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Sample records for negative ion collisions

  1. Mutual electron detachment in collisions between negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, R.; Melchert, F.; Krüdener, S.; Meuser, S.; Petri, S.; Benner, M.; Salzborn, E.

    1992-10-01

    Employing the crossed-beams technique, we have measured absolute cross sections for mutual electron detachment in collisions between two negative ions H-+X-→H0+X0+2e-(X-:B-, H-,Cu-,O-,Au-,F-) in the CM-energy range between a few keV and about 100 keV. The results obtained appear not to obey a simple scaling with negative ion binding energies. For H-+H--collisions also the single detachment reaction H-+H-→H0+... has been investigated.

  2. Effect of Coulomb collision on the negative ion extraction mechanism in negative ion sources.

    PubMed

    Goto, I; Miyamoto, K; Nishioka, S; Mattei, S; Lettry, J; Abe, S; Hatayama, A

    2016-02-01

    To improve the H(-) ion beam optics, it is necessary to understand the energy relaxation process of surface produced H(-) ions in the extraction region of Cs seeded H(-) ion sources. Coulomb collisions of charged particles have been introduced to the 2D3V-PIC (two dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space particle-in-cell) model for the H(-) extraction by using the binary collision model. Due to Coulomb collision, the lower energy part of the ion energy distribution function of H(-) ions has been greatly increased. The mean kinetic energy of the surface produced H(-) ions has been reduced to 0.65 eV from 1.5 eV. It has been suggested that the beam optics of the extracted H(-) ion beam is strongly affected by the energy relaxation process due to Coulomb collision. PMID:26932090

  3. Effect of Coulomb collision on the negative ion extraction mechanism in negative ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, I.; Miyamoto, K.; Nishioka, S.; Mattei, S.; Lettry, J.; Abe, S.; Hatayama, A.

    2016-02-01

    To improve the H- ion beam optics, it is necessary to understand the energy relaxation process of surface produced H- ions in the extraction region of Cs seeded H- ion sources. Coulomb collisions of charged particles have been introduced to the 2D3V-PIC (two dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space particle-in-cell) model for the H- extraction by using the binary collision model. Due to Coulomb collision, the lower energy part of the ion energy distribution function of H- ions has been greatly increased. The mean kinetic energy of the surface produced H- ions has been reduced to 0.65 eV from 1.5 eV. It has been suggested that the beam optics of the extracted H- ion beam is strongly affected by the energy relaxation process due to Coulomb collision.

  4. Studies of negative ions by collision-induced decomposition and hydrogen-deuterium exchange techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, D F; Sethi, S K; Shabanowitz, J

    1980-01-01

    Development of two new techniques for studying the gas phase chemistry of negative ions is reported. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of (M-1)- ions has been accomplished in a newly constructed triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometer. This instrument was assembled by adding two additional Finnigan quadrupole mass filters to a Finnigan Model 3200 CI mass spectrometer. Generation of (M-1)- ions is accomplished by allowing OH- and sample to react under CI conditions in the ion source. The first quadrupole mass filter, Q1, is then employed to selectively pass the (M-1)- ion into a second quadrupole filter containing argon or neon at 10(-3) torr. On collision with the inert gas the (M-1)- ions dissociate into fragments which are then mass analyzed in the third quadrupole filter, CID spectra of (M-1)- ions from twelve carbonyl compounds are presented in this paper. Ion molecule isotope exchange reactions in the CI ion source can be used to count the number of hydrogen atoms in many different chemical environments. Collisions between sample (M-1)- ions and deuterium-labeled reagent gases (ND3, D2O, EtOD) facilitate incorporation of deuterium into the negative ion if the basicities of the sample and reagent anions are similar. Thus it is possible to selectively incorporate deuterium into many organic samples by controlling the exothermicity of the acid base, ion-molecule chemistry. PMID:7428745

  5. Negative ion clusters in oxygen: collision cross sections and transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Urquijo, J.; Bekstein, A.; Ducasse, O.; Ruíz-Vargas, G.; Yousfi, M.; Benhenni, M.

    2009-12-01

    Using a pulsed Townsend experiment, we have observed the formation of two negative ion species in oxygen over the pressure range 100-600 torr, and the density-normalised electric field strength, E/N, from 2 to 14 Td. The peculiar shape of these transients has led us to propose a scheme of three-body ion-molecule reactions leading to the formation of O4 - and O6 -, which is substantiated by a curve fitting procedure. The resulting mobility data of these two ionic species have been used to calculate their respective momentum transfer collision cross sections, together with the dissociation cross sections that are needed to extend the range of calculation of mobility and diffusion (transverse and longitudinal) to 1000 Td. These calculations were based on an optimised Monte Carlo algorithm, using collision cross sections obtained from a JWKB approximation (Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin) or taken from literature.

  6. Effects of adsorption and roughness upon the collision processes at the convertor surface of a plasma sputter negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    Atomic collision processes associated with surface production of negative hydrogen ions (H{sup -}) by particle reflection at molybdenum surface immersed in hydrogen plasma have been investigated. To calculate sputtering yields of Cs, as well as energy spectra and angular distributions of reflected hydrogen atoms from molybdenum surface by H{sup +} ion and Cs{sup +} ion bombardments, a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) was run with the corresponding surface conditions. A fractal surface model has been developed and adopted to ACAT for evaluating the effect due to roughness of target material. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that the retention of hydrogen atoms leads to the reduction in sputtering yields of Cs, and the surface roughness does largely affect the sputtering yields of Cs.

  7. Effects of adsorption and roughness upon the collision processes at the convertor surface of a plasma sputter negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Kenmotsu, T; Wada, M

    2012-02-01

    Atomic collision processes associated with surface production of negative hydrogen ions (H(-)) by particle reflection at molybdenum surface immersed in hydrogen plasma have been investigated. To calculate sputtering yields of Cs, as well as energy spectra and angular distributions of reflected hydrogen atoms from molybdenum surface by H(+) ion and Cs(+) ion bombardments, a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) was run with the corresponding surface conditions. A fractal surface model has been developed and adopted to ACAT for evaluating the effect due to roughness of target material. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that the retention of hydrogen atoms leads to the reduction in sputtering yields of Cs, and the surface roughness does largely affect the sputtering yields of Cs. PMID:22380231

  8. Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion source--Insights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%).

  9. Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion source—Insights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model

    SciTech Connect

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2013-11-15

    Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%)

  10. Collision-induced dissociation analysis of negative atmospheric ion adducts in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2013-05-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments were performed on atmospheric ion adducts [M + R](-) formed between various types of organic compounds M and atmospheric negative ions R(-) [such as O2(-), HCO3(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO2(-), NO3(-), and NO3(-)(HNO3)] in negative-ion mode atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. All of the [M + R](-) adducts were fragmented to form deprotonated analytes [M - H](-) and/or atmospheric ions R(-), whose intensities in the CID spectra were dependent on the proton affinities of the [M - H](-) and R(-) fragments. Precursor ions [M + R](-) for which R(-) have higher proton affinities than [M - H](-) formed [M - H](-) as the dominant product. Furthermore, the CID of the adducts with HCO3(-) and NO3(-)(HNO3) led to other product ions such as [M + HO](-) and NO3(-), respectively. The fragmentation behavior of [M + R](-) for each R(-) observed was independent of analyte type (e.g., whether the analyte was aliphatic or aromatic, or possessed certain functional groups). PMID:23479312

  11. Estimating collision cross sections of negatively charged N-glycans using traveling wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Johanna; Struwe, Weston B; Scarff, Charlotte A; Scrivens, James H; Harvey, David J; Pagel, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications occurring in proteins. A detailed structural characterization of the involved carbohydrates, however, is still one of the greatest challenges in modern glycoproteomics, since multiple regio- and stereoisomers with an identical monosaccharide composition may exist. Recently, ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), a technique in which ions are separated according to their mass, charge, and shape, has evolved as a promising technique for the separation and structural analysis of complex carbohydrates. This growing interest is based on the fact that the measured drift times can be converted into collision cross sections (CCSs), which can be compared, implemented into databases, and used as additional search criteria for structural identification. However, most of the currently used commercial IM-MS instruments utilize a nonuniform traveling wave field to propel the ions through the IM cell. As a result, CCS measurements cannot be performed directly and require calibration. Here, we present a calibration data set consisting of over 500 reference CCSs for negatively charged N-glycans and their fragments. Moreover, we show that dextran, already widely used as a calibrant in high performance liquid chromatography, is also a suitable calibrant for CCS estimations. Our data also indicate that a considerably increased error has to be taken into account when reference CCSs acquired in a different drift gas are used for calibration. PMID:25268221

  12. Linkage Determination of Linear Oligosaccharides by MSn (n > 2) Collision-Induced Dissociation of Z1 Ions in the Negative Ion Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konda, Chiharu; Bendiak, Brad; Xia, Yu

    2013-12-01

    Obtaining unambiguous linkage information between sugars in oligosaccharides is an important step in their detailed structural analysis. An approach is described that provides greater confidence in linkage determination for linear oligosaccharides based on multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn, n >2) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) of Z1 ions in the negative ion mode. Under low energy CID conditions, disaccharides 18O-labeled on the reducing carbonyl group gave rise to Z1 product ions (m/z 163) derived from the reducing sugar, which could be mass-discriminated from other possible structural isomers having m/z 161. MS3 CID of these m/z 163 ions showed distinct fragmentation fingerprints corresponding to the linkage types and largely unaffected by sugar unit identities or their anomeric configurations. This unique property allowed standard CID spectra of Z1 ions to be generated from a small set of disaccharide samples that were representative of many other possible isomeric structures. With the use of MSn CID (n = 3 - 5), model linear oligosaccharides were dissociated into overlapping disaccharide structures, which were subsequently fragmented to form their corresponding Z1 ions. CID data of these Z1 ions were collected and compared with the standard database of Z1 ion CID using spectra similarity scores for linkage determination. As the proof-of-principle tests demonstrated, we achieved correct determination of individual linkage types along with their locations within two trisaccharides and a pentasaccharide.

  13. Thermodynamic model for electron emission and negative- and positive-ion formation in keV molecular collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhász, Z.

    2016-08-01

    A statistical-type model is developed to describe the ion production and electron emission in collisions of (molecular) ions with atoms. The model is based on the Boltzmann population of the bound electronic energy levels of the quasimolecule formed in the collision and the discretized continuum. The discretization of the continuum is implemented by a free-electron gas in a box model assuming an effective square potential of the quasimolecule. The temperature of the electron gas is calculated by taking into account a thermodynamically adiabatic process due to the change of the effective volume of the quasimolecule as the system evolves. The system may undergo a transition with a small probability from the discretized continuum to the states of the complementary continuum. It is assumed that these states are decoupled from the thermodynamic time development. The decoupled states overwhelmingly determine the yield of the asymptotically observed fragment ions. The main motivation of this work is to describe the recently observed H- ion production in O H++Ar collisions. The obtained differential cross sections for H- formation, cation production, and electron emission are close to the experimental ones. Calculations for the atomic systems O++Ar and H++Ar are also in reasonable agreement with the experiments indicating that the model can be applied to a wide class of collisions.

  14. Negative-ion states

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    In this brief review, we discuss some of the properties of atomic and molecular negative ions and their excited states. Experiments involving photon reactions with negative ions and polar dissociation are summarized. 116 references, 14 figures.

  15. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, R.W.

    1984-05-08

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions. 8 figs.

  16. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, Regan W.

    1984-01-01

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions.

  17. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  18. Ion Collision, Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.

    2013-09-11

    The outcome of a collision between an ion and neutral species depends on the chemical and physical properties of the two reactants, their relative velocities, and the impact parameter of their trajectories. These include elastic and inelastic scattering of the colliding particles, charge transfer (including dissociative charge transfer), atom abstraction, complex formation and dissociation of the colliding ion. Each of these reactions may be characterized in terms of their energy-dependent rate coefficients, cross sections and reaction kinetics. A theoretical framework that emphasizes simple models and classical mechanics is presented for these processes. Collision processes are addressed in two categories of low-energy and high-energy collisions. Experiments under thermal or quasi-thermal conditions–swarms, drift tubes, chemical ionization and ion cyclotron resonance are strongly influenced by long-range forces and often involve collisions in which atom exchange and extensive energy exchange are common characteristics. High-energy collisions are typically impulsive, involve short-range intermolecular forces and are direct, fast processes.

  19. Vibrational relaxation in H/sub 2/ molecules by wall collisions: applications to negative ion source processes

    SciTech Connect

    Karo, A.M.; Hiskes, J.R.; Hardy, R.J.

    1984-10-01

    In the volume of a hydrogen discharge, H/sub 2/ molecules, excited to high vibrational levels (v'' > 6), are formed either by fast-electron collisions or from H/sub 2//sup +/ ions that are accelerated across the discharge-wall potential that undergo Auger neutralization prior to impact with the discharge chamber wall. We have used computer molecular dynamics to study the de-excitation and re-excitation of vibrationally-excited H/sub 2/ molecules undergoing repeated wall collisions. The initial translational energies range from thermal to 100 eV and the initial vibrational states range from v'' = 2 to v'' = 12. The average loss or gain of vibrational, rotational, translational, and total molecular energies and the survival rates of the molecules have been evaluated. At thermal energies vibrational de-excitation is the predominant process, and a consistent picture emerges of rapid energy redistribution into all the molecular degrees of freedom and a slower rate of loss of total molecular energy to the wall. At higher translational energies (1 to 100 eV) a substantial fraction of the molecules survive with large (v'' > 6) vibrational energy. This vibrational population provides a contribution to the total excited vibrational population comparable to that from the fast-electron collision process.

  20. Measurements of scattering processes in negative ion: Atom collisions. Technical progress report, 1 September 1991--31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kvale, T.J.

    1994-09-27

    This report describes the progress made on the research objectives during the past three years of the grant. This research project is designed to study various scattering processes which occur in H{sup {minus}} collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets in the intermediate energy region. These processes include: elastic scattering, single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization. For the elastic and target inelastic processes where H{sup {minus}} is scattered intact, the experimental technique of Ion Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (IELS) will be employed to identify the final target state(s). In most of the above processes, cross sections are unknown both experimentally and theoretically. The measurements will provide total cross sections (TCS) initially, and once the angular positioning apparatus is installed, will provide angular differential cross sections (ADCS).

  1. Atomic negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brage, T.

    1991-01-01

    We review some of the recent progress in the studies of alkaline-earth, negative ions. Computations of autodetachment rates, electron affinities and transition wavelengths are discussed and some new and improved results are given.

  2. Atomic negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brage, T.

    1991-12-31

    We review some of the recent progress in the studies of alkaline-earth, negative ions. Computations of autodetachment rates, electron affinities and transition wavelengths are discussed and some new and improved results are given.

  3. Polarized negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Haeberli, W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents a survey of methods, commonly in use or under development, to produce beams of polarized negative ions for injection into accelerators. A short summary recalls how the hyperfine interaction is used to obtain nuclear polarization in beams of atoms. Atomic-beam sources for light ions are discussed. If the best presently known techniques are incorporated in all stages of the source, polarized H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ beams in excess of 10 ..mu..A can probably be achieved. Production of polarized ions from fast (keV) beams of polarized atoms is treated separately for atoms in the H(25) excited state (Lamb-Shift source) and atoms in the H(1S) ground state. The negative ion beam from Lamb-Shift sources has reached a plateau just above 1 ..mu..A, but this beam current is adequate for many applications and the somewhat lower beam current is compensated by other desirable characteristics. Sources using fast polarized ground state atoms are in a stage of intense development. The next sections summarize production of polarized heavy ions by the atomic beam method, which is well established, and by optical pumping, which has recently been demonstrated to yield very large nuclear polarization. A short discussion of proposed ion sources for polarized /sup 3/He/sup -/ ions is followed by some concluding remarks.

  4. Negative hydrogen ion yields at plasma grid surface in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2015-04-08

    Negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion yield from the plasma grid due to incident hydrogen ions and neutrals has been evaluated with the surface collision cascade model, ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) coupled to a negative surface ionization models. Dependence of negative ion fractions upon the velocity component normal to the surface largely affect the calculation results of the final energy and angular distributions of the H{sup −} ions. The influence is particularly large for H{sup −} ions desorbed from the surface due to less than several eV hydrogen particle implact. The present calculation predicts that H{sup −} ion yield can be maximized by setting the incident angle of hydrogen ions and neutrals to be 65 degree. The Cs thickness on the plasma grid should also affect the yields and mean energies of surface produced H{sup −} ions by back scattering and ion induced desorption processes.

  5. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-08-06

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  6. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1984-12-04

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field. 14 figs.

  7. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  8. Improved negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Delmore, J.E.

    1984-05-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reaccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200 to 500/sup 0/C for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  9. Measurements of Lyman Alpha Radiation from Collisions, 100 EV to 4000EV, of Negative Hydrogen Ions on Various Target Gases and Positive Hydrogen Ions on Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenland, Glenn Blair

    This study reports measurements of cross sections for the production of Lyman alpha radiation from processes in which an ion is incident on a neutral target gas. Two kinds of processes were measured: the stripping of the extra electron from a negative hydro- gen ion leaving an excited neutral and the capture of an electron by a proton also leaving an excited neutral. In each case, radiation from the 2p state of the neutral hydrogen was detected. The projectile struck the static gas target with a kinetic energy between 100 and 4000 electron volts. The measurements used the ultraviolet absorption properties of molecular oxygen to isolate the Lyman alpha line. Cross sections for emission of Lyman alpha perpendicular to the incident beam were determined. The targets used in the stripping experiments were the atomic gases: helium, neon, argon, krypton and xenon, and the molecular gases: hydrogen, nitrogen and methane. The cross sections are rela- tively flat over the energy range investigated. All are slightly below 10('-16) cm('2) at 1000 eV. Only with the neon target does the cross section fall below 2 x 10('0-17) cm('2) at 100 electron volts. While the data appear to support the modeling of stripping with excitation as a two step process, this modeling may not be valid for excitation above 2p. Only a xenon target was used in the capture experiments. Careful measurements did not substantiate an earlier report of unusual structure('1) in this cross section. ('1)P. J. Martin, Ph.D. Dissertation, Univ. of Nebraska, 1975.

  10. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Bacal, M.; Wada, M.

    2015-06-15

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed.

  11. Negative-ion source applications.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, J

    2008-02-01

    In this paper heavy negative-ion sources which we developed and their applications for materials science are reviewed. Heavy negative ions can be effectively produced by the ejection of a sputtered atom through the optimally cesiated surface of target with a low work function. Then, enough continuous negative-ion currents for materials-science applications can be obtained. We developed several kinds of sputter-type heavy negative-ion sources such as neutral- and ionized-alkaline metal bombardment-type heavy negative-ion source and rf-plasma sputter type. In the case where a negative ion is irradiated on a material surface, surface charging seldom takes place because incoming negative charge of the negative ion is well balanced with outgoing negative charge of the released secondary electron. In the negative-ion implantation into an insulator or insulated conductive material, high precision implantation processing with charge-up free properties can be achieved. Negative-ion implantation technique, therefore, can be applied to the following novel material processing systems: the surface modification of micrometer-sized powders, the nanoparticle formation in an insulator for the quantum devices, and the nerve cell growth manipulation by precise control of the biocompatibility of polymer surface. When a negative ion with low kinetic energy approaches the solid surface, the kinetic energy causes the interatomic bonding (kinetic bonding), and formation of a metastable material is promoted. Carbon films with high constituent of sp(3) bonding, therefore, can be formed by carbon negative-ion beam deposition. PMID:18315249

  12. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Christophorou, L G

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules area discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to "hot" molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules ("electron affinity"), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies. PMID:7428744

  13. Extracted current saturation in negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalskyy, S.; Lifschitz, A. F.; Minea, T.

    2012-06-01

    The extraction of negatively charged particles from a negative ion source is one of the crucial issues in the development of the neutral beam injector system for future experimental reactor ITER. Full 3D electrostatic particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision code - ONIX [S. Mochalskyy et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105011 (2010)] - is used to simulate the hydrogen plasma behaviour and the extracted particle features in the vicinity of the plasma grid, both sides of the aperture. It is found that the contribution to the extracted negative ion current of ions born in the volume is small compared with that of ions created at the plasma grid walls. The parametric study with respect to the rate of negative ions released from the walls shows an optimum rate. Beyond this optimum, a double layer builds-up by the negative ion charge density close to the grid aperture surface reducing thus extraction probability, and therefore the extracted current. The effect of the extraction potential and magnetic field magnitudes on the extraction is also discussed. Results are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  14. Grazing Ion-Surface Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravielle, M. S.

    Electron emission after grazing ion-surface collisions is studied for high impact velocities. We have focused on glancing angles of electron emission where the dominant mechanism is the ionization from atomic bound states. To describe this process, we introduce a quantum model called field distorted-wave (FDW) approximation, which takes into account the effect of the surface interaction on the electronic transition. The FDW model is applied to analyze electron distributions produced by impact of protons on Al and LiF surfaces, which are metal and insulator materials respectively. In the case of metals, we also evaluate the contibution coming from the valence band by employing the binary collisional formalism. Calculated electron emission yields are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. We find that the maximum of the convoy electron distribution is accelerated for Al and decelerated for LiF, with respect to its position in ion-atom collisions, in quantitative accordance with experiments.

  15. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  16. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  17. Exotics from Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Akira; Jido, Daisuke; Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Yazaki, Koichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-10-21

    Discriminating hadronic molecular and multi-quark states is a long standing problem in hadronic physics. We propose here to utilize relativistic heavy ion collisions to resolve this problem, as exotic hadron yields are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model, we find that the exotic hadron yield relative to the statistical model result is typically an order of magnitude smaller for a compact multi-quark state, and larger by a factor of two or more for a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured at RHIC and LHC.

  18. Head-on collision of dust-ion-acoustic soliton in quantum pair-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Prasanta; Ghorui, Malay kr.; Wong, C. S.

    2011-10-15

    In this paper, we study the head-on collision between two dust ion acoustic solitons in quantum pair-ion plasma. Using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method, we obtain the Korteweg-de Vries equation, the phase shifts, and the trajectories after the head-on collision of the two dust ion acoustic solitons. It is observed that the phase shifts are significantly affected by the values of the quantum parameter H, the ratio of the multiples of the charge state and density of positive ions to that of the negative ions {beta} and the concentration of the negatively charged dust particles {delta}.

