and immunohistological results, the lymphomas could be differentiated into two low-grade T-cell lymphomas and one high-grade multicentric polymorphic B-cell lymphoma. This corresponds to a 1.4% incidence of lymphomas in our cotton-top tamarin population over a period of 19 years. Although frozen material was not available and virological testing could not be carried out, clinical or histological evidence did not support an aetiological role of Herpes (H.) saimiri, H. ateles, simian T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 (STLV-1) or Epstein-Barr-related herpesvirus in any of these cases. The lymphomas were considered to be spontaneous. PMID:11990532

  1. High viral loads despite absence of clinical and pathological findings in cats experimentally infected with feline coronavirus (FCoV) type I and in naturally FCoV-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Meli, M; Kipar, A; Müller, C; Jenal, K; Gönczi, E; Borel, N; Gunn-Moore, D; Chalmers, S; Lin, F; Reinacher, M; Lutz, H

    2004-04-01

    Specified pathogen-free cats were naturally infected with FCoV or experimentally infected with FCoV type I. Seroconversion was determined and the course of infection was monitored by measuring the FCoV loads in faeces, whole blood, plasma and/or monocytes. Tissue samples collected at necropsy were examined for viral load and histopathological changes. Experimentally infected animals started shedding virus as soon as 2 days after infection. They generally displayed the highest viral loads in colon, ileum and mesenteric lymph nodes. Seroconversion occurred 3-4 weeks post infection. Naturally infected cats were positive for FCoV antibodies and monocyte-associated FCoV viraemia prior to death. At necropsy, most animals tested positive for viral shedding and FCoV RNA was found in spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes and bone marrow. Both experimentally and naturally infected cats remained clinically healthy. Pathological findings were restricted to generalized lymphatic hyperplasia. These findings demonstrate the presence of systemic FCoV infection with high viral loads in the absence of clinical and pathological signs. PMID:15123151

  2. An unusual pedestrian road trauma: from forensic pathology to forensic veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Isabella; Di Nunzio, Ciro; Paciello, Orlando; Britti, Domenico; Pepe, Francesca; De Luca, Ester; Ricci, Pietrantonio

    2014-01-01

    Traffic accidents have increased in the last decade, pedestrians being the most affected group. At autopsy, it is evident that the most common cause of pedestrian death is central nervous system injury, followed by skull base fractures, internal bleeding, lower limb haemorrhage, skull vault fractures, cervical spinal cord injury and airway compromise. The attribution of accident responsibility can be realised through reconstruction of road accident dynamics, investigation of the scene, survey of the vehicle involved and examination of the victim(s). A case study concerning a car accident where both humans and pets were involved is reported here. Investigation and reconstruction of the crime scene were conducted by a team consisting of forensic pathologists and forensic veterinarians. At the scene investigation, the pedestrian and his dog were recovered on the side of the road. An autopsy and a necropsy were conducted on the man and the dog, respectively. In addition, a complete inspection of the sports utility vehicle (SUV) implicated in the road accident was conducted. The results of the autopsy and necropsy were compared and the information was used to reconstruct the collision. This unusual case was solved through the collaboration between forensic pathology and veterinary forensic medicine, emphasising the importance of this kind of co-operation to solve a crime scene concerning both humans and animals. PMID:24091032

  3. Efficacy of emodepside plus toltrazuril oral suspension for dogs (Procox®, Bayer) against Trichuris vulpis in naturally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Petry, Gabriele; Altreuther, Gertraut; Wolken, Sonja; Swart, Petro; Kok, Dawie J

    2013-08-01

    The efficacy of emodepside plus toltrazuril oral suspension for dogs (Procox®, Bayer) against Trichuris vulpis was evaluated in a controlled, blinded and randomised laboratory study. Twenty naturally infected dogs were included. Dogs in the treatment group received the minimum therapeutic dose of 0.45 mg emodepside and 9 mg toltrazuril per kg body weight, while dogs in the control group were left untreated. Efficacy was calculated based on worm counts after necropsy on Day 7 post treatment. Additionally, all faeces were collected and examined for expelled worms. The treatment was 100 % effective. A total of 233 adult worms (geometric mean 17.0) and 3 immature adult worms were found in the control group at necropsy. Adequacy of infection was demonstrated. The treated group excreted a total of 186 adult worms within 2 days after treatment. Additionally, all dogs were co-infected with Uncinaria stenocephala. Efficacy against this parasite was 99.8 %. No side effects of the treatment were observed. This study demonstrates that in addition to the formerly proven efficacy against Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum and Uncinaria stenocephala, emodepside plus toltrazuril suspension is also effective against T. vulpis and thus represents a convenient treatment option for dogs co-infected with whipworms and coccidia. PMID:23756961

  4. A rapid postmortem screening test for lead toxicosis in common loons (Gavia immer) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Kornetsky, Rachel; Rock, Meagan; Pokras, Mark

    2013-07-01

    In live animals, lead poisoning can be diagnosed by analyzing blood samples. For postmortem testing, blood samples are not available and analysis of liver or kidney is often used for diagnosis. Liver and kidney analysis is relatively expensive and results might not be quickly available. We examined an inexpensive, rapid method to screen animals for lead toxicosis postmortem by testing the mixture of body fluids (termed "tissue fluids") that pool in the body cavity at necropsy for lead. At necropsy we collected body fluid and liver samples from Common Loon (Gavia immer) and Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) carcasses and determined concentrations of lead in tissue fluid using a desk-top blood lead analyzer. Concentrations of lead in liver were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. There was strong correlation between tissue fluid and liver tissue lead concentrations, and receiver-operating characteristic analysis gave an area under the curve of 0.91, indicating that postmortem measurements of lead in tissue fluids can be utilized as a screening method for lead toxicosis. PMID:23778630

  5. Blunt atrial transseptal puncture using excimer laser in swine

    PubMed Central

    Elagha, Abdalla A.; Kim, Ann H.; Kocaturk, Ozgur; Lederman, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We describe a new approach that may enhance safety of atrial transseptal puncture, using a commercially available laser catheter that is capable of perforation only when energized. We test this approach in swine. Background Despite wide application, conventional needle transseptal puncture continues to risk inadvertent non-target perforation and its consequences. Methods We used a commercial excimer laser catheter (0.9mm Clirpath, Spectranetics). Perforation force was compared in vitro with a conventional Brockenbrough needle. Eight swine underwent laser transseptal puncture under X-ray fluoroscopy steered using a variety of delivery catheters. Results The 0.9mm laser catheter traversed in vitro targets with reduced force compared with a Brockenbrough needle. In vitro, the laser catheter created holes that were 25–30% larger than the Brockenbrough needle. Laser puncture of the atrial septum was successful and accurate in all animals, evidenced by oximetry, pressure, angiography, and necropsy. The laser catheter was steered effectively using a modified Mullins introducer sheath and using two different deflectable guiding catheters. The mean procedure time was 15 ± 6 minutes, with an average 3.0 ± 0.8 seconds of laser activation. There were no adverse sequelae after prolonged observation. Necropsy revealed discrete 0.9mm holes in all septae. Conclusion Laser puncture of the interatrial septum is feasible and safe in swine, using a blunt laser catheter that perforates tissues in a controlled fashion. PMID:17896413

  6. Radiofrequency perforation and conventional needle percutaneous transseptal left heart access: pathological features.

    PubMed

    Veldtman, Gruschen R; Wilson, Gregory J; Peirone, Alejandro; Hartley, Amanda; Estrada, Marvin; Norgard, Gunnar; Leung, Ramsey K; Visram, Naheed; Benson, Lee N

    2005-08-01

    Perforating radiofrequency (PRF) energy has been used to obtain percutaneous transseptal left heart access. Contrary to ablative radiofrequency (RF), myocardial tissue responses to PRF thermal injury are incompletely defined. In this study, a newly developed RF catheter system for transseptal left atrial entry was compared with conventional needle puncture. Of 15 piglets having transfemoral cardiac catheterization, 12 had transseptal procedures. Needle punctures (NP) and PRF were followed by acute (1 hr; 3 NP, 3 PRF) and chronic necropsy (1 month; 3 NP, 3 PRF). The remaining three piglets had intentional RF aortic perforation through the atrial roof with necropsy at 1 month. Gross and histopathological effects were examined. Acutely, the gross RF lesion was similar to needle puncture. Histologically, the RF lesions had minimal mural thrombus, an inner zone of thermal injury characterized by grayish cytoplasmic staining (elastic trichrome), and a bubbly transformation of the cytoplasm in innermost cardiomyocytes, partial persistence of cross-striations, and an acute inflammatory reaction. The outer extent of the lesion (< 1 mm) was defined by a halo of contraction band necrosis similar to needle puncture. Acute NP injury showed comparable depth and extent of myocyte necrosis (principally contraction bands) with adjacent tissue hemorrhage and edema. At 1 month, a well-developed densely collagenous scar was present in both aortic and transseptal PRF lesions. The extent of acute RF injury is similar to that seen in conventional NP, but the characteristics of tissue insult are different. Both show well-developed healing at 1 month. PMID:16010688

  7. Surveillance and management of Echinococcus multilocularis in a wildlife park.

    PubMed

    Umhang, Gérald; Lahoreau, Jennifer; Hormaz, Vanessa; Boucher, Jean-Marc; Guenon, Amandine; Montange, Damien; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Boue, Franck

    2016-06-01

    The fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis is the causative agent of alveolar echinococcosis, a severe zoonotic disease that may be fatal if untreated. A broad spectrum of mammalian species may be accidentally infected even in captivity. In April 2011, liver lesions due to E. multilocularis were observed during the necropsy of a captive-born nutria (Myocastor coypus) in a French wildlife park, leading to initiation of a study to survey the parasite's presence in the park. A comparable environmental contamination with fox's feces infected by E. multilocularis was reported inside (17.8%) and outside (20.6%) the park. E. multilocularis worms were found in the intestines of three of the five roaming foxes shot in the park. Coprological analyses of potential definitive hosts in captivity (fox, lynx, wildcat, genet, wolf, bear and raccoon) revealed infection in one Eurasian wolf. Voles trapped inside the park also had a high prevalence of 5.3%. After diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis in a Lemur catta during necropsy, four other cases in L. catta were detected by a combination of ultrasound and serology. These animals were treated twice daily with albendazole. The systematic massive metacestode development and numerous protoscoleces in L. catta confirmed their particular sensitivity to E. multilocularis infection. The autochthonous origin of the infection in all the captive animals infected was genetically confirmed by EmsB microsatellite analysis. Preventive measures were implemented to avoid the presence of roaming foxes, contact with potential definitive hosts and contaminated food sources for potential intermediate hosts. PMID:26780546

  8. Adverse events of NOTES mediastinoscopy compared to conventional video-assisted mediastinoscopy: a randomized survival study in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Córdova, Henry; Cubas, Georgina; Boada, Marc; Rodríguez de Miguel, Cristina; Martínez-Pallí, Graciela; Gimferrer, Josep M.; Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Safety is a concern in natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) mediastinoscopy. The objective of this study was to compare the safety of NOTES mediastinoscopy with video-assisted mediastinoscopy (VAM). Methods: Twenty-four pigs were randomly assigned to NOTES or VAM. Thirty-minute mediastinoscopies were performed with the identification of seven predetermined structures. The animals were euthanized after 7 days and necropsy was performed. Results: Mediastinoscopy was not possible in one animal in each group. There were more intraoperative adverse events with NOTES than VAM (7 vs. 2, P = 0.04); hemorrhage was the most frequent adverse event (4 and 1, respectively). At necropsy, pathological findings were observed in 13 animals (9 NOTES and 4 VAM; P = 0.03). Inflammatory parameters were not different between groups and were not related to adverse events. Conclusion: Systematic NOTES mediastinoscopy is possible and comparable to VAM in terms of number of organs identified and inflammatory impact. However, the safety profile of NOTES mediastinoscopy has to be improved before it can be adopted in a clinical setting. PMID:26716115

  9. Testicular biopsy in psittacine birds (Psittaciformes): comparative evaluation of testicular reproductive status by endoscopic, histologic, and cytologic examination.

    PubMed

    Hänse, Maria; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Reitemeier, Susanne; Einspanier, Almuth; Schmidt, Volker

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the reproductive cycle of male parrots is important for examining the male genital tract and for successful breeding, especially of endangered species. To evaluate different diagnostic methods and criteria concerning the classification of reproductive stages, we examined 20 testicular samples obtained at necropsy in psittacine birds of different species and testicular biopsy samples collected from 9 cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and 7 rose-ringed parakeets (Psittacula krameri) by endoscopy 4 times over a 12-month period. The testicular reproductive status was assessed histologically and then compared with the macroscopic appearance of the testicles and cytologic results. The histologic examination was nondiagnostic in 19 of 59 testicular biopsy samples. By contrast, the cytologic preparations were diagnostic in 57 of 59 biopsy samples. The results of the cytologic examination coincided with the histologic results in 34 of 38 biopsy samples and 18 of 20 necropsy samples. Macroscopic parameters displayed some differences between reproductive stages but provided an unreliable indication of the reproductive status. These results suggest that microscopic examination of a testicular biopsy sample is a reliable method for evaluating the reproductive status of male parrots and is preferable to the macroscopic evaluation of the testicle. Cytologic examination provides fast preliminary results, even when the histologic preparation is not sufficient for evaluation, but results may be erroneous. Thus, a combination of histologic and cytologic examination is recommended for evaluating testicular reproductive status. PMID:24640925

  10. The relationship between Baylisascaris procyonis prevalence and raccoon population structure.

    PubMed

    Page, L Kristen; Gehrt, Stanley D; Cascione, Andrea; Kellner, Kenneth F

    2009-12-01

    Parasite transmission is a dynamic process that can be affected by factors including host and parasite population dynamics. Raccoons ( Procyon lotor ) are the definitive host of Baylisascaris procyonis , an intestinal roundworm. Transmission of this parasite has been linked to raccoon behavior and human land-use patterns; however, we do not know the importance of host population structure. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the relationship between raccoon population attributes and prevalence of B. procyonis. We necropsied 307 trapped or road-killed raccoons collected during 2000-2006 from the Chicago area. In addition, we examined, via fecal samples (n  =  433), the patterns of B. procyonis prevalence as they relate to population dynamics among 3 subpopulations within the larger study. Baylisascaris procyonis was seen in 39% of 307 necropsied raccoons. There were differences in prevalence as a function of host age and sex. Baylisascaris procyonis was observed in 18% of 433 fecal samples obtained from live-trapped raccoons, and there were differences according to age, but not by sex. We found that the host populations consistently differed in density across study areas, but were similar regarding sex and age structure. Differences in host density were associated with differences in prevalence, suggesting that possible differences between populations, as well as ecological differences in sites and raccoon behavior, may have influenced parasite prevalence. PMID:19480537

  11. RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF MORTALITY IN THE NORTH AMERICAN CAPTIVE RED PANDA (AILURUS FULGENS) POPULATION, 1992-2012.

    PubMed

    Delaski, Kristina M; Ramsay, Edward; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2015-12-01

    Red pandas ( Ailurus fulgens ) are managed as captive populations in both North America and Europe. Regular review of pathology reports is a useful tool for developing veterinary care and husbandry strategies for such populations. Though thorough pathology reviews have been conducted for the European studbook, the North American population has not been reviewed similarly until now. Complete gross and histopathology reports were requested from institutions holding red pandas that died during 1992 through 2012 (n = 530), and reports were received for 95.8% of the individuals, including full necropsy records for 366 red pandas. These reports were classified by subspecies, gender, and age, then reviewed for primary cause of death and secondary pathological findings. A substantial portion of the deaths (40.2%) were neonates (<30 days of age). In both neonatal and juvenile (age = 31-365 days) animals, pneumonia was the most common cause of death. In adult (age = 366 days-10 yr) and geriatric red pandas (age >10 yr), cardiovascular disease was the most common cause of death. Renal disease and gastrointestinal disease also were common pathologic findings in adult and geriatric animals. These findings suggest that stress associated with captivity and husbandry practices, including those associated with social, environmental, and nutritional conditions, may contribute to immune and cardiovascular pathologies, and other common necropsy findings. PMID:26667534

  12. “Alas poor Yorick”: What retrospective analysis of canine skulls can tell us about the impact of environmental factors on health

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Luciano O.; Chase, Kevin; McGill, Lawrence; Miller, Shawn; Nielsen, Mark; Lark, Karl G.

