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Sample records for negative regulatory feedback

  1. Noise Control in Gene Regulatory Networks with Negative Feedback.

    PubMed

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-07-01

    Genes and proteins regulate cellular functions through complex circuits of biochemical reactions. Fluctuations in the components of these regulatory networks result in noise that invariably corrupts the signal, possibly compromising function. Here, we create a practical formalism based on ideas introduced by Wiener and Kolmogorov (WK) for filtering noise in engineered communications systems to quantitatively assess the extent to which noise can be controlled in biological processes involving negative feedback. Application of the theory, which reproduces the previously proven scaling of the lower bound for noise suppression in terms of the number of signaling events, shows that a tetracycline repressor-based negative-regulatory gene circuit behaves as a WK filter. For the class of Hill-like nonlinear regulatory functions, this type of filter provides the optimal reduction in noise. Our theoretical approach can be readily combined with experimental measurements of response functions in a wide variety of genetic circuits, to elucidate the general principles by which biological networks minimize noise. PMID:27095600

  2. Negative Feedback Loops Involving Small Regulatory RNAs Precisely Control the Vibrio harveyi Quorum-Sensing Response

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Kimberly C.; Long, Tao; Svenningsen, Sine L.; Wingreen, Ned S.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Quorum sensing (QS) bacteria assess population density through secretion and detection of molecules called autoinducers (AIs). We identify and characterize two Vibrio harveyi negative feedback loops that facilitate precise transitions between low-cell-density (LCD) and high-cell-density (HCD) states. The QS central regulator LuxO autorepresses its own transcription and the Qrr small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) posttranscriptionally repress luxO. Disrupting feedback increases the concentration of AIs required for cells to transit from LCD to HCD QS modes. Thus, the two cooperative negative feedback loops determine the point at which V. harveyi has reached a quorum and control the range of AIs over which the transition occurs. Negative feedback regulation also constrains the range of QS output – by preventing sRNA levels from becoming too high and preventing luxO mRNA levels from reaching zero. We suggest that sRNA-mediated feedback regulation is a network design feature that permits fine-tuning of gene regulation and maintenance of homeostasis. PMID:20188674

  3. Negative Feedback and Transcriptional Overshooting in a Regulatory Network for Horizontal Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Lopez, Raul; del Campo, Irene; Revilla, Carlos; Cuevas, Ana; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major force driving bacterial evolution. Because of their ability to cross inter-species barriers, bacterial plasmids are essential agents for HGT. This ability, however, poses specific requisites on plasmid physiology, in particular the need to overcome a multilevel selection process with opposing demands. We analyzed the transcriptional network of plasmid R388, one of the most promiscuous plasmids in Proteobacteria. Transcriptional analysis by fluorescence expression profiling and quantitative PCR revealed a regulatory network controlled by six transcriptional repressors. The regulatory network relied on strong promoters, which were tightly repressed in negative feedback loops. Computational simulations and theoretical analysis indicated that this architecture would show a transcriptional burst after plasmid conjugation, linking the magnitude of the feedback gain with the intensity of the transcriptional burst. Experimental analysis showed that transcriptional overshooting occurred when the plasmid invaded a new population of susceptible cells. We propose that transcriptional overshooting allows genome rebooting after horizontal gene transfer, and might have an adaptive role in overcoming the opposing demands of multilevel selection. PMID:24586200

  4. Intrinsic Negative Feedback Governs Activation Surge in Two-Component Regulatory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Won-Sik; Zwir, Igor; Huang, Henry V.; Shin, Dongwoo; Kato, Akinori; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY PhoP and PhoQ comprise a two-component system in the bacterium Salmonella enterica. PhoQ is the sensor kinase/phosphatase that modifies the phosphorylation state of the regulator PhoP in response to stimuli. The amount of phosphorylated PhoP surges after activation, then declines to reach a steady-state level. We now recapitulate this surge in vitro by incubating PhoP and PhoQ with ATP and ADP. Mathematical modeling identified PhoQ’s affinity for ADP as the key parameter dictating phosphorylated PhoP levels, as ADP promotes PhoQ’s phosphatase activity toward phosphorylated PhoP. The lid covering the nucleotide-binding pocket of PhoQ governs the kinase to phosphatase switch because a lid mutation that decreased ADP binding compromised PhoQ’s phosphatase activity in vitro and resulted in sustained expression of PhoP-dependent mRNAs in vivo. This feedback mechanism may curtail futile ATP consumption because ADP not only stimulates PhoQ’s phosphatase activity but also inhibits ATP binding necessary for the kinase reaction. PMID:22325356

  5. Non-hypoxic activation of the negative regulatory feedback loop of prolyl-hydroxylase oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Tug, Suzan; Delos Reyes, Buena; Fandrey, Joachim; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, Utta

    2009-07-10

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) coordinate cellular responses towards hypoxia. HIFs are mainly regulated by a group of prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) that in the presence of oxygen, target the HIFalpha subunit for degradation. Herein, we studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating PHD activities under normoxic conditions. In the present study we show that different NO-donors initially inhibited endogenous PHD2 activity which led to accumulation of HIF-1alpha subsequently to enhance HIF-1 dependent increased PHD2 promoter activity. Consequently PHD2 abundance and activity were strongly induced which caused downregulation of HIF-1alpha. Interestingly, upregulation of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO was not found in cells that lack an intact pVHL dependent degradation pathway. Recovery of PHD activity required intact cells and was not observed in cell extracts or recombinant PHD2. In conclusion induction of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO is dependent on a feedback loop initiated despite normoxic conditions. PMID:19427832

  6. Acute heat stress brings down milk secretion in dairy cows by up-regulating the activity of the milk-borne negative feedback regulatory system

    PubMed Central

    Silanikove, Nissim; Shapiro, Fira; Shinder, Dima

    2009-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine if acute heat stress (HS) decreases milk secretion by activating the milk-borne negative feedback system, as an emergency physiological response to prevent a life-threatening situation. To induce HS, summer acclimatized dairy cows were exposed to full sun under mid-summer Mediterranean conditions, with and without conventional cooling procedures. Results Exposure to HS induced a rapid and acute (within 24 h) reduction in milk yield in proportion to the heat load. This decrease was moderated by cooler night-time ambient temperature. The reduction in milk yield was associated with corresponding responses in plasminogen activator/plasminogen-plasmin activities, and with increased activity (concentration) of the (1–28) N-terminal fragment peptide that is released by plasmin from β-casein (β-CN (1–28)). These metabolites constitute the regulatory negative feedback system. Previously, it has been shown that β-CN (1–28) down-regulated milk secretion by blocking potassium channels on the apical aspects of the mammary epithelial cells. Conclusion Here we demonstrate that the potassium channels in mammary tissue became more susceptible to β-CN (1–28) activity under HS. Thus, the present study highlighted two previously unreported features of this regulatory system: (i) that it modulates rapidly in response to stressor impact variations; and (ii) that the regulations of the mammary epithelial potassium channel sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of β-CN (1–28) is part of the regulatory system. PMID:19563620

  7. Negative cooperativity in regulatory enzymes.

    PubMed

    Levitzki, A; Koshland, D E

    1969-04-01

    Negative cooperativity has been observed in CTP synthetase, an allosteric enzyme which contains a regulatory site. Thus, the same enzyme exhibits negative cooperativity for GTP (an effector) and glutamine (a substrate) and positive cooperativity for ATP and UTP (both substrates). In the process of the delineation of these phenomena, diagnostic procedures for negative cooperativity were developed. Application of these procedures to other enzymes indicates that negative cooperativity is a characteristic of many of them. These findings add strong support for the sequential model of subunit interactions which postulates that ligand-induced conformational changes are responsible for regulatory and cooperative phenomena in enzymes. PMID:5256410

  8. Negative feedback system reduces pump oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenmann, W.

    1967-01-01

    External negative feedback system counteracts low frequency oscillations in rocket engine propellant pumps. The system uses a control piston to sense pump discharge fluid on one side and a gas pocket on the other.

  9. Negative feedback confers mutational robustness in yeast transcription factor regulation

    PubMed Central

    Denby, Charles M.; Im, Joo Hyun; Yu, Richard C.; Pesce, C. Gustavo; Brem, Rachel B.

    2012-01-01

    Organismal fitness depends on the ability of gene networks to function robustly in the face of environmental and genetic perturbations. Understanding the mechanisms of this stability is one of the key aims of modern systems biology. Dissecting the basis of robustness to mutation has proven a particular challenge, with most experimental models relying on artificial DNA sequence variants engineered in the laboratory. In this work, we hypothesized that negative regulatory feedback could stabilize gene expression against the disruptions that arise from natural genetic variation. We screened yeast transcription factors for feedback and used the results to establish ROX1 (Repressor of hypOXia) as a model system for the study of feedback in circuit behaviors and its impact across genetically heterogeneous populations. Mutagenesis experiments revealed the mechanism of Rox1 as a direct transcriptional repressor at its own gene, enabling a regulatory program of rapid induction during environmental change that reached a plateau of moderate steady-state expression. Additionally, in a given environmental condition, Rox1 levels varied widely across genetically distinct strains; the ROX1 feedback loop regulated this variation, in that the range of expression levels across genetic backgrounds showed greater spread in ROX1 feedback mutants than among strains with the ROX1 feedback loop intact. Our findings indicate that the ROX1 feedback circuit is tuned to respond to perturbations arising from natural genetic variation in addition to its role in induction behavior. We suggest that regulatory feedback may be an important element of the network architectures that confer mutational robustness across biology. PMID:22355134

  10. Negative Feedback in the Vibrio harveyi Quorum-Sensing Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Shu-Wen; Schaffer, Jessie; Wingreen, Ned; Bassler, Bonnie; Phuan Ong, Nai

    2010-03-01

    Quorum sensing is the mechanism by which bacteria communicate and synchronize group behaviors. Multiple feedbacks have been identified in the model quorum-sensing bacterium Vibrio harveyi, but it has been unclear how these feedbacks interact in individual cells to control the fidelity of signal transduction. We measured the copy number distribution of the master regulators to quantify the activity of the signaling network. We find that the feedbacks affect the production rate, level, and noise of the core quorum-sensing components. Using fluorescence time-lapse microscopy, we directly observed the master regulator in individual cells, and analyzed the persistence of heterogeneity in terms of the normalized time-delayed direct correlation. Our findings suggest that feedback from small regulatory RNAs regulates a receptor to control the noise level in signal transduction. We further tested this model by re-engineering the gene circuit to specifically diminish this feedback. We conclude that negative feedbacks mediated by sRNAs permit fine-tuning of gene regulation, thereby increasing the fidelity of signal transduction.

  11. Feedback delay gradually affects amplitude and valence specificity of the feedback-related negativity (FRN).

    PubMed

    Peterburs, Jutta; Kobza, Stefan; Bellebaum, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Processing of performance-related feedback is an essential prerequisite for adaptive behavior. Even though in everyday life feedback is rarely immediate, to date very few studies have investigated whether the feedback-related negativity (FRN), a relative negativity in the ERP approximately 200 to 300 ms after feedback that is sensitive to feedback valence and predictability, is modulated by feedback timing, and findings are inconsistent. The present study investigated effects of gradually increasing feedback delays on feedback processing in the FRN time window. Subjects completed a probabilistic learning task in which feedback was provided after short, intermediate, or long delays. Difference wave-based analyses showed that amplitudes decreased linearly with increasing feedback delay. A distinct pattern was observed for the FRN as defined in the original waveforms, with FRN amplitudes being largest for long and smallest for short delays. This pattern of results is consistent with the notion that the neural systems underlying feedback processing vary depending on feedback timing. The gradually reduced difference wave signal might reflect a gradual shift away from processing in frontostriatal circuits toward medial temporal involvement. To what extent increased signal amplitudes for longer delays in the original waveforms are related to processing in certain brain structures will need to be determined in future studies. PMID:26459164

  12. Distinct noise-controlling roles of multiple negative feedback mechanisms in a prokaryotic operon system.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, L K; Kulasiri, D

    2011-03-01

    Molecular fluctuations are known to affect dynamics of cellular systems in important ways. Studies aimed at understanding how molecular systems of certain regulatory architectures control noise therefore become essential. The interplay between feedback regulation and noise has been previously explored for cellular networks governed by a single negative feedback loop. However, similar issues within networks consisting of more complex regulatory structures remain elusive. The authors investigate how negative feedback loops manage noise within a biochemical cascade concurrently governed by multiple negative feedback loops, using the prokaryotic tryptophan (trp) operon system in Escherechia coli as the model system. To the authors knowledge, this is the first study of noise in the trp operon system. They show that the loops in the trp operon system possess distinct, even opposing, noise-controlling effects despite their seemingly analogous feedback structures. The enzyme inhibition loop, although controlling the last reaction of the cascade, was found to suppress noise not only for the tryptophan output but also for other upstream components. In contrast, the Repression (Rep) loop enhances noise for all systems components. Attenuation (Att) poses intermediate effects by attenuating noise for the upstream components but promoting noise for components downstream of its target. Regarding noise at the output tryptophan, Rep and Att can be categorised as noise-enhancing loops whereas Enzyme Inhibition as a noise-reducing loop. These findings suggest novel implications in how cellular systems with multiple feedback mechanisms control noise. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:21405203

  13. A biopsychosocial model based on negative feedback and control

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Timothy A.; Mansell, Warren; Tai, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the biopsychosocial model has been a popular topic of discussion for over four decades it has not had the traction in fields of research that might be expected of such an intuitively appealing idea. One reason for this might be the absence of an identified mechanism or a functional architecture that is authentically biopsychosocial. What is needed is a robust mechanism that is equally important to biochemical processes as it is to psychological and social processes. Negative feedback may be the mechanism that is required. Negative feedback has been implicated in the regulation of neurotransmitters as well as important psychological and social processes such as emotional regulation and the relationship between a psychotherapist and a client. Moreover, negative feedback is purported to also govern the activity of all other organisms as well as humans. Perceptual Control Theory (PCT) describes the way in which negative feedback establishes control at increasing levels of perceptual complexity. Thus, PCT may be the first biopsychosocial model to be articulated in functional terms. In this paper we outline the working model of PCT and explain how PCT provides an embodied hierarchical neural architecture that utilizes negative feedback to control physiological, psychological, and social variables. PCT has major implications for both research and practice and, importantly, provides a guide by which fields of research that are currently separated may be integrated to bring about substantial progress in understanding the way in which the brain alters, and is altered by, its behavioral and environmental context. PMID:24616685

  14. Negative feedback in genetic circuits confers evolutionary resilience and capacitance.

    PubMed

    Marciano, David C; Lua, Rhonald C; Katsonis, Panagiotis; Amin, Shivas R; Herman, Christophe; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2014-06-26

    Natural selection for specific functions places limits upon the amino acid substitutions a protein can accept. Mechanisms that expand the range of tolerable amino acid substitutions include chaperones that can rescue destabilized proteins and additional stability-enhancing substitutions. Here, we present an alternative mechanism that is simple and uses a frequently encountered network motif. Computational and experimental evidence shows that the self-correcting, negative-feedback gene regulation motif increases repressor expression in response to deleterious mutations and thereby precisely restores repression of a target gene. Furthermore, this ability to rescue repressor function is observable across the Eubacteria kingdom through the greater accumulation of amino acid substitutions in negative-feedback transcription factors compared to genes they control. We propose that negative feedback represents a self-contained genetic canalization mechanism that preserves phenotype while permitting access to a wider range of functional genotypes. PMID:24910431

  15. The regulation of positive and negative social feedback: A psychophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne; Remue, Jonathan; Ng, Kwun Kei; Mueller, Sven C; De Raedt, Rudi

    2015-09-01

    Everyday social evaluations are psychologically potent and trigger self-reflective thoughts and feelings. The present study sought to examine the psychophysiological impact of such evaluations using eye tracking, pupillometry, and heart-rate variability. Fifty-nine healthy adult volunteers received rigged social feedback (criticism and praise) based on their photograph. Gaze data were collected to investigate processes of attentional deployment/allocation toward the self or the evaluator expressing criticism or praise. Whereas voluntary attention was directed to evaluators who expressed praise, attention was drawn to one's own picture after criticism. Pupil dilation and heart-rate variability were larger in response to criticism as compared to praise, suggesting a flexible and adaptive emotion regulatory effort in response to social information that triggers an affective response. Altogether, healthy individuals recruited more regulatory resources to cope with negative (as compared to positive) social feedback, and this processing of social feedback was associated with adjustments in self-focused attention. PMID:25810280

  16. Coupled Positive and Negative Feedbacks Produce Diverse Gene Expression Patterns in Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Mitarai, Namiko; Jensen, Mogens Høgh

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Formation of patterns is a common feature in the development of multicellular organism as well as of microbial communities. To investigate the formation of gene expression patterns in colonies, we build a mathematical model of two-dimensional colony growth, where cells carry a coupled positive-and-negative-feedback circuit. We demonstrate that the model can produce sectored, target (concentric), uniform, and scattered expression patterns of regulators, depending on gene expression dynamics and nutrient diffusion. We reconstructed the same regulatory structure in Escherichia coli cells and found gene expression patterns on the surface of colonies similar to the ones produced by the computer simulations. By comparing computer simulations and experimental results, we observed that very simple rules of gene expression can yield a spectrum of well-defined patterns in a growing colony. Our results suggest that variations of the protein content among cells lead to a high level of heterogeneity in colonies. Importance Formation of patterns is a common feature in the development of microbial communities. In this work, we show that a simple genetic circuit composed of a positive-feedback loop and a negative-feedback loop can produce diverse expression patterns in colonies. We obtained similar sets of gene expression patterns in the simulations and in the experiments. Because the combination of positive feedback and negative feedback is common in intracellular molecular networks, our results suggest that the protein content of cells is highly diversified in colonies. PMID:25852158

  17. Feedback-induced glutamate spillover enhances negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones

    PubMed Central

    Vroman, Rozan; Kamermans, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Key points In the retina, horizontal cells feed back negatively to cone photoreceptors. Glutamate released from cones can spill over to neighbouring cones. Here we show that cone glutamate release induced by negative feedback can also spill over to neighbouring cones. This glutamate activates the glutamate transporter-associated chloride current in these neighbouring cones, which leads to a change in their membrane potential and thus modulates their output. In this way, feedback-induced glutamate spillover enhances negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones, thus forming an additional feedback pathway. This effect will be particularly prominent in cones that are strongly hyperpolarized by light. Abstract Inhibition in the outer retina functions via an unusual mechanism. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize the activation potential of the Ca2+ current of cones shifts to more negative potentials. The underlying mechanism consists of an ephaptic component and a Panx1/ATP-mediated component. Here we identified a third feedback component, which remains active outside the operating range of the Ca2+ current. We show that the glutamate transporters of cones can be activated by glutamate released from their neighbours. This pathway can be triggered by negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones, thus providing an additional feedback pathway. This additional pathway is mediated by a Cl− current, can be blocked by either removing the gradient of K+ or by adding the glutamate transporter blocker TBOA, or low concentrations of Zn2+. These features point to a glutamate transporter-associated Cl− current. The pathway has a delay of 4.7 ± 1.7 ms. The effectiveness of this pathway in modulating the cone output depends on the equilibrium potential of Cl− (ECl) and the membrane potential of the cone. Because estimates of ECl show that it is around the dark resting membrane potential of cones, the activation of the glutamate transporter-associated Cl− current

  18. Expression Optimization and Inducible Negative Feedback in Cell-Free Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karig, David K; Iyer, Sukanya; Simpson, Michael L; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology offers great promise to a variety of applications through the forward engineering of biological function. Most efforts in this field have focused on employing living cells. Cell-free approaches, on the other hand, offer simpler and more flexible contexts, but few synthetic systems based on cell-free protein expression have been constructed. Here, we evaluate cell-free regulatory systems based on T7 promoter driven expression, and we demonstrate negative feedback, an essential motif in many natural and engineered systems. First, we characterize variants of TetR and LacI repressible T7 promoters in a cell-free context and examine sequence elements that determine expression efficiency. Then, we explore different approaches for composing regulatory systems, leading to the implementation of inducible negative feedback in E. coli extracts and in the minimal PURE system, which consists of purified proteins necessary for transcription and translation. Our quantitative cell-free component characterizations and demonstration of negative feedback embody important steps on the path to harnessing biological function in a bottom up fashion.

  19. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  20. Bringing in the negative reinforcements: the avoidance feedback-related negativity.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Michael J; Wu, Jia; Bailey, Christopher A; Mayes, Linda C

    2009-11-25

    The feedback-related negativity (FRN) is an event-related potential thought to reflect a reward prediction error, when an outcome is worse than expected. Behavior motivated by the avoidance of negative outcomes is sustained through negative reinforcement processes. Escaping or avoiding a negative outcome may be successful or not, resulting in an analogous situation to that which elicits the FRN. We observed that when expected avoidance of an aversive outcome fails to occur, there occurs a negative deflection in the frontocentral event-related potential at approximately 350 ms, but with a slow wave following. We suggest that the FRN may be considered an index of a broader class of reward-based learning that also includes avoiding negative outcomes as well as expecting positive ones. PMID:19829164

  1. Negative feedback between stress and erosion: origin of sandstone landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruthans, Jiri; Soukup, Jan; Vaculikova, Jana; Filippi, Michal; Schweigstillova, Jana; Mayo, Alan; Masin, David; Kletetschka, Gunther; Rihosek, Jaroslav

    2015-04-01

    Weathering and erosion of sandstone produces spectacular landforms such as arches, alcoves, pedestal rocks and pillars. The effect of gravity loading stress has been overlooked or assumed to increase the landform's weathering rate. Here we show by physical and numerical modeling, and field observations of locked sands and sandstones that an increase in stress within the landform reduces weathering and erosion. Material with insufficient loading is rapidly removed by weathering process and the remaining load bearing landform structure is protected by the fabric interlocking mechanism. As the landform evolves the increased stress inhibits erosion from raindrop impact, flowing water and slaking, and retards surface retreat caused by salt and frost weathering. Planar discontinuities in sandstone and negative feedback between stress and weathering/erosion processes are sufficient conditions to create above-mentioned landforms. Our experiments are able to reproduce natural shapes including arches, alcoves, pedestal rocks and pillars using landform material and mimicking natural processes. The proposed negative feedback mechanism is supported by a numerical model of stress pattern in landforms. We conclude that stress field is the primary control of the shape evolution of sandstone landforms.

  2. Brain Activity Elicited by Positive and Negative Feedback in Preschool-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Xiaoqin; Tardif, Twila; Doan, Stacey N.; Liu, Chao; Gehring, William J.; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the processing of positive vs. negative feedback in children aged 4–5 years, we devised a prize-guessing game that is analogous to gambling tasks used to measure feedback-related brain responses in adult studies. Unlike adult studies, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) elicited by positive feedback was as large as that elicited by negative feedback, suggesting that the neural system underlying the FRN may not process feedback valence in early childhood. In addition, positive feedback, compared with negative feedback, evoked a larger P1 over the occipital scalp area and a larger positive slow wave (PSW) over the right central-parietal scalp area. We believe that the PSW is related to emotional arousal and the intensive focus on positive feedback that is present in the preschool and early school years has adaptive significance for both cognitive and emotional development during this period. PMID:21526189

  3. Brain activity elicited by positive and negative feedback in preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Mai, Xiaoqin; Tardif, Twila; Doan, Stacey N; Liu, Chao; Gehring, William J; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the processing of positive vs. negative feedback in children aged 4-5 years, we devised a prize-guessing game that is analogous to gambling tasks used to measure feedback-related brain responses in adult studies. Unlike adult studies, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) elicited by positive feedback was as large as that elicited by negative feedback, suggesting that the neural system underlying the FRN may not process feedback valence in early childhood. In addition, positive feedback, compared with negative feedback, evoked a larger P1 over the occipital scalp area and a larger positive slow wave (PSW) over the right central-parietal scalp area. We believe that the PSW is related to emotional arousal and the intensive focus on positive feedback that is present in the preschool and early school years has adaptive significance for both cognitive and emotional development during this period. PMID:21526189

  4. Inconsistency of mothers' feedback and toddlers' misbehavior and negative affect.

    PubMed

    Acker, M M; O'Leary, S G

    1996-12-01

    The general hypothesis that mothers' inconsistent discipline can cause children to misbehave was examined. Mothers, who were otherwise engaged in a telephone conversation, were instructed to respond to toddlers' inappropriate demands for attention with either consistent reprimands or with one of a variety of inconsistent strategies. Reprimanding half of the child's demands and providing positive attention to the rest of the demands resulted in high rates of both demands for mothers' attention and children's negative affect. Reprimanding half the children's demands and ignoring the other demands did not have deleterious effects nor did reprimanding and attending to the same demand half of the time and ignoring the other demands. Thus, clear, positive feedback for inappropriate demands is a type of inconsistent discipline that can cause normal toddlers to become "terrible twos." PMID:8970905

  5. Developmental and Gender Related Differences in Response Switches after Nonrepresentative Negative Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Brenda R. J.; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C. K.; Huizenga, Hilde M.

    2014-01-01

    In many decision making tasks negative feedback is probabilistic and, as a consequence, may be given when the decision is actually correct. This feedback can be referred to as nonrepresentative negative feedback. In the current study, we investigated developmental and gender related differences in such switching after nonrepresentative negative…

  6. Potentiated processing of negative feedback in depression is attenuated by anhedonia

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, E. M.; Pechtel, P.; Cohen, A.L.; Douglas, S.R.; Pizzagalli, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although cognitive theories of depression have postulated enhanced processing of negatively valenced information, previous EEG studies have shown both increased and reduced sensitivity for negative performance feedback in MDD. To reconcile these paradoxical findings, it has been speculated that sensitivity for negative feedback is potentiated in moderate MDD but reduced in highly anhedonic subjects. The goal of this study was to test this hypothesis by analyzing the feedback-related negativity (FRN), frontomedial theta power (FMT), and source-localized anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC) activity after negative feedback. Methods Fourteen unmedicated participants with MDD and 15 control participants performed a reinforcement learning task while 128-channel EEG was recorded. FRN, FMT and LORETA source-localized aMCC activity after negative and positive feedback were compared between groups. Results The MDD group showed higher FRN amplitudes and aMCC activation to negative feedback than controls. Moreover, aMCC activation to negative feedback was inversely related to self-reported anhedonia. In contrast, self-reported anxiety correlated with feedback-evoked frontomedial theta (FMT) within the depression group. Conclusions The present findings suggest that, among depressed and anxious individuals, enhanced processing of negative feedback occurs relatively early in the information processing stream. These results extend prior work and indicate that although moderate depression is associated with elevated sensitivity for negative feedback, high levels of anhedonia may attenuate this effect. PMID:25620272

  7. From Positivity to Negativity Bias: Ambiguity Affects the Neurophysiological Signatures of Feedback Processing.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Henning; Schnuerch, Robert; Stahl, Jutta

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies on the neurophysiological underpinnings of feedback processing almost exclusively used low-ambiguity feedback, which does not fully address the diversity of situations in everyday life. We therefore used a pseudo trial-and-error learning task to investigate ERPs of low- versus high-ambiguity feedback. Twenty-eight participants tried to deduce the rule governing visual feedback to their button presses in response to visual stimuli. In the blocked condition, the same two feedback words were presented across several consecutive trials, whereas in the random condition feedback was randomly drawn on each trial from sets of five positive and five negative words. The feedback-related negativity (FRN-D), a frontocentral ERP difference between negative and positive feedback, was significantly larger in the blocked condition, whereas the centroparietal late positive complex indicating controlled attention was enhanced for negative feedback irrespective of condition. Moreover, FRN-D in the blocked condition was due to increased reward positivity (Rew-P) for positive feedback, rather than increased (raw) FRN for negative feedback. Our findings strongly support recent lines of evidence that the FRN-D, one of the most widely studied signatures of reinforcement learning in the human brain, critically depends on feedback discriminability and is primarily driven by the Rew-P. A novel finding concerned larger frontocentral P2 for negative feedback in the random but not the blocked condition. Although Rew-P points to a positivity bias in feedback processing under conditions of low feedback ambiguity, P2 suggests a specific adaptation of information processing in case of highly ambiguous feedback, involving an early negativity bias. Generalizability of the P2 findings was demonstrated in a second experiment using explicit valence categorization of highly emotional positive and negative adjectives. PMID:26765948

  8. Development of negative feedback during successive growth cycles of black cherry.

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Alissa; Clay, Keith

    2004-01-01

    Negative feedback between plant and soil microbial communities can be a key determinant of vegetation structure and dynamics. Previous research has shown that negative feedback between black cherry (Prunus serotina) and soil pathogens is strongly distance dependent. Here, we investigate the temporal dynamics of negative feedback. To examine short-term changes, we planted successive cycles of seedlings in the same soil. We found that seedling mortality increased steadily with growth cycle when sterile background soil was inoculated with living field soil but not in controls inoculated with sterilized field soil. To examine long-term changes, we quantified negative feedback across successive growth cycles in soil inoculated with living field soil from a mature forest system (more than 70 years old) versus a younger successional site (ca. 25 years old). In both cases negative feedback developed similarly. Our results suggest that negative feedback can develop very quickly in forest systems, at the spatial scale of a single seedling. PMID:15058444

  9. Control your anger! The neural basis of aggression regulation in response to negative social feedback.

    PubMed

    Achterberg, Michelle; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Crone, Eveline A

    2016-05-01

    Negative social feedback often generates aggressive feelings and behavior. Prior studies have investigated the neural basis of negative social feedback, but the underlying neural mechanisms of aggression regulation following negative social feedback remain largely undiscovered. In the current study, participants viewed pictures of peers with feedback (positive, neutral or negative) to the participant's personal profile. Next, participants responded to the peer feedback by pressing a button, thereby producing a loud noise toward the peer, as an index of aggression. Behavioral analyses showed that negative feedback led to more aggression (longer noise blasts). Conjunction neuroimaging analyses revealed that both positive and negative feedback were associated with increased activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) and bilateral insula. In addition, more activation in the right dorsal lateral PFC (dlPFC) during negative feedback vs neutral feedback was associated with shorter noise blasts in response to negative social feedback, suggesting a potential role of dlPFC in aggression regulation, or top-down control over affective impulsive actions. This study demonstrates a role of the dlPFC in the regulation of aggressive social behavior. PMID:26755768

  10. Neural basis of abnormal response to negative feedback in unmedicated mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Taylor Tavares, Joana V; Clark, Luke; Furey, Maura L; Williams, Guy B; Sahakian, Barbara J; Drevets, Wayne C

    2008-09-01

    Depressed individuals show hypersensitivity to negative feedback during cognitive testing, which can precipitate subsequent errors and thereby impair a broad range of cognitive abilities. We studied the neural mechanisms underlying this feedback hypersensitivity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a reversal learning task that required subjects to ignore misleading negative feedback on some trials. Thirteen depressed subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD), 12 depressed subjects with bipolar disorder (BD) and 15 healthy controls participated. The MDD group, but not the BD group, demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to negative feedback compared to controls, as indicated by the rates of rule reversal following misleading negative feedback. In the control and BD groups, hemodynamic activity was significantly higher in the dorsomedial and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices during reversal shifting, and significantly lower in the right amygdala in response to negative feedback. The extent to which the amygdala showed less activity during negative feedback correlated inversely with the behavioral tendency to reverse after misleading feedback. This effect was not present in the MDD group, who also failed to recruit the prefrontal cortex during behavioral reversal. Hypersensitivity to negative feedback is present in unmedicated depressed patients with MDD. Disrupted top-down control by the prefrontal cortex of the amygdala may underlie this abnormal response to negative feedback in unipolar depression. PMID:18586109

  11. Brain Activation of Negative Feedback in Rule Acquisition Revealed in a Segmented Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Cao, Bihua; Cai, Xueli; Gao, Heming; Li, Fuhong

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the brain activation associated with the informative value of negative feedback in rule acquisition. In each trial of a segmented Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, participants were provided with three reference cards and one target card, and were asked to match one of three reference cards to the target card based on a classification rule. Participants received feedback after each match. Participants would acquire the rule after one negative feedback (1-NF condition) or two successive negative feedbacks (2-NF condition). The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results indicated that lateral prefrontal-to-parietal cortices were more active in the 2-NF condition than in the 1-NF condition. The activation in the right lateral prefrontal cortex and left posterior parietal cortex increased gradually with the amount of negative feedback. These results demonstrate that the informative value of negative feedback in rule acquisition might be modulated by the lateral prefronto-parietal loop. PMID:26469519

  12. Regulatory feedback loop between TP73 and TRIM32.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cano, L; Hillje, A-L; Fuertes-Alvarez, S; Marques, M M; Blanch, A; Ian, R W; Irwin, M S; Schwamborn, J C; Marín, M C

    2013-01-01

    The p73 transcription factor is one of the members of the p53 family of tumor suppressors with unique biological functions in processes like neurogenesis, embryonic development and differentiation. For this reason, p73 activity is tightly regulated by multiple mechanisms, including transcription and post-translational modifications. Here, we identified a novel regulatory loop between TAp73 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif protein 32 (TRIM32). TRIM32, a new direct p73 transcriptional target in the context of neural progenitor cells, is differentially regulated by p73. Although TAp73 binds to the TRIM32 promoter and activates its expression, TAp73-induced TRIM32 expression is efficiently repressed by DNp73. TRIM32 in turn physically interacts with TAp73 and promotes its ubiquitination and degradation, impairing p73-dependent transcriptional activity. This mutual regulation between p73 and TRIM32 constitutes a novel feedback loop, which might have important implications in central nervous system development as well as relevance in oncogenesis, and thus emerges as a possible therapeutic target. PMID:23828567

  13. Reciprocal, Longitudinal Associations among Adolescents' Negative Feedback-Seeking, Depressive Symptoms, and Peer Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borelli, Jessica L.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined reciprocal associations among adolescents' negative feedback-seeking, depressive symptoms, perceptions of friendship quality, and peer-reported social preference over an 11-month period. A total of 478 adolescents in grades 6-8 completed measures of negative feedback-seeking, depressive symptoms, friendship quality,…

  14. The linkage between infant negative temperament and parenting self-efficacy: the role of resilience against negative performance feedback.

    PubMed

    Verhage, Marije L; Oosterman, Mirjam; Schuengel, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    Caring for infants with negative reactive temperament may tax parents' confidence in their caregiving ability, or parenting self-efficacy (PSE). This may happen in particular in parents who interpret these signals as negative feedback on their performance. To test this hypothesis, 179 first-time pregnant women were presented a caregiving simulation that provided positive and negative feedback on their attempts to comfort a crying baby. According to their PSE resilience to negative feedback during the task, they were grouped in a high resilient and low resilient group. PSE was followed up at 32 weeks of pregnancy and 3 and 12 months after birth, while perceived temperament of the child was assessed at 3 and 12 months after birth. Results showed that among women with low resilience against negative feedback, perceived negative temperament was negatively associated with PSE at 3 months, whereas no such association was observed among women with high resilience against negative feedback. Implications of the concept of resilience for the study of PSE are discussed. PMID:26316310

  15. Oscillatory profiles of positive, negative and neutral feedback stimuli during adaptive decision making.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Baker, Travis E; Warren, Chris; Li, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The electrophysiological response to positive and negative feedback during reinforcement learning has been well documented over the past two decades, yet, little is known about the neural response to uninformative events that often follow our actions. To address this issue, we recorded the electroencephalograph (EEG) during a time-estimation task using both informative (positive and negative) and uninformative (neutral) feedback. In the time-frequency domain, uninformative feedback elicited significantly less induced beta-gamma activity than informative feedback. This result suggests that beta-gamma activity is particularly sensitive to feedback that can guide behavioral adjustments, consistent with other work. In contrast, neither theta nor delta activity were sensitive to the difference between negative and neutral feedback, though both frequencies discriminated between positive, and non-positive (neutral or negative) feedback. Interestingly, in the time domain, we observed a linear relationship in the amplitude of the feedback-related negativity (neutral>negative>positive), a component of the event-related brain potential thought to index a specific kind of reinforcement learning signal called a reward prediction error. Taken together, these results suggest that the reinforcement learning system treats neutral feedback as a special case, providing valuable information about the electrophysiological measures used to index the cognitive function of frontal midline cortex. PMID:27378537

  16. Loss of nuclear receptor SHP impairs but does not eliminate negative feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Thomas A; Saeki, Shigeru; Schneider, Manfred; Schaefer, Karen; Berdy, Sara; Redder, Thadd; Shan, Bei; Russell, David W; Schwarz, Margrit

    2002-06-01

    The in vivo role of the nuclear receptor SHP in feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis was examined. Loss of SHP in mice caused abnormal accumulation and increased synthesis of bile acids due to derepression of rate-limiting CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 hydroxylase enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway. Dietary bile acids induced liver damage and restored feedback regulation. A synthetic agonist of the nuclear receptor FXR was not hepatotoxic and had no regulatory effects. Reduction of the bile acid pool with cholestyramine enhanced CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 expression. We conclude that input from three negative regulatory pathways controls bile acid synthesis. One is mediated by SHP, and two are SHP independent and invoked by liver damage and changes in bile acid pool size. PMID:12062084

  17. A Theory of Circular Organization and Negative Feedback: Defining Life in a Cybernetic Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsokolov, Sergey

    2010-12-01

    All life today incorporates a variety of systems controlled by negative feedback loops and sometimes amplified by positive feedback loops. The first forms of life necessarily also required primitive versions of feedback, yet surprisingly little emphasis has been given to the question of how feedback emerged out of primarily chemical systems. One chemical system has been established that spontaneously develops autocatalytic feedback, the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. In this essay, I discuss the BZ reaction as a possible model for similar reactions that could have occurred under prebiotic Earth conditions. The main point is that the metabolism of contemporary life evolved from primitive homeostatic networks regulated by negative feedback. Because life could not exist in their absence, feedback loops should be included in definitions of life.