  19. Instrumentation for negative ion detection.

    PubMed

    McKeown, M

    1980-06-01

    The instrumentation and practical circuitry required for the detection of negative ions exiting the mass analysis section of a mass spectrometer is examined. The potentials needed to bias the electron multiplier when detecting negative ions from a low ion-energy mass spectrometer, e.g., a quadrupole, are contrasted with the biasing requirements of a mass spectrometer having high ion-energies, e.g., a magnetic sector. Methods of decoupling the biasing high voltage on the signal lead of the multiplier in pulse counting measurements are discussed in detail so that normal, ground referenced input, pulse preamplifiers may be used. Easily understood, practical rules for determining the values of circuit components are given together with a simplified theory of transferring pulse signals from multiplier collector to pulse preamplifier. The changes in circuitry needed when attempting to detect ions by current measurement methods from an electron multiplier area detailed. The effects of leakage currents into athe input of the current preamplifier and their avoidance bay using triaxial shielding on vacuum feed-throughs are explained. The article suggests possible methods of decoupling the high voltage referenced input and the ground referenced output of a current measuring preamplifier. PMID:7428750

  20. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS: EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, Erwin M.; Heckman, Harry H.

    1982-04-01

    Relativistic heavy ion physics began as a 'no man's land' between particle and nuclear physics, with both sides frowning upon it as 'unclean', because on one hand, hadronic interactions and particle production cloud nuclear structure effects, while on the other, the baryonic environment complicates the interpretation of production experiments. They have attempted to review here the experimental evidence on RHI collisions from the point of view that it represents a new endeavor in the understanding of strong interaction physics. Such an approach appears increasingly justified; first, by the accumulation of data and observations of new features of hadronic interactions that could not have been detected outside a baryonic environment; second, by the maturation of the field owing to the advances made over the past several years in experimental inquiries on particle production by RHI, including pions, kaons, hyperons, and searches for antiprotons; and third, by the steady and progressive increase in the energy and mass ranges of light nuclear beams that have become available to the experiment; indeed the energy range has widened from the {approx} 0.2 to 2 AGeV at the Bevalac to {approx}4 AGeV at Dubna and recently, to the quantum jump in energies to {approx} 1000 equivalent AGeV at the CERN PS-ISR. Accompanying these expansions in the energy frontier are the immediate prospects for very heavy ion beams at the Bevalac up to, and including, 1 AGeV {sup 238}U, thereby extending the 'mass frontier' to its ultimate extent.

  1. Initial conditions in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, Raju

    2001-10-01

    At very high energies, partons in nuclei form a color glass condensate (CGC). In a nuclear collision, the color glass shatters, producing a high multiplicity of gluons. We discuss the results of numerical simulations which describe the real time evolution of the CGC in a heavy ion collision.

  2. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  3. Formation of negative ions in grazing scattering from insulator surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Auth, C.; Mertens, A.; Winter, H.; Borisov, A.G.; Sidis, V.

    1998-01-01

    Substantial fractions of fast atoms or ions are converted to negative ions during grazing scattering from a clean and flat monocrystalline surface of alkali-metal halides. We interpret the experimental data by a model of local electron capture from the halogen sites of the crystal in binary-type collision events. Due to the band gap of the insulator, the probability for subsequent electron loss is low, resulting in large fractions of negative ions that survive from the collisional formation. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Experimental Evaluation of a Negative Ion Source for a Heavy Ion Fusion Negative Ion Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L. R.; Hahto, S. K.; Hahto, S. T.; Kwan, J. W.; Leung, K. N.

    2004-06-16

    Negative halogen ions have recently been proposed as a possible alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers because electron accumulation would not be a problem in the accelerator, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. To test the ability to make suitable quality beams, an experiment was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using chlorine in an RF-driven ion source. Without introducing any cesium (which is required to enhance negative ion production in hydrogen ion sources) a negative chlorine current density of 45 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained under the same conditions that gave 57 45 mA/cm{sup 2} of positive chlorine, suggesting the presence of nearly as many negative ions as positive ions in the plasma near the extraction plane. The negative ion spectrum was 99.5% atomic chlorine ions, with only 0.5% molecular chlorine, and essentially no impurities. Although this experiment did not incorporate the type of electron suppression technology that i s used in negative hydrogen beam extraction, the ratio of co-extracted electrons to Cl{sup -} was as low as 7 to 1, many times lower than the ratio of their mobilities, suggesting that few electrons are present in the near-extractor plasma. This, along with the near-equivalence of the positive and negative ion currents, suggests that the plasma in this region was mostly an ion-ion plasma. The negative chlorine current density was relatively insensitive to pressure, and scaled linearly with RF power. If this linear scaling continues to hold at higher RF powers, it should permit current densities of 100 45 mA/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for present heavy ion fusion injector concepts. The effective ion temperatures of the positive and negative ions appeared to be similar and relatively low for a plasma source.

  5. Negative ion extraction from hydrogen plasma bulk

    SciTech Connect

    Oudini, N.; Taccogna, F.; Minelli, P.

    2013-10-15

    A two-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision model has been developed and used to study low electronegative magnetized hydrogen plasma. A configuration characterized by four electrodes is used: the left electrode is biased at V{sub l} = −100 V, the right electrode is grounded, while the upper and lower transversal electrodes are biased at an intermediate voltage V{sub ud} between 0 and −100 V. A constant and homogeneous magnetic field is applied parallel to the lateral (left/right) electrodes. It is shown that in the magnetized case, the bulk plasma potential is close to the transversal electrodes bias inducing then a reversed sheath in front of the right electrode. The potential drop within the reversed sheath is controlled by the transversal electrodes bias allowing extraction of negative ions with a significant reduction of co-extracted electron current. Furthermore, introducing plasma electrodes, between the transversal electrodes and the right electrode, biased with a voltage just above the plasma bulk potential, increases the negative ion extracted current and decreases significantly the co-extracted electron current. The physical mechanism on basis of this phenomenon has been discussed.

  6. Electric Potential Near The Extraction Region In Negative Ion Sources With Surface Produced Negative Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fukano, A.; Hatayama, A.

    2011-09-26

    The potential distribution near the extraction region in negative ion sources for the plasma with the surface produced negative ions is studied analytically. The potential is derived analytically by using a plasma-sheath equation, where negative ions produced on the Plasma Grid (PG) surface are considered in addition to positive ions and electrons. A negative potential peak is formed in the sheath region near the PG surface for the case of strong surface production of negative ions or for low energy negative ions. Negative ions are reflected by the negative potential peak near the PG and returned to the PG surface. This reflection mechanism by the negative potential peak possibly becomes a factor in negative ion extraction. It is also indicated that the potential difference between the plasma region and the wall decreases by the surface produced negative ions. This also has the possibility to contribute to the negative ion extraction.

  7. Travelling-wave ion mobility and negative ion fragmentation of high-mannose N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J; Scarff, Charlotte A; Edgeworth, Matthew; Struwe, Weston B; Pagel, Kevin; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Crispin, Max; Scrivens, Jim

    2016-03-01

    The isomeric structure of high-mannose N-glycans can significantly impact biological recognition events. Here, the utility of travelling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometry for isomer separation of high-mannose N-glycans is investigated. Negative ion fragmentation using collision-induced dissociation gave more informative spectra than positive ion spectra with mass-different fragment ions characterizing many of the isomers. Isomer separation by ion mobility in both ionization modes was generally limited, with the arrival time distributions (ATD) often showing little sign of isomers. However, isomers could be partially resolved by plotting extracted fragment ATDs of the diagnostic fragment ions from the negative ion spectra, and the fragmentation spectra of the isomers could be extracted by using ions from limited areas of the ATD peak. In some cases, asymmetric ATDs were observed, but no isomers could be detected by fragmentation. In these cases, it was assumed that conformers or anomers were being separated. Collision cross sections of the isomers in positive and negative fragmentation mode were estimated from travelling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometry data using dextran glycans as calibrant. More complete collision cross section data were achieved in negative ion mode by utilizing the diagnostic fragment ions. Examples of isomer separations are shown for N-glycans released from the well-characterized glycoproteins chicken ovalbumin, porcine thyroglobulin and gp120 from the human immunodeficiency virus. In addition to the cross-sectional data, details of the negative ion collision-induced dissociation spectra of all resolved isomers are discussed. PMID:26956389

  8. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A. L.; Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H+ beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H- beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H- ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  9. Experiments on Negative Ion Plasmas in a Q-Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Tao

    Three experiments on negative ion plasmas in the University of Iowa Q-machine IQ-2 are described in this thesis. In the Lower-Hybrid wave experiment, the low-frequency (ion-ion mode) waves are excited, waves propagate at a right angle to the magnetic field. The wave frequencies increase as the negative ion concentration increases, in agreement with the dispersion relation obtained from fluid theory. In the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability experiment, the negative ions have a generally destabilizing effect on the instability driven by a relative drift between ions in adjacent layers. However, for large negative ion concentrations, enhanced radial diffusion associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz oscillations tends to have a stabilizing effect due to a "mixing" of ion flows in adjacent layer. In the diffusion experiment, the K^ {+} ions experience a displacement across the magnetic filed on the order of their gyroradius upon collision with a negative ion, leading to an enhancement in the rate of cross-field diffusion over that expected in the ordinary K^{+}/electron plasma.

  10. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results. PMID:26932087

  11. Propagation and oblique collision of ion-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized dusty electronegative plasma

    SciTech Connect

    El-Labany, S. K.; Behery, E. E.; El-Shamy, E. F.

    2013-12-15

    The propagation and oblique collision of ion-acoustic (IA) solitary waves in a magnetized dusty electronegative plasma consisting of cold mobile positive ions, Boltzmann negative ions, Boltzmann electrons, and stationary positive/negative dust particles are studied. The extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method is employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries equations and the corresponding expressions for the phase shifts after collision between two IA solitary waves. It turns out that the angle of collision, the temperature and density of negative ions, and the dust density of opposite polarity have reasonable effects on the phase shift. Clearly, the numerical results demonstrated that the IA solitary waves are delayed after the oblique collision. The current finding of this work is applicable in many plasma environments having negative ion species, such as D- and F-regions of the Earth's ionosphere and some laboratory plasma experiments.

  12. Simulation Based on Ion Propulsion Rocket System with Using Negative ion - Negative Ion Pair Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyavel, C.

    2016-07-01

    Ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of ion-ion pair techniques because of their stimulated of low propellant, Design of Thrust range is 1N with low electric power and high efficiency. A Negative ion-Negative ion pair of ion propulsion rocket system is proposed in this work .Negative Ion Based Rocket system consists of three parts 1.ionization chamber 2. Repulsion force and ion accelerator 3. Exhaust of Nozzle. The Negative ions from electro negatively gas are produced by attachment of the gas ,such as chlorine with electron emitted from a Electron gun ionization chamber. The formulate of large stable negative ion is achievable in chlorine gas with respect to electron affinity (∆E). The electron affinity is a measure of the energy change when an electron is added to a neutral atom to form a negative ion. When a neutral chlorine atom in the gaseous form picks up an electron to form a Cl- ion, it releases energy of 349 kJ/mol or 3.6 ev/atom. It is said to have an electron affinity of -349 kJ/mol ,the negative sign indicating that energy is released during this process .The mechanisms of attachment involve the formation of intermediate states. In that reason for , the highly repulsive force created between the same negative ions. The distance between same negative ions is important for the evaluate of the rocket thrust and is also determined by the exhaust velocity of the propellant. The mass flow rate of propellant is achieved by the ratio of total mass of the propellant (Kg) needed for operation to time period(s). Accelerate the Negative ions to a high velocity in the thrust vector direction with a significantly intense Magnetic field and the exhaust of negative ions through Nozzle. The simulation of the ion propulsion system has been carried out by MATLAB. By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results, we have found that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with estimated

  13. High-energy recoil-ion emission in keV heavy-ion surface collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Someren, B.; Rudolph, H.; Urazgil'din, I. F.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlmans; Niehaus, A.

    1997-11-01

    For keV Xe +, Kr + and Ar + ions incident at 30° on Cu(110) we have observed the emission of negatively charged particles with energies up to about 40% of the primary energy. By time-of-flight techniques we have found that electrons are emitted with energies up to 80 eV, whereas the negatively charged high-energy particles are Cu - recoil ions. High-energy Cu + ions have also been found. Simple energy and momentum conservation arguments show that such high recoil energies are indeed possible for multiple collision events in which the primary recoil ion scatters off one or more Cu atoms.

  14. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  15. Dissipative heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmeier, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    This report is a compilation of lecture notes of a series of lectures held at Argonne National Laboratory in October and November 1984. The lectures are a discussion of dissipative phenomena as observed in collisions of atomic nuclei. The model is based on a system which has initially zero temperature and the initial energy is kinetic and binding energy. Collisions excite the nuclei, and outgoing fragments or the compound system deexcite before they are detected. Brownian motion is used to introduce the concept of dissipation. The master equation and the Fokker-Planck equation are derived. 73 refs., 59 figs. (WRF)

  16. Electromagnetic processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Baur, G.

    1986-10-01

    Electromagnetic effects in relativistic heavy ion collisions with impact parameter larger than the sum of the nuclear radii are studied using the virtual photon method. With increasing value of the relativistic parameter γ the hardness of the virtual photon spectrum increases. This leads to interesting new effects which will also have to be considered in the design of future relativistic heavy ion machines and experiments. The excitation of high-lying giant E1 and E2 multipole resonances is calculated as well as electromagnetic pion production. Coulomb bremsstrahlung is calculated and compared to the bremsstrahlung emitted in the more violent central nuclear collisions. K-shell ionization and electron-positron pair production is studied. The latter process has a very large cross section for heavy ions and contributes significantly to the stopping power of relativistic heavy ions in a dense medium.

  17. Atomic collisions with 33-TeV lead ions

    SciTech Connect

    Vane, C.R.; Datz, S.; Krause, H.F.

    1996-10-01

    Recent availability of relativistic and ultrarelativistic beams of heavy ions has permitted the first controlled studies of atomic collisions at energies sufficient to measure effects of several new basic phenomena. These include measurements substantiating recently predicted finite nuclear size effects resulting in a reduction in the total electronic energy loss of heavy ions in matter, and measurements of Coulomb collisions in which electrons are excited from the Dirac negative energy continuum. Measurements of total energy loss, free electron-positron pair production, and electron capture from pair production have been recently performed using 33-TeV Pb{sup 82+} ions from the CERN SPS accelerator in Geneva. Results of these studies are presented, along with comparisons with relevant theory.

  18. Classical chromodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappi, T.

    2005-05-01

    This paper is a slightly modified version of the introductory part of a doctoral dissertation also containing the articles hep-ph/0303076, hep-ph/0409328 and hep-ph/0409058. The paper focuses on the calculation of particle production in a relativistic heavy ion collision using the McLerran-Venugopalan model. The main part of the paper summarizes the background of these numerical calculations. First we relate this calculation of the initial stage af a heavy ion collision to our understanding of the whole collision process. Then we discuss the saturation physics of the small x wavefunction of a hadron or a nucleus. The classical field model of Kovner, McLerran and Weigert is then introduced before moving to discuss the numerical algorithms used to compute gluon and quark pair production in this model. Finally we shortly review the results on gluon and quark-antiquark production obtained in the three articles mentioned above.

  19. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  20. Negative Ion Beam Extraction and Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Andrew J. T.

    2007-08-10

    The use of magnetic fields to both aid the production of negative ions and suppress the co-extracted electrons causes the emittance and hence the divergence of the negative ion beam to increase significantly due to the plasma non-uniformity from jxB drift. This drift distorts the beam-plasma meniscus and experimental results of the beam emittance are presented, which show that non-uniformity causes the square of the emittance to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the extracted current density. This can cause the divergence of the negative ion beam to be significantly larger than its positive ion counterpart. By comparing results from positive and negative ion beam emittances from the same source, it is also possible to draw conclusions about their vulnerability to magnetic effects. Finally emittances of caesiated and un-caesiated negative ion beams are compared to show how the surface and volume modes of production interact.

  1. Ionization phenomena and sources of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    Negative ion source technology has rapidly advanced during the past several years as a direct consequence of the discovery of Krohn that negative ion yields can be greatly enhanced by sputtering in the presence of Group IA elements. Today, most negative ion sources use this discovery directly or the principles implied to effect negative ion formation through surface ionization. As a consequence, the more traditional direct extraction plasma and charge exchange sources are being used less frequently. However, the charge exchange generation mechanism appears to be as universal, is very competitive in terms of efficiency and has the advantage in terms of metastable ion formation. In this review, an attempt has been made to briefly describe the principal processes involved in negative ion formation and sources which are representative of a particular principle. The reader is referred to the literature for specific details concerning the operational characteristics, emittances, brightnesses, species and intensity capabilities of particular sources. 100 references.

  2. Negative ion spectrometry for detecting nitrated explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettger, H. G.; Yinon, J.

    1975-01-01

    Ionization procedure is modified to produce mainly negative ions by electron capture. Peaks of negative ions are monitored conventionally. Nitrated organic materials could be identified directly from sample sniff inlet stream by suitably modified mass spectrometer because of unique electronegativity which nitro group imparts to organic material.

  3. Nonrelativistic theory of heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, G.

    1984-07-17

    A wide range of phenomena is observed in heavy-ion collisions, calling for a comprehensive theory based on fundamental principles of many-particle quantum mechanics. At low energies, the nuclear dynamics is controlled by the mean field, as we know from spectroscopic nuclear physics. We therefore expect the comprehensive theory of collisions to contain mean-field theory at low energies. The mean-field theory is the subject of the first lectures in this chapter. This theory can be studied quantum mechanically, in which form it is called TDHF (time-dependent Hartree-Fock), or classically, where the equation is called the Vlasov equation. 25 references, 14 figures.

  4. Dissociation of internally excited UF 6- ions in collision with argon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, J. A. D.

    1987-06-01

    Uranium hexafluoride negative ions (UF 6-) of controlled average internal and kinetic energy were collided with argon. A qualitative change was observed in the dependence of ionic fragmentation on internal excitation prior to collision, as the laboratory collision energy was increased above 150 eV.

  5. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapiditymore » spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.« less

  6. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapidity spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.

  7. Scaling of fluctuations in pp and pA collisions, and eccentricities in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, Adrian; Nara, Yasushi

    2012-03-01

    Multiplicity fluctuations at midrapidity in pp collisions at high energies are described by a negative binomial distribution and exhibit approximate Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) scaling. We find that these KNO fluctuations are important also for reproducing the multiplicity distribution in d+Au collisions observed at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), adding to the Glauber fluctuations of the number of binary collisions or participants. We predict that the multiplicity distribution in p+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) also deviates little from the KNO scaling function. Finally, we analyze various moments of the eccentricity of the collision zone in A+A collisions at RHIC and LHC and find that particle production fluctuations increase fluctuation dominated moments such as the triangularity ɛ3 substantially.

  8. Theory of Electron-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Donald C

    2009-10-02

    Collisions of electrons with atoms and ions play a crucial role in the modeling and diagnostics of fusion plasmas. In the edge and divertor regions of magnetically confined plasmas, data for the collisions of electrons with neutral atoms and low charge-state ions are of particular importance, while in the inner region, data on highly ionized species are needed. Since experimental measurements for these collisional processes remain very limited, data for such processes depend primarily on the results of theoretical calculations. Over the period of the present grant (January 2006 - August 2009), we have made additional improvements in our parallel scattering programs, generated data of direct fusion interest and made these data available on The Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center Web site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition, we have employed these data to do collsional-radiative modeling studies in support of a variety of experiments with magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

  9. Negative Halogen Ions for Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Leung, K.N.; Westenskow, G.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past quarter century, advances in hydrogen negative ion sources have extended the usable range of hydrogen isotope neutral beams to energies suitable for large magnetically confined fusion devices. Recently, drawing upon this experience, negative halogen ions have been proposed as an alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers in inertial confinement fusion, because electron accumulation would be prevented in negative ion beams, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. This paper reports the results of an experiment comparing the current density and beam emittance of Cl+ and Cl- extracted from substantially ion-ion plasmas with that of Ar+ extracted from an ordinary electron-ion plasma, all using the same source, extractor, and emittance scanner. At similar discharge conditions, the Cl- current was typically 85 – 90% of the positive chlorine current, with an e-/ Cl- ratio as low as seven without grid magnets. The Cl- was as much as 76% of the Ar+ current from a discharge with the same RF drive. The minimum normalized beam emittance and inferred ion temperatures of Cl+, Cl-, and Ar+ were all similar, so the current density and optical quality of Cl- appear as suitable for heavy ion fusion driver applications as a positive noble gas ion of similar mass. Since F, I, and Br should all behave similarly in an ion source, they should also be suitable as driver beams.

  10. Issues in the understanding of negative ion extraction for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, J. P.; Fubiani, G.; Garrigues, L.

    2016-08-01

    A number of recent papers have been devoted to the modeling of negative ion extraction using particle simulations but the published results are not entirely satisfactory and not fully consistent with experiments. Issues raised by the simulations concern the saturation of the negative ion current emitted from the caesiated plasma grid surface, its distribution along the surface, the shape of the meniscus formed around each grid aperture, the distribution and depth of the potential in the virtual cathode, and the profile of the extracted beamlet. These are important issues since they have direct impact on the properties of the extracted negative ion beam (intensity, brightness, aberration). In this paper we first summarize recently published model results that are unexpected and counter-intuitive since they predict that negative ions are extracted from regions of the grid that are directly exposed to the large extraction voltage (i.e. as in vacuum and without the need for a neutralizing background plasma). We then illustrate, with results from two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision simulations, some regimes of negative ion extraction that are more consistent with the expected physics.

  11. Femtoscopy in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa, M; Pratt, S; Soltz, R A; Wiedemann, U

    2005-07-29

    Analyses of two-particle correlations have provided the chief means for determining spatio-temporal characteristics of relativistic heavy ion collisions. We discuss the theoretical formalism behind these studies and the experimental methods used in carrying them out. Recent results from RHIC are put into context in a systematic review of correlation measurements performed over the past two decades. The current understanding of these results are discussed in terms of model comparisons and overall trends.

  12. LHCb results from proton ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massacrier, Laure

    2016-07-01

    Proton-lead and lead-proton data taking during 2013 has allowed LHCb to expand its physics program to heavy ion physics. Results include the first forward measurement of Z production in proton-lead collisions as well as a measurement of the nuclear modification factor and forward-backward production of prompt and displaced J/ψ, ψ(2S) and ϒ. Angular particle correlations have also been measured for events of varying charged particle activity.

  13. Negative and positive cesium ion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, D. G.; Sutliff, D. E.; Chanin, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analyses have been performed on the positive and negative species from discharges in Cs, He-Cs, and He-H2-Cs mixtures. Sampling was conducted through the electrodes of normal glow discharges and from close-spaced heated-cathode conditions, which approximate a cesium thermionic converter. No negative Cs ions were observed for Cs pressures less than .01 torr. Identified species included Cs(+), Cs2(+), Cs(-), and what appeared to be multiply charged ions. Low-mass negative and positive ions attributed to H2 were observed when an He-H2 mixture was also present in the discharge region.