    2014-01-01

    Necropsies and extensive histological evaluation for clinical and sub-clinical disease of approximately three hundred Portuguese Water dogs are available as part of an ongoing study to assess their state of health at end of life. Throughout life these dogs enjoyed a variety of lifestyles and environments. Here we carry out retrospective quantitative assessments of life-time dietary input and physical activity for each dog. To do this, collagens from skull vault bone and from dentine have been analyzed for ratios of stable isotopes to determine differences in diet that individual dogs experienced during late or early life respectively. Robustness of skull bone (weight/unit of skull size) was used as a relative indicator of the amount of physical activity experienced during a dog’s lifetime. These environmental parameters were correlated with the frequency and severity of specific disease processes determined at necropsy. Both measures were shown to exert significant low-level (r < 25%) differential effects on specific diseases. The value of retrospective analysis of environmental influences is discussed. PMID:24436781

  13. English yew poisoning in 43 cattle.

    PubMed

    Panter, K E; Molyneux, R J; Smart, R A; Mitchell, L; Hansen, S

    1993-05-01

    Thirty-five privately owned 1- to 2-year-old mixed-breed steers and heifers, weighing 340 to 454 kg, died from accidental ingestion of English yew (Taxus baccata). Estimated dosages ranged from 0.36 to 0.70 g of fresh plant/kg of body weight. Clinical signs of poisoning and death began 2 to 3 hours after first exposure, and cattle continued to have clinical signs, which ended in death 6 to 8 hours later. Most cattle had died by 4 hours after first ingestion. Necropsy of 4 cattle revealed substantial amounts of English yew leaves and small stems in the rumen contents. Grossly, there were areas of hyperemia in the abomasum and small intestine. Histologically, lesions were limited to the lungs and included moderate congestion and interlobular edema. Chemical analysis by thin-layer chromatography of suspected yew plant material from the rumen contents of the 4 necropsied cattle was compared to authentic taxol, and confirmed the presence of taxol in rumen samples. PMID:8098701

  14. Histopathologic evaluation of postmortem autolytic changes in bluegill (Lepomis macrohirus) and crappie (Pomoxis anularis) at varied time intervals and storage temperatures

    PubMed Central

    George, Jami; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Michaels, Blayk B.; Crain, Debbi

    2016-01-01

    Information is lacking on preserving fish carcasses to minimize postmortem autolysis artifacts when a necropsy cannot be performed immediately. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively identify and score histologic postmortem changes in two species of freshwater fish (bluegill—Lepomis macrochirus; crappie—Pomoxis annularis), at varied time intervals and storage temperatures, to assess the histologic quality of collected samples. A pooled sample of 36 mix sex individuals of healthy bluegill and crappie were euthanized, stored either at room temperature, refrigerated at 4 °C, or frozen at −20 °C, and then necropsied at 0, 4, 24, and 48 h intervals. Histologic specimens were evaluated by light microscopy. Data showed that immediate harvesting of fresh samples provides the best quality and refrigeration would be the preferred method of storage if sample collection had to be delayed for up to 24 h. When sample collection must be delayed more than 24 h, the preferred method of storage to minimize autolysis artifacts is freezing if evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is most important, or refrigeration if gill histology is most important. The gill arch, intestinal tract, followed by the liver and kidney were the most sensitive organs to autolysis. PMID:27114885

  15. ACP Best Practice No 164

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, M; Start, R

    2001-01-01

    Much important information can be obtained at necropsy by the pathological examination of the eye and its adnexal structures in adults and children. This information may be related to the cause of death (for example, violent shaking trauma in physical child abuse), or may pertain to disease processes affecting the eye, the orbit, and surrounding structures outside the orbit. This article reviews the technical methods used to remove the following: the vitreous (for example, for biochemistry); the eye itself (anterior approach); the eye and orbital contents (posterior approach); the eye, orbit and orbital walls; and the eye, orbital walls, and surrounding structures. The removal of the eye and adnexal ocular structures must be recognised as a "culturally sensitive" issue, which must be approached cautiously. It should only be undertaken for sound scientific reasons, with the fully informed consent of the relatives and/or the coroner (or equivalent authority), and with properly agreed procedures for the eventual retention or disposal of the ocular tissues. For this reason, this article reviews not only the scientific indications and methods for the removal of such tissues, but also the legal and ethical issues that must underpin this pathology "best practice". Key Words: necropsy • ophthalamic pathology • enucleation PMID:11376013

  16. Clinical and Pathological Findings in Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Gladstone, Queensland: Investigations of a Stranding Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Flint, Mark; Eden, Paul A; Limpus, Colin J; Owen, Helen; Gaus, Caroline; Mills, Paul C

    2015-06-01

    An investigation into the health of green turtles was undertaken near Gladstone, Queensland, in response to a dramatic increase in stranding numbers in the first half of 2011. A total of 56 live turtles were subject to clinical examination and blood sampling for routine blood profiles, and 12 deceased turtles underwent a thorough necropsy examination. This population of green turtles was found to be in poor body condition and a range of infectious and non-infectious conditions were identified in the unhealthy turtles, including hepato-renal insufficiency (up to 81%, 27/33 based on clinical pathology), cachexia (92%, 11/12), parasitism (75%, 9/12), cardiopulmonary anomalies (42%, 5/12), gastroenteritis (25%, 3/12), masses (25%, 3/12) and mechanical impediments (17%, 2/12 based on necropsy). Overall, there was no evidence to indicate a unifying disease as a primary cause of the mass mortality. Recent adverse weather events, historic regional contamination and nearby industrial activities are discussed as potential causative factors. PMID:25256011

  17. Avian mycobacteriosis in psittacines: a retrospective study of 123 cases.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, C; Roy, P; Dhillon, A S; Shivaprasad, H L

    2013-02-01

    One hundred and twenty-three cases of mycobacterioses were diagnosed in psittacine birds from a total of 9,241 submissions for necropsy examination or histopathology made to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System between 1990 and 2007. The species affected most commonly were Amazon parrots (Amazona spp.)(n = 32; 26%) and grey-cheeked parakeets Brotogeris pyrrophterus (n = 23; 18.7%). The main gross findings on necropsy examination were enlarged and mottled pale livers and spleens and thickening of the small intestinal wall with numerous pale miliary nodules on the mucosa. Microscopical examination revealed infiltration of foamy macrophages and giant cells containing acid-fast bacteria in various organs. The gene encoding mycobacterial 65 kDa heat shock protein (hsp65) was amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from DNA extracted from 22 cases. The species of Mycobacterium involved was determined by analysis of restriction endonuclease patterns of the PCR products. Mycobacterium genavense was detected in 19 cases and Mycobacterium avium in two cases. One parrotlet (Touit spp.) had a mixed infection of both species of mycobacteria. It is concluded that M. genavense is the primary cause of mycobacteriosis in psittacine birds and the potential for zoonotic disease should be considered, especially for immunocompromised owners. PMID:22884283

  18. LESSONS FROM A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF A 5-YR PERIOD OF PRESHIPMENT TESTING AT SAN DIEGO ZOO: A RISK-BASED APPROACH TO PRESHIPMENT TESTING MAY BENEFIT ANIMAL WELFARE.

    PubMed

    Marinkovich, Matt; Wallace, Chelsea; Morris, Pat J; Rideout, Bruce; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2016-03-01

    The preshipment examination, with associated transmissible disease testing, has become standard practice in the movement of animals between zoos. An alternative disease risk-based approach, based on a comprehensive surveillance program including necropsy and preventive medicine examination testing and data, has been in practice since 2006 between the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park. A retrospective analysis, evaluating comprehensive necropsy data and preshipment testing over a 5-yr study period, was performed to determine the viability of this model for use with sending animals to other institutions. Animals (607 birds, 704 reptiles and amphibians, and 341 mammals) were shipped to 116 Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA)-accredited and 29 non-AZA-accredited institutions. The evaluation showed no evidence of the specific transmissible diseases tested for during the preshipment exam being present within the San Diego Zoo collection. We suggest that a risk-based animal and institution-specific approach to transmissible disease preshipment testing is more cost effective and is in the better interest of animal welfare than the current industry standard of dogmatic preshipment testing. PMID:27010291

  19. Causes of death in preweaned northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris, Gill, 1866), Año Nuevo State Reserve, California, 2012.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Terry R; Lyons, Eugene T; Kuzmina, Tetiana A; Tift, Michael S; Raverty, Stephen; Jaggi, Nicole; Crocker, Daniel E

    2014-03-01

    During an ongoing physiological ecology study on pups and adult female northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris, Gill, 1866) on the mainland rookery at Año Nuevo State Reserve (California), an opportunity was afforded to collect fresh dead pups for parasitology and necropsy. The investigation was undertaken to delineate the causes of death of northern elephant seals recovered from Año Nuevo State Reserve. Prior to this study, there was no evidence of increased mortality or health problems on this rookery. Necropsies, histology, and ancillary diagnostic studies were conducted on 21 fresh dead preweaned pups. Ages ranged from 1 stillbirth to pups approximately 2 weeks of age. Gross lesions included varying degrees of bruising, hemorrhage, lacerations, and fractures attributed to blunt force trauma to the head, chest, and/or abdomen in 16 pups; starvation in 6 pups; bite wounds in 2 pups; generalized icterus in 2 pups; presumptive drowning in 2 pups; and 1 stillbirth. Most pups had multiple gross lesions. Following light microscopic examination, pups could be assigned into 4 general diagnostic categories: 1) trauma, 2) nutritional status, 3) infectious conditions, and 4) congenital anomalies. This investigation of preweaned pup mortality of northern elephant seals in California further refines diagnostic categories for perinatal pup mortality. PMID:24590664

  20. Behavior associated with forced copulation of juvenile Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) by southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Heather S.; Oates, Stori C.; Staedler, Michelle M.; Tinker, M. Tim; Jessup, David A.; Harvey, James T.; Miller, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    Nineteen occurrences of interspecific sexual behavior between male southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) and juvenile Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) were reported in Monterey Bay, California, between 2000 and 2002. At least three different male sea otters were observed harassing, dragging, guarding, and copulating with harbor seals for up to 7 d postmortem. Carcasses of 15 juvenile harbor seals were recovered, and seven were necropsied in detail by a veterinary pathologist. Necropsy findings from two female sea otters that were recovered dead from male sea otters exhibiting similar behavior are also presented to facilitate a comparison of lesions. The most frequent lesions included superficial skin lacerations; hemorrhage around the nose, eyes, flippers, and perineum; and traumatic corneal erosions or ulcers. The harbor seals sustained severe genital trauma, ranging from vaginal perforation to vagino-cervical transection, and colorectal perforations as a result of penile penetration. One harbor seal developed severe pneumoperitoneum subsequent to vaginal perforation, which was also observed in both female sea otters and has been reported as a postcoital lesion in humans. This study represents the first description of lesions resulting from forced copulation of harbor seals by sea otters and is also the first report of pneu-moperitoneum secondary to forced copulation in a nonhuman animal. Possible explanations for this behavior are discussed in the context of sea otter biology and population demographics.

  1. Clinical signs, treatment, and postmortem lesions in dairy goats with enterotoxemia: 13 cases (1979-1982).

    PubMed

    Blackwell, T E; Butler, D G

    1992-01-15

    Enterotoxemia attributable to Clostridium perfringens type D in goats is difficult to diagnose because of a lack of specific clinical signs or postmortem lesions, on which to base the diagnosis. This report describes the clinical signs, postmortem lesions, and clinical responses to treatment and vaccination in 4 goat herds, in which a diagnosis of enterotoxemia was confirmed. Four clinical cases had the diagnosis confirmed on the basis of signs of diarrhea or sudden death and the isolation of C perfringens and epsilon toxin from the feces at the time of admission. The 10 necropsy cases were diagnosed on the basis of the isolation of C perfringens (not typed) or epsilon toxin from the intestinal contents of goats that died with clinical signs compatible with enterotoxemia and without lesions associated with a second serious disease. Enterocolitis was the most consistent lesion reported at necropsy in the 10 goats with enterotoxemia. Ovine enterotoxemia vaccines were of limited value in preventing enterotoxemia. These observations imply that naturally induced enterotoxemia in goats involves a different pathophysiologic mechanism than that associated with enterotoxemia in sheep. PMID:1559880

  2. Effects of Exposure to the Sound from Seismic Airguns on Pallid Sturgeon and Paddlefish

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Jackson A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John; Young, John V.; Hawkins, Anthony D.; Zeddies, David

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of exposure to a single acoustic pulse from a seismic airgun array on caged endangered pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) and on paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) in Lake Sakakawea (North Dakota, USA). The experiment was designed to detect the onset of physiological responses including minor to mortal injuries. Experimental fish were held in cages as close as 1 to 3 m from the guns where peak negative sound pressure levels (Peak- SPL) reached 231 dB re 1 μPa (205 dB re 1 μPa2·s sound exposure level [SEL]). Additional cages were placed at greater distances in an attempt to develop a dose-response relationship. Treatment and control fish were then monitored for seven days, euthanized, and necropsied to determine injuries. Necropsy results indicated that the probability of delayed mortality associated with pulse pressure following the seven day monitoring period was the same for exposed and control fish of both species. Exposure to a single pulse from a small air gun array (10,160 cm3) was not lethal for pallid sturgeon and paddlefish. However, the risks from exposure to multiple sounds and to sound exposure levels that exceed those reported here remain to be examined. PMID:27505029

  3. First report of an outbreak trichomoniasis in turkey in Sistan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohammad; Ghashghaei, Omid; Khedri, Javad

    2016-03-01

    In June 2010, in small flock of turkeys (n = 45) that co-bred with domestic hens (n = 30) and pigeons (n = 35), a disease occurred with the clinical signs of pendulum crop, in appetence and loppy wings. Disease had morbidity (10.3 %) and mortality (6/6 %). Three carcasses and two ill turkeys were referred to the Veterinary clinic in Zabol region for diagnosis and treatment of disease. At necropsy, the oral cavity/crop small yellowish-white masses were characterized. Necrosis in mucosal of crop to gizzard increased and in the crop smelly yellowish green secretions were characterized. According to clinical and necropsy, strong suspicion to trichomoniasis was very high so for perfect diagnosing samples were taken from dead and live turkeys. Samples were taken from oral cavity, esophagus and crop mucous membranes indicated Trichomonas spp infection. 9 out of 45 pieces of turkey (20 %), 23 out of 35 pieces pigeons (65.7 %) were infected but the domestic hens were not contaminated. The result of this study indicates that tricomoniasis can be an important disease of turkeys in Iran co-bred with pigeons and domestic hens. PMID:27065599

  4. Fumonisin mycotoxicosis in broilers: plasma proteins and coagulation modifications.

    PubMed

    Espada, Y; Ruiz de Gopegui, R; Cuadradas, C; Cabañes, F J

    1997-01-01

    The effects of fumonisin B1 (FB1) intoxication in chickens were evaluated in three experiments. Two-day-old broiler chicks were fed a diet containing 10 mg pure FB1/kg feed for 6 days; some chicks were necropsied at this time, and others were allowed to recover for 5 wk before necropsy. In two other experiments, 2-day-old chicks were fed a broiler starter ration prepared with Fusarium moniliforme culture material containing FB1; one group received 30 mg/kg for 2 wk, and another received 300 mg FB1/kg for 8 days. Compared with controls, intoxicated chicks exhibited decreased prothrombin time, increased plasma fibrinogen (not included for the group receiving 30 mg/kg of culture material), and increased antithrombin III activity. Simultaneously decreased serum albumin concentration and increased serum globulins could be observed in groups intoxicated with F. moniliforme culture material containing FB1. The group allowed to recover for 5 wk did not exhibit modifications in hemostasis or serum proteins compared with controls. The results indicate that low doses of pure FB1 (10 mg/kg) and FB1 from F. moniliforme culture material (30 mg/kg) may alter hemostasis and serum proteins in young chicks. PMID:9087322

  5. Fumonisin mycotoxicosis in broilers. Weights and serum chemistry modifications.

    PubMed

    Espada, Y; Ruiz de Gopegui, R; Cuadradas, C; Cabañes, F J

    1994-01-01

    The effects of fumonisin B1 (FB1) intoxication in chickens was evaluated in three experiments. Two-day-old broiler chicks were fed a diet containing 10 mg pure FB1/kg feed for 6 days; some chicks were necropsied at this time, and others were allowed to recover for 5 weeks before necropsy. In two other experiments, 2-day-old chicks were fed a broiler starter ration prepared with Fusarium moniliforme culture material containing FB1; one group received 30 mg/kg for 2 weeks, and another received 300 mg FB1/kg for 8 days. Compared with controls, intoxicated chicks exhibited diarrhea; decreases in body weight and in liver, spleen, and bursa absolute weights; a hepatic relative weight increase; and spleen relative weight decrease. Triglycerides, uric acid levels, and alkaline phosphatase activity decreased, and gamma glutamyl transferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactic dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and cholesterol increased. The results indicate that low doses of pure FB1 (10 mg/kg) and FB1 from Fusarium moniliforme culture material (30 mg/kg) are toxic to young chicks. PMID:7832697

  6. Morbidity and mortality in stranded Cook Inlet beluga whales Delphinapterus leucas.

    PubMed

    Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A; Dushane, Jennifer L; Goertz, Caroline E C; Measures, Lena N; Romero, Carlos H; Raverty, Stephen A

    2015-05-11

    The endangered Cook Inlet (Alaska, USA) stock of beluga whales Delphinapterus leucas declined 47% between 1994 and 1998, from an estimated 653 whales to 347 whales, with a continued decline to approximately 312 in 2012. Between 1998 and 2013, 164 known dead strandings were reported by the National Marine Fisheries Service. Only 38 of these animals, or 23% of the known stranded carcasses, were necropsied. Carcasses were found between April and October. The majority of animals necropsied were adults (n=25), followed by juveniles (n=6), calves (n=3), and aborted fetuses (n=4). Eight of the 11 mature females were pregnant, post-partum, or lactating. Many (82%) of these belugas were in moderate to advanced autolysis, which hampered determination of a cause of death (COD). Each animal had a single primary COD assigned within a broad set of categories. The CODs were unknown (29%), trauma (18%), perinatal mortality (13%), mass stranding (13%), single stranding (11%), malnutrition (8%), or disease (8%). Other disease processes were coded as contributory or incidental to COD. Multiple animals had mild to moderate verminous pneumonia due to Stenurus arctomarinus, renal granulomas due to Crassicauda giliakiana, and ulcerative gastritis due to Anisakis sp. Each stranding affords a unique opportunity to obtain natural history data and evidence of human interactions, and, by long-term monitoring, to characterize pathologies of importance to individual and population health. PMID:25958805

  7. Practical pathology of aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Treuting, Piper M.

    2011-01-01

    Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington. PMID:22953032

  8. Focal transmural necrotic tracheitis in commercial meat turkeys.

    PubMed

    Sentíes-Cué, Gabriel; Crespo, Rocio; Chin, R P

    2003-01-01

    This report describes an unusual presentation of severe focal necrotic tracheitis in a flock of 8-wk-old commercial turkeys. The flock was kept on a range that is located near a cotton field. The cotton field had been chemically defoliated 2 wk before the birds were submitted for necropsy. At necropsy, most of the birds had a 1-cm, yellow-white constricture in the upper third of the trachea at which the lumen was partially occluded by necrotic tissue. Microscopically, there was severe, transmural necrosis with an accumulation of inflammatory exudate in the tracheal lumen and numerous bacteria within the necrotic debris, mucosa, and lamina propria. Mixed bacteria were isolated from the trachea. No viruses were detected. Neither abnormal heavy metal concentrations in the liver nor paraquat in the respiratory tract were detected. The exact cause of this severe, necrotic tracheitis was not determined. Based on the clinical history and laboratory findings, it was concluded that a combination of a toxic irritant, possibly an aerosolized cotton defoliant, and bacterial infections were likely the cause of this lesion. PMID:12713185

  9. Systemic mycosis in a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with detection of cystofilobasidiales DNA.

    PubMed

    Field, Cara L; Tuttle, Allison D; Sidor, Inga F; Nyaoke, Akinyi; Deering, Kathleen M; Gilbert-Marcheterre, Kelly; Risatti, Guillermo; Spoon, Tracey; Meegan, Jenny; Romano, Tracy A; Frasca, Salvatore; Dunn, J Lawrence

    2012-03-01

    A 6-yr-old, intact male California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with a systemic mycosis died after 5 wk of antifungal drug therapy. Antemortem clinical findings included hind flipper swelling, ring-lesions on skin of the flippers, and dermal nodules that increased in size and number spreading from the hind flippers and ventral abdomen to the foreflippers and muzzle. Lesions were accompanied by severe lymphadenopathy and development of systemic clinical signs despite therapy using itraconazole and later voriconazole. Histopathologic evaluation of biopsies revealed granulomatous dermatitis due to infection by fungus-producing yeast cells in tissue. Isolation attempts, using biopsied skin and tissue samples collected at necropsy, failed to yield growth of a fungus producing yeast cells like those in histologic section. Consensus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests of biopsied skin for fungal DNA produced an amplicon having significant sequence identity with a Cystofilobasidiales, a fungus belonging to a subclade that includes several Cryptococcus spp. Histopathologic evaluation of necropsy tissues revealed a systemic mycosis with yeast cells disseminated throughout subcutis, lymph nodes, and viscera. Hepatic necrosis was identified associated with acute liver failure, possibly from the voriconazole administration. This is the first report documenting the clinical presentation, treatment, and pathologic findings of infection associated with Cystofilobasidiales in a marine mammal and serves to expand the understanding of mycoses in pinnipeds. PMID:22448522

  10. Avian mycobacteriosis caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium in four ornamental birds and in vitro drug sensitivity testing of isolates.