  18. Processing of Positive and Negative Feedback in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions.

    PubMed

    Rustemeier, Martina; Koch, Benno; Schwarz, Michael; Bellebaum, Christian

    2016-08-01

    It is well accepted that the cerebellum plays a crucial role in the prediction of the sensory consequences of movements. Recent findings of altered error processing in patients with selective cerebellar lesions led to the hypothesis that feedback processing and feedback-based learning might be affected by cerebellar damage as well. Thus, the present study investigated learning from and processing of positive and negative feedback in 12 patients with selective cerebellar lesions and healthy control subjects. Participants performed a monetary feedback learning task. The processing of positive and negative feedback was assessed by means of event-related potentials (ERPs) during the learning task and during a separate task in which the frequencies of positive and negative feedback were balanced. Patients did not show a general learning deficit compared to controls. Relative to the control group, however, patients with cerebellar lesions showed significantly higher ERP difference wave amplitudes (rewards-losses) in a time window between 250 and 450 ms after feedback presentation, possibly indicating impaired outcome prediction. The analysis of the original waveforms suggested that patients and controls primarily differed in their pattern of feedback-related negativity and P300 amplitudes. Our results add to recent findings on altered performance monitoring associated with cerebellar damage and demonstrate, for the first time, alterations of feedback processing in patients with cerebellar damage. Unaffected learning performance appears to suggest that chronic cerebellar lesions can be compensated in behaviour. PMID:26208703

  19. Crystal structure of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein, GFRP.

    PubMed

    Bader, G; Schiffmann, S; Herrmann, A; Fischer, M; Gütlich, M; Auerbach, G; Ploom, T; Bacher, A; Huber, R; Lemm, T

    2001-10-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor required for hydroxylation of aromatic amino acids regulates its own synthesis in mammals through feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I. This mechanism is mediated by a regulatory subunit called GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). The 2.6 A resolution crystal structure of rat GFRP shows that the protein forms a pentamer. This indicates a model for the interaction of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I with its regulator, GFRP. Kinetic investigations of human GTP cyclohydrolase I in complex with rat and human GFRP showed similar regulatory effects of both GFRP proteins. PMID:11580249

  20. Managing Written and Oral Negative Feedback in a Synchronous Online Teaching Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guichon, Nicolas; Betrancourt, Mireille; Prie, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    This case study focuses on the feedback that is provided by tutors to learners in the course of synchronous online teaching. More specifically, we study how trainee tutors used the affordances of Visu, an experimental web videoconferencing system, to provide negative feedback. Visu features classical functionalities such as video and chat, and it…

  1. The effect of positive and negative verbal feedback on surgical skills performance and motivation.

    PubMed

    Kannappan, Aarthy; Yip, Dana T; Lodhia, Nayna A; Morton, John; Lau, James N

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable effort and time invested in providing feedback to medical students and residents during their time in training. However, little effort has been made to measure the effects of positive and negative verbal feedback on skills performance and motivation to learn and practice. To probe these questions, first-year medical students (n = 25) were recruited to perform a peg transfer task on Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery box trainers. Time to completion and number of errors were recorded. The students were then randomized to receive either positive or negative verbal feedback from an expert in the field of laparoscopic surgery. After this delivery of feedback, the students repeated the peg transfer task. Differences in performance pre- and post-feedback and also between the groups who received positive feedback (PF) vs negative feedback (NF) were analyzed. A survey was then completed by all the participants. Baseline task times were similar between groups (PF 209.3 seconds; NF 203 seconds, p = 0.58). The PF group averaged 1.83 first-time errors while the NF group 1 (p = 0.84). Post-feedback task times were significantly decreased for both groups (PF 159.75 seconds, p = 0.05; NF 132.08 seconds, p = 0.002). While the NF group demonstrated a greater improvement in mean time than the PF group, this was not statistically significant. Both groups also made fewer errors (PF 0.33 errors, p = 0.04; NF 0.38 errors, p = 0.23). When surveyed about their responses to standardized feedback scenarios, the students stated that both positive and negative verbal feedback could be potent stimulants for improved performance and motivation. Further research is required to better understand the effects of feedback on learner motivation and the interpersonal dynamic between mentors and their trainees. PMID:23111049

  2. Feedback Control of Two-Component Regulatory Systems.

    PubMed

    Groisman, Eduardo A

    2016-09-01

    Two-component systems are a dominant form of bacterial signal transduction. The prototypical two-component system consists of a sensor that responds to a specific input(s) by modifying the output of a cognate regulator. Because the output of a two-component system is the amount of phosphorylated regulator, feedback mechanisms may alter the amount of regulator, and/or modify the ability of a sensor or other proteins to alter the phosphorylation state of the regulator. Two-component systems may display intrinsic feedback whereby the amount of phosphorylated regulator changes under constant inducing conditions and without the participation of additional proteins. Feedback control allows a two-component system to achieve particular steady-state levels, to reach a given steady state with distinct dynamics, to express coregulated genes in a given order, and to activate a regulator to different extents, depending on the signal acting on the sensor. PMID:27607549

  3. Interrogative pressure in simulated forensic interviews: the effects of negative feedback.

    PubMed

    McGroarty, Allan; Baxter, James S

    2007-08-01

    Much experimental research on interrogative pressure has concentrated on the effects of leading questions, and the role of feedback in influencing responses in the absence of leading questions has been neglected by comparison. This study assessed the effect of negative feedback and the presence of a second interviewer on interviewee responding in simulated forensic interviews. Participants viewed a videotape of a crime, answered questions about the clip and were requestioned after receiving feedback. Compared with neutral feedback, negative feedback resulted in more response changes, higher reported state anxiety and higher ratings of interview difficulty. These results are consistent with Gudjonsson and Clark's (1986) model of interrogative suggestibility. The presence and involvement of a second interviewer did not significantly affect interviewee responding, although trait anxiety scores were elevated when a second interviewer was present. The theoretical and applied implications of these findings are considered. PMID:17535467

  4. Negative feedback within a mutualism: host-specific growth of mycorrhizal fungi reduces plant benefit.

    PubMed Central

    Bever, James D

    2002-01-01

    A basic tenet of ecology is that negative feedback on abundance plays an important part in the coexistence of species within guilds. Mutualistic interactions generate positive feedbacks on abundance and therefore are not thought to contribute to the maintenance of diversity. Here, I report evidence of negative feedback on plant growth through changes in the composition of their mutualistic fungal symbionts, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Negative feedback results from asymmetries in the delivery of benefit between plant and AM fungal species in which the AM fungus that grows best with the plant Plantago lanceolata is a poor growth promoter for Plantago. Growth of Plantago is, instead, best promoted by the AM fungal species that accumulate with a second plant species, Panicum sphaerocarpon. The resulting community dynamic leads to a decline in mutualistic benefit received by Plantago, and can contribute to the coexistence of these two competing plant species. PMID:12573075

  5. Stereotype threat engenders neural attentional bias toward negative feedback to undermine performance.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Chad E; Leitner, Jordan B

    2014-10-01

    Stereotype threat, a situational pressure individuals experience when they fear confirming a negative group stereotype, engenders a cascade of physiological stress responses, negative appraisals, and performance monitoring processes that tax working memory resources necessary for optimal performance. Less is known, however, about how stereotype threat biases attentional processing in response to performance feedback, and how such attentional biases may undermine performance. Women received feedback on math problems in stereotype threatening compared to stereotype-neutral contexts while continuous EEG activity was recorded. Findings revealed that stereotype threatened women elicited larger midline P100 ERPs, increased phase locking between anterior cingulate cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (two regions integral for attentional processes), and increased power in left fusiform gyrus in response to negative feedback compared to positive feedback and women in stereotype-neutral contexts. Increased power in left fusiform gyrus in response to negative feedback predicted underperformance on the math task among stereotype threatened women only. Women in stereotype-neutral contexts exhibited the opposite trend. Findings suggest that in stereotype threatening contexts, neural networks integral for attention and working memory are biased toward negative, stereotype confirming feedback at very early speeds of information processing. This bias, in turn, plays a role in undermining performance. PMID:25063472

  6. Quantifying negative feedback regulation by micro-RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shangying; Raghavachari, Sridhar

    2011-10-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in post-transcriptional gene regulation by pairing with target mRNAs to repress protein production. It has been shown that over one-third of human genes are targeted by miRNA. Although hundreds of miRNAs have been identified in mammalian genomes, the function of miRNA-based repression in the context of gene regulation networks still remains unclear. In this study, we explore the functional roles of feedback regulation by miRNAs. In a model where repression of translation occurs by sequestration of mRNA by miRNA, we find that miRNA and mRNA levels are anti-correlated, resulting in larger fluctuation in protein levels than theoretically expected assuming no correlation between miRNA and mRNA levels. If miRNA repression is due to a catalytic suppression of translation rates, we analytically show that the protein fluctuations can be strongly repressed with miRNA regulation. We also discuss how either of these modes may be relevant for cell function.

  7. Responses to formal performance appraisal feedback: the role of negative affectivity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Simon S K; Yik, Michelle S M; Schaubroeck, John

    2002-02-01

    This study examined the effects of performance appraisal feedback on job and organizational attitudes of tellers (N = 329) in a large international bank. Negative affectivity moderated the link between favorable appraisal feedback and job attitudes. Among the higher rated performers, attitudes were improved 1 month after being notified of favorable appraisal results (Time 2). Improved attitudes persisted 6 months after the performance appraisal (Time 3) among tellers with low negative affectivity but not among those with high negative affectivity. Among the lower rated performers, mean levels of attitudes did not change significantly during the study. PMID:11924542

  8. Negative feedback enables fast and flexible collective decision-making in ants.

    PubMed

    Grüter, Christoph; Schürch, Roger; Czaczkes, Tomer J; Taylor, Keeley; Durance, Thomas; Jones, Sam M; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2012-01-01

    Positive feedback plays a major role in the emergence of many collective animal behaviours. In many ants pheromone trails recruit and direct nestmate foragers to food sources. The strong positive feedback caused by trail pheromones allows fast collective responses but can compromise flexibility. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that when the environment changes, colonies are often unable to reallocate their foragers to a more rewarding food source. Here we show both experimentally, using colonies of Lasius niger, and with an agent-based simulation model, that negative feedback caused by crowding at feeding sites allows ant colonies to maintain foraging flexibility even with strong recruitment to food sources. In a constant environment, negative feedback prevents the frequently found bias towards one feeder (symmetry breaking) and leads to equal distribution of foragers. In a changing environment, negative feedback allows a colony to quickly reallocate the majority of its foragers to a superior food patch that becomes available when foraging at an inferior patch is already well underway. The model confirms these experimental findings and shows that the ability of colonies to switch to a superior food source does not require the decay of trail pheromones. Our results help to resolve inconsistencies between collective foraging patterns seen in laboratory studies and observations in the wild, and show that the simultaneous action of negative and positive feedback is important for efficient foraging in mass-recruiting insect colonies. PMID:22984518

  9. Ultrasensitive Negative Feedback Control: A Natural Approach for the Design of Synthetic Controllers.

    PubMed

    Montefusco, Francesco; Akman, Ozgur E; Soyer, Orkun S; Bates, Declan G

    2016-01-01

    Many of the most important potential applications of Synthetic Biology will require the ability to design and implement high performance feedback control systems that can accurately regulate the dynamics of multiple molecular species within the cell. Here, we argue that the use of design strategies based on combining ultrasensitive response dynamics with negative feedback represents a natural approach to this problem that fully exploits the strongly nonlinear nature of cellular information processing. We propose that such feedback mechanisms can explain the adaptive responses observed in one of the most widely studied biomolecular feedback systems-the yeast osmoregulatory response network. Based on our analysis of such system, we identify strong links with a well-known branch of mathematical systems theory from the field of Control Engineering, known as Sliding Mode Control. These insights allow us to develop design guidelines that can inform the construction of feedback controllers for synthetic biological systems. PMID:27537373

  10. Punishment sensitivity modulates the processing of negative feedback but not error-induced learning

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Kerstin; Heintz, Sonja; Kray, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that individual differences in punishment and reward sensitivity are associated with functional alterations in neural systems underlying error and feedback processing. In particular, individuals highly sensitive to punishment have been found to be characterized by larger mediofrontal error signals as reflected in the error negativity/error-related negativity (Ne/ERN) and the feedback-related negativity (FRN). By contrast, reward sensitivity has been shown to relate to the error positivity (Pe). Given that Ne/ERN, FRN, and Pe have been functionally linked to flexible behavioral adaptation, the aim of the present research was to examine how these electrophysiological reflections of error and feedback processing vary as a function of punishment and reward sensitivity during reinforcement learning. We applied a probabilistic learning task that involved three different conditions of feedback validity (100%, 80%, and 50%). In contrast to prior studies using response competition tasks, we did not find reliable correlations between punishment sensitivity and the Ne/ERN. Instead, higher punishment sensitivity predicted larger FRN amplitudes, irrespective of feedback validity. Moreover, higher reward sensitivity was associated with a larger Pe. However, only reward sensitivity was related to better overall learning performance and higher post-error accuracy, whereas highly punishment sensitive participants showed impaired learning performance, suggesting that larger negative feedback-related error signals were not beneficial for learning or even reflected maladaptive information processing in these individuals. Thus, although our findings indicate that individual differences in reward and punishment sensitivity are related to electrophysiological correlates of error and feedback processing, we found less evidence for influences of these personality characteristics on the relation between performance monitoring and feedback-based learning. PMID

  11. MK3 controls Polycomb target gene expression via negative feedback on ERK

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene-environment interactions are mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Polycomb Group proteins constitute part of an epigenetic cellular transcriptional memory system that is subject to dynamic modulation during differentiation. Molecular insight in processes that control dynamic chromatin association and dissociation of Polycomb repressive complexes during and beyond development is limited. We recently showed that MK3 interacts with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). The functional relevance of this interaction, however, remained poorly understood. MK3 is activated downstream of mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (M/SAPKs), all of which fulfill crucial roles during development. We here use activation of the immediate-early response gene ATF3, a bona fide PRC1 target gene, as a model to study how MK3 and its effector kinases MAPK/ERK and SAPK/P38 are involved in regulation of PRC1-dependent ATF3 transcription. Results Our current data show that mitogenic signaling through ERK, P38 and MK3 regulates ATF3 expression by PRC1/chromatin dissociation and epigenetic modulation. Mitogenic stimulation results in transient P38-dependent H3S28 phosphorylation and ERK-driven PRC1/chromatin dissociation at PRC1 targets. H3S28 phosphorylation by itself appears not sufficient to induce PRC1/chromatin dissociation, nor ATF3 transcription, as inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling blocks BMI1/chromatin dissociation and ATF3 expression, despite induced H3S28 phosphorylation. In addition, we establish that concomitant loss of local H3K27me3 promoter marking is not required for ATF3 activation. We identify pERK as a novel signaling-induced binding partner of PRC1, and provide evidence that MK3 controls ATF3 expression in cultured cells via negative regulatory feedback on M/SAPKs. Dramatically increased ectopic wing vein formation in the absence of Drosophila MK in a Drosophila ERK gain-of-function wing vein patterning model, supports the existence of MK

  12. Are Success and Failure Experiences Equally Motivational? An Investigation of Regulatory Focus and Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shu, Tse-Mei; Lam, Shui-fong

    2011-01-01

    The present study extended regulatory focus theory (Idson & Higgins, 2000) to an educational setting and attempted to identify individuals with high motivation after both success and failure feedback. College students in Hong Kong (N = 180) participated in an experiment with a 2 promotion focus (high vs. low) x 2 prevention focus (high vs. low) x…

  13. An HIV Feedback Resistor: Auto-Regulatory Circuit Deactivator and Noise Buffer

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Leor S; Shenk, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Animal viruses (e.g., lentiviruses and herpesviruses) use transcriptional positive feedback (i.e., transactivation) to regulate their gene expression. But positive-feedback circuits are inherently unstable when turned off, which presents a particular dilemma for latent viruses that lack transcriptional repressor motifs. Here we show that a dissipative feedback resistor, composed of enzymatic interconversion of the transactivator, converts transactivation circuits into excitable systems that generate transient pulses of expression, which decay to zero. We use HIV-1 as a model system and analyze single-cell expression kinetics to explore whether the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) uses a resistor to shut off transactivation. The Tat feedback circuit was found to lack bi-stability and Tat self-cooperativity but exhibited a pulse of activity upon transactivation, all in agreement with the feedback resistor model. Guided by a mathematical model, biochemical and genetic perturbation of the suspected Tat feedback resistor altered the circuit's stability and reduced susceptibility to molecular noise, in agreement with model predictions. We propose that the feedback resistor is a necessary, but possibly not sufficient, condition for turning off noisy transactivation circuits lacking a repressor motif (e.g., HIV-1 Tat). Feedback resistors may be a paradigm for examining other auto-regulatory circuits and may inform upon how viral latency is established, maintained, and broken. PMID:17194214

  14. Fear of negative evaluation modulates electrocortical and behavioral responses when anticipating social evaluative feedback

    PubMed Central

    Van der Molen, Melle J. W.; Poppelaars, Eefje S.; Van Hartingsveldt, Caroline T. A.; Harrewijn, Anita; Gunther Moor, Bregtje; Westenberg, P. Michiel

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive models posit that the fear of negative evaluation (FNE) is a hallmark feature of social anxiety. As such, individuals with high FNE may show biased information processing when faced with social evaluation. The aim of the current study was to examine the neural underpinnings of anticipating and processing social-evaluative feedback, and its correlates with FNE. We used a social judgment paradigm in which female participants (N = 31) were asked to indicate whether they believed to be socially accepted or rejected by their peers. Anticipatory attention was indexed by the stimulus preceding negativity (SPN), while the feedback-related negativity and P3 were used to index the processing of social-evaluative feedback. Results provided evidence of an optimism bias in social peer evaluation, as participants more often predicted to be socially accepted than rejected. Participants with high levels of FNE needed more time to provide their judgments about the social-evaluative outcome. While anticipating social-evaluative feedback, SPN amplitudes were larger for anticipated social acceptance than for social rejection feedback. Interestingly, the SPN during anticipated social acceptance was larger in participants with high levels of FNE. None of the feedback-related brain potentials correlated with the FNE. Together, the results provided evidence of biased information processing in individuals with high levels of FNE when anticipating (rather than processing) social-evaluative feedback. The delayed response times in high FNE individuals were interpreted to reflect augmented vigilance imposed by the upcoming social-evaluative threat. Possibly, the SPN constitutes a neural marker of this vigilance in females with higher FNE levels, particularly when anticipating social acceptance feedback. PMID:24478667

  15. How to not get stuck-negative feedback due to crowding maintains flexibility in ant foraging.

    PubMed

    Czaczkes, Tomer J

    2014-11-01

    Ant foraging is an important model system in the study of adaptive complex systems. Many ants use trail pheromones to recruit nestmates to resources. Differential recruitment depending on resource quality coupled with positive feedback allows ant colonies to make rapid and accurate collective decisions about how best to allocate their work-force. However, ant colonies can become trapped in sub-optimal foraging decisions if recruitment to a poor resource becomes too strong before a better resource is discovered. Genetic algorithms and Ant Colony Optimisation heuristics can also suffer from being trapped in such local optima. Recently, two negative feedback effects were described, in which an increase in crowding (crowding negative feedback-CNF) or trail pheromones (pheromone negative feedback-PNF) caused a decrease in subsequent pheromone deposition. Using agent based simulations with realistic parameters I test whether these negative feedback effects can prevent simulated ant colonies from becoming trapped in sub-optimal foraging decisions. Colonies are presented with two food sources of different qualities, and these qualities switch part way through the experiment. When either no negative feedback effects are implemented or only PNF is implemented colonies are completely unable to refocus their foraging effort to the high quality feeder. However, when CNF alone is implemented at a realistic level 97% of colonies successfully refocus their foraging effort. This ability to refocus colony foraging efforts is due to the strong reduction of pheromone deposition caused by CNF. This suggests that CNF is an important behaviour enabling ant colonies to maintain foraging flexibility. However, CNF comes at a slight cost to colonies when making their initial foraging decision. PMID:25034339

  16. Photoperiod-dependent negative feedback effects of thyroid hormones in Fundulus heteroclitus

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.L.; Stetson, M.H.

    1985-05-01

    In Fundulus heteroclitus, an annual cycle in the response of the thyroid to ovine thyroid-stimulating hormone (oTSH) is characterized by maximal thyroxin (T4) secretion in mid-winter and minimal T4 secretion in summer. Four daily injections of oTSH, given in winter caused serum T4 to plateau at elevated levels for several days, while in summer fish similar treatment resulted in far more fluctuating titers of serum T4; maximum levels were similar in both groups. The difference in sustenance rather than magnitude of Peak T4 led to an examination of the negative feedback effects of thyroid hormones as they might relate to these seasonal changes. Radioiodine uptake by thyroid follicles served as a simple, but effective bioassay for endogenous TSH. Fish collected in summer were more sensitive to negative feedback of T3 than those collected in winter; feedback effects of T4 in the two groups were not significantly different. The effects of specific photoperiods on negative feedback sensitivity to T3 and T4 were also tested. Exposure of winter fish for one month to long days (LD 14:10) enhanced the degree of reduction of iodine uptake caused by T4 in the aquarium water (10 micrograms/100 ml). Negative feedback in short-day (LD 8:16) winter fish was not demonstrated. It is concluded that long days increase and short days diminish the negative feedback sensitivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis to thyroid hormones in F. heteroclitus. Such photoperiodically induced changes may act to aid in the year-round maintenance of T4 levels necessary for seasonal adaptation and survival.

  17. Age-related changes in deterministic learning from positive versus negative performance feedback.

    PubMed

    van de Vijver, Irene; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; de Wit, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    Feedback-based learning declines with age. Because older adults are generally biased toward positive information ("positivity effect"), learning from positive feedback may be less impaired than learning from negative outcomes. The literature documents mixed results, due possibly to variability between studies in task design. In the current series of studies, we investigated the influence of feedback valence on reinforcement learning in young and older adults. We used nonprobabilistic learning tasks, to more systematically study the effects of feedback magnitude, learning of stimulus-response (S-R) versus stimulus-outcome (S-O) associations, and working-memory capacity. In most experiments, older adults benefitted more from positive than negative feedback, but only with large feedback magnitudes. Positivity effects were pronounced for S-O learning, whereas S-R learning correlated with working-memory capacity in both age groups. These results underline the context dependence of positivity effects in learning and suggest that older adults focus on high gains when these are informative for behavior. PMID:25761598

  18. Positive And Negative Feedback Loops Coupled By Common Transcription Activator And Repressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielewiesiuk, Jan; Łopaciuk, Agata

    2015-03-01

    Dynamical systems consisting of two interlocked loops with negative and positive feedback have been studied using the linear analysis of stability and numerical solutions. Conditions for saddle-node bifurcation were formulated in a general form. Conditions for Hopf bifurcations were found in a few symmetrical cases. Auto-oscillations, when they exist, are generated by the negative feedback repressive loop. This loop determines the frequency and amplitude of oscillations. The positive feedback loop of activation slightly modifies the oscillations. Oscillations are possible when the difference between Hilll's coefficients of the repression and activation is sufficiently high. The highly cooperative activation loop with a fast turnover slows down or even makes the oscillations impossible. The system under consideration can constitute a component of epigenetic or enzymatic regulation network.

  19. Interlocked positive and negative feedback network motifs regulate β-catenin activity in the adherens junction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, David J.; Horvath, Nicholas; Cuppett, Vanessa; Wu, Yueting; Deng, Wentao; Kanj, Rania

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial tissue architecture is maintained through adherens junctions that are created through extracellular homotypic protein–protein interactions between cadherin molecules. Cadherins also provide an intracellular scaffold for the formation of a multiprotein complex that contains signaling proteins, including β-catenin. Environmental factors and controlled tissue reorganization disrupt adherens junctions by cleaving the extracellular binding domain and initiating a series of transcriptional events that aim to restore tissue homeostasis. However, it remains unclear how alterations in cell adhesion coordinate transcriptional events, including those mediated by β-catenin in this pathway. Here were used quantitative single-cell and population-level in vitro assays to quantify the endogenous pathway dynamics after the proteolytic disruption of the adherens junctions. Using prior knowledge of isolated elements of the overall network, we interpreted these data using in silico model-based inference to identify the topology of the regulatory network. Collectively the data suggest that the regulatory network contains interlocked network motifs consisting of a positive feedback loop, which is used to restore the integrity of adherens junctions, and a negative feedback loop, which is used to limit β-catenin–induced gene expression. PMID:26224311

  20. Early Detection of Online Auction Opportunistic Sellers through the Use of Negative-Positive Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinert, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Apparently fraud is a growth industry. The monetary losses from Internet fraud have increased every year since first officially reported by the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) in 2000. Prior research studies and third-party reports of fraud show rates substantially higher than eBay's reported negative feedback rate of less than 1%. The…

  1. The Human Ventromedial Frontal Lobe Is Critical for Learning from Negative Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Elizabeth Z.; Fellows, Lesley K.

    2008-01-01

    Are positive and negative feedback weighed in a common balance in the brain, or do they influence behaviour through distinct neural mechanisms? Recent neuroeconomic studies in both human and non-human primates indicate that the ventromedial frontal lobe carries information about both losses and gains, suggesting that this region may encode value…

  2. Negative feedback from maternal signals reduces false alarms by collectively signalling offspring.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Jennifer A; Cocroft, Reginald B

    2012-09-22

    Within animal groups, individuals can learn of a predator's approach by attending to the behaviour of others. This use of social information increases an individual's perceptual range, but can also lead to the propagation of false alarms. Error copying is especially likely in species that signal collectively, because the coordination required for collective displays relies heavily on social information. Recent evidence suggests that collective behaviour in animals is, in part, regulated by negative feedback. Negative feedback may reduce false alarms by collectively signalling animals, but this possibility has not yet been tested. We tested the hypothesis that negative feedback increases the accuracy of collective signalling by reducing the production of false alarms. In the treehopper Umbonia crassicornis, clustered offspring produce collective signals during predator attacks, advertising the predator's location to the defending mother. Mothers signal after evicting the predator, and we show that this maternal communication reduces false alarms by offspring. We suggest that maternal signals elevate offspring signalling thresholds. This is, to our knowledge, the first study to show that negative feedback can reduce false alarms by collectively behaving groups. PMID:22787019

  3. A MicroRNA-Mediated Positive Feedback Regulatory Loop of the NF-κB Pathway in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongliang; Yuan, Jia; Chen, Yonggui; Li, Sedong; Su, Ziqi; Wei, Erman; Li, Chaozheng; Weng, Shaoping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2016-05-01

    In the evolutionarily conserved canonical NF-κB pathway, degradation of the NF-κB inhibitor IκB in the cytoplasmic NF-κB/IκB complex allows the liberated NF-κB to translocate into the nucleus to activate various target genes. The regulatory mechanism governing this process needs further investigation. In this study, a novel microRNA, temporarily named miR-1959, was first identified from an invertebrate Litopenaeus vannamei miR-1959 targets the 3'-untranslated region of the IκB homolog Cactus gene and reduces the protein level of Cactus in vivo, whereas the NF-κB homolog Dorsal directly binds the miR-1959 promoter to activate its transcription. Therefore, miR-1959 mediates a positive feedback regulatory loop, in that Dorsal activates miR-1959 expression, and in turn, miR-1959 inhibits the expression of Cactus, further leading to enhanced activation of Dorsal. Moreover, miR-1959 regulates the expression of many antimicrobial peptides in vivo and is involved in antibacterial immunity. To our knowledge, it is the first discovery of a microRNA-mediated feedback loop that directly regulates the NF-κB/IκB complex. This positive feedback loop could collaborate with the known NF-κB/IκB negative loop to generate a dynamic balance to regulate the activity of NF-κB, thus constituting an effective regulatory mechanism at the critical node of the NF-κB pathway. PMID:26994223

  4. Observational evidence for a negative shortwave cloud feedback in middle to high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppi, Paulo; McCoy, Daniel T.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    2016-02-01

    Exploiting the observed robust relationships between temperature and optical depth in extratropical clouds, we calculate the shortwave cloud feedback from historical data, by regressing observed and modeled cloud property histograms onto local temperature in middle to high southern latitudes. In this region, all CMIP5 models and observational data sets predict a negative cloud feedback, mainly driven by optical thickening. Between 45° and 60°S, the mean observed shortwave feedback (-0.91 ± 0.82 W m-2 K-1, relative to local rather than global mean warming) is very close to the multimodel mean feedback in RCP8.5 (-0.98 W m-2 K-1), despite differences in the meridional structure. In models, historical temperature-cloud property relationships reliably predict the forced RCP8.5 response. Because simple theory predicts this optical thickening with warming, and cloud amount changes are relatively small, we conclude that the shortwave cloud feedback is very likely negative in the real world at middle to high latitudes.

  5. Feedback-Related Negativity in Children with Two Subtypes of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jingbo; Yuan, Jiajin; Wang, Suhong; Shi, Lijuan; Cui, Xilong; Luo, Xuerong

    2014-01-01

    Objective The current model of ADHD suggests abnormal reward and punishment sensitivity, although differences in ADHD subgroups are unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effect of feedback valence (reward or punishment) and punishment magnitude (small or large) on Feedback-Related Negativity (FRN) and Late Positive Potential (LPP) in two subtypes of ADHD (ADHD-C and ADHD-I) compared to typically developing children (TD) during a children's gambling task. Methods Children with ADHD-C (n = 16), children with ADHD-I (n = 15) and typically developing children (n = 15) performed a children's gambling task under three feedback conditions: large losses, small losses and gains. FRN and LPP components in brain potentials were recorded and analyzed. Results In TD children and children with ADHD-C, large loss feedback evoked more negative FRN amplitudes than small loss feedback, suggesting that brain sensitivity to the punishment and its magnitude is not impaired in children with ADHD-C. In contrast to these two groups, the FRN effect was absent in children with ADHD-I. The LPP amplitudes were larger in children with ADHD-C in comparison with those with ADHD-I, regardless of feedback valence and magnitude. Conclusion Children with ADHD-C exhibit intact brain sensitivity to punishment similar to TD children. In contrast, children with ADHD-I are significantly impaired in neural sensitivity to the feedback stimuli and in particular, to punishment, compared to TD and ADHD-C children. Thus, FRN, rather than LPP, is a reliable index of the difference in reward and punishment sensitivity across different ADHD-subcategories. PMID:24932610

  6. Show me the Money: the impact of actual rewards and losses on the feedback negativity.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Anna; Riesel, Anja; Proudfit, Greg Hajcak

    2014-06-01

    The feedback negativity (FN) is an event-related potential component which is typically conceptualized as a negativity in response to losses that is absent in response to gains. However, there is also evidence that variation in the FN reflects the neural response to gains. The present study sought to explore these possibilities by manipulating the context in which loss and gain feedback was presented in a straightforward gambling task. In half the blocks, participants could win or lose money (Value condition), and in half the blocks, participants could not win or lose any money (No Value condition). The degree to which losses and gains were differentiated from one another (i.e., the ΔFN) was greater in the Value condition than in the No Value condition. Furthermore, though the responses to loss feedback and gain feedback were each enhanced in the Value condition relative to the No-Value condition, the effect of the monetary manipulation was substantially larger for the positivity to gains than the negativity to losses. This is consistent with the notion that the FN might reflect two independent processes, but that variation in the FN depends more upon the response to rewards than losses. PMID:24735733

  7. The influence of anhedonia on feedback negativity in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-hua; Wang, Ling-zhi; Shang, He-rui; Shen, Yue; Li, Zhi; Cheung, Eric F C; Chan, Raymond C K

    2014-01-01

    Anhedonia is associated with reward-processing deficits of the dopamine system, which may increase the risk of depression. Nevertheless, few previous studies have examined the influence of hedonic tone on event-related potential (ERP) measures of reward processing in major depressive disorder. A simple gambling task was used to elicit feedback negativity (FN), an ERP component elicited by feedback indicating gain versus loss, in 27 patients with major depression and 27 healthy participants. We found that participants with depression were characterized by reduced FN responses, especially towards monetary gains, but not losses, compared with healthy individuals. In addition, the amplitude of FN to gain feedback in participants with depression was related to anhedonia severity and depressive symptoms. These findings indicate an association between low hedonic capacity and reduction in FN. As a neural measure of reward sensitivity, FN may be generated in part by reward-related activity. PMID:24316199

  8. The feedback related negativity encodes both social rejection and explicit social expectancy violation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sai; Yu, Rongjun

    2014-01-01

    Humans consistently make predictions about the valence of future events and use feedback to validate initial predictions. While the valence of outcomes provides utilitarian information, the accuracy of predictions is crucial for future performance adjustment. The feedback related negativity (FRN), identified as a marker of reward prediction error, possibly encodes social rejection and social prediction error. To test this possibility, we used event related potential (ERP) techniques combined with social tasks in which participants were required to make explicit predictions (whether others will accept their “friend request” or not, Experiment 1) or implicit predictions (whether they would like this person or not, Experiment 2) respectively, and then received social feedback. We found that the FRN is sensitive to social rejection and explicit social prediction error in Experiment 1 but not implicit social prediction error in Experiment 2. We conclude that the FRN encodes social rejection and explicit social expectancy violation. PMID:25120457

  9. Spatio-temporal dynamcis of a cell signal cascade with negative feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maya Bernal, Jose Luis; Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo

    2014-03-01

    We studied the spatio-temporal dynamics of a system of reactio-diffusion equations that models a cell signal transduction pathway with six cycles and negative feedback. The basic cycle consists of the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of two antagonic proteins. We found two regimes of saturation of the enzimatic reaction in the kinetic parameters space and determined the conditions for the signal propagation in the steady state. The trajectories for which transduction occurs are defined in terms of the ratio of the enzimatic activities. We found that in spite of the negative feedback the cell signal cascade behaves as an amplifier and produces phosphoprotein concentration gradients within the cell. This model behaves also as a noise filter and as a switch. Supported by DGAPA-UNAM Contract IN118410-3.

  10. Modelling and analysis of gene regulatory network using feedback control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Samad, H.; Khammash, M.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular pathways are a part of a remarkable hierarchy of regulatory networks that operate at all levels of organisation. These regulatory networks are responsible for much of the biological complexity within the cell. The dynamic character of these pathways and the prevalence of feedback regulation strategies in their operation make them amenable to systematic mathematical analysis using the same tools that have been used with success in analysing and designing engineering control systems. In this article, we aim at establishing this strong connection through various examples where the behaviour exhibited by gene networks is explained in terms of their underlying control strategies. We complement our analysis by a survey of mathematical techniques commonly used to model gene regulatory networks and analyse their dynamic behaviour.