  14. Formation of heavy-Rydberg ion-pair states in Rydberg atom collisions with attaching targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changhao; Kelley, Michael; Buathong, Sitti; Dunning, F. Barry

    2014-05-01

    Electron transfer in collisions between K(np)Rydberg atoms and electron attaching molecules can lead to formation of heavy-Rydberg ion-pair states comprising a weakly-bound positive-negative ion pair orbiting at large internuclear separations. In the present work ion-pair states are created in a small collision cell and allowed to exit into an analysis region where their binding energy and velocity distributions are determined with the aid of electric-field-induced dissociation and a position sensitive detector. Ion pair production is analyzed using a Monte Carlo collision code that models both the initial Rydberg electron capture and the subsequent behavior of the product ion pair. The data demonstrate that collisions with SF6 and CCl4 lead to formation of long-lived ion pair states with a broad distribution of binding energies whose velocity distribution is strongly peaked in the forward direction. Research supported by the Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  15. An advanced negative hydrogen ion source.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, Alexey A; Dobrovolsky, Andrey N; Goretskii, Victor P

    2016-02-01

    The results of investigation of emission productivity of negative particles source with cesiated combined discharge are presented. A cylindrical beam of negative hydrogen ions with density about 2 A/cm(2) in low noise mode on source emission aperture is obtained. The total beam current values are up to 200 mA for negative hydrogen ions and up to 1.5 A for all negative particles with high divergence after source. The source has simple design and can produce stable discharge with low level of oscillation. PMID:26931996

  16. Transfer of small negative atmospheric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Toshiro; Katayama, Takashi

    2003-12-01

    The transfer of small negative atmospheric ions in air and from air to water has been studied. The mean lifetime of ions was experimentally obtained from the concentration distribution of ions in a round free jet. It was about 30 s in relative humidity of 63%-75%, indicating that ions generated at one source in a room could not be homogeneously spread throughout the room by conventional convective flow of air. Rapid dissipation of the ions occurs during diffusion in stationary air. However, most of the ions that enter the mouth of a human body reach the lungs, because of the high convective velocity of breathing. The irradiation of ions onto water decreased the electric conductivity of the water. This finding suggests that the transfer of ions into water in a human body breaks the network of H2O molecules and enhances the formation of hydrogen bonds between a biopolymer and water.

  17. Hydrogen Plasmas for Negative Ion Production

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, D.; Gorse, C.; Capitelli, M.

    2005-05-16

    We have improved a zero-dimensional model, built to simulate the operating conditions in the excitation ('driver') region of a multicusp ion source optimized for negative ion production of great interest in thermonuclear applications. The new approach to couple heavy particle and electron kinetics is discussed.

  18. Negative Ions for Emerging Interdisciplinary Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Guharay, Samar K.

    2011-09-26

    In many applications related to ion beam-materials interactions negative ions are particularly desirable due to its merit to yield a very low surface charge-up voltage, {approx} a few volts, for both electrically isolated surfaces and insulators. Some important applications pertaining to ion beam-material interactions include surface analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), voltage-contrast microscopy for semiconductor device inspection, materials processing, and ion beam lithography. These applications primarily require vacuum environments. On the other hand, a distinct area of activities constitutes formation of ions and ion transport in ambient environmental conditions, i.e., at atmospheric pressures. In this context, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an important analytical device that uses negative ions and operates at ambient conditions. IMS is widely used in both physical and biological sciences including monitoring environmental conditions, security screening and disease detection. This article highlights several critical issues related to the ionization sources and ion transport in IMS. Additionally, the critical issues related to ion sources, transport and focusing are discussed in the context of SIMS with sub-micrometer spatial resolution.

  19. Experimental evaluation of a negative ion source for a heavy ionfusion negative ion driver

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leung, K.N.

    2005-01-18

    Negative halogen ions have recently been proposed as a possible alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers because electron accumulation would not be a problem in the accelerator, and if desired, the beams could be photodetached to neutrals [1,2,3]. To test the ability to make suitable quality beams, an experiment was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using chlorine in an RF-driven ion source. Without introducing any cesium (which is required to enhance negative ion production in hydrogen ion sources) a negative chlorine current density of 45 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained under the same conditions that gave 57 mA/cm{sup 2} of positive chlorine, suggesting the presence of nearly as many negative ions as positive ions in the plasma near the extraction plane. The negative ion spectrum was 99.5% atomic chlorine ions, with only 0.5% molecular chlorine, and essentially no impurities. Although this experiment did not incorporate the type of electron suppression technology that is used in negative hydrogen beam extraction, the ratio of co-extracted electrons to Cl{sup -} was as low as 7 to 1, many times lower than the ratio of their mobilities, suggesting that few electrons are present in the near-extractor plasma. This, along with the near-equivalence of the positive and negative ion currents, suggests that the plasma in this region was mostly an ion-ion plasma. The negative chlorine current density was relatively insensitive to pressure, and scaled linearly with RF power. If this linear scaling continues to hold at higher RF powers, it should permit current densities of 100 mA/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for present heavy ion fusion injector concepts. The effective ion temperatures of the positive and negative ions appeared to be similar and relatively low for a plasma source.

  20. Positron production in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R.W.

    1995-08-01

    The ATLAS Positron Experiment APEX was built to study positron emission in collisions between very heavy ions. Narrow peaks were observed in such collisions at GSI, Darmstadt in the spectra of positrons and in the sum-energy spectra of electron-positron coincidences. APEX is a second-generation experiment which was specifically designed to look for the coincidence events and measure the opening angle between electrons and positrons. The first beam-induced positrons were detected using APEX in March 1993, and since then three additional runs were carried out. The first results for the collision system {sup 238}U + {sup 181}Ta show no evidence for sharp peaks in the electron-positron sum-energy spectrum. The current emphasis in this work is to obtain a complete understanding of the APEX apparatus. The atomic group is studying events involving coincidences between heavy ions and electrons. Since APEX measures the laboratory angles and energies of both electrons and heavy ions, it is possible to make an event-by-event Doppler correction of the electron spectra. These Doppler-corrected spectra show a number of lines which are attributed to conversion electrons which are emitted when a nuclear excited state decays by ejecting an inner-shell electron. The study of these spectra provide an important confirmation of the proper functioning of APEX. We are particularly concerned with the atomic physics aspects of this process. In order to understand the electron spectra, it is necessary to account for the change in binding energy of the inner-shell electrons as a function of ionic charge. We are utilizing the GRASP relativistic atomic structure program to calculate the binding energies. This information, together with the measured gamma-ray energies, allows us to calculate the expected energies of the conversion electrons which we can then compare with the observed Doppler-corrected conversion electron energies.

  1. Transfer ionization in collisions with a fast highly charged ion.

    PubMed

    Voitkiv, A B

    2013-07-26

    Transfer ionization in fast collisions between a bare ion and an atom, in which one of the atomic electrons is captured by the ion whereas another one is emitted, crucially depends on dynamic electron-electron correlations. We show that in collisions with a highly charged ion a strong field of the ion has a very profound effect on the correlated channels of transfer ionization. In particular, this field weakens (strongly suppresses) electron emission into the direction opposite (perpendicular) to the motion of the ion. Instead, electron emission is redirected into those parts of the momentum space which are very weakly populated in fast collisions with low charged ions. PMID:23931364

  2. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Calzetta, E.

    2014-01-14

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  3. Viscous photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, Maxime; Paquet, Jean-François; Schenke, Björn; Young, Clint; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical studies of the production of real thermal photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are performed. The space-time evolution of the colliding system is modelled using music, a 3+1D relativistic hydrodynamic simulation, using both its ideal and viscous versions. The inclusive spectrum and its azimuthal angular anisotropy are studied separately, and the relative contributions of the different photon sources are highlighted. It is shown that the photon v2 coefficient is especially sensitive to the details of the microscopic dynamics like the equation of state, the ratio of shear viscosity over entropy density, η/s, and to the morphology of the initial state.

  4. Ionization Phenomena in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveney, Edward Francis

    Two many-electron ion-atom collision systems are used to investigate atomic and molecular structure and collisional interactions. Electrons emitted from MeV/u C^{3+} projectile target -atom collisions were measured with a high-resolution position -sensitive electron spectrometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The electrons are predominantly ionized by direct projectile -target interactions or autoionizing (AI) from doubly excited AI levels of the ion which were excited in the collision. The energy dependence of directly scattered target electrons, binary-encounter electrons (BEE), is investigated and compared with theory. AI levels of the projectile 1s to nl single electron excited series, (1s2snl) n = 2,3,4,....infty, including the series limit are identified uniquely using energy level calculations. Original Auger yield calculations using a code by Cowan were used to discover a 1/{n^3} scaling in intensities of Auger peaks in the aforementioned series. This is explained using scattering theory. A nonstatistical population of the terms in the (1s2s2l) configuration was identified and investigated as a function of the beam energy and for four different target atoms. Two electron excited configurations are identified and investigated. The angular distribution of a correlated transfer and excitation AI state is measured and compared to theory. The final scattered charge state distributions of Kr^ {n+}, n = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, projectiles are measured following collisions with Kr targets in the Van de Graaff Laboratory here at The University of Connecticut. Average scattered charge states as high as 12 are observed. It appears that these electrons are ionized during the lifetime of the quasimolecular state but a complete picture of the ionization mechanism(s) is not known. Calculations using a statistical model of ionization, modified in several ways, are compared with the experimental results to see if it is possible to isolate whether or not the electrons originate

  5. Constraining relativistic models through heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, D. P.; Providencia, C.; Chiapparini, M.; Bracco, M. E.; Delfino, A.; Malheiro, M.

    2007-12-15

    Relativistic models can be successfully applied to the description of compact star properties in nuclear astrophysics as well as to nuclear matter and finite nuclei properties, these studies taking place at low and moderate temperatures. Nevertheless, all results are model dependent, and so far it is unclear whether some of them should be discarded. Moreover, in the regime of hot hadronic matter, very few calculations exist using these relativistic models, in particular when applied to particle yields in heavy ion collisions. A very important investigation is the simulation of a supernova explosion that is based on the construction of an adequate equation of state that needs to be valid within very large ranges of temperatures (0 to 100 MeV at least) and densities (very low to ten times the nuclear saturation density at least). In the present work, we comment on the known constraints that can help the selection of adequate models in this wide regime and investigate the main differences that arise when the particle production during a Au+Au collision at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is calculated with different relativistic models. We conclude that most of the models investigated in the present work give a very good overall description of the data and make predictions for not yet measured particle ratios.

  6. Geometrical methods in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taliotis, Anastasios

    Currently there exists no known way to construct the Stress-Energy tensor (Tmunu) of the medium produced in heavy ion collisions at strong coupling from purely theoretical grounds. In this work, some steps are taken in that direction. In particular, the evolution of Tmunu at strong coupling and at high energies is being studied for early proper times (tau). This is achieved in the context of the AdS/CFT duality by constructing the evolution of the dual geometry in an AdS5 background. We consider high energy collisions of two shock waves in AdS5 as a model of ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in the boundary theory. We first calculate the graviton field produced in the collisions in the LO, NLO and NNLO approximations, corresponding to two, three and four-graviton exchanges with the shock waves. We use this model to study Tmunu and in particular the energy density of the strongly-coupled matter created immediately after the collision because as we argue, the expansion of the energy density (epsilon) in the powers of proper time tau squared corresponds on the gravity side to a perturbative expansion of the metric in graviton exchanges. We point out that shock waves corresponding to physical energy-momentum tensors of the nuclei is likely to completely stop after the collision; on the field theory side, this corresponds to complete nuclear stopping due to strong coupling effects, likely leading to Landau hydrodynamics. This motivates a more detailed investigation. For this reason we consider the asymmetric limit where the energy density in one shock wave is much higher than in the other one. In the boundary theory this setup corresponds to proton-nucleus collisions. Employing the eikonal approximation we find the exact high energy analytic solution for the metric in AdS5 for the asymmetric collision of two delta-function shock waves. The solution resums all-order graviton exchanges with the nucleus-shock wave and a single-graviton exchange with the proton

  7. Generation of intense negative ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor); Aladzhadzhyan, Samuel H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An electron gun is used with a mirror electrostatic field to produce zero or near zero velocity electrons by forming a turning point in their trajectories. A gas capable of attaching zero or near zero velocity is introduced at this turning point, and negative ions are produced by the attachment or dissociative attachment process. Operation may be continuous or pulsed. Ions thus formed are extracted by a simple lens system and suitable biasing of grids.

  8. Negative Electrodes for Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Kim; Zaghib, Karim

    2001-10-01

    Graphitized carbons have played a key role in the successful commercialization of Li-ion batteries. The physicochemical properties of carbon cover a wide range; therefore identifying the optimum active electrode material can be time consuming. The significant physical properties of negative electrodes for Li-ion batteries are summarized, and the relationship of these properties to their electrochemical performance in nonaqueous electrolytes, are discussed in this paper.

  9. The production and destruction of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pegg, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Single photon absorption-single electron detachment from few-electron atomic negative ions was studied. A crossed beam apparatus is being used to perform energy- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopic measurements following photodetachment. Forward-directed electrons were collected and energy analyzed. The kinetic energies and yields of the photoelectrons were obtained by fitting the spectral peaks to Gaussian functions. Electron affinities, asymmetry parameters and cross sections are determined from these measurements. A ratio method in which the cross section for the ion of interest is measured relative to that of a reference ion was used. The study of the photodetachment of Li[sup [minus

  10. Landau quantization effects in ultracold atom-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, Andrea; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2011-12-01

    We study ultracold atom-ion collisions in the presence of an external magnetic field. At low collision energy the field can drastically modify the translational motion of the ion, which follows quantized cyclotron orbits. We present a rigorous theoretical approach for the calculation of quantum scattering amplitudes in these conditions. Collisions in different magnetic field regimes, identified by the size of the cyclotron radius with respect to the range of the interaction potential, are investigated. Our results are important in cases where use of a magnetic field to control the atom-ion collision dynamics is envisioned.

  11. Theoretical Concepts for Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2009-07-27

    Various forms of matter may be produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. These are the Quark GluonPlasma, the Color Glass Condensate , the Glasma and Quarkyoninc Matter. A novel effect that may beassociated with topological charge fluctuations is the Chiral Magnetic Effect. I explain these concepts andexplain how they may be seen in ultra-relatvistic heavy ion collisions

  12. Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions. The most favorable conditions of high densities and low temperatures are usually associated with astrophysical processes and may be difficult to achieve in heavy ion collisions. Nonetheless, some suggestions for the possible experimental verification of the existence of this phenomenon are made.

  13. Auger Stimulated Ion Desorption of Negative Ions via K -Capture Radioactive Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Verkhoturov, S. V.; Schweikert, E. A.; Chechik, Victor; Sabapathy, Rajaram C.; Crooks, Richard M.; Parilis, E. S.

    2001-07-16

    We report on Auger stimulated ion desorption via Coulomb explosion from surface self-assembled alkylthiol and fluorocarbon molecular layers, triggered by K -capture decay of an imbedded radioactive {sup 55}Fe atom. The charge state of the ejecta is determined by charge exchange in binary atomic collisions in bulk and electron tunneling outside the solid, as well as by fragmentation of electronically excited molecules or molecular fragments. We describe the first nonbeam experiments documenting positive and abundant negative ion desorption due solely to core electron excitation after radioactive decay.

  14. Multiplicities in Ultrarelativistic - Collisions and Negative Binomial Distribution FITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Dariusz

    Likelihood ratio tests are performed for the hypothesis that charged-particle multiplicities measured in proton-(anti)proton collisions at √ {s} = 0.9 and 2.36 TeV are distributed according to the negative binomial form. Results indicate that the hypothesis should be rejected in the all cases of ALICE-LHC measurements in the limited pseudorapidity windows, whereas should be accepted in the corresponding cases of UA5 data. Possible explanations of that and of the disagreement with the least-squares fitting method are given.

  15. Heavy-Rydberg ion-pair formation in collisions of Rydberg atoms with attaching targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changhao; Kelley, Michael; Dunning, F. Barry

    2012-06-01

    Collisions between K(np) Rydberg atoms and electron attaching targets can lead to the creation of heavy-Rydberg ion-pair states comprising a weakly-bound positive-negative ion pair orbiting at large internuclear separations. The lifetimes of such states and their correlation with binding energy and the channels available for decay, which can be controlled by varying n, the Rydberg atom velocity, and the target species, are being investigated. The ion-pair states are produced in a small collision cell and allowed to exit to form a beam that passes between a pair of electrodes where their number and binding energy distribution is determined by electric field induced dissociation. Ion-pair production is analyzed with the aid of a Monte Carlo collision code that models both initial Rydberg electron capture and the subsequent evolution of the product ion pair. Research supported by the Robert A Welch Foundation.

  16. Observables in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, J.R.; Schlei, B.R.; Strottman, D.D.; Sullivan, J.P.; Hecke, H.W. van

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors used several complimentary models of high-energy nuclear collisions to systematically study the large body of available data from high energy (p{sub beam}/A > 10 GeV/c) heavy ion experiments at BNL and CERN and to prepare for the data that will come from RHIC. One major goal of this project was to better understand the space-time history of the excited hadronic matter formed in these collisions and to use this understanding to improve models of this process. The space-time structure of the system can be extracted from measurements of single-particle p{sub T} distributions and multiparticle correlations. They looked for experimental effects of the formation of the quark-gluon plasma. Understanding the hadronic phase of the interaction determines the sensitivity of experimental measurements to the presence of this exotic state of matter.

  17. Jet Structure in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, J.-P.; Mehtar-Tani, Y.

    We review recent theoretical developments in the study of the structure of jets that are produced in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions. The core of the review focusses on the dynamics of the parton cascade that is induced by the interactions of a fast parton crossing a quark-gluon plasma. We recall the basic mechanisms responsible for medium induced radiation, underline the rapid disappearance of coherence effects, and the ensuing probabilistic nature of the medium induced cascade. We discuss how large radiative corrections modify the classical picture of the gluon cascade, and how these can be absorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter hat q. Then, we analyze the (wave)-turbulent transport of energy along the medium induced cascade, and point out the main characteristics of the angular structure of such a cascade. Finally, color decoherence of the incone jet structure is discussed. Modest contact with phenomenology is presented towards the end of the review.

  18. Identifying Multiquark Hadrons from Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Yazaki, Koichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Akira; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-05-27

    Identifying hadronic molecular states and/or hadrons with multiquark components either with or without exotic quantum numbers is a long-standing challenge in hadronic physics. We suggest that studying the production of these hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions offers a promising resolution to this problem as yields of exotic hadrons are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model for hadron production, we find that, compared to the case of a nonexotic hadron with normal quark numbers, the yield of an exotic hadron is typically an order of magnitude smaller when it is a compact multiquark state and a factor of 2 or more larger when it is a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured in these experiments.

  19. Electron-ion collision operator in strong electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraiman, Gennadiy; Balakin, Alexey

    2012-10-01

    The pair electron-ion collision operator is found for the kinetic equation describing the one-particle drift distribution in strong electromagnetic fields [1]. The pair collisions are studied under the conditions when the oscillation velocity of an electron driven by an external electromagnetic wave is much larger than the electron drift velocity. The operator is presented in the Boltzmann form and describes collisions with both small and large changes of the particle momentum. In contrast with the Landau collision operator, which describes diffusion in the momentum space, the collision operator that we propose describes a new and very important effect, namely, Coulomb attraction of a wave-driven oscillating electron to an ion due to multiple returns of the electron to the same ion. This effect leads to a large increase of the collision cross-section of electron-ion collisions in strong laser fields, to increased efficiency of the Joule heating in plasma, to the generation of fast electrons through e-i collisions, etc. [4pt] [1] A. A. Balakin and G. M. Fraiman, Electron-ion collision operator in strong electromagnetic fields, EPL 93, 35001 (2011).

  20. Negative ion states of sulfur hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.C.M.; Shuie, L.; Desai D'sa, E.; Batten, C.F.; Wentworth, W.E.

    1988-04-15

    The reaction of SF/sub 6/ with thermal electrons has been studied in a Ni-63 atmospheric pressure ionization source for a quadrupole mass spectrometer (API/MS). The major ions that are observed are the parent negative ion (SF/sup -//sub 6/) and the parent minus a fluorine atom (SF/sup -//sub 5/). The ratio of (SF/sup -//sub 5/)/(SF/sup -//sub 6/) is highly temperature dependent above 500 K. The dissociation energy of the ground state negative ion into SF/sup -//sub 5/ and F has been determined to be 1.35 +- 0.1 eV. This gives values of 3.8 +- 0.15 eV for the electron affinity of SF/sub 5/ and 1.15 +- 0.15 eV for the electron affinity of SF/sub 6/. The negative ion states of sulfur hexafluoride have been described by ''pseudo-two-dimensional'' Morse potentials calculated using experimental data.

  1. Development of versatile multiaperture negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cavenago, M.; Minarello, A.; Sattin, M.; Serianni, G.; Antoni, V.; Bigi, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Recchia, M.; Veltri, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Barbisan, M.; Baseggio, L.; Cervaro, V.; Degli Agostini, F.; Franchin, L.; Laterza, B.; Ravarotto, D.; Rossetto, F.; Zaniol, B.; Zucchetti, S.; and others

    2015-04-08

    Enhancement of negative ion sources for production of large ion beams is a very active research field nowadays, driven from demand of plasma heating in nuclear fusion devices and accelerator applications. As a versatile test bench, the ion source NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is being commissioned by Consorzio RFX and INFN. The nominal beam current of 135 mA at −60 kV is divided into 9 beamlets, with multiaperture extraction electrodes. The plasma is sustained by a 2 MHz radiofrequency power supply, with a standard matching box. A High Voltage Deck (HVD) placed inside the lead shielding surrounding NIO1 contains the radiofrequency generator, the gas control, electronics and power supplies for the ion source. An autonomous closed circuit water cooling system was installed for the whole system, with a branch towards the HVD, using carefully optimized helical tubing. Insulation transformer is installed in a nearby box. Tests of several magnetic configurations can be performed. Status of experiments, measured spectra and plasma luminosity are described. Upgrades of magnetic filter, beam calorimeter and extraction grid and related theoretical issues are reviewed.

  2. Behaviour of ion velocity distributions for a simple collision model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St-Maurice, J.-P.; Schunk, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the ion velocity distributions for a weakly ionized plasma subjected to crossed electric and magnetic fields. An exact solution to Boltzmann's equation has been obtained by replacing the Boltzmann collision integral with a simple relaxation model. At altitudes above about 150 km, where the ion collision frequency is much less than the ion cyclotron frequency, the ion distribution takes the shape of a torus in velocity space for electric fields greater than 40 mV/m. This shape persists for one to two hours after application of the electric field. At altitudes where the ion collision and cyclotron frequencies are approximately equal (about 120 km), the ion velocity distribution is shaped like a bean for large electric field strengths. This bean-shaped distribution persists throughout the lifetime of ionospheric electric fields. These highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions may have an appreciable affect on the interpretation of ion temperature measurements.

