Science.gov

Sample records for negatively charged molecules

  1. Astronomers Discover First Negatively-charged Molecule in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Cambridge, MA - Astronomers have discovered the first negatively charged molecule in space, identifying it from radio signals that were a mystery until now. While about 130 neutral and 14 positively charged molecules are known to exist in interstellar space, this is the first negative molecule, or anion, to be found. "We've spotted a rare and exotic species, like the white tiger of space," said astronomer Michael McCarthy of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). By learning more about the rich broth of chemicals found in interstellar space, astronomers hope to explain how the young Earth converted these basic ingredients into the essential chemicals for life. This new finding helps to advance scientists' understanding of the chemistry of the interstellar medium, and hence the birthplaces of planets. McCarthy worked with CfA colleagues Carl Gottlieb, Harshal Gupta (also from the Univ. of Texas), and Patrick Thaddeus to identify the molecular anion known as C6H-: a linear chain of six carbon atoms with one hydrogen atom at the end and an "extra" electron. Such molecules were thought to be extremely rare because ultraviolet light that suffuses space easily knocks electrons off molecules. The large size of C6H-, larger than most neutral and all positive molecules known in space, may increase its stability in the harsh cosmic environment. "The discovery of C6H- resolves a long-standing enigma in astrochemistry: the apparent lack of negatively charged molecules in space," stated Thaddeus. The team first conducted laboratory experiments to determine exactly what radio frequencies to use in their search. Then, they used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to hunt for C6H- in celestial objects. In particular, they targeted locations in which previous searches had spotted unidentified radio signals at the appropriate frequencies. They found C6H- in two very different locations-a shell of gas surrounding the evolved red giant

  2. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Christophorou, L G

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules area discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to "hot" molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules ("electron affinity"), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies. PMID:7428744

  3. Increasing the Net Negative Charge by Replacement of DOTA Chelator with DOTAGA Improves the Biodistribution of Radiolabeled Second-Generation Synthetic Affibody Molecules.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Kristina; Honarvar, Hadis; Norrström, Emily; Strand, Joanna; Mitran, Bogdan; Orlova, Anna; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A promising strategy to enable patient stratification for targeted therapies is to monitor the target expression in a tumor by radionuclide molecular imaging. Affibody molecules (7 kDa) are nonimmunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a 25-fold smaller size than intact antibodies. They have shown an apparent potential as molecular imaging probes both in preclinical and clinical studies. Earlier, we found that hepatic uptake can be reduced by the incorporation of negatively charged purification tags at the N-terminus of Affibody molecules. We hypothesized that liver uptake might similarly be reduced by positioning the chelator at the N-terminus, where the chelator-radionuclide complex will provide negative charges. To test this hypothesis, a second generation synthetic anti-HER2 ZHER2:2891 Affibody molecule was synthesized and labeled with (111)In and (68)Ga using DOTAGA and DOTA chelators. The chelators were manually coupled to the N-terminus of ZHER2:2891 forming an amide bond. Labeling DOTAGA-ZHER2:2891 and DOTA-ZHER2:2891 with (68)Ga and (111)In resulted in stable radioconjugates. The tumor-targeting and biodistribution properties of the (111)In- and (68)Ga-labeled conjugates were compared in SKOV-3 tumor-bearing nude mice at 2 h postinjection. The HER2-specific binding of the radioconjugates was verified both in vitro and in vivo. Using the DOTAGA chelator gave significantly lower radioactivity in liver and blood for both radionuclides. The (111)In-labeled conjugates showed more rapid blood clearance than the (68)Ga-labeled conjugates. The most pronounced influence of the chelators was found when they were labeled with (68)Ga. The DOTAGA chelator gave significantly higher tumor-to-blood (61 ± 6 vs 23 ± 5, p < 0.05) and tumor-to-liver (10.4 ± 0.6 vs 4.5 ± 0.5, p < 0.05) ratios than the DOTA chelator. This study demonstrated that chelators may be used to alter the uptake of Affibody molecules, and most likely other scaffold-based imaging probes, for improvement

  4. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Anup K.; Neyer, David W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Garguilo, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  5. Arabinogalactan proteins are incorporated in negatively charged coffee brew melanoidins.

    PubMed

    Bekedam, E Koen; De Laat, Marieke P F C; Schols, Henk A; Van Boekel, Martinus A J S; Smit, Gerrit

    2007-02-01

    The charge properties of melanoidins in high molecular weight (HMw) coffee brew fractions, isolated by diafiltration and membrane dialysis, were studied. Ion exchange chromatography experiments with the HMw fractions showed that coffee brew melanoidins were negatively charged whereas these molecules did not expose any positive charge at the pH of coffee brew. Fractions with different ionic charges were isolated and subsequently characterized by means of the specific extinction coefficient (K(mix 405nm)), sugar composition, phenolic group content, nitrogen content, and the arabinogalactan protein (AGP) specific Yariv gel-diffusion assay. The isolated fractions were different in composition and AGP was found to be present in one of the HMw fractions. The AGP accounted for 6% of the coffee brew dry matter and had a moderate negative charge, probably caused by the presence of uronic acids. As the fraction that precipitated with Yariv was brown (K(mix 405nm) = 1.2), compared to a white color in the green bean, it was concluded that these AGPs had undergone Maillard reaction resulting in an AGP-melanoidin complex. The presence of mannose (presumably from galactomannan) indicates the incorporation of galactomannans in the AGP-melanoidin complex. As the uronic acid content in the more negatively charged melanoidin-rich, AGP-poor HMw fractions decreased, it was hypothesized that acidic groups are formed or incorporated during melanoidin formation. PMID:17263472

  6. Membrane Permeabilization Induced by Sphingosine: Effect of Negatively Charged Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Rojo, Noemi; Sot, Jesús; Viguera, Ana R.; Collado, M. Isabel; Torrecillas, Alejandro; Gómez-Fernández, J.C.; Goñi, Félix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine [(2S, 3R, 4E)-2-amino-4-octadecen-1, 3-diol] is the most common sphingoid long chain base in sphingolipids. It is the precursor of important cell signaling molecules, such as ceramides. In the last decade it has been shown to act itself as a potent metabolic signaling molecule, by activating a number of protein kinases. Moreover, sphingosine has been found to permeabilize phospholipid bilayers, giving rise to vesicle leakage. The present contribution intends to analyze the mechanism by which this bioactive lipid induces vesicle contents release, and the effect of negatively charged bilayers in the release process. Fluorescence lifetime measurements and confocal fluorescence microscopy have been applied to observe the mechanism of sphingosine efflux from large and giant unilamellar vesicles; a graded-release efflux has been detected. Additionally, stopped-flow measurements have shown that the rate of vesicle permeabilization increases with sphingosine concentration. Because at the physiological pH sphingosine has a net positive charge, its interaction with negatively charged phospholipids (e.g., bilayers containing phosphatidic acid together with sphingomyelins, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol) gives rise to a release of vesicular contents, faster than with electrically neutral bilayers. Furthermore, phosphorous 31-NMR and x-ray data show the capacity of sphingosine to facilitate the formation of nonbilayer (cubic phase) intermediates in negatively charged membranes. The data might explain the pathogenesis of Niemann-Pick type C1 disease. PMID:24940775

  7. Negative ion-uranium hexafluoride charge transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Gerald E.; Newton, T. W.

    1980-10-01

    The flowing afterglow technique has been used to study the process of charge transfer from selected negative ions (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, SF6-) to UF6. The sole ionic product in all cases was observed to be UF6-. Data analysis was complicated by an unexpected coupling of chemical and diffusive ion loss processes when UF6- product ions were present. The rate coefficients for the charge transfer processes are (k in 10-9 cm3 molecule-1 s-1) F-, 1.3; Cl-, 1.1; Br-, 0.93; I-, 0.77; and SF6-, 0.69. The rate constants agree quite well with the classical Langevin predictions.

  8. Negatively Charged Lipid Membranes Catalyze Supramolecular Hydrogel Formation.

    PubMed

    Versluis, Frank; van Elsland, Daphne M; Mytnyk, Serhii; Perrier, Dayinta L; Trausel, Fanny; Poolman, Jos M; Maity, Chandan; le Sage, Vincent A A; van Kasteren, Sander I; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2016-07-20

    In this contribution we show that biological membranes can catalyze the formation of supramolecular hydrogel networks. Negatively charged lipid membranes can generate a local proton gradient, accelerating the acid-catalyzed formation of hydrazone-based supramolecular gelators near the membrane. Synthetic lipid membranes can be used to tune the physical properties of the resulting multicomponent gels as a function of lipid concentration. Moreover, the catalytic activity of lipid membranes and the formation of gel networks around these supramolecular structures are controlled by the charge and phase behavior of the lipid molecules. Finally, we show that the insights obtained from synthetic membranes can be translated to biological membranes, enabling the formation of gel fibers on living HeLa cells. PMID:27359373

  9. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. PMID:26057987

  10. The formation of negatively charged particles in thermoemission plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnyakov, V. I. Dragan, G. S.; Florko, A. V.

    2008-01-15

    The results of measuring the charges of the magnesium oxide particles formed near a block of metallic magnesium burning in air are presented. It has been found that, apart from positively charged magnesium oxide particles, there are negatively charged particles in the thermoemission plasma of the burning products. It has been shown that within the framework of the model of neutralizing charges, the oxide particles can acquire unlike charges in the thermoemission plasma. The calculations agree with the experimental data.

  11. The formation of negatively charged particles in thermoemission plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, V. I.; Dragan, G. S.; Florko, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    The results of measuring the charges of the magnesium oxide particles formed near a block of metallic magnesium burning in air are presented. It has been found that, apart from positively charged magnesium oxide particles, there are negatively charged particles in the thermoemission plasma of the burning products. It has been shown that within the framework of the model of neutralizing charges, the oxide particles can acquire unlike charges in the thermoemission plasma. The calculations agree with the experimental data.

  12. Laboratory infrared spectroscopy of gaseous negatively charged polyaromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Juehan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2014-06-01

    Based largely on infrared spectroscopic evidence, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are now widely accepted to occur abundantly in the interstellar medium. Laboratory infrared spectra have been obtained for a large variety of neutral and cationic PAHs, but data for anionic PAHs are scarce. Nonetheless, in regions with relatively high electron densities and low UV photon fluxes, PAHs have been suggested to occur predominantly as negatively charged ions (anions), having substantial influence on cloud chemistry. While some matrix spectra have been reported for radical anion PAHs, no data is available for even-electron anions, which are more stable against electron detachment. Here we present the first laboratory infrared spectra of deprotonated PAHs ([PAH-H]{sup –}) in the wavelength ranges between 6 and 16 μm and around 3 μm. Wavelength-dependent infrared multiple-photon electron detachment is employed to obtain spectra for deprotonated naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene in the gas phase. Spectra are compared with theoretical spectra computed at the density functional theory level. We show that the relative band intensities in different ranges of the IR spectrum deviate significantly from those of neutral and positively charged PAHs, and moreover from those of radical anion PAHs. These relative band intensities are, however, well reproduced by theory. An analysis of the frontier molecular orbitals of the even- and odd-electron anions reveals a high degree of charge localization in the deprotonated systems, qualitatively explaining the observed differences and suggesting unusually high electric dipole moments for this class of PAH molecules.

  13. Micro injector sample delivery system for charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    1999-11-09

    A micro injector sample delivery system for charged molecules. The injector is used for collecting and delivering controlled amounts of charged molecule samples for subsequent analysis. The injector delivery system can be scaled to large numbers (>96) for sample delivery to massively parallel high throughput analysis systems. The essence of the injector system is an electric field controllable loading tip including a section of porous material. By applying the appropriate polarity bias potential to the injector tip, charged molecules will migrate into porous material, and by reversing the polarity bias potential the molecules are ejected or forced away from the tip. The invention has application for uptake of charged biological molecules (e.g. proteins, nucleic acids, polymers, etc.) for delivery to analytical systems, and can be used in automated sample delivery systems.

  14. Contactless measurements of charge migration within single molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Sugishima, Akinori; Ohmasa, Yoshinori; Yao, Makoto

    2010-06-07

    Contactless measurements of charge migration were carried out for three pi-conjugated molecules in each of which a bromine atom and an oxygen atom are located on the opposite sides of the aromatic ring. A core hole was generated selectively in the Br atom by x-ray absorption, followed by the Auger cascade, and the subsequent charge migration within the molecule was examined by detecting an O{sup +} ion by means of the coincidence momentum imaging measurements.

  15. Is the negative glow plasma of a direct current glow discharge negatively charged?

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, E. A.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Demidov, V. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2015-02-15

    A classic problem in gas discharge physics is discussed: what is the sign of charge density in the negative glow region of a glow discharge? It is shown that traditional interpretations in text-books on gas discharge physics that states a negative charge of the negative glow plasma are based on analogies with a simple one-dimensional model of discharge. Because the real glow discharges with a positive column are always two-dimensional, the transversal (radial) term in divergence with the electric field can provide a non-monotonic axial profile of charge density in the plasma, while maintaining a positive sign. The numerical calculation of glow discharge is presented, showing a positive space charge in the negative glow under conditions, where a one-dimensional model of the discharge would predict a negative space charge.

  16. Is the negative glow plasma of a direct current glow discharge negatively charged?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, E. A.; Demidov, V. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Saifutdinov, A. I.

    2015-02-01

    A classic problem in gas discharge physics is discussed: what is the sign of charge density in the negative glow region of a glow discharge? It is shown that traditional interpretations in text-books on gas discharge physics that states a negative charge of the negative glow plasma are based on analogies with a simple one-dimensional model of discharge. Because the real glow discharges with a positive column are always two-dimensional, the transversal (radial) term in divergence with the electric field can provide a non-monotonic axial profile of charge density in the plasma, while maintaining a positive sign. The numerical calculation of glow discharge is presented, showing a positive space charge in the negative glow under conditions, where a one-dimensional model of the discharge would predict a negative space charge.

  17. Metal oxide charge transport material doped with organic molecules

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.

    2016-08-30

    Doping metal oxide charge transport material with an organic molecule lowers electrical resistance while maintaining transparency and thus is optimal for use as charge transport materials in various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic photovoltaic devices and organic light emitting devices.

  18. Negative-charge driven fragmentations for evidencing zwitterionic forms from doubly charged coppered peptides.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Michel; Bich, Claudia; Afonso, Carlos; Fournier, Françoise; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    In aqueous solution, amino acids (AA) and peptides are known to exist as zwitterions over a large pH range. However, in the gas phase, i.e. in electrospray (ESI), the zwitterionic form becomes unfavorable owing to the absence of stabilizing effects from intermolecular solvation. Nevertheless, during mass spectrometry experiments, the presence of a metallic cation can reinforce the zwitterionic character of the molecule and thus influence its fragmentation under low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions. The [M + Cu(II)](2+) complexes of six pentapeptides (YGGFL, YGGFL(NH(2)), YGGFK, YGGFQ, KYGGF and QYGGF) were analyzed by collision to highlight the presence of zwitterions. The experiments were performed on a 3D-ion trap equipped with an orthogonal ESI source. For each peptides studied, negative-charge driven fragmentations on globally positively charged ions were observed. These fragmentation mechanisms, generally observed in the negative mode, suggest the competitive deprotonation of the C-terminal carboxylic acid or of the tyrosine side-chain residue for each peptide studied and thus a zwitterionic form to preserve the charge balance. Moreover, the specific loss of (CH(3)--C(6)H(4)--O)(*) characterizes YGGFK compared to YGGFQ and the specific loss of styrene characterizes KYGGF compared to QYGGF. These results allow the differentiation of the two couples of isobaric pentapeptides. An unusual loss of NH(4) (+), which occurred from the N-terminus, was also observed for YGGFL, YGGFL(NH(2)), YGGFK and YGGFQ. Finally, the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I), concomitant with the (CH(3)--C(6)H(4)--O)(*) release, was pointed out for YGGFK. PMID:17149792

  19. Electrostatic Power Generation from Negatively Charged, Simulated Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; King, Glen C.; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yeonjoon

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to develop an electrostatic power generator for future lunar missions that facilitate the utilization of lunar resources. The lunar surface is known to be negatively charged from the constant bombardment of electrons and protons from the solar wind. The resulting negative electrostatic charge on the dust particles, in the lunar vacuum, causes them to repel each other minimizing the potential. The result is a layer of suspended dust about one meter above the lunar surface. This phenomenon was observed by both Clementine and Surveyor spacecrafts. During the Apollo 17 lunar landing, the charged dust was a major hindrance, as it was attracted to the astronauts' spacesuits, equipment, and the lunar buggies. The dust accumulated on the spacesuits caused reduced visibility for the astronauts, and was unavoidably transported inside the spacecraft where it caused breathing irritation [1]. In the lunar vacuum, the maximum charge on the particles can be extremely high. An article in the journal "Nature", titled "Moon too static for astronauts?" (Feb 2, 2007) estimates that the lunar surface is charged with up to several thousand volts [2]. The electrostatic power generator was devised to alleviate the hazardous effects of negatively charged lunar soil by neutralizing the charged particles through capacitive coupling and thereby simultaneously harnessing power through electric charging [3]. The amount of power generated or collected is dependent on the areal coverage of the device and hovering speed over the lunar soil surface. A thin-film array of capacitors can be continuously charged and sequentially discharged using a time-differentiated trigger discharge process to produce a pulse train of discharge for DC mode output. By controlling the pulse interval, the DC mode power can be modulated for powering devices and equipment. In conjunction with a power storage system, the electrostatic power generator can be a power source for a lunar rover or other

  20. Gating capacitive field-effect sensors by the charge of nanoparticle/molecule hybrids.

    PubMed

    Poghossian, Arshak; Bäcker, Matthias; Mayer, Dirk; Schöning, Michael J

    2015-01-21

    The semiconductor field-effect platform is a powerful tool for chemical and biological sensing with direct electrical readout. In this work, the field-effect capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) structure - the simplest field-effect (bio-)chemical sensor - modified with citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been applied for a label-free electrostatic detection of charged molecules by their intrinsic molecular charge. The EIS sensor detects the charge changes in AuNP/molecule inorganic/organic hybrids induced by the molecular adsorption or binding events. The feasibility of the proposed detection scheme has been exemplarily demonstrated by realizing capacitive EIS sensors consisting of an Al-p-Si-SiO2-silane-AuNP structure for the label-free detection of positively charged cytochrome c and poly-d-lysine molecules as well as for monitoring the layer-by-layer formation of polyelectrolyte multilayers of poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate), representing typical model examples of detecting small proteins and macromolecules and the consecutive adsorption of positively/negatively charged polyelectrolytes, respectively. For comparison, EIS sensors without AuNPs have been investigated, too. The adsorption of molecules on the surface of AuNPs has been verified via the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. In addition, a theoretical model of the functioning of the capacitive field-effect EIS sensor functionalized with AuNP/charged-molecule hybrids has been discussed. PMID:25470772

  1. Electronic properties of atoms and molecules containing one and two negative muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncada, Félix; Cruz, Daniel; Reyes, Andrés

    2013-05-01

    Any-Particle Molecular Orbital/Hartree-Fock (APMO/HF) calculations are performed for a variety of atoms and simple diatomic molecular systems containing one and two negative muons (μ). In these calculations electrons and muons are described quantum mechanically whereas nuclei are treated as point charges. Our results for atoms containing n = 1, 2 negative muons reveal that electronic properties such as electronic densities and ionization potentials shift to those of all-electron atoms with atomic numbers Z-n. In the case of diatomic molecules these muonic effects are more diverse ranging from transmutation of atomic properties to drastic changes in equilibrium geometries and energies.

  2. Negative temperature of electronic motion in atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shu-Kun |

    1996-12-31

    By definition both energy E and entropy S are positive functions. They are related to temperature T. The model of local thermodynamics of electronic motion by Ghosh, Berkowitz and by Parr is of great interest. Following virial theorem and the von Neumann-Shannon entropy formula, locally E and S vary in a way that the E reduces while its S increases. Consequently, relative to the conventional thermodynamic temperature of the surroundings, the local thermodynamic temperature T of electronic motion in atoms and molecules must be negative. Locally both kinetic energy K and S increase with the increase of the absolute value of the local thermodynamic temperature, {vert_bar}T{vert_bar}, or when T becomes more negative and when the system approaches the ground state. The typical quantum effects are characterized by such a local negative T. A local informational temperature (T{sub I}) of an electronic configuration in atoms and molecules is also defined, which is of the opposite sign (i.e., positive) of its local thermodynamic temperature, T. T{sub I} can be used to predict the relative stabilities of the excited states, where the local temperature T approaches zero at the excited states. The local thermodynamic temperature and the local informational temperature have been used as convenient concepts to characterize structural stability and process spontaneity of electronic systems.

  3. Gram-Negative Bacterial Sensors for Eukaryotic Signal Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Veron, Wilfried; Chapalain, Annelise; Madi, Amar; Blier, Anne-Sophie; Dagorn, Audrey; Connil, Nathalie; Chevalier, Sylvie; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Ample evidence exists showing that eukaryotic signal molecules synthesized and released by the host can activate the virulence of opportunistic pathogens. The sensitivity of prokaryotes to host signal molecules requires the presence of bacterial sensors. These prokaryotic sensors, or receptors, have a double function: stereospecific recognition in a complex environment and transduction of the message in order to initiate bacterial physiological modifications. As messengers are generally unable to freely cross the bacterial membrane, they require either the presence of sensors anchored in the membrane or transporters allowing direct recognition inside the bacterial cytoplasm. Since the discovery of quorum sensing, it was established that the production of virulence factors by bacteria is tightly growth-phase regulated. It is now obvious that expression of bacterial virulence is also controlled by detection of the eukaryotic messengers released in the micro-environment as endocrine or neuro-endocrine modulators. In the presence of host physiological stress many eukaryotic factors are released and detected by Gram-negative bacteria which in return rapidly adapt their physiology. For instance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can bind elements of the host immune system such as interferon-γ and dynorphin and then through quorum sensing circuitry enhance its virulence. Escherichia coli sensitivity to the neurohormones of the catecholamines family appears relayed by a recently identified bacterial adrenergic receptor. In the present review, we will describe the mechanisms by which various eukaryotic signal molecules produced by host may activate Gram-negative bacteria virulence. Particular attention will be paid to Pseudomonas, a genus whose representative species, P. aeruginosa, is a common opportunistic pathogen. The discussion will be particularly focused on the pivotal role played by these new types of pathogen sensors from the sensing to the transduction mechanism involved in

  4. Charge Measurement of Atoms and Atomic Resolution of Molecules with Noncontact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Leo

    2010-03-01

    Individual gold and silver adatoms [1] and pentacene molecules [2] on ultrathin NaCl films on Cu(111) were investigated using a qPlus tuning fork atomic force microscope (AFM) operated at 5 Kelvin with oscillation amplitudes in the sub-ångstrom regime. Charging a gold adatom by one electron charge increased the force on the AFM tip by a few piconewtons. Employing Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) we also measured the local contact potential difference (LCPD). We observed that the LCPD is shifted depending on the sign of the charge and allows the discrimination of positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged atoms. To image pentacene molecules we modified AFM tips by means of vertical manipulation techniques, i.e. deliberately picking up known atoms and molecules, such as Au, Ag, Cl, CO, and pentacene. Using a CO terminated tip we resolved all individual atoms and bonds within a pentacene molecule. Three dimensional force maps showing the site specific distance dependence above the molecule were extracted. We compared our experimental results with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to gain insight on the physical origin of AFM contrast formation. We found that atomic resolution is only obtained due to repulsive force contributions originating from the Pauli exclusion principle. [4pt] [1] L. Gross, F. Mohn, P. Liljeroth, J. Repp, F. J. Giessibl, G. Meyer, Science 324, 1428 (2009). [0pt] [2] L. Gross, F. Mohn, N. Moll, P. Liljeroth, G. Meyer, Science 325, 1110 (2009).

  5. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  6. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Charge Transport in Azobenzene-Based Single-Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Kim, Youngsang; Sysoiev, Dmytro; Frederiksen, Thomas; Groth, Ulrich; Scheer, Elke

    2013-03-01

    The azobenzene class of molecules has become an archetype of molecular photoswitch research, due to their simple structure and the significant difference of the electronic system between their cis and trans isomers. However, a detailed understanding of the charge transport for the two isomers, when embedded in a junction with electrodes is still lacking. In order to clarify this issue, we investigate charge transport properties through single Azobenzene-ThioMethyl (AzoTM) molecules in a mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) system at 4.2 K. Single-molecule conductance, I-V characteristics, and IETS spectra of molecular junctions are measured and compared with first-principles transport calculations. Our studies elucidate the origin of a slightly higher conductance of junctions with cis isomer and demonstrate that IETS spectra of cis and trans forms show distinct vibrational fingerprints that can be used for identifying the isomer.

  8. Increased negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centers in fluorinated diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Shanying; Hu, Evelyn L.

    2013-07-29

    We investigated the effect of fluorine-terminated diamond surface on the charged state of shallow nitrogen vacancy defect centers (NVs). Fluorination is achieved with CF{sub 4} plasma, and the surface chemistry is confirmed with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Photoluminescence of these ensemble NVs reveals that fluorine-treated surfaces lead to a higher and more stable negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV{sup −}) population than oxygen-terminated surfaces. NV{sup −} population is estimated by the ratio of negative to neutral charged NV zero-phonon lines. Surface chemistry control of NV{sup −} density is an important step towards improving the optical and spin properties of NVs for quantum information processing and magnetic sensing.

  9. Space Charge Neutralization in the ITER Negative Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Surrey, Elizabeth

    2007-08-10

    A model of the space charge neutralization of negative ion beams, developed from the model due to Holmes, is applied to the ITER heating and diagnostic beams. The Holmes model assumed that the plasma electron temperature was derived from the stripped electrons. This is shown to be incorrect for the ITER beams and the plasma electron temperature is obtained from the average creation energy upon ionization. The model shows that both ITER beams will be fully space charge compensated in the drift distance between the accelerator and the neutralizer. Inside the neutralizer, the plasma over compensates the space charge to the extent that a significant focusing force is predicted. At a certain position in the neutraliser this force balances the defocusing force due to the ions' transverse energy. Under these conditions the beam distribution function can change from Gaussian to Bennett and evidence of such a distribution observed in a multi-aperture, neutralized negative ion beam is presented.

  10. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  11. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J.; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C.; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  12. Positive Charge of “Sticky” Peptides and Proteins Impedes Release From Negatively Charged PLGA Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Balmert, Stephen C.; Zmolek, Andrew C.; Glowacki, Andrew J.; Knab, Timothy D.; Rothstein, Sam N.; Wokpetah, Joseph M.; Fedorchak, Morgan V.; Little, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of electrostatic interactions and/or acylation on release of charged (“sticky”) agents from biodegradable polymer matrices was systematically characterized. We hypothesized that release of peptides with positive charge would be hindered from negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles. Thus, we investigated release of peptides with different degrees of positive charge from several PLGA microparticle formulations, with different molecular weights and/or end groups (acid- or ester-terminated). Indeed, release studies revealed distinct inverse correlations between the amount of positive charge on peptides and their release rates from each PLGA microparticle formulation. Furthermore, we examined the case of peptides with net charge that changes from negative to positive within the pH range observed in degrading microparticles. These charge changing peptides displayed counterintuitive release kinetics, initially releasing faster from slower degrading (less acidic) microparticles, and releasing slower from the faster degrading (more acidic) microparticles. Importantly, trends between agent charge and release rates for model peptides also translated to larger, therapeutically relevant proteins and oligonucleotides. The results of these studies may improve future design of controlled release systems for numerous therapeutic biomolecules exhibiting positive charge, ultimately reducing time-consuming and costly trial and error iterations of such formulations. PMID:26085928

  13. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A. L.; Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H+ beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H- beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H- ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  14. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results. PMID:26932087

  15. Interstellar Chemistry Gets More Complex With New Charged-Molecule Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-07-01

    Astronomers using data from the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have found the largest negatively-charged molecule yet seen in space. The discovery of the third negatively-charged molecule, called an anion, in less than a year and the size of the latest anion will force a drastic revision of theoretical models of interstellar chemistry, the astronomers say. Molecule formation Formation Process of Large, Negatively-Charged Molecule in Interstellar Space CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for page of graphics and detailed information "This discovery continues to add to the diversity and complexity that is already seen in the chemistry of interstellar space," said Anthony J. Remijan of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "It also adds to the number of paths available for making the complex organic molecules and other large molecular species that may be precursors to life in the giant clouds from which stars and planets are formed," he added. Two teams of scientists found negatively-charged octatetraynyl, a chain of eight carbon atoms and one hydrogen atom, in the envelope of gas around an old, evolved star and in a cold, dark cloud of molecular gas. In both cases, the molecule had an extra electron, giving it a negative charge. About 130 neutral and about a dozen positively-charged molecules have been discovered in space, but the first negatively-charged molecule was not discovered until late last year. The largest previously-discovered negative ion found in space has six carbon atoms and one hydrogen atom. "Until recently, many theoretical models of how chemical reactions evolve in interstellar space have largely neglected the presence of anions. This can no longer be the case, and this means that there are many more ways to build large organic molecules in cosmic environments than have been explored," said Jan M. Hollis of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Ultraviolet light from stars can

  16. Charge exchange of a polar molecule at its cation

    SciTech Connect

    Buslov, E. Yu. Zon, B. A.

    2011-01-15

    The Landau-Herring method is used to derive an analytic expression for the one-electron exchange interaction of a polar molecule with its positively charged ion, induced by a {sigma}-electron. Analogously to the classical Van der Pole method, the exchange interaction potential is averaged over the rotational states of colliding particles. The resonant charge-transfer cross section is calculated, and the effect of the dipole moments of the core on the cross section is analyzed. It is shown that allowance for the dependence of the exchange potential on the orientation of the dipole moments relative to the molecular axis may change the dependence of the cross section on the velocity of colliding particles, which is typical of the resonant charge exchange, from the resonance to the quasi-resonance dependence.

  17. Gating capacitive field-effect sensors by the charge of nanoparticle/molecule hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghossian, Arshak; Bäcker, Matthias; Mayer, Dirk; Schöning, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    The semiconductor field-effect platform is a powerful tool for chemical and biological sensing with direct electrical readout. In this work, the field-effect capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) structure - the simplest field-effect (bio-)chemical sensor - modified with citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been applied for a label-free electrostatic detection of charged molecules by their intrinsic molecular charge. The EIS sensor detects the charge changes in AuNP/molecule inorganic/organic hybrids induced by the molecular adsorption or binding events. The feasibility of the proposed detection scheme has been exemplarily demonstrated by realizing capacitive EIS sensors consisting of an Al-p-Si-SiO2-silane-AuNP structure for the label-free detection of positively charged cytochrome c and poly-d-lysine molecules as well as for monitoring the layer-by-layer formation of polyelectrolyte multilayers of poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate), representing typical model examples of detecting small proteins and macromolecules and the consecutive adsorption of positively/negatively charged polyelectrolytes, respectively. For comparison, EIS sensors without AuNPs have been investigated, too. The adsorption of molecules on the surface of AuNPs has been verified via the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. In addition, a theoretical model of the functioning of the capacitive field-effect EIS sensor functionalized with AuNP/charged-molecule hybrids has been discussed.The semiconductor field-effect platform is a powerful tool for chemical and biological sensing with direct electrical readout. In this work, the field-effect capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) structure - the simplest field-effect (bio-)chemical sensor - modified with citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been applied for a label-free electrostatic detection of charged molecules by their intrinsic molecular charge. The EIS sensor

  18. Electron interactions with positively and negatively multiply charged biomolecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feketeová, Linda

    2012-07-01

    Interactions of positively and negatively multiply charged biomolecular clusters with low-energy electrons, from ~ 0 up to 50 eV of electron energy, were investigated in a high resolution Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionisation source. Electron-induced dissociation reactions of these clusters depend on the energy of the electrons, the size and the charge state of the cluster. The positively charged clusters [Mn+2H]2+ of zwitterionic betaines, M = (CH3)2XCH2CO2 (X = NCH3 and S), do capture an electron in the low electron energy region (< 10 eV). At higher electron energies neutral evaporation from the cluster becomes competitive with Coulomb explosion. In addition, a series of singly charged fragments arise from bond cleavage reactions, including decarboxylation and CH3 group transfer, due to the access of electronic excited states of the precursor ions. These fragmentation reactions depend on the type of betaine (X = NCH3 or S). For the negative dianionic clusters of tryptophan [Trp9-2H]2-, the important channel at low electron energies is loss of a neutral. Coulomb explosion competes from 19.8 eV and dominates at high electron energies. A small amount of [Trp2-H-NH3]- is observed at 21.8 eV.