    PubMed

    Stepień-Pyśniak, Dagmara; Puk, Krzysztof; Guz, Leszek; Wawrzyniak, Agata; Marek, Agnieszka; Kosikowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Avian tuberculosis, one of the most important diseases affecting various species of birds, is most often caused by Mycobacterium (M.) avium. This report describes cases of M. avium subsp. avium (MAA) infection in a white-crested Holland dwarf rooster, a male and a female golden pheasant and a male peacock. We also investigated the prevalence of mycobacteria in 60 other birds and 40 alpacas. Tissue samples of necropsied birds were cultured for mycobacteria. From non-necropsied 60 other birds and alpacas only faecal samples were collected. Clinical signs in the affected white-crested Holland cock included gradual loss of body weight and hoarse attempts at crowing during its last 3 weeks, with a dramatic loss of body condition and depression over the final week. Only slight weakening was observed in the peacock just before its death, and the golden pheasants died suddenly. Diagnosis was confirmed by microbiological, molecular and pathological results. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium strains were isolated from the internal organs of the affected birds. Only one faecal sample from 60 other birds was culture- and PCR-positive for M. avium subsp. avium, while another one was only PCR-positive for M. chelonae. We did not isolate any Mycobacterium spp. from faecal samples of alpacas and all of them were PCR-negative. All 18 isolated M. avium strains were resistant to rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, ethionamide, capreomycin and ofloxacin, and susceptible to cycloserine and streptomycin. PMID:26904899

  11. Comparison of Pathogenicity of Various Isolates of Bordetella Bronchiseptica in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Richard F.; Switzer, William P.; Duncan, J. Robert

    1967-01-01

    Eight groups of 12-to 24-hour-old pigs were procured from a respiratory disease-free herd of swine and reared in isolation using a box-rearing procedure. They were inoculated intranasally at 3 days of age with different isolates of Bordetella bronchiseptica. It was found at necropsy 4 weeks post-inoculation that 4 isolates of swine origin, an isolate of rabbit origin and an isolate of cat origin caused mild to moderate turbinate atrophy in 22 of 24 pigs. An isolate of rat origin caused mild turbinate atrophy in 1 of 4 pigs and an isolate of dog origin caused no turbinate atrophy. Pneumonia was present in most of the pigs inoculated with the swine, cat and rabbit isolates. Bordetella bronchiseptica was recovered in heavy growth from the nasal and tracheal exudate collected at necropsy from pigs inoculated with the 4 isolates of swine origin and the isolate of cat origin. Fewer organisms were isolated from nasal exudate collected from pigs inoculated with the rat, dog and rabbit isolates. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:4226661

  12. Effects of Exposure to the Sound from Seismic Airguns on Pallid Sturgeon and Paddlefish.

    PubMed

    Popper, Arthur N; Gross, Jackson A; Carlson, Thomas J; Skalski, John; Young, John V; Hawkins, Anthony D; Zeddies, David

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of exposure to a single acoustic pulse from a seismic airgun array on caged endangered pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) and on paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) in Lake Sakakawea (North Dakota, USA). The experiment was designed to detect the onset of physiological responses including minor to mortal injuries. Experimental fish were held in cages as close as 1 to 3 m from the guns where peak negative sound pressure levels (Peak- SPL) reached 231 dB re 1 μPa (205 dB re 1 μPa2·s sound exposure level [SEL]). Additional cages were placed at greater distances in an attempt to develop a dose-response relationship. Treatment and control fish were then monitored for seven days, euthanized, and necropsied to determine injuries. Necropsy results indicated that the probability of delayed mortality associated with pulse pressure following the seven day monitoring period was the same for exposed and control fish of both species. Exposure to a single pulse from a small air gun array (10,160 cm3) was not lethal for pallid sturgeon and paddlefish. However, the risks from exposure to multiple sounds and to sound exposure levels that exceed those reported here remain to be examined. PMID:27505029

  13. Forensic Entomology in Animal Cruelty Cases.

    PubMed

    Brundage, A; Byrd, J H

    2016-09-01

    Forensic entomology can be useful to the veterinary professional in cases of animal cruelty. A main application of forensic entomology is to determine the minimum postmortem interval by estimating the time of insect colonization, based on knowledge of the rate of development of pioneer colonizers and on insect species succession during decomposition of animal remains. Since insect development is temperature dependent, these estimates require documentation of the environmental conditions, including ambient temperature. It can also aid in the detection and recognition of wounds, as well as estimate the timing of periods of neglect. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of insects that colonize animal remains may suggest that there has been movement or concealment of the carcass or can create associations between a suspect, a victim, and a crime scene. In some instances, it can aid in the detection of drugs or toxins within decomposed or skeletonized remains. During animal cruelty investigations, it may become the responsibility of the veterinary professional to document and collect entomological evidence from live animals or during the necropsy. The applications of forensic entomology are discussed. A protocol is described for documenting and collecting entomological evidence at the scene and during the necropsy, with additional emphasis on recording geographic location, meteorological data, and collection and preservation of insect specimens. PMID:27480760

  14. Etiology, forms, and prognosis of gastrointestinal dysfunction resembling vagal indigestion occurring after surgical correction of right abomasal displacement.

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, N; Fecteau, G; Hélie, P; Lapointe, J M; Chouinard, L; Babkine, M; Desrochers, A; Couture, Y; Dubreuil, P

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the etiology and types of vagal indigestion (VI) occurring after right displacement of the abomasum or abomasal volvulus (RDA/AV), and the prognosis for each type. Data of cows presented for RDA/AV from a retrospective (n = 288) and a prospective (n = 132) study were used. Vagal indigestion occurred in 39 and 22 cows in each study, respectively. A necropsy was performed in 29 cases. Gastric compartment dilation compatible with VI type III or IV occurred in 23 cases. An abnormal gastric wall was detected in 22 cases. Peritonitis was present in 18 cows. Vagal nerve lesions were present in 5 out of 13 cases studied. Clinical, hematological, and necropsy results suggested a classification of VI with respect to presence or absence of peritonitis. Gastric wall damage, peritonitis and vagal nerve lesions appear important in the etiology. Considering peritonitis occurrence, antimicrobial therapy appears necessary in the treatment of RDA/AV. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:11062835

  15. Survival of dairy cows after surgery to correct abomasal displacement: 1. Clinical and laboratory parameters and overall survival.

    PubMed

    Rohn, M; Tenhagen, B-A; Hofmann, W

    2004-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical and laboratory consequences of left and right displacement of the abomasum (LDA and RDA), short- and long-term survival after surgery and the findings in cows, that could not be cured by omentopexy. Data from 564 cases of displaced abomasum (466 LDA, 98 RDA) were analysed retrospectively. Clinical and laboratory findings were compared between the two manifestations of DA. Survival was assessed after 10 days and after 15 months. Necropsy was carried out on cows that died or were killed. On arrival at the clinic, left displacement of the abomasum (LDA) cows had been recognized as diseased for longer. LDA occurred earlier in lactation, and more cows with right displacement of the abomasum (RDA) were pregnant. Overall clinical symptoms were more severe in RDA than in LDA cows. Heart rate was higher, body temperature was lower, inanition, abnormal faeces and ruminal stasis were more frequent in RDA cows. Leucocyte counts were higher, and potassium and chloride levels were lower in RDA cows. Acetonuria was more frequent in LDA cows. More LDA than RDA cows were released from the clinic as cured (82.0% versus 74.5%). However, survival after the early post-surgical period was similar for RDA and LDA cows. At necropsy, diseases of the gastrointestinal system were the predominant finding in RDA cows, while in LDA cows, diseases of the liver and other concurrent diseases were more important. PMID:15485565

  16. Efficacy of a 2 per cent moxidectin gel against gastrointestinal parasites of ponies.

    PubMed

    Bauer, C; Cirak, V Y; Hermosilla, C; Okoro, H

    1998-11-14

    The efficacy of moxidectin was evaluated in young ponies naturally infected with gastrointestinal parasites. Eight animals were treated orally with moxidectin at 0.4 mg/kg bodyweight and eight received only the vehicle. They were all necropsied two weeks later. Faecal samples were examined daily for egg counts and larval cultures. Parasites were recovered from total faecal samples collected daily and from the gastrointestinal tracts at necropsy. Moxidectin reduced the strongyle egg counts by > 99 per cent from three days after treatment but some individuals remained positive for 10 days. The drug had little or no ovicidal activity. As evaluated in the critical-controlled test, moxidectin was 99 to 100 per cent effective (P < 0.05) against luminal stages of parascaris equorum, Strongylus vulgaris, Triodontophorus species, Craterostomum acuticaudatum, 19 cyathostome species and Oxyuris equi. Adult S edentatus were also completely removed. Its efficacy against third stage larvae of Gasterophilus intestinalis was 95 per cent (P < 0.05). Luminal nematode stages were removed within a few days, and bots continued to be eliminated for at least two weeks after treatment. No activity was observed against Anoplocephala perforliata. As evaluated in the controlled test, moxidectin was 100 per cent effective against Habronema muscae (P < 0.05) and had a 76 per cent but not significant efficacy against encysted small strongyle larvae. PMID:9854319

  17. Controlled test evaluation of the benzimidazole anthelmintic VET 220-S alone or with concomitant trichlorfon treatment against naturally acquired gastrointestinal parasites in ponies.

    PubMed

    Bello, T R

    1991-04-01

    A controlled test was done in 30 naturally infected ponies to evaluate the antiparasitic activity of the dienbendazole analog VET 220-S given alone or with trichlorfon (TCF) by nasogastric intubation. Six ponies were nontreated; 6 were given VET 220-S (5.0 mg/kg); 6 were given TCF (40 mg/kg); 6 were given VET 220-S (2.5 mg/kg) and TCF (40 mg/kg); and 6 were given VET 220-S (5.0 mg/kg) and TCF (40 mg/kg). All ponies were euthanatized and necropsied 7 or 8 days after treatment. Draschia megastoma, Oxyuris equi, Strongylus vulgaris, S edentatus, and small strongyles were removed efficaciously by all doses of VET 220-S. Habronema muscae and microfilariae of Onchocerca cervicalis were not removed by VET 220-S or TCF. Gasterophilus intestinalis was 97.9% removed by TCF. Pregnant mares in all groups were not adversely affected by treatment, except for 1 mare that had diarrhea after TCF treatment. Parasite eggs per gram and larval culture data agreed with necropsy data. PMID:2053725

  18. Avian toxicologic diagnosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigurdson, C.J.; Franson, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    This chapter describes the sources and pathophysiology of some potential poisons that affect birds and summarizes useful laboratory tests. The diagnosis of poisoning in birds, as in mammals, requires a complete and accurate history, careful observation of clinical signs, and a thorough necropsy evaluation. Appropriate sample handling and analysis, based on consultation with the diagnostic toxicologist, are critical (Table 19--1). Veterinary toxicology laboratories are becoming increasingly specialized, with only certain laboratories capable of analyzing for drug residues or anticoagulants, for example. Although a local laboratory may not be able to fulfill a specific test request, they may recommend an alternative laboratory or may be willing to forward the sample. As a general rule in suspect poisoning cases, large tissue samples of liver, kidney, brain, and subcutaneous fat and of crop, proventriculus, and ventriculus contents should be collected at necropsy and frozen. Appropriate samples should be submitted frozen, with the remainder held in the freezer for possible later testing. A second set of tissues should be placed in 10% formalin for histopathologic examination.

  19. Practical pathology of aging mice.

    PubMed

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Treuting, Piper M

    2011-01-01

    Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington. PMID:22953032

  20. Health status and relative exposure of mule deer and white-tailed deer to soil contaminants at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    SciTech Connect

    Creekmore, T.E.; Franson, J.C.; Whittaker, D.G.; Roy, R.R. |; Baker, D.L.

    1999-02-01

    The authors evaluated the health of 18 radio-collared deer [13 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and 5 white-tailed deer (O. virginianus)] from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, near Denver, Colorado, USA, a Superfund site contaminated with a variety of materials, including organochlorine pesticides, metals and nerve gas production by-products. Radio-collared deer were tracked for 1 to 3 years (1989--1992) to identify relative exposure to contaminants based on telemetry locations plotted on grid maps depicting known soil contaminant concentrations. At the end of the study, all animals were in fair or good body condition at the time of necropsy. Mean ages of mule deer and white-tailed deer were 7.4 and 10.6 years, respectively. At necropsy, tissues were collected from the deer for serology, histopathology, and analysis for eight chlorinated hydrocarbons and two metals. Detectable residues of mercury were found in the kidneys of 10 deer, dieldrin was found in fat, liver, and brain, and DDE was found in the muscle of one animal. Relative exposure estimates derived from telemetry and soil contamination data were correlated with tissue levels of dieldrin and mercury. Two mule deer had severe testicular atrophy, and one of these animals also had antler deformities. The prevalence of antibodies against epizootic hemorrhagic disease serotype 2 was 85%.

  1. Diffuse malignant pleural mesothelioma and asbestos exposure

    PubMed Central

    Whitwell, F.; Rawcliffe, Rachel M.

    1971-01-01

    Pleural mesothelioma has been diagnosed in 52 patients in three hospitals on Merseyside between 1955 and 1970, 60% being diagnosed from operation specimens and the rest from postmortem tissues. Necropsies eventually held on nearly half the operation cases confirmed the diagnosis, giving a necropsy rate of 70% for the series. The morbid anatomy conformed to earlier descriptions except that widespread metastases were much commoner than has usually been described. Histological findings agreed with previous accounts of the tumour, except that, in our hands, special acid mucopolysaccharide staining was less reliable than Southgate's mucicarmine, which was of value in differential diagnosis. Association with asbestos was confirmed from industrial histories in 80% of cases, the commonest industries involved being shipbuilding and repairing in men and sackware repairing in women. Lungs of industrial mesothelioma cases showed basal asbestosis in 17% and excessive asbestos bodies in almost all the rest. Quantitative comparison of asbestos bodies in lung smears from mesothelioma cases compared with lung smears from other Merseyside adults showed much higher counts in the mesothelioma cases. The interval from first exposure to asbestos until appearance of mesothelioma ranged between 13 and 63 years, with a mean of 42 years. We think the incidence of mesothelioma will continue to rise with the increased use of asbestos until about 40 years after adequate protective measures have been taken. Images PMID:5101273

  2. Protection of Spanish Ibex (Capra pyrenaica) against Bluetongue Virus Serotypes 1 and 8 in a Subclinical Experimental Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lorca-Oró, Cristina; Pujols, Joan; García-Bocanegra, Ignacio; Mentaberre, Gregorio; Granados, José Enrique; Solanes, David; Fandos, Paulino; Galindo, Iván; Domingo, Mariano; Lavín, Santiago; López-Olvera, Jorge Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Many wild ruminants such as Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica) are susceptible to Bluetongue virus (BTV) infection, which causes disease mainly in domestic sheep and cattle. Outbreaks involving either BTV serotypes 1 (BTV-1) and 8 (BTV-8) are currently challenging Europe. Inclusion of wildlife vaccination among BTV control measures should be considered in certain species. In the present study, four out of fifteen seronegative Spanish ibexes were immunized with a single dose of inactivated vaccine against BTV-1, four against BTV-8 and seven ibexes were non vaccinated controls. Seven ibexes (four vaccinated and three controls) were inoculated with each BTV serotype. Antibody and IFN-gamma responses were evaluated until 28 days after inoculation (dpi). The vaccinated ibexes showed significant (P<0.05) neutralizing antibody levels after vaccination compared to non vaccinated ibexes. The non vaccinated ibexes remained seronegative until challenge and showed neutralizing antibodies from 7 dpi. BTV RNA was detected in the blood of non vaccinated ibexes from 2 to the end of the study (28 dpi) and in target tissue samples obtained at necropsy (8 and 28 dpi). BTV-1 was successfully isolated on cell culture from blood and target tissues of non vaccinated ibexes. Clinical signs were unapparent and no gross lesions were found at necropsy. Our results show for the first time that Spanish ibex is susceptible and asymptomatic to BTV infection and also that a single dose of vaccine prevents viraemia against BTV-1 and BTV-8 replication. PMID:22666321

  3. Quantitative ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and histologic image analysis of hepatic iron accumulation in pigeons (Columbia livia).