  11. Risky decision making from childhood through adulthood: Contributions of learning and sensitivity to negative feedback.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Kathryn L; Telzer, Eva H; Flannery, Jessica; Goff, Bonnie; Gabard-Durnam, Laurel; Gee, Dylan G; Lee, Steve S; Tottenham, Nim

    2016-02-01

    Decision making in the context of risk is a complex and dynamic process that changes across development. Here, we assessed the influence of sensitivity to negative feedback (e.g., loss) and learning on age-related changes in risky decision making, both of which show unique developmental trajectories. In the present study, we examined risky decision making in 216 individuals, ranging in age from 3-26 years, using the balloon emotional learning task (BELT), a computerized task in which participants pump up a series of virtual balloons to earn points, but risk balloon explosion on each trial, which results in no points. It is important to note that there were 3 balloon conditions, signified by different balloon colors, ranging from quick- to slow-to-explode, and participants could learn the color-condition pairings through task experience. Overall, we found age-related increases in pumps made and points earned. However, in the quick-to-explode condition, there was a nonlinear adolescent peak for points earned. Follow-up analyses indicated that this adolescent phenotype occurred at the developmental intersection of linear age-related increases in learning and decreases in sensitivity to negative feedback. Adolescence was marked by intermediate values on both these processes. These findings show that a combination of linearly changing processes can result in nonlinear changes in risky decision making, the adolescent-specific nature of which is associated with developmental improvements in learning and reduced sensitivity to negative feedback. PMID:26389647

  12. Trait "pessimism" is associated with increased sensitivity to negative feedback in rats.

    PubMed

    Rygula, Rafal; Popik, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Several cognitive theories of depression have proposed that cognitive judgment bias determines individual vulnerability to this disorder. Indeed, we have recently demonstrated a relationship between pessimistic judgment bias and vulnerability of rats to the stress-induced anhedonia, and a negative correlation between the level of pessimism and motivation. To further characterize the effects of trait pessimism on cognitive processes associated with depression, in the present study we compared the sensitivity of rats displaying optimistic and pessimistic traits to positive and negative feedback. The animals were initially trained and tested in the rat version of the probabilistic reversal-learning (PRL) task, which allowed for the assessment of feedback sensitivity in individual animals. Subsequently, the rats were re-trained and tested in a series of ambiguous-cue interpretation (ACI) tests, which allowed for the classification of animals displaying "optimistic" and "pessimistic" traits. The "pessimistic" rats were significantly more sensitive to negative feedback than their "optimistic" conspecifics, as indicated by an increased proportion of lose-shift behaviors. The results of our study demonstrate the interrelation and co-existence of two cognitive biases that may predict vulnerability to depressive disorder. PMID:26902303

  13. Valence-separated representation of reward prediction error in feedback-related negativity and positivity.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Katahira, Kentaro; Ohira, Hideki

    2015-02-11

    Feedback-related negativity (FRN) is an event-related brain potential (ERP) component elicited by errors and negative outcomes. Previous studies proposed that FRN reflects the activity of a general error-processing system that incorporates reward prediction error (RPE). However, other studies reported inconsistent results on this issue - namely, that FRN only reflects the valence of feedback and that the magnitude of RPE is reflected by the other ERP component called P300. The present study focused on the relationship between the FRN amplitude and RPE. ERPs were recorded during a reversal learning task performed by the participants, and a computational model was used to estimate trial-by-trial RPEs, which we correlated with the ERPs. The results indicated that FRN and P300 reflected the magnitude of RPE in negative outcomes and positive outcomes, respectively. In addition, the correlation between RPE and the P300 amplitude was stronger than the correlation between RPE and the FRN amplitude. These differences in the correlation between ERP and RPE components may explain the inconsistent results reported by previous studies; the asymmetry in the correlations might make it difficult to detect the effect of the RPE magnitude on the FRN and makes it appear that the FRN only reflects the valence of feedback. PMID:25634316

  14. The role of time delay in adaptive cellular negative feedback systems.

    PubMed

    Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2016-06-01

    Adaptation in cellular systems is often mediated by negative feedbacks, which usually come with certain time delays causing several characteristic response patterns including an overdamped response, damped or sustained oscillations. Here, we analyse generic two-dimensional delay differential equations with delayed negative feedback describing the dynamics of biochemical adaptive signal-response networks. We derive explicit thresholds and boundaries showing how time delay determines characteristic response patterns of these networks. Applying our theoretical analyses to concrete data we show that adaptation to osmotic stress in yeast is optimal in the sense of minimizing adaptation time without causing oscillatory behaviour, i.e., a critically damped response. In addition, our framework demonstrates that a slight increase of time delay in the NF-κB system might induce a switch from damped to sustained oscillatory behaviour. Thus, we demonstrate how delay differential equations can be used to explicitly study the delay in biochemical negative feedback systems. Our analysis also provides insight into how time delay may tune biological signal-response patterns and control the systems behaviour. PMID:26995333

  15. Repression of Essential Chloroplast Genes Reveals New Signaling Pathways and Regulatory Feedback Loops in Chlamydomonas[W

    PubMed Central

    Ramundo, Silvia; Rahire, Michèle; Schaad, Olivier; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2013-01-01

    Although reverse genetics has been used to elucidate the function of numerous chloroplast proteins, the characterization of essential plastid genes and their role in chloroplast biogenesis and cell survival has not yet been achieved. Therefore, we developed a robust repressible chloroplast gene expression system in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based mainly on a vitamin-repressible riboswitch, and we used this system to study the role of two essential chloroplast genes: ribosomal protein S12 (rps12), encoding a plastid ribosomal protein, and rpoA, encoding the α-subunit of chloroplast bacterial-like RNA polymerase. Repression of either of these two genes leads to the arrest of cell growth, and it induces a response that involves changes in expression of nuclear genes implicated in chloroplast biogenesis, protein turnover, and stress. This response also leads to the overaccumulation of several plastid transcripts and reveals the existence of multiple negative regulatory feedback loops in the chloroplast gene circuitry. PMID:23292734

  16. Class III PI3K regulates organismal glucose homeostasis by providing negative feedback on hepatic insulin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Nemazanyy, Ivan; Montagnac, Guillaume; Russell, Ryan C.; Morzyglod, Lucille; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Guan, Kun-Liang; Pende, Mario; Panasyuk, Ganna

    2015-01-01

    Defective hepatic insulin receptor (IR) signalling is a pathogenic manifestation of metabolic disorders including obesity and diabetes. The endo/lysosomal trafficking system may coordinate insulin action and nutrient homeostasis by endocytosis of IR and the autophagic control of intracellular nutrient levels. Here we show that class III PI3K—a master regulator of endocytosis, endosomal sorting and autophagy—provides negative feedback on hepatic insulin signalling. The ultraviolet radiation resistance-associated gene protein (UVRAG)-associated class III PI3K complex interacts with IR and is stimulated by insulin treatment. Acute and chronic depletion of hepatic Vps15, the regulatory subunit of class III PI3K, increases insulin sensitivity and Akt signalling, an effect that requires functional IR. This is reflected by FoxO1-dependent transcriptional defects and blunted gluconeogenesis in Vps15 mutant cells. On depletion of Vps15, the metabolic syndrome in genetic and diet-induced models of insulin resistance and diabetes is alleviated. Thus, feedback regulation of IR trafficking and function by class III PI3K may be a therapeutic target in metabolic conditions of insulin resistance. PMID:26387534

  17. BLOWIN' IN THE WIND: BOTH ''NEGATIVE'' AND ''POSITIVE'' FEEDBACK IN AN OBSCURED HIGH-z QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    Cresci, G.; Mannucci, F.; Mainieri, V.; Brusa, M.; Perna, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Piconcelli, E.; Feruglio, C.; Fiore, F.; Bongiorno, A.; Maiolino, R.; Merloni, A; Schramm, M.; Silverman, J. D.; Civano, F.

    2015-01-20

    Quasar feedback in the form of powerful outflows is invoked as a key mechanism to quench star formation in galaxies, preventing massive galaxies to overgrow and producing the red colors of ellipticals. On the other hand, some models are also requiring ''positive'' active galactic nucleus feedback, inducing star formation in the host galaxy through enhanced gas pressure in the interstellar medium. However, finding observational evidence of the effects of both types of feedback is still one of the main challenges of extragalactic astronomy, as few observations of energetic and extended radiatively driven winds are available. Here we present SINFONI near infrared integral field spectroscopy of XID2028, an obscured, radio-quiet z = 1.59 QSO detected in the XMM-COSMOS survey, in which we clearly resolve a fast (1500 km s{sup –1}) and extended (up to 13 kpc from the black hole) outflow in the [O III] lines emitting gas, whose large velocity and outflow rate are not sustainable by star formation only. The narrow component of Hα emission and the rest frame U-band flux from Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging enable to map the current star formation in the host galaxy: both tracers independently show that the outflow position lies in the center of an empty cavity surrounded by star forming regions on its edge. The outflow is therefore removing the gas from the host galaxy (''negative feedback''), but also triggering star formation by outflow induced pressure at the edges (''positive feedback''). XID2028 represents the first example of a host galaxy showing both types of feedback simultaneously at work.

  18. Blowin' in the Wind: Both "Negative" and "Positive" Feedback in an Obscured High-z Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresci, G.; Mainieri, V.; Brusa, M.; Marconi, A.; Perna, M.; Mannucci, F.; Piconcelli, E.; Maiolino, R.; Feruglio, C.; Fiore, F.; Bongiorno, A.; Lanzuisi, G.; Merloni, A.; Schramm, M.; Silverman, J. D.; Civano, F.

    2015-01-01

    Quasar feedback in the form of powerful outflows is invoked as a key mechanism to quench star formation in galaxies, preventing massive galaxies to overgrow and producing the red colors of ellipticals. On the other hand, some models are also requiring "positive" active galactic nucleus feedback, inducing star formation in the host galaxy through enhanced gas pressure in the interstellar medium. However, finding observational evidence of the effects of both types of feedback is still one of the main challenges of extragalactic astronomy, as few observations of energetic and extended radiatively driven winds are available. Here we present SINFONI near infrared integral field spectroscopy of XID2028, an obscured, radio-quiet z = 1.59 QSO detected in the XMM-COSMOS survey, in which we clearly resolve a fast (1500 km s-1) and extended (up to 13 kpc from the black hole) outflow in the [O III] lines emitting gas, whose large velocity and outflow rate are not sustainable by star formation only. The narrow component of Hα emission and the rest frame U-band flux from Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging enable to map the current star formation in the host galaxy: both tracers independently show that the outflow position lies in the center of an empty cavity surrounded by star forming regions on its edge. The outflow is therefore removing the gas from the host galaxy ("negative feedback"), but also triggering star formation by outflow induced pressure at the edges ("positive feedback"). XID2028 represents the first example of a host galaxy showing both types of feedback simultaneously at work.

  19. Regulation of release factor expression using a translational negative feedback loop: a systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Betney, Russell; de Silva, Eric; Mertens, Christina; Knox, Yvonne; Krishnan, J; Stansfield, Ian

    2012-12-01

    The essential eukaryote release factor eRF1, encoded by the yeast SUP45 gene, recognizes stop codons during ribosomal translation. SUP45 nonsense alleles are, however, viable due to the establishment of feedback-regulated readthrough of the premature termination codon; reductions in full-length eRF1 promote tRNA-mediated stop codon readthrough, which, in turn, drives partial production of full-length eRF1. A deterministic mathematical model of this eRF1 feedback loop was developed using a staged increase in model complexity. Model predictions matched the experimental observation that strains carrying the mutant SUQ5 tRNA (a weak UAA suppressor) in combination with any of the tested sup45(UAA) nonsense alleles exhibit threefold more stop codon readthrough than that of an SUQ5 yeast strain. The model also successfully predicted that eRF1 feedback control in an SUQ5 sup45(UAA) mutant would resist, but not completely prevent, imposed changes in eRF1 expression. In these experiments, the introduction of a plasmid-borne SUQ5 copy into a sup45(UAA) SUQ5 mutant directed additional readthrough and full-length eRF1 expression, despite feedback. Secondly, induction of additional sup45(UAA) mRNA expression in a sup45(UAA) SUQ5 strain also directed increased full-length eRF1 expression. The autogenous sup45 control mechanism therefore acts not to precisely control eRF1 expression, but rather as a damping mechanism that only partially resists changes in release factor expression level. The validated model predicts that the degree of feedback damping (i.e., control precision) is proportional to eRF1 affinity for the premature stop codon. The validated model represents an important tool to analyze this and other translational negative feedback loops. PMID:23104998

  20. Regulation of release factor expression using a translational negative feedback loop: A systems analysis

    PubMed Central

    Betney, Russell; de Silva, Eric; Mertens, Christina; Knox, Yvonne; Krishnan, J.; Stansfield, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The essential eukaryote release factor eRF1, encoded by the yeast SUP45 gene, recognizes stop codons during ribosomal translation. SUP45 nonsense alleles are, however, viable due to the establishment of feedback-regulated readthrough of the premature termination codon; reductions in full-length eRF1 promote tRNA-mediated stop codon readthrough, which, in turn, drives partial production of full-length eRF1. A deterministic mathematical model of this eRF1 feedback loop was developed using a staged increase in model complexity. Model predictions matched the experimental observation that strains carrying the mutant SUQ5 tRNA (a weak UAA suppressor) in combination with any of the tested sup45UAA nonsense alleles exhibit threefold more stop codon readthrough than that of an SUQ5 yeast strain. The model also successfully predicted that eRF1 feedback control in an SUQ5 sup45UAA mutant would resist, but not completely prevent, imposed changes in eRF1 expression. In these experiments, the introduction of a plasmid-borne SUQ5 copy into a sup45UAA SUQ5 mutant directed additional readthrough and full-length eRF1 expression, despite feedback. Secondly, induction of additional sup45UAA mRNA expression in a sup45UAA SUQ5 strain also directed increased full-length eRF1 expression. The autogenous sup45 control mechanism therefore acts not to precisely control eRF1 expression, but rather as a damping mechanism that only partially resists changes in release factor expression level. The validated model predicts that the degree of feedback damping (i.e., control precision) is proportional to eRF1 affinity for the premature stop codon. The validated model represents an important tool to analyze this and other translational negative feedback loops. PMID:23104998

  1. Feeling Better About Self After Receiving Negative Feedback: When the Sense That Ability Can Be Improved Is Activated.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyi; Chen, Yinghe; Tian, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    Past studies suggest that managers and educators often consider negative feedback as a motivator for individuals to think about their shortcomings and improve their work, but delivering negative feedback does not always achieve desired results. The present study, based on incremental theory, employed an intervention method to activate the belief that a particular ability could be improved after negative feedback. Three experiments tested the intervention effect on negative self-relevant emotion. Study 1 indicated conveying suggestions for improving ability reduced negative self-relevant emotion after negative feedback. Study 2 tested whether activating the sense of possible improvement in the ability could reduce negative self-relevant emotion. Results indicated activating the belief that ability could be improved reduced negative self-relevant emotion after failure, but delivering emotion management information alone did not yield the same effect. Study 3 extended the results by affirming the effort participants made in doing the test, and found the affirmation reduced negative self-relevant emotion. Collectively, the findings indicated focusing on the belief that the ability could be improved in the future can reduce negative self-relevant emotion after negative feedback. PMID:25699420

  2. Negative feedback in ants: crowding results in less trail pheromone deposition.

    PubMed

    Czaczkes, Tomer J; Grüter, Christoph; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2013-04-01

    Crowding in human transport networks reduces efficiency. Efficiency can be increased by appropriate control mechanisms, which are often imposed externally. Ant colonies also have distribution networks to feeding sites outside the nest and can experience crowding. However, ants do not have external controllers or leaders. Here, we report a self-organized negative feedback mechanism, based on local information, which downregulates the production of recruitment signals in crowded parts of a network by Lasius niger ants. We controlled crowding by manipulating trail width and the number of ants on a trail, and observed a 5.6-fold reduction in the number of ants depositing trail pheromone from least to most crowded conditions. We also simulated crowding by placing glass beads covered in nest-mate cuticular hydrocarbons on the trail. After 10 bead encounters over 20 cm, forager ants were 45 per cent less likely to deposit pheromone. The mechanism of negative feedback reported here is unusual in that it acts by downregulating the production of a positive feedback signal, rather than by direct inhibition or the production of an inhibitory signal. PMID:23365196

  3. REVEILLE8 and PSEUDO-REPONSE REGULATOR5 Form a Negative Feedback Loop within the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Reetika; Jones, Matthew A.; Schwartz, Jacob; Salemi, Michelle R.; Phinney, Brett S.; Harmer, Stacey L.

    2011-01-01

    Circadian rhythms provide organisms with an adaptive advantage, allowing them to regulate physiological and developmental events so that they occur at the most appropriate time of day. In plants, as in other eukaryotes, multiple transcriptional feedback loops are central to clock function. In one such feedback loop, the Myb-like transcription factors CCA1 and LHY directly repress expression of the pseudoresponse regulator TOC1 by binding to an evening element (EE) in the TOC1 promoter. Another key regulatory circuit involves CCA1 and LHY and the TOC1 homologs PRR5, PRR7, and PRR9. Purification of EE–binding proteins from plant extracts followed by mass spectrometry led to the identification of RVE8, a homolog of CCA1 and LHY. Similar to these well-known clock genes, expression of RVE8 is circadian-regulated with a dawn phase of expression, and RVE8 binds specifically to the EE. However, whereas cca1 and lhy mutants have short period phenotypes and overexpression of either gene causes arrhythmia, rve8 mutants have long-period and RVE8-OX plants have short-period phenotypes. Light input to the clock is normal in rve8, but temperature compensation (a hallmark of circadian rhythms) is perturbed. RVE8 binds to the promoters of both TOC1 and PRR5 in the subjective afternoon, but surprisingly only PRR5 expression is perturbed by overexpression of RVE8. Together, our data indicate that RVE8 promotes expression of a subset of EE–containing clock genes towards the end of the subjective day and forms a negative feedback loop with PRR5. Thus RVE8 and its homologs CCA1 and LHY function close to the circadian oscillator but act via distinct molecular mechanisms. PMID:21483796

  4. Functional genomics identifies negative regulatory nodes controlling phagocyte oxidative burst

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Daniel B.; Becker, Christine E.; Doan, Aivi; Goel, Gautam; Villablanca, Eduardo J.; Knights, Dan; Mok, Amanda; Ng, Aylwin C.Y.; Doench, John G.; Root, David E.; Clish, Clary B.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2015-01-01

    The phagocyte oxidative burst, mediated by Nox2 NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species, confers host defense against a broad spectrum of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss-of-function mutations that impair function of the Nox2 complex result in a life-threatening immunodeficiency, and genetic variants of Nox2 subunits have been implicated in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Thus, alterations in the oxidative burst can profoundly impact host defense, yet little is known about regulatory mechanisms that fine-tune this response. Here we report the discovery of regulatory nodes controlling oxidative burst by functional screening of genes within loci linked to human inflammatory disease. Implementing a multi-omics approach, we define transcriptional, metabolic and ubiquitin-cycling nodes controlled by Rbpj, Pfkl and Rnf145, respectively. Furthermore, we implicate Rnf145 in proteostasis of the Nox2 complex by endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Consequently, ablation of Rnf145 in murine macrophages enhances bacterial clearance, and rescues the oxidative burst defects associated with Ncf4 haploinsufficiency. PMID:26194095

  5. Response to "The Iris Hypothesis: A Negative or Positive Cloud Feedback?"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Lindzen, Richard S.; Hou, Arthur Y.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Based on radiance measurements of Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite, Lindzen et al. found that the high-level cloud cover averaged over the tropical western Pacific decreases with increasing sea surface temperature. They further found that the response of high-level clouds to the sea surface temperature had an effect of reducing the magnitude of climate change, which is referred as a negative climate feedback. Lin et al. reassessed the results found by Lindzen et al. by analyzing the radiation and clouds derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System measurements. They found a weak positive feedback between high-level clouds and the surface temperature. We have found that the approach taken by Lin et al. to estimating the albedo and the outgoing longwave radiation is incorrect and that the inferred climate sensitivity is unreliable.

  6. [Phenotypic switching of Escherichia coli cells containing cyclic digenic systems with negative feedback upon changes in cultivation conditions].

    PubMed

    Stupak, E E; Stupak, I V

    2010-05-01

    One of the mechanisms for the epigenetic control of cell phenotypes is based on switching the functioning regimes of bistable gene networks, which can maintain the two alternative levels of gene expression under the same conditions. Cyclic digenic systems with negative feedback represent an example of a simple bistable gene network. Cells carrying artificial cyclic digenic systems on plasmids inherit each alternative phenotype upon exponential growth on rich medium during several cell generations. The action of specific inducers is necessary for switching. In this work, the impact of changes in cell cultivation conditions on the phenotypic composition of the clonal Escherichia coli cell population containing artificial cyclic digenic systems with negative feedback was studied. Phenotypes differ with respect to the expression level of marker proteins: beta-galactosidase and GFP. Slow growth on a medium containing little-available carbon sources was shown to cause the transition from the phenotype Lac- to Lac+ in the absence of inducers. Phenotypic switching cannot be explained by transcriptional activation of the lactose operon, because 80 +/- 15% of cells inherit the acquired phenotype after replating bacteria on rich medium. Inheritance of the phenotype Lac- in batch culture depends on the medium and duration of cultivation. Dynamics of changes in the activity of beta-galactosidase and culture fluorescence suggests that a decrease in the level of metabolism resulted in the switch of these cyclic systems from bistable to monostable functioning regime, which corresponds to the Lac+ phenotype with respect to the ratio of regulatory proteins. Thus, the instability of growth conditions may cause phenotypic heterogeneity in the clonal population of cells containing bistable gene networks. PMID:20583595

  7. Gene expression in human thyrocytes and autonomous adenomas reveals suppression of negative feedbacks in tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    van Staveren, Wilma C. G.; Solís, David Weiss; Delys, Laurent; Venet, David; Cappello, Matteo; Andry, Guy; Dumont, Jacques E.; Libert, Frédérick; Detours, Vincent; Maenhaut, Carine

    2006-01-01

    The cAMP signaling pathway regulates growth of many cell types, including somatotrophs, thyrocytes, melanocytes, ovarian follicular granulosa cells, adrenocortical cells, and keratinocytes. Mutations of partners from the cAMP signaling cascade are involved in tumor formation. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor and Gsα activating mutations have been detected in thyroid autonomous adenomas, Gsα mutations in growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas, and PKAR1A mutations in Carney complex, a multiple neoplasia syndrome. To gain more insight into the role of cAMP signaling in tumor formation, human primary cultures of thyrocytes were treated for different times (1.5, 3, 16, 24, and 48 h) with TSH to characterize modulations in gene expression using cDNA microarrays. This kinetic study showed a clear difference in expression, early (1.5 and 3 h) and late (16–48 h) after the onset of TSH stimulation. This result suggests a progressive sequential process leading to a change of cell program. The gene expression profile of the long-term stimulated cultures resembled the autonomous adenomas, but not papillary carcinomas. The molecular phenotype of the adenomas thus confirms the role of long-term stimulation of the TSH–cAMP cascade in the pathology. TSH induced a striking up-regulation of different negative feedback modulators of the cAMP cascade, presumably insuring the one-shot effect of the stimulus. Some were down- or nonregulated in adenomas, suggesting a loss of negative feedback control in the tumors. These results suggest that in tumorigenesis, activation of proliferation pathways may be complemented by suppression of multiple corresponding negative feedbacks, i.e., specific tumor suppressors. PMID:16381821

  8. Working memory capacity and spontaneous emotion regulation: high capacity predicts self-enhancement in response to negative feedback.

    PubMed

    Schmeichel, Brandon J; Demaree, Heath A

    2010-10-01

    Although previous evidence suggests that working memory capacity (WMC) is important for success at emotion regulation, that evidence may reveal simply that people with higher WMC follow instructions better than those with lower WMC. The present study tested the hypothesis that people with higher WMC more effectively engage in spontaneous emotion regulation following negative feedback, relative to those with lower WMC. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either no feedback or negative feedback about their emotional intelligence. They then completed a disguised measure of self-enhancement and a self-report measure of affect. Experimental condition and WMC interacted such that higher WMC predicted more self-enhancement and less negative affect following negative feedback. This research provides novel insight into the consequences of individual differences in WMC and illustrates that cognitive capacity may facilitate the spontaneous self-regulation of emotion. PMID:21038959

  9. Negative Feedback of Glycolysis and Oxidative Phosphorylation: Mechanisms of and Reasons for It.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, S S; Balakireva, A V; Markova, O V; Severin, F F

    2015-05-01

    There are two main pathways of ATP biosynthesis: glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. As a rule, the two pathways are not fully active in a single cell. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of glycolytic inhibition of respiration (Warburg and Crabtree effects). What are the reasons for the existence of this negative feedback? It is known that maximal activation of both processes can cause generation of reactive oxygen species. Oxidative phosphorylation is more efficient from the energy point of view, while glycolysis is safer and favors biomass synthesis. This might be the reason why quiescent cells are mainly using oxidative phosphorylation, while the quickly proliferating ones - glycolysis. PMID:26071773

  10. The Effect of Positive and Negative Feedback on Risk-Taking across Different Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Losecaat Vermeer, Annabel B.; Sanfey, Alan G.

    2015-01-01

    Preferences for risky choices have often been shown to be unstable and context-dependent. Though people generally avoid gambles with mixed outcomes, a phenomenon often attributed to loss aversion, contextual factors can impact this dramatically. For example, people typically prefer risky options after a financial loss, while generally choosing safer options after a monetary gain. However, it is unclear what exactly contributes to these preference shifts as a function of prior outcomes, as these gain/loss outcomes are usually confounded with participant performance, and therefore it is unclear whether these effects are driven purely by the monetary gains or losses, or rather by success or failure at the actual task. Here, we experimentally separated the effects of monetary gains/losses from performance success/failure prior to a standard risky choice. Participants performed a task in which they experienced contextual effects: 1) monetary gain or loss based directly on performance, 2) monetary gain or loss that was randomly awarded and was, crucially, independent from performance, and 3) success or failure feedback based on performance, but without any monetary incentive. Immediately following these positive/negative contexts, participants were presented with a gain-loss gamble that they had to decide to either play or pass. We found that risk preferences for identical sets of gambles were biased by positive and negative contexts containing monetary gains and losses, but not by contexts containing performance feedback. This data suggests that the observed framing effects are driven by aversion for monetary losses and not simply by the positive or negative valence of the context, or by potential moods resulting from positive or negative contexts. These results highlight the specific context dependence of risk preferences. PMID:26407298

  11. Competing Positive and Negative Feedbacks on Glacier Response to Climatic Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupper, S.; Todd, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    The adiabatic temperature lapse rate imparts a well-studied positive feedback on glacier changes in response to a given change in climate. For example, if temperature increases, the surface of the glacier thins into the warmer temperatures of the lower surface elevation, dependent upon the local lapse rate, which amplifies the glacier response to the original temperature. However, a less well-quantified negative feedback can also be at play. As the length and thickness of a valley glacier changes, the percentage of the glacier surface that is shaded changes as well, decreasing the incident shortwave radiation at the surface. Assuming turbulent heat fluxes are small, the balance between changing downward longwave radiation (adiabatic lapse rate effect) and shortwave radiation (shading effect) in response to a climatic change will determine the equilibrium glacier profile for the new climate state. Here we use an energy balance model to determine the sensitivity of glacial retreat reconstructions to both the temperature lapse rate and the shading by valley topography. We quantify the effect of shading and lapse rates on idealized glaciers and topography, and assess under what conditions one or the other feedback mechanism is expected to dominate the change in energy balance. We then examine the effect of temperature lapse rates and increased shading on a paleoglacier at Monroe Peak, in the Sevier Plateau, Utah. Although the peak is currently ice-free, lateral moraines on Monroe Peak show that a glacier once extended approximately 4000 m from a 4700 m high headwall on the western side of the peak. Preliminary results suggest that as the glacier retreated from its maximum position, increased shading had a significant positive effect on glacial mass balance which partially compensated for the lapse rate feedback. These preliminary results suggest that reconstructions of smaller glaciers surrounded by steep topography must account for changes in shading of the glacier

  12. Positive and negative feedbacks among Amazon land uses, drought, and fire: the drought of 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepstad, D.; Brando, P.; Soares-Filho, B.; Balch, J.; Moutinho, P.

    2006-12-01

    Climate, rural economies, and ecosystems are connected in the Amazon basin through complex interactions with important implications for greenhouse gas fluxes, biodiversity, and the well-being of rural people. In the historically severe drought of 2005, drought-induced tree mortality and fire-dependent land uses (cattle ranching, swidden agriculture) favored forest fire as it increased the likelihood of further drought. Regions with fire-sensitive investments in the landscape, including improved cattle forage, agroforestry systems, and forest management, were also regions of high investments in the prevention of accidental fire, and experienced low levels of forest fire, in a negative feedback cycle. Some areas of agroindustrial production(cultivated soy) also experienced low forest fire occurrence because of the low flammability of crop fields. The combination of drought- and fire-induced carbon emissions can approach one billion tons in years of severe drought. The negative feedbacks between some types of land use and forest fire could substantially reduce these emissions in the short term.

  13. Quantifying the Negative Feedback of Vegetation to Greenhouse Warming: A Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bounous, L.; Hall, F. G.; Sellers, P. J.; Kumar, A.; Collatz, G. J.; Tucker, C. J.; Imhoff, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Several climate models indicate that in a 2 x CO2 environment, temperature and precipitation would increase and runoff would increase faster than precipitation. These models, however, did not allow the vegetation to increase its leaf density as a response to the physiological effects of increased CO2 and consequent changes in climate. Other assessments included these interactions but did not account for the vegetation down-regulation to reduce plant's photosynthetic activity and as such resulted in a weak vegetation negative response. When we combine these interactions in climate simulations with 2 x CO2, the associated increase in precipitation contributes primarily to increase evapotranspiration rather than surface runoff, consistent with observations, and results in an additional cooling effect not fully accounted for in previous simulations with elevated CO2. By accelerating the water cycle, this feedback slows but does not alleviate the projected warming, reducing the land surface warming by 0.6 C. Compared to previous studies, these results imply that long term negative feedback from CO2-induced increases in vegetation density could reduce temperature following a stabilization of CO2 concentration.

  14. Inhibition of Receptor Dimerization as a Novel Negative Feedback Mechanism of EGFR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kluba, Malgorzata; Engelborghs, Yves; Hofkens, Johan; Mizuno, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is crucial for initiating signal transduction. We employed raster image correlation spectroscopy to continuously monitor the EGFR monomer-dimer equilibrium in living cells. EGFR dimer formation upon addition of EGF showed oscillatory behavior with a periodicity of about 2.5 min, suggesting the presence of a negative feedback loop to monomerize the receptor. We demonstrated that monomerization of EGFR relies on phospholipase Cγ, protein kinase C, and protein kinase D (PKD), while being independent of Ca2+ signaling and endocytosis. Phosphorylation of the juxtamembrane threonine residues of EGFR (T654/T669) by PKD was identified as the factor that shifts the monomer-dimer equilibrium of ligand bound EGFR towards the monomeric state. The dimerization state of the receptor correlated with the activity of an extracellular signal-regulated kinase, downstream of the EGFR. Based on these observations, we propose a novel, negative feedback mechanism that regulates EGFR signaling via receptor monomerization. PMID:26465157

  15. Plant-soil feedbacks promote negative frequency dependence in the coexistence of two aridland grasses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y Anny; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2016-07-27

    Understanding the mechanisms of species coexistence is key to predicting patterns of species diversity. Historically, the ecological paradigm has been that species coexist by partitioning resources: as a species increases in abundance, self-limitation kicks in, because species-specific resources decline. However, determining coexistence mechanisms has been a particular puzzle for sedentary organisms with high overlap in their resource requirements, such as plants. Recent evidence suggests that plant-associated microbes could generate the stabilizing self-limitation (negative frequency dependence) that is required for species coexistence. Here, we test the key assumption that plant-microbe feedbacks cause such self-limitation. We used competition experiments and modelling to evaluate how two common groups of soil microbes (rhizospheric microbes and biological soil crusts) influenced the self-limitation of two competing desert grass species. Negative feedbacks between the dominant plant competitor and its rhizospheric microbes magnified self-limitation, whereas beneficial interactions between both plant species and biological soil crusts partly counteracted this stabilizing effect. Plant-microbe interactions have received relatively little attention as drivers of vegetation dynamics in dry land ecosystems. Our results suggest that microbial mechanisms can contribute to patterns of plant coexistence in arid grasslands. PMID:27466448

  16. Near infrared single photon avalanche detector with negative feedback and self quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linga, Krishna; Yevtukhov, Yuriy; Liang, Bing

    2009-08-01

    We present the design and development of a negative feedback devices using the internal discrete amplifier approach used for the development of a single photon avalanche photodetector in the near infrared wavelength region. This new family of photodetectors with negative feedback, requiring no quenching mechanism using Internal Discrete Amplification (IDA) mechanism for the realization of very high gain and low excess noise factor in the visible and near infrared spectral regions, operates in the non-gated mode under a constant bias voltage. The demonstrated device performance far exceeds any available solid state Photodetectors in the near infrared wavelength range. The measured devices have Gain > 2×105, Excess noise factor < 1.05, Rise time < 350ps, Fall time < 500ps, Dark current < 2×106 cps at room temperature, and Operating Voltage < 60V. These devices are ideal for researchers in the field of Ladar/Lidar, free space optical communication, 3D imaging, industrial and scientific instrumentation, night vision, quantum cryptography, and other military, defence and aerospace applications.

  17. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D promotes negative feedback regulation of TLR signaling via targeting microRNA-155-SOCS1 in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunzi; Liu, Weicheng; Sun, Tao; Huang, Yong; Wang, Youli; Deb, Dilip K; Yoon, Dosuk; Kong, Juan; Thadhani, Ravi; Li, Yan Chun

    2013-04-01

    The negative feedback mechanism is essential to maintain effective immunity and tissue homeostasis. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25[OH]2D3) modulates innate immune response, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this article, we report that vitamin D receptor signaling attenuates TLR-mediated inflammation by enhancing the negative feedback inhibition. Vitamin D receptor inactivation leads to hyperinflammatory response in mice and macrophage cultures when challenged with LPS, because of microRNA-155 (miR-155) overproduction that excessively suppresses suppressor of cytokine signaling 1, a key regulator that enhances the negative feedback loop. Deletion of miR-155 attenuates vitamin D suppression of LPS-induced inflammation, confirming that 1,25(OH)2D3 stimulates suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 by downregulating miR-155. 1,25(OH)2D3 downregulates bic transcription by inhibiting NF-κB activation, which is mediated by a κB cis-DNA element located within the first intron of the bic gene. Together, these data identify a novel regulatory mechanism for vitamin D to control innate immunity. PMID:23436936

  18. A Self-regulatory System of Interlinked Signaling Feedback Loops Controls Mouse Limb Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benazet, Jean-Denis; Bischofberger, Mirko; Tiecke, Eva; Gonalves, Alexandre; Martin, James F.; Zuniga, Aime; Naef, Felix; Zeller, Rolf

    Developmental pathways need to be robust against environmental and genetic variation to enable reliable morphogenesis. Here, we take a systems biology approach to explain how robustness is achieved in the developing mouse limb, a classical model of organogenesis. By combining quantitative genetics with computational modeling we established a computational model of multiple interlocked feedback modules, involving sonic hedgehog (SHH) morphogen, fibroblast growth factor (FGFs) signaling, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and its antagonist GREM1. Earlier modeling work had emphasized the versatile kinetic characteristics of interlocked feedback loops operating at different time scales. Here we develop and then validate a similar computational model to show how BMP4 first initiates and SHH then propagates feedback in the network through differential transcriptional regulation of Grem1 to control digit specification. This switch occurs by linking a fast BMP4/GREM1 module to a slower SHH/GREM1/FGF feedback loop. Simulated gene expression profiles modeled normal limb development as well those of single-gene knockouts. Sensitivity analysis showed how the model was robust and insensitive to variability in parameters. A surprising prediction of the model was that an early Bmp4 signal is essential to kick-start Grem1 expression and the digit specification system. We experimentally validated the prediction using inducible alleles and showed that early, but not late, removal of Bmp4 dramatically disrupted limb development. Sensitivity analysis showed how robustness emerges from this circuitry. This study shows how modeling and computation can help us understand how self-regulatory signaling networks achieve robust regulation of limb development, by exploiting interconnectivity among the three signaling pathways. We expect that similar computational analyses will shed light on the origins of robustness in other developmental systems, and I will discuss some recent examples from

  19. The COMT Val158Met polymorphism regulates the effect of a dopamine antagonist on the feedback-related negativity.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Erik M; Burgdorf, Christin; Chavanon, Mira-Lynn; Schweiger, Desiree; Hennig, Jürgen; Wacker, Jan; Stemmler, Gerhard

    2014-08-01

    Consistent with dopamine accounts of internal and external feedback processing, prior work showed that the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride modulates the relationship between the dopaminergic COMT Val158Met polymorphism and the error-related negativity (ERN). Here, we tested in an independent sample whether this Gene × Substance interaction generalizes to the feedback-related negativity (FRN), which presumably shares underlying dopaminergic mechanisms with the ERN. N = 83 female participants genotyped for COMT Val158Met received 200 mg sulpiride versus placebo and performed a virtual ball-catching task. The FRN to positive versus negative feedback was modulated by a significant COMT × Substance interaction. Mirroring prior work on the ERN, the tendency of the FRN to be more pronounced for VAL+ versus MET/MET carriers after placebo was reversed by sulpiride. The findings thus provide new evidence for dopaminergic models of feedback processing. PMID:24773408

  20. Corp Regulates P53 in Drosophila melanogaster via a Negative Feedback Loop

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Riddhita; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Golic, Kent G.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor P53 is a critical mediator of the apoptotic response to DNA double-strand breaks through the transcriptional activation of pro-apoptotic genes. This mechanism is evolutionarily conserved from mammals to lower invertebrates, including Drosophila melanogaster. P53 also transcriptionally induces its primary negative regulator, Mdm2, which has not been found in Drosophila. In this study we identified the Drosophila gene companion of reaper (corp) as a gene whose overexpression promotes survival of cells with DNA damage in the soma but reduces their survival in the germline. These disparate effects are shared by p53 mutants, suggesting that Corp may be a negative regulator of P53. Confirming this supposition, we found that corp negatively regulates P53 protein level. It has been previously shown that P53 transcriptionally activates corp; thus, Corp produces a negative feedback loop on P53. We further found that Drosophila Corp shares a protein motif with vertebrate Mdm2 in a region that mediates the Mdm2:P53 physical interaction. In Corp, this motif mediates physical interaction with Drosophila P53. Our findings implicate Corp as a functional analog of vertebrate Mdm2 in flies. PMID:26230084

  1. A small-RNA-mediated negative feedback loop controls quorum-sensing dynamics in Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Kimberly C; Waters, Christopher M; Svenningsen, Sine L; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2008-01-01

    The bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi uses a cell-to-cell communication process called quorum sensing (QS) to co-ordinate behaviours in response to changes in population density. QS is accomplished through the secretion and detection of extracellular signalling molecules called autoinducers. At the centre of the V. harveyi QS circuit are five small regulatory RNAs called Qrr1–5 which destabilize the mRNA of luxR, encoding LuxR, the master transcriptional regulator of QS target genes. Here we show that LuxR directly activates transcription of qrr2, qrr3 and qrr4, leading to the rapid downregulation of luxR. The LuxR-binding sites in the promoters of qrr2, qrr3 and qrr4 were identified and mutated to determine the consequences of this regulatory loop on QS dynamics. Disruption of the loop delays the transition from high to low cell density, and more significantly, decreases the cell density at which the population reaches a quorum. Our results suggest that feedback is essential for optimizing the dynamics of the transitions between individual and group behaviours. PMID:18808382

  2. A simple negative interaction in the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is sufficient to produce reliable oscillations.