  19. Interstellar Chemistry Gets More Complex With New Charged-Molecule Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-07-01

    Astronomers using data from the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have found the largest negatively-charged molecule yet seen in space. The discovery of the third negatively-charged molecule, called an anion, in less than a year and the size of the latest anion will force a drastic revision of theoretical models of interstellar chemistry, the astronomers say. Molecule formation Formation Process of Large, Negatively-Charged Molecule in Interstellar Space CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for page of graphics and detailed information "This discovery continues to add to the diversity and complexity that is already seen in the chemistry of interstellar space," said Anthony J. Remijan of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "It also adds to the number of paths available for making the complex organic molecules and other large molecular species that may be precursors to life in the giant clouds from which stars and planets are formed," he added. Two teams of scientists found negatively-charged octatetraynyl, a chain of eight carbon atoms and one hydrogen atom, in the envelope of gas around an old, evolved star and in a cold, dark cloud of molecular gas. In both cases, the molecule had an extra electron, giving it a negative charge. About 130 neutral and about a dozen positively-charged molecules have been discovered in space, but the first negatively-charged molecule was not discovered until late last year. The largest previously-discovered negative ion found in space has six carbon atoms and one hydrogen atom. "Until recently, many theoretical models of how chemical reactions evolve in interstellar space have largely neglected the presence of anions. This can no longer be the case, and this means that there are many more ways to build large organic molecules in cosmic environments than have been explored," said Jan M. Hollis of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Ultraviolet light from stars can

  20. Charged supramolecular assemblies of surfactant molecules in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno, David; Ceraulo, Leopoldo; Indelicato, Sergio; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo; Indelicato, Serena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to critically analyze recent literature on charged supramolecular assemblies formed by surfactant molecules in gas phase. Apart our specific interest on this research area, the stimuli to undertake the task arise from the widespread theoretical and applicative benefits emerging from a comprehensive view of this topic. In fact, the study of the formation, stability, and physicochemical peculiarities of non-covalent assemblies of surfactant molecules in gas phase allows to unveil interesting aspects such as the role of attractive, repulsive, and steric intermolecular interactions as driving force of supramolecular organization in absence of interactions with surrounding medium and the size and charge state dependence of aggregate structural and dynamical properties. Other interesting aspects worth to be investigated are joined to the ability of these assemblies to incorporate selected solubilizates molecules as well as to give rise to chemical reactions within a single organized structure. In particular, the incorporation of large molecules such as proteins has been of recent interest with the objective to protect their structure and functionality during the transition from solution to gas phase. Exciting fall-out of the study of gas phase surfactant aggregates includes mass and energy transport in the atmosphere, origin of life and simulation of supramolecular aggregation in the interstellar space. Moreover, supramolecular assemblies of amphiphilic molecules in gas phase could find remarkable applications as atmospheric cleaning agents, nanosolvents and nanoreactors for specialized chemical processes in confined space. Mass spectrometry techniques have proven to be particularly suitable to generate these assemblies and to furnish useful information on their size, size polydispersity, stability, and structural organization. On the other hand molecular dynamics simulations have been very useful to rationalize many experimental findings and to

  1. Photodetachment of gaseous multiply charged anions, copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate tetraanion: Tuning molecular electronic energy levels by charging and negative electron binding

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.B.; Ferris, K.; Wang, L.S.

    2000-01-13

    The authors report photodetachment photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of gaseous copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) tetrasulfonate quadruply charged anions, [CuPc(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sup 4{minus}}, and its monoprotonated and -sodiumated triply charged anions, [CuPc(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}H]{sup 3{minus}} and [CuPc(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}Na]{sup 3{minus}}. The [CuPc(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sup 4{minus}} tetraanion was found to possess a negative electron binding energy of {minus}0.9 eV, whereas the trianions have binding energies of 1.0 and 1.2 eV for the sodiumated and protonated species, respectively. The PES spectral features of the three multiply charged anions were observed to be similar to that of the parent CuPc neutral molecule, except that the anions have lower binding energies due to the presence of the negative charges ({minus}SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}). The data thus suggested a stepwise tuning of the molecular electronic energy levels of the CuPc molecule through charging, wherein the molecular orbital energies of the parent molecule were systematically pushed up by the negative charges. The authors further carried out semiempirical calculations, which provided insight into the nature of the localized charges on the peripheral {minus}SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} groups and the intramolecular electrostatic interactions in the multiply charged anions and confirmed the interpretation of the stepwise tuning of molecular energy levels by charging. Photon energy-dependent studies revealed the effects of the repulsive Coulomb barriers on the photodetachment PES spectra of the multiply charged anions. The barrier heights were estimated to be about 3.5 and 2.5 eV for the tetra- and trianions, respectively. The authors also observed excited states for the multiply charged anions and resonant tunneling through the repulsive Coulomb barriers via the excited states.

  2. Electron-molecule chemistry and charging processes on organic ices and Titan's icy aerosol surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirim, C.; Gann, R. D.; McLain, J. L.; Orlando, T. M.

    2015-09-01

    Electron-induced polymerization processes and charging events that can occur within Titan's atmosphere or on its surface were simulated using electron irradiation and dissociative electron attachment (DEA) studies of nitrogen-containing organic condensates. The DEA studies probe the desorption of H- from hydrogen cyanide (HCN), acetonitrile (CH3CN), and aminoacetonitrile (NH2CH2CN) ices, as well as from synthesized tholin materials condensed or deposited onto a graphite substrate maintained at low temperature (90-130 K). The peak cross sections for H- desorption during low-energy (3-15 eV) electron irradiation were measured and range from 3 × 10-21 to 2 × 10-18 cm2. Chemical and structural transformations of HCN ice upon 2 keV electron irradiation were investigated using X-ray photoelectron and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The electron-beam processed materials displayed optical properties very similar to tholins produced by conventional discharge methods. Electron and negative ion trapping lead to 1011 charges cm-2 on a flat surface which, assuming a radius of 0.05 μm for Titan aerosols, is ∼628 charges/radius (in μm). The facile charge trapping indicates that electron interactions with nitriles and complex tholin-like molecules could affect the conductivity of Titan's atmosphere due to the formation of large negative ion complexes. These negatively charged complexes can also precipitate onto Titan's surface and possibly contribute to surface reactions and the formation of dunes.

  3. Modeling the selective partitioning of cations into negatively charged nanopores in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Garde, Shekhar

    2007-02-01

    Partitioning and transport of water and small solutes into and through nanopores are important to a variety of chemical and biological processes and applications. Here we study water structure in negatively charged model cylindrical [carbon nanotube (CNT)-like] nanopores, as well as the partitioning of positive ions of increasing size (Na+, K+, and Cs+) into the pore interior using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. Despite the simplicity of the simulation system—containing a short CNT-like nanopore in water carrying a uniformly distributed charge of qpore=-ne surrounded by n (=0,…,8) cations, making the overall system charge neutral—the results provide new and useful insights on both the pore hydration and ion partitioning. For n =0, that is, for a neutral nanopore, water molecules partition into the pore and form single-file hydrogen-bonded wire spanning the pore length. With increasing n, water molecules enter the pore from both ends with preferred orientations, resulting in a mutual repulsion between oriented water molecules at the pore center and creating a cavity-like low density region at the center. For low negative charge densities on the pore, the driving force for partitioning of positive ions into the pore is weak, and no partitioning is observed. Increasing the pore charge gradually leads to partitioning of positive ions into the pore. Interestingly, over a range of intermediate negative charge densities, nanopores display both thermodynamic as well as kinetic selectivity toward partitioning of the larger K+ and Cs+ ions into their interior over the smaller Na+ ions. Specifically, the driving force is in the order K+>Cs+>Na+, and K+ and Cs+ ions enter the pore much more rapidly than Na+ ions. At higher charge densities, the driving force for partitioning increases for all cations—it is highest for K+ ions—and becomes similar for Na+ and Cs+ ions. The variation of thermodynamic driving force and the average partitioning time with the

  4. Intramolecular charge transfer in donor-acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Slama-Schwok, A.; Blanchard-Desce, M.; Lehn, J.M. )

    1990-05-17

    The photophysical properties of donor-acceptor molecules, push-pull polyenes and carotenoids, have been studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds bear various acceptor and donor groups, linked together by chains of different length and structure. The position of the absorption and fluorescence maxima and their variation in solvents of increasing polarity are in agreement with long-distance intramolecular charge-transfer processes, the linker acting as a molecular wire. The effects of the linker length and structure and of the nature of acceptor and donor are presented.

  5. Formation of Negative Ions upon Dissociative Electron Attachment to the Astrochemically Relevant Molecule Aminoacetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Pelc, Andrzej; Huber, Stefan E; Matias, Carolina; Czupyt, Zbigniew; Denifl, Stephan

    2016-02-18

    Aminoacetonitrile (NH2CH2CN, AAN) is a molecule relevant for interstellar chemistry and the chemical evolution of life. It is a very important molecule in the Strecker diagram explaining the formation of amino acids. In the present investigation, dissociative electron attachment to NH2CN was studied in a crossed electron-molecular beams experiment in the electron energy range from about 0 to 17 eV. In this electron energy range, the following six anionic species were detected: C2H3N2(-), C2H2N2(-), C2H2N(-), C2HN(-), CN(-), and NH2(-). Possible reaction channels for all the measured negative ions are discussed, and the experimental results are compared with calculated thermochemical thresholds of the observed anions. Similar to other nitrile and aminonitrile compounds, the main anions detected were the negatively charged nitrile group, the dehydrogenated parent molecule, and the amino group. No parent anion was observed. Low anion yields were observed indicating that AAN is less prone to electron capture. Therefore, AAN can be considered to exhibit a relatively long lifetime under typical conditions in outer space. PMID:26810336

  6. Solutions of negatively charged graphene sheets and ribbons.

    PubMed

    Vallés, Cristina; Drummond, Carlos; Saadaoui, Hassan; Furtado, Clascidia A; He, Maoshuai; Roubeau, Olivier; Ortolani, Luca; Monthioux, Marc; Pénicaud, Alain

    2008-11-26

    Negatively charged graphene layers from a graphite intercalation compound spontaneously dissolve in N-methylpyrrolidone, without the need for any sonication, yielding stable, air-sensitive, solutions of laterally extended atom-thick graphene sheets and ribbons with dimensions over tens of micrometers. These can be deposited on a variety of substrates. Height measurements showing single-atom thickness were performed by STM, AFM, multiple beam interferometry, and optical imaging on Sarfus wafers, demonstrating deposits of graphene flakes and ribbons. AFM height measurements on mica give the actual height of graphene (ca. 0.4 nm). PMID:18975900

  7. Negatively charged nanoparticles produced by splashing of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Hõrrak, U.; Kulmala, M.

    2009-01-01

    The production of splashing-generated balloelectric intermediate ions was studied by means of mobility spectrometry in the atmosphere during the rain and in a laboratory experiment simulating the heavy rain. The partial neutralization of intermediate ions with cluster ions generated by beta rays suppressed the space charge of intermediate ions but preserved the shape of the mobility distribution. The balloelectric ions produced from the waterworks water of high TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) had about the same mobilities as the ions produced from the rainwater of low TDS. This suggests that the balloelectric ions can be considered as singly charged water nanoparticles. By different measurements, the diameter mode of these particles was 2.2-2.7 nm, which is close to the diameter of 2.5 nm of the Chaplin's 280-molecule magic icosahedron superclusters. The measurements can be explained by a hypothesis that the pressure of saturated vapor over the nanoparticle surface is suppressed by a number of magnitudes due to the internal structure of the particles near the size of 2.5 nm. The records of the concentration bursts of balloelectric ions in the atmosphere are formally similar to the records of the nucleation bursts but they cannot be qualified as nucleation bursts because the particles are not growing but shrinking.

  8. Negatively charged nanoparticles produced by splashing of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Hõrrak, U.; Kulmala, M.

    2008-09-01

    The production of splashing-generated balloelectric intermediate ions was studied by means of mobility spectrometry in the atmosphere during the rain and in a laboratory experiment simulating the heavy rain. The partial neutralization of intermediate ions with cluster ions generated by beta rays suppressed the space charge of intermediate ions but preserved the shape of the mobility distribution. The balloelectric ions produced from the waterworks water of high TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) had about the same mobilities as the ions produced from the rainwater of low TDS. This suggests that the balloelectric ions can be considered as singly charged water nanodroplets. By different measurements, the diameter mode of these droplets was 2.2 2.7 nm, which is close to the diameter of 2.5 nm of the Chaplin's 280-molecule magic icosahedron superclusters. The measurements can be explained by a hypothesis that the pressure of saturated vapor over the nanodroplet surface is suppressed by a number of magnitudes due to the internal structure of the droplets near the size of 2.5 nm. The records of the concentration bursts of balloelectric ions in the atmosphere are formally similar to the records of the nucleation bursts but they cannot be qualified as nucleation bursts because the particles are not growing but shrinking.

  9. Charge asymmetry in pure vibrational states of the HD molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubin, Sergiy; Leonarski, Filip; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2009-03-01

    Very accurate variational calculations of all rotationless states (also called pure vibrational states) of the HD molecule have been performed within the framework that does not assume the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation. The non-BO wave functions of the states describing the internal motion of the proton, the deuteron, and the two electrons were expanded in terms of one-center explicitly correlated Gaussian functions multiplied by even powers of the internuclear distance. Up to 6000 functions were used for each state. Both linear and nonlinear parameters of the wave functions of all 18 states were optimized with a procedure that employs the analytical gradient of the energy with respect to the nonlinear parameters of the Gaussians. These wave functions were used to calculate expectation values of the interparticle distances and some other related quantities. The results allow elucidation of the charge asymmetry in HD as a function of the vibrational excitation.

  10. Negative Differential Conductance from Space Charge Limited Currents in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Andrew; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    Applying the theory of space charge limited currents (SCLC), we show that negative differential conductance can arise from doubly occupied traps that are nearly degenerate with the bottom of the conduction band. Using degenerate state perturbation theory, the Coulomb energy of the doubly occupied traps is shown to depend on the hybridization with the conduction band states. Initially, when carriers are injected into the solid, traps begin to fill while the conduction band states stay relatively empty and thus accessible to trapped electrons via hopping. Trap and conduction states continue to be filled as current is increased, and the energy of trapped electrons begins to rise. A critical current is reached whereupon a further increase in current leads to a reduction of filled traps (i.e. a reduction of space charge in the solid), and thus a corresponding decrease in voltage. This trend in the current-voltage characteristic curves persists until the bottom of the conduction band has been filled, then voltage rises with current.

  11. Charge transfer and negative curvature energy in magnesium boride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hui; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2016-07-01

    Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we study the energetics and charge transfer effects in MgBx nanotubes and two-dimensional (2D) sheets. The behavior of adsorbed Mg on 2D boron sheets is found to depend on the amount of electron transfer between the two subsystems. The amount is determined by both the density of adsorbed Mg as well as the atomic-scale structure of the boron subsystem. The degree of transfer can lead to repulsive or attractive Mg-Mg interactions. In both cases, model MgBx nanotubes built from 2D MgBx sheets can display negative curvature energy: a relatively unusual situation in nanosystems where the energy cost to curve the parent 2D sheet into a small-diameter nanotube is negative. Namely, the small-diameter nanotube is energetically preferred over the corresponding flat sheet. We also discuss how these findings may manifest themselves in experimentally synthesized MgBx nanotubes.

  12. Theoretical study of the charge transport through C60-based single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilan, S.; Zotti, L. A.; Pauly, F.; Cuevas, J. C.

    2012-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the conductance and thermopower of single-molecule junctions based on C60 and C60-terminated molecules. We first analyze the transport properties of gold-C60-gold junctions and show that these junctions can be highly conductive (with conductances above 0.1G0, where G0=2e2/h is the quantum of conductance). Moreover, we find that the thermopower in these junctions is negative due to the fact that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital dominates the charge transport, and its magnitude can reach several tens of microvolts per kelvin, depending on the contact geometry. On the other hand, we study the suitability of C60 as an anchoring group in single-molecule junctions. For this purpose, we analyze the transport through several dumbbell derivatives using C60 as anchors, and we compare the results with those obtained with thiol and amine groups. Our results show that the conductance of C60-terminated molecules is rather sensitive to the binding geometry. Moreover, the conductance of the molecules is typically reduced by the presence of the C60 anchors, which in turn makes the junctions more sensitive to the functionalization of the molecular core with appropriate side groups.

  13. Negatively Charged Lipids as a Potential Target for New Amphiphilic Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: A BIOPHYSICAL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Sautrey, Guillaume; El Khoury, Micheline; Dos Santos, Andreia Giro; Zimmermann, Louis; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Décout, Jean-Luc; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2016-06-24

    Bacterial membranes are highly organized, containing specific microdomains that facilitate distinct protein and lipid assemblies. Evidence suggests that cardiolipin molecules segregate into such microdomains, probably conferring a negative curvature to the inner plasma membrane during membrane fission upon cell division. 3',6-Dinonyl neamine is an amphiphilic aminoglycoside derivative active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including strains resistant to colistin. The mechanisms involved at the molecular level were identified using lipid models (large unilamellar vesicles, giant unilamelllar vesicles, and lipid monolayers) that mimic the inner membrane of P. aeruginosa The study demonstrated the interaction of 3',6-dinonyl neamine with cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, two negatively charged lipids from inner bacterial membranes. This interaction induced membrane permeabilization and depolarization. Lateral segregation of cardiolipin and membrane hemifusion would be critical for explaining the effects induced on lipid membranes by amphiphilic aminoglycoside antibiotics. The findings contribute to an improved understanding of how amphiphilic aminoglycoside antibiotics that bind to negatively charged lipids like cardiolipin could be promising antibacterial compounds. PMID:27189936

  14. The mobility of negative charges in liquid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, P. B.; Sokolov, I. M.

    1994-06-01

    There is a great difference in behavior of e- in liquid hydrogen and helium despite the fact that the adopted theories of the mobility are quite similar. Recently, Levchenko and Mezhov-Deglin (Journal of Low Temperature Physics, 89, 457 (1992)) reported large discrepancies of the mobility of the electrons in liquid hydrogen from estimates based on the theory that the electrons are trapped in bubbles forming atomlike structures (“bubblonium”). They properly suggested that these deviations are related to the existence in liquid hydrogen of another, metastable type of negative charge carrier. The subject of the current paper is the physical explanation of the existence of two types of carriers in liquid hydrogen. We attribute the second type of carriers to the cluster ion H - ( H 2 ) x , which is created by the formation of solid hydrogen around a bound state of a hydride ion. We provide estimates for the radius and the kinetics of degradation of the “snowball” formed around the H - ion on the basis of energy diagrams for a hydride ion submerged in liquid hydrogen.

  15. Negative differential mobility for negative carriers as revealed by space charge measurements on crosslinked polyethylene insulated model cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssedre, G.; Vu, T. T. N.; Laurent, C.

    2015-12-01

    Among features observed in polyethylene materials under relatively high field, space charge packets, consisting in a pulse of net charge that remains in the form of a pulse as it crosses the insulation, are repeatedly observed but without complete theory explaining their formation and propagation. Positive charge packets are more often reported, and the models based on negative differential mobility(NDM) for the transport of holes could account for some charge packets phenomenology. Conversely, NDM for electrons transport has never been reported so far. The present contribution reports space charge measurements by pulsed electroacoustic method on miniature cables that are model of HVDC cables. The measurements were realized at room temperature or with a temperature gradient of 10 °C through the insulation under DC fields on the order 30-60 kV/mm. Space charge results reveal systematic occurrence of a negative front of charges generated at the inner electrode that moves toward the outer electrode at the beginning of the polarization step. It is observed that the transit time of the front of negative charge increases, and therefore the mobility decreases, with the applied voltage. Further, the estimated mobility, in the range 10-14-10-13 m2 V-1 s-1 for the present results, increases when the temperature increases for the same condition of applied voltage. The features substantiate the hypothesis of negative differential mobility used for modelling space charge packets.

  16. Invariance of molecular charge transport upon changes of extended molecule size and several related issues.

    PubMed

    Bâldea, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    As a sanity test for the theoretical method employed, studies on (steady-state) charge transport through molecular devices usually confine themselves to check whether the method in question satisfies the charge conservation. Another important test of the theory's correctness is to check that the computed current does not depend on the choice of the central region (also referred to as the "extended molecule"). This work addresses this issue and demonstrates that the relevant transport and transport-related properties are indeed invariant upon changing the size of the extended molecule, when the embedded molecule can be described within a general single-particle picture (namely, a second-quantized Hamiltonian bilinear in the creation and annihilation operators). It is also demonstrates that the invariance of nonequilibrium properties is exhibited by the exact results but not by those computed approximately within ubiquitous wide- and flat-band limits (WBL and FBL, respectively). To exemplify the limitations of the latter, the phenomenon of negative differential resistance (NDR) is considered. It is shown that the exactly computed current may exhibit a substantial NDR, while the NDR effect is absent or drastically suppressed within the WBL and FBL approximations. The analysis done in conjunction with the WBLs and FBLs reveals why general studies on nonequilibrium properties require a more elaborate theoretical than studies on linear response properties (e.g., ohmic conductance and thermopower) at zero temperature. Furthermore, examples are presented that demonstrate that treating parts of electrodes adjacent to the embedded molecule and the remaining semi-infinite electrodes at different levels of theory (which is exactly what most NEGF-DFT approaches do) is a procedure that yields spurious structures in nonlinear ranges of current-voltage curves. PMID:27335734

  17. Experimental evidence on removing copper and light-induced degradation from silicon by negative charge

    SciTech Connect

    Boulfrad, Yacine Lindroos, Jeanette; Yli-Koski, Marko; Savin, Hele; Wagner, Matthias; Wolny, Franziska

    2014-11-03

    In addition to boron and oxygen, copper is also known to cause light-induced degradation (LID) in silicon. We have demonstrated previously that LID can be prevented by depositing negative corona charge onto the wafer surfaces. Positively charged interstitial copper ions are proposed to diffuse to the negatively charged surface and consequently empty the bulk of copper. In this study, copper out-diffusion was confirmed by chemical analysis of the near surface region of negatively/positively charged silicon wafer. Furthermore, LID was permanently removed by etching the copper-rich surface layer after negative charge deposition. These results demonstrate that (i) copper can be effectively removed from the bulk by negative charge, (ii) under illumination copper forms a recombination active defect in the bulk of the wafer causing severe light induced degradation.

  18. An analysis of five negative sprite-parent discharges and their associated thunderstorm charge structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Levi D.; Liu, Ningyu; Splitt, Michael; Lazarus, Steven; Glenn, Chad; Rassoul, Hamid; Cummer, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyze the discharge morphologies of five confirmed negative sprite-parent discharges and the associated charge structures of the thunderstorms that produced them. The negative sprite-parent lightning took place in two thunderstorms that were associated with a tropical disturbance in east central and south Florida. The first thunderstorm, which moved onshore in east central Florida, produced four of the five negative sprite-parent discharges within a period of 17 min, as it made landfall from the Atlantic Ocean. These negative sprite-parents were composed of bolt-from-the-blue (BFB), hybrid intracloud-negative cloud-to-ground (IC-NCG), and multicell IC-NCGs discharges. The second thunderstorm, which occurred inland over south Florida, produced a negative sprite-parent that was a probable hybrid IC-NCG discharge and two negative gigantic jets (GJs). Weakened upper positive charge with very large midlevel negative charge was inferred for both convective cells that initiated the negative-sprite-parent discharges. Our study suggests tall, intense convective systems with high wind shear at the middle to upper regions of the cloud accompanied by low cloud-to-ground (CG) flash rates promote these charge structures. The excess amount of midlevel negative charge results in these CG discharges transferring much more charge to ground than typical negative CG discharges. We find that BFB discharges prefer an asymmetrical charge structure that brings the negative leader exiting the upper positive charge region closer to the lateral positive screening charge layer. This may be the main factor in determining whether a negative leader exiting the upper positive region of the thundercloud forms a BFB or GJ.

  19. Self-Optimized Biological Channels in Facilitating the Transmembrane Movement of Charged Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Huyen, V. T. N.; Lap, Vu Cong; Nguyen, V. Lien

    2016-01-01

    We consider an anisotropically two-dimensional diffusion of a charged molecule (particle) through a large biological channel under an external voltage. The channel is modeled as a cylinder of three structure parameters: radius, length, and surface density of negative charges located at the channel interior-lining. These charges induce inside the channel a potential that plays a key role in controlling the particle current through the channel. It was shown that to facilitate the transmembrane particle movement the channel should be reasonably self-optimized so that its potential coincides with the resonant one, resulting in a large particle current across the channel. Observed facilitation appears to be an intrinsic property of biological channels, regardless of the external voltage or the particle concentration gradient. This facilitation is very selective in the sense that a channel of definite structure parameters can facilitate the transmembrane movement of only particles of proper valence at corresponding temperatures. Calculations also show that the modeled channel is nonohmic with the ion conductance which exhibits a resonance at the same channel potential as that identified in the current. PMID:27022394

  20. Self-Optimized Biological Channels in Facilitating the Transmembrane Movement of Charged Molecules.

    PubMed

    Huyen, V T N; Ho, Le Bin; Lap, Vu Cong; Nguyen, V Lien

    2016-01-01

    We consider an anisotropically two-dimensional diffusion of a charged molecule (particle) through a large biological channel under an external voltage. The channel is modeled as a cylinder of three structure parameters: radius, length, and surface density of negative charges located at the channel interior-lining. These charges induce inside the channel a potential that plays a key role in controlling the particle current through the channel. It was shown that to facilitate the transmembrane particle movement the channel should be reasonably self-optimized so that its potential coincides with the resonant one, resulting in a large particle current across the channel. Observed facilitation appears to be an intrinsic property of biological channels, regardless of the external voltage or the particle concentration gradient. This facilitation is very selective in the sense that a channel of definite structure parameters can facilitate the transmembrane movement of only particles of proper valence at corresponding temperatures. Calculations also show that the modeled channel is nonohmic with the ion conductance which exhibits a resonance at the same channel potential as that identified in the current. PMID:27022394

  1. Negative differential mobility for negative carriers as revealed by space charge measurements on crosslinked polyethylene insulated model cables

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssedre, G. Laurent, C.; Vu, T. T. N.

    2015-12-21

    Among features observed in polyethylene materials under relatively high field, space charge packets, consisting in a pulse of net charge that remains in the form of a pulse as it crosses the insulation, are repeatedly observed but without complete theory explaining their formation and propagation. Positive charge packets are more often reported, and the models based on negative differential mobility(NDM) for the transport of holes could account for some charge packets phenomenology. Conversely, NDM for electrons transport has never been reported so far. The present contribution reports space charge measurements by pulsed electroacoustic method on miniature cables that are model of HVDC cables. The measurements were realized at room temperature or with a temperature gradient of 10 °C through the insulation under DC fields on the order 30–60 kV/mm. Space charge results reveal systematic occurrence of a negative front of charges generated at the inner electrode that moves toward the outer electrode at the beginning of the polarization step. It is observed that the transit time of the front of negative charge increases, and therefore the mobility decreases, with the applied voltage. Further, the estimated mobility, in the range 10{sup −14}–10{sup −13} m{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for the present results, increases when the temperature increases for the same condition of applied voltage. The features substantiate the hypothesis of negative differential mobility used for modelling space charge packets.

  2. Mass Spectrometry Study of Multiply Negatively Charged, Gas-Phase NaAOT Micelles: How Does Charge State Affect Micellar Structure and Encapsulation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yigang; Liu, Fangwei; Liu, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    We report the formation and characterization of multiply negatively charged sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (NaAOT) aggregates in the gas phase, by electrospray ionization of methanol/water solution of NaAOT followed by detection using a guided-ion-beam tandem mass spectrometer. Singly and doubly charged aggregates dominate the mass spectra with the compositions of [Nan-zAOTn]z- ( n = 1-18 and z = 1-2). Solvation by water was detected only for small aggregates [Nan-1AOTnH2O]- of n = 3-9. Incorporation of glycine and tryptophan into [Nan-zAOTn]z- aggregates was achieved, aimed at identifying effects of guest molecule hydrophobicity on micellar solubilization. Only one glycine molecule could be incorporated into each [Nan-zAOTn]z- of n ≥ 7, and at most two glycine molecules could be hosted in that of n ≥ 13. In contrast to glycine, up to four tryptophan molecules could be accommodated within single aggregates of n ≥ 6. However, deprotonation of tryptophan significantly decrease its affinity towards aggregates. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was carried out for mass-selected aggregate ions, including measurements of product ion mass spectra for both empty and amino acid-containing aggregates. CID results provide a probe for aggregate structures, surfactant-solute interactions, and incorporation sites of amino acids. The present data was compared with mass spectrometry results of positively charged [Nan+zAOTn]z+ aggregates. Contrary to their positive analogues, which form reverse micelles, negatively charged aggregates may adopt a direct micelle-like structure with AOT polar heads exposed and amino acids being adsorbed near the micellar outer surface.

  3. Mass spectrometry study of multiply negatively charged, gas-phase NaAOT micelles: how does charge state affect micellar structure and encapsulation?

