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Sample records for neisseria gonorrhoeae absence

  1. Biofilm Formation by Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, L. L.; Edwards, J. L.; Shao, J.; Rabinak, C.; Entz, D.; Apicella, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Studies were performed in continuous-flow chambers to determine whether Neisseria gonorrhoeae could form a biofilm. Under these growth conditions, N. gonorrhoeae formed a biofilm with or without the addition of 10 μM sodium nitrite to the perfusion medium. Microscopic analysis of a 4-day growth of N. gonorrhoeae strain 1291 revealed evidence of a biofilm with organisms embedded in matrix, which was interlaced with water channels. N. gonorrhoeae strains MS11 and FA1090 were found to also form biofilms under the same growth conditions. Cryofield emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that organisms were embedded in a continuous matrix with membranous structures spanning the biofilm. These studies also demonstrated that N. gonorrhoeae has the capability to form a matrix in the presence and absence of CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac). Studies with monoclonal antibody 6B4 and the lectins soy bean agglutinin and Maackia amurensis indicated that the predominate terminal sugars in the biofilm matrix formed a lactosamine when the biofilm was grown in the absence of CMP-Neu5Ac and sialyllactosamine in the presence of CMP-Neu5Ac. N. gonorrhoeae strain 1291 formed a biofilm on primary urethral epithelial cells and cervical cells in culture without loss of viability of the epithelial cell layer. Our studies demonstrated that N. gonorrhoeae can form biofilms in continuous-flow chambers and on living cells. Studies of these biofilms may have implications for understanding asymptomatic gonococcal infection. PMID:15784536

  2. L Form of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Richard B.

    1966-01-01

    Roberts, Richard B. (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.). L form of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. J. Bacteriol. 92:1609–1614. 1966.—L forms were produced by the penicillin gradient plate technique from a recently isolated strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. To date, these L forms have had 30 serial passages on medium containing penicillin. Stabilized L forms developed on penicillin-free medium after 10 or more passages in the presence of penicillin. Morphological characteristics of these organisms were identical to L forms of meningococci. Medium and environmental conditions necessary for optimal growth included: Brain Heart Infusion of pH 7.2 to 7.4, 1.1 to 1.3% agar, 10 to 20% sucrose, 10 to 20% horse serum, temperature at 35 to 36 C, and increased CO2 tension (candle jar). L forms were more resistant than the parent gonococcus to penicillin, ampicillin, methicillin, cycloserine, and cephalothin, whereas both organisms had similar sensitivities to bacitracin, vancomycin, ristocetin, novobiocin, tetracycline, and erythromycin. Revertant gonococci were produced on penicillin-free medium from L forms which had had 1, 5, and 10 serial passages. Morphology and fermentative reactions of revertant strains were identical to those of the parent gonococcus. Revertant strains produced L forms more readily than the parent organism; in fact, L forms from certain revertants did not require penicillin, but only serum and sucrose for their production and propagation on artificial medium. Images PMID:4959715

  3. Emerging resistance in Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Stefanelli, Paola

    2011-02-01

    The value of monitoring antimicrobial resistance is particularly significant for Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae diseases, even if it is for different reasons. Although there is no global alert for the spread of resistant meningococcal strains, the emergence of resistance is correlated to the outcome of treatment and the successful prophylaxis of close contacts. Few cases of resistance among meningococci have been recorded worldwide; it remains unclear what intriguing mechanism is responsible for maintaining resistance in these cases in the absence of significant antibiotic selective pressure, as in the case of penicillin; on the contrary, although rifampicin is the antibiotic of choice in the prophylaxis of close contacts, there is a very low rate of resistance. The emergence of multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae is a great challenge in controlling gonorrhea as one of the main sexually transmitted bacterial diseases. International surveillance programs permit the monitoring of the susceptibility of the pathogen and allow the revision of the standardized treatment regimen when the situation changes. PMID:21342071

  4. Conjugative Plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Pachulec, Emilia; van der Does, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Many clinical isolates of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae contain conjugative plasmids. The host range of these plasmids is limited to Neisseria species, but presence of a tetracycline (tetM) determinant inserted in several of these plasmids is an important cause of the rapid spread of tetracycline resistance. Previously plasmids with different backbones (Dutch and American type backbones) and with and without different tetM determinants (Dutch and American type tetM determinants) have been identified. Within the isolates tested, all plasmids with American or Dutch type tetM determinants contained a Dutch type plasmid backbone. This demonstrated that tetM determinants should not be used to differentiate between conjugal plasmid backbones. The nucleotide sequences of conjugative plasmids with Dutch type plasmid backbones either not containing the tetM determinant (pEP5233) or containing Dutch (pEP5289) or American (pEP5050) type tetM determinants were determined. Analysis of the backbone sequences showed that they belong to a novel IncP1 subfamily divergent from the IncP1α, β, γ, δ and ε subfamilies. The tetM determinants were inserted in a genetic load region found in all these plasmids. Insertion was accompanied by the insertion of a gene with an unknown function, and rearrangement of a toxin/antitoxin gene cluster. The genetic load region contains two toxin/antitoxins of the Zeta/Epsilon toxin/antitoxin family previously only found in Gram positive organisms and the virulence associated protein D of the VapD/VapX toxin/antitoxin family. Remarkably, presence of VapX of pJD1, a small cryptic neisserial plasmid, in the acceptor strain strongly increased the conjugation efficiency, suggesting that it functions as an antitoxin for the conjugative plasmid. The presence of the toxin and antitoxin on different plasmids might explain why the host range of this IncP1 plasmid is limited to Neisseria species. The isolated plasmids conjugated efficiently between