    PubMed

    Miró-Bueno, Jesús M; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Negative and positive transcriptional feedback loops are present in natural and synthetic genetic oscillators. A single gene with negative transcriptional feedback needs a time delay and sufficiently strong nonlinearity in the transmission of the feedback signal in order to produce biochemical rhythms. A single gene with only positive transcriptional feedback does not produce oscillations. Here, we demonstrate that this single-gene network in conjunction with a simple negative interaction can also easily produce rhythms. We examine a model comprised of two well-differentiated parts. The first is a positive feedback created by a protein that binds to the promoter of its own gene and activates the transcription. The second is a negative interaction in which a repressor molecule prevents this protein from binding to its promoter. A stochastic study shows that the system is robust to noise. A deterministic study identifies that the dynamics of the oscillator are mainly driven by two types of biomolecules: the protein, and the complex formed by the repressor and this protein. The main conclusion of this paper is that a simple and usual negative interaction, such as degradation, sequestration or inhibition, acting on the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is a sufficient condition to produce reliable oscillations. One gene is enough and the positive transcriptional feedback signal does not need to activate a second repressor gene. This means that at the genetic level an explicit negative feedback loop is not necessary. The model needs neither cooperative binding reactions nor the formation of protein multimers. Therefore, our findings could help to clarify the design principles of cellular clocks and constitute a new efficient tool for engineering synthetic genetic oscillators. PMID:22205920

  3. A Simple Negative Interaction in the Positive Transcriptional Feedback of a Single Gene Is Sufficient to Produce Reliable Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Miró-Bueno, Jesús M.; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Negative and positive transcriptional feedback loops are present in natural and synthetic genetic oscillators. A single gene with negative transcriptional feedback needs a time delay and sufficiently strong nonlinearity in the transmission of the feedback signal in order to produce biochemical rhythms. A single gene with only positive transcriptional feedback does not produce oscillations. Here, we demonstrate that this single-gene network in conjunction with a simple negative interaction can also easily produce rhythms. We examine a model comprised of two well-differentiated parts. The first is a positive feedback created by a protein that binds to the promoter of its own gene and activates the transcription. The second is a negative interaction in which a repressor molecule prevents this protein from binding to its promoter. A stochastic study shows that the system is robust to noise. A deterministic study identifies that the dynamics of the oscillator are mainly driven by two types of biomolecules: the protein, and the complex formed by the repressor and this protein. The main conclusion of this paper is that a simple and usual negative interaction, such as degradation, sequestration or inhibition, acting on the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is a sufficient condition to produce reliable oscillations. One gene is enough and the positive transcriptional feedback signal does not need to activate a second repressor gene. This means that at the genetic level an explicit negative feedback loop is not necessary. The model needs neither cooperative binding reactions nor the formation of protein multimers. Therefore, our findings could help to clarify the design principles of cellular clocks and constitute a new efficient tool for engineering synthetic genetic oscillators. PMID:22205920

  4. Robust stability analysis and design under consideration of multiple feedback loops of the tryptophan regulatory network of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Baese, A; Theis, F; Emmett, M R

    2010-01-01

    The tryptophan system present in Escherichia coli represents an important regulatory unit described by multiple feedback loops. The role of these feedback loops is crucial for the analysis of the dynamical behavior of the tryptophan synthesis. We analyze the robust stability of this system which models the dynamics of both fast state, such as transcription and synthesis of free operator, and slow state, such as translation and tryptophan synthesis under consideration of nonlinear uncertainties. In addition, we analyze the role of these feedback loops as key design components of this regulatory unit responsible for its physiological performance. The range of allowed parameter perturbations and the conditions that ensure the existence of asymptotically stable equilibria of the perturbed system are determined. We also analyze two important alternate regulatory designs for the tryptophan synthesis pathway and derive the stability conditions. PMID:20865501

  5. Grassland establishment under varying resource availability: a test of positive and negative feedback.

    PubMed

    Baer, Sara G; Blair, John M

    2008-07-01

    The traditional logic of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) interactions in ecosystems predicts further increases or decreases in productivity (positive feedback) in response to high and low fertility in the soil, respectively; but the potential for development of feedback in ecosystems recovering from disturbance is less well understood. Furthermore, this logic has been challenged in grassland ecosystems where frequent fires or grazing may reduce the contribution of aboveground litter inputs to soil organic matter pools and nutrient supply for plant growth, relative to forest ecosystems. Further, if increases in plant productivity increase soil C content more than soil N content, negative feedback may result from increased microbial demand for N making less available for plant growth. We used a field experiment to test for feedback in an establishing grassland by comparing aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and belowground pools and fluxes of C and N in soil with enriched, ambient, and reduced N availability. For eight years annual N enrichment increased ANPP, root N, and root tissue quality, but root C:N ratios remained well above the threshold for net mineralization of N. There was no evidence that N enrichment increased root biomass, soil C or N accrual rates, or storage of C in total, microbial, or mineralizable pools within this time frame. However, the net nitrogen mineralization potential (NMP) rate was greater following eight years of N enrichment, and we attributed this to N saturation of the microbial biomass. Grassland developing under experimentally imposed N limitation through C addition to the soil exhibited ANPP, root biomass and quality, and net NMP rate similar to the ambient soil. Similarity in productivity and roots in the reduced and ambient N treatments was attributed to the potentially high nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) of the dominant C4 grasses, and increasing cover of legumes over time in the C-amended soil. Thus, in a developing

  6. GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein is expressed in serotonin neurons and regulates tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kapatos, G; Hirayama, K; Shimoji, M; Milstien, S

    1999-02-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin, the coenzyme required for hydroxylation of phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, regulates its own synthesis through feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) mediated by a regulatory subunit, the GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). In the liver, L-phenylalanine specifically stimulates tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis by displacing tetrahydrobiopterin from the GTPCH-GFRP complex. To explore the role of this regulatory system in rat brain, we examined the localization of GFRP mRNA using double-label in situ hybridization. GFRP mRNA expression was abundant in serotonin neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus but was undetectable in dopamine neurons of the midbrain or norepinephrine neurons of the locus coeruleus. Simultaneous nuclease protection assays for GFRP and GTPCH mRNAs showed that GFRP mRNA is most abundant within the brainstem and that the ratio of GFRP to GTPCH mRNA is much higher than in the ventral midbrain. Two species of GFRP mRNA differing by approximately 20 nucleotides in length were detected in brainstem but not in other tissues, with the longer, more abundant form being common to other brain regions. It is interesting that the pineal and adrenal glands did not contain detectable levels of GFRP mRNA, although GTPCH mRNA was abundant in both. Primary neuronal cultures were used to examine the role of GFRP-mediated regulation of GTPCH on tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis within brainstem serotonin neurons and midbrain dopamine neurons. L-Phenylalanine increased tetrahydrobiopterin levels in serotonin neurons to a maximum of twofold in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas D-phenylalanine and L-tryptophan were without effect. In contrast, tetrahydrobiopterin levels within cultured dopamine neurons were not altered by L-phenylalanine. The time course of this effect was very rapid, with a maximal response observed within 60 min. Inhibitors of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis prevented the L

  7. The time scale of the silicate weathering negative feedback on atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbourn, G.; Ridgwell, A.; Lenton, T. M.

    2015-05-01

    The ultimate fate of CO2 added to the ocean-atmosphere system is chemical reaction with silicate minerals and burial as marine carbonates. The time scale of this silicate weathering negative feedback on atmospheric pCO2 will determine the duration of perturbations to the carbon cycle, be they geological release events or the current anthropogenic perturbation. However, there has been little previous work on quantifying the time scale of the silicate weathering feedback, with the primary estimate of 300-400 kyr being traceable to an early box model study by Sundquist (1991). Here we employ a representation of terrestrial rock weathering in conjunction with the "GENIE" (Grid ENabled Integrated Earth system) model to elucidate the different time scales of atmospheric CO2 regulation while including the main climate feedbacks on CO2 uptake by the ocean. In this coupled model, the main dependencies of weathering—runoff, temperature, and biological productivity—were driven from an energy-moisture balance atmosphere model and parameterized plant productivity. Long-term projections (1 Myr) were conducted for idealized scenarios of 1000 and 5000 PgC fossil fuel emissions and their sensitivity to different model parameters was tested. By fitting model output to a series of exponentials we determined the e-folding time scale for atmospheric CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering to be ˜240 kyr (range 170-380 kyr), significantly less than existing quantifications. Although the time scales for reequilibration of global surface temperature and surface ocean pH are similar to that for CO2, a much greater proportion of the peak temperature anomaly persists on this longest time scale; ˜21% compared to ˜10% for CO2.

  8. Crystal structure of the stimulatory complex of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Okada, Kengo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2002-02-01

    In the presence of phenylalanine, GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) forms a stimulatory 360-kDa complex with GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. The crystal structure of the stimulatory complex reveals that the GTPCHI decamer is sandwiched by two GFRP homopentamers. Each GFRP pentamer forms a symmetrical five-membered ring similar to beta-propeller. Five phenylalanine molecules are buried inside each interface between GFRP and GTPCHI, thus enhancing the binding of these proteins. The complex structure suggests that phenylalanine-induced GTPCHI x GFRP complex formation enhances GTPCHI activity by locking the enzyme in the active state. PMID:11818540

  9. MicroRNAs Constitute a Negative Feedback Loop in Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Griss, Kathrin; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Seidel, Kerstin; Stielow, Christina; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Eberhardt, Martin; Wilhelm, Jochen; Vera, Julio; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-07-15

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes high mortality as a major pneumonia-inducing pathogen. In pneumonia, control of innate immunity is necessary to prevent organ damage. We assessed the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) as regulators in pneumococcal infection of human macrophages. Exposure of primary blood-derived human macrophages with pneumococci resulted in transcriptional changes in several gene clusters and a significant deregulation of 10 microRNAs. Computational network analysis retrieved miRNA-146a as one putatively important regulator of pneumococci-induced host cell activation. Its induction depended on bacterial structural integrity and was completely inhibited by blocking Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) or depleting its mediator MyD88. Furthermore, induction of miRNA-146a release did not require the autocrine feedback of interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α released from infected macrophages, and it repressed the TLR-2 downstream mediators IRAK-1 and TRAF-6, as well as the inflammatory factors cyclooxygenase 2 and interleukin 1β. In summary, pneumococci recognition induces a negative feedback loop, preventing excessive inflammation via miR-146a and potentially other miRNAs. PMID:26984146

  10. Construction of an Oscillator Gene Circuit by Negative and Positive Feedbacks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shihui; Ma, Yushu; Ren, Yuhong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic oscillators are gene circuits in which the protein expression will change over time. The delay of transcription, translation, and protein folding is used to form this kind of behavior. Here, we tried to design a synthetic oscillator by a negative feedback combined with a positive feedback. With the mutant promoter PLacC repressed by LacIq and PLux activated by AHL-bound LuxR, two gene circuits, Os-LAA and Os-ASV, were constructed and introduced into LacI-deleted E. coli DH5α cells. When glucose was used as the carbon source, a low level of fluorescence was detected in the culture, and the bacteria with Os-ASV showed no oscillation, whereas a small portion of those carrying Os-LAA demonstrated oscillation behavior with a period of about 68.3 ± 20 min. When glycerol was used as the carbon source, bacteria with Os-ASV demonstrated high fluorescence value and oscillation behavior with the period of about 121 ± 21 min. PMID:26387818

  11. Better Bet-Hedging with coupled positive and negative feedback loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narula, Jatin; Igoshin, Oleg

    2011-03-01

    Bacteria use the phenotypic heterogeneity associated with bistable switches to distribute the risk of activating stress response strategies like sporulation and persistence. However bistable switches offer little control over the timing of phenotype switching and first passage times (FPT) for individual cells are found to be exponentially distributed. We show that a genetic circuit consisting of interlinked positive and negative feedback loops allows cells to control the timing of phenotypic switching. Using a mathematical model we find that in this system a stable high expression state and stable low expression limit cycle coexist and the FPT distribution for stochastic transitions between them shows multiple peaks at regular intervals. A multimodal FPT distribution allows cells to detect the persistence of stress and control the rate of phenotype transition of the population. We further show that extracellular signals from cell-cell communication that change the strength of the feedback loops can modulate the FPT distribution and allow cells even greater control in a bet-hedging strategy.

  12. Antennally mediated negative feedback regulation of pheromone production in the pine engraver beetle, Ips pini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzel, Matthew D.; Bearfield, Jeremy C.; Keeling, Christopher I.; McCormack, Colin C.; Blomquist, Gary J.; Tittiger, Claus

    2007-01-01

    Bark beetles use monoterpenoid aggregation pheromones to coordinate host colonization and mating. These chemical signals are produced de novo in midgut cells via the mevalonate pathway, and pheromone production may be regulated by a negative feedback system mediated through the antennae. In this study, we explored the effect of antennectomy on pheromone production and transcript levels of key mevalonate pathway genes in juvenile hormone III-treated male pine engraver beetles, Ips pini (Say). Antennectomized males produced significantly greater amounts of pheromone than podectomized males and those with intact antennae. Likewise, mRNA levels of three mevalonate pathway genes important in pheromone biosynthesis were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and found to be induced to a greater extent with antennectomy, suggesting a transcriptional regulation of pheromone production.

  13. Smart conjugated polymer nanocarrier for healthy weight loss by negative feedback regulation of lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhu, Sha; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Pei-Jian; Yao, Xi-Kuang; Qian, Cheng-Gen; Zhang, Can; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2016-02-14

    Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution. PMID:26790821

  14. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  15. Solid-state wideband GaN HEMT power amplifier with a novel negative feedback structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiqun, Cheng; Minshi, Jia; Ya, Luan; Xinxiang, Lian

    2014-12-01

    The design and fabrication of an ultra-broadband power amplifier based on a GaN HEMT, which operates in the frequency range from 3 to 8 GHz, is presented in this paper. A TGF2023-02 GaN HEMT chip from TriQuint is adopted and modeled. A novel negative feedback structure is applied in the circuit. The measured results show that the amplifier module has a wide range frequency response that is almost consistent with those of simulation at frequencies from 3 to 6.5 GHz. The measured power gain is greater than 7 dB between 3 and 6.5 GHz. The saturated output power is 38.5 dBm under DC bias of Vds = 28 V, Vgs = -3.5 V at the frequency of 5.5 GHz.

  16. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide down-regulates expression of GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ernst R; Bahrami, Soheyl; Heller, Regine; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele

    2002-03-22

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) is a 9.7-kDa protein regulating GTP cyclohydrolase I activity in dependence of tetrahydrobiopterin and phenylalanine concentrations, thus enabling stimulation of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis by phenylalanine to ensure its efficient metabolism by phenylalanine hydroxylase. Here, we were interested in regulation of GFRP expression by proinflammatory cytokines and stimuli, which are known to induce GTP cyclohydrolase I expression. Recombinant human GFRP stimulated recombinant human GTP cyclohydrolase I in the presence of phenylalanine and mediated feedback inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin. Levels of GFRP mRNA in human myelomonocytoma (THP-1) cells remained unaltered by treatment of cells with interferon-gamma or interleukin-1beta, but were significantly down-regulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 microg/ml), without or with cotreatment by interferon-gamma, which strongly up-regulated GTP cyclohydrolase I expression and activity. GFRP expression was also suppressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with 1 microg/ml LPS, as well as in rat tissues 7 h post intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg LPS. THP-1 cells stimulated with interferon-gamma alone showed increased pteridine synthesis by addition of phenylalanine to the culture medium. Cells stimulated with interferon-gamma plus LPS, in contrast, showed phenylalanine-independent pteridine synthesis. These results demonstrate that LPS down-regulates expression of GFRP, thus rendering pteridine synthesis independent of metabolic control by phenylalanine. PMID:11799107

  17. GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein-dependent and -independent inhibitors of GTP cyclohydrolase I.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Wilson, L M; Hatakeyama, K

    2001-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) mediates the feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) through protein complex formation. Since guanine and BH4 have a common pyrimidine ring structure, we examined the inhibitory effect of guanine and its analogs on the enzyme activity. Guanine, 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-methylguanine, and 8-bromoguanine inhibited the enzyme activity in a GFRP-dependent and pH-dependent manner and induced complex formation between GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP. The type of inhibition by this group is a mixed type. All these properties were shared with BH4. In striking contrast, inhibition by 8-azaguanine and 8-mercaptoguanine was GFRP-independent and pH-independent. The type of inhibition by 8-azaguanine and 8-mercaptoguanine was a competitive type. The two compounds did not induce complex formation between the enzyme and GFRP. These results demonstrate that guanine compounds of the first group bind to the BH4-binding site of the GTP cyclohydrolase I/GFRP complex, whereas 8-azaguanine and 8-mercaptoguanine bind to the active site of the enzyme. Finally, the possible implications in Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and Parkinson diseases of the inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I by guanine and 8-hydroxyguanine are discussed. PMID:11361142

  18. A Cell-Regulatory Mechanism Involving Feedback between Contraction and Tissue Formation Guides Wound Healing Progression

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Clara; Javierre, Etelvina; García-Aznar, José Manuel; Gómez-Benito, María José

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a process driven by cells. The ability of cells to sense mechanical stimuli from the extracellular matrix that surrounds them is used to regulate the forces that cells exert on the tissue. Stresses exerted by cells play a central role in wound contraction and have been broadly modelled. Traditionally, these stresses are assumed to be dependent on variables such as the extracellular matrix and cell or collagen densities. However, we postulate that cells are able to regulate the healing process through a mechanosensing mechanism regulated by the contraction that they exert. We propose that cells adjust the contraction level to determine the tissue functions regulating all main activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and matrix production. Hence, a closed-regulatory feedback loop is proposed between contraction and tissue formation. The model consists of a system of partial differential equations that simulates the evolution of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor, as well as the deformation of the extracellular matrix. This model is able to predict the wound healing outcome without requiring the addition of phenomenological laws to describe the time-dependent contraction evolution. We have reproduced two in vivo experiments to evaluate the predictive capacity of the model, and we conclude that there is feedback between the level of cell contraction and the tissue regenerated in the wound. PMID:24681636

  19. Competing feedback loops shape IL-2 signaling between helper and regulatory T lymphocytes in cellular microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Dorothea; de la Rosa, Maurus; Hobiger, Kirstin; Thurley, Kevin; Flossdorf, Michael; Scheffold, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Cytokines are pleiotropic and readily diffusible messenger molecules, raising the question of how their action can be confined to specific target cells. The T cell cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) is essential for the homeostasis of regulatory T (Treg) cells that suppress (auto)immunity and stimulates immune responses mediated by conventional T cells. We combined mathematical modeling and experiments to dissect the dynamics of the IL-2 signaling network that links the prototypical IL-2 producers, conventional T helper (Th) cells, and Treg cells. We show how the IL-2-induced upregulation of high-affinity IL-2 receptors (IL-2R) establishes a positive feedback loop of IL-2 signaling. This feedback mediates a digital switch for the proliferation of Th cells and functions as an analog amplifier for the IL-2 uptake capacity of Treg cells. Unlike other positive feedbacks in cell signaling that augment signal propagation, the IL-2/IL-2R loop enhances the capture of the signal molecule and its degradation. Thus Treg and Th cells can compete for IL-2 and restrict its range of action through efficient cellular uptake. Depending on activation status and spatial localization of the cells, IL-2 may be consumed exclusively by Treg or Th cells, or be shared between them. In particular, a Treg cell can deprive a stimulated Th cell of its IL-2, but only when the cells are located in close proximity, within a few tens of micrometers. The present findings explain how IL-2 can play two disctinct roles in immune regulation and point to a hitherto largely unexplored spatiotemporal complexity of cytokine signaling. PMID:20133667

  20. Negative feedback regulation of Homer 1a on norepinephrine-dependent cardiac hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarello, Carmelina; Bortoloso, Elena; Carpi, Andrea; Furlan, Sandra; Volpe, Pompeo

    2013-07-15

    Homers are scaffolding proteins that modulate diverse cell functions being able to assemble signalling complexes. In this study, the presence, sub-cellular distribution and function of Homer 1 was investigated. Homer 1a and Homer 1b/c are constitutively expressed in cardiac muscle of both mouse and rat and in HL-1 cells, a cardiac cell line. As judged by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, Homer 1a displays sarcomeric and peri-nuclear localization. In cardiomyocytes and cultured HL-1 cells, the hypertrophic agonist norepinephrine (NE) induces α{sub 1}-adrenergic specific Homer 1a over-expression, with a two-to-three-fold increase within 1 h, and no up-regulation of Homer 1b/c, as judged by Western blot and qPCR. In HL-1 cells, plasmid-driven over-expression of Homer 1a partially antagonizes activation of ERK phosphorylation and ANF up-regulation, two well-established, early markers of hypertrophy. At the morphometric level, NE-induced increase of cell size is likewise and partially counteracted by exogenous Homer 1a. Under the same experimental conditions, Homer 1b/c does not have any effect on ANF up-regulation nor on cell hypertrophy. Thus, Homer 1a up-regulation is associated to early stages of cardiac hypertrophy and appears to play a negative feedback regulation on molecular transducers of hypertrophy. -- Highlights: • Homer 1a is constitutively expressed in cardiac tissue. • In HL-1 cells, norepinephrine activates signaling pathways leading to hypertrophy. • Homer 1a up-regulation is an early event of norepinephrine-induced hypertrophy. • Homer 1a plays a negative feedback regulation modulating pathological hypertrophy. • Over-expression of Homer 1a per se does not induce hypertrophy.

  1. Smart conjugated polymer nanocarrier for healthy weight loss by negative feedback regulation of lipase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhu, Sha; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Pei-Jian; Yao, Xi-Kuang; Qian, Cheng-Gen; Zhang, Can; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution.Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution

  2. Negative feedback in the bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) synexpression group governs its dynamic signaling range and canalizes development

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Malte; Legewie, Stefan; Eils, Roland; Karaulanov, Emil; Niehrs, Christof

    2011-01-01

    What makes embryogenesis a robust and canalized process is an important question in developmental biology. A bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) morphogen gradient plays a key role in embryonic development, and we are beginning to understand how the self-regulating properties of its signaling circuitry ensure robust embryonic patterning. An unexplored question is why the BMP signaling circuit is organized as a modular synexpression group, with a prevalence of feedback inhibitors. Here, we provide evidence from direct experimentation and mathematical modeling that the synexpressed feedback inhibitors BAMBI, SMAD6, and SMAD7 (i) expand the dynamic BMP signaling range essential for proper embryonic patterning and (ii) reduce interindividual phenotypic and molecular variability in Xenopus embryos. Thereby, negative feedback linearizes signaling responses and confers robust patterning, thus promoting canalized development. The presence of negative feedback inhibitors in other growth factor synexpression groups suggests that these properties may constitute a general principle. PMID:21633009

  3. Where and why soil moisture - precipitation feedback is negative: observational perspective over the African Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Irina; van Heerwaarden, Chiel; Guichard, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture affects initiation of convective rain storms and related precipitation variability. Yet, the physical mechanisms, strength and even the sign of the soil moisture - precipitation coupling remains uncertain, owning largely to a lack of extensive long-term observational products. Recent studies, built on global remote sensing data and probability statistics at 5° grid resolution, suggest the co-existence of a positive temporal (rain over temporally wetter soils) and a negative spatial (rain over spatially drier soils) coupling. However, the physical interpretation of the obtained statistical relationships remains subtle. Our present study revisits the physical nature of the observed spatial and temporal soil moisture - precipitation coupling (SMPC) at 1° grid resolution over the Sahelian domain (5-20°N, 20°W-40°E). Analysis of a 10-yr (2002-2011) satellite remote sensing data set of daily AMSR-E soil moisture and 3-hourly TMPA precipitation reveals a dipole pattern in the spatial SMPC over the region. In the S-W of the domain (Ghana, Benin), rainfall events indicate higher probability to occur over spatially drier soils, while they happen preferably over spatially wetter soils in the East (South Sudan). The dominant spatially negative coupling in the Sahel shows coherence with a negative temporal feedback. The latter contrasts with previous global findings and gives rise to additional questions on the atmospheric moisture origin in the event locations. The identified land surface factors contributing to the negative SMPC on the S-W include the presence of statistical extremes and higher relative to the rest of the domain drying rates of the upper surface layer prior events. In contrast, seasonal flooding of the territories in the East and an overall moister land surface and boundary layer characterize the locations of positive coupling in the South Sudan region. The contribution of atmospheric factors to the observed coupling relationships and

  4. Detection of the dominant direction of information flow and feedback links in densely interconnected regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Maslov, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    Background Finding the dominant direction of flow of information in densely interconnected regulatory or signaling networks is required in many applications in computational biology and neuroscience. This is achieved by first identifying and removing links which close up feedback loops in the original network and hierarchically arranging nodes in the remaining network. In mathematical language this corresponds to a problem of making a graph acyclic by removing as few links as possible and thus altering the original graph in the least possible way. The exact solution of this problem requires enumeration of all cycles and combinations of removed links, which, as an NP-hard problem, is computationally prohibitive even for modest-size networks. Results We introduce and compare two approximate numerical algorithms for solving this problem: the probabilistic one based on a simulated annealing of the hierarchical layout of the network which minimizes the number of "backward" links going from lower to higher hierarchical levels, and the deterministic, "greedy" algorithm that sequentially cuts the links that participate in the largest number of feedback cycles. We find that the annealing algorithm outperforms the deterministic one in terms of speed, memory requirement, and the actual number of removed links. To further improve a visual perception of the layout produced by the annealing algorithm, we perform an additional minimization of the length of hierarchical links while keeping the number of anti-hierarchical links at their minimum. The annealing algorithm is then tested on several examples of regulatory and signaling networks/pathways operating in human cells. Conclusion The proposed annealing algorithm is powerful enough to performs often optimal layouts of protein networks in whole organisms, consisting of around ~104 nodes and ~105 links, while the applicability of the greedy algorithm is limited to individual pathways with ~100 vertices. The considered examples

  5. Identification of a unique double-negative regulatory T-cell population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung O; Jones, Joyce E; Peters, Cory J; Whitacre, David; Frelin, Lars; Hughes, Janice; Kim, Won-Keun; Milich, David R

    2011-12-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells represent one of the main mechanisms of regulating self-reactive immune cells. Treg cells are thought to play a role in down-regulating immune responses to self or allogeneic antigens in the periphery. Although the function of Treg cells has been demonstrated in many experimental settings, the precise mechanisms and antigen specificity often remain unclear. In a hepatitis B e antigen-T-cell receptor (HBeAg-TCR) double transgenic mouse model, we observed a phenotypically unique (TCR+)  CD4- /CD8-  CD25(+/-)  GITR(high)  PD-1(high)  FoxP3-) HBeAg-specific population that demonstrates immune regulatory function. This HBeAg-specific double-negative regulatory cell population proliferates vigorously in vitro, in contrast to any other known regulatory population, in an interleukin-2-independent manner. PMID:22044159

  6. Identification of a unique double-negative regulatory T-cell population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung O; Jones, Joyce E; Peters, Cory J; Whitacre, David; Frelin, Lars; Hughes, Janice; Kim, Won-Keun; Milich, David R

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells represent one of the main mechanisms of regulating self-reactive immune cells. Treg cells are thought to play a role in down-regulating immune responses to self or allogeneic antigens in the periphery. Although the function of Treg cells has been demonstrated in many experimental settings, the precise mechanisms and antigen specificity often remain unclear. In a hepatitis B e antigen–T-cell receptor (HBeAg-TCR) double transgenic mouse model, we observed a phenotypically unique (TCR+ CD4−/CD8− CD25+/− GITRhigh PD-1high FoxP3−) HBeAg-specific population that demonstrates immune regulatory function. This HBeAg-specific double-negative regulatory cell population proliferates vigorously in vitro, in contrast to any other known regulatory population, in an interleukin-2-independent manner. PMID:22044159

  7. Negative feedback regulation of auxin signaling by ATHB8/ACL5-BUD2 transcription module.

    PubMed

    Baima, Simona; Forte, Valentina; Possenti, Marco; Peñalosa, Andrés; Leoni, Guido; Salvi, Sergio; Felici, Barbara; Ruberti, Ida; Morelli, Giorgio

    2014-06-01

    The role of auxin as main regulator of vascular differentiation is well established, and a direct correlation between the rate of xylem differentiation and the amount of auxin reaching the (pro)cambial cells has been proposed. It has been suggested that thermospermine produced by ACAULIS5 (ACL5) and bushy and dwarf2 (BUD2) is one of the factors downstream to auxin contributing to the regulation of this process in Arabidopsis. Here, we provide an in-depth characterization of the mechanism through which ACL5 modulates xylem differentiation. We show that an increased level of ACL5 slows down xylem differentiation by negatively affecting the expression of homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) III and key auxin signaling genes. This mechanism involves the positive regulation of thermospermine biosynthesis by the HD-ZIP III protein Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox8 tightly controlling the expression of ACL5 and BUD2. In addition, we show that the HD-ZIP III protein REVOLUTA contributes to the increased leaf vascularization and long hypocotyl phenotype of acl5 likely by a direct regulation of auxin signaling genes such as like auxin resistant2 (LAX2) and LAX3. We propose that proper formation and differentiation of xylem depend on a balance between positive and negative feedback loops operating through HD-ZIP III genes. PMID:24777988

  8. Modulation of feedback-related negativity during trial-and-error exploration and encoding of behavioral shifts

    PubMed Central

    Sallet, Jérôme; Camille, Nathalie; Procyk, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The feedback-related negativity (FRN) is a mid-frontal event-related potential (ERP) recorded in various cognitive tasks and associated with the onset of sensory feedback signaling decision outcome. Some properties of the FRN are still debated, notably its sensitivity to positive and negative reward prediction error (RPE)—i.e., the discrepancy between the expectation and the actual occurrence of a particular feedback,—and its role in triggering the post-feedback adjustment. In the present study we tested whether the FRN is modulated by both positive and negative RPE. We also tested whether an instruction cue indicating the need for behavioral adjustment elicited the FRN. We asked 12 human subjects to perform a problem-solving task where they had to search by trial and error which of five visual targets, presented on a screen, was associated with a correct feedback. After exploration and discovery of the correct target, subjects could repeat their correct choice until the onset of a visual signal to change (SC) indicative of a new search. Analyses showed that the FRN was modulated by both negative and positive prediction error (RPE). Finally, we found that the SC elicited an FRN-like potential on the frontal midline electrodes that was not modulated by the probability of that event. Collectively, these results suggest the FRN may reflect a mechanism that evaluates any event (outcome, instruction cue) signaling the need to engage adaptive actions. PMID:24294190

  9. Stochastic focusing coupled with negative feedback enables robust regulation in biochemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Engblom, Stefan; Bauer, Pavol; Khammash, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Nature presents multiple intriguing examples of processes that proceed with high precision and regularity. This remarkable stability is frequently counter to modellers' experience with the inherent stochasticity of chemical reactions in the regime of low-copy numbers. Moreover, the effects of noise and nonlinearities can lead to 'counterintuitive' behaviour, as demonstrated for a basic enzymatic reaction scheme that can display stochastic focusing (SF). Under the assumption of rapid signal fluctuations, SF has been shown to convert a graded response into a threshold mechanism, thus attenuating the detrimental effects of signal noise. However, when the rapid fluctuation assumption is violated, this gain in sensitivity is generally obtained at the cost of very large product variance, and this unpredictable behaviour may be one possible explanation of why, more than a decade after its introduction, SF has still not been observed in real biochemical systems. In this work, we explore the noise properties of a simple enzymatic reaction mechanism with a small and fluctuating number of active enzymes that behaves as a high-gain, noisy amplifier due to SF caused by slow enzyme fluctuations. We then show that the inclusion of a plausible negative feedback mechanism turns the system from a noisy signal detector to a strong homeostatic mechanism by exchanging high gain with strong attenuation in output noise and robustness to parameter variations. Moreover, we observe that the discrepancy between deterministic and stochastic descriptions of stochastically focused systems in the evolution of the means almost completely disappears, despite very low molecule counts and the additional nonlinearity due to feedback. The reaction mechanism considered here can provide a possible resolution to the apparent conflict between intrinsic noise and high precision in critical intracellular processes. PMID:26609065

  10. The negative feedback between anthropogenic ozone pollution and enhanced ocean emissions of iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas, Carlos A.; Prados-Roman, Cristina; Fernandez, Rafael P.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso

    2015-04-01

    Natural emissions of iodine compounds from the oceans efficiently destroy atmospheric ozone reducing its positive radiative forcing effects in the troposphere. Emissions of inorganic iodine have been experimentally shown to depend on the deposition to the oceans of tropospheric ozone, whose concentrations have significantly increased (40%) since 1850 as a result of human activities. In this work a chemistry-climate model is used to quantify the current ocean emissions of inorganic iodine and evaluate the impact that the anthropogenic increase of tropospheric ozone has had on the natural cycle of iodine in the marine environment since pre-industrial times. Our results indicate that the human driven enhancement of tropospheric ozone has doubled the oceanic inorganic iodine emissions following the reaction of ozone with iodide at the sea surface. The consequent build-up of atmospheric iodine, with maximum enhancements of up to 70% with respect to preindustrial times in continental pollution outflow regions, has in turn accelerated the ozone chemical loss over the oceans with strong spatial patterns. We suggest that this ocean-atmosphere interaction represents a negative geochemical feedback loop by which current ocean emissions of iodine act as a natural buffer for ozone pollution and its radiative forcing in the global marine environment. This feedback represents a potentially important link between climate change and tropospheric O3 since the oceanic emissions of iodine are not only linked to surface O3, but also to SST and wind speed and might also be linked to climatically driven changes in the state of the world oceans.