    PubMed

    Matheson, Jodi S; Paul-Murphy, Joanne; O'Brien, Robert T; Steinberg, Howard

    2007-06-01

    Iron overload was induced by iron dextran i.v. in clinically healthy adult pigeons, Columbia livia, (n = 8). Hemosiderosis was induced in all treated birds. Two control pigeons received no iron injections. Pigeons did not show clinical signs of iron overload during the 6-wk study. Ultrasound examination of the liver in the pigeons receiving iron dextran was performed on days 0, 13, 28, and 42. No ultrasound images were collected on the control pigeons. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on days 0, 13, 28, and 42 on all study pigeons and imaging sequences were collected in three different imaging formats: T1, T2, and gradient-recalled echo (GRE). Surgical liver biopsies were performed on pigeons receiving iron dextran on days 2, 16, and 45 (at necropsy). A single liver sample was collected at necropsy from the control birds. Histologic examination, quantitative image analysis, and tissue iron analysis by thin-layer chromatography were performed on each liver sample and compared to the imaging studies. Although hemosiderosis was confirmed histologically in each experimental pigeon, no significant change in pixel intensity of the ultrasound images was seen at any point in the study. Signal intensity, in all magnetic resonance imaging formats, significantly decreased in a linear fashion as the accumulation of iron increased. PMID:17679505

  4. Fatal Canid Herpesvirus 1 Respiratory Infections in 4 Clinically Healthy Adult Dogs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Driskell, E A; Cooley, A J; Jia, K; Blackmon, S; Wan, X-F; Uhl, E W; Saliki, J T; Sanchez, S; Krimer, P M; Hogan, R J

    2015-07-01

    Four healthy adult dogs (Golden Retrievers aged 6 years and 9 years, Dalmatian aged 13 years, and Mastiff aged 5 years) developed clinical signs of acute respiratory disease and died within 2 to 7 days of onset of clinical signs. The lungs of the 3 dogs submitted for necropsy were diffusely and severely reddened due to hyperemia and hemorrhage. Microscopic lesions in all dogs were suggestive of acute viral or toxic respiratory damage and varied from acute severe fibrinonecrotic or hemorrhagic bronchopneumonia to fibrinous or necrotizing bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Necropsied dogs also had hemorrhagic rhinitis and tracheitis with necrosis. Virus isolation, transmission electron microscopy, and polymerase chain reaction were used to confirm the presence of canid herpesvirus 1 (CaHV-1) in the lung samples of these dogs. Lung tissues were negative for influenza A virus, canine distemper virus, canine parainfluenza virus, canine respiratory coronavirus, and canine adenovirus 2. Canid herpesvirus 1 has been isolated from cases of acute infectious respiratory disease in dogs but has only rarely been associated with fatal primary viral pneumonia in adult dogs. The cases in the current report document lesions observed in association with CaHV-1 in 4 cases of fatal canine herpesvirus pneumonia in adult dogs. PMID:25358536

  5. A subchronic oral toxicity study on pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) disodium salt in rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chunlai; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Wei; Song, Yan; Jia, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    A subchronic oral toxicity study on pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) disodium salt was performed in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (10 rats/sex/group) and administered with PQQ disodium salt at doses of 0 (control), 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg bw/day by gavage for 13 weeks. Daily clinical observations and weekly measurement of body weights and food consumption were conducted. Blood samples were obtained on day 46 and day 91 for measurement of hematology and serum biochemical parameters. Animals were euthanized for necropsy, selected organs were weighted and recorded. Histological examination was performed on all tissues from animals in the control and PQQ disodium salt treatment groups. No mortality or toxicologically significant changes in clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, necropsy findings or organ weights was observed. Differences between treated and control groups in some hematological and serum biochemical examinations and histopathological examination were not considered treatment-related. The no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) of PQQ disodium salt in rats was considered to be 400 mg/kg bw/day for both sexes, the highest dose tested. PMID:25445509

  6. An outbreak of caprine meningoencephalitis due to Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Filioussis, George; Petridou, Evanthia; Karavanis, Emmanouel; Giadinis, Nektarios D; Xexaki, Anna; Govaris, Alexandros; Kritas, Spyridon K

    2013-11-01

    Five 1-month-old kid goats from a local herd in Kozani (northwest Greece) developed neurological disorders characterized by decreased appetite, ataxia, and head pressing. The animals received a 3-day course of treatment with intramuscular administration of enrofloxacin and ketoprofen. However, no significant clinical improvement was achieved, and 2 kids died. The remaining 3 animals were euthanized, and a necropsy was performed within 1 hr. Macroscopic lesions were confined to the central nervous system, with congestion and petechiae in the meninges. Microscopic lesions in all 3 animals revealed multifocal acute meningoencephalitis characterized by infiltrations composed of mononuclear inflammatory cells, lesser numbers of lymphocytes, and occasionally neutrophils and eosinophils. Additionally, in the kidney, there was multifocal expansion of the glomerular tufts by eosinophilic amorphous material, multifocal interstitial hemorrhages, and multifocal glomerular hypercellularity. The above noted lesions are consisted with an acute ongoing nephropathy indicative of a septicemic-toxemic procedure at its primary stages. Small, gray bacterial colonies, 3-4 mm in diameter, were obtained in pure culture from the brain of all 3 necropsied animals and were confirmed as Escherichia coli O157:H7 by use of phenotypic and genotypic methods. The isolates were sensitive to cefuroxime, ceftazidime, and gentamicin. In contrast, resistance to enrofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline was displayed. Additionally the bacterial isolates were found to carry a plasmid that harbored qnrS, sulII, and tetB genes that contribute to high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones, co-trimoxazole, and tetracycline, respectively. PMID:24153034

  7. Opportunistic infection of Aspergillus and bacteria in captive Cape vultures (Gyps coprotheres)

    PubMed Central

    Chege, Stephen; Howlett, Judith; Al Qassimi, Majid; Toosy, Arshad; Kinne, Joerg; Obanda, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe clinical signs, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of Cape vultures in which Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) and mixed species of bacteria were isolated. Methods Six Cape vultures sourced from South Africa for exhibition at Al Ain Zoo developed illness manifesting as anorexia, dyspnea, polyuria and lethargy. Three vultures died manifesting “pneumonia-like syndrome”. These three vultures were necropsied and gross lesions recorded, while organ tissues were collected for histopathology. Internal organs were swabbed for bacteriology and mycology. From live vultures, blood was collected for hematology and biochemistry, oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs were collected for mycology and bacteriology. Results A. fumigatus was isolated from the three dead vultures and two live ones that eventually survived. One of the dead vulture and two live vultures were co-infected with A. fumigatus and mixed species of bacteria that included Clostridium perfringens, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, Escherichia, Proteus, Enterococcus and Enterbacter. One of the Cape vulture and a Lappet-faced vulture, however, were free of Aspergillus or bacterial infections. At necropsy, intestinal hemorrhages were observed and the lungs were overtly congested with granulomas present on caudal air sac. Histopathological examinations demonstrated granulomatous lesions that were infiltrated by mononuclear cells and giant cells. Conclusions Aspergillosis is a persistent threat to captive birds and we recommend routine health assessments so that early diagnosis may prompt early treatment. It is likely that prompt prophylaxis by broad spectrum antibiotics and antifungals medication contributed to the survival of some of the vultures. PMID:23646305

  8. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC ANATOMY AND CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPIRATORY ASPERGILLOSIS IN JUVENILE WHOOPING CRANES

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Cristin; Pinkerton, Marie E.; Hartup, Barry K.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in captivity reared, endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana). Objectives of this retrospective, case series, cross‐sectional study were to describe computed tomography (CT) respiratory anatomy in a juvenile whooping crane without respiratory disease, compare CT characteristics with gross pathologic characteristics in a group of juvenile whooping cranes with respiratory aspergillosis, and test associations between the number of CT tracheal bends and bird sex and age. A total of 10 juvenile whooping cranes (one control, nine affected) were included. Seven affected cranes had CT characteristics of unilateral extrapulmonary bronchial occlusion or wall thickening, and seven cranes had luminal occlusion of the intrapulmonary primary or secondary bronchi. Air sac membrane thickening was observed in three cranes in the cranial and caudal thoracic air sacs, and air sac diverticulum opacification was observed in four cranes. Necropsy lesions consisted of severe, subacute to chronic, focally extensive granulomatous pathology of the trachea, primary bronchi, lungs, or air sacs. No false positive CT scan results were documented. Seven instances of false negative CT scan results occurred; six of these consisted of subtle, mild air sacculitis including membrane opacification or thickening, or the presence of small plaques found at necropsy. The number of CT tracheal bends was associated with bird age but not sex. Findings supported the use of CT as a diagnostic test for avian species with respiratory disease and tracheal coiling or elongated tracheae where endoscopic evaluation is impractical. PMID:26592357

  9. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC ANATOMY AND CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPIRATORY ASPERGILLOSIS IN JUVENILE WHOOPING CRANES.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Tobias; Kelley, Cristin; Pinkerton, Marie E; Hartup, Barry K

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in captivity reared, endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana). Objectives of this retrospective, case series, cross-sectional study were to describe computed tomography (CT) respiratory anatomy in a juvenile whooping crane without respiratory disease, compare CT characteristics with gross pathologic characteristics in a group of juvenile whooping cranes with respiratory aspergillosis, and test associations between the number of CT tracheal bends and bird sex and age. A total of 10 juvenile whooping cranes (one control, nine affected) were included. Seven affected cranes had CT characteristics of unilateral extrapulmonary bronchial occlusion or wall thickening, and seven cranes had luminal occlusion of the intrapulmonary primary or secondary bronchi. Air sac membrane thickening was observed in three cranes in the cranial and caudal thoracic air sacs, and air sac diverticulum opacification was observed in four cranes. Necropsy lesions consisted of severe, subacute to chronic, focally extensive granulomatous pathology of the trachea, primary bronchi, lungs, or air sacs. No false positive CT scan results were documented. Seven instances of false negative CT scan results occurred; six of these consisted of subtle, mild air sacculitis including membrane opacification or thickening, or the presence of small plaques found at necropsy. The number of CT tracheal bends was associated with bird age but not sex. Findings supported the use of CT as a diagnostic test for avian species with respiratory disease and tracheal coiling or elongated tracheae where endoscopic evaluation is impractical. PMID:26592357

  10. Hepatic Lipidosis in a Research Colony of Big Brown Bats (Eptesicus fuscus).

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jessica M; Treuting, Piper M; Brabb, Thea; Miller, Kimberly E; Covey, Ellen; Lencioni, Karen L

    2015-04-01

    During a nearby construction project, a sudden decrease in food intake and guano production occurred in an outdoor colony of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), and one animal was found dead. Investigation revealed that the project was generating a large amount of noise and vibration, which disturbed the bats' feeding. Consequently the bats were moved into an indoor enclosure away from the construction noises, and the colony resumed eating. Over the next 3 wk, additional animals presented with clinical signs of lethargy, weight loss, ecchymoses, and icterus and were necropsied. Gross necropsy of the affected bats revealed large, pale yellow to tan, friable livers with rounded edges that floated when placed in 10% neutral-buffered formalin. Some bats had ecchymoses on the webbing and skin and gross perirenal hemorrhage. Histologic examination showed hepatic and renal tubular lipidosis. The clinical and pathologic signs of hemorrhage and icterus were suggestive of hepatic failure. Hepatic lipidosis was attributed to stress and inappetence associated with environmental perturbations. Once the environmental stressor was removed, the colony morbidity and mortality decreased. However, 2 y later, a series of new environmental stressors triggered additional deaths associated with hepatic lipidosis. Over a 9-y period, 21 cases of hepatic lipidosis were diagnosed in this bat colony. PMID:25926399

  11. Visceral urate deposition in a little bittern (Ixobrychus minutus)

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Morad; Minoosh, Zahra; Haghighi, Siavosh

    2015-01-01

    Visceral urate deposition (visceral gout) is a common finding during post-mortem examination of poultry. Rare cases of visceral gout may occur in wild birds. A rare case of visceral urate deposition in a little bittern (Ixobrychus minutus) is reported here. In May 2013, carcass of a little bittern was submitted for necropsy to the Clinic of Poultry Diseases (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Razi University) by local authorities of Iran Department of Environment. At necropsy, white chalky deposits were observed on the heart and thoracic air sacs of the bird. To confirm the presence of urates, chalky deposits were collected from pericardium and tested by muerxide test. Heart and kidneys were sampled, preserved in 10% neutral-buffered formalin solution and submitted to laboratory for histopathology. Murexide test was positive for presence of uric acid in chalky deposits collected from pericardium. Light microscopy of affected organs confirmed the condition as visceral urate deposition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the occurrence of visceral urate deposition in a little bittern. PMID:26261716

  12. Detection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in round gobies in New York State (USA) waters of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groocock, G.H.; Getchell, R.G.; Wooster, G.A.; Britt, K.L.; Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.; Casey, R.N.; Casey, J.W.; Bowser, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    In May 2006 a large mortality of several thousand round gobies Neogobius melanostomus (Pallas, 1814) occurred in New York waters of the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Necropsies of sampled fish from these areas showed pallor of the liver and gills, and hemorrhagic areas in many organs. Histopathologic examination of affected tissues revealed areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Inoculations of fathead minnow Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820) cell cultures with dilutions of tissue samples from the necropsied gobies produced a cytopathic effect within 5 d post-inoculation. Samples of cell culture supernatant were tested using RT-PCR and confirmed the presence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). Sequence analysis of the VHSV isolate resulted in its assignment to the type-IVb subgroup. The detection of VHSV in a relatively recent invasive fish species in the Great Lakes and the potential impact of VHSV on the ecology and economy of the area will require further investigation and careful management considerations. ?? Inter-Research 2007.

  13. First report of Acanthocheilonema spirocauda in the Mediterranean monk seal (Monachus monachus).

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, E; Loukopoulos, P; Komnenou, A; Androukaki, E; Karamanlidis, A A

    2010-04-01

    The Mediterranean monk seal (Monachus monachus) is one of the world's most endangered marine mammals. The largest population is located mainly throughout the Aegean and Ionian islands and along the coastline of southern continental Greece. We report the findings of a necropsy and discuss their potential importance to the conservation of the species. The adult female monk seal appeared to be in a good nutritional state. The main necropsy findings were injuries consistent with a violent and sudden death, including three round wounds on the ventral surface of the body and several hematomas, as well as a decomposing male fetus in the uterus. Two nematodes were found in the right ventricle of the heart; no abnormalities were observed in the lungs, pulmonary vessels, or heart. The nematodes were identified as Acanthocheilonema spirocauda. This is the first report of infection of the Mediterranean monk seal with A. spirocauda, even though this is the most common heartworm found in most pinnipeds worldwide. This parasite should be considered in health care monitoring projects of this endangered species. PMID:20688652

  14. Alternate routes of invasion may affect pathogenesis of Salmonella typhimurium in swine.

    PubMed Central

    Fedorka-Cray, P J; Kelley, L C; Stabel, T J; Gray, J T; Laufer, J A

    1995-01-01

    Transmission of Salmonella typhimurium in swine is traditionally believed to occur by the fecal-oral route, with invasion through the intestinal wall and Peyer's patches. However, involvement of the upper respiratory tract may be equally important. An esophagotomy was performed on 6- to 8-week-old pigs. Esophagotomized pigs were challenged intranasally with 10(9) CFU of S. typhimurium cells and necropsied at 3, 6, 12, and 18 h postinoculation (p.i.). By 3 h p.i., S. typhimurium was recovered from cecum, colon, head, and thoracic tissues and from the middle ileum involving a large number of Peyer's patches. The ileocolic lymph nodes and ileocolic junction were not positive for S. typhimurium until 6 and 12 h p.i., respectively. Additional pigs were inoculated transthoracically with 10(9) CFU of S. typhimurium and necropsied at 3 and 18 h p.i. By 3 h p.i., all tissues were positive for S. typhimurium. Tonsil explants seeded with 10(9) CFU of S. typhimurium indicated that within 6 h p.i., S. typhimurium was located within the tonsilar crypts. These data show that after intranasal inoculation, S. typhimurium rapidly appears in the gut tissues and suggest that the tonsils and lung may be important sites for invasion and dissemination of Salmonella species. PMID:7790082

  15. Lesions and behavior associated with forced copulation of juvenile Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) by southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, H.S.; Oates, S.C.; Staedler, M.M.; Tinker, M.T.; Jessup, David A.; Harvey, J.T.; Miller, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Nineteen occurrences of interspecific sexual behavior between male southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) and juvenile Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) were reported in Monterey Bay, California, between 2000 and 2002. At least three different male sea otters were observed harassing, dragging, guarding, and copulating with harbor seals for up to 7 d postmortem. Carcasses of 15 juvenile harbor seals were recovered, and seven were necropsied in detail by a veterinary pathologist. Necropsy findings from two female sea otters that were recovered dead from male sea otters exhibiting similar behavior are also presented to facilitate a comparison of lesions. The most frequent lesions included superficial skin lacerations; hemorrhage around the nose, eyes, flippers, and perineum; and traumatic corneal erosions or ulcers. The harbor seals sustained severe genital trauma, ranging from vaginal perforation to vagino-cervical transection, and colorectal perforations as a result of penile penetration. One harbor seal developed severe pneumoperitoneum subsequent to vaginal perforation, which was also observed in both female sea otters and has been reported as a postcoital lesion in humans. This study represents the first description of lesions resulting from forced copulation of harbor seals by sea otters and is also the first report of pneumoperitoneum secondary to forced copulation in a nonhuman animal. Possible explanations for this behavior are discussed in the context of sea otter biology and population demographics.

  16. Independent evaluation of a canine Echinococcosis Control Programme in Hobukesar County, Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    van Kesteren, Freya; Qi, Xinwei; Tao, Jiang; Feng, Xiaohui; Mastin, Alexander; Craig, Philip S.; Vuitton, Dominique A.; Duan, Xinyu; Chu, Xiangdong; Zhu, Jinlong; Wen, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northwest China is one of the world's most important foci for cystic echinococcosis. Domestic dogs are the main source for human infection, and previous studies in Xinjiang have found a canine Echinococcus spp. coproELISA prevalence of between 36% and 41%. In 2010 the Chinese National Echinococcosis Control Programme was implemented in Xinjiang, and includes regular dosing of domestic dogs with praziquantel. Six communities in Hobukesar County, northwest Xinjiang were assessed in relation to the impact of this control programme through dog necropsies, dog Echinococcus spp. coproantigen surveys based on Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) and dog owner questionnaires. We found that 42.1% of necropsied dogs were infected with Echinococcus granulosus, and coproELISA prevalences were between 15% and 70% in the communities. Although approximately half of all dog owners reported dosing their dogs within the 12 months prior to sampling, coproELISA prevalence remained high. Regular praziquantel dosing of owned dogs in remote and semi-nomadic communities such as those in Hobukesar County is logistically very difficult and additional measures should be considered to reduce canine echinococcosis. PMID:25661801

  17. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California National Primate Research Center (1992-2014).

    PubMed

    Reader, J Rachel; Canfield, Don R; Lane, Jennifer F; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Ardeshir, Amir; Allen, A Mark; Tarara, Ross P

    2016-01-01

    Necropsy records and associated clinical histories from the rhesus macaque colony at the California National Primate Research Center were reviewed to identify mortality related to cardiac abnormalities involving left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Over a 21-y period, 162 cases (female, 90; male, 72) of idiopathic LVH were identified. Macaques presented to necropsy with prominent concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle associated with striking reduction of the ventricular lumen. Among all LVH cases, 74 macaques (female, 39; male, 35), mostly young adults, presented for spontaneous (sudden) death; more than 50% of these 74 cases were associated with a recent history of sedation or intraspecific aggression. The risk of sudden death in the 6- to 9-y-old age group was significantly higher in male macaques. Subtle histologic cardiac lesions included karyomegaly and increased cardiac myocyte diameter. Pedigree analyses based on rhesus macaque LVH probands suggested a strong genetic predisposition for the condition. In humans, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, associated with diverse clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic disease to sudden death. Although the overall risk of disease complications such as sudden death, end-stage heart failure, and stroke is low (1% to 2%) in patients with HCM, the absolute risk can vary dramatically. Prima facie comparison of HCM and LVH suggest that further study may allow the development of spontaneously occurring LVH in rhesus macaques as a useful model of HCM, to better understand the pathogenesis of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. PMID:27053572

  18. Distribution and characterization of Heterobilharzia americana in dogs in Texas.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J Y; Lewis, B C; Snowden, K F

    2014-06-16

    Heterobilharzia americana is a trematode parasite (family Schistosomatidae) that infects a wide range of wild mammalian hosts. Canine cases have been reported in the Gulf coast and south Atlantic states, Kansas, and Oklahoma. A total of 238 canine H. americana cases in Texas were retrospectively collected for a period of approximately 22 years from case records at the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory and the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital pathology service, diagnostic parasitology service, and Gastrointestinal Laboratory at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine. Of these cases, 26 patients had 1-2 repeat positive tests for a total of 268 positive tests (26 biopsies, 39 necropsies, 160 fecal examinations, and 43 PCR). Multiple dogs were infected in 12 households. Cases were distributed primarily in the eastern region of Texas in 42 of 254 counties. Cases were seen as far west as Kerr county and in counties bordering Oklahoma, Louisiana, Mexico, and the Gulf of Mexico. The median dog age was 5.6 years (2.7 months to 17.2 years) and the median weight was 20.5 kg (1-61.6 kg). All American Kennel Club (AKC) breed groups were represented (n=186): crossbred (20%), herding (17.8%), sporting (16.1%), toy (10.8%), hounds (10.8%), working (10.1%), terrier (8.5%), non-sporting (4.9%), and miscellaneous (1%). No seasonal pattern of diagnosis was apparent. Clinical signs reported (n=90) were diarrhea (67%), weight loss (38%), anorexia/hyporexia (27%), vomiting (22%), hematochezia (20%), lethargy (17%), polyuria/polydipsia (6%), and collapse (3%). In 39 necropsy cases, trematode eggs were identified by histopathology in the small intestine (84%), liver (84%), large intestine (39%), pancreas (35%), lung (9%), lymph node (8%), spleen (4%), and stomach (3%). Adult parasites were identified histologically in four cases. Granulomatous inflammation associated with the eggs was the most commonly reported histopathologic change. Other changes reported

  19. The utilization of the Welfare Quality® assessment for determining laying hen condition across three housing systems.