  5. Glucose Metabolism in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Stephen A.; Stein, Stefanie; Hines, James

    1974-01-01

    The metabolism of glucose was examined in several clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Radiorespirometric studies revealed that growing cells metabolized glucose by a combination on the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways. A portion of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate formed via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway was recycled by conversion to glucose-6-phosphate. Subsequent catabolism of this glucose-6-phosphate by either the Entner-Doudoroff or pentose phosphate pathways yielded CO2 from the original C6 of glucose. Enzyme analyses confirmed the presence of all enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff, pentose phosphate, and Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathways. There was always a high specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) relative to that of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.44). The glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase utilized either nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as electron acceptor. Acetate was the only detectable nongaseous end product of glucose metabolism. Following the disappearance of glucose, acetate was metabolized by the tricarboxylic acid cycle as evidenced by the preferential oxidation of [1-14C]acetate over that of [2-14C]acetate. When an aerobically grown log-phase culture was subjected to anaerobic conditions, lactate and acetate were formed from glucose. Radiorespirometric studies showed that under these conditions, glucose was dissimilated entirely by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Further studies determined that this anaerobic dissimilation of glucose was not growth dependent. PMID:4156358

  6. Diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Using Molecular Beacon

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Sonkar, Subash Chandra; Kumari, Indu; Saluja, Daman

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an important sexually transmitted diseases (STD) causing pathogen worldwide. Due to absence of an affordable diagnostic assay, routine screening of gonococcal infection becomes impossible in developing countries where infection rates are maximum. Treatment is given on the basis of symptoms alone which leads to spread of infection. Thus, development of a rapid, sensitive, specific, and PCR based visual diagnostic assay suitable for developing countries, required for better disease management, is aimed at in present study. Endocervical swabs were collected from patients visiting gynecology department of various hospitals in Delhi. In-house PCR based assay was developed and modified to visual assay using molecular beacon for end-point detection. It was evaluated against Roche AMPLICOR NG kit and rmp gene. Specificity of beacon was confirmed by competition experiments. Diagnostic test was 98.21% specific and 99.59% sensitive whereas negative and positive predicted value were 99.40% and 98.78%, respectively. We also observed that twice the concentration (2X) of premix was stable at 4°C for 4 months and dry swab samples gave concordant results with that of wet swabs. These features make the test best suitable for routine diagnosis of genital infections in developing countries. PMID:25802857

  7. Update on Quinolone Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Zenilman, Jonathan M.

    2002-04-01

    Quinolones are widely used for treating gonococcal infections, typically in single-dose, oral regimens. However, in the 1990s, quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae emerged, potentially compromising the utility of this drug class. In the past year, these strains have widely disseminated, accounting for over half of isolates in parts of Southeast Asia. The molecular mechanism of resistance has been localized to multiple mutations in genes coding for the bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase enzymes. These mutations accumulate until the minimum inhibitory concentration is 4.0 g/mL or more, which in clinical studies appears to be the threshold for clinical treatment failure. Quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae is independent from other plasmid- and chromosomally-mediated resistance determinants; nearly all isolates to date have been sensitive to cephalosporins and spectinomycin. Nevertheless, designing public health strategies to contain quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae will be difficult. PMID:11927047

  8. Antimicrobial Resistance and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Multiantigen Sequence Typing Profile of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in New Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Neeraj; Sood, Seema; Singh, Rajendra; Kapil, Arti; Das, Bimal Kumar; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Kar, Hemanta Kumar; Sharma, Vinod Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Molecular epidemiology of 100 consecutive gonococcal isolates collected between April 2010 and October 2013 from New Delhi was investigated using Neisseria gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) along with its association with antimicrobial resistance profiles. Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates were assigned into 60 different sequence types and 43 (71.6%) were novel. Sole representation was seen in 76.6% sequence types. There was significant association between ST6058 and resistance to penicillin (P = 0.00) and tetracycline (P = 0.002). PMID:27414684

  9. Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Boehme, Martha S.; Rudrik, James T.; Ganoczy, Dara; Crandell-Alden, Erin; Schneider, William A.; Somsel, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae (QRNG) in the United States is a cause for concern. Detecting resistance is complicated by the widespread use of molecular tests that do not provide isolates for susceptibility testing. The Michigan Department of Community Health developed a sentinel surveillance program to detect antimicrobial drug resistance in N. gonorrhoeae. Sentinel surveillance from 11 laboratories submitted 1,122 isolates for antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing and detected 2 clusters of QRNG from January 2003 to September 2004. These clusters were epidemiologically distinct: one involved young, heterosexual youth, and the other involved older men who have sex with men. This finding led to changes in local treatment recommendations that limited spread of resistant strains. Development of the sentinel program, collection of data, and epidemiologic analysis of the clusters are discussed. PMID:16022773

  10. Resistance to peroxynitrite in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Barth, Kenneth R; Isabella, Vincent M; Wright, Lori F; Clark, Virginia L

    2009-08-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae encodes a number of important genes that aid in survival during times of oxidative stress. The same immune cells capable of oxygen-dependent killing mechanisms also have the capacity to generate reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that may function antimicrobially. F62 and eight additional gonococcal strains displayed a high level of resistance to peroxynitrite, while Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli showed a four- to seven-log and a four-log decrease in viability, respectively. Mutation of gonococcal orthologues that are known or suspected to be involved in RNS defence in other bacteria (ahpC, dnrN and msrA) resulted in no loss of viability, suggesting that N. gonorrhoeae has a novel mechanism of resistance to peroxynitrite. Whole-cell extracts of F62 prevented the oxidation of dihydrorhodamine, and decomposition of peroxynitrite was not dependent on ahpC, dnrN or msrA. F62 grown in co-culture with E. coli strain DH10B was shown to protect E. coli viability 10-fold. Also, peroxynitrite treatment of F62 did not result in accumulation of nitrated proteins, suggesting that an active peroxynitrite reductase is responsible for peroxynitrite decomposition rather than a protein sink for amino acid modification. PMID:19406894

