Science.gov

Sample records for negatively charged molecules

  1. Astronomers Discover First Negatively-charged Molecule in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Cambridge, MA - Astronomers have discovered the first negatively charged molecule in space, identifying it from radio signals that were a mystery until now. While about 130 neutral and 14 positively charged molecules are known to exist in interstellar space, this is the first negative molecule, or anion, to be found. "We've spotted a rare and exotic species, like the white tiger of space," said astronomer Michael McCarthy of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). By learning more about the rich broth of chemicals found in interstellar space, astronomers hope to explain how the young Earth converted these basic ingredients into the essential chemicals for life. This new finding helps to advance scientists' understanding of the chemistry of the interstellar medium, and hence the birthplaces of planets. McCarthy worked with CfA colleagues Carl Gottlieb, Harshal Gupta (also from the Univ. of Texas), and Patrick Thaddeus to identify the molecular anion known as C6H-: a linear chain of six carbon atoms with one hydrogen atom at the end and an "extra" electron. Such molecules were thought to be extremely rare because ultraviolet light that suffuses space easily knocks electrons off molecules. The large size of C6H-, larger than most neutral and all positive molecules known in space, may increase its stability in the harsh cosmic environment. "The discovery of C6H- resolves a long-standing enigma in astrochemistry: the apparent lack of negatively charged molecules in space," stated Thaddeus. The team first conducted laboratory experiments to determine exactly what radio frequencies to use in their search. Then, they used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to hunt for C6H- in celestial objects. In particular, they targeted locations in which previous searches had spotted unidentified radio signals at the appropriate frequencies. They found C6H- in two very different locations-a shell of gas surrounding the evolved red giant

  2. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Christophorou, L G

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules area discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to "hot" molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules ("electron affinity"), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies. PMID:7428744

  3. Increasing the Net Negative Charge by Replacement of DOTA Chelator with DOTAGA Improves the Biodistribution of Radiolabeled Second-Generation Synthetic Affibody Molecules.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Kristina; Honarvar, Hadis; Norrström, Emily; Strand, Joanna; Mitran, Bogdan; Orlova, Anna; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A promising strategy to enable patient stratification for targeted therapies is to monitor the target expression in a tumor by radionuclide molecular imaging. Affibody molecules (7 kDa) are nonimmunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a 25-fold smaller size than intact antibodies. They have shown an apparent potential as molecular imaging probes both in preclinical and clinical studies. Earlier, we found that hepatic uptake can be reduced by the incorporation of negatively charged purification tags at the N-terminus of Affibody molecules. We hypothesized that liver uptake might similarly be reduced by positioning the chelator at the N-terminus, where the chelator-radionuclide complex will provide negative charges. To test this hypothesis, a second generation synthetic anti-HER2 ZHER2:2891 Affibody molecule was synthesized and labeled with (111)In and (68)Ga using DOTAGA and DOTA chelators. The chelators were manually coupled to the N-terminus of ZHER2:2891 forming an amide bond. Labeling DOTAGA-ZHER2:2891 and DOTA-ZHER2:2891 with (68)Ga and (111)In resulted in stable radioconjugates. The tumor-targeting and biodistribution properties of the (111)In- and (68)Ga-labeled conjugates were compared in SKOV-3 tumor-bearing nude mice at 2 h postinjection. The HER2-specific binding of the radioconjugates was verified both in vitro and in vivo. Using the DOTAGA chelator gave significantly lower radioactivity in liver and blood for both radionuclides. The (111)In-labeled conjugates showed more rapid blood clearance than the (68)Ga-labeled conjugates. The most pronounced influence of the chelators was found when they were labeled with (68)Ga. The DOTAGA chelator gave significantly higher tumor-to-blood (61 ± 6 vs 23 ± 5, p < 0.05) and tumor-to-liver (10.4 ± 0.6 vs 4.5 ± 0.5, p < 0.05) ratios than the DOTA chelator. This study demonstrated that chelators may be used to alter the uptake of Affibody molecules, and most likely other scaffold-based imaging probes, for improvement

  4. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Anup K.; Neyer, David W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Garguilo, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  5. Arabinogalactan proteins are incorporated in negatively charged coffee brew melanoidins.

    PubMed

    Bekedam, E Koen; De Laat, Marieke P F C; Schols, Henk A; Van Boekel, Martinus A J S; Smit, Gerrit

    2007-02-01

    The charge properties of melanoidins in high molecular weight (HMw) coffee brew fractions, isolated by diafiltration and membrane dialysis, were studied. Ion exchange chromatography experiments with the HMw fractions showed that coffee brew melanoidins were negatively charged whereas these molecules did not expose any positive charge at the pH of coffee brew. Fractions with different ionic charges were isolated and subsequently characterized by means of the specific extinction coefficient (K(mix 405nm)), sugar composition, phenolic group content, nitrogen content, and the arabinogalactan protein (AGP) specific Yariv gel-diffusion assay. The isolated fractions were different in composition and AGP was found to be present in one of the HMw fractions. The AGP accounted for 6% of the coffee brew dry matter and had a moderate negative charge, probably caused by the presence of uronic acids. As the fraction that precipitated with Yariv was brown (K(mix 405nm) = 1.2), compared to a white color in the green bean, it was concluded that these AGPs had undergone Maillard reaction resulting in an AGP-melanoidin complex. The presence of mannose (presumably from galactomannan) indicates the incorporation of galactomannans in the AGP-melanoidin complex. As the uronic acid content in the more negatively charged melanoidin-rich, AGP-poor HMw fractions decreased, it was hypothesized that acidic groups are formed or incorporated during melanoidin formation. PMID:17263472

  6. Membrane Permeabilization Induced by Sphingosine: Effect of Negatively Charged Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Rojo, Noemi; Sot, Jesús; Viguera, Ana R.; Collado, M. Isabel; Torrecillas, Alejandro; Gómez-Fernández, J.C.; Goñi, Félix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine [(2S, 3R, 4E)-2-amino-4-octadecen-1, 3-diol] is the most common sphingoid long chain base in sphingolipids. It is the precursor of important cell signaling molecules, such as ceramides. In the last decade it has been shown to act itself as a potent metabolic signaling molecule, by activating a number of protein kinases. Moreover, sphingosine has been found to permeabilize phospholipid bilayers, giving rise to vesicle leakage. The present contribution intends to analyze the mechanism by which this bioactive lipid induces vesicle contents release, and the effect of negatively charged bilayers in the release process. Fluorescence lifetime measurements and confocal fluorescence microscopy have been applied to observe the mechanism of sphingosine efflux from large and giant unilamellar vesicles; a graded-release efflux has been detected. Additionally, stopped-flow measurements have shown that the rate of vesicle permeabilization increases with sphingosine concentration. Because at the physiological pH sphingosine has a net positive charge, its interaction with negatively charged phospholipids (e.g., bilayers containing phosphatidic acid together with sphingomyelins, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol) gives rise to a release of vesicular contents, faster than with electrically neutral bilayers. Furthermore, phosphorous 31-NMR and x-ray data show the capacity of sphingosine to facilitate the formation of nonbilayer (cubic phase) intermediates in negatively charged membranes. The data might explain the pathogenesis of Niemann-Pick type C1 disease. PMID:24940775

  7. Negatively Charged Lipid Membranes Catalyze Supramolecular Hydrogel Formation.

    PubMed

    Versluis, Frank; van Elsland, Daphne M; Mytnyk, Serhii; Perrier, Dayinta L; Trausel, Fanny; Poolman, Jos M; Maity, Chandan; le Sage, Vincent A A; van Kasteren, Sander I; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2016-07-20

    In this contribution we show that biological membranes can catalyze the formation of supramolecular hydrogel networks. Negatively charged lipid membranes can generate a local proton gradient, accelerating the acid-catalyzed formation of hydrazone-based supramolecular gelators near the membrane. Synthetic lipid membranes can be used to tune the physical properties of the resulting multicomponent gels as a function of lipid concentration. Moreover, the catalytic activity of lipid membranes and the formation of gel networks around these supramolecular structures are controlled by the charge and phase behavior of the lipid molecules. Finally, we show that the insights obtained from synthetic membranes can be translated to biological membranes, enabling the formation of gel fibers on living HeLa cells. PMID:27359373

  8. Negative ion-uranium hexafluoride charge transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Gerald E.; Newton, T. W.

    1980-10-01

    The flowing afterglow technique has been used to study the process of charge transfer from selected negative ions (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, SF6-) to UF6. The sole ionic product in all cases was observed to be UF6-. Data analysis was complicated by an unexpected coupling of chemical and diffusive ion loss processes when UF6- product ions were present. The rate coefficients for the charge transfer processes are (k in 10-9 cm3 molecule-1 s-1) F-, 1.3; Cl-, 1.1; Br-, 0.93; I-, 0.77; and SF6-, 0.69. The rate constants agree quite well with the classical Langevin predictions.

  9. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. PMID:26057987

  10. The formation of negatively charged particles in thermoemission plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnyakov, V. I. Dragan, G. S.; Florko, A. V.

    2008-01-15

    The results of measuring the charges of the magnesium oxide particles formed near a block of metallic magnesium burning in air are presented. It has been found that, apart from positively charged magnesium oxide particles, there are negatively charged particles in the thermoemission plasma of the burning products. It has been shown that within the framework of the model of neutralizing charges, the oxide particles can acquire unlike charges in the thermoemission plasma. The calculations agree with the experimental data.

  11. The formation of negatively charged particles in thermoemission plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, V. I.; Dragan, G. S.; Florko, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    The results of measuring the charges of the magnesium oxide particles formed near a block of metallic magnesium burning in air are presented. It has been found that, apart from positively charged magnesium oxide particles, there are negatively charged particles in the thermoemission plasma of the burning products. It has been shown that within the framework of the model of neutralizing charges, the oxide particles can acquire unlike charges in the thermoemission plasma. The calculations agree with the experimental data.

  12. Laboratory infrared spectroscopy of gaseous negatively charged polyaromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Juehan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2014-06-01

    Based largely on infrared spectroscopic evidence, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are now widely accepted to occur abundantly in the interstellar medium. Laboratory infrared spectra have been obtained for a large variety of neutral and cationic PAHs, but data for anionic PAHs are scarce. Nonetheless, in regions with relatively high electron densities and low UV photon fluxes, PAHs have been suggested to occur predominantly as negatively charged ions (anions), having substantial influence on cloud chemistry. While some matrix spectra have been reported for radical anion PAHs, no data is available for even-electron anions, which are more stable against electron detachment. Here we present the first laboratory infrared spectra of deprotonated PAHs ([PAH-H]{sup –}) in the wavelength ranges between 6 and 16 μm and around 3 μm. Wavelength-dependent infrared multiple-photon electron detachment is employed to obtain spectra for deprotonated naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene in the gas phase. Spectra are compared with theoretical spectra computed at the density functional theory level. We show that the relative band intensities in different ranges of the IR spectrum deviate significantly from those of neutral and positively charged PAHs, and moreover from those of radical anion PAHs. These relative band intensities are, however, well reproduced by theory. An analysis of the frontier molecular orbitals of the even- and odd-electron anions reveals a high degree of charge localization in the deprotonated systems, qualitatively explaining the observed differences and suggesting unusually high electric dipole moments for this class of PAH molecules.

  13. Micro injector sample delivery system for charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    1999-11-09

    A micro injector sample delivery system for charged molecules. The injector is used for collecting and delivering controlled amounts of charged molecule samples for subsequent analysis. The injector delivery system can be scaled to large numbers (>96) for sample delivery to massively parallel high throughput analysis systems. The essence of the injector system is an electric field controllable loading tip including a section of porous material. By applying the appropriate polarity bias potential to the injector tip, charged molecules will migrate into porous material, and by reversing the polarity bias potential the molecules are ejected or forced away from the tip. The invention has application for uptake of charged biological molecules (e.g. proteins, nucleic acids, polymers, etc.) for delivery to analytical systems, and can be used in automated sample delivery systems.

  14. Contactless measurements of charge migration within single molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Sugishima, Akinori; Ohmasa, Yoshinori; Yao, Makoto

    2010-06-07

    Contactless measurements of charge migration were carried out for three pi-conjugated molecules in each of which a bromine atom and an oxygen atom are located on the opposite sides of the aromatic ring. A core hole was generated selectively in the Br atom by x-ray absorption, followed by the Auger cascade, and the subsequent charge migration within the molecule was examined by detecting an O{sup +} ion by means of the coincidence momentum imaging measurements.

  15. Is the negative glow plasma of a direct current glow discharge negatively charged?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, E. A.; Demidov, V. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Saifutdinov, A. I.

    2015-02-01

    A classic problem in gas discharge physics is discussed: what is the sign of charge density in the negative glow region of a glow discharge? It is shown that traditional interpretations in text-books on gas discharge physics that states a negative charge of the negative glow plasma are based on analogies with a simple one-dimensional model of discharge. Because the real glow discharges with a positive column are always two-dimensional, the transversal (radial) term in divergence with the electric field can provide a non-monotonic axial profile of charge density in the plasma, while maintaining a positive sign. The numerical calculation of glow discharge is presented, showing a positive space charge in the negative glow under conditions, where a one-dimensional model of the discharge would predict a negative space charge.

  16. Is the negative glow plasma of a direct current glow discharge negatively charged?

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, E. A.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Demidov, V. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2015-02-15

    A classic problem in gas discharge physics is discussed: what is the sign of charge density in the negative glow region of a glow discharge? It is shown that traditional interpretations in text-books on gas discharge physics that states a negative charge of the negative glow plasma are based on analogies with a simple one-dimensional model of discharge. Because the real glow discharges with a positive column are always two-dimensional, the transversal (radial) term in divergence with the electric field can provide a non-monotonic axial profile of charge density in the plasma, while maintaining a positive sign. The numerical calculation of glow discharge is presented, showing a positive space charge in the negative glow under conditions, where a one-dimensional model of the discharge would predict a negative space charge.

  17. Metal oxide charge transport material doped with organic molecules

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.

    2016-08-30

    Doping metal oxide charge transport material with an organic molecule lowers electrical resistance while maintaining transparency and thus is optimal for use as charge transport materials in various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic photovoltaic devices and organic light emitting devices.

  18. Negative-charge driven fragmentations for evidencing zwitterionic forms from doubly charged coppered peptides.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Michel; Bich, Claudia; Afonso, Carlos; Fournier, Françoise; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    In aqueous solution, amino acids (AA) and peptides are known to exist as zwitterions over a large pH range. However, in the gas phase, i.e. in electrospray (ESI), the zwitterionic form becomes unfavorable owing to the absence of stabilizing effects from intermolecular solvation. Nevertheless, during mass spectrometry experiments, the presence of a metallic cation can reinforce the zwitterionic character of the molecule and thus influence its fragmentation under low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions. The [M + Cu(II)](2+) complexes of six pentapeptides (YGGFL, YGGFL(NH(2)), YGGFK, YGGFQ, KYGGF and QYGGF) were analyzed by collision to highlight the presence of zwitterions. The experiments were performed on a 3D-ion trap equipped with an orthogonal ESI source. For each peptides studied, negative-charge driven fragmentations on globally positively charged ions were observed. These fragmentation mechanisms, generally observed in the negative mode, suggest the competitive deprotonation of the C-terminal carboxylic acid or of the tyrosine side-chain residue for each peptide studied and thus a zwitterionic form to preserve the charge balance. Moreover, the specific loss of (CH(3)--C(6)H(4)--O)(*) characterizes YGGFK compared to YGGFQ and the specific loss of styrene characterizes KYGGF compared to QYGGF. These results allow the differentiation of the two couples of isobaric pentapeptides. An unusual loss of NH(4) (+), which occurred from the N-terminus, was also observed for YGGFL, YGGFL(NH(2)), YGGFK and YGGFQ. Finally, the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I), concomitant with the (CH(3)--C(6)H(4)--O)(*) release, was pointed out for YGGFK. PMID:17149792

  19. Electrostatic Power Generation from Negatively Charged, Simulated Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; King, Glen C.; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yeonjoon

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to develop an electrostatic power generator for future lunar missions that facilitate the utilization of lunar resources. The lunar surface is known to be negatively charged from the constant bombardment of electrons and protons from the solar wind. The resulting negative electrostatic charge on the dust particles, in the lunar vacuum, causes them to repel each other minimizing the potential. The result is a layer of suspended dust about one meter above the lunar surface. This phenomenon was observed by both Clementine and Surveyor spacecrafts. During the Apollo 17 lunar landing, the charged dust was a major hindrance, as it was attracted to the astronauts' spacesuits, equipment, and the lunar buggies. The dust accumulated on the spacesuits caused reduced visibility for the astronauts, and was unavoidably transported inside the spacecraft where it caused breathing irritation [1]. In the lunar vacuum, the maximum charge on the particles can be extremely high. An article in the journal "Nature", titled "Moon too static for astronauts?" (Feb 2, 2007) estimates that the lunar surface is charged with up to several thousand volts [2]. The electrostatic power generator was devised to alleviate the hazardous effects of negatively charged lunar soil by neutralizing the charged particles through capacitive coupling and thereby simultaneously harnessing power through electric charging [3]. The amount of power generated or collected is dependent on the areal coverage of the device and hovering speed over the lunar soil surface. A thin-film array of capacitors can be continuously charged and sequentially discharged using a time-differentiated trigger discharge process to produce a pulse train of discharge for DC mode output. By controlling the pulse interval, the DC mode power can be modulated for powering devices and equipment. In conjunction with a power storage system, the electrostatic power generator can be a power source for a lunar rover or other

  20. Gating capacitive field-effect sensors by the charge of nanoparticle/molecule hybrids.

    PubMed

    Poghossian, Arshak; Bäcker, Matthias; Mayer, Dirk; Schöning, Michael J

    2015-01-21

    The semiconductor field-effect platform is a powerful tool for chemical and biological sensing with direct electrical readout. In this work, the field-effect capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) structure - the simplest field-effect (bio-)chemical sensor - modified with citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been applied for a label-free electrostatic detection of charged molecules by their intrinsic molecular charge. The EIS sensor detects the charge changes in AuNP/molecule inorganic/organic hybrids induced by the molecular adsorption or binding events. The feasibility of the proposed detection scheme has been exemplarily demonstrated by realizing capacitive EIS sensors consisting of an Al-p-Si-SiO2-silane-AuNP structure for the label-free detection of positively charged cytochrome c and poly-d-lysine molecules as well as for monitoring the layer-by-layer formation of polyelectrolyte multilayers of poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate), representing typical model examples of detecting small proteins and macromolecules and the consecutive adsorption of positively/negatively charged polyelectrolytes, respectively. For comparison, EIS sensors without AuNPs have been investigated, too. The adsorption of molecules on the surface of AuNPs has been verified via the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. In addition, a theoretical model of the functioning of the capacitive field-effect EIS sensor functionalized with AuNP/charged-molecule hybrids has been discussed. PMID:25470772

  1. Electronic properties of atoms and molecules containing one and two negative muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncada, Félix; Cruz, Daniel; Reyes, Andrés

    2013-05-01

    Any-Particle Molecular Orbital/Hartree-Fock (APMO/HF) calculations are performed for a variety of atoms and simple diatomic molecular systems containing one and two negative muons (μ). In these calculations electrons and muons are described quantum mechanically whereas nuclei are treated as point charges. Our results for atoms containing n = 1, 2 negative muons reveal that electronic properties such as electronic densities and ionization potentials shift to those of all-electron atoms with atomic numbers Z-n. In the case of diatomic molecules these muonic effects are more diverse ranging from transmutation of atomic properties to drastic changes in equilibrium geometries and energies.

  2. Negative temperature of electronic motion in atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shu-Kun |

    1996-12-31

    By definition both energy E and entropy S are positive functions. They are related to temperature T. The model of local thermodynamics of electronic motion by Ghosh, Berkowitz and by Parr is of great interest. Following virial theorem and the von Neumann-Shannon entropy formula, locally E and S vary in a way that the E reduces while its S increases. Consequently, relative to the conventional thermodynamic temperature of the surroundings, the local thermodynamic temperature T of electronic motion in atoms and molecules must be negative. Locally both kinetic energy K and S increase with the increase of the absolute value of the local thermodynamic temperature, {vert_bar}T{vert_bar}, or when T becomes more negative and when the system approaches the ground state. The typical quantum effects are characterized by such a local negative T. A local informational temperature (T{sub I}) of an electronic configuration in atoms and molecules is also defined, which is of the opposite sign (i.e., positive) of its local thermodynamic temperature, T. T{sub I} can be used to predict the relative stabilities of the excited states, where the local temperature T approaches zero at the excited states. The local thermodynamic temperature and the local informational temperature have been used as convenient concepts to characterize structural stability and process spontaneity of electronic systems.

  3. Gram-Negative Bacterial Sensors for Eukaryotic Signal Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Veron, Wilfried; Chapalain, Annelise; Madi, Amar; Blier, Anne-Sophie; Dagorn, Audrey; Connil, Nathalie; Chevalier, Sylvie; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Ample evidence exists showing that eukaryotic signal molecules synthesized and released by the host can activate the virulence of opportunistic pathogens. The sensitivity of prokaryotes to host signal molecules requires the presence of bacterial sensors. These prokaryotic sensors, or receptors, have a double function: stereospecific recognition in a complex environment and transduction of the message in order to initiate bacterial physiological modifications. As messengers are generally unable to freely cross the bacterial membrane, they require either the presence of sensors anchored in the membrane or transporters allowing direct recognition inside the bacterial cytoplasm. Since the discovery of quorum sensing, it was established that the production of virulence factors by bacteria is tightly growth-phase regulated. It is now obvious that expression of bacterial virulence is also controlled by detection of the eukaryotic messengers released in the micro-environment as endocrine or neuro-endocrine modulators. In the presence of host physiological stress many eukaryotic factors are released and detected by Gram-negative bacteria which in return rapidly adapt their physiology. For instance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can bind elements of the host immune system such as interferon-γ and dynorphin and then through quorum sensing circuitry enhance its virulence. Escherichia coli sensitivity to the neurohormones of the catecholamines family appears relayed by a recently identified bacterial adrenergic receptor. In the present review, we will describe the mechanisms by which various eukaryotic signal molecules produced by host may activate Gram-negative bacteria virulence. Particular attention will be paid to Pseudomonas, a genus whose representative species, P. aeruginosa, is a common opportunistic pathogen. The discussion will be particularly focused on the pivotal role played by these new types of pathogen sensors from the sensing to the transduction mechanism involved in

  4. Charge Measurement of Atoms and Atomic Resolution of Molecules with Noncontact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Leo

    2010-03-01

    Individual gold and silver adatoms [1] and pentacene molecules [2] on ultrathin NaCl films on Cu(111) were investigated using a qPlus tuning fork atomic force microscope (AFM) operated at 5 Kelvin with oscillation amplitudes in the sub-ångstrom regime. Charging a gold adatom by one electron charge increased the force on the AFM tip by a few piconewtons. Employing Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) we also measured the local contact potential difference (LCPD). We observed that the LCPD is shifted depending on the sign of the charge and allows the discrimination of positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged atoms. To image pentacene molecules we modified AFM tips by means of vertical manipulation techniques, i.e. deliberately picking up known atoms and molecules, such as Au, Ag, Cl, CO, and pentacene. Using a CO terminated tip we resolved all individual atoms and bonds within a pentacene molecule. Three dimensional force maps showing the site specific distance dependence above the molecule were extracted. We compared our experimental results with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to gain insight on the physical origin of AFM contrast formation. We found that atomic resolution is only obtained due to repulsive force contributions originating from the Pauli exclusion principle. [4pt] [1] L. Gross, F. Mohn, P. Liljeroth, J. Repp, F. J. Giessibl, G. Meyer, Science 324, 1428 (2009). [0pt] [2] L. Gross, F. Mohn, N. Moll, P. Liljeroth, G. Meyer, Science 325, 1110 (2009).

  5. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  6. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Charge Transport in Azobenzene-Based Single-Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Kim, Youngsang; Sysoiev, Dmytro; Frederiksen, Thomas; Groth, Ulrich; Scheer, Elke

    2013-03-01

    The azobenzene class of molecules has become an archetype of molecular photoswitch research, due to their simple structure and the significant difference of the electronic system between their cis and trans isomers. However, a detailed understanding of the charge transport for the two isomers, when embedded in a junction with electrodes is still lacking. In order to clarify this issue, we investigate charge transport properties through single Azobenzene-ThioMethyl (AzoTM) molecules in a mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) system at 4.2 K. Single-molecule conductance, I-V characteristics, and IETS spectra of molecular junctions are measured and compared with first-principles transport calculations. Our studies elucidate the origin of a slightly higher conductance of junctions with cis isomer and demonstrate that IETS spectra of cis and trans forms show distinct vibrational fingerprints that can be used for identifying the isomer.

  8. Space Charge Neutralization in the ITER Negative Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Surrey, Elizabeth

    2007-08-10

    A model of the space charge neutralization of negative ion beams, developed from the model due to Holmes, is applied to the ITER heating and diagnostic beams. The Holmes model assumed that the plasma electron temperature was derived from the stripped electrons. This is shown to be incorrect for the ITER beams and the plasma electron temperature is obtained from the average creation energy upon ionization. The model shows that both ITER beams will be fully space charge compensated in the drift distance between the accelerator and the neutralizer. Inside the neutralizer, the plasma over compensates the space charge to the extent that a significant focusing force is predicted. At a certain position in the neutraliser this force balances the defocusing force due to the ions' transverse energy. Under these conditions the beam distribution function can change from Gaussian to Bennett and evidence of such a distribution observed in a multi-aperture, neutralized negative ion beam is presented.

  9. Increased negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centers in fluorinated diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Shanying; Hu, Evelyn L.

    2013-07-29

    We investigated the effect of fluorine-terminated diamond surface on the charged state of shallow nitrogen vacancy defect centers (NVs). Fluorination is achieved with CF{sub 4} plasma, and the surface chemistry is confirmed with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Photoluminescence of these ensemble NVs reveals that fluorine-treated surfaces lead to a higher and more stable negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV{sup −}) population than oxygen-terminated surfaces. NV{sup −} population is estimated by the ratio of negative to neutral charged NV zero-phonon lines. Surface chemistry control of NV{sup −} density is an important step towards improving the optical and spin properties of NVs for quantum information processing and magnetic sensing.

  10. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  11. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J.; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C.; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  12. Positive Charge of “Sticky” Peptides and Proteins Impedes Release From Negatively Charged PLGA Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Balmert, Stephen C.; Zmolek, Andrew C.; Glowacki, Andrew J.; Knab, Timothy D.; Rothstein, Sam N.; Wokpetah, Joseph M.; Fedorchak, Morgan V.; Little, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of electrostatic interactions and/or acylation on release of charged (“sticky”) agents from biodegradable polymer matrices was systematically characterized. We hypothesized that release of peptides with positive charge would be hindered from negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles. Thus, we investigated release of peptides with different degrees of positive charge from several PLGA microparticle formulations, with different molecular weights and/or end groups (acid- or ester-terminated). Indeed, release studies revealed distinct inverse correlations between the amount of positive charge on peptides and their release rates from each PLGA microparticle formulation. Furthermore, we examined the case of peptides with net charge that changes from negative to positive within the pH range observed in degrading microparticles. These charge changing peptides displayed counterintuitive release kinetics, initially releasing faster from slower degrading (less acidic) microparticles, and releasing slower from the faster degrading (more acidic) microparticles. Importantly, trends between agent charge and release rates for model peptides also translated to larger, therapeutically relevant proteins and oligonucleotides. The results of these studies may improve future design of controlled release systems for numerous therapeutic biomolecules exhibiting positive charge, ultimately reducing time-consuming and costly trial and error iterations of such formulations. PMID:26085928

  13. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A. L.; Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H+ beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H- beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H- ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  14. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results. PMID:26932087

  15. Interstellar Chemistry Gets More Complex With New Charged-Molecule Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-07-01

    Astronomers using data from the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have found the largest negatively-charged molecule yet seen in space. The discovery of the third negatively-charged molecule, called an anion, in less than a year and the size of the latest anion will force a drastic revision of theoretical models of interstellar chemistry, the astronomers say. Molecule formation Formation Process of Large, Negatively-Charged Molecule in Interstellar Space CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for page of graphics and detailed information "This discovery continues to add to the diversity and complexity that is already seen in the chemistry of interstellar space," said Anthony J. Remijan of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "It also adds to the number of paths available for making the complex organic molecules and other large molecular species that may be precursors to life in the giant clouds from which stars and planets are formed," he added. Two teams of scientists found negatively-charged octatetraynyl, a chain of eight carbon atoms and one hydrogen atom, in the envelope of gas around an old, evolved star and in a cold, dark cloud of molecular gas. In both cases, the molecule had an extra electron, giving it a negative charge. About 130 neutral and about a dozen positively-charged molecules have been discovered in space, but the first negatively-charged molecule was not discovered until late last year. The largest previously-discovered negative ion found in space has six carbon atoms and one hydrogen atom. "Until recently, many theoretical models of how chemical reactions evolve in interstellar space have largely neglected the presence of anions. This can no longer be the case, and this means that there are many more ways to build large organic molecules in cosmic environments than have been explored," said Jan M. Hollis of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Ultraviolet light from stars can

  16. Charge exchange of a polar molecule at its cation

    SciTech Connect

    Buslov, E. Yu. Zon, B. A.

    2011-01-15

    The Landau-Herring method is used to derive an analytic expression for the one-electron exchange interaction of a polar molecule with its positively charged ion, induced by a {sigma}-electron. Analogously to the classical Van der Pole method, the exchange interaction potential is averaged over the rotational states of colliding particles. The resonant charge-transfer cross section is calculated, and the effect of the dipole moments of the core on the cross section is analyzed. It is shown that allowance for the dependence of the exchange potential on the orientation of the dipole moments relative to the molecular axis may change the dependence of the cross section on the velocity of colliding particles, which is typical of the resonant charge exchange, from the resonance to the quasi-resonance dependence.

  17. Gating capacitive field-effect sensors by the charge of nanoparticle/molecule hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghossian, Arshak; Bäcker, Matthias; Mayer, Dirk; Schöning, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    The semiconductor field-effect platform is a powerful tool for chemical and biological sensing with direct electrical readout. In this work, the field-effect capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) structure - the simplest field-effect (bio-)chemical sensor - modified with citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been applied for a label-free electrostatic detection of charged molecules by their intrinsic molecular charge. The EIS sensor detects the charge changes in AuNP/molecule inorganic/organic hybrids induced by the molecular adsorption or binding events. The feasibility of the proposed detection scheme has been exemplarily demonstrated by realizing capacitive EIS sensors consisting of an Al-p-Si-SiO2-silane-AuNP structure for the label-free detection of positively charged cytochrome c and poly-d-lysine molecules as well as for monitoring the layer-by-layer formation of polyelectrolyte multilayers of poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate), representing typical model examples of detecting small proteins and macromolecules and the consecutive adsorption of positively/negatively charged polyelectrolytes, respectively. For comparison, EIS sensors without AuNPs have been investigated, too. The adsorption of molecules on the surface of AuNPs has been verified via the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. In addition, a theoretical model of the functioning of the capacitive field-effect EIS sensor functionalized with AuNP/charged-molecule hybrids has been discussed.The semiconductor field-effect platform is a powerful tool for chemical and biological sensing with direct electrical readout. In this work, the field-effect capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) structure - the simplest field-effect (bio-)chemical sensor - modified with citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been applied for a label-free electrostatic detection of charged molecules by their intrinsic molecular charge. The EIS sensor

  18. Electron interactions with positively and negatively multiply charged biomolecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feketeová, Linda

    2012-07-01

    Interactions of positively and negatively multiply charged biomolecular clusters with low-energy electrons, from ~ 0 up to 50 eV of electron energy, were investigated in a high resolution Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionisation source. Electron-induced dissociation reactions of these clusters depend on the energy of the electrons, the size and the charge state of the cluster. The positively charged clusters [Mn+2H]2+ of zwitterionic betaines, M = (CH3)2XCH2CO2 (X = NCH3 and S), do capture an electron in the low electron energy region (< 10 eV). At higher electron energies neutral evaporation from the cluster becomes competitive with Coulomb explosion. In addition, a series of singly charged fragments arise from bond cleavage reactions, including decarboxylation and CH3 group transfer, due to the access of electronic excited states of the precursor ions. These fragmentation reactions depend on the type of betaine (X = NCH3 or S). For the negative dianionic clusters of tryptophan [Trp9-2H]2-, the important channel at low electron energies is loss of a neutral. Coulomb explosion competes from 19.8 eV and dominates at high electron energies. A small amount of [Trp2-H-NH3]- is observed at 21.8 eV.

  19. Interstellar Chemistry Gets More Complex With New Charged-Molecule Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-07-01

    Astronomers using data from the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have found the largest negatively-charged molecule yet seen in space. The discovery of the third negatively-charged molecule, called an anion, in less than a year and the size of the latest anion will force a drastic revision of theoretical models of interstellar chemistry, the astronomers say. Molecule formation Formation Process of Large, Negatively-Charged Molecule in Interstellar Space CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for page of graphics and detailed information "This discovery continues to add to the diversity and complexity that is already seen in the chemistry of interstellar space," said Anthony J. Remijan of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "It also adds to the number of paths available for making the complex organic molecules and other large molecular species that may be precursors to life in the giant clouds from which stars and planets are formed," he added. Two teams of scientists found negatively-charged octatetraynyl, a chain of eight carbon atoms and one hydrogen atom, in the envelope of gas around an old, evolved star and in a cold, dark cloud of molecular gas. In both cases, the molecule had an extra electron, giving it a negative charge. About 130 neutral and about a dozen positively-charged molecules have been discovered in space, but the first negatively-charged molecule was not discovered until late last year. The largest previously-discovered negative ion found in space has six carbon atoms and one hydrogen atom. "Until recently, many theoretical models of how chemical reactions evolve in interstellar space have largely neglected the presence of anions. This can no longer be the case, and this means that there are many more ways to build large organic molecules in cosmic environments than have been explored," said Jan M. Hollis of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Ultraviolet light from stars can

  20. Charged supramolecular assemblies of surfactant molecules in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno, David; Ceraulo, Leopoldo; Indelicato, Sergio; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo; Indelicato, Serena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to critically analyze recent literature on charged supramolecular assemblies formed by surfactant molecules in gas phase. Apart our specific interest on this research area, the stimuli to undertake the task arise from the widespread theoretical and applicative benefits emerging from a comprehensive view of this topic. In fact, the study of the formation, stability, and physicochemical peculiarities of non-covalent assemblies of surfactant molecules in gas phase allows to unveil interesting aspects such as the role of attractive, repulsive, and steric intermolecular interactions as driving force of supramolecular organization in absence of interactions with surrounding medium and the size and charge state dependence of aggregate structural and dynamical properties. Other interesting aspects worth to be investigated are joined to the ability of these assemblies to incorporate selected solubilizates molecules as well as to give rise to chemical reactions within a single organized structure. In particular, the incorporation of large molecules such as proteins has been of recent interest with the objective to protect their structure and functionality during the transition from solution to gas phase. Exciting fall-out of the study of gas phase surfactant aggregates includes mass and energy transport in the atmosphere, origin of life and simulation of supramolecular aggregation in the interstellar space. Moreover, supramolecular assemblies of amphiphilic molecules in gas phase could find remarkable applications as atmospheric cleaning agents, nanosolvents and nanoreactors for specialized chemical processes in confined space. Mass spectrometry techniques have proven to be particularly suitable to generate these assemblies and to furnish useful information on their size, size polydispersity, stability, and structural organization. On the other hand molecular dynamics simulations have been very useful to rationalize many experimental findings and to

  1. Photodetachment of gaseous multiply charged anions, copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate tetraanion: Tuning molecular electronic energy levels by charging and negative electron binding

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.B.; Ferris, K.; Wang, L.S.

    2000-01-13

    The authors report photodetachment photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of gaseous copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) tetrasulfonate quadruply charged anions, [CuPc(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sup 4{minus}}, and its monoprotonated and -sodiumated triply charged anions, [CuPc(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}H]{sup 3{minus}} and [CuPc(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}Na]{sup 3{minus}}. The [CuPc(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sup 4{minus}} tetraanion was found to possess a negative electron binding energy of {minus}0.9 eV, whereas the trianions have binding energies of 1.0 and 1.2 eV for the sodiumated and protonated species, respectively. The PES spectral features of the three multiply charged anions were observed to be similar to that of the parent CuPc neutral molecule, except that the anions have lower binding energies due to the presence of the negative charges ({minus}SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}). The data thus suggested a stepwise tuning of the molecular electronic energy levels of the CuPc molecule through charging, wherein the molecular orbital energies of the parent molecule were systematically pushed up by the negative charges. The authors further carried out semiempirical calculations, which provided insight into the nature of the localized charges on the peripheral {minus}SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} groups and the intramolecular electrostatic interactions in the multiply charged anions and confirmed the interpretation of the stepwise tuning of molecular energy levels by charging. Photon energy-dependent studies revealed the effects of the repulsive Coulomb barriers on the photodetachment PES spectra of the multiply charged anions. The barrier heights were estimated to be about 3.5 and 2.5 eV for the tetra- and trianions, respectively. The authors also observed excited states for the multiply charged anions and resonant tunneling through the repulsive Coulomb barriers via the excited states.

  2. Electron-molecule chemistry and charging processes on organic ices and Titan's icy aerosol surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirim, C.; Gann, R. D.; McLain, J. L.; Orlando, T. M.

    2015-09-01

    Electron-induced polymerization processes and charging events that can occur within Titan's atmosphere or on its surface were simulated using electron irradiation and dissociative electron attachment (DEA) studies of nitrogen-containing organic condensates. The DEA studies probe the desorption of H- from hydrogen cyanide (HCN), acetonitrile (CH3CN), and aminoacetonitrile (NH2CH2CN) ices, as well as from synthesized tholin materials condensed or deposited onto a graphite substrate maintained at low temperature (90-130 K). The peak cross sections for H- desorption during low-energy (3-15 eV) electron irradiation were measured and range from 3 × 10-21 to 2 × 10-18 cm2. Chemical and structural transformations of HCN ice upon 2 keV electron irradiation were investigated using X-ray photoelectron and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The electron-beam processed materials displayed optical properties very similar to tholins produced by conventional discharge methods. Electron and negative ion trapping lead to 1011 charges cm-2 on a flat surface which, assuming a radius of 0.05 μm for Titan aerosols, is ∼628 charges/radius (in μm). The facile charge trapping indicates that electron interactions with nitriles and complex tholin-like molecules could affect the conductivity of Titan's atmosphere due to the formation of large negative ion complexes. These negatively charged complexes can also precipitate onto Titan's surface and possibly contribute to surface reactions and the formation of dunes.

  3. Intramolecular charge transfer in donor-acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Slama-Schwok, A.; Blanchard-Desce, M.; Lehn, J.M. )

    1990-05-17

    The photophysical properties of donor-acceptor molecules, push-pull polyenes and carotenoids, have been studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds bear various acceptor and donor groups, linked together by chains of different length and structure. The position of the absorption and fluorescence maxima and their variation in solvents of increasing polarity are in agreement with long-distance intramolecular charge-transfer processes, the linker acting as a molecular wire. The effects of the linker length and structure and of the nature of acceptor and donor are presented.

  4. Modeling the selective partitioning of cations into negatively charged nanopores in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Garde, Shekhar

    2007-02-01

    Partitioning and transport of water and small solutes into and through nanopores are important to a variety of chemical and biological processes and applications. Here we study water structure in negatively charged model cylindrical [carbon nanotube (CNT)-like] nanopores, as well as the partitioning of positive ions of increasing size (Na+, K+, and Cs+) into the pore interior using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. Despite the simplicity of the simulation system—containing a short CNT-like nanopore in water carrying a uniformly distributed charge of qpore=-ne surrounded by n (=0,…,8) cations, making the overall system charge neutral—the results provide new and useful insights on both the pore hydration and ion partitioning. For n =0, that is, for a neutral nanopore, water molecules partition into the pore and form single-file hydrogen-bonded wire spanning the pore length. With increasing n, water molecules enter the pore from both ends with preferred orientations, resulting in a mutual repulsion between oriented water molecules at the pore center and creating a cavity-like low density region at the center. For low negative charge densities on the pore, the driving force for partitioning of positive ions into the pore is weak, and no partitioning is observed. Increasing the pore charge gradually leads to partitioning of positive ions into the pore. Interestingly, over a range of intermediate negative charge densities, nanopores display both thermodynamic as well as kinetic selectivity toward partitioning of the larger K+ and Cs+ ions into their interior over the smaller Na+ ions. Specifically, the driving force is in the order K+>Cs+>Na+, and K+ and Cs+ ions enter the pore much more rapidly than Na+ ions. At higher charge densities, the driving force for partitioning increases for all cations—it is highest for K+ ions—and becomes similar for Na+ and Cs+ ions. The variation of thermodynamic driving force and the average partitioning time with the

  5. Formation of Negative Ions upon Dissociative Electron Attachment to the Astrochemically Relevant Molecule Aminoacetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Pelc, Andrzej; Huber, Stefan E; Matias, Carolina; Czupyt, Zbigniew; Denifl, Stephan

    2016-02-18

    Aminoacetonitrile (NH2CH2CN, AAN) is a molecule relevant for interstellar chemistry and the chemical evolution of life. It is a very important molecule in the Strecker diagram explaining the formation of amino acids. In the present investigation, dissociative electron attachment to NH2CN was studied in a crossed electron-molecular beams experiment in the electron energy range from about 0 to 17 eV. In this electron energy range, the following six anionic species were detected: C2H3N2(-), C2H2N2(-), C2H2N(-), C2HN(-), CN(-), and NH2(-). Possible reaction channels for all the measured negative ions are discussed, and the experimental results are compared with calculated thermochemical thresholds of the observed anions. Similar to other nitrile and aminonitrile compounds, the main anions detected were the negatively charged nitrile group, the dehydrogenated parent molecule, and the amino group. No parent anion was observed. Low anion yields were observed indicating that AAN is less prone to electron capture. Therefore, AAN can be considered to exhibit a relatively long lifetime under typical conditions in outer space. PMID:26810336

  6. Solutions of negatively charged graphene sheets and ribbons.

    PubMed

    Vallés, Cristina; Drummond, Carlos; Saadaoui, Hassan; Furtado, Clascidia A; He, Maoshuai; Roubeau, Olivier; Ortolani, Luca; Monthioux, Marc; Pénicaud, Alain

    2008-11-26

    Negatively charged graphene layers from a graphite intercalation compound spontaneously dissolve in N-methylpyrrolidone, without the need for any sonication, yielding stable, air-sensitive, solutions of laterally extended atom-thick graphene sheets and ribbons with dimensions over tens of micrometers. These can be deposited on a variety of substrates. Height measurements showing single-atom thickness were performed by STM, AFM, multiple beam interferometry, and optical imaging on Sarfus wafers, demonstrating deposits of graphene flakes and ribbons. AFM height measurements on mica give the actual height of graphene (ca. 0.4 nm). PMID:18975900

  7. Negatively charged nanoparticles produced by splashing of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Hõrrak, U.; Kulmala, M.

    2009-01-01

    The production of splashing-generated balloelectric intermediate ions was studied by means of mobility spectrometry in the atmosphere during the rain and in a laboratory experiment simulating the heavy rain. The partial neutralization of intermediate ions with cluster ions generated by beta rays suppressed the space charge of intermediate ions but preserved the shape of the mobility distribution. The balloelectric ions produced from the waterworks water of high TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) had about the same mobilities as the ions produced from the rainwater of low TDS. This suggests that the balloelectric ions can be considered as singly charged water nanoparticles. By different measurements, the diameter mode of these particles was 2.2-2.7 nm, which is close to the diameter of 2.5 nm of the Chaplin's 280-molecule magic icosahedron superclusters. The measurements can be explained by a hypothesis that the pressure of saturated vapor over the nanoparticle surface is suppressed by a number of magnitudes due to the internal structure of the particles near the size of 2.5 nm. The records of the concentration bursts of balloelectric ions in the atmosphere are formally similar to the records of the nucleation bursts but they cannot be qualified as nucleation bursts because the particles are not growing but shrinking.

  8. Negatively charged nanoparticles produced by splashing of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Hõrrak, U.; Kulmala, M.

    2008-09-01

    The production of splashing-generated balloelectric intermediate ions was studied by means of mobility spectrometry in the atmosphere during the rain and in a laboratory experiment simulating the heavy rain. The partial neutralization of intermediate ions with cluster ions generated by beta rays suppressed the space charge of intermediate ions but preserved the shape of the mobility distribution. The balloelectric ions produced from the waterworks water of high TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) had about the same mobilities as the ions produced from the rainwater of low TDS. This suggests that the balloelectric ions can be considered as singly charged water nanodroplets. By different measurements, the diameter mode of these droplets was 2.2 2.7 nm, which is close to the diameter of 2.5 nm of the Chaplin's 280-molecule magic icosahedron superclusters. The measurements can be explained by a hypothesis that the pressure of saturated vapor over the nanodroplet surface is suppressed by a number of magnitudes due to the internal structure of the droplets near the size of 2.5 nm. The records of the concentration bursts of balloelectric ions in the atmosphere are formally similar to the records of the nucleation bursts but they cannot be qualified as nucleation bursts because the particles are not growing but shrinking.

  9. Charge asymmetry in pure vibrational states of the HD molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubin, Sergiy; Leonarski, Filip; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2009-03-01

    Very accurate variational calculations of all rotationless states (also called pure vibrational states) of the HD molecule have been performed within the framework that does not assume the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation. The non-BO wave functions of the states describing the internal motion of the proton, the deuteron, and the two electrons were expanded in terms of one-center explicitly correlated Gaussian functions multiplied by even powers of the internuclear distance. Up to 6000 functions were used for each state. Both linear and nonlinear parameters of the wave functions of all 18 states were optimized with a procedure that employs the analytical gradient of the energy with respect to the nonlinear parameters of the Gaussians. These wave functions were used to calculate expectation values of the interparticle distances and some other related quantities. The results allow elucidation of the charge asymmetry in HD as a function of the vibrational excitation.

  10. Negative Differential Conductance from Space Charge Limited Currents in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Andrew; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    Applying the theory of space charge limited currents (SCLC), we show that negative differential conductance can arise from doubly occupied traps that are nearly degenerate with the bottom of the conduction band. Using degenerate state perturbation theory, the Coulomb energy of the doubly occupied traps is shown to depend on the hybridization with the conduction band states. Initially, when carriers are injected into the solid, traps begin to fill while the conduction band states stay relatively empty and thus accessible to trapped electrons via hopping. Trap and conduction states continue to be filled as current is increased, and the energy of trapped electrons begins to rise. A critical current is reached whereupon a further increase in current leads to a reduction of filled traps (i.e. a reduction of space charge in the solid), and thus a corresponding decrease in voltage. This trend in the current-voltage characteristic curves persists until the bottom of the conduction band has been filled, then voltage rises with current.

  11. Charge transfer and negative curvature energy in magnesium boride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hui; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2016-07-01

    Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we study the energetics and charge transfer effects in MgBx nanotubes and two-dimensional (2D) sheets. The behavior of adsorbed Mg on 2D boron sheets is found to depend on the amount of electron transfer between the two subsystems. The amount is determined by both the density of adsorbed Mg as well as the atomic-scale structure of the boron subsystem. The degree of transfer can lead to repulsive or attractive Mg-Mg interactions. In both cases, model MgBx nanotubes built from 2D MgBx sheets can display negative curvature energy: a relatively unusual situation in nanosystems where the energy cost to curve the parent 2D sheet into a small-diameter nanotube is negative. Namely, the small-diameter nanotube is energetically preferred over the corresponding flat sheet. We also discuss how these findings may manifest themselves in experimentally synthesized MgBx nanotubes.

  12. Theoretical study of the charge transport through C60-based single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilan, S.; Zotti, L. A.; Pauly, F.; Cuevas, J. C.

    2012-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the conductance and thermopower of single-molecule junctions based on C60 and C60-terminated molecules. We first analyze the transport properties of gold-C60-gold junctions and show that these junctions can be highly conductive (with conductances above 0.1G0, where G0=2e2/h is the quantum of conductance). Moreover, we find that the thermopower in these junctions is negative due to the fact that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital dominates the charge transport, and its magnitude can reach several tens of microvolts per kelvin, depending on the contact geometry. On the other hand, we study the suitability of C60 as an anchoring group in single-molecule junctions. For this purpose, we analyze the transport through several dumbbell derivatives using C60 as anchors, and we compare the results with those obtained with thiol and amine groups. Our results show that the conductance of C60-terminated molecules is rather sensitive to the binding geometry. Moreover, the conductance of the molecules is typically reduced by the presence of the C60 anchors, which in turn makes the junctions more sensitive to the functionalization of the molecular core with appropriate side groups.

  13. The mobility of negative charges in liquid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, P. B.; Sokolov, I. M.

    1994-06-01

    There is a great difference in behavior of e- in liquid hydrogen and helium despite the fact that the adopted theories of the mobility are quite similar. Recently, Levchenko and Mezhov-Deglin (Journal of Low Temperature Physics, 89, 457 (1992)) reported large discrepancies of the mobility of the electrons in liquid hydrogen from estimates based on the theory that the electrons are trapped in bubbles forming atomlike structures (“bubblonium”). They properly suggested that these deviations are related to the existence in liquid hydrogen of another, metastable type of negative charge carrier. The subject of the current paper is the physical explanation of the existence of two types of carriers in liquid hydrogen. We attribute the second type of carriers to the cluster ion H - ( H 2 ) x , which is created by the formation of solid hydrogen around a bound state of a hydride ion. We provide estimates for the radius and the kinetics of degradation of the “snowball” formed around the H - ion on the basis of energy diagrams for a hydride ion submerged in liquid hydrogen.

  14. Negatively Charged Lipids as a Potential Target for New Amphiphilic Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: A BIOPHYSICAL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Sautrey, Guillaume; El Khoury, Micheline; Dos Santos, Andreia Giro; Zimmermann, Louis; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Décout, Jean-Luc; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2016-06-24

    Bacterial membranes are highly organized, containing specific microdomains that facilitate distinct protein and lipid assemblies. Evidence suggests that cardiolipin molecules segregate into such microdomains, probably conferring a negative curvature to the inner plasma membrane during membrane fission upon cell division. 3',6-Dinonyl neamine is an amphiphilic aminoglycoside derivative active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including strains resistant to colistin. The mechanisms involved at the molecular level were identified using lipid models (large unilamellar vesicles, giant unilamelllar vesicles, and lipid monolayers) that mimic the inner membrane of P. aeruginosa The study demonstrated the interaction of 3',6-dinonyl neamine with cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, two negatively charged lipids from inner bacterial membranes. This interaction induced membrane permeabilization and depolarization. Lateral segregation of cardiolipin and membrane hemifusion would be critical for explaining the effects induced on lipid membranes by amphiphilic aminoglycoside antibiotics. The findings contribute to an improved understanding of how amphiphilic aminoglycoside antibiotics that bind to negatively charged lipids like cardiolipin could be promising antibacterial compounds. PMID:27189936

  15. Negative differential mobility for negative carriers as revealed by space charge measurements on crosslinked polyethylene insulated model cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssedre, G.; Vu, T. T. N.; Laurent, C.

    2015-12-01

    Among features observed in polyethylene materials under relatively high field, space charge packets, consisting in a pulse of net charge that remains in the form of a pulse as it crosses the insulation, are repeatedly observed but without complete theory explaining their formation and propagation. Positive charge packets are more often reported, and the models based on negative differential mobility(NDM) for the transport of holes could account for some charge packets phenomenology. Conversely, NDM for electrons transport has never been reported so far. The present contribution reports space charge measurements by pulsed electroacoustic method on miniature cables that are model of HVDC cables. The measurements were realized at room temperature or with a temperature gradient of 10 °C through the insulation under DC fields on the order 30-60 kV/mm. Space charge results reveal systematic occurrence of a negative front of charges generated at the inner electrode that moves toward the outer electrode at the beginning of the polarization step. It is observed that the transit time of the front of negative charge increases, and therefore the mobility decreases, with the applied voltage. Further, the estimated mobility, in the range 10-14-10-13 m2 V-1 s-1 for the present results, increases when the temperature increases for the same condition of applied voltage. The features substantiate the hypothesis of negative differential mobility used for modelling space charge packets.

  16. Invariance of molecular charge transport upon changes of extended molecule size and several related issues.

    PubMed

    Bâldea, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    As a sanity test for the theoretical method employed, studies on (steady-state) charge transport through molecular devices usually confine themselves to check whether the method in question satisfies the charge conservation. Another important test of the theory's correctness is to check that the computed current does not depend on the choice of the central region (also referred to as the "extended molecule"). This work addresses this issue and demonstrates that the relevant transport and transport-related properties are indeed invariant upon changing the size of the extended molecule, when the embedded molecule can be described within a general single-particle picture (namely, a second-quantized Hamiltonian bilinear in the creation and annihilation operators). It is also demonstrates that the invariance of nonequilibrium properties is exhibited by the exact results but not by those computed approximately within ubiquitous wide- and flat-band limits (WBL and FBL, respectively). To exemplify the limitations of the latter, the phenomenon of negative differential resistance (NDR) is considered. It is shown that the exactly computed current may exhibit a substantial NDR, while the NDR effect is absent or drastically suppressed within the WBL and FBL approximations. The analysis done in conjunction with the WBLs and FBLs reveals why general studies on nonequilibrium properties require a more elaborate theoretical than studies on linear response properties (e.g., ohmic conductance and thermopower) at zero temperature. Furthermore, examples are presented that demonstrate that treating parts of electrodes adjacent to the embedded molecule and the remaining semi-infinite electrodes at different levels of theory (which is exactly what most NEGF-DFT approaches do) is a procedure that yields spurious structures in nonlinear ranges of current-voltage curves. PMID:27335734

  17. Experimental evidence on removing copper and light-induced degradation from silicon by negative charge

    SciTech Connect

    Boulfrad, Yacine Lindroos, Jeanette; Yli-Koski, Marko; Savin, Hele; Wagner, Matthias; Wolny, Franziska

    2014-11-03

    In addition to boron and oxygen, copper is also known to cause light-induced degradation (LID) in silicon. We have demonstrated previously that LID can be prevented by depositing negative corona charge onto the wafer surfaces. Positively charged interstitial copper ions are proposed to diffuse to the negatively charged surface and consequently empty the bulk of copper. In this study, copper out-diffusion was confirmed by chemical analysis of the near surface region of negatively/positively charged silicon wafer. Furthermore, LID was permanently removed by etching the copper-rich surface layer after negative charge deposition. These results demonstrate that (i) copper can be effectively removed from the bulk by negative charge, (ii) under illumination copper forms a recombination active defect in the bulk of the wafer causing severe light induced degradation.

  18. An analysis of five negative sprite-parent discharges and their associated thunderstorm charge structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Levi D.; Liu, Ningyu; Splitt, Michael; Lazarus, Steven; Glenn, Chad; Rassoul, Hamid; Cummer, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyze the discharge morphologies of five confirmed negative sprite-parent discharges and the associated charge structures of the thunderstorms that produced them. The negative sprite-parent lightning took place in two thunderstorms that were associated with a tropical disturbance in east central and south Florida. The first thunderstorm, which moved onshore in east central Florida, produced four of the five negative sprite-parent discharges within a period of 17 min, as it made landfall from the Atlantic Ocean. These negative sprite-parents were composed of bolt-from-the-blue (BFB), hybrid intracloud-negative cloud-to-ground (IC-NCG), and multicell IC-NCGs discharges. The second thunderstorm, which occurred inland over south Florida, produced a negative sprite-parent that was a probable hybrid IC-NCG discharge and two negative gigantic jets (GJs). Weakened upper positive charge with very large midlevel negative charge was inferred for both convective cells that initiated the negative-sprite-parent discharges. Our study suggests tall, intense convective systems with high wind shear at the middle to upper regions of the cloud accompanied by low cloud-to-ground (CG) flash rates promote these charge structures. The excess amount of midlevel negative charge results in these CG discharges transferring much more charge to ground than typical negative CG discharges. We find that BFB discharges prefer an asymmetrical charge structure that brings the negative leader exiting the upper positive charge region closer to the lateral positive screening charge layer. This may be the main factor in determining whether a negative leader exiting the upper positive region of the thundercloud forms a BFB or GJ.

  19. Self-Optimized Biological Channels in Facilitating the Transmembrane Movement of Charged Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Huyen, V. T. N.; Lap, Vu Cong; Nguyen, V. Lien

    2016-01-01

    We consider an anisotropically two-dimensional diffusion of a charged molecule (particle) through a large biological channel under an external voltage. The channel is modeled as a cylinder of three structure parameters: radius, length, and surface density of negative charges located at the channel interior-lining. These charges induce inside the channel a potential that plays a key role in controlling the particle current through the channel. It was shown that to facilitate the transmembrane particle movement the channel should be reasonably self-optimized so that its potential coincides with the resonant one, resulting in a large particle current across the channel. Observed facilitation appears to be an intrinsic property of biological channels, regardless of the external voltage or the particle concentration gradient. This facilitation is very selective in the sense that a channel of definite structure parameters can facilitate the transmembrane movement of only particles of proper valence at corresponding temperatures. Calculations also show that the modeled channel is nonohmic with the ion conductance which exhibits a resonance at the same channel potential as that identified in the current. PMID:27022394

  20. Self-Optimized Biological Channels in Facilitating the Transmembrane Movement of Charged Molecules.

    PubMed

    Huyen, V T N; Ho, Le Bin; Lap, Vu Cong; Nguyen, V Lien

    2016-01-01

    We consider an anisotropically two-dimensional diffusion of a charged molecule (particle) through a large biological channel under an external voltage. The channel is modeled as a cylinder of three structure parameters: radius, length, and surface density of negative charges located at the channel interior-lining. These charges induce inside the channel a potential that plays a key role in controlling the particle current through the channel. It was shown that to facilitate the transmembrane particle movement the channel should be reasonably self-optimized so that its potential coincides with the resonant one, resulting in a large particle current across the channel. Observed facilitation appears to be an intrinsic property of biological channels, regardless of the external voltage or the particle concentration gradient. This facilitation is very selective in the sense that a channel of definite structure parameters can facilitate the transmembrane movement of only particles of proper valence at corresponding temperatures. Calculations also show that the modeled channel is nonohmic with the ion conductance which exhibits a resonance at the same channel potential as that identified in the current. PMID:27022394

  1. Negative differential mobility for negative carriers as revealed by space charge measurements on crosslinked polyethylene insulated model cables

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssedre, G. Laurent, C.; Vu, T. T. N.

    2015-12-21

    Among features observed in polyethylene materials under relatively high field, space charge packets, consisting in a pulse of net charge that remains in the form of a pulse as it crosses the insulation, are repeatedly observed but without complete theory explaining their formation and propagation. Positive charge packets are more often reported, and the models based on negative differential mobility(NDM) for the transport of holes could account for some charge packets phenomenology. Conversely, NDM for electrons transport has never been reported so far. The present contribution reports space charge measurements by pulsed electroacoustic method on miniature cables that are model of HVDC cables. The measurements were realized at room temperature or with a temperature gradient of 10 °C through the insulation under DC fields on the order 30–60 kV/mm. Space charge results reveal systematic occurrence of a negative front of charges generated at the inner electrode that moves toward the outer electrode at the beginning of the polarization step. It is observed that the transit time of the front of negative charge increases, and therefore the mobility decreases, with the applied voltage. Further, the estimated mobility, in the range 10{sup −14}–10{sup −13} m{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for the present results, increases when the temperature increases for the same condition of applied voltage. The features substantiate the hypothesis of negative differential mobility used for modelling space charge packets.

  2. Mass Spectrometry Study of Multiply Negatively Charged, Gas-Phase NaAOT Micelles: How Does Charge State Affect Micellar Structure and Encapsulation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yigang; Liu, Fangwei; Liu, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    We report the formation and characterization of multiply negatively charged sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (NaAOT) aggregates in the gas phase, by electrospray ionization of methanol/water solution of NaAOT followed by detection using a guided-ion-beam tandem mass spectrometer. Singly and doubly charged aggregates dominate the mass spectra with the compositions of [Nan-zAOTn]z- ( n = 1-18 and z = 1-2). Solvation by water was detected only for small aggregates [Nan-1AOTnH2O]- of n = 3-9. Incorporation of glycine and tryptophan into [Nan-zAOTn]z- aggregates was achieved, aimed at identifying effects of guest molecule hydrophobicity on micellar solubilization. Only one glycine molecule could be incorporated into each [Nan-zAOTn]z- of n ≥ 7, and at most two glycine molecules could be hosted in that of n ≥ 13. In contrast to glycine, up to four tryptophan molecules could be accommodated within single aggregates of n ≥ 6. However, deprotonation of tryptophan significantly decrease its affinity towards aggregates. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was carried out for mass-selected aggregate ions, including measurements of product ion mass spectra for both empty and amino acid-containing aggregates. CID results provide a probe for aggregate structures, surfactant-solute interactions, and incorporation sites of amino acids. The present data was compared with mass spectrometry results of positively charged [Nan+zAOTn]z+ aggregates. Contrary to their positive analogues, which form reverse micelles, negatively charged aggregates may adopt a direct micelle-like structure with AOT polar heads exposed and amino acids being adsorbed near the micellar outer surface.

  3. Mass spectrometry study of multiply negatively charged, gas-phase NaAOT micelles: how does charge state affect micellar structure and encapsulation?

    PubMed

    Fang, Yigang; Liu, Fangwei; Liu, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    We report the formation and characterization of multiply negatively charged sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (NaAOT) aggregates in the gas phase, by electrospray ionization of methanol/water solution of NaAOT followed by detection using a guided-ion-beam tandem mass spectrometer. Singly and doubly charged aggregates dominate the mass spectra with the compositions of [Na(n-z)AOT(n)](z-) (n = 1-18 and z = 1-2). Solvation by water was detected only for small aggregates [Na(n-1)AOT(n)H(2)O](-) of n = 3-9. Incorporation of glycine and tryptophan into [Na(n-z)AOT(n)](z-) aggregates was achieved, aimed at identifying effects of guest molecule hydrophobicity on micellar solubilization. Only one glycine molecule could be incorporated into each [Na(n-z)AOT(n)](z-) of n ≥ 7, and at most two glycine molecules could be hosted in that of n ≥ 13. In contrast to glycine, up to four tryptophan molecules could be accommodated within single aggregates of n ≥ 6. However, deprotonation of tryptophan significantly decrease its affinity towards aggregates. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was carried out for mass-selected aggregate ions, including measurements of product ion mass spectra for both empty and amino acid-containing aggregates. CID results provide a probe for aggregate structures, surfactant-solute interactions, and incorporation sites of amino acids. The present data was compared with mass spectrometry results of positively charged [Na(n+z)AOT(n)](z+) aggregates. Contrary to their positive analogues, which form reverse micelles, negatively charged aggregates may adopt a direct micelle-like structure with AOT polar heads exposed and amino acids being adsorbed near the micellar outer surface. PMID:23247969

  4. Binding of monovalent alkali metal ions with negatively charged phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Maity, Pabitra; Saha, Baishakhi; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh; Karmakar, Sanat

    2016-04-01

    We have systematically investigated the effect of various alkali metal ions with negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Size distributions of large unilamellar vesicles have been confirmed using dynamic light scattering. Zeta potential and effective charges per vesicle in the presence of various alkali metal ions have been estimated from the measured electrophoretic mobility. We have determined the intrinsic binding constant from the zeta potential using electrostatic double layer theory. The reasonable and consistent value of the intrinsic binding constant of Na(+), found at moderate NaCl concentration (10-100 mM), indicates that the Gouy-Chapman theory cannot be applied for very high (> 100mM) and very low (< 10 mM) electrolyte concentrations. The isothermal titration calorimetry study has revealed that the net binding heat of interaction of the negatively charged vesicles with monovalent alkali metal ions is small and comparable to those obtained from neutral phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The overall endothermic response of binding heat suggests that interaction is primarily entropy driven. The entropy gain might arise due to the release of water molecules from the hydration layer vicinity of the membranes. Therefore, the partition model which does not include the electrostatic contribution suffices to describe the interaction. The binding constant of Na(+) (2.4 ± 0.1 M(-1)), obtained from the ITC, is in agreement with that estimated from the zeta potential (-2.0 M(-1)) at moderate salt concentrations. Our results suggest that hydration dynamics may play a vital role in the membrane solution interface which strongly affects the ion-membrane interaction. PMID:26802251

  5. Probing the charge-transfer dynamics in DNA at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Matsutani, Eri; Maruyama, Atsushi; Majima, Tetsuro

    2011-10-01

    Photoinduced charge-transfer fluorescence quenching of a fluorescent dye produces the nonemissive charge-separated state, and subsequent charge recombination makes the reaction reversible. While the information available from the photoinduced charge-transfer process provides the basis for monitoring the microenvironment around the fluorescent dyes and such monitoring is particularly important in live-cell imaging and DNA diagnosis, the information obtainable from the charge recombination process is usually overlooked. When looking at fluorescence emitted from each single fluorescent dye, photoinduced charge-transfer, charge-migration, and charge recombination cause a "blinking" of the fluorescence, in which the charge-recombination rate or the lifetime of the charge-separated state (τ) is supposed to be reflected in the duration of the off time during the single-molecule-level fluorescence measurement. Herein, based on our recently developed method for the direct observation of charge migration in DNA, we utilized DNA as a platform for spectroscopic investigations of charge-recombination dynamics for several fluorescent dyes: TAMRA, ATTO 655, and Alexa 532, which are used in single-molecule fluorescence measurements. Charge recombination dynamics were observed by transient absorption measurements, demonstrating that these fluorescent dyes can be used to monitor the charge-separation and charge-recombination events. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of ATTO 655 modified DNA allowed the successful measurement of the charge-recombination dynamics in DNA at the single-molecule level. Utilizing the injected charge just like a pulse of sound, such as a "ping" in active sonar systems, information about the DNA sequence surrounding the fluorescent dye was read out by measuring the time it takes for the charge to return. PMID:21875061

  6. Invariance of molecular charge transport upon changes of extended molecule size and several related issues

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary As a sanity test for the theoretical method employed, studies on (steady-state) charge transport through molecular devices usually confine themselves to check whether the method in question satisfies the charge conservation. Another important test of the theory’s correctness is to check that the computed current does not depend on the choice of the central region (also referred to as the “extended molecule”). This work addresses this issue and demonstrates that the relevant transport and transport-related properties are indeed invariant upon changing the size of the extended molecule, when the embedded molecule can be described within a general single-particle picture (namely, a second-quantized Hamiltonian bilinear in the creation and annihilation operators). It is also demonstrates that the invariance of nonequilibrium properties is exhibited by the exact results but not by those computed approximately within ubiquitous wide- and flat-band limits (WBL and FBL, respectively). To exemplify the limitations of the latter, the phenomenon of negative differential resistance (NDR) is considered. It is shown that the exactly computed current may exhibit a substantial NDR, while the NDR effect is absent or drastically suppressed within the WBL and FBL approximations. The analysis done in conjunction with the WBLs and FBLs reveals why general studies on nonequilibrium properties require a more elaborate theoretical than studies on linear response properties (e.g., ohmic conductance and thermopower) at zero temperature. Furthermore, examples are presented that demonstrate that treating parts of electrodes adjacent to the embedded molecule and the remaining semi-infinite electrodes at different levels of theory (which is exactly what most NEGF-DFT approaches do) is a procedure that yields spurious structures in nonlinear ranges of current–voltage curves. PMID:27335734

  7. Calculating Henry’s Constants of Charged Molecules Using SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry is a computer program designed to model physical and chemical properties of molecules solely based on thier chemical structure. SPARC uses a toolbox of mechanistic perturbation models to model intermolecular interactions. SPARC has ...