  3. Influence of the quantum interference on the bosonic and fermionic ion-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-03-01

    The quantum interference effects on the bosonic-bosonic (He-4)-(He-4), fermionic-fermionic (He-3)-(He-3), and bosonic-fermionic (He-4)-(He-3) ion-ion collisions are investigated by using the isotope of the He nucleus in dense semiclassical Coulomb systems with the Faxen-Holtzmark method. It is found that the scattering cross section for the fermionic-fermionic ion-ion collision is greater than the bosonic-bosonic and bosonic-fermionic ion collision cross sections. It is also found that the collisional induced quantum interference effect enhances the ion-ion collision cross section in semiclassical Coulomb systems. The variation of the quantum-mechanical effect on the bosonic and fermionic ion-ion collisions is also discussed. This paper is dedicated to the late Prof. P. K. Shukla in memory of exciting and stimulating collaborations on physical processes in semiclassical Coulomb systems.

  4. New types of negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Borisko, V.N.; Lapshin, V.I.

    1995-12-31

    The plasma sources of negative ions which were elaborated in Kharkov State University are considered in this paper. These sources use the mechanism of dissociative stick of electrons with low energies to molecules of a working gas. The effective work of such sources needs a special system of low energy electrons formation. The effect of secondary electron emission used in negative ion sources is considered. The electrode material with a great coefficient of secondary electron emission allows one to obtain a few slow electrons per one bombarding electron. A plasma of Penning discharge is an emitter of initial elections. The electron electromagnetic trap in the secondary electron emission region allows one to enlarge volume of interaction of low energy electrons with the working gas molecules. The lifetime of slow electrons grows in this trap.

  5. Ground state of the hydrogen negative ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreshkov, Boyan

    2009-03-01

    Based on recently developed variational many-body Schr"odinger equation for electrons with Coulomb interactions [1], we provide first numerical results for the ground state electron structure of the hydrogen negative ion. It is shown that Fermi-Teller promotion effect together with non-adiabatic screening effects due to the Pauli's exclusion principle are responsible for the weak binding of the anion. The calculated ionization potential J=-1/2 - 2 λ+ <1/r12> of the hydrogen negative ion is compared with the experiment, where λ is the mean binding energy per one electron in the ground state.[0pt] [1] B. D. Obreshkov , Phys. Rev. A 78, 032503 (2008).

  6. EDITORIAL: Negative ion based neutral beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, R. S.

    2006-06-01

    It is widely recognized that neutral beam injection (NBI), i.e. the injection of high energy, high power, beams of H or D atoms, is a flexible and reliable system that has been the main heating system on a large variety of fusion devices, and NBI has been chosen as one of the three heating schemes of the International Tokomak Reactor (ITER). To date, all the NBI systems but two have been based on the neutralization (in a simple gas target) of positive hydrogen or deuterium ions accelerated to <100 keV/nucleon. Above that energy the neutralization of positive ions falls to unacceptably low values, and higher energy neutral beams have to be created by the neutralization of accelerated negative ions (in a simple gas target), as this remains high (approx60%) up to >1 MeV/nucleon. Unfortunately H- and D- are difficult to create, and the very characteristic that makes them attractive, the ease with which the electron is detached from the ion, means that it is difficult to create high concentrations or fluxes of them, and it is difficult to avoid substantial, collisional, losses in the extraction and acceleration processes. However, there has been impressive progress in negative ion sources and accelerators over the past decade, as demonstrated by the two pioneering, operational, multi-megawatt, negative ion based, NBI systems at LHD (180 keV, H0) and JT-60U (500 keV, D0), both in Japan. Nevertheless, the system proposed for ITER represents a substantial technological challenge as an increase is required in beam energy, to 1 MeV, D0, accelerated ion (D-) current, to 40 A, accelerated current density, 200 A m-2 of D-, and pulse length, to 1 h. At the Fourth IAEA Technical Meeting on Negative Ion Based Neutral Beam Injectors, hosted by the Consorzio RFX, Padova, Italy, 9-11 May 2005, the status of the R&D aimed at the realization of the injectors for ITER was presented. Because of the importance of this development to the success of the ITER project, participants at that

  7. Negative ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Hahto, Sami K.; Hahto, Sari T.

    2007-02-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source. A converter can be included in the ion source to produce negative ions.

  8. Newly appreciated roles for electrons in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Since the previous Debrecen workshop on High-Energy Ion-Atom Collisions there have been numerous experiments and substantial theoretical developments in the fields of fast ion-atom and ion- solid collisions concerned with explicating the previously largely underappreciated role of electrons as ionizing and exciting agents in such collisions. Examples to be discussed include the double electron ionization problem in He; transfer ionization by protons in He; double excitation in He; backward scattering of electrons in He; the role of electron-electron interaction in determining beta parameters for ELC; projectile K ionization by target electrons; electron spin exchange in transfer excitation; electron impact ionization in crystal channels; resonant coherent excitation in crystal channels; excitation and dielectronic recombination in crystal channels; resonant transfer and excitation; the similarity of recoil ion spectra observed in coincidence with electron capture vs. electron loss; and new research on ion-atom collisions at relativistic energies.

  9. Factorization, the Glasma and the Ridge in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopalan, Raju

    2008-10-13

    High energy heavy ion collisions can be efficiently described as the collision of two sheets of Color Glass Condensate. The dynamics of the collision can be studied ab initio in a systematic effective field theory approach. This requires factorization theorems that separate the initial state evolution of the wave functions with energy from the final state interactions that produce matter with high energy densities called the Glasma. We discuss how this matter is formed, its remarkable properties and its relevance for understanding thermalization of the Quark Gluon Plasma in heavy ion collisions. Long range rapidity correlations in the collision that have a remarkable ridge like structure may allow us to probe early times in the collision and infer directly the properties of the Glasma.

  10. Universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phobos Collaboration; Steinberg, Peter A.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/pbar-p and e+e- data. N_tot/(N_part/2) in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with sqrt(s) in a similar way as N_tot in e+e- collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  11. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  12. Sputtered metal and silicon cluster ions: collision-induced fragmentation and neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begemann, W.; Hector, R.; Liu, Y. Y.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Lutz, H. O.

    1989-03-01

    Mass separated metal and silicon cluster ion beams M{/n +, -} are produced by sputtering and undergo fragmenting and/or neutralizing collisions at different kinetic energies (100 1800 eV) in Ar and SF6. Fragment patterns induced by rare gas collisions open a way to determine ionization potentials and electron affinities of clusters. These values are compared to known experimental and theoretical data. For negatively charged clusters the absorption in gas targets is mainly due to neutralization, the cross sections varying with cluster material, number of atoms and collision partner from 10 Å2 to about 50 Å2.

  13. Ion collision crosssection measurements in quadrupole ion traps using a time-frequency analysis method.

    PubMed

    He, Muyi; Guo, Dan; Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xingchuang; Fang, Xiang; Xu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a method for measuring ion collision crosssections (CCSs) was proposed through time-frequency analysis of ion trajectories in quadrupole ion traps. A linear ion trap with added high-order electric fields was designed and simulated. With the presence of high-order electric fields and ion-neutral collisions, ion secular motion frequency within the quadrupole ion trap will be a function of ion motion amplitude, thus a function of time and ion CCS. A direct relationship was then established between ion CCS and ion motion frequency with respect to time, which could be obtained through time-frequency analysis of ion trajectories (or ion motion induced image currents). To confirm the proposed theory, realistic ion trajectory simulations were performed, where the CCSs of bradykinin, angiotensin I and II, and ubiquitin ions were calculated from simulated ion trajectories. As an example, differentiation of isomeric ubiquitin ions was also demonstrated in the simulations. PMID:25319271

  14. Ultracold collisions between Rb atoms and a Sr+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Ziv; Sikorsky, Tomas; Ben-Shlomi, Ruti; Dallal, Yehonatan; Ozeri, Roee

    2015-05-01

    In last decade, a novel field emerged, in which ultracold atoms and ions in overlapping traps are brought into interaction. In contrast to the short ranged atom-atom interaction which scales as r-6, atom-ion potential persists for hundreds of μm's due to its lower power-law scaling - r-4. Inelastic collisions between the consistuents lead to spin and charge transfer and also to molecule formation. Elastic collisions control the energy transfer between the ion and the atoms. The study of collisions at the μK range has thus far been impeded by the effect of the ion's micromotion which limited collision energy to mK scale. Unraveling this limit will allow to investigate few partial wave and even S-wave collisions. Our system is capable of trapping Sr+ ions and Rb and Sr atoms and cooling them to their quantum ground state. Atoms and ions are trapped and cooled in separate chambers. Then, the atoms are transported using an optical conveyer belt to overlap the ions. In contrast to other experiments in this field where the atoms are used to sympathetic cool the ion, our system is also capable of ground state cooling the ion before immersing it into the atom cloud. By this method, we would be able to explore heating and cooling dynamics in the ultracold regime.

  15. Effect of correlations on cumulants in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, D. K.; Garg, P.; Netrakanti, P. K.

    2016-02-01

    We study the effects of correlations on cumulants and their ratios of net-proton multiplicity distributions which have been measured for central (0%-5%) Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This effect has been studied by assuming individual proton and antiproton distributions as a Poisson or negative binomial distribution (NBD). In spite of significantly correlated production due to baryon number, electric charge conservation, and kinematical correlations of protons and antiprotons, the measured cumulants of the net-proton distribution follow the independent-production model. In the present work we demonstrate how the introduction of the correlations will affect the cumulants and their ratios for the difference distributions. We have also demonstrated this study using the proton and antiproton distributions obtained from the hijing event generator.

  16. Fluctuating Glasma Initial Conditions and Flow in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, Björn; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2012-06-01

    We compute initial conditions in heavy ion collisions within the color glass condensate framework by combining the impact parameter dependent saturation model with the classical Yang-Mills description of initial Glasma fields. In addition to fluctuations of nucleon positions, this impact parameter dependent Glasma description includes quantum fluctuations of color charges on the length scale determined by the inverse nuclear saturation scale Qs. The model naturally produces initial energy fluctuations that are described by a negative binomial distribution. The ratio of triangularity to eccentricity ɛ3/ɛ2 is close to that in a model tuned to reproduce experimental flow data. We compare transverse momentum spectra and v2,3,4(pT) of pions from different models of initial conditions using relativistic viscous hydrodynamic evolution.

  17. Fluctuating glasma initial conditions and flow in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Schenke, Björn; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2012-06-22

    We compute initial conditions in heavy ion collisions within the color glass condensate framework by combining the impact parameter dependent saturation model with the classical Yang-Mills description of initial Glasma fields. In addition to fluctuations of nucleon positions, this impact parameter dependent Glasma description includes quantum fluctuations of color charges on the length scale determined by the inverse nuclear saturation scale Q(s). The model naturally produces initial energy fluctuations that are described by a negative binomial distribution. The ratio of triangularity to eccentricity ε(3)/ε(2) is close to that in a model tuned to reproduce experimental flow data. We compare transverse momentum spectra and v(2,3,4)(p(T)) of pions from different models of initial conditions using relativistic viscous hydrodynamic evolution. PMID:23004589

  18. Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, R K; Townsend, L W

    1994-07-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions. The most favorable conditions of high densities and low temperatures are usually associated with astrophysical processes and may be difficult to achieve in heavy ion collisions. Nonetheless, some suggestions for the possible experimental verification of the existence of this phenomenon are made. PMID:9969695

  19. Negative ion source with low temperature transverse divergence optical system

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Stirling, William L.

    1986-01-01

    A negative ion source is provided which has extremely low transverse divergence as a result of a unique ion focusing system in which the focal line of an ion beam emanating from an elongated, concave converter surface is outside of the ion exit slit of the source and the path of the exiting ions. The beam source operates with a minimum ion temperature which makes possible a sharply focused (extremely low transverse divergence) ribbon like negative ion beam.

  20. Negative ion source with low temperature transverse divergence optical system

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, J.H.; Stirling, W.L.

    1985-03-04

    A negative ion source is provided which has extremely low transverse divergence as a result of a unique ion focusing system in which the focal line of an ion beam emanating from an elongated, concave converter surface is outside of the ion exit slit of the source and the path of the exiting ions. The beam source operates with a minimum ion temperature which makes possible a sharply focused (extremely low transverse divergence) ribbon like negative ion beam.

  1. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectra of Halomethyl Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelhuber, Kristen M.; Wren, Scott W.; McCoy, Anne B.; Ervin, Kent M.; Lineberger, W. Carl

    2009-06-01

    Halomethyl anions undergo a significant geometry change upon electron photodetachment, resulting in multiple extended vibrational progressions in the photoelectron spectra. The normal mode analysis that successfully models photoelectron spectra when geometry changes are modest is unable to reproduce the experimental data using physically reasonable parameters. A three-dimensional anharmonic coupled-mode analysis was employed to accurately reproduce the observed vibrational structure. We present the 364 nm negative ion photoelectron spectra of the halomethyl anions CHX_2^- and CDX_2^- (X = Cl, Br, I) and report electron affinities, vibrational frequencies, and geometries.

  2. Cesium injection system for negative ion duoplasmatrons

    DOEpatents

    Kobayashi, Maasaki; Prelec, Krsto; Sluyters, Theodorus J

    1978-01-01

    Longitudinally extending, foraminous cartridge means having a cylindrical side wall forming one flat, circular, tip end surface and an opposite end; an open-ended cavity, and uniformly spaced orifices for venting the cavity through the side wall in the annulus of a plasma ring for uniformly ejecting cesium for coating the flat, circular, surface. To this end, the cavity is filled with a cesium containing substance and attached to a heater in a hollow-discharge duoplasmatron. By coating the flat circular surface with a uniform monolayer of cesium and locating it in an electrical potential well at the end of a hollow-discharge, ion duoplasmatron source of an annular hydrogen plasma ring, the negative hydrogen production from the duoplasmatron is increased. The negative hydrogen is produced on the flat surface of the cartridge and extracted by the electrical potential well along a trajectory coaxial with the axis of the plasma ring.

  3. Jets and Vector Bosons in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, Begoña

    2013-11-01

    This paper reviews experimental results on jets and electroweak boson (photon,Wand Z) production in heavy-ion collisions, from the CMS and ATLAS detectors, using data collected during 2011 PbPb run and pp data collected at an equivalent energy. By comparing the two collision systems, the energy loss of the partons propagating through the medium produced in PbPb collisions can be studied. Its characterization is done using dijet events and isolated photon-jet pairs. Since the electroweak gauge bosons do not participate in the strong interaction, and are thus unmodified by the nuclear medium, they serve as clean probes of the initial state in the collision.

  4. Alignment and orientation in ion/endash/atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, M.; Lane, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the theoretical study of alignment and orientation in atom-atom and ion-atom collisions at intermediate energies is reviewed. Recent systematic studies of the alignment and orientation of electronic charge cloud distributions of excited states resulting from such collisions clearly have provided more detailed information about the underlying collision dynamics. However, since accurate determination of these parameters is quite difficult, both theoretically and experimentally, a close collaboration between theory and experiment is necessary for a deeper understanding of the collision dynamics. A more complete approach, where the full density matrix is determined, is also discussed.

  5. How to Deal with Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Rolf

    A qualitative review is given of the theoretical problems and possibilities arising when one tries to understand what happens in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The striking similarity between these and pp collisions suggests the use of techniques similar to those used 5-12 years ago in pp collisions to disentangle collective motions from thermodynamics. A very heuristic and qualitative sketch of statistical bootstrap thermodynamics concludes an idealized picture in which a relativistic heavy ion collision appears as a superposition of moving `fireballs' with equilibrium thermodynamics in the rest frames of these fireballs. The interesting problems arise where this theoretician's picture deviates from reality: non-equilibrium, more complicated motion (shock waves, turbulence, spin) and the collision history. Only if these problems have been solved or shown to be irrelevant can we safely identify signatures of unusual states of hadronic matter as, for example, a quark-gluon plasma or density isomers.

  6. Noise reduction in negative-ion quadrupole mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1993-01-01

    A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system having an ion source, quadrupole mass filter, and ion collector/recorder system. A weak, transverse magnetic field and an electron collector are disposed between the quadrupole and ion collector. When operated in negative ion mode, the ion source produces a beam of primarily negatively-charged particles from a sample, including electrons as well as ions. The beam passes through the quadrupole and enters the magnetic field, where the electrons are deflected away from the beam path to the electron collector. The negative ions pass undeflected to the ion collector where they are detected and recorded as a mass spectrum.

  7. Noise reduction in negative-ion quadrupole mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1993-04-20

    A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system is described having an ion source, quadrupole mass filter, and ion collector/recorder system. A weak, transverse magnetic field and an electron collector are disposed between the quadrupole and ion collector. When operated in negative ion mode, the ion source produces a beam of primarily negatively-charged particles from a sample, including electrons as well as ions. The beam passes through the quadrupole and enters the magnetic field, where the electrons are deflected away from the beam path to the electron collector. The negative ions pass undeflected to the ion collector where they are detected and recorded as a mass spectrum.

  8. Skyrme tensor force in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Fracasso, S.; Barton, M. C.; Umar, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Background: It is generally acknowledged that the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) method provides a useful foundation for a fully microscopic many-body theory of low-energy heavy ion reactions. The TDHF method is also known in nuclear physics in the small-amplitude domain, where it provides a useful description of collective states, and is based on the mean-field formalism, which has been a relatively successful approximation to the nuclear many-body problem. Currently, the TDHF theory is being widely used in the study of fusion excitation functions, fission, and deep-inelastic scattering of heavy mass systems, while providing a natural foundation for many other studies. Purpose: With the advancement of computational power it is now possible to undertake TDHF calculations without any symmetry assumptions and incorporate the major strides made by the nuclear structure community in improving the energy density functionals used in these calculations. In particular, time-odd and tensor terms in these functionals are naturally present during the dynamical evolution, while being absent or minimally important for most static calculations. The parameters of these terms are determined by the requirement of Galilean invariance or local gauge invariance but their significance for the reaction dynamics have not been fully studied. This work addresses this question with emphasis on the tensor force. Method: The full version of the Skyrme force, including terms arising only from the Skyrme tensor force, is applied to the study of collisions within a completely symmetry-unrestricted TDHF implementation. Results: We examine the effect on upper fusion thresholds with and without the tensor force terms and find an effect on the fusion threshold energy of the order several MeV. Details of the distribution of the energy within terms in the energy density functional are also discussed. Conclusions: Terms in the energy density functional linked to the tensor force can play a non

  9. Electron-less negative ion extraction from ion-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-03-09

    This paper presents experimental results showing that continuous negative ion extraction, without co-extracted electrons, is possible from highly electronegative SF{sub 6} ion-ion plasma at low gas pressure (1 mTorr). The ratio between the negative ion and electron densities is more than 3000 in the vicinity of the two-grid extraction and acceleration system. The measurements are conducted by both magnetized and non-magnetized energy analyzers attached to the external grid. With these two analyzers, we show that the extracted negative ion flux is almost electron-free and has the same magnitude as the positive ion flux extracted and accelerated when the grids are biased oppositely. The results presented here can be used for validation of numerical and analytical models of ion extraction from ion-ion plasma.

  10. Ion momentum and energy transfer rates for charge exchange collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The rates of momentum and energy transfer have been obtained for charge exchange collisions between ion and neutral gases having arbitrary Maxwellian temperatures and bulk transport velocities. The results are directly applicable to the F-region of the ionosphere where 0+ - 0 charge is the dominant mechanism affecting ion momentum and energy transfer.

  11. Study of negative hydrogen ion beam optics using the 3D3V PIC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, K.; Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Hanada, M.; Kojima, A.

    2015-04-01

    The mechanism of negative ion extraction under real conditions with the complex magnetic field is studied by using the 3D PIC simulation code. The extraction region of the negative ion source for the negative ion based neutral beam injection system in fusion reactors is modelled. It is shown that the E x B drift of electrons is caused by the magnetic filter and the electron suppression magnetic field, and the resultant asymmetry of the plasma meniscus. Furthermore, it is indicated that that the asymmetry of the plasma meniscus results in the asymmetry of negative ion beam profile including the beam halo. It could be demonstrated theoretically that the E x B drift is not significantly weakened by the elastic collisions of the electrons with neutral particles.

  12. Study of negative hydrogen ion beam optics using the 3D3V PIC model

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Hanada, M.; Kojima, A.

    2015-04-08

    The mechanism of negative ion extraction under real conditions with the complex magnetic field is studied by using the 3D PIC simulation code. The extraction region of the negative ion source for the negative ion based neutral beam injection system in fusion reactors is modelled. It is shown that the E x B drift of electrons is caused by the magnetic filter and the electron suppression magnetic field, and the resultant asymmetry of the plasma meniscus. Furthermore, it is indicated that that the asymmetry of the plasma meniscus results in the asymmetry of negative ion beam profile including the beam halo. It could be demonstrated theoretically that the E x B drift is not significantly weakened by the elastic collisions of the electrons with neutral particles.

  13. Head-on collisions of electrostatic solitons in multi-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Verheest, Frank; Hellberg, Manfred A.; Hereman, Willy A.

    2012-09-15

    Head-on collisions between two electrostatic solitons are dealt with by the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method of strained coordinates, for a plasma composed of a number of cold (positive and negative) ion species and Boltzmann electrons. The nonlinear evolution equations for both solitons and their phase shift due to the collision, resulting in time delays, are established. A Korteweg-de Vries description is the generic conclusion, except when the plasma composition is special enough to replace the quadratic by a cubic nonlinearity in the evolution equations, with concomitant repercussions on the phase shifts. Applications include different two-ion plasmas, showing positive or negative polarity solitons in the generic case. At critical composition, a combination of a positive and a negative polarity soliton is possible.

  14. Polarization effects in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, C. C. Jr.

    2010-11-12

    Recent experiments at RHIC have shown that in 200 GeV Au-Au collisions, the {Lambda} and {Lambda}-bar hyperons are produced with very small polarizations, almost consistent with zero. These results can be understood in terms of a model that we recently proposed. In this work, we show how this model may be applied in such collisions, and also will discuss the relation of our results with other models, in order to explain the experimental data.

  15. Models for Cometary Comae Containing Negative Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of IP/Halley. The anions O(-), OH(-), C(-), CH(-) and CN(-) have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu [I]. Organic molecular anions such as C4H(-) and C6H(-) are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been fully explored. We present details of our new models for the chemistry of cometary comae that include atomic and molecular anions. We calculate the impact of these anions on the charge balance and examine their importance for cometary coma chemistry.

  16. DNA Oligonucleotide Fragment Ion Rearrangements Upon Collision-Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Brett; Neumann, Elizabeth K.; Solouki, Touradj

    2015-08-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of m/z-isolated w type fragment ions and an intact 5' phosphorylated DNA oligonucleotide generated rearranged product ions. Of the 21 studied w ions of various nucleotide sequences, fragment ion sizes, and charge states, 18 (~86%) generated rearranged product ions upon CID in a Synapt G2-S HDMS (Waters Corporation, Manchester, England, UK) ion mobility-mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometry (MS), ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and theoretical modeling data suggest that purine bases can attack the free 5' phosphate group in w type ions and 5' phosphorylated DNA to generate sequence permuted [phosphopurine]- fragment ions. We propose and discuss a potential mechanism for generation of rearranged [phosphopurine]- and complementary y-B type product ions.