  11. Detection of quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Kam, K M; Wong, P W; Cheung, M M; Ho, N K

    1996-01-01

    The present National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guideline for testing Neisseria gonorrhoeae quinolone susceptibility defines only a susceptible category for ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, lomefloxacin, and ofloxacin, while susceptible, intermediate, and resistant categories are defined for fleroxacin. To further define the criteria for detection of quinolone resistance in gonococci, by standard disk diffusion and agar dilution methodologies recommended by the NCCLS, we tested 29 strains of quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae (QRNG) recently isolated from ofloxacin-treated patients who were considered clinical failures. Regression analyses were performed on these results together with those of another 20 strains showing reduced susceptibility and 13 fully susceptible strains (ofloxacin MICs of < or = 0.25 microgram/ml). With 5-micrograms ofloxacin disks, resistance in 27 (93.1%) of the QRNG strains (MICs of > 1 microgram/ml) was detected by the criterion of a zone diameter of < 22 mm, while in the remaining 2 (6.9%), the disks failed to detect resistance. A cluster of 15 highly resistant strains showed ofloxacin MICs of > 4 micrograms/ml and zone diameters of < 13 mm. When tested with 5-micrograms ciprofloxacin disks, the corresponding values for resistance and high-level resistance of these QRNG strains were < 25 mm (MICs of > 0.5 micrograms/ml) and < 15 mm (MICs of > 2 micrograms /ml), respectively. Six strains for which ofloxacin MICs were > or = 8 micrograms/ml showed no zones at all with both 5-micrograms ofloxacin and 5-micrograms ciprofloxacin disks. These QRNG strains are now firmly established in the Southeast Asia region, and it is important for clinical laboratories to recognize these clinically resistant strains and to monitor their spread. PMID:8735098

  12. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and fosfomycin: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Tesh, Lauren D; Shaeer, Kristy M; Cho, Jonathan C; Estrada, Sandy J; Huang, Vanthida; Bland, Christopher M; DiMondi, V Paul; Potter, Alicia N; Hussein, Gamal; Bookstaver, P Brandon

    2015-09-01

    Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae has become a global health concern that requires immediate attention. Due to increasing resistance to cephalosporins, pursuing novel alternatives for treating N. gonorrhoeae infections is paramount. Whilst new drug development is often cumbersome, reviving antiquated antibiotic agents for treatment of modern infections has become prevalent in clinical practice. Fosfomycin exhibits bactericidal activity through a unique mechanism of action, and a variety of organisms including N. gonorrhoeae are susceptible. In vitro studies have demonstrated that fosfomycin can retain activity against ceftriaxone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae; however, it remains unclear whether there is synergy between fosfomycin and other antibiotics. Clinical investigations evaluating fosfomycin for the treatment of N. gonorrhoeae infections are confounded by methodological limitations, none the less they do provide some perspective on its potential role in therapy. Future studies are needed to establish a safe, convenient and effective fosfomycin regimen for treating N. gonorrhoeae infections. PMID:26145201

  13. Phospholipids and fatty acids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Sud, I J; Feingold, D S

    1975-01-01

    The phospholipids and fatty acids of two strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae of different penicillin susceptibilities were examined. The phospholipids, which comprise about 8% of the dry weight of the cells, consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine (70%) and phosphatidylglycerol (20%); small amounts of phosphatidylcholine and traces of cardiolipin were also present. Growing and stationary-phase cells were similar in content and composition of phospholipids except for phosphatidylcholine, which increased two- to fivefold in the stationary-phase cells. The fatty acids of the phospholipids were characterized by two major acids, palmitic and a C16:1, with myristic and a C18:1 acid present in smaller amounts. The fatty acids present in purified phospholipid fractions varied considerably in relative proportions from fraction to fraction. No significant difference in the composition of phospholipids from the two strains was evident. Large amounts of beta-hydroxy lauric acid were detected only after saponification of the organisms. Differences in the lipid composition between the gonococcus and other gram-negative bacteria are discussed. PMID:810478

  14. Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Tonsils and Posterior Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, D. M.; Lee, D. M.; Snow, A. F.; Fairley, C. K.; Peel, J.; Bradshaw, C. S.; Hocking, J. S.; Lahra, M. M.; Chen, M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the factors influencing gonorrhea detection at the pharynx. One hundred men infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae were swabbed from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx. N. gonorrhoeae was reisolated from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx in 62% and 52%, respectively (P = 0.041). Culture positivity was greater with higher gonococcal DNA loads at the tonsils (P = 0.001) and oropharynx (P < 0.001). N. gonorrhoeae can be cultured from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx with greater isolation rates where gonococcal loads are higher. PMID:26292303

  15. Porin protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: cloning and gene structure.

    PubMed Central

    Gotschlich, E C; Seiff, M E; Blake, M S; Koomey, M

    1987-01-01

    The outer membrane porin molecule of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is known as protein I (PI). Among different strains of gonococci there is variability of PI, and two main classes, PIA and PIB, have been recognized. A lambda gt11 bank of gonococcal DNA was screened using monoclonal antibodies directed to a PIB-type porin molecule of N. gonorrhoeae, and three immunoreactive clones were isolated. DNA sequence analysis indicated that each contained only portions of the PI structural gene, but that together they contained the complete gene, and its structure was determined. The DNA sequence predicts a protein of 348 amino acids with a typical 19 amino acid signal peptide. The PI protein resembles Escherichia coli porins in size, lack of long hydrophobic sequences, and absence of cysteine residues. Sequence homologies between PI and the E. coli porins were found, particularly in the 100 N-terminal and the 110 C-terminal amino acids. In addition to the coding sequence of PI, the complementary strand contains a large open reading frame. At the 3' end of the PI gene, immediately following an inverted repeat (probably the transcription terminator), the clone contains an unusual sequence consisting of 31 perfect repeats of the heptamer CTGTTTT. Hybridization analysis suggests that there is a single structural gene for PI and that it is homologous to the gene found in a PIA-bearing strain of gonococcus. Images PMID:2825179