  8. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  9. Negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise in single-molecule magnet junctions

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Liang, Jiu-Qing; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Molecular spintroinic device based on a single-molecule magnet is one of the ultimate goals of semiconductor nanofabrication technologies. It is thus necessary to understand the electron transport properties of a single-molecule magnet junction. Here we study the negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise properties of electron transport through a single-molecule magnet weakly coupled to two electrodes with either one or both of them being ferromagnetic. We predict that the negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise, which can be tuned by a gate voltage, depend sensitively on the spin polarization of the source and drain electrodes. In particular, the shot noise in the negative differential conductance region can be enhanced or decreased originating from the different formation mechanisms of negative differential conductance. The effective competition between fast and slow transport channels is responsible for the observed negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise. In addition, we further discuss the skewness and kurtosis properties of transport current in the super-Poissonian shot noise regions. Our findings suggest a tunable negative differential conductance molecular device, and the predicted properties of high-order current cumulants are very interesting for a better understanding of electron transport through single-molecule magnet junctions. PMID:25736094

  10. Maximizing Ion Current by Space Charge Neutralization using Negative Ions and Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2005-01-25

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space charge neutralization are introduced. Space charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  11. Maximizing ion current by space-charge neutralization using negative ions and dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2005-05-15

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space-charge neutralization are introduced. Space-charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space-charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  12. Maximizing ion current by space-charge neutralization using negative ions and dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space-charge neutralization are introduced. Space-charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space-charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  13. An atomic charge-charge flux-dipole flux atom-in-molecule decomposition for molecular dipole-moment derivatives and infrared fundamental intensities.

    PubMed

    Haiduke, Roberto L A; Bruns, Roy E

    2005-03-24

    The molecular dipole moment and its derivatives are determined from atomic charges, atomic dipoles, and their fluxes obtained from AIM formalism and calculated at the MP2(FC)/6-311++G(3d,3p) level for 16 molecules: 6 diatomic hydrides, CO, HCN, OCS, CO2, CS2, C2H2, C2N2, H2O, H2CO, and CH4. Root-mean-square (rms) errors of 0.052 D and 0.019 e are found for the dipole moments and their derivatives calculated using AIM parameters when compared with those obtained directly from the MP2(FC)/6-311++G(3d,3p) calculations and 0.097 D and 0.049 e when compared to the experimental values. The major deviations occur for the NaH, HF, and H2O molecules. Parallel polar tensor elements for the diatomic and linear polyatomic molecules, except H2, HF, LiH, and NaH, have values resulting from cancellations of substantial contributions from atomic charge fluxes and atomic dipole fluxes. These fluxes have a large negative correlation coefficient, -0.97. IR fundamental intensity sums for CO, HCN, OCS, CO2, CS2, C2H2, C2N2, H2CO, and CH4 calculated using AIM charges, charge fluxes, and atomic dipole fluxes have rms errors of 14.9 km mol(-1) when compared with sums calculated directly from the molecular wave function and 36.2 km mol(-1) relative to experimental values. The classical model proposed here to calculate dipole-moment derivatives is compared with the charge-charge flux-overlap model long used by spectroscopists for interpreting IR vibrational intensities. The utility of the AIM atomic charges and dipoles was illustrated by calculating the forces exerted on molecules by a charged particle. AIM quantities were able to reproduce forces due to a +0.1 e particle over a 3-8-A separation range for the CO and HF molecules in collinear and perpendicular arrangements. These results show that IR intensities do contain information relevant to the study of intermolecular interactions. PMID:16833574

  14. Formation of positive and negative ions of thymine molecules under the action of slow electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranyosh, I. I.; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Shimon, L. L.

    2008-12-01

    The formation of positive and negative molecules of thymine—a base of nucleic acids—under the action of slow electrons is investigated by the method of crossed electron and molecular beams. The method developed makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the energy dependences and absolute values of total cross sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of thymine molecules. It is found that the maximal cross section for the formation of positive ions is reached at an energy of 95 eV and its absolute value is, accordingly, 1.4 × 10-15 cm2. The total cross section for the formation of negative ions is 8.2 × 10-18 cm2 at an energy of 1.1 eV. The mass spectra of thymine molecules are measured and the cross sections of dissociative ionization are determined.

  15. Charging-delay induced dust acoustic collisionless shock wave: Roles of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Bharuthram, R.; Khan, Manoranjan; Gupta, M. R.

    2006-11-15

    The effects of charging-delay and negative ions on nonlinear dust acoustic waves are investigated. It has been found that the charging-delay induced anomalous dissipation causes generation of dust acoustic collisionless shock waves in an electronegative dusty plasma. The small but finite amplitude wave is governed by a Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation in which the Burger term arises due to the charging-delay. Numerical investigations reveal that the charging-delay induced dissipation and shock strength decreases (increases) with the increase of negative ion concentration (temperature)

  16. Ion beam driven ion-acoustic waves in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Walia, Ritu; Sharma, Kavita

    2012-07-15

    An ion beam propagating through a magnetized potassium plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives electrostatic ion-acoustic waves to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The phase velocity of sound wave increases with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase, with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales as one-third power of the beam density. The real part of frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales as almost the one-half power of the beam energy.

  17. Production of intense beams of polarized negative hydrogen ions by double charge exchange in alkali vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruëbler, W.; Schmelzbach, P. A.

    1983-07-01

    The intensity of the polarized negative hydrogen ion beam of the ETHZ atomic beam polarized ion source has been substantially improved by a new double charge exchange device. Increasing the diameter of the charge exchange canal to 1.4 cm results in a beam output of the source of 6 μA of polarized negative hydrogen ions. Further improvements of the charge exchanger are proposed and discussed. With an updated design of the atomic beam apparatus, beams of 0.5 mA polarized negative hydrogen ions may be obtained from such a source.

  18. Nonlinear charge transport in the helicoidal DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang Koko, A.; Tabi, C. B.; Ekobena Fouda, H. P.; Mohamadou, A.; Kofané, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Charge transport in the twist-opening model of DNA is explored via the modulational instability of a plane wave. The dynamics of charge is shown to be governed, in the adiabatic approximation, by a modified discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with next-nearest neighbor interactions. The linear stability analysis is performed on the latter and manifestations of the modulational instability are discussed according to the value of the parameter α, which measures hopping interaction correction. In so doing, increasing α leads to a reduction of the instability domain and, therefore, increases our chances of choosing appropriate values of parameters that could give rise to pattern formation in the twist-opening model. Our analytical predictions are verified numerically, where the generic equations for the radial and torsional dynamics are directly integrated. The impact of charge migration on the above degrees of freedom is discussed for different values of α. Soliton-like and localized structures are observed and thus confirm our analytical predictions. We also find that polaronic structures, as known in DNA charge transport, are generated through modulational instability, and hence reinforces the robustness of polaron in the model we study.

  19. Nonlinear charge transport in the helicoidal DNA molecule.

    PubMed

    Dang Koko, A; Tabi, C B; Ekobena Fouda, H P; Mohamadou, A; Kofané, T C

    2012-12-01

    Charge transport in the twist-opening model of DNA is explored via the modulational instability of a plane wave. The dynamics of charge is shown to be governed, in the adiabatic approximation, by a modified discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with next-nearest neighbor interactions. The linear stability analysis is performed on the latter and manifestations of the modulational instability are discussed according to the value of the parameter α, which measures hopping interaction correction. In so doing, increasing α leads to a reduction of the instability domain and, therefore, increases our chances of choosing appropriate values of parameters that could give rise to pattern formation in the twist-opening model. Our analytical predictions are verified numerically, where the generic equations for the radial and torsional dynamics are directly integrated. The impact of charge migration on the above degrees of freedom is discussed for different values of α. Soliton-like and localized structures are observed and thus confirm our analytical predictions. We also find that polaronic structures, as known in DNA charge transport, are generated through modulational instability, and hence reinforces the robustness of polaron in the model we study. PMID:23278045

  20. Surface charging by large multivalent molecules. Extending the standard Gouy-Chapman treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Stankowski, S

    1991-01-01

    Traditionally, Gouy-Chapman theory has been used to calculate the distribution of ions in the diffuse layer next to a charged surface. In recent years, the same theory has found application to adsorption (incorporation, partitioning) of charged peptides, hormones, or drugs at the membrane-water interface. Empirically it has been found that an effective charge, smaller than the physical charge, must often be used in the Gouy-Chapman formula. In addition, the large size of these molecules can be expected to influence their adsorption isotherms. To improve evaluation techniques for such experiments, comparatively simple extensions of the standard Gouy-Chapman formalism have been studied which are based on a discrete charge virial expansion. The model allows for the mobility of charged groups at the interface. It accounts for finite size of the adsorbed macromolecules and for discrete charge effects arising from pair interactions in the interface plane. In contrast to previous discrete charge treatments this model nearly coincides with the Gouy-Chapman formalism in the case where the adsorbing molecules are univalent. Large discrepancies are found for multivalent molecules. This could explain the reduced effective charges needed in the standard Gouy-Chapman treatment. The reduction factor can be predicted. The model is mainly limited to low surface coverage, typical for the adsorption studies in question. PMID:1912277

  1. Periodic Charging of Individual Molecules Coupled to the Motion of an Atomic Force Microscopy Tip.

    PubMed

    Kocić, N; Weiderer, P; Keller, S; Decurtins, S; Liu, S-X; Repp, J

    2015-07-01

    Individual molecules at the edges of self-assembled islands grown on Ag(111) can be deliberately switched in their charge state with the electric field from a scanning-probe tip. Close to the threshold voltage for a charge state transition, periodic switching of the charge is directly driven by the cantilever motion in frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM), as can be deduced from the signature in the measured frequency shift. In this regime, the integrated frequency shift yields the tip-sample force that is due to a single additional electron. Further, the signature of the dynamic charging response provides information on the electronic coupling of the molecule to the substrate. In analogy to previous experiments on quantum dots, this may also be used in the future to access excited state properties of single molecules from AFM experiments. PMID:26039575

  2. Charge migration induced by attosecond pulses in bio-relevant molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calegari, Francesca; Trabattoni, Andrea; Palacios, Alicia; Ayuso, David; Castrovilli, Mattea C.; Greenwood, Jason B.; Decleva, Piero; Martín, Fernando; Nisoli, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    After sudden ionization of a large molecule, the positive charge can migrate throughout the system on a sub-femtosecond time scale, purely guided by electronic coherences. The possibility to actively explore the role of the electron dynamics in the photo-chemistry of bio-relevant molecules is of fundamental interest for understanding, and perhaps ultimately controlling, the processes leading to damage, mutation and, more generally, to the alteration of the biological functions of the macromolecule. Attosecond laser sources can provide the extreme time resolution required to follow this ultrafast charge flow. In this review we will present recent advances in attosecond molecular science: after a brief description of the results obtained for small molecules, recent experimental and theoretical findings on charge migration in bio-relevant molecules will be discussed.

  3. Ionization of water molecules by fast charged projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Carniato, S.; Fainstein, P. D.; Hansen, J. P.

    2011-07-15

    Single-ionization cross sections of water molecules colliding with fast protons are calculated from lowest-order perturbation theory by taking all electrons and molecular orientations consistently into account. Explicit analytical formulas based on the peaking approximation are obtained for differential ionization cross sections with the partial contribution from the various electron orbitals accounted for. The results, which are in very good agreement with total and partial cross sections at high electron and projectile energies, display a strong variation on molecular orientation and molecular orbitals.

  4. Gold plasmonic effects on charge transport through single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Olgun; Venkataraman, Latha

    2014-03-01

    We study the impact of surface plasmon polaritons, the coupling of electromagnetic waves to collective electron oscillations on metal surfaces, on the conductance of single-molecule junctions. We use a scanning-tunneling microscope based break junction setup that is built into an optical microscope to form molecular junctions. Coherent 685nm light is used to illuminate the molecular junctions formed with 4,4'-bipyridine with diffraction limited focusing performance. We employ a lock-in type technique to measure currents induced by light. Furthermore, the thermal expansion due to laser heating is mimicked by mechanically modulating inter-electrode separation. For each junction studied, we measure current, and use AC techniques to determine molecular junction resonance levels and coupling strengths. We use a cross correlations analysis technique to analyze and compare the effect of light to that of the mechanical modulation. Our results show that junction transmission characteristics are not altered under illumination, within the resolution of our instrument. We argue that photo-currents measured with lock-in techniques in these kinds of structures are due to thermal effects. This work was funded by the Center for Re-Defining Photovoltaic Efficiency through Molecule Scale Control, an EFRC funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DESC0001085.

  5. Interactions of PAMAM dendrimers with negatively charged model biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Yanez Arteta, Marianna; Ainalem, Marie-Louise; Porcar, Lionel; Martel, Anne; Coker, Helena; Lundberg, Dan; Chang, Debby P; Soltwedel, Olaf; Barker, Robert; Nylander, Tommy

    2014-11-13

    We have investigated the interactions between cationic poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers of generation 4 (G4), a potential gene transfection vector, with net-anionic model biomembranes composed of different ratios of zwitterionic phosphocholine (PC) and anionic phospho-L-serine (PS) phospholipids. Two types of model membranes were used: solid-supported bilayers, prepared with lipids carrying palmitoyl-oleoyl (PO) and diphytanoyl (DPh) acyl chains, and free-standing bilayers, formed at the interface between two aqueous droplets in oil (droplet interface bilayers, DIBs) using the DPh-based lipids. G4 dendrimers were found to translocate through POPC:POPS bilayers deposited on silica surfaces. The charge density of the bilayer affects translocation, which is reduced when the ionic strength increases. This shows that the dendrimer-bilayer interactions are largely controlled by their electrostatic attraction. The structure of the solid-supported bilayers remains intact upon translocation of the dendrimer. However, the amount of lipids in the bilayer decreases and dendrimer/lipid aggregates are formed in bulk solution, which can be deposited on the interfacial layers upon dilution of the system with dendrimer-free solvent. Electrophysiology measurements on DIBs confirm that G4 dendrimers cross the lipid membranes containing PS, which then become more permeable to ions. The obtained results have implications for PAMAM dendrimers as delivery vehicles to cells. PMID:25310456

  6. Changes in mitochondrial surface charge mediate recruitment of signaling molecules during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Heit, Bryan; Yeung, Tony; Grinstein, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions with negative lipids contribute to the subcellular localization of polycationic proteins. In situ measurements using cytosolic probes of surface charge indicate that normal mitochondria are not noticeably electronegative. However, during apoptosis mitochondria accrue negative charge and acquire the ability to attract cationic proteins, including K-Ras. The marked increase in the surface charge of mitochondria occurs early in apoptosis, preceding depolarization of their inner membrane, cytochrome c release, and flipping of phosphatidylserine across the plasmalemma. Using novel biosensors, we determined that the increased electronegativity of the mitochondria coincided with and was likely attributable to increased exposure of cardiolipin, which is dianionic. Ectopic (over)expression of cardiolipin-binding proteins precluded the increase in surface charge and inhibited apoptosis, implying that mitochondrial exposure of negatively charged lipids is required for progression of programmed cell death. PMID:20926778

  7. Vibrational States of Hydrogen Molecules in One Third LHD Negative Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M.; Tsumori, K.; Matsumoto, Y.; Wada, M.; Inoue, T.

    2011-09-26

    The effect of the cesium on hydrogen negative ions is discussed using the vacuum ultraviolet emissions (VUV) from vibrational states of hydrogen molecules. The VUV spectrum from 90 to 165 nm is related to the H{sup -} production from the dissociative attachment of electrons to hydrogen molecules. The VUV spectra in hydrogen plasmas are measured in the extraction region of a negative ion source for neutral beam injector. Under the pure hydrogen discharge, the cesium vapor is introduced into the ion source to enhance the hydrogen negative ion density. When the same arc power of {approx}99 kW is applied in both with and without cesium admixture cases, the ratio of the observed VUV spectrum without to with cesium is not changed clearly. Therefore the production process of H{sup -} related to the wall/electrode surface would be enhanced rather than the volume production process.

  8. Crystal growth of new charge-transfer salts based on π-conjugated donor molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morherr, Antonia; Witt, Sebastian; Chernenkaya, Alisa; Bäcker, Jan-Peter; Schönhense, Gerd; Bolte, Michael; Krellner, Cornelius

    2016-09-01

    New charge transfer crystals of π-conjugated, aromatic molecules (phenanthrene and picene) as donors were obtained by physical vapor transport. The melting behavior, optimization of crystal growth and the crystal structure are reported for charge transfer salts with (fluorinated) tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ-Fx, x=0, 2, 4), which was used as acceptor material. The crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Growth conditions for different vapor pressures in closed ampules were applied and the effect of these starting conditions for crystal size and quality is reported. The process of charge transfer was investigated by geometrical analysis of the crystal structure and by infrared spectroscopy on single crystals. With these three different acceptor strengths and the two sets of donor materials, it is possible to investigate the distribution of the charge transfer systematically. This helps to understand the charge transfer process in this class of materials with π-conjugated donor molecules.

  9. Isotropic-nematic transition and dynamics of rigid charged molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatrantos, Argyrios

    2016-03-01

    Using molecular dynamics, an isotropic-nematic transition was found in bulk salt-free solutions of charged rods with their counterions in the semidilute regime. This phase transition is driven primarily by electrostatics, rather than by excluded volume. The counterion condensation effect, which is controlled by the Manning parameter, leads to liquid crystalline phases of rods. For elevated values of the Manning parameter, an attraction is obtained between the rods, and the nematic phase appears. For small values of the Manning parameter the counterions de-condense, and the nematic phase disappears. Instead, in a neutral system of rods and spheres there is no appearance of nematic phase. The diffusivity of both rods and counterions is reduced with the Manning parameter.

  10. Terminal supraparticle assemblies from similarly charged protein molecules and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jai Il; Nguyen, Trung Dac; de Queirós Silveira, Gleiciani; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Srivastava, Sudhanshu; Zhao, Gongpu; Sun, Kai; Zhang, Peijun; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2014-05-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and inorganic nanoparticles into terminal assemblies makes possible a large family of uniformly sized hybrid colloids. These particles can be compared in terms of utility, versatility and multifunctionality to other known types of terminal assemblies. They are simple to make and offer theoretical tools for designing their structure and function. To demonstrate such assemblies, we combine cadmium telluride nanoparticles with cytochrome C protein and observe spontaneous formation of spherical supraparticles with a narrow size distribution. Such self-limiting behaviour originates from the competition between electrostatic repulsion and non-covalent attractive interactions. Experimental variation of supraparticle diameters for several assembly conditions matches predictions obtained in simulations. Similar to micelles, supraparticles can incorporate other biological components as exemplified by incorporation of nitrate reductase. Tight packing of nanoscale components enables effective charge and exciton transport in supraparticles and bionic combination of properties as demonstrated by enzymatic nitrate reduction initiated by light absorption in the nanoparticle.

  11. Terminal Supraparticle Assemblies from Similarly Charged Protein Molecules and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jai Il; Nguyen, Trung Dac; de Queirós Silveira, Gleiciani; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Srivastava, Sudhanshu; Sun, Kai; Zhao, Gongpu; Zhang, Peijun; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and inorganic nanoparticles into terminal assemblies makes possible a large family of uniformly sized hybrid colloids. These particles can be compared in terms of utility, versatility and multifunctionality to other known types of terminal assemblies. They are simple to make and offer theoretical tools for designing their structure and function. To demonstrate such assemblies, we combine cadmium telluride nanoparticles with cytochrome C protein and observe spontaneous formation of spherical supraparticles with a narrow size distribution. Such self-limiting behaviour originates from the competition between electrostatic repulsion and non-covalent attractive interactions. Experimental variation of supraparticle diameters for several assembly conditions matches predictions obtained in simulations. Similar to micelles, supraparticles can incorporate other biological components as exemplified by incorporation of nitrate reductase. Tight packing of nanoscale components enables effective charge and exciton transport in supraparticles as demonstrated by enzymatic nitrate reduction initiated by light absorption in the nanoparticle. PMID:24845400

  12. Measurement of positively and negatively charged particles inside PMSE during MIDAS SOLSTICE 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, B.; Robertson, S.; HoráNyi, M.; Blix, T.; Rapp, M.; Latteck, R.; Gumbel, J.

    2003-04-01

    A magnetically shielded, charge collecting rocket probe was used on two flights in the MIddle Atmosphere Dynamics and Structure (MIDAS) Studies of Layered STructures and ICE (SOLSTICE) 2001 rocket campaign over Andøya, Norway. The probe was a graphite collection surface with a permanent magnet underneath to deflect electrons. The first MIDAS was launched 17 June 2001 into a strong, multiply layered PMSE. The probe measured negative particles inside an electron biteout within the PMSE, having a peak charge number density of -1500 charges per cubic centimeter. The second MIDAS was launched 24 June 2001 into another strong, multiply layered PMSE. The probe saw a band of positive particles centered in the lowest radar echo maximum, and a negative particle layer accompanied by a positive ion excess. The charge number densities for the positive and negative PMSE particles were several thousand charges per cubic centimeter. Unexpectedly, 2 km beneath the PMSE, the probe also found a very pronounced negative layer, which was probably an NLC. Computer simulations of incoming, negatively charged ice grains were performed using a rarefied flow field representative of the MIDAS payload at zero angle of attack. Ice grains ≤1 nm in radius were diverted by the leading shock front, indicating the smallest detectable ice particle by this probe.

  13. The chemical hardness of molecules and the band gap of solids within charge equilibration formalisms. Toward force field-based simulations of redox reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müser, M. H.

    2012-04-01

    This work finds that different charge equilibration methods lead to qualitatively different responses of molecules and solids to an excess charge. The investigated approaches are the regular charge equilibration (QE), the atom-atom-charge transfer (AACT), and the split-charge equilibration (SQE) method. In QE, the hardness of molecules and the band gap of solids approaches zero at large particle numbers, affirming the claim that QE induces metallic behavior. AACT suffers from producing negative values of the hardness; moreover valence and conduction bands of solids cross. In contrast to these methods, SQE can reproduce the generic behavior of dielectric molecules or solids. Moreover, first quantitative results for the NaCl molecule are promising. The results derived in this work may have beneficial implications for the modeling of redox reactions. They reveal that by introducing formal oxidation states into force field-based simulations it will become possible to simulate redox reactions including non-equilibrium contact electrification, voltage-driven charging of galvanic cells, and the formation of zwitterionic molecules.

  14. Charge transfer along DNA molecule within Peyrard-Bishop-Holstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edirisinghe, Neranjan; Apalkov, Vadym

    2010-03-01

    Charge transport through DNA molecule is important in many areas ranging from DNA damage repair to molecular nanowires. It is now widely accepted that a phonon mediated hopping of a charge carrier plays a major role in charge transport through DNA. In the present study we investigate system dynamics within Peyrard-Bishop-Holstein model for the charge transfer between donor and acceptor sites. We found that an escape time of a charge, trapped at the donor state of the DNA strand, is very sensitive to the initial value of H-bond stretching. This suggests importance of ensemble averaging. Moreover sharp phase transitions were observed for escape time in parameter space of transfer integrals and phonon-charge coupling constant.

  15. Gate-tunable large negative tunnel magnetoresistance in Ni-C60-Ni single molecule transistors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Hamada, Ikutaro; Sakata, Shuichi; Umeno, Akinori; Tsukada, Masaru; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-02-13

    We have fabricated single C(60) molecule transistors with ferromagnetic Ni leads (FM-SMTs) by using an electrical break junction method and investigated their magnetotransport. The FM-SMTs exhibited clear gate-dependent hysteretic tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) and the TMR values reached as high as -80%. The polarity of the TMR was found to be always negative over the entire bias range studied here. Density functional theory calculations show that hybridization between the Ni substrate states and the C(60) molecular orbitals generates an antiferromagnetic configuration in the local density of states near the Fermi level, which gives a reasonable explanation for the observed negative TMR. PMID:23327475

  16. Molecular length dictates the nature of charge carriers in single-molecule junctions of oxidized oligothiophenes.

    PubMed

    Dell, Emma J; Capozzi, Brian; Xia, Jianlong; Venkataraman, Latha; Campos, Luis M

    2015-03-01

    To develop advanced materials for electronic devices, it is of utmost importance to design organic building blocks with tunable functionality and to study their properties at the molecular level. For organic electronic and photovoltaic applications, the ability to vary the nature of charge carriers and so create either electron donors or acceptors is critical. Here we demonstrate that charge carriers in single-molecule junctions can be tuned within a family of molecules that contain electron-deficient thiophene-1,1-dioxide (TDO) building blocks. Oligomers of TDO were designed to increase electron affinity and maintain delocalized frontier orbitals while significantly decreasing the transport gap. Through thermopower measurements we show that the dominant charge carriers change from holes to electrons as the number of TDO units is increased. This results in a unique system in which the charge carrier depends on the backbone length, and provides a new means to tune p- and n-type transport in organic materials. PMID:25698329

  17. The influence of negative charged centers on the hole transport in a typical molecularly doped polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyutnev, Andrey P.; Ikhsanov, Renat Sh.; Saenko, Vladimir S.; Pozhidaev, Evgenii D.

    2014-03-01

    We have studied effects of the negative charged centers on the time of flight (TOF) curves measured in a typical hole-conducting molecularly doped polymer. The main effects are the unusual TOF (surface generation) current rise in the preflight region (be it a flat plateau or a cusp) due to the accumulated space charge and the current reduction at all times because of the monomolecular recombination. TOF-2 (bulk generation) transients are less sensitive to charged centers. Analysis of these effects has proved that charged centers do not change the carrier mobility provided that the space charge field and bimolecular recombination are properly accounted for in terms of the proposed two-layer MT model. We have shown that combination of TOF, TOF-1a and TOF-2 variants of the electron-gun based technique allows one to establish definitively the character of the charge carrier transport in MDPs.

  18. The Role of Negative Charge in the Delivery of Quantum Dots to Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Ryan; Medintz, Igor L.; Delehanty, James B.; Stewart, Michael H.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Huston, Alan L.; Dawson, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite our extensive knowledge of the structure of negatively charged cell surface proteoglycans and sialoglycoconjugates in the brain, we have little understanding of how their negative charge contributes to brain function. We have previously shown that intensely photoluminescent 9-nm diameter quantum dots (QDs) with a CdSe core, a ZnS shell, and a negatively charged compact molecular ligand coating (CL4) selectively target neurons rather than glia. We now provide an explanation for this selective neuronal delivery. In this study, we compared three zwitterionic QD coatings differing only in their regions of positive or negative charge, as well as a positively charged (NH2) polyethylene glycol (PEG) coat, for their ability to deliver the cell-membrane-penetrating chaperone lipopeptide JB577 (WG(Palmitoyl)VKIKKP9G2H6) to individual cells in neonatal rat hippocampal slices. We confirm both that preferential uptake in neurons, and the lack of uptake in glia, is strongly associated with having a region of greater negative charge on the QD coating. In addition, the role of negatively charged chondroitin sulfate of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in restricting uptake was further suggested by digesting neonatal rat hippocampal slices with chondroitinase ABC and showing increased uptake of QDs by oligodendrocytes. Treatment still did not affect uptake in astrocytes or microglia. Finally, the future potential of using QDs as vehicles for trafficking proteins into cells continues to show promise, as we show that by administering a histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (eGFP-His6) to hippocampal slices, we can observe neuronal uptake of GFP. PMID:26243591

  19. The Role of Negative Charge in the Delivery of Quantum Dots to Neurons.

    PubMed

    Walters, Ryan; Medintz, Igor L; Delehanty, James B; Stewart, Michael H; Susumu, Kimihiro; Huston, Alan L; Dawson, Philip E; Dawson, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Despite our extensive knowledge of the structure of negatively charged cell surface proteoglycans and sialoglycoconjugates in the brain, we have little understanding of how their negative charge contributes to brain function. We have previously shown that intensely photoluminescent 9-nm diameter quantum dots (QDs) with a CdSe core, a ZnS shell, and a negatively charged compact molecular ligand coating (CL4) selectively target neurons rather than glia. We now provide an explanation for this selective neuronal delivery. In this study, we compared three zwitterionic QD coatings differing only in their regions of positive or negative charge, as well as a positively charged (NH2) polyethylene glycol (PEG) coat, for their ability to deliver the cell-membrane-penetrating chaperone lipopeptide JB577 (WG(Palmitoyl)VKIKKP9G2H6) to individual cells in neonatal rat hippocampal slices. We confirm both that preferential uptake in neurons, and the lack of uptake in glia, is strongly associated with having a region of greater negative charge on the QD coating. In addition, the role of negatively charged chondroitin sulfate of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in restricting uptake was further suggested by digesting neonatal rat hippocampal slices with chondroitinase ABC and showing increased uptake of QDs by oligodendrocytes. Treatment still did not affect uptake in astrocytes or microglia. Finally, the future potential of using QDs as vehicles for trafficking proteins into cells continues to show promise, as we show that by administering a histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (eGFP-His6) to hippocampal slices, we can observe neuronal uptake of GFP. PMID:26243591

  20. Nanotribological Properties of Positively and Negatively charged nanodiamonds as additives to solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zijian; Corley, Steven; Shenderova, Olga; Brenner, Donald; Krim, Jacqueline

    2013-03-01

    Nano-diamond (ND) particles are known to be beneficial for wear and friction reduction when used as additives in liquids, but the fundamental origins of the improvement in tribological properties has not been established. In order to explore this issue, we have investigated the nanotribological properties of ND coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAM) as additives to solutions, employing gold/chrome coated quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). Measurements were performed with the QCM initially immersed in deionized water. ND particles with positively and negatively charged SAM end groups were then added to the water, while the frequency and amplitude of the QCM were monitored. Negative shifts in both the QCM frequency and amplitude were observed when ND with positively charged SAM end groups were added, while positive shifts in both the QCM frequency and amplitude were observed when ND with negatively charged ND end groups were added. The results are consistent with a lubricating effect for the negatively charged ND, but were only observed for sufficiently small negative ND particle size. Experiments on QCM surfaces with differing textures and roughness are in progress, to determine the separate contributing effects of surface roughness charge-water interactions. Funding provided by NSF DMR.

  1. Reversible Tuning of Interfacial and Intramolecular Charge Transfer in Individual MnPc Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Zhunzhun; Zhang, Jia Lin; Wright, Christopher A; Yuan, Kaidi; Gu, Chengding; Tadich, Anton; Qi, Dongchen; Li, He Xing; Lai, Min; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Hu, Wenping; Li, Zhenyu; Chen, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The reversible selective hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of individual manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) molecules has been investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM), synchrotron-based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) measurements, and supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is shown conclusively that interfacial and intramolecular charge transfer arises during the hydrogenation process. The electronic energetics upon hydrogenation is identified, enabling a greater understanding of interfacial and intramolecular charge transportation in the field of single-molecule electronics. PMID:26528623

  2. Auger electron spectroscopy as a tool for measuring intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.

    A way for the determination of the values of intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules of some binary dielectrics, based on Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), is proposed. These values can be obtained from the coverage dependences of the ratios of intensities of anion KL 23L 23 and KL 1L 1 Auger transitions, which are sensitive to the amount of charge at the 2p-orbitals. As an example, MgO adsorbed on Mo(110) is presented.

  3. Auger electron spectroscopy as a tool for measuring intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.

    1993-10-01

    A way for the determination of the values of intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules of some binary dielectrics, based on Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), is proposed. These values can be obtained from the coverage dependences of the ratios of intensities of anion KL 23L 23 and KL 1L 1 Auger transitions, which are sensitive to the amount of charge at the 2p-orbitals. As an example, MgO adsorbed on Mo(110) is presented.

  4. Influence of bismuth on the charging ability of negative plates in lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, L. T.; Ceylan, H.; Haigh, N. P.; Manders, J. E.

    To examine the influence of bismuth on the charging ability of negative plates in lead-acid batteries, plates are made from three types of oxides: (i) leady oxide of high quality which contains virtually no bismuth (termed 'control oxide'); (ii) control oxide in which bismuth oxide is blended at bismuth levels from 0.01 to 0.12 wt.%; (iii) leady oxide produced from Pasminco VRLA Refined™ lead (0.05-0.06 wt.%Bi). An experimental tool—the 'conversion indicator'—is developed to assess the charging ability of the test negative plates when cycling under either zero percent state-of-charge (SoC)/full-charge or partial state-of-charge (PSoC) duty. Although the conversion indicator is not the true charging efficiency, the two parameters have a close relationship, namely, the higher the conversion indicator, the greater the charging efficiency. Little difference is found in the charging ability, irrespective of bismuth content and discharge rate, when the plates are subjected to zero percent SoC/full-charge duty; the conversion indicator lies in the range 81-84%. By contrast, there is a marked difference when the negative plates are subjected to PSoC duty, i.e. consecutive cycling through 90-60, 70-40, 80-40 and 90-40% SoC windows. Up to 0.06 wt.%Bi improves the charging ability, especially with a low and narrow PSoC window (40-70% SoC) of the type that will be experienced in 42 V powernet automobile and hybrid electric duties. To maximize this beneficial effect, bismuth must be distributed uniformly in the plates. This is best achieved by using VRLA Refined™ lead for oxide production.

  5. Photoinduced charge transfer from vacuum-deposited molecules to single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Kazuki; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Ohno, Shinya; Suzuki, Takanori

    2016-06-01

    Variations of photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectra of single-layer MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 due to the vacuum deposition of C60 or copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules have been investigated. PL spectra are decomposed into two competitive components, an exciton and a charged exciton (trion), depending on carrier density. The variation of PL spectra is interpreted in terms of charge transfer across the interfaces between transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and dopant molecules. We find that deposited C60 molecules inject photoexcited electrons into MoS2, MoSe2, and WS2 or holes into WSe2. CuPc molecules also inject electrons into MoS2, MoSe2, and WS2, while holes are depleted from WSe2 to CuPc. We then propose a band alignment between TMDs and dopant molecules. Peak shifts of Raman spectra and doped carrier density estimated using a three-level model also support the band alignment. We thus demonstrate photoinduced charge transfer from dopant molecules to single-layer TMDs.

  6. BTNL2, a butyrophilin/B7-like molecule, is a negative costimulatory molecule modulated in intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Arnett, Heather A; Escobar, Sabine S; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva; Budelsky, Alison L; Steffen, Lori A; Boiani, Norman; Zhang, Ming; Siu, Gerald; Brewer, Avery W; Viney, Joanne L

    2007-02-01

    Butyrophilin-like 2 (BTNL2) is a butyrophilin family member with homology to the B7 costimulatory molecules, polymorphisms of which have been recently associated through genetic analyses to sporadic inclusion body myositis and sarcoidosis. We have characterized the full structure, expression, and function of BTNL2. Structural analysis of BTNL2 shows a molecule with an extracellular region containing two sets of two Ig domains, a transmembrane region, and a previously unreported cytoplasmic tail. Unlike most other butyrophilin members, BTNL2 lacks the prototypical B30.2 ring domain. TaqMan and Northern blot analysis indicate BTNL2 is predominantly expressed in digestive tract tissues, in particular small intestine and Peyer's patches. Immunohistochemistry with BTNL2-specific Abs further localizes BTNL2 to epithelial and dendritic cells within these tissues. Despite its homology to the B7 family, BTNL2 does not bind any of the known B7 family receptors such as CD28, CTLA-4, PD-1, ICOS, or B and T lymphocyte attenuator. Because of its localization in the gut and potential role in the immune system, BTNL2 expression was analyzed in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease. BTNL2 is overexpressed during both the asymptomatic and symptomatic phase of the Mdr1a knockout model of spontaneous colitis. In functional assays, soluble BTNL2-Fc protein inhibits the proliferation of murine CD4(+) T cells from the spleen, mesenteric lymph node, and Peyer's patch. In addition, BTNL2-Fc reduces proliferation and cytokine production from T cells activated by anti-CD3 and B7-related protein 1. These data suggest a role for BTNL2 as a negative costimulatory molecule with implications for inflammatory disease. PMID:17237401

  7. Process for preparing negative plates for use in a dry charge battery

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, P.C.

    1986-02-11

    This patent describes a process for the production of lead-containing negative plates for use in a dry charge battery. The process cnsists of drying wet negative plates while protecting them from oxidation. This improvement is accomplished by treating the wet negative plates prior to the drying operation with an aqueous soluton of an oxidation inhibiting agent selected from salicylic acid, and 2-naphtol. The plates are then protected against oxidation during drying; and dry negative plates are obtained which are resistant to the absorption of water from the atmosphere on storage but are wet immediately by battery acid in use.

  8. Quantum mechanical investigations on the role of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates in organocatalyzed reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubin, Pierre O.; Jacquemin, Denis; Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P.

    2014-04-01

    The proline-catalyzed aldol reaction is the seminal example of asymmetric organocatalysis. Previous theoretical and experimental studies aimed at identifying its mechanism in order to rationalize the outcome of this reaction. Here, we focus on key steps with modern first principle methods, i.e. the M06-2X hybrid exchange-correlation functional combined to the solvation density model to account for environmental effects. In particular, different pathways leading to the formation of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates are investigated, and their reactivity towards two electrophiles, i.e. an aldehyde and a benzhydrylium cation, are compared. Regarding the self-aldol reaction, our calculations confirm that the neutral enamine intermediate is more reactive than the negatively charged one. For the reaction with benzhydrylium cations however, the negatively charged enamine intermediate is more reactive.

  9. Dust acoustic solitary wave with variable dust charge: Role of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran

    2005-09-15

    The role of negative ions on small but finite amplitude dust acoustic solitary wave including the effects of high and low charging rates of dust grains compared to the dust oscillation frequency in electronegative dusty plasma is investigated. In the case of high charging rate, the solitary wave is governed by Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, but in the case of low charging rate, it is governed by KdV equation with a linear damping term. Numerical investigations reveal that in both cases dust acoustic soliton sharpens (flatens) and soliton width decreases (increases) with the increase of negative-ion number density (temperature). Also, the negative ions reduce the damping rate.

  10. A Model of Ball Lightning as a Formation of Water Molecules Confining an Electric Charge and the Classical Theory of the Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennakone, K.

    2012-04-01

    Ball lightning or faintly luminous floating spheres with radii of the order of ten centimeters appearing transiently in air notably during stormy weather continue to remain an unresolved phenomenon. It is suggested that these objects are organized structures constituted of an electrically charged spherical thin shell of electro-frozen dipole oriented water molecules carrying an electric charge, balanced by the internal negative pressure and outward electrostatic stress. A model presented, resembling the classical theory of the electron with Poincare stresses explain almost all observed attributes of this phenomenon. The possibility of realizing macroscopic spherical surface charge distributions in the vacuum and their implication on the problem of electron are commented.

  11. Selective charge asymmetric distribution in heteronuclear diatomic molecules in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei; Guo, Chunlei

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we study double-ionization-induced charge asymmetric dissociation (CAD) in heteronuclear diatomic molecules. In CO we find a selective charge distribution in two CAD channels, i.e., C2 ++O is abundantly produced but C +O2 + is nearly nonexistent. This cannot be explained by the ionization energy difference between the two channels alone. Our study shows that the C2 ++O channel is sequentially formed through an intermediate state C++O and the selective charge distribution is the result of electron distribution in CO when exposed to intense laser fields.

  12. First-Principles Studies of Charge Separation in Single-Molecule Heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darancet, Pierre; Doak, Peter; Neaton, Jeffrey

    2010-03-01

    Single-molecule heterojunctions, consisting of donor and acceptor moieties linked by covalent bonds and coupled to metal electrodes, provide an interesting model system for understanding processes fundamental to organic solar cells, such as light absorption and charge separation. However, how the covalent contact with metallic leads influence these processes -- and metal-molecule interface electronic structure -- remains largely unknown. Using density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory, we discuss the influence of the metal contacts and binding groups on junction electronic level alignment for small asymmetric molecules containing covalently-linked moieties based on thiophene, durene and tetrafluoro-, dinitrile-, and metoxy-benzene. Implications for photocurrent and rectification are discussed.

  13. Negative space charge effects in photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar converters

    SciTech Connect

    Segev, G.; Weisman, D.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Kribus, A.

    2015-07-06

    In thermionic energy converters, electrons in the gap between electrodes form a negative space charge and inhibit the emission of additional electrons, causing a significant reduction in conversion efficiency. However, in Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) solar energy converters, electrons that are reflected by the electric field in the gap return to the cathode with energy above the conduction band minimum. These electrons first occupy the conduction band from which they can be reemitted. This form of electron recycling makes PETE converters less susceptible to negative space charge loss. While the negative space charge effect was studied extensively in thermionic converters, modeling its effect in PETE converters does not account for important issues such as this form of electron recycling, nor the cathode thermal energy balance. Here, we investigate the space charge effect in PETE solar converters accounting for electron recycling, with full coupling of the cathode and gap models, and addressing conservation of both electric and thermal energy. The analysis shows that the negative space charge loss is lower than previously reported, allowing somewhat larger gaps compared to previous predictions. For a converter with a specific gap, there is an optimal solar flux concentration. The optimal solar flux concentration, the cathode temperature, and the efficiency all increase with smaller gaps. For example, for a gap of 3 μm the maximum efficiency is 38% and the optimal flux concentration is 628, while for a gap of 5 μm the maximum efficiency is 31% and optimal flux concentration is 163.

  14. Bactericidal action mechanism of negatively charged food grade clove oil nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Hamid; Liu, Fei; Hategekimana, Joseph; Sharif, Hafiz Rizwan; Qi, Jing; Ali, Barkat; Bian, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Jianguo; Yokoyama, Wallace; Zhong, Fang

    2016-04-15

    Clove oil (CO) anionic nanoemulsions were prepared with varying ratios of CO to canola oil (CA), emulsified and stabilized with purity gum ultra (PGU), a newly developed succinylated waxy maize starch. Interfacial tension measurements showed that CO acted as a co-surfactant and there was a gradual decrease in interfacial tension which favored the formation of small droplet sizes on homogenization until a critical limit (5:5% v/v CO:CA) was reached. Antimicrobial activity of the negatively charged CO nanoemulsion was determined against Gram positive GPB (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative GNB (Escherichia coli) bacterial strains using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and a time kill dynamic method. Negatively charged PGU emulsified CO nanoemulsion showed prolonged antibacterial activities against Gram positive bacterial strains. We concluded that negatively charged CO nanoemulsion droplets self-assemble with GPB cell membrane, and facilitated interaction with cellular components of bacteria. Moreover, no electrostatic interaction existed between negatively charged droplets and the GPB membrane. PMID:26616926

  15. Framework selection can influence pharmacokinetics of a humanized therapeutic antibody through differences in molecule charge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Tesar, Devin; Boswell, C Andrew; Cahaya, Hendry S; Wong, Anne; Zhang, Jianhuan; Meng, Y Gloria; Eigenbrot, Charles; Pantua, Homer; Diao, Jinyu; Kapadia, Sharookh B; Deng, Rong; Kelley, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) testing of a humanized (κI, VH3 framework) and affinity matured anti-hepatitis C virus E2-glycoprotein (HCV-E2) antibody (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v3) in rats revealed unexpected fast clearance (34.9 mL/day/kg). This antibody binds to the rat recycling receptor FcRn as expected for a human IgG1 antibody and does not display non-specific binding to baculovirus particles in an assay that is correlated with fast clearance in cynomolgus monkey. The antigen is not expressed in rat so target-dependent clearance does not contribute to PK. Removal of the affinity maturation changes (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1) did not restore normal clearance. The antibody was re-humanized on a κ4, VH1 framework and the non-affinity matured version (hu5B3.κ4VH1.v1) was shown to have normal clearance (8.5 mL/day/kg). Since the change in framework results in a lower pI, primarily due to more negative charge on the κ4 template, the effect of additional charge variation on antibody PK was tested by incorporating substitutions obtained through phage display affinity maturation of hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1. A variant having a pI of 8.61 gave very fast clearance (140 mL/day/kg) whereas a molecule with pI of 6.10 gave slow clearance (5.8 mL/kg/day). Both antibodies exhibited comparable binding to rat FcRn, but biodistribution experiments showed that the high pI variant was catabolized in liver and spleen. These results suggest antibody charge can have an effect on PK through alterations in antibody catabolism independent of FcRn-mediated recycling. Furthermore, introduction of affinity maturation changes into the lower pI framework yielded a candidate with PK and virus neutralization properties suitable for clinical development. PMID:25517310

  16. Aspects of lead/acid battery technology 5. Dry charging of formed negative plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prout, L.

    The objective in the dry charging of formed negative plates in lead/acid batteries is to preserve the highly active sponge lead material from attack by atmospheric oxygen until the dry and unfilled charged battery is put into service. This review discusses the following methods that are commonly used for dry charging: (i) drying in a vacuum; (ii) drying by direct application of superheated steam; (iii) drying in an inert-gas atmosphere; (iv) removal of water by hot kerosene and subsequent drying in a closed kerosene vapour chamber and (v) drying in the presence of anti-oxidants. The protection of dry-charge characteristics, rapid evaluation of dry-charge quality and testing for excess wax or oil inhibitors are also described.

  17. Luminescent systems based on the isolation of conjugated PI systems and edge charge compensation with polar molecules on a charged nanostructured surface

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Zhao, Bin; Geohegan, David B.; Styers-Barnett, David J.; Hu, Hui

    2014-07-15

    A photoluminescent or electroluminescent system and method of making a non-luminescent nanostructured material into such a luminescent system is presented. The method of preparing the luminescent system, generally, comprises the steps of modifying the surface of a nanostructured material to create isolated regions to act as luminescent centers and to create a charge imbalance on the surface; applying more than one polar molecule to the charged surface of the nanostructured material; and orienting the polar molecules to compensate for the charge imbalance on the surface of the nanostructured material. The compensation of the surface charge imbalance by the polar molecules allows the isolated regions to exhibit luminescence.

  18. Evidence for photo-induced charge separation between dye molecules adsorbed to aluminium oxide surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cappel, Ute B.; Moia, Davide; Bruno, Annalisa; Vaissier, Valerie; Haque, Saif A.; Barnes, Piers R. F.

    2016-01-01

    Excited state dynamics and photo-induced charge transfer of dye molecules have been widely studied due to their relevance for organic and dye-sensitised solar cells. Herein, we present a femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy study of the indolene dye D131 when adsorbed to inert Al2O3 substrates for different surface concentration of the dye. Surprisingly, we find that at high surface concentrations, the first singlet excited state of the dye is converted into a new state with an efficiency of about 80%. We assign the absorption features of this state to the oxidised dye and discuss the possibility of photo-induced charge separation between neighboring dye molecules. Our study is the first to show that this process can be highly efficient without the use of donor and acceptor molecules of different chemical structures. PMID:26891851

  19. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  20. Spin-boson theory for charge photogeneration in organic molecules: Role of quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The charge photogeneration process in organic molecules is investigated by a quantum heat engine model, in which two molecules are modeled by a two-spin system sandwiched between two bosonic baths. The two baths represent the high-temperature photon emission source and the low-temperature phonon environment, respectively. We utilize the time-dependent density matrix renormalization group algorithm to investigate the quantum dynamics of the model. It is found that the transient energy current flowing through the two molecules exhibits two stages. In the first stage the energy current is of a coherent feature and represents the ultrafast delocalization of the charge-transfer state, and in the second stage a steady incoherent current is established. The power conversion efficiency is significantly high and may reach the maximum value of 93 % with optimized model parameters. The long-lived quantum entanglement between the two spins is found to be primarily responsible for the hyperefficiency.

  1. Evidence for photo-induced charge separation between dye molecules adsorbed to aluminium oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappel, Ute B.; Moia, Davide; Bruno, Annalisa; Vaissier, Valerie; Haque, Saif A.; Barnes, Piers R. F.

    2016-02-01

    Excited state dynamics and photo-induced charge transfer of dye molecules have been widely studied due to their relevance for organic and dye-sensitised solar cells. Herein, we present a femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy study of the indolene dye D131 when adsorbed to inert Al2O3 substrates for different surface concentration of the dye. Surprisingly, we find that at high surface concentrations, the first singlet excited state of the dye is converted into a new state with an efficiency of about 80%. We assign the absorption features of this state to the oxidised dye and discuss the possibility of photo-induced charge separation between neighboring dye molecules. Our study is the first to show that this process can be highly efficient without the use of donor and acceptor molecules of different chemical structures.

  2. Influence of electrostatic interactions on the release of charged molecules from lipid cubic phases.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Renata; Sánchez-Ferrer, Antoni; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-04-22

    The release of positive, negative, and neutral hydrophilic drugs from pH responsive bicontinuous cubic phases was investigated under varying conditions of electrostatic interactions. A weak acid, linoleic acid (LA), or a weak base, pyridinylmethyl linoleate (PML), were added to the neutral monolinolein (ML) in order to form lyotropic liquid-crystalline (LLC) phases, which are negatively charged at neutral pH and positively charged at acidic pH. Release studies at low ionic strength (I = 20 mM) and at different pH values (3 and 7) revealed that electrostatic attraction between a positive drug, proflavine (PF), and the negatively charged LLC at pH = 7 or between a negative drug, antraquinone 2-sulfonic acid sodium salt (AQ2S), and the positively charged LLC at pH = 3 did delay the release behavior, while electrostatic repulsion affects the transport properties only to some extent. Release profiles of a neutral drug, caffeine, were not affected by the surface charge type and density in the cubic LLCs. Moreover, the influence of ionic strength was also considered up to 150 mM, corresponding to a Debye length smaller than the LLC water channels radius, which showed that efficient screening of electrostatic attractions occurring within the LLC water domains results in an increased release rate. Four transport models were applied to fit the release data, providing an exhaustive, quantitative insight on the role of electrostatic interactions in transport properties from pH responsive bicontinuous cubic phases. PMID:24673189

  3. Sprite produced by consecutive impulse charge transfers following a negative stroke: Observation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gaopeng; Cummer, Steven A.; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Hongbo; Lyu, Fanchao; Wang, Tao; Stanley, Mark A.; Yang, Jing; Lyons, Walter A.

    2016-04-01

    On the morning of 5 June 2013, two cameras of the SpriteCam network concurrently captured a red sprite with diffuse halo over a mesoscale convective system (MCS) passing the panhandle area of Oklahoma. This sprite was produced by a negative cloud-to-ground (CG) stroke with peak current of -103 kA in a manner different from previous observations in several aspects. First of all, the causative stroke of sprite is located by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) in the trailing stratiform of MCS, instead of the deep convection typically for negative sprites. Second, the sprite-producing stroke was likely the first stroke of a multistroke negative CG flash (with ≥6 CG strokes) whose evolution was mainly confined in the lower part of thunderstorm; although the parent flash of sprite might contain relatively long in-cloud evolution prior to the first stroke, there is no evidence that the negative leader had propagated into the upper positive region of thundercloud as typically observed for the sprite-producing/class negative CG strokes. Third, as shown by the simulation with a two-dimensional full-wave electrodynamic model, although the impulse charge moment change (-190 C km) produced by the main stroke was not sufficient to induce conventional breakdown in the mesosphere, a second impulse charge transfer occurred with ~2 ms delay to cause a substantial charge transfer (-290 C km) so that the overall charge moment change (-480 C km) exceeded the threshold for sprite production; this is a scenario different from the typical case discussed by Li et al. (2012). As for the source of the second current pulse that played a critical role to produce the sprite, it could be an M component whose charge source was at least 9 km horizontally displaced from the main stroke or a negative CG stroke (with weak peak current for the return stroke) that was not detected by the NLDN.

  4. Dynamic secondary electron emission characteristics of polymers in negative charging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Ming; Hu, Tian-Cun; Zhang, Na; Cao, Meng

    2016-04-01

    We studied the dynamic secondary electron emission (SEE) characteristics of a polyimide sample in negative charging process under electron bombardment. The time evolution of secondary electron yield (SEY) has been measured with a pulsed electron gun. The dynamic SEY, as well as the surface potential have been analyzed using a capacitance model. The shift in surface potential caused by the negative charge accumulation on the sample reduces the landing energy of the primary electrons (PEs), which in turn alters the SEY. The charging process tends to be stable when the landing energy of PEs reaches the secondary crossover energy where the corresponding SEY is 1. The surface potential has an approximately negative exponential relationship with the irradiation time. The total accumulated charge at the stable state is found to be proportional to the product of the sample capacitance and the difference between initial incident energy and the secondary crossover energy. The time constant of the exponential function is proportional to the ratio of final accumulated charge to the incident current.

  5. How Do Distance and Solvent Affect Halogen Bonding Involving Negatively Charged Donors?

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaoqiang; Wang, Guimin; Xu, Zhijian; Wang, Jinan; Yu, Yuqi; Cai, Tingting; Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2016-09-01

    It was reported that negatively charged donors can form halogen bonding, which is stable, especially, in a polar environment. On the basis of a survey of the Protein Data Bank, we noticed that the distance between the negative charge center and the halogen atom of an organohalogen may vary greatly. Therefore, a series of model systems, composed of 4-halophenyl-conjugated polyene acids and ammonia, were designed to explore the potential effect of distance on halogen bonding in different solvents. Quantum mechanics (QM) calculations demonstrated that the longer the distance, the stronger the bonding. The energy decomposition analysis on all of the model systems demonstrated that electrostatic interaction contributes the most (44-56%) to the overall binding, followed by orbital interaction (42-36%). Natural bond orbital calculations showed that electron transfer takes place from the acceptor to the donor, whereas the halogen atom becomes more positive during the bonding, which is in agreement with the result of neutral halogen bonding. QM/molecular mechanics calculations demonstrated that the polarity of binding pockets makes all of the interactions attractive in a protein system. Hence, the strength of halogen bonding involving negatively charged donors could be adjusted by changing the distance between the negative charge center and halogen atom and the environment in which the bonding exists, which may be applied in material and drug design for tuning their function and activity. PMID:27504672

  6. Ion-exchange molecularly imprinted polymer for the extraction of negatively charged acesulfame from wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Zarejousheghani, Mashaalah; Schrader, Steffi; Möder, Monika; Lorenz, Pierre; Borsdorf, Helko

    2015-09-11

    Acesulfame is a known indicator that is used to identify the introduction of domestic wastewater into water systems. It is negatively charged and highly water-soluble at environmental pH values. In this study, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized for negatively charged acesulfame and successfully applied for the selective solid phase extraction (SPE) of acesulfame from influent and effluent wastewater samples. (Vinylbenzyl)trimethylammonium chloride (VBTA) was used as a novel phase transfer reagent, which enhanced the solubility of negatively charged acesulfame in the organic solvent (porogen) and served as a functional monomer in MIP synthesis. Different molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized to optimize the extraction capability of acesulfame. The different materials were evaluated using equilibrium rebinding experiments, selectivity experiments and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The most efficient MIP was used in a molecularly imprinted-solid phase extraction (MISPE) protocol to extract acesulfame from wastewater samples. Using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS-MS) analysis, detection and quantification limits were achieved at 0.12μgL(-1) and 0.35μgL(-1), respectively. Certain cross selectivity for the chemical compounds containing negatively charged sulfonamide functional group was observed during selectivity experiments. PMID:26256920

  7. Charged particle flows in the beam extraction region of a negative ion source for NBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, S.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Shibuya, M.; Kaneko, O.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments by a four-pin probe and photodetachment technique were carried out to investigate the charged particle flows in the beam extraction region of a negative hydrogen ion source for neutral beam injector. Electron and positive ion flows were obtained from the polar distribution of the probe saturation current. Negative hydrogen ion flow velocity and temperature were obtained by comparing the recovery times of the photodetachment signals at opposite probe tips. Electron and positive ions flows are dominated by crossed field drift and ambipolar diffusion. Negative hydrogen ion temperature is evaluated to be 0.12 eV.

  8. Charged particle flows in the beam extraction region of a negative ion source for NBI.

    PubMed

    Geng, S; Tsumori, K; Nakano, H; Kisaki, M; Ikeda, K; Osakabe, M; Nagaoka, K; Takeiri, Y; Shibuya, M; Kaneko, O

    2016-02-01

    Experiments by a four-pin probe and photodetachment technique were carried out to investigate the charged particle flows in the beam extraction region of a negative hydrogen ion source for neutral beam injector. Electron and positive ion flows were obtained from the polar distribution of the probe saturation current. Negative hydrogen ion flow velocity and temperature were obtained by comparing the recovery times of the photodetachment signals at opposite probe tips. Electron and positive ions flows are dominated by crossed field drift and ambipolar diffusion. Negative hydrogen ion temperature is evaluated to be 0.12 eV. PMID:26931985

  9. Quantum interference and electron correlation in charge transport through triangular quantum dot molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chieh; Chang, Yia-chung; Kuo, David M T

    2015-03-01

    We study the charge transport properties of triangular quantum dot molecules (TQDMs) connected to metallic electrodes, taking into account all correlation functions and relevant charging states. The quantum interference (QI) effect of TQDMs resulting from electron coherent tunneling between quantum dots is revealed and well interpreted by the long distance coherent tunneling mechanism. The spectra of electrical conductance of TQDMs with charge filling from one to six electrons clearly depict the many-body and topological effects. The calculated charge stability diagram for conductance and total occupation numbers matches well with the recent experimental measurements. We also demonstrate that the destructive QI effect on the tunneling current of TQDMs is robust with respect to temperature variation, making the single electron QI transistor feasible at higher temperatures. PMID:25660124

  10. Negative Ion CID Fragmentation of O-linked Oligosaccharide Aldoses—Charge Induced and Charge Remote Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doohan, Roisin A.; Hayes, Catherine A.; Harhen, Brendan; Karlsson, Niclas Göran

    2011-06-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation was compared between reducing and reduced sulfated, sialylated, and neutral O-linked oligosaccharides. It was found that fragmentation of the [M - H]- ions of aldoses with acidic residues gave unique Z-fragmentation of the reducing end GalNAc containing the acidic C-6 branch, where the entire C-3 branch was lost. This fragmentation pathway, which is not seen in the alditols, showed that the process involved charge remote fragmentation catalyzed by a reducing end acidic anomeric proton. With structures containing sialic acid on both the C-3 and C-6 branch, the [M - H]- ions were dominated by the loss of sialic acid. This fragmentation pathway was also pronounced in the [M - 2H]2- ions revealing both the C-6 Z-fragment plus its complementary C-3 C-fragment in addition to glycosidic and cross ring fragmentation. This generation of the Z/C-fragment pairs from GalNAc showed that the charges were not participating in their generation. Fragmentation of neutral aldoses showed pronounced Z-fragmentation believed to be generated by proton migration from the C-6 branch to the negatively charged GalNAc residue followed by charge remote fragmentation similar to the acidic oligosaccharides. In addition, A-type fragments generated by charge induced fragmentation of neutral oligosaccharides were observed when the charge migrated from C-1 of the GalNAc to the GlcNAc residue followed by rearrangement to accommodate the 0,2A-fragmentation. LC-MS also showed that O-linked aldoses existed as interchangeable α/β pyranose anomers, in addition to a third isomer (25% of the total free aldose) believed to be the furanose form.

  11. Photodissociation and charge transfer dynamics of negative ions studied with femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zanni, Martin T.

    1999-12-17

    This dissertation presents studies aimed at understanding the potential energy surfaces and dynamics of isolated negative ions, and the effects of solvent on each. Although negative ions play important roles in atmospheric and solution phase chemistry, to a large extent the ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of gas phase negative ions are poorly characterized, and solvent effects even less well understood. In an effort to fill this gap, the author's coworkers and the author have developed a new technique, anion femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy, and applied it to gas phase photodissociation and charge transfer processes. Studies are presented that (1) characterize the ground and excited states of isolated and clustered anions, (2) monitor the photodissociation dynamics of isolated and clustered anions, and (3) explore the charge-transfer-to-solvent states of atomic iodide clustered with polar and non-polar solvents.

  12. Channel-forming activity of syringopeptin 25A in mercury-supported phospholipid monolayers and negatively charged bilayers.

    PubMed

    Becucci, Lucia; Toppi, Arianna; Fiore, Alberto; Scaloni, Andrea; Guidelli, Rolando

    2016-10-01

    Interactions of the cationic lipodepsipeptide syringopeptin 25A (SP25A) with mercury-supported dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) and dioeleoylphosphatidic acid (DOPA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were investigated by AC voltammetry in 0.1M KCl at pH3, 5.4 and 6.8. SP25A targets and penetrates the DOPS SAM much more effectively than the other SAMs not only at pH6.8, where the DOPS SAM is negatively charged, but also at pH3, where it is positively charged just as SP25A. Similar investigations at tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) consisting of a thiolipid called DPTL anchored to mercury, with a DOPS, DOPA or DOPC distal monolayer on top of it, showed that, at physiological transmembrane potentials, SP25A forms ion channels spanning the tBLM only if DOPS is the distal monolayer. The distinguishing chemical feature of the DOPS SAM is the ionic interaction between the protonated amino group of a DOPS molecule and the carboxylate group of an adjacent phospholipid molecule. Under the reasonable assumption that SP25A preferentially interacts with this ion pair, the selective lipodepsipeptide antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria may be tentatively explained by its affinity for similar protonated amino-carboxylate pairs, which are expected to be present in the peptide moieties of peptidoglycan strands. PMID:27322780

  13. Efficient in vivo gene delivery by the negatively charged complexes of cationic liposomes and plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Son, K K; Tkach, D; Hall, K J

    2000-09-29

    We examined changes in zeta potential (the surface charge density, zeta) of the complexes of liposome (nmol)/DNA (microg) (L/D) formed in water at three different ratios (L/D=1, 10 and 20) by changing the ionic strength or pH to find an optimum formulation for in vivo gene delivery. At high DNA concentrations, zeta of the complexes formed in water at L/D=10 was significantly lowered by adding NaCl (zeta=+8.44+/-3.1 to -27.6+/-3.5 mV) or increasing pH from 5 (zeta=+15.3+/-1.0) to 9 (zeta=-22.5+/-2.5 mV). However, the positively charged complexes formed at L/D=20 (zeta=+6.2+/-3.5 mV) became negative as NaCl was added at alkaline pH as observed in medium (zeta=-19.7+/-9.9 mV). Thus, the complexes formed in water under the optimum condition were stable and largely negatively charged at L/D=1 (zeta=-58.1+/-3.9 mV), unstable and slightly positively charged at L/D=10 (zeta=+8.44+/-3.7 mV), and unstable and largely positively charged at L/D=20 (zeta=+24.3+/-3.6 mV). The negatively charged complexes efficiently delivered DNA into both solid and ascitic tumor cells. However, the positively charged complexes were very poor in delivering DNA into solid tumors, yet were efficient in delivering DNA into ascitic tumors grown in the peritoneum regardless of complex size. This slightly lower gene transfer efficiency of the negatively charged complexes can be as efficient as the positively charged ones when an injection is repeated (at least two injections), which is the most common case for therapy regimes. The results indicate that optimum in vivo lipofection may depend on the site of tumor growth. PMID:11018645

  14. Ionization Efficiency of Doubly Charged Ions Formed from Polyprotic Acids in Electrospray Negative Mode.

    PubMed

    Liigand, Piia; Kaupmees, Karl; Kruve, Anneli

    2016-07-01

    The ability of polyprotic acids to give doubly charged ions in negative mode electrospray was studied and related to physicochemical properties of the acids via linear discriminant analysis (LDA). It was discovered that the compound has to be strongly acidic (low pK a1 and pK a2) and to have high hydrophobicity (logP ow) to become multiply charged. Ability to give multiply charged ions in ESI/MS cannot be directly predicted from the solution phase acidities. Therefore, for the first time, a quantitative model to predict the charge state of the analyte in ESI/MS is proposed and validated for small anions. Also, a model to predict ionization efficiencies of these analytes was developed. Results indicate that acidity of the analyte, its octanol-water partition coefficient, and charge delocalization are important factors that influence ionization efficiencies as well as charge states of the analytes. The pH of the solvent was also found to be an important factor influencing the ionization efficiency of doubly charged ions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27044024

  15. Ionization Efficiency of Doubly Charged Ions Formed from Polyprotic Acids in Electrospray Negative Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liigand, Piia; Kaupmees, Karl; Kruve, Anneli

    2016-07-01

    The ability of polyprotic acids to give doubly charged ions in negative mode electrospray was studied and related to physicochemical properties of the acids via linear discriminant analysis (LDA). It was discovered that the compound has to be strongly acidic (low p K a1 and p K a2) and to have high hydrophobicity (log P ow) to become multiply charged. Ability to give multiply charged ions in ESI/MS cannot be directly predicted from the solution phase acidities. Therefore, for the first time, a quantitative model to predict the charge state of the analyte in ESI/MS is proposed and validated for small anions. Also, a model to predict ionization efficiencies of these analytes was developed. Results indicate that acidity of the analyte, its octanol-water partition coefficient, and charge delocalization are important factors that influence ionization efficiencies as well as charge states of the analytes. The pH of the solvent was also found to be an important factor influencing the ionization efficiency of doubly charged ions.

  16. Solvent-tuned intramolecular charge-recombination rates in a conjugated donor-acceptor molecule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khundkar, Lutfur R.; Stiegman, A. E.; Perry, Joseph W.

    1990-01-01

    The nonradiative charge-recombination rates from the charge-transfer state of a new conjugated donor-acceptor molecule (p-cyano-p-prime-methylthiodiphenylacetylene) can be tuned over almost an order of magnitude by varying the polarity of the solvent. These measurements of intramolecular recombination show a turnover of rates as a function of emission energy, consistent with the 'normal' and 'inverted' behavior of Marcus theory. Steady-state spectra and time-resolved measurements make it possible to quantitatively compare thermal and optical electron-transfer rates as a function of driving force and demonstrate their correspondence.