  17. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Prelec, Krsto

    1983-01-01

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  18. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.

    1980-12-12

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface is described. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  19. Dynamical Aspects of Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier

    1995-01-01

    Two independent studies on heavy-ion collisions are presented. In the first part, the charge and mass of the projectile-like fragments produced in the 15-MeV per nucleon ^{40}Ca+^{209 } Bi reaction were determined for products detected near the grazing angle. Neutron number-charge (N-Z) distributions were generated as a function of the total kinetic energy loss and parameterized by their centroids, variances and correlation coefficients. After the interaction, a drift of the charge and mass centroids towards asymmetry is observed. The production of projectile -like fragments is consistent with a tendency of the projectile -like fragments to retain the projectile neutron-to-proton ratio < N > / < Z > = 1. The correlation coefficient remains well below 1.0 for the entire range of total kinetic energy lost. Predictions of two nucleon exchange models, Randrup's and Tassan-Got's, are compared to the experimental results. The models are not able to reproduce the evolution of the experimental distributions, especially the fact that the variances reach a maximum and then decrease as function of the energy loss. This behavior supports the hypothesis that some form of projectile -like fragmentation or cluster emission is perturbing the product distribution from that expected from a damped mechanism. In the second part of the thesis a clustering model that allows the recognition of mass fragments from dynamical simulations has been developed. Studying the evolution of a microscopic computation based on the nuclear -Boltzman transport equation, a suitable time is chosen to identify the bound clusters. At this time the number of binding surfaces for each test nucleon is found. Based on the number of nucleon bindings the interior nucleons are identified, and the cluster kernels are formed. An iterative routine is then applied to determine the coalescence of the surrounding free nucleons. Once the fragment formation has been established, a statistical decay code is used to

  20. Pseudorapidity correlations in heavy ion collisions from viscous fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnai, Akihiko; Schenke, Björn

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate by explicit calculations in 3+1 dimensional viscous relativistic fluid dynamics how two-particle pseudorapidity correlation functions in heavy ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC depend on the number of particle producing sources and the transport properties of the produced medium. In particular, we present results for the Legendre coefficients of the two-particle pseudorapidity correlation function, an,m, in Pb+Pb collisions at 2760 GeV and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV from viscous hydrodynamics with three dimensionally fluctuating initial conditions. Our results suggest that the an,m provide important constraints on initial state fluctuations in heavy ion collisions.

  1. Effects of Ion-Ion Collisions and Inhomogeneity in Two-Dimensional Kinetic Ion Simulations of Stimulated Brillouin Backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Divol, L; Langdon, A B; Williams, E A

    2005-10-17

    Two-dimensional simulations with the BZOHAR [B.I. Cohen, B.F. Lasinski, A.B. Langdon, and E.A. Williams, Phys. Plasmas 4, 956 (1997)] hybrid code (kinetic particle ions and Boltzmann fluid electrons) have been used to investigate the saturation of stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBBS) instability including the effects of ion-ion collisions and inhomogeneity. Ion-ion collisions tend to increase ion-wave dissipation, which decreases the gain exponent for stimulated Brillouin backscattering; and the peak Brillouin backscatter reflectivities tend to decrease with increasing collisionality in the simulations. Two types of Langevin-operator, ion-ion collision models were implemented in the simulations. In both models used the collisions are functions of the local ion temperature and density, but the collisions have no velocity dependence in the first model. In the second model, the collisions are also functions of the energy of the ion that is being scattered so as to represent a Fokker-Planck collision operator. Collisions decorrelate the ions from the acoustic waves in SBS, which disrupts ion trapping in the acoustic wave. Nevertheless, ion trapping leading to a hot ion tail and two-dimensional physics that allows the SBS ion waves to nonlinearly scatter remain robust saturation mechanisms for SBBS in a high-gain limit over a range of ion collisionality. SBS backscatter in the presence of a spatially nonuniform plasma flow is also investigated. Simulations show that depending on the sign of the spatial gradient of the flow relative to the backscatter, ion trapping effects that produce a nonlinear frequency shift can enhance (auto-resonance) or decrease (anti-auto-resonance) reflectivities in agreement with theoretical arguments.

  2. Hot topics in ultra-peripheral ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, G.; Bertulani, C.A.; Chiu, M.; Ginzburg, I.F.; Hencken, K.; Klein, S.R.; Nystrand, J.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Roldao, C.G.; Silvermyr, D.; Thomas, J.H.; White, S.N.; Yepes, P.

    2001-10-16

    Ultra-peripheral collisions of relativistic heavy ions involve long-ranged electromagnetic interactions at impact parameters too large for hadronic interactions to occur. The nuclear charges are large; with the coherent enhancement, the cross sections are also large. Many types of photonuclear and purely electromagnetic interactions are possible. We present here an introduction to ultra-peripheral collisions, and present four of the most compelling physics topics.

  3. Production of negative hydrogen ions on metal grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oohara, W.; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, H.; Kawata, K.

    2015-03-15

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced on a nickel grid with positive-ion irradiation. In order to investigate the production mechanism, a copper grid without the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and positive helium ions without negative ionization are used for comparison. Positive hydrogen ions reflected on the metal surface obtain two electrons from the surface and become negatively ionized. It is found that the production yield of negative ions by desorption ionization of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms seems to be small, and the production is a minor mechanism.

  4. Thermal, chemical and spectral equilibration in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almási, Gábor András; Wolf, György

    2015-11-01

    We have considered the equilibration in relativistic heavy ion collisions at energies 1-7 A GeV using our transport model. We applied periodic boundary conditions to close the system in a box. We found that the thermal equilibration takes place in the first 20-40 fm/c whose time is comparable to the duration of a heavy ion collision. The chemical equilibration is a much slower process and the system does not equilibrate in a heavy ion collision. We have shown that in the testparticle simulation of the Boltzmann equation the mass spectra of broad resonances follow instantaneously their in-medium spectral functions as expected from the Markovian approximation to the Kadanoff-Baym equations employed via the (local) gradient expansion.

  5. GlycoMob: an ion mobility-mass spectrometry collision cross section database for glycomics.

    PubMed

    Struwe, Weston B; Pagel, Kevin; Benesch, Justin L P; Harvey, David J; Campbell, Matthew P

    2016-06-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a promising analytical technique for glycomics that separates glycan ions based on their collision cross section (CCS) and provides glycan precursor and fragment masses. It has been shown that isomeric oligosaccharide species can be separated by IM and identified on basis of their CCS and fragmentation. These results indicate that adding CCSs information for glycans and glycan fragments to searchable databases and analysis pipelines will increase identification confidence and accuracy. We have developed a freely accessible database, GlycoMob ( http://www.glycomob.org ), containing over 900 CCSs values of glycans, oligosaccharide standards and their fragments that will be continually updated. We have measured the absolute CCSs of calibration standards, biologically derived and synthetic N-glycans ionized with various adducts in positive and negative mode or as protonated (positive ion) and deprotonated (negative ion) ions. PMID:26314736

  6. Ion beam driven ion-acoustic waves in a plasma cylinder with negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Gahlot, Ajay

    2008-07-15

    An ion beam propagating through a magnetized plasma cylinder containing K{sup +} positive ions, electrons, and SF{sub 6}{sup -} negative ions drives electrostatic ion-acoustic (IA) waves to instability via Cerenkov interaction. Two electrostatic IA wave modes in presence of K{sup +} and SF{sub 6}{sup -} ions are studied. The phase velocity of the sound wave in presence of positive and negative ions increase with the relative density of negative ions. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate of both the modes in presence of positive and negative ions increase with the relative density of negative ions. The growth rate of both the unstable modes in presence of SF{sub 6}{sup -} and K{sup +} ions scales as the one-third power of the beam density. Numerical calculations of the phase velocity, growth rate, and mode frequencies have been carried out for the parameters of the experiment of Song et al. [Phys. Fluids B 3, 284 (1991)].

  7. Multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-03-01

    Research in atomic physics at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Super-HILAC and Bevalac accelerators on multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions is described. Experiments have studied various aspects of the charge-transfer, ionization, and excitation processes. Examples of processes in which electron correlation plays a role are resonant transfer and excitation and Auger-electron emission. Processes in which electron behavior can generally be described as uncorrelated include ionization and charge transfer in high-energy ion-atom collisions. A variety of experiments and results for energies from 1 MeV/u to 420 MeV/u are presented. 20 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Complexified boost invariance and holographic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, Steven S.; van der Schee, Wilke

    2015-01-01

    At strong coupling holographic studies have shown that heavy ion collisions do not obey normal boost invariance. Here we study a modified boost invariance through a complex shift in time, and show that this leads to surprisingly good agreement with numerical holographic computations. When including perturbations the agreement becomes even better, both in the hydrodynamic and the far-from-equilibrium regime. One of the main advantages is an analytic formulation of the stress-energy tensor of the longitudinal dynamics of holographic heavy ion collisions.

  9. Negative ions at Titan and Enceladus: recent results.

    PubMed

    Coates, Andrew J; Wellbrock, Anne; Lewis, Gethyn R; Jones, Geraint H; Young, David T; Crary, Frank J; Waite, J Hunter; Johnson, Robert E; Hille, Thomas W; Sittler, Edward C

    2010-01-01

    The detection of heavy negative ions (up to 13 800 amu) in Titan's ionosphere is one of the tantalizing new results from the Cassini mission. These heavy ions indicate for the first time the existence of heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile molecules in this primitive Earth-like atmosphere. These ions were suggested to be precursors of aerosols in Titan's atmosphere and may precipitate to the surface as tholins. We present the evidence for and the analysis of these heavy negative ions at Titan. In addition we examine the variation of the maximum mass of the Titan negative ions with altitude and latitude for the relevant encounters so far, and we discuss the implications for the negative ion formation process. We present data from a recent set of encounters where the latitude was varied between encounters, with other parameters fixed. Models are beginning to explain the low mass negative ions, but the formation process for the higher mass ions is still not understood. It is possible that the structures may be chains, rings or even fullerenes. Negative ions, mainly water clusters in this case, were seen during Cassini's recent close flybys of Enceladus. We present mass spectra from the Enceladus plume, showing water clusters and additional species. As at Titan, the negative ions indicate chemical complexities which were unknown before the Cassini encounters, and are indicative of a complex balance between neutrals and positively and negatively charged ions. PMID:21302552

  10. Cavity Ring-Down System for Density Measurement of Negative Hydrogen Ion on Negative Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Haruhisa; Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Nagaoka, Kenichi; Shibuya, Masayuki; Kisaki, Masashi; Ikeda, Katsunori; Osakabe, Masaki; Kaneko, Osamu; Asano, Eiji; Kondo, Tomoki; Sato, Mamoru; Komada, Seiji; Sekiguchi, Haruo; Takeiri, Yasuhiko; Fantz, Ursel

    2011-09-26

    A Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) system was applied to measure the density of negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -}) in vicinity of extraction surface in the H{sup -} source for the development of neutral beam injector on Large Helical Device (LHD). The density measurement with sampling time of 50 ms was carried out. The measured density with the CRD system is relatively good agreement with the density evaluated from extracted beam-current with applying a similar relation of positive ion sources. In cesium seeded into ion-source plasma, the linearity between an arc power of the discharge and the measured density with the CRD system was observed. Additionally, the measured density was proportional to the extracted beam current. These characteristics indicate the CRD system worked well for H{sup -} density measurement in the region of H{sup -} and extraction.

  11. Threshold photodetachment spectroscopy of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsopoulos, T.N.

    1991-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development and application of high resolution threshold photodetachment spectroscopy of negative ions. Chapter I deals with the principles of our photodetachment technique, and in chapter II a detailed description of the apparatus is presented. The threshold photodetachment spectra of I{sup {minus}}, and SH{sup {minus}}, presented in the last sections of chapter II, indicated that a resolution of 3 cm{sup {minus}1} can be achieved using our technique. In chapter III the threshold photodetachment spectroscopy study of the transition state region of I + HI and I + Di reactions is discussed. Our technique probes the transition state region directly, and the results of our study are the first unambiguous observations of reactive resonances in a chemical reaction. Chapters IV, V and VI are concerned with the spectroscopy of small silicon and carbon clusters. From our spectra we were able to assign electronic state energies and vibrational frequencies for the low lying electronics states of Si{sub n} (n=2,3,4), C{sub 5} and their corresponding anions.

  12. Effect of fast positive ions incident on caesiated plasma grid of negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bacal, M.

    2012-02-15

    This paper describes the effect on negative ion formation on a caesiated surface of the backscattering of positive ions approaching it with energy of a few tens of eV. For a positive ion energy of 45 eV, the surface produced negative ion current density due to these fast positive ions is 12 times larger than that due to thermal atoms, thus dominating the negative ion surface production instead of the thermal atoms, as considered until now.

  13. Negative-ion source applications (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, J.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper heavy negative-ion sources which we developed and their applications for materials science are reviewed. Heavy negative ions can be effectively produced by the ejection of a sputtered atom through the optimally cesiated surface of target with a low work function. Then, enough continuous negative-ion currents for materials-science applications can be obtained. We developed several kinds of sputter-type heavy negative-ion sources such as neutral- and ionized-alkaline metal bombardment-type heavy negative-ion source and rf-plasma sputter type. In the case where a negative ion is irradiated on a material surface, surface charging seldom takes place because incoming negative charge of the negative ion is well balanced with outgoing negative charge of the released secondary electron. In the negative-ion implantation into an insulator or insulated conductive material, high precision implantation processing with charge-up free properties can be achieved. Negative-ion implantation technique, therefore, can be applied to the following novel material processing systems: the surface modification of micrometer-sized powders, the nanoparticle formation in an insulator for the quantum devices, and the nerve cell growth manipulation by precise control of the biocompatibility of polymer surface. When a negative ion with low kinetic energy approaches the solid surface, the kinetic energy causes the interatomic bonding (kinetic bonding), and formation of a metastable material is promoted. Carbon films with high constituent of sp3 bonding, therefore, can be formed by carbon negative-ion beam deposition.

  14. Anisotropic negative-ion emission from cluster nanoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, R.; Dalui, Malay; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Rishad, K. P. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-06-01

    Recent experiments have shown that the enhanced charge transfer by Rydberg excited clusters (ECTREC) reduces the highly charged ions very efficiently to neutral atoms and negative ions with little loss of momentum. Neutral-atom emission is anisotropic with respect to the laser polarization and the anisotropy is larger than that of the ion emission from Coulomb explosion of isolated single clusters. In such a scenario, it is expected that the negative-ion emission (like neutrals) should be anisotropic and have larger propensity along the laser polarization than in the perpendicular direction. Further, it may be anticipated that negative-ion emission is more anisotropic than neutral-atom emission if ECTREC is taken in to account. We demonstrate that the negative-ion emission is anisotropic. Contrary to expectations, the negative-ion emission anisotropy is not more than that of the neutral-atom emission. We show that this can be rationalized if low-energy (about 10 eV) electron collisional detachment of the negative ions is taken into account. Electron collisional detachment depletes the negative-ion yield preferentially along the laser polarization direction and reduces the negative-ion emission anisotropy.

  15. Atomic wall recombination and volume negative ion production

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, Damiano; Gorse, Claudine; Capitelli, Mario

    2006-03-15

    The development of a numerical code for the modeling of negative ion sources requires the knowledge of a lot of processes occurring both in the gas phase and at the surface. The present work concerns the effect of surface processes (in particular atomic wall recombination) on the kinetics of production/destruction of negative ions. Especially in the pressure regimes useful to produce negative hydrogen ions for thermonuclear applications, wall processes can strongly affect the negative ion production acting on the vibrational distribution of molecular hydrogen.

  16. Meson interferometry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: Recent HBT results form CERN experiment NA44; interferometry results from E802/E859/E866; recent results on two particle correlations from E814; source sizes from CERN data; intermittency and interferometry; Bose-Einstein correlations in 200A GeV S+Au collisions; HBT correlations at STAR; HBT interferometry with PHENIX; HBT calculations from ARC; three pion correlations; and pion correlations in proton-induced reactions.

  17. Bremsstrahlung dileptons in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jalilian-Marian, J.; Koch, V.

    1998-12-01

    We consider production of dilepton pairs through coherent electromagnetic radiation during nuclear collisions. We show that the number of pairs produced through bremsstrahlung is about two orders of magnitude smaller than the yield measured by the CERES Collaboration. Therefore, coherent bremsstrahlung can be ruled out as an explanation for the observed enhancement of low mass dileptons in CERES and HELIOS data. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Quasimolecular single-nucleon effects in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Erb, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    Several experimental examples are discussed to illustrate that single-particle molecular orbital behavior has become an established reality in nuclear physics over the last several years. Measurements and analyses of inelastic scattering in the /sup 13/C + /sup 12/C and /sup 17/O + /sup 12/C systems, and of neutron transfer in the /sup 13/C(/sup 13/C, /sup 12/C)/sup 14/C reaction, show that the motion of valence nucleons can be strongly and simultaneously influenced by both collision partners in heavy-ion collisions. This bvehavior is characteristic of a molecular (single-particle) rather than a direct (DWBA) mechanism: it demonstrates that the single-particle analog of atomic molecular motion plays an important role in nuclear reactions at bombarding energies near the Coulomb barrier. Such behavior may be even more pronounced in the collisions of massive nuclei that will be studied with the new generation of heavy-ion accelerators. 19 references.

  19. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  20. [12th International workshop on Inelastic Ion-Surface Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rabalais, J.W.; Nordlander, P.

    1999-10-15

    The twelfth international workshop on inelastic ion surface collisions was held at the Bahia Mar Resort and Conference Center on South Padre Island, Texas (USA) from January 24-29, 1999. The workshop brought together most of the leading researchers from around the world to focus on both the theoretical and experimental aspects of particle - surface interactions and related topics.

  1. The role of prompt electrons in the post-collision effect in fast ion - atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Víkor, Gy; Ricz, S.; Kövér, Á.; Gulyás, L.; Pelicon, P.; Sulik, B.

    1997-10-01

    The influence of the post-collision Coulomb effect of direct-electrons on the Auger-line energy shift has been studied in fast proton - atom collisions. KLL and LMM Auger spectra of neon and krypton target have been measured and analysed with high precision. The semiclassical theory of the post-collision interaction (PCI) has been extended to include the effect of both the receeding projectile ion and the ejected prompt electron. Experimental and theoretical line-energy shifts exhibit a reasonable agreement in the entire angular range of the Auger emission. In a narrow cone around 0953-4075/30/19/020/img9, the line-energy shift is influenced mainly by the PCI with the projectile ion, while at backward angles, it is predominantly governed by the ejected electron - Auger - electron interaction.

  2. Electrode activation in cesium-free negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2010-02-15

    Features of emission electrode activation leading to enhancement of negative ion emission in cesium-free discharges are discussed. In some ion sources with cesium-free discharges, the emission of negative ions has been increased significantly by emission electrode activation using strong heating of the negative biased electrode by discharge plasma. A simple explanation of this enhancement is that it is due to an accumulation on the emission surface of the plasma electrode of impurities with low ionization potential that decreases in surface work function and increases the secondary emission of negative ions similar to ''Cesiation.'' The negative biasing of emission surface is important for accumulation and trapping the impurities on the emission surface. To effectively control the activation process it is important to directly detect the evolution of the work function and the impurity concentration during electrode activation with enhancement of negative ion emission.

  3. Investigations of negative and positive cesium ion species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanin, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    A direct test is provided of the hypothesis of negative ion creation at the anode or collector of a diode operating under conditions simulating a cesium thermionic converter. The experimental technique involves using direct ion sampling through the collector electrode with mass analysis using a quadrupole mass analyzer. Similar measurements are undertaken on positive ions extracted through the emitter electrode. Measurements were made on a variety of gases including pure cesium, helium-cesium mixtures and cesium-hydrogen as well as cesium-xenon mixtures. The gas additive was used primarily to aid in understanding the negative ion formation processes. Measurements were conducted using emitter (cathode) temperatures up to about 1000 F. The major negative ion identified through the collector was Cs(-) with minor negative ion peaks tentatively identified as H(-), H2(-), H3(-), He(-) and a mass 66. Positive ions detected were believed to be Cs(+), Cs2(+) and Cs3(+).

  4. Cesium in hydrogen negative-ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Belchenko, Yu.I.; Davydenko, V.I.

    2006-03-15

    Experimental data on the dynamics of cesium particles in the pulsed magnetron and Penning surface-plasma ion sources are presented. Cesium escape from the source emission apertures and the cesium ion current to discharge electrodes was measured. The low value of cesium flux from the source was detected. An intense cesium ion current to the cathode (up to 0.8 A/cm{sup 2}) was measured. The high value of cesium ion current to surface-plasma source cathode confirms the cesium circulation near the cathode.

  5. Observation of the negative ions: Ra[sup [minus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X.; Nadeau, M.; Garwan, M.A.; Kilius, L.R.; Litherland, A.E. )

    1993-11-01

    The negative ions of the isotopes [sup 226]Ra, [sup 231]Pa, and [sup 244]Pu have been observed by means of accelerator mass spectrometry and their properties compared with the negative ions of Th and U. The electron affinities of all these elements have been estimated to be similar and greater than 50 meV.

  6. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, A.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ((IHI) and (FH{sub 2})). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  7. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, A.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ([IHI] and [FH{sub 2}]). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  8. Negative ions of nitroethane and its clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, S. T.; Bowen, K. H.; Sommerfeld, T.; Ard, S.; Mirsaleh-Kohan, N.; Steill, J. D.; Compton, R. N.

    2008-08-01

    Valence and dipole-bound negative ions of the nitroethane (NE) molecule and its clusters are studied using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), Rydberg electron transfer (RET) techniques, and ab initio methods. Valence adiabatic electron affinities (EAas) of NE, C2H5NO2, and its clusters, (C2H5NO2)n, n=2-5, are estimated using vibrationally unresolved PES to be 0.3+/-0.2 eV (n=1), 0.9+/-0.2 eV (n=2), 1.5+/-0.2 eV (n=3), 1.9+/-0.2 eV (n=4), and 2.1+/-0.2 eV (n=5). These energies were then used to determine stepwise anion-neutral solvation energies and compared with previous literature values. Vertical detachment energies for (C2H5NO2)n- were also measured to be 0.92+/-0.10 eV (n=1), 1.63+/-0.10 eV (n=2), 2.04+/-0.10 eV (n=3), and 2.3+/-0.1 eV (n=4). RET experiments show that Rydberg electrons can be attached to NE both as dipole-bound and valence bound anion states. The results are similar to those found for nitromethane (NM), where it was argued that the diffuse dipole state act as a ``doorway state'' to the more tightly bound valence anion. Using previous models for relating the maximum in the RET dependence of the Rydberg effective principle number nmax*, the dipole-bound electron affinity is predicted to be ~25 meV. However, a close examination of the RET cross section data for NE and a re-examination of such data for NM finds a much broader dependence on n* than is seen for RET in conventional dipole bound states and, more importantly, a pronounced l dependence is found in nmax* (nmax* increases with l). Ab initio calculations agree well with the experimental results apart from the vertical electron affinity value associated with the dipole bound state which is predicted to be 8 meV. Moreover, the calculations help to visualize the dramatic difference in the distributions of the excess electron for dipole-bound and valence states, and suggest that NE clusters form only anions where the excess electron localizes on a single monomer.