    PubMed

    Blatchford, R A; Fulton, R M; Mench, J A

    2016-01-01

    The Welfare Quality(®) Assessment protocol for poultry ( WQA: ) provides animal-based measures allowing welfare comparisons across farms and housing systems. It was used to compare Lohmann LSL Classic White hens housed in an enriched colony ( EC: ), aviary ( AV: ), and conventional cage system ( CC: ) on a commercial farm over 2 flock cycles. Hens (n = 100/system) were scored on a variety of measures. A baseline measurement was made at placement at 19 wk of age for 1 flock, since AV hens had been reared in an aviary pullet facility ( AVP: while EC and CC hens were reared in a conventional pullet facility ( CCP: ). Hens in all systems were then assessed at 52 and 72 wk of age. Necropsies were performed on all mortalities 1 wk before and after the WQA sampling. WQAs were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests for prevalence and Fisher's exact tests for severity. There was an effect of rearing, with AVP having shorter claws (P = 0.01), dirtier feathers (P = 0.03), and more keel abnormalities (P < 0.0001) than CCP at placement. For the hens, there were several significant housing system effects across flocks and age periods (all P ≤ 0.05). AV and EC hens had more keel abnormalities than CC hens. They also had fewer foot abnormalities than CC hens, although those in AV hens were more severe. AV hens had consistently dirtier feathers than EC and CC hens. While AV hens had the best overall feather cover, feather loss patterns suggested that loss was due to head pecking for AV, whereas in EC and CC it was due to cage abrasion. The necropsy findings and the WQA results were similar, except that the WQA failed to find enteritis at 19 wk, although it was detected in the necropsies during this sampling period. These results show that the WQA is a useful tool for detecting hen condition differences across housing systems. PMID:26240396

  20. Effects of doxycycline on heartworm embryogenesis, transmission, circulating microfilaria, and adult worms in microfilaremic dogs.

    PubMed

    McCall, J W; Kramer, L; Genchi, C; Guerrero, J; Dzimianski, M T; Mansour, A; McCall, S D; Carson, B

    2014-11-15

    Tetracycline treatment of animals or humans infected with filariae that harbor Wolbachia endosymbionts blocks further embryogenesis, and existing microfilariae gradually die. This treatment also kills developing larvae and has a slow-kill effect on adult filariae, all presumably due to elimination of the Wolbachia. Also, Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae in blood collected from dogs up to 25 days after the last dose of doxycycline developed to infective L3 that were normal in appearance and motility in mosquitoes but did not continue to develop or migrate normally after subcutaneous (SC) injection into dogs. The present study was designed to determine whether heartworm microfilariae collected at later times after treatment would regain the ability to continue normal development in a dog. The study also was expected to yield valuable data on the effects of treatment on microfilariae and antigen levels and adult worms. The study was conducted in 16 dogs as two separate replicates at different times. A total of five dogs (two in Replicate A and three in Replicate B) infected either by SC injection of L3 or intravenous transplantation of adult heartworms were given doxycycline orally at 10mg/kg twice daily for 30 days, with three untreated controls. Microfilarial counts in the five treated dogs gradually declined during the 12-13 months after treatment initiation. Two dogs were amicrofilaremic before necropsy and three had 13 or fewer microfilariae/ml. Only one treated dog was negative for heartworm antigen before necropsy. Overall, treated dogs generally had fewer live adult heartworms than controls, and most of their live worms were moribund. All three control dogs remained positive for microfilariae and antigen and had many live worms. L3 from mosquitoes fed on blood collected 73-77 or 161-164 days after initiation of doxycycline treatments were injected SC into five dogs. None of the dogs injected with L3 from mosquitoes fed on blood from doxycycline-treated dogs

  1. Pilot Field Trial of the EG95 Vaccine Against Ovine Cystic Echinococcosis in Rio Negro, Argentina: Second Study of Impact

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu, Edmundo; Mujica, Guillermo; Gauci, Charles G.; Vizcaychipi, Katherina; Seleiman, Marcos; Herrero, Eduardo; Labanchi, José Luis; Araya, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Luis; Grizmado, Claudia; Calabro, Arnoldo; Talmon, Gabriel; Poggio, Thelma Verónica; Crowley, Pablo; Cespedes, Graciela; Santillán, Graciela; García Cachau, Mariela; Lamberti, Roberto; Gino, Lilia; Donadeu, Meritxell; Lightowlers, Marshall W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is an important zoonotic disease caused by the cestode parasite Echinococcus granulosus. It occurs in many parts of the world where pastoral activities predominate, including the Rio Negro province of Argentina. Although CE control activities have been undertaken in the western regions of Rio Negro for more than two decades, the disease continues to remain prevalent in both the human and livestock animal populations. Vaccination of animal intermediate hosts of CE with the EG95 vaccine may provide a new opportunity to improve the effectiveness of CE control measures, although data are lacking about field application of the vaccine. Aims Evaluate the impact of EG95 vaccination in sheep on the transmission of Echinococcus granulosus in a field environment. Methodology Two trial sites were established in western Rio Negro province within indigenous communities. Vaccination of lambs born into one trial site was introduced and continued for 6 years. Prior to initiation of the trial, and at the end of the trial, the prevalence of CE in sheep was determined by necropsy. Weaned lambs received two injections of EG95 vaccine, approximately one month apart, and a single booster injection one year later. Vaccination was not implemented at the second trial site. A total of 2725 animals were vaccinated in the first year. Animals from this cohort as well as age-matched sheep from the control area were evaluated by necropsy. Key results Introduction of the vaccine led to a statistically significant in the number and size of hydatid cysts in comparison to the situation prior to the introduction of the vaccine, or compared to CE prevalence in the control area where the vaccine was not applied. The prevalence of infection in the vaccinated area was also significantly reduced by 62% compared to the re-intervention level, being lower than the prevalence seen in the control area, although the difference from the control area after the intervention

  2. Detection and characterization of viruses as field and vaccine strains in feedlot cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Landis, C; Miles, D G; Smith, R A; Saliki, J T; Ridpath, J F; Confer, A W; Neill, J D; Eberle, R; Clement, T J; Chase, C C L; Burge, L J; Payton, M E

    2016-06-24

    This study investigated viruses in bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases in feedlots, including bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V). Nasal swabs were collected from 114 cattle on initial BRD treatment. Processing included modified live virus (MLV) vaccination. Seven BRD necropsy cases were included for 121 total cases. Mean number of days on feed before first sample was 14.9 days. Swabs and tissue homogenates were tested by gel based PCR (G-PCR), quantitative-PCR (qPCR) and quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) and viral culture. There were 87/114 (76.3%) swabs positive for at least one virus by at least one test. All necropsy cases were positive for at least one virus. Of 121 cases, positives included 18/121 (14.9%) BoHV-1; 19/121 (15.7%) BVDV; 76/121 (62.8%) BoCV; 11/121 (9.1%) BRSV; and 10/121 (8.3%) PI3V. For nasal swabs, G-PCR (5 viruses) detected 44/114 (38.6%); q-PCR and qRT-PCR (4 viruses) detected 81/114 (71.6%); and virus isolation detected 40/114 (35.1%). Most were positive for only one or two tests, but not all three tests. Necropsy cases had positives: 5/7 G-PCR, 5/7 q-PCR and qRT-PCR, and all were positive by cell culture. In some cases, G-PCR and both real time PCR were negative for BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V in samples positive by culture. PCR did not differentiate field from vaccines strains of BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V. However based on sequencing and analysis, field and vaccine strains of culture positive BoHV-1, BoCV, BVDV, and PI3V, 11/18 (61.1%) of BoHV-1 isolates, 6/17 (35.3%) BVDV isolates, and 1/10 (10.0%) PI3V identified as vaccine. BRSV was only identified by PCR testing. Interpretation of laboratory tests is appropriate as molecular based tests and virus isolation cannot separate field from vaccine strains. Additional testing using sequencing appears appropriate for identifying vaccine

  3. Transgenerational Effects of Di (2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate in the Male CRL:CD(SD) Rat: Added Value of Assessing Multiple Offspring per Litter

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Leon Earl; Barlow, Norman J.; Howdeshell, Kembra L.; Ostby, Joseph S.; Furr, Johnathan R.; Gray, Clark L.

    2009-01-01

    In the rat, some phthalates alter sexual differentiation at relatively low dosage levels by altering fetal Leydig cell development and hormone synthesis, thereby inducing abnormalities of the testis, gubernacular ligaments, epididymis, and other androgen-dependent tissues. In order to define the dose-response relationship between di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and the Phthalate Syndrome of reproductive alterations in F1 male rats, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat dams were dosed by gavage from gestational day 8 to day 17 of lactation with 0, 11, 33, 100, or 300 mg/kg/day DEHP (71–93 males per dose from 12 to 14 litters per dose). Some of the male offspring continued to be exposed to DEHP via gavage from 18 days of age to necropsy at 63–65 days of age (PUB cohort; 16–20/dose). Remaining males were not exposed after postnatal day 17 (in utero-lactational [IUL] cohort) and were necropsied after reaching full maturity. Anogenital distance, sperm counts and reproductive organ weights were reduced in F1 males in the 300 mg/kg/day group and they displayed retained nipples. In the IUL cohort, seminal vesicle weight also was reduced at 100 mg/kg/day. In contrast, serum testosterone and estradiol levels were unaffected in either the PUB or IUL cohorts at necropsy. A significant percentage of F1 males displayed one or more Phthalate Syndrome lesions at 11 mg/kg/day DEHP and above. We were able to detect effects in the lower dose groups only because we examined all the males in each litter rather than only one male per litter. Power calculations demonstrate how using multiple males versus one male/litter enhances the detection of the effects of DEHP. The results at 11 mg/kg/day confirm those reported from a National Toxicology Program multigenerational study which reported no observed adverse effect levels-lowest observed adverse effect levels of 5 and 10 mg/kg/day DEHP, respectively, via the diet. PMID:19482887

  4. Effect of Infection Duration on Habitat Selection and Morphology of Adult Echinostoma caproni (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) in ICR Mice.

    PubMed

    Platt, Thomas R; Zelmer, Derek A

    2016-02-01

    The course of infection of Echinostoma caproni was followed in female ICR mice, a permissive laboratory host, from infection to natural termination. Twenty-one mice were infected with 20 metacercariae via oral intubation and housed 3 per cage. Three mice from a randomly selected cage were necropsied at 1 mo intervals. A second group of 15 mice was infected approximately 1 yr later to replace mice negative at necropsy in the first group. Mice in the second group were examined weekly for the presence of eggs in the feces. Mice negative for eggs on consecutive days were killed and necropsied. The location of individual worms and worm clusters were located in 20 segments of the small intestine. Adult worms were killed and fixed in hot formalin, stained, and prepared as whole mounts. Standard measurements were taken using a compound microscope fitted with an ocular micrometer. The infection spontaneously resolved in 10 mice from 7 to 32 wk PI, indicating the host response is highly variable and extending the maximum recorded length of E. caproni infections in ICR mice to 31 wk. A moribund worm was found in the feces of an animal that continued to pass eggs for an additional 2 mo indicating individual variation in worm responses. Worms located preferentially in the ileum (segments 11-13) during the first 3 mo of the infection but shifted to the jejunum (segments 8-9) during weeks 4-6. Morphologically, worms of different ages clustered together in multivariate space, with substantial overlap between the 3- and 4-mo-old infrapopulations and between the 5- and 6-mo-old infrapopulations. Muscular structures increased in size throughout the experiment, while the gonads increased in size for the first 3 mo and then declined during the last 3 mo. The relationship between E. caproni and ICR mice is more nuanced than previously reported. The reduction in gonad size and the shift from the ileum to the jejunum in the last 3 mo likely are related. These changes might be attributable

  5. Tracking the Emergence of Host-Specific Simian Immunodeficiency Virus env and nef Populations Reveals nef Early Adaptation and Convergent Evolution in Brain of Naturally Progressing Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Susanna L.; Nolan, David J.; Rife, Brittany D.; Fogel, Gary B.; McGrath, Michael S.; Burdo, Tricia H.; Autissier, Patrick; Williams, Kenneth C.; Goodenow, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT While a clear understanding of the events leading to successful establishment of host-specific viral populations and productive infection in the central nervous system (CNS) has not yet been reached, the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaque provides a powerful model for the study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intrahost evolution and neuropathogenesis. The evolution of the gp120 and nef genes, which encode two key proteins required for the establishment and maintenance of infection, was assessed in macaques that were intravenously inoculated with the same viral swarm and allowed to naturally progress to simian AIDS and potential SIV-associated encephalitis (SIVE). Longitudinal plasma samples and immune markers were monitored until terminal illness. Single-genome sequencing was employed to amplify full-length env through nef transcripts from plasma over time and from brain tissues at necropsy. nef sequences diverged from the founder virus faster than gp120 diverged. Host-specific sequence populations were detected in nef (∼92 days) before they were detected in gp120 (∼182 days). At necropsy, similar brain nef sequences were found in different macaques, indicating convergent evolution, while gp120 brain sequences remained largely host specific. Molecular clock and selection analyses showed weaker clock-like behavior and stronger selection pressure in nef than in gp120, with the strongest nef selection in the macaque with SIVE. Rapid nef diversification, occurring prior to gp120 diversification, indicates that early adaptation of nef in the new host is essential for successful infection. Moreover, the convergent evolution of nef sequences in the CNS suggests a significant role for nef in establishing neurotropic strains. IMPORTANCE The SIV-infected rhesus macaque model closely resembles HIV-1 immunopathogenesis, neuropathogenesis, and disease progression in humans. Macaques were intravenously infected with identical viral

  6. Effect of cold stress on broilers selected for resistance or susceptibility to ascites syndrome.

    PubMed

    Balog, J M; Kidd, B D; Huff, W E; Huff, G R; Rath, N C; Anthony, N B

    2003-09-01

    Genetic selection for an ascites-resistant line of broilers is seen as a permanent solution to the ascites problem. Ascites-resistant and ascites-susceptible lines have been developed using sire family selection based on mortality data taken from siblings reared in a hypobaric chamber (simulated 2,900 m above sea level). The relaxed line is representative of the original commercial pureline stock randomly mated with no artificial selection pressure. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the differences between the lines when reared in floor pens and subjected to an ascites-inducing cold stress. Seven hundred eighty three straight run broilers were reared in floor pens at local elevation (390 m above sea level). Feed and water were available ad libitum. Birds were brooded at 32 C during the first week. The second week birds were maintained at 30 degrees C. Cold stress was applied for the remaining 4 wk at 14 degrees C. Mortalities were necropsied daily to determine cause of death. Birds and feed were weighed weekly. At 6 wk, five birds per pen were bled, and half the survivors in each pen (8 to 15 birds) were killed, necropsied, and scored for ascites. Blood gases, clinical chemistries, and blood cell counts were taken. Liver, spleen, split heart, and lung weights were recorded. Body weights were not different among the resistant, susceptible, and relaxed lines (P < 0.05). Feed conversion was better in the resistant line when compared to the susceptible and relaxed lines (P < 0.05). Ascites incidence, as measured by mortality and lesion score at necropsy, was higher in the susceptible and relaxed lines when compared to the resistant line; 18.8, 12.7, and 1.6% respectively (P < 0.001). Susceptible and relaxed lines showed more right ventricular hypertrophy when compared with the resistant line (P < 0.05). The results show that under severe cold stress at local altitude (390 m above sea level), the ascites-resistant line was growing as rapidly as the other

  7. Effect of pre-cardiac and adult stages of Dirofilaria immitis in pulmonary disease of cats: CBC, bronchial lavage cytology, serology, radiographs, CT images, bronchial reactivity, and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Ray Dillon, A; Tillson, D M; Wooldridge, A; Cattley, R; Hathcock, J; Brawner, W R; Cole, R; Welles, B; Christopherson, P W; Lee-Fowler, T; Bordelon, S; Barney, S; Sermersheim, M; Garbarino, R; Wells, S Z; Diffie, E B; Schachner, E R

    2014-11-15

    A controlled, blind study was conducted to define the initial inflammatory response and lung damage associated with the death of precardiac stages of Dirofilaria immitis in cats as compared to adult heartworm infections and normal cats. Three groups of six cats each were used: UU: uninfected untreated controls; PreS I: infected with 100 D. immitis L3 by subcutaneous injection and treated topically with selamectin 32 and 2 days pre-infection and once monthly for 8 months); IU: infected with 100 D. immitis L3 and left untreated. Peripheral blood, serum, bronchial lavage, and thoracic radiographic images were collected from all cats on Days 0, 70, 110, 168, and 240. CT images were acquired on Days 0, 110, and 240. Cats were euthanized, and necropsies were conducted on Day 240 to determine the presence of heartworms. Bronchial rings were collected for in vitro reactivity. Lung, heart, brain, kidney, and liver tissues were collected for histopathology. Results were compared for changes within each group. Pearson and Spearman correlations were performed for association between histologic, radiographic, serologic, hematologic and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) results. Infected cats treated with selamectin did not develop radiographically evident changes throughout the study, were heartworm antibody negative, and were free of adult heartworms and worm fragments at necropsy. Histologic lung scores and CT analysis were not significantly different between PreS I cats and UU controls. Subtle alveolar myofibrosis was noted in isolated areas of several PreS I cats and an eosinophilic BAL cytology was noted on Days 75 and 120. Bronchial ring reactivity was blunted in IU cats but was normal in PreS I and UU cats. The IU cats became antibody positive, and five cats developed adult heartworms. All cats with heartworms were antigen positive at one time point; but one cat was antibody positive, antigen negative, with viable adult females at necropsy. The CT revealed early involvement

  8. Canine echinococcosis in Turkana (north-western Kenya): a coproantigen survey in the previous hydatid-control area and an analysis of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Buishi, I; Njoroge, E; Zeyhle, E; Rogan, M T; Craig, P S

    2006-10-01

    A study of Echinococcus granulosus infection in dogs, with risk-factor analysis, was carried out in the endemic area of northern Turkana district, Kenya, using necropsy on 42 strays and a coproantigen-ELISA survey of 161 owned animals. During the post-mortem examinations, 14 (33%) of the necropsied dogs were found infected with E. granulosus, with a mean burden of 540 worms (range=two to 4080 worms). The 26 necropsied dogs that came from the north-western Lokichoggio division--an area where, from 1983 to 1997, there had been a continuous programme of hydatid control--showed a similar prevalence of infection to the other dogs (34.6%) but a significantly lower mean burden, of 53 worms (range=two to 300). Forty-two (26%) of the animals tested for Echinococcus coproantigen were found positive. Although the dogs from the Lokichoggio division were more likely to be coproantigen-positive (29%) than those from the central Kakuma division (20%) or the north-eastern division (18%), the differences were not statistically significant. In questionnaire-based interviews, the owners of the dogs tested for coproantigens were asked about possible risk factors for canine infection with E. granulosus. Women were found to have twice the level of contact with dogs as men. The results of a univariate analysis of the dog-owners' responses revealed six factors that appeared to be significantly associated with a coproantigen-positive dog: non-restraint of the dog (P<0.001); dog fed on raw offal (P<0.001); the improper disposal of slaughter offal (P<0.001); the dog-owner's lack of knowledge about the transmission of echinococcosis (P=0.001); the dog not receiving anthelmintic treatment (P=0.003); and dog age < or =5 years (P=0.01). The results of a multivariate analysis confirmed that lack of dog restraint, access to raw offal, and young age of the dog (< or =5 years) each significantly increased the risk of coproantigen positivity (P, 0.005). Dogs that scavenged from cooking pots, were

  9. Skeletal lesions in the broiler, with special reference to dyschondroplasia (osteochondrosis). Pathology, frequency and clinical significance in two strains of birds on high and low energy feed.