    PubMed

    Fang, Yigang; Liu, Fangwei; Liu, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    We report the formation and characterization of multiply negatively charged sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (NaAOT) aggregates in the gas phase, by electrospray ionization of methanol/water solution of NaAOT followed by detection using a guided-ion-beam tandem mass spectrometer. Singly and doubly charged aggregates dominate the mass spectra with the compositions of [Na(n-z)AOT(n)](z-) (n = 1-18 and z = 1-2). Solvation by water was detected only for small aggregates [Na(n-1)AOT(n)H(2)O](-) of n = 3-9. Incorporation of glycine and tryptophan into [Na(n-z)AOT(n)](z-) aggregates was achieved, aimed at identifying effects of guest molecule hydrophobicity on micellar solubilization. Only one glycine molecule could be incorporated into each [Na(n-z)AOT(n)](z-) of n ≥ 7, and at most two glycine molecules could be hosted in that of n ≥ 13. In contrast to glycine, up to four tryptophan molecules could be accommodated within single aggregates of n ≥ 6. However, deprotonation of tryptophan significantly decrease its affinity towards aggregates. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was carried out for mass-selected aggregate ions, including measurements of product ion mass spectra for both empty and amino acid-containing aggregates. CID results provide a probe for aggregate structures, surfactant-solute interactions, and incorporation sites of amino acids. The present data was compared with mass spectrometry results of positively charged [Na(n+z)AOT(n)](z+) aggregates. Contrary to their positive analogues, which form reverse micelles, negatively charged aggregates may adopt a direct micelle-like structure with AOT polar heads exposed and amino acids being adsorbed near the micellar outer surface. PMID:23247969

  4. Binding of monovalent alkali metal ions with negatively charged phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Maity, Pabitra; Saha, Baishakhi; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh; Karmakar, Sanat

    2016-04-01

    We have systematically investigated the effect of various alkali metal ions with negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Size distributions of large unilamellar vesicles have been confirmed using dynamic light scattering. Zeta potential and effective charges per vesicle in the presence of various alkali metal ions have been estimated from the measured electrophoretic mobility. We have determined the intrinsic binding constant from the zeta potential using electrostatic double layer theory. The reasonable and consistent value of the intrinsic binding constant of Na(+), found at moderate NaCl concentration (10-100 mM), indicates that the Gouy-Chapman theory cannot be applied for very high (> 100mM) and very low (< 10 mM) electrolyte concentrations. The isothermal titration calorimetry study has revealed that the net binding heat of interaction of the negatively charged vesicles with monovalent alkali metal ions is small and comparable to those obtained from neutral phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The overall endothermic response of binding heat suggests that interaction is primarily entropy driven. The entropy gain might arise due to the release of water molecules from the hydration layer vicinity of the membranes. Therefore, the partition model which does not include the electrostatic contribution suffices to describe the interaction. The binding constant of Na(+) (2.4 ± 0.1 M(-1)), obtained from the ITC, is in agreement with that estimated from the zeta potential (-2.0 M(-1)) at moderate salt concentrations. Our results suggest that hydration dynamics may play a vital role in the membrane solution interface which strongly affects the ion-membrane interaction. PMID:26802251

  5. Probing the charge-transfer dynamics in DNA at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Matsutani, Eri; Maruyama, Atsushi; Majima, Tetsuro

    2011-10-01

    Photoinduced charge-transfer fluorescence quenching of a fluorescent dye produces the nonemissive charge-separated state, and subsequent charge recombination makes the reaction reversible. While the information available from the photoinduced charge-transfer process provides the basis for monitoring the microenvironment around the fluorescent dyes and such monitoring is particularly important in live-cell imaging and DNA diagnosis, the information obtainable from the charge recombination process is usually overlooked. When looking at fluorescence emitted from each single fluorescent dye, photoinduced charge-transfer, charge-migration, and charge recombination cause a "blinking" of the fluorescence, in which the charge-recombination rate or the lifetime of the charge-separated state (τ) is supposed to be reflected in the duration of the off time during the single-molecule-level fluorescence measurement. Herein, based on our recently developed method for the direct observation of charge migration in DNA, we utilized DNA as a platform for spectroscopic investigations of charge-recombination dynamics for several fluorescent dyes: TAMRA, ATTO 655, and Alexa 532, which are used in single-molecule fluorescence measurements. Charge recombination dynamics were observed by transient absorption measurements, demonstrating that these fluorescent dyes can be used to monitor the charge-separation and charge-recombination events. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of ATTO 655 modified DNA allowed the successful measurement of the charge-recombination dynamics in DNA at the single-molecule level. Utilizing the injected charge just like a pulse of sound, such as a "ping" in active sonar systems, information about the DNA sequence surrounding the fluorescent dye was read out by measuring the time it takes for the charge to return. PMID:21875061

  6. Invariance of molecular charge transport upon changes of extended molecule size and several related issues

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary As a sanity test for the theoretical method employed, studies on (steady-state) charge transport through molecular devices usually confine themselves to check whether the method in question satisfies the charge conservation. Another important test of the theory’s correctness is to check that the computed current does not depend on the choice of the central region (also referred to as the “extended molecule”). This work addresses this issue and demonstrates that the relevant transport and transport-related properties are indeed invariant upon changing the size of the extended molecule, when the embedded molecule can be described within a general single-particle picture (namely, a second-quantized Hamiltonian bilinear in the creation and annihilation operators). It is also demonstrates that the invariance of nonequilibrium properties is exhibited by the exact results but not by those computed approximately within ubiquitous wide- and flat-band limits (WBL and FBL, respectively). To exemplify the limitations of the latter, the phenomenon of negative differential resistance (NDR) is considered. It is shown that the exactly computed current may exhibit a substantial NDR, while the NDR effect is absent or drastically suppressed within the WBL and FBL approximations. The analysis done in conjunction with the WBLs and FBLs reveals why general studies on nonequilibrium properties require a more elaborate theoretical than studies on linear response properties (e.g., ohmic conductance and thermopower) at zero temperature. Furthermore, examples are presented that demonstrate that treating parts of electrodes adjacent to the embedded molecule and the remaining semi-infinite electrodes at different levels of theory (which is exactly what most NEGF-DFT approaches do) is a procedure that yields spurious structures in nonlinear ranges of current–voltage curves. PMID:27335734

  7. Calculating Henry’s Constants of Charged Molecules Using SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry is a computer program designed to model physical and chemical properties of molecules solely based on thier chemical structure. SPARC uses a toolbox of mechanistic perturbation models to model intermolecular interactions. SPARC has ...

  8. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  9. Negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise in single-molecule magnet junctions

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Liang, Jiu-Qing; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Molecular spintroinic device based on a single-molecule magnet is one of the ultimate goals of semiconductor nanofabrication technologies. It is thus necessary to understand the electron transport properties of a single-molecule magnet junction. Here we study the negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise properties of electron transport through a single-molecule magnet weakly coupled to two electrodes with either one or both of them being ferromagnetic. We predict that the negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise, which can be tuned by a gate voltage, depend sensitively on the spin polarization of the source and drain electrodes. In particular, the shot noise in the negative differential conductance region can be enhanced or decreased originating from the different formation mechanisms of negative differential conductance. The effective competition between fast and slow transport channels is responsible for the observed negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise. In addition, we further discuss the skewness and kurtosis properties of transport current in the super-Poissonian shot noise regions. Our findings suggest a tunable negative differential conductance molecular device, and the predicted properties of high-order current cumulants are very interesting for a better understanding of electron transport through single-molecule magnet junctions. PMID:25736094

  10. Maximizing Ion Current by Space Charge Neutralization using Negative Ions and Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2005-01-25

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space charge neutralization are introduced. Space charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  11. Maximizing ion current by space-charge neutralization using negative ions and dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2005-05-15

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space-charge neutralization are introduced. Space-charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space-charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  12. Maximizing ion current by space-charge neutralization using negative ions and dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space-charge neutralization are introduced. Space-charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space-charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  13. An atomic charge-charge flux-dipole flux atom-in-molecule decomposition for molecular dipole-moment derivatives and infrared fundamental intensities.

    PubMed

    Haiduke, Roberto L A; Bruns, Roy E

    2005-03-24

    The molecular dipole moment and its derivatives are determined from atomic charges, atomic dipoles, and their fluxes obtained from AIM formalism and calculated at the MP2(FC)/6-311++G(3d,3p) level for 16 molecules: 6 diatomic hydrides, CO, HCN, OCS, CO2, CS2, C2H2, C2N2, H2O, H2CO, and CH4. Root-mean-square (rms) errors of 0.052 D and 0.019 e are found for the dipole moments and their derivatives calculated using AIM parameters when compared with those obtained directly from the MP2(FC)/6-311++G(3d,3p) calculations and 0.097 D and 0.049 e when compared to the experimental values. The major deviations occur for the NaH, HF, and H2O molecules. Parallel polar tensor elements for the diatomic and linear polyatomic molecules, except H2, HF, LiH, and NaH, have values resulting from cancellations of substantial contributions from atomic charge fluxes and atomic dipole fluxes. These fluxes have a large negative correlation coefficient, -0.97. IR fundamental intensity sums for CO, HCN, OCS, CO2, CS2, C2H2, C2N2, H2CO, and CH4 calculated using AIM charges, charge fluxes, and atomic dipole fluxes have rms errors of 14.9 km mol(-1) when compared with sums calculated directly from the molecular wave function and 36.2 km mol(-1) relative to experimental values. The classical model proposed here to calculate dipole-moment derivatives is compared with the charge-charge flux-overlap model long used by spectroscopists for interpreting IR vibrational intensities. The utility of the AIM atomic charges and dipoles was illustrated by calculating the forces exerted on molecules by a charged particle. AIM quantities were able to reproduce forces due to a +0.1 e particle over a 3-8-A separation range for the CO and HF molecules in collinear and perpendicular arrangements. These results show that IR intensities do contain information relevant to the study of intermolecular interactions. PMID:16833574

  14. Formation of positive and negative ions of thymine molecules under the action of slow electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranyosh, I. I.; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Shimon, L. L.

    2008-12-01

    The formation of positive and negative molecules of thymine—a base of nucleic acids—under the action of slow electrons is investigated by the method of crossed electron and molecular beams. The method developed makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the energy dependences and absolute values of total cross sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of thymine molecules. It is found that the maximal cross section for the formation of positive ions is reached at an energy of 95 eV and its absolute value is, accordingly, 1.4 × 10-15 cm2. The total cross section for the formation of negative ions is 8.2 × 10-18 cm2 at an energy of 1.1 eV. The mass spectra of thymine molecules are measured and the cross sections of dissociative ionization are determined.

  15. Charging-delay induced dust acoustic collisionless shock wave: Roles of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Bharuthram, R.; Khan, Manoranjan; Gupta, M. R.

    2006-11-15

    The effects of charging-delay and negative ions on nonlinear dust acoustic waves are investigated. It has been found that the charging-delay induced anomalous dissipation causes generation of dust acoustic collisionless shock waves in an electronegative dusty plasma. The small but finite amplitude wave is governed by a Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation in which the Burger term arises due to the charging-delay. Numerical investigations reveal that the charging-delay induced dissipation and shock strength decreases (increases) with the increase of negative ion concentration (temperature)

  16. Production of intense beams of polarized negative hydrogen ions by double charge exchange in alkali vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruëbler, W.; Schmelzbach, P. A.

    1983-07-01

    The intensity of the polarized negative hydrogen ion beam of the ETHZ atomic beam polarized ion source has been substantially improved by a new double charge exchange device. Increasing the diameter of the charge exchange canal to 1.4 cm results in a beam output of the source of 6 μA of polarized negative hydrogen ions. Further improvements of the charge exchanger are proposed and discussed. With an updated design of the atomic beam apparatus, beams of 0.5 mA polarized negative hydrogen ions may be obtained from such a source.

  17. Ion beam driven ion-acoustic waves in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Walia, Ritu; Sharma, Kavita

    2012-07-15

    An ion beam propagating through a magnetized potassium plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives electrostatic ion-acoustic waves to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The phase velocity of sound wave increases with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase, with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales as one-third power of the beam density. The real part of frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales as almost the one-half power of the beam energy.

  18. Nonlinear charge transport in the helicoidal DNA molecule.

    PubMed

    Dang Koko, A; Tabi, C B; Ekobena Fouda, H P; Mohamadou, A; Kofané, T C

    2012-12-01

    Charge transport in the twist-opening model of DNA is explored via the modulational instability of a plane wave. The dynamics of charge is shown to be governed, in the adiabatic approximation, by a modified discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with next-nearest neighbor interactions. The linear stability analysis is performed on the latter and manifestations of the modulational instability are discussed according to the value of the parameter α, which measures hopping interaction correction. In so doing, increasing α leads to a reduction of the instability domain and, therefore, increases our chances of choosing appropriate values of parameters that could give rise to pattern formation in the twist-opening model. Our analytical predictions are verified numerically, where the generic equations for the radial and torsional dynamics are directly integrated. The impact of charge migration on the above degrees of freedom is discussed for different values of α. Soliton-like and localized structures are observed and thus confirm our analytical predictions. We also find that polaronic structures, as known in DNA charge transport, are generated through modulational instability, and hence reinforces the robustness of polaron in the model we study. PMID:23278045

  19. Nonlinear charge transport in the helicoidal DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang Koko, A.; Tabi, C. B.; Ekobena Fouda, H. P.; Mohamadou, A.; Kofané, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Charge transport in the twist-opening model of DNA is explored via the modulational instability of a plane wave. The dynamics of charge is shown to be governed, in the adiabatic approximation, by a modified discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with next-nearest neighbor interactions. The linear stability analysis is performed on the latter and manifestations of the modulational instability are discussed according to the value of the parameter α, which measures hopping interaction correction. In so doing, increasing α leads to a reduction of the instability domain and, therefore, increases our chances of choosing appropriate values of parameters that could give rise to pattern formation in the twist-opening model. Our analytical predictions are verified numerically, where the generic equations for the radial and torsional dynamics are directly integrated. The impact of charge migration on the above degrees of freedom is discussed for different values of α. Soliton-like and localized structures are observed and thus confirm our analytical predictions. We also find that polaronic structures, as known in DNA charge transport, are generated through modulational instability, and hence reinforces the robustness of polaron in the model we study.

  20. Surface charging by large multivalent molecules. Extending the standard Gouy-Chapman treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Stankowski, S

    1991-01-01

    Traditionally, Gouy-Chapman theory has been used to calculate the distribution of ions in the diffuse layer next to a charged surface. In recent years, the same theory has found application to adsorption (incorporation, partitioning) of charged peptides, hormones, or drugs at the membrane-water interface. Empirically it has been found that an effective charge, smaller than the physical charge, must often be used in the Gouy-Chapman formula. In addition, the large size of these molecules can be expected to influence their adsorption isotherms. To improve evaluation techniques for such experiments, comparatively simple extensions of the standard Gouy-Chapman formalism have been studied which are based on a discrete charge virial expansion. The model allows for the mobility of charged groups at the interface. It accounts for finite size of the adsorbed macromolecules and for discrete charge effects arising from pair interactions in the interface plane. In contrast to previous discrete charge treatments this model nearly coincides with the Gouy-Chapman formalism in the case where the adsorbing molecules are univalent. Large discrepancies are found for multivalent molecules. This could explain the reduced effective charges needed in the standard Gouy-Chapman treatment. The reduction factor can be predicted. The model is mainly limited to low surface coverage, typical for the adsorption studies in question. PMID:1912277

  1. Periodic Charging of Individual Molecules Coupled to the Motion of an Atomic Force Microscopy Tip.

    PubMed

    Kocić, N; Weiderer, P; Keller, S; Decurtins, S; Liu, S-X; Repp, J

    2015-07-01

    Individual molecules at the edges of self-assembled islands grown on Ag(111) can be deliberately switched in their charge state with the electric field from a scanning-probe tip. Close to the threshold voltage for a charge state transition, periodic switching of the charge is directly driven by the cantilever motion in frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM), as can be deduced from the signature in the measured frequency shift. In this regime, the integrated frequency shift yields the tip-sample force that is due to a single additional electron. Further, the signature of the dynamic charging response provides information on the electronic coupling of the molecule to the substrate. In analogy to previous experiments on quantum dots, this may also be used in the future to access excited state properties of single molecules from AFM experiments. PMID:26039575

  2. Charge migration induced by attosecond pulses in bio-relevant molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calegari, Francesca; Trabattoni, Andrea; Palacios, Alicia; Ayuso, David; Castrovilli, Mattea C.; Greenwood, Jason B.; Decleva, Piero; Martín, Fernando; Nisoli, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    After sudden ionization of a large molecule, the positive charge can migrate throughout the system on a sub-femtosecond time scale, purely guided by electronic coherences. The possibility to actively explore the role of the electron dynamics in the photo-chemistry of bio-relevant molecules is of fundamental interest for understanding, and perhaps ultimately controlling, the processes leading to damage, mutation and, more generally, to the alteration of the biological functions of the macromolecule. Attosecond laser sources can provide the extreme time resolution required to follow this ultrafast charge flow. In this review we will present recent advances in attosecond molecular science: after a brief description of the results obtained for small molecules, recent experimental and theoretical findings on charge migration in bio-relevant molecules will be discussed.

  3. Ionization of water molecules by fast charged projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Carniato, S.; Fainstein, P. D.; Hansen, J. P.

    2011-07-15

    Single-ionization cross sections of water molecules colliding with fast protons are calculated from lowest-order perturbation theory by taking all electrons and molecular orientations consistently into account. Explicit analytical formulas based on the peaking approximation are obtained for differential ionization cross sections with the partial contribution from the various electron orbitals accounted for. The results, which are in very good agreement with total and partial cross sections at high electron and projectile energies, display a strong variation on molecular orientation and molecular orbitals.

  4. Gold plasmonic effects on charge transport through single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Olgun; Venkataraman, Latha

    2014-03-01

    We study the impact of surface plasmon polaritons, the coupling of electromagnetic waves to collective electron oscillations on metal surfaces, on the conductance of single-molecule junctions. We use a scanning-tunneling microscope based break junction setup that is built into an optical microscope to form molecular junctions. Coherent 685nm light is used to illuminate the molecular junctions formed with 4,4'-bipyridine with diffraction limited focusing performance. We employ a lock-in type technique to measure currents induced by light. Furthermore, the thermal expansion due to laser heating is mimicked by mechanically modulating inter-electrode separation. For each junction studied, we measure current, and use AC techniques to determine molecular junction resonance levels and coupling strengths. We use a cross correlations analysis technique to analyze and compare the effect of light to that of the mechanical modulation. Our results show that junction transmission characteristics are not altered under illumination, within the resolution of our instrument. We argue that photo-currents measured with lock-in techniques in these kinds of structures are due to thermal effects. This work was funded by the Center for Re-Defining Photovoltaic Efficiency through Molecule Scale Control, an EFRC funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DESC0001085.

  5. Interactions of PAMAM dendrimers with negatively charged model biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Yanez Arteta, Marianna; Ainalem, Marie-Louise; Porcar, Lionel; Martel, Anne; Coker, Helena; Lundberg, Dan; Chang, Debby P; Soltwedel, Olaf; Barker, Robert; Nylander, Tommy

    2014-11-13

    We have investigated the interactions between cationic poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers of generation 4 (G4), a potential gene transfection vector, with net-anionic model biomembranes composed of different ratios of zwitterionic phosphocholine (PC) and anionic phospho-L-serine (PS) phospholipids. Two types of model membranes were used: solid-supported bilayers, prepared with lipids carrying palmitoyl-oleoyl (PO) and diphytanoyl (DPh) acyl chains, and free-standing bilayers, formed at the interface between two aqueous droplets in oil (droplet interface bilayers, DIBs) using the DPh-based lipids. G4 dendrimers were found to translocate through POPC:POPS bilayers deposited on silica surfaces. The charge density of the bilayer affects translocation, which is reduced when the ionic strength increases. This shows that the dendrimer-bilayer interactions are largely controlled by their electrostatic attraction. The structure of the solid-supported bilayers remains intact upon translocation of the dendrimer. However, the amount of lipids in the bilayer decreases and dendrimer/lipid aggregates are formed in bulk solution, which can be deposited on the interfacial layers upon dilution of the system with dendrimer-free solvent. Electrophysiology measurements on DIBs confirm that G4 dendrimers cross the lipid membranes containing PS, which then become more permeable to ions. The obtained results have implications for PAMAM dendrimers as delivery vehicles to cells. PMID:25310456

  6. Changes in mitochondrial surface charge mediate recruitment of signaling molecules during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Heit, Bryan; Yeung, Tony; Grinstein, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions with negative lipids contribute to the subcellular localization of polycationic proteins. In situ measurements using cytosolic probes of surface charge indicate that normal mitochondria are not noticeably electronegative. However, during apoptosis mitochondria accrue negative charge and acquire the ability to attract cationic proteins, including K-Ras. The marked increase in the surface charge of mitochondria occurs early in apoptosis, preceding depolarization of their inner membrane, cytochrome c release, and flipping of phosphatidylserine across the plasmalemma. Using novel biosensors, we determined that the increased electronegativity of the mitochondria coincided with and was likely attributable to increased exposure of cardiolipin, which is dianionic. Ectopic (over)expression of cardiolipin-binding proteins precluded the increase in surface charge and inhibited apoptosis, implying that mitochondrial exposure of negatively charged lipids is required for progression of programmed cell death. PMID:20926778

  7. Vibrational States of Hydrogen Molecules in One Third LHD Negative Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M.; Tsumori, K.; Matsumoto, Y.; Wada, M.; Inoue, T.

    2011-09-26

    The effect of the cesium on hydrogen negative ions is discussed using the vacuum ultraviolet emissions (VUV) from vibrational states of hydrogen molecules. The VUV spectrum from 90 to 165 nm is related to the H{sup -} production from the dissociative attachment of electrons to hydrogen molecules. The VUV spectra in hydrogen plasmas are measured in the extraction region of a negative ion source for neutral beam injector. Under the pure hydrogen discharge, the cesium vapor is introduced into the ion source to enhance the hydrogen negative ion density. When the same arc power of {approx}99 kW is applied in both with and without cesium admixture cases, the ratio of the observed VUV spectrum without to with cesium is not changed clearly. Therefore the production process of H{sup -} related to the wall/electrode surface would be enhanced rather than the volume production process.

  8. Crystal growth of new charge-transfer salts based on π-conjugated donor molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morherr, Antonia; Witt, Sebastian; Chernenkaya, Alisa; Bäcker, Jan-Peter; Schönhense, Gerd; Bolte, Michael; Krellner, Cornelius

    2016-09-01

    New charge transfer crystals of π-conjugated, aromatic molecules (phenanthrene and picene) as donors were obtained by physical vapor transport. The melting behavior, optimization of crystal growth and the crystal structure are reported for charge transfer salts with (fluorinated) tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ-Fx, x=0, 2, 4), which was used as acceptor material. The crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Growth conditions for different vapor pressures in closed ampules were applied and the effect of these starting conditions for crystal size and quality is reported. The process of charge transfer was investigated by geometrical analysis of the crystal structure and by infrared spectroscopy on single crystals. With these three different acceptor strengths and the two sets of donor materials, it is possible to investigate the distribution of the charge transfer systematically. This helps to understand the charge transfer process in this class of materials with π-conjugated donor molecules.

  9. Terminal Supraparticle Assemblies from Similarly Charged Protein Molecules and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jai Il; Nguyen, Trung Dac; de Queirós Silveira, Gleiciani; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Srivastava, Sudhanshu; Sun, Kai; Zhao, Gongpu; Zhang, Peijun; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and inorganic nanoparticles into terminal assemblies makes possible a large family of uniformly sized hybrid colloids. These particles can be compared in terms of utility, versatility and multifunctionality to other known types of terminal assemblies. They are simple to make and offer theoretical tools for designing their structure and function. To demonstrate such assemblies, we combine cadmium telluride nanoparticles with cytochrome C protein and observe spontaneous formation of spherical supraparticles with a narrow size distribution. Such self-limiting behaviour originates from the competition between electrostatic repulsion and non-covalent attractive interactions. Experimental variation of supraparticle diameters for several assembly conditions matches predictions obtained in simulations. Similar to micelles, supraparticles can incorporate other biological components as exemplified by incorporation of nitrate reductase. Tight packing of nanoscale components enables effective charge and exciton transport in supraparticles as demonstrated by enzymatic nitrate reduction initiated by light absorption in the nanoparticle. PMID:24845400

  10. Isotropic-nematic transition and dynamics of rigid charged molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatrantos, Argyrios

    2016-03-01

    Using molecular dynamics, an isotropic-nematic transition was found in bulk salt-free solutions of charged rods with their counterions in the semidilute regime. This phase transition is driven primarily by electrostatics, rather than by excluded volume. The counterion condensation effect, which is controlled by the Manning parameter, leads to liquid crystalline phases of rods. For elevated values of the Manning parameter, an attraction is obtained between the rods, and the nematic phase appears. For small values of the Manning parameter the counterions de-condense, and the nematic phase disappears. Instead, in a neutral system of rods and spheres there is no appearance of nematic phase. The diffusivity of both rods and counterions is reduced with the Manning parameter.

  11. Terminal supraparticle assemblies from similarly charged protein molecules and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jai Il; Nguyen, Trung Dac; de Queirós Silveira, Gleiciani; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Srivastava, Sudhanshu; Zhao, Gongpu; Sun, Kai; Zhang, Peijun; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2014-05-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and inorganic nanoparticles into terminal assemblies makes possible a large family of uniformly sized hybrid colloids. These particles can be compared in terms of utility, versatility and multifunctionality to other known types of terminal assemblies. They are simple to make and offer theoretical tools for designing their structure and function. To demonstrate such assemblies, we combine cadmium telluride nanoparticles with cytochrome C protein and observe spontaneous formation of spherical supraparticles with a narrow size distribution. Such self-limiting behaviour originates from the competition between electrostatic repulsion and non-covalent attractive interactions. Experimental variation of supraparticle diameters for several assembly conditions matches predictions obtained in simulations. Similar to micelles, supraparticles can incorporate other biological components as exemplified by incorporation of nitrate reductase. Tight packing of nanoscale components enables effective charge and exciton transport in supraparticles and bionic combination of properties as demonstrated by enzymatic nitrate reduction initiated by light absorption in the nanoparticle.

  12. Measurement of positively and negatively charged particles inside PMSE during MIDAS SOLSTICE 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, B.; Robertson, S.; HoráNyi, M.; Blix, T.; Rapp, M.; Latteck, R.; Gumbel, J.

    2003-04-01

    A magnetically shielded, charge collecting rocket probe was used on two flights in the MIddle Atmosphere Dynamics and Structure (MIDAS) Studies of Layered STructures and ICE (SOLSTICE) 2001 rocket campaign over Andøya, Norway. The probe was a graphite collection surface with a permanent magnet underneath to deflect electrons. The first MIDAS was launched 17 June 2001 into a strong, multiply layered PMSE. The probe measured negative particles inside an electron biteout within the PMSE, having a peak charge number density of -1500 charges per cubic centimeter. The second MIDAS was launched 24 June 2001 into another strong, multiply layered PMSE. The probe saw a band of positive particles centered in the lowest radar echo maximum, and a negative particle layer accompanied by a positive ion excess. The charge number densities for the positive and negative PMSE particles were several thousand charges per cubic centimeter. Unexpectedly, 2 km beneath the PMSE, the probe also found a very pronounced negative layer, which was probably an NLC. Computer simulations of incoming, negatively charged ice grains were performed using a rarefied flow field representative of the MIDAS payload at zero angle of attack. Ice grains ≤1 nm in radius were diverted by the leading shock front, indicating the smallest detectable ice particle by this probe.

  13. The chemical hardness of molecules and the band gap of solids within charge equilibration formalisms. Toward force field-based simulations of redox reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müser, M. H.

    2012-04-01

    This work finds that different charge equilibration methods lead to qualitatively different responses of molecules and solids to an excess charge. The investigated approaches are the regular charge equilibration (QE), the atom-atom-charge transfer (AACT), and the split-charge equilibration (SQE) method. In QE, the hardness of molecules and the band gap of solids approaches zero at large particle numbers, affirming the claim that QE induces metallic behavior. AACT suffers from producing negative values of the hardness; moreover valence and conduction bands of solids cross. In contrast to these methods, SQE can reproduce the generic behavior of dielectric molecules or solids. Moreover, first quantitative results for the NaCl molecule are promising. The results derived in this work may have beneficial implications for the modeling of redox reactions. They reveal that by introducing formal oxidation states into force field-based simulations it will become possible to simulate redox reactions including non-equilibrium contact electrification, voltage-driven charging of galvanic cells, and the formation of zwitterionic molecules.

  14. Charge transfer along DNA molecule within Peyrard-Bishop-Holstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edirisinghe, Neranjan; Apalkov, Vadym

    2010-03-01

    Charge transport through DNA molecule is important in many areas ranging from DNA damage repair to molecular nanowires. It is now widely accepted that a phonon mediated hopping of a charge carrier plays a major role in charge transport through DNA. In the present study we investigate system dynamics within Peyrard-Bishop-Holstein model for the charge transfer between donor and acceptor sites. We found that an escape time of a charge, trapped at the donor state of the DNA strand, is very sensitive to the initial value of H-bond stretching. This suggests importance of ensemble averaging. Moreover sharp phase transitions were observed for escape time in parameter space of transfer integrals and phonon-charge coupling constant.

  15. Gate-tunable large negative tunnel magnetoresistance in Ni-C60-Ni single molecule transistors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Hamada, Ikutaro; Sakata, Shuichi; Umeno, Akinori; Tsukada, Masaru; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-02-13

    We have fabricated single C(60) molecule transistors with ferromagnetic Ni leads (FM-SMTs) by using an electrical break junction method and investigated their magnetotransport. The FM-SMTs exhibited clear gate-dependent hysteretic tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) and the TMR values reached as high as -80%. The polarity of the TMR was found to be always negative over the entire bias range studied here. Density functional theory calculations show that hybridization between the Ni substrate states and the C(60) molecular orbitals generates an antiferromagnetic configuration in the local density of states near the Fermi level, which gives a reasonable explanation for the observed negative TMR. PMID:23327475

  16. Molecular length dictates the nature of charge carriers in single-molecule junctions of oxidized oligothiophenes.

    PubMed

    Dell, Emma J; Capozzi, Brian; Xia, Jianlong; Venkataraman, Latha; Campos, Luis M

    2015-03-01

    To develop advanced materials for electronic devices, it is of utmost importance to design organic building blocks with tunable functionality and to study their properties at the molecular level. For organic electronic and photovoltaic applications, the ability to vary the nature of charge carriers and so create either electron donors or acceptors is critical. Here we demonstrate that charge carriers in single-molecule junctions can be tuned within a family of molecules that contain electron-deficient thiophene-1,1-dioxide (TDO) building blocks. Oligomers of TDO were designed to increase electron affinity and maintain delocalized frontier orbitals while significantly decreasing the transport gap. Through thermopower measurements we show that the dominant charge carriers change from holes to electrons as the number of TDO units is increased. This results in a unique system in which the charge carrier depends on the backbone length, and provides a new means to tune p- and n-type transport in organic materials. PMID:25698329

  17. The influence of negative charged centers on the hole transport in a typical molecularly doped polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyutnev, Andrey P.; Ikhsanov, Renat Sh.; Saenko, Vladimir S.; Pozhidaev, Evgenii D.

    2014-03-01

    We have studied effects of the negative charged centers on the time of flight (TOF) curves measured in a typical hole-conducting molecularly doped polymer. The main effects are the unusual TOF (surface generation) current rise in the preflight region (be it a flat plateau or a cusp) due to the accumulated space charge and the current reduction at all times because of the monomolecular recombination. TOF-2 (bulk generation) transients are less sensitive to charged centers. Analysis of these effects has proved that charged centers do not change the carrier mobility provided that the space charge field and bimolecular recombination are properly accounted for in terms of the proposed two-layer MT model. We have shown that combination of TOF, TOF-1a and TOF-2 variants of the electron-gun based technique allows one to establish definitively the character of the charge carrier transport in MDPs.

  18. The Role of Negative Charge in the Delivery of Quantum Dots to Neurons.

    PubMed

    Walters, Ryan; Medintz, Igor L; Delehanty, James B; Stewart, Michael H; Susumu, Kimihiro; Huston, Alan L; Dawson, Philip E; Dawson, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Despite our extensive knowledge of the structure of negatively charged cell surface proteoglycans and sialoglycoconjugates in the brain, we have little understanding of how their negative charge contributes to brain function. We have previously shown that intensely photoluminescent 9-nm diameter quantum dots (QDs) with a CdSe core, a ZnS shell, and a negatively charged compact molecular ligand coating (CL4) selectively target neurons rather than glia. We now provide an explanation for this selective neuronal delivery. In this study, we compared three zwitterionic QD coatings differing only in their regions of positive or negative charge, as well as a positively charged (NH2) polyethylene glycol (PEG) coat, for their ability to deliver the cell-membrane-penetrating chaperone lipopeptide JB577 (WG(Palmitoyl)VKIKKP9G2H6) to individual cells in neonatal rat hippocampal slices. We confirm both that preferential uptake in neurons, and the lack of uptake in glia, is strongly associated with having a region of greater negative charge on the QD coating. In addition, the role of negatively charged chondroitin sulfate of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in restricting uptake was further suggested by digesting neonatal rat hippocampal slices with chondroitinase ABC and showing increased uptake of QDs by oligodendrocytes. Treatment still did not affect uptake in astrocytes or microglia. Finally, the future potential of using QDs as vehicles for trafficking proteins into cells continues to show promise, as we show that by administering a histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (eGFP-His6) to hippocampal slices, we can observe neuronal uptake of GFP. PMID:26243591

  19. The Role of Negative Charge in the Delivery of Quantum Dots to Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Ryan; Medintz, Igor L.; Delehanty, James B.; Stewart, Michael H.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Huston, Alan L.; Dawson, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite our extensive knowledge of the structure of negatively charged cell surface proteoglycans and sialoglycoconjugates in the brain, we have little understanding of how their negative charge contributes to brain function. We have previously shown that intensely photoluminescent 9-nm diameter quantum dots (QDs) with a CdSe core, a ZnS shell, and a negatively charged compact molecular ligand coating (CL4) selectively target neurons rather than glia. We now provide an explanation for this selective neuronal delivery. In this study, we compared three zwitterionic QD coatings differing only in their regions of positive or negative charge, as well as a positively charged (NH2) polyethylene glycol (PEG) coat, for their ability to deliver the cell-membrane-penetrating chaperone lipopeptide JB577 (WG(Palmitoyl)VKIKKP9G2H6) to individual cells in neonatal rat hippocampal slices. We confirm both that preferential uptake in neurons, and the lack of uptake in glia, is strongly associated with having a region of greater negative charge on the QD coating. In addition, the role of negatively charged chondroitin sulfate of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in restricting uptake was further suggested by digesting neonatal rat hippocampal slices with chondroitinase ABC and showing increased uptake of QDs by oligodendrocytes. Treatment still did not affect uptake in astrocytes or microglia. Finally, the future potential of using QDs as vehicles for trafficking proteins into cells continues to show promise, as we show that by administering a histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (eGFP-His6) to hippocampal slices, we can observe neuronal uptake of GFP. PMID:26243591

  20. Nanotribological Properties of Positively and Negatively charged nanodiamonds as additives to solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zijian; Corley, Steven; Shenderova, Olga; Brenner, Donald; Krim, Jacqueline

    2013-03-01

    Nano-diamond (ND) particles are known to be beneficial for wear and friction reduction when used as additives in liquids, but the fundamental origins of the improvement in tribological properties has not been established. In order to explore this issue, we have investigated the nanotribological properties of ND coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAM) as additives to solutions, employing gold/chrome coated quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). Measurements were performed with the QCM initially immersed in deionized water. ND particles with positively and negatively charged SAM end groups were then added to the water, while the frequency and amplitude of the QCM were monitored. Negative shifts in both the QCM frequency and amplitude were observed when ND with positively charged SAM end groups were added, while positive shifts in both the QCM frequency and amplitude were observed when ND with negatively charged ND end groups were added. The results are consistent with a lubricating effect for the negatively charged ND, but were only observed for sufficiently small negative ND particle size. Experiments on QCM surfaces with differing textures and roughness are in progress, to determine the separate contributing effects of surface roughness charge-water interactions. Funding provided by NSF DMR.