  9. Enhancement of electric force by ion-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Makrinich, G.; Fruchtman, A.

    2009-11-02

    The measured force exerted on an ion flow by an electric field is found to be larger than the electric force that can be exerted if the ions are collisionless. In addition, the increase of the gas pressure is found to result in an increase of the electric force despite a simultaneous decrease of the deposited electric power. Employing a simple model, we argue that these experimental findings result from the electric force being felt by the ions for a longer time, their residence time in the acceleration region is increased due to their slowing-down collisions with neutrals.

  10. Negative ion based neutral beam injector for JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Y.; Araki, M.; Hanada, M.; Inoue, T.; Kunieda, S.; Kuriyama, M.; Matsuoka, M.; Mizuno, M.; Ohara, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Watanabe, K.

    1992-10-01

    A 500 keV, 10 MW neutral beam injector is to be constructed in JT-60 Upgrade for the experiments of current drive and heating of heat density core plasmas. This is the first neutral beam injector in the world using negative ions as the primary ions. In the design, D- ion beams of 44 A, 500 keV are produced by two ion sources (22 A/each ion source) and neutralized in a long gas neutralizer. The total system efficiency is about 40%. The ion source is a cesium-seeded multicusp volume source having a three stage electrostatic accelerator. To reduce the stripping loss of D- ions in the accelerator, the ion source should be operated at a low pressure of 0.3 Pa with a current density of 13 mA/cm2. The first test of the full-size negative ion source is scheduled from middle of 1993.

  11. Negative ion source development for fusion application (invited).

    PubMed

    Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2010-02-01

    Giant negative ion sources, producing high-current of several tens amps with high energy of several hundreds keV to 1 MeV, are required for a neutral beam injector (NBI) in a fusion device. The giant negative ion sources are cesium-seeded plasma sources, in which the negative ions are produced on the cesium-covered surface. Their characteristic features are discussed with the views of large-volume plasma production, large-area beam acceleration, and high-voltage dc holding. The international thermonuclear experimental reactor NBI employs a 1 MeV-40 A of deuterium negative ion source, and intensive development programs for the rf-driven source plasma production and the multistage electrostatic acceleration are in progress, including the long pulse operation for 3600 s. Present status of the development, as well as the achievements of the giant negative ion sources in the working injectors, is also summarized. PMID:20192420

  12. Application of anomalous diffusion in production of negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimbo, Kouichi

    1984-11-01

    The production of negative hydrogen ions is investigated in the reflex-type negative ion sources. When anomalous diffusion in the positive column was found by Hoh and Lehnert [Phys. Fluids 3, 600 (1960)], it was pointed out that the large particle loss produced by anomalous diffusion is compensated for by the larger particle production inside the plasma. In the present experiments anomalous diffusion was artificially encouraged by changing the radial electric field inside the reflex discharge. Apparent encouragement of negative ion current by the increase of the density fluctuation amplitude is observed. Twice as much negative ion current was obtained with the artificial encouragement as without. On the other hand, the larger extracted negative ion current was observed with a lower electron temperature, which is calculated from the anomalous diffusion coefficient derived from a simple nonlinear theory. This result is consistent with Wadehra's calculated results [Appl. Phys. Lett. 35, 917 (1979)].

  13. Negative ion source development for fusion application (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2010-02-15

    Giant negative ion sources, producing high-current of several tens amps with high energy of several hundreds keV to 1 MeV, are required for a neutral beam injector (NBI) in a fusion device. The giant negative ion sources are cesium-seeded plasma sources, in which the negative ions are produced on the cesium-covered surface. Their characteristic features are discussed with the views of large-volume plasma production, large-area beam acceleration, and high-voltage dc holding. The international thermonuclear experimental reactor NBI employs a 1 MeV-40 A of deuterium negative ion source, and intensive development programs for the rf-driven source plasma production and the multistage electrostatic acceleration are in progress, including the long pulse operation for 3600 s. Present status of the development, as well as the achievements of the giant negative ion sources in the working injectors, is also summarized.

  14. Application of anomalous diffusion in production of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimbo, K.

    1984-11-01

    The production of negative hydrogen ions is investigated in the reflex-type negative ion sources. When anomalous diffusion in the positive column was found by Hoh and Lehnert (Phys. Fluids 3, 600 (1960)), it was pointed out that the large particle loss produced by anomalous diffusion is compensated for by the larger particle production inside the plasma. In the present experiments anomalous diffusion was artificially encouraged by changing the radial electric field inside the reflex discharge. Apparent encouragement of negative ion current by the increase of the density fluctuation amplitude is observed. Twice as much negative ion current was obtained with the artificial encouragement as without. On the other hand, the larger extracted negative ion current was observed with a lower electron temperature, which is calculated from the anomalous diffusion coefficient derived from a simple nonlinear theory. This result is consistent with Wadehra's calculated results (Appl. Phys. Lett. 35, 917 (1979)).

  15. Dynamical fission following peripheral heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzeri, A.; Italiano, A.

    2016-02-01

    A closed-form theoretical approach describing in a single picture both the evaporation component and the fast nonequilibrium component of the sequential fission of projectile-like fragments in a peripheral heavy-ion collision is derived and then applied to the dynamical fission observed in the 124Sn+64Ni semiperipheral collision at 35AMeV. Information on the reaction mechanism is obtained such as the opposite polarization effects and the estimate of the “formation-to-fast fission lifetimes” of the fissioning fragment.

  16. The Photodetachment of Ps ion and Low-Energy e(+) -H Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Two calculations in the area of positron collisions are presented. The first is the calculation of the photodetachment cross section of the positronium negative ion (Ps-) using accurate variational wave functions for both the initial bound-state and the final P continuum state. The second is the calculation of partial wave cross sections for Ps(1s)-formation in ef -H(ls) collisions using the hyperspherical hidden crossing method. Since the S-wave Stiickelberg phase is close to pi, the very small S-wave Ps(1s) formation cross section can be understood in terms of destructive interference. Other examples in positron collisions are given where it is either known or expected that destructive interference is the cause of the small S-wave Ps(1s) formation cross section. In addition, examples are presented of processes in atomic physics where the Stiickelberg phase is a multiple of pi/2.

  17. Chemical Property in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneta, M.

    K-/K+ and bar{p}/p ratios measured in 158 A\\cdotGeV Pb + Pb collisions are shown as a function of centrality and transverse momentum (Pt). Little significant centrality dependence in neither K-/K+ nor bar{p}/p ratios are observed and they are almost constant as a function of Pt. The chemical freeze-out temperature Tch and the chemical potentials for both light and strange quarks (μq, μs) are extracted by comparing the present data with simple model predictions. The μq, μs and Tch from the NA44 are compared with those obtained from similar analysis of SPS S + A and AGS Si + A data. The chemical freeze-out temperature Tch in CERN energy is higher than thermal freeze-out temperature Tfo which is extracted from transverse momentum distribution of charged hadrons. In AGS energy Tch is close to Tfo.

  18. Electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Stirling, W.L.

    1979-10-25

    An electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources is provided. The system, employing crossed electric and magnetic fields, separates the electrons from the ions as they are extracted from the ion source plasma generator and before the ions are accelerated to their full energy. With the electric and magnetic fields oriented 90/sup 0/ to each other, the electrons remain at approximately the electrical potential at which they were generated. The electromagnetic forces cause the ions to be accelerated to the full accelerating supply voltage energy while being deflected through an angle of less than 90/sup 0/. The electrons precess out of the accelerating field region into an electron recovery region where they are collected at a small fraction of the full accelerating supply energy. It is possible, by this method, to collect > 90% of the electrons extracted along with the negative ions from a negative ion source beam at < 4% of full energy.

  19. Negative hydrogen ion source for TOKAMAK neutral beam injector (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Y.; Fujiwara, Y.; Kashiwagi, M.; Kitagawa, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Morishita, T.; Hanada, M.; Takayanagi, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Watanabe, K.

    2000-02-01

    Intense negative ion source producing multimegawatt hydrogen/deuterium negative ion beams has been developed for the neutral beam injector (NBI) in TOKAMAK thermonuclear fusion machines. Negative ions are produced in a cesium seeded multi-cusp plasma generator via volume and surface processes, and accelerated with a multistage electrostatic accelerator. The negative ion source for JT-60U has produced 18.5 A/360 keV (6.7 MW) H- and 14.3 A/380 keV (5.4 MW) D- ion beams at average current densities of 11 mA/cm2 (H-) and 8.5 mA/cm2 (D-). A high energy negative ion source has been developed for the next generation TOKAMAK such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The source has demonstrated to accelerate negative ions up to 1 MeV, the energy required for ITER. Higher negative ion current density of more than 20 mA/cm2 was obtained in the ITER concept sources. It was confirmed that the consumption rate of cesium is small enough to operate the source for a half year in ITER-NBI without maintenance.

  20. Reaction parameters for heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcke, W.W.; Birkelund, J.R.; Wollersheim, H.J.; Hoover, A.D.; Huizenga, J.R.; Schroeder, W.U.; Tubbs, L.E.

    1980-09-01

    These tables present reaction parameters for all combinations of 27 projectile and 16 target nuclei in a laboratory bombarding energy range of 1--50 MeV/u. The reaction parameters are derived from the Fresnel model of heavy-ion scattering, the droplet model, and the rotating liquid-drop model, or from systematics of experimental data.

  1. Study of the negative ion extraction mechanism from a double-ion plasma in negative ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, I.; Miyamoto, K.; Nishioka, S.; Hatayama, A.

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a 2D3V-PIC model of the extraction region, aiming to clarify the basic extraction mechanism of H- ions from the double-ion plasma in H- negative ion sources. The result shows the same tendency of the H- ion density nH- as that observed in the experiments, i.e.,nH- in the upstream region away from the plasma meniscus (H- emitting surface) has been reduced by applying the extraction voltage. At the same time, relatively slow temporal oscillation of the electric potential compared with the electron plasma frequency has been observed in the extraction region. Results of the systematic study using a 1D3V-PIC model with the uniform magnetic field confirm the result that the electrostatic oscillation is identified to be lower hybrid wave. The effect of this oscillation on the H- transport will be studied in the future.

  2. Time evolution of negative ion profile in a large cesiated negative ion source applicable to fusion reactors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Hanada, M; Kojima, A; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Hiratsuka, J; Ichikawa, M; Watanabe, K; R Grisham, L; Tsumori, K; Kisaki, M

    2016-02-01

    To understand the physics of the cesium (Cs) recycling in the large Cs-seeded negative ion sources relevant to ITER and JT-60SA with ion extraction area of 45-60 cm × 110-120 cm, the time evolution of the negative ion profile was precisely measured in JT-60SA where the ion extraction area is longitudinally segmented into 5. The Cs was seeded from the oven at 180 °C to the ion source. After 1 g of Cs input, surface production of the negative ions appeared only in the central segment where a Cs nozzle was located. Up to 2 g of Cs, the negative ion profile was longitudinally expanded over full ion extraction area. The measured time evolution of the negative ion profile has the similar tendency of distribution of the Cs atoms that is calculated. From the results, it is suggested that Cs atom distribution is correlated with the formation of the negative ion profile. PMID:26932026

  3. Time evolution of negative ion profile in a large cesiated negative ion source applicable to fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Hanada, M.; Kojima, A.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Hiratsuka, J.; Ichikawa, M.; Watanabe, K.; R. Grisham, L.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.

    2016-02-01

    To understand the physics of the cesium (Cs) recycling in the large Cs-seeded negative ion sources relevant to ITER and JT-60SA with ion extraction area of 45-60 cm × 110-120 cm, the time evolution of the negative ion profile was precisely measured in JT-60SA where the ion extraction area is longitudinally segmented into 5. The Cs was seeded from the oven at 180 °C to the ion source. After 1 g of Cs input, surface production of the negative ions appeared only in the central segment where a Cs nozzle was located. Up to 2 g of Cs, the negative ion profile was longitudinally expanded over full ion extraction area. The measured time evolution of the negative ion profile has the similar tendency of distribution of the Cs atoms that is calculated. From the results, it is suggested that Cs atom distribution is correlated with the formation of the negative ion profile.

  4. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of cold negative ions

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1984-02-13

    A process for selectively neutralizing H/sup -/ ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H/sup -/ ions that are

  5. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  6. Study of entropy in intermediate-energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ji; Guo, Wen-Jun; Li, Xian-Jie; Wang, Kuo

    2016-03-01

    Using the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model, the entropy of an intermediate-energy heavy ion collision system after the reaction and the number of deuteronlike and protonlike particles produced in the collision is calculated. In the collision, different parameters are used and the mass number used here is from 40 to 93 at incident energy from 150 MeV to 1050 MeV. We build a new model in which the density distribution of the reaction product is used to calculate the size of the entropy. The entropy calculated with this model is in good agreement with experimental values. Our data reveals that with the increase of the neutron-proton ratio and impact parameter, the entropy of the reaction system decreases, and it increases with the increase of system mass and reaction energy.

  7. Development of negative ion source at the IPP Nagoya University

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroda, T; Okamura, H; Kaneko, O; Oka, Y

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary experiments have been made to develop a high current H/sup -/ ion surface for a neutral beam injector. Initially, an H/sup -/ ion source of the magnetron type has been investigated in order to determine its physical and technical problems. A second plasma source for negative ion production is under construction, which is based on controlled plasma production. This paper describes preliminary experimental results of the magnetron ion source and some features in the new type of plasma source.

  8. Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Shu; Shuryak, Edward

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, we derive a critical condition for matter equilibration in heavy ion collisions using a holographic approach. Gravitational shock waves with infinite transverse extension are used to model an infinite nucleus. We construct the trapped surface in the collision of two asymmetric planar shock waves with sources at different depth in the bulk AdS and formulate a critical condition for matter equilibration in the collision of ''nuclei'' in the dual gauge theory. We find the critical condition is insensitive to the depth of the source closer to the AdS boundary. To understand the origin of the critical condition, we compute the Next-to-Leading Order stress tensor in the boundary field theory due to the interaction of the nuclei and find that the critical condition corresponds to the breaking down of the perturbative expansion. We expect nonperturbative effects are needed to describe black hole formation.

  9. Negative ion-driven associated particle neutron generator

    SciTech Connect

    Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K. N.; Morse, D. H.; Donovan, D. C.; Chames, J. M.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Chen, A. X.; Hausladen, P. A.; Liang, F.

    2015-10-09

    We describe an associated particle neutron generator that employs a negative ion source to produce high neutron flux from a small source size. Furthermore, negative ions produced in an rf-driven plasma source are extracted through a small aperture to form a beam which bombards a positively biased, high voltage target electrode. Electrons co-extracted with the negative ions are removed by a permanent magnet electron filter. The use of negative ions enables high neutron output (100% atomic ion beam), high quality imaging (small neutron source size), and reliable operation (no high voltage breakdowns). Finally, the neutron generator can operate in either pulsed or continuous-wave (cw) mode and has been demonstrated to produce 106 D-D n/s (equivalent to similar to 108 D-T n/s) from a 1 mm-diameter neutron source size to facilitate high fidelity associated particle imaging.

  10. Negative Ions Enhance Survival of Membrane Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Liko, Idlir; Hopper, Jonathan T S; Allison, Timothy M; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-06-01

    Membrane protein complexes are commonly introduced to the mass spectrometer solubilized in detergent micelles. The collisional activation used to remove the detergent, however, often causes protein unfolding and dissociation. As in the case for soluble proteins, electrospray in the positive ion mode is most commonly used for the study of membrane proteins. Here we show several distinct advantages of employing the negative ion mode. Negative polarity can yield lower average charge states for membrane proteins solubilized in saccharide detergents, with enhanced peak resolution and reduced adduct formation. Most importantly, we demonstrate that negative ion mode electrospray ionization (ESI) minimizes subunit dissociation in the gas phase, allowing access to biologically relevant oligomeric states. Together, these properties mean that intact membrane protein ions can be generated in a greater range of solubilizing detergents. The formation of negative ions, therefore, greatly expands the possibilities of using mass spectrometry on this intractable class of protein. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27106602

  11. Negative Ions Enhance Survival of Membrane Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liko, Idlir; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Allison, Timothy M.; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-06-01

    Membrane protein complexes are commonly introduced to the mass spectrometer solubilized in detergent micelles. The collisional activation used to remove the detergent, however, often causes protein unfolding and dissociation. As in the case for soluble proteins, electrospray in the positive ion mode is most commonly used for the study of membrane proteins. Here we show several distinct advantages of employing the negative ion mode. Negative polarity can yield lower average charge states for membrane proteins solubilized in saccharide detergents, with enhanced peak resolution and reduced adduct formation. Most importantly, we demonstrate that negative ion mode electrospray ionization (ESI) minimizes subunit dissociation in the gas phase, allowing access to biologically relevant oligomeric states. Together, these properties mean that intact membrane protein ions can be generated in a greater range of solubilizing detergents. The formation of negative ions, therefore, greatly expands the possibilities of using mass spectrometry on this intractable class of protein.

  12. Negative ion-driven associated particle neutron generator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K. N.; Morse, D. H.; Donovan, D. C.; Chames, J. M.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Chen, A. X.; Hausladen, P. A.; Liang, F.

    2015-10-09

    We describe an associated particle neutron generator that employs a negative ion source to produce high neutron flux from a small source size. Furthermore, negative ions produced in an rf-driven plasma source are extracted through a small aperture to form a beam which bombards a positively biased, high voltage target electrode. Electrons co-extracted with the negative ions are removed by a permanent magnet electron filter. The use of negative ions enables high neutron output (100% atomic ion beam), high quality imaging (small neutron source size), and reliable operation (no high voltage breakdowns). Finally, the neutron generator can operate in eithermore » pulsed or continuous-wave (cw) mode and has been demonstrated to produce 106 D-D n/s (equivalent to similar to 108 D-T n/s) from a 1 mm-diameter neutron source size to facilitate high fidelity associated particle imaging.« less

  13. Negative ion-driven associated particle neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K. N.; Morse, D. H.; Donovan, D. C.; Chames, J. M.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Chen, A. X.; Hausladen, P. A.; Liang, F.

    2016-01-01

    An associated particle neutron generator is described that employs a negative ion source to produce high neutron flux from a small source size. Negative ions produced in an rf-driven plasma source are extracted through a small aperture to form a beam which bombards a positively biased, high voltage target electrode. Electrons co-extracted with the negative ions are removed by a permanent magnet electron filter. The use of negative ions enables high neutron output (100% atomic ion beam), high quality imaging (small neutron source size), and reliable operation (no high voltage breakdowns). The neutron generator can operate in either pulsed or continuous-wave (cw) mode and has been demonstrated to produce 106 D-D n/s (equivalent to ~108 D-T n/s) from a 1 mm-diameter neutron source size to facilitate high fidelity associated particle imaging.

  14. Negative Ions Enhance Survival of Membrane Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liko, Idlir; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Allison, Timothy M.; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-04-01

    Membrane protein complexes are commonly introduced to the mass spectrometer solubilized in detergent micelles. The collisional activation used to remove the detergent, however, often causes protein unfolding and dissociation. As in the case for soluble proteins, electrospray in the positive ion mode is most commonly used for the study of membrane proteins. Here we show several distinct advantages of employing the negative ion mode. Negative polarity can yield lower average charge states for membrane proteins solubilized in saccharide detergents, with enhanced peak resolution and reduced adduct formation. Most importantly, we demonstrate that negative ion mode electrospray ionization (ESI) minimizes subunit dissociation in the gas phase, allowing access to biologically relevant oligomeric states. Together, these properties mean that intact membrane protein ions can be generated in a greater range of solubilizing detergents. The formation of negative ions, therefore, greatly expands the possibilities of using mass spectrometry on this intractable class of protein.

  15. Nonplanar ion-acoustic solitons collision in Xe+-F-- SF6- and Ar+-F-- SF6- plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; Carbonaro, P.

    2016-04-01

    The solitons collision in nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) plasmas consisting of positive ions, two different negative ions, and isothermal electrons is studied. For this purpose, the Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) method is used to obtain two-coupled nonplanar Korteweg-de Vries (nKdV) equations. Also, the nonplanar phase shifts are calculated. The physical parameters of two plasma experiments; namely Xe+-F-- SF6- and Ar+-F-- SF6- are used to examine the properties of the localized pulses and their phase shifts after collision. It is found that the present model gives rise to the propagation of positive and negative pulses. The effects of the total negative ions concentration, the density ratio of the second-negative ions, the temperature ratio, and the geometrical effects on the behavior of solitons collisions and their phase shifts are investigated. Furthermore, it is found that the phase shifts in the case of the Ar+-F-- SF6- plasma are much larger than those of the Xe+-F-- SF6- plasma. Also, for fixed plasma parameters, the solitons collision received the largest phase shift in spherical geometry, followed by the cylindrical and planar geometries.

  16. Kaon and pion production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M.; Larionov, A.B.; Mosel, U.

    2005-03-01

    The Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) transport model is applied to study strangeness and pion production in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Starting from proton induced reactions, we further investigate Si+Au, Au+Au, and Pb+Pb collisions in the energy range between 2 and 40A GeV and compare the results with data and other transport calculations. The qq-annihilation, or resonance, channel simulated by the string model in meson-nucleon collisions at {radical}(s)>2 GeV is introduced. The importance of this channel for a good description of the proton-nucleus data on K{sup +} production is demonstrated. We further show that meson-meson collisions contribute significantly to the KK{sup lowbar} production in heavy-ion collisions above 5A GeV and improve the agreement with data on the K{sup +}/{pi}{sup +} ratio. Finally, we study the influence of in-medium modifications of the FRITIOF model on pion and kaon production.

  17. A negative ion source test facility.

    PubMed

    Melanson, S; Dehnel, M; Potkins, D; Theroux, J; Hollinger, C; Martin, J; Philpott, C; Stewart, T; Jackle, P; Williams, P; Brown, S; Jones, T; Coad, B; Withington, S

    2016-02-01

    Progress is being made in the development of an Ion Source Test Facility (ISTF) by D-Pace Inc. in collaboration with Buckley Systems Ltd. in Auckland, NZ. The first phase of the ISTF is to be commissioned in October 2015 with the second phase being commissioned in March 2016. The facility will primarily be used for the development and the commercialization of ion sources. It will also be used to characterize and further develop various D-Pace Inc. beam diagnostic devices. PMID:26931991

  18. Volume production of negative ions in the reflex-type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jimbo, K.

    1982-06-01

    The production of negative hydrogen ions is investigated in the reflex-type negative ion source. The extracted negative hydrogen currents of 9.7 mA (100 mA/cm/sup 2/) for H/sup -/ and of 4.1 mA(42 mA/cm/sup 2/) for D/sup -/ are obtained continuously. The impurity is less than 1%. An isotope effect of negative ion production is observed.