  16. Epidemiological characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Whittington, W L; Rice, R J; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 101 isolates of penicillinase-producing and non-penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae with known nutritional requirements, plasmid content, and serovars, were examined for lectin agglutination patterns. These isolates were from outbreaks in Georgia, California, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania. Cell suspensions made from 16- to 18-h cultures were mixed with 14 different lectins, and the resultant agglutination patterns were classified as agglutination groups. Among the 101 isolates tested, 24 different agglutination groups were demonstrated. Of the organisms tested, 55% were located in 3 of the 24 groups, and 86% of the isolates reacted with the lectins Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, peanut agglutinin, soybean agglutinin, potato agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin. One isolate did not react with peanut or potato agglutinin, five isolates lacked reactivity with potato agglutinin, and six isolates did not react with wheat germ agglutinin. Of the wheat germ-negative isolates, four were from Pennsylvania and were identical with regard to auxotype, plasmid content, serovar, and lectin group. The other two wheat germ-negative isolates were from California and were unrelated by the same criteria to the four Pennsylvania isolates and to each other. Among the isolates tested, there were no differences in lectin groups with regard to the sex of the patient. In the Georgia collection, agglutination with one lectin group was confined to isolates of serogroup IA. This association was not observed for the other geographic areas. Some isolates showing identical auxotype, plasmid content, and serovars could be differentiated based on lectin agglutination patterns, whereas other isolates were identical by all testing criteria. PMID:3930560

  17. Transcriptional and functional analysis of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae fur regulon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To ensure survival in the host, bacteria have evolved strategies to acquire the essential element iron. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the ferric uptake regulator senses intracellular iron stores and acting as a repressor, directly regulates transcription of iron-responsive genes by binding to a conserve...

  18. DNA stability of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in urine.

    PubMed

    Le Guern, Rémi; Miaux, Brigitte; Pischedda, Patricia; Herwegh, Stéphanie; Courcol, René

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the DNA stability of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in 55 urine samples. Crossing threshold (Ct) values were highly similar after 3 to 14 days at room temperature (+0.002, P = 0.99). Consequently, it does not seem necessary to transfer urine specimens into a transport medium in less than 24 hours as recommended by manufacturers. PMID:27130478

  19. Fluorescent monoclonal antibody for confirmation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Laughon, B E; Ehret, J M; Tanino, T T; Van der Pol, B; Handsfield, H H; Jones, R B; Judson, F N; Hook, E W

    1987-01-01

    We evaluated a monoclonal fluorescent-antibody (FA) reagent (Neisseria gonorrhoeae Culture Confirmation Test; Syva Co., Palo Alto, Calif.) for confirmation of N. gonorrhoeae isolates obtained from clinics for sexually transmitted diseases in four cities. The FA test was performed in parallel with established confirmation procedures on all organisms growing on 773 primary culture plates of modified Thayer-Martin agar. All N. gonorrhoeae isolates reacted with the FA reagent and produced a bright, easily interpretable fluorescence. The FA test correctly identified 533 N. gonorrhoeae isolates from 474 patients and did not react with 90 N. meningitidis or with 213 non-Neisseria isolates. In one city (Baltimore), Gonochek II (Du Pont Co., Wilmington, Del.) failed to identify four N. gonorrhoeae isolates reactive with the FA reagent and confirmed as N. gonorrhoeae by Phadebact (Pharmacia Inc., Piscataway, N.J.) and acid production from sugars. The FA test was rapid and specific and could be performed directly from primary isolation plates. The test requires 1 h to perform and is applicable to mixed-flora cultures. PMID:3123514

  20. Characterization of a cryptic gene pair from Neisseria gonorrhoeae that is common to pathogenic Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Seifert, H S; Wilson, D

    1992-03-01

    A pair of genes, each of which produces in Escherichia coli a 20-kDa, periplasmically localized protein that cross-reacts with anti-rpoN monoclonal antibody, was isolated from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Homologs of the two genes were detected in pathogenic Neisseria species but not in commensal species. These genes are designated cnp1 and cnp2 (cryptic neisserial protein). PMID:1541538

  1. Will targeting oropharyngeal gonorrhoea delay the further emergence of drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains?

    PubMed

    Lewis, D A

    2015-06-01

    Gonorrhoea is an important sexually transmitted infection associated with serious complications and enhanced HIV transmission. Oropharyngeal infections are often asymptomatic and will only be detected by screening. Gonococcal culture has low sensitivity (<50%) for detecting oropharyngeal gonorrhoea, and, although not yet approved commercially, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) are the assay of choice. Screening for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea should be performed in high-risk populations, such as men-who-have-sex-with-men(MSM). NAATs have a poor positive predictive value when used in low-prevalence populations. Gonococci have repeatedly thwarted gonorrhoea control efforts since the first antimicrobial agents were introduced. The oropharyngeal niche provides an enabling environment for horizontal transfer of genetic material from commensal Neisseria and other bacterial species to Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This has been the mechanism responsible for the generation of mosaic penA genes, which are responsible for most of the observed cases of resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC). As antimicrobial-resistant gonorrhoea is now an urgent public health threat, requiring improved antibiotic stewardship, laboratory-guided recycling of older antibiotics may help reduce ESC use. Future trials of antimicrobial agents for gonorrhoea should be powered to test their efficacy at the oropharynx as this is the anatomical site where treatment failure is most likely to occur. It remains to be determined whether a combination of frequent screening of high-risk individuals and/or laboratory-directed fluoroquinolone therapy of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea will delay the further emergence of drug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae strains. PMID:25911525