  1. Reversible Tuning of Interfacial and Intramolecular Charge Transfer in Individual MnPc Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Zhunzhun; Zhang, Jia Lin; Wright, Christopher A; Yuan, Kaidi; Gu, Chengding; Tadich, Anton; Qi, Dongchen; Li, He Xing; Lai, Min; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Hu, Wenping; Li, Zhenyu; Chen, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The reversible selective hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of individual manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) molecules has been investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM), synchrotron-based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) measurements, and supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is shown conclusively that interfacial and intramolecular charge transfer arises during the hydrogenation process. The electronic energetics upon hydrogenation is identified, enabling a greater understanding of interfacial and intramolecular charge transportation in the field of single-molecule electronics. PMID:26528623

  2. Auger electron spectroscopy as a tool for measuring intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.

    A way for the determination of the values of intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules of some binary dielectrics, based on Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), is proposed. These values can be obtained from the coverage dependences of the ratios of intensities of anion KL 23L 23 and KL 1L 1 Auger transitions, which are sensitive to the amount of charge at the 2p-orbitals. As an example, MgO adsorbed on Mo(110) is presented.

  3. Auger electron spectroscopy as a tool for measuring intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.

    1993-10-01

    A way for the determination of the values of intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules of some binary dielectrics, based on Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), is proposed. These values can be obtained from the coverage dependences of the ratios of intensities of anion KL 23L 23 and KL 1L 1 Auger transitions, which are sensitive to the amount of charge at the 2p-orbitals. As an example, MgO adsorbed on Mo(110) is presented.

  4. Influence of bismuth on the charging ability of negative plates in lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, L. T.; Ceylan, H.; Haigh, N. P.; Manders, J. E.

    To examine the influence of bismuth on the charging ability of negative plates in lead-acid batteries, plates are made from three types of oxides: (i) leady oxide of high quality which contains virtually no bismuth (termed 'control oxide'); (ii) control oxide in which bismuth oxide is blended at bismuth levels from 0.01 to 0.12 wt.%; (iii) leady oxide produced from Pasminco VRLA Refined™ lead (0.05-0.06 wt.%Bi). An experimental tool—the 'conversion indicator'—is developed to assess the charging ability of the test negative plates when cycling under either zero percent state-of-charge (SoC)/full-charge or partial state-of-charge (PSoC) duty. Although the conversion indicator is not the true charging efficiency, the two parameters have a close relationship, namely, the higher the conversion indicator, the greater the charging efficiency. Little difference is found in the charging ability, irrespective of bismuth content and discharge rate, when the plates are subjected to zero percent SoC/full-charge duty; the conversion indicator lies in the range 81-84%. By contrast, there is a marked difference when the negative plates are subjected to PSoC duty, i.e. consecutive cycling through 90-60, 70-40, 80-40 and 90-40% SoC windows. Up to 0.06 wt.%Bi improves the charging ability, especially with a low and narrow PSoC window (40-70% SoC) of the type that will be experienced in 42 V powernet automobile and hybrid electric duties. To maximize this beneficial effect, bismuth must be distributed uniformly in the plates. This is best achieved by using VRLA Refined™ lead for oxide production.

  5. BTNL2, a butyrophilin/B7-like molecule, is a negative costimulatory molecule modulated in intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Arnett, Heather A; Escobar, Sabine S; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva; Budelsky, Alison L; Steffen, Lori A; Boiani, Norman; Zhang, Ming; Siu, Gerald; Brewer, Avery W; Viney, Joanne L

    2007-02-01

    Butyrophilin-like 2 (BTNL2) is a butyrophilin family member with homology to the B7 costimulatory molecules, polymorphisms of which have been recently associated through genetic analyses to sporadic inclusion body myositis and sarcoidosis. We have characterized the full structure, expression, and function of BTNL2. Structural analysis of BTNL2 shows a molecule with an extracellular region containing two sets of two Ig domains, a transmembrane region, and a previously unreported cytoplasmic tail. Unlike most other butyrophilin members, BTNL2 lacks the prototypical B30.2 ring domain. TaqMan and Northern blot analysis indicate BTNL2 is predominantly expressed in digestive tract tissues, in particular small intestine and Peyer's patches. Immunohistochemistry with BTNL2-specific Abs further localizes BTNL2 to epithelial and dendritic cells within these tissues. Despite its homology to the B7 family, BTNL2 does not bind any of the known B7 family receptors such as CD28, CTLA-4, PD-1, ICOS, or B and T lymphocyte attenuator. Because of its localization in the gut and potential role in the immune system, BTNL2 expression was analyzed in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease. BTNL2 is overexpressed during both the asymptomatic and symptomatic phase of the Mdr1a knockout model of spontaneous colitis. In functional assays, soluble BTNL2-Fc protein inhibits the proliferation of murine CD4(+) T cells from the spleen, mesenteric lymph node, and Peyer's patch. In addition, BTNL2-Fc reduces proliferation and cytokine production from T cells activated by anti-CD3 and B7-related protein 1. These data suggest a role for BTNL2 as a negative costimulatory molecule with implications for inflammatory disease. PMID:17237401

  6. Photoinduced charge transfer from vacuum-deposited molecules to single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Kazuki; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Ohno, Shinya; Suzuki, Takanori

    2016-06-01

    Variations of photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectra of single-layer MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 due to the vacuum deposition of C60 or copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules have been investigated. PL spectra are decomposed into two competitive components, an exciton and a charged exciton (trion), depending on carrier density. The variation of PL spectra is interpreted in terms of charge transfer across the interfaces between transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and dopant molecules. We find that deposited C60 molecules inject photoexcited electrons into MoS2, MoSe2, and WS2 or holes into WSe2. CuPc molecules also inject electrons into MoS2, MoSe2, and WS2, while holes are depleted from WSe2 to CuPc. We then propose a band alignment between TMDs and dopant molecules. Peak shifts of Raman spectra and doped carrier density estimated using a three-level model also support the band alignment. We thus demonstrate photoinduced charge transfer from dopant molecules to single-layer TMDs.

  7. Process for preparing negative plates for use in a dry charge battery

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, P.C.

    1986-02-11

    This patent describes a process for the production of lead-containing negative plates for use in a dry charge battery. The process cnsists of drying wet negative plates while protecting them from oxidation. This improvement is accomplished by treating the wet negative plates prior to the drying operation with an aqueous soluton of an oxidation inhibiting agent selected from salicylic acid, and 2-naphtol. The plates are then protected against oxidation during drying; and dry negative plates are obtained which are resistant to the absorption of water from the atmosphere on storage but are wet immediately by battery acid in use.

  8. Quantum mechanical investigations on the role of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates in organocatalyzed reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubin, Pierre O.; Jacquemin, Denis; Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P.

    2014-04-01

    The proline-catalyzed aldol reaction is the seminal example of asymmetric organocatalysis. Previous theoretical and experimental studies aimed at identifying its mechanism in order to rationalize the outcome of this reaction. Here, we focus on key steps with modern first principle methods, i.e. the M06-2X hybrid exchange-correlation functional combined to the solvation density model to account for environmental effects. In particular, different pathways leading to the formation of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates are investigated, and their reactivity towards two electrophiles, i.e. an aldehyde and a benzhydrylium cation, are compared. Regarding the self-aldol reaction, our calculations confirm that the neutral enamine intermediate is more reactive than the negatively charged one. For the reaction with benzhydrylium cations however, the negatively charged enamine intermediate is more reactive.

  9. Dust acoustic solitary wave with variable dust charge: Role of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran

    2005-09-15

    The role of negative ions on small but finite amplitude dust acoustic solitary wave including the effects of high and low charging rates of dust grains compared to the dust oscillation frequency in electronegative dusty plasma is investigated. In the case of high charging rate, the solitary wave is governed by Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, but in the case of low charging rate, it is governed by KdV equation with a linear damping term. Numerical investigations reveal that in both cases dust acoustic soliton sharpens (flatens) and soliton width decreases (increases) with the increase of negative-ion number density (temperature). Also, the negative ions reduce the damping rate.

  10. A Model of Ball Lightning as a Formation of Water Molecules Confining an Electric Charge and the Classical Theory of the Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennakone, K.

    2012-04-01

    Ball lightning or faintly luminous floating spheres with radii of the order of ten centimeters appearing transiently in air notably during stormy weather continue to remain an unresolved phenomenon. It is suggested that these objects are organized structures constituted of an electrically charged spherical thin shell of electro-frozen dipole oriented water molecules carrying an electric charge, balanced by the internal negative pressure and outward electrostatic stress. A model presented, resembling the classical theory of the electron with Poincare stresses explain almost all observed attributes of this phenomenon. The possibility of realizing macroscopic spherical surface charge distributions in the vacuum and their implication on the problem of electron are commented.

  11. Selective charge asymmetric distribution in heteronuclear diatomic molecules in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei; Guo, Chunlei

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we study double-ionization-induced charge asymmetric dissociation (CAD) in heteronuclear diatomic molecules. In CO we find a selective charge distribution in two CAD channels, i.e., C2 ++O is abundantly produced but C +O2 + is nearly nonexistent. This cannot be explained by the ionization energy difference between the two channels alone. Our study shows that the C2 ++O channel is sequentially formed through an intermediate state C++O and the selective charge distribution is the result of electron distribution in CO when exposed to intense laser fields.

  12. First-Principles Studies of Charge Separation in Single-Molecule Heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darancet, Pierre; Doak, Peter; Neaton, Jeffrey

    2010-03-01

    Single-molecule heterojunctions, consisting of donor and acceptor moieties linked by covalent bonds and coupled to metal electrodes, provide an interesting model system for understanding processes fundamental to organic solar cells, such as light absorption and charge separation. However, how the covalent contact with metallic leads influence these processes -- and metal-molecule interface electronic structure -- remains largely unknown. Using density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory, we discuss the influence of the metal contacts and binding groups on junction electronic level alignment for small asymmetric molecules containing covalently-linked moieties based on thiophene, durene and tetrafluoro-, dinitrile-, and metoxy-benzene. Implications for photocurrent and rectification are discussed.

  13. Negative space charge effects in photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar converters

    SciTech Connect

    Segev, G.; Weisman, D.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Kribus, A.

    2015-07-06

    In thermionic energy converters, electrons in the gap between electrodes form a negative space charge and inhibit the emission of additional electrons, causing a significant reduction in conversion efficiency. However, in Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) solar energy converters, electrons that are reflected by the electric field in the gap return to the cathode with energy above the conduction band minimum. These electrons first occupy the conduction band from which they can be reemitted. This form of electron recycling makes PETE converters less susceptible to negative space charge loss. While the negative space charge effect was studied extensively in thermionic converters, modeling its effect in PETE converters does not account for important issues such as this form of electron recycling, nor the cathode thermal energy balance. Here, we investigate the space charge effect in PETE solar converters accounting for electron recycling, with full coupling of the cathode and gap models, and addressing conservation of both electric and thermal energy. The analysis shows that the negative space charge loss is lower than previously reported, allowing somewhat larger gaps compared to previous predictions. For a converter with a specific gap, there is an optimal solar flux concentration. The optimal solar flux concentration, the cathode temperature, and the efficiency all increase with smaller gaps. For example, for a gap of 3 μm the maximum efficiency is 38% and the optimal flux concentration is 628, while for a gap of 5 μm the maximum efficiency is 31% and optimal flux concentration is 163.

  14. Bactericidal action mechanism of negatively charged food grade clove oil nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Hamid; Liu, Fei; Hategekimana, Joseph; Sharif, Hafiz Rizwan; Qi, Jing; Ali, Barkat; Bian, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Jianguo; Yokoyama, Wallace; Zhong, Fang

    2016-04-15

    Clove oil (CO) anionic nanoemulsions were prepared with varying ratios of CO to canola oil (CA), emulsified and stabilized with purity gum ultra (PGU), a newly developed succinylated waxy maize starch. Interfacial tension measurements showed that CO acted as a co-surfactant and there was a gradual decrease in interfacial tension which favored the formation of small droplet sizes on homogenization until a critical limit (5:5% v/v CO:CA) was reached. Antimicrobial activity of the negatively charged CO nanoemulsion was determined against Gram positive GPB (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative GNB (Escherichia coli) bacterial strains using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and a time kill dynamic method. Negatively charged PGU emulsified CO nanoemulsion showed prolonged antibacterial activities against Gram positive bacterial strains. We concluded that negatively charged CO nanoemulsion droplets self-assemble with GPB cell membrane, and facilitated interaction with cellular components of bacteria. Moreover, no electrostatic interaction existed between negatively charged droplets and the GPB membrane. PMID:26616926

  15. Framework selection can influence pharmacokinetics of a humanized therapeutic antibody through differences in molecule charge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Tesar, Devin; Boswell, C Andrew; Cahaya, Hendry S; Wong, Anne; Zhang, Jianhuan; Meng, Y Gloria; Eigenbrot, Charles; Pantua, Homer; Diao, Jinyu; Kapadia, Sharookh B; Deng, Rong; Kelley, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) testing of a humanized (κI, VH3 framework) and affinity matured anti-hepatitis C virus E2-glycoprotein (HCV-E2) antibody (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v3) in rats revealed unexpected fast clearance (34.9 mL/day/kg). This antibody binds to the rat recycling receptor FcRn as expected for a human IgG1 antibody and does not display non-specific binding to baculovirus particles in an assay that is correlated with fast clearance in cynomolgus monkey. The antigen is not expressed in rat so target-dependent clearance does not contribute to PK. Removal of the affinity maturation changes (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1) did not restore normal clearance. The antibody was re-humanized on a κ4, VH1 framework and the non-affinity matured version (hu5B3.κ4VH1.v1) was shown to have normal clearance (8.5 mL/day/kg). Since the change in framework results in a lower pI, primarily due to more negative charge on the κ4 template, the effect of additional charge variation on antibody PK was tested by incorporating substitutions obtained through phage display affinity maturation of hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1. A variant having a pI of 8.61 gave very fast clearance (140 mL/day/kg) whereas a molecule with pI of 6.10 gave slow clearance (5.8 mL/kg/day). Both antibodies exhibited comparable binding to rat FcRn, but biodistribution experiments showed that the high pI variant was catabolized in liver and spleen. These results suggest antibody charge can have an effect on PK through alterations in antibody catabolism independent of FcRn-mediated recycling. Furthermore, introduction of affinity maturation changes into the lower pI framework yielded a candidate with PK and virus neutralization properties suitable for clinical development. PMID:25517310

  16. Aspects of lead/acid battery technology 5. Dry charging of formed negative plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prout, L.

    The objective in the dry charging of formed negative plates in lead/acid batteries is to preserve the highly active sponge lead material from attack by atmospheric oxygen until the dry and unfilled charged battery is put into service. This review discusses the following methods that are commonly used for dry charging: (i) drying in a vacuum; (ii) drying by direct application of superheated steam; (iii) drying in an inert-gas atmosphere; (iv) removal of water by hot kerosene and subsequent drying in a closed kerosene vapour chamber and (v) drying in the presence of anti-oxidants. The protection of dry-charge characteristics, rapid evaluation of dry-charge quality and testing for excess wax or oil inhibitors are also described.

  17. Luminescent systems based on the isolation of conjugated PI systems and edge charge compensation with polar molecules on a charged nanostructured surface

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Zhao, Bin; Geohegan, David B.; Styers-Barnett, David J.; Hu, Hui

    2014-07-15

    A photoluminescent or electroluminescent system and method of making a non-luminescent nanostructured material into such a luminescent system is presented. The method of preparing the luminescent system, generally, comprises the steps of modifying the surface of a nanostructured material to create isolated regions to act as luminescent centers and to create a charge imbalance on the surface; applying more than one polar molecule to the charged surface of the nanostructured material; and orienting the polar molecules to compensate for the charge imbalance on the surface of the nanostructured material. The compensation of the surface charge imbalance by the polar molecules allows the isolated regions to exhibit luminescence.

  18. Evidence for photo-induced charge separation between dye molecules adsorbed to aluminium oxide surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cappel, Ute B.; Moia, Davide; Bruno, Annalisa; Vaissier, Valerie; Haque, Saif A.; Barnes, Piers R. F.

    2016-01-01

    Excited state dynamics and photo-induced charge transfer of dye molecules have been widely studied due to their relevance for organic and dye-sensitised solar cells. Herein, we present a femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy study of the indolene dye D131 when adsorbed to inert Al2O3 substrates for different surface concentration of the dye. Surprisingly, we find that at high surface concentrations, the first singlet excited state of the dye is converted into a new state with an efficiency of about 80%. We assign the absorption features of this state to the oxidised dye and discuss the possibility of photo-induced charge separation between neighboring dye molecules. Our study is the first to show that this process can be highly efficient without the use of donor and acceptor molecules of different chemical structures. PMID:26891851

  19. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  20. Evidence for photo-induced charge separation between dye molecules adsorbed to aluminium oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappel, Ute B.; Moia, Davide; Bruno, Annalisa; Vaissier, Valerie; Haque, Saif A.; Barnes, Piers R. F.

    2016-02-01

    Excited state dynamics and photo-induced charge transfer of dye molecules have been widely studied due to their relevance for organic and dye-sensitised solar cells. Herein, we present a femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy study of the indolene dye D131 when adsorbed to inert Al2O3 substrates for different surface concentration of the dye. Surprisingly, we find that at high surface concentrations, the first singlet excited state of the dye is converted into a new state with an efficiency of about 80%. We assign the absorption features of this state to the oxidised dye and discuss the possibility of photo-induced charge separation between neighboring dye molecules. Our study is the first to show that this process can be highly efficient without the use of donor and acceptor molecules of different chemical structures.

  1. Spin-boson theory for charge photogeneration in organic molecules: Role of quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The charge photogeneration process in organic molecules is investigated by a quantum heat engine model, in which two molecules are modeled by a two-spin system sandwiched between two bosonic baths. The two baths represent the high-temperature photon emission source and the low-temperature phonon environment, respectively. We utilize the time-dependent density matrix renormalization group algorithm to investigate the quantum dynamics of the model. It is found that the transient energy current flowing through the two molecules exhibits two stages. In the first stage the energy current is of a coherent feature and represents the ultrafast delocalization of the charge-transfer state, and in the second stage a steady incoherent current is established. The power conversion efficiency is significantly high and may reach the maximum value of 93 % with optimized model parameters. The long-lived quantum entanglement between the two spins is found to be primarily responsible for the hyperefficiency.

  2. Influence of electrostatic interactions on the release of charged molecules from lipid cubic phases.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Renata; Sánchez-Ferrer, Antoni; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-04-22

    The release of positive, negative, and neutral hydrophilic drugs from pH responsive bicontinuous cubic phases was investigated under varying conditions of electrostatic interactions. A weak acid, linoleic acid (LA), or a weak base, pyridinylmethyl linoleate (PML), were added to the neutral monolinolein (ML) in order to form lyotropic liquid-crystalline (LLC) phases, which are negatively charged at neutral pH and positively charged at acidic pH. Release studies at low ionic strength (I = 20 mM) and at different pH values (3 and 7) revealed that electrostatic attraction between a positive drug, proflavine (PF), and the negatively charged LLC at pH = 7 or between a negative drug, antraquinone 2-sulfonic acid sodium salt (AQ2S), and the positively charged LLC at pH = 3 did delay the release behavior, while electrostatic repulsion affects the transport properties only to some extent. Release profiles of a neutral drug, caffeine, were not affected by the surface charge type and density in the cubic LLCs. Moreover, the influence of ionic strength was also considered up to 150 mM, corresponding to a Debye length smaller than the LLC water channels radius, which showed that efficient screening of electrostatic attractions occurring within the LLC water domains results in an increased release rate. Four transport models were applied to fit the release data, providing an exhaustive, quantitative insight on the role of electrostatic interactions in transport properties from pH responsive bicontinuous cubic phases. PMID:24673189

  3. Sprite produced by consecutive impulse charge transfers following a negative stroke: Observation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gaopeng; Cummer, Steven A.; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Hongbo; Lyu, Fanchao; Wang, Tao; Stanley, Mark A.; Yang, Jing; Lyons, Walter A.

    2016-04-01

    On the morning of 5 June 2013, two cameras of the SpriteCam network concurrently captured a red sprite with diffuse halo over a mesoscale convective system (MCS) passing the panhandle area of Oklahoma. This sprite was produced by a negative cloud-to-ground (CG) stroke with peak current of -103 kA in a manner different from previous observations in several aspects. First of all, the causative stroke of sprite is located by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) in the trailing stratiform of MCS, instead of the deep convection typically for negative sprites. Second, the sprite-producing stroke was likely the first stroke of a multistroke negative CG flash (with ≥6 CG strokes) whose evolution was mainly confined in the lower part of thunderstorm; although the parent flash of sprite might contain relatively long in-cloud evolution prior to the first stroke, there is no evidence that the negative leader had propagated into the upper positive region of thundercloud as typically observed for the sprite-producing/class negative CG strokes. Third, as shown by the simulation with a two-dimensional full-wave electrodynamic model, although the impulse charge moment change (-190 C km) produced by the main stroke was not sufficient to induce conventional breakdown in the mesosphere, a second impulse charge transfer occurred with ~2 ms delay to cause a substantial charge transfer (-290 C km) so that the overall charge moment change (-480 C km) exceeded the threshold for sprite production; this is a scenario different from the typical case discussed by Li et al. (2012). As for the source of the second current pulse that played a critical role to produce the sprite, it could be an M component whose charge source was at least 9 km horizontally displaced from the main stroke or a negative CG stroke (with weak peak current for the return stroke) that was not detected by the NLDN.

  4. Dynamic secondary electron emission characteristics of polymers in negative charging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Ming; Hu, Tian-Cun; Zhang, Na; Cao, Meng

    2016-04-01

    We studied the dynamic secondary electron emission (SEE) characteristics of a polyimide sample in negative charging process under electron bombardment. The time evolution of secondary electron yield (SEY) has been measured with a pulsed electron gun. The dynamic SEY, as well as the surface potential have been analyzed using a capacitance model. The shift in surface potential caused by the negative charge accumulation on the sample reduces the landing energy of the primary electrons (PEs), which in turn alters the SEY. The charging process tends to be stable when the landing energy of PEs reaches the secondary crossover energy where the corresponding SEY is 1. The surface potential has an approximately negative exponential relationship with the irradiation time. The total accumulated charge at the stable state is found to be proportional to the product of the sample capacitance and the difference between initial incident energy and the secondary crossover energy. The time constant of the exponential function is proportional to the ratio of final accumulated charge to the incident current.

  5. How Do Distance and Solvent Affect Halogen Bonding Involving Negatively Charged Donors?

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaoqiang; Wang, Guimin; Xu, Zhijian; Wang, Jinan; Yu, Yuqi; Cai, Tingting; Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2016-09-01

    It was reported that negatively charged donors can form halogen bonding, which is stable, especially, in a polar environment. On the basis of a survey of the Protein Data Bank, we noticed that the distance between the negative charge center and the halogen atom of an organohalogen may vary greatly. Therefore, a series of model systems, composed of 4-halophenyl-conjugated polyene acids and ammonia, were designed to explore the potential effect of distance on halogen bonding in different solvents. Quantum mechanics (QM) calculations demonstrated that the longer the distance, the stronger the bonding. The energy decomposition analysis on all of the model systems demonstrated that electrostatic interaction contributes the most (44-56%) to the overall binding, followed by orbital interaction (42-36%). Natural bond orbital calculations showed that electron transfer takes place from the acceptor to the donor, whereas the halogen atom becomes more positive during the bonding, which is in agreement with the result of neutral halogen bonding. QM/molecular mechanics calculations demonstrated that the polarity of binding pockets makes all of the interactions attractive in a protein system. Hence, the strength of halogen bonding involving negatively charged donors could be adjusted by changing the distance between the negative charge center and halogen atom and the environment in which the bonding exists, which may be applied in material and drug design for tuning their function and activity. PMID:27504672

  6. Ion-exchange molecularly imprinted polymer for the extraction of negatively charged acesulfame from wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Zarejousheghani, Mashaalah; Schrader, Steffi; Möder, Monika; Lorenz, Pierre; Borsdorf, Helko

    2015-09-11

    Acesulfame is a known indicator that is used to identify the introduction of domestic wastewater into water systems. It is negatively charged and highly water-soluble at environmental pH values. In this study, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized for negatively charged acesulfame and successfully applied for the selective solid phase extraction (SPE) of acesulfame from influent and effluent wastewater samples. (Vinylbenzyl)trimethylammonium chloride (VBTA) was used as a novel phase transfer reagent, which enhanced the solubility of negatively charged acesulfame in the organic solvent (porogen) and served as a functional monomer in MIP synthesis. Different molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized to optimize the extraction capability of acesulfame. The different materials were evaluated using equilibrium rebinding experiments, selectivity experiments and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The most efficient MIP was used in a molecularly imprinted-solid phase extraction (MISPE) protocol to extract acesulfame from wastewater samples. Using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS-MS) analysis, detection and quantification limits were achieved at 0.12μgL(-1) and 0.35μgL(-1), respectively. Certain cross selectivity for the chemical compounds containing negatively charged sulfonamide functional group was observed during selectivity experiments. PMID:26256920

  7. Charged particle flows in the beam extraction region of a negative ion source for NBI.

    PubMed

    Geng, S; Tsumori, K; Nakano, H; Kisaki, M; Ikeda, K; Osakabe, M; Nagaoka, K; Takeiri, Y; Shibuya, M; Kaneko, O

    2016-02-01

    Experiments by a four-pin probe and photodetachment technique were carried out to investigate the charged particle flows in the beam extraction region of a negative hydrogen ion source for neutral beam injector. Electron and positive ion flows were obtained from the polar distribution of the probe saturation current. Negative hydrogen ion flow velocity and temperature were obtained by comparing the recovery times of the photodetachment signals at opposite probe tips. Electron and positive ions flows are dominated by crossed field drift and ambipolar diffusion. Negative hydrogen ion temperature is evaluated to be 0.12 eV. PMID:26931985

  8. Charged particle flows in the beam extraction region of a negative ion source for NBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, S.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Shibuya, M.; Kaneko, O.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments by a four-pin probe and photodetachment technique were carried out to investigate the charged particle flows in the beam extraction region of a negative hydrogen ion source for neutral beam injector. Electron and positive ion flows were obtained from the polar distribution of the probe saturation current. Negative hydrogen ion flow velocity and temperature were obtained by comparing the recovery times of the photodetachment signals at opposite probe tips. Electron and positive ions flows are dominated by crossed field drift and ambipolar diffusion. Negative hydrogen ion temperature is evaluated to be 0.12 eV.

  9. Quantum interference and electron correlation in charge transport through triangular quantum dot molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chieh; Chang, Yia-chung; Kuo, David M T

    2015-03-01

    We study the charge transport properties of triangular quantum dot molecules (TQDMs) connected to metallic electrodes, taking into account all correlation functions and relevant charging states. The quantum interference (QI) effect of TQDMs resulting from electron coherent tunneling between quantum dots is revealed and well interpreted by the long distance coherent tunneling mechanism. The spectra of electrical conductance of TQDMs with charge filling from one to six electrons clearly depict the many-body and topological effects. The calculated charge stability diagram for conductance and total occupation numbers matches well with the recent experimental measurements. We also demonstrate that the destructive QI effect on the tunneling current of TQDMs is robust with respect to temperature variation, making the single electron QI transistor feasible at higher temperatures. PMID:25660124

  10. Negative Ion CID Fragmentation of O-linked Oligosaccharide Aldoses—Charge Induced and Charge Remote Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doohan, Roisin A.; Hayes, Catherine A.; Harhen, Brendan; Karlsson, Niclas Göran

    2011-06-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation was compared between reducing and reduced sulfated, sialylated, and neutral O-linked oligosaccharides. It was found that fragmentation of the [M - H]- ions of aldoses with acidic residues gave unique Z-fragmentation of the reducing end GalNAc containing the acidic C-6 branch, where the entire C-3 branch was lost. This fragmentation pathway, which is not seen in the alditols, showed that the process involved charge remote fragmentation catalyzed by a reducing end acidic anomeric proton. With structures containing sialic acid on both the C-3 and C-6 branch, the [M - H]- ions were dominated by the loss of sialic acid. This fragmentation pathway was also pronounced in the [M - 2H]2- ions revealing both the C-6 Z-fragment plus its complementary C-3 C-fragment in addition to glycosidic and cross ring fragmentation. This generation of the Z/C-fragment pairs from GalNAc showed that the charges were not participating in their generation. Fragmentation of neutral aldoses showed pronounced Z-fragmentation believed to be generated by proton migration from the C-6 branch to the negatively charged GalNAc residue followed by charge remote fragmentation similar to the acidic oligosaccharides. In addition, A-type fragments generated by charge induced fragmentation of neutral oligosaccharides were observed when the charge migrated from C-1 of the GalNAc to the GlcNAc residue followed by rearrangement to accommodate the 0,2A-fragmentation. LC-MS also showed that O-linked aldoses existed as interchangeable α/β pyranose anomers, in addition to a third isomer (25% of the total free aldose) believed to be the furanose form.

  11. Photodissociation and charge transfer dynamics of negative ions studied with femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zanni, Martin T.

    1999-12-17

    This dissertation presents studies aimed at understanding the potential energy surfaces and dynamics of isolated negative ions, and the effects of solvent on each. Although negative ions play important roles in atmospheric and solution phase chemistry, to a large extent the ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of gas phase negative ions are poorly characterized, and solvent effects even less well understood. In an effort to fill this gap, the author's coworkers and the author have developed a new technique, anion femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy, and applied it to gas phase photodissociation and charge transfer processes. Studies are presented that (1) characterize the ground and excited states of isolated and clustered anions, (2) monitor the photodissociation dynamics of isolated and clustered anions, and (3) explore the charge-transfer-to-solvent states of atomic iodide clustered with polar and non-polar solvents.

  12. Channel-forming activity of syringopeptin 25A in mercury-supported phospholipid monolayers and negatively charged bilayers.