    PubMed

    Poulos, P W; Reiland, S; Elwinger, K; Olsson, S E

    1978-01-01

    The material consisted of 2,950 broilers of the variety Hybro Compact of two lines. An equal number of birds of both lines were given either a high energy feed (H) or a low energy feed (L), containing all nutrients known to be required by broilers. During the first 3 weeks, H and L starter feeds were given and thereafter H and L finishing feeds. At 21, 35, and 45 days of age, the birds were weighed in groups, and feed conversion calculated. At 21 days of age, the frequency of crooked toes and swollen hocks was registered. Birds were taken from each group for necropsy at regular intervals. Both clinically normal birds and those with locomotor disturbances were selected for necropsy, including radiographic examination. With the exception of 240 birds, which were kept for a long-term study, the birds on the H feed were slaughtered at 42 days of age and the ones on the L feed at 49 days of age. The long-term birds were slaughtered at regular intervals, weighed, and necropsied. The last birds were slaughtered at 134 days of age. A large number of skeletal lesions were found. They were: Twisted legs, slipped tendons, crooked toes, bowing of the proximal tibia, dyschondroplasia at different sites, fracture of the fibula, deformity of the spine, deviated sternum (with breast blisters), arthritis, and osteomyelitis. Leg weakness was found to be almost synonymous with skeletal deformities. Other causes were rare. The normal development and morphology of the skeleton and the morphology of tibial dyschondroplasia were the same as those previously described in the turkey. Dyschondroplasia was found not only in the proximal tibia but also in the distal tibia, proximal tarsometatarsus, proximal and distal femur, and to some extent also in the costochondral junction. Tibial dyschondroplasia was more common in the birds on the H feed than in the birds on the L feed. Hence, tibial dyschondroplasia was correlated with rapid growth. The other skeletal lesions did not differ in

  10. Single Intravenous-dose Toxicity of Water-soluble Carthami-flos Pharmacopuncture (WCF) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Da-jung; Choi, Yoo-min; Kim, Seok-hee; Kim, Jong-uk; Yook, Tae-han

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was performed to analyze the toxicity and to find the lethal dose of the test substance Water-soluble Carthami-flos pharmacopuncture (WCF) when used as a single intravenous-dose in 6-week-old, male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods: The experiment was conducted at Biotoxtech according to Good Laboratory Practices. 20 female and 20 male Spague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups of 5 female and 5 male animals per group. The rats in the three experimental groups received single intravenous injections with 0.125-mL, 0.25-mL and 0.5-mL/animal doses of WCF, Groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively, and the control group, Group 1, received a single intravenous injection with a 0.5-mL dose of normal saline. Clinical signs were observed and body weight measurements were carried out for 14 days following the injections. At the end of the observation period, hematology, clinical chemistry, histopathological tests and necropsy were performed on the injected parts. Results: No deaths occurred in any of the groups. Also, no significant changes in body weight, hematological parameters or clinical chemistry test results between the control group and the experimental groups were observed. Visual inspection after necropsy showed no abnormalities. Histopathological tests on the injected parts showed no significant differences, except for Group 1 females; however, the result was spontaneous generation and had no toxicological meaning because it was not dose-dependent. Therefore, this study showed that WCF had no effect on the injected parts in terms of clinical signs, body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, and necropsy. Conclusion: As a result of single intravenous-dose tests of the test substance WCF in 4 groups of rats, the lethal dose for both males and females exceeded 0.5 mL/animal. Therefore, WCF is a relatively safe pharmacopuncture that can be used for treatment, but further studies should be performed. PMID:25780707

  11. Analysis of somatic and salivary gland antigens of third stage larvae of Rhinoestrus spp. (Diptera, Oestridae).

    PubMed

    Milillo, Piermarino; Traversa, Donato; Elia, Gabriella; Otranto, Domenico

    2010-04-01

    Larvae of Rhinoestrus spp. (Diptera, Oestridae) infect nasal and sinus cavities of horses, causing a nasal myiasis characterized by severe respiratory distress. Presently, the diagnosis of horse nasal botfly relies on the observation of clinical signs, on the post mortem retrieval of larvae or on molecular assays performed using pharyngeal swabs. The present study was carried out to characterize larval somatic proteins and salivary glands of Rhinoestrus spp. in a preliminary assessment towards the immunodiagnosis of equine rhinoestrosis. Out of the 212 necropsied horses 13 were positive for the presence of Rhinoestrus spp. larvae. The analysis of the sera from the infected animals by Western blotting assay showed the presence of a specific host humoral immune response against Rhinoestrus spp. larvae and proved that the salivary glands are the major immunogens in horse nasal botflies. PMID:19948170

  12. Coinfection by Ureaplasma spp., Photobacterium damselae and an Actinomyces-like microorganism in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) with pleuropneumonia stranded along the Adriatic coast of Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Gabriella; Cammà, Cesare; Curini, Valentina; Mazzariol, Sandro; Proietto, Umberto; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Ferri, Nicola; Di Provvido, Andrea; Di Guardo, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    A case of pleuropneumonia is reported in an adult male bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) found stranded in 2014 along the Central Adriatic coast of Italy. A severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia and thoracic lymphadenopathy were present at necropsy. Numerous Splendore-Hoeppli bodies were found microscopically scattered throughout the lung. Histochemical evidence of Actinomyces-like organisms was obtained from the pulmonary parenchyma, with a strain of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and Ureaplasma spp. being also isolated from the same tissue. For the latter, a genome fragment of approximately 1400 bp from the 16s rDNA was amplified and sequenced. BLAST analysis revealed 100% identity with an uncultured Ureaplasma spp. (JQ193826.1). PMID:27033917

  13. Cryptococcus gattii infection in a Spanish pet ferret (Mustela putorius furo) and asymptomatic carriage in ferrets and humans from its environment.

    PubMed

    Morera, Neus; Juan-Sallés, Carles; Torres, Josep M; Andreu, Mariano; Sánchez, Manuel; Zamora, María Ángeles; Colom, M Francisca

    2011-10-01

    A domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was presented with lymphadenopathy and acute bilateral blindness. Cytologic evaluation and biopsy of an affected lymph node revealed pyogranulomatous lymphadenitis with intralesional yeast consistent with Cryptococcus sp. Subsequent studies demonstrated Cryptococcus gattii serotype B VGI/AFLP4 as the causative agent. The ferret was treated with fluconazole and prednisone. After one month of therapy, an improvement of the clinical symptoms was detected although blindness persisted. Seven months after presentation, the disease progressed to a severe neurologic condition, and it was euthanized. Postmortem exam revealed disseminated cryptococcosis with prominent neurologic involvement. Nasal swabs of other ferrets and humans from the same household revealed that two ferrets and two humans to be asymptomatic carriers of the same strain of cryptococcus as the necropsied ferret. These findings stress the importance of veterinary diagnostic work with pets and epidemiological investigations for disease prevention in them and in their owners. PMID:21395475

  14. Responses of Pregnant Ewes and Young Lambs to Cold Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Olson, David P.; Parker, C.F.; LeaMaster, B.R.; Dixon, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of cold stress were studied in pregnant ewes during the last three weeks of gestation and in their progeny during the first three days of life. In general, ewes were unaffected by treatment whereas changes were observed in the cold-stressed lambs. Cold-induced changes in lambs included physical weakness, depression, and poor nursing response. Serum concentrations of glucose and insulin were lowered whereas concentrations of blood urea nitrogen, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, triglycerides, and cortisol tended to be higher in cold exposed lambs. The mortality rate was higher (40%) in cold-stressed lambs than in lambs kept at warmer temperatures (10%). At necropsy, cold-exposed lambs had reduced amounts of adipose tissue in perirenal areas, and extensive subcutaneous hemorrhages and edema in the distal portions of the thoracic and pelvic limbs. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:17422756

  15. Cerebral Baylisascaris larva migrans in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Shoieb, Ahmed; Radi, Zaher A

    2014-08-01

    An incidental, asymptomatic, focal inflammatory lesion was detected in brain cerebrum of an approximately 6-year-old, female cynomolgus macaque from a chronic toxicology study. No gross lesions were noted at necropsy. Microscopically, the lesion contained a cross-section of larvae approximately 70-80 μm in diameter, a centrally located intestine flanked on either side by large triangular excretory columns, and prominent single lateral cuticular alae. Mixed inflammatory cells of eosinophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes admixed with abundant connective tissue stroma and necrosis surrounded the larvae. Histochemical stains for trichrome revealed significant amount of fibrous connective tissue. The morphology of the larvae was compatible with Baylisascaris spp. Based on the microscopic and histochemical examination, a diagnosis of neural Baylisascaris spp. larva migrans was made. PMID:24795276

  16. Chronic localised encephalitis (Rasmussen's) in an adult with epilepsia partialis continua.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, F; Serdaru, M; Baron, H; Daumas-Duport, C; Loron, P; Sauron, B; Poirier, J

    1987-01-01

    A 29 year old male presented with epileptic fits, progressive left sided focal seizures and epilepsia partialis continua, increasing left hemiparesis and mental slowing. Death occurred 2 years after the onset of the illness. Lesions were limited to the right cerebral hemisphere. Hypertrophic astrocytosis was diffuse throughout the gray and white matter but was more severe in the deep cortical layers and U fibres, where it was associated with vacuolar changes and capillary proliferation. Sparse perivascular lymphocytic cuffs, rod shaped microglia and microglial nodules were present. No inclusion bodies were found. These clinico-pathologic features were similar to the cases described by Rasmussen. Only five necropsy cases of this rare disease have been reported previously, all in children. The aetiology is unknown. Images PMID:3112310

  17. In vitro isolation and characterisation of a bovine Neospora species in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamane, I; Kokuho, T; Shimura, K; Eto, M; Shibahara, T; Haritani, M; Ouchi, Y; Sverlow, K; Conrad, P A

    1997-01-01

    Eleven aborted bovine fetuses and five calves suspected as having neosporosis were necropsied and tissues from these animals were inoculated into bovine cardiopulmonary aortic endothelial cells and monkey kidney cells and maintained at 37 degrees C with 5 per cent CO2. Neospora tachyzoites were observed in one cell 49 days after inoculation. The isolated parasite (JPA1) was morphologically identical to the previously reported bovine Neospora species (BPA1) and confirmed by its strong antigenic reactivity with bovine control antisera to Neospora species and its lack of reactivity with Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis cruzi antisera. This is the first bovine Neospora species isolate in Asia and further studies with this isolate are now expected. PMID:9368961

  18. Advanced gastric cancer and a concomitant pregnancy associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Takumi; Isii, Keisuke; Suzuki, Mina; Takakuwa, Koichi; Shibazaki, Yasuhiko; Ozawa, Tsunenori; Narisawa, Rintaro; Sekizuka, Naoto; Tanaka, Kenichi

    2004-07-01

    Gastric cancer associated with pregnancy is extremely rare and the prognosis is generally grave. A 31-year-old Japanese women, 41 weeks pregnant, displayed disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), although clinical symptoms and diagnostic examinations did not indicate an obstetrical cause. She went into labor spontaneously and vaginally delivered a 3248-g normal female infant, after receiving a blood transfusion. On the day 5 postpartum, a gastroduodenal fiberscope examination indicated advanced gastric cancer. She was also diagnosed with bilateral chronic subdural hematoma and underwent an operation to allow drainage. It was not possible to treat her curatively, so she was treated conservatively for DIC. She died on day 13 postpartum. Necropsy of the iliac bone indicated bone marrow metastasis of adenocarcinoma. This is the first known case of a pregnant woman with DIC occurring as the first manifestation of advanced gastric cancer. PMID:15232763

  19. Response of adult mallard ducks to ingested South Louisiana crude oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coon, N.C.; Dieter, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    Adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed South Louisiana crude oil as 0.25 and 2.5% of the total diet for 26 weeks to assess the chronic effects of oil ingestion. Additional birds were fed diets containing either 1.0% of a paraffin mixture or clean feed. No birds died during the study, nor were their body weights significantly depressed. Oviduct weight at necropsy was greatly reduced in hens on the 2.5% oil diet and also was significantly reduced in hens on the 0.25% oil diet when compared with controls. Male reproductive organs were not atrophied by treatment. Hens on oil-treated diets laid fewer eggs than those on the control diet; however, eggs from treated hens hatched as well as those from controls when artificially incubated. Pathological or biochemical alterations were no greater in the treated birds than in controls.

  20. Responses of adult mallard ducks to ingested South Louisiana crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, N.C.; Dieter, M.P.

    1981-04-01

    Adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed South Louisiana crude oil as 0.25 and 2.5% of the total diet for 26 weeks to assess the chronic effects of oil ingestion. Additional birds were fed diets containing either 1.0% of a paraffin mixture or clean feed. No birds died during the study, nor were their body weights significantly depressed. Oviduct weight at necropsy was greatly reduced in hens on the 2.5% oil diet and also was significantly reduced in hens on the 0.25% oil diet when compared with controls. Male reproductive organs were not atrophied by treatment. Hens on oil-treated diets laid fewer eggs than those on the control diet; however, eggs from treated hens hatched as well as those from controls when artifically incubated. Pathological or biochemical alterations were no greater in the treated birds than in controls.

  1. Fatal verminous pharyngitis and esophagitis caused by Streptocara incognita in mute swans (Cygnus olor).

    PubMed

    Alić, A; Prasović, S; Hodzić, A; Besirović, H; Residbegović, Emina; Omeragić, J

    2013-03-01

    Streptocara spp. infections are reported to cause gastritis, proventriculitis, esophagitis, and pharyngitis in various waterfowls, especially diving ducks. In the present paper, we describe severe fatal diphtheritic pharyngitis and esophagitis caused by Streptocara incognita in three female mute swans (Cygnus olor) in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Prior to death, the swans were showing signs of lethargy, anorexia, and reluctance to move. At necropsy, in all swans severe diphtheritic pharyngitis and esophagitis with deep, dark red hemorrhagic ulcerations were observed. Numerous thin, white, up to 1-cm-long nematodes, identified as S. incognita, were observed embedded in the pharyngeal and esophageal mucosa under the diphtheritic membranes. Histopathology revealed severe fibrinonecrotic inflammation with numerous cross-sections of the parasites. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of severe, fatal streptocariasis in mute swans. PMID:23678745

  2. Giant cell glioblastoma in the cerebrum of a Pembroke Welsh corgi.

    PubMed

    Giri, D K; Aloisio, F; Alosio, F; Ajithdoss, D K; Ambrus, A; Lidbury, J A; Hein, H E; Porter, B F

    2011-05-01

    A 6-year-old, neutered female Pembroke Welsh corgi was presented with a 1-month history of ataxia and panting. The clinical signs progressed until the dog became anorexic, obtunded and exhibited circling to the left. At necropsy examination, a mass was detected in the left forebrain, impinging on the cribriform plate. Microscopically, the mass was composed of sheets of round to pleomorphic neoplastic cells with vacuolated cytoplasm. Nuclear atypia, anisocytosis and anisokaryosis were common. Numerous bizarre, multinucleated giant cells containing 60 or more nuclei and giant mononuclear cells were present. The matrix contained abundant reticulin. Immunohistochemistry revealed the neoplastic cells uniformly to express vimentin, and a small number of neoplastic cells expressed glial fibrillary acid protein. A diagnosis of giant cell glioblastoma was made. Although well recognized in man, this tumour has been documented rarely in the veterinary literature. PMID:21146179

  3. Optical characteristics of natural waters protect amphibians from UV-B in the U.S. Pacific Northwest: a reply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palen, Wendy J.; Schindler, Daniel E.; Adams, Michael J.; Pearl, Christopher A.; Bury, R. Bruce; Diamond, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Nonimmune homing pigeons Columba livia were infected with the Jones' Barn strain of Trichomonas gallinae and subsequently transfused with plasma from acute or chronically infected pigeons harboring one of 3 different strains of T. gallinae. The transfusions were either a single 2 mi dose given one day after inoculation or three 1 ml doses given 0, 5, and 10 days after inoculation. Plasma from pigeons harboring any of the 3 strains was capable of passively immunizing nonimmune birds. All birds which were immunized with plasma from infected pigeons survived until killed at the end of the test period and no visceral lesions were found on necropsy but trichomonads were present in the oropharynx. All controls (untreated or transfused with normal plasma) died of visceral trichomoniasis. Immune plasma produced some lysis of trichomonads in vitro, and inhibition of motility and vacuolization occurred in some of the non-lysed organisms. The overall lytic activity in vitro affected less than 10% of the suspended trichomonads.