  17. Metal-molecule contacts and charge transport across monomolecular layers: measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Kushmerick, J G; Holt, D B; Yang, J C; Naciri, J; Moore, M H; Shashidhar, R

    2002-08-19

    Charge transport studies across molecular length scales under symmetric and asymmetric metal-molecule contact conditions using a simple crossed-wire tunnel junction technique are presented. It is demonstrated that oligo(phenylene ethynylene), a conjugated organic molecule, acts like a molecular wire under symmetric contact conditions, but exhibits characteristics of a molecular diode when the connections are asymmetric. To understand this behavior, we have calculated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics using extended Huckel theory coupled with a Green's function approach. The experimentally observed I-V characteristics are in excellent qualitative agreement with the theory. PMID:12190491

  18. Bond-forming reactions of small triply charged cations with neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, James D; Parkes, Michael A; Price, Stephen D

    2013-08-12

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry reveals that atomic and small molecular triply charged cations exhibit extensive bond-forming chemistry, following gas-phase collisions with neutral molecules. These experiments show that at collision energies of a few eV, I(3+) reacts with a variety of small molecules to generate molecular monocations and molecular dications containing iodine. Xe(3+) and CS2(3+) react in a similar manner to I(3+), undergoing bond-forming reactions with neutrals. A simple model, involving relative product energetics and electrostatic interaction potentials, is used to account for the observed reactivity. PMID:23843367

  19. Simulation of space charge compensation in a multibeamlet negative ion beam.

    PubMed

    Sartori, E; Maceina, T J; Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    Ion beam space charge compensation occurs by cumulating in the beam potential well charges having opposite polarity, usually generated by collisional processes. In this paper we investigate the case of a H(-) ion beam drift, in a bi-dimensional approximation of the NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization phase 1) negative ion source. H(-) beam ion transport and plasma formation are studied via particle-in-cell simulations. Differential cross sections are sampled to determine the velocity distribution of secondary particles generated by ionization of the residual gas (electrons and slow H2 (+) ions) or by stripping of the beam ions (electrons, H, and H(+)). The simulations include three beamlets of a horizontal section, so that multibeamlet space charge and secondary particle diffusion between separate generation regions are considered, and include a repeller grid biased at various potentials. Results show that after the beam space charge is effectively screened by the secondary plasma in about 3 μs (in agreement with theoretical expectations), a plasma grows across the beamlets with a characteristic time three times longer, and a slight overcompensation of the electric potential is verified as expected in the case of negative ions. PMID:26932089

  20. Simulation of space charge compensation in a multibeamlet negative ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Maceina, T. J.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    Ion beam space charge compensation occurs by cumulating in the beam potential well charges having opposite polarity, usually generated by collisional processes. In this paper we investigate the case of a H- ion beam drift, in a bi-dimensional approximation of the NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization phase 1) negative ion source. H- beam ion transport and plasma formation are studied via particle-in-cell simulations. Differential cross sections are sampled to determine the velocity distribution of secondary particles generated by ionization of the residual gas (electrons and slow H2+ ions) or by stripping of the beam ions (electrons, H, and H+). The simulations include three beamlets of a horizontal section, so that multibeamlet space charge and secondary particle diffusion between separate generation regions are considered, and include a repeller grid biased at various potentials. Results show that after the beam space charge is effectively screened by the secondary plasma in about 3 μs (in agreement with theoretical expectations), a plasma grows across the beamlets with a characteristic time three times longer, and a slight overcompensation of the electric potential is verified as expected in the case of negative ions.

  1. Discharges on a negatively biased solar array in a charged particle environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    The charging behavior of a negatively biased solar cell array when subjected to a charged particle environment is studied in the ion density range from 200 to 12 000 ions/sq cm with the applied bias range of -500 to -1400 V. The profile of the surface potentials across the array is related to the presence of discharges. At the low end of the ion density range the solar cell cover slides charge to from 0 to +5 volts independent of the applied voltage. No discharges are seen at bias voltages as large as -1400 V. At the higher ion densities the cover slide potential begins to fluctuate, and becomes significantly negative. Under these conditions discharges can occur. The threshold bias voltage for discharges decreases with increasing ion density. A condition for discharges emerging from the experimental observations is that the average coverslide potential must be more negative than -4 V. The observations presented suggest that the plasma potential near the array becomes negative before a discharge occurs. This suggests that discharges are driven by an instability in the plasma.

  2. Discharges on a negatively biased solar cell array in a charged-particle environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.

    1985-03-01

    The charging behavior of a negatively biased solar cell array when subjected to a charged particle environment is studied in the ion density range from 200 to 12,000 ions/sq cm with the applied bias range of -500 to -1400 V. The profile of the surface potentials across the array is related to the presence of discharges. At the low end of the ion density range the solar cell cover slides charge to from 0 to +5 volts independent of the applied voltage. No discharges are seen at bias voltages as large as -1400 V. At the higher ion densities the cover slide potential begins to fluctuate, and becomes significantly negative. Under these conditions discharges can occur. The threshold bias voltage for discharges decreases with increasing ion density. A condition for discharges emerging from the experimental observations is that the average coverslide potential must be more negative than -4 V. The observations presented suggest that the plasma potential near the array becomes negative before a discharge occurs. This suggests that discharges are driven by an instability in the plasma.

  3. Gating of single molecule junction conductance by charge transfer complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Grace, Iain; Brooke, Carly; Wang, Kun; Lambert, Colin J.; Xu, Bingqian; Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-11-01

    The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference.The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis of 1c; experimental details of conductance measurements, formation of charge transfer complexes of 1c and 2 in solution; further details of theoretical methods. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04420k

  4. Nanoscale charge transport in cytochrome c3/DNA network: Comparative studies between redox-active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Harumasa; Che, Dock-Chil; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2015-09-01

    The redox-active molecule of a cytochrome c3/DNA network exhibits nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with a threshold bias voltage at low temperature and zero-bias conductance at room temperature. I-V curves for the cytochrome c3/DNA network are well matched with the Coulomb blockade network model. Comparative studies of the Mn12 cluster, cytochrome c, and cytochrome c3, which have a wide variety of redox potentials, indicate no difference in charge transport, which suggests that the conduction mechanism is not directly related to the redox states. The charge transport mechanism has been discussed in terms of the newly-formed electronic energy states near the Fermi level, induced by the ionic interaction between redox-active molecules with the DNA network.

  5. Charge transfer in dissociating iodomethane and fluoromethane molecules ionized by intense femtosecond X-ray pulses

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Rebecca; Erk, Benjamin; Coffee, Ryan; Trippel, Sebastian; Kierspel, Thomas; Bomme, Cédric; Bozek, John D.; Burkett, Mitchell; Carron, Sebastian; Ferguson, Ken R.; Foucar, Lutz; Küpper, Jochen; Marchenko, Tatiana; Miron, Catalin; Patanen, Minna; Osipov, Timur; Schorb, Sebastian; Simon, Marc; Swiggers, Michelle; Techert, Simone; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Bostedt, Christoph; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in dissociating iodomethane and fluoromethane molecules was studied at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser using an ultraviolet-pump, X-ray-probe scheme. The results for both molecules are discussed with respect to the nature of their UV excitation and different chemical properties. Signatures of long-distance intramolecular charge transfer are observed for both species, and a quantitative analysis of its distance dependence in iodomethane is carried out for charge states up to I21+. The reconstructed critical distances for electron transfer are in good agreement with a classical over-the-barrier model and with an earlier experiment employing a near-infrared pump pulse. PMID:27051675

  6. Charge transfer in dissociating iodomethane and fluoromethane molecules ionized by intense femtosecond X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Boll, Rebecca; Erk, Benjamin; Coffee, Ryan; Trippel, Sebastian; Kierspel, Thomas; Bomme, Cédric; Bozek, John D; Burkett, Mitchell; Carron, Sebastian; Ferguson, Ken R; Foucar, Lutz; Küpper, Jochen; Marchenko, Tatiana; Miron, Catalin; Patanen, Minna; Osipov, Timur; Schorb, Sebastian; Simon, Marc; Swiggers, Michelle; Techert, Simone; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Bostedt, Christoph; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in dissociating iodomethane and fluoromethane molecules was studied at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser using an ultraviolet-pump, X-ray-probe scheme. The results for both molecules are discussed with respect to the nature of their UV excitation and different chemical properties. Signatures of long-distance intramolecular charge transfer are observed for both species, and a quantitative analysis of its distance dependence in iodomethane is carried out for charge states up to I(21+). The reconstructed critical distances for electron transfer are in good agreement with a classical over-the-barrier model and with an earlier experiment employing a near-infrared pump pulse. PMID:27051675

  7. Solution, surface, and single molecule platforms for the study of DNA-mediated charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Muren, Natalie B.; Olmon, Eric D.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    The structural core of DNA, a continuous stack of aromatic heterocycles, the base pairs, which extends down the helical axis, gives rise to the fascinating electronic properties of this molecule that is so critical for life. Our laboratory and others have developed diverse experimental platforms to investigate the capacity of DNA to conduct charge, termed DNA-mediated charge transport (DNA CT). Here, we present an overview of DNA CT experiments in solution, on surfaces, and with single molecules that collectively provide a broad and consistent perspective on the essential characteristics of this chemistry. DNA CT can proceed over long molecular distances but is remarkably sensitive to perturbations in base pair stacking. We discuss how this foundation, built with data from diverse platforms, can be used both to inform a mechanistic description of DNA CT and to inspire the next platforms for its study: living organisms and molecular electronics. PMID:22850865

  8. Fixed negative charge and the Donnan effect: a description of the driving forces associated with brain tissue swelling and oedema.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Benjamin S; Shaik, Mohammed A; Morrison, Barclay

    2010-02-13

    Cerebral oedema or brain tissue swelling is a significant complication following traumatic brain injury or stroke that can increase the intracranial pressure (ICP) and impair blood flow. Here, we have identified a potential driver of oedema: the negatively charged molecules fixed within cells. This fixed charge density (FCD), once exposed, could increase ICP through the Donnan effect. We have shown that metabolic processes and membrane integrity are required for concealing this FCD as slices of rat cortex swelled immediately (within 30 min) following dissection if treated with 2 deoxyglucose + cyanide (2DG+CN) or Triton X-100. Slices given ample oxygen and glucose, however, did not swell significantly. We also found that dead brain tissue swells and shrinks in response to changes in ionic strength of the bathing medium, which suggests that the Donnan effect is capable of pressurizing and swelling brain tissue. As predicted, a non-ionic osmolyte, 1,2 propanediol, elicited no volume change at 2000 x 10(-3) osmoles l(-1) (Osm). Swelling data were well described by triphasic mixture theory with the calculated reference state FCD similar to that measured with a 1,9 dimethylmethylene blue assay. Taken together, these data suggest that intracellular fixed charges may contribute to the driving forces responsible for brain swelling. PMID:20047940

  9. Probing Dynamics from Within in Negative Ions, Neutral Molecules and van der Waals Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrah, Nora

    2006-05-01

    We have investigated with unprecedented levels of detail, processes and phenomena involving photodetachment of negative ions and photoionization of molecules and van der Waals clusters using the brightness, spectral resolution, tunability and polarization of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Photodetachment of negative ions exhibit structure and processes differing substantially from corresponding processes in neutral and positive ions, owing to the dominance of correlation in both the initial and final states. We will report on investigations carried out in inner-valence CN^- molecules giving rise to absolute double photodetachment cross sections as well as on fragmentation of negative ions clusters. We will also present absolute inner-shell photodetachment of atoms leading to multi-Auger decay [1] and discuss threshold laws [2] and PCI effects [3]. The measurements were conducted using collinear photon-ion spectroscopy. The evolution of inner-shell photoionization of clusters, as a function of photon energy, will be presented and compared to analogous measurements in atoms. The measurements were conducted using angle resolved two-dimensional photoelectron spectroscopy. Molecular fragmentation results using an ion imaging detector will briefly be presented. [1] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, G. D. Ackerman, N. D. Gibson, C. W.Walter, A. Aguilar, G. Turri, I. Dumitriu and N. Berrah, PRA 72, 050701(R), 2005. [2] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, N. D. Gibson, C. W. Walter, G. D. Ackerman, I. Dumitriu, and N. Berrah, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 083001 (2005). [3] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, A. Agular, G. D. Ackerman, and N. Berrah, (in press PRA brief report).

  10. Characteristics of EMI generated by negative metal-positive dielectric voltage stresses due to spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaky, R. C.; Inouye, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    Charging of spacecraft surfaces by the environmental plasma can result in differential potentials between metallic structure and adjacent dielectric surfaces in which the relative polarity of the voltage stress is either negative dielectric/positive metal or negative metal/positive dielectric. Negative metal/positive dielectric is a stress condition that may arise if relatively large areas of spacecraft surface metals are shadowed from solar UV and/or if the UV intensity is reduced as in the situation in which the spacecraft is entering into or leaving eclipse. The results of experimental studies of negative metal/positive dielectric systems are given. Information is given on: enhanced electron emission I-V curves; e(3) corona noise vs e(3) steady-state current; the localized nature of e(3) and negative metal arc discharge currents; negative metal arc discharges at stress thresholds below 1 kilovolt; negative metal arc discharge characteristics; dependence of blowoff arc discharge current on spacecraft capacitance to space (linear dimension); and damage to second surface mirrors due to negative metal arcs.

  11. Characteristics of EMI generated by negative metal-positive dielectric voltage stresses due to spacecraft charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaky, R. C.; Inouye, G. T.

    1985-03-01

    Charging of spacecraft surfaces by the environmental plasma can result in differential potentials between metallic structure and adjacent dielectric surfaces in which the relative polarity of the voltage stress is either negative dielectric/positive metal or negative metal/positive dielectric. Negative metal/positive dielectric is a stress condition that may arise if relatively large areas of spacecraft surface metals are shadowed from solar UV and/or if the UV intensity is reduced as in the situation in which the spacecraft is entering into or leaving eclipse. The results of experimental studies of negative metal/positive dielectric systems are given. Information is given on: enhanced electron emission I-V curves; e(3) corona noise vs e(3) steady-state current; the localized nature of e(3) and negative metal arc discharge currents; negative metal arc discharges at stress thresholds below 1 kilovolt; negative metal arc discharge characteristics; dependence of blowoff arc discharge current on spacecraft capacitance to space (linear dimension); and damage to second surface mirrors due to negative metal arcs.

  12. Field-induced conductance switching by charge-state alternation in organometallic single-molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Florian; Kastlunger, Georg; Lissel, Franziska; Egler-Lucas, Carolina; Semenov, Sergey N; Venkatesan, Koushik; Berke, Heinz; Stadler, Robert; Lörtscher, Emanuel

    2016-02-01

    Charge transport through single molecules can be influenced by the charge and spin states of redox-active metal centres placed in the transport pathway. These intrinsic properties are usually manipulated by varying the molecule's electrochemical and magnetic environment, a procedure that requires complex setups with multiple terminals. Here we show that oxidation and reduction of organometallic compounds containing either Fe, Ru or Mo centres can solely be triggered by the electric field applied to a two-terminal molecular junction. Whereas all compounds exhibit bias-dependent hysteresis, the Mo-containing compound additionally shows an abrupt voltage-induced conductance switching, yielding high-to-low current ratios exceeding 1,000 at bias voltages of less than 1.0 V. Density functional theory calculations identify a localized, redox-active molecular orbital that is weakly coupled to the electrodes and closely aligned with the Fermi energy of the leads because of the spin-polarized ground state unique to the Mo centre. This situation provides an additional slow and incoherent hopping channel for transport, triggering a transient charging effect in the entire molecule with a strong hysteresis and large high-to-low current ratios. PMID:26571004

  13. Field-induced conductance switching by charge-state alternation in organometallic single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Florian; Kastlunger, Georg; Lissel, Franziska; Egler-Lucas, Carolina; Semenov, Sergey N.; Venkatesan, Koushik; Berke, Heinz; Stadler, Robert; Lörtscher, Emanuel

    2016-02-01

    Charge transport through single molecules can be influenced by the charge and spin states of redox-active metal centres placed in the transport pathway. These intrinsic properties are usually manipulated by varying the molecule's electrochemical and magnetic environment, a procedure that requires complex setups with multiple terminals. Here we show that oxidation and reduction of organometallic compounds containing either Fe, Ru or Mo centres can solely be triggered by the electric field applied to a two-terminal molecular junction. Whereas all compounds exhibit bias-dependent hysteresis, the Mo-containing compound additionally shows an abrupt voltage-induced conductance switching, yielding high-to-low current ratios exceeding 1,000 at bias voltages of less than 1.0 V. Density functional theory calculations identify a localized, redox-active molecular orbital that is weakly coupled to the electrodes and closely aligned with the Fermi energy of the leads because of the spin-polarized ground state unique to the Mo centre. This situation provides an additional slow and incoherent hopping channel for transport, triggering a transient charging effect in the entire molecule with a strong hysteresis and large high-to-low current ratios.

  14. Anomalous charge and negative-charge-transfer insulating state in cuprate chain compound KCuO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Rivero, P.; Meyers, D.; Liu, X.; Cao, Y.; Middey, S.; Whitaker, M. J.; Barraza-Lopez, S.; Freeland, J. W.; Greenblatt, M.; Chakhalian, J.

    2015-11-01

    Using a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments and first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that insulating KCuO2 contains Cu in an unusually high formal 3+ valence state, and the ligand-to-metal (O-to-Cu) charge-transfer energy is intriguingly negative (Δ ˜-1.5 eV) and has a dominant (˜60 % ) ligand-hole character in the ground state akin to the high Tc cuprate Zhang-Rice state. Unlike most other formal Cu3 + compounds, the Cu 2 p XAS spectra of KCuO2 exhibit pronounced 3 d8 (Cu3 +) multiplet structures, which account for ˜40 % of its ground state wave function. Ab initio calculations elucidate the origin of the band gap in KCuO2 as arising primarily from strong intracluster Cu 3 d -O 2 p hybridizations (tpd); the value of the band gap decreases with a reduced value of tpd. Further, unlike conventional negative-charge-transfer insulators, the band gap in KCuO2 persists even for vanishing values of Coulomb repulsion U , underscoring the importance of single-particle band-structure effects connected to the one-dimensional nature of the compound.

  15. Distance dependent rates of photoinduced charge separation and dark charge recombination in fixed distance porphyrin-quinone molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Niemczyk, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    Three zinc tetraphenylporphyrin-anthraquinone derivatives were prepared in which the edge-to-edge distances between the porphyrin and quinone ..pi.. systems are fixed by a rigid hydrocarbon spacer molecule. Triptycene, trans-1,2-diphenylcyclopentane, and adamantane were used to fix the porphyrin-anthraquinone distance at 2.5, 3.7, and 4.9 A, respectively. These molecules possess 1,2, and 3 saturated carbon atoms, respectively, between the porphyrin donor and the quinone acceptor. Rate constants for photoinduced electron transfer from the lowest excited singlet state of the zinc tetraphenylporphyrin donor to the anthraquinone acceptor were measured. In addition, the corresponding radical ion pair recombination rate constants for each of these molecules were also determined. The rate constants for both photoinduced charge separation and subsequent radical ion pair recombination decrease by approximately a factor of 10 for each saturated carbon atom intervening between the porphyrin donor and the quinone acceptor. These results are consistent with a model in which the rate of electron transfer is determined by weak mixing of the sigma orbitals of the saturated hydrocarbon spacer with the ..pi.. orbitals of the donor and acceptor. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Charge moment change and lightning-driven electric fields associated with negative sprites and halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingbo; Cummer, Steven; Lu, Gaopeng; Zigoneanu, Lucian

    2012-09-01

    Sprites are structured high altitude optical emissions produced by lightning-driven electric fields. Both strong positive and negative cloud to ground flashes (CGs) are capable of initiating sprites. However, reported sprites are almost exclusively produced by +CGs. The very limited number of negative polarity sprites makes it difficult to reveal their morphologies and mechanisms. Since 2008, we have operated low light cameras at 5 locations in the United States to detect lightning-driven transient luminous events (TLEs). At Duke University, two pairs of magnetic sensors simultaneously record lightning-radiated magnetic fields. During 4 years of observations, the low light cameras collectively captured 1651 sprite events. Among them, 6 were produced by -CG lightning, which was confirmed by both the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and magnetic field measurements. All of these negative sprites show similar features in their morphology, lightning source current, and lightning-driven ambient electric fields. They all initiate within a few ms from their parent lightning discharges and always are accompanied by sprite halos. Compared to positive sprites, the downward streamers in negative sprites terminate at higher altitudes, about 55-60 km. The extracted source current of their parent lightning discharges is very impulsive and produces at least 450 C km charge moment change in 0.5 ms or less. Unlike most +CG strokes, essentially no continuing current follows these -CGs. Thus the uniformity of negative sprite morphology appears to reflect the uniformity of the characteristics of high charge transfer negative strokes. Numerical simulation shows these impulsive source currents produce very high (>2 Ek, where Ek is the local air breakdown field) but short-lived electric fields at halo altitudes between 70 km and 90 km. At streamer termination altitudes, the inferred background electric field is 0.2-0.3 Ek, which is close to but below the critical field (0.4 Ek

  17. Link between hopping models and percolation scaling laws for charge transport in mixtures of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Dong-Gwang; Kim, Jang-Joo; Baldo, Marc A.

    2016-04-01

    Mixed host compositions that combine charge transport materials with luminescent dyes offer superior control over exciton formation and charge transport in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). Two approaches are typically used to optimize the fraction of charge transport materials in a mixed host composition: either an empirical percolative model, or a hopping transport model. We show that these two commonly-employed models are linked by an analytic expression which relates the localization length to the percolation threshold and critical exponent. The relation is confirmed both numerically and experimentally through measurements of the relative conductivity of Tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl)amine (TCTA) :1,3-bis(3,5-dipyrid-3-yl-phenyl)benzene (BmPyPb) mixtures with different concentrations, where the TCTA plays a role as hole conductor and the BmPyPb as hole insulator. The analytic relation may allow the rational design of mixed layers of small molecules for high-performance OLEDs.

  18. Trapped water molecule in the charge separation of a bacterial reaction center.

    PubMed

    Ivashin, Nikolai; Larsson, Sven

    2008-09-25

    Low-frequency oscillations in the absorption spectrum at 1020 nm, connected to the primary charge separation process in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, have been shown by Yakovlev et al. to be caused by rotational motion of an interstitial water molecule called "water-A". The same water molecule was shown by Potter et al. to increase the rate of charge separation by a factor of 8. We have carried out geometry optimization of water-A and its nearest atoms in the protein pocket, using density functional theory (DFT). There are strong hydrogen bonds to the axial imidazol group of the B part of the special pair (P=PAPB) and to the keto carbonyl group of ring V of the accessory chlorophyll (BA). Rotation of water-A is thus impossible in the electronic ground state. We have tried to support our speculations on other possible mechanisms by calculations. The P(+)BA(-) charge transfer state is stabilized by proton transfer from water-A and simultaneous proton transfer from the axial group of PB to water-A. After double proton transfer the hydrogen bond to the keto group disappears whereby a possibility opens up for almost free water rotation. The results therefore would explain the 32 cm(-1) oscillation of Yakovlev et al. The proposed mechanism assumes, however, that the general assumption that the activation energy disappears in the primary charge separation of bacterial photosynthesis, holds also for this special case. PMID:18761433

  19. Anisotropic charge transport in large single crystals of π-conjugated organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Wael; Rahimi, Khosrow; Botiz, Ioan; Koch, Felix Peter Vinzenz; Reiter, Günter; Lienerth, Peter; Heiser, Thomas; Bubendorff, Jean-Luc; Simon, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    The electronic properties of organic semiconductors depend strongly on the nature of the molecules, their conjugation and conformation, their mutual distance and the orientation between adjacent molecules. Variations of intramolecular distances and conformation disturb the conjugation and perturb the delocalization of charges. As a result, the mobility considerably decreases compared to that of a covalently well-organized crystal. Here, we present electrical characterization of large single crystals made of the regioregular octamer of 3-hexyl-thiophene (3HT)8 using a conductive-atomic force microscope (C-AFM) in air. We find a large anisotropy in the conduction with charge mobility values depending on the crystallographic orientation of the single crystal. The smaller conduction is in the direction of π-π stacking (along the long axis of the single crystal) with a mobility value in the order of 10(-3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and the larger one is along the molecular axis (in the direction normal to the single crystal surface) with a mobility value in the order of 0.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The measured current-voltage (I-V) curves showed that along the molecular axis, the current followed an exponential dependence corresponding to an injection mode. In the π-π stacking direction, the current exhibits a space charge limited current (SCLC) behavior, which allows us to estimate the charge carrier mobility. PMID:24658783

  20. Tuning Charge and Correlation Effects for a Single Molecule on a Graphene Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Lu, Jiong; Lischner, Johannes; Omrani, Arash A.; Riss, Alexander; Karrasch, Christoph; Jung, Han Sae; Khajeh, Ramin; Wong, Dillon; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Michael F.

    Controlling electronic devices down to the single molecule level is a grand challenge of nanotechnology. Single-molecules have been integrated into devices capable of tuning electronic response, but a drawback for these systems is that their microscopic structure remains unknown due to inability to image molecules in the junction region. Here we present a combined STM and nc-AFM study demonstrating gate-tunable control of the charge state of individual F4TCNQ molecules at the surface of a graphene field effect transistor. This is different from previous studies in that the Fermi level of the substrate was continuously tuned across the molecular orbital energy level. Using STS we have determined the resulting energy level evolution of the LUMO, its associated vibronic modes, and the graphene Dirac point (ED). We show that the energy difference between ED and the LUMO increases as EF is moved away from ED due to electron-electron interactions that renormalize the molecular quasiparticle energy. This is attributed to gate-tunable image-charge screening in graphene and corroborated by ab initio calculations.

  1. Long-range charge transport in single G-quadruplex DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livshits, Gideon I.; Stern, Avigail; Rotem, Dvir; Borovok, Natalia; Eidelshtein, Gennady; Migliore, Agostino; Penzo, Erika; Wind, Shalom J.; di Felice, Rosa; Skourtis, Spiros S.; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Gurevich, Leonid; Kotlyar, Alexander B.; Porath, Danny

    2014-12-01

    DNA and DNA-based polymers are of interest in molecular electronics because of their versatile and programmable structures. However, transport measurements have produced a range of seemingly contradictory results due to differences in the measured molecules and experimental set-ups, and transporting significant current through individual DNA-based molecules remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report reproducible charge transport in guanine-quadruplex (G4) DNA molecules adsorbed on a mica substrate. Currents ranging from tens of picoamperes to more than 100 pA were measured in the G4-DNA over distances ranging from tens of nanometres to more than 100 nm. Our experimental results, combined with theoretical modelling, suggest that transport occurs via a thermally activated long-range hopping between multi-tetrad segments of DNA. These results could re-ignite interest in DNA-based wires and devices, and in the use of such systems in the development of programmable circuits.

  2. Isotope-Resolved and Charge-Sensitive Force Imaging Using Scanned Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Rastawicki, Dominik; Liu, Yang; Mar, Warren; Manoharan, Hari; Miglio, Anna; Melinte, Sorin; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; He, Lianhua; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Aihui

    Originally conceived as surface imaging instruments, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) and the atomic force microscope (AFM) were recently used to probe molecular chemical bonds with exquisite sensitivity. Remarkably, molecule-functionalized scanning tips can also provide direct access to the inelastic electron tunneling spectrum (IETS) of the terminal molecule. Here we report atomic manipulation experiments addressing carbon monoxide (CO) isotopes at low temperatures. The unique and quantifiable dependence of the CO vibrational modes offers insight into tip-controlled force and charge sensing of surface adsorbates, subsurface defects, and quantum nanostructures. The specific behavior of the monitored vibrational modes originates from the interplay of interaction forces between the top electrode--a scanned tip functionalized with a single molecule--and the atomic scale force field surrounding the target atomically-assembled nanostructure. We also present density functional theory (DFT) computations that have been performed in order to scrutinize and visualize the vibrational spectroscopic fingerprints and local force fields.

  3. Time-resolved spectroscopy of charge-transfer fluorescent molecules in polymer matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstraat, Johannes W.; Verhey, H. J.; Verhoeven, Jan W.; Kuemke, M.; McGown, Linda B.; Novikov, Eugene G.; van Hoek, Arie; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.

    1996-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence measurements have been carried out on charge-transfer fluorescent molecules incorporated in polymeric lattices, consisting of polystyrene cores and polyglycidylmethacrylate shells, and in polymethylmethacrylate thin films. New approaches to the analysis of fluorescence lifetime data obtained for molecules in polymer matrices had to be applied, since conventional analysis methods appeared not suitable for such strongly heterogeneous systems. The polymer lattices could be characterized by application of phase- resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements followed by maximum-entropy methods for data analysis. The thin films were studied using time-correlated single photon counting fluorescence lifetime measurements and data analysis with a home-built program based on stretched exponential decays. Interactions of the fluorescent guest molecules could be established by combined fluorescence lifetime and depolarization measurements. Suggestions for further improvements in fluorescence lifetime methods for characterization of polymeric materials have been made.

  4. Equilibrium negative-charge fractions in swift proton beams emerging from freshly evaporated metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, D. P.; de Castro Faria, N. V.; Freire, F. L., Jr.; Kirsch, R.; de Pinho, A. G.

    1988-05-01

    The equilibrium fraction of negative ions in a beam of proton or deuteron projectiles (0.2-3.5 MeV/u) which have penetrated thin metallic targets has been measured for the first time. Pure beryllium, copper, and gold were evaporated in situ on the exit surface of carbon foils. In this energy interval the equilibrium fractions depend strongly on the atomic number of the last surface layers. The measured equilibrium fractions are compared with those obtained with carbon foils and noble gases, and it is shown that they can be interpreted considering the solid to be a dense atomic gas. Even some subtle details of the atomic charge-changing cross sections become transparent in the solid equilibrium negative-charge fractions.

  5. Catalytic Water Oxidation by Ruthenium Complexes Containing Negatively Charged Ligand Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Kärkäs, Markus D; Åkermark, Björn

    2016-04-01

    Artificial photosynthesis represents an attractive way of converting solar energy into storable chemical energy. The H2O oxidation half-reaction, which is essential for producing the necessary reduction equivalents, is an energy-demanding transformation associated with a high kinetic barrier. Herein we present a couple of efficient Ru-based catalysts capable of mediating this four-proton-four-electron oxidation. We have focused on the incorporation of negatively charged ligands, such as carboxylate, phenol, and imidazole, into the catalysts to decrease the redox potentials. This account describes our work in designing Ru catalysts based on this idea. The presence of the negatively charged ligands is crucial for stabilizing the metal centers, allowing for light-driven H2O oxidation. Mechanistic details associated with the designed catalysts are also presented. PMID:26991306

  6. Optimizing charge neutralization for a magnetic sector SIMS instrument in negative mode

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovarov, Alexander L.; Guryanov, Georgiy M.

    2012-07-15

    Successful self-adjusted charge compensation was demonstrated for a CAMECA magnetic-sector secondary ion mass spectrometer applied in negative mode. Operation with the normal-incidence electron gun (NEG) potential positively biased relative to a sample potential enables substantial broadening of the Cs primary-ion-current density range available for analysis of insulators. The decrease of the negative NEG potential by 30 V allows the highest value of primary current density used for the analysis of a silica sample to increase by a factor of more than 6. By applying the improved charge neutralization technique, accurate Na depth profiles for SiO{sub 2} samples were obtained within detection limits of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 3}.

  7. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A.; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Midttun, Øystein

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  8. Properties of clusters in the gas phase. V - Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, R. G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ion-molecules association reactions of the form A(-)(B)n-1 + B = A(-)(B)n were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), and NO2(-) with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO2(-) and SO3(-) with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), NO2(-), CO3(-), and SO3(-) with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions.

  9. Evaluating the Effect of Ionic Strength on Duplex Stability for PNA Having Negatively or Positively Charged Side Chains

    PubMed Central

    De Costa, N. Tilani S.; Heemstra, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    The enhanced thermodynamic stability of PNA:DNA and PNA:RNA duplexes compared with DNA:DNA and DNA:RNA duplexes has been attributed in part to the lack of electrostatic repulsion between the uncharged PNA backbone and negatively charged DNA or RNA backbone. However, there are no previously reported studies that systematically evaluate the effect of ionic strength on duplex stability for PNA having a charged backbone. Here we investigate the role of charge repulsion in PNA binding by synthesizing PNA strands having negatively or positively charged side chains, then measuring their duplex stability with DNA or RNA at varying salt concentrations. At low salt concentrations, positively charged PNA binds more strongly to DNA and RNA than does negatively charged PNA. However, at medium to high salt concentrations, this trend is reversed, and negatively charged PNA shows higher affinity for DNA and RNA than does positively charged PNA. These results show that charge screening by counterions in solution enables negatively charged side chains to be incorporated into the PNA backbone without reducing duplex stability with DNA and RNA. This research provides new insight into the role of electrostatics in PNA binding, and demonstrates that introduction of negatively charged side chains is not significantly detrimental to PNA binding affinity at physiological ionic strength. The ability to incorporate negative charge without sacrificing binding affinity is anticipated to enable the development of PNA therapeutics that take advantage of both the inherent benefits of PNA and the multitude of charge-based delivery technologies currently being developed for DNA and RNA. PMID:23484047

  10. Evaluating the effect of ionic strength on duplex stability for PNA having negatively or positively charged side chains.

    PubMed

    De Costa, N Tilani S; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2013-01-01

    The enhanced thermodynamic stability of PNA:DNA and PNA:RNA duplexes compared with DNA:DNA and DNA:RNA duplexes has been attributed in part to the lack of electrostatic repulsion between the uncharged PNA backbone and negatively charged DNA or RNA backbone. However, there are no previously reported studies that systematically evaluate the effect of ionic strength on duplex stability for PNA having a charged backbone. Here we investigate the role of charge repulsion in PNA binding by synthesizing PNA strands having negatively or positively charged side chains, then measuring their duplex stability with DNA or RNA at varying salt concentrations. At low salt concentrations, positively charged PNA binds more strongly to DNA and RNA than does negatively charged PNA. However, at medium to high salt concentrations, this trend is reversed, and negatively charged PNA shows higher affinity for DNA and RNA than does positively charged PNA. These results show that charge screening by counterions in solution enables negatively charged side chains to be incorporated into the PNA backbone without reducing duplex stability with DNA and RNA. This research provides new insight into the role of electrostatics in PNA binding, and demonstrates that introduction of negatively charged side chains is not significantly detrimental to PNA binding affinity at physiological ionic strength. The ability to incorporate negative charge without sacrificing binding affinity is anticipated to enable the development of PNA therapeutics that take advantage of both the inherent benefits of PNA and the multitude of charge-based delivery technologies currently being developed for DNA and RNA. PMID:23484047

  11. Excited states and valley effects in a negatively charged impurity in a silicon FinFET.

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenberg, Lloyd; Klimeck, Gerhard; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Rahman, Rajib; Muller, Richard Partain; Rogge, Sven; Verduijn, Arjan; Lansbergen, Gabriel

    2010-07-01

    The observation and characterization of a single atom system in silicon is a significant landmark in half a century of device miniaturization, and presents an important new laboratory for fundamental quantum and atomic physics. We compare with multi-million atom tight binding (TB) calculations the measurements of the spectrum of a single two-electron (2e) atom system in silicon - a negatively charged (D-) gated Arsenic donor in a FinFET. The TB method captures accurate single electron eigenstates of the device taking into account device geometry, donor potentials, applied fields, interfaces, and the full host bandstructure. In a previous work, the depths and fields of As donors in six device samples were established through excited state spectroscopy of the D0 electron and comparison with TB calculations. Using self-consistent field (SCF) TB, we computed the charging energies of the D- electron for the same six device samples, and found good agreement with the measurements. Although a bulk donor has only a bound singlet ground state and a charging energy of about 40 meV, calculations show that a gated donor near an interface can have a reduced charging energy and bound excited states in the D- spectrum. Measurements indeed reveal reduced charging energies and bound 2e excited states, at least one of which is a triplet. The calculations also show the influence of the host valley physics in the two-electron spectrum of the donor.

  12. An experimental test of the discreteness-of-charge effect in positive and negative lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Winiski, A P; McLaughlin, A C; McDaniel, R V; Eisenberg, M; McLaughlin, S

    1986-12-16

    The electrostatic properties of charged bilayers and the bilayer component of biological membranes are often described theoretically by assuming the charge is smeared uniformly over the surface. This is one of the fundamental assumptions in the Gouy-Chapman-Stern (GCS) theory. However, the average distance between the charged phospholipids in a typical biological membrane is 2-3 nm, which is 2-3 times the Debye length in a 0.1 M salt solution. Existing discreteness-of-charge theories predict significant deviations from the GCS theory for the adsorption of ions to such membranes. We considered the predictions of the simplest discreteness-of-charge theory [Nelson, A. P., & McQuarrie, D. A. (1975) J. Theor. Biol. 55, 13-27], in which the charges are assumed to be fixed in a square lattice and the potential is described by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann relation. This theory predicts deviations that are larger for counterions than for co-ions and much larger for divalent than for monovalent counterions. We tested these predictions by measuring the adsorption of a fluorescent monovalent anion and a paramagnetic divalent cation to both positive and negative membranes, which we demonstrated experimentally had the same average surface potential. All our experimental results with probes, including those obtained on membranes in the gel rather than in the liquid-crystalline state, agreed with the predictions of the GCS theory rather than with the discreteness-of-charge theory. A simple calculation indicates that the agreement between the experimental results and the predictions of the GCS theory could be due to the finite size of the lipids. PMID:3814579

  13. Imaging charge and energy transfer in molecules using free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, Artem

    2014-05-01

    Charge and energy transfer reactions drive numerous important processes in physics, chemistry and biology, with applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics. Experimentally, the central goal in studies of transfer phenomena is to trace the spatial localization of charge at a given time. Because of their element and site sensitivity, ultrafast X-rays provide a promising tool to address this goal. In this talk I will discuss several experiments where free-electron lasers were employed to study charge and energy transfer dynamics in fragmenting molecules. In a first example, we used intense, 70 femtosecond 1.5 keV pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study distance dependence of electron transfer in laser-dissociated methyl iodide molecules. Inducing well-localized positive charge on the heavy iodine atom, we observe signature of electron transition from the separated methyl group up to the distances of 35 atomic units. In a complementary experiment, we studied charge exchange between two partners in a dissociating molecular iodine employing a pump-probe arrangement with two identical 90 eV pulses from the Free-Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). In both cases, the effective spatial range of the electron transfer can be reasonably described by a classical over-the-barrier model developed for ion-atom collisions. Finally, I will discuss a time-resolved measurement on non-local relaxation mechanism based on a long-range energy transfer, the so-called interatomic Coulombic decay. This work was supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy and by the Kansas NSF ``First Award'' program.

  14. Single Molecule Spectroelectrochemistry of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics In Hybrid Organic Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Shanlin

    2014-11-16

    Our research under support of this DOE grant is focused on applied and fundamental aspects of model organic solar cell systems. Major accomplishments are: 1) we developed a spectroelectorchemistry technique of single molecule single nanoparticle method to study charge transfer between conjugated polymers and semiconductor at the single molecule level. The fluorescence of individual fluorescent polymers at semiconductor surfaces was shown to exhibit blinking behavior compared to molecules on glass substrates. Single molecule fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements showed the conformation of the polymer molecules did not differ appreciably between glass and semiconductor substrates. The similarities in molecular conformation suggest that the observed differences in blinking activity are due to charge transfer between fluorescent polymer and semiconductor, which provides additional pathways between states of high and low fluorescence quantum efficiency. Similar spectroelectrochemistry work has been done for small organic dyes for understand their charge transfer dynamics on various substrates and electrochemical environments; 2) We developed a method of transferring semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets into organic solvent for a potential electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells which employed polymer semiconductor as the electron donor. Electron transfer from the polymer semiconductor to semiconductor and GO in solutions and thin films was established through fluorescence spectroscopy and electroluminescence measurements. Solar cells containing these materials were constructed and evaluated using transient absorption spectroscopy and dynamic fluorescence techniques to understand the charge carrier generation and recombination events; 3) We invented a spectroelectorchemistry technique using light scattering and electroluminescence for rapid size determination and studying electrochemistry of single NPs in an

  15. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment. PMID:27486044

  16. Preparation and characterization of negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingguo; Crossley, Alison; Czernuszka, Jan

    2009-07-01

    Negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres encapsulated with hydrophilic drugs have been successfully prepared by a solid-in-oil-in-water (s/o/w) solvent evaporation method in the presence of anionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DSS), and nonionic surfactant polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The effects of microencapsulation methods, surfactants types, and surfactant concentrations on the properties of microspheres were studied. Amoxicillin (AMX) was chosen as a hydrophilic model drug, and its encapsulation efficiency (EE) and in vitro release profiles were measured. The s/o/w method achieved higher EE of 40% in PLGA microspheres using surfactant SDS compared with the conventional water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) method (about 2%). Triphasic release profiles were observed for all PLGA microspheres (s/o/w) with slight drug burst, a slow diffusion-controlled release within the period of about 7 days and followed by the degradation-controlled sustained release for further 30 days. Smaller particle size and surface charge were achieved for s/o/w method than w/o/w method using the same anionic surfactants, and smooth surface and less porous interior matrix. The s/o/w method effectively encapsulated AMX into anionic PLGA microspheres using anionic surfactants, and these negatively charged PLGA microspheres represented an attractive approach for the controlled release of hydrophilic drugs. PMID:19009589

  17. Intermolecular interactions, charge-density distribution and the electrostatic properties of pyrazinamide anti-TB drug molecule: an experimental and theoretical charge-density study.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, Gnanasekaran; Hathwar, Venkatesha R; Kumaradhas, Poomani

    2014-06-01

    An experimental charge-density analysis of pyrazinamide (a first line antitubercular drug) was performed using high-resolution X-ray diffraction data [(sin θ/λ)max = 1.1 Å(-1)] measured at 100 (2) K. The structure was solved by direct methods using SHELXS97 and refined by SHELXL97. The total electron density of the pyrazinamide molecule was modeled using the Hansen-Coppens multipole formalism implemented in the XD software. The topological properties of electron density determined from the experiment were compared with the theoretical results obtained from CRYSTAL09 at the B3LYP/6-31G** level of theory. The crystal structure was stabilized by N-H...N and N-H...O hydrogen bonds, in which the N3-H3B...N1 and N3-H3A...O1 interactions form two types of dimers in the crystal. Hirshfeld surface analysis was carried out to analyze the intermolecular interactions. The fingerprint plot reveals that the N...H and O...H hydrogen-bonding interactions contribute 26.1 and 18.4%, respectively, of the total Hirshfeld surface. The lattice energy of the molecule was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP) methods with the 6-31G** basis set. The molecular electrostatic potential of the pyrazinamide molecule exhibits extended electronegative regions around O1, N1 and N2. The existence of a negative electrostatic potential (ESP) region just above the upper and lower surfaces of the pyrazine ring confirm the π-electron cloud. PMID:24892603

  18. Charge transfer through amino groups-small molecules interface improving the performance of electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havare, Ali Kemal; Can, Mustafa; Tozlu, Cem; Kus, Mahmut; Okur, Salih; Demic, Şerafettin; Demirak, Kadir; Kurt, Mustafa; Icli, Sıddık

    2016-05-01

    A carboxylic group functioned charge transporting was synthesized and self-assembled on an indium tin oxide (ITO) anode. A typical electroluminescent device [modified ITO/TPD (50 nm)/Alq3 (60 nm)/LiF (2 nm)/(120 nm)] was fabricated to investigate the effect of the amino groups-small molecules interface on the characteristics of the device. The increase in the surface work function of ITO is expected to facilitate the hole injection from the ITO anode to the Hole Transport Layer (HTL) in electroluminescence. The modified electroluminescent device could endure a higher current and showed a much higher luminance than the nonmodified one. For the produced electroluminescent devices, the I-V characteristics, optical characterization and quantum yields were performed. The external quantum efficiency of the modified electroluminescent device is improved as the result of the presence of the amino groups-small molecules interface.

  19. Effects of Surfactants and Polyelectrolytes on the Interaction between a Negatively Charged Surface and a Hydrophobic Polymer Surface.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Michael V; Donaldson, Stephen H; Gebbie, Matthew A; Gizaw, Yonas; Koenig, Peter; Roiter, Yuri; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-07-28

    We have measured and characterized how three classes of surface-active molecules self-assemble at, and modulate the interfacial forces between, a negatively charged mica surface and a hydrophobic end-grafted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer surface in solution. We provide a broad overview of how chemical and structural properties of surfactant molecules result in different self-assembled structures at polymer and mineral surfaces, by studying three characteristic surfactants: (1) an anionic aliphatic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), (2) a cationic aliphatic surfactant, myristyltrimethylammonium bromide (MTAB), and (3) a silicone polyelectrolyte with a long-chain PDMS midblock and multiple cationic end groups. Through surface forces apparatus measurements, we show that the separate addition of three surfactants can result in interaction energies ranging from fully attractive to fully repulsive. Specifically, SDS adsorbs at the PDMS surface as a monolayer and modifies the monotonic electrostatic repulsion to a mica surface. MTAB adsorbs at both the PDMS (as a monolayer) and the mica surface (as a monolayer or bilayer), resulting in concentration-dependent interactions, including a long-range electrostatic repulsion, a short-range steric hydration repulsion, and a short-range hydrophobic attraction. The cationic polyelectrolyte adsorbs as a monolayer on the PDMS and causes a long-range electrostatic attraction to mica, which can be modulated to a monotonic repulsion upon further addition of SDS. Therefore, through judicious selection of surfactants, we show how to modify the magnitude and sign of the interaction energy at different separation distances between hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, which govern the static and kinetic stability of colloidal dispersions. Additionally, we demonstrate how the charge density of silicone polyelectrolytes modifies both their self-assembly at polymer interfaces and the robust adhesion of thin PDMS films to target

  20. Comprehensive approach to intrinsic charge carrier mobility in conjugated organic molecules, macromolecules, and supramolecular architectures.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Akinori; Koizumi, Yoshiko; Aida, Takuzo; Seki, Shu

    2012-08-21

    (-1) s(-1), based on a combination of flash-photolysis TRMC and transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) measurements. Single-crystal rubrene showed an ambipolarity with anisotropic charge carrier transport along each crystal axis on the nanometer scale. Finally, we describe the charge carrier mobility of a self-assembled nanotube consisting of a large π-plane of hexabenzocoronene (HBC) partially appended with an electron acceptor. The local (intratubular) charge carrier mobility reached 3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for the nanotubes that possessed well-ordered π-stacking, but it dropped to 0.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in regions that contained greater amounts of the electron acceptor because those molecules reduced the structural integrity of π-stacked HBC arrays. Interestingly, the long-range (intertubular) charge carrier mobility was on the order of 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and monotonically decreased when the acceptor content was increased. These results suggest the importance of investigating charge carrier mobilities by frequency-dependent charge carrier motion for the development of more efficient organic electronic devices. PMID:22676381

  1. Charged Nonclassical Antifolates with Activity Against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Scocchera, Eric; Reeve, Stephanie M; Keshipeddy, Santosh; Lombardo, Michael N; Hajian, Behnoush; Sochia, Adrienne E; Alverson, Jeremy B; Priestley, Nigel D; Anderson, Amy C; Wright, Dennis L

    2016-07-14

    Although classical, negatively charged antifolates such as methotrexate possess high affinity for the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) enzyme, they are unable to penetrate the bacterial cell wall, rendering them poor antibacterial agents. Herein, we report a new class of charged propargyl-linked antifolates that capture some of the key contacts common to the classical antifolates while maintaining the ability to passively diffuse across the bacterial cell wall. Eight synthesized compounds exhibit extraordinary potency against Gram-positive S. aureus with limited toxicity against mammalian cells and good metabolic profile. High resolution crystal structures of two of the compounds reveal extensive interactions between the carboxylate and active site residues through a highly organized water network. PMID:27437079

  2. Charged Molecules Modulate the Volume Exclusion Effects Exerted by Crowders on FtsZ Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Monterroso, Begoña; Reija, Belén; Jiménez, Mercedes; Zorrilla, Silvia; Rivas, Germán

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the influence of protein crowders, either combined or individually, on the GTP-induced FtsZ cooperative assembly, crucial for the formation of the dynamic septal ring and, hence, for bacterial division. It was earlier demonstrated that high concentrations of inert polymers like Ficoll 70, used to mimic the crowded cellular interior, favor the assembly of FtsZ into bundles with slow depolymerization. We have found, by fluorescence anisotropy together with light scattering measurements, that the presence of protein crowders increases the tendency of FtsZ to polymerize at micromolar magnesium concentration, being the effect larger with ovomucoid, a negatively charged protein. Neutral polymers and a positively charged protein also diminished the critical concentration of assembly, the extent of the effect being compatible with that expected according to pure volume exclusion models. FtsZ polymerization was also observed to be strongly promoted by a negatively charged polymer, DNA, and by some unrelated polymers like PEGs at concentrations below the crowding regime. The influence of mixed crowders mimicking the heterogeneity of the intracellular environment on the tendency of FtsZ to assemble was also studied and nonadditive effects were found to prevail. Far from exactly reproducing the bacterial cytoplasm environment, this approach serves as a simplified model illustrating how its intrinsically crowded and heterogeneous nature may modulate FtsZ assembly into a functional Z-ring. PMID:26870947

  3. Optical spectra and intensities of graphene magnetic dot bound to a negatively charged Coulomb impurity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C. M. E-mail: apkschan@cityu.edu.hk; Chan, K. S. E-mail: apkschan@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-07-28

    Employing numerical diagonalization, we study the optical properties of an electron in a monolayer-graphene magnetic dot bound to an off-center negatively charged Coulomb impurity based on the massless Dirac-Weyl model. Numerical results show that, since the electron-hole symmetry is broken by the Coulomb potential, the optical absorption spectra of the magnetic dot in the presence of a Coulomb impurity are different between the electron states and the hole states. Effects of both the magnetic field and the dot size on the absorption coefficient are presented as functions of the incident photon energies.

  4. Transient performance estimation of charge plasma based negative capacitance junctionless tunnel FET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sangeeta; Kondekar, P. N.; Pal, Pawan

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the transient behavior of an n-type double gate negative capacitance junctionless tunnel field effect transistor (NC-JLTFET). The structure is realized by using the work-function engineering of metal electrodes over a heavily doped n+ silicon channel and a ferroelectric gate stack to get negative capacitance behavior. The positive feedback in the electric dipoles of ferroelectric materials results in applied gate bias boosting. Various device transient parameters viz. transconductance, output resistance, output conductance, intrinsic gain, intrinsic gate delay, transconductance generation factor and unity gain frequency are analyzed using ac analysis of the device. To study the impact of the work-function variation of control and source gate on device performance, sensitivity analysis of the device has been carried out by varying these parameters. Simulation study reveals that it preserves inherent advantages of charge-plasma junctionless structure and exhibits improved transient behavior as well.

  5. Negative-ion injection by charge exchange at 2.4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1995-09-01

    The present technical note describes multi-turn injection by charge exchange of 2.4-GeV negative ions in a Accumulator Ring used as an intense Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source. The major concern of beam loss due to magnetic stripping of the negative ions is addressed. It is demonstrated that, despite the high energy of the ions and the limitation on the magnitude of the magnetic field, it is possible to control the amount of beam losses to a fractional value of better than 10{sup {minus}5}, as it is required to avoid latent activation of the accelerator components. The injection magnet system which accomplish this is described. The paper addresses also the concern of beam loss due to the same effect in the 2.4-GeV injector linear accelerator, and in the transport from the Linac to the Accumulator Ring.

  6. Charge transfer interactions of a Ru(II) dye complex and related ligand molecules adsorbed on Au(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, Andrew J.; Weston, Matthew; O'Shea, James N.; Taylor, J. Ben; Rienzo, Anna; Mayor, Louise C.

    2011-10-28

    The interaction of the dye molecule, N3 (cis-bis(isothiocyanato)bis(2,2{sup '}-bipyridyl-4,4{sup '}-dicarboxylato) -ruthenium(II)), and related ligand molecules with a Au(111) surface has been studied using synchrotron radiation-based electron spectroscopy. Resonant photoemission spectroscopy (RPES) and autoionization of the adsorbed molecules have been used to probe the coupling between the molecules and the substrate. Evidence of charge transfer from the states near the Fermi level of the gold substrate into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the molecules is found in the monolayer RPES spectra of both isonicotinic acid and bi-isonicotinic acid (a ligand of N3), but not for the N3 molecule itself. Calibrated x-ray absorption spectroscopy and valence band spectra of the monolayers reveals that the LUMO crosses the Fermi level of the surface in all cases, showing that charge transfer is energetically possible both from and to the molecule. A core-hole clock analysis of the resonant photoemission reveals a charge transfer time of around 4 fs from the LUMO of the N3 dye molecule to the surface. The lack of charge transfer in the opposite direction is understood in terms of the lack of spatial overlap between the {pi}*-orbitals in the aromatic rings of the bi-isonicotinic acid ligands of N3 and the gold surface.

  7. Characterization of oil-free and oil-loaded liquid-crystalline particles stabilized by negatively charged stabilizer citrem.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Christa; Edwards, Katarina; Eriksson, Jonny; Larsen, Susan Weng; Østergaard, Jesper; Larsen, Claus; Urtti, Arto; Yaghmur, Anan

    2012-08-14

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the negatively charged food-grade emulsifier citrem on the internal nanostructures of oil-free and oil-loaded aqueous dispersions of phytantriol (PHYT) and glyceryl monooleate (GMO). To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature on the utilization of this charged stabilizing agent in the formation of aqueous dispersions consisting of well-ordered interiors (either inverted-type hexagonal (H(2)) phases or inverted-type microemulsion systems). Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) were used to characterize the dispersed and the corresponding nondispersed phases of inverted-type nonlamellar liquid-crystalline phases and microemulsions. The results suggest a transition between different internal nanostructures of the aqueous dispersions after the addition of the stabilizer. In addition to the main function of citrem as a stabilizer that adheres to the surface of the dispersed particles, it has a significant impact on the internal nanostructures, which is governed by the following factors: (1) its penetration between the hydrophobic tails of the lipid molecules and (2) its degree of incorporation into the lipid-water interfacial area. In the presence of citrem, the formation of aqueous dispersions with functionalized hydrophilic domains by the enlargement of the hydrophilic nanochannels of the internal H(2) phase in hexosomes and the hydrophilic core of the L(2) phase in emulsified microemulsions (EMEs) could be particularly attractive for solubilizing and controlling the release of positively charged drugs. PMID:22831645

  8. A charge-charge flux-dipole flux decomposition of the dipole moment derivatives and infrared intensities of the AB 3 (A = N, P; B = H, F) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    César, Paulo H.; Faria, Sérgio H. D. M.; da Silva, João V.; Haiduke, R. L. A.; Bruns, Roy E.

    2005-10-01

    The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (AIM) has been used to decompose dipole moment derivatives and fundamental infrared intensities of the AB 3 (A = N,P; B = H,F) molecules into charge-charge flux-dipole flux (CCFDF) contributions. Calculations were carried out at the MP2(FC)/6-311++G(3d,3p) level. Infrared intensities calculated from the AIM atomic charges and atomic dipoles are within 13.8 km mol -1 of the experimental values not considering the NH 3 and PH 3 stretching vibrations for which the experimental bands are severely overlapped. Group V atomic dipoles are very important in determining the molecular dipole moments of NF 3, PH 3 and PF 3 although the atomic charges account for almost all of the NH 3 molecular moment. Dipole fluxes on the Group V atom are important in determining the stretching band intensities of all molecules whereas they make small contributions to the bending mode intensities. Consideration of dipole flux contributions from the terminal atoms must also be made for accurately describing the intensities of all these molecules. As expected from a simple bond moment model, charge contributions dominate for most of the NH 3, NF 3, and PF 3 dipole moment derivatives and intensities. Charge flux and dipole flux contributions are very substantial for all the PH 3 vibrations, cancelling each other for the stretching modes and reinforcing one another for the bending modes.

  9. A negatively charged transmembrane aspartate residue controls activation of the relaxin-3 receptor RXFP3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Meng-Jun; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-08-15

    Relaxin-3 is an insulin/relaxin superfamily neuropeptide involved in the regulation of food intake and stress response via activation of its cognate receptor RXFP3, an A-class G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In recent studies, a highly conserved ExxxD motif essential for binding of relaxin-3 has been identified at extracellular end of the second transmembrane domain (TMD2) of RXFP3. For most of the A-class GPCRs, a highly conserved negatively charged Asp residue (Asp(2.50) using Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering and Asp128 in human RXFP3) is present at the middle of TMD2. To elucidate function of the conserved transmembrane Asp128, in the present work we replaced it with other residues and the resultant RXFP3 mutants all retained quite high ligand-binding potency, but their activation and agonist-induced internalization were abolished or drastically decreased. Thus, the negatively charged transmembrane Asp128 controlled transduction of agonist-binding information from the extracellular region to the intracellular region through maintaining RXFP3 in a metastable state for efficient conformational change induced by binding of an agonist. PMID:27353281

  10. The negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail of β-tubulin promotes proper chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Fees, Colby P.; Aiken, Jayne; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Moore, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the broadly conserved role of microtubules in chromosome segregation, we have a limited understanding of how molecular features of tubulin proteins contribute to the underlying mechanisms. Here we investigate the negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail domains (CTTs) of α- and β-tubulins, using a series of mutants that alter or ablate CTTs in budding yeast. We find that ablating β-CTT causes elevated rates of chromosome loss and cell cycle delay. Complementary live-cell imaging and electron tomography show that β-CTT is necessary to properly position kinetochores and organize microtubules within the assembling spindle. We identify a minimal region of negatively charged amino acids that is necessary and sufficient for proper chromosome segregation and provide evidence that this function may be conserved across species. Our results provide the first in vivo evidence of a specific role for tubulin CTTs in chromosome segregation. We propose that β-CTT promotes the ordered segregation of chromosomes by stabilizing the spindle and contributing to forces that move chromosomes toward the spindle poles. PMID:27053662

  11. Negative-charge-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles as drug vehicles targeting hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meng; Xu, Yuanguo; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Ge, Yanru; Xie, Jimin

    2014-10-20

    In this paper, a series of doxorubicin-loaded and negative-charge-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (DOX-MSN/COOH) was successfully prepared and used for imaging and targeting therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. The nanoparticles were uniform and negatively charged, with a diameter of about 55 nm, and a zeta potential of -20 mV. In vitro study showed that the nanoparticles could easily be endocytosed by liver cancer cells (HepG2) and were well-accumulated in the liver by passive targeting. In vivo study proved the ability of DOX-MSN/COOH to inhibit the tumor growth and prolong the survival time of mice bearing hepatocellular carcinoma in situ, giving better results than free DOX. More importantly, histological examination showed no histopathological abnormalities of normal liver cells and heart cells after the administration of DOX-MSN/COOH, while the treatment with free DOX caused damage to those cells. In conclusion, DOX-MSN/COOH exhibited enhanced antitumor efficacy as well as reduced side effects for liver cancer therapy. PMID:25149125

  12. How topoisomerase IV can efficiently unknot and decatenate negatively supercoiled DNA molecules without causing their torsional relaxation.

    PubMed

    Rawdon, Eric J; Dorier, Julien; Racko, Dusan; Millett, Kenneth C; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Freshly replicated DNA molecules initially form multiply interlinked right-handed catenanes. In bacteria, these catenated molecules become supercoiled by DNA gyrase before they undergo a complete decatenation by topoisomerase IV (Topo IV). Topo IV is also involved in the unknotting of supercoiled DNA molecules. Using Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the shapes of supercoiled DNA molecules that are either knotted or catenated. We are especially interested in understanding how Topo IV can unknot right-handed knots and decatenate right-handed catenanes without acting on right-handed plectonemes in negatively supercoiled DNA molecules. To this end, we investigate how the topological consequences of intersegmental passages depend on the geometry of the DNA-DNA juxtapositions at which these passages occur. We observe that there are interesting differences between the geometries of DNA-DNA juxtapositions in the interwound portions and in the knotted or catenated portions of the studied molecules. In particular, in negatively supercoiled, multiply interlinked, right-handed catenanes, we detect specific regions where DNA segments belonging to two freshly replicated sister DNA molecules form left-handed crossings. We propose that, due to its geometrical preference to act on left-handed crossings, Topo IV can specifically unknot supercoiled DNA, as well as decatenate postreplicative catenanes, without causing their torsional relaxation. PMID:27106058

  13. How topoisomerase IV can efficiently unknot and decatenate negatively supercoiled DNA molecules without causing their torsional relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Rawdon, Eric J.; Dorier, Julien; Racko, Dusan; Millett, Kenneth C.; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Freshly replicated DNA molecules initially form multiply interlinked right-handed catenanes. In bacteria, these catenated molecules become supercoiled by DNA gyrase before they undergo a complete decatenation by topoisomerase IV (Topo IV). Topo IV is also involved in the unknotting of supercoiled DNA molecules. Using Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the shapes of supercoiled DNA molecules that are either knotted or catenated. We are especially interested in understanding how Topo IV can unknot right-handed knots and decatenate right-handed catenanes without acting on right-handed plectonemes in negatively supercoiled DNA molecules. To this end, we investigate how the topological consequences of intersegmental passages depend on the geometry of the DNA-DNA juxtapositions at which these passages occur. We observe that there are interesting differences between the geometries of DNA-DNA juxtapositions in the interwound portions and in the knotted or catenated portions of the studied molecules. In particular, in negatively supercoiled, multiply interlinked, right-handed catenanes, we detect specific regions where DNA segments belonging to two freshly replicated sister DNA molecules form left-handed crossings. We propose that, due to its geometrical preference to act on left-handed crossings, Topo IV can specifically unknot supercoiled DNA, as well as decatenate postreplicative catenanes, without causing their torsional relaxation. PMID:27106058

  14. Link between hopping models and percolation scaling laws for charge transport in mixtures of small molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ha, Dong -Gwang; Kim, Jang -Joo; Baldo, Marc A.

    2016-04-29

    Mixed host compositions that combine charge transport materials with luminescent dyes offer superior control over exciton formation and charge transport in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). Two approaches are typically used to optimize the fraction of charge transport materials in a mixed host composition: either an empirical percolative model, or a hopping transport model. We show that these two commonly-employed models are linked by an analytic expression which relates the localization length to the percolation threshold and critical exponent. The relation is confirmed both numerically and experimentally through measurements of the relative conductivity of Tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl) amine (TCTA) :1,3-bis(3,5-dipyrid-3-yl-phenyl) benzene (BmPyPb)more » mixtures with different concentrations, where the TCTA plays a role as hole conductor and the BmPyPb as hole insulator. Furthermore, the analytic relation may allow the rational design of mixed layers of small molecules for high-performance OLEDs.« less

  15. Mechanism of charge transfer and its impacts on Fermi-level pinning for gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changjie; Yang, Weihuang; Zhu, Huili

    2015-06-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to assess changes in the geometric and electronic structures of monolayer WS2 upon adsorption of various gas molecules (H2, O2, H2O, NH3, NO, NO2, and CO). The most stable configuration of the adsorbed molecules, the adsorption energy, and the degree of charge transfer between adsorbate and substrate were determined. All evaluated molecules were physisorbed on monolayer WS2 with a low degree of charge transfer and accept charge from the monolayer, except for NH3, which is a charge donor. Band structure calculations showed that the valence and conduction bands of monolayer WS2 are not significantly altered upon adsorption of H2, H2O, NH3, and CO, whereas the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of O2, NO, and NO2 are pinned around the Fermi-level when these molecules are adsorbed on monolayer WS2. The phenomenon of Fermi-level pinning was discussed in light of the traditional and orbital mixing charge transfer theories. The impacts of the charge transfer mechanism on Fermi-level pinning were confirmed for the gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS2. The proposed mechanism governing Fermi-level pinning is applicable to the systems of adsorbates on recently developed two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides. PMID:26049513

  16. Long-range charge transport in single G-quadruplex DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Livshits, Gideon I; Stern, Avigail; Rotem, Dvir; Borovok, Natalia; Eidelshtein, Gennady; Migliore, Agostino; Penzo, Erika; Wind, Shalom J; Di Felice, Rosa; Skourtis, Spiros S; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Gurevich, Leonid; Kotlyar, Alexander B; Porath, Danny

    2014-12-01

    DNA and DNA-based polymers are of interest in molecular electronics because of their versatile and programmable structures. However, transport measurements have produced a range of seemingly contradictory results due to differences in the measured molecules and experimental set-ups, and transporting significant current through individual DNA-based molecules remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report reproducible charge transport in guanine-quadruplex (G4) DNA molecules adsorbed on a mica substrate. Currents ranging from tens of picoamperes to more than 100 pA were measured in the G4-DNA over distances ranging from tens of nanometres to more than 100 nm. Our experimental results, combined with theoretical modelling, suggest that transport occurs via a thermally activated long-range hopping between multi-tetrad segments of DNA. These results could re-ignite interest in DNA-based wires and devices, and in the use of such systems in the development of programmable circuits. PMID:25344689

  17. Activation energy of negative fixed charges in thermal ALD Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnhold-Pospischil, S.; Saint-Cast, P.; Richter, A.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-08-01

    A study of the thermally activated negative fixed charges Qtot and the interface trap densities Dit at the interface between Si and thermal atomic-layer-deposited amorphous Al2O3 layers is presented. The thermal activation of Qtot and Dit was conducted at annealing temperatures between 220 °C and 500 °C for durations between 3 s and 38 h. The temperature-induced differences in Qtot and Dit were measured using the characterization method called corona oxide characterization of semiconductors. Their time dependency were fitted using stretched exponential functions, yielding activation energies of EA = (2.2 ± 0.2) eV and EA = (2.3 ± 0.7) eV for Qtot and Dit, respectively. For annealing temperatures from 350 °C to 500 °C, the changes in Qtot and Dit were similar for both p- and n-type doped Si samples. In contrast, at 220 °C the charging process was enhanced for p-type samples. Based on the observations described in this contribution, a charging model leading to Qtot based on an electron hopping process between the silicon and Al2O3 through defects is proposed.

  18. A Hypersweet Protein: Removal of The Specific Negative Charge at Asp21 Enhances Thaumatin Sweetness

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Ojiro, Naoko; Murata, Kazuki; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito; Temussi, Piero Andrea; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    Thaumatin is an intensely sweet-tasting protein that elicits sweet taste at a concentration of 50 nM, a value 100,000 times larger than that of sucrose on a molar basis. Here we attempted to produce a protein with enhanced sweetness by removing negative charges on the interacting side of thaumatin with the taste receptor. We obtained a D21N mutant which, with a threshold value 31 nM is much sweeter than wild type thaumatin and, together with the Y65R mutant of single chain monellin, one of the two sweetest proteins known so far. The complex model between the T1R2-T1R3 sweet receptor and thaumatin, derived from tethered docking in the framework of the wedge model, confirmed that each of the positively charged residues critical for sweetness is close to a receptor residue of opposite charge to yield optimal electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, the distance between D21 and its possible counterpart D433 (located on the T1R2 protomer of the receptor) is safely large to avoid electrostatic repulsion but, at the same time, amenable to a closer approach if D21 is mutated into the corresponding asparagine. These findings clearly confirm the importance of electrostatic potentials in the interaction of thaumatin with the sweet receptor. PMID:26837600

  19. The Negatively Charged Regions of Lactoferrin Binding Protein B, an Adaptation against Anti-Microbial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B.

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein’s C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24465982

  20. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24465982

  1. Mitigation of charged impurity effects in graphene field-effect transistors with polar organic molecules (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Barrett C.; Kim, Seohee; Akinwande, Deji; Rossky, Peter J.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-09-01

    Recent developments in monolayer graphene production allow its use as the active layer in field-effect transistor technology. Favorable electrical characteristics of monolayer graphene include high mobility, operating frequency, and good stability. These characteristics are governed by such key transport physical phenomena as electron-hole transport symmetry, Dirac point voltage, and charged impurity effects. Doping of graphene occurs during device fabrication, and is largely due to charged impurities located at or near the graphene/substrate interface. These impurities cause scattering of charge carriers, which lowers mobility. Such scattering is detrimental to graphene transistor performance, but our group has shown that coating with fluoropolymer thin films or exposure to polar organic vapors can restore favorable electrical characteristics to monolayer graphene. By partially neutralizing charged impurities and defects, we can improve the mobility by approximately a factor of 2, change the Dirac voltage by fairly large amounts, and reduce the residual carrier density significantly. We hypothesize that this phenomena results from screening of charged impurities by the polar molecules. To better understand such screening interactions, we performed computational chemistry experiments to observe interactions between polar organic molecules and monolayer graphene. The molecules interacted more strongly with defective graphene than with pristine graphene, and the electronic environment of graphene was altered. These computational observations correlate well with our experimental results to support our hypothesis that polar molecules can act to screen charged impurities on or near monolayer graphene. Such screening favorably mitigates charge scattering, improving graphene transistor performance.