    PubMed

    Becucci, Lucia; Toppi, Arianna; Fiore, Alberto; Scaloni, Andrea; Guidelli, Rolando

    2016-10-01

    Interactions of the cationic lipodepsipeptide syringopeptin 25A (SP25A) with mercury-supported dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) and dioeleoylphosphatidic acid (DOPA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were investigated by AC voltammetry in 0.1M KCl at pH3, 5.4 and 6.8. SP25A targets and penetrates the DOPS SAM much more effectively than the other SAMs not only at pH6.8, where the DOPS SAM is negatively charged, but also at pH3, where it is positively charged just as SP25A. Similar investigations at tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) consisting of a thiolipid called DPTL anchored to mercury, with a DOPS, DOPA or DOPC distal monolayer on top of it, showed that, at physiological transmembrane potentials, SP25A forms ion channels spanning the tBLM only if DOPS is the distal monolayer. The distinguishing chemical feature of the DOPS SAM is the ionic interaction between the protonated amino group of a DOPS molecule and the carboxylate group of an adjacent phospholipid molecule. Under the reasonable assumption that SP25A preferentially interacts with this ion pair, the selective lipodepsipeptide antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria may be tentatively explained by its affinity for similar protonated amino-carboxylate pairs, which are expected to be present in the peptide moieties of peptidoglycan strands. PMID:27322780

  13. Efficient in vivo gene delivery by the negatively charged complexes of cationic liposomes and plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Son, K K; Tkach, D; Hall, K J

    2000-09-29

    We examined changes in zeta potential (the surface charge density, zeta) of the complexes of liposome (nmol)/DNA (microg) (L/D) formed in water at three different ratios (L/D=1, 10 and 20) by changing the ionic strength or pH to find an optimum formulation for in vivo gene delivery. At high DNA concentrations, zeta of the complexes formed in water at L/D=10 was significantly lowered by adding NaCl (zeta=+8.44+/-3.1 to -27.6+/-3.5 mV) or increasing pH from 5 (zeta=+15.3+/-1.0) to 9 (zeta=-22.5+/-2.5 mV). However, the positively charged complexes formed at L/D=20 (zeta=+6.2+/-3.5 mV) became negative as NaCl was added at alkaline pH as observed in medium (zeta=-19.7+/-9.9 mV). Thus, the complexes formed in water under the optimum condition were stable and largely negatively charged at L/D=1 (zeta=-58.1+/-3.9 mV), unstable and slightly positively charged at L/D=10 (zeta=+8.44+/-3.7 mV), and unstable and largely positively charged at L/D=20 (zeta=+24.3+/-3.6 mV). The negatively charged complexes efficiently delivered DNA into both solid and ascitic tumor cells. However, the positively charged complexes were very poor in delivering DNA into solid tumors, yet were efficient in delivering DNA into ascitic tumors grown in the peritoneum regardless of complex size. This slightly lower gene transfer efficiency of the negatively charged complexes can be as efficient as the positively charged ones when an injection is repeated (at least two injections), which is the most common case for therapy regimes. The results indicate that optimum in vivo lipofection may depend on the site of tumor growth. PMID:11018645

  14. Ionization Efficiency of Doubly Charged Ions Formed from Polyprotic Acids in Electrospray Negative Mode.

    PubMed

    Liigand, Piia; Kaupmees, Karl; Kruve, Anneli

    2016-07-01

    The ability of polyprotic acids to give doubly charged ions in negative mode electrospray was studied and related to physicochemical properties of the acids via linear discriminant analysis (LDA). It was discovered that the compound has to be strongly acidic (low pK a1 and pK a2) and to have high hydrophobicity (logP ow) to become multiply charged. Ability to give multiply charged ions in ESI/MS cannot be directly predicted from the solution phase acidities. Therefore, for the first time, a quantitative model to predict the charge state of the analyte in ESI/MS is proposed and validated for small anions. Also, a model to predict ionization efficiencies of these analytes was developed. Results indicate that acidity of the analyte, its octanol-water partition coefficient, and charge delocalization are important factors that influence ionization efficiencies as well as charge states of the analytes. The pH of the solvent was also found to be an important factor influencing the ionization efficiency of doubly charged ions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27044024

  15. Ionization Efficiency of Doubly Charged Ions Formed from Polyprotic Acids in Electrospray Negative Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liigand, Piia; Kaupmees, Karl; Kruve, Anneli

    2016-07-01

    The ability of polyprotic acids to give doubly charged ions in negative mode electrospray was studied and related to physicochemical properties of the acids via linear discriminant analysis (LDA). It was discovered that the compound has to be strongly acidic (low p K a1 and p K a2) and to have high hydrophobicity (log P ow) to become multiply charged. Ability to give multiply charged ions in ESI/MS cannot be directly predicted from the solution phase acidities. Therefore, for the first time, a quantitative model to predict the charge state of the analyte in ESI/MS is proposed and validated for small anions. Also, a model to predict ionization efficiencies of these analytes was developed. Results indicate that acidity of the analyte, its octanol-water partition coefficient, and charge delocalization are important factors that influence ionization efficiencies as well as charge states of the analytes. The pH of the solvent was also found to be an important factor influencing the ionization efficiency of doubly charged ions.

  16. Solvent-tuned intramolecular charge-recombination rates in a conjugated donor-acceptor molecule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khundkar, Lutfur R.; Stiegman, A. E.; Perry, Joseph W.

    1990-01-01

    The nonradiative charge-recombination rates from the charge-transfer state of a new conjugated donor-acceptor molecule (p-cyano-p-prime-methylthiodiphenylacetylene) can be tuned over almost an order of magnitude by varying the polarity of the solvent. These measurements of intramolecular recombination show a turnover of rates as a function of emission energy, consistent with the 'normal' and 'inverted' behavior of Marcus theory. Steady-state spectra and time-resolved measurements make it possible to quantitatively compare thermal and optical electron-transfer rates as a function of driving force and demonstrate their correspondence.

  17. Metal-molecule contacts and charge transport across monomolecular layers: measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Kushmerick, J G; Holt, D B; Yang, J C; Naciri, J; Moore, M H; Shashidhar, R

    2002-08-19

    Charge transport studies across molecular length scales under symmetric and asymmetric metal-molecule contact conditions using a simple crossed-wire tunnel junction technique are presented. It is demonstrated that oligo(phenylene ethynylene), a conjugated organic molecule, acts like a molecular wire under symmetric contact conditions, but exhibits characteristics of a molecular diode when the connections are asymmetric. To understand this behavior, we have calculated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics using extended Huckel theory coupled with a Green's function approach. The experimentally observed I-V characteristics are in excellent qualitative agreement with the theory. PMID:12190491

  18. Bond-forming reactions of small triply charged cations with neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, James D; Parkes, Michael A; Price, Stephen D

    2013-08-12

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry reveals that atomic and small molecular triply charged cations exhibit extensive bond-forming chemistry, following gas-phase collisions with neutral molecules. These experiments show that at collision energies of a few eV, I(3+) reacts with a variety of small molecules to generate molecular monocations and molecular dications containing iodine. Xe(3+) and CS2(3+) react in a similar manner to I(3+), undergoing bond-forming reactions with neutrals. A simple model, involving relative product energetics and electrostatic interaction potentials, is used to account for the observed reactivity. PMID:23843367

  19. Simulation of space charge compensation in a multibeamlet negative ion beam.

    PubMed

    Sartori, E; Maceina, T J; Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    Ion beam space charge compensation occurs by cumulating in the beam potential well charges having opposite polarity, usually generated by collisional processes. In this paper we investigate the case of a H(-) ion beam drift, in a bi-dimensional approximation of the NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization phase 1) negative ion source. H(-) beam ion transport and plasma formation are studied via particle-in-cell simulations. Differential cross sections are sampled to determine the velocity distribution of secondary particles generated by ionization of the residual gas (electrons and slow H2 (+) ions) or by stripping of the beam ions (electrons, H, and H(+)). The simulations include three beamlets of a horizontal section, so that multibeamlet space charge and secondary particle diffusion between separate generation regions are considered, and include a repeller grid biased at various potentials. Results show that after the beam space charge is effectively screened by the secondary plasma in about 3 μs (in agreement with theoretical expectations), a plasma grows across the beamlets with a characteristic time three times longer, and a slight overcompensation of the electric potential is verified as expected in the case of negative ions. PMID:26932089

  20. Simulation of space charge compensation in a multibeamlet negative ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Maceina, T. J.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    Ion beam space charge compensation occurs by cumulating in the beam potential well charges having opposite polarity, usually generated by collisional processes. In this paper we investigate the case of a H- ion beam drift, in a bi-dimensional approximation of the NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization phase 1) negative ion source. H- beam ion transport and plasma formation are studied via particle-in-cell simulations. Differential cross sections are sampled to determine the velocity distribution of secondary particles generated by ionization of the residual gas (electrons and slow H2+ ions) or by stripping of the beam ions (electrons, H, and H+). The simulations include three beamlets of a horizontal section, so that multibeamlet space charge and secondary particle diffusion between separate generation regions are considered, and include a repeller grid biased at various potentials. Results show that after the beam space charge is effectively screened by the secondary plasma in about 3 μs (in agreement with theoretical expectations), a plasma grows across the beamlets with a characteristic time three times longer, and a slight overcompensation of the electric potential is verified as expected in the case of negative ions.

  1. Discharges on a negatively biased solar array in a charged particle environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    The charging behavior of a negatively biased solar cell array when subjected to a charged particle environment is studied in the ion density range from 200 to 12 000 ions/sq cm with the applied bias range of -500 to -1400 V. The profile of the surface potentials across the array is related to the presence of discharges. At the low end of the ion density range the solar cell cover slides charge to from 0 to +5 volts independent of the applied voltage. No discharges are seen at bias voltages as large as -1400 V. At the higher ion densities the cover slide potential begins to fluctuate, and becomes significantly negative. Under these conditions discharges can occur. The threshold bias voltage for discharges decreases with increasing ion density. A condition for discharges emerging from the experimental observations is that the average coverslide potential must be more negative than -4 V. The observations presented suggest that the plasma potential near the array becomes negative before a discharge occurs. This suggests that discharges are driven by an instability in the plasma.

  2. Discharges on a negatively biased solar cell array in a charged-particle environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.

    1985-03-01

    The charging behavior of a negatively biased solar cell array when subjected to a charged particle environment is studied in the ion density range from 200 to 12,000 ions/sq cm with the applied bias range of -500 to -1400 V. The profile of the surface potentials across the array is related to the presence of discharges. At the low end of the ion density range the solar cell cover slides charge to from 0 to +5 volts independent of the applied voltage. No discharges are seen at bias voltages as large as -1400 V. At the higher ion densities the cover slide potential begins to fluctuate, and becomes significantly negative. Under these conditions discharges can occur. The threshold bias voltage for discharges decreases with increasing ion density. A condition for discharges emerging from the experimental observations is that the average coverslide potential must be more negative than -4 V. The observations presented suggest that the plasma potential near the array becomes negative before a discharge occurs. This suggests that discharges are driven by an instability in the plasma.

  3. Gating of single molecule junction conductance by charge transfer complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Grace, Iain; Brooke, Carly; Wang, Kun; Lambert, Colin J.; Xu, Bingqian; Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-11-01

    The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference.The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis of 1c; experimental details of conductance measurements, formation of charge transfer complexes of 1c and 2 in solution; further details of theoretical methods. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04420k

  4. Charge transfer in dissociating iodomethane and fluoromethane molecules ionized by intense femtosecond X-ray pulses

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Rebecca; Erk, Benjamin; Coffee, Ryan; Trippel, Sebastian; Kierspel, Thomas; Bomme, Cédric; Bozek, John D.; Burkett, Mitchell; Carron, Sebastian; Ferguson, Ken R.; Foucar, Lutz; Küpper, Jochen; Marchenko, Tatiana; Miron, Catalin; Patanen, Minna; Osipov, Timur; Schorb, Sebastian; Simon, Marc; Swiggers, Michelle; Techert, Simone; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Bostedt, Christoph; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in dissociating iodomethane and fluoromethane molecules was studied at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser using an ultraviolet-pump, X-ray-probe scheme. The results for both molecules are discussed with respect to the nature of their UV excitation and different chemical properties. Signatures of long-distance intramolecular charge transfer are observed for both species, and a quantitative analysis of its distance dependence in iodomethane is carried out for charge states up to I21+. The reconstructed critical distances for electron transfer are in good agreement with a classical over-the-barrier model and with an earlier experiment employing a near-infrared pump pulse. PMID:27051675

  5. Nanoscale charge transport in cytochrome c3/DNA network: Comparative studies between redox-active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Harumasa; Che, Dock-Chil; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2015-09-01

    The redox-active molecule of a cytochrome c3/DNA network exhibits nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with a threshold bias voltage at low temperature and zero-bias conductance at room temperature. I-V curves for the cytochrome c3/DNA network are well matched with the Coulomb blockade network model. Comparative studies of the Mn12 cluster, cytochrome c, and cytochrome c3, which have a wide variety of redox potentials, indicate no difference in charge transport, which suggests that the conduction mechanism is not directly related to the redox states. The charge transport mechanism has been discussed in terms of the newly-formed electronic energy states near the Fermi level, induced by the ionic interaction between redox-active molecules with the DNA network.

  6. Solution, surface, and single molecule platforms for the study of DNA-mediated charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Muren, Natalie B.; Olmon, Eric D.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    The structural core of DNA, a continuous stack of aromatic heterocycles, the base pairs, which extends down the helical axis, gives rise to the fascinating electronic properties of this molecule that is so critical for life. Our laboratory and others have developed diverse experimental platforms to investigate the capacity of DNA to conduct charge, termed DNA-mediated charge transport (DNA CT). Here, we present an overview of DNA CT experiments in solution, on surfaces, and with single molecules that collectively provide a broad and consistent perspective on the essential characteristics of this chemistry. DNA CT can proceed over long molecular distances but is remarkably sensitive to perturbations in base pair stacking. We discuss how this foundation, built with data from diverse platforms, can be used both to inform a mechanistic description of DNA CT and to inspire the next platforms for its study: living organisms and molecular electronics. PMID:22850865

  7. Charge transfer in dissociating iodomethane and fluoromethane molecules ionized by intense femtosecond X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Boll, Rebecca; Erk, Benjamin; Coffee, Ryan; Trippel, Sebastian; Kierspel, Thomas; Bomme, Cédric; Bozek, John D; Burkett, Mitchell; Carron, Sebastian; Ferguson, Ken R; Foucar, Lutz; Küpper, Jochen; Marchenko, Tatiana; Miron, Catalin; Patanen, Minna; Osipov, Timur; Schorb, Sebastian; Simon, Marc; Swiggers, Michelle; Techert, Simone; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Bostedt, Christoph; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in dissociating iodomethane and fluoromethane molecules was studied at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser using an ultraviolet-pump, X-ray-probe scheme. The results for both molecules are discussed with respect to the nature of their UV excitation and different chemical properties. Signatures of long-distance intramolecular charge transfer are observed for both species, and a quantitative analysis of its distance dependence in iodomethane is carried out for charge states up to I(21+). The reconstructed critical distances for electron transfer are in good agreement with a classical over-the-barrier model and with an earlier experiment employing a near-infrared pump pulse. PMID:27051675

  8. Fixed negative charge and the Donnan effect: a description of the driving forces associated with brain tissue swelling and oedema.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Benjamin S; Shaik, Mohammed A; Morrison, Barclay

    2010-02-13

    Cerebral oedema or brain tissue swelling is a significant complication following traumatic brain injury or stroke that can increase the intracranial pressure (ICP) and impair blood flow. Here, we have identified a potential driver of oedema: the negatively charged molecules fixed within cells. This fixed charge density (FCD), once exposed, could increase ICP through the Donnan effect. We have shown that metabolic processes and membrane integrity are required for concealing this FCD as slices of rat cortex swelled immediately (within 30 min) following dissection if treated with 2 deoxyglucose + cyanide (2DG+CN) or Triton X-100. Slices given ample oxygen and glucose, however, did not swell significantly. We also found that dead brain tissue swells and shrinks in response to changes in ionic strength of the bathing medium, which suggests that the Donnan effect is capable of pressurizing and swelling brain tissue. As predicted, a non-ionic osmolyte, 1,2 propanediol, elicited no volume change at 2000 x 10(-3) osmoles l(-1) (Osm). Swelling data were well described by triphasic mixture theory with the calculated reference state FCD similar to that measured with a 1,9 dimethylmethylene blue assay. Taken together, these data suggest that intracellular fixed charges may contribute to the driving forces responsible for brain swelling. PMID:20047940

  9. Probing Dynamics from Within in Negative Ions, Neutral Molecules and van der Waals Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrah, Nora

    2006-05-01

    We have investigated with unprecedented levels of detail, processes and phenomena involving photodetachment of negative ions and photoionization of molecules and van der Waals clusters using the brightness, spectral resolution, tunability and polarization of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Photodetachment of negative ions exhibit structure and processes differing substantially from corresponding processes in neutral and positive ions, owing to the dominance of correlation in both the initial and final states. We will report on investigations carried out in inner-valence CN^- molecules giving rise to absolute double photodetachment cross sections as well as on fragmentation of negative ions clusters. We will also present absolute inner-shell photodetachment of atoms leading to multi-Auger decay [1] and discuss threshold laws [2] and PCI effects [3]. The measurements were conducted using collinear photon-ion spectroscopy. The evolution of inner-shell photoionization of clusters, as a function of photon energy, will be presented and compared to analogous measurements in atoms. The measurements were conducted using angle resolved two-dimensional photoelectron spectroscopy. Molecular fragmentation results using an ion imaging detector will briefly be presented. [1] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, G. D. Ackerman, N. D. Gibson, C. W.Walter, A. Aguilar, G. Turri, I. Dumitriu and N. Berrah, PRA 72, 050701(R), 2005. [2] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, N. D. Gibson, C. W. Walter, G. D. Ackerman, I. Dumitriu, and N. Berrah, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 083001 (2005). [3] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, A. Agular, G. D. Ackerman, and N. Berrah, (in press PRA brief report).

  10. Characteristics of EMI generated by negative metal-positive dielectric voltage stresses due to spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaky, R. C.; Inouye, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    Charging of spacecraft surfaces by the environmental plasma can result in differential potentials between metallic structure and adjacent dielectric surfaces in which the relative polarity of the voltage stress is either negative dielectric/positive metal or negative metal/positive dielectric. Negative metal/positive dielectric is a stress condition that may arise if relatively large areas of spacecraft surface metals are shadowed from solar UV and/or if the UV intensity is reduced as in the situation in which the spacecraft is entering into or leaving eclipse. The results of experimental studies of negative metal/positive dielectric systems are given. Information is given on: enhanced electron emission I-V curves; e(3) corona noise vs e(3) steady-state current; the localized nature of e(3) and negative metal arc discharge currents; negative metal arc discharges at stress thresholds below 1 kilovolt; negative metal arc discharge characteristics; dependence of blowoff arc discharge current on spacecraft capacitance to space (linear dimension); and damage to second surface mirrors due to negative metal arcs.

  11. Characteristics of EMI generated by negative metal-positive dielectric voltage stresses due to spacecraft charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaky, R. C.; Inouye, G. T.

    1985-03-01

    Charging of spacecraft surfaces by the environmental plasma can result in differential potentials between metallic structure and adjacent dielectric surfaces in which the relative polarity of the voltage stress is either negative dielectric/positive metal or negative metal/positive dielectric. Negative metal/positive dielectric is a stress condition that may arise if relatively large areas of spacecraft surface metals are shadowed from solar UV and/or if the UV intensity is reduced as in the situation in which the spacecraft is entering into or leaving eclipse. The results of experimental studies of negative metal/positive dielectric systems are given. Information is given on: enhanced electron emission I-V curves; e(3) corona noise vs e(3) steady-state current; the localized nature of e(3) and negative metal arc discharge currents; negative metal arc discharges at stress thresholds below 1 kilovolt; negative metal arc discharge characteristics; dependence of blowoff arc discharge current on spacecraft capacitance to space (linear dimension); and damage to second surface mirrors due to negative metal arcs.

  12. Field-induced conductance switching by charge-state alternation in organometallic single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Florian; Kastlunger, Georg; Lissel, Franziska; Egler-Lucas, Carolina; Semenov, Sergey N.; Venkatesan, Koushik; Berke, Heinz; Stadler, Robert; Lörtscher, Emanuel

    2016-02-01

    Charge transport through single molecules can be influenced by the charge and spin states of redox-active metal centres placed in the transport pathway. These intrinsic properties are usually manipulated by varying the molecule's electrochemical and magnetic environment, a procedure that requires complex setups with multiple terminals. Here we show that oxidation and reduction of organometallic compounds containing either Fe, Ru or Mo centres can solely be triggered by the electric field applied to a two-terminal molecular junction. Whereas all compounds exhibit bias-dependent hysteresis, the Mo-containing compound additionally shows an abrupt voltage-induced conductance switching, yielding high-to-low current ratios exceeding 1,000 at bias voltages of less than 1.0 V. Density functional theory calculations identify a localized, redox-active molecular orbital that is weakly coupled to the electrodes and closely aligned with the Fermi energy of the leads because of the spin-polarized ground state unique to the Mo centre. This situation provides an additional slow and incoherent hopping channel for transport, triggering a transient charging effect in the entire molecule with a strong hysteresis and large high-to-low current ratios.

  13. Field-induced conductance switching by charge-state alternation in organometallic single-molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Florian; Kastlunger, Georg; Lissel, Franziska; Egler-Lucas, Carolina; Semenov, Sergey N; Venkatesan, Koushik; Berke, Heinz; Stadler, Robert; Lörtscher, Emanuel

    2016-02-01

    Charge transport through single molecules can be influenced by the charge and spin states of redox-active metal centres placed in the transport pathway. These intrinsic properties are usually manipulated by varying the molecule's electrochemical and magnetic environment, a procedure that requires complex setups with multiple terminals. Here we show that oxidation and reduction of organometallic compounds containing either Fe, Ru or Mo centres can solely be triggered by the electric field applied to a two-terminal molecular junction. Whereas all compounds exhibit bias-dependent hysteresis, the Mo-containing compound additionally shows an abrupt voltage-induced conductance switching, yielding high-to-low current ratios exceeding 1,000 at bias voltages of less than 1.0 V. Density functional theory calculations identify a localized, redox-active molecular orbital that is weakly coupled to the electrodes and closely aligned with the Fermi energy of the leads because of the spin-polarized ground state unique to the Mo centre. This situation provides an additional slow and incoherent hopping channel for transport, triggering a transient charging effect in the entire molecule with a strong hysteresis and large high-to-low current ratios. PMID:26571004

  14. Anomalous charge and negative-charge-transfer insulating state in cuprate chain compound KCuO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Rivero, P.; Meyers, D.; Liu, X.; Cao, Y.; Middey, S.; Whitaker, M. J.; Barraza-Lopez, S.; Freeland, J. W.; Greenblatt, M.; Chakhalian, J.

    2015-11-01

    Using a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments and first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that insulating KCuO2 contains Cu in an unusually high formal 3+ valence state, and the ligand-to-metal (O-to-Cu) charge-transfer energy is intriguingly negative (Δ ˜-1.5 eV) and has a dominant (˜60 % ) ligand-hole character in the ground state akin to the high Tc cuprate Zhang-Rice state. Unlike most other formal Cu3 + compounds, the Cu 2 p XAS spectra of KCuO2 exhibit pronounced 3 d8 (Cu3 +) multiplet structures, which account for ˜40 % of its ground state wave function. Ab initio calculations elucidate the origin of the band gap in KCuO2 as arising primarily from strong intracluster Cu 3 d -O 2 p hybridizations (tpd); the value of the band gap decreases with a reduced value of tpd. Further, unlike conventional negative-charge-transfer insulators, the band gap in KCuO2 persists even for vanishing values of Coulomb repulsion U , underscoring the importance of single-particle band-structure effects connected to the one-dimensional nature of the compound.

  15. Distance dependent rates of photoinduced charge separation and dark charge recombination in fixed distance porphyrin-quinone molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Niemczyk, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    Three zinc tetraphenylporphyrin-anthraquinone derivatives were prepared in which the edge-to-edge distances between the porphyrin and quinone ..pi.. systems are fixed by a rigid hydrocarbon spacer molecule. Triptycene, trans-1,2-diphenylcyclopentane, and adamantane were used to fix the porphyrin-anthraquinone distance at 2.5, 3.7, and 4.9 A, respectively. These molecules possess 1,2, and 3 saturated carbon atoms, respectively, between the porphyrin donor and the quinone acceptor. Rate constants for photoinduced electron transfer from the lowest excited singlet state of the zinc tetraphenylporphyrin donor to the anthraquinone acceptor were measured. In addition, the corresponding radical ion pair recombination rate constants for each of these molecules were also determined. The rate constants for both photoinduced charge separation and subsequent radical ion pair recombination decrease by approximately a factor of 10 for each saturated carbon atom intervening between the porphyrin donor and the quinone acceptor. These results are consistent with a model in which the rate of electron transfer is determined by weak mixing of the sigma orbitals of the saturated hydrocarbon spacer with the ..pi.. orbitals of the donor and acceptor. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Charge moment change and lightning-driven electric fields associated with negative sprites and halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingbo; Cummer, Steven; Lu, Gaopeng; Zigoneanu, Lucian

    2012-09-01

    Sprites are structured high altitude optical emissions produced by lightning-driven electric fields. Both strong positive and negative cloud to ground flashes (CGs) are capable of initiating sprites. However, reported sprites are almost exclusively produced by +CGs. The very limited number of negative polarity sprites makes it difficult to reveal their morphologies and mechanisms. Since 2008, we have operated low light cameras at 5 locations in the United States to detect lightning-driven transient luminous events (TLEs). At Duke University, two pairs of magnetic sensors simultaneously record lightning-radiated magnetic fields. During 4 years of observations, the low light cameras collectively captured 1651 sprite events. Among them, 6 were produced by -CG lightning, which was confirmed by both the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and magnetic field measurements. All of these negative sprites show similar features in their morphology, lightning source current, and lightning-driven ambient electric fields. They all initiate within a few ms from their parent lightning discharges and always are accompanied by sprite halos. Compared to positive sprites, the downward streamers in negative sprites terminate at higher altitudes, about 55-60 km. The extracted source current of their parent lightning discharges is very impulsive and produces at least 450 C km charge moment change in 0.5 ms or less. Unlike most +CG strokes, essentially no continuing current follows these -CGs. Thus the uniformity of negative sprite morphology appears to reflect the uniformity of the characteristics of high charge transfer negative strokes. Numerical simulation shows these impulsive source currents produce very high (>2 Ek, where Ek is the local air breakdown field) but short-lived electric fields at halo altitudes between 70 km and 90 km. At streamer termination altitudes, the inferred background electric field is 0.2-0.3 Ek, which is close to but below the critical field (0.4 Ek

  17. Link between hopping models and percolation scaling laws for charge transport in mixtures of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Dong-Gwang; Kim, Jang-Joo; Baldo, Marc A.

    2016-04-01

    Mixed host compositions that combine charge transport materials with luminescent dyes offer superior control over exciton formation and charge transport in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). Two approaches are typically used to optimize the fraction of charge transport materials in a mixed host composition: either an empirical percolative model, or a hopping transport model. We show that these two commonly-employed models are linked by an analytic expression which relates the localization length to the percolation threshold and critical exponent. The relation is confirmed both numerically and experimentally through measurements of the relative conductivity of Tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl)amine (TCTA) :1,3-bis(3,5-dipyrid-3-yl-phenyl)benzene (BmPyPb) mixtures with different concentrations, where the TCTA plays a role as hole conductor and the BmPyPb as hole insulator. The analytic relation may allow the rational design of mixed layers of small molecules for high-performance OLEDs.

  18. Trapped water molecule in the charge separation of a bacterial reaction center.

    PubMed

    Ivashin, Nikolai; Larsson, Sven

    2008-09-25

    Low-frequency oscillations in the absorption spectrum at 1020 nm, connected to the primary charge separation process in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, have been shown by Yakovlev et al. to be caused by rotational motion of an interstitial water molecule called "water-A". The same water molecule was shown by Potter et al. to increase the rate of charge separation by a factor of 8. We have carried out geometry optimization of water-A and its nearest atoms in the protein pocket, using density functional theory (DFT). There are strong hydrogen bonds to the axial imidazol group of the B part of the special pair (P=PAPB) and to the keto carbonyl group of ring V of the accessory chlorophyll (BA). Rotation of water-A is thus impossible in the electronic ground state. We have tried to support our speculations on other possible mechanisms by calculations. The P(+)BA(-) charge transfer state is stabilized by proton transfer from water-A and simultaneous proton transfer from the axial group of PB to water-A. After double proton transfer the hydrogen bond to the keto group disappears whereby a possibility opens up for almost free water rotation. The results therefore would explain the 32 cm(-1) oscillation of Yakovlev et al. The proposed mechanism assumes, however, that the general assumption that the activation energy disappears in the primary charge separation of bacterial photosynthesis, holds also for this special case. PMID:18761433

  19. Anisotropic charge transport in large single crystals of π-conjugated organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Wael; Rahimi, Khosrow; Botiz, Ioan; Koch, Felix Peter Vinzenz; Reiter, Günter; Lienerth, Peter; Heiser, Thomas; Bubendorff, Jean-Luc; Simon, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    The electronic properties of organic semiconductors depend strongly on the nature of the molecules, their conjugation and conformation, their mutual distance and the orientation between adjacent molecules. Variations of intramolecular distances and conformation disturb the conjugation and perturb the delocalization of charges. As a result, the mobility considerably decreases compared to that of a covalently well-organized crystal. Here, we present electrical characterization of large single crystals made of the regioregular octamer of 3-hexyl-thiophene (3HT)8 using a conductive-atomic force microscope (C-AFM) in air. We find a large anisotropy in the conduction with charge mobility values depending on the crystallographic orientation of the single crystal. The smaller conduction is in the direction of π-π stacking (along the long axis of the single crystal) with a mobility value in the order of 10(-3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and the larger one is along the molecular axis (in the direction normal to the single crystal surface) with a mobility value in the order of 0.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The measured current-voltage (I-V) curves showed that along the molecular axis, the current followed an exponential dependence corresponding to an injection mode. In the π-π stacking direction, the current exhibits a space charge limited current (SCLC) behavior, which allows us to estimate the charge carrier mobility. PMID:24658783

  20. Tuning Charge and Correlation Effects for a Single Molecule on a Graphene Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Lu, Jiong; Lischner, Johannes; Omrani, Arash A.; Riss, Alexander; Karrasch, Christoph; Jung, Han Sae; Khajeh, Ramin; Wong, Dillon; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Michael F.

    Controlling electronic devices down to the single molecule level is a grand challenge of nanotechnology. Single-molecules have been integrated into devices capable of tuning electronic response, but a drawback for these systems is that their microscopic structure remains unknown due to inability to image molecules in the junction region. Here we present a combined STM and nc-AFM study demonstrating gate-tunable control of the charge state of individual F4TCNQ molecules at the surface of a graphene field effect transistor. This is different from previous studies in that the Fermi level of the substrate was continuously tuned across the molecular orbital energy level. Using STS we have determined the resulting energy level evolution of the LUMO, its associated vibronic modes, and the graphene Dirac point (ED). We show that the energy difference between ED and the LUMO increases as EF is moved away from ED due to electron-electron interactions that renormalize the molecular quasiparticle energy. This is attributed to gate-tunable image-charge screening in graphene and corroborated by ab initio calculations.

  1. Long-range charge transport in single G-quadruplex DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livshits, Gideon I.; Stern, Avigail; Rotem, Dvir; Borovok, Natalia; Eidelshtein, Gennady; Migliore, Agostino; Penzo, Erika; Wind, Shalom J.; di Felice, Rosa; Skourtis, Spiros S.; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Gurevich, Leonid; Kotlyar, Alexander B.; Porath, Danny

    2014-12-01

    DNA and DNA-based polymers are of interest in molecular electronics because of their versatile and programmable structures. However, transport measurements have produced a range of seemingly contradictory results due to differences in the measured molecules and experimental set-ups, and transporting significant current through individual DNA-based molecules remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report reproducible charge transport in guanine-quadruplex (G4) DNA molecules adsorbed on a mica substrate. Currents ranging from tens of picoamperes to more than 100 pA were measured in the G4-DNA over distances ranging from tens of nanometres to more than 100 nm. Our experimental results, combined with theoretical modelling, suggest that transport occurs via a thermally activated long-range hopping between multi-tetrad segments of DNA. These results could re-ignite interest in DNA-based wires and devices, and in the use of such systems in the development of programmable circuits.

  2. Time-resolved spectroscopy of charge-transfer fluorescent molecules in polymer matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstraat, Johannes W.; Verhey, H. J.; Verhoeven, Jan W.; Kuemke, M.; McGown, Linda B.; Novikov, Eugene G.; van Hoek, Arie; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.