  11. Bayesian non-negative factor analysis for reconstructing transcription factor mediated regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transcriptional regulation by transcription factor (TF) controls the time and abundance of mRNA transcription. Due to the limitation of current proteomics technologies, large scale measurements of protein level activities of TFs is usually infeasible, making computational reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory network a difficult task. Results We proposed here a novel Bayesian non-negative factor model for TF mediated regulatory networks. Particularly, the non-negative TF activities and sample clustering effect are modeled as the factors from a Dirichlet process mixture of rectified Gaussian distributions, and the sparse regulatory coefficients are modeled as the loadings from a sparse distribution that constrains its sparsity using knowledge from database; meantime, a Gibbs sampling solution was developed to infer the underlying network structure and the unknown TF activities simultaneously. The developed approach has been applied to simulated system and breast cancer gene expression data. Result shows that, the proposed method was able to systematically uncover TF mediated transcriptional regulatory network structure, the regulatory coefficients, the TF protein level activities and the sample clustering effect. The regulation target prediction result is highly coordinated with the prior knowledge, and sample clustering result shows superior performance over previous molecular based clustering method. Conclusions The results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach in reconstructing transcriptional networks mediated by TFs through simulated systems and real data. PMID:22166063

  12. GTP Cyclohydrolase I Phosphorylation and Interaction with GTP Cyclohydrolase Feedback Regulatory Protein Provide Novel Regulation of Endothelial Tetrahydrobiopterin and Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Rezvan, Amir; Salerno, John C.; Husain, Ahsan; Kwon, Kihwan; Jo, Hanjoong; Harrison, David G.; Chen, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Rationale GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH-1) is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor for nitric oxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. GTPCH-1 undergoes negative feedback regulation by its end-product BH4 via interaction with the GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). Such a negative feedback mechanism should maintain cellular BH4 levels within a very narrow range; however, we recently identified a phosphorylation site (S81) on human GTPCH-1 that markedly increases BH4 production in response to laminar shear. Objective To define how S81 phosphorylation alters GTPCH-1 enzyme activity and how this is modulated by GFRP. Methods and Results Using prokaryotically expressed proteins, we found that the GTPCH-1 phospho-mimetic mutant (S81D) has increased enzyme activity, reduced binding to GFRP and resistance to inhibition by GFRP compared to wild-type GTPCH-1. Using siRNA or overexpressing plasmids, GFRP was shown to modulate phosphorylation of GTPCH-1, BH4 levels and nitric oxide (NO) production in human endothelial cells. Laminar, but not oscillatory shear stress caused dissociation of GTPCH-1 and GFRP, promoting GTPCH-1 phosphorylation. We also found that both GTPCH-1 phosphorylation and GFRP down-regulation prevents eNOS uncoupling in response to oscillatory shear. Finally oscillatory shear was associated with impaired GTPCH-1 phosphorylation and reduced BH4 levels in vivo. Conclusion These studies provide a new mechanism for regulation of endothelial GTPCH-1 by its phosphorylation and interplay with GFRP. This mechanism allows for escape from GFRP negative feedback and permits large amounts of BH4 to be produced in response to laminar shear stress. PMID:19926872

  13. Negative feedback on IL-23 exerted by IL-17A during pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Silverpil, Elin; Wright, Adam K A; Hansson, Marit; Jirholt, Pernilla; Henningsson, Louise; Smith, Margaretha E; Gordon, Stephen B; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Gjertsson, Inger; Glader, Pernilla; Lindén, Anders

    2013-10-01

    It is now established that IL-17 has a broad pro-inflammatory potential in mammalian host defense, in inflammatory disease and in autoimmunity, whereas little is known about its anti-inflammatory potential and inhibitory feedback mechanisms. Here, we examined whether IL-17A can inhibit the extracellular release of IL-23 protein, the upstream regulator of IL-17A producing lymphocyte subsets, that is released from macrophages during pulmonary inflammation. We characterized the effect of IL-17A on IL-23 release in several models of pulmonary inflammation, evaluated the presence of IL-17 receptor A (RA) and C (RC) on human alveolar macrophages and assessed the role of the Rho family GTPase Rac1 as a mediator of the effect of IL-17A on the release of IL-23 protein. In a model of sepsis-induced pneumonia, intravenous exposure to Staphylococcus aureus caused higher IL-23 protein concentrations in cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from IL-17A knockout (KO) mice, compared with wild type (WT) control mice. In a model of Gram-negative airway infection, pre-treatment with a neutralizing anti-IL-17A Ab and subsequent intranasal (i.n.) exposure to LPS caused higher IL-23 and IL-17A protein concentrations in BAL samples compared with mice exposed to LPS, but pre-treated with an isotype control Ab. Moreover, i.n. exposure with IL-17A protein per se decreased IL- 23 protein concentrations in BAL samples. We detected IL-17RA and IL-17RC on human alveolar macrophages, and found that in vitro stimulation of these cells with IL-17A protein, after exposure to LPS, decreased IL-23 protein in conditioned medium, but not IL-23 p19 or p40 mRNA. This study indicates that IL-17A can partially inhibit the release of IL-23 protein during pulmonary inflammation, presumably by stimulating the here demonstrated receptor units IL-17RA and IL-17RC on alveolar macrophages. Hypothetically, the demonstrated mechanism may serve as negative feedback to protect from excessive IL-17A

  14. Phytochrome Signaling in Green Arabidopsis Seedlings: Impact Assessment of a Mutually Negative phyB–PIF Feedback Loop

    PubMed Central

    Leivar, Pablo; Monte, Elena; Cohn, Megan M.; Quail, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    The reversibly red (R)/far-red (FR)-light-responsive phytochrome (phy) photosensory system initiates both the deetiolation process in dark-germinated seedlings upon first exposure to light, and the shade-avoidance process in fully deetiolated seedlings upon exposure to vegetational shade. The intracellular signaling pathway from the light-activated photoreceptor conformer (Pfr) to the transcriptional network that drives these responses involves direct, physical interaction of Pfr with a small subfamily of bHLH transcription factors, termed Phy-Interacting Factors (PIFs), which induces rapid PIF proteolytic degradation. In addition, there is evidence of further complexity in light-grown seedlings, whereby phyB–PIF interaction reciprocally induces phyB degradation, in a mutually-negative, feedback-loop configuration. Here, to assess the relative contributions of these antagonistic activities to the net phenotypic readout in light-grown seedlings, we have examined the magnitude of the light- and simulated-shade-induced responses of a pentuple phyBpif1pif3pif4pif5 (phyBpifq) mutant and various multiple pif-mutant combinations. The data (1) reaffirm that phyB is the predominant, if not exclusive, photoreceptor imposing the inhibition of hypocotyl elongation in deetiolating seedlings in response to prolonged continuous R irradiation and (2) show that the PIF quartet (PIF1, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5) retain and exert a dual capacity to modulate hypocotyl elongation under these conditions, by concomitantly promoting cell elongation through intrinsic transcriptional-regulatory activity, and reducing phyB-inhibitory capacity through feedback-loop-induced phyB degradation. In shade-exposed seedlings, immunoblot analysis shows that the shade-imposed reduction in Pfr levels induces increases in the abundance of PIF3, and mutant analysis indicates that PIF3 acts, in conjunction with PIF4 and PIF5, to promote the known shade-induced acceleration of hypocotyl elongation. Conversely

  15. Spatio-temporal dynamics of a cell signal pathway with negative feedbacks: the MAPK/ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Maya-Bernal, José Luis; Ramírez-Santiago, Guillermo

    2016-03-01

    We studied the spatio-temporal dynamics of a cell signal cascade with negative feedback that quantitatively emulates the regulative process that occurs in the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Regulated Kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway. The model consists of a set of six coupled reaction-diffusion equations that describes the dynamics of the six-module pathway. In the basic module the active form of the protein transmits the signal to the next pathway’s module. As suggested by experiments, the model considers that the fifth module's kinase down-regulates the first and third modules. The feedback parameter is defined as, μ(r)( j)= k(kin)5/k(kin)(j), (j = 1, 3). We analysed the pathway's dynamics for μ(r)( j) = 0.10, 1.0, and 10 in the kinetic regimes: i) saturation of both kinases and phosphatases, ii) saturation of the phosphatases and iii) saturation of the kinases. For a regulated pathway the Total Activated Protein Profiles (TAPPs) as a function of time develop a maximum during the transient stage in the three kinetic regimes. These maxima become higher and their positions shift to longer times downstream. This scenario also applies to the TAPP's regulatory kinase that sums up its inhibitory action to that of the phosphatases leading to a maximum. Nevertheless, when μ(r)(j)= 1.0 , the TAPPs develop two maxima, with the second maximum being almost imperceptible. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data obtained from NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. In addition, analyses of the stationary states as a function of position indicate that in the kinetic regime i) which is of physiological interest, signal transduction occurs with a relatively large propagation length for the three values of the regulative parameter. However, for μ(r)(j)= 0.10 , the sixth module concentration profile is transmitted with approximately 45% of its full value. The results obtained for μ(r)(j) = 10 , indicate that the first five concentration profiles are

  16. The interplay between feedback-related negativity and individual differences in altruistic punishment: An EEG study.

    PubMed

    Mothes, Hendrik; Enge, Sören; Strobel, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    To date, the interplay betwexen neurophysiological and individual difference factors in altruistic punishment has been little understood. To examine this issue, 45 individuals participated in a Dictator Game with punishment option while the feedback-related negativity (FRN) was derived from the electroencephalogram (EEG). Unlike previous EEG studies on the Dictator Game, we introduced a third party condition to study the effect of fairness norm violations in addition to employing a first person perspective. For the first time, we also examined the role of individual differences, specifically fairness concerns, positive/negative affectivity, and altruism/empathy as well as recipients' financial situation during altruistic punishment. The main results show that FRN amplitudes were more pronounced for unfair than for fair assignments in both the first person and third party perspectives. These findings suggest that FRN amplitudes are sensitive to fairness norm violations and play a crucial role in the recipients' evaluation of dictator assignments. With respect to individual difference factors, recipients' current financial situation affected the FRN fairness effect in the first person perspective, indicating that when being directly affected by the assignments, more affluent participants experienced stronger violations of expectations in altruistic punishment decisions. Regarding individual differences in trait empathy, in the third party condition FRN amplitudes were more pronounced for those who scored lower in empathy. This may suggest empathy as another motive in third party punishment. Independent of the perspective taken, higher positive affect was associated with more punishment behavior, suggesting that positive emotions may play an important role in restoring violated fairness norms. PMID:26530245

  17. Hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia blunts the Insulin-Inpp5f negative feedback loop in the diabetic heart

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Danna; Zhang, Yajun; Shen, Mingzhi; Sun, Yongfeng; Xia, Qing; Zhang, Yingmei; Liu, Xuedong; Wang, Haichang; Yuan, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is diabetic cardiomyopathy, in which alteration of Akt signal plays an important role. Inpp5f is recently found to be a negative regulator of Akt signaling, while its expression and function in diabetic heart is largely unknown. In this study, we found that in both the streptozotocin (STZ) and high fat diet (HFD) induced diabetic mouse models, Inpp5f expression was coordinately regulated by insulin, blood glucose and lipid levels. Increased Inpp5f was inversely correlated with the cardiac function. Further studies revealed that Insulin transcriptionally activated Inpp5f in an Sp1 dependent manner, and increased Inpp5f in turn reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, forming a negative feedback loop. The negative feedback plays a protective role under diabetic condition. However, high blood glucose and lipid, which are characteristics of uncontrolled diabetes and type 2 diabetes, increased Inpp5f expression through activation of NF-κB, blunts the protective feedback. Thus, our study has revealed that Inpp5f provides as a negative feedback regulator of insulin signaling and downregulation of Inpp5f in diabetes is cardioprotective. Increased Inpp5f by hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia is an important mediator of diabetic cardiomyopathy and is a promising therapeutic target for the disease. PMID:26908121

  18. Negative Feedback Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis

    EPA Science Inventory

    A basic understanding of the endocrinology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of anuran larvae is necessary for predicting the consequences of HPT perturbation by thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDCs) on the whole organism. This project examined negative feedback con...

  19. A negative feedback loop at the nuclear periphery regulates GAL gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Green, Erin M.; Jiang, Ying; Joyner, Ryan; Weis, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    The genome is nonrandomly organized within the nucleus, but it remains unclear how gene position affects gene expression. Silenced genes have frequently been found associated with the nuclear periphery, and the environment at the periphery is believed to be refractory to transcriptional activation. However, in budding yeast, several highly regulated classes of genes, including the GAL7-10-1 gene cluster, are known to translocate to the nuclear periphery concurrent with their activation. To investigate the role of gene positioning on GAL gene expression, we monitored the effects of mutations that disrupt the interaction between the GAL locus and the periphery or synthetically tethered the locus to the periphery. Localization to the nuclear periphery was found to dampen initial GAL gene induction and was required for rapid repression after gene inactivation, revealing a function for the nuclear periphery in repressing endogenous GAL gene expression. Our results do not support a gene-gating model in which GAL gene interaction with the nuclear pore ensures rapid gene expression, but instead they suggest that a repressive environment at the nuclear periphery establishes a negative feedback loop that enables the GAL locus to respond rapidly to changes in environmental conditions. PMID:22323286

  20. The stability of the feedback negativity and its relationship with depression during childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Bress, Jennifer N; Meyer, Alexandria; Proudfit, Greg Hajcak

    2015-11-01

    Feedback negativity (FN) is an event-related potential elicited by monetary reward and loss; it is thought to relate to reward-related neural activity and has been linked to depression in children and adults. In the current study, we examined the stability of FN, and its relationship with depression in adolescents, over 2 years in 45 8- to 13-year-old children. From Time 1 to Time 2, FN in response to monetary loss and in response to monetary gain showed moderate to strong reliability (rs = .64 and .67, respectively); these relationships remained significant even when accounting for related variables. FN also demonstrated high within-session reliability. Moreover, the relationship between a blunted FN and greater depression observed at Time 1 was reproduced at Time 2, and the magnitude of FN at Time 1 predicted depressive symptomatology at Time 2. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that FN and its relationship with depression remain consistent over the course of development, and that FN may prospectively predict later depressive symptomatology. The current results suggest that FN may be suitable as a biomarker of depressive symptoms during adolescence. PMID:26439074

  1. Chronic Psychosocial Stress and Negative Feedback Inhibition: Enhanced Hippocampal Glucocorticoid Signaling despite Lower Cytoplasmic GR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Füchsl, Andrea M.; Reber, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC), a pre-clinically validated mouse model for chronic psychosocial stress, results in increased basal and acute stress-induced plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels. We assessed CSC effects on hippocampal glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and FK506 binding protein (FKBP51) expression, acute heterotypic stressor-induced GR translocation, as well as GC effects on gene expression and cell viability in isolated hippocampal cells. CSC mice showed decreased GR mRNA and cytoplasmic protein levels compared with single-housed control (SHC) mice. Basal and acute stress-induced nuclear GR protein expression were comparable between CSC and SHC mice, as were MR and FKBP51 mRNA and/or cytoplasmic protein levels. In vitro the effect of corticosterone (CORT) on hippocampal cell viability and gene transcription was more pronounced in CSC versus SHC mice. In summary, CSC mice show an, if at all, increased hippocampal GC signaling capacity despite lower cytoplasmic GR protein expression, making negative feedback deficits in the hippocampus unlikely to contribute to the increased ACTH drive following CSC. PMID:27057751

  2. Meteorin is upregulated in reactive astrocytes and functions as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Shin; Lee, Soon-Hee; Cha, Jong-Ho; Seo, Ji Hae; Ahn, Bum Ju; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2015-08-01

    Reactive gliosis is a glial response to a wide range of central nervous system insults, which results in cellular and molecular changes to resting glial cells. Despite its fundamental effect on neuropathologies, the identification and characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression profile and functions of the astrocytic neurotrophic factor, meteorin, in the progression of reactive gliosis. A mouse model of photothrombotic ischemia, and a primary astrocyte culture were used in the present study. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were performed to examine the expression levels of meteorin and reactive gliosis markers. Increased expression levels of meteorin were observed in reactive astrocytes in a photothrombotic ischemia mouse model, as well as in cultured astrocytes, which were stimulated by transforming growth factor-β1. Exogenous treatment of the astrocytes with meteorin did not induce janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling, however, silencing the expression of meteorin in the astrocytes resulted in an upregulation of reactive astrocyte markers, including glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100β, indicating that endogenous meteorin is required for the maintenance of astrocytic homeostasis. These results suggested a novel role for meteorin as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis. PMID:25873382

  3. Meteorin is upregulated in reactive astrocytes and functions as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis

    PubMed Central

    LEE, HYE SHIN; LEE, SOON-HEE; CHA, JONG-HO; SEO, JI HAE; AHN, BUM JU; KIM, KYU-WON

    2015-01-01

    Reactive gliosis is a glial response to a wide range of central nervous system insults, which results in cellular and molecular changes to resting glial cells. Despite its fundamental effect on neuropathologies, the identification and characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression profile and functions of the astrocytic neurotrophic factor, meteorin, in the progression of reactive gliosis. A mouse model of photothrombotic ischemia, and a primary astrocyte culture were used in the present study. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were performed to examine the expression levels of meteorin and reactive gliosis markers. Increased expression levels of meteorin were observed in reactive astrocytes in a photothrombotic ischemia mouse model, as well as in cultured astrocytes, which were stimulated by transforming growth factor-β1. Exogenous treatment of the astrocytes with meteorin did not induce janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling, however, silencing the expression of meteorin in the astrocytes resulted in an upregulation of reactive astrocyte markers, including glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100β, indicating that endogenous meteorin is required for the maintenance of astrocytic homeostasis. These results suggested a novel role for meteorin as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis. PMID:25873382

  4. Negative feedback from CaSR signaling to aquaporin-2 sensitizes vasopressin to extracellular Ca2.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Marianna; Tamma, Grazia; Di Mise, Annarita; Russo, Annamaria; Centrone, Mariangela; Svelto, Maria; Calamita, Giuseppe; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-07-01

    We previously described that high luminal Ca(2+) in the renal collecting duct attenuates short-term vasopressin-induced aquaporin-2 (AQP2) trafficking through activation of the Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR). Here, we evaluated AQP2 phosphorylation and permeability, in both renal HEK-293 cells and in the dissected inner medullary collecting duct, in response to specific activation of CaSR with NPS-R568. In CaSR-transfected cells, CaSR activation drastically reduced the basal levels of AQP2 phosphorylation at S256 (AQP2-pS256), thus having an opposite effect to vasopressin action. When forskolin stimulation was performed in the presence of NPS-R568, the increase in AQP2-pS256 and in the osmotic water permeability were prevented. In the freshly isolated inner mouse medullar collecting duct, stimulation with forskolin in the presence of NPS-R568 prevented the increase in AQP2-pS256 and osmotic water permeability. Our data demonstrate that the activation of CaSR in the collecting duct prevents the cAMP-dependent increase in AQP2-pS256 and water permeability, counteracting the short-term vasopressin response. By extension, our results suggest the attractive concept that CaSR expressed in distinct nephron segments exerts a negative feedback on hormones acting through cAMP, conferring high sensitivity of hormone to extracellular Ca(2+). PMID:25977473

  5. Urocortin3 mediates somatostatin-dependent negative feedback control of insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    van der Meulen, Talitha; Donaldson, Cynthia J.; Cáceres, Elena; Hunter, Anna E.; Cowing–Zitron, Christopher; Pound, Lynley D.; Adams, Michael W.; Zembrzycki, Andreas; Grove, Kevin L.; Huising, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone Urocortin3 (Ucn3) is abundantly expressed by mature beta cells, yet its physiological role is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Ucn3 is stored and co–released with insulin and potentiates glucose–stimulated somatostatin secretion via cognate receptor on delta cells. Further, we found that islets lacking endogenous Ucn3 demonstrate fewer delta cells, reduced somatostatin content, impaired somatostatin secretion and exaggerated insulin release, and that these defects are rectified by synthetic Ucn3 in vitro. Our observations indicate that the paracrine actions of Ucn3 activate a negative feedback loop that promotes somatostatin release to ensure the timely reduction of insulin secretion upon normalization of plasma glucose. Moreover, Ucn3 is markedly depleted from beta cells in mouse and macaque diabetes models and in human diabetic islets. This suggests that Ucn3 is a key contributor to stable glycemic control whose reduction during diabetes aggravates glycemic volatility and contributes to the pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:26076035

  6. Positive, But Not Negative Feedback Actions of Estradiol in Adult Female Mice Require Estrogen Receptor α in Kisspeptin Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Sharon L.; Acosta-Martínez, Maricedes; DeJoseph, Mary R.; Wolfe, Andrew; Radovick, Sally; Boehm, Ulrich; Urban, Janice H.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons express estrogen receptor α (ERα) and exert control over GnRH/LH secretion in female rodents. It has been proposed that estradiol (E2) activation of ERα in kisspeptin neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) suppresses GnRH/LH secretion (negative feedback), whereas E2 activation of ERα in kisspeptin neurons in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) mediates the release of preovulatory GnRH/LH surges (positive feedback). To test these hypotheses, we generated mice bearing kisspeptin cell–specific deletion of ERα (KERαKO) and treated them with E2 regimens that evoke either negative or positive feedback actions on GnRH/LH secretion. Using negative feedback regimens, as expected, E2 effectively suppressed LH levels in ovariectomized (OVX) wild-type (WT) mice to the levels seen in ovary-intact mice. Surprisingly, however, despite the fact that E2 regulation of Kiss1 mRNA expression was abrogated in both the ARC and AVPV of KERαKO mice, E2 also effectively decreased LH levels in OVX KERαKO mice to the levels seen in ovary-intact mice. Conversely, using a positive feedback regimen, E2 stimulated LH surges in WT mice, but had no effect in KERαKO mice. These experiments clearly demonstrate that ERα in kisspeptin neurons is required for the positive, but not negative feedback actions of E2 on GnRH/LH secretion in adult female mice. It remains to be determined whether the failure of KERαKO mice to exhibit GnRH/LH surges reflects the role of ERα in the development of kisspeptin neurons, in the active signaling processes leading to the release of GnRH/LH surges, or both. PMID:25545386

  7. Identification of cis-acting repressive sequences within the negative regulatory element of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y C; Touzjian, N; Stenzel, M; Dorfman, T; Sodroski, J G; Haseltine, W A

    1990-01-01

    The negative regulatory element of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is a 260-nucleotide-long sequence that decreases the rate of RNA transcription initiation specified by the long terminal repeat. This region has the potential to bind several cellular transcription factors. Here it is shown that sequences which recognize the NFAT-1 and USF cellular transcription factors contribute to this negative regulatory effect. The sequences within the negative regulatory element which resemble the AP-1 site and the URS do not negatively regulate human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat transcription initiation. PMID:2398545

  8. Patient's pain feedback using negative pressure wound therapy with foam and gauze.

    PubMed

    Fraccalvieri, Marco; Ruka, Erind; Bocchiotti, Maria Alessandra; Zingarelli, Enrico; Bruschi, Stefano

    2011-10-01

    Wounds can be caused by different mechanisms and have a significant morbidity and mortality. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is one of the most successful treatment modalities for wound healing. We have been using both foam and gauze-based NPWT. During application of NPWT, we noticed that the patient's pain was of varying intensity depending on the filler used. The aim of our work was to compare the level of pain and feedback before, during the treatment and at the dressing change after treatment with NPWT with two different fillers. For this study, we compared a pool of 13 gauze-treated patients with a pool of 18 foam-treated patients regarding the level of pain and feedback before, during the treatment and at the dressing change after treatment with NPWT. They were all post-traumatic patients with loss of tissue up to the muscular band. The patients were asked to respond to a questionnaire interviewed by the same physician to assess the level of pain using VNS (verbal numerical scale). We observed similar difference of means before and during the treatment with NPWT with gauze and foam. Regarding the pain at the dressing change, the mean of the scores for the foam was 6·5 while for the gauze was 4·15. In this case, we noticed the most significant difference between means from the scores given: 2·35 which was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P = 0·046). The finding of this study confirms less pain at the dressing change after treatment with gauze-based NPWT. In our opinion, this finding is related to the more adhesive property of the foam probably because of the ingrowth of the granulation tissue in the micropores present on the foam. Considering this statement, we recommend the foam for neuropathic and paraplegic patients and the gauze for patients with bone and tendon exposition wounds, patients that do not tolerate NPWT with foam and low compliant patient particularly paediatric and old-age patients. We remind that the

  9. Clustering and Negative Feedback by Endocytosis in Planar Cell Polarity Signaling Is Modulated by Ubiquitinylation of Prickle

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Bomsoo; Pierre-Louis, Gandhy; Sagner, Andreas; Eaton, Suzanne; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The core components of the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling system, including both transmembrane and peripheral membrane associated proteins, form asymmetric complexes that bridge apical intercellular junctions. While these can assemble in either orientation, coordinated cell polarization requires the enrichment of complexes of a given orientation at specific junctions. This might occur by both positive and negative feedback between oppositely oriented complexes, and requires the peripheral membrane associated PCP components. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying feedback are not understood. We find that the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex Cullin1(Cul1)/SkpA/Supernumerary limbs(Slimb) regulates the stability of one of the peripheral membrane components, Prickle (Pk). Excess Pk disrupts PCP feedback and prevents asymmetry. We show that Pk participates in negative feedback by mediating internalization of PCP complexes containing the transmembrane components Van Gogh (Vang) and Flamingo (Fmi), and that internalization is activated by oppositely oriented complexes within clusters. Pk also participates in positive feedback through an unknown mechanism promoting clustering. Our results therefore identify a molecular mechanism underlying generation of asymmetry in PCP signaling. PMID:25996914

  10. Can we bet on negative emissions to achieve the 2°C target even under strong carbon cycle feedbacks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Yamagata, Y.; Yokohata, T.; Emori, S.; Hanaoka, T.

    2015-12-01

    Negative emission technologies such as Bioenergy with Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (BioCCS) play an ever more crucial role in meeting the 2°C stabilization target. However, such technologies are currently at their infancy and their future penetrations may fall short of the scale required to stabilize the warming. Furthermore, the overshoot in the mid-century prior to a full realization of negative emissions would give rise to a risk because such a temporal but excessive warming above 2°C might amplify itself by strengthening climate-carbon cycle feedbacks. It has not been extensively assessed yet how carbon cycle feedbacks might play out during the overshoot in the context of negative emissions. This study explores how 2°C stabilization pathways, in particular those which undergo overshoot, can be influenced by carbon cycle feedbacks and asks their climatic and economic consequences. We compute 2°C stabilization emissions scenarios under a cost-effectiveness principle, in which the total abatement costs are minimized such that the global warming is capped at 2°C. We employ a reduced-complexity model, the Aggregated Carbon Cycle, Atmospheric Chemistry, and Climate model (ACC2), which comprises a box model of the global carbon cycle, simple parameterizations of the atmospheric chemistry, and a land-ocean energy balance model. The total abatement costs are estimated from the marginal abatement cost functions for CO2, CH4, N2O, and BC.Our preliminary results show that, if carbon cycle feedbacks turn out to be stronger than what is known today, it would incur substantial abatement costs to keep up with the 2°C stabilization goal. Our results also suggest that it would be less expensive in the long run to plan for a 2°C stabilization pathway by considering strong carbon cycle feedbacks because it would cost more if we correct the emission pathway in the mid-century to adjust for unexpectedly large carbon cycle feedbacks during overshoot. Furthermore, our

  11. Regulatory Forum Opinion Piece*: The Value of Publishing Negative Scientific Study Data.

    PubMed

    Boorman, Gary A; Foster, John R; Laast, Victoria A; Francke, Sabine

    2015-10-01

    Historically it has been easier to publish positive scientific results than negative data not supporting the research hypothesis. This appears to be increasing, with fewer negative studies appearing in the literature across many disciplines. Failure to recognize the value of negative results has important implications for the toxicology community. Implications include perpetuating scientific fields based upon selective or occasionally erroneous, positive results. One example is decreased vaccination rates and increased measles infections that can lead to childhood mortality following one erroneous positive study linking vaccination to adverse effects despite multiple negative studies. Publication of negative data that challenges existing paradigms enhances progress by stopping further investment in scientifically barren topics, decreases the use of animals, and focuses research in more fruitful areas. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) publishes both positive and negative rodent data. Retrospective analysis of the NTP database has provided insights on the carcinogenic process and in the gradual acceptance of using fewer animals in safety studies. This article proposes that careful publication of both positive and negative data can enhance product safety assessment, add robustness to safety determinations in the regulatory decision-making process, and should be actively encouraged by those determining journal editorial policy. PMID:26269614

  12. Purification and cloning of the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein, GFRP.

    PubMed

    Milstien, S; Jaffe, H; Kowlessur, D; Bonner, T I

    1996-08-16

    The activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I, the initial enzyme of the de novo pathway for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor required for aromatic amino acid hydroxylations and nitric oxide synthesis, is sensitive to end-product feedback inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin. This inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin is mediated by the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein GFRP, previously named p35 (Harada, T., Kagamiyama, H., and Hatakeyama, K. (1993) Science 260, 1507-1510), and -phenylalanine specifically reverses the tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent inhibition. As a first step in the investigation of the physiological role of this unique mechanism of regulation, a convenient procedure has been developed to co-purify to homogeneity both GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP from rat liver. GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP exist in a complex which can be bound to a GTP-affinity column from which GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP are separately and selectively eluted. GFRP is dissociated from the GTP agarose-bound complex with 0.2 NaCl, a concentration of salt which also effectively blocks the tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent inhibitory activity of GFRP. GTP cyclohydrolase I is then eluted from the GTP-agarose column with GTP. Both GFRP and GTP cyclohydrolase I were then purified separately to near homogeneity by sequential high performance anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. GFRP was found to have a native molecular mass of 20 kDa and consist of a homodimer of 9.5-kDa subunits. Based on peptide sequences obtained from purified GFRP, oligonucleotides were synthesized and used to clone a cDNA from a rat liver cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction-based methods. The cDNA contained an open reading frame that encoded a novel protein of 84 amino acids (calculated molecular mass 9665 daltons). This protein when expressed in Escherichia coli as a thioredoxin fusion protein had tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent GTP cyclohydrolase I inhibitory activity. Northern

  13. The Facilitatory Effect of Negative Feedback on the Emergence of Analogical Reasoning Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Linden J.; Hoyle, Alison M.; Towse, Andrea S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of analogical reasoning abilities in 5- and 6-year-old children. Our particular interest relates to the way in which analogizing is influenced by the provision of task-based feedback coupled with a self-explanation requirement. Both feedback and self-explanation provide children with opportunities to engage in…

  14. Methylglyoxal in cells elicits a negative feedback loop entailing transglutaminase 2 and glyoxalase 1☆

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Der-Yen; Chang, Geen-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Glyoxalase 1 (GlxI) is the key enzyme that converts the highly reactive α-oxo-aldehydes into the corresponding α-hydroxy acids using l-glutathione as a cofactor. In our preliminary data, GlxI was identified as a substrate of transglutaminase 2 (TG2), a ubiquitous enzyme with multiple functions. According to the catalytic properties of TG2, protein cross-linking, polyamine conjugation, and/or deamidation are potential post-translational modifications. In this article, we have demonstrated that TG2 catalyzes either polyamine conjugation or deamidation to GlxI depending on the presence of polyamines or not. Deamidation leads to activation of GlxI while polyamine conjugation results in activation of GlxI as well as stabilization of GlxI against denaturation treatment. In cultured HeLa cells, methylglyoxal challenge causes increase in intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium leading to TG2 activation and subsequent transamidation and activation of GlxI. The inhibition of TG2 significantly weakens the cell resistance to the methylglyoxal challenge. Thus, GlxI is a novel substrate of TG2 and is activated by TG2 in vitro and in cellulo. Exposure to methylglyoxal elicits a negative feedback loop entailing ROS, calcium, TG2 and GlxI, thus leading to attenuation of the increase in the methylglyoxal level. The results imply that cancer cells highly express TG2 or GlxI can endure the oxidative stress derived from higher glycolytic flux and may gain extra growth advantage from the aerobic glycolysis. PMID:24494193

  15. A Negative Feedback Loop Controlling bHLH Complexes Is Involved in Vascular Cell Division and Differentiation in the Root Apical Meristem.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hirofumi; Iwamoto, Kuninori; Kariya, Yuka; Asakawa, Tomohiro; Kan, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Hiroo; Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko

    2015-12-01

    Controlling cell division and differentiation in meristems is essential for proper plant growth. Two bHLH heterodimers consisting of LONESOME HIGHWAY (LHW) and TARGET OF MONOPTEROS 5 (TMO5)/TMO5-LIKE1 (T5L1) regulate periclinal cell division in vascular cells in the root apical meristem (RAM). In this study, we further investigated the functions of LHW-T5L1, finding that in addition to controlling cell division, this complex regulates xylem differentiation in the RAM via a novel negative regulatory system. LHW-T5L1 upregulated the thermospermine synthase gene ACAULIS5 (ACL5), as well as SUPPRESSOR OF ACAULIS5 LIKE3 (SACL3), which encodes a bHLH protein, in the RAM. The SACL3 promoter sequence contains a conserved upstream open reading frame (uORF), which blocked translation of the main SACL3 ORF in the absence of thermospermine. Thermospermine eliminated the negative effect of uORF and enhanced SACL3 production. Further genetic and molecular biological analyses indicated that ACL5 and SACL3 suppress the function of LHW-T5L1 through a protein-protein interaction between LHW and SACL3. Finally, we showed that a negative feedback loop consisting of LHW-T5L1, ACL5, SACL3, and LHW-SACL3 contributes to maintain RAM size and proper root growth. These findings suggest that a negative feedback loop regulates the LHW-T5L1 output level to coordinate cell division and differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. PMID:26616019

  16. Stochasticity and bifurcations in a reduced model with interlinked positive and negative feedback loops of CREB1 and CREB2 stimulated by 5-HT.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lijie; Yang, Zhuoqin; Bi, Yuanhong

    2016-04-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-response element-binding protein (CREB) family of transcription factors is crucial in regulating gene expression required for long-term memory (LTM) formation. Upon exposure of sensory neurons to the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT), CREB1 is activated via activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) intracellular signaling pathways, and CREB2 as a transcriptional repressor is relieved possibly via phosphorylation of CREB2 by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Song et al. [18] proposed a minimal model with only interlinked positive and negative feedback loops of transcriptional regulation by the activator CREB1 and the repressor CREB2. Without considering feedbacks between the CREB proteins, Pettigrew et al. [8] developed a computational model characterizing complex dynamics of biochemical pathways downstream of 5-HT receptors. In this work, to describe more simply the biochemical pathways and gene regulation underlying 5-HT-induced LTM, we add the important extracellular sensitizing stimulus 5-HT as well as the product Ap-uch into the Song's minimal model. We also strive to examine dynamical properties of the gene regulatory network under the changing concentration of the stimulus, [5-HT], cooperating with the varying positive feedback strength in inducing a high state of CREB1 for the establishment of long-term memory. Different dynamics including monostability, bistability and multistability due to coexistence of stable steady states and oscillations is investigated by means of codimension-2 bifurcation analysis. At the different positive feedback strengths, comparative analysis of deterministic and stochastic dynamics reveals that codimension-1 bifurcation with respect to [5-HT] as the parameter can predict diverse stochastic behaviors resulted from the finite number of molecules, and the number of CREB1 molecules more and more preferentially resides near the high steady state with increasing [5-HT], which contributes to long

  17. A general non-equilibrium framework for the parameterization of positive and negative feedbacks in atmospheric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    For any identifiable system, regardless of its complexity or scale, evolution can be treated as a spontaneous thermodynamic response to a local convergence of down-gradient material flows. In climate studies, examples of identifiable systems might include cloud cover or the global incidence of temperatures warmer than a certain threshold. Here it is shown how the time-dependent evolution of such systems is constrained by positive and negative feedbacks that fall into a few mathematically distinct modes. In general, evolution depends on the time integral of past flows and the current availability of material and energetic resources. More specifically, negative feedbacks arise from the depletion or predation of the material and potential energy reservoirs that supply the system. Positive feedbacks are due to either new reservoir "discovery" or system expansion into existing reservoirs. When positive feedbacks dominate, the time dependent response of system growth falls into a few clearly identifiable behaviors that include a law of diminishing returns, logistic behavior, and, if reservoirs are expanding very rapidly, unstable super-exponential or explosive growth. For open systems (e.g. radiative flows in our atmosphere) that have a resolved sink as well as a source, oscillatory behavior emerges and can be characterized in terms of a slightly modified form of the predator-prey equations commonly employed in ecology. The perturbation formulation of these equations is equivalent to a damped simple harmonic oscillator. Specific examples of non-equilibrium positive and negative feedback response can be described for the sudden development of rain and the oscillatory evolution of open-celled stratocumulus cloud decks.

  18. Positive and negative feedbacks to climate change associated with methane emissions from arctic permafrost systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter Anthony, K. M.; Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    sensing time series of thermokarst lakes on the Northern Seward Peninsula in Alaska revealed that while lakes are rapidly expanding, an unprecedented number of lakes drained during the past 55 years, suggesting that degradation of permafrost may be accelerating in some regions. Drained basins fill in with new terrestrial vegetation, often becoming wetlands. Although these are a source of methane to the atmosphere when their surface is unfrozen in summer, their total annual emissions are often lower than lakes because of refreezing of the lake thaw bulb. Plant productivity in basins, together with the buildup of peat, serve as a sink of atmospheric carbon and a negative feedback to permafrost thaw. Results presented here aim to improve understanding of microbial and geologic methane emission dynamics related to permafrost degradation in various regions of the Arctic in order to better constrain current and future atmospheric methane budgets and global climate models.

  19. Neodymium laser with negative feedback: Suppression of self-mode-locking, control of mode-locking regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlova, M. V.; Smirnov, A. M.; Al-Khuzheyri, R. M.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Dneprovskii, V. S.

    2015-08-01

    A simple way of suppression of self-mode-locking in a nanosecond Q-switched Nd3+:YAlO3 laser by placing an element introducing a negative feedback into the laser cavity, which consists of a plate of singlecrystal GaAs exhibiting two-photon absorption (complete suppression) or a cell containing colloidal solution of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (partial suppression), is implemented. Placing the element introducing the negative feedback into the cavity of a pulsed picosecond mode-locked Nd3+:Y3Al5O12 laser allowed an increase in the number of pulses in the pulse train and a change in the energy distribution between the pulses. Specificities of laser oscillation regimes in the presence of a nonlinear absorbing element in the cavity were analyzed by numerically solving the set of balance equations describing the population inversion density and the photon flux density in the cavity.

  20. Leader-member exchange and member performance: a new look at individual-level negative feedback-seeking behavior and team-level empowerment climate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziguang; Lam, Wing; Zhong, Jian An

    2007-01-01

    From a basis in social exchange theory, the authors investigated whether, and how, negative feedback-seeking behavior and a team empowerment climate affect the relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX) and member performance. Results showed that subordinates' negative feedback-seeking behavior mediated the relationship between LMX and both objective and subjective in-role performance. In addition, the level of a team's empowerment climate was positively related to subordinates' own sense of empowerment, which in turn negatively moderated the effects of LMX on negative feedback-seeking behavior. PMID:17227161

  1. The feedback-related negativity (FRN) revisited: new insights into the localization, meaning and network organization.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Tobias U; Iannaccone, Reto; Stämpfli, Philipp; Drechsler, Renate; Brandeis, Daniel; Walitza, Susanne; Brem, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Changes in response contingencies require adjusting ones assumptions about outcomes of behaviors. Such adaptation processes are driven by reward prediction error (RPE) signals which reflect the inadequacy of expectations. Signals resembling RPEs are known to be encoded by mesencephalic dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum and frontal regions. Although regions that process RPEs, such as the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), have been identified, only indirect evidence links timing and network organization of RPE processing in humans. In electroencephalography (EEG), which is well known for its high temporal resolution, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) has been suggested to reflect RPE processing. Recent studies, however, suggested that the FRN might reflect surprise, which would correspond to the absolute, rather than the signed RPE signals. Furthermore, the localization of the FRN remains a matter of debate. In this simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we localized the FRN directly using the superior spatial resolution of fMRI without relying on any spatial constraint or other assumption. Using two different single-trial approaches, we consistently found a cluster within the dACC. One analysis revealed additional activations of the salience network. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of signed RPEs and surprise signals on the FRN amplitude. We considered that both signals are usually correlated and found that only surprise signals modulate the FRN amplitude. Last, we explored the pathway of RPE signals using dynamic causal modeling (DCM). We found that the surprise signals are directly projected to the source region of the FRN. This finding contradicts earlier theories about the network organization of the FRN, but is in line with a recent theory stating that dopamine neurons also encode surprise-like saliency signals. Our findings crucially advance the understanding of the FRN. We found compelling evidence that

  2. Thymic regulatory T cell niche size is dictated by limiting interleukin 2 from antigen-bearing dendritic cells and feedback competition

    PubMed Central

    Weist, Brian M.; Kurd, Nadia; Boussier, Jeremy; Chan, Shiao Wei; Robey, Ellen A.