  2. A fast empirical GAFF compatible partial atomic charge assignment scheme for modeling interactions of small molecules with biomolecular targets.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Goutam; Patra, Niladri; Barua, Poranjyoti; Jayaram, B

    2011-04-15

    We report here a new and fast approach [Transferable Partial Atomic Charge Model (TPACM4)-upto four bonds] for deriving the partial atomic charges of small molecules for use in protein/DNA-ligand docking and scoring. We have created a look-up table of 5302 atom types to cover the chemical space of C, H, O, N, S, P, F, Cl, and Br atoms in small molecules together with their quantum mechanical RESP fit charges. The atom types defined span diverse plausible chemical environments of each atom in a molecule. The partial charge on any atom in a given molecule is then assigned by a reference to the look-up table. We tested the sensitivity of the TPACM4 partial charges in estimates of hydrogen bond dimers energies, solvation free energies and protein-ligand binding free energies. An average error ±1.11 kcal/mol and a correlation coefficient of 0.90 is obtained in the calculated protein-ligand binding free energies vis-à-vis an RMS error of ±1.02 kcal/mol and a correlation coefficient of 0.92 obtained with RESP fit charges in comparison to experiment. Similar accuracies are realized in predictions of hydrogen bond energies and solvation free energies of small molecules. For a molecule containing 50-55 atoms, the method takes on the order of milliseconds on a single processor machine to assign partial atomic charges. The TPACM4 programme has been web-enabled and made freely accessible at http://www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/drugdesign/charge.jsp. PMID:21341292

  3. Hydrogen Bonding and Binding of Polybasic Residues with Negatively Charged Mixed Lipid Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, C.; Feraudo, J.; Travesset, A.

    2008-01-23

    Phosphoinositides, phosphorylated products of phosphatidylinositol, are a family of phospholipids present in tiny amounts (1% or less) in the cytosolic surface of cell membranes, yet they play an astonishingly rich regulatory role, particularly in signaling processes. In this letter, we use molecular dynamics simulations on a model system of mixed lipid monolayers to investigate the interaction of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), the most common of the phosphoinositides, with a polybasic peptide consisting of 13 lysines. Our results show that the polybasic peptide sequesters three PIP{sub 2} molecules, forming a complex stabilized by the formation of multiple hydrogen bonds between PIP{sub 2} and the Lys residues. We also show that the polybasic peptide does not sequester other charged phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine because of the inability to form long-lived stable hydrogen bonds.

  4. New effects of a long-lived negatively charged massive particle on big bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-02

    Primordial {sup 7}Li abundance inferred from observations of metal-poor stars is a factor of about 3 lower than the theoretical value of standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model. One of the solutions to the Li problem is {sup 7}Be destruction during the BBN epoch caused by a long-lived negatively charged massive particle, X{sup −}. The particle can bind to nuclei, and X-bound nuclei (X-nuclei) can experience new reactions. The radiative X{sup −} capture by {sup 7}Be nuclei followed by proton capture of the bound state of {sup 7}Be and X{sup −} ({sup 7}Be{sub x}) is a possible {sup 7}Be destruction reaction. Since the primordial abundance of {sup 7}Li originates mainly from {sup 7}Li produced via the electron capture of {sup 7}Be after BBN, the {sup 7}Be destruction provides a solution to the {sup 7}Li problem. We suggest a new route of {sup 7}Be{sub x} formation, that is the {sup 7}Be charge exchange at the reaction of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+} ion and X{sup −}. The formation rate depends on the ionization fraction of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+} ion, the charge exchange cross section of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+}, and the probability that excited states {sup 7}Be{sub x}* produced at the charge exchange are converted to the ground state. We find that this reaction can be equally important as or more important than ordinary radiative recombination of {sup 7}Be and X{sup −}. The effect of this new route is shown in a nuclear reaction network calculation.

  5. Space Charge Neutralization of DEMO Relevant Negative Ion Beams at Low Gas Density

    SciTech Connect

    Surrey, Elizabeth; Porton, Michael

    2011-09-26

    The application of neutral beams to future power plant devices (DEMO) is dependent on achieving significantly improved electrical efficiency and the most promising route to achieving this is by implementing a photoneutralizer in place of the traditional gas neutralizer. A corollary of this innovation would be a significant reduction in the background gas density through which the beam is transported between the accelerator and the neutralizer. This background gas is responsible for the space charge neutralization of the beam, enabling distances of several metres to be traversed without significant beam expansion. This work investigates the sensitivity of a D{sup -} beam to reduced levels of space charge compensation for energies from 100 keV to 1.5 MeV, representative of a scaled prototype experiment, commissioning and full energy operation. A beam transport code, following the evolution of the phase space ellipse, is employed to investigate the effect of space charge on the beam optics. This shows that the higher energy beams are insensitive to large degrees of under compensation, unlike the lower energies. The probable degree of compensation at low gas density is then investigated through a simple, two component beam-plasma model that allows the potential to be negative. The degree of under-compensation is dependent on the positive plasma ion energy, one source of which is dissociation of the gas by the beam. The subsequent space charge state of the beam is shown to depend upon the relative times for equilibration of the dissociation energy and ionization by the beam ions.

  6. Dust-ion acoustic shock waves in a dusty multi-ion plasma with negatively dust-charge fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Kaibiao

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-ion acoustic shock waves in a collisionless, unmagnetized multi-ion dusty plasma contains Botlzemann-distributed electrons, negative and positive ions with extremely massive and stationary negative charge dust grains with dust charge fluctuations is investigated. By employing the reductive perturbation method, we obtain a Burgers equation that describes the two-ion fluid dynamics. The dust charge variation is found to play an important role in the formation of such dust-ion acoustic shock structures. The viscosity only affects the thickness of the shock waves. The dependences of the shock wave's velocity, height and thickness on the system parameters are investigated.

  7. Single charge exchange in collision of fast protons with hydrogen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari-Adivi, Ebrahim; Sattarpour, Seyedeh Hedyeh

    2015-11-01

    Single charge transfer process in collision of energetic protons with molecular hydrogens is theoretically studied using a first-order two-effective-center Born approximation. The correct boundary conditions are incorporated in the formalism and the Hartree-Fock molecular wave function for molecular targets and the residual ions are used to calculate the transition amplitude. The interference patterns in the capture differential cross-sections (DCSs) for a given fixed orientation of the molecule, due to the scattering from the two-atomic centers in the molecular targets, are examined. The dependence of the DCSs upon the angle between the molecular axis and the direction of the incident velocity is theoretically investigated. Both average differential and integral cross-sections are calculated. The obtained results are compared with the available experimental data.

  8. Communication: Charge-population based dispersion interactions for molecules and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöhr, Martin; Michelitsch, Georg S.; Tully, John C.; Reuter, Karsten; Maurer, Reinhard J.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a system-independent method to derive effective atomic C6 coefficients and polarizabilities in molecules and materials purely from charge population analysis. This enables the use of dispersion-correction schemes in electronic structure calculations without recourse to electron-density partitioning schemes and expands their applicability to semi-empirical methods and tight-binding Hamiltonians. We show that the accuracy of our method is en par with established electron-density partitioning based approaches in describing intermolecular C6 coefficients as well as dispersion energies of weakly bound molecular dimers, organic crystals, and supramolecular complexes. We showcase the utility of our approach by incorporation of the recently developed many-body dispersion method [Tkatchenko et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 236402 (2012)] into the semi-empirical density functional tight-binding method and propose the latter as a viable technique to study hybrid organic-inorganic interfaces.

  9. Long-lived charge carrier generation in ordered films of a covalent perylenediimide–diketopyrrolopyrrole–perylenediimide molecule

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hartnett, Patrick E.; Dyar, Scott M.; Margulies, Eric A.; Shoer, Leah E.; Cook, Andrew W.; Eaton, Samuel W.; Marks, Tobin J.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2015-07-31

    The photophysics of a covalently linked perylenediimide–diketopyrrolopyrrole–perylenediimide acceptor–donor–acceptor molecule (PDI–DPP–PDI, 1) were investigated and found to be markedly different in solution versus in unannealed and solvent annealed films. Photoexcitation of 1 in toluene results in quantitative charge separation in τ = 3.1 ± 0.2 ps, with charge recombination in τ = 340 ± 10 ps, while in unannealed/disordered films of 1, charge separation occurs in τ < 250 fs, while charge recombination displays a multiexponential decay in ~6 ns. The absence of long-lived, charge separation in the disordered film suggests that few free charge carriers are generated. In contrast, uponmore » CH₂Cl₂ vapor annealing films of 1, grazing-incidence X-ray scattering shows that the molecules form a more ordered structure. Photoexcitation of the ordered films results in initial formation of a spin-correlated radical ion pair (electron–hole pair) as indicated by magnetic field effects on the formation of free charge carriers which live for ~4 μs. This result has significant implications for the design of organic solar cells based on covalent donor–acceptor systems and shows that long-lived, charge-separated states can be achieved by controlling intramolecular charge separation dynamics in well-ordered systems.« less

  10. Long-lived charge carrier generation in ordered films of a covalent perylenediimide–diketopyrrolopyrrole–perylenediimide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, Patrick E.; Dyar, Scott M.; Margulies, Eric A.; Shoer, Leah E.; Cook, Andrew W.; Eaton, Samuel W.; Marks, Tobin J.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2015-07-31

    The photophysics of a covalently linked perylenediimide–diketopyrrolopyrrole–perylenediimide acceptor–donor–acceptor molecule (PDI–DPP–PDI, 1) were investigated and found to be markedly different in solution versus in unannealed and solvent annealed films. Photoexcitation of 1 in toluene results in quantitative charge separation in τ = 3.1 ± 0.2 ps, with charge recombination in τ = 340 ± 10 ps, while in unannealed/disordered films of 1, charge separation occurs in τ < 250 fs, while charge recombination displays a multiexponential decay in ~6 ns. The absence of long-lived, charge separation in the disordered film suggests that few free charge carriers are generated. In contrast, upon CH₂Cl₂ vapor annealing films of 1, grazing-incidence X-ray scattering shows that the molecules form a more ordered structure. Photoexcitation of the ordered films results in initial formation of a spin-correlated radical ion pair (electron–hole pair) as indicated by magnetic field effects on the formation of free charge carriers which live for ~4 μs. This result has significant implications for the design of organic solar cells based on covalent donor–acceptor systems and shows that long-lived, charge-separated states can be achieved by controlling intramolecular charge separation dynamics in well-ordered systems.

  11. Higher stabilities of positive and negative charge on tetrafluoroethylene-hexafluoropropylene copolymer (FEP) electrets treated with titanium-tetrachloride vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychkov, D.; Rychkov, A.; Efimov, N.; Malygin, A.; Gerhard, R.

    2013-08-01

    Tetrafluoroethylene-hexafluoropropylene copolymer (FEP) films were treated with titanium-tetrachloride vapor in a molecular-layer deposition process. As a result of the surface treatment, significant improvements of the thermal and temporal charge stability were observed. Charge-decay measurements revealed enhancements of the half-value temperatures and the relaxation times of positively charged FEP electrets by at least 120 °C and two orders of magnitude, respectively. Beyond previous publications on fluoropolymer electrets with surface modification, we here report enhanced charge stabilities of the FEP films charged in negative as well as in positive corona discharges. Even though the improvement for negatively charged FEP films is moderate (half-value temperature about 20 °C higher), our experiments show that the asymmetry in positive and negative charge stability that is typical for FEP electrets can be overcome by means of chemical surface treatments. The results are discussed in the context of the formation of modified surface layers with enhanced charge-trapping properties.

  12. Magnetic field dependence of the energy of negatively charged excitons in semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Riva, C.; Peeters, F. M.; Varga, K.

    2001-03-15

    We present a variational calculation of the spin-singlet and spin-triplet states of a negatively charged exciton (trion) confined to a single quantum well in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. We calculated the probability density and the pair correlation function of the singlet and triplet trion states. The dependence of the energy levels and of the binding energy on the well width and on the magnetic field strength was investigated. We compared our results with the available experimental data on GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells and find that in the low-magnetic-field region (B<18 T) the observed transitions are those of the singlet and the dark triplet trion (with angular momentum L{sub z}=-1), while for high magnetic fields (B>25 T) the dark trion becomes optically inactive and possibly a transition to a bright triplet trion (angular momentum L{sub z}=0) state is observed.

  13. Transient negative photoconductance in a charge transfer double quantum well under optical intersubband excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüfenacht, M.; Tsujino, S.; Sakaki, H.

    1998-06-01

    Recently, it was shown that an electron-hole radiative recombination is induced by a mid-infrared light exciting an intersubband transition in a charge transfer double quantum well (CTDQW). This recombination was attributed to an upstream transfer of electrons from an electron-rich well to a hole-rich well. In this study, we investigated the electrical response of a CTDQW under intersubband optical excitation, and found that a positive photocurrent, opposite in sign and proportional to the applied electric field, accompanies the intersubband-transition-induced luminescence (ITIL) signal. A negative photocurrent component was also observed and attributed to heating processes. This work brings a further evidence of the ITIL process and shows that an important proportion of the carriers are consumed by the transfer of electrons.

  14. Stroke multiplicity and horizontal scale of negative charge regions in thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Earle R.; Mattos, Enrique V.; Machado, Luiz A. T.

    2016-05-01

    An X-band polarimetric radar and multiple lightning detection systems are used to document the initial cloud-to-ground lightning flash in a large number (46 cases) of incipient thunderstorms, as part of the CHUVA-Vale field campaign during the 2011/2012 spring-summer in southeast Brazil. The results show an exceptionally low stroke multiplicity (87% of flashes with single stroke) in the initial ground flashes, a finding consistent with the limited space available for the positive leader extension into new regions of negative space charge in compact cells. The results here are contrasted with the behavior of ground flashes in mesoscale thunderstorms in previous studies. Additionally, we found evidence for a minimum scale (radar echo >20 dBZ) for lightning initiation (>3 km in radius) and that the peak currents of initial cloud-to-ground flashes in these compact thunderstorms are only half as large as return stroke peak currents in general.

  15. Polymerization on the rocks: negatively-charged alpha-amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. R. Jr; Bohler, C.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Oligomers of the negatively-charged amino acids, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and O-phospho-L-serine are adsorbed by hydroxylapatite and illite with affinities that increase with oligomer length. In the case of oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite, addition of an extra residue results in an approximately four-fold increase in the strength of adsorption. Oligomers much longer than the 7-mer are retained tenaciously by the mineral. Repeated incubation of short oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite or illite with activated monomer leads to the accumulation of oligomers at least 45 units long. The corresponding reactions of aspartic acid and O-phospho-L-serine on hydroxylapatite are less effective in generating long oligomers, while illite fails to accumulate substantial amounts of long oligomers of aspartic acid or of O-phospho-L-serine.

  16. Dynamic Jahn-Teller Effect in Negatively Charged Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abtew, Tesfaye; Zhang, Peihong

    2011-03-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has attracted much research interest recently owing to its desirable optical properties and long spin coherent lifetime. The ground state of NV- center has a 3 A2 symmetry, which can be optically excited, to a 3 E state. The excited state is orbitally degenerate therefore should experience either static or dynamic Jahn-Teller (JT) effects. We use accurate first-principles methods to study structural and electronic properties of the NV- center in diamond both in the ground and excited states. Our results indicate that the excited state of the NV- center is indeed a dynamic JT system. We acknowledge the Center for Computational Research at the University at Buffalo, SUNY. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-0946404 and by the Department of Energy under GrantNo. DE-SC0002623.

  17. Saccharification of natural lignocellulose biomass and polysaccharides by highly negatively charged heteropolyacids in concentrated aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yoshiyuki; Itagaki, Shintaro; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2011-04-18

    Highly negatively charged heteropolyacids (HPAs), in particular H(5) BW(12) O(40) , efficiently promoted saccharification of crystalline cellulose into water-soluble saccharides in concentrated aqueous solutions (e.g., 82 % total yield and 77 % glucose yield, based on cellulose with a 0.7 M H(5) BW(12) O(40) solution); the performance was much better than those of previously reported systems with commonly utilized mineral acids (e.g., H(2) SO(4) and HCl) and HPAs (e.g., H(3) PW(12) O(40) and H(4) SiW(12) O(40)). Besides crystalline cellulose, the present system was applicable to the selective transformation of cellobiose, starch, and xylan to the corresponding monosaccharides such as glucose and xylose. In addition, one-pot synthesis of levulinic acid and sorbitol directly from cellulose was realized by using concentrated HPA solutions. The present system, concentrated aqueous solutions of highly negatively charged HPAs, was further applicable to saccharification of natural (non-purified) lignocellulose biomass, such as "rice plant straw", "oil palm empty fruit bunch (palm EFB) fiber", and "Japanese cedar sawdust", giving a mixture of the corresponding water-soluble saccharides, such as glucose (main product), galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose, and cellobiose, in high yields (≥77 % total yields of saccharides based on holocellulose). Separation of the saccharides and H(5) BW(12) O(40) was easy, and the retrieved H(5) BW(12) O(40) could repeatedly be used without appreciable loss of the high performance. PMID:21404445

  18. Negatively Charged Carbon Nanohorn Supported Cationic Liposome Nanoparticles: A Novel Delivery Vehicle for Anti-Nicotine Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Hu, Yun; Huang, Wei; de Villiers, Sabina; Pentel, Paul; Zhang, Jianfei; Dorn, Harry; Ehrich, Marion; Zhang, Chenming

    2015-12-01

    Tobacco addiction is the second-leading cause of death in the world. Due to the nature of nicotine (a small molecule), finding ways to combat nicotine's deleterious effects has been a constant challenge to the society and the medical field. In the present work, a novel anti-nicotine vaccine based on nanohorn supported liposome nanoparticles (NsL NPs) was developed. The nano-vaccine was constructed by using negatively charged carbon nanohorns as a scaffold for the assembly of cationic liposomes, which allow the conjugation of hapten conjugated carrier proteins. The assembled bio-nanoparticles are stable. Mice were immunized subcutaneously with the nano-vaccine, which induced high titer and high affinity of nicotine specific antibodies in mice. Furthermore, no evidence of clinical signs or systemic toxicity followed multiple administrations of NsL-based anti-nicotine vaccine. These results suggest that NsL-based anti-nicotine vaccine is a promising candidate in treating nicotine dependence and could have potential to significantly contribute to smoking cessation. PMID:26510313

  19. Rational design of charge transport molecules for blue organic light emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmaperuma, Asanga; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Koech, Phillip; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James; Gaspar, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The efficiency and stability of blue OLEDs continue to be the primary roadblock to developing organic solid-state white lighting as well as power efficient displays. It is generally accepted that such high quantum efficiency can be achieved with the use of organometallic phosphor doped OLEDs. The transport layers can be designed to increase the carrier density as a way to reduce the drive voltage. We have developed a comprehensive library of charge transporting molecules using combination of theoretical modeling and experimental evidence. Our work focuses on using chemical structure design and computational methods to develop host, transport, emitter, and blocking materials for high efficiency blue OLEDs, along with device architectures to take advantage of these new materials. Through chemical modification of materials we are able to influence both the charge balance and emission efficiency of OLEDs, and understand the influence of the location of photon emission in OLEDs as a function of minor chemical modifications of host and electron transport materials. Design rules, structure-property relationships and results from state of the art OLEDs will be presented.

  20. Positively-charged, porous, polysaccharide nanoparticles loaded with anionic molecules behave as 'stealth' cationic nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Paillard, Archibald; Passirani, Catherine; Saulnier, Patrick; Kroubi, Maya; Garcion, Emmanuel; Benoît, Jean-Pierre; Betbeder, Didier

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Stealth nanoparticles are generally obtained after modifying their surface with hydrophilic polymers such as PEG. In this study we analysed the effect of a phospholipid (DG) or protein (BSA) inclusion in porous cationic polysaccharide (NP+) on their physico-chemical structure and the effect on complement activation. METHODS NP+s were characterised in terms of size, zeta potential (ζ) and static light-scattering (SLS). Complement consumption was assessed in normal human serum (NHS) by measuring the residual haemolytic capacity of the complement system. RESULTS DG-loading did not change their size or ζ whereas progressive BSA loading decreased lightly their ζ. An electrophoretic mobility analysis study showed the presence of 2 differently-charged sublayers at the NP+ surface which are not affected by DG-loading. Complement system activation, studied via a CH50 test, was suppressed by DG- or BSA-loading. We also demonstrated that NP+s could be loaded by a polyanionic molecule such as BSA, after their preliminary filling by a hydrophobic molecule such as DG. CONCLUSION These nanoparticles are able to absorb large amounts of phospholipids or proteins without change in their size or zeta potential. Complement studies showed that stealth behaviour is observed when they are loaded and saturated either with anionic phospholipid or proteins. PMID:19851846

  1. Kinking the coiled coil--negatively charged residues at the coiled-coil interface.

    PubMed

    Straussman, Ravid; Ben-Ya'acov, Ami; Woolfson, Derek N; Ravid, Shoshana

    2007-03-01

    The coiled coil is one of the most common protein-structure motifs. It is believed to be adopted by 3-5% of all amino acids in proteins. It comprises two or more alpha-helical chains wrapped around one another. The sequences of most coiled coils are characterized by a seven-residue (heptad) repeat, denoted (abcdefg)(n). Residues at the a and d positions define the helical interface (core) and are usually hydrophobic, though about 20% are polar or charged. We show that parallel coiled-coils have a unique pattern of their negatively charged residues at the core positions: aspartic acid is excluded from these positions while glutamic acid is not. In contrast the antiparallel structures are more permissive in their amino acid usage. We show further, and for the first time, that incorporation of Asp but not Glu into the a positions of a parallel coiled coil creates a flexible hinge and that the maximal hinge angle is being directly related to the number of incorporated mutations. These new computational and experimental observations will be of use in improving protein-structure predictions, and as rules to guide rational design of novel coiled-coil motifs and coiled coil-based materials. PMID:17207815

  2. Synthesis of positively and negatively charged silver nanoparticles and their deposition on the surface of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharonova, A.; Loza, K.; Surmeneva, M.; Surmenev, R.; Prymak, O.; Epple, M.

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial infections related to dental implants are currently a significant complication. A good way to overcome this challenge is functionalization of implant surface with Ag nanoparticles (NPs) as antibacterial agent. This article aims at review the synthesis routes, size and electrical properties of AgNPs. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) were used as stabilizers. Dynamic Light Scattering, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) have been used to characterize the prepared AgNPs. Two types of NPs were synthesized in aqueous solutions: PVP-stabilized NPs with a diameter of the metallic core of 70 ± 20 nm, and negative charge of -20 mV, PEI-stabilized NPs with the size of the metallic core of 50 ± 20 nm and positive charge of +55 mV. According to SEM results, all the NPs have a spherical shape. Functionalization of the titanium substrate surface with PVP and PEI-stabilized AgNPs was carried out by dropping method. XRD patterns revealed that the AgNPs are crystalline with the crystallite size of 14 nm.

  3. Gap state charge induced spin-dependent negative differential resistance in tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Zhang, X.-G.; Han, X. F.

    2016-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate through first-principles calculation a new spin-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) with cubic cation disordered crystals (CCDC) AlO x or Mg1‑x Al x O as barrier materials. The CCDC is a class of insulators whose band gap can be changed by cation doping. The gap becomes arched in an ultrathin layer due to the space charge formed from metal-induced gap states. With an appropriate combination of an arched gap and a bias voltage, NDR can be produced in either spin channel. This mechanism is applicable to 2D and 3D ultrathin junctions with a sufficiently small band gap that forms a large space charge. It provides a new way of controlling the spin-dependent transport in spintronic devices by an electric field. A generalized Simmons formula for tunneling current through junction with an arched gap is derived to show the general conditions under which ultrathin junctions may exhibit NDR.

  4. Negatively-charged NV-center in SiC: Electronic structure properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, Pratibha; Economou, Sophia

    Deep defects with high-spin states in semiconductors are promising candidates as solid-state systems for quantum computing applications. The charged NV-center in diamond is the best-known and most-studied defect center, and has proven to be a good proof-of-principle structure for demonstrating the use of such defects in quantum technologies. Increasingly, however, there is an interest in exploring deep defects in alternative semiconductors such as SiC. This is due to the challenges posed by diamond as host material for defects, as well as the attractive properties of SiC. In this density functional theory work, we study the spin-1 structure of the negatively charged NV-center in two polytypes: 3C-SiC and 4H-SiC. The calculated zero phonon line for the excited state of the defect is in telecom range (0.90eV), making it a very good candidate for quantum technologies. This work provides basic ingredients required to understand the physics of this color center at a quantitative and qualitative level. We also design quantum information applications, such as a spin-photon interface and multi-photon entanglement.

  5. Negatively charged hyperbranched polyglycerol grafted membranes for osmotic power generation from municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Cai, Tao; Chen, Chunyan; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2016-02-01

    Osmotic power holds great promise as a clean, sustainable and largely unexploited energy resource. Recent membrane development for pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) is making the osmotic power generation more and more realistic. However, severe performance declines have been observed because the porous layer of PRO membranes is fouled by the feed stream. To overcome it, a negatively charged antifouling PRO hollow fiber membrane has been designed and studied in this work. An antifouling polymer, derived from hyperbranched polyglycerol and functionalized by α-lipoic acid and succinic anhydride, was synthesized and grafted onto the polydopamine (PDA) modified poly(ether sulfone) (PES) hollow fiber membranes. In comparison to unmodified membranes, the charged hyperbranched polyglycerol (CHPG) grafted membrane is much less affected by organic deposition, such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption, and highly resistant to microbial growths, demonstrated by Escherichia coli adhesion and Staphylococcus aureus attachment. CHPG-g-TFC was also examined in PRO tests using a concentrated wastewater as the feed. Comparing to the plain PES-TFC and non-charged HPG-g-TFC, the newly developed membrane exhibits not only the smallest decline in water flux but also the highest recovery rate. When using 0.81 M NaCl and wastewater as the feed pair in PRO tests at 15 bar, the average power density remains at 5.6 W/m(2) in comparison to an average value of 3.6 W/m(2) for unmodified membranes after four PRO runs. In summary, osmotic power generation may be sustained by properly designing and anchoring the functional polymers to PRO membranes. PMID:26630043

  6. Molecular-scale quantitative charge density measurement of biological molecule by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Kei; Oyabu, Noriaki; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2015-07-01

    Surface charge distributions on biological molecules in aqueous solutions are essential for the interactions between biomolecules, such as DNA condensation, antibody-antigen interactions, and enzyme reactions. There has been a significant demand for a molecular-scale charge density measurement technique for better understanding such interactions. In this paper, we present the local electric double layer (EDL) force measurements on DNA molecules in aqueous solutions using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) with a three-dimensional force mapping technique. The EDL forces measured in a 100 mM KCl solution well agreed with the theoretical EDL forces calculated using reasonable parameters, suggesting that FM-AFM can be used for molecular-scale quantitative charge density measurements on biological molecules especially in a highly concentrated electrolyte.

  7. Internal configuration and electric potential in planar negatively charged lipid head group region in contact with ionic solution.

    PubMed

    Lebar, Alenka Maček; Velikonja, Aljaž; Kramar, Peter; Iglič, Aleš

    2016-10-01

    The lipid bilayer composed of negatively charged lipid 1-palmitoyl-3-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS) in contact with an aqueous solution of monovalent salt ions was studied theoretically by using the mean-field modified Langevin-Poisson-Boltzmann (MLPB) model. The MLPB results were tested by using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. In the MLPB model the charge distribution of POPS head groups is theoretically described by the negatively charged surface which accounts for negatively charged phosphate groups, while the positively charged amino groups and negatively charged carboxylate groups are assumed to be fixed on the rod-like structures with rotational degree of freedom. The spatial variation of relative permittivity, which is not considered in the well-known Gouy-Chapman (GC) model or in MD simulations, is thoroughly derived within a strict statistical mechanical approach. Therefore, the spatial dependence and magnitude of electric potential within the lipid head group region and its close vicinity are considerably different in the MLPB model from the GC model. The influence of the bulk salt concentration and temperature on the number density profiles of counter-ions and co-ions in the lipid head group region and aqueous solution along with the probability density function for the lipid head group orientation angle was compared and found to be in qualitative agreement in the MLPB and MD models. PMID:27209203

  8. Simultaneous Separation of Negatively and Positively Charged Species in Dynamic Field Gradient Focusing Using a Dual Polarity Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jeffrey M.; Huang, Zheng; Ivory, Cornelius F.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic field gradient focusing (DFGF) utilizes an electric field gradient established by a computer-controlled electrode array to separate and concentrate charged analytes at unique axial positions. Traditionally, DFGF has been restricted to the analysis of negatively charged species due to limitations in the software of our voltage controller. This paper introduces a new voltage controller capable of operating under normal polarity (positive potentials applied to the electrode array) and reversed polarity (negative potentials applied to the electrode array) for the separation of negatively and positively charged analytes, respectively. The experiments conducted under normal polarity and reversed polarity illustrate the utility of the new controller to perform reproducible DFGF separations (elution times showing less than 1% run-to-run variation) over a wide pH range (3.08 to 8.5) regardless of the protein charge. A dual polarity experiment is then shown in which the separation channel has been divided into normal polarity and reversed polarity regions. This simultaneous separation of negatively charged R-phycoerythrin (R-PE) and positively charged cytochrome c (CYTC) within the same DFGF apparatus is shown. PMID:19722517

  9. Exploration of Porphyrin-based Semiconductors for Negative Charge Transport Applications Using Synthetic, Spectroscopic, Potentiometric, Magnetic Resonance, and Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawson, Jeffrey Scott

    Organic pi-conjugated materials are emerging as commercially relevant components in electronic applications that include transistors, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. One requirement common to all of these functions is an aptitude for accepting and transmitting charges. It is generally agreed that the development of organic semiconductors that favor electrons as the majority carriers (n-type) lags behind the advances in hole transporting (p-type) materials. This shortcoming suggests that the design space for n-type materials is not yet well explored, presenting researchers with the opportunity to develop unconventional architectures. In this regard, it is worth noting that discrete molecular materials are demonstrating the potential to usurp the preeminent positions that pi-conjugated polymers have held in these areas of organic electronics research. This dissertation describes how an extraordinary class of molecules, meso-to-meso ethyne-bridged porphyrin arrays, has been bent to these new uses. Chapter one describes vis-NIR spectroscopic and magnetic resonance measurements revealing that these porphyrin arrays possess a remarkable aptitude for the delocalization of negative charge. In fact, the miniscule electron-lattice interactions exhibited in these rigid molecules allow them to host the most vast electron-polarons ever observed in a pi-conjugated material. Chapter two describes the development of an ethyne-bridged porphyrin-isoindigo hybrid chromophore that can take the place of fullerene derivatives in the conventional thin film solar cell architecture. Particularly noteworthy is the key role played by the 5,15-bis(heptafluoropropyl)porphyrin building block in the engineering of a chromophore that, gram for gram, is twice as absorptive as poly(3-hexyl)thiophene, exhibits a lower energy absorption onset than this polymer, and yet possesses a photoexcited singlet state sufficiently energetic to transfer a hole to this polymer. Chapter three describes

  10. Kinetic distinction between cytochromes a and a3 in cytochrome c oxidase. Rapid scanning stopped flow study of anaerobic reduction by a neutral and a negatively charged donor.

    PubMed

    Halaka, F G; Babcock, G T; Dye, J L

    1981-02-10

    Anaerobic reduction of cytochrome c oxidase by 5,10-dihydro-5-methylphenazine (reduced PMS) and by sodium dithionite were studied by rapid scanning stopped flow spectrophotometry. In both cases the decay of the Soret band of the oxidized oxidase is not uniform. With reduced PMS, the reduction involves two molecules of reductant (4 electrons)/oxidase molecule. The first stage of the reduction exhibits an isosbestic point in the Soret region at 437 nm. This shifts to 428 nm in later stages of the reaction. The reduction of the oxidase by sodium dithionite is also complete and apparently involves SO2 radical. In this case the spectra show an isosbestic point at approximately 420 nm which shifts to 432 nm as the reaction proceeds. For each of the reductants the reaction is best described by three phases: the first is a second order reaction between the oxidase and the reductant, followed by two first order processes which appear to describe the intramolecular electron redistribution within the oxidase molecule. The results agree with the assignment of the Soret band of the oxidase molecule to cytochrome a3 with an absorption maximum near 410 nm and to cytochrome a which has its maximum absorption hear 430 nm. If these assignments are correct, the present data show that reduced PMS, an uncharged molecule, reacts more rapidly with cytochrome a than it does with cytochrome a3, while the negatively charged radical anion, SO2, appears to have more direct access to cytochrome a3. PMID:6256379

  11. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  12. Highly efficient bioinspired molecular Ru water oxidation catalysts with negatively charged backbone ligands.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Li, Fusheng; Li, Fei; Sun, Licheng

    2015-07-21

    The oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of the natural photosynthesis system II (PSII) oxidizes water to produce oxygen and reducing equivalents (protons and electrons). The oxygen released from PSII provides the oxygen source of our atmosphere; the reducing equivalents are used to reduce carbon dioxide to organic products, which support almost all organisms on the Earth planet. The first photosynthetic organisms able to split water were proposed to be cyanobacteria-like ones appearing ca. 2.5 billion years ago. Since then, nature has chosen a sustainable way by using solar energy to develop itself. Inspired by nature, human beings started to mimic the functions of the natural photosynthesis system and proposed the concept of artificial photosynthesis (AP) with the view to creating energy-sustainable societies and reducing the impact on the Earth environments. Water oxidation is a highly energy demanding reaction and essential to produce reducing equivalents for fuel production, and thereby effective water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) are required to catalyze water oxidation and reduce the energy loss. X-ray crystallographic studies on PSII have revealed that the OEC consists of a Mn4CaO5 cluster surrounded by oxygen rich ligands, such as oxyl, oxo, and carboxylate ligands. These negatively charged, oxygen rich ligands strongly stabilize the high valent states of the Mn cluster and play vital roles in effective water oxidation catalysis with low overpotential. This Account describes our endeavors to design effective Ru WOCs with low overpotential, large turnover number, and high turnover frequency by introducing negatively charged ligands, such as carboxylate. Negatively charged ligands stabilized the high valent states of Ru catalysts, as evidenced by the low oxidation potentials. Meanwhile, the oxygen production rates of our Ru catalysts were improved dramatically as well. Thanks to the strong electron donation ability of carboxylate containing ligands, a seven

  13. Cationic Cell-Penetrating Peptide Binds to Planar Lipid Bilayers Containing Negatively Charged Lipids but does not Induce Conductive Pores

    PubMed Central

    Gurnev, Philip A.; Yang, Sung-Tae; Melikov, Kamran C.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2013-01-01

    Using a cation-selective gramicidin A channel as a sensor of the membrane surface charge, we studied interactions of oligoarginine peptide R9C, a prototype cationic cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), with planar lipid membranes. We have found that R9C sorption to the membrane depends strongly on its lipid composition from virtually nonexistent for membranes made of uncharged lipids to very pronounced for membranes containing negatively charged lipids, with charge overcompensation at R9C concentrations exceeding 1 μM. The sorption was reversible as it was removed by addition of polyanionic dextran sulfate to the membrane bathing solution. No membrane poration activity of R9C (as would be manifested by increased bilayer conductance) was detected in the charged or neutral membranes, including those with asymmetric negative/neutral and negative/positive lipid leaflets. We conclude that interaction of R9C with planar lipid bilayers does not involve pore formation in all studied lipid combinations up to 20 μM peptide concentration. However, R9C induces leakage of negatively charged but not neutral liposomes in a process that involves lipid mixing between liposomes. Our findings suggest that direct traversing of CPPs through the uncharged outer leaflet of the plasma membrane bilayer is unlikely and that permeabilization necessarily involves both anionic lipids and CPP-dependent fusion between opposing membranes. PMID:23663836

  14. Interaction of Bee Venom Melittin with Zwitterionic and Negatively Charged Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschmidt, Jörg H.; Mahaney, James E.; Thomas, David D.; Marsh, Derek

    1997-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to study the penetration and interaction of bee venom melittin with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and ditetradecylphosphatidylglycerol (DTPG) bilayer membranes. Melittin is a surface-active, amphipathic peptide and serves as a useful model for a variety of membrane interactions, including those of presequences and signal peptides, as well as the charged subdomain of the cardiac regulatory protein phospholamban. Derivatives of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol spin-labeled at various positions along the sn-2 acyl chain were used to establish the chain flexibility gradient for the two membranes in the presence and absence of melittin. Negatively charged DTPG bilayer membranes showed a higher capacity for binding melittin without bilayer disruption than did membranes formed by the zwitterionic DMPC, demonstrating the electrostatic neutralization of bound melittin by DTPG. The temperature dependence of the ESR spectra showed that the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition is eliminated by binding melittin to DTPG bilayers, whereas a very broad transition remains in the case of DMPC bilayers. None of the spin labels used showed a two-component spectrum characteristic of a specific restriction of their chain motion by melittin, but the outer hyperfine splittings and effective chain order parameters were increased for all labels upon binding melittin. This indicates a reduced flexibility of the lipid chains induced by a surface orientation of the bound melittin. Whereas the characteristic shape of the chain flexibility gradient was maintained upon melittin addition to DMPC bilayers, the chain flexibility profile in DTPG bilayers was much more strongly perturbed. It was found that the steepest change in segmental flexibility was shifted toward the bilayer interior when melittin was bound to DTPG membranes, indicating a greater depth of penetration than in DMPC membranes. pH titration of stearic acid

  15. Excitation of dust acoustic waves by an ion beam in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Kaur, Daljeet; Gahlot, Ajay; Sharma, Jyotsna

    2014-10-15

    An ion beam propagating through a plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives a low frequency electrostatic dust acoustic wave (DAW) to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales to the one-third power of the beam density. The real part of the frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales to almost one-half power of the beam energy. The phase velocity, frequency, and wavelength results of the unstable mode are in compliance with the experimental observations.

  16. Statistical mechanics of dust charging in a multi-ion plasma with negative and positive ionic species

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha

    2015-02-15

    On the basis of statistical mechanics and charging kinetics, the charge distribution over uniform size spherical dust particles in a multi-ion plasma comprising of multiple charged negative and positive ions is investigated. Two specific situations where the complex plasma is viz., (i) dark (no emission from dust) and (ii) irradiated by laser light (causing photoemission from dust) have been taken into account. The analytical formulation includes the population balance equation for the charged dust particles along with number and energy balance of the complex plasma constituents. The departure of the results for multi-ion plasma from that in case of usual singly charged positive ion plasma is graphically illustrated and discussed. In contrast to electron-ion plasma, significant number of particles is seen to acquire opposite charge in case of pure positive-negative ion plasma, even in the absence of electron emission from the dust grains. The effects of various plasma parameters viz., number density, particle size, and work function of dust on charge distribution have also been examined.

  17. Statistical mechanics of dust charging in a multi-ion plasma with negative and positive ionic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha

    2015-02-01

    On the basis of statistical mechanics and charging kinetics, the charge distribution over uniform size spherical dust particles in a multi-ion plasma comprising of multiple charged negative and positive ions is investigated. Two specific situations where the complex plasma is viz., (i) dark (no emission from dust) and (ii) irradiated by laser light (causing photoemission from dust) have been taken into account. The analytical formulation includes the population balance equation for the charged dust particles along with number and energy balance of the complex plasma constituents. The departure of the results for multi-ion plasma from that in case of usual singly charged positive ion plasma is graphically illustrated and discussed. In contrast to electron-ion plasma, significant number of particles is seen to acquire opposite charge in case of pure positive-negative ion plasma, even in the absence of electron emission from the dust grains. The effects of various plasma parameters viz., number density, particle size, and work function of dust on charge distribution have also been examined.

  18. Negatively charged nano-grains at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Burch, J. L.; Horányi, M.

    2015-11-01

    Shortly after the Rosetta mission's rendezvous with 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko the RPC/IES instrument intermittently detected negative particles that were identified as singly charged nano-dust grains. These grains were recorded as a nearly mono-energetic beam of particles in the 200-500 eV range arriving from the direction of the comet. Occasionally, another population of particles in the energy range of 1-20 keV were also noticed arriving from the approximate direction of the Sun. In this paper we review the processes that can explain the energization and the directionality of the observed nano-dust populations. We show that the observations are consistent with gas-drag acceleration of the outflowing particles with radii of 3-4 nm, and with the returning fragments of bigger particles accelerated by radiation pressure with approximate radii of 30-80 nm. In addition to gas drag and radiation pressure, we also examine the role of the solar wind induced motional electric field, and its possible role in explaining the intermittency of the detection of a nano-grain population arriving from the solar direction.

  19. Protein PEGylation attenuates adsorption and aggregation on a negatively charged and moderately hydrophobic polymer surface.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sheetal S; Przybycien, Todd M; Tilton, Robert D

    2010-12-01

    Covalent grafting of poly(ethylene glycol) chains to proteins ("PEGylation") is emerging as an effective technique to increase the in vivo circulation time and efficacy of protein drugs. PEGylated protein adsorption at a variety of solid/aqueous interfaces is a critical aspect of their manufacture, storage, and delivery. A special category of block copolymer, PEGylated proteins have one or more water-soluble linear polymer (PEG) blocks and a single globular protein block that each exert distinct intermolecular and surface interaction forces. We report the impact of PEGylation on protein adsorption at the interface between aqueous solutions and solid films of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG), a moderately hydrophobic and negatively charged polymer. Using the model protein lysozyme with controlled degrees of PEGylation, we employ total internal reflection fluorescence techniques to measure adsorption isotherms, adsorption reversibility, and the extent of surface-induced aggregation. Lysozyme PEGylation reduces the extent of protein adsorption and surface-induced aggregation and increases the reversibility of adsorption compared to the unconjugated protein. Results are interpreted in terms of steric forces among grafted PEG chains and their effects on protein-protein interactions and protein orientation on the surface. PMID:21067142

  20. Photoluminescence Studies of Both the Neutral and Negatively Charged Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaiyue; Steeds, John W; Li, Zhihong; Tian, Yuming

    2016-02-01

    In this study low temperature micro-photoluminescence technology was employed to investigate effects of the irradiation and nitrogen concentration on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) luminescence, with the photochromic and vibronic properties of the NV defects. Results showed that the NV luminescence was weakened due to recombination of self-interstitials created by electron irradiation in diamond and the vacancies within the structure of NV centers. For very pure diamond, the vacancies migrated the long distance to get trapped by N atoms only after sufficient high temperature annealing. As with the increase in nitrogen content, the migration distance of vacancies got smaller. The nitrogen also favored the formation of negatively charged NV centers with the donating electrons. Under the high-energy ultraviolet laser excitation, the photochromic property of the NV- center was also observed, though it was not stable. Besides, the NV centers showed very strong broad sidebands, and the vibrations involved one phonon with energy of ~42 meV and another with ~67 meV energy. PMID:26758647

  1. Toward a Molecular Understanding of Protein Solubility: Increased Negative Surface Charge Correlates with Increased Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Ryan M.; Shende, Varad R.; Motl, Nicole; Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Protein solubility is a problem for many protein chemists, including structural biologists and developers of protein pharmaceuticals. Knowledge about how intrinsic factors influence solubility is limited due to the difficulty of obtaining quantitative solubility measurements. Solubility measurements in buffer alone are difficult to reproduce, because gels or supersaturated solutions often form, making it impossible to determine solubility values for many proteins. Protein precipitants can be used to obtain comparative solubility measurements and, in some cases, estimations of solubility in buffer alone. Protein precipitants fall into three broad classes: salts, long-chain polymers, and organic solvents. Here, we compare the use of representatives from two classes of precipitants, ammonium sulfate and polyethylene glycol 8000, by measuring the solubility of seven proteins. We find that increased negative surface charge correlates strongly with increased protein solubility and may be due to strong binding of water by the acidic amino acids. We also find that the solubility results obtained for the two different precipitants agree closely with each other, suggesting that the two precipitants probe similar properties that are relevant to solubility in buffer alone. PMID:22768947

  2. Temperature-controlled interaction of thermosensitive polymer-modified cationic liposomes with negatively charged phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Kono, K; Henmi, A; Takagishi, T

    1999-09-21

    To obtain cationic liposomes of which affinity to negatively charged membranes can be controlled by temperature, cationic liposomes consisting of 3beta-[N-(N', N'-dimethylaminoethane)carbamoyl]cholesterol and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine were modified with poly(N-acryloylpyrrolidine), which is a thermosensitive polymer exhibiting a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) at ca. 52 degrees C. The unmodified cationic liposomes did not change its zeta potential between 20-60 degrees C. The polymer-modified cationic liposomes revealed much lower zeta potential values below the LCST of the polymer than the unmodified cationic liposomes. However, their zeta potential increased significantly above this temperature. The unmodified cationic liposomes formed aggregates and fused intensively with anionic liposomes consisting of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidic acid in the region of 20-60 degrees C, due to the electrostatic interaction. In contrast, aggregation and fusion of the polymer-modified cationic liposomes with the anionic liposomes were strongly suppressed below the LCST. However, these interactions were enhanced remarkably above the LCST. In addition, the polymer-modified cationic liposomes did not cause leakage of calcein from the anionic liposomes below the LCST, but promoted the leakage above this temperature as the unmodified cationic liposomes did. Temperature-induced conformational change of the polymer chains from a hydrated coil to a dehydrated globule might affect the affinity of the polymer-modified cationic liposomes to the anionic liposomes. PMID:10561483

  3. STUDIES OF X-RAY PRODUCTION FOLLOWING CHARGE EXCHANGE RECOMBINATION BETWEEN HIGHLY CHARGED IONS AND NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Thorn, D B; Wargelin, B J

    2008-08-28

    We have used microcalorimeters built by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Electron Beam Ion Trap to measure X-ray emission produced by charge exchange reactions between highly charged ions colliding with neutral helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas. Our measurements show the spectral dependence on neutral species and also show the distinct differences between spectra produced by charge exchange reactions and those produced by direct impact excitation. These results are part of an ongoing experimental investigation at the LLNL EBIT facility of charge exchange spectral signatures and can be used to interpret X-ray spectra produced by a variety of laboratory and celestial sources including cometary and planetary atmospheres, the Earth's magnetosheath, the heliosphere, and tokamaks.

  4. Identification of functionally important negatively charged residues in the carboxy end of mouse hepatitis coronavirus A59 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sandhya; Bednar, Valerie; Blount, Andrew; Hogue, Brenda G

    2006-05-01

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is a multifunctional viral gene product that encapsidates the RNA genome and also plays some as yet not fully defined role in viral RNA replication and/or transcription. A number of conserved negatively charged amino acids are located within domain III in the carboxy end of all coronavirus N proteins. Previous studies suggested that the negatively charged residues are involved in virus assembly by mediating interaction between the membrane (M) protein carboxy tail and nucleocapsids. To determine the importance of these negatively charged residues, a series of alanine and other charged-residue substitutions were introduced in place of those in the N gene within a mouse hepatitis coronavirus A59 infectious clone. Aspartic acid residues 440 and 441 were identified as functionally important. Viruses could not be isolated when both residues were replaced by positively charged amino acids. When either amino acid was replaced by a positively charged residue or both were changed to alanine, viruses were recovered that contained second-site changes within N, but not in the M or envelope protein. The compensatory role of the new changes was confirmed by the construction of new viruses. A few viruses were recovered that retained the D441-to-arginine change and no compensatory changes. These viruses exhibited a small-plaque phenotype and produced significantly less virus. Overall, results from our analysis of a large panel of plaque-purified recovered viruses indicate that the negatively charged residues at positions 440 and 441 are key residues that appear to be involved in virus assembly. PMID:16611893

  5. Linear free energy relationships for metal-ligand complexation: Bidentate binding to negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonaro, Richard F.; Atalay, Yasemin B.; Di Toro, Dominic M.

    2011-05-01

    Stability constants for metal complexation to bidentate ligands containing negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms can be estimated from the following linear free energy relationship (LFER): log KML = χOO( αO log KHL,1 + αO log KHL,2) where KML is the metal-ligand stability constant for a 1:1 complex, KHL,1 and KHL,2 are the proton-ligand stability constants (the ligand p Ka values), and αO is the Irving-Rossotti slope. The parameter χOO is metal specific and has slightly different values for five and six membered chelate rings. LFERs are presented for 21 different metal ions and are accurate to within approximately 0.30 log units in predictions of log KML values. Ligands selected for use in LFER development include dicarboxylic acids, carboxyphenols, and ortho-diphenols. For ortho-hydroxybenzaldehydes, α-hydroxycarboxylic acids, and α-ketocarboxylic acids, a modification of the LFER where log KHL,2 is set equal to zero is required. The chemical interpretation of χOO is that it accounts for the extra stability afforded to metal complexes by the chelate effect. Cu-NOM binding constants calculated from the bidentate LFERs are similar in magnitude to those used in WHAM 6. This LFER can be used to make log KML predictions for small organic molecules. Since natural organic matter (NOM) contains many of the same functional groups (i.e. carboxylic acids, phenols, alcohols), the LFER log KML predictions shed light on the range of appropriate values for use in modeling metal partitioning in natural systems.

  6. Radiation transport codes for potential applications related to radiobiology and radiotherapy using protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Several Monte Carlo radiation transport computer codes are used to predict quantities of interest in the fields of radiotherapy and radiobiology. The calculational methods are described and comparisions of calculated and experimental results are presented for dose distributions produced by protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions. Comparisons of calculated and experimental cell survival probabilities are also presented.

  7. Equilibrium distribution of permeants in polyelectrolyte microcapsules filled with negatively charged polyelectrolyte: the influence of ionic strength and solvent polarity.

    PubMed

    Tong, Weijun; Song, Haiqing; Gao, Changyou; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2006-07-01

    The effects of ionic strength and solvent polarity on the equilibrium distribution of fluorescein (FL) and FITC-dextran between the interior of polyelectrolyte multilayer microcapsules filled with negatively charged strong polyelectrolyte and the bulk solution were systematically investigated. A negatively charged strong polyelectrolyte, poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS), used for CaCO3 core fabrication, was entrapped inside the capsules. Due to the semipermeability of the capsule wall, a Donnan equilibrium between the inner solution within the capsules and the bulk solution was created. The equilibrium distribution of the negatively charged permeants was investigated by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy as a function of ionic strength and solvent polarity. The equilibrium distribution of the negatively charged permeants could be tuned by increasing the bulk ionic strength to decrease the Donnan potential. Decreasing the solvent polarity also could enhance the permeation of FL, which induces a sudden increase of permeation when the ethanol volume fraction was higher than 0.7. This is mainly attributed to the precipitation of PSS. A theoretical model combining the Donnan equilibrium and Manning counterion condensation was employed to discuss the results. PMID:16805590

  8. Negative differential conductance in InAs wire based double quantum dot induced by a charged AFM tip

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. A.; Volk, Ch.; Winden, A.; Hardtdegen, H.; Schaepers, Th.

    2012-12-15

    We investigate the conductance of an InAs nanowire in the nonlinear regime in the case of low electron density where the wire is split into quantum dots connected in series. The negative differential conductance in the wire is initiated by means of a charged atomic force microscope tip adjusting the transparency of the tunneling barrier between two adjoining quantum dots. We confirm that the negative differential conductance arises due to the resonant tunneling between these two adjoining quantum dots. The influence of the transparency of the blocking barriers and the relative position of energy states in the adjoining dots on a decrease of the negative differential conductance is investigated in detail.

  9. Negatively charged lipid membranes promote a disorder-order transition in the Yersinia YscU protein.

    PubMed

    Weise, Christoph F; Login, Frédéric H; Ho, Oanh; Gröbner, Gerhard; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2014-10-21

    The inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is negatively charged, rendering positively charged cytoplasmic proteins in close proximity likely candidates for protein-membrane interactions. YscU is a Yersinia pseudotuberculosis type III secretion system protein crucial for bacterial pathogenesis. The protein contains a highly conserved positively charged linker sequence that separates membrane-spanning and cytoplasmic (YscUC) domains. Although disordered in solution, inspection of the primary sequence of the linker reveals that positively charged residues are separated with a typical helical periodicity. Here, we demonstrate that the linker sequence of YscU undergoes a largely electrostatically driven coil-to-helix transition upon binding to negatively charged membrane interfaces. Using membrane-mimicking sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles, an NMR derived structural model reveals the induction of three helical segments in the linker. The overall linker placement in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles was identified by NMR experiments including paramagnetic relaxation enhancements. Partitioning of individual residues agrees with their hydrophobicity and supports an interfacial positioning of the helices. Replacement of positively charged linker residues with alanine resulted in YscUC variants displaying attenuated membrane-binding affinities, suggesting that the membrane interaction depends on positive charges within the linker. In vivo experiments with bacteria expressing these YscU replacements resulted in phenotypes displaying significantly reduced effector protein secretion levels. Taken together, our data identify a previously unknown membrane-interacting surface of YscUC that, when perturbed by mutations, disrupts the function of the pathogenic machinery in Yersinia. PMID:25418176

  10. Tantalum oxide/silicon nitride: A negatively charged surface passivation stack for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao Bullock, James; Cuevas, Andres

    2015-05-18

    This letter reports effective passivation of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces by thermal atomic layer deposited tantalum oxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) underneath plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}). Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy imaging shows an approximately 2 nm thick interfacial layer between Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and c-Si. Surface recombination velocities as low as 5.0 cm/s and 3.2 cm/s are attained on p-type 0.8 Ω·cm and n-type 1.0 Ω·cm c-Si wafers, respectively. Recombination current densities of 25 fA/cm{sup 2} and 68 fA/cm{sup 2} are measured on 150 Ω/sq boron-diffused p{sup +} and 120 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused n{sup +} c-Si, respectively. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal a negative fixed insulator charge density of −1.8 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} for the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} film and −1.0 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} for the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiN{sub x} stack. The Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiN{sub x} stack is demonstrated to be an excellent candidate for surface passivation of high efficiency silicon solar cells.

  11. Molecular Interactions of Alzheimer Amyloid-β Oligomer with Neutral and Negatively Charged Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiang; Wang, Qiuming; Pan, Qingfen; Zhou, Feimeng; Zheng, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Interaction of p3 (Aβ17-42) peptides with cell membrane is crucial for the understanding of amyloid toxicity associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Such p3-membrane interactions are considered to induce the disruption of membrane permeability and integrity, but the exact mechanisms of how p3 aggregates, particularly small p3 oligomers, induce receptor-independent membrane disruption are not yet completely understood. Here, we investigate the adsorption, orientation, and surface interaction of the p3 pentamer with lipid bilayers composed of both pure zwitterionic POPC (palmitoyl-oleyl-phosphatidylcholine) and mixed anionic POPC/POPG (palmitoyl-oleyl-phosphatidylglycerol) (3:1) lipids using explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. MD simulation results show that the p3 pentamer has much stronger interactions with mixed POPC/POPG lipids than pure POPC lipids, consistent with experimental observation that Aβ adsorption and fibrililation are enhanced on anionic lipid bilayers. Although electrostatic interactions are main attractive forces to drive the p3 to adsorb on the bilayer surface, the adsorption of the p3 pentamer on the lipid bilayer with a preferential C-terminal β-strands facing toward the bilayer surface is a net outcome of different competitions between p3 peptides-lipid bilayer and ions-p3-bilayer interactions. More importantly, Ca2+ ions are found to form ionic bridges to associate negatively charged residues of p3 with anionic headgroups of the lipid bilayer, resulting in Aβ–Ca2+–PO4− complexes. Intensive Ca2+ bound to lipid bilayer and Ca2+ ionic bridges may lead to the alternation of Ca2+ hemostasis responsible for neuronal dysfunction and death. This work provides insights into the mutual structure, dynamics, and interactions of both Aβ peptides and lipid bilayer at the atomic level, which expand our understanding of the complex behavior of amyloid-induced membrane disruption. PMID:23493873

  12. New results on catalyzed big bang nucleosynthesis with a long-lived negatively charged massive particle

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yoshida, Takashi; Mathews, Grant J.

    2010-04-15

    It has been proposed that the apparent discrepancies between the inferred primordial abundances of {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li and the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) can be resolved by the existence of a negatively charged massive unstable supersymmetric particle (X{sup -}) during the BBN epoch. Here, we present new BBN calculations with an X{sup -} particle utilizing an improved nuclear reaction network including captures of nuclei by the particle, nuclear reactions and {beta} decays of normal nuclei and nuclei bound to the X{sup -} particles (X nuclei), and new reaction rates derived from recent rigorous quantum many-body dynamical calculations. We find that this is still a viable model to explain the observed {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li abundances. We also show that with the new rates the production of heavier nuclei is suppressed and there is no signature on abundances of nuclei heavier than Be in the X{sup -}-particle catalyzed BBN model as has been previously proposed. We also consider the version of this model whereby the X{sup -} particle decays into the present cold dark matter. We analyze this paradigm in light of the recent constraints on the dark-matter mass deduced from the possible detected events in the CDMS-II experiment. We conclude that based upon the inferred range for the dark-matter mass, only X{sup -} decay via the weak interaction can achieve the desired {sup 7}Li destruction while also reproducing the observed {sup 6}Li abundance.

  13. High-energy negative ion beam obtained from pulsed inductively coupled plasma for charge-free etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-06-01

    Negative ions in conventional inductively coupled plasma are often more chemically active than positive ions (for example, in CF4 or SF6 plasmas), but inconveniently they are trapped inside the sheath and cannot be used for high-energy surface etching in sources with a grid-type acceleration system. In this work we describe a method of positive and negative ion extraction that allows the energy and flux of oppositely charged particles to be varied independently. Then by scattering the ions off from a metal surface, it is possible to form a high-energy beam of neutrals from the negative ions by using the low-energy positive component of the beam current for better charge compensation.

  14. Charge Enhancement of Single-Stranded DNA in Negative Electrospray Ionization Using the Supercharging Reagent Meta-nitrobenzyl Alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahim, Bessem; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B.; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-12-01

    Charge enhancement of single-stranded oligonucleotide ions in negative ESI mode is investigated. The employed reagent, meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), was found to improve total signal intensity (Itot), increase the highest observed charge states (zhigh), and raise the average charge states (zavg) of all tested oligonucleotides analyzed in negative ESI. To quantify these increases, signal enhancement ratios (SER1%) and charge enhancement coefficients (CEC1%) were introduced. The SER1%, (defined as the quotient of total oligonucleotide ion abundances with 1 % m-NBA divided by total oligonucleotide abundance without m-NBA) was found to be greater than unity for every oligonucleotide tested. The CEC1% values (defined as the average charge state in the presence of 1 % m-NBA minus the average charge state in the absence of m-NBA) were found to be uniformly positive. Upon close inspection, the degree of charge enhancement for longer oligonucleotides was found to be dependent upon thymine density (i.e., the number and the location of phospho-thymidine units). A correlation between the charge enhancement induced by the presence of m-NBA and the apparent gas-phase acidity (largely determined by the sequence of thymine units but also by the presence of protons on other nucleobases) of multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide species, was thus established. Ammonium cations appeared to be directly involved in the m-NBA supercharging mechanism, and their role seems to be consistent with previously postulated ESI mechanisms describing desorption/ionization of single-stranded DNA into the gas phase.

  15. Charge-transfer complex formation in gelation: the role of solvent molecules with different electron-donating capacities.

    PubMed

    Basak, Shibaji; Bhattacharya, Sumantra; Datta, Ayan; Banerjee, Arindam

    2014-05-01

    A naphthalenediimide (NDI)-based synthetic peptide molecule forms gels in a particular solvent mixture (chloroform/aromatic hydrocarbon, 4:1) through charge-transfer (CT) complex formation; this is evident from the corresponding absorbance and fluorescence spectra at room temperature. Various aromatic hydrocarbon based solvents, including benzene, toluene, xylene (ortho, meta and para) and mesitylene, have been used for the formation of the CT complex. The role of different solvent molecules with varying electron-donation capacities in the formation of CT complexes has been established through spectroscopic and computational studies. PMID:24677404

  16. Role of negatively charged ions in plasma on the growth and field emission properties of spherical carbon nanotube tip

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Aarti; Walia, Ritu; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2012-01-15

    The role of negatively charged ions in plasma on growth (without catalyst) and field emission properties of spherical carbon nanotube (CNT) tip has been theoretically investigated. A theoretical model of charge neutrality, including the kinetics of electrons, negatively and positively charged ions, neutral atoms, and the energy balance of various species has been developed. Numerical calculations of the spherical CNT tip radius for different relative density of negatively charged ions {epsilon}{sub r}(=n{sub SF{sub 6{sup -}}}/n{sub C{sup +}}, where n{sub SF{sub 6{sup -}}} and n{sub C}{sup +} are the equilibrium densities of sulphur hexafluoride and carbon ions, respectively) have been carried out for the typical glow discharge plasma parameters. It is found that the spherical CNT tip radius decreases with {epsilon}{sub r} and hence the field emission of electrons from the spherical CNT tip increases. Some of our theoretical results are in accordance with the existing experimental observations.

  17. Chemical Interaction, Space-charge Layer and Molecule Charging Energy for a TiO2/TCNQ Interface

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, José I.; Flores, Fernando; Ortega, José; Rangan, Sylvie; Ruggieri, Charles; Bartynski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Three driving forces control the energy level alignment between transition-metal oxides and organic materials: the chemical interaction between the two materials, the organic electronegativity and the possible space charge layer formed in the oxide. This is illustrated in this study by analyzing experimentally and theoretically a paradigmatic case, the TiO2(110) / TCNQ interface: due to the chemical interaction between the two materials, the organic electron affinity level is located below the Fermi energy of the n-doped TiO2. Then, one electron is transferred from the oxide to this level and a space charge layer is developed in the oxide inducing an important increase in the interface dipole and in the oxide work-function. PMID:26877826

  18. Structure, Stability, and Fragmentation of Sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)Sulfosuccinate Negatively Charged Aggregates In Vacuo by MD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Giovanna; Abbate, Sergio; Ceselli, Alberto; Ceraulo, Leopoldo; Fornili, Sandro L.; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo

    2014-09-01

    Negatively charged supramolecular aggregates formed in vacuo by n bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT-) anions and n + n c sodium counterions (i.e., [AOT n Na n+nc ] nc ) have been investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for n = 1 to 20 and n c = -1 to -5. By comparing the maximum excess charge values of negatively and positively charged AOTNa aggregates, it is found that the charge storage capability is higher for the latter systems, the difference decreasing as the aggregation number increases. Statistical analysis of physical properties like gyration radii and moment of inertia tensors of aggregates provides detailed information on their structural properties. Even for n c = -5, all stable aggregates show a reverse micelle-like structure with an internal core, including sodium counterions and surfactant polar heads, surrounded by an external layer consisting of the surfactant alkyl chains. Interestingly, the reverse micelle-like structure is retained also in proximity of fragmentation. Moreover, the aggregate shapes may be approximated by elongated ellipsoids whose longer axis increases with n and | n c |. The fragmentation patterns of a number of these aggregates have also been examined and have been found to markedly depend on the aggregate charge state. The simulated fragmentation patterns of a representative aggregate show good agreement with experimental data obtained using low collision voltages.

  19. Structure, stability, and fragmentation of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate negatively charged aggregates in vacuo by MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Giovanna; Abbate, Sergio; Ceselli, Alberto; Ceraulo, Leopoldo; Fornili, Sandro L; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo

    2014-09-01

    Negatively charged supramolecular aggregates formed in vacuo by n bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT(-)) anions and n + n(c) sodium counterions (i.e., [AOT(n) Na(n+nc)](nc)) have been investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for n = 1 to 20 and n(c) = -1 to -5. By comparing the maximum excess charge values of negatively and positively charged AOTNa aggregates, it is found that the charge storage capability is higher for the latter systems, the difference decreasing as the aggregation number increases. Statistical analysis of physical properties like gyration radii and moment of inertia tensors of aggregates provides detailed information on their structural properties. Even for n(c) = -5, all stable aggregates show a reverse micelle-like structure with an internal core, including sodium counterions and surfactant polar heads, surrounded by an external layer consisting of the surfactant alkyl chains. Interestingly, the reverse micelle-like structure is retained also in proximity of fragmentation. Moreover, the aggregate shapes may be approximated by elongated ellipsoids whose longer axis increases with n and |n(c)|. The fragmentation patterns of a number of these aggregates have also been examined and have been found to markedly depend on the aggregate charge state. The simulated fragmentation patterns of a representative aggregate show good agreement with experimental data obtained using low collision voltages. PMID:24969925

  20. Direct single-molecule observations of local denaturation of a DNA double helix under a negative supercoil state.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shunsuke; Motooka, Shinya; Usui, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Shohei; Miyata, Hidefumi; Kurita, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Takeshi; Matsuura, Shun-ichi; Mizuno, Akira; Oshige, Masahiko; Katsura, Shinji

    2015-03-17

    Effects of a negative supercoil on the local denaturation of the DNA double helix were studied at the single-molecule level. The local denaturation in λDNA and λDNA containing the SV40 origin of DNA replication (SV40ori-λDNA) was directly observed by staining single-stranded DNA regions with a fusion protein comprising the ssDNA binding domain of a 70-kDa subunit of replication protein A and an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (RPA-YFP) followed by staining the double-stranded DNA regions with YOYO-1. The local denaturation of λDNA and SV40ori-λDNA under a negative supercoil state was observed as single bright spots at the single-stranded regions. When negative supercoil densities were gradually increased to 0, -0.045, and -0.095 for λDNA and 0, -0.047, and -0.1 for SV40ori-λDNA, single bright spots at the single-stranded regions were frequently induced under higher negative supercoil densities of -0.095 for λDNA and -0.1 for SV40ori-λDNA. However, single bright spots of the single-stranded regions were rarely observed below a negative supercoil density of -0.045 and -0.047 for λDNA and SV40ori-λDNA, respectively. The probability of occurrence of the local denaturation increased with negative superhelicity for both λDNA and SV40ori-λDNA. PMID:25697222

  1. Negligible "negative space-charge layer effects" at oxide-electrolyte/electrode interfaces of thin-film batteries.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Masakazu; Shiraki, Susumu; Suzuki, Tohru; Kumatani, Akichika; Ohsawa, Takeo; Takagi, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Ryota; Hitosugi, Taro

    2015-03-11

    In this paper, we report the surprisingly low electrolyte/electrode interface resistance of 8.6 Ω cm(2) observed in thin-film batteries. This value is an order of magnitude smaller than that presented in previous reports on all-solid-state lithium batteries. The value is also smaller than that found in a liquid electrolyte-based batteries. The low interface resistance indicates that the negative space-charge layer effects at the Li3PO(4-x)N(x)/LiCoO2 interface are negligible and demonstrates that it is possible to fabricate all-solid state batteries with faster charging/discharging properties. PMID:25710500

  2. Fixed negative charge and the Donnan effect: a description of the driving forces associated with brain tissue swelling and oedema

    PubMed Central

    Elkin, Benjamin S.; Shaik, Mohammed A.; Morrison, Barclay

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral oedema or brain tissue swelling is a significant complication following traumatic brain injury or stroke that can increase the intracranial pressure (ICP) and impair blood flow. Here, we have identified a potential driver of oedema: the negatively charged molecules fixed within cells. This fixed charge density (FCD), once exposed, could increase ICP through the Donnan effect. We have shown that metabolic processes and membrane integrity are required for concealing this FCD as slices of rat cortex swelled immediately (within 30 min) following dissection if treated with 2 deoxyglucose + cyanide (2DG+CN) or Triton X-100. Slices given ample oxygen and glucose, however, did not swell significantly. We also found that dead brain tissue swells and shrinks in response to changes in ionic strength of the bathing medium, which suggests that the Donnan effect is capable of pressurizing and swelling brain tissue. As predicted, a non-ionic osmolyte, 1,2 propanediol, elicited no volume change at 2000×10−3 osmoles l−1 (Osm). Swelling data were well described by triphasic mixture theory with the calculated reference state FCD similar to that measured with a 1,9 dimethylmethylene blue assay. Taken together, these data suggest that intracellular fixed charges may contribute to the driving forces responsible for brain swelling. PMID:20047940

  3. Negative-U carbon vacancy in 4H-SiC: Assessment of charge correction schemes and identification of the negative carbon vacancy at the quasicubic site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, X. T.; Szász, K.; Hornos, T.; Kawahara, K.; Suda, J.; Kimoto, T.; Gali, A.; Janzén, E.; Son, N. T.