  2. History and epidemiology of antibiotic susceptibilities of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a common causative microorganism of male urethritis. The most important problem with this infectious disease is antibiotic resistance. For instance, in the 1980's-1990's, most studies showed almost 100% susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to the representative cephalosporins, cefixime and cefpodoxime. By the late 1990s, the reported susceptibility decreased to 93.3-100% and further decreased to 82.9-100% in the early 2000's. However, reported susceptibility was revived to 95.8-100% in the late 2000's to 2010's. The susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to penicillins varied in different countries and regions. A 2002 Japanese study showed a resistance ratio of about 30% and while Laos, China and Korea showed 80-100% resistance. Fluoroquinolones have shown a dramatic change in their effect on N. gonorrhoeae. In the early 1990's, 0.3-1.3% of N. gonorrhoeae showed low susceptibility or resistance to ciprofloxacin in the US but this figure jumped to 9.5% by 1999. In Asia, N. gonorrhoeae ciprofloxacin resistance or lower susceptibility was about 80-90% in the early 2000's and this trend continues to the present day. Azithromycin is currently the possible last weapon for N. gonorrhoeae treatment per oral administration. The susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to azithromycin was 100% in Indonesia in 2004 and the latest study from Germany showed 6% resistance in strains from 2010-2011. This review summarizes the history and epidemiology of N. gonorrhoeae antibiotic susceptibilities, for which the most frequently used antibiotics vary between countries or regions. PMID:25410409

  3. [Purulent keratoconjunctivitis due to Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis coinfection].

    PubMed

    Arvai, Mariann; Ostorházi, Eszter; Mihalik, Noémi; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Marschalkó, Márta

    2013-05-26

    Gonococcal conjunctivitis is a rare infection induced by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and it usually manifests as a hyperacute purulent conjunctivitis. Ocular access of the infectious secretion during sexual intercourse is the way of transmission among adults. Inclusion conjunctivitis caused by the serovars D-K of Chlamydia trachomatis also affects the sexually active population. Authors present a case of a 33-year-old homosexual man who was treated for late latent syphilis formerly. Clinical symptoms were yellow purulent discharge for 3 weeks without any urological or upper respiratory tract symptoms. Conjunctival Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis infection was identified using cultures and polymerase chain reaction; pharyngeal swab culture and polymerase chain reaction showed positive results for both pathogens. The patient was probably under influence of party drugs at the time of sexual abuse when he became infected. After parenteral and oral cephalosporin and azithromycin therapy the patient had complete recovery within three weeks. PMID:23692878

  4. Pili-taxis: Clustering of Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taktikos, Johannes; Zaburdaev, Vasily; Biais, Nicolas; Stark, Holger; Weitz, David A.

    2012-02-01

    The first step of colonization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria, the etiological agent of gonorrhea, is the attachment to human epithelial cells. The attachment of N. gonorrhoeae bacteria to surfaces or other cells is primarily mediated by filamentous appendages, called type IV pili (Tfp). Cycles of elongation and retraction of Tfp are responsible for a common bacterial motility called twitching motility which allows the bacteria to crawl over surfaces. Experimentally, N. gonorrhoeae cells initially dispersed over a surface agglomerate into round microcolonies within hours. It is so far not known whether this clustering is driven entirely by the Tfp dynamics or if chemotactic interactions are needed. Thus, we investigate whether the agglomeration may stem solely from the pili-mediated attraction between cells. By developing a statistical model for pili-taxis, we try to explain the experimental measurements of the time evolution of the mean cluster size, number of clusters, and area fraction covered by the cells.

  5. Defenses against oxidative stress in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis: distinctive systems for different lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Seib, Kate L; Tseng, Hsing-Ju; McEwan, Alastair G; Apicella, Michael A; Jennings, Michael P

    2004-07-01

    Defenses against oxidative stress are crucial for the survival of the pathogens Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. An Mn(II) uptake system is involved in manganese (Mn)-dependent resistance to superoxide radicals in N. gonorrhoeae. Here, we show that accumulation of Mn also confers resistance to hydrogen peroxide killing via a catalase-independent mechanism. An mntC mutant of N. meningitidis is susceptible to oxidative killing, but supplementation of growth media with Mn does not enhance the organism's resistance to oxidative killing. N. meningitidis is able to grow in the presence of millimolar levels of Mn ion, in contrast to N. gonorrhoeae, whose growth is retarded at Mn concentrations >100 micromol/L, indicating that Mn homeostasis in the 2 species is probably quite different. N. meningitidis superoxide dismutase B plays a role in protection against oxidative killing. However, a sodC mutant of N. meningitidis is no more sensitive to oxidative killing than is the wild type. A cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp) is present in N. gonorrhoeae but not in N. meningitidis. Investigations of a ccp mutant revealed a role for Ccp in protection against hydrogen peroxide killing. These differences in oxidative defenses in the pathogenic Neisseria are most likely a result of their localization in different ecological niches. PMID:15195253

  6. Rapid identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis by using enzymatic profiles.

    PubMed Central

    D'Amato, R F; Eriquez, L A; Tomfohrde, K M; Singerman, E

    1978-01-01

    The enzymatic profiles of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, N. meningitidis, and related species were determined, using a total of 48 chromogenic substrates. Enzyme classes assayed for included glycosidases, aminopeptidases, phosphoamidases, proteases, lipases, esterases, and aryl sulfatase. A final test selection of 10 substrates, based upon their differential and reproducible characteristics, allowed the separation of N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis from each other and from all species tested within 4 h after primary isolation on modified Thayer-Martin medium. The need for subculturing suspect colonies from modified Thayer-Martin medium to chocolate medium with a subsequent loss of 18 to 24 h of identification is eliminated. PMID:203607

  7. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and humans perform an evolutionary LINE dance.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark T; Seifert, H Steven

    2011-05-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important mechanism for generating genetic diversity. As the number of sequenced genomes continues to increase, so do the examples of horizontal genetic exchange between both related and divergent organisms. Here we discuss the recent finding that certain strains of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae have incorporated a small fragment of human DNA sequence into their genomes. The horizontally acquired sequence exhibits 98-100% nucleotide identity to a 685 bp portion of the highly repetitive retrotransposable element L1 and its presence in the gonococcal genome has been confirmed by multiple molecular techniques. The possibility of similar L1 horizontal gene transfer events having occurred in other bacteria based on genomic sequence evidence is explored. Potential mechanisms of how N. gonorrhoeae was able to acquire and maintain this human sequence are also discussed in addition to the evolutionary implications of such an event. PMID:22016852

  8. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains determined by disk diffusion].