    1996-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence measurements have been carried out on charge-transfer fluorescent molecules incorporated in polymeric lattices, consisting of polystyrene cores and polyglycidylmethacrylate shells, and in polymethylmethacrylate thin films. New approaches to the analysis of fluorescence lifetime data obtained for molecules in polymer matrices had to be applied, since conventional analysis methods appeared not suitable for such strongly heterogeneous systems. The polymer lattices could be characterized by application of phase- resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements followed by maximum-entropy methods for data analysis. The thin films were studied using time-correlated single photon counting fluorescence lifetime measurements and data analysis with a home-built program based on stretched exponential decays. Interactions of the fluorescent guest molecules could be established by combined fluorescence lifetime and depolarization measurements. Suggestions for further improvements in fluorescence lifetime methods for characterization of polymeric materials have been made.

  3. Isotope-Resolved and Charge-Sensitive Force Imaging Using Scanned Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Rastawicki, Dominik; Liu, Yang; Mar, Warren; Manoharan, Hari; Miglio, Anna; Melinte, Sorin; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; He, Lianhua; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Aihui

    Originally conceived as surface imaging instruments, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) and the atomic force microscope (AFM) were recently used to probe molecular chemical bonds with exquisite sensitivity. Remarkably, molecule-functionalized scanning tips can also provide direct access to the inelastic electron tunneling spectrum (IETS) of the terminal molecule. Here we report atomic manipulation experiments addressing carbon monoxide (CO) isotopes at low temperatures. The unique and quantifiable dependence of the CO vibrational modes offers insight into tip-controlled force and charge sensing of surface adsorbates, subsurface defects, and quantum nanostructures. The specific behavior of the monitored vibrational modes originates from the interplay of interaction forces between the top electrode--a scanned tip functionalized with a single molecule--and the atomic scale force field surrounding the target atomically-assembled nanostructure. We also present density functional theory (DFT) computations that have been performed in order to scrutinize and visualize the vibrational spectroscopic fingerprints and local force fields.

  4. Catalytic Water Oxidation by Ruthenium Complexes Containing Negatively Charged Ligand Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Kärkäs, Markus D; Åkermark, Björn

    2016-04-01

    Artificial photosynthesis represents an attractive way of converting solar energy into storable chemical energy. The H2O oxidation half-reaction, which is essential for producing the necessary reduction equivalents, is an energy-demanding transformation associated with a high kinetic barrier. Herein we present a couple of efficient Ru-based catalysts capable of mediating this four-proton-four-electron oxidation. We have focused on the incorporation of negatively charged ligands, such as carboxylate, phenol, and imidazole, into the catalysts to decrease the redox potentials. This account describes our work in designing Ru catalysts based on this idea. The presence of the negatively charged ligands is crucial for stabilizing the metal centers, allowing for light-driven H2O oxidation. Mechanistic details associated with the designed catalysts are also presented. PMID:26991306

  5. Equilibrium negative-charge fractions in swift proton beams emerging from freshly evaporated metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, D. P.; de Castro Faria, N. V.; Freire, F. L., Jr.; Kirsch, R.; de Pinho, A. G.

    1988-05-01

    The equilibrium fraction of negative ions in a beam of proton or deuteron projectiles (0.2-3.5 MeV/u) which have penetrated thin metallic targets has been measured for the first time. Pure beryllium, copper, and gold were evaporated in situ on the exit surface of carbon foils. In this energy interval the equilibrium fractions depend strongly on the atomic number of the last surface layers. The measured equilibrium fractions are compared with those obtained with carbon foils and noble gases, and it is shown that they can be interpreted considering the solid to be a dense atomic gas. Even some subtle details of the atomic charge-changing cross sections become transparent in the solid equilibrium negative-charge fractions.

  6. Optimizing charge neutralization for a magnetic sector SIMS instrument in negative mode

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovarov, Alexander L.; Guryanov, Georgiy M.

    2012-07-15

    Successful self-adjusted charge compensation was demonstrated for a CAMECA magnetic-sector secondary ion mass spectrometer applied in negative mode. Operation with the normal-incidence electron gun (NEG) potential positively biased relative to a sample potential enables substantial broadening of the Cs primary-ion-current density range available for analysis of insulators. The decrease of the negative NEG potential by 30 V allows the highest value of primary current density used for the analysis of a silica sample to increase by a factor of more than 6. By applying the improved charge neutralization technique, accurate Na depth profiles for SiO{sub 2} samples were obtained within detection limits of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 3}.

  7. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A.; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Midttun, Øystein

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  8. Properties of clusters in the gas phase. V - Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, R. G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ion-molecules association reactions of the form A(-)(B)n-1 + B = A(-)(B)n were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), and NO2(-) with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO2(-) and SO3(-) with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), NO2(-), CO3(-), and SO3(-) with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions.

  9. Evaluating the Effect of Ionic Strength on Duplex Stability for PNA Having Negatively or Positively Charged Side Chains

    PubMed Central

    De Costa, N. Tilani S.; Heemstra, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    The enhanced thermodynamic stability of PNA:DNA and PNA:RNA duplexes compared with DNA:DNA and DNA:RNA duplexes has been attributed in part to the lack of electrostatic repulsion between the uncharged PNA backbone and negatively charged DNA or RNA backbone. However, there are no previously reported studies that systematically evaluate the effect of ionic strength on duplex stability for PNA having a charged backbone. Here we investigate the role of charge repulsion in PNA binding by synthesizing PNA strands having negatively or positively charged side chains, then measuring their duplex stability with DNA or RNA at varying salt concentrations. At low salt concentrations, positively charged PNA binds more strongly to DNA and RNA than does negatively charged PNA. However, at medium to high salt concentrations, this trend is reversed, and negatively charged PNA shows higher affinity for DNA and RNA than does positively charged PNA. These results show that charge screening by counterions in solution enables negatively charged side chains to be incorporated into the PNA backbone without reducing duplex stability with DNA and RNA. This research provides new insight into the role of electrostatics in PNA binding, and demonstrates that introduction of negatively charged side chains is not significantly detrimental to PNA binding affinity at physiological ionic strength. The ability to incorporate negative charge without sacrificing binding affinity is anticipated to enable the development of PNA therapeutics that take advantage of both the inherent benefits of PNA and the multitude of charge-based delivery technologies currently being developed for DNA and RNA. PMID:23484047

  10. Evaluating the effect of ionic strength on duplex stability for PNA having negatively or positively charged side chains.

    PubMed

    De Costa, N Tilani S; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2013-01-01

    The enhanced thermodynamic stability of PNA:DNA and PNA:RNA duplexes compared with DNA:DNA and DNA:RNA duplexes has been attributed in part to the lack of electrostatic repulsion between the uncharged PNA backbone and negatively charged DNA or RNA backbone. However, there are no previously reported studies that systematically evaluate the effect of ionic strength on duplex stability for PNA having a charged backbone. Here we investigate the role of charge repulsion in PNA binding by synthesizing PNA strands having negatively or positively charged side chains, then measuring their duplex stability with DNA or RNA at varying salt concentrations. At low salt concentrations, positively charged PNA binds more strongly to DNA and RNA than does negatively charged PNA. However, at medium to high salt concentrations, this trend is reversed, and negatively charged PNA shows higher affinity for DNA and RNA than does positively charged PNA. These results show that charge screening by counterions in solution enables negatively charged side chains to be incorporated into the PNA backbone without reducing duplex stability with DNA and RNA. This research provides new insight into the role of electrostatics in PNA binding, and demonstrates that introduction of negatively charged side chains is not significantly detrimental to PNA binding affinity at physiological ionic strength. The ability to incorporate negative charge without sacrificing binding affinity is anticipated to enable the development of PNA therapeutics that take advantage of both the inherent benefits of PNA and the multitude of charge-based delivery technologies currently being developed for DNA and RNA. PMID:23484047

  11. Excited states and valley effects in a negatively charged impurity in a silicon FinFET.

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenberg, Lloyd; Klimeck, Gerhard; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Rahman, Rajib; Muller, Richard Partain; Rogge, Sven; Verduijn, Arjan; Lansbergen, Gabriel

    2010-07-01

    The observation and characterization of a single atom system in silicon is a significant landmark in half a century of device miniaturization, and presents an important new laboratory for fundamental quantum and atomic physics. We compare with multi-million atom tight binding (TB) calculations the measurements of the spectrum of a single two-electron (2e) atom system in silicon - a negatively charged (D-) gated Arsenic donor in a FinFET. The TB method captures accurate single electron eigenstates of the device taking into account device geometry, donor potentials, applied fields, interfaces, and the full host bandstructure. In a previous work, the depths and fields of As donors in six device samples were established through excited state spectroscopy of the D0 electron and comparison with TB calculations. Using self-consistent field (SCF) TB, we computed the charging energies of the D- electron for the same six device samples, and found good agreement with the measurements. Although a bulk donor has only a bound singlet ground state and a charging energy of about 40 meV, calculations show that a gated donor near an interface can have a reduced charging energy and bound excited states in the D- spectrum. Measurements indeed reveal reduced charging energies and bound 2e excited states, at least one of which is a triplet. The calculations also show the influence of the host valley physics in the two-electron spectrum of the donor.

  12. An experimental test of the discreteness-of-charge effect in positive and negative lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Winiski, A P; McLaughlin, A C; McDaniel, R V; Eisenberg, M; McLaughlin, S

    1986-12-16

    The electrostatic properties of charged bilayers and the bilayer component of biological membranes are often described theoretically by assuming the charge is smeared uniformly over the surface. This is one of the fundamental assumptions in the Gouy-Chapman-Stern (GCS) theory. However, the average distance between the charged phospholipids in a typical biological membrane is 2-3 nm, which is 2-3 times the Debye length in a 0.1 M salt solution. Existing discreteness-of-charge theories predict significant deviations from the GCS theory for the adsorption of ions to such membranes. We considered the predictions of the simplest discreteness-of-charge theory [Nelson, A. P., & McQuarrie, D. A. (1975) J. Theor. Biol. 55, 13-27], in which the charges are assumed to be fixed in a square lattice and the potential is described by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann relation. This theory predicts deviations that are larger for counterions than for co-ions and much larger for divalent than for monovalent counterions. We tested these predictions by measuring the adsorption of a fluorescent monovalent anion and a paramagnetic divalent cation to both positive and negative membranes, which we demonstrated experimentally had the same average surface potential. All our experimental results with probes, including those obtained on membranes in the gel rather than in the liquid-crystalline state, agreed with the predictions of the GCS theory rather than with the discreteness-of-charge theory. A simple calculation indicates that the agreement between the experimental results and the predictions of the GCS theory could be due to the finite size of the lipids. PMID:3814579

  13. Imaging charge and energy transfer in molecules using free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, Artem

    2014-05-01

    Charge and energy transfer reactions drive numerous important processes in physics, chemistry and biology, with applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics. Experimentally, the central goal in studies of transfer phenomena is to trace the spatial localization of charge at a given time. Because of their element and site sensitivity, ultrafast X-rays provide a promising tool to address this goal. In this talk I will discuss several experiments where free-electron lasers were employed to study charge and energy transfer dynamics in fragmenting molecules. In a first example, we used intense, 70 femtosecond 1.5 keV pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study distance dependence of electron transfer in laser-dissociated methyl iodide molecules. Inducing well-localized positive charge on the heavy iodine atom, we observe signature of electron transition from the separated methyl group up to the distances of 35 atomic units. In a complementary experiment, we studied charge exchange between two partners in a dissociating molecular iodine employing a pump-probe arrangement with two identical 90 eV pulses from the Free-Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). In both cases, the effective spatial range of the electron transfer can be reasonably described by a classical over-the-barrier model developed for ion-atom collisions. Finally, I will discuss a time-resolved measurement on non-local relaxation mechanism based on a long-range energy transfer, the so-called interatomic Coulombic decay. This work was supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy and by the Kansas NSF ``First Award'' program.

  14. Single Molecule Spectroelectrochemistry of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics In Hybrid Organic Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Shanlin

    2014-11-16

    Our research under support of this DOE grant is focused on applied and fundamental aspects of model organic solar cell systems. Major accomplishments are: 1) we developed a spectroelectorchemistry technique of single molecule single nanoparticle method to study charge transfer between conjugated polymers and semiconductor at the single molecule level. The fluorescence of individual fluorescent polymers at semiconductor surfaces was shown to exhibit blinking behavior compared to molecules on glass substrates. Single molecule fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements showed the conformation of the polymer molecules did not differ appreciably between glass and semiconductor substrates. The similarities in molecular conformation suggest that the observed differences in blinking activity are due to charge transfer between fluorescent polymer and semiconductor, which provides additional pathways between states of high and low fluorescence quantum efficiency. Similar spectroelectrochemistry work has been done for small organic dyes for understand their charge transfer dynamics on various substrates and electrochemical environments; 2) We developed a method of transferring semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets into organic solvent for a potential electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells which employed polymer semiconductor as the electron donor. Electron transfer from the polymer semiconductor to semiconductor and GO in solutions and thin films was established through fluorescence spectroscopy and electroluminescence measurements. Solar cells containing these materials were constructed and evaluated using transient absorption spectroscopy and dynamic fluorescence techniques to understand the charge carrier generation and recombination events; 3) We invented a spectroelectorchemistry technique using light scattering and electroluminescence for rapid size determination and studying electrochemistry of single NPs in an

  15. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment. PMID:27486044

  16. Preparation and characterization of negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingguo; Crossley, Alison; Czernuszka, Jan

    2009-07-01

    Negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres encapsulated with hydrophilic drugs have been successfully prepared by a solid-in-oil-in-water (s/o/w) solvent evaporation method in the presence of anionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DSS), and nonionic surfactant polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The effects of microencapsulation methods, surfactants types, and surfactant concentrations on the properties of microspheres were studied. Amoxicillin (AMX) was chosen as a hydrophilic model drug, and its encapsulation efficiency (EE) and in vitro release profiles were measured. The s/o/w method achieved higher EE of 40% in PLGA microspheres using surfactant SDS compared with the conventional water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) method (about 2%). Triphasic release profiles were observed for all PLGA microspheres (s/o/w) with slight drug burst, a slow diffusion-controlled release within the period of about 7 days and followed by the degradation-controlled sustained release for further 30 days. Smaller particle size and surface charge were achieved for s/o/w method than w/o/w method using the same anionic surfactants, and smooth surface and less porous interior matrix. The s/o/w method effectively encapsulated AMX into anionic PLGA microspheres using anionic surfactants, and these negatively charged PLGA microspheres represented an attractive approach for the controlled release of hydrophilic drugs. PMID:19009589

  17. Intermolecular interactions, charge-density distribution and the electrostatic properties of pyrazinamide anti-TB drug molecule: an experimental and theoretical charge-density study.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, Gnanasekaran; Hathwar, Venkatesha R; Kumaradhas, Poomani

    2014-06-01

    An experimental charge-density analysis of pyrazinamide (a first line antitubercular drug) was performed using high-resolution X-ray diffraction data [(sin θ/λ)max = 1.1 Å(-1)] measured at 100 (2) K. The structure was solved by direct methods using SHELXS97 and refined by SHELXL97. The total electron density of the pyrazinamide molecule was modeled using the Hansen-Coppens multipole formalism implemented in the XD software. The topological properties of electron density determined from the experiment were compared with the theoretical results obtained from CRYSTAL09 at the B3LYP/6-31G** level of theory. The crystal structure was stabilized by N-H...N and N-H...O hydrogen bonds, in which the N3-H3B...N1 and N3-H3A...O1 interactions form two types of dimers in the crystal. Hirshfeld surface analysis was carried out to analyze the intermolecular interactions. The fingerprint plot reveals that the N...H and O...H hydrogen-bonding interactions contribute 26.1 and 18.4%, respectively, of the total Hirshfeld surface. The lattice energy of the molecule was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP) methods with the 6-31G** basis set. The molecular electrostatic potential of the pyrazinamide molecule exhibits extended electronegative regions around O1, N1 and N2. The existence of a negative electrostatic potential (ESP) region just above the upper and lower surfaces of the pyrazine ring confirm the π-electron cloud. PMID:24892603

  18. Charge transfer through amino groups-small molecules interface improving the performance of electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havare, Ali Kemal; Can, Mustafa; Tozlu, Cem; Kus, Mahmut; Okur, Salih; Demic, Şerafettin; Demirak, Kadir; Kurt, Mustafa; Icli, Sıddık

    2016-05-01

    A carboxylic group functioned charge transporting was synthesized and self-assembled on an indium tin oxide (ITO) anode. A typical electroluminescent device [modified ITO/TPD (50 nm)/Alq3 (60 nm)/LiF (2 nm)/(120 nm)] was fabricated to investigate the effect of the amino groups-small molecules interface on the characteristics of the device. The increase in the surface work function of ITO is expected to facilitate the hole injection from the ITO anode to the Hole Transport Layer (HTL) in electroluminescence. The modified electroluminescent device could endure a higher current and showed a much higher luminance than the nonmodified one. For the produced electroluminescent devices, the I-V characteristics, optical characterization and quantum yields were performed. The external quantum efficiency of the modified electroluminescent device is improved as the result of the presence of the amino groups-small molecules interface.

  19. Effects of Surfactants and Polyelectrolytes on the Interaction between a Negatively Charged Surface and a Hydrophobic Polymer Surface.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Michael V; Donaldson, Stephen H; Gebbie, Matthew A; Gizaw, Yonas; Koenig, Peter; Roiter, Yuri; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-07-28

    We have measured and characterized how three classes of surface-active molecules self-assemble at, and modulate the interfacial forces between, a negatively charged mica surface and a hydrophobic end-grafted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer surface in solution. We provide a broad overview of how chemical and structural properties of surfactant molecules result in different self-assembled structures at polymer and mineral surfaces, by studying three characteristic surfactants: (1) an anionic aliphatic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), (2) a cationic aliphatic surfactant, myristyltrimethylammonium bromide (MTAB), and (3) a silicone polyelectrolyte with a long-chain PDMS midblock and multiple cationic end groups. Through surface forces apparatus measurements, we show that the separate addition of three surfactants can result in interaction energies ranging from fully attractive to fully repulsive. Specifically, SDS adsorbs at the PDMS surface as a monolayer and modifies the monotonic electrostatic repulsion to a mica surface. MTAB adsorbs at both the PDMS (as a monolayer) and the mica surface (as a monolayer or bilayer), resulting in concentration-dependent interactions, including a long-range electrostatic repulsion, a short-range steric hydration repulsion, and a short-range hydrophobic attraction. The cationic polyelectrolyte adsorbs as a monolayer on the PDMS and causes a long-range electrostatic attraction to mica, which can be modulated to a monotonic repulsion upon further addition of SDS. Therefore, through judicious selection of surfactants, we show how to modify the magnitude and sign of the interaction energy at different separation distances between hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, which govern the static and kinetic stability of colloidal dispersions. Additionally, we demonstrate how the charge density of silicone polyelectrolytes modifies both their self-assembly at polymer interfaces and the robust adhesion of thin PDMS films to target

  20. Charged Nonclassical Antifolates with Activity Against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Scocchera, Eric; Reeve, Stephanie M; Keshipeddy, Santosh; Lombardo, Michael N; Hajian, Behnoush; Sochia, Adrienne E; Alverson, Jeremy B; Priestley, Nigel D; Anderson, Amy C; Wright, Dennis L

    2016-07-14

    Although classical, negatively charged antifolates such as methotrexate possess high affinity for the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) enzyme, they are unable to penetrate the bacterial cell wall, rendering them poor antibacterial agents. Herein, we report a new class of charged propargyl-linked antifolates that capture some of the key contacts common to the classical antifolates while maintaining the ability to passively diffuse across the bacterial cell wall. Eight synthesized compounds exhibit extraordinary potency against Gram-positive S. aureus with limited toxicity against mammalian cells and good metabolic profile. High resolution crystal structures of two of the compounds reveal extensive interactions between the carboxylate and active site residues through a highly organized water network. PMID:27437079

  1. Comprehensive approach to intrinsic charge carrier mobility in conjugated organic molecules, macromolecules, and supramolecular architectures.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Akinori; Koizumi, Yoshiko; Aida, Takuzo; Seki, Shu

    2012-08-21

    (-1) s(-1), based on a combination of flash-photolysis TRMC and transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) measurements. Single-crystal rubrene showed an ambipolarity with anisotropic charge carrier transport along each crystal axis on the nanometer scale. Finally, we describe the charge carrier mobility of a self-assembled nanotube consisting of a large π-plane of hexabenzocoronene (HBC) partially appended with an electron acceptor. The local (intratubular) charge carrier mobility reached 3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for the nanotubes that possessed well-ordered π-stacking, but it dropped to 0.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in regions that contained greater amounts of the electron acceptor because those molecules reduced the structural integrity of π-stacked HBC arrays. Interestingly, the long-range (intertubular) charge carrier mobility was on the order of 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and monotonically decreased when the acceptor content was increased. These results suggest the importance of investigating charge carrier mobilities by frequency-dependent charge carrier motion for the development of more efficient organic electronic devices. PMID:22676381

  2. Charged Molecules Modulate the Volume Exclusion Effects Exerted by Crowders on FtsZ Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Monterroso, Begoña; Reija, Belén; Jiménez, Mercedes; Zorrilla, Silvia; Rivas, Germán

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the influence of protein crowders, either combined or individually, on the GTP-induced FtsZ cooperative assembly, crucial for the formation of the dynamic septal ring and, hence, for bacterial division. It was earlier demonstrated that high concentrations of inert polymers like Ficoll 70, used to mimic the crowded cellular interior, favor the assembly of FtsZ into bundles with slow depolymerization. We have found, by fluorescence anisotropy together with light scattering measurements, that the presence of protein crowders increases the tendency of FtsZ to polymerize at micromolar magnesium concentration, being the effect larger with ovomucoid, a negatively charged protein. Neutral polymers and a positively charged protein also diminished the critical concentration of assembly, the extent of the effect being compatible with that expected according to pure volume exclusion models. FtsZ polymerization was also observed to be strongly promoted by a negatively charged polymer, DNA, and by some unrelated polymers like PEGs at concentrations below the crowding regime. The influence of mixed crowders mimicking the heterogeneity of the intracellular environment on the tendency of FtsZ to assemble was also studied and nonadditive effects were found to prevail. Far from exactly reproducing the bacterial cytoplasm environment, this approach serves as a simplified model illustrating how its intrinsically crowded and heterogeneous nature may modulate FtsZ assembly into a functional Z-ring. PMID:26870947

  3. Optical spectra and intensities of graphene magnetic dot bound to a negatively charged Coulomb impurity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C. M. E-mail: apkschan@cityu.edu.hk; Chan, K. S. E-mail: apkschan@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-07-28

    Employing numerical diagonalization, we study the optical properties of an electron in a monolayer-graphene magnetic dot bound to an off-center negatively charged Coulomb impurity based on the massless Dirac-Weyl model. Numerical results show that, since the electron-hole symmetry is broken by the Coulomb potential, the optical absorption spectra of the magnetic dot in the presence of a Coulomb impurity are different between the electron states and the hole states. Effects of both the magnetic field and the dot size on the absorption coefficient are presented as functions of the incident photon energies.

  4. Transient performance estimation of charge plasma based negative capacitance junctionless tunnel FET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sangeeta; Kondekar, P. N.; Pal, Pawan

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the transient behavior of an n-type double gate negative capacitance junctionless tunnel field effect transistor (NC-JLTFET). The structure is realized by using the work-function engineering of metal electrodes over a heavily doped n+ silicon channel and a ferroelectric gate stack to get negative capacitance behavior. The positive feedback in the electric dipoles of ferroelectric materials results in applied gate bias boosting. Various device transient parameters viz. transconductance, output resistance, output conductance, intrinsic gain, intrinsic gate delay, transconductance generation factor and unity gain frequency are analyzed using ac analysis of the device. To study the impact of the work-function variation of control and source gate on device performance, sensitivity analysis of the device has been carried out by varying these parameters. Simulation study reveals that it preserves inherent advantages of charge-plasma junctionless structure and exhibits improved transient behavior as well.

  5. Negative-ion injection by charge exchange at 2.4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1995-09-01

    The present technical note describes multi-turn injection by charge exchange of 2.4-GeV negative ions in a Accumulator Ring used as an intense Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source. The major concern of beam loss due to magnetic stripping of the negative ions is addressed. It is demonstrated that, despite the high energy of the ions and the limitation on the magnitude of the magnetic field, it is possible to control the amount of beam losses to a fractional value of better than 10{sup {minus}5}, as it is required to avoid latent activation of the accelerator components. The injection magnet system which accomplish this is described. The paper addresses also the concern of beam loss due to the same effect in the 2.4-GeV injector linear accelerator, and in the transport from the Linac to the Accumulator Ring.

  6. Charge transfer interactions of a Ru(II) dye complex and related ligand molecules adsorbed on Au(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, Andrew J.; Weston, Matthew; O'Shea, James N.; Taylor, J. Ben; Rienzo, Anna; Mayor, Louise C.

    2011-10-28

    The interaction of the dye molecule, N3 (cis-bis(isothiocyanato)bis(2,2{sup '}-bipyridyl-4,4{sup '}-dicarboxylato) -ruthenium(II)), and related ligand molecules with a Au(111) surface has been studied using synchrotron radiation-based electron spectroscopy. Resonant photoemission spectroscopy (RPES) and autoionization of the adsorbed molecules have been used to probe the coupling between the molecules and the substrate. Evidence of charge transfer from the states near the Fermi level of the gold substrate into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the molecules is found in the monolayer RPES spectra of both isonicotinic acid and bi-isonicotinic acid (a ligand of N3), but not for the N3 molecule itself. Calibrated x-ray absorption spectroscopy and valence band spectra of the monolayers reveals that the LUMO crosses the Fermi level of the surface in all cases, showing that charge transfer is energetically possible both from and to the molecule. A core-hole clock analysis of the resonant photoemission reveals a charge transfer time of around 4 fs from the LUMO of the N3 dye molecule to the surface. The lack of charge transfer in the opposite direction is understood in terms of the lack of spatial overlap between the {pi}*-orbitals in the aromatic rings of the bi-isonicotinic acid ligands of N3 and the gold surface.

  7. Characterization of oil-free and oil-loaded liquid-crystalline particles stabilized by negatively charged stabilizer citrem.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Christa; Edwards, Katarina; Eriksson, Jonny; Larsen, Susan Weng; Østergaard, Jesper; Larsen, Claus; Urtti, Arto; Yaghmur, Anan

    2012-08-14

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the negatively charged food-grade emulsifier citrem on the internal nanostructures of oil-free and oil-loaded aqueous dispersions of phytantriol (PHYT) and glyceryl monooleate (GMO). To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature on the utilization of this charged stabilizing agent in the formation of aqueous dispersions consisting of well-ordered interiors (either inverted-type hexagonal (H(2)) phases or inverted-type microemulsion systems). Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) were used to characterize the dispersed and the corresponding nondispersed phases of inverted-type nonlamellar liquid-crystalline phases and microemulsions. The results suggest a transition between different internal nanostructures of the aqueous dispersions after the addition of the stabilizer. In addition to the main function of citrem as a stabilizer that adheres to the surface of the dispersed particles, it has a significant impact on the internal nanostructures, which is governed by the following factors: (1) its penetration between the hydrophobic tails of the lipid molecules and (2) its degree of incorporation into the lipid-water interfacial area. In the presence of citrem, the formation of aqueous dispersions with functionalized hydrophilic domains by the enlargement of the hydrophilic nanochannels of the internal H(2) phase in hexosomes and the hydrophilic core of the L(2) phase in emulsified microemulsions (EMEs) could be particularly attractive for solubilizing and controlling the release of positively charged drugs. PMID:22831645

  8. A charge-charge flux-dipole flux decomposition of the dipole moment derivatives and infrared intensities of the AB 3 (A = N, P; B = H, F) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    César, Paulo H.; Faria, Sérgio H. D. M.; da Silva, João V.; Haiduke, R. L. A.; Bruns, Roy E.

    2005-10-01

    The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (AIM) has been used to decompose dipole moment derivatives and fundamental infrared intensities of the AB 3 (A = N,P; B = H,F) molecules into charge-charge flux-dipole flux (CCFDF) contributions. Calculations were carried out at the MP2(FC)/6-311++G(3d,3p) level. Infrared intensities calculated from the AIM atomic charges and atomic dipoles are within 13.8 km mol -1 of the experimental values not considering the NH 3 and PH 3 stretching vibrations for which the experimental bands are severely overlapped. Group V atomic dipoles are very important in determining the molecular dipole moments of NF 3, PH 3 and PF 3 although the atomic charges account for almost all of the NH 3 molecular moment. Dipole fluxes on the Group V atom are important in determining the stretching band intensities of all molecules whereas they make small contributions to the bending mode intensities. Consideration of dipole flux contributions from the terminal atoms must also be made for accurately describing the intensities of all these molecules. As expected from a simple bond moment model, charge contributions dominate for most of the NH 3, NF 3, and PF 3 dipole moment derivatives and intensities. Charge flux and dipole flux contributions are very substantial for all the PH 3 vibrations, cancelling each other for the stretching modes and reinforcing one another for the bending modes.

  9. How topoisomerase IV can efficiently unknot and decatenate negatively supercoiled DNA molecules without causing their torsional relaxation.