    2013-12-01

    The carbon vacancy (VC) has been suggested by different studies to be involved in the Z1/Z2 defect-a carrier lifetime killer in SiC. However, the correlation between the Z1/Z2 deep level with VC is not possible since only the negative carbon vacancy (VC-) at the hexagonal site, VC-(h), with unclear negative-U behaviors was identified by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Using freestanding n-type 4H-SiC epilayers irradiated with low energy (250 keV) electrons at room temperature to introduce mainly VC and defects in the C sublattice, we observed the strong EPR signals of VC-(h) and another S = 1/2 center. Electron paramagnetic resonance experiments show a negative-U behavior of the two centers and their similar symmetry lowering from C3v to C1h at low temperatures. Comparing the 29Si and 13C ligand hyperfine constants observed by EPR and first principles calculations, the new center is identified as VC-(k). The negative-U behavior is further confirmed by large scale density functional theory supercell calculations using different charge correction schemes. The results support the identification of the lifetime limiting Z1/Z2 defect to be related to acceptor states of the carbon vacancy.

  4. Small-molecule inhibitors of gram-negative lipoprotein trafficking discovered by phenotypic screening.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Sarah M; Fleming, Paul R; MacCormack, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Robert E; Whiteaker, James D; Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Tokuda, Hajime; Miller, Alita A

    2015-03-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are transported to the outer membrane by the Lol system. In this process, lipoproteins are released from the inner membrane by the ABC transporter LolCDE and passed to LolA, a diffusible periplasmic molecular chaperone. Lipoproteins are then transferred to the outer membrane receptor protein, LolB, for insertion in the outer membrane. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of novel pyridineimidazole compounds that inhibit this process. Escherichia coli mutants resistant to the pyridineimidazoles show no cross-resistance to other classes of antibiotics and map to either the LolC or LolE protein of the LolCDE transporter complex. The pyridineimidazoles were shown to inhibit the LolA-dependent release of the lipoprotein Lpp from E. coli spheroplasts. These results combined with bacterial cytological profiling are consistent with LolCDE-mediated disruption of lipoprotein targeting to the outer membrane as the mode of action of these pyridineimidazoles. The pyridineimidazoles are the first reported inhibitors of the LolCDE complex, a target which has never been exploited for therapeutic intervention. These compounds open the door to further interrogation of the outer membrane lipoprotein transport pathway as a target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:25583975

  5. Positive and negative singly charged ion production of a laser induced plasma using a capillary graphite target.

    PubMed

    Saquilayan, G Q; Wada, M

    2016-02-01

    A new type of laser ion source is being developed aiming at the production of positive and negative singly charged ions using a capillary graphite target structure. The initial results of the laser plasma produced inside of the 10 mm diameter conduit indicated the formation of the secondary charged particle production inside the target. A high speed camera clearly recorded the plasma plume expansion inside the target. The time-of-flight spectrum of the laser produced plasma in vacuum showed that the signal of the positive ions formed two peaks as the laser power density exceeded 10 GW/cm(2). The addition of neutral gas to the system produced a signal corresponding to negative ions after the positive signal. PMID:26931968

  6. CHARGE MEASUREMENTS ON INDIVIDUAL PARTICLES EXITING LABORATORY PRECIPITATORS WITH POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE CORONA AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports measurements of charge values on individual particles exiting three different laboratory electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in an experimental apparatus containing a Millikan cell. Dioctylphthalate (DOP) droplets and fly ash particles were measured at temperatur...

  7. Water Dispersible, Positively and Negatively Charged MoS2 Nanosheets: Surface Chemistry and the Role of Surfactant Binding.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Arunachalam, Vaishali; Vasudevan, Sukumaran

    2015-02-19

    Stable aqueous dispersions of atomically thin layered MoS2 nanosheets have been obtained by sonication in the presence of ionic surfactants. The dispersions are stabilized by electrostatic repulsion between the sheets, and we show that the sign of the charge on the MoS2 nanosheets, either positive or negative, can be can be controlled by the choice of the surfactant. Using techniques from solution NMR, we show that the surfactant chains are weakly bound to the MoS2 sheets and undergo rapid exchange with free surfactant chains present in the dispersion. In situ nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopic measurements provide direct evidence that the surfactant chains lie flat, arranged randomly on the basal plane of the MoS2 nanosheets with their charged headgroup exposed. These results provide a chemical perspective for understanding the stability of these inorganic nanosheets in aqueous dispersions and the origin of the charge on the sheets. PMID:26262496

  8. Spatial distribution of the charged particles and potentials during beam extraction in a negative-ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Shibuya, M.; Asano, E.; Kondo, T.; Sato, M.; Komada, S.; Sekiguchi, H.; Kameyama, N.; Fukuyama, T.; Wada, S.; Hatayama, A.

    2012-02-15

    We report on the characteristics of the electronegative plasma in a large-scale hydrogen negative ion (H{sup -}) source. The measurement has been made with a time-resolved Langmuir probe installed in the beam extraction region. The H{sup -} density is monitored with a cavity ring-down system to identify the electrons in the negative charges. The electron-saturation current decreases rapidly after starting to seed Cs, and ion-ion plasma is observed in the extraction region. The H{sup -} density steps down during the beam extraction and the electron density jumps up correspondingly. The time integral of the decreasing H{sup -} charge density agrees well with the electron charge collected with the probe. The agreement of the charges is interpreted to indicate that the H{sup -} density decreasing at the beam extraction is compensated by the electrons diffusing from the driver region. In the plasmas with very low electron density, the pre-sheath of the extraction field penetrates deeply inside the plasmas. That is because the shielding length in those plasmas is longer than that in the usual electron-ion plasmas, and furthermore the electrons are suppressed to diffuse to the extraction region due to the strong magnetic field.

  9. Shotgun Metabolomics Approach for the Analysis of Negatively Charged Water-Soluble Cellular Metabolites from Mouse Heart Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Gang; Yang, Kui; Zhao, Zhongdan; Guan, Shaoping; Han, Xianlin; Gross, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    A shotgun metabolomics approach using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was developed for the rapid analysis of negatively charged water-soluble cellular metabolites. Through the use of neutral organic solvents to inactivate endogenous enzyme activities (i.e., methanol/chloroform/H2O extraction), in conjunction with a matrix having minimal background noise (9-amnioacridine), a set of multiplexed conditions was developed that allowed identification of 285 peaks corresponding to negatively charged metabolites from mouse heart extracts. Identification of metabolite peaks was based on mass accuracy and was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry for 90 of the identified metabolite peaks. Through multiplexing ionization conditions, new suites of metabolites could be ionized and “spectrometric isolation” of closely neighboring peaks for subsequent tandem mass spectrometric interrogation could be achieved. Moreover, assignments of ions from isomeric metabolites and quantitation of their relative abundance was achieved in many cases through tandem mass spectrometry by identification of diagnostic fragmentation ions (e.g., discrimination of ATP from dGTP). The high sensitivity of this approach facilitated the detection of extremely low abundance metabolites including important signaling metabolites such as IP3, cAMP, and cGMP. Collectively, these results identify a multiplexed MALDI-TOF/TOF MS approach for analysis of negatively charged metabolites in mammalian tissues. PMID:17665876

  10. Positive and negative ion formation in deep-core excited molecules: S 1s excitation in dimethyl sulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Coutinho, L. H.; Gardenghi, D. J.; Schlachter, A. S.; Souza, G. G. B. de; Stolte, W. C.

    2014-01-14

    The photo-fragmentation of the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) molecule was studied using synchrotron radiation and a magnetic mass spectrometer. The total cationic yield spectrum was recorded in the photon energy region around the sulfur K edge. The sulfur composition of the highest occupied molecular orbital's and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital's in the DMSO molecule has been obtained using both ab initio and density functional theory methods. Partial cation and anion-yield measurements were obtained in the same energy range. An intense resonance is observed at 2475.4 eV. Sulfur atomic ions present a richer structure around this resonant feature, as compared to other fragment ions. The yield curves are similar for most of the other ionic species, which we interpret as due to cascade Auger processes leading to multiply charged species which then undergo Coulomb explosion. The anions S{sup −}, C{sup −}, and O{sup −} are observed for the first time in deep-core-level excitation of DMSO.

  11. Consecutive Charging of a Molecule-on-Insulator Ensemble Using Single Electron Tunnelling Methods.

    PubMed

    Rahe, Philipp; Steele, Ryan P; Williams, Clayton C

    2016-02-10

    We present the local charge state modification at room temperature of small insulator-supported molecular ensembles formed by 1,1'-ferrocenedicarboxylic acid on calcite. Single electron tunnelling between the conducting tip of a noncontact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) and the molecular islands is observed. By joining NC-AFM with Kelvin probe force microscopy, successive charge build-up in the sample is observed from consecutive experiments. Charge transfer within the islands and structural relaxation of the adsorbate/surface system is suggested by the experimental data. PMID:26713686

  12. Charge transport in C60-based dumbbell-type molecules: mechanically induced switching between two distinct conductance states.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Pavel; La Rosa, Andrea; Kolivoška, Viliam; Bermejo, Daniel; Hong, Wenjing; Yoshida, Koji; Baghernejad, Masoud; Filippone, Salvatore; Broekmann, Peter; Wandlowski, Thomas; Martín, Nazario

    2015-02-18

    Single molecule charge transport characteristics of buckminsterfullerene-capped symmetric fluorene-based dumbbell-type compound 1 were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (STM-BJ), current sensing atomic force microscopy break junction (CS-AFM-BJ), and mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) techniques, under ambient conditions. We also show that compound 1 is able to form highly organized defect-free surface adlayers, allowing the molecules on the surface to be addressed specifically. Two distinct single molecule conductance states (called high G(H)(1) and low G(L)(1)) were observed, depending on the pressure exerted by the probe on the junction, thus allowing molecule 1 to function as a mechanically driven molecular switch. These two distinct conductance states were attributed to the electron tunneling through the buckminsterfullerene anchoring group and fully extended molecule 1, respectively. The assignment of conductance features to these configurations was further confirmed by control experiments with asymmetrically designed buckminsterfullerene derivative 2 as well as pristine buckminsterfullerene 3, both lacking the G(L) feature. PMID:25651069

  13. Enhancement of charge transport in DNA molecules induced by the next nearest-neighbor effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakooti, Sadeq; Hedin, Eric R.; Kim, Young D.; Joe, Yong S.

    2012-11-01

    An advanced two-dimensional tight-binding model including the next nearest-neighbor effects for quantum mechanical electron transport through double-stranded DNA molecules is proposed. Considering the next nearest-neighbor hopping strengths between sites gives a more rational and realistic model for the electron path-way through DNA molecules. We show higher overall transmission and enhanced current for a 30 base-pair poly(G)-poly(C) DNA molecule with the inclusion of diagonal electron hopping between the sites. In addition, an optimum condition of the contact hopping strength and Fermi energy to obtain the maximum current for the system is demonstrated. Finally, we present the current-voltage characteristics showing a transition from a semiconductor-like to a metal-like DNA molecule with the variation of the Fermi energy.

  14. Computational modeling of chemical reactions and interstitial growth and remodeling involving charged solutes and solid-bound molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nims, Robert J.; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanobiological processes are rooted in mechanics and chemistry, and such processes may be modeled in a framework that couples their governing equations starting from fundamental principles. In many biological applications, the reactants and products of chemical reactions may be electrically charged, and these charge effects may produce driving forces and constraints that significantly influence outcomes. In this study, a novel formulation and computational implementation are presented for modeling chemical reactions in biological tissues that involve charged solutes and solid-bound molecules within a deformable porous hydrated solid matrix, coupling mechanics with chemistry while accounting for electric charges. The deposition or removal of solid-bound molecules contributes to the growth and remodeling of the solid matrix; in particular, volumetric growth may be driven by Donnan osmotic swelling, resulting from charged molecular species fixed to the solid matrix. This formulation incorporates the state of strain as a state variable in the production rate of chemical reactions, explicitly tying chemistry with mechanics for the purpose of modeling mechanobiology. To achieve these objectives, this treatment identifies the specific theoretical and computational challenges faced in modeling complex systems of interacting neutral and charged constituents while accommodating any number of simultaneous reactions where reactants and products may be modeled explicitly or implicitly. Several finite element verification problems are shown to agree with closed-form analytical solutions. An illustrative tissue engineering analysis demonstrates tissue growth and swelling resulting from the deposition of chondroitin sulfate, a charged solid-bound molecular species. This implementation is released in the open-source program FEBio (www.febio.org). The availability of this framework may be particularly beneficial to optimizing tissue engineering culture systems by examining the

  15. Computational modeling of chemical reactions and interstitial growth and remodeling involving charged solutes and solid-bound molecules.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Nims, Robert J; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-01

    Mechanobiological processes are rooted in mechanics and chemistry, and such processes may be modeled in a framework that couples their governing equations starting from fundamental principles. In many biological applications, the reactants and products of chemical reactions may be electrically charged, and these charge effects may produce driving forces and constraints that significantly influence outcomes. In this study, a novel formulation and computational implementation are presented for modeling chemical reactions in biological tissues that involve charged solutes and solid-bound molecules within a deformable porous hydrated solid matrix, coupling mechanics with chemistry while accounting for electric charges. The deposition or removal of solid-bound molecules contributes to the growth and remodeling of the solid matrix; in particular, volumetric growth may be driven by Donnan osmotic swelling, resulting from charged molecular species fixed to the solid matrix. This formulation incorporates the state of strain as a state variable in the production rate of chemical reactions, explicitly tying chemistry with mechanics for the purpose of modeling mechanobiology. To achieve these objectives, this treatment identifies the specific theoretical and computational challenges faced in modeling complex systems of interacting neutral and charged constituents while accommodating any number of simultaneous reactions where reactants and products may be modeled explicitly or implicitly. Several finite element verification problems are shown to agree with closed-form analytical solutions. An illustrative tissue engineering analysis demonstrates tissue growth and swelling resulting from the deposition of chondroitin sulfate, a charged solid-bound molecular species. This implementation is released in the open-source program FEBio ( www.febio.org ). The availability of this framework may be particularly beneficial to optimizing tissue engineering culture systems by examining the

  16. Charge transfer between a CdSe/CdS quantum rod and an attached ferrocene molecule: a first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarafder, Kartick; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dot (QD) shows interesting opto-electrical properties, very different from bulk semiconductors. However, one major challenge for opto-electrical application is to get the charge carrier out of the QD. One approach is to use an attached molecule to extract the photon generated carrier from the QD. Ferrocene has a potential to change its electron transition level either by adjusting the Ferrocene and Ferrocene + ratio in a solvent, or by adding other functional groups. However, proper understanding of the interactions between QD and molecule is limited, which is extremely useful for further design of such system. One of the main difficult is that there are thousands of atoms contained in the system, a first principle study of which is beyond the limit of existing computational power using direct density functional theory method. In this work we used a novel technique called charge-patching method, and combined that with Marcus model to study the electron and hole transfer between ferrocene and CdS/CdSe core-shell quantum dot. This study allows us to gain insights into the molecule dot interactions and underlying photoluminescence quenching process.

  17. Production of N-acylhomoserine lactone signal molecules by gram-negative soil-borne and plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Veselova, M; Kholmeckaya, M; Klein, S; Voronina, E; Lipasova, V; Metlitskaya, A; Mayatskaya, A; Lobanok, E; Khmel, I; Chernin, L

    2003-01-01

    Quorum-sensing control mediated by N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules has been established as a key feature in the regulation of various metabolic traits in many bacteria. Approximately 300 strains representing 6 genera and 18 species of soil-borne and plant-associated Gram-negative bacteria isolated in various regions of the former USSR using two reporter systems were screened for AHL production. The production was observed in 17.5% of the screened bacterial strains. Positive response was detected in all of the 14 tested strains of Erwinia herbicola, in 41 of the 239 strains of Pseudomonas species; in all 5 strains of Xanthomonas ampelina, X. campestris pv. malvacearum, pv. translucens, pv. vesicatoria and in one strain of Pantoea stewartii. AHL assay of 41 strains of X. maltophilia (syn. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia) isolated from soils with Chromobacterium violaceum reporter has revealed no strains synthesizing these signal molecules; 26 strains analyzed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens reporter showed the same result. PMID:15058194

  18. Nearly Perfect Spin Filter, Spin Valve and Negative Differential Resistance Effects in a Fe4-based Single-molecule Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Fengxia; Liu, Zuli; Yao, Kailun; Gao, Guoying; Fu, Huahua; Zhu, Sicong; Ni, Yun; Peng, Li

    2014-05-01

    The spin-polarized transport in a single-molecule magnet Fe4 sandwiched between two gold electrodes is studied, using nonequilibrium Green's functions in combination with the density-functional theory. We predict that the device possesses spin filter effect (SFE), spin valve effect (SVE), and negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior. Moreover, we also find that the appropriate chemical ligand, coupling the single molecule to leads, is a key factor for manipulating spin-dependent transport. The device containing the methyl ligand behaves as a nearly perfect spin filter with efficiency approaching 100%, and the transport is dominated by transmission through the Fe4 metal center. However, in the case of phenyl ligand, the spin filter effect seems to be reduced, but the spin valve effect is significantly enhanced with a large magnetoresistance ratio, reaching 1800%. This may be attributed to the blocking effect of the phenyl ligands in mediating transport. Our findings suggest that such a multifunctional molecular device, possessing SVE, NDR and high SFE simultaneously, would be an excellent candidate for spintronics of molecular devices.

  19. Nearly Perfect Spin Filter, Spin Valve and Negative Differential Resistance Effects in a Fe4-based Single-molecule Junction

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Fengxia; Liu, Zuli; Yao, Kailun; Gao, Guoying; Fu, Huahua; Zhu, Sicong; Ni, Yun; Peng, Li

    2014-01-01

    The spin-polarized transport in a single-molecule magnet Fe4 sandwiched between two gold electrodes is studied, using nonequilibrium Green's functions in combination with the density-functional theory. We predict that the device possesses spin filter effect (SFE), spin valve effect (SVE), and negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior. Moreover, we also find that the appropriate chemical ligand, coupling the single molecule to leads, is a key factor for manipulating spin-dependent transport. The device containing the methyl ligand behaves as a nearly perfect spin filter with efficiency approaching 100%, and the transport is dominated by transmission through the Fe4 metal center. However, in the case of phenyl ligand, the spin filter effect seems to be reduced, but the spin valve effect is significantly enhanced with a large magnetoresistance ratio, reaching 1800%. This may be attributed to the blocking effect of the phenyl ligands in mediating transport. Our findings suggest that such a multifunctional molecular device, possessing SVE, NDR and high SFE simultaneously, would be an excellent candidate for spintronics of molecular devices. PMID:24787446

  20. Spin dynamics in the negatively charged terbium (III) bis-phthalocyaninato complex.

    PubMed

    Branzoli, Francesca; Carretta, Pietro; Filibian, Marta; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Graf, Michael J; Galan-Mascaros, Jose R; Fuhr, Olaf; Brink, Susan; Ruben, Mario

    2009-04-01

    The experimental and theoretical study of the electron spin dynamics in the anionic form of a single-ion molecule magnet (SIMM), the bis-phthalocyaninato terbium (III) molecule [Pc(2)Tb](-)[TBA](+), has been addressed by means of solid state (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The magnetic properties of the caged Tb(3+) metal center were investigated in a series of diamagnetically diluted preparations, where the excess of tetrabutylamonium bromide ([TBA]Br)(n) salt was used as diamagnetic matrix complement. We found that a high temperature activated spin dynamics characterizes the systems, which involved phonon-assisted transitions among the crystal field levels in qualitative agreements with literature results. However, the activation barriers in these processes range from 641 cm(-1) for the diamagnetically diluted samples to 584 cm(-1) for those undiluted; thus, they exhibit barriers 2-3 times larger than witnessed in earlier (230 cm(-1)) reports (e.g., Ishikawa, N.; Sugita, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Koshihara, S.; Kaizu, Y. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 8694-8695). At cryogenic temperatures, fluctuations are driven by tunneling processes between the m = +6 and -6 low-energy levels. We found that the barrier Delta and the tunneling rates change from sample to sample and especially the diamagnetically diluted [Pc(2)Tb](-) molecules appear affected by the sample's magneto/thermal history. These observations emphasize that matrix arrangements around [Pc(2)Tb](-) can appreciably alter the splitting of the crystal field levels, its symmetry, and hence, the spin dynamics. Therefore, understanding how small differences in molecular surroundings (as for instance occurring by depositing on surfaces) can trigger substantial modifications in the SIMM property is of utmost importance for the effective operation of such molecules for single-molecule data storage, for example. PMID:19275145

  1. Roles of negatively-charged heavy ions and nonextensivity in cylindrical and spherical dust-ion-acoustic shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ema, S. A.; Ferdousi, M.; Sultana, S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been carried out on the propagation of nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) waves in an unmagnetized dusty multi-ion plasma system containing nonextensive electrons, inertial negatively-charged heavy ions, positively-charged Maxwellian light ions, and negatively-charged stationary dust. The well-known reductive perturbation technique has been used to derive the modified Burgers-type equation (which describes the shock wave's properties), and its numerical solution is obtained. The basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of the cylindrical and the spherical DIA shock waves are investigated. The basic features of the cylindrical and the spherical DIA shock waves are found to have been significantly modified in a way that depends on the intrinsic parameters (viz. electron nonextensivity, heavy-ion's kinematic viscosity, heavy-to-light-ion number density ratio, electron-to-light-ion temperature ratio, etc.) of the considered plasma system. The characteristics of the cylindrical and the spherical DIA shock waves are observed to be qualitatively different from those of planar ones.

  2. Charge and Nuclear Dynamics Induced by Deep Inner-Shell Multiphoton Ionization of CH3I Molecules by Intense X-ray Free-Electron Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Koji; Kukk, Edwin; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Wada, Shin-ichi; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Ohmura, Satoshi; Mondal, Subhendu; Tachibana, Tetsuya; Ito, Yuta; Koga, Ryosuke; Sakai, Tsukasa; Matsunami, Kenji; Rudenko, Artem; Nicolas, Christophe; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Miron, Catalin; Zhang, Yizhu; Jiang, Yuhai; Chen, Jianhui; Anand, Mailam; Kim, Dong Eon; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Yao, Makoto; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, free-electron lasers operating in the true X-ray regime have opened up access to the femtosecond-scale dynamics induced by deep inner-shell ionization. We have investigated charge creation and transfer dynamics in the context of molecular Coulomb explosion of a single molecule, exposed to sequential deep inner-shell ionization within an ultrashort (10 fs) X-ray pulse. The target molecule was CH3I, methane sensitized to X-rays by halogenization with a heavy element, iodine. Time-of-flight ion spectroscopy and coincident ion analysis was employed to investigate, via the properties of the atomic fragments, single-molecule charge states of up to +22. Experimental findings have been compared with a parametric model of simultaneous Coulomb explosion and charge transfer in the molecule. The study demonstrates that including realistic charge dynamics is imperative when molecular Coulomb explosion experiments using short-pulse facilities are performed. PMID:26267186

  3. Large three-photon absorption and intramolecular charge transfer of the bis-donor fluorene-based molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenbo; Wu, Yiqun; Han, Junhe; Gu, Donghong; Gan, Fuxi

    2005-10-01

    Three-photon absorption (3PA) of two fluorene-based molecules with D-π-D structural motifs (abbreviated as BPAF and BCZF) has been determined by using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pumped with 38 ps pulses at 1064 nm in DMF. The measured 3PA cross-sections are 222 and 140×10 -78 cm 6 s 2 for BPAF and BCZF, respectively. AM1 calculations show that attaching different donors changes the charge density distribution of the fluorene skeleton, and it is observed that the 3PA cross-section can be enhanced with increasing intramolecular charge transfer character, measured by the parameter Δ ρ1/Δ ρ2/Δ ρ1'.

  4. Mechanism of How Salt-Gradient-Induced Charges Affect the Translocation of DNA Molecules through a Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuhui; Tsutsui, Makusu; Scheicher, Ralph H.; Fan, Chun; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2013-01-01

    Experiments using nanopores demonstrated that a salt gradient enhances the capture rate of DNA and reduces its translocation speed. These two effects can help to enable electrical DNA sequencing with nanopores. Here, we provide a quantitative theoretical evaluation that shows the positive net charges, which accumulate around the pore entrance due to the salt gradient, are responsible for the two observed effects: they reinforce the electric capture field, resulting in promoted molecule capture rate; and they induce cationic electroosmotic flow through the nanopore, thus significantly retarding the motion of the anionic DNA through the nanopore. Our multiphysical simulation results show that, during the polymer trapping stage, the former effect plays the major role, thus resulting in promoted DNA capture rate, while during the nanopore-penetrating stage the latter effect dominates and consequently reduces the DNA translocation speed significantly. Quantitative agreement with experimental results has been reached by further taking nanopore wall surface charges into account. PMID:23931325

  5. Bianthrone at a metal surface: Conductance switching with a bistable molecule made feasible by image charge effects

    SciTech Connect

    Geskin, Victor; Bouzakraoui, Saïd; Cornil, Jérôme; Lara-Avila, Samuel; Danilov, Andrey; Kubatkin, Sergey; Bjornholm, Thomas

    2015-01-22

    Bianthrone is a sterically hindered compound that exists in the form of two non-planar isomers. Our experimental study of single-molecule junctions with bianthrone reveals persistent switching of electric conductance at low temperatures, which can be reasonably associated to molecular isomerization events. Temperature dependence of the switching rate allows for an estimate of the activation energy of the process, on the order of 35–90 meV. Quantum-chemical calculations of the potential surface of neutral bianthrone and its anion, including identification of transition states, yields the isolated molecule isomerization barriers too high vs. the previous estimate, though in perfect agreement with previous experimental studies in solution. Nevertheless, we show that the attraction of the anion in the vicinity of the metal surface by its image charge can significantly alter the energetic landscape, in particular, by reducing the barrier to the values compatible with the observed switching behavior.

  6. Atomistic simulations of negatively charged donor states probed in STM experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankasala, Archana; Salfi, Joe; Rogge, Sven; Klimeck, Gerhard; Rahman, Rajib

    A single donor in silicon binding two electrons (D-) is important for electron spin readout and two-qubit operations in a donor based silicon (Si) quantum computer, and has recently been probed in Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) experiments for sub-surface dopants. In this work, atomistic configuration interaction technique is used to compute the two-electron states of the donor taking into account the geometry of the STM-vacuum-silicon-reservoir device. While 45 meV charging energy is obtained for D- in bulk Si, the electrostatics of the device reduces the charging energy to 30 meVs. It is also shown that the reduced charging energy enables spin triplet states to be bound to the donor. The exchange splitting between the singlet and triplet states can be tuned by an external electric field. The computed wavefunctions of the D- state helps to understand how the contribution of the momentum space valley states change with donor depth and electric field.

  7. Complexation of ionomers and surfactant molecules of the same charge in a nonpolar solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeev, K.N.; Chugunov, S.A.; Zezin, A.B.; Kabanov, V.A. . Dept. of Polymer Science); Teraoka, I. ); MacKnight, W.J. . Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering)

    1994-07-04

    Complexation between sulfonated polystyrene ionomers and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate sodium salt (aerosol OT, AOT) surfactant molecules in m-xylene was studied by ultracentrifugation, vapor pressure osmometry, viscometry, and dynamic light scattering. When the dilute ionomer solution is mixed with the AOT solution, complexation takes place for both the slightly aggregated state of AOT and reversed micelles of AOT containing water. In the presence of excess AOT molecules, some of the AOT are free from the ionomers, and there are well-defined limiting compositions for complexes of the ionomer and AOT and for those of the ionomer and AOT micelles. The limiting composition depends on the species of the salt or acid group of the ionomer and on the state of AOT before mixing. The composition was estimated to be 0.21--0.66 reversed AOT micelles per salt/acid group for the ionomer--AOT micelles complexes and 14--23 AOT molecules per salt/acid group for the ionomer--AOT complexes. AOT molecules were found to disrupt efficiently the cluster-forming contacts among salt/acid groups, each of them encapsulating a single salt/acid group. The AOT micelles, however, do not completely disrupt the intrachain aggregation.

  8. Preparation and chromatographic evaluation of zwitterionic stationary phases with controllable ratio of positively and negatively charged groups.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao-Dong; Hao, Yan-Hong; Peng, Xi-Tian; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Shi, Zhi-Guo; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-08-15

    The present study described the preparation and application of zwitterionic stationary phases (ACS) with controllable ratio of positively charged tertiary amine groups and negatively charged carboxyl groups. Various parameters, including water content, pH values and ionic strength of the mobile phase, were investigated to study the chromatographic characteristics of ACS columns. The prepared ACS columns demonstrated a mix-mode retention mechanism composed of surface adsorption, partitioning and electrostatic interactions. The elemental analysis of different batches of the ACS phases demonstrated good reproducibility of the preparation strategy. Additionally, various categories of compounds, including nucleosides, water-soluble vitamins, benzoic acid derivatives and basic compounds were successively employed to evaluate the separation selectivity of the prepared ACS stationary phases. These ACS phases exhibited entirely different selectivity and retention behavior from each other for various polar analytes, demonstrating the excellent application potential in the analysis of polar compounds in HILIC. PMID:25966373

  9. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 108-109 V m-1, which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ˜1 V (˜2 ṡ 108 V m-1) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ˜1.4 V (˜2.8 ṡ 108 V m-1) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (DMPC

  10. Nanostructures formed by self-assembly of negatively charged polymer and cationic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Nizri, G; Makarsky, A; Magdassi, S; Talmon, Y

    2009-02-17

    The formation of nanoparticles by interaction of an anionic polyelectrolyte, sodium polyacrylate (NaPA), was studied with a series of oppositely charged surfactants with different chain lengths, alkyltrimethylammonium bromide (CnTAB). The binding and formation of nanoparticles was characterized by dynamic light scattering, zeta-potential, and self-diffusion NMR. The inner nanostructure of the particles was observed by direct-imaging cryogenic-temperature transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), indicating aggregates of hexagonal liquid crystal with nanometric size. PMID:19143559

  11. A nano-confined charged layer defies the principle of electrostatic interaction.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhat K; Kumbhakar, Manoj; Pal, Haridas; Nath, Sukhendu

    2011-06-28

    The reactivity between two charged molecules and the activity of charged biomolecules are mainly governed by the principle of electrostatic interaction, i.e., like charges repel and opposite charges attract. In the present study it is shown that the principle of electrostatic interaction is violated in the nano-confined biomimetic environment. Thus a positively charged molecule shows more preference to a positively charged surface compared to a negatively charged surface. PMID:21594238

  12. The effect of polymer size and charge of molecules on permeation through synovial membrane and accumulation in hyaline articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sterner, B; Harms, M; Wöll, S; Weigandt, M; Windbergs, M; Lehr, C M

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of joint related diseases often involves direct intra-articular injections. For rational development of novel delivery systems with extended residence time in the joint, detailed understanding of transport and retention phenomena within the joint is mandatory. This work presents a systematic study on the in vitro permeation, penetration and accumulation of model polymers with differing charges and molecular weights in bovine joint tissue. Permeation experiments with bovine synovial membrane were performed with PEG polymers (6-200kDa) and methylene blue in customized diffusion chambers. For polyethylene glycol, 2-fold (PEG 6kDa), 3-fold (PEG 10kDa) and 13-fold (PEG 35kDa) retention by the synovial membrane in reference to the small molecule methylene blue was demonstrated. No PEG 200kDa was found in the acceptor in detectable amounts after 48h. This showed the potential for a distinct extension of joint residence times by increasing molecular weights. In addition, experiments with bovine cartilage tissue were conducted. The ability for positively charged, high molecular weight chitosans and HEMA-Co-TMAP (HCT) polymers (up to 233kDa) to distribute throughout the entire cartilage matrix was demonstrated. In contrast, a distribution into cartilage was not observed for neutral PEG polymers (6-200kDa). Furthermore, the positive charge density of different compounds (chitosan, HEMA-Co-TMAP, methylene blue, MSC C1 (neutral NCE) and MSC D1 (positively charged NCE) was found to correlate with their accumulation in bovine cartilage tissue. In summary, the results offer pre-clinical in vitro data, indicating that the modification of molecular size and charge of a substance has the potential to decelerate its clearance through the synovial membrane and to promote accumulation inside the cartilage matrix. PMID:26876928

  13. Structural influences on charge carrier dynamics for small-molecule organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiping Shibata, Yosei; Yamanari, Toshihiro; Matsubara, Koji; Yoshida, Yuji; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Zhou, Ying

    2014-07-07

    We investigated the structural influences on the charge carrier dynamics in zinc phthalocyanine/fullerene (ZnPc/C{sub 60}) photovoltaic cells by introducing poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) and 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)-bithiophene (BP2T) between indium tin oxide and ZnPc layers. ZnPc films can be tuned to be round, long fiber-like, and short fiber-like structure, respectively. Time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements reveal that charge carrier lifetime in ZnPc/C{sub 60} bilayer films is considerably affected by the intra-grain properties. Transient photocurrent of ZnPc single films indicated that the charge carriers can transport for a longer distance in the long fiber-like grains than that in the round grains, due to the greatly lessened grain boundaries. By carefully controlling the structure of ZnPc films, the short-circuit current and fill factor of a ZnPc/C{sub 60} heterojunction solar cell with BP2T are significantly improved and the power conversion efficiency is increased to 2.6%, which is 120% larger than the conventional cell without BP2T.

  14. Structural influences on charge carrier dynamics for small-molecule organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Saeki, Akinori; Zhou, Ying; Seki, Shu; Shibata, Yosei; Yamanari, Toshihiro; Matsubara, Koji; Yoshida, Yuji

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the structural influences on the charge carrier dynamics in zinc phthalocyanine/fullerene (ZnPc/C60) photovoltaic cells by introducing poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) and 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)-bithiophene (BP2T) between indium tin oxide and ZnPc layers. ZnPc films can be tuned to be round, long fiber-like, and short fiber-like structure, respectively. Time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements reveal that charge carrier lifetime in ZnPc/C60 bilayer films is considerably affected by the intra-grain properties. Transient photocurrent of ZnPc single films indicated that the charge carriers can transport for a longer distance in the long fiber-like grains than that in the round grains, due to the greatly lessened grain boundaries. By carefully controlling the structure of ZnPc films, the short-circuit current and fill factor of a ZnPc/C60 heterojunction solar cell with BP2T are significantly improved and the power conversion efficiency is increased to 2.6%, which is 120% larger than the conventional cell without BP2T.

  15. Exciton formation as a rate limiting step for charge recombination in disordered organic molecules or polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Preezant, Yevgeni; Tessler, Nir

    2011-01-01

    The exciton formation (direct charge recombination) is studied and quantified as a function of material physical-properties such as the exciton binding energy, the exciton lifetime, and the mechanism causing the electronic disorder. By using a model that is an extension of a charge transport model [Y. Preezant and N. Tessler, Phys. Rev. B 74, 235202 (2006)] we are able to compare the direct exciton formation rate with the one predicted by the Langevin model. Using reasonable material parameters we find that in many cases the overall balance between free charge carrier and excitons is significantly affected by the exciton formation rate with its values being significantly low compared to the Langevin rate. We also find that in order to describe the complete recombination process it is important to introduce an intermediate state which we term exciton-precursor. This is in contrast to the common practice of using the Langevin model which embeds the assumption that the exciton formation rate is negligibly fast. The relations found between the physical-properties and the recombination rate can explain why certain materials exhibit Langevin rate while others exhibit significantly suppressed rates. This would eventually lead to the design of new materials better suited for either photocells or light-emitting diodes.

  16. Direct visual evidence for chemical mechanism of SERRS of the S-complex of pyrimidine molecule adsorbed on silver nanoparticle via charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Wang, Peijie; Sheng, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Lisheng; Fang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the S-complex of pyrimidine molecule absorbed on silver clusters was employed as a model molecule to study the enhancement mechanism in surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS). We described the chemical enhancement of SERRS through charge transfer (CT) from Ag20 to pyrimidine on resonance excitation, and electromagnetic enhancement through intracluster charge redistribution (CR) on the electronic intracluster collective oscillation excitation. It is shown that SERRS process of the pyrimidine molecule absorbed on silver clusters with different incident wavelength are dominated by different enhancement mechanisms. Both experimental and theoretical works have been performed to understand the CT process in SERRS. PMID:24287052

  17. Negatively charged excitons in semimagnetic CdSe/ZnSe/ZnMnSe quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Brichkin, A. S. Chernenko, A. V.; Chekhovich, E. A.; Dorozhkin, P. S.; Kulakovskii, V. D.; Ivanov, S. V.; Toropov, A. A.

    2007-08-15

    Low-temperature (T = 1.6 K) photoluminescence (PL) of individual CdSe/ZnSe/ZnMnSe quantum dots (QDs) with different magnitudes of the sp-d exchange interaction between the magnetic impurity ions and charge carriers has been studied in a magnetic field up to 12 T applied in the Faraday and Voigt geometry. The magnitude of the interaction was controlled by changing the fraction ({eta}{sub e,h}) of the squared wave function of charge carriers in the semimagnetic barrier by means of variation of the nonmagnetic (ZnSe) layer thickness. It is established that the sp-d exchange interaction leads to a change in the sign of the effective hole g factor even for {eta}{sub e,h} {approx} 5%, while further increase in the interaction magnitude is accompanied by a rapid growth in the magnitude of spin splitting for both electrons and holes. The quantum yield of PL exhibits a significant decrease due to nonradiative Auger recombination with the excitation of Mn ions only for {eta}{sub e,h} {approx} 12%, while the rate of the holes spin relaxation starts growing only for still higher {eta}{sub e,h} values. In a strong magnetic field perpendicular to the sample plane, the alignment of Mn spins leads to suppression of the Auger recombination only in the excited spin state. For a small rate of the hole spin relaxation, this leads to a rather unusual result: the emission from an excited trion state predominates in strong magnetic fields.

  18. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-14

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement. PMID:25494729

  19. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: Bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-01

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement.

  20. Modeling light-induced charge transfer dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal junction: Bridging classical electrodynamics and quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zixuan; Ratner, Mark A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-12-14

    We develop a numerical approach for simulating light-induced charge transport dynamics across a metal-molecule-metal conductance junction. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to simulate the plasmonic response of the metal structures. The Huygens subgridding technique, as adapted to Lorentz media, is used to bridge the vastly disparate length scales of the plasmonic metal electrodes and the molecular system, maintaining accuracy. The charge and current densities calculated with classical electrodynamics are transformed to an electronic wavefunction, which is then propagated through the molecular linker via the Heisenberg equations of motion. We focus mainly on development of the theory and exemplify our approach by a numerical illustration of a simple system consisting of two silver cylinders bridged by a three-site molecular linker. The electronic subsystem exhibits fascinating light driven dynamics, wherein the charge density oscillates at the driving optical frequency, exhibiting also the natural system timescales, and a resonance phenomenon leads to strong conductance enhancement.

  1. Mechanism of charge transfer and its impacts on Fermi-level pinning for gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Changjie; Zhu, Huili; Yang, Weihuang

    2015-06-07

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to assess changes in the geometric and electronic structures of monolayer WS{sub 2} upon adsorption of various gas molecules (H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO). The most stable configuration of the adsorbed molecules, the adsorption energy, and the degree of charge transfer between adsorbate and substrate were determined. All evaluated molecules were physisorbed on monolayer WS{sub 2} with a low degree of charge transfer and accept charge from the monolayer, except for NH{sub 3}, which is a charge donor. Band structure calculations showed that the valence and conduction bands of monolayer WS{sub 2} are not significantly altered upon adsorption of H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, and CO, whereas the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of O{sub 2}, NO, and NO{sub 2} are pinned around the Fermi-level when these molecules are adsorbed on monolayer WS{sub 2}. The phenomenon of Fermi-level pinning was discussed in light of the traditional and orbital mixing charge transfer theories. The impacts of the charge transfer mechanism on Fermi-level pinning were confirmed for the gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS{sub 2}. The proposed mechanism governing Fermi-level pinning is applicable to the systems of adsorbates on recently developed two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides.

  2. The role of multiparticle correlations and Cooper pairing in the formation of molecules in an ultracold gas of Fermi atoms with a negative scattering length

    SciTech Connect

    Babichenko, V. S. Kagan, Yu.

    2012-11-15

    The influence of multiparticle correlation effects and Cooper pairing in an ultracold Fermi gas with a negative scattering length on the formation rate of molecules is investigated. Cooper pairing is shown to cause the formation rate of molecules to increase, as distinct from the influence of Bose-Einstein condensation in a Bose gas on this rate. This trend is retained in the entire range of temperatures below the critical one.

  3. Light emission spectra of molecules in negative and positive back discharges in nitrogen with carbon dioxide mixture at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Tadeusz; Sobczyk, Arkadiusz Tomasz; Jaworek, Anatol

    2015-10-01

    Results of spectroscopic investigations and current-voltage characteristics of back discharge generated in point-plane electrode geometry with plate covered fly ash layer in a mixture of N2 + CO2 at atmospheric pressure, for positive and negative polarity of the discharge electrode are presented in this paper. Point-plane electrode configuration was chosen in these studies in order to simulate the physical processes occurring in electrostatic precipitator. Three forms of back discharge for both polarities were investigated: glow, streamers and low-current back-arc. Diatomic reactions and dissociation products of N2 and CO2 (OH, NO, CN), atoms from fly ash layer (N, Ti, Na), free radicals, molecules or ions, which have unpaired valence electrons, and other active species, e.g., N2 (in C,B,A-state), N 2 + (B) were identified in the discharges by the method of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The measurements shown that atomic and molecular optical emission spectral lines from back discharge depend on the forms of discharge and the discharge current. In normal electrical discharges, the emission spectra are dominated by gaseous components, but in the case of back discharge, atomic lines belonging to chemical compounds of fly ash were also recorded and identified.

  4. Charge-transfer photodissociation of adsorbed molecules via electron image states

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E. T.

    2008-01-28

    The 248 and 193 nm photodissociations of submonolayer quantities of CH{sub 3}Br and CH{sub 3}I adsorbed on thin layers of n-hexane indicate that the dissociation is caused by dissociative electron attachment from subvacuum level photoelectrons created in the copper substrate. The characteristics of this photodissociation-translation energy distributions and coverage dependences show that the dissociation is mediated by an image potential state which temporarily traps the photoelectrons near the n-hexane-vacuum interface, and then the charge transfers from this image state to the affinity level of a coadsorbed halomethane which then dissociates.

  5. Charge recombination mechanism to explain the negative capacitance in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie-Feng, Feng; Kun, Zhao; Hai-Tao, Dai; Shu-Guo, Wang; Xiao-Wei, Sun

    2016-03-01

    Negative capacitance (NC) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) has been confirmed experimentally. In this work, the recombination behavior of carriers in DSC with semiconductor interface as a carrier’s transport layer is explored theoretically in detail. Analytical results indicate that the recombination behavior of carriers could contribute to the NC of DSCs under small signal perturbation. Using this recombination capacitance we propose a novel equivalent circuit to completely explain the negative terminal capacitance. Further analysis based on the recombination complex impedance show that the NC is inversely proportional to frequency. In addition, analytical recombination resistance is composed by the alternating current (AC) recombination resistance (Rrac) and the direct current (DC) recombination resistance (Rrdc), which are caused by small-signal perturbation and the DC bias voltage, respectively. Both of two parts will decrease with increasing bias voltage. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204209 and 60876035) and the Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin City, China (Grant No. 13JCZDJC32800).

  6. Negative Ion MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Polyoxometalates (POMs): Mechanism of Singly Charged Anion Formation and Chemical Properties Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulicault, Jean E.; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B.

    2016-05-01

    MALDI-MS has been developed for the negative ion mode analysis of polyoxometalates (POMs). Matrix optimization was performed using a variety of matrix compounds. A first group of matrixes offers MALDI mass spectra containing abundant intact singly charged anionic adduct ions, as well as abundant in-source fragmentations at elevated laser powers. A relative ranking of the ability to induce POM fragmentation is found to be: DAN > CHCA > CNA > DIT> HABA > DCTB > IAA. Matrixes of a second group provide poorer quality MALDI mass spectra without observable fragments. Sample preparation, including the testing of salt additives, was performed to optimize signals for a model POM, POMc12, the core structure of which bears four negative charges. The matrix 9-cyanoanthracene (CNA) provided the best signals corresponding to singly charged intact POMc12 anions. Decompositions of these intact anionic species were examined in detail, and it was concluded that hydrogen radical-induced mechanisms were not prevalent, but rather that the observed prompt fragments originate from transferred energy derived from initial electronic excitation of the CNA matrix. Moreover, in obtained MALDI mass spectra, clear evidence of electron transfer to analyte POM species was found: a manifestation of the POMs ability to readily capture electrons. The affinity of polyanionic POMc12 toward a variety of cations was evaluated and the following affinity ranking was established: Fe3+ > Al3+ > Li+ > Ga3+ > Co2+ > Cr3+ > Cu2+ > [Mn2+, Mg2+] > [Na+, K+]. Thus, from the available cationic species, specific adducts are preferentially formed, and evidence is given that these higher affinity POM complexes are formed in the gas phase during the early stages of plume expansion.

  7. Associating a negatively charged GdDOTA-derivative to the Pittsburgh compound B for targeting Aβ amyloid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Martins, André F; Oliveira, Alexandre C; Morfin, Jean-François; Laurents, Douglas V; Tóth, Éva; Geraldes, Carlos F G C

    2016-03-01

    We have conjugated the tetraazacyclododecane-tetraacetate (DOTA) chelator to Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) forming negatively charged lanthanide complexes, Ln(L4), with targeting capabilities towards aggregated amyloid peptides. The amphiphilic Gd(L4) chelate undergoes micellar aggregation in aqueous solution, with a critical micellar concentration of 0.68 mM, lower than those for the neutral complexes of similar structure. A variable temperature (17)O NMR and NMRD study allowed the assessment of the water exchange rate, k ex (298) = 9.7 × 10(6) s(-1), about the double of GdDOTA, and for the description of the rotational dynamics for both the monomeric and the micellar forms of Gd(L4). With respect to the analogous neutral complexes, the negative charge induces a significant rigidity of the micelles formed, which is reflected by slower and more restricted local motion of the Gd(3+) centers as evidenced by higher relaxivities at 20-60 MHz. Surface Plasmon Resonance results indicate that the charge does not affect significantly the binding strength to Aβ1-40 [K d = 194 ± 11 μM for La(L4)], but it does enhance the affinity constant to human serum albumin [K a = 6530 ± 68 M(-1) for Gd(L4)], as compared to neutral counterparts. Protein-based NMR points to interaction of Gd(L4) with Aβ1-40 in the monomer state as well, in contrast to neutral complexes interacting only with the aggregated form. Circular dichroism spectroscopy monitored time- and temperature-dependent changes of the Aβ1-40 secondary structure, indicating that Gd(L4) stabilizes the random coil relative to the α-helix and β-sheet. TEM images confirm that the Gd(L4) complex reduces the formation of aggregated fibrils. PMID:26613605

  8. The Combining Sites of Anti-lipid A Antibodies Reveal a Widely Utilized Motif Specific for Negatively Charged Groups.

    PubMed

    Haji-Ghassemi, Omid; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Rodriguez, Teresa; Brade, Lore; Grimmecke, Hans-Dieter; Brade, Helmut; Evans, Stephen V

    2016-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharide dispersed in the blood by Gram-negative bacteria can be a potent inducer of septic shock. One research focus has been based on antibody sequestration of lipid A (the endotoxic principle of LPS); however, none have been successfully developed into a clinical treatment. Comparison of a panel of anti-lipid A antibodies reveals highly specific antibodies produced through distinct germ line precursors. The structures of antigen-binding fragments for two homologous mAbs specific for lipid A, S55-3 and S55-5, have been determined both in complex with lipid A disaccharide backbone and unliganded. These high resolution structures reveal a conserved positively charged pocket formed within the complementarity determining region H2 loops that binds the terminal phosphates of lipid A. Significantly, this motif occurs in unrelated antibodies where it mediates binding to negatively charged moieties through a range of epitopes, including phosphorylated peptides used in diagnostics and therapeutics. S55-3 and S55-5 have combining sites distinct from anti-lipid A antibodies previously described (as a result of their separate germ line origin), which are nevertheless complementary both in shape and charge to the antigen. S55-3 and S55-5 display similar avidity toward lipid A despite possessing a number of different amino acid residues in their combining sites. Binding of lipid A occurs independent of the acyl chains, although the GlcN-O6 attachment point for the core oligosaccharide is buried in the combining site, which explains their inability to recognize LPS. Despite their lack of therapeutic potential, the observed motif may have significant immunological implications as a tool for engineering recombinant antibodies. PMID:26933033

  9. Negative Ion MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Polyoxometalates (POMs): Mechanism of Singly Charged Anion Formation and Chemical Properties Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulicault, Jean E.; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B.

    2016-08-01

    MALDI-MS has been developed for the negative ion mode analysis of polyoxometalates (POMs). Matrix optimization was performed using a variety of matrix compounds. A first group of matrixes offers MALDI mass spectra containing abundant intact singly charged anionic adduct ions, as well as abundant in-source fragmentations at elevated laser powers. A relative ranking of the ability to induce POM fragmentation is found to be: DAN > CHCA > CNA > DIT> HABA > DCTB > IAA. Matrixes of a second group provide poorer quality MALDI mass spectra without observable fragments. Sample preparation, including the testing of salt additives, was performed to optimize signals for a model POM, POMc12, the core structure of which bears four negative charges. The matrix 9-cyanoanthracene (CNA) provided the best signals corresponding to singly charged intact POMc12 anions. Decompositions of these intact anionic species were examined in detail, and it was concluded that hydrogen radical-induced mechanisms were not prevalent, but rather that the observed prompt fragments originate from transferred energy derived from initial electronic excitation of the CNA matrix. Moreover, in obtained MALDI mass spectra, clear evidence of electron transfer to analyte POM species was found: a manifestation of the POMs ability to readily capture electrons. The affinity of polyanionic POMc12 toward a variety of cations was evaluated and the following affinity ranking was established: Fe3+ > Al3+ > Li+ > Ga3+ > Co2+ > Cr3+ > Cu2+ > [Mn2+, Mg2+] > [Na+, K+]. Thus, from the available cationic species, specific adducts are preferentially formed, and evidence is given that these higher affinity POM complexes are formed in the gas phase during the early stages of plume expansion.

  10. Negative Ion MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Polyoxometalates (POMs): Mechanism of Singly Charged Anion Formation and Chemical Properties Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Boulicault, Jean E; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B

    2016-08-01

    MALDI-MS has been developed for the negative ion mode analysis of polyoxometalates (POMs). Matrix optimization was performed using a variety of matrix compounds. A first group of matrixes offers MALDI mass spectra containing abundant intact singly charged anionic adduct ions, as well as abundant in-source fragmentations at elevated laser powers. A relative ranking of the ability to induce POM fragmentation is found to be: DAN > CHCA > CNA > DIT> HABA > DCTB > IAA. Matrixes of a second group provide poorer quality MALDI mass spectra without observable fragments. Sample preparation, including the testing of salt additives, was performed to optimize signals for a model POM, POMc12, the core structure of which bears four negative charges. The matrix 9-cyanoanthracene (CNA) provided the best signals corresponding to singly charged intact POMc12 anions. Decompositions of these intact anionic species were examined in detail, and it was concluded that hydrogen radical-induced mechanisms were not prevalent, but rather that the observed prompt fragments originate from transferred energy derived from initial electronic excitation of the CNA matrix. Moreover, in obtained MALDI mass spectra, clear evidence of electron transfer to analyte POM species was found: a manifestation of the POMs ability to readily capture electrons. The affinity of polyanionic POMc12 toward a variety of cations was evaluated and the following affinity ranking was established: Fe(3+) > Al(3+) > Li(+) > Ga(3+) > Co(2+) > Cr(3+) > Cu(2+) > [Mn(2+), Mg(2+)] > [Na(+), K(+)]. Thus, from the available cationic species, specific adducts are preferentially formed, and evidence is given that these higher affinity POM complexes are formed in the gas phase during the early stages of plume expansion. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27142457

  11. Relation between Nonlinear Optical Properties of Push-Pull Molecules and Metric of Charge Transfer Excitations.

    PubMed

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Zaleśny, Robert; Murugan, N Arul; Kongsted, Jacob; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Ågren, Hans

    2015-09-01

    We establish the relationships between the metric of charge transfer excitation (Δr) for the bright ππ* state and the two-photon absorption probability as well as the first hyperpolarizability for two families of push-pull π-conjugated systems. As previously demonstrated by Guido et al. (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2013, 9, 3118-3126), Δr is a measure for the average hole-electron distance upon excitation and can be used to discriminate between short- and long-range electronic excitations. We indicate two new benefits from using this metric for the analyses of nonlinear optical properties of push-pull systems. First, the two-photon absorption probability and the first hyperpolarizability are found to be interrelated through Δr; if β ∼ (Δr)(k), then roughly, δ(TPA) ∼ (Δr)(k+1). Second, a simple power relation between Δr and the molecular hyperpolarizabilities of push-pull systems offers the possibility of estimating properties for longer molecular chains without performing calculations of high-order response functions explicitly. We further demonstrate how to link the hyperpolarizabilities with the chain length of the push-pull π-conjugated systems through the metric of charge transfer. PMID:26575913

  12. Monte Carlo charge transport and photoemission from negative electron affinity GaAs photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkare, Siddharth; Dimitrov, Dimitre; Schaff, William; Cultrera, Luca; Bartnik, Adam; Liu, Xianghong; Sawyer, Eric; Esposito, Teresa; Bazarov, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    High quantum yield, low transverse energy spread, and prompt response time make GaAs activated to negative electron affinity an ideal candidate for a photocathode in high brightness photoinjectors. Even after decades of investigation, the exact mechanism of electron emission from GaAs is not well understood. Here, photoemission from such photocathodes is modeled using detailed Monte Carlo electron transport simulations. Simulations show a quantitative agreement with the experimental results for quantum efficiency, energy distributions of emitted electrons, and response time without the assumption of any ad hoc parameters. This agreement between simulation and experiment sheds light on the mechanism of electron emission and provides an opportunity to design novel semiconductor photocathodes with optimized performance.

  13. Charge transfer states appear in the π-conjugated pure hydrocarbon molecule on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Keiichirou; Suda, Yosuke; Yanagisawa, Susumu; Hosokai, Takuya; Kato, Kengo; Yamaguchi, Takuma; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Nobuo; Kera, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    We report on the results of experimental and theoretical studies on the electronic structure of gas-phase diindenoperylene (DIP) and DIP-monolayer (ML) on Cu(111). Vapor-phase ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) was realized for 11.3 mg of DIP, giving reference orbital energies of isolated DIP, and UPS and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of DIP-ML/graphite were performed to obtain DIP-ML electronic states at a weak interfacial interaction. Furthermore, first-principles calculation clearly demonstrates the interfacial rearrangement. These results provide evidence that the rearrangement of orbital energies, which is realized in HOMO-LUMO and HOMO-HOMO-1 gaps, brings partially occupied LUMO through the surface-induced aromatic stabilization of DIP, a pure hydrocarbon molecule, on Cu(111).

  14. Negative Oxygen Ion Formation in a Pulsed Inductively RF Excited Argon-Oxygen Discharge and the Influence of Highly Excited Oxygen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsch, H.-M.; Manthey, C.; Döbele, H.-F.

    2003-10-01

    The temporal behavior of negative oxygen ions oxygen / argon mixtures was investigated in the afterglow of a pulsed inductively excited modified GEC reactor. The objective of this investigation is an improved understanding of the production reactions of the negative ions and the loss processes of negative ions during the plasma decay phase. Collisions of O-minus ions with O atoms and metastable oxygen molecules lead to considerable electron production in the afterglow. This late supply of electrons entails a delayed formation of a so-called ion-ion plasma. Discharges with admixtures of argon (up to 8:2 argon : oxygen) are also strongly electronegative. An increase of the absolute O-minus density is observed with increasing argon fraction. At low pressures and high contents of argon it is necessary to consider an additional production reaction channel for the negative ions in order to explain the measured increase of the negative ion density. Appearance potential mass spectroscopy measurements show an increase of highly excited oxygen molecules with increasing argon fraction. It is, therefore, likely that additional negative ions are generated by dissociative attachment of highly excited metastable oxygen molecules [1]. [1] D. Hayashi and K. Kadota, J. Appl. Phys. 83 (1998) 697 This project is funded by the Bundesminister für Bildung und Forschung BMBF (FKZ 13N8052).

  15. Interfacial charge transfer between CdTe quantum dots and Gram negative vs. Gram positive bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Dumas, E.; Gao, C.; Suffern, D.; Bradforth, S. E.; Dimitrejevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L.; McGill Univ.; Univ. of Southern California

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative toxicity of semiconductor and metal nanomaterials to cells has been well established. However, it may result from many different mechanisms, some requiring direct cell contact and others resulting from the diffusion of reactive species in solution. Published results are contradictory due to differences in particle preparation, bacterial strain, and experimental conditions. It has been recently found that C{sub 60} nanoparticles can cause direct oxidative damage to bacterial proteins and membranes, including causing a loss of cell membrane potential (depolarization). However, this did not correlate with toxicity. In this study we perform a similar analysis using fluorescent CdTe quantum dots, adapting our tools to make use of the particles fluorescence. We find that two Gram positive strains show direct electron transfer to CdTe, resulting in changes in CdTe fluorescence lifetimes. These two strains also show changes in membrane potential upon nanoparticle binding. Two Gram negative strains do not show these effects - nevertheless, they are over 10-fold more sensitive to CdTe than the Gram positives. We find subtoxic levels of Cd{sup 2+} release from the particles upon irradiation of the particles, but significant production of hydroxyl radicals, suggesting that the latter is a major source of toxicity. These results help establish mechanisms of toxicity and also provide caveats for use of certain reporter dyes with fluorescent nanoparticles which will be of use to anyone performing these assays. The findings also suggest future avenues of inquiry into electron transfer processes between nanomaterials and bacteria.

  16. One-step solvothermal synthesis of highly water-soluble, negatively charged superparamagnetic Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jining; Ran, Xinze; Shi, Chunmeng; Cheng, Humin; Cheng, Tianmin; Su, Yongping

    2013-07-01

    Highly charged hydrophilic superparamagnetic Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters with an average diameter of 195 nm have been successfully synthesized using a modified one-step solvothermal method. Anionic polyelectrolyte poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium salt containing both sulfonate and carboxylate groups was used as the stabilizer. The clusters synthesized under different experimental conditions were characterized with transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering; it was found that the size distribution and water dispersity were significantly affected by the concentration of the polyelectrolyte stabilizer and iron sources in the reaction mixtures. A possible mechanism involving novel gel-like large molecular networks that confined the nucleation and aggregation process was proposed and discussed. The colloidal nanocrystal clusters remained negatively charged in the experimental pH ranges from 2 to 11, and also showed high colloidal stability in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and ethanol. These highly colloidal stable superparamagnetic Fe3O4 clusters could find potential applications in bioseparation, targeted drug delivery, and photonics.Highly charged hydrophilic superparamagnetic Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters with an average diameter of 195 nm have been successfully synthesized using a modified one-step solvothermal method. Anionic polyelectrolyte poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium salt containing both sulfonate and carboxylate groups was used as the stabilizer. The clusters synthesized under different experimental conditions were characterized with transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering; it was found that the size distribution and water dispersity were significantly affected by the concentration of the polyelectrolyte stabilizer and iron sources in the reaction mixtures. A possible mechanism involving novel gel-like large molecular networks that confined the nucleation and

  17. MoS2/Ag nanohybrid: A novel matrix with synergistic effect for small molecule drugs analysis by negative-ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaju; Deng, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaohui; Sun, Liang; Li, Hui; Cheng, Quan; Xi, Kai; Xu, Danke

    2016-09-21

    This paper reports a facile synthesis of molybdenum disulfide nanosheets/silver nanoparticles (MoS2/Ag) hybrid and its use as an effective matrix in negative ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The nanohybrid exerts a strong synergistic effect, leading to high performance detection of small molecule analytes including amino acids, peptides, fatty acids and drugs. The enhancement of laser desorption/ionization (LDI) efficiency is largely attributed to the high surface roughness and large surface area for analyte adsorption, better dispersibility, increased thermal conductivity and enhanced UV energy absorption as compared to pure MoS2. Moreover, both Ag nanoparticles and the edge of the MoS2 layers function as deprotonation sites for proton capture, facilitating the charging process in negative ion mode and promoting formation of negative ions. As a result, the MoS2/Ag nanohybrid proves to be a highly attractive matrix in MALDI-TOF MS, with desired features such as high desorption/ionization efficiency, low fragmentation interference, high salt tolerance, and no sweet-spots for mass signal. These characteristic properties allowed for simultaneous analysis of eight different drugs and quantification of acetylsalicylic acid in the spiked human serum. This work demonstrates for the first time the fabrication and application of a novel MoS2/Ag hybrid, and provides a new platform for use in the rapid and high throughput analysis of small molecules by mass spectrometry. PMID:27590549

  18. Investigation of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecule production in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from cooling tower water and biofilm samples.

    PubMed

    Haslan, Ezgi; Kimiran-Erdem, Ayten

    2013-09-01

    In this study, 99 Gram-negative rod bacteria were isolated from cooling tower water, and biofilm samples were examined for cell-to-cell signaling systems, N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecule types, and biofilm formation capacity. Four of 39 (10 %) strains isolated from water samples and 14 of 60 (23 %) strains isolated from biofilm samples were found to be producing a variety of AHL signal molecules. It was determined that the AHL signal molecule production ability and the biofilm formation capacity of sessile bacteria is higher than planktonic bacteria, and there was a statistically significant difference between the AHL signal molecule production of these two groups (p < 0.05). In addition, it was found that bacteria belonging to the same species isolated from cooling tower water and biofilm samples produced different types of AHL signal molecules and that there were different types of AHL signal molecules in an AHL extract of bacteria. In the present study, it was observed that different isolates of the same strains did not produce the same AHLs or did not produce AHL molecules, and bacteria known as AHL producers did not produce AHL. These findings suggest that detection of signal molecules in bacteria isolated from cooling towers may contribute to prevention of biofilm formation, elimination of communication among bacteria in water systems, and blockage of quorum-sensing controlled virulence of these bacteria. PMID:23250628

  19. Using light-switching molecules to modulate charge mobility in a quantum dot array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Iek-Heng; Trinastic, Jonathan; Wang, Lin-Wang; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the electron hopping in a two-CdSe quantum dot (QD) system linked by an azobenzene-derived light-switching molecule. This system can be considered as a prototype of a QD supercrystal. Following the computational strategies given in our recent work [I.-H. Chu et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 115, 21409 (2011), 10.1021/jp206526s], we have investigated the effects of molecular attachment, molecular isomer (trans and cis), and QD size on the electron hopping rate using Marcus theory. Our results indicate that molecular attachment has a large impact on the system for both isomers. In the most energetically favorable attachment, the cis isomer provides significantly greater coupling between the two QDs and hence the electron hopping rate is greater compared to the trans isomer. As a result, the carrier mobility of the QD array in the low carrier density, weak external electric-field regime is several orders of magnitude higher in the cis compared to the trans configuration. This demonstration of mobility modulation using QDs and azobenzene could lead to an alternative type of switching device.

  20. Cell Type-Specific Activation of AKT and ERK Signaling Pathways by Small Negatively-Charged Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Jens; Kolch, Walter; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with living organisms has become a focus of public and scientific debate due to their potential wide applications in biomedicine, but also because of unwanted side effects. Here, we show that superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs) with different surface coatings can differentially affect signal transduction pathways. Using isogenic pairs of breast and colon derived cell lines we found that the stimulation of ERK and AKT signaling pathways by SPIONs is selectively dependent on the cell type and SPION type. In general, cells with Ras mutations respond better than their non-mutant counterparts. Small negatively charged SPIONs (snSPIONs) activated ERK to a similar extent as epidermal growth factor (EGF), and used the same upstream signaling components including activation of the EGF receptor. Importantly, snSPIONs stimulated the proliferation of Ras transformed breast epithelial cells as efficiently as EGF suggesting that NPs can mimic physiological growth factors. PMID:23162692

  1. Excellent passivation of highly doped p-type Si surfaces by the negative-charge-dielectric Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoex, B.; Schmidt, J.; Bock, R.; Altermatt, P. P.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2007-09-01

    From lifetime measurements, including a direct experimental comparison with thermal SiO2, a-Si :H, and as-deposited a-SiNx:H, it is demonstrated that Al2O3 provides an excellent level of surface passivation on highly B-doped c-Si with doping concentrations around 1019cm-3. The Al2O3 films, synthesized by plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition and with a high fixed negative charge density, limit the emitter saturation current density of B-diffused p +-emitters to ˜10 and ˜30fA/cm2 on >100 and 54Ω/sq sheet resistance p+-emitters, respectively. These results demonstrate that highly doped p-type Si surfaces can be passivated as effectively as highly doped n-type surfaces.

  2. Donor bound or negatively charged excitons in thin CdTe/Cd1-xMnxTe quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganotto, N.; Siviniant, J.; Coquillat, D.; Scalbert, D.; Lascaray, J.-P.; Kavokin, A. V.

    1998-08-01

    Magnetophotoluminescence spectroscopy of unintentionally doped thin CdTe/(Cd,Mn)Te single and double quantum wells (QW's) revealed a pronounced excitonic transition that can be associated with either an exciton bound to a neutral donor (D0X) or a negatively charged exciton (X-). Comparative experimental study and theoretical analysis of this transition in quantum wells of different thicknesses allowed us to attribute it to the D0X complex in a single QW and to the X- state in the double QW. A record X- binding energy of 3.7 meV has been detected. The double QW structure was shown to be favorable for the formation of X- in the wide well due to the efficient interwell electron tunneling.

  3. Cell Type-Specific Activation of AKT and ERK Signaling Pathways by Small Negatively-Charged Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Jens; Kolch, Walter; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2012-11-01

    The interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with living organisms has become a focus of public and scientific debate due to their potential wide applications in biomedicine, but also because of unwanted side effects. Here, we show that superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs) with different surface coatings can differentially affect signal transduction pathways. Using isogenic pairs of breast and colon derived cell lines we found that the stimulation of ERK and AKT signaling pathways by SPIONs is selectively dependent on the cell type and SPION type. In general, cells with Ras mutations respond better than their non-mutant counterparts. Small negatively charged SPIONs (snSPIONs) activated ERK to a similar extent as epidermal growth factor (EGF), and used the same upstream signaling components including activation of the EGF receptor. Importantly, snSPIONs stimulated the proliferation of Ras transformed breast epithelial cells as efficiently as EGF suggesting that NPs can mimic physiological growth factors.