    PubMed

    Llanes Caballero, R; Acosta Giraldo, J C; Sosa Puente, J; Guzmán Hernández, D; Gutiérrez González, O; Llop Hernández, A

    1999-01-01

    The Gonoccocus Laboratory of "Pedro Kourí" Tropical Medicine Institute carried out a study of in vitro susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to penicillin, tetracycline, cefuroxime ceftriaxone, cefotaxine and ciprofoxacin by means of a disk diffusion method with the culture medium agar base GC plus supplement. In the first phase, the method was standardized and the reference N. gonorrhoeae ATCC 49226 strain was used whereas in the second phase, 50 gonococcal strains isolated in 8 provinces during 1995 and 1996 were examined. The results of such standardization confirmed that the antimicrobial susceptibility values were within the allowable limits. 52 and 34% of strains were resistant to penicillin and tetracycline respectively and all of them showed susceptibility to the rest of evaluated antimicrobial drugs. We recommend the use of the disk diffusion method for surveillance of gonococci resistance to these drugs in our country. PMID:10887570

  9. Pilin gene variation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: reassessing the old paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Stuart A.; Davies, John K.

    2009-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae displays considerable potential for antigenic variation as shown in human experimental studies. Various surface antigens can change either by antigenic variation using RecA-dependent recombination schemes (e.g., PilE antigenic variation), or, alternatively, through phase variation (on/off switching) in a RecA-independent fashion (e.g., Opa and LOS phase variation). PilE antigenic variation has been well documented over the years. However, with the availability of the Nesseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 genome sequence, considerable genetic advances have recently been made regarding the mechanistic considerations of the gene conversion event leading to an altered PilE protein. This review will compare the various models that have been presented and will highlight potential mechanistic problems that may constrain any genetic model for pilE gene variation. PMID:19396954

  10. Shuttle mutagenesis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: pilin null mutations lower DNA transformation competence.

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, H S; Ajioka, R S; Paruchuri, D; Heffron, F; So, M

    1990-01-01

    The method of shuttle mutagenesis has been extended to Neisseria gonorrhoeae. We have constructed a defective mini-Tn3 derivative that encodes chloramphenicol resistance in both N. gonorrhoeae and Escherichia coli and selected for mutations in the chloramphenicol resistance gene that express higher levels of antibiotic resistance in N. gonorrhoeae. Isogenic N. gonorrhoeae strains that differ only in pilin expression were constructed and used to test the effect of pilin null mutations on DNA transformation competence. PMID:2152910

  11. Production of Neisseria gonorrhoeae pili (fimbriae) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyne, P A; Haas, R; Meyer, T F; Davies, J K; Elleman, T C

    1992-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa K/2PfS, when transformed with an expression plasmid harboring the pilin gene (pilE1) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11, was able to express and assemble gonococcal pilin monomers into surface-associated pili, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and immunoelectron microscopy. Concomitant with the expression of gonococcal pili in P. aeruginosa was the virtual loss of production of P. aeruginosa K/2PfS pili normally associated with the host cell. Images PMID:1358873

  12. Strain-specific virulence-associated antigen of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, W A; Leong, J K; Hough, D M

    1975-01-01

    A strain-specific virulence-associated antigen has been found in Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain F-62. Using immunodiffusion in agar gel, it has been shown that the antigen is distinguishable from endotoxin and the virulence-associated toxic protein. It does not appear to be derived from pili. The antigen was not detected in T1 and/or T2 colony type cultures of 10 other isolates. It exhibited a possible partial immunological relationship with an antigen found in one additional strain. It was susceptible to digestion with Pronase and trypsin. Images PMID:804445

  13. Ceftibuten Resistance and Treatment Failure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Janice Y. C.; Ho, K. M.; Leung, Anna O. C.; Tiu, Felisa S. T.; Tsang, Grand K. L.; Lo, Angus C. T.; Tapsall, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections have been empirically treated in Hong Kong with a single oral 400-mg dose of ceftibuten since 1997. Following anecdotal reports of the treatment failure of gonorrhea with oral extended-spectrum cephalosporins, the current study was undertaken to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and molecular characteristics of isolates of N. gonorrhoeae among patients with putative treatment failure in a sexually transmitted disease clinic setting. Between October 2006 and August 2007, 44 isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were studied from patients identified clinically to have treatment failure with empirical ceftibuten. The ceftibuten MICs for three strains were found to have been 8 mg/liter. These strains were determined by N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing to belong to sequence type 835 (ST835) or the closely related ST2469. The testing of an additional eight archived ST835 strains revealed similarly elevated ceftibuten MICs. The penA gene sequences of these 11 isolates all had the mosaic pattern previously described as pattern X. Of note is that the ceftriaxone susceptibility results of these strains all fell within the susceptible range. It is concluded that ceftibuten resistance may contribute to the empirical treatment failure of gonorrhea caused by strains harboring the mosaic penA gene, which confers reduced susceptibility to oral extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Screening for such resistance in the routine clinical laboratory may be undertaken by the disk diffusion test. The continued monitoring of antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristics of N. gonorrhoeae isolates is important to ensure that control and prevention strategies remain effective. PMID:18663018

  14. [MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF DRUG RESISTANCE NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE HISTORY AND PROSPECTS].