    2015-01-01

    Thymic regulatory T (Treg) cell production requires interleukin 2 (IL-2) and agonist TCR ligands, and is controlled by competition for a limited developmental niche, but the thymic sources of IL-2 and the factors that limit access to the niche are poorly understood. Here we show that IL-2 produced by antigen-bearing dendritic cells plays a key role in Treg cell development, and that existing Treg cells limit new Treg cell development by competing for IL-2. . Our data suggest that antigen-presenting cells that can provide both IL-2 and a TCR ligand comprise the thymic niche, and that competition by existing Treg cells for a limited supply of IL-2 provides negative feedback for new Treg cell production. PMID:25939026

  3. Effects of spike-triggered negative feedback on receptive-field properties.

    PubMed

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Samengo, Inés

    2015-04-01

    Sensory neurons are often described in terms of a receptive field, that is, a linear kernel through which stimuli are filtered before they are further processed. If information transmission is assumed to proceed in a feedforward cascade, the receptive field may be interpreted as the external stimulus' profile maximizing neuronal output. The nervous system, however, contains many feedback loops, and sensory neurons filter more currents than the ones representing the transduced external stimulus. Some of the additional currents are generated by the output activity of the neuron itself, and therefore constitute feedback signals. By means of a time-frequency analysis of the input/output transformation, here we show how feedback modifies the receptive field. The model is applicable to various types of feedback processes, from spike-triggered intrinsic conductances to inhibitory synaptic inputs from nearby neurons. We distinguish between the intrinsic receptive field (filtering all input currents) and the effective receptive field (filtering only external stimuli). Whereas the intrinsic receptive field summarizes the biophysical properties of the neuron associated to subthreshold integration and spike generation, only the effective receptive field can be interpreted as the external stimulus' profile maximizing neuronal output. We demonstrate that spike-triggered feedback shifts low-pass filtering towards band-pass processing, transforming integrator neurons into resonators. For strong feedback, a sharp resonance in the spectral neuronal selectivity may appear. Our results provide a unified framework to interpret a collection of previous experimental studies where specific feedback mechanisms were shown to modify the filtering properties of neurons. PMID:25601482

  4. Positive or negative? The impact of X-ray feedback on the formation of direct collapse black hole seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, John A.; Johansson, Peter H.; Wise, John H.

    2016-09-01

    A nearby source of Lyman-Werner (LW) photons is thought to be a central component in dissociating H2 and allowing for the formation of a direct collapse black hole seed. Nearby sources are also expected to produce copious amounts of hydrogen ionizing photons and X-ray photons. We study here the feedback effects of the X-ray photons by including a spectrum due to high-mass X-ray binaries on top of a galaxy with a stellar spectrum. We explicitly trace photon packages emerging from the nearby source and track the radiative and chemical effects of the multifrequency source (Ephoton = 0.76 eV → 7500 eV). We find that X-rays have a strongly negative feedback effect, compared to a stellar only source, when the radiative source is placed at a separation greater than ≳ 1 kpc. The X-rays heat the low and medium density gas in the envelope surrounding the collapsing halo suppressing the mass inflow. The result is a smaller enclosed mass compared to the stellar only case. However, for separations of ≲ 1 kpc, the feedback effects of the X-rays becomes somewhat neutral. The enhanced LW intensity at close separations dissociates more H2 and this gas is heated due to stellar photons alone, the addition of X-rays is then not significant. This distance dependence of X-ray feedback suggests that a Goldilocks zone exists close to a forming galaxy where X-ray photons have a much smaller negative feedback effect and ideal conditions exist for creating massive black hole seeds.

  5. Influences of State and Trait Affect on Behavior, Feedback-Related Negativity, and P3b in the Ultimatum Game.

    PubMed

    Riepl, Korbinian; Mussel, Patrick; Osinsky, Roman; Hewig, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates how different emotions can alter social bargaining behavior. An important paradigm to study social bargaining is the Ultimatum Game. There, a proposer gets a pot of money and has to offer part of it to a responder. If the responder accepts, both players get the money as proposed by the proposer. If he rejects, none of the players gets anything. Rational choice models would predict that responders accept all offers above 0. However, evidence shows that responders typically reject a large proportion of all unfair offers. We analyzed participants' behavior when they played the Ultimatum Game as responders and simultaneously collected electroencephalogram data in order to quantify the feedback-related negativity and P3b components. We induced state affect (momentarily emotions unrelated to the task) via short movie clips and measured trait affect (longer-lasting emotional dispositions) via questionnaires. State happiness led to increased acceptance rates of very unfair offers. Regarding neurophysiology, we found that unfair offers elicited larger feedback-related negativity amplitudes than fair offers. Additionally, an interaction of state and trait affect occurred: high trait negative affect (subsuming a variety of aversive mood states) led to increased feedback-related negativity amplitudes when participants were in an angry mood, but not if they currently experienced fear or happiness. We discuss that increased rumination might be responsible for this result, which might not occur, however, when people experience happiness or fear. Apart from that, we found that fair offers elicited larger P3b components than unfair offers, which might reflect increased pleasure in response to fair offers. Moreover, high trait negative affect was associated with decreased P3b amplitudes, potentially reflecting decreased motivation to engage in activities. We discuss implications of our results in the light of theories and research on depression and

  6. Influences of State and Trait Affect on Behavior, Feedback-Related Negativity, and P3b in the Ultimatum Game

    PubMed Central

    Riepl, Korbinian; Mussel, Patrick; Osinsky, Roman; Hewig, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates how different emotions can alter social bargaining behavior. An important paradigm to study social bargaining is the Ultimatum Game. There, a proposer gets a pot of money and has to offer part of it to a responder. If the responder accepts, both players get the money as proposed by the proposer. If he rejects, none of the players gets anything. Rational choice models would predict that responders accept all offers above 0. However, evidence shows that responders typically reject a large proportion of all unfair offers. We analyzed participants’ behavior when they played the Ultimatum Game as responders and simultaneously collected electroencephalogram data in order to quantify the feedback-related negativity and P3b components. We induced state affect (momentarily emotions unrelated to the task) via short movie clips and measured trait affect (longer-lasting emotional dispositions) via questionnaires. State happiness led to increased acceptance rates of very unfair offers. Regarding neurophysiology, we found that unfair offers elicited larger feedback-related negativity amplitudes than fair offers. Additionally, an interaction of state and trait affect occurred: high trait negative affect (subsuming a variety of aversive mood states) led to increased feedback-related negativity amplitudes when participants were in an angry mood, but not if they currently experienced fear or happiness. We discuss that increased rumination might be responsible for this result, which might not occur, however, when people experience happiness or fear. Apart from that, we found that fair offers elicited larger P3b components than unfair offers, which might reflect increased pleasure in response to fair offers. Moreover, high trait negative affect was associated with decreased P3b amplitudes, potentially reflecting decreased motivation to engage in activities. We discuss implications of our results in the light of theories and research on depression and

  7. Fearless Dominance and reduced feedback-related negativity amplitudes in a time-estimation task – Further neuroscientific evidence for dual-process models of psychopathy☆

    PubMed Central

    Schulreich, Stefan; Pfabigan, Daniela M.; Derntl, Birgit; Sailer, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Dual-process models of psychopathy postulate two etiologically relevant processes. Their involvement in feedback processing and its neural correlates has not been investigated so far. Multi-channel EEG was collected while healthy female volunteers performed a time-estimation task and received negative or positive feedback in form of signs or emotional faces. The affective-interpersonal factor Fearless Dominance, but not Self-Centered Impulsivity, was associated with reduced feedback-related negativity (FRN) amplitudes. This neural dissociation extends previous findings on the impact of psychopathy on feedback processing and further highlights the importance of distinguishing psychopathic traits and extending previous (neuroscientific) models of psychopathy. PMID:23607997

  8. Hairless and the polyamine putrescine form a negative regulatory loop in the epidermis.

    PubMed

    Luke, Courtney T; Casta, Alexandre; Kim, Hyunmi; Christiano, Angela M

    2013-10-01

    Hairless (HR) is a nuclear protein with corepressor activity that is highly expressed in the skin and hair follicle. Mutations in Hairless lead to hair loss accompanied by the appearance of papules (atrichia with papular lesions), and similar phenotypes appear when the key polyamine enzymes ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and spermidine/spermine N(1) -acetyltransferase (SSAT) are overexpressed. Both ODC and SSAT transgenic mice have elevated epidermal levels of putrescine, leading us to investigate the mechanistic link between putrescine and HR. We show here that HR and putrescine form a negative regulatory network, as epidermal ODC expression is elevated when HR is decreased and vice versa. We also show that the regulation of ODC by HR is dependent on the MYC superfamily of proteins, in particular MYC, MXI1 and MXD3. Furthermore, we found that elevated levels of putrescine lead to decreased HR expression, but that the SSAT-TG phenotype is distinct from that found when HR is mutated. Transcriptional microarray analysis of putrescine-treated primary human keratinocytes demonstrated differential regulation of genes involved in protein-protein interactions, nucleotide binding and transcription factor activity, suggesting that the putrescine-HR negative regulatory loop may have a large impact on epidermal homeostasis and hair follicle cycling. PMID:24079733

  9. Hairless and the polyamine putrescine form a negative regulatory loop in the epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Courtney T.; Casta, Alexandre; Kim, Hyunmi; Christiano, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Hairless (HR) is a nuclear protein with co-repressor activity that is highly expressed in the skin and hair follicle. Mutations in Hairless lead to hair loss accompanied by the appearance of papules (atrichia with papular lesions) and similar phenotypes appear when the key polyamine enzymes ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) are overexpressed. Both ODC and SSAT transgenic mice have elevated epidermal levels of putrescine, leading us to investigate the mechanistic link between putrescine and HR. We show here that HR and putrescine form a negative regulatory network, since epidermal ODC expression is elevated when HR is decreased and vice versa. We also show that regulation of ODC by HR is dependent on the MYC superfamily of proteins, in particular MYC, MXI1 and MXD3. Furthermore, we found that elevated levels of putrescine lead to decreased HR expression but that the SSAT-TG phenotype is distinct from that of HR mutants. Transcriptional microarray analysis of putrescine-treated primary human keratinocytes demonstrated differential regulation of genes involved in protein-protein interactions, nucleotide binding, and transcription factor activity, suggesting that the putrescine-HR negative regulatory loop may have a large impact on epidermal homeostasis and hair follicle cycling. PMID:24079733

  10. CXXC5 is a negative-feedback regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway involved in osteoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H-Y; Yoon, J-Y; Yun, J-H; Cho, K-W; Lee, S-H; Rhee, Y-M; Jung, H-S; Lim, H J; Lee, H; Choi, J; Heo, J-N; Lee, W; No, K T; Min, D; Choi, K-Y

    2015-01-01

    The positive roles of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in osteoblast differentiation and bone mineral density (BMD) maintenance have been clearly demonstrated in both animal experiments and clinical investigations. CXXC finger protein 5 (CXXC5), a recently identified negative regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, showed altered cellular localization and function, which were dependent on the cell type in previous studies. However, the in vivo function of CXXC5 has not been clearly investigated yet. Here, we characterized CXXC5 as a negative regulator of osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Deficiency of CXXC5 resulted in elevated BMD in mice without any severe gross developmental abnormalities. CXXC5 exerted a negative-feedback effect on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway via Wnt-dependent binding to Dishevelled (Dvl) during osteoblast differentiation. Suppression of the Dvl–CXXC5 interaction using a competitor peptide resulted in the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and osteoblast differentiation, and accelerated thickness growth of ex vivo-cultured calvariae. Overall, CXXC5 is a negative-feedback regulator induced by Wnt/β-catenin signaling that inhibits osteoblast differentiation and bone formation via interaction with Dvl. PMID:25633194

  11. Development of a low noise induction magnetic sensor using magnetic flux negative feedback in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, X G; Shang, X L; Lin, J

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain electromagnetic system can implement great depth detection. As for the electromagnetic system, the receiver utilized an air coil sensor, and the matching mode of the sensor employed the resistance matching method. By using the resistance matching method, the vibration of the coil in the time domain can be effectively controlled. However, the noise of the sensor, especially the noise at the resonance frequency, will be increased as well. In this paper, a novel design of a low noise induction coil sensor is proposed, and the experimental data and noise characteristics are provided. The sensor is designed based on the principle that the amplified voltage will be converted to current under the influence of the feedback resistance of the coil. The feedback loop around the induction coil exerts a magnetic field and sends the negative feedback signal to the sensor. The paper analyses the influence of the closed magnetic feedback loop on both the bandwidth and the noise of the sensor. The signal-to-noise ratio is improved dramatically. PMID:27250444

  12. The organization of plant communities: negative plant-soil feedbacks and semiarid grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimates of species losses and evidence of positive plant diversity-productivity relationships have spurred interest in understanding the mechanism(s) regulating species coexistence and relative abundance. Plant-soil biota feedbacks appear to affect plant diversity and community structure by eithe...

  13. The Effects of a Local Negative Feedback Function between Choice and Relative Reinforcer Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Michael; Elliffe, Douglas; Marr, M. Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Four pigeons were trained on two-key concurrent variable-interval schedules with no changeover delay. In Phase 1, relative reinforcers on the two alternatives were varied over five conditions from 0.1 to 0.9. In Phases 2 and 3, we instituted a molar feedback function between relative choice in an interreinforcer interval and the probability of…

  14. The Feedback Negativity Reflects Favorable Compared to Non-favorable Outcomes Based on Global, Not Local, Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Kujawa, Autumn; Smith, Ezra; Luhmann, Christian; Hajcak, Greg

    2013-01-01

    The feedback negativity (FN) has been shown to reflect the binary evaluation of possible outcomes in a context-dependent manner, but it is unclear whether context-dependence is based on global or local alternatives. A cued gambling task was used to examine whether the FN is sensitive to possible outcomes on a given trial, or the range of outcomes across trials. On 50% of trials, participants could break even or lose money; on remaining trials, participants could win or break even. Breaking even was an unfavorable outcome relative to all possibilities in the current task, but the best possible outcome on 50% of trials. Results indicated that breaking even elicited an FN in both contexts, and reward feedback was uniquely associated with an enhanced positivity. Results suggest that the magnitude of the FN depends on all possible outcomes within the current task and are consistent with the view that the FN reflects reward-related neural activity. PMID:23241216

  15. Coordination of the Arc Regulatory System and Pheromone-Mediated Positive Feedback in Controlling the Vibrio fischeri lux Operon

    PubMed Central

    Septer, Alecia N.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pheromone signaling is often governed both by environmentally responsive regulators and by positive feedback. This regulatory combination has the potential to coordinate a group response among distinct subpopulations that perceive key environmental stimuli differently. We have explored the interplay between an environmentally responsive regulator and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in intercellular signaling by Vibrio fischeri ES114, a bioluminescent bacterium that colonizes the squid Euprymna scolopes. Bioluminescence in ES114 is controlled in part by N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3OC6), a pheromone produced by LuxI that together with LuxR activates transcription of the luxICDABEG operon, initiating a positive feedback loop and inducing luminescence. The lux operon is also regulated by environmentally responsive regulators, including the redox-responsive ArcA/ArcB system, which directly represses lux in culture. Here we show that inactivating arcA leads to increased 3OC6 accumulation to initiate positive feedback. In the absence of positive feedback, arcA-mediated control of luminescence was only ∼2-fold, but luxI-dependent positive feedback contributed more than 100 fold to the net induction of luminescence in the arcA mutant. Consistent with this overriding importance of positive feedback, 3OC6 produced by the arcA mutant induced luminescence in nearby wild-type cells, overcoming their ArcA repression of lux. Similarly, we found that artificially inducing ArcA could effectively repress luminescence before, but not after, positive feedback was initiated. Finally, we show that 3OC6 produced by a subpopulation of symbiotic cells can induce luminescence in other cells co-colonizing the host. Our results suggest that even transient loss of ArcA-mediated regulation in a sub-population of cells can induce luminescence in a wider community. Moreover, they indicate that 3OC6 can communicate information about both cell density and the state of

  16. Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 and Its Regulatory Protein Inhibitor 2 Negatively Regulate ABA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Xie, Shaojun; Batelli, Giorgia; Wang, Bangshing; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Xing, Lu; Lei, Mingguang; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The core ABA signaling pathway consists of three major components: ABA receptor (PYR1/PYLs), type 2C Protein Phosphatase (PP2C) and SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2). Nevertheless, the complexity of ABA signaling remains to be explored. To uncover new components of ABA signal transduction pathways, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen for SnRK2-interacting proteins. We found that Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 (TOPP1) and its regulatory protein, At Inhibitor-2 (AtI-2), physically interact with SnRK2s and also with PYLs. TOPP1 inhibited the kinase activity of SnRK2.6, and this inhibition could be enhanced by AtI-2. Transactivation assays showed that TOPP1 and AtI-2 negatively regulated the SnRK2.2/3/6-mediated activation of the ABA responsive reporter gene RD29B, supporting a negative role of TOPP1 and AtI-2 in ABA signaling. Consistent with these findings, topp1 and ati-2 mutant plants displayed hypersensitivities to ABA and salt treatments, and transcriptome analysis of TOPP1 and AtI-2 knockout plants revealed an increased expression of multiple ABA-responsive genes in the mutants. Taken together, our results uncover TOPP1 and AtI-2 as negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:26943172

  17. Regulatory effects of a Mnk2-eIF4E feedback loop during mTORC1 targeting of human medulloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Eckerdt, Frank; Beauchamp, Elspeth; Bell, Jonathan; Iqbal, Asneha; Su, Bing; Fukunaga, Rikiro; Lulla, Rishi R; Goldman, Stewart; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2014-09-30

    The mTOR pathway controls mRNA translation of mitogenic proteins and is a central regulator of metabolism in malignant cells. Development of malignant cell resistance is a limiting factor to the effects of mTOR inhibitors, but the mechanisms accounting for such resistance are not well understood. We provide evidence that mTORC1 inhibition by rapamycin results in engagement of a negative feedback regulatory loop in malignant medulloblastoma cells, involving phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation-initiation factor eIF4E. This eIF4E phosphorylation is Mnk2- mediated, but Mnk1-independent, and acts as a survival mechanism for medulloblastoma cells. Pharmacological targeting of Mnk1/2 or siRNA-mediated knockdown of Mnk2 sensitizes medulloblastoma cells to mTOR inhibition and promotes suppression of malignant cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. Altogether, these findings provide evidence for the existence of a Mnk2-controlled feedback loop in medulloblastoma cells that accounts for resistance to mTOR inhibitors, and raise the potential for combination treatments of mTOR and Mnk inhibitors for the treatment of medulloblastoma. PMID:25193863

  18. Molecular cloning and analysis of the scon-2 negative regulatory gene of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Paietta, J V

    1990-01-01

    The sulfur regulatory system of Neurospora crassa is composed of a group of highly regulated structural genes (e.g., the gene encoding arylsulfatase) that are under coordinate control of scon+ (sulfur controller) negative and cys-3+ positive regulatory genes. In scon-1 (previously designated sconC) and scon-2 mutants, there is constitutive expression of sulfur structural genes regardless of the sulfur level available to the cells. The scon-2+ gene was cloned by sib selection screening of a cosmid-based gene library. The screening was based on the use of chromate, a toxic sulfate analog, which is transported into scon-2 cells grown on high sulfur but is not transported into cells that have regained normal sulfur regulation. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to confirm that the cloned segment mapped to the proper chromosomal location. In wild-type cells, Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed that a 2.6-kilobase scon-2+ transcript was present at a substantial level only under sulfur-derepressing conditions. Kinetic analysis showed that scon-2+ mRNA content increased as the cells became sulfur starved. Further, scon-2+ RNA was detectable in a nuclear transcription assay only under derepressing conditions. In scon-1, the levels of scon-2+ mRNA were found to be constitutive. In the cys-3 regulatory mutant, there was a reduced level of scon-2+ transcript. cys-3+ and ars-1+ mRNAs were present under both derepressing and repressing conditions in the scon-2 mutant. Repeat-induced point mutation-generated scon-2 mutants were identical in phenotype to the known mutant. Images PMID:1975945

  19. Cardiovascular regulatory response to lower body negative pressure following blood volume loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Ghista, D. N.; Sandler, H.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the cardiovascular regulatory responses to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) stress, both in the absence of and following blood or plasma volume loss, the latter being factors regularly observed with short- or long-term recumbency or weightlessness and associated with resulting cardiovascular deconditioning. Analytical expressions are derived for the responses of mean venous pressure and blood volume pooled in the lower body due to LBNP. An analysis is presented for determining the HR change due to LBNP stress following blood volume loss. It is concluded that the reduced orthostatic tolerance following long-term space flight or recumbency can be mainly attributed to blood volume loss, and that the associated cardiovascular responses characterizing this orthostatic intolerance is elicited by the associated central venous pressure response.

  20. A Regulated Double-Negative Feedback Decodes the Temporal Gradient of Input Stimulation in a Cell Signaling Network.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Min; Shin, Sung-Young; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Revealing the hidden mechanism of how cells sense and react to environmental signals has been a central question in cell biology. We focused on the rate of increase of stimulation, or temporal gradient, known to cause different responses of cells. We have investigated all possible three-node enzymatic networks and identified a network motif that robustly generates a transient or sustained response by acute or gradual stimulation, respectively. We also found that a regulated double-negative feedback within the motif is essential for the temporal gradient-sensitive switching. Our analysis highlights the essential structure and mechanism enabling cells to properly respond to dynamic environmental changes. PMID:27584002

  1. Arctic shelf flooding: a negative feedback on climate warming during terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschek, Michael; Renssen, Hans

    2013-04-01

    heat release and surface warming during the entire year. Our analysis exhibits a surprising connection between increased sea-ice export through Fram Strait and changes in atmospheric winds that result from modifications in the atmospheric circulation, that are forced by changes in differential heating over the East Siberian Shelf and the Nordic Seas. This atmospheric teleconnection clearly shows that regional changes can affect hemispheric changes. In a first comparison with available sea-ice proxy reconstructions our results do not disagree, but show the necessity of increased temporal and spatial coverage of proxy reconstructions for future investigations. Our results indicate that shelf flooding had a significant impact on the climate during the early Holocene, namely reducing sea-ice cover and affecting atmospheric circulation. During terminations this can be considered to be a negative feedback on the progress of the termination, as a shelf area becomes flooded, sea-ice production and extent are likely to increase and reduce high latitude intake of orbitally-forced insolation, slowing down the warming trend. This can be the cause of observed cold reversals during warming phases in the continuous transformation of a glacial to an interglacial climate. This implies that shelf flooding should be taken into account when studying the climate dynamics during all glacial terminations. References Bauch, H.; Mueller-Lupp, T.; Taldenkova, E.; Spielhagen, R.; Kassens, H.; Grootes, P.; Thiede, J.; Heinemeier, J. & Petryashov, V. Chronology of the Holocene transgression at the North Siberian margin, Global and Planetary Change, 2001, 31, 125 - 139 Rigor, I. & Colony, R., Sea-ice production and transport of pollutants in the Laptev Sea, 1979-1993, Science of The Total Environment, Environmental Radioactivity in the Arctic, 1997, 202, 89-110 Tamura, T. & Ohshima, K. I., Mapping of sea ice production in the Arctic coastal polynyas, J. Geophys. Res., AGU, 2011, 116, C07030-

  2. Microwave oscillator with reduced phase noise by negative feedback incorporating microwave signals with suppressed carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Saunders, J.

    1989-01-01

    Oscillator configurations which reduce the effect of 1/f noise sources for both direct feedback and stabilized local oscillator (STALO) circuits are developed and analyzed. By appropriate use of carrier suppression, a small signal is generated which suffers no loss of loop phase information or signal-to-noise ratio. This small signal can be amplified without degradation by multiplicative amplifier noise, and can be detected without saturation of the detector. Together with recent advances in microwave resonator Qs, these circuit improvements will make possible lower phase noise than can be presently achieved without the use of cryogenic devices.

  3. Positive and negative regulatory elements mediating transcription from the Drosophila melanogaster actin 5C distal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Y T; Keller, E B

    1990-01-01

    The major cytoskeletal actin gene of Drosophila melanogaster, the actin 5C gene, has two promoters, the distal one of which controls synthesis of actin in a tissue- and developmental stage-specific manner. This very strong promoter has widely been used for expression of heterologous genes in cultured cells. To locate functional regulatory elements in this distal promoter, mutants of the promoter were fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene and assayed for transient expression activity in cultured Drosophila embryonic Schneider line 2 cells. The results showed that the upstream end of the promoter extends to 522 bp from the transcription start site. In addition, there are two remote activating regions about 2 kb upstream. Between -522 and -379 are two regions that exert a strong negative effect. Downstream from these negative regions are at least six positive regions and a TATA element. The strongest positive determinant of the promoter was identified at -320 as AAAATGTG by footprinting and by a replacement experiment. When the relevant region was replaced by a synthetic sequence containing this element in a random context, the transient expression activity was restored. The sequence TGTATG located at -355 was also identified as a positive element by a similar replacement approach. Apparently the very high activity of this promoter is the result of the combined activities of multiple factors. Images PMID:2123290

  4. Positive and Negative Feedbacks and Free-Scale Pattern Distribution in Rural-Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Alados, Concepción L.; Errea, Paz; Gartzia, Maite; Saiz, Hugo; Escós, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Depopulation of rural areas is a widespread phenomenon that has occurred in most industrialized countries, and has contributed significantly to a reduction in the productivity of agro-ecological resources. In this study, we identified the main trends in the dynamics of rural populations in the Central Pyrenees in the 20th C and early 21st C, and used density independent and density dependent models and identified the main factors that have influenced the dynamics. In addition, we investigated the change in the power law distribution of population size in those periods. Populations exhibited density-dependent positive feedback between 1960 and 2010, and a long-term positive correlation between agricultural activity and population size, which has resulted in a free-scale population distribution that has been disrupted by the collapse of the traditional agricultural society and by emigration to the industrialized cities. We concluded that complex socio-ecological systems that have strong feedback mechanisms can contribute to disruptive population collapses, which can be identified by changes in the pattern of population distribution. PMID:25474704

  5. A Runx2/miR-3960/miR-2861 regulatory feedback loop during mouse osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong; Liu, Wei; Li, Hui; Yang, Li; Chen, Chao; Xia, Zhu-Ying; Guo, Li-Juan; Xie, Hui; Zhou, Hou-De; Wu, Xian-Ping; Luo, Xiang-Hang

    2011-04-01

    Our recent study showed that miR-2861 promotes osteoblast differentiation by targeting histone deacetylase 5, resulting in increased runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) protein production. Here we identified another new microRNA (miRNA) (miR-3960) that played a regulatory role in osteoblast differentiation through a regulatory feedback loop with miR-2861. miR-3960 and miR-2861 were found clustered at the same loci. miR-3960 was transcribed during bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2)-induced osteogenesis of ST2 stromal cells. Overexpression of miR-3960 promoted BMP2-induced osteoblastogenesis. However, the inhibition of miR-3960 expression attenuated the osteoblastogenesis. Homeobox A2 (Hoxa2), a repressor of Runx2 expression, was confirmed to be a target of miR-3960. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that Runx2 bound to the promoter of the miR-3960/miR-2861 cluster. Furthermore, overexpression of Runx2 induced miR-3960/miR-2861 transcription, and block of Runx2 expression attenuated BMP2-induced miR-3960/miR-2861 transcription. Here we report that miR-3960 and miR-2861, transcribed together from the same miRNA polycistron, both function in osteoblast differentiation through a novel Runx2/miR-3960/miR-2861 regulatory feedback loop. Our findings provide new insights into the roles of miRNAs in osteoblast differentiation. PMID:21324897

  6. The catalytic activity of the kinase ZAP-70 mediates basal signaling and negative feedback of the T cell receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Sjölin-Goodfellow, Hanna; Frushicheva, Maria P; Ji, Qinqin; Cheng, Debra A; Kadlecek, Theresa A; Cantor, Aaron J; Kuriyan, John; Chakraborty, Arup K; Salomon, Arthur R; Weiss, Arthur

    2015-05-19

    T cell activation by antigens binding to the T cell receptor (TCR) must be properly regulated to ensure normal T cell development and effective immune responses to pathogens and transformed cells while avoiding autoimmunity. The Src family kinase Lck and the Syk family kinase ZAP-70 (ζ chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kD) are sequentially activated in response to TCR engagement and serve as critical components of the TCR signaling machinery that leads to T cell activation. We performed a mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic study comparing the quantitative differences in the temporal dynamics of phosphorylation in stimulated and unstimulated T cells with or without inhibition of ZAP-70 catalytic activity. The data indicated that the kinase activity of ZAP-70 stimulates negative feedback pathways that target Lck and thereby modulate the phosphorylation patterns of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) of the CD3 and ζ chain components of the TCR and of signaling molecules downstream of Lck, including ZAP-70. We developed a computational model that provides a mechanistic explanation for the experimental findings on ITAM phosphorylation in wild-type cells, ZAP-70-deficient cells, and cells with inhibited ZAP-70 catalytic activity. This model incorporated negative feedback regulation of Lck activity by the kinase activity of ZAP-70 and predicted the order in which tyrosines in the ITAMs of TCR ζ chains must be phosphorylated to be consistent with the experimental data. PMID:25990959

  7. Targeting mTOR signaling pathways and related negative feedback loops for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Benedito A; Kaplan, Jason B; Altman, Jessica K; Giles, Francis J; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2015-01-01

    An accumulating understanding of the complex pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continues to lead to promising therapeutic approaches. Among the key aberrant intracellular signaling pathways involved in AML, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) axis is of major interest. This axis modulates a wide array of critical cellular functions, including proliferation, metabolism, and survival. Pharmacologic inhibitors of components of this pathway have been developed over the past decade, but none has an established role in the treatment of AML. This review will discuss the preclinical data and clinical results driving ongoing attempts to exploit the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in patients with AML and address issues related to negative feedback loops that account for leukemic cell survival. Targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is of high interest for the treatment of AML, but combination therapies with other targeted agents may be needed to block negative feedback loops in leukemia cells. PMID:25801978

  8. Targeting mTOR signaling pathways and related negative feedback loops for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Benedito A; Kaplan, Jason B; Altman, Jessica K; Giles, Francis J; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2015-01-01

    An accumulating understanding of the complex pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continues to lead to promising therapeutic approaches. Among the key aberrant intracellular signaling pathways involved in AML, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) axis is of major interest. This axis modulates a wide array of critical cellular functions, including proliferation, metabolism, and survival. Pharmacologic inhibitors of components of this pathway have been developed over the past decade, but none has an established role in the treatment of AML. This review will discuss the preclinical data and clinical results driving ongoing attempts to exploit the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in patients with AML and address issues related to negative feedback loops that account for leukemic cell survival. Targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is of high interest for the treatment of AML, but combination therapies with other targeted agents may be needed to block negative feedback loops in leukemia cells. PMID:25801978

  9. Dusp6 (Mkp3) is a negative feedback regulator of FGF-stimulated ERK signaling during mouse development.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaoying; Scott, Daryl A; Hatch, Ekaterina; Tian, Xiaoyan; Mansour, Suzanne L

    2007-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are major mediators of extracellular signals that are transduced to the nucleus. MAPK signaling is attenuated at several levels, and one class of dual-specificity phosphatases, the MAPK phosphatases (MKPs), inhibit MAPK signaling by dephosphorylating activated MAPKs. Several of the MKPs are themselves induced by the signaling pathways they regulate, forming negative feedback loops that attenuate the signals. We show here that in mouse embryos, Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are required for transcription of Dusp6, which encodes MKP3, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-specific MKP. Targeted inactivation of Dusp6 increases levels of phosphorylated ERK, as well as the pERK target, Erm, and transcripts initiated from the Dusp6 promoter itself. Finally, the Dusp6 mutant allele causes variably penetrant, dominant postnatal lethality, skeletal dwarfism, coronal craniosynostosis and hearing loss; phenotypes that are also characteristic of mutations that activate FGFRs inappropriately. Taken together, these results show that DUSP6 serves in vivo as a negative feedback regulator of FGFR signaling and suggest that mutations in DUSP6 or related genes are candidates for causing or modifying unexplained cases of FGFR-like syndromes. PMID:17164422

  10. The catalytic activity of the kinase ZAP-70 mediates basal signaling and negative feedback of the T cell receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Debra A; Kadlecek, Theresa A.; Cantor, Aaron J.; Kuriyan, John

    2015-01-01

    T cell activation must be properly regulated to ensure normal T cell development and effective immune responses to pathogens and transformed cells while avoiding autoimmunity. The mechanisms controlling the fine-tuning of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and T cell activation are unclear. The Syk family kinase ζ chain–associated protein kinase of 70 kD (ZAP-70) is a critical component of the TCR signaling machinery that leads to T cell activation. To elucidate potential feedback targets that are dependent on the kinase activity of ZAP-70, we performed a mass spectrometry–based, phosphoproteomic study to quantify temporal changes in phosphorylation patterns after inhibition of ZAP-70 catalytic activity. Our results provide insights into the fine-tuning of the T cell signaling network before and after TCR engagement. The data indicate that the kinase activity of ZAP-70 stimulates negative feedback pathways that target the Src family kinase Lck and modulate the phosphorylation patterns of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) of the CD3 and ζ-chain components of the TCR, and of downstream signaling molecules, including ZAP-70. We developed a computational model that provides a unified mechanistic explanation for the experimental findings on ITAM phosphorylation in wild-type cells, ZAP-70–deficient cells, and cells with inhibited ZAP-70 catalytic activity. This model incorporates negative feedback regulation of Lck activity by the kinase activity of ZAP-70 and makes unanticipated specific predictions for the order in which tyrosines in the ITAMs of TCR ζ-chains must be phosphorylated to be consistent with the experimental data. PMID:25990959

  11. The Context Matters: Outcome Probability and Expectation Mismatch Modulate the Feedback Negativity When Self-Evaluation of Response Correctness Is Possible

    PubMed Central

    Leue, Anja; Cano Rodilla, Carmen; Beauducel, André

    2015-01-01

    Individuals typically evaluate whether their performance and the obtained feedback match. Previous research has shown that feedback negativity (FN) depends on outcome probability and feedback valence. It is, however, less clear to what extent previous effects of outcome probability on FN depend on self-evaluations of response correctness. Therefore, we investigated the effects of outcome probability on FN amplitude in a simple go/no-go task that allowed for the self-evaluation of response correctness. We also investigated effects of performance incompatibility and feedback valence. In a sample of N = 22 participants, outcome probability was manipulated by means of precues, feedback valence by means of monetary feedback, and performance incompatibility by means of feedback that induced a match versus mismatch with individuals' performance. We found that the 100% outcome probability condition induced a more negative FN following no-loss than the 50% outcome probability condition. The FN following loss was more negative in the 50% compared to the 100% outcome probability condition. Performance-incompatible loss resulted in a more negative FN than performance-compatible loss. Our results indicate that the self-evaluation of the correctness of responses should be taken into account when the effects of outcome probability and expectation mismatch on FN are investigated. PMID:26783525

  12. Generation of sub-Poisson light in a negative feedback and cascade three-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Jinhua; Guo, Guangcan

    1992-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to try to find out the possibility of reducing the photon number noise in an optically pumped three-level atomic system. Consider a three-level atomic system. The atomic transition between level 1 and level 3 is forbidden. Each atom is incoherently excited to upper level 3 from level 1, transits to level 1 through intermediate level 2, and emits photons at frequency (omega) 1 and (omega) 2. We place the atoms with the above feature into an oscillator and may obtain two coherent light beams, whose frequency are (omega) 1 and (omega) 2, respectively. There may be some correlation between these two light beams. We make one beam to control the pump source by a feedback loop and expect to reduce the noise of photon number of the other beam.

  13. Negative feedback-defective PRPS1 mutants drive thiopurine resistance in relapsed childhood ALL

    PubMed Central

    Li, Benshang; Li, Hui; Bai, Yun; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Yang, Jun J; Chen, Yao; Lu, Gang; Tzoneva, Gannie; Ma, Xiaotu; Wu, Tongmin; Li, Wenjing; Lu, Haisong; Ding, Lixia; Liang, Huanhuan; Huang, Xiaohang; Yang, Minjun; Jin, Lei; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shuting; Du, Alicia; Shen, Shuhong; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jing; von Stackelberg, Arend; Gu, Longjun; Zhang, Jinghui; Ferrando, Adolfo; Tang, Jingyan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Bin-Bing S.