  4. Recurrent sebaceous carcinoma in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Yong-Baek; Park, Jun-Won; Oh, Won-Seok; Kim, Eun-Ok; Lim, Byoung-Yong; Kim, Dae-Yong

    2010-07-01

    A 1.5-year-old intact male African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was presented with a firm, non-movable subcutaneous mass on ventral chest area. Microscopically, the tumor was un-encapsulated, invasive up to the muscle layer, and composed of highly pleomorphic polygonal cells arranged in variably-sized lobules. The neoplastic cells had abundant cytoplasm with vacuolation and a large pleomorphic nucleus with prominent nucleoli. Mitotic figures were frequently observed with atypical mitoses. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were strongly positive for cytokeratin, but negative for vimentin. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of sebaceous carcinoma was made. Three months after the surgery, a recurrent mass was found at the surgical site. On necropsy, the mass has penetrated the underlying intercostal musculature, without metastasis to distant organs. This is the first report of a sebaceous carcinoma in an African hedgehog. PMID:20215722

  5. Spontaneous neoplasia in four captive greater hedgehog tenrecs (Setifer setosus).

    PubMed

    Khoii, Mina K; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Burns, Roy B; Carmichael, K Paige; Gyimesi, Zoltan S

    2008-09-01

    Little information is available about diseases and pathology of species within the family Tenrecidae, including the greater hedgehog tenrec (Setifer setosus), a Madagascan insectivore. This report summarizes necropsy and histopathologic findings of neoplasia in four captive greater hedgehog tenrecs. Although only four animals are included in this report, neoplasia seems to be a common and significant source of morbidity and mortality in greater hedgehog tenrecs. Types of neoplasia identified include a thyroid follicular-solid carcinoma, two urinary bladder transitional cell carcinomas, uterine endometrial polyps, and multicentric B-cell lymphoma. Due to small sample size, no etiology could be determined, but genetics, viral infection, pesticide treatment, nutrition, or other environmental factors might contribute to the development of neoplasia in this species. This is the first report of neoplasia in greater hedgehog tenrecs. PMID:18817002

  6. Internal parasites of horses on mixed grassveld and bushveld in Transvaal, Republic of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Krecek, R C; Reinecke, R K; Horak, I G

    1989-11-01

    Between 1980 and 1982, the gastrointestinal tracts of 17 horses which had been grazing on mixed grassveld at Potchefstroom and bushveld at Onderstepoort in the province of Transvaal, Republic of South Africa, were examined at necropsy and processed for parasite recovery. The large strongyles and their prevalences were as follows: Strongylus vulgaris and associated lesions (88-94%), Strongylus edentatus (24%), Strongylus equinus (30%), Triodontophorus nipponicus (35%) and Craterostomum acuticaudatum (18%). The seven most prevalent and abundant cyathostomes collected were Cylicostephanus longibursatus, Cylicostephanus goldi, Cylicostephanus calicatus, Cylicocyclus nassatus, Cyathostomum catinatum, Cylicostephanus minutus and Cyathostomum coronatum. Gasterophilus intestinalis was the most prevalent and abundant botfly larva recovered. Most of the cyathostome larvae and adults were present during all seasons except winter. The distribution of cyathostome species in the large intestine of the host is discussed. PMID:2588465

  7. The use of magnetic resonance imaging to better define hoof pathology in the reticulated giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata).

    PubMed

    Wakeman, Kyle A; Sanchez, Carlos R; Lung, Nancy P; Hersman, Jake; Barrett, Myra F

    2014-09-01

    A 22-yr-old bull giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata) with severely altered hoof conformation in both forelimbs was presented for necropsy following acute mortality. Due to multiple challenges that prevented safe immobilization, corrective hoof trimming procedures were never performed on this animal. To better define the extent of the damage of the soft tissue structures and bone within the hoof, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system was used to obtain images of these structures. The MRI study found evidence of severe osteolysis, phalangeal fractures of both forelimbs, and tenosynovitis of several tendon sheaths. These findings help demonstrate the impact that hoof overgrowth can have on internal structures within the hoof. By managing hoof problems early in the course of disease and investing in appropriate facilities that make giraffe immobilization safer, morbidity and mortality associated with hoof disease and overgrowth can potentially be reduced. PMID:25314840

  8. Classical swine fever virus Strain 'C'. How long is it detectable after oral vaccination?

    PubMed

    Kaden, V; Lange, E; Riebe, R; Lange, B

    2004-08-01

    To determine the persistence period of C-strain vaccine virus in immunized animals, domestic pigs and wild boars were vaccinated orally and killed on different days post vaccinationem (dpv). Tissue samples were taken at necropsy from both species for detection of C-strain virus. From domestic pigs nasal swabs and faeces were also collected. During the investigation period (2-12 dpv) vaccine virus could never be detected in nasal secretions and in faeces of vaccinated domestic pigs. In contrast, C-strain virus was found in organs until day 8 pv in domestic pigs and until day 9 pv in wild boars. Whereas in domestic pigs virus was detected in tonsils, Ln. mandibularis or in spleen, in wild boar it only was found in tonsils. We conclude that C-strain vaccine virus is not detectable in wild boars longer than 10-12 days after intake of the vaccine baits. PMID:15458487

  9. A geochemical basis for endomyocardial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Valiathan, M S; Kartha, C C; Panday, V K; Dang, H S; Sunta, C M

    1986-09-01

    In a search for geochemical factors that could play a role in the pathogenesis of tropical endomyocardial fibrosis, endomyocardial tissue samples obtained from patients at necropsy or operation were analysed for major elements present in laterite and monazite, which are important soil constituents of Kerala State of India. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used for detecting iron, silicon, aluminium, zinc, magnesium, calcium, sodium, potassium, and manganese and neutron activation analysis for thorium. Compared with control samples from victims of fatal accidents, an excess of thorium, sodium, and calcium and a deficiency of magnesium were present in samples from patients. It has been shown earlier that the staple diets of people in Kerala have high concentrations of thorium, and these data show that thorium can become concentrated in cardiac tissues. It is speculated that thorium excess in conjunction with magnesium deficiency may play a role in the causation of tropical endomyocardial fibrosis. PMID:3791358

  10. Metastatic Liposarcoma in a South African Fur Seal (Arctocephalus pusillus).

    PubMed

    Pervin, M; Izawa, T; Ito, S; Kuwamura, M; Yamate, J

    2016-07-01

    A 14-year-old female South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) was presented with a large skin mass on the right shoulder. At necropsy examination, multiple white nodules were found in the lungs, liver, spleen and right axillary lymph nodes. Histologically, the skin mass was composed of round to polygonal neoplastic cells with round to oval nuclei and variably sized cytoplasmic vacuoles. Cellular and nuclear atypia were prominent. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells expressed vimentin, but not cytokeratins, S100 protein, adipophilin or desmin. The cytoplasmic lipid droplets stained positively with oil red O. Metastasis was seen in the lungs, liver, spleen and right axillary lymph nodes, with similar morphological features to the skin mass. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of a pleomorphic liposarcoma with systemic metastasis was made. No previous reports of metastatic liposarcomas have been published in marine mammals. PMID:27290645

  11. Transponders as permanent identification markers for domestic ferrets, black-footed ferrets, and other wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fagerstone, Kathleen A.; Johns, Brad E.

    1987-01-01

    A 0.05-g transponder implanted subcutaneously was tested to see if it provided a reliable identification method. In laboratory tests 20 domestic ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) received transponders and were monitored for a minimum of 6 months. None showed signs of inflammation, and necropsies conducted at the end of the study showed no scar tissue or transponder migration. Seven of 23 transponders failed during the test because of leakage through the plastic case, and a glass case is now being manufactured that does not have the leakage problem. During mark-recapture studies in September and October 1985, transponders were implanted in 20 black-footed ferrets (M. nigripes), 11 of which were subsequently recaptured and 9 of which were brought into captivity; none showed signs of inflammation. Transponders provide a reliable new method for identifying hard-to-mark wildlife with a unique, permanent number than can be read with the animal in-hand or by remote equipment.

  12. Dermal penetration of 14C-labeled diisopropyl methylphosphonate in swine. Toxicological study

    SciTech Connect

    Snodgrass, H.L.; Metker, L.W.

    1991-10-01

    DIMP is a water contaminant resulting from the manufacture of the chemical warfare agent GB. To determine its potential contribution to human exposure, its dermal penetration was assessed in swine. Pigs received a single dermal application of 14C-labeled DIMP at one of three exposure levels, i.e., 400, 40, or 4 micro g/cm2 of skin. Absorption was quantitated by measuring radiocarbon in the urine or feces through 7 days and in tissues collected at necropsy. It was concluded that DIMP is a minimal skin penetrant to pigs and absorption by man would be expected to be less than 10% of a dermal exposure. Absorbed dose would be rapidly metabolized in the body, primarily to isopropyl methyl phosphonic acid, and excreted in the urine within 24 to 48 hours. No bioaccumulation would be anticipated. Significant evaporation from the skin surface would predictably occur within 1 to 3 hours.

  13. Overwhelming strongyloidosis in a foal.

    PubMed

    Brown, C A; MacKay, R J; Chandra, S; Davenport, D; Lyons, E T

    1997-08-01

    A 6-month-old foal was evaluated because of weakness, weight loss, and inappetence of 3 weeks' duration. On initial examination, the foal was weak, poorly responsive, and emaciated. Clinicopathologic abnormalities included anemia and hypoproteinemia. Because of its severe debilitation, the foal was euthantized. Necropsy revealed marked infection of the small intestine with Strongyloides westeri and severe edema of the entire gastrointestinal tract. The foal had been orphaned when it was 6 hours old and raised in isolation from other horses. We believe that this foal developed overwhelming strongyloidosis when it was first exposed to other foals at 5 months of age, because it had not been naturally exposed to the organism at a younger age and was immunologically naive. PMID:9262674

  14. Rheumatoid and other diseases of the cervical interspinous bursae, and changes in the spinous processes.

    PubMed Central

    Bywaters, E G

    1982-01-01

    Bursal spaces between the cervical interspinous processes were found at necropsy in 14 out of 27 "normal' adult necks, especially when the spines were close together. In this random series they were the seat of crystallopathic disease in 2 instances out of 14 cases. In spines from 9 cases of adult-onset rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid bursitis was seen in 2 and banal bursitis in 2. In juvenile-onset chronic arthritis inflammatory bursal changes of rheumatoid nature were found in 2 out of 5 cases, and are compared with the "normal'. A third case showed crystallopathic destruction. In one instance of adult RA very severe changes were seen, with destruction of the spinous processes, and this was associated with hypermobile segments dependent on discal destruction starting in the oncovertebral joints. An association is described between discal lesions, spinous erosion, enthesopathy, and interspinous bursitis. Images PMID:7114919

  15. Validation of ultrasound as a noninvasive tool to measure subcutaneous fat depth in leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Heather S.; Benson, Scott R.; James, Michael C.; Martin, Kelly J.; Stacy, Brian A.; Daoust, Pierre-Yves; Rist, Paul M.; Work, Thierry M.; Balazs, George H.; Seminoff, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) undergo substantial cyclical changes in body condition between foraging and nesting. Ultrasonography has been used to measure subcutaneous fat as an indicator of body condition in many species but has not been applied in sea turtles. To validate this technique in leatherback turtles, ultrasound images were obtained from 36 live-captured and dead-stranded immature and adult turtles from foraging and nesting areas in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Ultrasound measurements were compared with direct measurements from surgical biopsy or necropsy. Tissue architecture was confirmed histologically in a subset of turtles. The dorsal shoulder region provided the best site for differentiation of tissues. Maximum fat depth values with the front flipper in a neutral (45–90°) position demonstrated good correlation with direct measurements. Ultrasound-derived fat measurements may be used in the future for quantitative assessment of body condition as an index of health in this critically endangered species.

  16. Mycoplasma columbinum Isolated From a Racing Pigeon ( Columba livia ) With Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hellebuyck, Tom; Garmyn, An; De Cooman, Lien; Boyen, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Martel, An

    2014-09-01

    A juvenile racing pigeon ( Columba livia ) was presented with drooping of the wing and inability to fly. On physical examination, the right shoulder joint was swollen. The pigeon was euthanatized and submitted for necropsy. An excessive amount of fibrin was present in the canalis triosseus with severe arthritis of the affected shoulder joint. A pure growth of Mycoplasma-like colonies was obtained on microbiological culture of the shoulder joint. A 16S ribosomal RNA gene-specific polymerase chain reaction assay was performed on the isolate and revealed 100% similarity with Mycoplasma columbinum . Although infectious arthritis in homing pigeons is primarily associated with paratyphoid and Streptococcus gallolyticus infection, clinical practitioners should consider the potential role of Mycoplasma columbinum in arthritis in pigeons. PMID:25843324

  17. Study of an unusual paratyphoid epornitic in canaries (Serinus canaria).

    PubMed

    Madadgar, O; Salehi, T Zahraei; Ghafari, M M; Tamai, I Ashrafi; Madani, S A; Yahyareyat, R

    2009-12-01

    High mortalities in 17 canary flocks from different regions of Tehran, Iran, were reported. Necropsy and histopathologic examination revealed necrotic hepatitis and overall congestive septicaemia in carcasses. Salmonella enterica was isolated from 34 examined samples, two samples from each flock, including visceral organs of carcasses and droppings of live diseased birds. All isolates were typed as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by conventional serotyping. Antibiotic resistance profiling using 33 antibiotics and random amplification of polymorphic DNA differentiation by three primers were performed and showed an identical clonal relationship between these isolates and S. Typhimurium isolated from a sample of feedstuffs. Changing the feed ingredients along with antibiotic therapy via the drinking water by enrofloxacin solution controlled the outbreaks, and mortalities ceased. The zoonotic nature of S. Typhimurium and close contact of bird owners with pet birds in the home environment made the case significant in relation to public health. PMID:19937532

  18. Opportunistic bacterial infections in breeding colonies of the NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mouse strain

    PubMed Central

    foreman, Oded; Kavirayani, Anoop M; Griffey, Stephen M; Reader, Rachel; Shultz, Leonard D

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous morbidity primarily affecting female breeders in three independent breeding colonies of NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mice prompted an investigation to uncover the cause of disease. Necropsies were performed on 264 (157 female and 107 male) spontaneously sick, experimentally unmanipulated NSG mice. 42 (15.9%) of the mice had acute or chronic renal inflammatory lesions. 12 of the mice with nephritis had concurrent histologic evidence of an ascending urinary tract infection. From 94 kidneys cultured for bacterial organisms, 23 (24.4%) grew Enterococcus species and 19 (20%) grew Klebsiella Oxytoca. Female mice were twice more likely to present with nephritis than males. These findings indicate that bacterial nephritis is a major contributor to morbidity in the NSG strain. PMID:20817888

  19. Atmospheric flash injuries in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus).

    PubMed

    Zele, Diana; Bidovec, A; Vengust, G

    2006-03-01

    The pathological and histopathological examination of two female roe deer found dead after a severe thunderstorm is described. One of the two roe deer was killed by a direct hit of atmospheric flash, while the other animal, lying 1.5 m from the first one, died as a consequence of ground current strike. The major part of the coat and skin of the animal that was killed by a direct hit was covered with scorched streaks. The trachea and bronchi of both animals contained a considerable amount of aspirated light-red foam. Necropsy revealed diffuse haemorrhages over the epicardium of the right atrium with a diameter of 1 millimetre. The liver and the kidney exhibited severe congestion. PMID:16613025

  20. Tissue biocompatibility of kevlar aramid fibers and polymethylmethacrylate, composites in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J D; Mullarky, R H; Ryan, D E

    1987-01-01

    Two groups of female NZW rabbits were implanted in the paravertebral muscles with aramid (du Pont Kevlar aramid 49) fibers and aramid-polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) composites for 14 and 28 days. Rabbits were killed at these times periods, necropsies performed, sites scored for gross tissue response, and tissue specimens containing the implants removed for histopathological evaluation. A mild fibrous tissue reaction was observed around all implants containing aramid fiber similar to that observed around the silicone control implant. Some foreign body giant cells were also present adjacent to the fibers. An intense necrotic inflammatory reaction was present around the positive control material (PVC Y-78). The tissue response to implantation of aramid fiber and fiber-PMMA composites indicates that aramid is a biocompatible material. PMID:3558440

  1. Equine colitis X associated with infection by Clostridium difficile NAP1/027.

    PubMed

    Songer, J Glenn; Trinh, H T; Dial, Sharon M; Brazier, Jon S; Glock, Robert D

    2009-05-01

    A 14-year-old Quarter Horse with a 48-hr history of colic was euthanized after failure to respond to treatment. At necropsy, cecal and colonic mucosae were congested throughout, and there was segmental edema and significant thickening of the intestinal wall. Excessive numbers of mononuclear cells were found in mucosal lamina propria. Submucosal hemorrhage was diffuse and extensive, and Clostridium difficile toxins A and B were detected. Large numbers of C. difficile were isolated, and genetic characterization revealed them to be North American pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type 1, polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027, and toxinotype III. Genes for the binary toxin were present, and toxin negative-regulator tcdC contained an 18-bp deletion. This genotype comprises the current human "epidemic strain," which is associated with human C. difficile-associated disease of greater than historical severity. The diagnosis was peracute typhlocolitis, with lesions and history typical of those attributed to colitis X. PMID:19407094

  2. Encephalitozoon hellem infection in aviary passerine and psittacine birds in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rosell, J; Máinez, M; Didier, E S; Bowers, L C; Marco, A; Juan-Sallés, C

    2016-03-30

    A European goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis), a canary (Serinus canaria), and a lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis) captive-bred at three different private aviaries in Spain were submitted for necropsy with a history of weakness and ruffled feathers, weight loss associated with glossitis, and respiratory disease, respectively. Microscopically, enterocytes in the jejunum and ileum contained colonies of gram- and Stamp-positive, oval to elliptical microorganisms within parasitophorous vacuoles in the apical cytoplasm. Nested PCR using MSP primers that target microsporidian RNA genes produced amplicons of expected size for Encephalitozoon species, and analysis of forward and reverse DNA sequences confirmed the presence of Encephalitozoon hellem in all cases. The main cause of death of all three birds consisted of concurrent infections. However, intestinal encephalitozoonosis may have contributed to exacerbated catabolism. Encephalitozoonosis (or microsporidiosis) has been rarely described in passerine birds. PMID:26921040

  3. Presentation and prognostic indicators for free-living black cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus spp.) admitted to an Australian zoo veterinary hospital over 10 years.