    PubMed

    Rawdon, Eric J; Dorier, Julien; Racko, Dusan; Millett, Kenneth C; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Freshly replicated DNA molecules initially form multiply interlinked right-handed catenanes. In bacteria, these catenated molecules become supercoiled by DNA gyrase before they undergo a complete decatenation by topoisomerase IV (Topo IV). Topo IV is also involved in the unknotting of supercoiled DNA molecules. Using Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the shapes of supercoiled DNA molecules that are either knotted or catenated. We are especially interested in understanding how Topo IV can unknot right-handed knots and decatenate right-handed catenanes without acting on right-handed plectonemes in negatively supercoiled DNA molecules. To this end, we investigate how the topological consequences of intersegmental passages depend on the geometry of the DNA-DNA juxtapositions at which these passages occur. We observe that there are interesting differences between the geometries of DNA-DNA juxtapositions in the interwound portions and in the knotted or catenated portions of the studied molecules. In particular, in negatively supercoiled, multiply interlinked, right-handed catenanes, we detect specific regions where DNA segments belonging to two freshly replicated sister DNA molecules form left-handed crossings. We propose that, due to its geometrical preference to act on left-handed crossings, Topo IV can specifically unknot supercoiled DNA, as well as decatenate postreplicative catenanes, without causing their torsional relaxation. PMID:27106058

  10. How topoisomerase IV can efficiently unknot and decatenate negatively supercoiled DNA molecules without causing their torsional relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Rawdon, Eric J.; Dorier, Julien; Racko, Dusan; Millett, Kenneth C.; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Freshly replicated DNA molecules initially form multiply interlinked right-handed catenanes. In bacteria, these catenated molecules become supercoiled by DNA gyrase before they undergo a complete decatenation by topoisomerase IV (Topo IV). Topo IV is also involved in the unknotting of supercoiled DNA molecules. Using Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the shapes of supercoiled DNA molecules that are either knotted or catenated. We are especially interested in understanding how Topo IV can unknot right-handed knots and decatenate right-handed catenanes without acting on right-handed plectonemes in negatively supercoiled DNA molecules. To this end, we investigate how the topological consequences of intersegmental passages depend on the geometry of the DNA-DNA juxtapositions at which these passages occur. We observe that there are interesting differences between the geometries of DNA-DNA juxtapositions in the interwound portions and in the knotted or catenated portions of the studied molecules. In particular, in negatively supercoiled, multiply interlinked, right-handed catenanes, we detect specific regions where DNA segments belonging to two freshly replicated sister DNA molecules form left-handed crossings. We propose that, due to its geometrical preference to act on left-handed crossings, Topo IV can specifically unknot supercoiled DNA, as well as decatenate postreplicative catenanes, without causing their torsional relaxation. PMID:27106058

  11. Negative-charge-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles as drug vehicles targeting hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meng; Xu, Yuanguo; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Ge, Yanru; Xie, Jimin

    2014-10-20

    In this paper, a series of doxorubicin-loaded and negative-charge-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (DOX-MSN/COOH) was successfully prepared and used for imaging and targeting therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. The nanoparticles were uniform and negatively charged, with a diameter of about 55 nm, and a zeta potential of -20 mV. In vitro study showed that the nanoparticles could easily be endocytosed by liver cancer cells (HepG2) and were well-accumulated in the liver by passive targeting. In vivo study proved the ability of DOX-MSN/COOH to inhibit the tumor growth and prolong the survival time of mice bearing hepatocellular carcinoma in situ, giving better results than free DOX. More importantly, histological examination showed no histopathological abnormalities of normal liver cells and heart cells after the administration of DOX-MSN/COOH, while the treatment with free DOX caused damage to those cells. In conclusion, DOX-MSN/COOH exhibited enhanced antitumor efficacy as well as reduced side effects for liver cancer therapy. PMID:25149125

  12. A negatively charged transmembrane aspartate residue controls activation of the relaxin-3 receptor RXFP3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Meng-Jun; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-08-15

    Relaxin-3 is an insulin/relaxin superfamily neuropeptide involved in the regulation of food intake and stress response via activation of its cognate receptor RXFP3, an A-class G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In recent studies, a highly conserved ExxxD motif essential for binding of relaxin-3 has been identified at extracellular end of the second transmembrane domain (TMD2) of RXFP3. For most of the A-class GPCRs, a highly conserved negatively charged Asp residue (Asp(2.50) using Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering and Asp128 in human RXFP3) is present at the middle of TMD2. To elucidate function of the conserved transmembrane Asp128, in the present work we replaced it with other residues and the resultant RXFP3 mutants all retained quite high ligand-binding potency, but their activation and agonist-induced internalization were abolished or drastically decreased. Thus, the negatively charged transmembrane Asp128 controlled transduction of agonist-binding information from the extracellular region to the intracellular region through maintaining RXFP3 in a metastable state for efficient conformational change induced by binding of an agonist. PMID:27353281

  13. The negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail of β-tubulin promotes proper chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Fees, Colby P.; Aiken, Jayne; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Moore, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the broadly conserved role of microtubules in chromosome segregation, we have a limited understanding of how molecular features of tubulin proteins contribute to the underlying mechanisms. Here we investigate the negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail domains (CTTs) of α- and β-tubulins, using a series of mutants that alter or ablate CTTs in budding yeast. We find that ablating β-CTT causes elevated rates of chromosome loss and cell cycle delay. Complementary live-cell imaging and electron tomography show that β-CTT is necessary to properly position kinetochores and organize microtubules within the assembling spindle. We identify a minimal region of negatively charged amino acids that is necessary and sufficient for proper chromosome segregation and provide evidence that this function may be conserved across species. Our results provide the first in vivo evidence of a specific role for tubulin CTTs in chromosome segregation. We propose that β-CTT promotes the ordered segregation of chromosomes by stabilizing the spindle and contributing to forces that move chromosomes toward the spindle poles. PMID:27053662

  14. Link between hopping models and percolation scaling laws for charge transport in mixtures of small molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ha, Dong -Gwang; Kim, Jang -Joo; Baldo, Marc A.

    2016-04-29

    Mixed host compositions that combine charge transport materials with luminescent dyes offer superior control over exciton formation and charge transport in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). Two approaches are typically used to optimize the fraction of charge transport materials in a mixed host composition: either an empirical percolative model, or a hopping transport model. We show that these two commonly-employed models are linked by an analytic expression which relates the localization length to the percolation threshold and critical exponent. The relation is confirmed both numerically and experimentally through measurements of the relative conductivity of Tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl) amine (TCTA) :1,3-bis(3,5-dipyrid-3-yl-phenyl) benzene (BmPyPb)more » mixtures with different concentrations, where the TCTA plays a role as hole conductor and the BmPyPb as hole insulator. Furthermore, the analytic relation may allow the rational design of mixed layers of small molecules for high-performance OLEDs.« less

  15. Mechanism of charge transfer and its impacts on Fermi-level pinning for gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changjie; Yang, Weihuang; Zhu, Huili

    2015-06-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to assess changes in the geometric and electronic structures of monolayer WS2 upon adsorption of various gas molecules (H2, O2, H2O, NH3, NO, NO2, and CO). The most stable configuration of the adsorbed molecules, the adsorption energy, and the degree of charge transfer between adsorbate and substrate were determined. All evaluated molecules were physisorbed on monolayer WS2 with a low degree of charge transfer and accept charge from the monolayer, except for NH3, which is a charge donor. Band structure calculations showed that the valence and conduction bands of monolayer WS2 are not significantly altered upon adsorption of H2, H2O, NH3, and CO, whereas the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of O2, NO, and NO2 are pinned around the Fermi-level when these molecules are adsorbed on monolayer WS2. The phenomenon of Fermi-level pinning was discussed in light of the traditional and orbital mixing charge transfer theories. The impacts of the charge transfer mechanism on Fermi-level pinning were confirmed for the gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS2. The proposed mechanism governing Fermi-level pinning is applicable to the systems of adsorbates on recently developed two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides. PMID:26049513

  16. Long-range charge transport in single G-quadruplex DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Livshits, Gideon I; Stern, Avigail; Rotem, Dvir; Borovok, Natalia; Eidelshtein, Gennady; Migliore, Agostino; Penzo, Erika; Wind, Shalom J; Di Felice, Rosa; Skourtis, Spiros S; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Gurevich, Leonid; Kotlyar, Alexander B; Porath, Danny

    2014-12-01

    DNA and DNA-based polymers are of interest in molecular electronics because of their versatile and programmable structures. However, transport measurements have produced a range of seemingly contradictory results due to differences in the measured molecules and experimental set-ups, and transporting significant current through individual DNA-based molecules remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report reproducible charge transport in guanine-quadruplex (G4) DNA molecules adsorbed on a mica substrate. Currents ranging from tens of picoamperes to more than 100 pA were measured in the G4-DNA over distances ranging from tens of nanometres to more than 100 nm. Our experimental results, combined with theoretical modelling, suggest that transport occurs via a thermally activated long-range hopping between multi-tetrad segments of DNA. These results could re-ignite interest in DNA-based wires and devices, and in the use of such systems in the development of programmable circuits. PMID:25344689

  17. A Hypersweet Protein: Removal of The Specific Negative Charge at Asp21 Enhances Thaumatin Sweetness

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Ojiro, Naoko; Murata, Kazuki; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito; Temussi, Piero Andrea; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    Thaumatin is an intensely sweet-tasting protein that elicits sweet taste at a concentration of 50 nM, a value 100,000 times larger than that of sucrose on a molar basis. Here we attempted to produce a protein with enhanced sweetness by removing negative charges on the interacting side of thaumatin with the taste receptor. We obtained a D21N mutant which, with a threshold value 31 nM is much sweeter than wild type thaumatin and, together with the Y65R mutant of single chain monellin, one of the two sweetest proteins known so far. The complex model between the T1R2-T1R3 sweet receptor and thaumatin, derived from tethered docking in the framework of the wedge model, confirmed that each of the positively charged residues critical for sweetness is close to a receptor residue of opposite charge to yield optimal electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, the distance between D21 and its possible counterpart D433 (located on the T1R2 protomer of the receptor) is safely large to avoid electrostatic repulsion but, at the same time, amenable to a closer approach if D21 is mutated into the corresponding asparagine. These findings clearly confirm the importance of electrostatic potentials in the interaction of thaumatin with the sweet receptor. PMID:26837600

  18. Activation energy of negative fixed charges in thermal ALD Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnhold-Pospischil, S.; Saint-Cast, P.; Richter, A.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-08-01

    A study of the thermally activated negative fixed charges Qtot and the interface trap densities Dit at the interface between Si and thermal atomic-layer-deposited amorphous Al2O3 layers is presented. The thermal activation of Qtot and Dit was conducted at annealing temperatures between 220 °C and 500 °C for durations between 3 s and 38 h. The temperature-induced differences in Qtot and Dit were measured using the characterization method called corona oxide characterization of semiconductors. Their time dependency were fitted using stretched exponential functions, yielding activation energies of EA = (2.2 ± 0.2) eV and EA = (2.3 ± 0.7) eV for Qtot and Dit, respectively. For annealing temperatures from 350 °C to 500 °C, the changes in Qtot and Dit were similar for both p- and n-type doped Si samples. In contrast, at 220 °C the charging process was enhanced for p-type samples. Based on the observations described in this contribution, a charging model leading to Qtot based on an electron hopping process between the silicon and Al2O3 through defects is proposed.

  19. The Negatively Charged Regions of Lactoferrin Binding Protein B, an Adaptation against Anti-Microbial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B.

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein’s C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24465982

  20. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24465982

  1. Mitigation of charged impurity effects in graphene field-effect transistors with polar organic molecules (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Barrett C.; Kim, Seohee; Akinwande, Deji; Rossky, Peter J.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-09-01

    Recent developments in monolayer graphene production allow its use as the active layer in field-effect transistor technology. Favorable electrical characteristics of monolayer graphene include high mobility, operating frequency, and good stability. These characteristics are governed by such key transport physical phenomena as electron-hole transport symmetry, Dirac point voltage, and charged impurity effects. Doping of graphene occurs during device fabrication, and is largely due to charged impurities located at or near the graphene/substrate interface. These impurities cause scattering of charge carriers, which lowers mobility. Such scattering is detrimental to graphene transistor performance, but our group has shown that coating with fluoropolymer thin films or exposure to polar organic vapors can restore favorable electrical characteristics to monolayer graphene. By partially neutralizing charged impurities and defects, we can improve the mobility by approximately a factor of 2, change the Dirac voltage by fairly large amounts, and reduce the residual carrier density significantly. We hypothesize that this phenomena results from screening of charged impurities by the polar molecules. To better understand such screening interactions, we performed computational chemistry experiments to observe interactions between polar organic molecules and monolayer graphene. The molecules interacted more strongly with defective graphene than with pristine graphene, and the electronic environment of graphene was altered. These computational observations correlate well with our experimental results to support our hypothesis that polar molecules can act to screen charged impurities on or near monolayer graphene. Such screening favorably mitigates charge scattering, improving graphene transistor performance.

  2. A fast empirical GAFF compatible partial atomic charge assignment scheme for modeling interactions of small molecules with biomolecular targets.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Goutam; Patra, Niladri; Barua, Poranjyoti; Jayaram, B

    2011-04-15

    We report here a new and fast approach [Transferable Partial Atomic Charge Model (TPACM4)-upto four bonds] for deriving the partial atomic charges of small molecules for use in protein/DNA-ligand docking and scoring. We have created a look-up table of 5302 atom types to cover the chemical space of C, H, O, N, S, P, F, Cl, and Br atoms in small molecules together with their quantum mechanical RESP fit charges. The atom types defined span diverse plausible chemical environments of each atom in a molecule. The partial charge on any atom in a given molecule is then assigned by a reference to the look-up table. We tested the sensitivity of the TPACM4 partial charges in estimates of hydrogen bond dimers energies, solvation free energies and protein-ligand binding free energies. An average error ±1.11 kcal/mol and a correlation coefficient of 0.90 is obtained in the calculated protein-ligand binding free energies vis-à-vis an RMS error of ±1.02 kcal/mol and a correlation coefficient of 0.92 obtained with RESP fit charges in comparison to experiment. Similar accuracies are realized in predictions of hydrogen bond energies and solvation free energies of small molecules. For a molecule containing 50-55 atoms, the method takes on the order of milliseconds on a single processor machine to assign partial atomic charges. The TPACM4 programme has been web-enabled and made freely accessible at http://www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/drugdesign/charge.jsp. PMID:21341292

  3. Hydrogen Bonding and Binding of Polybasic Residues with Negatively Charged Mixed Lipid Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, C.; Feraudo, J.; Travesset, A.

    2008-01-23

    Phosphoinositides, phosphorylated products of phosphatidylinositol, are a family of phospholipids present in tiny amounts (1% or less) in the cytosolic surface of cell membranes, yet they play an astonishingly rich regulatory role, particularly in signaling processes. In this letter, we use molecular dynamics simulations on a model system of mixed lipid monolayers to investigate the interaction of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), the most common of the phosphoinositides, with a polybasic peptide consisting of 13 lysines. Our results show that the polybasic peptide sequesters three PIP{sub 2} molecules, forming a complex stabilized by the formation of multiple hydrogen bonds between PIP{sub 2} and the Lys residues. We also show that the polybasic peptide does not sequester other charged phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine because of the inability to form long-lived stable hydrogen bonds.

  4. New effects of a long-lived negatively charged massive particle on big bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-02

    Primordial {sup 7}Li abundance inferred from observations of metal-poor stars is a factor of about 3 lower than the theoretical value of standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model. One of the solutions to the Li problem is {sup 7}Be destruction during the BBN epoch caused by a long-lived negatively charged massive particle, X{sup −}. The particle can bind to nuclei, and X-bound nuclei (X-nuclei) can experience new reactions. The radiative X{sup −} capture by {sup 7}Be nuclei followed by proton capture of the bound state of {sup 7}Be and X{sup −} ({sup 7}Be{sub x}) is a possible {sup 7}Be destruction reaction. Since the primordial abundance of {sup 7}Li originates mainly from {sup 7}Li produced via the electron capture of {sup 7}Be after BBN, the {sup 7}Be destruction provides a solution to the {sup 7}Li problem. We suggest a new route of {sup 7}Be{sub x} formation, that is the {sup 7}Be charge exchange at the reaction of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+} ion and X{sup −}. The formation rate depends on the ionization fraction of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+} ion, the charge exchange cross section of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+}, and the probability that excited states {sup 7}Be{sub x}* produced at the charge exchange are converted to the ground state. We find that this reaction can be equally important as or more important than ordinary radiative recombination of {sup 7}Be and X{sup −}. The effect of this new route is shown in a nuclear reaction network calculation.

  5. Space Charge Neutralization of DEMO Relevant Negative Ion Beams at Low Gas Density

    SciTech Connect

    Surrey, Elizabeth; Porton, Michael

    2011-09-26

    The application of neutral beams to future power plant devices (DEMO) is dependent on achieving significantly improved electrical efficiency and the most promising route to achieving this is by implementing a photoneutralizer in place of the traditional gas neutralizer. A corollary of this innovation would be a significant reduction in the background gas density through which the beam is transported between the accelerator and the neutralizer. This background gas is responsible for the space charge neutralization of the beam, enabling distances of several metres to be traversed without significant beam expansion. This work investigates the sensitivity of a D{sup -} beam to reduced levels of space charge compensation for energies from 100 keV to 1.5 MeV, representative of a scaled prototype experiment, commissioning and full energy operation. A beam transport code, following the evolution of the phase space ellipse, is employed to investigate the effect of space charge on the beam optics. This shows that the higher energy beams are insensitive to large degrees of under compensation, unlike the lower energies. The probable degree of compensation at low gas density is then investigated through a simple, two component beam-plasma model that allows the potential to be negative. The degree of under-compensation is dependent on the positive plasma ion energy, one source of which is dissociation of the gas by the beam. The subsequent space charge state of the beam is shown to depend upon the relative times for equilibration of the dissociation energy and ionization by the beam ions.

  6. Dust-ion acoustic shock waves in a dusty multi-ion plasma with negatively dust-charge fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Kaibiao

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-ion acoustic shock waves in a collisionless, unmagnetized multi-ion dusty plasma contains Botlzemann-distributed electrons, negative and positive ions with extremely massive and stationary negative charge dust grains with dust charge fluctuations is investigated. By employing the reductive perturbation method, we obtain a Burgers equation that describes the two-ion fluid dynamics. The dust charge variation is found to play an important role in the formation of such dust-ion acoustic shock structures. The viscosity only affects the thickness of the shock waves. The dependences of the shock wave's velocity, height and thickness on the system parameters are investigated.

  7. Single charge exchange in collision of fast protons with hydrogen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari-Adivi, Ebrahim; Sattarpour, Seyedeh Hedyeh

    2015-11-01

    Single charge transfer process in collision of energetic protons with molecular hydrogens is theoretically studied using a first-order two-effective-center Born approximation. The correct boundary conditions are incorporated in the formalism and the Hartree-Fock molecular wave function for molecular targets and the residual ions are used to calculate the transition amplitude. The interference patterns in the capture differential cross-sections (DCSs) for a given fixed orientation of the molecule, due to the scattering from the two-atomic centers in the molecular targets, are examined. The dependence of the DCSs upon the angle between the molecular axis and the direction of the incident velocity is theoretically investigated. Both average differential and integral cross-sections are calculated. The obtained results are compared with the available experimental data.

  8. Communication: Charge-population based dispersion interactions for molecules and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöhr, Martin; Michelitsch, Georg S.; Tully, John C.; Reuter, Karsten; Maurer, Reinhard J.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a system-independent method to derive effective atomic C6 coefficients and polarizabilities in molecules and materials purely from charge population analysis. This enables the use of dispersion-correction schemes in electronic structure calculations without recourse to electron-density partitioning schemes and expands their applicability to semi-empirical methods and tight-binding Hamiltonians. We show that the accuracy of our method is en par with established electron-density partitioning based approaches in describing intermolecular C6 coefficients as well as dispersion energies of weakly bound molecular dimers, organic crystals, and supramolecular complexes. We showcase the utility of our approach by incorporation of the recently developed many-body dispersion method [Tkatchenko et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 236402 (2012)] into the semi-empirical density functional tight-binding method and propose the latter as a viable technique to study hybrid organic-inorganic interfaces.

  9. Long-lived charge carrier generation in ordered films of a covalent perylenediimide–diketopyrrolopyrrole–perylenediimide molecule

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hartnett, Patrick E.; Dyar, Scott M.; Margulies, Eric A.; Shoer, Leah E.; Cook, Andrew W.; Eaton, Samuel W.; Marks, Tobin J.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2015-07-31

    The photophysics of a covalently linked perylenediimide–diketopyrrolopyrrole–perylenediimide acceptor–donor–acceptor molecule (PDI–DPP–PDI, 1) were investigated and found to be markedly different in solution versus in unannealed and solvent annealed films. Photoexcitation of 1 in toluene results in quantitative charge separation in τ = 3.1 ± 0.2 ps, with charge recombination in τ = 340 ± 10 ps, while in unannealed/disordered films of 1, charge separation occurs in τ < 250 fs, while charge recombination displays a multiexponential decay in ~6 ns. The absence of long-lived, charge separation in the disordered film suggests that few free charge carriers are generated. In contrast, uponmore » CH₂Cl₂ vapor annealing films of 1, grazing-incidence X-ray scattering shows that the molecules form a more ordered structure. Photoexcitation of the ordered films results in initial formation of a spin-correlated radical ion pair (electron–hole pair) as indicated by magnetic field effects on the formation of free charge carriers which live for ~4 μs. This result has significant implications for the design of organic solar cells based on covalent donor–acceptor systems and shows that long-lived, charge-separated states can be achieved by controlling intramolecular charge separation dynamics in well-ordered systems.« less

  10. Long-lived charge carrier generation in ordered films of a covalent perylenediimide–diketopyrrolopyrrole–perylenediimide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, Patrick E.; Dyar, Scott M.; Margulies, Eric A.; Shoer, Leah E.; Cook, Andrew W.; Eaton, Samuel W.; Marks, Tobin J.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2015-07-31

    The photophysics of a covalently linked perylenediimide–diketopyrrolopyrrole–perylenediimide acceptor–donor–acceptor molecule (PDI–DPP–PDI, 1) were investigated and found to be markedly different in solution versus in unannealed and solvent annealed films. Photoexcitation of 1 in toluene results in quantitative charge separation in τ = 3.1 ± 0.2 ps, with charge recombination in τ = 340 ± 10 ps, while in unannealed/disordered films of 1, charge separation occurs in τ < 250 fs, while charge recombination displays a multiexponential decay in ~6 ns. The absence of long-lived, charge separation in the disordered film suggests that few free charge carriers are generated. In contrast, upon CH₂Cl₂ vapor annealing films of 1, grazing-incidence X-ray scattering shows that the molecules form a more ordered structure. Photoexcitation of the ordered films results in initial formation of a spin-correlated radical ion pair (electron–hole pair) as indicated by magnetic field effects on the formation of free charge carriers which live for ~4 μs. This result has significant implications for the design of organic solar cells based on covalent donor–acceptor systems and shows that long-lived, charge-separated states can be achieved by controlling intramolecular charge separation dynamics in well-ordered systems.

  11. Higher stabilities of positive and negative charge on tetrafluoroethylene-hexafluoropropylene copolymer (FEP) electrets treated with titanium-tetrachloride vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychkov, D.; Rychkov, A.; Efimov, N.; Malygin, A.; Gerhard, R.

    2013-08-01

    Tetrafluoroethylene-hexafluoropropylene copolymer (FEP) films were treated with titanium-tetrachloride vapor in a molecular-layer deposition process. As a result of the surface treatment, significant improvements of the thermal and temporal charge stability were observed. Charge-decay measurements revealed enhancements of the half-value temperatures and the relaxation times of positively charged FEP electrets by at least 120 °C and two orders of magnitude, respectively. Beyond previous publications on fluoropolymer electrets with surface modification, we here report enhanced charge stabilities of the FEP films charged in negative as well as in positive corona discharges. Even though the improvement for negatively charged FEP films is moderate (half-value temperature about 20 °C higher), our experiments show that the asymmetry in positive and negative charge stability that is typical for FEP electrets can be overcome by means of chemical surface treatments. The results are discussed in the context of the formation of modified surface layers with enhanced charge-trapping properties.

  12. Magnetic field dependence of the energy of negatively charged excitons in semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Riva, C.; Peeters, F. M.; Varga, K.

    2001-03-15

    We present a variational calculation of the spin-singlet and spin-triplet states of a negatively charged exciton (trion) confined to a single quantum well in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. We calculated the probability density and the pair correlation function of the singlet and triplet trion states. The dependence of the energy levels and of the binding energy on the well width and on the magnetic field strength was investigated. We compared our results with the available experimental data on GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells and find that in the low-magnetic-field region (B<18 T) the observed transitions are those of the singlet and the dark triplet trion (with angular momentum L{sub z}=-1), while for high magnetic fields (B>25 T) the dark trion becomes optically inactive and possibly a transition to a bright triplet trion (angular momentum L{sub z}=0) state is observed.

  13. Polymerization on the rocks: negatively-charged alpha-amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. R. Jr; Bohler, C.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Oligomers of the negatively-charged amino acids, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and O-phospho-L-serine are adsorbed by hydroxylapatite and illite with affinities that increase with oligomer length. In the case of oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite, addition of an extra residue results in an approximately four-fold increase in the strength of adsorption. Oligomers much longer than the 7-mer are retained tenaciously by the mineral. Repeated incubation of short oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite or illite with activated monomer leads to the accumulation of oligomers at least 45 units long. The corresponding reactions of aspartic acid and O-phospho-L-serine on hydroxylapatite are less effective in generating long oligomers, while illite fails to accumulate substantial amounts of long oligomers of aspartic acid or of O-phospho-L-serine.

  14. Transient negative photoconductance in a charge transfer double quantum well under optical intersubband excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüfenacht, M.; Tsujino, S.; Sakaki, H.

    1998-06-01

    Recently, it was shown that an electron-hole radiative recombination is induced by a mid-infrared light exciting an intersubband transition in a charge transfer double quantum well (CTDQW). This recombination was attributed to an upstream transfer of electrons from an electron-rich well to a hole-rich well. In this study, we investigated the electrical response of a CTDQW under intersubband optical excitation, and found that a positive photocurrent, opposite in sign and proportional to the applied electric field, accompanies the intersubband-transition-induced luminescence (ITIL) signal. A negative photocurrent component was also observed and attributed to heating processes. This work brings a further evidence of the ITIL process and shows that an important proportion of the carriers are consumed by the transfer of electrons.

  15. Stroke multiplicity and horizontal scale of negative charge regions in thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Earle R.; Mattos, Enrique V.; Machado, Luiz A. T.

    2016-05-01

    An X-band polarimetric radar and multiple lightning detection systems are used to document the initial cloud-to-ground lightning flash in a large number (46 cases) of incipient thunderstorms, as part of the CHUVA-Vale field campaign during the 2011/2012 spring-summer in southeast Brazil. The results show an exceptionally low stroke multiplicity (87% of flashes with single stroke) in the initial ground flashes, a finding consistent with the limited space available for the positive leader extension into new regions of negative space charge in compact cells. The results here are contrasted with the behavior of ground flashes in mesoscale thunderstorms in previous studies. Additionally, we found evidence for a minimum scale (radar echo >20 dBZ) for lightning initiation (>3 km in radius) and that the peak currents of initial cloud-to-ground flashes in these compact thunderstorms are only half as large as return stroke peak currents in general.

  16. Dynamic Jahn-Teller Effect in Negatively Charged Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abtew, Tesfaye; Zhang, Peihong

    2011-03-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has attracted much research interest recently owing to its desirable optical properties and long spin coherent lifetime. The ground state of NV- center has a 3 A2 symmetry, which can be optically excited, to a 3 E state. The excited state is orbitally degenerate therefore should experience either static or dynamic Jahn-Teller (JT) effects. We use accurate first-principles methods to study structural and electronic properties of the NV- center in diamond both in the ground and excited states. Our results indicate that the excited state of the NV- center is indeed a dynamic JT system. We acknowledge the Center for Computational Research at the University at Buffalo, SUNY. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-0946404 and by the Department of Energy under GrantNo. DE-SC0002623.

  17. Negatively Charged Carbon Nanohorn Supported Cationic Liposome Nanoparticles: A Novel Delivery Vehicle for Anti-Nicotine Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Hu, Yun; Huang, Wei; de Villiers, Sabina; Pentel, Paul; Zhang, Jianfei; Dorn, Harry; Ehrich, Marion; Zhang, Chenming

    2015-12-01

    Tobacco addiction is the second-leading cause of death in the world. Due to the nature of nicotine (a small molecule), finding ways to combat nicotine's deleterious effects has been a constant challenge to the society and the medical field. In the present work, a novel anti-nicotine vaccine based on nanohorn supported liposome nanoparticles (NsL NPs) was developed. The nano-vaccine was constructed by using negatively charged carbon nanohorns as a scaffold for the assembly of cationic liposomes, which allow the conjugation of hapten conjugated carrier proteins. The assembled bio-nanoparticles are stable. Mice were immunized subcutaneously with the nano-vaccine, which induced high titer and high affinity of nicotine specific antibodies in mice. Furthermore, no evidence of clinical signs or systemic toxicity followed multiple administrations of NsL-based anti-nicotine vaccine. These results suggest that NsL-based anti-nicotine vaccine is a promising candidate in treating nicotine dependence and could have potential to significantly contribute to smoking cessation. PMID:26510313

  18. Saccharification of natural lignocellulose biomass and polysaccharides by highly negatively charged heteropolyacids in concentrated aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yoshiyuki; Itagaki, Shintaro; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2011-04-18

    Highly negatively charged heteropolyacids (HPAs), in particular H(5) BW(12) O(40) , efficiently promoted saccharification of crystalline cellulose into water-soluble saccharides in concentrated aqueous solutions (e.g., 82 % total yield and 77 % glucose yield, based on cellulose with a 0.7 M H(5) BW(12) O(40) solution); the performance was much better than those of previously reported systems with commonly utilized mineral acids (e.g., H(2) SO(4) and HCl) and HPAs (e.g., H(3) PW(12) O(40) and H(4) SiW(12) O(40)). Besides crystalline cellulose, the present system was applicable to the selective transformation of cellobiose, starch, and xylan to the corresponding monosaccharides such as glucose and xylose. In addition, one-pot synthesis of levulinic acid and sorbitol directly from cellulose was realized by using concentrated HPA solutions. The present system, concentrated aqueous solutions of highly negatively charged HPAs, was further applicable to saccharification of natural (non-purified) lignocellulose biomass, such as "rice plant straw", "oil palm empty fruit bunch (palm EFB) fiber", and "Japanese cedar sawdust", giving a mixture of the corresponding water-soluble saccharides, such as glucose (main product), galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose, and cellobiose, in high yields (≥77 % total yields of saccharides based on holocellulose). Separation of the saccharides and H(5) BW(12) O(40) was easy, and the retrieved H(5) BW(12) O(40) could repeatedly be used without appreciable loss of the high performance. PMID:21404445

  19. Rational design of charge transport molecules for blue organic light emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmaperuma, Asanga; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Koech, Phillip; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James; Gaspar, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The efficiency and stability of blue OLEDs continue to be the primary roadblock to developing organic solid-state white lighting as well as power efficient displays. It is generally accepted that such high quantum efficiency can be achieved with the use of organometallic phosphor doped OLEDs. The transport layers can be designed to increase the carrier density as a way to reduce the drive voltage. We have developed a comprehensive library of charge transporting molecules using combination of theoretical modeling and experimental evidence. Our work focuses on using chemical structure design and computational methods to develop host, transport, emitter, and blocking materials for high efficiency blue OLEDs, along with device architectures to take advantage of these new materials. Through chemical modification of materials we are able to influence both the charge balance and emission efficiency of OLEDs, and understand the influence of the location of photon emission in OLEDs as a function of minor chemical modifications of host and electron transport materials. Design rules, structure-property relationships and results from state of the art OLEDs will be presented.

  20. Positively-charged, porous, polysaccharide nanoparticles loaded with anionic molecules behave as 'stealth' cationic nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Paillard, Archibald; Passirani, Catherine; Saulnier, Patrick; Kroubi, Maya; Garcion, Emmanuel; Benoît, Jean-Pierre; Betbeder, Didier

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Stealth nanoparticles are generally obtained after modifying their surface with hydrophilic polymers such as PEG. In this study we analysed the effect of a phospholipid (DG) or protein (BSA) inclusion in porous cationic polysaccharide (NP+) on their physico-chemical structure and the effect on complement activation. METHODS NP+s were characterised in terms of size, zeta potential (ζ) and static light-scattering (SLS). Complement consumption was assessed in normal human serum (NHS) by measuring the residual haemolytic capacity of the complement system. RESULTS DG-loading did not change their size or ζ whereas progressive BSA loading decreased lightly their ζ. An electrophoretic mobility analysis study showed the presence of 2 differently-charged sublayers at the NP+ surface which are not affected by DG-loading. Complement system activation, studied via a CH50 test, was suppressed by DG- or BSA-loading. We also demonstrated that NP+s could be loaded by a polyanionic molecule such as BSA, after their preliminary filling by a hydrophobic molecule such as DG. CONCLUSION These nanoparticles are able to absorb large amounts of phospholipids or proteins without change in their size or zeta potential. Complement studies showed that stealth behaviour is observed when they are loaded and saturated either with anionic phospholipid or proteins. PMID:19851846

  1. Synthesis of positively and negatively charged silver nanoparticles and their deposition on the surface of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharonova, A.; Loza, K.; Surmeneva, M.; Surmenev, R.; Prymak, O.; Epple, M.

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial infections related to dental implants are currently a significant complication. A good way to overcome this challenge is functionalization of implant surface with Ag nanoparticles (NPs) as antibacterial agent. This article aims at review the synthesis routes, size and electrical properties of AgNPs. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) were used as stabilizers. Dynamic Light Scattering, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) have been used to characterize the prepared AgNPs. Two types of NPs were synthesized in aqueous solutions: PVP-stabilized NPs with a diameter of the metallic core of 70 ± 20 nm, and negative charge of -20 mV, PEI-stabilized NPs with the size of the metallic core of 50 ± 20 nm and positive charge of +55 mV. According to SEM results, all the NPs have a spherical shape. Functionalization of the titanium substrate surface with PVP and PEI-stabilized AgNPs was carried out by dropping method. XRD patterns revealed that the AgNPs are crystalline with the crystallite size of 14 nm.