    2015-01-01

    Relapse is the leading cause of mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among chemotherapeutics, thiopurines are key drugs in the backbone of ALL combination therapy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified relapse-specific mutations in phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRPS1), a rate-limiting purine biosynthesis enzyme, in 24/358 (6.7%) relapse B-ALL cases. All individuals who harbored PRPS1 mutations relapsed early on-treatment, and mutated ALL clones expanded exponentially prior to clinical relapse. Our functional analyses of PRPS1 mutants uncovered a new chemotherapy resistance mechanism involving reduced feedback inhibition of de novo purine biosynthesis and competitive inhibition of thiopurine activation. Notably, the de novo purine synthesis inhibitor lometrexol can effectively abrogate PRPS1 mutant-driven drug resistance. Overall these results highlight the importance of constitutive activation of de novo purine pathway in thiopurine resistance, and offer therapeutic strategies for the treatment of relapsed and resistant ALL. PMID:25962120

  14. Identifying the Impact of Negative Feedback and Learners' Responses on ESL Question Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim

    2005-01-01

    Swain's (1985, 1995, 2000) output hypothesis states that language production is facilitative of second language (L2) learning. An important component of the output hypothesis involves "pushing" learners to produce appropriate, accurate, and complex language (Swain, 1993), which may occur when interlocutors provide learners with negative feedback…

  15. Negative feedback regulation of NF-κB-inducing kinase is proteasome-dependent but does not require cellular inhibitors of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Carolyn M; McCorkell, Kelly A; Chunduru, Srinivas K; McKinlay, Mark A; May, Michael J

    2014-07-18

    Non-canonical NF-κB signaling is controlled by the precise regulation of NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK) stability. NIK is constitutively ubiquitylated by cellular inhibitor of apoptosis (cIAP) proteins 1 and 2, leading to its complete proteasomal degradation in resting cells. Following stimulation, cIAP-mediated ubiquitylation of NIK ceases and NIK is stabilized, allowing for inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK)α activation and non-canonical NF-κB signaling. Non-canonical NF-κB signaling is terminated by feedback phosphorylation of NIK by IKKα that promotes NIK degradation; however, the mechanism of active NIK protein turnover remains unknown. To address this question, we established a strategy to precisely distinguish between basal degradation of newly synthesized endogenous NIK and induced active NIK in stimulated cells. Using this approach, we found that IKKα-mediated degradation of signal-induced activated NIK occurs through the proteasome. To determine whether cIAP1 or cIAP2 play a role in active NIK turnover, we utilized a Smac mimetic (GT13072), which promotes degradation of these E3 ubiquitin ligases. As expected, GT13072 stabilized NIK in resting cells. However, loss of the cIAPs did not inhibit proteasome-dependent turnover of signal-induced NIK showing that unlike the basal regulatory mechanism, active NIK turnover is independent of cIAP1 and cIAP2. Our results therefore establish that the negative feedback control of IKKα-mediated NIK turnover occurs via a novel proteasome-dependent and cIAP-independent mechanism. PMID:24942881

  16. A synthetic gene circuit for measuring autoregulatory feedback control.

    PubMed

    Schikora-Tamarit, Miquel Àngel; Toscano-Ochoa, Carlos; Domingo Espinós, Júlia; Espinar, Lorena; Carey, Lucas B

    2016-04-18

    Autoregulatory feedback loops occur in the regulation of molecules ranging from ATP to MAP kinases to zinc. Negative feedback loops can increase a system's robustness, while positive feedback loops can mediate transitions between cell states. Recent genome-wide experimental and computational studies predict hundreds of novel feedback loops. However, not all physical interactions are regulatory, and many experimental methods cannot detect self-interactions. Our understanding of regulatory feedback loops is therefore hampered by the lack of high-throughput methods to experimentally quantify the presence, strength and temporal dynamics of autoregulatory feedback loops. Here we present a mathematical and experimental framework for high-throughput quantification of feedback regulation and apply it to RNA binding proteins (RBPs) in yeast. Our method is able to determine the existence of both direct and indirect positive and negative feedback loops, and to quantify the strength of these loops. We experimentally validate our model using two RBPs which lack native feedback loops and by the introduction of synthetic feedback loops. We find that RBP Puf3 does not natively participate in any direct or indirect feedback regulation, but that replacing the native 3'UTR with that of COX17 generates an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop which reduces gene expression noise. Likewise, RBP Pub1 does not natively participate in any feedback loops, but a synthetic positive feedback loop involving Pub1 results in increased expression noise. Our results demonstrate a synthetic experimental system for quantifying the existence and strength of feedback loops using a combination of high-throughput experiments and mathematical modeling. This system will be of great use in measuring auto-regulatory feedback by RNA binding proteins, a regulatory motif that is difficult to quantify using existing high-throughput methods. PMID:26728081

  17. Estrogen impairs glucocorticoid dependent negative feedback on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis via estrogen receptor alpha within the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Weiser, M J; Handa, R J

    2009-03-17

    Numerous studies have established a link between individuals with affective disorders and a dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, most notably characterized by a reduced sensitivity to glucocorticoid negative (-) feedback. Furthermore there is a sex difference in the etiology of mood disorders with incidence in females being two to three times that of males, an association that may be a result of the influence of estradiol (E2) on HPA axis function. In these studies, we have examined the effect of E2 on glucocorticoid-mediated HPA axis (-) feedback during both the diurnal peak and the stress-induced rise in corticosterone (CORT). Young adult female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were ovariectomized (OVX) and 1 week later treated subcutaneous (s.c.) with oil or estradiol benzoate (EB) for 4 days. On the 4th day of treatment, animals were injected with a single dose of dexamethasone (DEX), or vehicle. EB treatment significantly increased the evening elevation in CORT and the stress-induced rise in CORT. In contrast, DEX treatment reduced the diurnal and stress induced rise in CORT and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and this reduction was not apparent following co-treatment with EB. To determine a potential site of E2's action, female SD rats were OVX and 1 week later, wax pellets containing E2, the estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN), or the estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) agonist propylpyrazoletriol (PPT), was implanted bilaterally and dorsal to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Seven days later, animals were injected s.c. with a single dose of DEX, or vehicle to test for glucocorticoid-dependent (-) feedback. Results show that E2 and PPT increased, while DPN decreased the diurnal peak and stress-induced CORT and ACTH levels as compared to controls. Furthermore, E2 and PPT impaired the ability of DEX to inhibit both the diurnal and the stress-induced rise in CORT and ACTH, whereas DPN had

  18. Deletion analysis of BMI1 oncoprotein identifies its negative regulatory domain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The polycomb group (PcG) protein BMI1 is an important regulator of development. Additionally, aberrant expression of BMI1 has been linked to cancer stem cell phenotype and oncogenesis. In particular, its overexpression has been found in several human malignancies including breast cancer. Despite its established role in stem cell maintenance, cancer and development, at present not much is known about the functional domains of BMI1 oncoprotein. In the present study, we carried out a deletion analysis of BMI1 to identify its negative regulatory domain. Results We report that deletion of the C-terminal domain of BMI1, which is rich in proline-serine (PS) residues and previously described as PEST-like domain, increased the stability of BMI1, and promoted its pro-oncogenic activities in human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). Specifically, overexpression of a PS region deleted mutant of BMI1 increased proliferation of HMECs and promoted an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in the HMECs. Furthermore, when compared to the wild type BMI1, exogenous expression of the mutant BMI1 led to a significant downregulation of p16INK4a and an efficient bypass of cellular senescence in human diploid fibroblasts. Conclusions In summary, our data suggest that the PS domain of BMI1 is involved in its stability and that it negatively regulates function of BMI1 oncoprotein. Our results also suggest that the PS domain of BMI1 could be targeted for the treatment of proliferative disorders such as cancer and aging. PMID:20569464

  19. MASSIVE MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS AND NEGATIVE FEEDBACK IN ULIRGs OBSERVED BY HERSCHEL-PACS

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, E.; Gracia-Carpio, J.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Contursi, A.; Poglitsch, A.; Davies, R.; Genzel, R.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L.; De Jong, J. A.; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E.; Veilleux, S.; Fischer, J.; Sternberg, A.; Verma, A.; Maiolino, R.

    2011-05-20

    Mass outflows driven by stars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are a key element in many current models of galaxy evolution. They may produce the observed black-hole-galaxy mass relation and regulate and quench both star formation in the host galaxy and black hole accretion. However, observational evidence of such feedback processes through outflows of the bulk of the star-forming molecular gas is still scarce. Here we report the detection of massive molecular outflows, traced by the hydroxyl molecule (OH), in far-infrared spectra of ULIRGs obtained with Herschel-PACS as part of the SHINING key project. In some of these objects the (terminal) outflow velocities exceed 1000 km s{sup -1}, and their outflow rates (up to {approx}1200 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) are several times larger than their star formation rates. We compare the outflow signatures in different types of ULIRGs and in starburst galaxies to address the issue of the energy source (AGN or starburst) of these outflows. We report preliminary evidence that ULIRGs with a higher AGN luminosity (and higher AGN contribution to L{sub IR}) have higher terminal velocities and shorter gas depletion timescales. The outflows in the observed ULIRGs are able to expel the cold gas reservoirs from the centers of these objects within {approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} years.

  20. Negative Feedbacks by Isoprenoids on a Mevalonate Kinase Expressed in the Corpora Allata of Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Juvenile hormones (JH) regulate development and reproductive maturation in insects. JHs are synthesized through the mevalonate pathway (MVAP), an ancient metabolic pathway present in the three domains of life. Mevalonate kinase (MVK) is a key enzyme in the MVAP. MVK catalyzes the synthesis of phosphomevalonate (PM) by transferring the γ-phosphoryl group from ATP to the C5 hydroxyl oxygen of mevalonic acid (MA). Despite the importance of MVKs, these enzymes have been poorly characterized in insects. Results We functionally characterized an Aedes aegypti MVK (AaMVK) expressed in the corpora allata (CA) of the mosquito. AaMVK displayed its activity in the presence of metal cofactors. Different nucleotides were used by AaMVK as phosphoryl donors. In the presence of Mg2+, the enzyme has higher affinity for MA than ATP. The activity of AaMVK was regulated by feedback inhibition from long-chain isoprenoids, such as geranyl diphosphate (GPP) and farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). Conclusions AaMVK exhibited efficient inhibition by GPP and FPP (Ki less than 1 μM), and none by isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethyl allyl pyrophosphate (DPPM). These results suggest that GPP and FPP might act as physiological inhibitors in the synthesis of isoprenoids in the CA of mosquitoes. Changing MVK activity can alter the flux of precursors and therefore regulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis. PMID:26566274

  1. Negative feedback-defective PRPS1 mutants drive thiopurine resistance in relapsed childhood ALL.

    PubMed

    Li, Benshang; Li, Hui; Bai, Yun; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Yang, Jun J; Chen, Yao; Lu, Gang; Tzoneva, Gannie; Ma, Xiaotu; Wu, Tongmin; Li, Wenjing; Lu, Haisong; Ding, Lixia; Liang, Huanhuan; Huang, Xiaohang; Yang, Minjun; Jin, Lei; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shuting; Du, Alicia; Shen, Shuhong; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jing; von Stackelberg, Arend; Gu, Longjun; Zhang, Jinghui; Ferrando, Adolfo; Tang, Jingyan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Bin-Bing S

    2015-06-01

    Relapse is the leading cause of mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among chemotherapeutics, thiopurines are key drugs in ALL combination therapy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified relapse-specific mutations in the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 gene (PRPS1), which encodes a rate-limiting purine biosynthesis enzyme, in 24/358 (6.7%) relapsed childhood B cell ALL (B-ALL) cases. All individuals who harbored PRPS1 mutations relapsed early during treatment, and mutated ALL clones expanded exponentially before clinical relapse. Our functional analyses of PRPS1 mutants uncovered a new chemotherapy-resistance mechanism involving reduced feedback inhibition of de novo purine biosynthesis and competitive inhibition of thiopurine activation. Notably, the de novo purine synthesis inhibitor lometrexol effectively abrogated PRPS1 mutant-driven drug resistance. These results highlight the importance of constitutive activation of the de novo purine synthesis pathway in thiopurine resistance, and they offer therapeutic strategies for the treatment of relapsed and thiopurine-resistant ALL. PMID:25962120

  2. Negative feedback from a Proteus class II flagellum export defect to the flhDC master operon controlling cell division and flagellum assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Furness, R B; Fraser, G M; Hay, N A; Hughes, C

    1997-01-01

    The Proteus mirabilis flagellum class I flhDC operon was isolated, and its transcript was shown to originate from a sigma70 promoter 244 bp 5' of flhD and 29 bp 3' of a putative cyclic AMP receptor protein-binding site. Expression of this regulatory master operon increased strongly as cells differentiated into elongated hyperflagellated swarm filaments, and cell populations artificially overexpressing flhDC migrated sooner and faster. A class II flhA transposon mutant was reduced in flagellum class III gene expression, as would be expected from the FlgM anti-sigma28 accumulation demonstrated in Salmonella typhimurium, but was unexpectedly also reduced in cell elongation. Here, we show that levels of flhDC transcript were ca. 10-fold lower in this flagellum export mutant, indicating that in cells defective in flagellum assembly, there is additional negative feedback via flhDC. In support of this view, artificial overexpression of flhDC in the flhA mutant restored elongation but not class III flagellum gene transcription. PMID:9287017

  3. The inhibitory effects of AR/miR-190a/YB-1 negative feedback loop on prostate cancer and underlying mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaohua; Wang, Tao; Song, Wen; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Feng; Yin, Yu; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Wu, Kongming; Yu, Zuoren; Wang, Chenguang; Chen, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer at advanced stages including metastatic and castration-resistant cancer remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. MiR-190a belongs to the small noncoding RNA family and has an important role in breast cancer metastasis. However, it is still unknown whether miR-190a plays a role in prostate cancer development. Herein, we first observed AR/miR-190a/YB-1 forms an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop in prostate cancer: miR-190a expression was down-regulated by AR activation; YB-1 functions are as an AR activator; miR-190a inhibited AR expression and transactivation through direct binding to 3′UTR of YB-1 gene. MiR-190a contributes the human prostate cancer cell growth through AR-dependent signaling. Moreover, we examined the expression of miR-190a and observed a significant decrease in human prostate cancers. Reduced expression of miR-190a was inversely correlated to AR levels of prostate cancer patients, and patients with higher miR-190a expression in their tumor have improved tumor-free survival. Taken together, our findings identified a biochemical and functional link between miR-190a with reduced expression in advanced prostate cancer, YB-1 and AR signaling in prostate cancer. PMID:26314494

  4. Preparation and crystallization of the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, N; Okada, K; Hirotsu, S; Hatakeyama, K; Hakoshima, T

    2001-08-01

    Mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is a decameric enzyme in the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, which is an essential cofactor for enzymes producing neurotransmitters such as catecholamines and for nitric oxide synthases. The enzyme is dually regulated by its feedback regulatory protein GFRP in the presence of its stimulatory effector phenylalanine and its inhibitory effector biopterin. Here, both the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I bound to GFRP were crystallized by vapour diffusion. Diffraction data sets at resolutions of 3.0 and 2.64 A were collected for the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes, respectively. Each complex consists of two GTPCHI pentamer rings and two GFRP pentamer rings, with pseudo-52 point-group symmetry. PMID:11468403

  5. An ocean-biology-induced negative feedback on ENSO as derived from a hybrid coupled model of the tropical Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Biological conditions in the tropical Pacific Ocean (e.g., phytoplankton biomass) are strongly regulated by physical changes that are associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The existence and variation of phytoplankton biomass act to modulate the vertical penetration of the incoming sunlight into the upper ocean, which causes an ocean-biology-induced heating (OBH) effect on the climate system. Previously, the penetration depth of solar radiation in the upper ocean (Hp) has been defined to describe the related bioclimate connections. An empirical model for interannual Hp variability that is parameterized in terms of its relationship with the sea surface temperature (SST) in the tropical Pacific was derived from remotely sensed ocean color data and is incorporated into a hybrid coupled model (HCM) to represent the OBH effects. In this paper, several HCM experiments are performed to demonstrate the biofeedback onto the ENSO, including a climatological Hp run (in which Hp is prescribed as only seasonally varying), interannual Hp runs (with different intensities of the interannually varying OBH effects), and a run in which the sign of the OBH effect is reversed. Significant modulating impacts on the interannual variability are found in the HCM and are characterized by a negative feedback between the ocean biology and the climate system in the tropical Pacific; stronger the OBH feedback, weaker the interannual variability. The processes that are involved in the feedback are analyzed. The SST is modulated indirectly by dynamic ocean processes that are induced by OBH. The significance and implication of the OBH effects are discussed in terms of their roles in ENSO variability and the model biases in the tropical Pacific.

  6. The Circadian System: A Regulatory Feedback Network of Periphery and Brain.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Frederik N; León-Mercado, Luis; Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara; Guerrero-Vargas, Natali N; Romo-Nava, Francisco; Buijs, Ruud M

    2016-05-01

    Circadian rhythms are generated by the autonomous circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and clock genes that are present in all tissues. The SCN times these peripheral clocks, as well as behavioral and physiological processes. Recent studies show that frequent violations of conditions set by our biological clock, such as shift work, jet lag, sleep deprivation, or simply eating at the wrong time of the day, may have deleterious effects on health. This infringement, also known as circadian desynchronization, is associated with chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and psychiatric disorders. In this review, we will evaluate evidence that these diseases stem from the need of the SCN for peripheral feedback to fine-tune its output and adjust physiological processes to the requirements of the moment. This feedback can vary from neuronal or hormonal signals from the liver to changes in blood pressure. Desynchronization renders the circadian network dysfunctional, resulting in a breakdown of many functions driven by the SCN, disrupting core clock rhythms in the periphery and disorganizing cellular processes that are normally driven by the synchrony between behavior and peripheral signals with neuronal and humoral output of the hypothalamus. Consequently, we propose that the loss of synchrony between the different elements of this circadian network as may occur during shiftwork and jet lag is the reason for the occurrence of health problems. PMID:27053731

  7. GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein is a pentamer of identical subunits. Purification, cDNA cloning, and bacterial expression.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Brewer, J M; Hatakeyama, K

    1997-04-11

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) mediates feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by tetrahydrobiopterin and also mediates the stimulatory effect of phenylalanine on the enzyme activity. To characterize the molecular structure of GFRP, we have purified it from rat liver using an efficient step of affinity chromatography and isolated cDNA clones, based on partial amino acid sequences of peptides derived from purified GFRP. Comparison between the amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA and the N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified GFRP showed that the mature form of GFRP consists of 83 amino acid residues with a calculated Mr of 9,542. The isolated GFRP cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with six consecutive histidine residues at its N terminus. The fusion protein was affinity-purified and digested with thrombin to remove the histidine tag. The resulting recombinant GFRP showed kinetic properties similar to those of GFRP purified from rat liver. Cross-linking experiments using dimethyl suberimidate indicated that GFRP was a pentamer of 52 kDa. Sedimentation equilibrium measurements confirmed the pentameric structure of GFRP by giving an average Mr of 49,734, which is 5 times the calculated molecular weight of the recombinant GFRP polypeptide. Based on the pentameric structure of GFRP, we have proposed a model for the quaternary structure of GFRP and GTP cyclohydrolase I complexes. PMID:9092499

  8. Structural basis of biopterin-induced inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I by GFRP, its feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Okada, Kengo; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2004-12-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI) is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, a key cofactor necessary for nitric oxide synthase and for the hydroxylases that are involved in the production of catecholamines and serotonin. In animals, the GTPCHI feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) binds GTPCHI to mediate feed-forward activation of GTPCHI activity in the presence of phenylalanine, whereas it induces feedback inhibition of enzyme activity in the presence of biopterin. Here, we have reported the crystal structure of the biopterin-induced inhibitory complex of GTPCHI and GFRP and compared it with the previously reported phenylalanine-induced stimulatory complex. The structure reveals five biopterin molecules located at each interface between GTPCHI and GFRP. Induced fitting structural changes by the biopterin binding expand large conformational changes in GTPCHI peptide segments forming the active site, resulting in inhibition of the activity. By locating 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine-responsive dystonia mutations in the complex structure, we found mutations that may possibly disturb the GFRP-mediated regulation of GTPCHI. PMID:15448133

  9. The Feedback-related Negativity Codes Components of Abstract Inference during Reward-based Decision-making.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Andrea M F; Koch, Stefan P; Schröger, Erich; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Deserno, Lorenz; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Behavioral control is influenced not only by learning from the choices made and the rewards obtained but also by "what might have happened," that is, inference about unchosen options and their fictive outcomes. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the neural signatures of direct learning from choices that are actually made and their associated rewards via reward prediction errors (RPEs). However, electrophysiological correlates of abstract inference in decision-making are less clear. One seminal theory suggests that the so-called feedback-related negativity (FRN), an ERP peaking 200-300 msec after a feedback stimulus at frontocentral sites of the scalp, codes RPEs. Hitherto, the FRN has been predominantly related to a so-called "model-free" RPE: The difference between the observed outcome and what had been expected. Here, by means of computational modeling of choice behavior, we show that individuals employ abstract, "double-update" inference on the task structure by concurrently tracking values of chosen stimuli (associated with observed outcomes) and unchosen stimuli (linked to fictive outcomes). In a parametric analysis, model-free RPEs as well as their modification because of abstract inference were regressed against single-trial FRN amplitudes. We demonstrate that components related to abstract inference uniquely explain variance in the FRN beyond model-free RPEs. These findings advance our understanding of the FRN and its role in behavioral adaptation. This might further the investigation of disturbed abstract inference, as proposed, for example, for psychiatric disorders, and its underlying neural correlates. PMID:27031567

  10. miR-340 and ZEB1 negative feedback loop regulates TGF-β- mediated breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Hou, Li-Kun; Yu, Yue; Xie, Ye-Gong; Wang, Jie; Mao, Jie-Fei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xin; Cao, Xu-Chen

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs act as key regulators in carcinogenesis and progression in various cancers. In present study, we explored the role of miR-340 in the breast cancer progression. Our results showed that overexpression of miR-340 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion, whereas depletion of miR-340 promotes breast cancer progression. Molecularly, ZEB1 was identified as a target gene of miR-340 and miR-340 suppressed the expression of ZEB1 by directly binding to the 3'-UTR of ZEB1. Furthermore, ZEB1 transcriptionally suppresses miR-340 expression. The negative feedback loop regulated TGF-β-mediated breast cancer progression. In conclusion, our data suggested that miR-340 acted as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer progression. PMID:27036021

  11. Negative feedback between secretory and cytosolic phospholipase A2 and their opposing roles in ovalbumin-induced bronchoconstriction in rats.

    PubMed

    Offer, Sarit; Yedgar, Saul; Schwob, Ouri; Krimsky, Miron; Bibi, Haim; Eliraz, Abraham; Madar, Zecharia; Shoseyov, David

    2005-03-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) hydrolyzes cell membrane phospholipids (PL) to produce arachidonic acid and lyso-PL. The PLA2 enzymes include the secretory (sPLA2) and cytosolic (cPLA2) isoforms, which are assumed to act synergistically in production of eicosanoids that are involved in inflammatory processes. However, growing evidence raises the possibility that in airways and asthma-related inflammatory cells (eosinophils, basophils), the production of the bronchoconstrictor cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLT) is linked exclusively to sPLA2, whereas the bronchodilator prostaglandin PGE2 is produced by cPLA2. It has been further reported that the capacity of airway epithelial cells to produce CysLT is inversely proportional to PGE2 production. This seems to suggest that sPLA2 and cPLA2 play opposing roles in asthma pathophysiology and the possibility of a negative feedback between the two isoenzymes. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of a cell-impermeable extracellular sPLA2 inhibitor on bronchoconstriction and PLA2 expression in rats with ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma. It was found that OVA-induced bronchoconstriction was associated with elevation of lung sPLA2 expression and CysLT production, concomitantly with suppression of cPLA2 expression and PGE2 production. These were reversed by treatment with the sPLA2 inhibitor, resulting in amelioration of bronchoconstriction and reduced CysLT production and sPLA2 expression, concomitantly with enhanced PGE2 production and cPLA2 expression. This study demonstrates, for the first time in vivo, a negative feedback between sPLA2 and cPLA2 and assigns opposing roles for these enzymes in asthma pathophysiology: sPLA2 activation induces production of the bronchoconstrictor CysLT and suppresses cPLA2 expression and the subsequent production of the bronchodilator PGE2. PMID:15557087

  12. Negative feedback control of jasmonate signaling by an alternative splice variant of JAZ10.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Javier E; Shyu, Christine; Campos, Marcelo L; Patel, Lalita C; Chung, Hoo Sun; Yao, Jian; He, Sheng Yang; Howe, Gregg A

    2013-06-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) activates gene expression by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation of jasmonate ZIM domain (JAZ) transcriptional repressor proteins. A key feature of all JAZ proteins is the highly conserved Jas motif, which mediates both JAZ degradation and JAZ binding to the transcription factor MYC2. Rapid expression of JAZ genes in response to JA is thought to attenuate JA responses, but little is known about the mechanisms by which newly synthesized JAZ proteins exert repression in the presence of the hormone. Here, we show in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that desensitization to JA is mediated by an alternative splice variant (JAZ10.4) of JAZ10 that lacks the Jas motif. Unbiased protein-protein interaction screens identified three related basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors (MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4) and the corepressor NINJA as JAZ10.4-binding partners. We show that the amino-terminal region of JAZ10.4 contains a cryptic MYC2-binding site that resembles the Jas motif and that the ZIM motif of JAZ10.4 functions as a transferable repressor domain whose activity is associated with the recruitment of NINJA. Functional studies showed that the expression of JAZ10.4 from the native JAZ10 promoter complemented the JA-hypersensitive phenotype of a jaz10 mutant. Moreover, treatment of these complemented lines with JA resulted in the rapid accumulation of JAZ10.4 protein. Our results provide an explanation for how the unique domain architecture of JAZ10.4 links transcription factors to a corepressor complex and suggest how JA-induced transcription and alternative splicing of JAZ10 premessenger RNA creates a regulatory circuit to attenuate JA responses. PMID:23632853

  13. Fulfilling desire: evidence for negative feedback between men's testosterone, sociosexual psychology, and sexual partner number.

    PubMed

    Puts, David A; Pope, Lauramarie E; Hill, Alexander K; Cárdenas, Rodrigo A; Welling, Lisa L M; Wheatley, John R; Marc Breedlove, S

    2015-04-01

    Across human societies and many nonhuman animals, males have greater interest in uncommitted sex (more unrestricted sociosexuality) than do females. Testosterone shows positive associations with male-typical sociosexual behavior in nonhuman animals. Yet, it remains unclear whether the human sex difference in sociosexual psychology (attitudes and desires) is mediated by testosterone, whether any relationships between testosterone and sociosexuality differ between men and women, and what the nature of these possible relationships might be. In studies to resolve these questions, we examined relationships between salivary testosterone concentrations and sociosexual psychology and behavior in men and women. We measured testosterone in all men in our sample, but only in those women taking oral contraception (OC-using women) in order to reduce the influence of ovulatory cycle variation in ovarian hormone production. We found that OC-using women did not differ from normally-ovulating women in sociosexual psychology or behavior, but that circulating testosterone mediated the sex difference in human sociosexuality and predicted sociosexual psychology in men but not OC-using women. Moreover, when sociosexual psychology was controlled, men's sociosexual behavior (number of sexual partners) was negatively related to testosterone, suggesting that testosterone drives sociosexual psychology in men and is inhibited when those desires are fulfilled. This more complex relationship between androgens and male sexuality may reconcile some conflicting prior reports. PMID:25644313

  14. Negative regulatory loci coupling flagellin synthesis to flagellar assembly in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, K L; Hughes, K T

    1991-01-01

    The complex regulation of flagellin gene expression in Salmonella typhimurium was characterized in vivo by using lac transcriptional fusions to the two flagellin structural genes (fliC [H1] and fljB [H2]). Phase variation was measured as the rate of switching of flagellin gene expression. Switching frequencies varied from 1/500 per cell per generation to 1/10,000 per cell per generation depending on the particular insertion and the direction of switching. There is a 4- to 20-fold bias in favor of switching from the fljB(On) to the fljB(Off) orientation. Random Tn10dTc insertions were isolated which failed to express flagellin. While most of these insertions mapped to loci known to be required for flagellin expression, several new loci were identified. The presence of functional copies of all of the genes responsible for complete flagellar assembly, except the hook-associated proteins (flgK, flgL, and fliD gene products), were required for expression of the fliC or fljB flagellin genes. Two novel loci involved in negative regulation of fliC and fljB in fla mutant backgrounds were identified. One of these loci, designated the flgR locus, mapped to the flg operon at 23 min on the Salmonella linkage map. An flgR insertion mutation resulted in relief of repression of the fliC and fljB genes in all fla mutant backgrounds except for mutants in the positive regulatory loci (flhC, flhD, and fliA genes). PMID:1848842

  15. FGF signaling enhances a sonic hedgehog negative feedback loop at the initiation of spinal cord ventral patterning.

    PubMed

    Morales, Aixa V; Espeso-Gil, Sergio; Ocaña, Inmaculada; Nieto-Lopez, Francisco; Calleja, Elena; Bovolenta, Paola; Lewandoski, Mark; Diez Del Corral, Ruth

    2016-09-01

    A prevalent developmental mechanism for the assignment of cell identities is the production of spatiotemporal concentration gradients of extracellular signaling molecules that are interpreted by the responding cells. One of such signaling systems is the Shh gradient that controls neuronal subtype identity in the ventral spinal cord. Using loss and gain of function approaches in chick and mouse embryos, we show here that the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathway is required to restrict the domains of ventral gene expression as neuroepithelial cells become exposed to Shh during caudal extension of the embryo. FGF signaling activates the expression of the Shh receptor and negative pathway regulator Patched 2 (Ptch2) and therefore can enhance a negative feedback loop that restrains the activity of the pathway. Thus, we identify one of the mechanisms by which FGF signaling acts as a modulator of the onset of Shh signaling activity in the context of coordination of ventral patterning and caudal axis extension. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 956-971, 2016. PMID:26600420

  16. Inhibitory and toxic effects of extracellular self-DNA in litter: a mechanism for negative plant-soil feedbacks?

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, Stefano; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; Chiusano, Maria Luisa; Termolino, Pasquale; Mingo, Antonio; Senatore, Mauro; Giannino, Francesco; Cartenì, Fabrizio; Rietkerk, Max; Lanzotti, Virginia

    2015-02-01

    Plant-soil negative feedback (NF) is recognized as an important factor affecting plant communities. The objectives of this work were to assess the effects of litter phytotoxicity and autotoxicity on root proliferation, and to test the hypothesis that DNA is a driver of litter autotoxicity and plant-soil NF. The inhibitory effect of decomposed litter was studied in different bioassays. Litter biochemical changes were evaluated with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. DNA accumulation in litter and soil was measured and DNA toxicity was assessed in laboratory experiments. Undecomposed litter caused nonspecific inhibition of root growth, while autotoxicity was produced by aged litter. The addition of activated carbon (AC) removed phytotoxicity, but was ineffective against autotoxicity. Phytotoxicity was related to known labile allelopathic compounds. Restricted (13) C NMR signals related to nucleic acids were the only ones negatively correlated with root growth on conspecific substrates. DNA accumulation was observed in both litter decomposition and soil history experiments. Extracted total DNA showed evident species-specific toxicity. Results indicate a general occurrence of litter autotoxicity related to the exposure to fragmented self-DNA. The evidence also suggests the involvement of accumulated extracellular DNA in plant-soil NF. Further studies are needed to further investigate this unexpected function of extracellular DNA at the ecosystem level and related cellular and molecular mechanisms. PMID:25354164

  17. French Regulatory practice and experience feedback on steam generator tube integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Sandon, G.

    1997-02-01

    This paper summarizes the way the French Safety Authority applies regulatory rules and practices to the problem of steam generator tube cracking in French PWR reactors. There are 54 reactors providing 80% of French electrical consumption. The Safety Authority closely monitors the performance of tubes in steam generators, and requires application of a program which deals with problems prior to the actual development of leakage. The actual rules regarding such performance are flexible, responding to the overall performance of operating steam generators. In addition there is an inservice inspection service to examine tubes during shutdown, and to monitor steam generators for leakage during operation, with guidelines for when generators must be pulled off line.

  18. MicroRNA-7/NF-κB signaling regulatory feedback circuit regulates gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Di; Lu, Yuan-Yuan; Guo, Hao; Xie, Hua-Hong; He, Li-Jie; Shen, Gao-Fei; Zhou, Jin-Feng; Li, Ting; Hu, Si-Jun; Zhou, Lin; Han, Ya-Nan; Liang, Shu-Li; Wang, Xin; Wu, Kai-Chun; Shi, Yong-Quan; Nie, Yong-Zhan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs play essential roles in gene expression regulation during carcinogenesis. Here, we investigated the role of miR-7 and the mechanism by which it is dysregulated in gastric cancer (GC). We used genome-wide screenings and identified RELA and FOS as novel targets of miR-7. Overexpression of miR-7 repressed RELA and FOS expression and prevented GC cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. These effects were clinically relevant, as low miR-7 expression was correlated with high RELA and FOS expression and poor survival in GC patients. Intriguingly, we found that miR-7 indirectly regulated RELA activation by targeting the IκB kinase IKKε. Furthermore, IKKε and RELA can repress miR-7 transcription, which forms a feedback circuit between miR-7 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling. Additionally, we demonstrate that down-regulation of miR-7 may occur as a result of the aberrant activation of NF-κB signaling by Helicobacter pylori infection. These findings suggest that miR-7 may serve as an important regulator in GC development and progression. PMID:26261179

  19. Ligand binding to the inhibitory and stimulatory GTP cyclohydrolase I/GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Hatakeyama, K

    2001-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) mediates feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by 6R-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), which is an essential cofactor for key enzymes producing catecholamines, serotonin, and nitric oxide as well as phenylalanine hydroxylase. GFRP also mediates feed-forward stimulation of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by phenylalanine at subsaturating GTP levels. These ligands, BH4 and phenylalanine, induce complex formation between one molecule of GTP cyclohydrolase I and two molecules of GFRP. Here, we report the analysis of ligand binding using the gel filtration method of Hummel and Dreyer. BH4 binds to the GTP cyclohydrolase I/GFRP complex with a Kd of 4 microM, and phenylalanine binds to the protein complex with a Kd of 94 microM. The binding of BH4 is enhanced by dGTP. The binding stoichiometrics of BH4 and phenylalanine were estimated to be 10 molecules of each per protein complex, in other words, one molecule per subunit of protein, because GTP cyclohydrolase I is a decamer and GFRP is a pentamer. These findings were corroborated by data from equilibrium dialysis experiments. Regarding ligand binding to free proteins, BH4 binds weakly to GTP cyclohydrolase I but not to GFRP, and phenylalanine binds weakly to GFRP but not to GTP cyclohydrolase I. These results suggest that the overall structure of the protein complex contributes to binding of BH4 and phenylalanine but also that each binding site of BH4 and phenylalanine may be primarily composed of residues of GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP, respectively. PMID:11274478

  20. Identification of a negative regulatory domain in the human papillomavirus type 18 promoter: interaction with the transcriptional repressor YY1.

    PubMed Central

    Bauknecht, T; Angel, P; Royer, H D; zur Hausen, H

    1992-01-01

    The human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) promoter contains a TPA responsive element (TRE) which confers TPA responsiveness on a heterologous promoter. In the context of the HPV-18 promoter, however, this AP-1 site is inactive. We have identified a negative regulatory domain in the HPV-18 promoter which represses the constitutive and TPA-induced AP-1 activity. This negative regulatory sequence has been mapped to 44 nucleotides (OL13). We identified this element as a transcriptional silencer based on its ability to interfere with transcriptional initiation. This HPV-18 silencer domain was narrowed down further to 23 nucleotides, the OL13B element, which bears similarity to three other silencer sequences, present in the mouse N-ras gene upstream regulatory region, the mouse albumin gene enhancer and the adeno-associated virus P5 promoter. The transcriptional repressor protein YY1, which negatively regulates the P5 promoter, binds to the HPV-18 silencer with high affinity. Mutation of the YY1 binding site leads to an enhanced activity of the HPV-18 promoter, strongly suggesting that YY1 plays an important role in controlling HPV-18 early gene expression. Images PMID:1330541

  1. EGR1, EGR2, and EGR3 activate the expression of their coregulator NAB2 establishing a negative feedback loop in cells of neuroectodermal and epithelial origin

    PubMed Central

    Kumbrink, Joerg; Kirsch, Kathrin H.; Johnson, Judith P.