  4. Observation of relaxation time of surface charge limit for InGaN photocathodes with negative electron affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Daiki; Nishitani, Tomohiro; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    A thin p-type InGaN with a negative electron affinity (NEA) surface was used to measure the relaxation time of a surface charge limit (SCL) by irradiating rectangular laser beam pulses at changing time interval. The p-type InGaN film was grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy and the NEA activation was performed after the sample was heat cleaned. 13 nC per pulse with 10 ms width was obtained from the InGaN photocathode. The current decreased exponentially from the beginning of the pulse. The initial current value after the laser irradiation decreased with the time interval. As a result, the SCL relaxation time was estimated through the InGaN photocathode measurements at 100 ms.

  5. Negatively-charged residues in the polar carboxy-terminal region in FSP27 are indispensable for expanding lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Tamori, Yoshikazu; Tateya, Sanshiro; Ijuin, Takeshi; Nishimoto, Yuki; Nakajima, Shinsuke; Ogawa, Wataru

    2016-03-01

    FSP27 has an important role in large lipid droplet (LD) formation because it exchanges lipids at the contact site between LDs. In the present study, we clarify that the amino-terminal domain of FSP27 (amino acids 1-130) is dispensable for LD enlargement, although it accelerates LD growth. LD expansion depends on the carboxy-terminal domain of FSP27 (amino acids 131-239). Especially, the negative charge of the acidic residues (D215, E218, E219 and E220) in the polar carboxy-terminal region (amino acids 202-239) is essential for the enlargement of LD. We propose that the carboxy-terminal domain of FSP27 has a crucial role in LD expansion, whereas the amino-terminal domain only has a supportive role. PMID:26921608

  6. Interaction of the Tim44 C-terminal domain with negatively charged phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Marom, Milit; Safonov, Roman; Amram, Shay; Avneon, Yoav; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem; Zohary, Keren; Azem, Abdussalam; Tsfadia, Yossi

    2009-12-01

    The translocation of proteins from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix is mediated by the coordinated action of the TOM complex in the outer membrane, as well as the TIM23 complex and its associated protein import motor in the inner membrane. The focus of this work is the peripheral inner membrane protein Tim44. Tim44 is a vital component of the mitochondrial protein translocation motor that anchors components of the motor to the TIM23 complex. For this purpose, Tim44 associates with the import channel by direct interaction with the Tim23 protein. Additionally, it was shown in vitro that Tim44 associates with acidic model membranes, in particular those containing cardiolipin. The latter interaction was shown to be mediated by the carboxy-terminal domain of Tim44 [Weiss, C., et al. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 96, 8890-8894]. The aim of this study was to determine the precise recognition site for negative lipids in the C-terminal domain of Tim44. In particular, we wanted to examine the recently suggested hypothesis that acidic phospholipids associate with Tim44 via a hydrophobic cavity that is observed in the high-resolution structure of the C-terminal domain of the protein [Josyula, R., et al. (2006) J. Mol. Biol. 359, 798-804]. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that (i) the hydrophobic tail of lipids may interact with Tim44 via the latter's hydrophobic cavity and (ii) a region, located in the N-terminal alpha-helix of the C-terminal domain (helices A1 and A2), may serve as a membrane attachment site. To validate this assumption, N-terminal truncations of yeast Tim44 were examined for their ability to bind cardiolipin-containing phospholipid vesicles. The results indicate that removal of the N-terminal alpha-helix (helix A1) abolishes the capacity of Tim44 to associate with cardiolipin-containing liposomes. We suggest that helices A1 and A2, in Tim44, jointly promote the association of the protein with acidic phospholipids. PMID:19863062

  7. Antitumor potential of a synthetic interferon-alpha/PLGF-2 positive charge peptide hybrid molecule in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hongmei; Chen, Naifei; Guo, Rui; Wang, Hong; Li, Wei; Wang, Guanjun; Cui, Jiuwei; Jin, Haofan; Hu, Ji-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most aggressive malignant disease, ranking as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in the United States. Interferon alpha (IFNα) has been used to treat pancreatic cancer, but its clinical application has been significantly hindered due to the low antitumor activity. We used a “cDNA in-frame fragment library” screening approach to identify short peptides that potentiate the antitumor activity of interferons. A short positively charged peptide derived from the C-terminus of placental growth factor-2 (PLGF-2) was selected to enhance the activity of IFNα. For this, we constructed a synthetic interferon hybrid molecule (SIFα) by fusing the positively charged PLGF-2 peptide to the C-terminus of the human IFNα. Using human pancreatic cell lines (ASPC and CFPAC1) as a model system, we found that SIFα exhibited a significantly higher activity than did the wild-type IFNα in inhibiting the tumor cell growth. The enhanced activity of the synthetic SIFα was associated with the activation of interferon pathway target genes and the increased binding of cell membrane receptor. This study demonstrates the potential of a synthetic SIFα as a novel antitumor agent. PMID:26584517

  8. Manipulating the dipole layer of polar organic molecules on metal surfaces via different charge-transfer channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meng-Kai; Nakayama, Yasuo; Zhuang, Ying-Jie; Wang, Chin-Yung; Pi, Tun-Wen; Ishii, Hisao; Tang, S.-J.

    The key properties of organic films such as energy level alignment (ELA), work functions, and injection barriers are closely linked to this dipole layer. Using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we systemically investigate the coverage-dependent work functions and spectra line shapes of occupied molecular orbital states of a polar molecule, chloroaluminium phthalocyanine (ClAlPc), grown on Ag(111) to show that the orientations of the first ClAlPc layer can be manipulated via the molecule deposition rate and post annealing, causing ELA at organic-metal interface to differ for about 0.3 eV between Cl-up and Cl-down configuration. Moreover, by comparing the experimental results with the calculations based on both gas-phase model and realistic model of ClAlPc on Ag(111) , we evidence that the different orientations of ClAlPc dipole layers lead to different charge-transfer channels between ClAlPc and Ag, a key factor that controls the ELA at organic-metal interface.

  9. Integrating high electrical conductivity and photocatalytic activity in cotton fabric by cationizing for enriched coating of negatively charged graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Sahito, Iftikhar Ali; Sun, Kyung Chul; Arbab, Alvira Ayoub; Qadir, Muhammad Bilal; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2015-10-01

    Electroconductive textiles have attended tremendous focus recently and researchers are making efforts to increase conductivity of e-textiles, in order to increase the use of such flexible and low cost textile materials. In this study, surface conductivity and photo catalytic activity of standard cotton fabric (SCF) was enhanced by modifying its surface charge, from negative to positive, using Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) as a cationic agent, to convert it into cationised cotton fabric (CCF). Then, both types of fabrics were dip coated with a simple dip and dry technique for the adsorption of negatively charged graphene oxide (GO) sheets onto its surface. This resulted in 67.74% higher loading amount of GO on the CCF making self-assembly. Finally, this coating was chemically converted by vapor reduction using hydrazine hydrate to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) for restoration of a high electrical conductivity at the fabric surface. Our results revealed that with such high loading of GO, the surface resistance of CCF was only 40Ω/sq as compared to 510Ω/sq of the SCF and a 66% higher photo catalytic activity was also achieved through cationization for improved GO coating. Graphene coated SCF and CCF were characterized using FE-SEM, FTIR, Raman, UV-vis, WAXD, EDX and XPS spectroscopy to ascertain successful reduction of GO to rGO. The effect of BSA treatment on adsorption of cotton fabric was studied using drop shape analyzer to measure contact angle and for thermal and mechanical resistance, the fabric was tested for TGA and tensile strength, respectively. rGO coated fabric also showed slightly improved thermal stability yet a minor loss of strength was observed. The high flexibility, photocatalytic activity and excellent conductivity of this fabric suggests that it can be used as an electrode material for various applications. PMID:26076630

  10. Exposure to negatively charged-particle dominant air-conditions on human lymphocytes in vitro activates immunological responses.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Mase, Akinori; Kotani, Muneo; Ami, Kazuhisa; Maeda, Megumi; Shirahama, Takashi; Lee, Suni; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Yoshitome, Kei; Otsuki, Takemi

    2015-12-01

    Indoor air-conditions may play an important role in human health. Investigation of house conditions that promote health revealed that negatively charged-particle dominant indoor air-conditions (NAC) induced immune stimulation. NAC was established using fine charcoal powder on walls and ceilings and utilizing forced negatively charged particles (approximate diameter: 20 nm) dominant in indoor air-conditions created by applying an electric voltage (72 V) between the backside of the walls and the ground. We reported previously that these conditions induced a slight and significant increase of interleukin-2 during 2.5 h stay, and an increase of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity, when examining human subjects after a two-week night stay under these conditions. In the present study, we investigated whether exposure to NAC in vitro affects immune conditions. Although the concentrations of particles were different, an incubator for cell culture with NAC was set and cellular compositions and functions of various freshly isolated human lymphocytes derived from healthy donors were assayed in the NAC incubator and compared with those of cultures in a standard (STD) incubator. Results showed that NAC cultivation caused an increase of CD25 and PD-1 expressing cells in the CD4 positive fraction, enhancement of NK cell cytotoxicity, production of interferon-y (IFNγ), and slight enhancement of regulatory T cell function. In addition, the formula designated as the "immune-index" clearly differed between STD and NAC culture conditions. Thus, NAC conditions may promote human health through slight activation of the immune system against cancer cells and virus infection as shown by this in vitro study and our previously reported human studies. PMID:26213096

  11. Quantum effects in electron emission from and accretion on negatively charged spherical particles in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.; Misra, Shikha

    2012-07-15

    The authors have investigated the electron emissions (thermionic, electric field, photoelectric, and light induced field) from and electron accretion on a charged particle in a complex plasma, on the basis of a three region electrical potential model in and around a charged spherical particle in a complex plasma, characterized by Debye shielding. A continuous variation of the transmission coefficient across the surface of a particle (corresponding to emission and accretion) with the radial electron energy {epsilon}{sub r} has been obtained. It is seen that the numerical values of the emission and accretion transmission coefficients [D({epsilon}{sub r})] are almost the same. This is the necessary and sufficient condition for the validity of Saha's equation for thermal equilibrium of a system of dust and electrons. This is in contrast to the earlier condition, which limited the range of validity of Saha's equation to the range of the applicability of Born approximation. It is seen that D({epsilon}{sub r}) increases with increasing {epsilon}{sub r}, increasing negative electric potential on the surface, decreasing radius, and deceasing Debye length. The electron currents, corresponding to thermionic, electric field, photoelectric and light induced field emission increase with increasing surface potential; this fact may have significant repercussions in complex plasma kinetics. Since numerically D({epsilon}{sub r}) is significantly different from unity in the range of {epsilon}{sub r} of interest, it is necessary to take into account the D({epsilon}{sub r})-{epsilon}{sub r} dependence in complex plasma theory.

  12. Comparison of positively and negatively charged achiral co-monomers added to cyclodextrin monolith: improved chiral separations in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Shamsi, Shahab A

    2014-10-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) and their derivatives have been one of the most popular and successful chiral additives used in electrokinetic chromatography because of the presence of multiple chiral centers, which leads to multiple chiral interactions. However, there has been relatively less published work on the use of CDs as monolithic media for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The goal of this study was to show how the addition of achiral co-monomer to a polymerizable CD such as glycidyl methacrylate β-cyclodextrin (GMA/β-CD) can affect the enantioselective separations in monolithic CEC. To achieve this goal, polymeric monoliths columns were prepared by co-polymerizing GMA/β-CD with cationic or anionic achiral co-monomers [(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) and vinyl benzyltrimethyl-ammonium (VBTA)] in the presence of conventional crosslinker (ethylene dimethacrylate) and ternary porogen system including butanediol, propanol and water. A total of 34 negatively charged compounds, 30 positively charged compounds and 33 neutral compounds were screened to compare the enantioresolution capability on the GMA/β-CD, GMA/β-CD-VBTA and GMA/β-CD-AMPS monolithic columns. PMID:24108813

  13. Negatively charged silver nanoparticles cause retinal vascular permeability by activating plasma contact system and disrupting adherens junction.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan-Min; Zhao, Xing-Chen; Clermont, Allen C; Zhou, Qun-Fang; Liu, Qian; Feener, Edward P; Yan, Bing; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively used as antibacterial component in numerous healthcare, biomedical and consumer products. Therefore, their adverse effects to biological systems have become a major concern. AgNPs have been shown to be absorbed into circulation and redistributed into various organs. It is thus of great importance to understand how these nanoparticles affect vascular permeability and uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms. A negatively charged mecaptoundeonic acid-capped silver nanoparticle (MUA@AgNP) was investigated in this work. Ex vivo experiments in mouse plasma revealed that MUA@AgNPs caused plasma prekallikrein cleavage, while positively charged or neutral AgNPs, as well as Ag ions had no effect. In vitro tests revealed that MUA@AgNPs activated the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) by triggering Hageman factor autoactivation. By using specific inhibitors aprotinin and HOE 140, we demonstrated that KKS activation caused the release of bradykinin, which activated B2 receptors and induced the shedding of adherens junction protein, VE-cadherin. These biological perturbations eventually resulted in endothelial paracellular permeability in mouse retina after intravitreal injection of MUA@AgNPs. The findings from this work provided key insights for toxicity modulation and biomedical applications of AgNPs. PMID:26399585

  14. Experimental and theoretical characterization of the 3,5-didehydrobenzoate anion: a negatively charged meta-benzyne.

    PubMed

    Price, Jason M; Nizzi, Katrina Emilia; Campbell, J Larry; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I; Seierstad, Mark; Cramer, Christopher J

    2003-01-01

    A negatively charged analogue of meta-benzyne, 3,5-didehydrobenzoate, was synthesized in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, and its reactivity was compared to that of the same ion generated previously in a flowing afterglow apparatus and to its positively charged cousin, N-(3,5-didehydrophenyl)-3-fluoropyridinium. 3,5-Didehydrobenzoate was found to react as a nucleophile with electrophilic reagents. In contrast, N-(3,5-didehydrophenyl)-3-fluoropyridinium does not react with the same electrophilic reagents but reacts instead with nucleophilic reagents. Neither ion is able to abstract hydrogen atoms from typical hydrogen atom donors. The absence of any radical reactivity for these meta-benzynes is consistent with predictions that radical reactions of singlet biradicals should be hindered as compared to their monoradical counterparts. High-level calculations predict that the carboxylate moiety does not significantly perturb the singlet-triplet splitting of 3,5-didehydrobenzoate relative to the parent meta-benzyne. PMID:12515514

  15. Estimating collision cross sections of negatively charged N-glycans using traveling wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Johanna; Struwe, Weston B; Scarff, Charlotte A; Scrivens, James H; Harvey, David J; Pagel, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications occurring in proteins. A detailed structural characterization of the involved carbohydrates, however, is still one of the greatest challenges in modern glycoproteomics, since multiple regio- and stereoisomers with an identical monosaccharide composition may exist. Recently, ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), a technique in which ions are separated according to their mass, charge, and shape, has evolved as a promising technique for the separation and structural analysis of complex carbohydrates. This growing interest is based on the fact that the measured drift times can be converted into collision cross sections (CCSs), which can be compared, implemented into databases, and used as additional search criteria for structural identification. However, most of the currently used commercial IM-MS instruments utilize a nonuniform traveling wave field to propel the ions through the IM cell. As a result, CCS measurements cannot be performed directly and require calibration. Here, we present a calibration data set consisting of over 500 reference CCSs for negatively charged N-glycans and their fragments. Moreover, we show that dextran, already widely used as a calibrant in high performance liquid chromatography, is also a suitable calibrant for CCS estimations. Our data also indicate that a considerably increased error has to be taken into account when reference CCSs acquired in a different drift gas are used for calibration. PMID:25268221

  16. Macrocyclic lanthanide complexes as artificial nucleases and ribonucleases: effects of pH, metal ionic radii, number of coordinated water molecules, charge, and concentrations of the metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chang, C Allen; Wu, Bo Hong; Kuan, Bu Yuan

    2005-09-19

    We have been interested in the design, synthesis, and characterization of artificial nucleases and ribonucleases by employing macrocyclic lanthanide complexes because their high thermodynamic stability, low kinetic lability, high coordination number, and charge density (Lewis acidity) allow more design flexibility and stability. In this paper, we report the study of the use of the europium(III) complex, EuDO2A+ (DO2A is 1,7-dicarboxymethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) and other lanthanide complexes (i.e., LaDO2A+, YbDO2A+, EuK21DA+, EuEDDA+, and EuHEDTA where K21DA is 1,7-diaza-4,10,13-trioxacyclopentadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid, EDDA is ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid, and HEDTA is N-hydroxyethyl-ethylenediamine-N,N',N'-triacetic acid), as potential catalysts for the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond of BNPP (sodium bis(4-nitrophenyl)-phosphate). For the pH range 7.0-11.0 studied, EuDO2A+ promotes BNPP hydrolysis with the quickest rates among LaDO2A+, EuDO2A+, and YbDO2A+. This indicates that charge density is not the only factor affecting the reaction rates. Among the four complexes, EuDO2A+, EuK21DA+, EuEDDA+, and EuHEDTA, with their respective number of inner-sphere coordinated water molecules three, two, five, and three, EuEDDA+, with the greatest number of inner-sphere coordinated water molecules and a positive charge, promotes BNPP hydrolysis more efficiently at pH below 8.4, and the observed rate trend is EuEDDA+ > EuDO2A+ > EuK21DA+ > EuHEDTA. At pH > 8.4, the EuEDDA+ solution becomes misty and precipitates form. At pH 11.0, the hydrolysis rate of BNPP in the presence of EuDO2A+ is 100 times faster than that of EuHEDTA, presumably because the positively charged EuDO2A+ is more favorable for binding with the negatively charged phosphodiester compounds. The logarithmic hydrolysis constants (pKh) were determined, and are reported in the parentheses, by fitting the kinetic k(obs) data vs pH for EuDO2A+ (8.4), LaDO2A+ (8.4), YbDO2A+ (9.4), EuK21DA+ (7

  17. Single-molecule conductance of a chemically modified, π-extended tetrathiafulvalene and its charge-transfer complex with F4TCNQ.

    PubMed

    García, Raúl; Herranz, M Ángeles; Leary, Edmund; González, M Teresa; Bollinger, Gabino Rubio; Bürkle, Marius; Zotti, Linda A; Asai, Yoshihiro; Pauly, Fabian; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Agraït, Nicolás; Martín, Nazario

    2015-01-01

    We describe the synthesis and single-molecule electrical transport properties of a molecular wire containing a π-extended tetrathiafulvalene (exTTF) group and its charge-transfer complex with F4TCNQ. We form single-molecule junctions using the in situ break junction technique using a homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope with a range of conductance between 10 G0 down to 10(-7) G0. Within this range we do not observe a clear conductance signature of the neutral parent molecule, suggesting either that its conductance is too low or that it does not form a stable junction. Conversely, we do find a clear conductance signature in the experiments carried out on the charge-transfer complex. Due to the fact we expected this species to have a higher conductance than the neutral molecule, we believe this supports the idea that the conductance of the neutral molecule is very low, below our measurement sensitivity. This idea is further supported by theoretical calculations. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported single-molecule conductance measurements on a molecular charge-transfer species. PMID:26199662

  18. Single-molecule conductance of a chemically modified, π-extended tetrathiafulvalene and its charge-transfer complex with F4TCNQ

    PubMed Central

    García, Raúl; Herranz, M Ángeles; González, M Teresa; Bollinger, Gabino Rubio; Bürkle, Marius; Zotti, Linda A; Asai, Yoshihiro; Pauly, Fabian; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Agraït, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Summary We describe the synthesis and single-molecule electrical transport properties of a molecular wire containing a π-extended tetrathiafulvalene (exTTF) group and its charge-transfer complex with F4TCNQ. We form single-molecule junctions using the in situ break junction technique using a homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope with a range of conductance between 10 G0 down to 10−7 G0. Within this range we do not observe a clear conductance signature of the neutral parent molecule, suggesting either that its conductance is too low or that it does not form a stable junction. Conversely, we do find a clear conductance signature in the experiments carried out on the charge-transfer complex. Due to the fact we expected this species to have a higher conductance than the neutral molecule, we believe this supports the idea that the conductance of the neutral molecule is very low, below our measurement sensitivity. This idea is further supported by theoretical calculations. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported single-molecule conductance measurements on a molecular charge-transfer species. PMID:26199662

  19. Gate-induced switching and negative differential resistance in a single-molecule transistor: emergence of fixed and shifting states with molecular length.

    PubMed

    Farajian, A A; Belosludov, R V; Mizuseki, H; Kawazoe, Y; Hashizume, T; Yakobson, B I

    2007-07-14

    The quantum transport of a gated polythiophene nanodevice is analyzed using density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function approach. For this typical molecular field effect transistor, we prove the existence of two main features of electronic components, i.e., negative differential resistance and good switching. Ab initio based explanations of these features are provided by distinguishing fixed and shifting conducting states, which are shown to arise from the interface and functional molecule, respectively. The results show that proper functional molecules can be used in conjunction with metallic electrodes to achieve basic electronics functionality at molecular length scales. PMID:17640145

  20. Non-adiabatic processes in the charge transfer reaction of O2 molecules with potassium surfaces without dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krix, David; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2014-08-01

    Thin potassium films grown on Si(001) substrates are used to measure internal chemicurrents and the external emission of exoelectrons simultaneously during adsorption of molecular oxygen on K surfaces at 120 K. The experiments clarify the dynamics of electronic excitations at a simple metal with a narrow valence band. X-ray photoemission reveals that for exposures below 5 L almost exclusively peroxide K2O2 is formed, i.e., no dissociation of the molecule occurs during interaction. Still a significant chemicurrent and a delayed exoelectron emission are detected due to a rapid injection of unoccupied molecular levels below the Fermi level. Since the valence band width of potassium is approximately equal to the potassium work function (2.4 eV) the underlying mechanism of exoemission is an Auger relaxation whereas chemicurrents are detected after resonant charge transfer from the metal valence band into the injected level. The change of the chemicurrent and exoemission efficiencies with oxygen coverage can be deduced from the kinetics of the reaction and the recorded internal and external emission currents traces. It is shown that the non-adiabaticity of the reaction increases with coverage due to a reduction of the electronic density of states at the surface while the work function does not vary significantly. Therefore, the peroxide formation is one of the first reaction systems which exhibits varying non-adiabaticity and efficiencies during the reaction. Non-adiabatic calculations based on model Hamiltonians and density functional theory support the picture of chemicurrent generation and explain the rapid injection of hot hole states by an intramolecular motion, i.e., the expansion of the oxygen molecule on the timescale of a quarter of a vibrational period.

  1. Non-adiabatic processes in the charge transfer reaction of O2 molecules with potassium surfaces without dissociation.

    PubMed

    Krix, David; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2014-08-21

    Thin potassium films grown on Si(001) substrates are used to measure internal chemicurrents and the external emission of exoelectrons simultaneously during adsorption of molecular oxygen on K surfaces at 120 K. The experiments clarify the dynamics of electronic excitations at a simple metal with a narrow valence band. X-ray photoemission reveals that for exposures below 5 L almost exclusively peroxide K2O2 is formed, i.e., no dissociation of the molecule occurs during interaction. Still a significant chemicurrent and a delayed exoelectron emission are detected due to a rapid injection of unoccupied molecular levels below the Fermi level. Since the valence band width of potassium is approximately equal to the potassium work function (2.4 eV) the underlying mechanism of exoemission is an Auger relaxation whereas chemicurrents are detected after resonant charge transfer from the metal valence band into the injected level. The change of the chemicurrent and exoemission efficiencies with oxygen coverage can be deduced from the kinetics of the reaction and the recorded internal and external emission currents traces. It is shown that the non-adiabaticity of the reaction increases with coverage due to a reduction of the electronic density of states at the surface while the work function does not vary significantly. Therefore, the peroxide formation is one of the first reaction systems which exhibits varying non-adiabaticity and efficiencies during the reaction. Non-adiabatic calculations based on model Hamiltonians and density functional theory support the picture of chemicurrent generation and explain the rapid injection of hot hole states by an intramolecular motion, i.e., the expansion of the oxygen molecule on the timescale of a quarter of a vibrational period. PMID:25149810

  2. Non-adiabatic processes in the charge transfer reaction of O{sub 2} molecules with potassium surfaces without dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Krix, David; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2014-08-21

    Thin potassium films grown on Si(001) substrates are used to measure internal chemicurrents and the external emission of exoelectrons simultaneously during adsorption of molecular oxygen on K surfaces at 120 K. The experiments clarify the dynamics of electronic excitations at a simple metal with a narrow valence band. X-ray photoemission reveals that for exposures below 5 L almost exclusively peroxide K{sub 2}O{sub 2} is formed, i.e., no dissociation of the molecule occurs during interaction. Still a significant chemicurrent and a delayed exoelectron emission are detected due to a rapid injection of unoccupied molecular levels below the Fermi level. Since the valence band width of potassium is approximately equal to the potassium work function (2.4 eV) the underlying mechanism of exoemission is an Auger relaxation whereas chemicurrents are detected after resonant charge transfer from the metal valence band into the injected level. The change of the chemicurrent and exoemission efficiencies with oxygen coverage can be deduced from the kinetics of the reaction and the recorded internal and external emission currents traces. It is shown that the non-adiabaticity of the reaction increases with coverage due to a reduction of the electronic density of states at the surface while the work function does not vary significantly. Therefore, the peroxide formation is one of the first reaction systems which exhibits varying non-adiabaticity and efficiencies during the reaction. Non-adiabatic calculations based on model Hamiltonians and density functional theory support the picture of chemicurrent generation and explain the rapid injection of hot hole states by an intramolecular motion, i.e., the expansion of the oxygen molecule on the timescale of a quarter of a vibrational period.

  3. Kinetic Energy Release of the Singly and Doubly Charged Methylene Chloride Molecule: The Role of Fast Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, K F; Rocha, A B; Gomes, A H A; Wolff, W; Sigaud, L; Santos, A C F

    2016-09-01

    The center of mass kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) spectra of selected ionic fragments, formed through dissociative single and double photoionization of CH2Cl2 at photon energies around the Cl 2p edge, were extracted from the shape and width of the experimentally obtained time-of-flight (TOF) distributions. The KERD spectra exhibit either smooth profiles or structures, depending on the moiety and photon energy. In general, the heavier the ionic fragments, the lower their average KERDs are. In contrast, the light H(+) fragments are observed with kinetic energies centered around 4.5-5.5 eV, depending on the photon energy. It was observed that the change in the photon energy involves a change in the KERDs, indicating different processes or transitions taking place in the breakup process. In the particular case of double ionization with the ejection of two charged fragments, the KERDs present have characteristics compatible with the Coulombic fragmentation model. Intending to interpret the experimental data, singlet and triplet states at Cl 2p edge of the CH2Cl2 molecule, corresponding to the Cl (2p → 10a1*) and Cl (2p → 4b1*) transitions, were calculated at multiconfigurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) level and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI). These states were selected to form the spin-orbit coupling matrix elements, which after diagonalization result in a spin-orbit manifold. Minimum energy pathways for dissociation of the molecule were additionally calculated aiming to give support to the presence of the ultrafast dissociation mechanism in the molecular breakup. PMID:27523328

  4. The interplay of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) and room temperature organic phosphorescence in sterically-constrained donor-acceptor charge-transfer molecules.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jonathan S; Nobuyasu, Roberto S; Batsanov, Andrei S; Data, Przemyslaw; Monkman, Andrew P; Dias, Fernando B; Bryce, Martin R

    2016-02-11

    A series of phenothiazine-dibenzothiophene-S,S-dioxide charge-transfer molecules have been synthesized. Increasing steric restriction around the donor-acceptor bond significantly alters contributions from TADF and phosphorescence. Bulky substituents on the 1-(and 9) position(s) of the phenothiazine result in no TADF in the solid state; instead strong phosphorescence is observed at ambient temperature. PMID:26750426

  5. Excitation of atoms and molecules in collisions with highly charged ions. [Cyclotron Inst. , Texas A M Univ. , College Station, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the double ionization of He by high-energy N[sup 7+] ions was extended up in energy to 40 MeV/amu. Coincidence time-of-flight studies of multicharged N[sub 2], O[sub 2], and CO molecular ions produced in collisions with 97-MeV Ar[sup 14+] ions were completed. Analysis of the total kinetic energy distributions and comparison with the available data for CO[sup 2+] and CO[sup 3+] from synchrotron radiation experiments led to the conclusion that ionization by Ar-ion impact populates states having considerably higher excitation energies than those accessed by photoionization. The dissociation fractions for CO[sup 1+] and CO[sup 2+] molecular ions, and the branching ratios for the most prominent charge division channels of CO[sup 2+] through CO[sup 7+] were determined from time-of-flight singles and coincidence data. An experiment designed to investigate the orientation dependence of dissociative multielectron ionization of molecules by heavy ion impact was completed. Measurements of the cross sections for K-shell ionization of intermediate-Z elements by 30-MeV/amu H, N, Ne, and Ar ions were completed. The cross sections were determined for solid targets of Z = 13, 22, 26, 29, 32, 40, 42, 46, and 50 by recording the spectra of K x rays with a Si(Li) spectrometer.

  6. Excitation of atoms and molecules in collisions with highly charged ions. Progress report, January 1, 1990--December 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the double ionization of He by high-energy N{sup 7+} ions was extended up in energy to 40 MeV/amu. Coincidence time-of-flight studies of multicharged N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO molecular ions produced in collisions with 97-MeV Ar{sup 14+} ions were completed. Analysis of the total kinetic energy distributions and comparison with the available data for CO{sup 2+} and CO{sup 3+} from synchrotron radiation experiments led to the conclusion that ionization by Ar-ion impact populates states having considerably higher excitation energies than those accessed by photoionization. The dissociation fractions for CO{sup 1+} and CO{sup 2+} molecular ions, and the branching ratios for the most prominent charge division channels of CO{sup 2+} through CO{sup 7+} were determined from time-of-flight singles and coincidence data. An experiment designed to investigate the orientation dependence of dissociative multielectron ionization of molecules by heavy ion impact was completed. Measurements of the cross sections for K-shell ionization of intermediate-Z elements by 30-MeV/amu H, N, Ne, and Ar ions were completed. The cross sections were determined for solid targets of Z = 13, 22, 26, 29, 32, 40, 42, 46, and 50 by recording the spectra of K x rays with a Si(Li) spectrometer.

  7. Effect of negatively charged cellulose nanofibers on the dispersion of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for scaffolds in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Park, Minsung; Lee, Dajung; Shin, Sungchul; Hyun, Jinho

    2015-06-01

    Nanofibrous 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl(TEMPO)-oxidized bacterial cellulose (TOBC) was used as a dispersant of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles in aqueous solution. The surfaces of TOBC nanofibers were negatively charged after the reaction with the TEMPO/NaBr/NaClO system at pH 10 and room temperature. HA nanoparticles were simply adsorbed on the TOBC nanofibers (HA-TOBC) and dispersed well in DI water. The well-dispersed HA-TOBC colloidal solution formed a hydrogel after the addition of gelatin, followed by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde (HA-TOBC-Gel). The chemical modification of the fiber surfaces and the colloidal stability of the dispersion solution confirmed TOBC as a promising HA dispersant. Both the Young's modulus and maximum tensile stress increased as the amount of gelatin increased due to the increased crosslinking of gelatin. In addition, the well-dispersed HA produced a denser scaffold structure resulting in the increase of the Young's modulus and maximum tensile stress. The well-developed porous structures of the HA-TOBC-Gel composites were incubated with Calvarial osteoblasts. The HA-TOBC-Gel significantly improved cell proliferation as well as cell differentiation confirming the material as a potential candidate for use in bone tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:25910635

  8. Manufacturing and characterization of bent silicon crystals for studies of coherent interactions with negatively charged particles beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germogli, G.; Mazzolari, A.; Bandiera, L.; Bagli, E.; Guidi, V.

    2015-07-01

    Efficient steering of GeV-energy negatively charged particle beams was demonstrated to be possible with a new generation of thin bent silicon crystals. Suitable crystals were produced at the Sensor Semiconductor Laboratory of Ferrara starting from Silicon On Insulator wafers, adopting proper revisitation of silicon micromachining techniques such as Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition, photolithography and anisotropic chemical etching. Mechanical holders, which allow to properly bend the crystal and to reduce unwanted torsions, were employed. Crystallographic directions and crystal holder design were optimized in order to excite quasi-mosaic effect along (1 1 1) planes. Prior to exposing the crystal to particle beams, a full set of characterizations were performed. Infrared interferometry was used to measure crystal thickness with high accuracy. White-light interferometry was employed to characterize surface deformational state and its torsion. High-resolution X-rays diffraction was used to precisely measure crystal bending angle along the beam. Manufactured crystals were installed and tested at the MAMI MAinz MIcrotron to steer sub-GeV electrons, and at SLAC to deflect an electron beam in the 1 to 10 GeV energy range.

  9. Bid binding to negatively charged phospholipids may not be required for its pro-apoptotic activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Manara, Anna; Lindsay, Jennefer; Marchioretto, Marta; Astegno, Alessandra; Gilmore, Andrew P.; Esposti, Mauro Degli; Crimi, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Bid is a ubiquitous pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family that has been involved in a variety of pathways of cell death. Unique among pro-apoptotic proteins, Bid is activated after cleavage by the apical caspases of the extrinsic pathway; subsequently it moves to mitochondria, where it promotes the release of apoptogenic proteins in concert with other Bcl-2 family proteins like Bak. Diverse factors appear to modulate the pro-apoptotic action of Bid, from its avid binding to mitochondrial lipids (in particular, cardiolipin) to multiple phosphorylations at sites that can modulate its caspase cleavage. This work addresses the question of how the lipid interactions of Bid that are evident in vitro actually impact on its pro-apoptotic action within cells. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified mutations that reduced mouse Bid lipid binding in vitro. Mutation of the conserved residue Lys157 specifically decreased the binding to negatively charged lipids related to cardiolipin and additionally affected the rate of caspase cleavage. However, this lipid-binding mutant had no discernable effect on Bid pro-apoptotic function in vivo. The results are interpreted in relation to an underlying interaction of Bid with lysophosphatidylcholine, which is not disrupted in any mutant retaining pro-apoptotic function both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19463967

  10. Vibrational relaxation in H/sub 2/ molecules by wall collisions: applications to negative ion source processes

    SciTech Connect

    Karo, A.M.; Hiskes, J.R.; Hardy, R.J.

    1984-10-01

    In the volume of a hydrogen discharge, H/sub 2/ molecules, excited to high vibrational levels (v'' > 6), are formed either by fast-electron collisions or from H/sub 2//sup +/ ions that are accelerated across the discharge-wall potential that undergo Auger neutralization prior to impact with the discharge chamber wall. We have used computer molecular dynamics to study the de-excitation and re-excitation of vibrationally-excited H/sub 2/ molecules undergoing repeated wall collisions. The initial translational energies range from thermal to 100 eV and the initial vibrational states range from v'' = 2 to v'' = 12. The average loss or gain of vibrational, rotational, translational, and total molecular energies and the survival rates of the molecules have been evaluated. At thermal energies vibrational de-excitation is the predominant process, and a consistent picture emerges of rapid energy redistribution into all the molecular degrees of freedom and a slower rate of loss of total molecular energy to the wall. At higher translational energies (1 to 100 eV) a substantial fraction of the molecules survive with large (v'' > 6) vibrational energy. This vibrational population provides a contribution to the total excited vibrational population comparable to that from the fast-electron collision process.

  11. Theoretical study of the BeLi, BeNa, MgLi, MgNa, and AlBe molecules and their negative ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry

    1992-01-01

    The alkaline earth-alkali diatomics are found to have weak bonds, because the diffuse alkali valence s orbitals cannot form a bond of sufficient strength to pay the promotion energy of the alkaline-earth atoms. This leads to van der Waals bonding in the neutrals as well as the negative ions. In fact, the negative ions have larger binding energies than the neutrals as a result of the much larger polarizability of the negative ion. The binding energy of AlBe is significantly larger than the Be-alkali molecules, due to a covalent contribution to the bonding. The binding energy in AlBe(-) is considerably larger than AlBe; the binding energy of the X 3Sigma(-) state of AlBe(-) is computed to be 1.36 eV, as compared with 0.57 eV for the X 2Pi state of AlBe.

  12. New Antibiotic Molecules: Bypassing the Membrane Barrier of Gram Negative Bacteria Increases the Activity of Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mamelli, Laurent; Petit, Sylvain; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Giglione, Carmela; Lieutaud, Aurélie; Meinnel, Thierry; Artaud, Isabelle; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a major concern in hospitals worldwide and urgently require the development of new antibacterial molecules. Peptide deformylase is an intracellular target now well-recognized for the design of new antibiotics. The bacterial susceptibility to such a cytoplasmic target primarily depends on the capacity of the compound to reach and accumulate in the cytosol. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the respective involvement of penetration (influx) and pumping out (efflux) mechanisms to peptide deformylase inhibitors (PDF-I) activity, the potency of various series was determined using various genetic contexts (efflux overproducers or efflux-deleted strains) and membrane permeabilizers. Depending on the structure of the tested molecules, two behaviors could be observed: (i) for actinonin the first PDF-I characterized, the AcrAB efflux system was the main parameter involved in the bacterial susceptibility, and (ii), for the lastest PDF-Is such as the derivatives of 2-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)-N-hydroxyacetamide, the penetration through the membrane was a important limiting step. Conclusions/Significance Our results clearly show that the bacterial membrane plays a key role in modulating the antibacterial activity of PDF-Is. The bacterial susceptibility for these new antibacterial molecules can be improved by two unrelated ways in MDR strains: by collapsing the Acr efflux activity or by increasing the uptake rate through the bacterial membrane. The efficiency of the second method is associated with the nature of the compound. PMID:19649280

  13. A self-consistent phase-field approach to implicit solvation of charged molecules with Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Wen, Jiayi; Zhao, Yanxiang; Li, Bo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Dielectric boundary based implicit-solvent models provide efficient descriptions of coarse-grained effects, particularly the electrostatic effect, of aqueous solvent. Recent years have seen the initial success of a new such model, variational implicit-solvent model (VISM) [Dzubiella, Swanson, and McCammon Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 087802 (2006) and J. Chem. Phys. 124, 084905 (2006)], in capturing multiple dry and wet hydration states, describing the subtle electrostatic effect in hydrophobic interactions, and providing qualitatively good estimates of solvation free energies. Here, we develop a phase-field VISM to the solvation of charged molecules in aqueous solvent to include more flexibility. In this approach, a stable equilibrium molecular system is described by a phase field that takes one constant value in the solute region and a different constant value in the solvent region, and smoothly changes its value on a thin transition layer representing a smeared solute-solvent interface or dielectric boundary. Such a phase field minimizes an effective solvation free-energy functional that consists of the solute-solvent interfacial energy, solute-solvent van der Waals interaction energy, and electrostatic free energy described by the Poisson-Boltzmann theory. We apply our model and methods to the solvation of single ions, two parallel plates, and protein complexes BphC and p53/MDM2 to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of our approach at different levels. With a diffuse dielectric boundary, our new approach can describe the dielectric asymmetry in the solute-solvent interfacial region. Our theory is developed based on rigorous mathematical studies and is also connected to the Lum-Chandler-Weeks theory (1999). We discuss these connections and possible extensions of our theory and methods.

  14. A self-consistent phase-field approach to implicit solvation of charged molecules with Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Wen, Jiayi; Zhao, Yanxiang; Li, Bo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-12-28

    Dielectric boundary based implicit-solvent models provide efficient descriptions of coarse-grained effects, particularly the electrostatic effect, of aqueous solvent. Recent years have seen the initial success of a new such model, variational implicit-solvent model (VISM) [Dzubiella, Swanson, and McCammon Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 087802 (2006) and J. Chem. Phys. 124, 084905 (2006)], in capturing multiple dry and wet hydration states, describing the subtle electrostatic effect in hydrophobic interactions, and providing qualitatively good estimates of solvation free energies. Here, we develop a phase-field VISM to the solvation of charged molecules in aqueous solvent to include more flexibility. In this approach, a stable equilibrium molecular system is described by a phase field that takes one constant value in the solute region and a different constant value in the solvent region, and smoothly changes its value on a thin transition layer representing a smeared solute-solvent interface or dielectric boundary. Such a phase field minimizes an effective solvation free-energy functional that consists of the solute-solvent interfacial energy, solute-solvent van der Waals interaction energy, and electrostatic free energy described by the Poisson-Boltzmann theory. We apply our model and methods to the solvation of single ions, two parallel plates, and protein complexes BphC and p53/MDM2 to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of our approach at different levels. With a diffuse dielectric boundary, our new approach can describe the dielectric asymmetry in the solute-solvent interfacial region. Our theory is developed based on rigorous mathematical studies and is also connected to the Lum-Chandler-Weeks theory (1999). We discuss these connections and possible extensions of our theory and methods. PMID:26723595

  15. A 90-day study of subchronic oral toxicity of 20 nm, negatively charged zinc oxide nanoparticles in Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hark-Soo; Shin, Sung-Sup; Meang, Eun Ho; Hong, Jeong-sup; Park, Jong-Il; Kim, Su-Hyon; Koh, Sang-Bum; Lee, Seung-Young; Jang, Dong-Hyouk; Lee, Jong-Yun; Sun, Yle-Shik; Kang, Jin Seok; Kim, Yu-Ri; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Jeong, Jayoung; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Son, Woo-Chan; Park, Jae-Hak

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The widespread use of nanoparticles (NPs) in industrial and biomedical applications has prompted growing concern regarding their potential toxicity and impact on human health. This study therefore investigated the subchronic, systemic oral toxicity and no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of 20 nm, negatively charged zinc oxide (ZnOSM20(−)) NPs in Sprague Dawley rats for 90 days. Methods The high-dose NP level was set at 500 mg/kg of bodyweight, and the mid- and low-dose levels were set at 250 and 125 mg/kg, respectively. The rats were observed during a 14-day recovery period after the last NP administration for the persistence or reduction of any adverse effects. Toxicokinetic and distribution studies were also conducted to determine the systemic distribution of the NPs. Results No rats died during the test period. However, ZnOSM20(−) NPs (500 mg/kg) induced changes in the levels of anemia-related factors, prompted acinar cell apoptosis and ductular hyperplasia, stimulated periductular lymphoid cell infiltration and excessive salivation, and increased the numbers of regenerative acinar cells in the pancreas. In addition, stomach lesions were seen at 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg, and retinal atrophy was observed at 250 and 500 mg/kg. The Zn concentration was dose-dependently increased in the liver, kidney, intestines, and plasma, but not in other organs investigated. Conclusion A ZnOSM20(−) NP NOAEL could not be established from the current results, but the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level was 125 mg/kg. Furthermore, the NPs were associated with a number of undesirable systemic actions. Thus, their use in humans must be approached with caution. PMID:25565828

  16. Propafenone blocks human cardiac Kir2.x channels by decreasing the negative electrostatic charge in the cytoplasmic pore.

    PubMed

    Amorós, Irene; Dolz-Gaitón, Pablo; Gómez, Ricardo; Matamoros, Marcos; Barana, Adriana; de la Fuente, Marta González; Núñez, Mercedes; Pérez-Hernández, Marta; Moraleda, Ignacio; Gálvez, Enrique; Iriepa, Isabel; Tamargo, Juan; Caballero, Ricardo; Delpón, Eva

    2013-07-15

    Human cardiac inward rectifier current (IK1) is generated by Kir2.x channels. Inhibition of IK1 could offer a useful antiarrhythmic strategy against fibrillatory arrhythmias. Therefore, elucidation of Kir2.x channels pharmacology, which still remains elusive, is mandatory. We characterized the electrophysiological and molecular basis of the inhibition produced by the antiarrhythmic propafenone of the current generated by Kir2.x channels (IKir2.x) and the IK1 recorded in human atrial myocytes. Wild type and mutated human Kir2.x channels were transiently transfected in CHO and HEK-293 cells. Macroscopic and single-channel currents were recorded using the patch-clamp technique. At concentrations >1μM propafenone inhibited IKir2.x the order of potency being Kir2.3∼IK1>Kir2.2>Kir2.1 channels. Blockade was irrespective of the extracellular K(+) concentration whereas markedly increased when the intracellular K(+) concentration was decreased. Propafenone decreased inward rectification since at potentials positive to the K(+) equilibrium potential propafenone-induced block decreased in a voltage-dependent manner. Importantly, propafenone favored the occurrence of subconductance levels in Kir2.x channels and decreased phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2)-channel affinity. Blind docking and site-directed mutagenesis experiments demonstrated that propafenone bound Kir2.x channels at the cytoplasmic domain, close to, but not in the pore itself, the binding site involving two conserved Arg residues (residues 228 and 260 in Kir2.1). Our results suggested that propafenone incorporated into the cytoplasmic domain of the channel in such a way that it decreased the net negative charge sensed by K(+) ions and polyamines which, in turn, promotes the appearance of subconductance levels and the decrease of PIP2 affinity of the channels. PMID:23648307

  17. Absence of a guiding effect and charge transfer in the interaction of keV-energy negative ions with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocapillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lin; Guo Yanling; Jia Juanjuan; Zhang Hongqiang; Cui Ying; Shao Jianxiong; Yin Yongzhi; Qiu Xiyu; Lv Xueyang; Sun Guangzhi; Wang Jun; Chen Yifeng; Xi Fayuan; Chen Ximeng

    2011-09-15

    In this work, the efficient electron loss process was observed for the transmission of 10- to 18-keV Cu{sup -} and Cl{sup -} ions through Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocapillaries. The fractions of the scattered particles were simultaneously measured using a position-sensitive microchannel plate detector. The neutrals were guided through the capillary via multiple grazing scattering. In particular, the scattered Cl{sup -} ions were observed in the transmission, whereas no Cu{sup -} ion was formed. In contrast to highly charged ions, these results support strongly the fact that the scattering events dominate the transport of negative ions through the nanocapillaries and that there is no direct evidence for the formation of negative charge patches inside the capillaries which are able to repulse and guide negative ions efficiently.

  18. Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    falling and till reach the equilibrium of stable spatial charge distribution, which is just the cause of the geomagnetic field and the geo-electric field (the observational value on the earth surface is about 120 V/m downward equivalent to 500000 Coulomb negative charges in the earth surface). All celestial bodies are gravitation sources and attract the molecules and ions in space to its circumference by the gravitation of own and other celestial bodies, e.g., all planets in the solar system have their own atmospheres. Therefore, the origin mechanism of geo-electric and geomagnetic fields caused by gravitation is very universal, at least it is appli-cable to all the planets in the solar system. For planets, the joint result of the gravitations of the planets and the sun makes the negative charges and dipolar charges distributed in the surfaces of the celestial bodies. The quicker the rotation is, the larger the angular momentum U is, then larger the accompanying current and magnetic moment P, it accord a experiential law found by subsistent observational data of all celestial bodies in solar system: P = -G 1/2 U cos θ / c (1), θ is the angle between the net ν 0 flux direction (mark by CMB) and the rotational axis of celestial body (Chen Shao-Guang, Chinese Science Bulletin, 26,233,1981). Uranian and Neptunian P predicted with Eq.(1) in 1981 are about -3.4•1028 Gs•cm3 and 1.9•1028 Gs•cm3 respectively (use new rotate speed measured by Voyager 2). The P measured by Voyager 2 in 1986 and 1989 are about -1.9 •1028 Gs•cm3 and 1.5•1028 Gs•cm3 respectively (the contribution of quadrupole P is converted into the contribution of dipole P alone). The neutron star pos-sesses much high density and rotational speed because of the conservation of the mass and the angular momentum during the course of the formation, then has strong gravity and largerU. From Eq.(1) there is a larger P and extremely strong surface magnetic field in neutron star. The origin mechanism of

  19. Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    falling and till reach the equilibrium of stable spatial charge distribution, which is just the cause of the geomagnetic field and the geo-electric field (the observational value on the earth surface is about 120 V/m downward equivalent to 500000 Coulomb negative charges in the earth surface). All celestial bodies are gravitation sources and attract the molecules and ions in space to its circumference by the gravitation of own and other celestial bodies, e.g., all planets in the solar system have their own atmospheres. Therefore, the origin mechanism of geo-electric and geomagnetic fields caused by gravitation is very universal, at least it is appli-cable to all the planets in the solar system. For planets, the joint result of the gravitations of the planets and the sun makes the negative charges and dipolar charges distributed in the surfaces of the celestial bodies. The quicker the rotation is, the larger the angular momentum U is, then larger the accompanying current and magnetic moment P, it accord a experiential law found by subsistent observational data of all celestial bodies in solar system: P = -G 1/2 U cos θ / c (1), θ is the angle between the net ν 0 flux direction (mark by CMB) and the rotational axis of celestial body (Chen Shao-Guang, Chinese Science Bulletin, 26,233,1981). Uranian and Neptunian P predicted with Eq.(1) in 1981 are about -3.4•1028 Gs•cm3 and 1.9•1028 Gs•cm3 respectively (use new rotate speed measured by Voyager 2). The P measured by Voyager 2 in 1986 and 1989 are about -1.9 •1028 Gs•cm3 and 1.5•1028 Gs•cm3 respectively (the contribution of quadrupole P is converted into the contribution of dipole P alone). The neutron star pos-sesses much high density and rotational speed because of the conservation of the mass and the angular momentum during the course of the formation, then has strong gravity and largerU. From Eq.(1) there is a larger P and extremely strong surface magnetic field in neutron star. The origin mechanism of

  20. Charge transfer dynamics of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride molecules on Au(111) probed by resonant photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liang; Wang, Yu-Zhan; Chen, Tie-Xin; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Yu, Xiao-Jiang; Ibrahim, Kurash; Wang, Jia-Ou; Qian, Hai-Jie; Xu, Fa-Qiang; Qi, Dong-Chen; Wee, Andrew T S

    2011-11-01

    Charge transfer dynamics across the lying-down 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) organic semiconductor molecules on Au(111) interface has been investigated using the core-hole clock implementation of resonant photoemission spectroscopy. It is found that the charge transfer time scale at the PTCDA∕Au(111) interface is much larger than the C 1s core-hole lifetime of 6 fs, indicating weak electronic coupling between PTCDA and the gold substrate due to the absence of chemical reaction and∕or bonding. PMID:22070311

  1. Investigation of multi-state charge-storage properties of redox-active organic molecules in silicon-molecular hybrid devices for DRAM and Flash applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, Srivardhan Shivappa

    Molecular electronics has recently spawned a considerable amount of interest with several molecules possessing charge-conduction and charge-storage properties proposed for use in electronic devices. Hybrid silicon-molecular technology has the promise of augmenting the current silicon technology and provide for a transitional path to future molecule-only technology. The focus of this dissertation work has been on developing a class of hybrid silicon-molecular electronic devices for DRAM and Flash memory applications utilizing redox-active molecules. This work exploits the ability of molecules to store charges with single-electron precision at room temperature. The hybrid devices are fabricated by forming self-assembled monolayers of redox-active molecules on Si and oxide (SiO2 and HfO2) surfaces via formation of covalent linkages. The molecules possess discrete quantum states from which electrons can tunnel to the Si substrate at discrete applied voltages (oxidation process, cell write), leaving behind a positively charged layer of molecules. The reduction (erase) process, which is the process of electrons tunneling back from Si to the molecules, neutralizes the positively charged molecular monolayer. Hybrid silicon-molecular capacitor test structures were electrically characterized with an electrolyte gate using cyclic voltammetry (CyV) and impedance spectroscopy (CV) techniques. The redox voltages, kinetics (write/erase speeds) and charge-retention characteristics were found to be strongly dependent on the Si doping type and densities, and ambient light. It was also determined that the redox energy states in the molecules communicate with the valence band of the Si substrate. This allows tuning of write and read states by modulating minority carriers in n- and p-Si substrates. Ultra-thin dielectric tunnel barriers (SiO2, HfO2) were placed between the molecules and the Si substrate to augment charge-retention for Flash memory applications. The redox response was

  2. Femtosecond Hydrogen Bond Dynamics of Bulk-like and Bound Water at Positively and Negatively Charged Lipid Interfaces Revealed by 2D HD-VSFG Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant Chandra; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-08-26

    Interfacial water in the vicinity of lipids plays an important role in many biological processes, such as drug delivery, ion transportation, and lipid fusion. Hence, molecular-level elucidation of the properties of water at lipid interfaces is of the utmost importance. We report the two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) study of the OH stretch of HOD at charged lipid interfaces, which shows that the hydrogen bond dynamics of interfacial water differ drastically, depending on the lipids. The data indicate that the spectral diffusion of the OH stretch at a positively charged lipid interface is dominated by the ultrafast (<∼100 fs) component, followed by the minor sub-picosecond slow dynamics, while the dynamics at a negatively charged lipid interface exhibit sub-picosecond dynamics almost exclusively, implying that fast hydrogen bond fluctuation is prohibited. These results reveal that the ultrafast hydrogen bond dynamics at the positively charged lipid-water interface are attributable to the bulk-like property of interfacial water, whereas the slow dynamics at the negatively charged lipid interface are due to bound water, which is hydrogen-bonded to the hydrophilic head group. PMID:27482947

  3. First study of the negative binomial distribution applied to higher moments of net-charge and net-proton multiplicity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnowsky, Terence J.; Westfall, Gary D.

    2013-07-01

    A study of the first four moments (mean, variance, skewness, and kurtosis) and their products (κσ2 and Sσ) of the net-charge and net-proton distributions in Au + Au collisions at √{sNN} = 7.7- 200 GeV from HIJING simulations has been carried out. The skewness and kurtosis and the collision volume independent products κσ2 and Sσ have been proposed as sensitive probes for identifying the presence of a QCD critical point. A discrete probability distribution that effectively describes the separate positively and negatively charged particle (or proton and anti-proton) multiplicity distributions is the negative binomial (or binomial) distribution (NBD/BD). The NBD/BD has been used to characterize particle production in high-energy particle and nuclear physics. Their application to the higher moments of the net-charge and net-proton distributions is examined. Differences between κσ2 and a statistical Poisson assumption of a factor of four (for net-charge) and 40% (for net-protons) can be accounted for by the NBD/BD. This is the first application of the properties of the NBD/BD to describe the behavior of the higher moments of net-charge and net-proton distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  4. Quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux models for fundamental vibrational intensity changes on H-bond formation of water and hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Arnaldo F.; Richter, Wagner E.; Bruns, Roy E.; Terrabuio, Luiz A.; Haiduke, Roberto L. A.

    2014-02-28

    The Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules/Charge-Charge Flux-Dipole Flux (QTAIM/CCFDF) model has been used to investigate the electronic structure variations associated with intensity changes on dimerization for the vibrations of the water and hydrogen fluoride dimers as well as in the water-hydrogen fluoride complex. QCISD/cc-pVTZ wave functions applied in the QTAIM/CCFDF model accurately provide the fundamental band intensities of water and its dimer predicting symmetric and antisymmetric stretching intensity increases for the donor unit of 159 and 47 km mol{sup −1} on H-bond formation compared with the experimental values of 141 and 53 km mol{sup −1}. The symmetric stretching of the proton donor water in the dimer has intensity contributions parallel and perpendicular to its C{sub 2v} axis. The largest calculated increase of 107 km mol{sup −1} is perpendicular to this axis and owes to equilibrium atomic charge displacements on vibration. Charge flux decreases occurring parallel and perpendicular to this axis result in 42 and 40 km mol{sup −1} total intensity increases for the symmetric and antisymmetric stretches, respectively. These decreases in charge flux result in intensity enhancements because of the interaction contributions to the intensities between charge flux and the other quantities. Even though dipole flux contributions are much smaller than the charge and charge flux ones in both monomer and dimer water they are important for calculating the total intensity values for their stretching vibrations since the charge-charge flux interaction term cancels the charge and charge flux contributions. The QTAIM/CCFDF hydrogen-bonded stretching intensity strengthening of 321 km mol{sup −1} on HF dimerization and 592 km mol{sup −1} on HF:H{sub 2}O complexation can essentially be explained by charge, charge flux and their interaction cross term. Atomic contributions to the intensities are also calculated. The bridge hydrogen atomic contributions alone

  5. Formation of negative ions in the interstellar medium by dissociative electron attachment to the H2CN molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Fonseca Dos Santos, Samantha; Douguet, Nicolas; Orel, Ann

    2013-05-01

    The methylene amidogen radical (H2CN) was first discovered, in 1962 by Cochran et al ., and since then it has received considerable attention from both experimentalists and theoreticians. It is considered an important intermediate in the combustion of nitramine propellants and proposed to play a role in extraterrestrial atmospheres. It was detected in interstellar clouds in 1994, and its dissociative electron attachment (DEA) process may be responsible for the formation of the CN- and the H- negative ions: e-+H2CN --> CN- + H2; e-+H2CN --> H- + HCN. We report here the results of our ab initio quantum chemical studies of the geometrical and electronic structure of the methylene amidogen and and its negative ion H2CN- in the theoretical of DEA in H2CN. The scattering calculations are carried out using the complex Kohn variational method. The nuclear dynamics, including dissociation, will later be treated using the MCTDH code with a three-dimensional potential energy surface, in which the distance of CN is kept frozen. This work is supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Science and the National Science Foundation, Grant No's PHY-11-60611 and PHY-10-68785.

  6. Charge steering of laser plasma accelerated fast ions in a liquid spray — creation of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schnürer, M.; Abicht, F.; Priebe, G.; Braenzel, J.; Prasad, R.; Borghesi, M.; Andreev, A.; Nickles, P. V.; Jequier, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2013-11-15

    The scenario of “electron capture and loss” has been recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with up to MeV kinetic energy [S. Ter-Avetisyan, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 051501 (2011)]. Validation of these processes and of their generic nature is here provided in experiments where the ion source and the interaction medium have been spatially separated. Fast positive ions accelerated from a laser plasma source are sent through a cold spray where their charge is changed. Such formed neutral atom or negative ion has nearly the same momentum as the original positive ion. Experiments are released for protons, carbon, and oxygen ions and corresponding beams of negative ions and neutral atoms have been obtained. The electron capture and loss phenomenon is confirmed to be the origin of the negative ion and neutral atom beams. The equilibrium ratios of different charge components and cross sections have been measured. Our method is general and allows the creation of beams of neutral atoms and negative ions for different species which inherit the characteristics of the positive ion source.

  7. Incorporation of negatively charged iron oxide nanoparticles in the shell of anionic surfactant-stabilized microbubbles: The effect of NaCl concentration.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Artem; Jouhannaud, Julien; Polavarapu, Prasad; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Waton, Gilles; Pourroy, Geneviève

    2016-06-15

    We report on the key effect of NaCl for the stabilization of nanoparticle-decorated microbubbles coated by an anionic perfluoroalkylated phosphate C10F21(CH2)2OP(O)(OH)2 surfactant and negatively charged iron oxide nanoparticles. We show that hollow microspheres with shells of 100-200 nm in thickness can be stabilized even at high pH when a strong ionic force is required to screen the negative charges. Due to the more drastic conditions required to stabilize the hollow microspheres, they appear to be stable enough to be deposited on a surface and dried. That can be a simple way to fabricate porous ceramics. PMID:27038281

  8. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles based electrochemical sensor for the measurement of Gram-negative bacterial quorum signaling molecules (N-acyl-homoserine-lactones).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui; Jiang, Donglei; Shao, Jingdong; Sun, Xiulan

    2016-01-15

    We have developed a novel and economical electrochemical sensor to measure Gram-negative bacterial quorum signaling molecules (AHLs) using magnetic nanoparticles and molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) technology. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) capable of selectively absorbing AHLs were successfully synthesized by surface polymerization. The particles were deposited onto a magnetic carbon paste electrode (MGCE) surface, and characterized by electrochemical measurements. Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) was utilized to record the oxidative current signal that is characteristic of AHL. The detection limit of this assay was determined to be 8×10(-10)molL(-1) with a linear detection range of 2.5×10(-9)molL(-1) to 1.0×10(-7)molL(-1). This Fe3O4@SiO2-MIP-based electrochemical sensor is a valuable new tool that allows quantitative measurement of Gram-negative bacterial quorum signaling molecules. It has potential applications in the fields of clinical diagnosis or food analysis with real-time detection capability, high specificity, excellent reproducibility, and good stability. PMID:26344904

  9. The axon guidance molecule semaphorin 3F is a negative regulator of tumor progression and proliferation in ileal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Vercherat, Cécile; Blanc, Martine; Lepinasse, Florian; Gadot, Nicolas; Couderc, Christophe; Poncet, Gilles; Walter, Thomas; Joly, Marie-Odile; Hervieu, Valérie; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Roche, Colette

    2015-01-01

    Gastro-intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are rare neoplasms, frequently metastatic, raising difficult clinical and therapeutic challenges due to a poor knowledge of their biology. As neuroendocrine cells express both epithelial and neural cell markers, we studied the possible involvement in GI-NETs of axon guidance molecules, which have been shown to decrease tumor cell proliferation and metastatic dissemination in several tumor types. We focused on the role of Semaphorin 3F (SEMA3F) in ileal NETs, one of the most frequent subtypes of GI-NETs. SEMA3F expression was detected in normal neuroendocrine cells but was lost in most of human primary tumors and all their metastases. SEMA3F loss of expression was associated with promoter gene methylation. After increasing endogenous SEMA3F levels through stable transfection, enteroendocrine cell lines STC-1 and GluTag showed a reduced proliferation rate in vitro. In two different xenograft mouse models, SEMA3F-overexpressing cells exhibited a reduced ability to form tumors and a hampered liver dissemination potential in vivo. This resulted, at least in part, from the inhibition of mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways. This study demonstrates an anti-tumoral role of SEMA3F in ileal NETs. We thus suggest that SEMA3F and/or its cellular signaling pathway could represent a target for ileal NET therapy. PMID:26447612

  10. Probing charge transport at the single-molecule level on silicon by using cryogenic ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guisinger, Nathan P; Yoder, Nathan L; Hersam, Mark C

    2005-06-21

    A cryogenic variable-temperature ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope is used for measuring the electrical properties of isolated cyclopentene molecules adsorbed to the degenerately p-type Si(100)-2x1 surface at a temperature of 80 K. Current-voltage curves taken under these conditions show negative differential resistance at positive sample bias, in agreement with previous observations at room temperature. Because of the enhanced stability of the scanning tunneling microscope at cryogenic temperatures, repeated measurements can be routinely taken over the same molecule. Taking advantage of this improved stability, we show that current-voltage curves on isolated cyclopentene molecules are reproducible and possess negligible hysteresis for a given tip-molecule distance. On the other hand, subsequent measurements with variable tip position show that the negative differential resistance voltage increases with increasing tip-molecule distance. By using a one-dimensional capacitive equivalent circuit and a resonant tunneling model, this behavior can be quantitatively explained, thus providing insight into the electrostatic potential distribution across a semiconductor-molecule-vacuum-metal tunnel junction. This model also provides a quantitative estimate for the alignment of the highest occupied molecular orbital of cyclopentene with respect to the Fermi level of the silicon substrate, thus suggesting that this experimental approach can be used for performing chemical spectroscopy at the single-molecule level on semiconductor surfaces. Overall, these results serve as the basis for a series of design rules that can be applied to silicon-based molecular electronic devices. PMID:15956214

  11. A New Class of Quorum Quenching Molecules from Staphylococcus Species Affects Communication and Growth of Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ya-Yun; Nega, Mulugeta; Wölfle, Martina; Plener, Laure; Grond, Stephanie; Jung, Kirsten; Götz, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge that many pathogens rely on cell-to-cell communication mechanisms known as quorum sensing, opens a new disease control strategy: quorum quenching. Here we report on one of the rare examples where Gram-positive bacteria, the ‘Staphylococcus intermedius group’ of zoonotic pathogens, excrete two compounds in millimolar concentrations that suppress the quorum sensing signaling and inhibit the growth of a broad spectrum of Gram-negative beta- and gamma-proteobacteria. These compounds were isolated from Staphylococcus delphini. They represent a new class of quorum quenchers with the chemical formula N-[2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]-urea and N-(2-phenethyl)-urea, which we named yayurea A and B, respectively. In vitro studies with the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) responding receptor LuxN of V. harveyi indicated that both compounds caused opposite effects on phosphorylation to those caused by AHL. This explains the quorum quenching activity. Staphylococcal strains producing yayurea A and B clearly benefit from an increased competitiveness in a mixed community. PMID:24098134

  12. Geoengineering with Charged Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2011-12-01

    Water molecules in a droplet are held together by intermolecular forces generated by hydrogen bonding which has a bonding energy of only about 0.2 eV. One can create a more rugged droplet by using an ion as a condensation nucleus. In that case, water molecules are held together by the interaction between the ion and the dipole moments of the water molecules surrounding the ion, in addition to any hydrogen bonding. In this research, properties of such charged droplets were investigated using first principle quantum mechanical calculations. A molecule which exhibits positive electron affinity is a good candidate to serve as the ionic condensation nucleus, because addition of an electron to such a molecule creates an energetically more stable state than the neutral molecule. A good example is the oxygen molecule (O2) where energy of O2 negative (O2-) ion is lower than that of the neutral O2 by about 0.5 eV. Examples of other molecules which have positive electron affinity include ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur oxides (SOx, x=1-3). Atomic models used in the calculations consisted of a negative ion of one of the molecules mentioned above surrounded by water molecules. Calculations were performed using the DFT method with B3LYP hybrid functional and Pople type basis sets with polarization and diffuse functions. Energy of interaction between O2- ion and the water molecule was found to be ~0.7 eV. This energy is an order of magnitude greater than the thermal energy of even the highest temperatures encountered in the atmosphere. Once created, charged rugged droplets can survive in hot and dry climates where they can be utilized to create humidity and precipitation. The ion which serves as the nucleus of the droplet can attract not only water molecules but also other dipolar gases in the atmosphere. Such dipolar gases include industrial pollutants, for example nitrogen dioxide (NO2) or sulfur dioxide (SO2). Energy of interaction between O2- ion and pollutant

  13. Spectroscopic and computational investigations on the origin of charge transfer between included neutral guest molecules and a functionalized anionic layered host.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dipak; Tummanapelli, Anil Kumar

    2016-08-10

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) or anionic clays are an important class of ion-exchange materials, well known for drug and gene delivery and several other applications including catalysis, bioactive nanocomposite, electroactive and photoactive materials. Their structure is based on positively charged brucite-like inorganic sheets with the interlamellar space being occupied by charge-compensating exchangeable anions. In spite of having a vast scope many of the applications of LDHs are restricted as their host-guest chemistry is limited to ion-exchange reactions. Recently we have shown for the first time that charge-transfer interactions can be used as a driving force for the insertion of neutral guest molecules (ortho- and para-chloranil) within the galleries of an Mg-Al LDH by forming a charge-transfer complex with aniline pre-intercalated as p-aminobenzoate anion. Here, we have performed quantum chemical calculations in combination with molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the nature of interactions, arrangement and the evaluation of electronic and Raman spectral signatures of the chloranil charge-transfer complex included within the galleries of the Mg-Al LDH. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has been used to understand the nature and origin of the unidirectional charge-transfer that lead to the unusual insertion of chloranil in the galleries of the Mg-Al LDH. The NBO analysis reveals that a considerable amount of electronic charge redistribution occurs from the p-aminobenzoate to the chloranil during latter's insertion within the LDH galleries with a very negligible amount of back donation. This work is expected to pave the way for understanding the host-guest chemistry and targeted and controlled delivery of poorly soluble drugs. PMID:27461409

  14. Positronium ions and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.

    1990-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies on positronium ions and molecules are discussed. A positronium ion is a three particle system consisting of two electrons in singlet spin state, and a positron. Recent studies include calculations of its binding energy, positron annihilation rate, and investigations of its doubly excited resonant states. A positronium molecule is a four body system consisting of two positrons and two electrons in an overall singlet spin state. The recent calculations of its binding energy against the dissociation into two positronium atoms, and studies of auto-detaching states in positronium molecules are discussed. These auto-dissociating states, which are believed to be part of the Rydberg series as a result of a positron attaching to a negatively charged positronium ion, Ps-, would appear as resonances in Ps-Ps scattering.