  2. Kinking the coiled coil--negatively charged residues at the coiled-coil interface.

    PubMed

    Straussman, Ravid; Ben-Ya'acov, Ami; Woolfson, Derek N; Ravid, Shoshana

    2007-03-01

    The coiled coil is one of the most common protein-structure motifs. It is believed to be adopted by 3-5% of all amino acids in proteins. It comprises two or more alpha-helical chains wrapped around one another. The sequences of most coiled coils are characterized by a seven-residue (heptad) repeat, denoted (abcdefg)(n). Residues at the a and d positions define the helical interface (core) and are usually hydrophobic, though about 20% are polar or charged. We show that parallel coiled-coils have a unique pattern of their negatively charged residues at the core positions: aspartic acid is excluded from these positions while glutamic acid is not. In contrast the antiparallel structures are more permissive in their amino acid usage. We show further, and for the first time, that incorporation of Asp but not Glu into the a positions of a parallel coiled coil creates a flexible hinge and that the maximal hinge angle is being directly related to the number of incorporated mutations. These new computational and experimental observations will be of use in improving protein-structure predictions, and as rules to guide rational design of novel coiled-coil motifs and coiled coil-based materials. PMID:17207815

  3. Negatively-charged NV-center in SiC: Electronic structure properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, Pratibha; Economou, Sophia

    Deep defects with high-spin states in semiconductors are promising candidates as solid-state systems for quantum computing applications. The charged NV-center in diamond is the best-known and most-studied defect center, and has proven to be a good proof-of-principle structure for demonstrating the use of such defects in quantum technologies. Increasingly, however, there is an interest in exploring deep defects in alternative semiconductors such as SiC. This is due to the challenges posed by diamond as host material for defects, as well as the attractive properties of SiC. In this density functional theory work, we study the spin-1 structure of the negatively charged NV-center in two polytypes: 3C-SiC and 4H-SiC. The calculated zero phonon line for the excited state of the defect is in telecom range (0.90eV), making it a very good candidate for quantum technologies. This work provides basic ingredients required to understand the physics of this color center at a quantitative and qualitative level. We also design quantum information applications, such as a spin-photon interface and multi-photon entanglement.

  4. Gap state charge induced spin-dependent negative differential resistance in tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Zhang, X.-G.; Han, X. F.

    2016-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate through first-principles calculation a new spin-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) with cubic cation disordered crystals (CCDC) AlO x or Mg1‑x Al x O as barrier materials. The CCDC is a class of insulators whose band gap can be changed by cation doping. The gap becomes arched in an ultrathin layer due to the space charge formed from metal-induced gap states. With an appropriate combination of an arched gap and a bias voltage, NDR can be produced in either spin channel. This mechanism is applicable to 2D and 3D ultrathin junctions with a sufficiently small band gap that forms a large space charge. It provides a new way of controlling the spin-dependent transport in spintronic devices by an electric field. A generalized Simmons formula for tunneling current through junction with an arched gap is derived to show the general conditions under which ultrathin junctions may exhibit NDR.

  5. Negatively charged hyperbranched polyglycerol grafted membranes for osmotic power generation from municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Cai, Tao; Chen, Chunyan; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2016-02-01

    Osmotic power holds great promise as a clean, sustainable and largely unexploited energy resource. Recent membrane development for pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) is making the osmotic power generation more and more realistic. However, severe performance declines have been observed because the porous layer of PRO membranes is fouled by the feed stream. To overcome it, a negatively charged antifouling PRO hollow fiber membrane has been designed and studied in this work. An antifouling polymer, derived from hyperbranched polyglycerol and functionalized by α-lipoic acid and succinic anhydride, was synthesized and grafted onto the polydopamine (PDA) modified poly(ether sulfone) (PES) hollow fiber membranes. In comparison to unmodified membranes, the charged hyperbranched polyglycerol (CHPG) grafted membrane is much less affected by organic deposition, such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption, and highly resistant to microbial growths, demonstrated by Escherichia coli adhesion and Staphylococcus aureus attachment. CHPG-g-TFC was also examined in PRO tests using a concentrated wastewater as the feed. Comparing to the plain PES-TFC and non-charged HPG-g-TFC, the newly developed membrane exhibits not only the smallest decline in water flux but also the highest recovery rate. When using 0.81 M NaCl and wastewater as the feed pair in PRO tests at 15 bar, the average power density remains at 5.6 W/m(2) in comparison to an average value of 3.6 W/m(2) for unmodified membranes after four PRO runs. In summary, osmotic power generation may be sustained by properly designing and anchoring the functional polymers to PRO membranes. PMID:26630043

  6. Molecular-scale quantitative charge density measurement of biological molecule by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Kei; Oyabu, Noriaki; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2015-07-01

    Surface charge distributions on biological molecules in aqueous solutions are essential for the interactions between biomolecules, such as DNA condensation, antibody-antigen interactions, and enzyme reactions. There has been a significant demand for a molecular-scale charge density measurement technique for better understanding such interactions. In this paper, we present the local electric double layer (EDL) force measurements on DNA molecules in aqueous solutions using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) with a three-dimensional force mapping technique. The EDL forces measured in a 100 mM KCl solution well agreed with the theoretical EDL forces calculated using reasonable parameters, suggesting that FM-AFM can be used for molecular-scale quantitative charge density measurements on biological molecules especially in a highly concentrated electrolyte.

  7. Internal configuration and electric potential in planar negatively charged lipid head group region in contact with ionic solution.

    PubMed

    Lebar, Alenka Maček; Velikonja, Aljaž; Kramar, Peter; Iglič, Aleš

    2016-10-01

    The lipid bilayer composed of negatively charged lipid 1-palmitoyl-3-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS) in contact with an aqueous solution of monovalent salt ions was studied theoretically by using the mean-field modified Langevin-Poisson-Boltzmann (MLPB) model. The MLPB results were tested by using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. In the MLPB model the charge distribution of POPS head groups is theoretically described by the negatively charged surface which accounts for negatively charged phosphate groups, while the positively charged amino groups and negatively charged carboxylate groups are assumed to be fixed on the rod-like structures with rotational degree of freedom. The spatial variation of relative permittivity, which is not considered in the well-known Gouy-Chapman (GC) model or in MD simulations, is thoroughly derived within a strict statistical mechanical approach. Therefore, the spatial dependence and magnitude of electric potential within the lipid head group region and its close vicinity are considerably different in the MLPB model from the GC model. The influence of the bulk salt concentration and temperature on the number density profiles of counter-ions and co-ions in the lipid head group region and aqueous solution along with the probability density function for the lipid head group orientation angle was compared and found to be in qualitative agreement in the MLPB and MD models. PMID:27209203

  8. Simultaneous Separation of Negatively and Positively Charged Species in Dynamic Field Gradient Focusing Using a Dual Polarity Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jeffrey M.; Huang, Zheng; Ivory, Cornelius F.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic field gradient focusing (DFGF) utilizes an electric field gradient established by a computer-controlled electrode array to separate and concentrate charged analytes at unique axial positions. Traditionally, DFGF has been restricted to the analysis of negatively charged species due to limitations in the software of our voltage controller. This paper introduces a new voltage controller capable of operating under normal polarity (positive potentials applied to the electrode array) and reversed polarity (negative potentials applied to the electrode array) for the separation of negatively and positively charged analytes, respectively. The experiments conducted under normal polarity and reversed polarity illustrate the utility of the new controller to perform reproducible DFGF separations (elution times showing less than 1% run-to-run variation) over a wide pH range (3.08 to 8.5) regardless of the protein charge. A dual polarity experiment is then shown in which the separation channel has been divided into normal polarity and reversed polarity regions. This simultaneous separation of negatively charged R-phycoerythrin (R-PE) and positively charged cytochrome c (CYTC) within the same DFGF apparatus is shown. PMID:19722517

  9. Kinetic distinction between cytochromes a and a3 in cytochrome c oxidase. Rapid scanning stopped flow study of anaerobic reduction by a neutral and a negatively charged donor.

    PubMed

    Halaka, F G; Babcock, G T; Dye, J L

    1981-02-10

    Anaerobic reduction of cytochrome c oxidase by 5,10-dihydro-5-methylphenazine (reduced PMS) and by sodium dithionite were studied by rapid scanning stopped flow spectrophotometry. In both cases the decay of the Soret band of the oxidized oxidase is not uniform. With reduced PMS, the reduction involves two molecules of reductant (4 electrons)/oxidase molecule. The first stage of the reduction exhibits an isosbestic point in the Soret region at 437 nm. This shifts to 428 nm in later stages of the reaction. The reduction of the oxidase by sodium dithionite is also complete and apparently involves SO2 radical. In this case the spectra show an isosbestic point at approximately 420 nm which shifts to 432 nm as the reaction proceeds. For each of the reductants the reaction is best described by three phases: the first is a second order reaction between the oxidase and the reductant, followed by two first order processes which appear to describe the intramolecular electron redistribution within the oxidase molecule. The results agree with the assignment of the Soret band of the oxidase molecule to cytochrome a3 with an absorption maximum near 410 nm and to cytochrome a which has its maximum absorption hear 430 nm. If these assignments are correct, the present data show that reduced PMS, an uncharged molecule, reacts more rapidly with cytochrome a than it does with cytochrome a3, while the negatively charged radical anion, SO2, appears to have more direct access to cytochrome a3. PMID:6256379

  10. Exploration of Porphyrin-based Semiconductors for Negative Charge Transport Applications Using Synthetic, Spectroscopic, Potentiometric, Magnetic Resonance, and Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawson, Jeffrey Scott

    Organic pi-conjugated materials are emerging as commercially relevant components in electronic applications that include transistors, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. One requirement common to all of these functions is an aptitude for accepting and transmitting charges. It is generally agreed that the development of organic semiconductors that favor electrons as the majority carriers (n-type) lags behind the advances in hole transporting (p-type) materials. This shortcoming suggests that the design space for n-type materials is not yet well explored, presenting researchers with the opportunity to develop unconventional architectures. In this regard, it is worth noting that discrete molecular materials are demonstrating the potential to usurp the preeminent positions that pi-conjugated polymers have held in these areas of organic electronics research. This dissertation describes how an extraordinary class of molecules, meso-to-meso ethyne-bridged porphyrin arrays, has been bent to these new uses. Chapter one describes vis-NIR spectroscopic and magnetic resonance measurements revealing that these porphyrin arrays possess a remarkable aptitude for the delocalization of negative charge. In fact, the miniscule electron-lattice interactions exhibited in these rigid molecules allow them to host the most vast electron-polarons ever observed in a pi-conjugated material. Chapter two describes the development of an ethyne-bridged porphyrin-isoindigo hybrid chromophore that can take the place of fullerene derivatives in the conventional thin film solar cell architecture. Particularly noteworthy is the key role played by the 5,15-bis(heptafluoropropyl)porphyrin building block in the engineering of a chromophore that, gram for gram, is twice as absorptive as poly(3-hexyl)thiophene, exhibits a lower energy absorption onset than this polymer, and yet possesses a photoexcited singlet state sufficiently energetic to transfer a hole to this polymer. Chapter three describes

  11. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  12. Highly efficient bioinspired molecular Ru water oxidation catalysts with negatively charged backbone ligands.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Li, Fusheng; Li, Fei; Sun, Licheng

    2015-07-21

    The oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of the natural photosynthesis system II (PSII) oxidizes water to produce oxygen and reducing equivalents (protons and electrons). The oxygen released from PSII provides the oxygen source of our atmosphere; the reducing equivalents are used to reduce carbon dioxide to organic products, which support almost all organisms on the Earth planet. The first photosynthetic organisms able to split water were proposed to be cyanobacteria-like ones appearing ca. 2.5 billion years ago. Since then, nature has chosen a sustainable way by using solar energy to develop itself. Inspired by nature, human beings started to mimic the functions of the natural photosynthesis system and proposed the concept of artificial photosynthesis (AP) with the view to creating energy-sustainable societies and reducing the impact on the Earth environments. Water oxidation is a highly energy demanding reaction and essential to produce reducing equivalents for fuel production, and thereby effective water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) are required to catalyze water oxidation and reduce the energy loss. X-ray crystallographic studies on PSII have revealed that the OEC consists of a Mn4CaO5 cluster surrounded by oxygen rich ligands, such as oxyl, oxo, and carboxylate ligands. These negatively charged, oxygen rich ligands strongly stabilize the high valent states of the Mn cluster and play vital roles in effective water oxidation catalysis with low overpotential. This Account describes our endeavors to design effective Ru WOCs with low overpotential, large turnover number, and high turnover frequency by introducing negatively charged ligands, such as carboxylate. Negatively charged ligands stabilized the high valent states of Ru catalysts, as evidenced by the low oxidation potentials. Meanwhile, the oxygen production rates of our Ru catalysts were improved dramatically as well. Thanks to the strong electron donation ability of carboxylate containing ligands, a seven

  13. Cationic Cell-Penetrating Peptide Binds to Planar Lipid Bilayers Containing Negatively Charged Lipids but does not Induce Conductive Pores

    PubMed Central

    Gurnev, Philip A.; Yang, Sung-Tae; Melikov, Kamran C.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2013-01-01

    Using a cation-selective gramicidin A channel as a sensor of the membrane surface charge, we studied interactions of oligoarginine peptide R9C, a prototype cationic cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), with planar lipid membranes. We have found that R9C sorption to the membrane depends strongly on its lipid composition from virtually nonexistent for membranes made of uncharged lipids to very pronounced for membranes containing negatively charged lipids, with charge overcompensation at R9C concentrations exceeding 1 μM. The sorption was reversible as it was removed by addition of polyanionic dextran sulfate to the membrane bathing solution. No membrane poration activity of R9C (as would be manifested by increased bilayer conductance) was detected in the charged or neutral membranes, including those with asymmetric negative/neutral and negative/positive lipid leaflets. We conclude that interaction of R9C with planar lipid bilayers does not involve pore formation in all studied lipid combinations up to 20 μM peptide concentration. However, R9C induces leakage of negatively charged but not neutral liposomes in a process that involves lipid mixing between liposomes. Our findings suggest that direct traversing of CPPs through the uncharged outer leaflet of the plasma membrane bilayer is unlikely and that permeabilization necessarily involves both anionic lipids and CPP-dependent fusion between opposing membranes. PMID:23663836

  14. Interaction of Bee Venom Melittin with Zwitterionic and Negatively Charged Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschmidt, Jörg H.; Mahaney, James E.; Thomas, David D.; Marsh, Derek

    1997-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to study the penetration and interaction of bee venom melittin with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and ditetradecylphosphatidylglycerol (DTPG) bilayer membranes. Melittin is a surface-active, amphipathic peptide and serves as a useful model for a variety of membrane interactions, including those of presequences and signal peptides, as well as the charged subdomain of the cardiac regulatory protein phospholamban. Derivatives of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol spin-labeled at various positions along the sn-2 acyl chain were used to establish the chain flexibility gradient for the two membranes in the presence and absence of melittin. Negatively charged DTPG bilayer membranes showed a higher capacity for binding melittin without bilayer disruption than did membranes formed by the zwitterionic DMPC, demonstrating the electrostatic neutralization of bound melittin by DTPG. The temperature dependence of the ESR spectra showed that the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition is eliminated by binding melittin to DTPG bilayers, whereas a very broad transition remains in the case of DMPC bilayers. None of the spin labels used showed a two-component spectrum characteristic of a specific restriction of their chain motion by melittin, but the outer hyperfine splittings and effective chain order parameters were increased for all labels upon binding melittin. This indicates a reduced flexibility of the lipid chains induced by a surface orientation of the bound melittin. Whereas the characteristic shape of the chain flexibility gradient was maintained upon melittin addition to DMPC bilayers, the chain flexibility profile in DTPG bilayers was much more strongly perturbed. It was found that the steepest change in segmental flexibility was shifted toward the bilayer interior when melittin was bound to DTPG membranes, indicating a greater depth of penetration than in DMPC membranes. pH titration of stearic acid

  15. Excitation of dust acoustic waves by an ion beam in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Kaur, Daljeet; Gahlot, Ajay; Sharma, Jyotsna

    2014-10-15

    An ion beam propagating through a plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives a low frequency electrostatic dust acoustic wave (DAW) to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales to the one-third power of the beam density. The real part of the frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales to almost one-half power of the beam energy. The phase velocity, frequency, and wavelength results of the unstable mode are in compliance with the experimental observations.

  16. Statistical mechanics of dust charging in a multi-ion plasma with negative and positive ionic species

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha

    2015-02-15

    On the basis of statistical mechanics and charging kinetics, the charge distribution over uniform size spherical dust particles in a multi-ion plasma comprising of multiple charged negative and positive ions is investigated. Two specific situations where the complex plasma is viz., (i) dark (no emission from dust) and (ii) irradiated by laser light (causing photoemission from dust) have been taken into account. The analytical formulation includes the population balance equation for the charged dust particles along with number and energy balance of the complex plasma constituents. The departure of the results for multi-ion plasma from that in case of usual singly charged positive ion plasma is graphically illustrated and discussed. In contrast to electron-ion plasma, significant number of particles is seen to acquire opposite charge in case of pure positive-negative ion plasma, even in the absence of electron emission from the dust grains. The effects of various plasma parameters viz., number density, particle size, and work function of dust on charge distribution have also been examined.

  17. Statistical mechanics of dust charging in a multi-ion plasma with negative and positive ionic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha

    2015-02-01

    On the basis of statistical mechanics and charging kinetics, the charge distribution over uniform size spherical dust particles in a multi-ion plasma comprising of multiple charged negative and positive ions is investigated. Two specific situations where the complex plasma is viz., (i) dark (no emission from dust) and (ii) irradiated by laser light (causing photoemission from dust) have been taken into account. The analytical formulation includes the population balance equation for the charged dust particles along with number and energy balance of the complex plasma constituents. The departure of the results for multi-ion plasma from that in case of usual singly charged positive ion plasma is graphically illustrated and discussed. In contrast to electron-ion plasma, significant number of particles is seen to acquire opposite charge in case of pure positive-negative ion plasma, even in the absence of electron emission from the dust grains. The effects of various plasma parameters viz., number density, particle size, and work function of dust on charge distribution have also been examined.

  18. Negatively charged nano-grains at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Burch, J. L.; Horányi, M.

    2015-11-01

    Shortly after the Rosetta mission's rendezvous with 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko the RPC/IES instrument intermittently detected negative particles that were identified as singly charged nano-dust grains. These grains were recorded as a nearly mono-energetic beam of particles in the 200-500 eV range arriving from the direction of the comet. Occasionally, another population of particles in the energy range of 1-20 keV were also noticed arriving from the approximate direction of the Sun. In this paper we review the processes that can explain the energization and the directionality of the observed nano-dust populations. We show that the observations are consistent with gas-drag acceleration of the outflowing particles with radii of 3-4 nm, and with the returning fragments of bigger particles accelerated by radiation pressure with approximate radii of 30-80 nm. In addition to gas drag and radiation pressure, we also examine the role of the solar wind induced motional electric field, and its possible role in explaining the intermittency of the detection of a nano-grain population arriving from the solar direction.

  19. Protein PEGylation attenuates adsorption and aggregation on a negatively charged and moderately hydrophobic polymer surface.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sheetal S; Przybycien, Todd M; Tilton, Robert D

    2010-12-01

    Covalent grafting of poly(ethylene glycol) chains to proteins ("PEGylation") is emerging as an effective technique to increase the in vivo circulation time and efficacy of protein drugs. PEGylated protein adsorption at a variety of solid/aqueous interfaces is a critical aspect of their manufacture, storage, and delivery. A special category of block copolymer, PEGylated proteins have one or more water-soluble linear polymer (PEG) blocks and a single globular protein block that each exert distinct intermolecular and surface interaction forces. We report the impact of PEGylation on protein adsorption at the interface between aqueous solutions and solid films of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG), a moderately hydrophobic and negatively charged polymer. Using the model protein lysozyme with controlled degrees of PEGylation, we employ total internal reflection fluorescence techniques to measure adsorption isotherms, adsorption reversibility, and the extent of surface-induced aggregation. Lysozyme PEGylation reduces the extent of protein adsorption and surface-induced aggregation and increases the reversibility of adsorption compared to the unconjugated protein. Results are interpreted in terms of steric forces among grafted PEG chains and their effects on protein-protein interactions and protein orientation on the surface. PMID:21067142

  20. Photoluminescence Studies of Both the Neutral and Negatively Charged Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaiyue; Steeds, John W; Li, Zhihong; Tian, Yuming

    2016-02-01

    In this study low temperature micro-photoluminescence technology was employed to investigate effects of the irradiation and nitrogen concentration on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) luminescence, with the photochromic and vibronic properties of the NV defects. Results showed that the NV luminescence was weakened due to recombination of self-interstitials created by electron irradiation in diamond and the vacancies within the structure of NV centers. For very pure diamond, the vacancies migrated the long distance to get trapped by N atoms only after sufficient high temperature annealing. As with the increase in nitrogen content, the migration distance of vacancies got smaller. The nitrogen also favored the formation of negatively charged NV centers with the donating electrons. Under the high-energy ultraviolet laser excitation, the photochromic property of the NV- center was also observed, though it was not stable. Besides, the NV centers showed very strong broad sidebands, and the vibrations involved one phonon with energy of ~42 meV and another with ~67 meV energy. PMID:26758647

  1. Toward a Molecular Understanding of Protein Solubility: Increased Negative Surface Charge Correlates with Increased Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Ryan M.; Shende, Varad R.; Motl, Nicole; Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Protein solubility is a problem for many protein chemists, including structural biologists and developers of protein pharmaceuticals. Knowledge about how intrinsic factors influence solubility is limited due to the difficulty of obtaining quantitative solubility measurements. Solubility measurements in buffer alone are difficult to reproduce, because gels or supersaturated solutions often form, making it impossible to determine solubility values for many proteins. Protein precipitants can be used to obtain comparative solubility measurements and, in some cases, estimations of solubility in buffer alone. Protein precipitants fall into three broad classes: salts, long-chain polymers, and organic solvents. Here, we compare the use of representatives from two classes of precipitants, ammonium sulfate and polyethylene glycol 8000, by measuring the solubility of seven proteins. We find that increased negative surface charge correlates strongly with increased protein solubility and may be due to strong binding of water by the acidic amino acids. We also find that the solubility results obtained for the two different precipitants agree closely with each other, suggesting that the two precipitants probe similar properties that are relevant to solubility in buffer alone. PMID:22768947

  2. Temperature-controlled interaction of thermosensitive polymer-modified cationic liposomes with negatively charged phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Kono, K; Henmi, A; Takagishi, T

    1999-09-21

    To obtain cationic liposomes of which affinity to negatively charged membranes can be controlled by temperature, cationic liposomes consisting of 3beta-[N-(N', N'-dimethylaminoethane)carbamoyl]cholesterol and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine were modified with poly(N-acryloylpyrrolidine), which is a thermosensitive polymer exhibiting a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) at ca. 52 degrees C. The unmodified cationic liposomes did not change its zeta potential between 20-60 degrees C. The polymer-modified cationic liposomes revealed much lower zeta potential values below the LCST of the polymer than the unmodified cationic liposomes. However, their zeta potential increased significantly above this temperature. The unmodified cationic liposomes formed aggregates and fused intensively with anionic liposomes consisting of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidic acid in the region of 20-60 degrees C, due to the electrostatic interaction. In contrast, aggregation and fusion of the polymer-modified cationic liposomes with the anionic liposomes were strongly suppressed below the LCST. However, these interactions were enhanced remarkably above the LCST. In addition, the polymer-modified cationic liposomes did not cause leakage of calcein from the anionic liposomes below the LCST, but promoted the leakage above this temperature as the unmodified cationic liposomes did. Temperature-induced conformational change of the polymer chains from a hydrated coil to a dehydrated globule might affect the affinity of the polymer-modified cationic liposomes to the anionic liposomes. PMID:10561483

  3. STUDIES OF X-RAY PRODUCTION FOLLOWING CHARGE EXCHANGE RECOMBINATION BETWEEN HIGHLY CHARGED IONS AND NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Thorn, D B; Wargelin, B J

    2008-08-28

    We have used microcalorimeters built by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Electron Beam Ion Trap to measure X-ray emission produced by charge exchange reactions between highly charged ions colliding with neutral helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas. Our measurements show the spectral dependence on neutral species and also show the distinct differences between spectra produced by charge exchange reactions and those produced by direct impact excitation. These results are part of an ongoing experimental investigation at the LLNL EBIT facility of charge exchange spectral signatures and can be used to interpret X-ray spectra produced by a variety of laboratory and celestial sources including cometary and planetary atmospheres, the Earth's magnetosheath, the heliosphere, and tokamaks.

  4. Identification of functionally important negatively charged residues in the carboxy end of mouse hepatitis coronavirus A59 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sandhya; Bednar, Valerie; Blount, Andrew; Hogue, Brenda G

    2006-05-01

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is a multifunctional viral gene product that encapsidates the RNA genome and also plays some as yet not fully defined role in viral RNA replication and/or transcription. A number of conserved negatively charged amino acids are located within domain III in the carboxy end of all coronavirus N proteins. Previous studies suggested that the negatively charged residues are involved in virus assembly by mediating interaction between the membrane (M) protein carboxy tail and nucleocapsids. To determine the importance of these negatively charged residues, a series of alanine and other charged-residue substitutions were introduced in place of those in the N gene within a mouse hepatitis coronavirus A59 infectious clone. Aspartic acid residues 440 and 441 were identified as functionally important. Viruses could not be isolated when both residues were replaced by positively charged amino acids. When either amino acid was replaced by a positively charged residue or both were changed to alanine, viruses were recovered that contained second-site changes within N, but not in the M or envelope protein. The compensatory role of the new changes was confirmed by the construction of new viruses. A few viruses were recovered that retained the D441-to-arginine change and no compensatory changes. These viruses exhibited a small-plaque phenotype and produced significantly less virus. Overall, results from our analysis of a large panel of plaque-purified recovered viruses indicate that the negatively charged residues at positions 440 and 441 are key residues that appear to be involved in virus assembly. PMID:16611893

  5. Linear free energy relationships for metal-ligand complexation: Bidentate binding to negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonaro, Richard F.; Atalay, Yasemin B.; Di Toro, Dominic M.

    2011-05-01

    Stability constants for metal complexation to bidentate ligands containing negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms can be estimated from the following linear free energy relationship (LFER): log KML = χOO( αO log KHL,1 + αO log KHL,2) where KML is the metal-ligand stability constant for a 1:1 complex, KHL,1 and KHL,2 are the proton-ligand stability constants (the ligand p Ka values), and αO is the Irving-Rossotti slope. The parameter χOO is metal specific and has slightly different values for five and six membered chelate rings. LFERs are presented for 21 different metal ions and are accurate to within approximately 0.30 log units in predictions of log KML values. Ligands selected for use in LFER development include dicarboxylic acids, carboxyphenols, and ortho-diphenols. For ortho-hydroxybenzaldehydes, α-hydroxycarboxylic acids, and α-ketocarboxylic acids, a modification of the LFER where log KHL,2 is set equal to zero is required. The chemical interpretation of χOO is that it accounts for the extra stability afforded to metal complexes by the chelate effect. Cu-NOM binding constants calculated from the bidentate LFERs are similar in magnitude to those used in WHAM 6. This LFER can be used to make log KML predictions for small organic molecules. Since natural organic matter (NOM) contains many of the same functional groups (i.e. carboxylic acids, phenols, alcohols), the LFER log KML predictions shed light on the range of appropriate values for use in modeling metal partitioning in natural systems.

  6. Radiation transport codes for potential applications related to radiobiology and radiotherapy using protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Several Monte Carlo radiation transport computer codes are used to predict quantities of interest in the fields of radiotherapy and radiobiology. The calculational methods are described and comparisions of calculated and experimental results are presented for dose distributions produced by protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions. Comparisons of calculated and experimental cell survival probabilities are also presented.

  7. Equilibrium distribution of permeants in polyelectrolyte microcapsules filled with negatively charged polyelectrolyte: the influence of ionic strength and solvent polarity.

    PubMed

    Tong, Weijun; Song, Haiqing; Gao, Changyou; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2006-07-01

    The effects of ionic strength and solvent polarity on the equilibrium distribution of fluorescein (FL) and FITC-dextran between the interior of polyelectrolyte multilayer microcapsules filled with negatively charged strong polyelectrolyte and the bulk solution were systematically investigated. A negatively charged strong polyelectrolyte, poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS), used for CaCO3 core fabrication, was entrapped inside the capsules. Due to the semipermeability of the capsule wall, a Donnan equilibrium between the inner solution within the capsules and the bulk solution was created. The equilibrium distribution of the negatively charged permeants was investigated by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy as a function of ionic strength and solvent polarity. The equilibrium distribution of the negatively charged permeants could be tuned by increasing the bulk ionic strength to decrease the Donnan potential. Decreasing the solvent polarity also could enhance the permeation of FL, which induces a sudden increase of permeation when the ethanol volume fraction was higher than 0.7. This is mainly attributed to the precipitation of PSS. A theoretical model combining the Donnan equilibrium and Manning counterion condensation was employed to discuss the results. PMID:16805590

  8. Negative differential conductance in InAs wire based double quantum dot induced by a charged AFM tip

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. A.; Volk, Ch.; Winden, A.; Hardtdegen, H.; Schaepers, Th.

    2012-12-15

    We investigate the conductance of an InAs nanowire in the nonlinear regime in the case of low electron density where the wire is split into quantum dots connected in series. The negative differential conductance in the wire is initiated by means of a charged atomic force microscope tip adjusting the transparency of the tunneling barrier between two adjoining quantum dots. We confirm that the negative differential conductance arises due to the resonant tunneling between these two adjoining quantum dots. The influence of the transparency of the blocking barriers and the relative position of energy states in the adjoining dots on a decrease of the negative differential conductance is investigated in detail.

  9. Negatively charged lipid membranes promote a disorder-order transition in the Yersinia YscU protein.

    PubMed

    Weise, Christoph F; Login, Frédéric H; Ho, Oanh; Gröbner, Gerhard; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2014-10-21

    The inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is negatively charged, rendering positively charged cytoplasmic proteins in close proximity likely candidates for protein-membrane interactions. YscU is a Yersinia pseudotuberculosis type III secretion system protein crucial for bacterial pathogenesis. The protein contains a highly conserved positively charged linker sequence that separates membrane-spanning and cytoplasmic (YscUC) domains. Although disordered in solution, inspection of the primary sequence of the linker reveals that positively charged residues are separated with a typical helical periodicity. Here, we demonstrate that the linker sequence of YscU undergoes a largely electrostatically driven coil-to-helix transition upon binding to negatively charged membrane interfaces. Using membrane-mimicking sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles, an NMR derived structural model reveals the induction of three helical segments in the linker. The overall linker placement in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles was identified by NMR experiments including paramagnetic relaxation enhancements. Partitioning of individual residues agrees with their hydrophobicity and supports an interfacial positioning of the helices. Replacement of positively charged linker residues with alanine resulted in YscUC variants displaying attenuated membrane-binding affinities, suggesting that the membrane interaction depends on positive charges within the linker. In vivo experiments with bacteria expressing these YscU replacements resulted in phenotypes displaying significantly reduced effector protein secretion levels. Taken together, our data identify a previously unknown membrane-interacting surface of YscUC that, when perturbed by mutations, disrupts the function of the pathogenic machinery in Yersinia. PMID:25418176

  10. New results on catalyzed big bang nucleosynthesis with a long-lived negatively charged massive particle

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yoshida, Takashi; Mathews, Grant J.

    2010-04-15

    It has been proposed that the apparent discrepancies between the inferred primordial abundances of {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li and the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) can be resolved by the existence of a negatively charged massive unstable supersymmetric particle (X{sup -}) during the BBN epoch. Here, we present new BBN calculations with an X{sup -} particle utilizing an improved nuclear reaction network including captures of nuclei by the particle, nuclear reactions and {beta} decays of normal nuclei and nuclei bound to the X{sup -} particles (X nuclei), and new reaction rates derived from recent rigorous quantum many-body dynamical calculations. We find that this is still a viable model to explain the observed {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li abundances. We also show that with the new rates the production of heavier nuclei is suppressed and there is no signature on abundances of nuclei heavier than Be in the X{sup -}-particle catalyzed BBN model as has been previously proposed. We also consider the version of this model whereby the X{sup -} particle decays into the present cold dark matter. We analyze this paradigm in light of the recent constraints on the dark-matter mass deduced from the possible detected events in the CDMS-II experiment. We conclude that based upon the inferred range for the dark-matter mass, only X{sup -} decay via the weak interaction can achieve the desired {sup 7}Li destruction while also reproducing the observed {sup 6}Li abundance.