    PubMed

    Bodoev, I N; Il'ina, E N

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococcus) is a strict human pathogen, which causes gonorrhea--an infectious disease, whose origin dates back to more than two thousand years. Due to the unique plasticity of the genetic material, these bacteria have acquired the capacity to adapt to the host immune system, cause repeated infections, as well as withstand antimicrobials. Since the introduction of antibiotics in 1930s, gonococcus has displayed its propensity to develop resistance to all clinically useful antibiotics. It is important to note that the known resistance determinants of N. gonorrhoeae were acquired through horizontal gene transfer, recombination and spontaneous mutagenesis, and may be located both in the chromosome and on the plasmid. After introduction of a new antimicrobial drug, gonococcus becomes resistant within two decades and replaces sensitive bacterial population. Currently Ceftriaxone is the last remaining antibiotic for first-line treatment of gonorrhea. However, the first gonococcus displaying high-level resistance to Ceftriaxone was isolated in Japan a few years ago. Therefore, in the near future, gonorrhea may become untreatable. In the present review, we discuss the chronology of the anti-gonorrhea drugs (antibiotics) replacement, the evolution of resistance mechanisms emergence and future perspectives of N. gonorrhoeae treatment. PMID:26665738

  15. Functional analysis of the Gonococcal Genetic Island of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Pachulec, Emilia; Siewering, Katja; Bender, Tobias; Heller, Eva-Maria; Salgado-Pabon, Wilmara; Schmoller, Shelly K; Woodhams, Katelynn L; Dillard, Joseph P; van der Does, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen that is responsible for the sexually-transmitted disease gonorrhea. N. gonorrhoeae encodes a T4SS within the Gonococcal Genetic Island (GGI), which secretes ssDNA directly into the external milieu. Type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) play a role in horizontal gene transfer and delivery of effector molecules into target cells. We demonstrate that GGI-like T4SSs are present in other β-proteobacteria, as well as in α- and γ-proteobacteria. Sequence comparison of GGI-like T4SSs reveals that the GGI-like T4SSs form a highly conserved unit that can be found located both on chromosomes and on plasmids. To better understand the mechanism of DNA secretion by N. gonorrhoeae, we performed mutagenesis of all genes encoded within the GGI, and studied the effects of these mutations on DNA secretion. We show that genes required for DNA secretion are encoded within the yaa-atlA and parA-parB regions, while genes encoded in the yfeB-exp1 region could be deleted without any effect on DNA secretion. Genes essential for DNA secretion are encoded within at least four different operons. PMID:25340397

  16. Preservation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae at -20 degrees C.

    PubMed Central

    Harbec, P S; Turcotte, P

    1996-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of preserving Neisseria gonorrhoeae at -20 degrees C, we studied its viability quantitatively and qualitatively for 12 and 18 months, respectively, in the following media: a gelatin-based medium used mainly to prepare dried gelatin discs (S. Yamai, Y. Obara, T. Nikkawa, Y Shimoda, and Y. Miyamoto, Br. J. Vener. Dis. 55:90-93, 1979), a simplified version (LSPQ preservation medium), and Trypticase soy broth with 10% (vol/vol) glycerol, a medium commonly used for preservation at -70 degrees C. The latter was studied for 4 months only. Four reference strains and two clinical isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were used. The storage temperature was rigorously preadjusted and monitored at -20 +/- 1 degree C during the entire project. After 12 months of storage, all strains remained viable in both gelatin-based media, whereas a significant loss of viability was observed in Trypticase soy broth-10% glycerol after only 4 months. After 18 months, five strains were still viable in both gelatin-based media and no significant difference was observed between antimicrobial susceptibility results and those of the original strains preserved at -70 degrees C. On the basis of these results, we believe that LSPQ preservation medium represents a good alternative for the storage of N. gonorrhoeae at -20 degrees C for at least a year. Furthermore, it is easy to prepare and use and can by stored at 4 to 8 degrees C for a year prior to use. PMID:8727891

  17. Resistance to penicillin and identification of penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae among clinical isolates in Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Crum, J W; Duangmani, C; Vibulyasekha, S; Suthisomboon, K

    1980-01-01

    Penicillin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae from 405 patients were studied by determination of penicillin minimal inhibitory concentrations an penicillinase production. Eighteen percent were identified as penicillin-producing N. gonorrhoeae and the mean minimal inhibitory concentration, for all except penicillin-producing strains, was 0.805 micrograms/ml. PMID:6778382

  18. Possible Mechanism of Decreased Susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to Penicillin

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, William; Saz, Arthur K.

    1975-01-01

    By use of 14C-labeled benzyl penicillin, it has been established that β-lactamases and/or acylases play no role in the resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to penicillin. It has been found, however, that very susceptible strains of the organisms (minimal inhibitory concentration, 0.008 μg/ml) bind 10 to 15 times as much penicillin as do moderately to highly resistant strains of the gonoccoccus (minimal inhibitory concentration, 0.125 to 2.0 μg/ml). It is postulated that this degree of change in binding components of the whole cell and whole cytoplasmic membrane is sufficient to account for the decreased susceptibility of the organism to penicillin. PMID:808158

  19. Transformation-deficient mutants of piliated Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, G D; Lacks, S A; Sparling, P F

    1989-01-01

    Seven transformation-deficient mutants of piliated, competent Neisseria gonorrhoeae were isolated by screening them for their inability to be transformed by chromosomal DNA after chemical mutagenesis. Three distinct classes of mutants were obtained, each of which was piliated, as determined by electron microscopy. One class exhibited abnormal colony morphology and was unable to take up DNA into a DNase-resistant state. A second class was morphologically normal and took up DNA into a DNase-resistant state normally, but was deficient in both chromosomal and plasmid transformation; mutations in these mutants may affect entry of DNA into the cell proper. A third class was similar to the second but was fully competent for plasmid transformation, suggesting that there was a defect in a late stage of chromosomal transformation. Images PMID:2563367