  15. Possibility of controlling the earth's negative charge and the unitary variation of its electric field by cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragin, Y. A.; Vorontsov, S. S.; Kocheyev, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    The dependence of the atmospheric conductivity upon the cosmic ray intensity, the possibility of charge generation in thunderstorms by cosmic rays, the dependence of the troposphere electricity on the stratosphere, the relationship between the unitary variation of the earth's electric field intensity and that of cosmic ray intensity (daily, yearly and 11-year latitudinal dependence of both values), deny first, the exceptional role of the tropospheric processes in maintaining the terrestrial charge and unitary variation, and, second, compel one to consider the cause mentioned above to be the result of the influence of cosmic rays.

  16. Charge-transfer complexes of 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone with amino molecules in polar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berto, Silvia; Chiavazza, Enrico; Ribotta, Valentina; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Barolo, Claudia; Giacomino, Agnese; Vione, Davide; Malandrino, Mery

    2015-10-01

    The charge-transfer complexes have scientific relevance because this type of molecular interaction is at the basis of the activity of pharmacological compounds and because the absorption bands of the complexes can be used for the quantification of electron donor molecules. This work aims to assess the stability of the charge-transfer complexes between the electron acceptor 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) and two drugs, procaine and atenolol, in acetonitrile and ethanol. The stability of DDQ in solution and the time required to obtain the maximum complex formation were evaluated. The stoichiometry and the stability of the complexes were determined, respectively, by Job's plot method and by the elaboration of UV-vis titrations data. The latter task was carried out by using the non-linear global analysis approach to determine the equilibrium constants. This approach to data elaboration allowed us to overcome the disadvantages of the classical linear-regression method, to obtain reliable values of the association constants and to calculate the entire spectra of the complexes. NMR spectra were recorded to identify the portion of the donor molecule that was involved in the interaction. The data support the participation of the aliphatic amino groups in complex formation and exclude the involvement of the aromatic amine present in the procaine molecule.

  17. Positively and Negatively Charged Ionic Modifications to Cellulose Assessed as Cotton-Based Protease-Lowering and Haemostatic Wound Agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in cellulose wound dressings targeted to different stages of wound healing have been based on structural and charge modifications that function to modulate events in the complex inflammatory and hemostatic phases of wound healing. Hemostasis and inflammation comprise two overlapp...

  18. The role of charge and multiple faces of the CD8 alpha/alpha homodimer in binding to major histocompatibility complex class I molecules: support for a bivalent model.

    PubMed Central

    Giblin, P A; Leahy, D J; Mennone, J; Kavathas, P B

    1994-01-01

    The CD8 dimer interacts with the alpha 3 domain of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules through two immunoglobulin variable-like domains. In this study a crystal structure-informed mutational analysis has been performed to identify amino acids in the CD8 alpha/alpha homodimer that are likely to be involved in binding to class I. Several key residues are situated on the top face of the dimer within loops analogous to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of immunoglobulin. In addition, other important amino acids are located in the A and B beta-strands on the sides of the dimer. The potential involvement of amino acids on both the top and the side faces of the molecule is consistent with a bivalent model for the interaction between a single CD8 alpha/alpha homodimer and two class I molecules and may have important implications for signal transduction in class I-expressing cells. This study also demonstrates a role for the positive surface potential of CD8 in class I binding and complements previous work demonstrating the importance of a negatively charged loop on the alpha 3 domain of class I for CD8 alpha/alpha-class I interaction. We propose a model whereby residues located on the CDR-like loops of the CD8 homodimer interact with the alpha 3 domain of MHC class I while amino acids on the side of the molecule containing the A and B beta-strands contact the alpha 2 domain of class I. Images PMID:8127870

  19. FOB-SH: Fragment orbital-based surface hopping for charge carrier transport in organic and biological molecules and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, J.; Gajdos, F.; Blumberger, J.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a fragment orbital-based fewest switches surface hopping method, FOB-SH, designed to efficiently simulate charge carrier transport in strongly fluctuating condensed phase systems such as organic semiconductors and biomolecules. The charge carrier wavefunction is expanded and the electronic Hamiltonian constructed in a set of singly occupied molecular orbitals of the molecular sites that mediate the charge transfer. Diagonal elements of the electronic Hamiltonian (site energies) are obtained from a force field, whereas the off-diagonal or electronic coupling matrix elements are obtained using our recently developed analytic overlap method. We derive a general expression for the exact forces on the adiabatic ground and excited electronic state surfaces from the nuclear gradients of the charge localized electronic states. Applications to electron hole transfer in a model ethylene dimer and through a chain of ten model ethylenes validate our implementation and demonstrate its computational efficiency. On the larger system, we calculate the qualitative behaviour of charge mobility with change in temperature T for different regimes of the intermolecular electronic coupling. For small couplings, FOB-SH predicts a crossover from a thermally activated regime at low temperatures to a band-like transport regime at higher temperatures. For higher electronic couplings, the thermally activated regime disappears and the mobility decreases according to a power law. This is interpreted by a gradual loss in probability for resonance between the sites as the temperature increases. The polaron hopping model solved for the same system gives a qualitatively different result and underestimates the mobility decay at higher temperatures. Taken together, the FOB-SH methodology introduced here shows promise for a realistic investigation of charge carrier transport in complex organic, aqueous, and biological systems.

  20. Negatively charged residues of the segment linking the enzyme and cytolysin moieties restrict the membrane-permeabilizing capacity of adenylate cyclase toxin.

    PubMed

    Masin, Jiri; Osickova, Adriana; Sukova, Anna; Fiser, Radovan; Halada, Petr; Bumba, Ladislav; Linhartova, Irena; Osicka, Radim; Sebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The whooping cough agent, Bordetella pertussis, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA) that plays a crucial role in host respiratory tract colonization. CyaA targets CR3-expressing cells and disrupts their bactericidal functions by delivering into their cytosol an adenylate cyclase enzyme that converts intracellular ATP to cAMP. In parallel, the hydrophobic domain of CyaA forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize cell membrane. The invasive AC and pore-forming domains of CyaA are linked by a segment that is unique in the RTX cytolysin family. We used mass spectrometry and circular dichroism to show that the linker segment forms α-helical structures that penetrate into lipid bilayer. Replacement of the positively charged arginine residues, proposed to be involved in target membrane destabilization by the linker segment, reduced the capacity of the toxin to translocate the AC domain across cell membrane. Substitutions of negatively charged residues then revealed that two clusters of negative charges within the linker segment control the size and the propensity of CyaA pore formation, thereby restricting the cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA. The 'AC to Hly-linking segment' thus appears to account for the smaller size and modest cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA pores, as compared to typical RTX hemolysins. PMID:27581058

  1. Design of an electrolyte composition for stable and rapid charging-discharging of a graphite negative electrode in a bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide-based ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Yukiko; Yamagata, Masaki; Murakami, Satoshi; Saito, Yasuteru; Higashizaki, Tetsuya; Ishiko, Eriko; Kono, Michiyuki; Ishikawa, Masashi

    2015-04-01

    We evaluate the effects of lithium salt on the charge-discharge performance of a graphite negative electrode in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (EMImFSI) ionic liquid-based electrolytes. Although the graphite negative electrode exhibits good cyclability and rate capability in both 0.43 mol dm-3 LiFSI/EMImFSI and LiTFSI/EMImFSI (TFSI- = bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) at room temperature, only the LiFSI/EMImFSI system enables the graphite electrode to be operated with sufficient discharge capacity at the low temperature of 0 °C, even though there is no noticeable difference in ionic conductivity, compared with LiTFSI/EMImFSI. Furthermore, a clear difference in the low-temperature behaviors of the two cells composed of EMImFSI with a high-concentration of lithium salts is observed. Additionally, charge-discharge operation of the graphite electrode at C-rate of over 5.0 can be achieved using of the high-concentration LiFSI/EMImFSI electrolyte. Considering the low-temperature characteristics in both high-concentration electrolytes, the stable and rapid charge-discharge operation in the high-concentration LiFSI/EMImFSI is presumably attributed to a suitable electrode/electrolyte interface with low resistivity. These results suggest that optimization of the electrolyte composition can realize safe and high-performance lithium-ion batteries that utilize ionic liquid-based electrolytes.

  2. Negatively charged residues of the segment linking the enzyme and cytolysin moieties restrict the membrane-permeabilizing capacity of adenylate cyclase toxin

    PubMed Central

    Masin, Jiri; Osickova, Adriana; Sukova, Anna; Fiser, Radovan; Halada, Petr; Bumba, Ladislav; Linhartova, Irena; Osicka, Radim; Sebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The whooping cough agent, Bordetella pertussis, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA) that plays a crucial role in host respiratory tract colonization. CyaA targets CR3-expressing cells and disrupts their bactericidal functions by delivering into their cytosol an adenylate cyclase enzyme that converts intracellular ATP to cAMP. In parallel, the hydrophobic domain of CyaA forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize cell membrane. The invasive AC and pore-forming domains of CyaA are linked by a segment that is unique in the RTX cytolysin family. We used mass spectrometry and circular dichroism to show that the linker segment forms α-helical structures that penetrate into lipid bilayer. Replacement of the positively charged arginine residues, proposed to be involved in target membrane destabilization by the linker segment, reduced the capacity of the toxin to translocate the AC domain across cell membrane. Substitutions of negatively charged residues then revealed that two clusters of negative charges within the linker segment control the size and the propensity of CyaA pore formation, thereby restricting the cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA. The ‘AC to Hly-linking segment’ thus appears to account for the smaller size and modest cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA pores, as compared to typical RTX hemolysins. PMID:27581058

  3. Negatively charged subnanometer-sized silicon clusters and their reversible migration into AFI zeolite pores studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Cheow-keong; Sakamoto, Takashi; Tanaka, Katsumi; Nakata, Ryouhei; Asakawa, Tetsuo

    1999-02-01

    Subnanometer sized silicon clusters were deposited on AFI zeolite (AlPO 4-5: one-dimensional channel diameter <0.73 nm) by pulsed laser ablation of silicon wafer. Their electronic structures were elucidated in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). Core level Si 2p spectra were analyzed into five components, Si(I) to Si(V). Si(I) and Si(II) species selectively increased with a constant ratio during pulsed laser silicon ablation. Their binding energies (BEs) were below 99.5 eV implying negatively charged states. Charge transfer occurred between silicon clusters and framework oxygen and phosphor ions. It was interpreted that the stability of negative charge is due to large electron affinity of silicon clusters. The intensity of XPS signals decreased as a function of time and at the same time the channels were blocked. These results were interpreted due to migration of silicon clusters into zeolite pores. The estimated activation energy (57 kJ/mol) suggests that rate-determining step of the migration is reflected by a weak adsorbed state of silicon clusters similar to physisorbed state. The silicon clusters were partially oxidized at 573 K, which was interpreted as a driving force of backward migration from zeolite pores to the external surface. The composition of silicon cluster was discussed based on homogeneous dispersion of single species.

  4. R.E.D. Server: a web service for deriving RESP and ESP charges and building force field libraries for new molecules and molecular fragments

    PubMed Central

    Vanquelef, Enguerran; Simon, Sabrina; Marquant, Gaelle; Garcia, Elodie; Klimerak, Geoffroy; Delepine, Jean Charles; Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves

    2011-01-01

    R.E.D. Server is a unique, open web service, designed to derive non-polarizable RESP and ESP charges and to build force field libraries for new molecules/molecular fragments. It provides to computational biologists the means to derive rigorously molecular electrostatic potential-based charges embedded in force field libraries that are ready to be used in force field development, charge validation and molecular dynamics simulations. R.E.D. Server interfaces quantum mechanics programs, the RESP program and the latest version of the R.E.D. tools. A two step approach has been developed. The first one consists of preparing P2N file(s) to rigorously define key elements such as atom names, topology and chemical equivalencing needed when building a force field library. Then, P2N files are used to derive RESP or ESP charges embedded in force field libraries in the Tripos mol2 format. In complex cases an entire set of force field libraries or force field topology database is generated. Other features developed in R.E.D. Server include help services, a demonstration, tutorials, frequently asked questions, Jmol-based tools useful to construct PDB input files and parse R.E.D. Server outputs as well as a graphical queuing system allowing any user to check the status of R.E.D. Server jobs. PMID:21609950

  5. R.E.D. Server: a web service for deriving RESP and ESP charges and building force field libraries for new molecules and molecular fragments.

    PubMed

    Vanquelef, Enguerran; Simon, Sabrina; Marquant, Gaelle; Garcia, Elodie; Klimerak, Geoffroy; Delepine, Jean Charles; Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves

    2011-07-01

    R.E.D. Server is a unique, open web service, designed to derive non-polarizable RESP and ESP charges and to build force field libraries for new molecules/molecular fragments. It provides to computational biologists the means to derive rigorously molecular electrostatic potential-based charges embedded in force field libraries that are ready to be used in force field development, charge validation and molecular dynamics simulations. R.E.D. Server interfaces quantum mechanics programs, the RESP program and the latest version of the R.E.D. tools. A two step approach has been developed. The first one consists of preparing P2N file(s) to rigorously define key elements such as atom names, topology and chemical equivalencing needed when building a force field library. Then, P2N files are used to derive RESP or ESP charges embedded in force field libraries in the Tripos mol2 format. In complex cases an entire set of force field libraries or force field topology database is generated. Other features developed in R.E.D. Server include help services, a demonstration, tutorials, frequently asked questions, Jmol-based tools useful to construct PDB input files and parse R.E.D. Server outputs as well as a graphical queuing system allowing any user to check the status of R.E.D. Server jobs. PMID:21609950

  6. Redox-Active Star Molecules Incorporating the 4-Benzolypyridinium Cation: Implications for the Charge Transfer Efficiency Along Branches versus Across the Perimeter in Dendrimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jin-Hua; Rawashdeh, Abdel Monem M.; Oh, Woon Su; Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia; Leventis, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    We report the redox properties of four star systems incorporating the 4-benzoyl-N-alkylpyridinium cation; the redox potential varies along the branches, but remains constant at fixed radii. Voltammetric analysis (cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry) shows that only two of the three redox-active centers in the perimeter are electrochemically accessible during potential sweeps as slow as 20 mV/s and as fast as 10 V/s. On the contrary, both redox centers of a branch are accessible electrochemically within the same time frame. These results are discussed in terms of slow through-space charge transfer and the globular 3-D folding of the molecules.

  7. Negative electrospray ionization on porous supporting tips for mass spectrometric analysis: electrostatic charging effect on detection sensitivity and its application to explosive detection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Melody Yee-Man; Man, Sin-Heng; Che, Chi-Ming; Lau, Kai-Chung; Ng, Kwan-Ming

    2014-03-21

    The simplicity and easy manipulation of a porous substrate-based ESI-MS technique have been widely applied to the direct analysis of different types of samples in positive ion mode. However, the study and application of this technique in negative ion mode are sparse. A key challenge could be due to the ease of electrical discharge on supporting tips upon the application of negative voltage. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of supporting materials, including polyester, polyethylene and wood, on the detection sensitivity of a porous substrate-based negative ESI-MS technique. By using nitrobenzene derivatives and nitrophenol derivatives as the target analytes, it was found that the hydrophobic materials (i.e., polyethylene and polyester) with a higher tendency to accumulate negative charge could enhance the detection sensitivity towards nitrobenzene derivatives via electron-capture ionization; whereas, compounds with electron affinities lower than the cut-off value (1.13 eV) were not detected. Nitrophenol derivatives with pKa smaller than 9.0 could be detected in the form of deprotonated ions; whereas polar materials (i.e., wood), which might undergo competitive deprotonation with the analytes, could suppress the detection sensitivity. With the investigation of the material effects on the detection sensitivity, the porous substrate-based negative ESI-MS method was developed and applied to the direct detection of two commonly encountered explosives in complex samples. PMID:24492411

  8. The role of the angle of pretwist of some molecules forming twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) states in polymer matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hassan, Khader A.; Azumi, Tohru; Rettig, Wolfgang

    1993-04-01

    It is shown that the relative intensity of the twisted intramolecular charge transfer band of ester and benzonitrile derivatives of dialkylaniline in non-hydrogen-bonding polymers increases with increasing size of the donor (dialkylamino) group and is sensitive to both the local polarity and local free volume of polymer sites.

  9. Energy spectra of single neutrons and charged particles emitted following the absorption of stopped negative pions in 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernigoi, C.; Gabrielli, I.; Grion, N.; Pauli, G.; Saitta, B.; Ricci, R. A.; Boccaccio, P.; Viesti, G.

    1981-02-01

    Energy spectra have been measured of single neutrons, protons and deuterons emitted following the capture at rest of negative pions in 4He. The neutron energy spectrum has been measured with an energy resolution of 4% at 90 MeV. The absolute number of stopped pions has been measured.

  10. Impact of negative affectively charged stimuli and response style on cognitive-control-related neural activation: An ERP study

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, C.; Pine, D. S.; Fox, N. A.

    2013-01-01

    The canonical AX-CPT task measures two forms of cognitive control: sustained goal-oriented control (“proactive” control) and transient changes in cognitive control following unexpected events (“reactive” control). We modified this task by adding negative and neutral International Affective Picture System (IAPS) pictures to assess the effects of negative emotion on these two forms of cognitive control. Proactive and reactive control styles were assessed based on measures of behavior and electrophysiology, including the N2 event-related potential component and source space activation (Low Resolution Tomography [LORETA]). We found slower reaction-times and greater DLPFC activation for negative relative to neutral stimuli. Additionally, we found that a proactive style of responding was related to less prefrontal activation (interpreted to reflect increased efficiency of processing) during actively maintained previously cued information and that a reactive style of responding was related to less prefrontal activation (interpreted to reflect increased efficiency of processing) during just-in-time environmentally triggered information. This pattern of results was evident in relatively neutral contexts, but in the face of negative emotion, these associations were not found, suggesting potential response style-by-emotion interaction effects on prefrontal neural activation PMID:24021156

  11. Nuclear factor kappaB dominant negative genetic constructs inhibit X-ray induction of cell adhesion molecules in the vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D E; Virudachalam, S; Kuchibhotla, J

    1998-12-01

    X-ray-induced expression of inflammatory mediators has been proposed to contribute to radiation injury in normal tissues. Radiation-inducible inflammatory mediators include the cell adhesion molecule (CAM) E-selectin and the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. Nuclear factor (NF)kappaB is activated by X-rays and may participate in the transcriptional regulation of each of these inflammatory mediators. To determine whether NFkappaB inhibition abrogates X-ray induction of inflammatory mediators, we used two experimental approaches including NFkappaB inhibitory drugs and a dominant negative genetic construct. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human microvascular endothelial cells were treated with the NFkappaB inhibitors ALLN, PDTC, NAC, and MG132. After irradiation, E-selectin or ICAM-1 was measured by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis. E-selectin and ICAM-1 expression was measured by use of immunofluorescence and fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis. E-selectin expression increased 7-fold, and ICAM-1 expression increased 4-fold after irradiation. All of the inhibitors attenuated E-selectin expression after irradiation. ALLN and MG132 attenuated radiation-induced ICAM expression. However, PDTC and NAC induced increased expression of ICAM-1 in HUVECs. Inhibition of X-ray induction of ICAM by these agents could not be demonstrated. In separate experiments, the NFkappaB dominant negative genetic construct was cotransfected with the promoter-reporter constructs by means of Lipofectin reagent. The ICAM promoter-reporter construct consists of the 1.2-kb segment of the human ICAM promoter upstream of the transcriptional start site linked to the luciferase reporter gene (pGL.FL-Luc). The E-selectin promoter-reporter construct consists of 525 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site of the human E-selectin promoter linked to the human growth hormone reporter gene (pE525-GH). Endothelial cells transfected with the ICAM-1 promoter

  12. Enhancement of NK Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Long-Term Living in Negatively Charged-Particle Dominant Indoor Air-Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Mase, Akinori; Kotani, Muneo; Ami, Kazuhisa; Maeda, Megumi; Shirahama, Takashi; Lee, Suni; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Yoshitome, Kei; Otsuki, Takemi

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of house conditions that promote health revealed that negatively charged-particle dominant indoor air-conditions (NCPDIAC) induced immune stimulation. Negatively charged air-conditions were established using a fine charcoal powder on walls and ceilings and utilizing forced negatively charged particles (approximate diameter: 20 nm) dominant in indoor air-conditions created by applying an electric voltage (72 V) between the backside of the walls and the ground. We reported previously that these conditions induced a slight and significant increase of interleukin-2 during a 2.5-h stay and an increase of NK cell cytotoxicity when examining human subjects after a two-week night stay under these conditions. In the present study, seven healthy volunteers had a device installed to create NCPDIAC in the living or sleeping rooms of their own homes. Every three months the volunteers then turned the NCPDIAC device on or off. A total of 16 ON and 13 OFF trials were conducted and their biological effects were analyzed. NK activity increased during ON trials and decreased during OFF trials, although no other adverse effects were found. In addition, there were slight increases of epidermal growth factor (EGF) during ON trials. Furthermore, a comparison of the cytokine status between ON and OFF trials showed that basic immune status was stimulated slightly during ON trials under NCPIADC. Our overall findings indicate that the NCPDIAC device caused activation of NK activity and stimulated immune status, particularly only on NK activity, and therefore could be set in the home or office buildings. PMID:26173062

  13. Influence of expander components on the processes at the negative plates of lead-acid cells on high-rate partial-state-of-charge cycling. Part I: Effect of lignosulfonates and BaSO 4 on the processes of charge and discharge of negative plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, D.; Nikolov, P.; Rogachev, T.

    This study investigates the influence of the organic expander component (Vanisperse A) and of BaSO 4 on the performance of negative lead-acid battery plates on high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) cycling. Batteries operating in the HRPSoC mode should be classified as a separate type of lead-acid batteries. Hence, the additives to the negative plates should differ from the conventional expander composition. It has been established that lignosulfonates are adsorbed onto the lead surface and thus impede the charge processes, which results in impaired reversibility of the charge-discharge processes and hence shorter cycle life on HRPSoC operation, limited by sulfation of the negative plates. BaSO 4 exerts the opposite effect: it improves the reversibility of the processes in the HRPSoC mode and hence prolongs the cycle life of the cells. The most pronounced effect of BaSO 4 has been registered when it is added in concentration of 1.0 wt.% versus the leady oxide (LO) used for paste preparation. It has also been established that BaSO 4 lowers the overpotential of PbSO 4 nucleation. The results of the present investigation indicate that BaSO 4 affects also the crystallization process of Pb during cell charging. Thus, BaSO 4 eventually improves the performance characteristics of lead-acid cells on HRPSoC cycling.

  14. Charge effect on the photoinactivation of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by cationic meso-substituted porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent times photodynamic antimicrobial therapy has been used to efficiently destroy Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria using cationic porphyrins as photosensitizers. There is an increasing interest in this approach, namely in the search of photosensitizers with adequate structural features for an efficient photoinactivation process. In this study we propose to compare the efficiency of seven cationic porphyrins differing in meso-substituent groups, charge number and charge distribution, on the photodynamic inactivation of a Gram (+) bacterium (Enterococcus faecalis) and of a Gram (-) bacterium (Escherichia coli). The present study complements our previous work on the search for photosensitizers that might be considered good candidates for the photoinactivation of a large spectrum of environmental microorganisms. Results Bacterial suspension (107 CFU mL-1) treated with different photosensitizers concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 μM) were exposed to white light (40 W m-2) for a total light dose of 64.8 J cm-2. The most effective photosensitizers against both bacterial strains were the Tri-Py+-Me-PF and Tri-Py+-Me-CO2Me at 5.0 μM with a light fluence of 64.8 J cm-2, leading to > 7.0 log (> 99,999%) of photoinactivation. The tetracationic porphyrin also proved to be a good photosensitizer against both bacterial strains. Both di-cationic and the monocationic porphyrins were the least effective ones. Conclusion The number of positive charges, the charge distribution in the porphyrins' structure and the meso-substituent groups seem to have different effects on the photoinactivation of both bacteria. As the Tri-Py+-Me-PF porphyrin provides the highest log reduction using lower light doses, this photosensitizer can efficiently photoinactivate a large spectrum of environmental bacteria. The complete inactivation of both bacterial strains with low light fluence (40 W m-2) means that the photodynamic approach can be applied to wastewater treatment under natural

  15. Nanoscale charge localization induced by random orientations of organic molecules in hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbI3.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-01-14

    Perovskite-based solar cells have achieved high solar-energy conversion efficiencies and attracted wide attentions nowadays. Despite the rapid progress in solar-cell devices, many fundamental issues of the hybrid perovskites have not been fully understood. Experimentally, it is well-known that in CH3NH3PbI3 the organic molecules CH3NH3 are randomly orientated at the room temperature, but the impact of the random molecular orientation has not been investigated. Because of the dipole moment of the organic molecule, the random orientation creates a novel system with long-range potential fluctuations unlike alloys or other conventional disordered systems. Using linear scaling ab initio methods, we find that the charge densities of the conduction band minimum and the valence band maximum are localized in nanoscales due to the potential fluctuations. The charge localization causes electron-hole separation and reduces carrier recombination rates, which may contribute to the long carrier lifetime observed in experiments. PMID:25493911

  16. Charge density of the biologically active molecule (2-oxo-1,3-benzoxazol-3(2H)-yl)acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai; Ashurov, Jamshid; Ibragimov, Aziz; Wang, Ruimin; Mouhib, Halima; Mukhamedov, Nasir; Englert, Ulli

    2016-02-01

    (2-Oxo-1,3-benzoxazol-3(2H)-yl)acetic acid is a member of a biologically active class of compounds. Its molecular structure in the crystal has been determined by X-ray diffraction, and its gas phase structure was obtained by quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. In order to understand the dynamics of the molecule, two presumably soft degrees of freedom associated with the relative orientation of the planar benzoxazolone system and its substituent at the N atom were varied systematically. Five conformers have been identified as local minima on the resulting two-dimensional potential energy surface within an energy window of 27 kJ mol(-1). The energetically most favourable minimum closely matches the conformation observed in the crystal. Based on high-resolution diffraction data collected at low temperature, the experimental electron density of the compound was determined. Comparison with the electron density established by theory for the isolated molecule allowed the effect of intermolecular interactions to be addressed, in particular a moderately strong O-H...O hydrogen bond with a donor...acceptor distance of 2.6177 (9) Å: the oxygen acceptor is clearly polarized in the extended solid. The hydrogen bond connects consecutive molecules to chains, and the pronounced charge separation leads to stacking between neighburs with antiparallel dipole moments perpendicular to the chain direction. PMID:26830806

  17. Redox-Active Star Molecules Incorporating the 4-Benzoylpyridinium Cation - Implications for the Charge Transfer Along Branches vs. Across the Perimeter in Dendrimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Yang, Jinua; Fabrizio,Even F.; Rawashdeh, Abdel-Monem M.; Oh, Woon Su; Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia

    2004-01-01

    Dendrimers are self-repeating globular branched star molecules, whose fractal structure continues to fascinate, challenge, and inspire. Functional dendrimers may incorporate redox centers, and potential applications include antennae molecules for light harvesting, sensors, mediators, and artificial biomolecules. We report the synthesis and redox properties of four star systems incorporating the 4-benzoyl-N-alkylpyridinium cation; the redox potential varies along the branches but remains constant at fixed radii. Bulk electrolysis shows that at a semi-infinite time scale all redox centers are electrochemically accessible. However, voltammetric analysis (cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry) shows that on1y two of the three redox-active centers in the perimeter are electrochemically accessible during potential sweeps as slow as 20 mV/s and as fast as 10 V/s. On the contrary, both redox centers along branches are accessible electrochemically within the same time frame. These results are explained in terms of slow through-space charge transfer and the globular 3-D folding of the molecules and are discussed in terms of their implications on the design of efficient redox functional dendrimers.

  18. Impact of the Crystalline Packing Structures on Charge Transport and Recombination via Alkyl Chain Tunability of DPP-Based Small Molecules in Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Chang Eun; Kim, Yu Jin; Suranagi, Sanjaykumar R; Kini, Gururaj P; Park, Sangheon; Lee, Sang Kyu; Shin, Won Suk; Moon, Sang-Jin; Kang, In-Nam; Park, Chan Eon; Lee, Jong-Cheol

    2016-05-25

    A series of small compound materials based on benzodithiophene (BDT) and diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) with three different alkyl side chains were synthesized and used for organic photovoltaics. These small compounds had different alkyl branches (i.e., 2-ethylhexyl (EH), 2-butyloctyl (BO), and 2-hexyldecyl (HD)) attached to DPP units. Thin films made of these compounds were characterized and their solar cell parameters were measured in order to systematically analyze influences of the different side chains of compounds on the film microstructure, molecular packing, and hence, charge-transport and recombination properties. The relatively shorter side chains in the small molecules enabled more ordered packing structures with higher crystallinities, which resulted in higher carrier mobilities and less recombination factors; the small molecule with the EH branches exhibited the best semiconducting properties with a power conversion efficiency of up to 5.54% in solar cell devices. Our study suggested that tuning the alkyl chain length of semiconducting molecules is a powerful strategy for achieving high performance of organic photovoltaics. PMID:27156705

  19. Characterization of a Novel Small Molecule That Potentiates β-Lactam Activity against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Dhanalakshmi R.; Monteiro, João M.; Memmi, Guido; Thanassi, Jane; Pucci, Michael; Schwartzman, Joseph; Pinho, Mariana G.

    2015-01-01

    In a loss-of-viability screen using small molecules against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain USA300 with a sub-MIC of a β-lactam, we found a small molecule, designated DNAC-1, which potentiated the effect of oxacillin (i.e., the MIC of oxacillin decreased from 64 to 0.25 μg/ml). Fluorescence microscopy indicated a disruption in the membrane structures within 15 min of exposure to DNAC-1 at 2× MIC. This permeabilization was accompanied by a rapid loss of membrane potential, as monitored by use of the DiOC2 (3,3′-diethyloxacarbocyanine iodide) dye. Macromolecular analysis showed the inhibition of staphylococcal cell wall synthesis by DNAC-1. Transmission electron microscopy of treated MRSA USA300 cells revealed a slightly thicker cell wall, together with mesosome-like projections into the cytosol. The exposure of USA300 cells to DNAC-1 was associated with the mislocalization of FtsZ accompanied by the localization of penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) and PBP4 away from the septum, as well as mild activation of the vraRS-mediated cell wall stress response. However, DNAC-1 does not have any generalized toxicity toward mammalian host cells. DNAC-1 in combination with ceftriaxone is also effective against an assortment of Gram-negative pathogens. Using a murine subcutaneous coinjection model with 108 CFU of USA300 as a challenge inoculum, DNAC-1 alone or DNAC-1 with a sub-MIC of oxacillin resulted in a 6-log reduction in bacterial load and decreased abscess formation compared to the untreated control. We propose that DNAC-1, by exerting a bimodal effect on the cell membrane and cell wall, is a viable candidate in the development of combination therapy against many common bacterial pathogens. PMID:25583731

  20. Quantitative Estimation of Aluminum-Induced Negative Charge Region Top Area of SiO2 Based on Frequency-Dependent AC Surface Photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hirofumi; Wakashima, Hiroya; Ishikawa, Takuma; Ikeda, Masanori

    2007-11-01

    Most aluminum (Al) in Al-contaminated and thermally oxidized n-type silicon (Si) dioxide (SiO2) is clarified to be segregated at the very top area of SiO2, causing a negative charge, as has been suggested by the formation of an (AlOSi)- network and/or AlO2- based on AC surface photovoltage (SPV). For a strongly inverted state at an oxidation temperature of 800 °C for 1 h, the thickness of the Al-induced negative charge region is quantitatively determined to be 2.4 nm on the basis of AC SPV after successive step etching and chemical analysis. As oxidation duration increased at 800 °C for 3 h, the strongly inverted state changed into a weakly inverted state, where the thickness of the Al-rich region is reduced (0.8 nm), proving that more than half of the (AlOSi)- network collapse and/or Al diffuses inside SiO2 during a longer oxidation duration.

  1. Lactosylated PLGA nanoparticles containing ϵ-polylysine for the sustained release and liver-targeted delivery of the negatively charged proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; An, Tong; Zhao, Chuan; Li, Yuan; Li, Rongshan; Yang, Rui; Wang, Yinsong; Gao, Xiujun

    2015-01-30

    The acidic internal pH environment, initial burst release and lack of targeting property are main limitations of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles for carrying proteins. In this study, ϵ-polylysine (ϵ-PL) was used as an anti-acidic agent and a protein protectant to prepare PLGA nanoparticles for the protein delivery. To obtain the liver-targeting capability, lactosylated PLGA (Lac-PLGA) was synthesized by conjugation of lactose acid to PLGA at both ends, and then used to prepare nanoparticles containing ϵ-PL by the nanoprecipitation method. Bovine serumal bumin (BSA), a negatively charged protein, was efficiently loaded into Lac-PLGA/ϵ-PL nanoparticles and exhibited significant decreased burst release in vitro, sustained release in the blood and increased liver distribution in mice after intravenous injections. The enhanced stability of BSA was due to its electrical interaction with ϵ-PL and the neutralized internal environment of nanoparticles. In conclusion, Lac-PLGA/ϵ-PL nanoparticle system can be used as a promising carrier for the negatively charged proteins. PMID:25510599

  2. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Song Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Dong Ke

    2010-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids.

  3. Quantitative Estimation of the Metal-Induced Negative Oxide Charge Density in n-Type Silicon Wafers from Measurements of Frequency-Dependent AC Surface Photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hirofumi; Shin, Ryuhei; Ikeda, Masanori

    2006-03-01

    A quantitative estimation of metal-induced oxide charge (Qmi) density is performed on the surface of n-type silicon (Si) wafers rinsed with trivalent aluminum (Al)- and iron (Fe)-contaminated RCA alkaline solution by analyzing the frequency-dependent AC surface photovoltage (SPV). Qmi arises from (AlOSi)- or (FeOSi)- networks in native oxide which are responsible for inducing negative oxide charge. On the basis of Munakata and Nishimatsu’s half-sided junction model [C. Munakata and S. Nishimatsu: Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 25 (1986) 807], the network densities are estimated in depletion and/or weak inversion in which the cutoff frequencies of the frequency-dependent AC SPV curves are defined. It is found that the charge density Qmi increases with the time of exposure to air and it is calculated that about 4% of Al atoms in the native oxide are activated in the form of an (AlOSi)- network for 1 h of exposure. The (FeOSi)- network density is calculated as a function of Fe concentration. As a result, the frequency-dependent AC SPV measurements carried out here enable a successful evaluation of impurity level in a nondestructive and noncontact manner.

  4. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuzhe; Song, Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo, Ningguang; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids. PMID:20561903

  5. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuzhe; Song, Weizhong; Groome, James R; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo, Ningguang; Dong, Ke

    2010-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids. PMID:20561903

  6. Kinetic instability of the dust acoustic mode in inhomogeneous, partially magnetized plasma with both positively and negatively charged grains

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Poedts, S.

    2010-08-15

    A purely kinetic instability of the dust acoustic mode in inhomogeneous plasmas is discussed. In the presence of a magnetic field, electrons and ions may be magnetized while at the same time dust grains may remain unmagnetized. Although the dynamics of the light species is strongly affected by the magnetic field, the dust acoustic mode may still propagate in practically any direction. The inhomogeneity implies a source of free energy for an instability that develops through the diamagnetic drift effects of the magnetized species. It is shown that this may be a powerful mechanism for the excitation of dust acoustic waves. The analysis presented in the work is also directly applicable to plasmas containing both positive and negative ions and electrons, provided that at least one of the two ion species is unmagnetized.

  7. REVISED BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS WITH LONG-LIVED, NEGATIVELY CHARGED MASSIVE PARTICLES: UPDATED RECOMBINATION RATES, PRIMORDIAL {sup 9}Be NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND IMPACT OF NEW {sup 6}Li LIMITS

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: kyungsik@kau.ac.kr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp E-mail: gmathews@nd.edu

    2014-09-01

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X {sup –}, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X {sup –} particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the {sup 6,} {sup 7}Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, {sup 7}Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X {sup –} particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 4}He with X {sup –}. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X {sup –} mass, m{sub X} ≳ 100 GeV, the d-wave → 2P transition is most important for {sup 7}Li and {sup 7,} {sup 9}Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the {sup 7}Be recombination for m{sub X} = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for {sup 9}Be production: the recombination of {sup 7}Li and X {sup –} followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of {sup 7}Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of {sup 7}Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X {sup –} are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial {sup 6}Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the {sup 7}Li problem and the primordial {sup 9}Be abundances are revised.

  8. Revised Big Bang Nucleosynthesis with Long-lived, Negatively Charged Massive Particles: Updated Recombination Rates, Primordial 9Be Nucleosynthesis, and Impact of New 6Li Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant. J.

    2014-09-01

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X -, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X - particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the 6, 7Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, 7Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X - particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of 7Be, 7Li, 9Be, and 4He with X -. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X - mass, mX >~ 100 GeV, the d-wave → 2P transition is most important for 7Li and 7, 9Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the 7Be recombination for mX = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for 9Be production: the recombination of 7Li and X - followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of 7Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of 7Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X - are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial 6Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the 7Li problem and the primordial 9Be abundances are revised.

  9. Selective binding of IgG4 and other negatively charged plasma proteins in normal and diabetic human kidneys.

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, T.; Kim, Y.; Michael, A. F.

    1984-01-01

    Renal tissue from 9 patients with diabetes mellitus (4 with mild and 5 with end-stage disease) and 3 with antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis, as well as 5 normal human kidneys, were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy for the presence of plasma proteins of varying isoelectric point (pI). In normal and diabetic kidneys, IgG deposition in basement membranes was restricted to IgG4 (pI 5.5-6.0), the subclass present in lowest concentration in human plasma. IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 (pI 7.0-9.5) were not detected. In contrast, in anti-GBM nephritis, all four subclasses were present in a linear pattern in GBM. Other plasma proteins of low isoelectric point were detected in basement membranes: albumin (pI 4.9), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (pI 2.7), amyloid P (pI 3.9-4.8), and alpha-1-antitrypsin (pI 4.5). These studies are consistent with the hypothesis that circulating anionic plasma proteins are electrostatically bound in vivo to positively charged moieties in normal and especially diabetic basement membranes. Images Figure 1 PMID:6375393

  10. Negatively Charged Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Interact with the 20S Proteasome and Differentially Modulate Its Biologic Functional Effects

    PubMed Central

    Falaschetti, Christine A.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Kurepa, Jasmina; Nanavati, Dhaval; Chou, Stanley S.; De, Mrinmoy; Song, MinHa; Jang, Jung-tak; Wu, Aiguo; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Cheon, Jinwoo; Smalle, Jan; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2013-01-01

    The multicatalytic ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) carries out proteolysis in a highly orchestrated way and regulates a large number of cellular processes. Deregulation of the UPS in many disorders has been documented. In some cases, e.g. carcinogenesis, elevated proteasome activity has been implicated in disease development, while the etiology of other diseases, e.g. neurodegeneration, includes decreased UPS activity. Therefore, agents that alter proteasome activity could suppress as well as enhance a multitude of diseases. Metal oxide nanoparticles, often developed as diagnostic tools, have not previously been tested as modulators of proteasome activity. Here, several types of metal oxide nanoparticles were found to adsorb to the proteasome and show variable preferential binding for particular proteasome subunits with several peptide binding “hotspots” possible. These interactions depend on the size, charge, and concentration of the nanoparticles and affect proteasome activity in a time-dependent manner. Should metal oxide nanoparticles increase proteasome activity in cells, as they do in vitro, unintended effects related to changes in proteasome function can be expected. PMID:23930940

  11. Development of additives in negative active-material to suppress sulfation during high-rate partial-state-of-charge operation of lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Ken; Funato, Takayuki; Watanabe, Masashi; Wada, Hidetoshi; Nakamura, Kenji; Shiomi, Masaaki; Osumi, Shigeharu

    Additives in the negative active-material of lead-acid batteries were examined to determine whether they could prevent progressive accumulation of lead sulfate (PbSO 4) in negative plates during high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. This phenomenon is caused by progressive growth of PbSO 4 particles and a lack of conductive paths near these PbSO 4 particles. Barium sulfate (BaSO 4) particles in various sizes and synthetic lignin were added to the negative active-material to control PbSO 4 particle size during HRPSoC cycle-life. Some types of carbon fibres were also added to form conductive paths around the PbSO 4 particles. Synthetic lignin was found to be the most effective additive for improving battery life in HRPSoC cycle-life tests, whereas the other factors such as BaSO 4 size or carbon fibre extended less influence. The growth rate of PbSO 4 particles per cycle was much lower in a cell with synthetic lignin than in a cell with natural lignin.

  12. Novel negatively charged hybrids. 3. Removal of Pb2+ from aqueous solution using zwitterionic hybrid polymers as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junsheng; Ma, Yue; Zhang, Yaping; Shao, Guoquan

    2010-01-15

    Using zwitterionic hybrid polymers as adsorbent, the adsorption kinetics and isotherm, thermodynamic parameters of Delta G, Delta H and DeltaS for the removal of Pb(2+) from aqueous solution were investigated. It is indicated that the adsorption of Pb(2+) ions on these zwitterionic hybrid polymers followed the Lagergren second-order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model, demonstrating that the adsorption process might be Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The negative values of Delta G and the positive values of Delta H evidence that Pb(2+) adsorption on these zwitterionic hybrid polymers is spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. Moreover, the zwitterionic hybrid polymers produced reveal relatively higher desorption efficiency in 2 mol dm(-3) aqueous HNO(3) solution, indicating that they can be recycled in industrial processes. These findings suggest that these zwitterionic hybrid polymers are the promising adsorbents for Pb(2+) removal and can be potentially applied in the separation and recovery of Pb(2+) ions from the waste chemicals and contaminated water of lead-acid rechargeable battery. PMID:19744785

  13. PEG-b-PCL copolymer micelles with the ability of pH-controlled negative-to-positive charge reversal for intracellular delivery of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hongzhang; Liu, Jinjian; Zhao, Xuefei; Zhang, Yuming; Liu, Jianfeng; Xu, Shuxin; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-11-10

    The application of PEG-b-PCL micelles was dampened by their inherent low drug-loading capability and relatively poor cell uptake efficiency. In this study, a series of novel PEG-b-PCL copolymers methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone-co-γ-dimethyl maleamidic acid -ε-caprolactone) (mPEG-b-P(CL-co-DCL)) bearing different amounts of acid-labile β-carboxylic amides on the polyester moiety were synthesized. The chain structure and chemical composition of copolymers were characterized by (1)H NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). mPEG-b-P(CL-co-DCL) with critical micellar concentrations (CMCs) of 3.2-6.3 μg/mL could self-assemble into stable micelles in water with diameters of 100 to 150 nm. Doxorubicin (DOX), a cationic hydrophobic drug, was successfully encapsulated into the polymer micelles, achieving a very high loading content due to electrostatic interaction. Then the stability, charge-conversional behavior, loading and release profiles, cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity of free drug and drug-loaded micelles were evaluated. The β-carboxylic amides functionalized polymer micelles are negatively charged and stable in neutral solution but quickly become positively charged at pH 6.0, due to the hydrolysis of β-carboxylic amides in acidic conditions. The pH-triggered negative-to-positive charge reversal not only resulted in a very fast drug release in acidic conditions, but also effectively enhanced the cellular uptake by electrostatic absorptive endocytosis. The MTT assay demonstrated that mPEG-b-P(CL-co-DCL) micelles were biocompatible to HepG2 cells while DOX-loaded micelles showed significant cytotoxicity. In sum, the introduction of acid-labile β-carboxylic amides on the polyester block in mPEG-b-P(CL-co-DCL) exhibited great potentials for the modifications in the stability in blood circulation, drug solubilization, and release properties, as well as cell internalization and

  14. A study of donor-acceptor in the charge transfer molecular complexes of some thiacrown ethers with dihalogen molecules by DFT method.

    PubMed

    Oftadeh, Mohsen; Moghadary, Mitra; Solimannejad, Mohammad; Semnani, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    The molecular complexes of 1,3,5-trithiane, (TT), tetrathia-8-crown-4, (TT8C4), and trithia-9-crown-3 , (TT9C3) with dihalogens in the ground state were investigated in the gas and dicholoromethane phases using B3LYP method and 6-31G** and 6-31+G** bases sets. In both TT and TT8C4 complexes, it is predicted that charge transfer takes place from the dihalogen to the thiacrown ether molecule; the magnitude trend of the total CT was ICl > IBr > I2, and Cl2 > Br2 > I2, respectively. There was not such a trend with TT9C3. The frequency analysis showed that all complexes in the excited state were unstable. The analysis of natural bond orbitals and comparison of the calculated thermodynamic quantities of the complexes between the gas phase and tetrachloromethane solution confirmed the results. PMID:23841337

  15. A single Tisbnd Osbnd C linkage induces interfacial charge-transfer transitions between TiO2 and a π-conjugated molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Matsumura, Shingo; Hanaya, Minoru

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions between wide-band-gap semiconductors such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and π-conjugated molecules enable the absorption of visible light with colorless organic compounds and also direct photoinduced electron transfers across the interfaces. ICT transitions have been reported to be induced by a double Tisbnd Osbnd C linkage of enediol compounds with two hydroxy groups to TiO2. In this Letter, we demonstrate that a single Tisbnd Osbnd C linkage of phenol with one hydroxy group can induce ICT transitions in the visible region. Our result widely opens up the range of organic compounds available for ICT transitions from diol compounds to mono-hydroxy compounds.

  16. Resonance Raman spectra of organic molecules absorbed on inorganic semiconducting surfaces: Contribution from both localized intramolecular excitation and intermolecular charge transfer excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, ChuanXiang; Zhao, Yi E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn; Liang, WanZhen E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-10-21

    The time-dependent correlation function approach for the calculations of absorption and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of organic molecules absorbed on semiconductor surfaces [Y. Zhao and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044108 (2011)] is extended to include the contribution of the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitation from the absorbers to the semiconducting nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the bidirectionally interfacial CT significantly modifies the spectral line shapes. Although the intermolecular CT excitation makes the absorption spectra red shift slightly, it essentially changes the relative intensities of mode-specific RRS and causes the oscillation behavior of surface enhanced Raman spectra with respect to interfacial electronic couplings. Furthermore, the constructive and destructive interferences of RRS from the localized molecular excitation and CT excitation are observed with respect to the electronic coupling and the bottom position of conductor band. The interferences are determined by both excitation pathways and bidirectionally interfacial CT.

  17. Charge-transfer processes in collisions of He{sup 2+} ions with H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} molecules below 4 keV/u

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Toshio; Miyamoto, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Mineo; Tawara, Hiroyuki

    2006-02-15

    Single- and double-charge-transfer cross sections of {sup 3}He{sup 2+} ions in collisions with N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} molecules have been measured in the energy range of 0.20 to 2.7 keV/u. In addition, the same type of measurements for H{sub 2} molecules has been also carried out again for energies in the range from 0.13 to 0.40 keV/u. For all molecules except for CO{sub 2}, the present single-charge-transfer cross sections are found to be generally larger than, or at least comparable to, double-charge-transfer cross sections in the energy region studied. This is a marked difference in comparison to experimental results reported earlier where a sharp increase for double charge transfer was observed below 0.3 keV/u. The double-charge-transfer cross sections are found to be apparently larger than single-charge-transfer cross sections only for CO{sub 2} molecules at energies below 0.8 keV/u. A theoretical analysis based on a close-coupling method within a molecular representation has also been carried out for H{sub 2} and CO targets to provide some insights.

  18. Predictive DFT-based approaches to charge and spin transport in single-molecule junctions and two-dimensional materials: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Quek, Su Ying; Khoo, Khoong Hong

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The emerging field of flexible electronics based on organics and two-dimensional (2D) materials relies on a fundamental understanding of charge and spin transport at the molecular and nanoscale. It is desirable to make predictions and shine light on unexplained experimental phenomena independently of experimentally derived parameters. Indeed, density functional theory (DFT), the workhorse of first-principles approaches, has been used extensively to model charge/spin transport at the nanoscale. However, DFT is essentially a ground state theory that simply guarantees correct total energies given the correct charge density, while charge/spin transport is a nonequilibrium phenomenon involving the scattering of quasiparticles. In this Account, we critically assess the validity and applicability of DFT to predict charge/spin transport at the nanoscale. We also describe a DFT-based approach, DFT+Σ, which incorporates corrections to Kohn-Sham energy levels based on many-electron calculations. We focus on single-molecule junctions and then discuss how the important considerations for DFT descriptions of transport can differ in 2D materials. We conclude that when used appropriately, DFT and DFT-based approaches can play an important role in making predictions and gaining insight into transport in these materials. Specifically, we shall focus on the low-bias quasi-equilibrium regime, which is also experimentally most relevant for single-molecule junctions. The next question is how well can the scattering of DFT Kohn-Sham particles approximate the scattering of true quasiparticles in the junction? Quasiparticles are electrons (holes) that are surrounded by a constantly changing cloud of holes (electrons), but Kohn-Sham particles have no physical significance. However, Kohn-Sham particles can often be used as a qualitative approximation to quasiparticles. The errors in standard DFT descriptions of transport arise primarily from errors in the Kohn-Sham energy levels

  19. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on small aluminum oxide clusters: Role of the local atomic environment and charge state on the oxidation of the CO molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornelas-Lizcano, J. C.; Guirado-López, R. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations dedicated to analyze the adsorption behavior of CO molecules on small AlxOy± clusters. Following the experimental results of Johnson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 112, 4732 (2008)], we consider structures having the bulk composition Al2O3, as well as smaller Al2O2 and Al2O units. Our electron affinity and total energy calculations are consistent with aluminum oxide clusters having two-dimensional rhombus-like structures. In addition, interconversion energy barriers between two- and one-dimensional atomic arrays are of the order of 1 eV, thus clearly defining the preferred isomers. Single CO adsorption on our charged AlxOy± clusters exhibits, in general, spontaneous oxygen transfer events leading to the production of CO2 in line with the experimental data. However, CO can also bind to both Al and O atoms of the clusters forming aluminum oxide complexes with a CO2 subunit. The vibrational spectra of AlxOy + CO2 provides well defined finger prints that may allow the identification of specific isomers. The AlxOy+ clusters are more reactive than the anionic species and the final Al2O+ + CO reaction can result in the production of atomic Al and carbon dioxide as observed from experiments. We underline the crucial role played by the local atomic environment, charge density distribution, and spin-multiplicity on the oxidation behavior of CO molecules. Finally, we analyze the importance of coadsorption and finite temperature effects by performing DFT Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Our calculations show that CO oxidation on AlxOy+ clusters can be also promoted by the binding of additional CO species at 300 K, revealing the existence of fragmentation processes in line with the ones experimentally inferred.

  20. Predicting the stability of atom-like and molecule-like unit-charge Coulomb three-particle systems

    SciTech Connect

    King, Andrew W.; Herlihy, Patrick E.; Cox, Hazel

    2014-07-28

    Non-relativistic quantum chemical calculations of the particle mass, m{sub 2}{sup ±}, corresponding to the dissociation threshold in a range of Coulomb three-particle systems of the form (m{sub 1}{sup ±}m{sub 2}{sup ±}m{sub 3}{sup ∓}), are performed variationally using a series solution method with a Laguerre-based wavefunction. These masses are used to calculate an accurate stability boundary, i.e., the line that separates the stability domain from the instability domains, in a reciprocal mass fraction ternary diagram. This result is compared to a lower bound to the stability domain derived from symmetric systems and reveals the importance of the asymmetric (mass-symmetry breaking) terms in the Hamiltonian at dissociation. A functional fit to the stability boundary data provides a simple analytical expression for calculating the minimum mass of a third particle required for stable binding to a two-particle system, i.e., for predicting the bound state stability of any unit-charge three-particle system.

  1. Charge transfer excitations in water-soluble sulfonated zinc-phthalocyanine (ZnPcS) donor molecules coupled to C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zope, Rajendra; Basurto, Luis; Olguin, Marco; Baruah, Tunna

    2013-03-01

    We present a study of charge transfer (CT) excited states for a recently synthesized group of water-soluble sulfonated zinc-phthalocyanine (ZnPcS) donor molecules coupled to C60. The ZnPcS donors (ZnPcS2, ZnPcS3, and ZnPcS4) are promising materials for achieving solar cell device production with the photoactive area prepared from aqueous solution. Experimentally, decreasing the number of sulfonate substituent groups for ZnPc increased the photocurrent and lowered the open circuit voltage VOC. Measurements show that the VOC is largest for ZnPc-S4/C60 and lowest for ZnPc-S3/C60. The degree of sulfonation and the measured device VOC does not result in the expected pattern of values based on donor-acceptor HOMO/LUMO energy differences. Variations in film morphology may account for the unexpected pattern of VOC values. Our charge transfer excited state calculations show that the lowest CT excitation energy among the group of ZnPcS/C60 donor-acceptor pairs corresponds to the disulfonated ZnPc/C60 system. The largest CT excited state energies belong to the tetrasulfonated ZnPc/C60 complex. We also examine the effect of geometrical orientation on the CT energies for the ZnPcS donor-acceptor pairs.

  2. Optical study of a doubly negatively charged exciton in a CdTe/ZnTe quantum dot containing a single Mn+2 ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoleński, T.; Koperski, M.; Goryca, M.; Wojnar, P.; Kossacki, P.; Kazimierczuk, T.

    2015-08-01

    We present a magnetospectroscopic study of a doubly negatively charged exciton X2 - in a CdTe quantum dot doped with a single Mn+2 ion. The X2 - emission leading to the singlet final state of an excited electron pair is demonstrated to consist of six distinct lines corresponding to different projections of the Mn+2 spin, similarly as for the neutral exciton X . We show that the fine structure of X2 - energy levels, as well as the effects of the longitudinal magnetic field, are well reproduced by a simple spin Hamiltonian model featuring both carrier-ion and intershell electron-hole exchange interactions. We also point out two important effects distinguishing the X2 - from the X , which result from different symmetries of the electron wave function: the field-induced decrease of the anisotropic part of intershell electron-hole exchange, and the negligible value of the Mn+2 exchange integral with the p -shell electron.

  3. Negative charge trapping effects in Al2O3 films grown by atomic layer deposition onto thermally oxidized 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilirò, Emanuela; Lo Nigro, Raffaella; Fiorenza, Patrick; Roccaforte, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    This letter reports on the negative charge trapping in Al2O3 thin films grown by atomic layer deposition onto oxidized silicon carbide (4H-SiC). The films exhibited a permittivity of 8.4, a breakdown field of 9.2 MV/cm and small hysteresis under moderate bias cycles. However, severe electron trapping inside the Al2O3 film (1 × 1012 cm-2) occurs upon high positive bias stress (>10V). Capacitance-voltage measurements at different temperatures and stress conditions have been used to determine an activation energy of 0.1eV. The results provide indications on the possible nature of the trapping defects and, hence, on the strategies to improve this technology for 4H-SiC devices.

  4. ZRBA1, a Mixed EGFR/DNA Targeting Molecule, Potentiates Radiation Response Through Delayed DNA Damage Repair Process in a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Model

    SciTech Connect

    Heravi, Mitra; Kumala, Slawomir; Rachid, Zakaria; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J.; Radzioch, Danuta; Muanza, Thierry M.

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: ZRBA1 is a combi-molecule designed to induce DNA alkylating lesions and to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) TK domain. Inasmuch as ZRBA1 downregulates the EGFR TK-mediated antisurvival signaling and induces DNA damage, we postulated that it might be a radiosensitizer. The aim of this study was to further investigate the potentiating effect of ZRBA1 in combination with radiation and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of interaction between these 2 treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: The triple negative human breast MDA-MB-468 cancer cell line and mouse mammary cancer 4T1 cell line were used in this study. Clonogenic assay, Western blot analysis, and DNA damage analysis were performed at multiple time points after treatment. To confirm our in vitro findings, in vivo tumor growth delay assay was performed. Results: Our results show that a combination of ZRBA1 and radiation increases the radiation sensitivity of both cell lines significantly with a dose enhancement factor of 1.56, induces significant numbers of DNA strand breaks, prolongs higher DNA damage up to 24 hours after treatment, and significantly increases tumor growth delay in a syngeneic mouse model. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the higher efficacy of this combination could be partially due to increased DNA damage and delayed DNA repair process and to the inhibition of EGFR. The encouraging results of this combination demonstrated a significant improvement in treatment efficiency and therefore could be applicable in early clinical trial settings.

  5. Vibrationally state selected ion molecule experimental and computational studies of both reactant charge states of [nitrogen dioxide + ethyne]+ and HOD+ with nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Jason M.

    2011-12-01

    Ion molecule studies have not only determined reactivity of systems that would have otherwise been unavailable, but also provide a perspective that improves the understanding of the mechanisms that drive reaction. Presented here are studies of three ion molecule systems one of which is accompanied by an extensive set of direct dynamics trajectory calculations. In the first system presented, NO2+ in six different vibrational states was reacted with C2H2 over the center-of-mass energy range from 0.03 to 3.3 eV. The effects of the symmetric bend overtone (0200) excitation are particularly strong (factor of 4) while the delta overtone (0220) effects are much weaker. A large set of quasi-classical trajectories were calculated at the PBE1PBE/6-311G** level of theory, in an attempt to understand the mechanistic origins of this observation. The trajectories reproduce experiment where comparable. Analysis of these trajectories resolves the mechanistic origins of this vibrational effect. Similar experimental measurements were made for the first excited electronic state of this system where the charge is localized on the acetylene. The C 2H2+ reactant was prepared in four distinct modes. Because both reactants have one unpaired electron, collisions can occur with either singlet or triplet coupling of these unpaired electrons, and the contributions the three channels (charge, O-, and O transfer) are separated based on distinct recoil dynamics. The effects of C2H 2+ vibration are modest, but mode specific. Integral cross sections and product recoil velocity distributions were also measured for reaction of HOD+ with NO2, in which the HOD+ reactant was prepared in its ground state, and with mode-selective excitation in the 001 (OH stretch), 100 (OD stretch) and bend (010) modes. In addition, we measured the 300 K thermal kinetics in a selected ion flow tube reactor and report product branching ratios different from previous measurements. Reaction is found to occur on both the

  6. Beneficial effects of activated carbon additives on the performance of negative lead-acid battery electrode for high-rate partial-state-of-charge operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Jiayuan; Ding, Ping; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Xianzhang; Chen, Jian; Yang, Yusheng

    2013-11-01

    Experiments are made with negative electrode of 2 V cell and 12 V lead-acid battery doped with typical activated carbon additives. It turns out that the negative electrode containing tens-of-micron-sized carbon particles in NAM exhibits markedly increased HRPSoC cycle life than the one containing carbon particles with much smaller size of several microns or the one containing no activated carbon. The improved performance is mainly attributed to the optimized NAM microstructure and the enhanced electrode reaction kinetics by introducing appropriate activated carbon. The beneficial effects can be briefly summarized from three aspects. First, activated carbon acts as new porous-skeleton builder to increase the porosity and active surface of NAM, and thus facilitates the electrolyte diffusion from surface to inner and provides more sites for crystallization/dissolution of lead sulfate; second, activated carbon plays the role of electrolyte supplier to provide sufficient H2SO4 in the inner of plate when the diffusion of H2SO4 from plate surface cannot keep pace of the electrode reaction; Third, activated carbon acts as capacitive buffer to absorb excess charge current which would otherwise lead to insufficient NAM conversion and hydrogen evolution.

  7. The electrostatic co-assembly in non-stoichiometric aqueous mixtures of copolymers composed of one neutral water-soluble and one polyelectrolyte (either positively or negatively charged) block: a dissipative particle dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Šindelka, Karel; Limpouchová, Zuzana; Lísal, Martin; Procházka, Karel

    2016-06-28

    The electrostatic co-assembly in non-stoichiometric aqueous mixtures of diblock copolymers composed of a neutral water-soluble block and an either positively or negatively charged polyelectrolyte (PE) block has been studied by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The employed DPD variant includes explicit electrostatics and enables the investigation of the role of small ions in the co-assembly. The properties of core-shell associates containing insoluble interpolyelectrolyte complex cores and protective neutral shells were investigated as functions of the ratio of positive-to-negative charges in the system. This ratio was varied by increasing the number of positively charged PE chains of the same length as those of negatively charged chains, and by changing the PE length and charge density. The simulation results show that the associates formed in non-stoichiometric mixtures differ from those formed in stoichiometric mixtures: their association numbers are lower, their cores are charged and a fraction of excess chains remain free in the non-associated state. The study demonstrates the important role of the compatibility of the counterions with the polymer blocks. It simultaneously emphasizes the necessity of including the electrostatic interaction of all the charged species in the DPD computational scheme. PMID:27253089

  8. Nonlocal desorption of chlorobenzene molecules from the Si(111)-(7×7) surface by charge injection from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope: remote control of atomic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Sloan, P A; Sakulsermsuk, S; Palmer, R E

    2010-07-23

    We report the nonlocal desorption of chlorobenzene molecules from the Si(111)-(7×7) surface by charge injection from the laterally distant tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and demonstrate remote control of the manipulation process by precise selection of the atomic site for injection. Nonlocal desorption decays exponentially as a function of radial distance (decay length ∼100  A) from the injection site. Electron injection at corner-hole and faulted middle adatoms sites couples preferentially to the desorption of distant adsorbate molecules. Molecules on the faulted half of the unit cell desorb with higher probability than those on the unfaulted half. PMID:20867889

  9. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on small aluminum oxide clusters: Role of the local atomic environment and charge state on the oxidation of the CO molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Ornelas-Lizcano, J. C.; Guirado-López, R. A.

    2015-03-28

    We present extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations dedicated to analyze the adsorption behavior of CO molecules on small Al{sub x}O{sub y}{sup ±} clusters. Following the experimental results of Johnson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 112, 4732 (2008)], we consider structures having the bulk composition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as smaller Al{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O units. Our electron affinity and total energy calculations are consistent with aluminum oxide clusters having two-dimensional rhombus-like structures. In addition, interconversion energy barriers between two- and one-dimensional atomic arrays are of the order of 1 eV, thus clearly defining the preferred isomers. Single CO adsorption on our charged Al{sub x}O{sub y}{sup ±} clusters exhibits, in general, spontaneous oxygen transfer events leading to the production of CO{sub 2} in line with the experimental data. However, CO can also bind to both Al and O atoms of the clusters forming aluminum oxide complexes with a CO{sub 2} subunit. The vibrational spectra of Al{sub x}O{sub y} + CO{sub 2} provides well defined finger prints that may allow the identification of specific isomers. The Al{sub x}O{sub y}{sup +} clusters are more reactive than the anionic species and the final Al{sub 2}O{sup +} + CO reaction can result in the production of atomic Al and carbon dioxide as observed from experiments. We underline the crucial role played by the local atomic environment, charge density distribution, and spin-multiplicity on the oxidation behavior of CO molecules. Finally, we analyze the importance of coadsorption and finite temperature effects by performing DFT Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Our calculations show that CO oxidation on Al{sub x}O{sub y}{sup +} clusters can be also promoted by the binding of additional CO species at 300 K, revealing the existence of fragmentation processes in line with the ones experimentally inferred.

  10. Charge Transfer Reactions Induce Born-Oppenheimer Breakdown in Surface Chemistry: Applications of Double Resonance Spectroscopy in Molecule-Surface Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodtke, Alec M.

    2013-06-01

    Atomic and molecular interactions constitute a many-body quantum problem governed fundamentally only by the Coulomb forces between many electrons and nuclei. While simple to state, computers are simply not fast enough to solve this problem by brute force, except for the simplest examples. Combining the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation (BOA) with Density Functional Theory (DFT), however, allows theoretical simulations of extraordinarily complex chemical systems including molecular interactions at solid metal surfaces, the physical basis of surface chemistry. This lecture describes experiments demonstrating the limits of the BOA/DFT approximation as it relates to molecules interacting with solid metal surfaces. One of the most powerful experimental tools at our disposal is a form of double resonance spectroscopy, which allows us to define the quantum state of the molecule both before and after the collision with the surface, providing a complete picture of the resulting energy conversion processes. With such data, we are able to emphasize quantitative measurements that can be directly compared to first principles theories that go beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. One important outcome of this work is the realization that Born-Oppenheimer breakdown can be induced by simple charge transfer reactions that are common in surface chemistry. J. D. White, J. Chen, D. Matsiev, D. J. Auerbach and A. M. Wodtke Nature {433}(7025), 503-505 (2005) Y. H. Huang, C. T. Rettner, D. J. Auerbach and A. M. Wodtke Science {290}(5489), 111-114 (2000) R. Cooper, I. Rahinov, Z. S. Li, D. Matsiev, D. J. Auerbach and A. M. Wodtke Chemical Science {1}(1), 55-61 (2010) J. Larue, T. Schäfer, D. Matsiev, L. Velarde, N. H. Nahler, D. J. Auerbach and A. M. Wodtke PCCP {13}(1), 97-99 (2011).

  11. Adapting SAFT-γ perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. III. Molecules with partial charges at bulk phases, confined geometries and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2014-09-07

    In Paper I [A. F. Ghobadi and J. R. Elliott, J. Chem. Phys. 139(23), 234104 (2013)], we showed that how a third-order Weeks–Chandler–Anderson (WCA) Thermodynamic Perturbation Theory and molecular simulation can be integrated to characterize the repulsive and dispersive contributions to the Helmholtz free energy for realistic molecular conformations. To this end, we focused on n-alkanes to develop a theory for fused and soft chains. In Paper II [A. F. Ghobadi and J. R. Elliott, J. Chem. Phys. 141(2), 024708 (2014)], we adapted the classical Density Functional Theory and studied the microstructure of the realistic molecular fluids in confined geometries and vapor-liquid interfaces. We demonstrated that a detailed consistency between molecular simulation and theory can be achieved for both bulk and inhomogeneous phases. In this paper, we extend the methodology to molecules with partial charges such as carbon dioxide, water, 1-alkanols, nitriles, and ethers. We show that the electrostatic interactions can be captured via an effective association potential in the framework of Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT). Implementation of the resulting association contribution in assessing the properties of these molecules at confined geometries and interfaces presents satisfactory agreement with molecular simulation and experimental data. For example, the predicted surface tension deviates less than 4% comparing to full potential simulations. Also, the theory, referred to as SAFT-γ WCA, is able to reproduce the specific orientation of hydrophilic head and hydrophobic tail of 1-alkanols at the vapor-liquid interface of water.

  12. Adapting SAFT-γ perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. III. Molecules with partial charges at bulk phases, confined geometries and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2014-09-01

    In Paper I [A. F. Ghobadi and J. R. Elliott, J. Chem. Phys. 139(23), 234104 (2013)], we showed that how a third-order Weeks-Chandler-Anderson (WCA) Thermodynamic Perturbation Theory and molecular simulation can be integrated to characterize the repulsive and dispersive contributions to the Helmholtz free energy for realistic molecular conformations. To this end, we focused on n-alkanes to develop a theory for fused and soft chains. In Paper II [A. F. Ghobadi and J. R. Elliott, J. Chem. Phys. 141(2), 024708 (2014)], we adapted the classical Density Functional Theory and studied the microstructure of the realistic molecular fluids in confined geometries and vapor-liquid interfaces. We demonstrated that a detailed consistency between molecular simulation and theory can be achieved for both bulk and inhomogeneous phases. In this paper, we extend the methodology to molecules with partial charges such as carbon dioxide, water, 1-alkanols, nitriles, and ethers. We show that the electrostatic interactions can be captured via an effective association potential in the framework of Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT). Implementation of the resulting association contribution in assessing the properties of these molecules at confined geometries and interfaces presents satisfactory agreement with molecular simulation and experimental data. For example, the predicted surface tension deviates less than 4% comparing to full potential simulations. Also, the theory, referred to as SAFT-γ WCA, is able to reproduce the specific orientation of hydrophilic head and hydrophobic tail of 1-alkanols at the vapor-liquid interface of water.