    2010-01-01

    The inducible zinc finger transcription factors EGR1, EGR2, and EGR3 regulate the expression of numerous genes involved in differentiation, growth, and response to extracellular signals. Their activity is modulated in part through NAB2 which is induced by the same stimuli. In melanoma and carcinoma cells EGR1 activates NAB2 expression. In T lymphocytes EGR2 and EGR3 have been shown to inhibit NAB2 expression. Therefore, we investigated the influence of EGR2 and EGR3 on NAB2 expression in melanoma and carcinoma cells. Here we show that like EGR1, EGR2 and EGR3 induce NAB2 expression in these cells. EGR1 and EGR3 act in concert on the NAB2 promoter and are more potent activators of NAB2 transcription than EGR2. EGR1-, EGR2-, and EGR3-induced NAB2 promoter activity is mediated through similar cis-regulatory elements and the activation by each EGR is repressed by NAB2. Kinetic studies suggest that induction of EGR1 leads to low NAB2 expression while EGR2 and EGR3 are necessary for maximal and sustained expression. As aleady shown for EGR1, reduction of EGR2 or EGR3 expression by siRNAs reduced endogenous NAB2 levels. Depletion of EGR3 also resulted in a reduction of EGR2 levels confirming EGR2 as a target gene of EGR3. Our results suggest that in many cells of neuroectodermal and epithelial origin EGR1, EGR2, and EGR3 activate NAB2 transcription which is in turn is repressed by NAB2, thus establishing a negative feedback loop. This points to a complex relationship between the EGR factors and NAB2 expression likely depending on the cellular context. PMID:20506119

  2. Low noise InGaAs/InP single-photon negative feedback avalanche diodes: characterization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boso, Gianluca; Korzh, Boris; Lunghi, Tommaso; Zbinden, Hugo

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, many applications have been proposed that require detection of light signals in the near-infrared range with single-photon sensitivity and time resolution down to few hundreds of picoseconds. InGaAs/InP singlephoton avalanche diodes (SPADs) are a viable choice for these tasks thanks to their compactness and ease-of-use. Unfortunately, their performance is traditionally limited by high dark count rates (DCRs) and afterpulsing effects. However, a recent demonstration of negative feedback avalanche diodes (NFADs), operating in the free-running regime, achieved a DCR down to 1 cps at 10 % photon detection efficiency (PDE) at telecom wavelengths. Here we present our recent results on the characterization of NFAD detectors for temperatures down to approximately 150 K. A FPGA controlled test-bench facilitates the acquisition of all the parameters of interest like PDE, DCR, afterpulsing probability etc. We also demonstrate the performance of the detector in different applications: In particular, with low-temperature NFADs, we achieved high secret key rates with quantum key distribution over fiber links between 100-300 km. But low noise InGaAs/InP SPADs will certainly find applications in yet unexplored fields like photodynamic therapy, near infrared diffuse optical spectroscopy and many more. For example with a large area detector, we made time-resolved measurements of singlet-oxygen luminescence from a standard Rose Bengal dye in aqueous solution.

  3. Escalating risk and the moderating effect of resistance to peer influence on the P200 and feedback-related negativity.

    PubMed

    Kiat, John; Straley, Elizabeth; Cheadle, Jacob E

    2016-03-01

    Young people frequently socialize together in contexts that encourage risky decision making, pointing to a need for research into how susceptibility to peer influence is related to individual differences in the neural processing of decisions during sequentially escalating risk. We applied a novel analytic approach to analyze EEG activity from college-going students while they completed the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), a well-established risk-taking propensity assessment. By modeling outcome-processing-related changes in the P200 and feedback-related negativity (FRN) sequentially within each BART trial as a function of pump order as an index of increasing risk, our results suggest that analyzing the BART in a progressive fashion may provide valuable new insights into the temporal neurophysiological dynamics of risk taking. Our results showed that a P200, localized to the left caudate nucleus, and an FRN, localized to the left dACC, were positively correlated with the level of risk taking and reward. Furthermore, consistent with our hypotheses, the rate of change in the FRN was higher among college students with greater self-reported resistance to peer influence. PMID:26416785

  4. The H19/let-7 double-negative feedback loop contributes to glucose metabolism in muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan; Wu, Fuju; Zhou, Jichun; Yan, Lei; Jurczak, Michael J.; Lee, Hui-Young; Yang, Lihua; Mueller, Martin; Zhou, Xiao-Bo; Dandolo, Luisa; Szendroedi, Julia; Roden, Michael; Flannery, Clare; Taylor, Hugh; Carmichael, Gordon G.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Huang, Yingqun

    2014-01-01

    The H19 lncRNA has been implicated in development and growth control and is associated with human genetic disorders and cancer. Acting as a molecular sponge, H19 inhibits microRNA (miRNA) let-7. Here we report that H19 is significantly decreased in muscle of human subjects with type-2 diabetes and insulin resistant rodents. This decrease leads to increased bioavailability of let-7, causing diminished expression of let-7 targets, which is recapitulated in vitro where H19 depletion results in impaired insulin signaling and decreased glucose uptake. Furthermore, acute hyperinsulinemia downregulates H19, a phenomenon that occurs through PI3K/AKT-dependent phosphorylation of the miRNA processing factor KSRP, which promotes biogenesis of let-7 and its mediated H19 destabilization. Our results reveal a previously undescribed double-negative feedback loop between sponge lncRNA and target miRNA that contributes to glucose regulation in muscle cells. PMID:25399420

  5. Negative feedback loop between p66Shc and ZEB1 regulates fibrotic EMT response in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Gao, D; Wang, H; Li, X; Yang, J; Yan, X; Liu, Z; Ma, Z

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program is crucial for the epithelial cancer progression and fibrotic diseases. Our previous work has demonstrated that p66Shc, a focal adhesion-associated adaptor protein, is frequently downregulated in lung cancers and its depletion promotes metastasis behavior through anoikis resistance. However, mechanism underlying loss of p66Shc and EMT response is not fully understood. Here, we showed that p66Shc deficiency enhanced the expression of ZEB1, the known mesenchymal transcription factor and consequently increased Vimentin, and decreased epithelial markers of E-cadherin and β-catenin. p66Shc depletion also increased cell invasion and migration. In addition, ChIP and luciferase assays showed that these effects were directly mediated by ZEB1 repression of p66Shc promoter. Thus, our findings define a critical role of p66Shc in the suppression of fibrotic EMT response with a negative feedback loop between p66Shc and ZEB1 in lung epithelial cancer cells. PMID:25837484

  6. Genetic polymorphisms in circadian negative feedback regulation genes predict overall survival and response to chemotherapy in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Falin; Qiao, Qing; Wang, Nan; Ji, Gang; Zhao, Huadong; He, Li; Wang, Haichao; Bao, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Circadian negative feedback loop (CNFL) genes play important roles in cancer development and progression. To evaluate the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CNFL genes on the survival of GC patients, 13 functional SNPs from 5 CNFL genes were genotyped in a cohort of 1030 resected GC patients (704 in the training set, 326 in the validation set) to explore the association of SNPs with overall survival (OS). Among the 13 SNPs, three SNPs (rs1056560 in CRY1, rs3027178 in PER1 and rs228729 in PER3) were significantly associated with OS of GC in the training set, and verified in the validation set and pooled analysis. Furthermore, a dose-dependent cumulative effect of these SNPs on GC survival was observed, and survival tree analysis showed higher order interactions between these SNPs. In addition, protective effect conferred by adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) on GC was observed in patients with variant alleles (TG/GG) of rs1056560, but not in those with homozygous wild (TT) genotype. Functional assay suggested rs1056560 genotypes significantly affect CRY1 expression in cancer cells. Our study presents that SNPs in the CNFL genes may be associated with GC prognosis, and provides the guidance in selecting potential GC patients most likely responsive to ACT. PMID:26927666

  7. Negative feedback avalanche diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Itzler, Mark Allen (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A single-photon avalanche detector is disclosed that is operable at wavelengths greater than 1000 nm and at operating speeds greater than 10 MHz. The single-photon avalanche detector comprises a thin-film resistor and avalanche photodiode that are monolithically integrated such that little or no additional capacitance is associated with the addition of the resistor.

  8. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder, but Not Panic Anxiety Disorder, Are Associated with Higher Sensitivity to Learning from Negative Feedback: Behavioral and Computational Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Khdour, Hussain Y.; Abushalbaq, Oday M.; Mughrabi, Ibrahim T.; Imam, Aya F.; Gluck, Mark A.; Herzallah, Mohammad M.; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and panic anxiety disorder (PAD), are a group of common psychiatric conditions. They are characterized by excessive worrying, uneasiness, and fear of future events, such that they affect social and occupational functioning. Anxiety disorders can alter behavior and cognition as well, yet little is known about the particular domains they affect. In this study, we tested the cognitive correlates of medication-free patients with GAD, SAD, and PAD, along with matched healthy participants using a probabilistic category-learning task that allows the dissociation between positive and negative feedback learning. We also fitted all participants' data to a Q-learning model and various actor-critic models that examine learning rate parameters from positive and negative feedback to investigate effects of valence vs. action on performance. SAD and GAD patients were more sensitive to negative feedback than either PAD patients or healthy participants. PAD, SAD, and GAD patients did not differ in positive-feedback learning compared to healthy participants. We found that Q-learning models provide the simplest fit of the data in comparison to other models. However, computational analysis revealed that groups did not differ in terms of learning rate or exploration values. These findings argue that (a) not all anxiety spectrum disorders share similar cognitive correlates, but are rather different in ways that do not link them to the hallmark of anxiety (higher sensitivity to negative feedback); and (b) perception of negative consequences is the core feature of GAD and SAD, but not PAD. Further research is needed to examine the similarities and differences between anxiety spectrum disorders in other cognitive domains and potential implementation of behavioral therapy to remediate cognitive deficits. PMID:27445719

  9. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder, but Not Panic Anxiety Disorder, Are Associated with Higher Sensitivity to Learning from Negative Feedback: Behavioral and Computational Investigation.

    PubMed

    Khdour, Hussain Y; Abushalbaq, Oday M; Mughrabi, Ibrahim T; Imam, Aya F; Gluck, Mark A; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and panic anxiety disorder (PAD), are a group of common psychiatric conditions. They are characterized by excessive worrying, uneasiness, and fear of future events, such that they affect social and occupational functioning. Anxiety disorders can alter behavior and cognition as well, yet little is known about the particular domains they affect. In this study, we tested the cognitive correlates of medication-free patients with GAD, SAD, and PAD, along with matched healthy participants using a probabilistic category-learning task that allows the dissociation between positive and negative feedback learning. We also fitted all participants' data to a Q-learning model and various actor-critic models that examine learning rate parameters from positive and negative feedback to investigate effects of valence vs. action on performance. SAD and GAD patients were more sensitive to negative feedback than either PAD patients or healthy participants. PAD, SAD, and GAD patients did not differ in positive-feedback learning compared to healthy participants. We found that Q-learning models provide the simplest fit of the data in comparison to other models. However, computational analysis revealed that groups did not differ in terms of learning rate or exploration values. These findings argue that (a) not all anxiety spectrum disorders share similar cognitive correlates, but are rather different in ways that do not link them to the hallmark of anxiety (higher sensitivity to negative feedback); and (b) perception of negative consequences is the core feature of GAD and SAD, but not PAD. Further research is needed to examine the similarities and differences between anxiety spectrum disorders in other cognitive domains and potential implementation of behavioral therapy to remediate cognitive deficits. PMID:27445719

  10. Estradiol, but not testosterone, heightens cortisol-mediated negative feedback on pulsatile ACTH secretion and ACTH approximate entropy in unstressed older men and women.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Animesh N; Aoun, Paul; Wigham, Jean R; Weist, Suanne M; Veldhuis, Johannes D

    2014-05-01

    How sex steroids modulate glucocorticoid feedback on the hypothalamic-pituitary-corticotrope (HPC) unit is controversial in humans. We postulated that testosterone (T) in men and estradiol (E2) in women govern unstressed cortisol-mediated negative feedback on ACTH secretion. To test this hypothesis, 24 men and 24 women age 58 ± 2.4 yr were pretreated with leuprolide and either sex steroid (E2 in women, T in men) or placebo addback. Placebo or ketoconazole (KTCZ) was administered overnight to inhibit adrenal steroidogenesis during overnight 14-h intravenous infusions of saline or cortisol in a continuous versus pulsatile manner to test for feedback differences. ACTH was measured every 10 min during the last 8 h of the infusions. The main outcome measures were mean ACTH concentrations, pulsatile ACTH secretion, and ACTH approximate entropy (ApEn). ACTH concentrations were lower in women than men (P < 0.01), and in women in the E2+ compared with E2- group under both continuous (P = 0.01) and pulsatile (P = 0.006) cortisol feedback, despite higher cortisol binding globulin and lower free cortisol levels in women than men (P < 0.01). In the combined groups, under both modes of cortisol addback, ACTH concentrations, pulsatile ACTH secretion, and ACTH secretory-burst mass correlated negatively and univariately with E2 levels (each P < 0.005). E2 also suppressed ACTH ApEn (process randomness) during continuous cortisol feedback (P = 0.004). T had no univariate effect but was a positive correlate of ACTH when assessed jointly with E2 (negative) under cortisol pulses. In conclusion, sex steroids modulate selective gender-related hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal-axis adaptations to cortisol feedback in unstressed humans. PMID:24573184

  11. FOXP3 controls an miR-146/NFκB negative feedback loop that inhibits apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhua; Liu, Cong; Chen, Dongquan; Yang, Wei-Hsiung; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-Gong; Dugas, Courtney M.; Tang, Fei; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    FOXP3 functions not only as the master regulator in regulatory T cells but also as an X-linked tumor suppressor. The tumor suppressive activity of FOXP3 has been observed in tumor initiation, but its role during tumor progression remains controversial. Moreover, the mechanism of FOXP3-mediated tumor suppressive activity remains largely unknown. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing, we identified a series of potential FOXP3-targeted microRNAs (miRs) in MCF7 cells. Notably, FOXP3 significantly induced the expression of miR-146a/b. In vitro, FOXP3-induced miR-146a/b prevented tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis. Functional analyses in vitro and in vivo revealed that FOXP3-induced miR-146a/b negatively regulate NF-κB activation by inhibiting the expression of IRAK1 and TRAF6. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, FOXP3 directly bound the promoter region of miR-146a but not of miR-146b, and FOXP3 interacted directly with NF-κB p65 to regulate an miR-146-NF-κB negative feedback regulation loop in normal breast epithelial and tumor cells, as demonstrated with luciferase reporter assays. Although FOXP3 significantly inhibited breast tumor growth and migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo, FOXP3-induced miR-146a/b contributed only to the inhibition of breast tumor growth. These data suggest that miR-146a/b contribute to FOXP3-mediated tumor suppression during tumor growth by triggering apoptosis. The identification of a FOXP3-miR-146-NF-κB axis provides an underlying mechanism for disruption of miR-146 family member expression and constitutive NF-κB activation in breast cancer cells. Linking the tumor suppressor function of FOXP3 to NF-κB activation reveals a potential therapeutic approach for cancers with FOXP3 defects. PMID:25712342

  12. A self-adjusting negative feedback joint controller for legs standing on moving substrates of unknown compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Axel; Cruse, Holk; Fischer, Björn; Schmitz, Josef

    2007-05-01

    Some recent robot controllers for hexapod walking have been developed based on investigations of stick insects. These animals live in an unpredictable environment that consists of twigs and leaves. Supports like twigs, leaves and branches induce a considerable amount of movement to the legs and their elastic joints. Earlier studies proposed negative feedback PD-controllers to regulate the angles of the knee joints to handle this situation. Recent studies suggest that the behaviour of the joint controller depends on the compliance of the substrate the insect is standing on. On highly elastic substrates (e.g. leaves) the joint controller exhibits an I-characteristic. Deviations from the original position are compensated completely. On moderately elastic substrates (e.g. twigs) the joint controller comprises a P-characteristic. The leg attains a resting position that differs from the original position through application of a specific compensation force. On stiff substrates the knee joint seems to be controlled by a D-controller. If the leg endpoint is forced away from the original position by an external disturbance (e.g. a moving branch), the controller compensates this deviation by activation of the according muscle which results in a counter force. After some time the controller seems to "give up." The force decreases to zero. To model these results, we propose a self-adjusting joint controller that changes its own setpoint in dependance of the substrate stiffness. The substrate stiffness is determined by means of a correlator circuit that compares (superimposed) movement commands with the actual responses of the leg joint. The new controller can be used for the control of legged robots.

  13. GTP Cyclohydrolase I Expression, Protein, and Activity Determine Intracellular Tetrahydrobiopterin Levels, Independent of GTP Cyclohydrolase Feedback Regulatory Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Amy L.; Crabtree, Mark J.; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2009-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  14. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  15. Overexpression of GTP Cyclohydrolase 1 Feedback Regulatory Protein Is Protective in a Murine Model of Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Anna; Sand, Claire A.; Heikal, Lamia; Kelly, Peter D.; Spina, Domenico; Crabtree, Mark; Channon, Keith M.; Leiper, James M.; Nandi, Manasi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase contributes toward refractory hypotension, impaired microvascular perfusion, and end-organ damage in septic shock patients. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential NOS cofactor. GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for BH4 biosynthesis. Under inflammatory conditions, GCH1 activity and hence BH4 levels are increased, supporting pathological NOS activity. GCH1 activity can be controlled through allosteric interactions with GCH1 feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We investigated whether overexpression of GFRP can regulate BH4 and NO production and attenuate cardiovascular dysfunction in sepsis. Sepsis was induced in mice conditionally overexpressing GFRP and wild-type littermates by cecal ligation and puncture. Blood pressure was monitored by radiotelemetry, and mesenteric blood flow was quantified by laser speckle contrast imaging. Blood biochemistry data were obtained using an iSTAT analyzer, and BH4 levels were measured in plasma and tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography. Increased BH4 and NO production and hypotension were observed in all mice, but the extents of these pathophysiological changes were attenuated in GFRP OE mice. Perturbations in blood biochemistry were similarly attenuated in GFRP OE compared with wild-type controls. These results suggest that GFRP overexpression regulates GCH1 activity during septic shock, which in turn limits BH4 bioavailability for iNOS. We conclude that the GCH1-GFRP axis is a critical regulator of BH4 and NO production and the cardiovascular derangements that occur in septic shock. PMID:25046538

  16. Overexpression of GTP cyclohydrolase 1 feedback regulatory protein is protective in a murine model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Starr, Anna; Sand, Claire A; Heikal, Lamia; Kelly, Peter D; Spina, Domenico; Crabtree, Mark; Channon, Keith M; Leiper, James M; Nandi, Manasi

    2014-11-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase contributes toward refractory hypotension, impaired microvascular perfusion, and end-organ damage in septic shock patients. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential NOS cofactor. GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for BH4 biosynthesis. Under inflammatory conditions, GCH1 activity and hence BH4 levels are increased, supporting pathological NOS activity. GCH1 activity can be controlled through allosteric interactions with GCH1 feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We investigated whether overexpression of GFRP can regulate BH4 and NO production and attenuate cardiovascular dysfunction in sepsis. Sepsis was induced in mice conditionally overexpressing GFRP and wild-type littermates by cecal ligation and puncture. Blood pressure was monitored by radiotelemetry, and mesenteric blood flow was quantified by laser speckle contrast imaging. Blood biochemistry data were obtained using an iSTAT analyzer, and BH4 levels were measured in plasma and tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography. Increased BH4 and NO production and hypotension were observed in all mice, but the extents of these pathophysiological changes were attenuated in GFRP OE mice. Perturbations in blood biochemistry were similarly attenuated in GFRP OE compared with wild-type controls. These results suggest that GFRP overexpression regulates GCH1 activity during septic shock, which in turn limits BH4 bioavailability for iNOS. We conclude that the GCH1-GFRP axis is a critical regulator of BH4 and NO production and the cardiovascular derangements that occur in septic shock. PMID:25046538

  17. Validating the GTP-cyclohydrolase 1-feedback regulatory complex as a therapeutic target using biophysical and in vivo approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, D; Starr, A; Heikal, L; McNeill, E; Channon, K M; Brown, P R; Sutton, B J; McDonnell, J M; Nandi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose 6R-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for nitric oxide biosynthesis. Substantial clinical evidence indicates that intravenous BH4 restores vascular function in patients. Unfortunately, oral BH4 has limited efficacy. Therefore, orally bioavailable pharmacological activators of endogenous BH4 biosynthesis hold significant therapeutic potential. GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1), the rate limiting enzyme in BH4 synthesis, forms a protein complex with GCH1 feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). This complex is subject to allosteric feed-forward activation by L-phenylalanine (L-phe). We investigated the effects of L-phe on the biophysical interactions of GCH1 and GFRP and its potential to alter BH4 levels in vivo. Experimental Approach Detailed characterization of GCH1–GFRP protein–protein interactions were performed using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with or without L-phe. Effects on systemic and vascular BH4 biosynthesis in vivo were investigated following L-phe treatment (100 mg·kg−1, p.o.). Key Results GCH1 and GFRP proteins interacted in the absence of known ligands or substrate but the presence of L-phe doubled maximal binding and enhanced binding affinity eightfold. Furthermore, the complex displayed very slow association and dissociation rates. In vivo, L-phe challenge induced a sustained elevation of aortic BH4, an effect absent in GCH1(fl/fl)-Tie2Cre mice. Conclusions and Implications Biophysical data indicate that GCH1 and GFRP are constitutively bound. In vivo, data demonstrated that L-phe elevated vascular BH4 in an endothelial GCH1 dependent manner. Pharmacological agents which mimic the allosteric effects of L-phe on the GCH1–GFRP complex have the potential to elevate endothelial BH4 biosynthesis for numerous cardiovascular disorders. PMID:26014146

  18. The role of mRNA and protein stability in the function of coupled positive and negative feedback systems in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Moss Bendtsen, Kristian; Jensen, Mogens H; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Oscillators and switches are important elements of regulation in biological systems. These are composed of coupling negative feedback loops, which cause oscillations when delayed, and positive feedback loops, which lead to memory formation. Here, we examine the behavior of a coupled feedback system, the Negative Autoregulated Frustrated bistability motif (NAF). This motif is a combination of two previously explored motifs, the frustrated bistability motif (FBM) and the negative auto regulation motif (NAR), which both can produce oscillations. The NAF motif was previously suggested to govern long term memory formation in animals, and was used as a synthetic oscillator in bacteria. We build a mathematical model to analyze the dynamics of the NAF motif. We show analytically that the NAF motif requires an asymmetry in the strengths of activation and repression links in order to produce oscillations. We show that the effect of time delays in eukaryotic cells, originating from mRNA export and protein import, are negligible in this system. Based on the reported protein and mRNA half-lives in eukaryotic cells, we find that even though the NAF motif possesses the ability for oscillations, it mostly promotes constant protein expression at the biologically relevant parameter regimes. PMID:26365394

  19. The role of mRNA and protein stability in the function of coupled positive and negative feedback systems in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Moss Bendtsen, Kristian; Jensen, Mogens H.; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Oscillators and switches are important elements of regulation in biological systems. These are composed of coupling negative feedback loops, which cause oscillations when delayed, and positive feedback loops, which lead to memory formation. Here, we examine the behavior of a coupled feedback system, the Negative Autoregulated Frustrated bistability motif (NAF). This motif is a combination of two previously explored motifs, the frustrated bistability motif (FBM) and the negative auto regulation motif (NAR), which both can produce oscillations. The NAF motif was previously suggested to govern long term memory formation in animals, and was used as a synthetic oscillator in bacteria. We build a mathematical model to analyze the dynamics of the NAF motif. We show analytically that the NAF motif requires an asymmetry in the strengths of activation and repression links in order to produce oscillations. We show that the effect of time delays in eukaryotic cells, originating from mRNA export and protein import, are negligible in this system. Based on the reported protein and mRNA half-lives in eukaryotic cells, we find that even though the NAF motif possesses the ability for oscillations, it mostly promotes constant protein expression at the biologically relevant parameter regimes. PMID:26365394

  20. Trauma Exposure and Cigarette Smoking: The Impact of Negative Affect and Affect-Regulatory Smoking Motives

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Samantha G.; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Beckham, Jean C.; Vujanovic, Anka A.; Schmidt, Norman B.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive-affective mechanisms related to the maintenance of smoking among trauma-exposed individuals are largely unknown. Cross-sectional data from trauma-exposed treatment-seeking smokers (n = 283) were utilized to test a series of multiple mediator models of trauma exposure and smoking, as mediated by the sequential effects of negative affect and affect-modulation smoking motives. The sequential effects of both mediators indirectly predicted the effect of greater trauma exposure types on nicotine dependence, a biochemical index of smoking, perceived barriers to smoking cessation, and greater withdrawal-related problems during past quit attempts. Negative affect and affect-modulation motives for smoking may contribute to the trauma-smoking association. PMID:25299617

  1. Trauma exposure and cigarette smoking: the impact of negative affect and affect-regulatory smoking motives.

    PubMed

    Farris, Samantha G; Zvolensky, Michael J; Beckham, Jean C; Vujanovic, Anka A; Schmidt, Norman B

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive-affective mechanisms related to the maintenance of smoking among trauma-exposed individuals are largely unknown. Cross-sectional data from trauma-exposed treatment-seeking smokers (n = 283) were utilized to test a series of multiple mediator models of trauma exposure and smoking, as mediated by the sequential effects of negative affect and affect-modulation smoking motives. The sequential effects of both mediators indirectly predicted the effect of greater trauma exposure types on nicotine dependence, a biochemical index of smoking, perceived barriers to smoking cessation, and greater withdrawal-related problems during past quit attempts. Negative affect and affect-modulation motives for smoking may contribute to the trauma-smoking association. PMID:25299617

  2. Identification of a negative regulatory role for spi-C in the murine B cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Li, Stephen K H; Solomon, Lauren A; Fulkerson, Patricia C; DeKoter, Rodney P

    2015-04-15

    Spi-C is an E26 transformation-specific family transcription factor that is highly related to PU.1 and Spi-B. Spi-C is expressed in developing B cells, but its function in B cell development and function is not well characterized. To determine whether Spi-C functions as a negative regulator of Spi-B (encoded by Spib), mice were generated that were germline knockout for Spib and heterozygous for Spic (Spib(-/-)Spic(+/-)). Interestingly, loss of one Spic allele substantially rescued B cell frequencies and absolute numbers in Spib(-/-) mouse spleens. Spib(-/-)Spic(+/-) B cells had restored proliferation compared with Spib(-/-) B cells in response to anti-IgM or LPS stimulation. Investigation of a potential mechanism for the Spib(-/-)Spic(+/-) phenotype revealed that steady-state levels of Nfkb1, encoding p50, were elevated in Spib(-/-)Spic(+/-) B cells compared with Spib(-/-) B cells. Spi-B was shown to directly activate the Nfkb1 gene, whereas Spi-C was shown to repress this gene. These results indicate a novel role for Spi-C as a negative regulator of B cell development and function. PMID:25769919

  3. Negative prognostic impact of regulatory T cell infiltration in surgically resected esophageal cancer post-radiochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Semeraro, Michaela; Enot, David P; Chaba, Kariman; Poirier Colame, Vichnou; Dartigues, Peggy; Perier, Aurelie; Villa, Irene; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Gronnier, Caroline; Goéré, Diane; Mariette, Christophe; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-08-28

    Ever accumulating evidence indicates that the long-term effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy largely depend on the induction (or restoration) of an anticancer immune response. Here, we investigated this paradigm in the context of esophageal carcinomas treated by neo-adjuvant radiochemotherapy, in a cohort encompassing 196 patients. We found that the density of the FOXP3+ regulatory T cell (Treg) infiltrate present in the residual tumor (or its scar) correlated with the pathological response (the less Tregs the more pronounced was the histological response) and predicted cancer-specific survival. In contrast, there was no significant clinical impact of the frequency of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. At difference with breast or colorectal cancer, a loss-of-function allele of toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) improved cancer-specific survival of patients with esophageal cancer. While a loss-of-function allele of purinergic receptor P2X, ligand-gated ion channel, 7 (P2RX7) failed to affect cancer-specific survival, its presence did correlate with an increase in Treg infiltration. Altogether, these results corroborate the notion that the immunosurveillance seals the fate of patients with esophageal carcinomas treated with conventional radiochemotherapy. PMID:26369701

  4. The CaM Kinase CMK-1 Mediates a Negative Feedback Mechanism Coupling the C. elegans Glutamate Receptor GLR-1 with Its Own Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Benjamin J.; Park, Lidia; Dahlberg, Caroline L.; Juo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of synaptic AMPA receptor levels is a major mechanism underlying homeostatic synaptic scaling. While in vitro studies have implicated several molecules in synaptic scaling, the in vivo mechanisms linking chronic changes in synaptic activity to alterations in AMPA receptor expression are not well understood. Here we use a genetic approach in C. elegans to dissect a negative feedback pathway coupling levels of the AMPA receptor GLR-1 with its own transcription. GLR-1 trafficking mutants with decreased synaptic receptors in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) exhibit compensatory increases in glr-1 mRNA, which can be attributed to increased glr-1 transcription. Glutamatergic transmission mutants lacking presynaptic eat-4/VGLUT or postsynaptic glr-1, exhibit compensatory increases in glr-1 transcription, suggesting that loss of GLR-1 activity is sufficient to trigger the feedback pathway. Direct and specific inhibition of GLR-1-expressing neurons using a chemical genetic silencing approach also results in increased glr-1 transcription. Conversely, expression of a constitutively active version of GLR-1 results in decreased glr-1 transcription, suggesting that bidirectional changes in GLR-1 signaling results in reciprocal alterations in glr-1 transcription. We identify the CMK-1/CaMK signaling axis as a mediator of the glr-1 transcriptional feedback mechanism. Loss-of-function mutations in the upstream kinase ckk-1/CaMKK, the CaM kinase cmk-1/CaMK, or a downstream transcription factor crh-1/CREB, result in increased glr-1 transcription, suggesting that the CMK-1 signaling pathway functions to repress glr-1 transcription. Genetic double mutant analyses suggest that CMK-1 signaling is required for the glr-1 transcriptional feedback pathway. Furthermore, alterations in GLR-1 signaling that trigger the feedback mechanism also regulate the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of CMK-1, and activated, nuclear-localized CMK-1 blocks the feedback pathway. We propose a model in

  5. IDO expression in brain tumors increases the recruitment of regulatory T cells and negatively impacts survival

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Derek A.; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Chang, Alan L.; Ahmed, Atique U.; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Auffinger, Brenda; Tobias, Alex L.; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive adult brain tumor with a poor prognosis. One hallmark of GBM is the accumulation of immunosuppressive and tumor-promoting CD4+FoxP3+GITR+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here, we investigated the role of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) in brain tumors and the impact on Treg recruitment. Experimental Design To determine the clinical relevance of IDO expression in brain tumors, we first correlated patient survival to the level of IDO expression from resected glioma specimens. We also used novel orthotopic and transgenic models of glioma to study how IDO affects Tregs. The impact of tumor-derived and peripheral IDO expression on Treg recruitment, GITR expression and long-term survival was determined. Results Downregulated IDO expression in glioma predicted a significantly better prognosis in patients. Co-incidently, both IDO -competent and -deficient mice showed a survival advantage bearing IDO-deficient brain tumors, when compared to IDO-competent brain tumors. Moreover, IDO-deficiency was associated with a significant decrease in brain-resident Tregs, both in orthotopic and transgenic mouse glioma models. IDO-deficiency was also associated with lower GITR expression levels on Tregs. Interestingly, the long-term survival advantage conferred by IDO-deficiency was lost in T cell-deficient mice. Conclusions These clinical and pre-clinical data confirm that IDO expression increases the recruitment of immunosuppressive Tregs which leads to tumor outgrowth. In contrast, IDO deficiency decreases Treg recruitment and enhances T cell-mediated tumor rejection. Thus, the data suggest a critical role for IDO-mediated immunosuppression in glioma and supports the continued investigation of IDO-Treg interactions in the context of brain tumors. PMID:22932670

  6. A minimal RNA polymerase III transcription system from human cells reveals positive and negative regulatory roles for CK2.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Wu, Si; Hernandez, Nouria

    2003-09-01

    In higher eukaryotes, RNA polymerase (pol) III is known to use different transcription factors to recognize three basic types of promoters, but in no case have these transcription factors been completely defined. We show that a highly purified pol III complex combined with the recombinant transcription factors SNAP(c), TBP, Brf2, and Bdp1 directs multiple rounds of transcription initiation and termination from the human U6 promoter. The pol III complex contains traces of CK2, and CK2 associates with the U6 promoter region in vivo. Transcription requires CK2 phosphorylation of the pol III complex. In contrast, CK2 phosphorylation of TBP, Brf2, and Bdp1 combined is inhibitory. The results define a minimum core machinery, the ultimate target of regulatory mechanisms, capable of directing all steps of the transcription process-initiation, elongation, and termination-by a metazoan RNA polymerase, and suggest positive and negative regulatory roles for CK2 in transcription by pol III. PMID:14527415

  7. A patient-specific model of the negative-feedback control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Pandiyan, Balamurugan; Merrill, Stephen J; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of modelling the negative-feedback control mechanism of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis is to describe the clinical course of euthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and overt hypothyroidism for patients. Thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels are controlled by negative-feedback control through thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). T4, like other hormones, can be bound or unbound; the unbound T4 (FT4) is used as a marker for hypothyroidism. Autoimmune thyroiditis is a disease in which the thyroid-infiltrating lymphocytes attack autoantigens in follicle cells, destroying them over a long time. To describe the operation of the feedback control, we developed a mathematical model involving four clinical variables: TSH, FT4, anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies and the thyroid gland's functional size. The first three variables are regularly measured while the last variable is determined through relationships between the other three variables. The problem of two different time scales for circulating hormones and thyroid damage is addressed using singular perturbation theory. Analysis of the mathematical model establishes stability and conditions under which the diseased state can maintain the slow movement toward diseased state equilibrium. Although we have used four variables in modelling the feedback control through the HPT axis, the predicted clinical course given any set of parameters is shown to depend on the steady-state levels of TSH and FT4. This observation makes possible the development of the clinical charts based only on the levels of TSH, time and potential steady-state values. To validate the model predictions, a dataset obtained from a Sicilian adult population has been employed. PMID:23639794

  8. Reciprocal relationships between behaviour and parasites suggest that negative feedback may drive flexibility in male reproductive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Snider, Matthew H

    2016-05-25

    Parasites are ubiquitous components of the environment that contribute to behavioural and life-history variation among hosts. Although it is well known that host behaviour can affect parasite infection risk and that parasites can alter host behaviour, the potential for dynamic feedback between these processes is poorly characterized. Using Grant's gazelle (Nanger granti) as a model, we tested for reciprocal effects of behaviour on parasites and parasites on behaviour to understand whether behaviour-parasite feedback could play a role in maintaining variation in male reproductive behaviour. Adult male gazelles either defend territories to attract mates or reside in bachelor groups. Territoriality is highly variable both within- and between-individuals, suggesting that territory maintenance is costly. Using a combination of longitudinal and experimental studies, we found that individual males transition frequently between territorial and bachelor reproductive status, and that elevated parasite burdens are a cost of territoriality. Moreover, among territorial males, parasites suppress aspects of behaviour related to territory maintenance and defence. These results suggest that territorial behaviour promotes the accumulation of parasites in males, and these parasites dampen the very behaviours required for territory maintenance. Our findings suggest that reciprocal feedback between host behaviour and parasitism could be a mechanism maintaining variation in male reproductive behaviour in the system. PMID:27194703

  9. Dual Masking of Specific Negative Splicing Regulatory Elements Resulted in Maximal Exon 7 Inclusion of SMN2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Pao, Peng Wen; Wee, Keng Boon; Yee, Woon Chee; DwiPramono, Zacharias Aloysius

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a fatal autosomal recessive disease caused by survival motor neuron (SMN) protein insufficiency due to SMN1 mutations. Boosting SMN2 expression is a potential therapy for SMA. SMN2 has identical coding sequence as SMN1 except for a silent C-to-T transition at the 6th nucleotide of exon 7, converting a splicing enhancer to a silencer motif. Consequently, most SMN2 transcripts lack exon 7. More than ten putative splicing regulatory elements (SREs) were reported to regulate exon 7 splicing. To investigate the relative strength of each negative SRE in inhibiting exon 7 inclusion, antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) were used to mask each element, and the fold increase of full-length SMN transcripts containing exon 7 were compared. The most potent negative SREs are at intron 7 (in descending order): ISS-N1, 3′ splice site of exon 8 (ex8 3′ss) and ISS+100. Dual-targeting AONs were subsequently used to mask two nonadjacent SREs simultaneously. Notably, masking of both ISS-N1 and ex8 3′ss induced the highest fold increase of full-length SMN transcripts and proteins. Therefore, efforts should be directed towards the two elements simultaneously for the development of optimal AONs for SMA therapy. PMID:24317636

  10. GTP cyclohydrolase I inhibition by the prototypic inhibitor 2, 4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine. Mechanisms and unanticipated role of GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Xie, L; Smith, J A; Gross, S S

    1998-08-14

    2,4-Diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP) is considered to be a selective and direct-acting inhibitor of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway for synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Accordingly, DAHP has been widely employed to distinguish whether de novo BH4 synthesis is required in a given biological system. Although it has been assumed that DAHP inhibits GTPCH by direct competition with substrate GTP, this has never been formally demonstrated. In view of apparent structural homology between DAHP and BH4, we questioned whether DAHP may mimic BH4 in its inhibition of GTPCH by an indirect mechanism, involving interaction with a recently cloned 9.5-kDa protein termed GTPCH Feedback Regulatory Protein (GFRP). We show by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction that GFRP mRNA is constitutively expressed in rat aortic smooth muscle cells and further induced by treatment with immunostimulants. Moreover, functional GFRP is expressed and immunostimulant-induced BH4 accumulates in sufficient quantity to trigger feedback inhibition of GTPCH. Studies with DAHP reveal that GFRP is also essential to achieve potent inhibition of GTPCH. Indeed, DAHP inhibits GTPCH by dual mechanisms. At a relatively low concentration, DAHP emulates BH4 and engages the GFRP-dependent feedback inhibitory system; at higher concentrations, DAHP competes directly for binding with GTP substrate. This knowledge predicts that DAHP would preferably target GTPCH in tissues with abundant GFRP. PMID:9694862