  19. Evolution of an expanding dusty plasma with negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kechouri, B.; Djebli, M.

    2006-11-15

    The dusty plasma radial expansion is studied in the case of a spherical as well as cylindrical configuration. The effect of negative ions is introduced through the dust charge fluctuation equation. Electrons, positive, and negative ions are modelled by the Boltzmann distribution function and the dust grains by fluid equations. Using the self-similar theory, the nonlinear set of differential equations is solved numerically. It is found that the dust charge presents a critical value which depends on the negative ion species type. It is also found that the dust expansion ends earlier and the lighter particle densities profiles depend on the dust initial charge.

  20. Chiral phase transition in peripheral heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Alejandro; Bashir, Adnan; Raya, Alfredo; Sanchez, Angel

    2009-04-20

    It has been recently realized that in peripheral heavy-ion collisions at high energies, a sizable magnetic field is produced in the interaction region. Although this field becomes weak at the proper times when the chiral phase transition is believed to occur, it is still significant so as to ask whether it influences such transition. We use the linear sigma model to study the chiral phase transition in the presence of weak magnetic fields.

  1. THE GEOMETRICAL ASPECT OF HIGH-ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamiya, S.; Morrissey, D.J.

    1980-02-01

    The total yields of nuclear charge or mass from projectile and target fragments and the fragments from the overlapping region between projectile and target were evaluated based on existing data. These values are compared with simple formulas expected from the participant-spectator model. Agreement is reasonably good, suggesting that the major part of the integrated yields for all reaction products from high-energy heavy-ion collisions are geometrical.

  2. Dynamical description of heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitani, P.; Colonna, M.

    2016-05-01

    Descriptions of heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energies require to take into account in-medium dissipation and phase-space fluctuations. The interplay of these correlations with the one-body collective behaviour determines the properties (kinematics and fragment production) and the variety of mechanisms (from fusion to neck formation and multifragmentation) of the exit channel. Starting from fundamental concepts tested on nuclear matter, we build up a microscopic description which addresses finite systems and applies to experimental observables.

  3. Aspects of heavy-ion collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Wolschin, G.

    2014-01-14

    Three aspects of relativistic heavy-ion collisions are considered in this article: (1) Stopping and baryon transport in a QCD-based approach, (2) charged-hadron production in a nonequilibrium-statistical relativistic diffusion model (RDM), and (3) quarkonia suppression and in particular, Υ suppression in PbPb at the current LHC energy of √(s{sub NN}) = 2.76TeV.

  4. Negative hydrogen ion sources for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Moehs, D.P.; Peters, J.; Sherman, J.; /Los Alamos

    2005-08-01

    A variety of H{sup -} ion sources are in use at accelerator laboratories around the world. A list of these ion sources includes surface plasma sources with magnetron, Penning and surface converter geometries as well as magnetic-multipole volume sources with and without cesium. Just as varied is the means of igniting and maintaining magnetically confined plasmas. Hot and cold cathodes, radio frequency, and microwave power are all in use, as well as electron tandem source ignition. The extraction systems of accelerator H{sup -} ion sources are highly specialized utilizing magnetic and electric fields in their low energy beam transport systems to produce direct current, as well as pulsed and/or chopped beams with a variety of time structures. Within this paper, specific ion sources utilized at accelerator laboratories shall be reviewed along with the physics of surface and volume H{sup -} production in regard to source emittance. Current research trends including aperture modeling, thermal modeling, surface conditioning, and laser diagnostics will also be discussed.

  5. Recent negative ion source activity at JYFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Laitinen, M.; Sajavaara, T.; Koivisto, H.; Jokinen, A.; Dehnel, M. P.

    2013-02-01

    A filament-powered multicusp ion source for production of H- has been developed for the Jyväskylä Pelletron accelerator for use in ion beam lithography and particle induced X-ray emission applications. The source can be considered conventional with the exception of the filter field being created with an electric magnet for continuous adjustability. A permanent magnet dipoleantidipole electron dump is integrated in the puller electrode. The source provides 50 μA H- beam at 10 keV energy with 0.019 mm mrad 95 % normalized rms emittance through a 2 mm aperture. Lower emittance is achievable by changing the plasma electrode insert to a smaller aperture one if application requires. A new commercial MCC30/15 cyclotron has been installed at the Jyväskylä accelerator laboratory providing 30MeV H+ and 15Mev D+ for use in nuclear physics experiments and applications. The ion source delivered with the cyclotron is a a filament-powered multicusp source capable of about 130 h continuous operation at 1 mA H- output between filament changes. The ion source is located in the cyclotron vault and therefore a significant waiting time for the vault cooldown is required before filament change is possible. This kind of operation is not acceptable as 350 h and longer experiments are expected. Therefore a project for developing a CW 13.56 MHz RF ion source has been initiated. A planar RF antenna replacing the filament back plate of the existing TRIUMF-type ion source has been used in the first tests with 240 μA of H- and 21 mA of electrons measured at 1.5 kW of RF power. Tests with higher RF power levels were prevented by electron beam induced sparking. A new plasma chamber has been built and a new extraction is being designed for the RF ion source. The extraction code IBSimu has recently gone through a major update on how smooth electrode surfaces are implemented in the Poisson solvers. This has made it possible to implement a fast multigrid solver with low memory consumption. Also

  6. Increase of the electric field in head-on collisions between negative and positive streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihaddadene, Mohand A.; Celestin, Sebastien

    2015-07-01

    Head-on collisions between negative and positive streamer discharges have recently been suggested to be responsible for the production of high electric fields leading to X-rays emissions. Using a plasma fluid approach, we model head-on collisions between negative and positive streamers. We observe the occurrence of a very strong electric field at the location of the streamer collision. However, the enhancement of the field produces a strong increase in the electron density, which leads to a collapse of the field over only a few picoseconds. Using a Monte Carlo model, we have verified that this process is therefore not responsible for the acceleration of a significant number of electrons to energy >1 keV. We conclude that no significant X-ray emission could be produced by the head-on encounter of nonthermal streamer discharges. Moreover, we quantify the optical emissions produced in the streamer collision.

  7. Production of charge in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Scott; McCormack, William Patrick; Ratti, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    By analyzing preliminary experimental measurements of charge-balance functions from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), it is found that scenarios in which balancing charges are produced in a single surge, and therefore separated by a single length scale, are inconsistent with data. In contrast, a model that assumes two surges, one associated with the formation of a thermalized quark-gluon plasma and a second associated with hadronization, provides a far superior reproduction of the data. A statistical analysis of the model comparison finds that the two-surge model best reproduces the data if the charge production from the first surge is similar to expectations for equilibrated matter taken from lattice gauge theory. The charges created in the first surge appear to separate by approximately one unit of spatial rapidity before emission, while charges from the second wave appear to have separated by approximately a half unit or less.

  8. Negative ions in the coma of Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaizy, P.; Reme, H.; Sauvaud, J. A.; D'Uston, C.; Lin, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    The detection of negatively charged cometary ions in the inner coma of Comet Halley is reported. These ions are observed in three broad mass peaks at 7-19, 22-65, and 85-110 AMU, with densities reaching greater than about 1/cu cm, about 0.05/cu cm, and about 0.04/cu cm, respectively, at a distance of about 2300 km from the nucleus. The ion species thought to be present include O(-), OH(-), C(-), CH(-), CN(-) and heavier complex CHO molecular ions. As negative ions are easily destroyed by solar radiation at about 1 AU, an efficient production mechanism, so far unidentified, is required to account for the observed densities. The detection of negative ions in the coma near 1 AU implies that negative ions should also be present in similar neutral gas and dust environment farther away from the sun. If the negative-ion densities are large enough, they could play an important part in physical processes such as radiative transfer or charge exchange.

  9. Negative impurity ions in liquid H4e

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancilotto, F.; Barranco, M.; Pi, M.

    2009-11-01

    We present theoretical results, based on zero-temperature density-functional theory, for the formation and properties of a negative impurity ion in bulk liquid H4e . We first consider Ca which, due to its very low electron affinity, does not easily form a negative ion in vacuum. We show that a neutral Ca atom in bulk liquid H4e can easily capture a nearby electron bubble leading to the exothermic formation of a Ca- ion trapped inside a spherical cavity of ˜15Å radius. The Ca negative ion in bulk H4e turns out to be a metastable state, the lowest-energy configuration being represented instead by a weakly bound Ca- ion floating over the nearly unperturbed free surface of liquid H4e . We have computed the threshold negative pressure at which the trapped Ca- ion bubble explodes and we discuss our results in light of recent experimental measurements. We have also considered the possible ion formation in the case of a Ne atom, i.e., an atomic impurity that does not form a negative ion in vacuum. Despite the long-range attraction between the electron bubble and the Ne atom due to polarization forces, in the minimum-energy configuration the electron bubble and the Ne atom rather than merge together remain spatially separated in bulk liquid H4e , forming a weakly bound state that has no analog in vacuum.

  10. Elementary processes during collisions of ions with tryptophan molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrosimov, V. V.; Basalaev, A. A.; Kuz'michev, V. V.; Panov, M. N.; Smirnov, O. V.

    2016-03-01

    The relative cross sections of elementary processes occurring in single collisions of tryptophan molecules in the gaseous phase with He2+ ions with energy 4 keV/u are measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry for studying the mechanism of radiation damage of amino acid molecules. The fragmentation channels for intermediate singly and doubly charged tryptophan molecular ions formed during one-electron capture, two-electron capture, and electron capture with ionization are investigated. Significant difference is observed in the mass spectra of fragmentation of intermediate doubly charged ions formed during the capture with ionization and double capture, which is associated with different energies of excitation of {C11H12N2O2}2+* ions.

  11. Excitation of lower hybrid waves by a gyrating ion beam in a negative ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Jyotsna; Jain, V. K.; Sharma, Suresh C.; Gahlot, Ajay

    2013-03-15

    A gyrating ion beam propagating through a magnetized plasma cylinder containing K{sup +} positive ions, electrons, and SF{sub 6}{sup -} negative ions drives electrostatic lower hybrid waves to instability via Cyclotron interaction. Numerical calculations of the unstable mode frequencies and growth rates of both the unstable positive ion and negative ion modes have been carried out for the existing negative ion plasma parameters. It is found that the unstable mode frequencies of both the modes increase, with the relative density of negative ions. In addition, the growth rates of both the unstable modes also increases with relative density of negative ions. Moreover, the growth rates of both the unstable modes scale as the one-third power of the beam density. The frequencies of both the unstable modes also increase with the magnetic fields. The real part of the unstable wave frequency increases as almost the square root of the beam energy.

  12. New versions of sources for nuclear polarized negative ion production

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.G.; Shabalin, A.L. ); Wojtsekhowski, B.B. ); Belov, A.S.; Kuzik, V.E.; Plohinsky, Y.V.; Yakushev, V.P. )

    1992-10-05

    Several variants of sources for nuclear polarized negative ion production have been proposed and tested. The simple adaptation of a high intensity polarized proton source for nuclear polarized H[sup [minus

  13. Cesium vapor thermionic converter anomalies arising from negative ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasor, Ned S.

    2016-08-01

    Compelling experimental evidence is given that a longstanding limit encountered on cesium vapor thermionic energy converter performance improvement and other anomalies arise from thermionic emission of cesium negative ions. It is shown that the energy that characterizes thermionic emission of cesium negative ions is 1.38 eV and, understandably, is not the electron affinity 0.47 eV determined for the photodetachment threshold of the cesium negative ion. The experimental evidence includes measurements of collector work functions and volt-ampere characteristics in quasi-vacuum cesium vapor thermionic diodes, along with reinterpretation of the classic Taylor-Langmuir S-curve data on electron emission in cesium vapor. The quantitative effects of negative ion emission on performance in the ignited, unignited, and quasi-vacuum modes of cesium vapor thermionic converter operation are estimated.

  14. Neutralization of a fast negative-ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Mowat, J.R.; Stearns, J.W.; Gohil, P.; Pyle, R.V.

    1986-01-01

    Neutralization of a fast negative-ion beam, primarily H/sup -/, is discussed in terms of competing one- and two-electron detachment processes in a variety of media: gas (vapor), plasma, liquid sheet, solid foil.

  15. Measurements of the negative ion density in reactive gas plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Masako; Ueda, Yoko; Kawai, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Nobuo

    1999-11-01

    The reactive gas plasmas, such as C_4F_8, SiH4 and SF6 gas plasmas, have been widely used in plasma etching or CVD. The radicals and ions species in these plasmas have been reported in a lot of study. However, the negative ion density has not been measured quantitatively, since the conventional Langmuir probe cannot be used due to film depositions on its surface. In this study, the negative ion density in the reactive gas plasmas was measured with a heated Langmuir probe and an 8-mm microwave interferometer as a function of gas flow rate and radial position. Furthermore, the following equation was suggested to estimate the negative ion density only from the probe measurements: fracI_+(X )I_+(Ar) = [ fracI_-(X)I_-(Ar) + fracN_-(X )N_+(Ar)√fracT_e(X)T_e(Ar) ] √fracM_+(Ar)M_+(X), where N- denotes negative ion density and the other characteristics represent the conventional ones. The positive ion mass M+ should be assumed properly. It was confirmed that this equation provides the negative ion density both in the magnetized plasmas, such as ECR plasmas, and non-magnetized plasmas.

  16. Field-Reversal Source for Negative Halogen Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Orient, O. J.; Aladzhadzhyan, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Large zero-energy electron-attachment cross sections result in intense ion beams. Concept for producing negative halogen ions takes advantage of large cross sections at zero kinetic energy for dissociative attachment of electrons to such halogen-containing gases as SF6, CFCI3, and CCI4.

  17. The simplest three body system: Positronium negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Michishio, Koji; Terabe, Hiroki

    2014-03-05

    The positron, an anti-particle of the electron, can bind with an electron to form positronium. Another electron can also bind to the positronium weakly to form a positronium negative ion. In this paper, recent progresses in the experimental studies on this ion are reviewed.

  18. Influence of electron-ion collisions on Buneman instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostomyan, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    Buneman instability (BI) [1] has been found to play a role in many scenarios in space physics and geophysics. It has also been invoked to explain many phenomena in the earth ionosphere [2] and in the solar chromosphere [3]. In double-layer and collisionless shock physics the same instability has been found responsible in formation of nonlinear structures [4]. In situations where an electron beam enters plasma, like in the fast ignition scenario for inertial fusion [5], Buneman modes are excited and play essential role [6]. BI is caused by motion of plasma electrons against ions. However, up to now investigations on BI did not take into account influence collisions in plasma (for quantum case a paper has recently appeared [7]). Influence of collisions may be very important especially in dense fully ionized plasma with long distance character of interaction. Particularly collisions lead to energy dissipation with an array of ensuing effects e.g. change of the instability physical nature to that of dissipative type [8]. Due to role of BI in various processes in space (and laboratory) plasma necessity of the consideration is long overdue. Absence of investigations on a problem along with its importance may be explained by its complexity only. For given case correct consideration should be based on solution of transport equation with collisional term. In fully ionized plasma correct description of collisions is given by Landau collision integral (LCI) [9]. This is very complex formation. It greatly complicates transport equation and actually makes it intractable. Since its formulation in 1936, there is very little literature on solution of the transport equation with LCI. Almost all successful attempts to accommodate influence of collisions on various processes in plasma are based on BGK model [10]. This model is much simpler. However in fully ionized plasma usage LCI is more appropriate as it is designed for system with long distance character of particle interaction

  19. Negative thermal ion mass spectrometry of osmium, rhenium, and iridium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creaser, R. A.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for obtaining, in a conventional surface ionization mass spectrometer, intense ion beams of negatively charged oxides of Os, Re, and Ir by thermal ionization. It is shown that the principal ion species of these ions are OsO3(-), ReO4(-), and IrO2(-), respectively. For Re-187/Os-187 studies, this technique offers the advantage of isotopic analyses without prior chemical separation of Re from Os.

  20. Mass Spectra and Ion Collision Cross Sections of Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yang; Terrier, Peran; Douglas, D. J.

    2011-02-01

    Mass spectra of commercially obtained hemoglobin (Hb) show higher levels of monomer and dimer ions, heme-deficient dimer ions, and apo-monomer ions than hemoglobin freshly prepared from blood. This has previously been attributed to oxidation of commercial Hb. Further, it has been reported that that dimer ions from commercial bovine Hb have lower collision cross sections than low charge state monomer ions. To investigate these effects further, we have recorded mass spectra of fresh human Hb, commercial human and bovine Hb, fresh human Hb oxidized with H2O2, lyophilized fresh human Hb, fresh human Hb both lyophilized and chemically oxidized, and commercial human Hb oxidized with H2O2. Masses of α-monomer ions of all hemoglobins agree with the masses expected from the sequences within 3 Da or better. Mass spectra of the β chains of commercial Hb and oxidized fresh human Hb show a peak or shoulder on the high mass side, consistent with oxidation of the protein. Both commercial proteins and oxidized fresh human Hb produce heme-deficient dimers with masses 32 Da greater than expected and higher levels of monomer and dimer ions than fresh Hb. Lyophilization or oxidation of Hb both produce higher levels of monomer and dimer ions in mass spectra. Fresh human Hb, commercial human Hb, commercial bovine Hb, and oxidized commercial human Hb all give dimer ions with cross sections greater than monomer ions. Thus, neither oxidation of Hb or the difference in sequence between human and bovine Hb make substantial differences to cross sections of ions.

  1. Particle-production mechanism in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, B.W.; Nix, J.R.

    1994-07-01

    We discuss the production of particles in relativistic heavy-ion collisions through the mechanism of massive bremsstrahlung, in which massive mesons are emitted during rapid nucleon acceleration. This mechanism is described within the framework of classical hadrodynamics for extended nucleons, corresponding to nucleons of finite size interacting with massive meson fields. This new theory provides a natural covariant microscopic approach to relativistic heavy-ion collisions that includes automatically spacetime nonlocality and retardation, nonequilibrium phenomena, interactions among all nucleons, and particle production. Inclusion of the finite nucleon size cures the difficulties with preacceleration and runaway solutions that have plagued the classical theory of self-interacting point particles. For the soft reactions that dominate nucleon-nucleon collisions, a significant fraction of the incident center-of-mass energy is radiated through massive bremsstrahlung. In the present version of the theory, this radiated energy is in the form of neutral scalar ({sigma}) and neutral vector ({omega}) mesons, which subsequently decay primarily into pions with some photons also. Additional meson fields that are known to be important from nucleon-nucleon scattering experiments should be incorporated in the future, in which case the radiated energy would also contain isovector pseudoscalar ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup 0}), isovector scalar ({delta}{sup +}, {delta}{sup {minus}}, {delta}{sup 0}), isovector vector ({rho}{sup +}, {rho}{sup {minus}}, {rho}{sup 0}), and neutral pseudoscalar ({eta}) mesons.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamics and charge identified directed flow in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürsoy, Umut; Kharzeev, Dmitri; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Strong magnetic fields produced in any non-central heavy ion collision are expected to affect the dynamics of the hot QCD matter produced in this collision. The magnetic field is time-dependent and the medium is expanding, which leads to the induction of charged currents due to the combination of Faraday and Hall effects. We study the imprint the magnetic fields produced in non-central heavy ion collisions leave on the azimuthal distributions and correlations of the produced charged hadrons by employing an analytic solution to hydrodynamics combined with the electromagnetic effects in a perturbative fashion. We use the Cooper-Frye freeze-out procedure on an isothermal freeze-out surface to obtain the azimuthal hadron distributions. We find that the charged currents induced by the present of the electromagnetic fields result in a charge-dependent directed flow v1 that is odd in rapidity and odd under charge exchange. It can be detected by measuring correlations between the directed flow of charged hadrons at different rapidities, < v1±(y1)v1±(y2) > .

  3. Quarkonium formation time in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Taesoo; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng

    2015-04-01

    We calculate the quarkonium formation time in relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the space-time correlator of heavy quark vector currents in a hydrodynamic background with the initial nonequilibrium stage expanding only in the longitudinal direction. Using in-medium quarkonia properties determined with the heavy quark potential taken to be the free energy from lattice calculations and the fact that quarkonia can only be formed below their dissociation temperatures due to color screening, we find that Υ (1S), Υ (2S), Υ (3S), J /ψ , and ψ' are formed, respectively, at 1.2, 6.6, 8.8, 5.8, and 11.0 fm/c after the quark pair are produced in central Au+Au collisions at the top energy of the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and these times become shorter in semicentral collisions. We further show, as an example, that including the effect of formation time enhances appreciably the survivability of Υ (1S) in the produced hot dense matter.

  4. Negative Dielectric Constant Material Based on Ion Conducting Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Metamaterials or artificial negative index materials (NIMs) have generated great attention due to their unique and exotic electromagnetic properties. One exemplary negative dielectric constant material, which is an essential key for creating the NIMs, was developed by doping ions into a polymer, a protonated poly(benzimidazole) (PBI). The doped PBI showed a negative dielectric constant at megahertz (MHz) frequencies due to its reduced plasma frequency and an induction effect. The magnitude of the negative dielectric constant and the resonance frequency were tunable by doping concentration. The highly doped PBI showed larger absolute magnitude of negative dielectric constant at just above its resonance frequency than the less doped PBI.

  5. PULSED POSITIVE ION NEGATIVE ION CHEMICAL IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPLICATONS TO ENVIRONMENTAL AND HAZARDOUS WASTE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The simultaneous acquisition of both positive ion and negative ion data under chemical ionization mass spectrometric conditions can aid in the confirmation of assignments made by electron impact gas chromatography mass spectrometry or electron capture gas chromatography. Pulsed p...

  6. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of negative ions

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    1987-01-01

    A process for selectively neutralizing H.sup.- ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H.sup.- ions that are intersected by a beam of laser light. Photodetachment is effected in a uniform magnetic field that is provided around the beam of H.sup.- ions to spin polarize the H.sup.- ions and produce first and second populations or groups of ions, having their respective proton spin aligned either with the magnetic field or opposite to it. The intersecting beam of laser light is directed to selectively neutralize a majority of the ions in only one population, or given spin polarized group of H.sup.- ions, without neutralizing the ions in the other group thereby forming a population of H.sup.- ions each of which has its proton spin down, and a second group or population of H.sup.o atoms having proton spin up. Finally, the two groups of ions are separated from each other by magnetically bending the group of H.sup.- ions away from the group of neutralized ions, thereby to form an intense H.sup.- ion beam that is directed toward a predetermined objective.