  13. Impact of Multiple Negative Charges on Blood Clearance and Biodistribution Characteristics of 99mTc-Labeled Dimeric Cyclic RGD Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the impact of multiple negative charges on blood clearance kinetics and biodistribution properties of 99mTc-labeled RGD peptide dimers. Bioconjugates HYNIC-P6G-RGD2 and HYNIC-P6D-RGD2 were prepared by reacting P6G-RGD2 and P6D-RGD2, respectively, with excess HYNIC-OSu in the presence of diisopropylethylamine. Their IC50 values were determined to be 31 ± 5 and 41 ± 6 nM, respectively, against 125I-echistatin bound to U87MG glioma cells in a whole-cell displacement assay. Complexes [99mTc(HYNIC-P6G-RGD2)(tricine)(TPPTS)] (99mTc-P6G-RGD2) and [99mTc(HYNIC-P6D-RGD2)(tricine)(TPPTS)] (99mTc-P6D-RGD2) were prepared in high radiochemical purity (RCP > 95%) and specific activity (37–110 GBq/μmol). They were evaluated in athymic nude mice bearing U87MG glioma xenografts for their biodistribution. The most significant difference between 99mTc-P6D-RGD2 and 99mTc-P6G-RGD2 was their blood radioactivity levels and tumor uptake. The initial blood radioactivity level for 99mTc-P6D-RGD2 (4.71 ± 1.00%ID/g) was ∼5× higher than that of 99mTc-P6G-RGD2 (0.88 ± 0.05%ID/g), but this difference disappeared at 60 min p.i. 99mTc-P6D-RGD2 had much lower tumor uptake (2.20–3.11%ID/g) than 99mTc-P6G-RGD2 (7.82–9.27%ID/g) over a 2 h period. Since HYNIC-P6D-RGD2 and HYNIC-P6G-RGD2 shared a similar integrin αvβ3 binding affinity (41 ± 6 nM versus 31 ± 5 nM), the difference in their blood activity and tumor uptake is most likely related to the nine negative charges and high protein binding of 99mTc-P6D-RGD2. Despite its low uptake in U87MG tumors, the tumor uptake of 99mTc-P6D-RGD2 was integrin αvβ3-specific. SPECT/CT studies were performed using 99mTc-P6G-RGD2 in athymic nude mice bearing U87MG glioma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenografts. The SPECT/CT data demonstrated the tumor-targeting capability of 99mTc-P6G-RGD2, and its tumor uptake depends on the integrin αvβ3 expression levels on tumor cells and neovasculature. It was concluded that

  14. Conserved Negative Charges in the N-terminal Tetramerization Domain Mediate Efficient Assembly of Kv2.1 and Kv2.1/Kv6.4 Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Bocksteins, Elke; Labro, Alain J.; Mayeur, Evy; Bruyns, Tine; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk; Snyders, Dirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are transmembrane tetramers of individual α-subunits. Eight different Shaker-related Kv subfamilies have been identified in which the tetramerization domain T1, located on the intracellular N terminus, facilitates and controls the assembly of both homo- and heterotetrameric channels. Only the Kv2 α-subunits are able to form heterotetramers with members of the silent Kv subfamilies (Kv5, Kv6, Kv8, and Kv9). The T1 domain contains two subdomains, A and B box, which presumably determine subfamily specificity by preventing incompatible subunits to assemble. In contrast, little is known about the involvement of the A/B linker sequence. Both Kv2 and silent Kv subfamilies contain a fully conserved and negatively charged sequence (CDD) in this linker that is lacking in the other subfamilies. Neutralizing these aspartates in Kv2.1 by mutating them to alanines did not affect the gating properties, but reduced the current density moderately. However, charge reversal arginine substitutions strongly reduced the current density of these homotetrameric mutant Kv2.1 channels and immunocytochemistry confirmed the reduced expression at the plasma membrane. Förster resonance energy transfer measurements using confocal microscopy showed that the latter was not due to impaired trafficking, but to a failure to assemble the tetramer. This was further confirmed with co-immunoprecipitation experiments. The corresponding arginine substitution in Kv6.4 prevented its heterotetrameric interaction with Kv2.1. These results indicate that these aspartates (especially the first one) in the A/B box linker of the T1 domain are required for efficient assembly of both homotetrameric Kv2.1 and heterotetrameric Kv2.1/silent Kv6.4 channels. PMID:19717558

  15. Negatively charged Ir(iii) cyclometalated complexes containing a chelating bis-tetrazolato ligand: synthesis, photophysics and the study of reactivity with electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Valentina; Zacchini, Stefano; Raiteri, Paolo; Mazzoni, Rita; Zanotti, Valerio; Massi, Massimiliano; Stagni, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    The bis-tetrazolate dianion [1,2 BTB](2-), which is the deprotonated form of 1,2 bis-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)benzene [1,2-H2BTB], is for the first time exploited as an ancillary N^N ligand for negatively charged [Ir(C^N)2(N^N)](-)-type complexes, where C^N is represented by cyclometalated 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) or 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine (F2ppy). The new Ir(iii) complexes [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- and [Ir(F2ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- have been fully characterised and the analysis of the X-ray structure of [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- confirmed the coordination of the [1,2 BTB](2-) dianion in a bis chelated fashion through the N-atoms adjacent to each of the tetrazolic carbons. Both of the new anionic Ir(iii) complexes displayed phosphorescence in the visible region, with intense sky-blue (λmax = 460-490 nm) or aqua (λmax = 490-520 nm) emissions originating from [Ir(F2ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- and [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]-, respectively. In comparison with our very recent examples of anionic Ir(iii)tetrazolate cyclometalates, the new Ir(iii) tris chelate complexes [Ir(F2ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- and [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]-, display an improved robustness, allowing the study of their reactivity toward the addition of electrophiles such as H(+) and CH3(+). In all cases, the electrophilic attacks occurred at the coordinated tetrazolate rings, involving the reversible - by a protonation deprotonation mechanism - or permanent - upon addition of a methyl moiety - switching of their global net charge from negative to positive and, in particular, the concomitant variation of their photoluminescence output. The combination of the anionic complexes [Ir(F2ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- or [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- with a deep red emitting (λmax = 686 nm) cationic Ir(iii) tetrazole complex such as [IrTPYZ-Me]+, where TPYZ-Me is 2-(2-methyl-2H-tetrazol-5-yl)pyrazine, gave rise to two fully Ir(iii)-based soft salts capable of displaying additive and O2-sensitive emission colours, with an almost pure white light obtained by the appropriate

  16. Imaging ion-molecule reactions: Charge transfer and C-N bond formation in the C{sup +}+ NH{sub 3} system

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M.

    2012-05-28

    The velocity mapping ion imaging method is applied to the ion-molecule reactions occurring between C{sup +} and NH{sub 3}. The velocity space images are collected over the relative collision energy range from 1.5 to 3.3 eV, allowing both product kinetic energy distributions and angular distributions to be obtained from the data. The charge transfer process appears to be direct, dominated by long-range electron transfer that results in minimal deflection of the products. The product kinetic energy distributions are consistent with a process dominated by energy resonance. The kinetic energy distributions for C-N bond formation appear to scale with the total available energy, providing strong evidence that energy in the [CNH{sub 3}]{sup +} precursor to products is distributed statistically. The angular distributions for C-N bond formation show pronounced forward-backward symmetry, as expected for a complex that resembles a prolate symmetric top decaying along its symmetry axis.

  17. Theoretical study of stability and charge-transport properties of coronene molecule and some of its halogenated derivatives: A path to ambipolar organic-based materials?

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho-García, J. C. Pérez-Jiménez, A. J.

    2014-10-07

    We have carefully investigated the structural and electronic properties of coronene and some of its fluorinated and chlorinated derivatives, including full periphery substitution, as well as the preferred orientation of the non-covalent dimer structures subsequently formed. We have paid particular attention to a set of methodological details, to first obtain single-molecule magnitudes as accurately as possible, including next the use of modern dispersion-corrected methods to tackle the corresponding non-covalently bound dimers. Generally speaking, this class of compounds is expected to self-assembly in neighboring π-stacks with dimer stabilization energies ranging from –20 to –30 kcal mol{sup −1} at close distances around 3.0–3.3 Å. Then, in a further step, we have also calculated hole and electron transfer rates of some suitable candidates for ambipolar materials, and corresponding charge mobility values, which are known to critically depend on the supramolecular organization of the samples. For coronene and per-fluorinated coronene, we have found high values for their hopping rates, although slightly smaller for the latter due to an increase (decrease) of the reorganization energies (electronic couplings)

  18. Theoretical study of stability and charge-transport properties of coronene molecule and some of its halogenated derivatives: a path to ambipolar organic-based materials?

    PubMed

    Sancho-García, J C; Pérez-Jiménez, A J

    2014-10-01

    We have carefully investigated the structural and electronic properties of coronene and some of its fluorinated and chlorinated derivatives, including full periphery substitution, as well as the preferred orientation of the non-covalent dimer structures subsequently formed. We have paid particular attention to a set of methodological details, to first obtain single-molecule magnitudes as accurately as possible, including next the use of modern dispersion-corrected methods to tackle the corresponding non-covalently bound dimers. Generally speaking, this class of compounds is expected to self-assembly in neighboring π-stacks with dimer stabilization energies ranging from -20 to -30 kcal mol(-1) at close distances around 3.0-3.3 Å. Then, in a further step, we have also calculated hole and electron transfer rates of some suitable candidates for ambipolar materials, and corresponding charge mobility values, which are known to critically depend on the supramolecular organization of the samples. For coronene and per-fluorinated coronene, we have found high values for their hopping rates, although slightly smaller for the latter due to an increase (decrease) of the reorganization energies (electronic couplings). PMID:25296829

  19. Theoretical study of stability and charge-transport properties of coronene molecule and some of its halogenated derivatives: A path to ambipolar organic-based materials?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho-García, J. C.; Pérez-Jiménez, A. J.

    2014-10-01

    We have carefully investigated the structural and electronic properties of coronene and some of its fluorinated and chlorinated derivatives, including full periphery substitution, as well as the preferred orientation of the non-covalent dimer structures subsequently formed. We have paid particular attention to a set of methodological details, to first obtain single-molecule magnitudes as accurately as possible, including next the use of modern dispersion-corrected methods to tackle the corresponding non-covalently bound dimers. Generally speaking, this class of compounds is expected to self-assembly in neighboring π-stacks with dimer stabilization energies ranging from -20 to -30 kcal mol-1 at close distances around 3.0-3.3 Å. Then, in a further step, we have also calculated hole and electron transfer rates of some suitable candidates for ambipolar materials, and corresponding charge mobility values, which are known to critically depend on the supramolecular organization of the samples. For coronene and per-fluorinated coronene, we have found high values for their hopping rates, although slightly smaller for the latter due to an increase (decrease) of the reorganization energies (electronic couplings).

  20. Disinfection of Escherichia coli Gram negative bacteria using surface modified TiO2: optimization of Ag metallization and depiction of charge transfer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gomathi Devi, LakshmipathiNaik; Nagaraj, Basavalingaiah

    2014-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of silver deposited TiO2 (Ag-TiO2 ) against Gram negative Escherichia coli bacteria was investigated by varying the Ag metal content from 0.10 to 0.50% on the surface of TiO2 . Ag depositions by the photoreduction method were found to be stable. Surface silver metallization was confirmed by EDAX and XPS studies. Photoluminescence studies show that the charge carrier recombination is less for 0.1% Ag-TiO2 and this catalyst shows superior bactericidal activity under solar light irradiation compared to Sol gel TiO2 (SG-TiO2 ) due to the surface plasmon effect. The energy levels of deposited Ag are dependent on the Ag content and it varies from -4.64 eV to -1.30 eV with respect to the vacuum energy level based on atomic silver to bulk silver deposits. The ability of electron transfer from Ag deposit to O2 depends on the position of the energy levels. The 0.25% and 0.50% Ag depositions showed detrimental effect on bactericidal activity due to the mismatch of energy levels. The effect of the EROS (External generation of the Reactive Oxygen Species by 0.1% Ag-TiO2 ) and IROS (Interior generation of Reactive Oxygen Species within the bacteria) on the bactericidal inactivation is discussed in detail. PMID:24995499

  1. Recovery rate of multiple enteric viruses artificially seeded in water and concentrated by adsorption-elution with negatively charged membranes: interaction and interference between different virus species.

    PubMed

    Vecchia, Andréia Dalla; Rigotto, Caroline; Soliman, Mayra Cristina; Souza, Fernanda Gil de; Giehl, Isabel Cristina; Spilki, Fernando Rosado

    2015-01-01

    Viral concentration method by adsorption-elution with negative membranes has been widely employed for concentrating viruses from environmental samples. In order to provide an adequate assessment of its recovery efficiency, this study was conducted to assess viral recovery rates for viral species commonly found in water (HAdV-5, EV, RV, BAdV and CAV-2), quantifying viral genomes at the end of the five different steps of the process. Recovery rates were analyzed for several viruses combined in a single water sample and for each virus assayed separately. Ultrapure water samples were artificially contaminated and analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). High recovery rates were found after the final stage when assessed individually (89 to 125%) and combined in the same sample (23 to > 164%). HAdV-5 exhibited >100% recovery when assayed with human viruses and other AdVs, whereas BAdV and CAV-2 were not detected. These data suggest that recovery efficiency could be related to viral structural characteristics, their electric charges and other interactions, so that they are retained with greater or lesser efficiency when coupled. This protocol could be applied to environmental samples, since high recovery rates were observed and infectious viruses were detected at the end of the concentration process. PMID:26676018

  2. Structural basis of UDP-galactose binding by alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase (alpha3GT): role of negative charge on aspartic acid 316 in structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Tumbale, Percy; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Brew, Keith; Acharya, K Ravi

    2008-08-19

    alpha-1,3-Galactosyltransferase (alpha3GT) catalyzes the transfer of galactose from UDP-galactose to form an alpha 1-3 link with beta-linked galactosides; it is part of a family of homologous retaining glycosyltransferases that includes the histo-blood group A and B glycosyltransferases, Forssman glycolipid synthase, iGb3 synthase, and some uncharacterized prokaryotic glycosyltransferases. In mammals, the presence or absence of active forms of these enzymes results in antigenic differences between individuals and species that modulate the interplay between the immune system and pathogens. The catalytic mechanism of alpha3GT is controversial, but the structure of an enzyme complex with the donor substrate could illuminate both this and the basis of donor substrate specificity. We report here the structure of the complex of a low-activity mutant alpha3GT with UDP-galactose (UDP-gal) exhibiting a bent configuration stabilized by interactions of the galactose with multiple residues in the enzyme including those in a highly conserved region (His315 to Ser318). Analysis of the properties of mutants containing substitutions for these residues shows that catalytic activity is strongly affected by His315 and Asp316. The negative charge of Asp316 is crucial for catalytic activity, and structural studies of two mutants show that its interaction with Arg202 is needed for an active site structure that facilitates the binding of UDP-gal in a catalytically competent conformation. PMID:18651752

  3. Nepsilon-(3-[*I]Iodobenzoyl)-Lys5-Nalpha-maleimido-Gly1-GEEEK ([*I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK): a radioiodinated prosthetic group containing negatively charged D-glutamates for labeling internalizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Alston, Kevin L; Bigner, Darrel D; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Novel methods are needed for the radiohalogenation of cell-internalizing proteins and peptides because rapid loss of label occurs after lysosomal processing when these molecules are labeled using conventional radioiodination methodologies. We have developed a radiolabeled prosthetic group that contains multiple negatively charged D-amino acids to facilitate trapping of the radioactivity in the cell after proteolysis of the labeled protein. N(epsilon)-(3-[(125)I]iodobenzoyl)-Lys(5)-N(alpha)-maleimido-Gly(1)-GEEEK ([(125)I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK) was synthesized via iododestannylation in 90.3 +/- 3.9% radiochemical yields. This radioiodinated agent was conjugated to iminothiolane-treated L8A4, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) in 54.3 +/- 17.7% conjugation yields. In vitro assays with the EGFRvIII-expressing U87MGDeltaEGFR glioma cell line demonstrated that the internalized radioactivity for the [(125)I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK-L8A4 conjugate increased from 14.1% at 1 h to 44.7% at 24 h and was about 15-fold higher than that of directly radioiodinated L8A4 at 24 h. A commensurately increased tumor uptake in vivo in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous U87MGDeltaEGFR xenografts (52.6 +/- 14.3% injected dose per gram versus 17.4 +/- 3.5% ID/g at 72 h) also was observed. These results suggest that [(125)I]IB-Mal-d-GEEEK is a promising reagent for the radioiodination of internalizing mAbs. PMID:16848419

  4. Atmospheric reactions on electrically charged surfaces.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Leon F

    2013-07-14

    It is proposed that tropospheric NO2 at concentrations in the parts-per-billion range can be efficiently converted to HONO in a dust storm, by a process that is initiated by electron capture by NO2 from a negatively-charged dust particle. The electron capture is visualized as a harpoon-type process that does not require the NO2 to be adsorbed on the particle. The resulting electronically excited [NO2(-)]* ion reacts with water to form an HONO molecule plus an OH(-)·(H2O)n cluster ion. It is suggested that analogous processes can occur on other atmospheric aerosol particles with both positive and negative charges, with other molecules of high electron affinity such as SO2, and also, because the earth's surface is effectively the negative plate of a planet-sized capacitor, at the surfaces of terrestrial solids, lakes and oceans. PMID:23689618

  5. Charge transport in HoxLu1 -xB12 : Separating positive and negative magnetoresistance in metals with magnetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluchanko, N. E.; Khoroshilov, A. L.; Anisimov, M. A.; Azarevich, A. N.; Bogach, A. V.; Glushkov, V. V.; Demishev, S. V.; Krasnorussky, V. N.; Samarin, N. A.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.; Filippov, V. B.; Levchenko, A. V.; Pristas, G.; Gabani, S.; Flachbart, K.

    2015-06-01

    The magnetoresistance (MR) Δ ρ /ρ of the cage-glass compound HoxLu1 -xB12 with various concentrations of magnetic holmium ions (x ≤0.5 ) has been studied in detail concurrently with magnetization M (T ) and Hall effect investigations on high-quality single crystals at temperatures 1.9-120 K and in magnetic field up to 80 kOe. The undertaken analysis of Δ ρ /ρ allows us to conclude that the large negative magnetoresistance (nMR) observed in the vicinity of the Néel temperature is caused by scattering of charge carriers on magnetic clusters of Ho3 + ions, and that these nanosize regions with antiferromagnetic (AF) exchange inside may be considered as short-range-order AF domains. It was shown that the Yosida relation -Δ ρ /ρ ˜M2 provides an adequate description of the nMR effect for the case of Langevin-type behavior of magnetization. Moreover, a reduction of Ho-ion effective magnetic moments in the range 3-9 μB was found to develop both with temperature lowering and under the increase of holmium content. A phenomenological description of the large positive quadratic contribution Δ ρ /ρ ˜μD2H2 which dominates in HoxLu1 -xB12 in the intermediate temperature range 20-120 K allows us to estimate the drift mobility exponential changes μD˜T-α with α =1.3 -1.6 depending on Ho concentration. An even more comprehensive behavior of magnetoresistance has been found in the AF state of HoxLu1 -xB12 where an additional linear positive component was observed and attributed to charge-carrier scattering on the spin density wave (SDW). High-precision measurements of Δ ρ /ρ =f (H ,T ) have allowed us also to reconstruct the magnetic H-T phase diagram of Ho0.5Lu0.5B12 and to resolve its magnetic structure as a superposition of 4 f (based on localized moments) and 5 d (based on SDW) components.

  6. Macroporous hydrogels based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Part 4: growth of rat bone marrow stromal cells in three-dimensional hydrogels with positive and negative surface charges and in polyelectrolyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Lesný, P; Prádný, M; Jendelová, P; Michálek, J; Vacík, J; Syková, E

    2006-09-01

    The growth of bone marrow stromal cells was assessed in vitro in macroporous hydrogels based on 2-hydro- xyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) copolymers with different electric charges. Copolymers of HEMA with sodium methacrylate (MA(-)) carried a negative electric charge, copolymers of HEMA with [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride (MOETA(-)) carried a positive electric charge and terpolymers of HEMA, MA(-) and MOETA(+) carried both, positive and negative electric charges. The charges in the polyelectrolyte complexes were shielded by counter-ions. The hydrogels had similar porosities, based on a comparison of their diffusion parameters for small cations as measured by the real-time tetramethylammonium iontophoretic method of diffusion analysis. The cell growth was studied in the peripheral and central regions of the hydrogels at 2 hours and 2, 7, 14 and 28 days after cell seeding. Image analysis revealed the highest cellular density in the HEMA-MOETA(+) copolymers; most of the cells were present in the peripheral region of the hydrogels. A lower density of cells but no difference between the peripheral and central regions was observed in the HEMA-MA(-) copolymers and in polyelectrolyte complexes. This study showed that positively charged functional groups promote the adhesion of cells. PMID:16932865

  7. Study of electrochemically active carbon, Ga2O3 and Bi2O3 as negative additives for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries working under high-rate, partial-state-of-charge conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Baishuang; Wu, Jinzhu; Wang, Dianlong

    2014-02-01

    Electrochemically active carbon (EAC), Gallium (III) oxide (Ga2O3) and Bismuth (III) oxide (Bi2O3) are used as the negative additives of valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries to prolong the cycle life of VRLA batteries under high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) conditions, and their effects on the cycle life of VRLA batteries are investigated. It is found that the addition of EAC in negative active material can restrain the sulfation of the negative plates and prolong the cycle performance of VRLA batteries under HRPSoC conditions. It is also observed that the addition of Ga2O3 or Bi2O3 in EAC can effectively increase the overpotential of hydrogen evolution on EAC electrodes, and decrease the evolution rate of hydrogen. An appropriate addition amount of Ga2O3 or Bi2O3 in the negative plates of VRLA batteries can decrease the cut-off charging voltage, increase the cut-off discharging voltage, and prolong the cycle life of VRLA batteries under HRPSoC conditions. The battery added with 0.5% EAC and 0.01% Ga2O3 in negative active material shows a lowest cut-off charging voltage and a highest cut-off discharging voltage under HRPSoC conditions, and its' cycle life reaches about 8100 cycles which is at least three times longer than that without Ga2O3.

  8. Charge-exchange processes in collisions of H+,H2+,H3+,He+ , and He2+ ions with CO and CO2 molecules at energies below 1000 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbowy, S.; Pranszke, B.

    2016-02-01

    Absolute measurements of charge-exchange cross sections of H+,H2+,H3+,He+, and He2+ ions in CO and CO2 have been made for energies below 1000 eV, an equivalent of the energy of ionized particles at typical solar-wind conditions. An attenuation method for the case of complex ions of a molecule, taking into account the influence on the ion beam composition of the processes of disintegration of the primary ions into secondary ones with different charge-exchange cross sections, is described. Also the secondary effects, like three-body collisions and re-ionization processes that could emerge at higher pressures of the gas layer, are discussed. Dependence of the cross sections on the number of atomic centers in the projectile have been explained on the basis of the energy defect of the reactions and asymmetric near-resonant charge-exchange process between the ion and target molecule including the Doppler broadening in the interaction of the monoenergetic ion beam and target molecules having an isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution corresponding to room temperature. Using the semiempirical approach based on the parametrized numerical coupled-channel two-state calculations, we have extrapolated the cross sections to a broader range of velocities.

  9. CuFe2O4 magnetic nanocrystal clusters as a matrix for the analysis of small molecules by negative-ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zian; Zheng, Jiangnan; Bian, Wei; Cai, Zongwei

    2015-08-01

    CuFe2O4 magnetic nanocrystal clusters (CuFe2O4 MNCs) were proposed as a new matrix for small molecule analysis by negative ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the first time. We demonstrated its advantages over conventional organic matrices in the detection of small molecules such as amino acids, peptides, nucleobases, fatty acids, and steroid hormones. A systematic comparison of CuFe2O4 MNCs with different ionization modes revealed that MS spectra obtained for the CuFe2O4 MNC matrix in the negative ion mode was only featured by deprotonated ion peaks with a free matrix background, which was different from the complicated alkali metal adducts produced in the positive ion mode. The developed method was found relatively tolerant to salt contamination and exhibited good reproducibility. A detection limit down to the subpicomolar level was achieved when testosterone was analyzed. In addition, by comparison of the MS spectra obtained from bare Fe3O4 and MFe2O4 MNC (M = Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) matrices, two main factors of MFe2O4 MNC matrices were revealed to play a vital role in assisting the negative ion desorption/ionization (D/I) process: doping transition metals into ferrite nanocrystals favoring laser absorption and energy transfer and a good match between the UV absorption of MFe2O4 MNCs and the excitation of nitrogen laser source facilitating LDI efficiency. This work creates a new branch of application for MFe2O4 MNCs and provides an alternative solution for small molecule analysis. PMID:26086699

  10. Single C59N molecule as a molecular rectifier.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin; Zeng, Changgan; Cheng, Xin; Wang, Kedong; Wang, Guanwu; Yang, Jinlong; Hou, J G; Zhu, Qingshi

    2005-07-22

    We report a new kind of experimental realization of a molecular rectifier, which is based on a single azafullerene C59N molecule in a double-barrier tunnel junction via the single electron tunneling effect. An obvious rectifying effect is observed. The positive onset voltage is about 0.5-0.7 V, while the negative onset voltage is about 1.6-1.8 V. Theoretical analyses show that the half-occupied molecular orbital of the C59N molecule and the asymmetric shift of the molecular Fermi level when the molecule is charged are responsible for the molecular rectification. PMID:16090819

  11. Fluorescent H-Aggregates Hosted by a Charged Cyclodextrin Cavity.

    PubMed

    Mudliar, Niyati H; Singh, Prabhat K

    2016-05-23

    Most macrocyclic host molecules, including cyclodextrins, usually prevent self-aggregation of the guest organic molecules, by exploiting inclusion complexation of the guest with the host. In this work, it was found that a negatively charged β-cylcodextrin derivative induces aggregation of a well-known amyloid sensing dye, Thioflavin-T, and leads to an unprecedented formation of the rarely observed emissive H-type aggregates of the dye. PMID:27028039

  12. Proposal for high-speed and high-fidelity electron-spin initialization in a negatively charged quantum dot coupled to a microcavity in a weak external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Arka; Lin Ziliang; Faraon, Andrei; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2010-08-15

    We describe a proposal for fast electron-spin initialization in a negatively charged quantum dot coupled to a microcavity without the need for a strong magnetic field. We employ two-photon excitation to access trion states that are spin forbidden by one-photon excitation. Our simulation shows a maximum initialization speed of 1.3 GHz and maximum fidelity of 99.7% with realistic system parameters.

  13. Analytical modeling and simulation of electrochemical charge/discharge behavior of Si thin film negative electrodes in Li-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, M.; Chandran, K. S. Ravi

    2014-02-01

    Physically-based analytical models that provide insights into the diffusion and/or interface charge transfer effects in bulk (lithiating/delithiating) electrodes are needed to truly assess the performance/limitations of electrode materials for Li-ion batteries. In this context, an analytical modeling framework is constructed here to predict the electrochemical charge-discharge characteristics during lithiation and delithiation of solid amorphous Si (a-Si) thin film electrodes. The framework includes analytical expressions that satisfy Fick's second law for Li transport and the requisite flux boundary conditions of lithiation and delithiation steps. The expressions are derived here by the method of separation of variables. They enable the determination of transient Li concentration profiles in the thin film electrode as a function of state of charge/discharge. The time-dependent electrode surface concentrations (at the electrode-electrolyte interface) obtained from these profiles were used to determine the activation overpotentials and thus, the non-equilibrium cell potentials, as a function of state of charge/discharge using Butler-Volmer kinetics. The simulated charge/discharge characteristics agreed well with the experimental data of a-Si thin film electrodes obtained at different C-rates. The model offers insights into how the charge-discharge behavior is controlled by diffusion limitation within electrode and/or the activation overpotentials at the interface. The analytical framework is also shown to predict successfully the hysteretic behavior of lithiation/delithiation voltage curves.

  14. Phase behavior of mixtures of oppositely charged protein nanoparticles at asymmetric charge ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarten Biesheuvel, P.; Lindhoud, Saskia; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; de Vries, Renko

    2006-04-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for the phase behavior of mixtures of oppositely charged globular protein molecules in aqueous solutions containing monovalent salt. These colloidal mixtures are interesting model systems, on the one hand for electrolyte solutions (“colloidal ionic liquids”), and on the other for mixtures of oppositely charged (bio)macromolecules, colloids, micelles, etc., with the range of the electrostatic interactions (Debye length) easily tunable from much smaller to much larger than the particle size, simply by adding different amounts of monovalent salt. In this paper we investigate the phase behavior of such mixtures in the case that equally sized colloids have a large difference in charge magnitude. This is possible at any mixing ratio because small ions compensate any colloidal charge asymmetry. Our experimental system is based on lysozyme, a positively charged “hard” globular protein molecule, and succinylated lysozyme, a chemical modification of lysozyme which is negatively charged. By changing the solution pH we can adjust the ratio of charge between the two molecules. To describe phase separation into a dilute phase and a dense “complex” phase, a thermodynamic model is set up in which we combine the Carnahan-Starling-van der Waals equation of state with a heterogeneous Poisson-Boltzmann cell model and include the possibility that protein molecules adjust their charge when they move from one phase to the other (charge regulation). The theory uses the nonelectrostatic attraction strength as the only adjustable parameter and reasonably well reproduces the data in that complexation is only possible at intermediate pH , not too asymmetric mixing ratios, and low enough ionic strength and temperature.

  15. Increased cellularity and expression of adhesion molecules in muscle biopsy specimens from patients with rheumatoid arthritis with clinical suspicion of vasculitis, but negative routine histology

    PubMed Central

    Verschueren, P.; Voskuyl, A.; Smeets, T; Zwinderman, K.; Breedveld, F.; Tak, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Histological analysis of random quadriceps muscle biopsy specimens can be used to detect vasculitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study aimed at determining the immunohistological features in patients with clinical suspicion of rheumatoid vasculitis, but without a transmural infiltrate or fibrinoid necrosis of the vessel wall on routine histology.
METHODS—Three groups of patients with RA were studied: (a) without clinical signs of vasculitis (n=6); (b) with recent onset of extra-articular features and a clinical suspicion of vasculitis but normal routine histology (n=11); and (c) with recent onset of extra-articular features and vasculitis, histologically proved either in muscle or other biopsy specimens (n=14). A control group of patients with osteoarthritis was also included (n=5). Frozen sections from quadriceps muscle biopsy specimens were analysed with monoclonal antibodies to detect CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and HLA-DR. The slides were evaluated using a semiquantitative scoring system (0-4).
RESULTS—The mean scores gradually increased from group 1 to 3, leading to significant differences between groups 1 and 2, but not between groups 2 and 3 for most markers (p< 0.05). Thus the pathological changes were similar for the two groups with clinical signs of vasculitis, even when the conventional histological evaluation was negative. Higher immunohistological scores were associated with perivascular infiltrates on routine histology.
CONCLUSION—The pathophysiological events leading to vasculitis are reflected by the changes in the quadriceps muscle biopsy specimens. The data indicate that the sensitivity of examination of muscle biopsy specimens for the diagnosis of rheumatoid vasculitis can be increased by the use of new criteria.

 PMID:10913056

  16. Fragmentation of multiply charged hydrocarbon molecules C{sub n}H{sup q+} (n{<=} 4, q{<=} 9) produced in high-velocity collisions: Branching ratios and kinetic energy release of the H{sup +} fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Beroff, K.; Pino, T.; Carpentier, Y.; Van-Oanh, N. T.; Chabot, M.; Tuna, T.; Martinet, G.; Le Padellec, A.; Lavergne, L.

    2011-09-15

    Fragmentation branching ratios for channels involving H{sup +} emission and associated kinetic energy release of the H{sup +} fragment [KER(H{sup +})] have been measured for multicharged C{sub n}H{sup q+} molecules produced in high velocity (3.6 a.u.) collisions between C{sub n}H{sup +} projectiles and helium atoms. For CH{sup q+} (q{<=} 4) molecules, measured KER(H{sup +}) were found well below predictions of the simple point charge Coulomb model (PCCM) for all q values. Multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations for ground as well as electronic excited states were performed which allowed a perfect interpretation of the CH{sup q+} experimental results for low charges (q = 2-3) as well as for the highest charge (q = 4). In this last case we could show, on the basis of ionization cross sections calculations and experimental measurements performed on the same systems at slightly higher velocity (4.5 a.u.), the prominent role played by inner-shell ionization followed by Auger relaxation and could extract the lifetime of this Auger relaxation giving rise to the best agreement between the experiment and the calculations. For dissociation of C{sub 2}H{sup q+} and C{sub 3}H{sup q+} with the highest charges (q{>=} 5), inner-shell ionization contributed in a prominent way to the ion production. In these two cases it was shown that measured KER(H{sup +}) were in good agreement with PCCM predictions when those were corrected for Auger relaxation with the same Auger lifetime value as in CH{sup 3+}.

  17. Submolecular Resolution Imaging of Molecules by Atomic Force Microscopy: The Influence of the Electrostatic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lit, Joost; Di Cicco, Francesca; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-03-01

    The forces governing the contrast in submolecular resolution imaging of molecules with atomic force microscopy (AFM) have recently become a topic of intense debate. Here, we show that the electrostatic force is essential to understand the contrast in atomically resolved AFM images of polar molecules. Specifically, we image strongly polarized molecules with negatively and positively charged tips. A contrast inversion is observed above the polar groups. By taking into account the electrostatic forces between tip and molecule, the observed contrast differences can be reproduced using a molecular mechanics model. In addition, we analyze the height dependence of the various force components contributing to the high-resolution AFM contrast.

  18. Low energy positron interactions with biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanniarachchi, Indika L.

    Calculations of the positron density distribution which can be used for positrons bound to midsize and larger molecules have been tested for smaller molecules and subsequently applied to investigate the most likely e +e-- annihilation sites for positrons interacting with biological molecules containing C, H, O, and N. In order to allow consideration of positrons bound to extended molecules with regions of different character and no particular symmetry, atom-centered positron basis sets of Gaussian-type functions were developed for positrons bound to molecules containing O, N, C, H, Li, Na, and Be. Testing shows that there is no need to scale the positron basis functions to take into account different effective charges on the atoms in different molecules. Even at the HF level of theory the calculated positron and the contact density of e+LiH system is in qualitative agreement with the most accurate calculation was done in ECG method. Also it has been found that for larger biological molecules such as derivation of formaldehyde can leave out positron basis sets centered on H atoms and still get qualitatively acceptable contact density distribution. According to our results, the electronic and positronic wavefunctions have the most overlap in the regions of most negative electrostatic potential in the parent molecule, and we can expect that a positron bound to the molecule will be more likely to annihilate with one of the electrons in these regions. Also we find that the highest energy occupied electronic orbital often does not make the largest contribution to e+e -- annihilation, and that the energy liberated by subsequent electronic relaxation is sufficient to break the backbone in several places in di-peptides and other organic molecules.

  19. Observation of Peierls transition in nanowires (diameter approximately 130 nm) of the charge transfer molecule TTF-TCNQ synthesized by electric-field-directed growth.

    PubMed

    Sai, T Phanindra; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2010-01-29

    We report the growth of nanowires of the charge transfer complex tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) with diameters as low as 130 nm and show that such nanowires can show Peierls transitions at low temperatures. The wires of sub-micron length were grown between two prefabricated electrodes (with sub-micron gap) by vapor phase growth from a single source by applying an electric field between the electrodes during the growth process. The nanowires so grown show a charge transfer ratio approximately 0.57, which is close to that seen in bulk crystals. Below the transition the transport is strongly nonlinear and can be interpreted as originating from de-pinning of CDW that forms at the Peierls transition. PMID:20009165

  20. Observation of Peierls transition in nanowires (diameter~130 nm) of the charge transfer molecule TTF-TCNQ synthesized by electric-field-directed growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanindra Sai, T.; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the growth of nanowires of the charge transfer complex tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) with diameters as low as 130 nm and show that such nanowires can show Peierls transitions at low temperatures. The wires of sub-micron length were grown between two prefabricated electrodes (with sub-micron gap) by vapor phase growth from a single source by applying an electric field between the electrodes during the growth process. The nanowires so grown show a charge transfer ratio ~0.57, which is close to that seen in bulk crystals. Below the transition the transport is strongly nonlinear and can be interpreted as originating from de-pinning of CDW that forms at the Peierls transition.

  1. Molecules in the ejecta of SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Lepp, S.; Dalgarno, A.; Mccray, R. Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO )

    1990-07-01

    Carbon monoxide has been observed in the ejecta of SN 1987A. The molecular formation and destruction mechanisms in the ejecta environment are explored to determine how the CO and other molecules may be formed. In the absence of grains the first molecules must be formed either through negative ion reactions or through radiative association. The molecules are destroyed by interactions with the radiation field, by fast electron impact, and most effectively by charge transfer reactions with He(+) ions. The CO masses inferred from the observations of vibrational emission can be reproduced by a partially mixed model of the element distribution or by a fully mixed model with rapid charge transfer of He(+) to metal atoms. 23 refs.

  2. Crucial roles of charged saccharide moieties in survival of gram negative bacteria against protamine revealed by combination of grazing incidence x-ray structural characterizations and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Rafael G.; Schneck, Emanuel; Quinn, Bonnie E.; Konovalov, Oleg V.; Brandenburg, Klaus; Gutsmann, Thomas; Gill, Tom; Hanna, Charles B.; Pink, David A.; Tanaka, Motomu

    2010-04-01

    Grazing incidence x-ray scattering techniques and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are combined to reveal the influence of molecular structure (genetic mutation) and divalent cations on the survival of gram negative bacteria against cationic peptides such as protamine. The former yields detailed structures of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) membranes with minimized radiation damages, while the minimal computer model based on the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann theory allows for the simulation of conformational changes of macromolecules (LPSs and peptides) that occur in the time scale of ms. The complementary combination of the structural characterizations and MC simulation demonstrates that the condensations of divalent ions ( Ca2+ or Mg2+ ) in the negatively charged core saccharides are crucial for bacterial survival.

  3. Synthesis of an A-D-A type of molecule used as electron acceptor for improving charge transfer in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao-Zhi; Gu, Shu-Duo; Shen, Dan; Yuan, Yang; Zhang, Mingdao

    2016-08-01

    Electron-accepting molecules play an important role in developing organic solar cells. A new type of A-D-A molecule, 3,6-di([7-(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-1,5,2,4,6,8-dithiotetrazocin-3-yl]thiophen-2-yl)-9-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole, was synthesized. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy levels are -3.55 and -5.85 eV, respectively. Therefore, the A-D-A type of compound could be used as electron acceptor for fabricating organic solar cell with a high open circuit voltage. Gibbs free energy (-49.2 kJ/mol) reveals that the process of A-D-A acceptor accepting an electron from poly(3-hexylthiophene) at excited state is spontaneous. The value of entropy (118 J/mol) in the process of an electron transferring from P3HT to the A-D-A acceptor at organic interface suggests that electrons generated from separation of electron-hole pairs at donor/acceptor interface would be delocalized efficiently. Therefore, the A-D-A molecule would be a potential acceptor for efficient organic BHJ solar cells.

  4. An efficient computational scheme for electronic excitation spectra of molecules in solution using the symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction method: The accuracy of excitation energies and intuitive charge-transfer indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    Solvent effects on electronic excitation spectra are considerable in many situations; therefore, we propose an efficient and reliable computational scheme that is based on the symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method and the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for describing electronic excitations in solution. The new scheme combines the recently proposed first-order PCM SAC-CI method with the PTE (perturbation theory at the energy level) PCM SAC scheme. This is essentially equivalent to the usual SAC and SAC-CI computations with using the PCM Hartree-Fock orbital and integrals, except for the additional correction terms that represent solute-solvent interactions. The test calculations demonstrate that the present method is a very good approximation of the more costly iterative PCM SAC-CI method for excitation energies of closed-shell molecules in their equilibrium geometry. This method provides very accurate values of electric dipole moments but is insufficient for describing the charge-transfer (CT) indices in polar solvent. The present method accurately reproduces the absorption spectra and their solvatochromism of push-pull type 2,2'-bithiophene molecules. Significant solvent and substituent effects on these molecules are intuitively visualized using the CT indices. The present method is the simplest and theoretically consistent extension of SAC-CI method for including PCM environment, and therefore, it is useful for theoretical and computational spectroscopy.

  5. An efficient computational scheme for electronic excitation spectra of molecules in solution using the symmetry-adapted cluster–configuration interaction method: The accuracy of excitation energies and intuitive charge-transfer indices

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Ryoichi Ehara, Masahiro

    2014-10-21

    Solvent effects on electronic excitation spectra are considerable in many situations; therefore, we propose an efficient and reliable computational scheme that is based on the symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method and the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for describing electronic excitations in solution. The new scheme combines the recently proposed first-order PCM SAC-CI method with the PTE (perturbation theory at the energy level) PCM SAC scheme. This is essentially equivalent to the usual SAC and SAC-CI computations with using the PCM Hartree-Fock orbital and integrals, except for the additional correction terms that represent solute-solvent interactions. The test calculations demonstrate that the present method is a very good approximation of the more costly iterative PCM SAC-CI method for excitation energies of closed-shell molecules in their equilibrium geometry. This method provides very accurate values of electric dipole moments but is insufficient for describing the charge-transfer (CT) indices in polar solvent. The present method accurately reproduces the absorption spectra and their solvatochromism of push-pull type 2,2{sup ′}-bithiophene molecules. Significant solvent and substituent effects on these molecules are intuitively visualized using the CT indices. The present method is the simplest and theoretically consistent extension of SAC-CI method for including PCM environment, and therefore, it is useful for theoretical and computational spectroscopy.

  6. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-03-21

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F{sup -} and a Na{sup +} ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na{sup +} and F{sup -} ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity {Delta}C{sub p} stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na{sup +} ion, it decreases upon charging the F{sup -} ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q=-0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  7. Effect of Polyelectrolyte Stiffness and Solution pH on the Nanostructure of Complexes Formed by Cationic Amphiphiles and Negatively Charged Polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Ram-On, Maor; Cohen, Yachin; Talmon, Yeshayahu

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between amphiphiles and polyelectrolytes has been widely investigated in recent years due to their potential application in industry and medicine, with special focus on gene therapy. The cationic lipid dioleoyl trimethylammonium propane, DOTAP, and the oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, sodium poly(acrylic acid) and sodium poly(styrenesulfonate), form multilamellar complexes in water. Because of the different molecular stiffness of the two polyelectrolytes, they form different nanostructured complexes. Also, because of the different ionization behavior of the two polyelectrolytes, pH differently affects the complexation of the polyelectrolytes with didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), another cationic surfactant. We used cryogenic temperature transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to compare the nanostructures formed. Our results show that although the basic nanostructures of the complexes are always lamellar (multilamellar or unilamellar) the morphology of the complexes is affected by the polyelectrolyte rigidity and the solution pH. PMID:27049758

  8. The empirical dependence of radiation-induced charge neutralization on negative bias in dosimeters based on the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Chris; Albadri, Abdulrahman; Joyce, Malcolm J.; Price, Robert A.

    2006-08-15

    The dependence of radiation-induced charge neutralization (RICN) has been studied in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters. These devices were first exposed to x rays under positive bias and then to further dose increments at a selection of reverse bias levels. A nonlinear empirical trend has been established that is consistent with that identified in the data obtained in this work. Estimates for the reverse bias level corresponding to the maximum rate of RICN have been extracted from the data. These optimum bias levels appear to be independent of the level of initial absorbed dose under positive bias. The established models for threshold voltage change have been considered and indicate a related nonlinear trend for neutralization cross section {sigma}{sub N} as a function of oxide field. These data are discussed in the context of dose measurement with MOSFETs and within the framework of statistical mechanics associated with neutral traps and their field dependence.

  9. Detection of heavy-metal ions using liquid crystal droplet patterns modulated by interaction between negatively charged carboxylate and heavy-metal cations.

    PubMed

    Han, Gyeo-Re; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    Herein, we demonstrated a simple, sensitive, and rapid label-free detection method for heavy-metal (HM) ions using liquid crystal (LC) droplet patterns on a solid surface. Stearic-acid-doped LC droplet patterns were spontaneously generated on an n-octyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-treated glass substrate by evaporating a solution of the nematic LC, 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB), dissolved in heptane. The optical appearance of the droplet patterns was a dark crossed texture when in contact with air, which represents the homeotropic orientation of the LC. This was caused by the steric interaction between the LC molecules and the alkyl chains of the OTS-treated surface. The dark crossed appearance of the acid-doped LC patterns was maintained after the addition of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution (pH 8.1 at 25°C). The deprotonated stearic-acid molecules self-assembled through the LC/aqueous interface, thereby supporting the homeotropic anchoring of 5CB. However, the optical image of the acid-doped LC droplet patterns incubated with PBS containing HM ions appeared bright, indicating a planar orientation of 5CB at the aqueous/LC droplet interface. This dark to bright transition of the LC patterns was caused by HM ions attached to the deprotonated carboxylate moiety, followed by the sequential interruption of the self-assembly of the stearic acid at the LC/aqueous interface. The results showed that the acid-doped LC pattern system not only enabled the highly sensitive detection of HM ions at a sub-nanomolar concentration but it also facilitated rapid detection (<10 min) with simple procedures. PMID:25059128

  10. "Like-charge attraction" between anionic polyelectrolytes: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Ferenc; Rieger, Jens

    2005-01-18

    "Like-charge attraction" is a phenomenon found in many biological systems containing DNA or proteins, as well as in polyelectrolyte systems of industrial importance. "Like-charge attraction" between polyanions is observed in the presence of mobile multivalent cations. At a certain limiting concentration of cations, the negatively charged macroions cease to repel each other and even an attractive force between the anions is found. With classical molecular dynamics simulations it is possible to elucidate the processes that govern the attractive behavior with atomistic resolution. As an industrially relevant example we study the interaction of negatively charged carboxylate groups of sodium polyacrylate molecules with divalent cationic Ca2+ counterions. Here we show that Ca2+ ions initially associate with single chains of polyacrylates and strongly influence sodium ion distribution; shielded polyanions approach each other and eventually "stick" together (precipitate), contrary to the assumption that precipitation is initially induced by intermolecular Ca2+ bridging. PMID:15641856

  11. Charge exchange and dissociative processes in collisions of slow He{sup 2+} ions with H{sub 2}O molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Seredyuk, B.; McCullough, R.W.; Tawara, H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Bodewits, D.; Hoekstra, R.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Sobocinski, P.; Pesic, D.; Hellhammer, R.; Sulik, B.; Stolterfoht, N.; Abu-Haija, O.; Kamber, E.Y.

    2005-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of one-electron capture in collisions of He{sup 2+} ions with H{sub 2}O molecules have been carried out in the range 0.025-12 keV amu{sup -1} corresponding to typical solar wind velocities of 70-1523 km s{sup -1}. Translational energy spectroscopy (TES), photon emission spectroscopy (PES), and fragment ion spectroscopy were employed to identify and quantify the collision mechanisms involved. Cross sections for selective single electron capture into n=1, 2, and 3 states of the He{sup +} ion were obtained using TES while PES provided cross sections for capture into the He{sup +}(2p) and He{sup +}(3p) states. Our model calculations show that He{sup +}(n=2) and He{sup +}(n=3) formation proceeds via a single-electron process governed by the nucleus-electron interaction. In contrast, the He{sup +}(1s) formation mechanism involves an exothermic two-electron process driven by the electron-electron interaction, where the potential energy released by the electron capture is used to remove a second electron thereby resulting in fragmentation of the H{sub 2}O molecule. This process is found to become increasingly important as the collision energy decreases. The experimental cross sections are found to be in reasonable agreement with cross sections calculated using the Demkov and Landau-Zener models.

  12. Asymmetric charge distributions in planar bilayer systems.

    PubMed Central

    McQuarrie, D A; Mulás, P

    1977-01-01

    Using the simple argument based on irreversible thermodynamics and the Gouy-Chapman theory of the double layer, we show that the equilibrium distribution of charged lipid molecules between the two surfaces of a bilayer is asymmetric if the two solutions bathing the surfaces have the same ionic strength but contain ions of different valencies. For example, if one bathing solution contains 0.10 M NaCl and the other contains 0.70 M NaCl and 0.10 M CaCl2, the ratio of charged lipid molecules of the two surfaces in a membrane that contains 50% total negative lipids is 1.46, leading to a transbilayer potential of 18 mV. A complete set of such numerical results is presented in four figures. PMID:836930

  13. Asymmetric charge distributions in planar bilayer systems.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, D A; Mulás, P

    1977-02-01

    Using the simple argument based on irreversible thermodynamics and the Gouy-Chapman theory of the double layer, we show that the equilibrium distribution of charged lipid molecules between the two surfaces of a bilayer is asymmetric if the two solutions bathing the surfaces have the same ionic strength but contain ions of different valencies. For example, if one bathing solution contains 0.10 M NaCl and the other contains 0.70 M NaCl and 0.10 M CaCl2, the ratio of charged lipid molecules of the two surfaces in a membrane that contains 50% total negative lipids is 1.46, leading to a transbilayer potential of 18 mV. A complete set of such numerical results is presented in four figures. PMID:836930

  14. Models for Cometary Comae Containing Negative Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of IP/Halley. The anions O(-), OH(-), C(-), CH(-) and CN(-) have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu [I]. Organic molecular anions such as C4H(-) and C6H(-) are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been fully explored. We present details of our new models for the chemistry of cometary comae that include atomic and molecular anions. We calculate the impact of these anions on the charge balance and examine their importance for cometary coma chemistry.

  15. Theoretical Study of Negative Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Jack

    2011-05-01

    Although this review provides references to tabulations of molecular electron affinities, primarily it focuses on explaining why theory plays an important role in understanding the behavior of anions, explaining the challenges that anions pose to theory, making connections between the theories used to compute electron affinities and the potentials (e.g., charge-dipole, charge-quadrupole, valence attraction and exchange repulsion, dispersion, and polarization) that govern the electron-molecule interaction, and discussing how species with negative electron affinities may possess metastable anion states and how such states should be treated. In addition to references to published literature, many links are given to websites of practicing theoretical chemists who study molecular anions; these links (which appear in boldface) offer the reader a broad avenue to access much more information about molecular anions than can be covered in a review or even through conventional literature sources.

  16. Optimization studies of carbon additives to negative active material for the purpose of extending the life of VRLA batteries in high-rate partial-state-of-charge operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boden, D. P.; Loosemore, D. V.; Spence, M. A.; Wojcinski, T. D.

    The negative plates of lead-acid batteries subjected to partial-state-of-charge (PSOC) operation fail because of the development of an electrically inert film of lead sulfate on their surfaces. It has been found that carbon additives to the negative active material can significantly increase their cycle life in this type of operation. In this paper we show that various types of carbon, including graphite, carbon black eliminate the surface development of lead sulfate and that, in their presence, the lead sulfate becomes homogeneously distributed throughout the active material. Examination of active material by energy dispersive spectroscopy after extensive cycling shows that lead formed during charge of lead sulfate preferentially deposits on the carbon particles that have been embedded in the active material. Electrochemical studies have been carried out on a number of types of carbon additives having a wide range of properties. These included flake, expanded and synthetic graphite, isotropically graphitized carbon, carbon black and activated carbon. We have investigated their effect on the resistivity and surface areas of the negative active material and also on such electrochemical properties as active material utilization and cycle life. Most of the carbon additives increase the utilization of the active material and impressive increases in cycle life have been obtained with over 6000 capacity turnovers having been achieved. However, at this time, we have not been able to correlate either the type or the properties of the carbon with capacity or cycle life. Further work is needed in this area. The increases that have been achieved in cycle life provide evidence that the lead-acid battery is a viable low cost option for hybrid-electric vehicle use.

  17. Charge and aggregation pattern govern the interaction of plasticins with LPS monolayers mimicking the external leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Michel, J P; Wang, Y X; Dé, E; Fontaine, P; Goldmann, M; Rosilio, V

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics has become today a major public health issue. In the development of new anti-infectious therapies, antimicrobial peptides appear as promising candidates. However, their mechanisms of action against bacterial membranes are still poorly understood. We describe for the first time the interaction and penetration of plasticins into lipid monolayers and bilayers modeling the two leaflets of the asymmetrical outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The lipid composition of these monolayers mimics that of each leaflet: mixtures of LPS Re 595 mutant and wild type S-form from Salmonella enterica for the external leaflet, and SOPE/SOPG/cardiolipin (80/15/5) for the inner one. The analysis of the interfacial behavior of native (PTCDA1) and modified (PTCDA1-KF) antimicrobial plasticins showed that PTCDA1-KF exhibited better surface properties than its unmodified counterpart. Both peptides could penetrate into the model monolayers at concentrations higher than 0.1 μM. The penetration was particularly enhanced for PTCDA1-KF into the mixed LPS monolayer, due to attractive electrostatic interactions. Grazing X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy studies revealed the changes in LPS monolayers organization upon peptide insertion. The interaction of plasticins with liposomes was also monitored by light scattering and circular dichroism techniques. Only the cationic plasticin achieved full disaggregation and structuration in α helices, whereas the native one remained aggregated and unstructured. The main steps of the penetration mechanism of the two plasticins into lipid models of the external leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria have been established. PMID:26343162

  18. Correlation of ionizing irradiation-induced late pulmonary fibrosis with long-term bone marrow culture fibroblast progenitor cell biology in mice homozygous deletion recombinant negative for endothelial cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Michael W; Guo, Hongliang; Shields, Donna; Zhang, Xichen; Greenberger, Joel S

    2004-01-01

    Ionizing irradiation damage to the lung is associated with an acute inflammatory reaction, followed by a latent period and then late effects including predominantly pulmonary fibrosis. The cells mediating fibrosis have recently been shown to derive from the bone marrow hematopoietic microenvironment. Initiation of late pulmonary irradiation lung damage has been correlated with up-regulation of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 in pulmonary endothelial cells, followed by infiltration of macrophages and bone marrow-derived fibroblasts forming the fibrotic lesions of organizing alveolitis/fibrosis. To determine whether the absence of expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, or other adhesion molecules known to be relevant to inflammatory cell attachment to lung endothelial cells was associated with a decrease in irradiation-induced lung fibrosis, homozygous deletion recombinant knockout mice lacking each of several adhesion molecules were tested compared to littermates for survival and development of organizing alveolitis following 20 Gy irradiation to both lungs. Bone marrow culture longevity has been shown to be a parameter, which correlates with both hematopoietic stem cell reserve and the integrity of fibroblast progenitors of the supportive hematopoietic microenvironment; radiation lung survival data were correlated to longevity of hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures established from tibia and femur bone marrow of the same mice. Homozygous deletion recombinant negative mice including VCAM-1-/-, ICAM-1-/-, E-Selectin-/-, or L-Selectin-/- were irradiated to 20 Gy to both lungs and followed for survival and percent organizing alveolitis at time of death compared to each normal littermate. A significant increase in survival (median 190 days) was detected with L-Selectin-/- compared to littermate control mice (median 140 days) or other groups. Long-term bone marrow cultures from L-Selectin-/- mice showed no detectable difference in marrow fibroblasts or hematopoietic cell biology

  19. Quantifying charge transfer energies at donor-acceptor interfaces in small-molecule solar cells with constrained DFTB and spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Reinhard; Luschtinetz, Regina; Seifert, Gotthard; Jägeler-Hoheisel, Till; Körner, Christian; Leo, Karl; Rapacioli, Mathias

    2013-11-27

    Charge transfer states around the donor-acceptor interface in an organic solar cell determine the device performance in terms of the open circuit voltage. In the present work, we propose a computational scheme based on constrained density functional tight binding theory (c-DFTB) to assess the energy of the lowest charge transfer (CT) state in such systems. A comparison of the c-DFTB scheme with Hartree-Fock based configuration interaction of singles (CIS) and with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) using the hybrid functional B3LYP reveals that CIS and c-DFTB reproduce the correct Coulomb asymptotics between cationic donor and anionic acceptor configurations, whereas TD-DFT gives a qualitatively wrong excitation energy. Together with an embedding scheme accounting for the polarizable medium, this c-DFTB scheme is applied to several donor-acceptor combinations used in molecular solar cells. The external quantum efficiency of photovoltaic cells based on zinc phthalocyanine-C60 blends reveals a CT band remaining much narrower than the density of states of acceptor HOMO and donor LUMO, an observation which can be interpreted in a natural way in terms of Marcus transfer theory. A detailed comparison with c-DFTB calculations reveals an energy difference of 0.32 eV between calculated and observed absorption from the electronic ground state into the CT state. In a blend of a functionalized thiophene and C60, the photoluminescence spectra differ significantly from neat films, allowing again an assignment to CT states. The proposed computational scheme reproduces the observed trends of the observed open circuit voltages in photovoltaic devices relying on several donor-acceptor blends, finding an offset of 1.16 eV on average. This value is similar as in polymer-fullerene photovoltaic systems where it amounts to about 0.9 eV, indicating that the photophysics of CT states in molecular donor-acceptor blends and in polymer-fullerene blends are governed by the

  20. Quantifying charge transfer energies at donor-acceptor interfaces in small-molecule solar cells with constrained DFTB and spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Reinhard; Luschtinetz, Regina; Seifert, Gotthard; Jägeler-Hoheisel, Till; Körner, Christian; Leo, Karl; Rapacioli, Mathias

    2013-11-01

    Charge transfer states around the donor-acceptor interface in an organic solar cell determine the device performance in terms of the open circuit voltage. In the present work, we propose a computational scheme based on constrained density functional tight binding theory (c-DFTB) to assess the energy of the lowest charge transfer (CT) state in such systems. A comparison of the c-DFTB scheme with Hartree-Fock based configuration interaction of singles (CIS) and with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) using the hybrid functional B3LYP reveals that CIS and c-DFTB reproduce the correct Coulomb asymptotics between cationic donor and anionic acceptor configurations, whereas TD-DFT gives a qualitatively wrong excitation energy. Together with an embedding scheme accounting for the polarizable medium, this c-DFTB scheme is applied to several donor-acceptor combinations used in molecular solar cells. The external quantum efficiency of photovoltaic cells based on zinc phthalocyanine-C60 blends reveals a CT band remaining much narrower than the density of states of acceptor HOMO and donor LUMO, an observation which can be interpreted in a natural way in terms of Marcus transfer theory. A detailed comparison with c-DFTB calculations reveals an energy difference of 0.32 eV between calculated and observed absorption from the electronic ground state into the CT state. In a blend of a functionalized thiophene and C60, the photoluminescence spectra differ significantly from neat films, allowing again an assignment to CT states. The proposed computational scheme reproduces the observed trends of the observed open circuit voltages in photovoltaic devices relying on several donor-acceptor blends, finding an offset of 1.16 eV on average. This value is similar as in polymer-fullerene photovoltaic systems where it amounts to about 0.9 eV, indicating that the photophysics of CT states in molecular donor-acceptor blends and in polymer-fullerene blends are governed by the same

  1. Charge inversion in DNA-amphiphile complexes: Possible application to gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Paulo S.; Levin, Yan; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    1999-12-01

    We study complex formation between the DNA and cationic amphiphilic molecules. As the amphiphile is added to the solution containing DNA, a cooperative binding of surfactants to the DNA molecules is found. This binding transition occurs at a specific density of amphiphile, which is strongly dependent on the concentration of the salt and on the hydrophobicity of the surfactant molecules. We find that for amphiphiles which are sufficiently hydrophobic, a charge neutralization, or even charge inversion of the complex is possible. This is of particular importance in applications to gene therapy, for which the functional delivery of specific base sequence into living cells remains an outstanding problem. The charge inversion could, in principle, allow the DNA-surfactant complexes to approach the negatively charged cell membranes permitting the transfection to take place.

  2. Charge inversion in DNA--amphiphile complexes: Applications for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Marcia C.; Kuhn, Paulo; Levin, Yan

    2000-03-01

    We study a complex formation between the DNA and cationic amphiphilic molecules. As the amphiphile is added to the solution containing DNA, a cooperative binding of surfactants to the DNA molecules is found. This binding transition occurs at specific density of amphiphile, which is strongly dependent on the concentration of the salt and on the hydrophobicity of the surfactant molecules. We find that for amphiphiles which are sufficiently hydrophobic, a charge neutralization, or even charge inversion of the complex is possible. This is of particular importance in applications to gene therapy, for which the functional delivery of specific base sequence into living cells remains an outstanding problem. The charge inversion could, in principle, allow the DNA-surfactant complexes to approach negatively charged cell membranes permitting the transfection to take place.

  3. Singlet molecular oxygen ( sup 1. Delta. sub g O sub 2 ) formation upon irradiation of an oxygen ( sup 3. Sigma. sub g sup minus O sub 2 )-organic molecule charge-transfer absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R. )

    1989-07-13

    Singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) phosphorescence ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup {minus}}O{sub 2} {l arrow} {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}: 1270 nm) has been observed in a time-resolved experiment subsequent to pulsed UV laser irradiation of the oxygen ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup {minus}}O{sub 2})-organic molecule charge-transfer bands of liquid aromatic hydrocarbons (mesitylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, toluene, benzene), ethers (tetrahydrofuran, 1,4-dioxane, glyme, diglyme, triglyme), alcohols (methanol, propanol), and aliphatic hydrocarbons (cyclohexane, cyclooctane, decahydronaphthalene). Although {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} could originate from a variety of different processes in these oxygenated solvent systems, we have used the results of several independent experiments to indicate that an oxygen-solvent charge-transfer (CT) state is the {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} precursor. Other transient species have also been observed in time-resolved absorption experiments subsequent to pulsed UV irradiation of the oxygen-solvent CT bands. Some of these molecular transients, or species derived from these intermediates, may be responsible for an observed increase in the rate of {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} decay under certain conditions.

  4. Quadrupole, octopole, and hexadecapole electric moments of Sigma, Pi, Delta, and Phi electronic states: cylindrically asymmetric charge density distributions in linear molecules with nonzero electronic angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Bruna, Pablo J; Grein, Friedrich

    2007-08-21

    The number of independent components, n, of traceless electric 2(l)-multipole moments is determined for C(infinity v) molecules in Sigma(+/-), Pi, Delta, and Phi electronic states (Lambda=0,1,2,3). Each 2(l) pole is defined by a rank-l irreducible tensor with (2l+1) components P(m)((l)) proportional to the solid spherical harmonic r(l)Y(m)(l)(theta,phi). Here we focus our attention on 2(l) poles with l=2,3,4 (quadrupole Theta, octopole Omega, and hexadecapole Phi). An important conclusion of this study is that n can be 1 or 2 depending on both the multipole rank l and state quantum number Lambda. For Sigma(+/-)(Lambda=0) states, all 2(l) poles have one independent parameter (n=1). For spatially degenerate states--Pi, Delta, and Phi (Lambda=1,2,3)--the general rule reads n=1 for l<2/Lambda/ (when the 2(l)-pole rank lies below 2/Lambda/ but n=2 for higher 2(l) poles with l>or=2/Lambda/. The second nonzero term is the off-diagonal matrix element [formula: see text]. Thus, a Pi(Lambda=1) state has one dipole (mu(z)) but two independent 2(l) poles for l>or=2--starting with the quadrupole [Theta(zz),(Theta(xx)-Theta(yy))]. A Delta(Lambda=2) state has n=1 for 2((1,2,3)) poles (mu(z),Theta(zz),Omega(zzz)) but n=2 for higher 2((l>or=4)) poles--from the hexadecapole Phi up. For Phi(Lambda=3) states, it holds that n=1 for 2(1) to 2(5) poles but n=2 for all 2((l>or=6)) poles. In short, what is usually stated in the literature--that n=1 for all possible 2(l) poles of linear molecules--only applies to Sigma(+/-) states. For degenerate states with n=2, all Cartesian 2(l)-pole components (l>or=2/Lambda/) can be expressed as linear combinations of two irreducible multipoles, P(m=0)((l)) and P/m/=2 Lambda)((l)) [parallel (z axis) and anisotropy (xy plane)]. Our predictions are exemplified by the Theta, Omega, and Phi moments calculated for Lambda=0-3 states of selected diatomics (in parentheses): X (2)Sigma(+)(CN), X (2)Pi(NO), a (3)Pi(u)(C(2)), X (2)Delta(NiH), X (3)Delta(TiO), X

  5. Visualizing the Positive-Negative Interface of Molecular Electrostatic Potentials as an Educational Tool for Assigning Chemical Polarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonborn, Konrad; Host, Gunnar; Palmerius, Karljohan

    2010-01-01

    To help in interpreting the polarity of a molecule, charge separation can be visualized by mapping the electrostatic potential at the van der Waals surface using a color gradient or by indicating positive and negative regions of the electrostatic potential using different colored isosurfaces. Although these visualizations capture the molecular…

  6. Charge separation in CO oxidation involving supported gold clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, R. S.; Smirnov, B. M.

    2011-12-15

    The character of the catalytic oxidation of CO by supported gold cluster catalysts is analyzed with emphasis on the unique characteristics of this process. The scheme of this process used here has the reagent CO molecule captured in the interface between the cluster and support, with oxygen molecules or atoms located on the support surface to react with the CO. (Other models have also been presented.) The experimental data indicate that, together with configurational transitions that lead to the CO molecule joining an oxygen atom to form the CO{sub 2} molecule, the charge separation due to capture of the CO molecule by the supported gold cluster is important. The process of release of the CO{sub 2} molecule results in charge exchange; the time for this process is relatively long because of the large distance separating positive and negative charges, a distance exceeding the cluster radius. This provides a high efficiency of the oxidation of CO with this catalyst despite the relatively high activation energy for the configurational transition.

  7. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  8. A model for the abrogation of the SOS response by an SOS protein: a negatively charged helix in DinI mimics DNA in its interaction with RecA

    PubMed Central

    Voloshin, Oleg N.; Ramirez, Benjamin E.; Bax, Ad; Camerini-Otero, R. Daniel

    2001-01-01

    DinI is a recently described negative regulator of the SOS response in Escherichia coli. Here we show that it physically interacts with RecA and prevents the binding of single-stranded DNA to RecA, which is required for the activation of the latter. DinI also displaces ssDNA from a stable RecA–DNA cofilament, thus eliminating the SOS signal. In addition, DinI inhibits RecA-mediated homologous DNA pairing, but has no effect on actively proceeding strand exchange. Biochemical data, together with the molecular structure, define the C-terminal α-helix in DinI as the active site of the protein. In an unusual example of molecular mimicry, a negatively charged surface on this α-helix, by imitating single-stranded DNA, interacts with the loop L2 homologous pairing region of RecA and interferes with the activation of RecA. PMID:11230150

  9. Why molecules move along a temperature gradient

    PubMed Central

    Duhr, Stefan; Braun, Dieter

    2006-01-01