    PubMed

    Le Souëf, Anna; Holyoake, Carly; Vitali, Simone; Warren, Kristin

    2015-04-01

    The veterinary records of three species of free-living, endangered black cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus spp.; n = 565) admitted to the Perth Zoo Veterinary Hospital in Western Australia during a 10-yr period (2000-09) were analyzed to determine the effect of clinical presentation and treatment on survival to release. The most-common reason for admission was trauma (at least 76.7% of cases), and trauma was also the most-frequent finding on necropsy examination (80.1% of cases). Anemia and paralysis-paresis were significant factors determining the decreased likelihood of survival of cockatoos undergoing rehabilitation. Human activities, in particular vehicle strike, were significant causes of morbidity and mortality in free-living black cockatoo populations. PMID:25647589

  4. Giant hydronephrosis and secondary pyelonephritis induced by Salmonella dublin in a Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Taghipur Bazargani, T; Khodakaram-Tafti, A; Ashrafi, I; Abbassi, A M

    2015-01-01

    Hydronephrosis occurs as a congenital or an acquired condition following obstruction of the urinary tract. In this study, a four month old male Holstein calf with emaciation, growth retardation and a poor dry scruffy hair coat was examined because of remarkable distention of right abdomen. At necropsy, right kidney was hydronephrotic as a very big fluid-filled round pelvis with the presence of multilocular cysts bulged from the cortical surface. With sectioning, more than 10 L of bloody fluid poured out from this sac. Microscopic examination showed severe atrophy of cortical tissue and fibrosis of the medulla. Also, the dilated pelvis was composed of fibrinous exudate and necrosis of epithelium associated with multifocal aggregations of neutrophils and bacterial microcolonies. In a culture and serotyping of isolated bacteria, Salmonella dublin was determined. In conclusion, S. dublin induced pyelonephritis secondary to congenital giant hydronephrosis is the first report in cattle in the world. PMID:27175163

  5. Systemic toxoplasmosis and Gram-negative sepsis in a southern chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica) from the Pyrenees in northeast Spain.

    PubMed

    Marco, Ignasi; Velarde, Roser; López-Olvera, Jorge R; Cabezón, Oscar; Pumarola, Martí; Lavín, Santiago

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old, male southern chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica) had an absence of flight response and was captured by hand in the Catalan Pyrenees in northeast Spain. On clinical examination, the animal was in good body condition, and only atrophy of the right eye was observed. Blood samples were collected and hematologic analysis performed, but no alterations were observed. The animal was sent to a Wildlife Rescue Centre, where it developed chronic wasting and died after 32 days in captivity. At necropsy, the animal was cachectic and had edematous, mottled lungs. Histopathologic examination revealed systemic toxoplasmosis and acute Gram-negative septicemia. The protozoan organisms were identified as Toxoplasma gondii based on immunohistochemistry. An indirect fluorescent antibody test was performed, and the animal was positive with an antibody titer of 150. PMID:19286506

  6. The spectrum of primary blastomycotic meningitis: a review of central nervous system blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Gonyea, E F

    1978-01-01

    Three cases of meningitis with initial and exclusive neurological involvement prompted a review of the clinical, cerebrospinal fluid, and pathological findings in an additional 78 patients with central nervous system blastomycosis. The first patient of the 3 had progressive cerebellar dysfunction as the result of chronic basilar meningitis. The second had a C8-T1 radiculopathy without other evidence of superior sulcus syndrome, and subsequent acute fatal meningitis. The third had aseptic, benign, self-limited meningitis followed by clinically obvious systemic blastomycosis. Diagnosis is difficult, and it is likely that other cases have been presumptively treated for tuberculous meningitis. A more aggressive approach to diagnosis is proposed that takes into account the condition of the patient, the likelihood of dissemination at necropsy, and the frequent meningeal infections that are negative on culture of lumbar CSF. PMID:655652

  7. Herpes simplex encephalitis in a domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Grest, P; Albicker, P; Hoelzle, L; Wild, P; Pospischil, A

    2002-05-01

    An adult domestic rabbit showing neurological signs was subjected to euthanasia. At necropsy, macroscopical lesions were absent. Histopathologically, extensive lesions were seen, particularly in the cerebral cortex. Non-suppurative meningitis was present and there was lymphocytic and plasmacytic perivascular cuffing in the neuropil. The cerebral cortex showed extensive segmental neuronal and glial necrosis. Within the necrotic areas, large amphophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies were present in neurons and glial cells. Immunohistochemically, neurons and glial cells in the affected areas were labelled by polyclonal antibodies against both herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. The agent was classified as HSV-1 by polymerase chain reaction analysis. This is only the second reported natural case of herpes simplex infection in a rabbit. PMID:12056779

  8. Cerebral embolism: local CFBF and edema measured by CT scanning and Xe inhalation. [Baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Yamamoto, M.; Hayman, L.A.; Sakai, F.; Nakajima, S.; Armstrong, D.

    1980-01-01

    Serial CT scans were made in baboons after cerebral embolization during stable Xe inhalation for measuring local values for CBF and lambda (brain-blood partition or solubility coefficients), followed by iodine infusion for detecting blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage. Persistent zones of zero flow surrounded by reduced flow were measured predominantly in subcortical regions, which showed gross and microscopic evidence of infarction at necropsy. Overlying cortex was relatively spared. Reduced lambda values attributed to edema appeared within 3 to 5 minutes and progressed up to 60 minutes. Damage to BBB with visible transvascular seepage of iodine began to appear 1 to 1 1/2 hours after embolism. In chronic animals, lambda values were persistently reduced in areas showing histologic infarction. Contralateral hemispheric CBF increased for the first 15 minutes after embolism, followed by progressive reduction after 30 minutes (diaschisis).

  9. Mass stranding of Odontoceti caused by parasitogenic eighth cranial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Morimitsu, T; Nagai, T; Ide, M; Kawano, H; Naichuu, A; Koono, M; Ishii, A

    1987-10-01

    Hearing organs of the Odontoceti from two mass strandings in 1983 and 1986 were examined histopathologically. In the 1983 stranding, two of three pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) were necropsied and numerous Nasitrema sp. were found close to the eighth cranial nerve (nervus vistibulo cochlearis) in both animals. Patchy degeneration of the eighth cranial nerve in and out of the modiolus of the cochlea was observed. In the 1986 stranding, five of 125 false killer whales (Pseudorca crassiclens) were examined and numerous trematodes (Nasitrema gondo) were found in the tympanic cavities. Severe degeneration of the eighth cranial nerve was discovered and there were many trematode eggs in the nervous and surrounding tissues. Parasitogenic eighth neuropathy is proposed again as the cause of mass stranding of the Odontoceti. PMID:3682083

  10. Concurrent Fowlpox and Candidiasis Diseases in Backyard Chickens with Unusual Pox Lesions in the Bursa of Fabricius.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Fusae; Yamamoto, Yu; Sato, Yasuo; Fukunari, Kazuhiro; Murata, Ken-Ichi; Yaegashi, Gakuji; Goto, Makiko; Murakami, Ryukoh

    2016-09-01

    Concurrent fowlpox and candidiasis diseases occurred in a backyard chicken flock. Four deceased chickens (one Nagoya breed and three white silkie chickens) were examined for diagnosis. At necropsy, white curd-like plaques were observed in the crop. Fungal elements that stained positive for Candida albicans with immunohistochemistry were distributed throughout the tongue, choanal mucosa, esophagus, and crop. Typical fowlpox lesions, composed of proliferating epithelial cells with ballooning degeneration and viral intracytoplasmic inclusions, were observed in the conjunctiva, nasal mucosa, and skin around the cloaca. Interestingly, hyperplastic interfollicular epithelium with rare virus inclusions was observed in the bursa of Fabricius (BF). Some bursal follicles were replaced by proliferating epithelial cells. These proliferating cells immunohistochemically stained positive for cytokeratin. PCR and subsequent genetic sequencing detected the C. albicans gene in the crop, and fowlpox virus genes in the BF. These results indicate that this outbreak was a rare presentation of fowlpox in spontaneously infected chickens, with unusual pox lesions in the BF. PMID:27610735

  11. Comparative Analysis of SIV-specific Cellular Immune Responses Induced by Different Vaccine Platforms in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Antonio; McKinnon, Katherine; Li, Jinyao; Rosati, Margherita; Kulkarni, Viraj; Pilkington, Guy R.; Bear, Jenifer; Alicea, Candido; Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A.; Patterson, L. Jean; Pegu, Poonam; Liyanage, Namal P. M.; Gordon, Shari N.; Vaccari, Monica; Wang, Yichuan; Hogg, Alison E.; Frey, Blake; Sui, Yongjun; Reed, Steven G.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Franchini, Genoveffa; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Felber, Barbara K.; Pavlakis, George N.

    2014-01-01

    To identify the most promising vaccine candidates for combinatorial strategies, we compared five SIV vaccine platforms including recombinant canary pox virus ALVAC, replication-competent adenovirus type 5 host range mutant RepAd, DNA, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), peptides and protein in distinct combinations. Three regimens used viral vectors (prime or boost) and two regimens used plasmid DNA. Analysis at necropsy showed that the DNA-based vaccine regimens elicited significantly higher cellular responses against Gag and Env than any of the other vaccine platforms. The T cell responses induced by most vaccine regimens disseminated systemically into secondary lymphoid tissues (lymph nodes, spleen) and effector anatomical sites (including liver, vaginal tissue), indicative of their role in viral containment at the portal of entry. The cellular and reported humoral immune response data suggest that combination of DNA and viral vectors elicits a balanced immunity with strong and durable responses able to disseminate into relevant mucosal sites. PMID:25229164

  12. Comparative analysis of SIV-specific cellular immune responses induced by different vaccine platforms in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Antonio; McKinnon, Katherine; Li, Jinyao; Rosati, Margherita; Kulkarni, Viraj; Pilkington, Guy R; Bear, Jenifer; Alicea, Candido; Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Jean Patterson, L; Pegu, Poonam; Liyanage, Namal P M; Gordon, Shari N; Vaccari, Monica; Wang, Yichuan; Hogg, Alison E; Frey, Blake; Sui, Yongjun; Reed, Steven G; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Berzofsky, Jay A; Franchini, Genoveffa; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Felber, Barbara K; Pavlakis, George N

    2014-11-01

    To identify the most promising vaccine candidates for combinatorial strategies, we compared five SIV vaccine platforms including recombinant canary pox virus ALVAC, replication-competent adenovirus type 5 host range mutant RepAd, DNA, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), peptides and protein in distinct combinations. Three regimens used viral vectors (prime or boost) and two regimens used plasmid DNA. Analysis at necropsy showed that the DNA-based vaccine regimens elicited significantly higher cellular responses against Gag and Env than any of the other vaccine platforms. The T cell responses induced by most vaccine regimens disseminated systemically into secondary lymphoid tissues (lymph nodes, spleen) and effector anatomical sites (including liver, vaginal tissue), indicative of their role in viral containment at the portal of entry. The cellular and reported humoral immune response data suggest that combination of DNA and viral vectors elicits a balanced immunity with strong and durable responses able to disseminate into relevant mucosal sites. PMID:25229164

  13. Incidence of dental lesions in musk shrews (Suncus murinus) and their association with sex, age, body weight and diet.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Emily S; Grunden, Beverly K; Crocker, Conan; Boivin, Gregory P

    2013-10-22

    Both wild and laboratory strains of the musk shrew (Suncus murinus) have a high incidence of periodontitis. The authors completed necropsy examinations in 51 shrews to identify dental lesions including tooth loss, mobility and fractures. Dental lesions were identified in significantly more females than males, and older animals were more likely to have lesions present. Shrews with one or more dental lesions weighed significantly less than those without lesions present. Dietary supplementation with mealworms did not significantly affect the incidence of dental lesions or the body weight of male or female shrews. The authors recommend routine body weight measurement as a simple, noninvasive method of detecting shrews with an increased likelihood of having dental lesions. PMID:24150169

  14. Infection of cattle with Brucella abortus biovar 1 isolated from a bison in Wood Buffalo National Park.

    PubMed

    Forbes, L B; Tessaro, S V

    1996-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine if cattle could be infected with a strain of Brucella abortus biovar 1 isolated from a bison in Wood Buffalo National Park. Three pregnant cows inoculated conjunctivally with 5.7 x 10(8) cfu of the bacterium, and their subsequent calves, showed seroconversion on standard serological tests for bovine brucellosis, and large numbers of the bacterium were isolated from numerous tissues at necropsy. A 4th cow that was moved into the pen that previously contained the inoculated cows subsequently showed seroconversion, and the same strain of B. abortus biovar 1 was isolated from numerous tissues. Although this strain from bison in Wood Buffalo National Park has existed in isolation from cattle for over 60 years, it remains infectious and contagious for cattle. PMID:8809394

  15. Macroscopic lesions of the ventriculus of Rhea americana , Linnaeus, 1758 (Aves: Rheidae) naturally infected by Sicarius uncinipenis (Molin, 1860) (Nematoda: Habronematidae).

    PubMed

    Ederli, N B; de Oliveira, F C R

    2014-12-01

    There are few studies concerning the parasites of rheas. However, parasitism is the major cause of the limited success in captive breeding of these birds. Deletrocephalus dimidiatus, Deletrocephalus cesarpintoi, Paradeletrocephalus minor, and Sicarius uncinipenis are the most prevalent nematode species affecting these birds, but the lesions caused by these parasites have not been previously reported. Four adult rheas were necropsied to determine the presence or absence of gross lesions within the gastrointestinal tract, associated with parasitic infection. Two rheas parasitized by S. uncinipenis had ulcers on the koilin layer or had parasites penetrating this layer, resulting in widespread necrosis and hemorrhagic areas, whereas the 2 nonparasitized birds did not present lesions. The degree of injury was proportional to the parasitic load found in the birds. Thus, high parasitic loads can result in necrosis of the ventriculus, which may contribute to the death of birds, resulting in economic losses in the rural production of these birds. PMID:25001213

  16. Diagnostic exercise: ascites, abdominal masses, and diffuse peritoneal nodules in a rat.

    PubMed

    Cooper, T K; Dumpala, P R; Whitcomb, T L

    2014-05-01

    A 1.4-year-old virgin female brown-hooded fancy rat presented for abdominal distention, jaundice, and dyspnea. At physical examination, a firm mass was palpable in the caudoventral abdomen as well as multiple small nodular masses associated with the abdominal viscera. At necropsy, in addition to a large mass replacing the left ovary and myriad nodules studding the peritoneal surface, there was 31 ml of abdominal effusion. By cytology, the abdominal fluid contained numerous pleomorphic vacuolated tumor cells surrounding globular pale eosinophilic to amphophilic acellular material that was strongly periodic acid-Schiff positive. Histologically, the tumor was biphasic with abundant acellular hyaline matrix that was also periodic acid-Schiff positive. PMID:23912713

  17. The helminth fauna of the red-crested cardinal (Paroaria coronata) Passeriformes: Emberizidae in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Carolina S; Krüger, Cristiane; Müller, Gertrud

    2009-10-01

    With the objective of identifying the helminths of Paroaria coronata, 40 birds were necropsied, and their organs and contents were examined. The parasites were preserved in 70 masculineGL alcohol and prepared for identification using standard techniques. The helminth fauna found in P. coronata were Aproctella carinii, Dispharynx nasuta, Capillaria sp., Diplotriaena sp., Tanaisia oviaspera, Tanaisia valida, Tanaisia sp., Prosthogonimus ovatus, Orthoskrjabinia sp., and Mediorhynchus sp., with Nematoda being most represented, occurring in 22.5% of the birds. Besides being the first record of these helminths in P. coronata, this work also extends the area of occurrence of Orthoskrjabinia sp. for Brazil and of A. carinii, Diplotriaena sp., T. oviaspera, T. valida, and Mediorhynchus sp. for the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. PMID:19636590

  18. Peritoneal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus macrourus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Hsuan; Chen, I-Ping; Chen, An; Chang, Chih-Hua

    2005-06-01

    An 8-yr-old, male brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus macrourus) presented for necropsy examination in good nutritional status. It had received treatment for Strongylus spp. infection 1 yr earlier, and it had a short episode of diarrhea 2 days before death. Postmortem examination revealed disseminated, variably discrete, soft to firm, white-gray nodules over the omentum, mesentery, intestinal serosa, and at the liver surface. Histologically, these tumors were mainly arranged as proliferating spindle cells growing in interlacing fascicles or in a storiform pattern associated with ropy collagenous stroma and vascularization. Inflammatory cells, consisting of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages, infiltrated between the tumor cells. Cytoplasmic immunoreactivity of antibodies to alpha-smooth muscle actin and vimentin was observed in the tumor cells. Antidesmin immunoreactivity varied with area. The morphologic features, the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, and the immunohistochemical expression were consistent with a diagnosis of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor as reported in humans, horses, and cats. PMID:17323585

  19. Intrauterine fetal death with subsequent quill exfoliation and dissemination in a North American porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum).

    PubMed

    Cushing, Andrew C; Noonan, Brendan; Gutman, Matthew R; Pillai, Smitha P S

    2013-12-01

    An adult female, wild North American porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum) presented with bilateral cataracts and naso-ocular discharge. A pregnancy was identified by radiography with a near-full-term fetus, which was delivered stillborn 4 wk later with hard, developed quills. At that time, a repeated examination and further imaging, including computed tomography, demonstrated a uterine mass that was identified as a choriocarcinoma following ovariohysterectomy. Additionally, numerous exfoliated quills were discovered throughout the abdomen, most of which were removed during the surgical procedure. Ultimately, development of peritonitis despite medical care led to the porcupine's death. Necropsy confirmed a wide migration of the quills with extensive serosal adhesions and granulomas affecting liver, lungs, urinary bladder, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24450079

  20. Metastatic malignant melanoma in a prehensile-tailed porcupine (Coendou prehensilis).

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Amanda; deMaar, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    A 14-yr-old male, prehensile-tailed porcupine (Coendou prehensilis) presented for an ulcerated, bleeding lesion of the right flank. The wound presented similar to a bite wound and was treated with antibiotics. After 2 mo, the lesion had increased in size and was nonhealing, so surgical excision was elected. Histopathology diagnosed this lesion as a malignant melanoma with incomplete margins. Radiographs showed no evidence of pulmonary metastasis. At 6 mo, another skin lesion was removed and was diagnosed as malignant melanoma with clean surgical margins. At 8 mo, another four dermal masses were surgically excised and, again, these were melanomas that were completely excised. The animal was euthanized approximately 15 mo after initial presentation due to continued growth of dermal masses, dyspnea, and decreased appetite. Necropsy and histopathology revealed metastatic melanoma present in skin, kidneys, and lung. PMID:22946381