  7. Theoretical Study of Negative Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Jack

    2011-05-01

    Although this review provides references to tabulations of molecular electron affinities, primarily it focuses on explaining why theory plays an important role in understanding the behavior of anions, explaining the challenges that anions pose to theory, making connections between the theories used to compute electron affinities and the potentials (e.g., charge-dipole, charge-quadrupole, valence attraction and exchange repulsion, dispersion, and polarization) that govern the electron-molecule interaction, and discussing how species with negative electron affinities may possess metastable anion states and how such states should be treated. In addition to references to published literature, many links are given to websites of practicing theoretical chemists who study molecular anions; these links (which appear in boldface) offer the reader a broad avenue to access much more information about molecular anions than can be covered in a review or even through conventional literature sources.

  8. Study of the negative ion extraction mechanism from a double-ion plasma in negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, I.; Nishioka, S.; Hatayama, A.; Miyamoto, K.

    2015-04-08

    We have developed a 2D3V-PIC model of the extraction region, aiming to clarify the basic extraction mechanism of H{sup −} ions from the double-ion plasma in H{sup −} negative ion sources. The result shows the same tendency of the H{sup −} ion density n{sub H{sup −}} as that observed in the experiments, i.e.,n{sub H{sup −}} in the upstream region away from the plasma meniscus (H{sup −} emitting surface) has been reduced by applying the extraction voltage. At the same time, relatively slow temporal oscillation of the electric potential compared with the electron plasma frequency has been observed in the extraction region. Results of the systematic study using a 1D3V-PIC model with the uniform magnetic field confirm the result that the electrostatic oscillation is identified to be lower hybrid wave. The effect of this oscillation on the H{sup −} transport will be studied in the future.

  9. Entanglement and fast quantum thermalization in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Chiu Man; Hsu, Stephen D. H.

    2016-06-01

    Let A be subsystem of a larger system A ∪ B and ψ be a typical state from the subspace of the Hilbert space ℋAB satisfying an energy constraint. Then ρA(ψ) = TrB|ψ><ψ| is nearly thermal. We discuss how this observation is related to fast thermalization of the central region ( ≈ A) in heavy ion collisions (HIC), where B represents other degrees of freedom (soft modes, hard jets, collinear particles) outside of A. Entanglement between the modes in A and B play a central role: the entanglement entropy SA increases rapidly in the collision. In gauge-gravity duality, SA is related to the area of extremal surfaces in the bulk, which can be studied using gravitational duals.

  10. Evaluation of negative ion distribution changes by image processing diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, K. Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Geng, S.

    2015-04-08

    Distributions of hydrogen Balmer-α (H{sub α}) intensity and its reduction behavior close to a plasma grid (PG) surface have been observed by a spectrally selective imaging system in an arc discharge type negative hydrogen ion source in National Institute for Fusion Science. H{sub α} reduction indicates a reduction of negative hydrogen ions because the mutual neutralization process between H{sup +} and H{sup −} ions causes the dominant excitation process for H{sub α} emission in the rich H{sup −} condition such as in ionic plasma. We observed a significant change in H{sub α} reduction distribution due to change in the bias voltage, which is used to suppress the electron influx. Small H{sub α} reduction in higher bias is likely because the production of negative ions is suppressed by the potential difference between the plasma and PG surface.

  11. Experimental investigation of the relation between H- negative ion density and Lyman-α emission intensity in a microwave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleiferis, S.; Tarvainen, O.; Svarnas, P.; Bacal, M.; Béchu, S.

    2016-03-01

    A new mechanism for producing negative ions in low density and low power hydrogen plasmas was proposed recently. It refers to anion formation due to collisions between hydrogen atoms being in the first excited state. The proposed mechanism was indirectly supported by the quadratic relation observed between the extracted negative ion current and Lyman-α radiation of a filament-driven arc discharge, when borrowed data from the literature were combined. The present work provides experimental data comparing directly the absolute negative ion density and Lyman-α radiation in an ECR-driven hydrogen plasma source. The previously mentioned quadratic relation is not observed in the specific source studied, underlying the difficulty of distinguishing between the proposed mechanism and other negative ion production paths.

  12. Comparison of measured and modelled negative hydrogen ion densities at the ECR-discharge HOMER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauner, D.; Kurutz, U.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-01

    As the negative hydrogen ion density nH- is a key parameter for the investigation of negative ion sources, its diagnostic quantification is essential in source development and operation as well as for fundamental research. By utilizing the photodetachment process of negative ions, generally two different diagnostic methods can be applied: via laser photodetachment, the density of negative ions is measured locally, but only relatively to the electron density. To obtain absolute densities, the electron density has to be measured additionally, which induces further uncertainties. Via cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), the absolute density of H- is measured directly, however LOS-averaged over the plasma length. At the ECR-discharge HOMER, where H- is produced in the plasma volume, laser photodetachment is applied as the standard method to measure nH-. The additional application of CRDS provides the possibility to directly obtain absolute values of nH-, thereby successfully bench-marking the laser photodetachment system as both diagnostics are in good agreement. In the investigated pressure range from 0.3 to 3 Pa, the measured negative hydrogen ion density shows a maximum at 1 to 1.5 Pa and an approximately linear response to increasing input microwave powers from 200 up to 500 W. Additionally, the volume production of negative ions is 0-dimensionally modelled by balancing H- production and destruction processes. The modelled densities are adapted to the absolute measurements of nH- via CRDS, allowing to identify collisions of H- with hydrogen atoms (associative and non-associative detachment) to be the dominant loss process of H- in the plasma volume at HOMER. Furthermore, the characteristic peak of nH- observed at 1 to 1.5 Pa is identified to be caused by a comparable behaviour of the electron density with varying pressure, as ne determines the volume production rate via dissociative electron attachment to vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules.

  13. Signal Propagation in Collisional Plasma with Negative Ions

    SciTech Connect

    I. Kaganovich; S.V. Berezhnoi; C.B. Shin

    2000-12-18

    The transport of charged species in collisional currentless plasmas is traditionally thought of as a diffusion-like process. In this paper, it is demonstrated that, in contrast to two-component plasma, containing electrons and positive ions, the transport of additional ions in multi-species plasmas is not governed by diffusion, rather described by nonlinear convection. As a particular example, plasmas with the presence of negative ions have been studied. The velocity of a small perturbation of negative ions was found analytically and validated by numerical simulation. As a result of nonlinear convection, initially smooth ion density profiles break and form strongly inhomogeneous shock-like fronts. These fronts are different from collisionless shocks and shocks in fully ionized plasma. The structure of the fronts has been found analytically and numerically.

  14. A future, intense source of negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siefken, Hugh; Stein, Charles

    1994-01-01

    By directly heating lithium hydride in a vacuum, up to 18 micro-A/sq cm of negative hydrogen has been obtained from the crystal lattice. The amount of ion current extracted and analyzed is closely related to the temperature of the sample and to the rate at which the temperature is changed. The ion current appears to be emission limited and saturates with extraction voltage. For a fixed extraction voltage, the ion current could be maximized by placing a grid between the sample surface and the extraction electrode. Electrons accompanying the negative ions were removed by a magnetic trap. A Wein velocity filter was designed and built to provide definitive mass analysis of the extracted ion species. This technique when applied to other alkali hydrides may produce even higher intensity beams possessing low values of emittance.

  15. Initial state fluctuations and higher harmonic flow in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Charles; Jeon, Sangyong; Schenke, Björn; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2013-05-01

    A framework combining Yang-Mills dynamics of the pre-equilibrium glasma with relativistic viscous hydrodynamic evolution of the quark-gluon plasma and hadron gas phases is presented. Event-by-event fluctuations of nucleon positions and color charges are taken into account, leading to negative binomial fluctuations of gluon multiplicities. Experimental anisotropic flow coefficients v2 - v5 of charged hadron distributions in heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider are well described. Furthermore, event-by-event distributions of v2,v3andv4 measured by the ATLAS collaboration are reproduced.

  16. Volume production of negative ions in the reflex type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jimbo, K.

    1982-01-01

    The production of negative hydrogen ions is investigated in the reflex-type negative ion source. The extracted negative hydrogen currents of 9.7 mA (100 mA/cm/sup 2/) for H/sup -/ and of 4.1 mA (42 mA/cm/sup 2/) for D/sup -/ are obtained continuously. The impurity is less then 1%. An isotope effect of negative ion production is observed. When anomalous diffusion in the positive column was found by Lehnert and Hoh (1960), it was pointed out that the large particle loss produced by anomalous diffusion is compensated by the large particle production inside the plasma, i.e., the plasma tries to maintain itself. The self-sustaining property of the plasma is applied to the reflex-type negative ion source. Anomalous diffusion was artificially encouraged by changing the radial electric field inside the reflex discharge. The apparent encouragement of negative ion diffusion by the increase of density fluctuation amplitude is observed. Twice as much negative ion current was obtained with the artificial encouragement as without. It is found from the quasilinear theory that the inwardly directed radial electric field destabilizes the plasma in the reflex-type ion source. The nonlinear theory based on Yoshikawa method (1962) is extended, and the anomalous diffusion coefficient in a weakly ionized plasma is obtained. The electrostatic sheath trap, which increases the confinement of negative ions in the reflex-type ion source, is also discussed.

  17. Isotropization and Hydrodynamization in Weakly Coupled Heavy-Ion Collisions.

    PubMed

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Zhu, Yan

    2015-10-30

    We numerically solve the (2+1)-dimensional effective kinetic theory of weak coupling QCD under longitudinal expansion, relevant for early stages of heavy-ion collisions. We find agreement with viscous hydrodynamics and classical Yang-Mills simulations in the regimes where they are applicable. By choosing initial conditions that are motivated by a color-glass-condensate framework, we find that for Q_{s}=2 GeV and α_{s}=0.3 the system is approximately described by viscous hydrodynamics well before τ≲1.0 fm/c. PMID:26565462

  18. Theory of transfer reactions in peripheral heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rapisarda, A. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, Corso Italia 57, I-95129 Catania, Italy ); Baldo, M. ); Broglia, R.A. The Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark ); Winther, A. )

    1990-03-01

    The total absorption from the elastic channel due to transfer and inelastic processes in peripheral heavy-ion collisions at low bombarding energies is calculated in a microscopic coupled-channel approach. It is demonstrated for the first time that considering the depopulation of the entrance channel as an incoherent depopulation due to transfer processes is a good approximation. Using the corresponding absorptive potential within the framework of the Born approximation to calculate the transfer to individual channels, the results of full coupled-channels calculations are accurately reproduced.

  19. Charge Transfer in Collisions of Lithium Ions with Beryllium through Oxygen Ions at Energies Below 32 keV/amu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, S.; Shirai, T.; Shimakura, N.

    The charge transfer cross sections of Li+ (1s2) ions in collisions with B5+ , C6+, N5+ (1s2), and O6+ (1s2) ions, and of Li2+ (1s) ions with Be+ (1s22s) ions are calculated in the collision energy range of 0.02-32 keV/amu by using a semi-classical close-coupling method with molecular-state expansion.

  20. Maximizing Ion Current by Space Charge Neutralization using Negative Ions and Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2005-01-25

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space charge neutralization are introduced. Space charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  1. Maximizing ion current by space-charge neutralization using negative ions and dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2005-05-15

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space-charge neutralization are introduced. Space-charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space-charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  2. Maximizing ion current by space-charge neutralization using negative ions and dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space-charge neutralization are introduced. Space-charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space-charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  3. Molecular and negative ion production by a standard electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Juhasz, Z.; Sulik, B.

    2012-02-15

    Molecular and negative ion beams, usually produced in special ion sources, play an increasingly important role in fundamental and applied atomic physics. The ATOMKI-ECRIS is a standard ECR ion source, designed to provide highly charged ion (HCI) plasmas and beams. In the present work, H{sup -}, O{sup -}, OH{sup -}, O{sub 2}{sup -}, C{sup -}, C{sub 60}{sup -} negative ions and H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}, OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +} positive molecular ions were generated in this HCI-ECRIS. Without any major modification in the source and without any commonly applied tricks (such as usage of cesium or magnetic filter), negative ion beams of several {mu}A and positive molecular ion beams in the mA range were successfully obtained.

  4. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Armesto, N; Borghini, N; Jeon, S; Wiedemann, U A; Abreu, S; Akkelin, V; Alam, J; Albacete, J L; Andronic, A; Antonuv, D; Arleo, F; Armesto, N; Arsene, I C; Barnafoldi, G G; Barrette, J; Bauchle, B; Becattini, F; Betz, B; Bleicher, M; Bluhm, M; Boer, D; Bopp, F W; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Busza, W; Cacciari, M; Capella, A; Casalderrey-Solana, J; Chatterjee, R; Chen, L; Cleymans, J; Cole, B A; delValle, Z C; Csernai, L P; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; de Deus, J D; Ding, H; Djordjevic, M; Drescher, H; Dremin, I M; Dumitru, A; El, A; Engel, R; d'Enterria, D; Eskola, K J; Fai, G; Ferreiro, E G; Fries, R J; Frodermann, E; Fujii, H; Gale, C; Gelis, F; Goncalves, V P; Greco, V; Gyulassy, M; van Hees, H; Heinz, U; Honkanen, H; Horowitz, W A; Iancu, E; Ingelman, G; Jalilian-Marian, J; Jeon, S; Kaidalov, A B; Kampfer, B; Kang, Z; Karpenko, I A; Kestin, G; Kharzeev, D; Ko, C M; Koch, B; Kopeliovich, B; Kozlov, M; Kraus, I; Kuznetsova, I; Lee, S H; Lednicky, R; Letessier, J; Levin, E; Li, B; Lin, Z; Liu, H; Liu, W; Loizides, C; Lokhtin, I P; Machado, M T; Malinina, L V; Managadze, A M; Mangano, M L; Mannarelli, M; Manuel, C; Martinez, G; Milhano, J G; Mocsy, A; Molnar, D; Nardi, M; Nayak, J K; Niemi, H; Oeschler, H; Ollitrault, J; Paic, G; Pajares, C; Pantuev, V S; Papp, G; Peressounko, D; Petreczky, P; Petrushanko, S V; Piccinini, F; Pierog, T; Pirner, H J; Porteboeuf, S; Potashnikova, I; Qin, G Y; Qiu, J; Rafelski, J; Rajagopal, K; Ranft, J; Rapp, R; Rasanen, S S; Rathsman, J; Rau, P; Redlich, K; Renk, T; Rezaeian, A H; Rischke, D; Roesler, S; Ruppert, J; Ruuskanen, P V; Salgado, C A; Sapeta, S; Sarcevic, I; Sarkar, S; Sarycheva, L I; Schmidt, I; Shoski, A I; Sinha, B; Sinyukov, Y M; Snigirev, A M; Srivastava, D K; Stachel, J; Stasto, A; Stocker, H; Teplov, C Y; Thews, R L; Torrieri, G; Pop, V T; Triantafyllopoulos, D N; Tuchin, K L; Turbide, S; Tywoniuk, K; Utermann, A; Venugopalan, R; Vitev, I; Vogt, R; Wang, E; Wang, X N; Werner, K; Wessels, E; Wheaton, S; Wicks, S; Wiedemann, U A; Wolschin, G; Xiao, B; Xu, Z; Yasui, S; Zabrodin, E; Zapp, K; Zhang, B

    2008-02-25

    In August 2006, the CERN Theory Unit announced to restructure its visitor program and to create a 'CERN Theory Institute', where 1-3 month long specific programs can take place. The first such Institute was held from 14 May to 10 June 2007, focusing on 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions'. It brought together close to 100 scientists working on the theory of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The aim of this workshop was to review and document the status of expectations and predictions for the heavy ion program at the Large Hadron Collider LHC before its start. LHC will explore heavy ion collisions at {approx} 30 times higher center of mass energy than explored previously at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC. So, on the one hand, the charge of this workshop provided a natural forum for the exchange of the most recent ideas, and allowed to monitor how the understanding of heavy ion collisions has evolved in recent years with the data from RHIC, and with the preparation of the LHC experimental program. On the other hand, the workshop aimed at a documentation which helps to distinguish pre- from post-dictions. An analogous documentation of the 'Last Call for Predictions' [1] was prepared prior to the start of the heavy-ion program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC, and it proved useful in the subsequent discussion and interpretation of RHIC data. The present write-up is the documentation of predictions for the LHC heavy ion program, received or presented during the CERN TH Institute. The set-up of the CERN TH Institute allowed us to aim for the wide-most coverage of predictions. There were more than 100 presentations and discussions during the workshop. Moreover, those unable to attend could still participate by submitting predictions in written form during the workshop. This followed the spirit that everybody interested in making a prediction had the right to be heard. To arrive at a concise document, we required that

  5. Negative ion ESI-MS analysis of natural yellow dye flavonoids--An isotopic labelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, Hamish; Ferreira, Ester S. B.; Hulme, Alison N.; Quye, Anita

    2009-07-01

    Flavonoids are amongst the most commonly used natural yellow colourants in paintings, as lakes, and in historical textiles as mordant dyes. In this paper, evidence from isotopically labelled substrates is used to propose negative ion electrospray collision induced decomposition mechanisms of flavones, flavonols and an isoflavone. These mechanisms include a retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation (observed for flavones and flavonols) and an M-122 fragmentation (characteristic of 3',4'-dihydroxyflavonols). In addition, the presence of a m/z 125 fragment ion is shown to be characteristic of 2'-hydroxyflavonols and an ion at m/z 149 is shown to be characteristic of 4'-hydroxyflavones. Applications of these methods are exemplified by the identification of a minor component of Dyer's camomile (Anthemis tinctoria L.) and the identification of the dye source in green threads sampled from an 18th Century Scottish tartan fragment.

  6. Quantifying the sQGP - Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Richard

    2014-12-01

    This is the closeout for DE-FG02-86ER40271 entitled Quantifying the sQGP - Heavy Ion Collisions at the RHIC. Two major things were accomplished. The first, is the physics planning, design, approval, construction, and commissioning of the MPC-EX. The MPC-EX is an electromagnetic calorimeter covering a rapidity of 3<|eta|<4, which was added to the PHENIX detector. Its primary aim is to measure low-x gluons, in order to understand the suppression seen in a variety of signatures, such as the J/Psi. A candidate to explain this phenomena is the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) A second task was to look at collisions of asymmetric species, in particularly Cu+Au. The signature was the suppression of J/Psi mesons at forward and backward rapidity, where a stronger suppression was seen in the copper going direction. While the blue of the suppression is due to hot nuclear matter effects (e.g. screening) the increase in suppression on the Au side was consistent with cold nuclear matter effects seen in d+Au collisions. A major candidate for the explanation of this phenomena is the aforementioned CGC. Finally the work on sPHENIX, particularly an extension to the forward region, called fsPHENIX is described.

  7. Production of strange clusters in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.; Baltz, A.J.; Pang, Yang; Schlagel, T.J.; Kahana, S.H.

    1993-02-01

    We address a number of issues related to the production of strangeness in high energy heavy ion collisions, including the possibility that stable states of multi-strange hyperonic or quark matter might exist, and the prospects that such objects may be created and detected in the laboratory. We make use of events generated by the cascade code ARC to estimate the rapidity distribution dN/dy of strange clusters produced in Si+Au and Au+Au collisions at AGS energies. These calculations are performed in a simple coalescence model, which yields a consistent description of the strange cluster (d, [sup 3]HE, [sup 3]H, [sup 4]He) production at these energies. If a doubly strange, weakly bound [Lambda][Lambda] dibaryon exists, we find that it is produced rather copiously in Au+Au collisions, with dN/dy [approximately]0.1 at raid-rapidity. If one adds another non-strange or strange baryon to a cluster, the production rate decreases by roughly one or two orders of magnitude, respectively. For instance, we predict that the hypernucleus [sub [Lambda][Lambda

  8. Possibilities for relativistic heavy ion collisions at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.O.; Hahn, H.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1980 there has been considerable interest at Brookhaven in exploiting the existence of the Colliding Beam Accelerator, CBA, earlier referred to as Isabelle, for the generation of heavy ion collisions at very high energies. The only requirement for a heavy ion collider would have been for an energy booster for the Tandem accelerator and a tunnel and magnet transport system to the AGS. For a few million dollars heavy ions up to nearly 200 GeV/amu could be collided with luminosities of 10/sup 27/ to 10/sup 28//cm/sup 2/ sec in experimental halls with ideal facilities for heavy ion physics studies. Although the CBA project has been stopped, it is still true that Brookhaven has in place enormous advantages for constructing a heavy ion collider. This paper describes a design that exploits those advantages. It uses the tunnel and other civil construction, the refrigerator, vacuum equipment, injection line components, and the magnet design for which there is expertise and a production facility in place. The result is a machine that appears quite different than would a machine designed from first principles without access to these resources but one which is of high performance and of very attractive cost.

  9. Negative ion mass spectrometry and the detection of carbonyls and HCN from clover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Thomas G.; Kato, Shuji; Fall, Ray; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2000-12-01

    We have demonstrated that negative ion-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) can be used to distinguish several isomeric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted from wounded plants. Reaction chemistry with HO-, hydrogen/deuterium exchange patterns, and collision-induced dissociation spectra allow identification of the isomers. Laboratory studies of emissions from wounded clover using NI-CIMS show several previously detected VOCs, but also clearly demonstrate the emission of HCN. This compound is presumably formed by the decomposition of cyanogenic glycosides which also form aldehyde and ketone byproducts. These results suggest that NI-CIMS may be a valuable tool for investigating VOCs and HCN release from vegetation.

  10. Characteristics of ion acoustic solitary waves in a negative ion plasma with superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rouhani, M. R.; Ebne Abbasi, Z.

    2012-11-15

    The behavior of ion acoustic solitons in a plasma including positive and negative ions and kappa distributed electrons is studied, using both small amplitude and arbitrary amplitude approaches. The existence regions of compressive and rarefactive solitons will depend on negative to positive ion density ratio ({nu}) and kappa parameter as well as positive to negative ion mass ratio (Q). The numerical analysis of Sagdeev potential shows that for a chosen plasma with fixed Q, the existence regime of compressive solitons is decreased (increased) by increasing density ratio (kappa parameter), while for rarefactive solitons these conditions are quite opposite. Additionally, the possibility of propagation of both compressive and rarefactive subsonic solitons is investigated. It is found that by increasing negative ions, the existence domains of subsonic solitons are decreased, so that in excess of negative ions subsonic solitons will not propagate even at the presence of superthermal electrons. Indeed, there is a critical negative ion density ratio for all values of kappa, above that only supersonic solitons are observed. Furthermore, in addition to the previous results based on Cairns-distributed electrons [R. A. Cairns et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 22, 2709 (1995)], which predicted that both compressive and rarefactive solitons can coexist simultaneously, we have also found the regions of {nu} and {kappa} in which either positive or negative potentials are permitted (i.e., not together). This research will be helpful in understanding the properties of space and laboratory plasmas containing negative ions with energetic electrons.