  20. A 26-base-pair repetitive sequence specific for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis genomic DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Correia, F F; Inouye, S; Inouye, M

    1986-01-01

    Two-dimensional heteroduplex mapping of Neisseria gonorrhoeae genomic DNA revealed a number of spots, indicating the existence of repetitive sequences. When one of the spots was extracted and used as a probe for Southern blot analysis, two HindIII bands (11.0 and 3.6 kilobases [kb]) of the genomic digest hybridized with approximately equal intensity. The 3.6-kb fragment was cloned and found to contain two different types of repeated sequence. One type was approximately 1.1 kb in length and was found at least twice in the entire genome. The other consisted of a 26-base-pair family GT(C/A)C(Py)G(Pu)TTTTTGTTAAT(Py)C(Pu)CTATA (Py, pyrimidine; Pu, purine) that was repeated at least 20 times in the entire genome. This repetitive sequence was found also in Neisseria meningitidis but not in various other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3091577

  1. The obligate human pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, is polyploid.

    PubMed

    Tobiason, Deborah M; Seifert, H Steven

    2006-06-01

    We show using several methodologies that the Gram-negative, diplococcal-bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae has more than one complete genome copy per cell. Gene dosage measurements demonstrated that only a single replication initiation event per chromosome occurs per round of cell division, and that there is a single origin of replication. The region containing the origin does not encode any genes previously associated with bacterial origins of replication. Quantitative PCR results showed that there are on average three genome copies per coccal cell unit. These findings allow a model for gonococcal DNA replication and cell division to be proposed, in which a minimum of two chromosomal copies exist per coccal unit within a monococcal or diplococcal cell, and these chromosomes replicate in unison to produce four chromosomal copies during cell division. Immune evasion via antigenic variation is an important mechanism that allows these organisms to continually infect a high risk population of people. We propose that polyploidy may be necessary for the high frequency gene conversion system that mediates pilin antigenic variation and the propagation of N. gonorrhoeae within its human hosts. PMID:16719561

  2. Mechanism of action of Neisseria gonorrhoeae O-acetylpeptidoglycan esterase, an SGNH serine esterase.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, John M; Weadge, Joel T; Clarke, Anthony J

    2013-01-25

    O-Acetylpeptidoglycan esterase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae functions to release O-acetyl groups from the C-6 position of muramoyl residues in O-acetylated peptidoglycan, thereby permitting the continued metabolism of this essential cell wall heteropolymer. It has been demonstrated to be a serine esterase with sequence similarity to the family CE-3 carbohydrate esterases of the CAZy classification system. In the absence of a three-dimensional structure for any Ape, further knowledge of its structure and function relationship is dependent on modeling and kinetic studies. In this study, we predicted Neisseria gonorrhoeae Ape1a to be an SGNH hydrolase with an adopted α/β-hydrolase fold containing a central twisted four-stranded parallel β-sheet flanked by six α-helices with the putative catalytic triad, Asp-366, His-369, and Ser-80 appropriately aligned within a pocket. The role of eight invariant and highly conserved residues localized to the active site was investigated by site-directed replacements coupled with kinetic characterization and binding studies of the resultant engineered enzymes. Based on these data and theoretical considerations, Gly-236 and Asn-268 were identified as participating at the oxyanion hole to stabilize the tetrahedral species in the reaction mechanism, whereas Gly-78, Asp-79, His-81, Asn-235, Thr-267, and Val-368 are proposed to position appropriately the catalytic residues and participate in substrate binding. PMID:23209280

  3. Mechanism of Action of Neisseria gonorrhoeae O-Acetylpeptidoglycan Esterase, an SGNH Serine Esterase*

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, John M.; Weadge, Joel T.; Clarke, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    O-Acetylpeptidoglycan esterase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae functions to release O-acetyl groups from the C-6 position of muramoyl residues in O-acetylated peptidoglycan, thereby permitting the continued metabolism of this essential cell wall heteropolymer. It has been demonstrated to be a serine esterase with sequence similarity to the family CE-3 carbohydrate esterases of the CAZy classification system. In the absence of a three-dimensional structure for any Ape, further knowledge of its structure and function relationship is dependent on modeling and kinetic studies. In this study, we predicted Neisseria gonorrhoeae Ape1a to be an SGNH hydrolase with an adopted α/β-hydrolase fold containing a central twisted four-stranded parallel β-sheet flanked by six α-helices with the putative catalytic triad, Asp-366, His-369, and Ser-80 appropriately aligned within a pocket. The role of eight invariant and highly conserved residues localized to the active site was investigated by site-directed replacements coupled with kinetic characterization and binding studies of the resultant engineered enzymes. Based on these data and theoretical considerations, Gly-236 and Asn-268 were identified as participating at the oxyanion hole to stabilize the tetrahedral species in the reaction mechanism, whereas Gly-78, Asp-79, His-81, Asn-235, Thr-267, and Val-368 are proposed to position appropriately the catalytic residues and participate in substrate binding. PMID:23209280

  4. Transcriptional landscape and essential genes of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Remmele, Christian W.; Xian, Yibo; Albrecht, Marco; Faulstich, Michaela; Fraunholz, Martin; Heinrichs, Elisabeth; Dittrich, Marcus T.; Müller, Tobias; Reinhardt, Richard; Rudel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The WHO has recently classified Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a super-bacterium due to the rapid spread of antibiotic resistant derivatives and an overall dramatic increase in infection incidences. Genome sequencing has identified potential genes, however, little is known about the transcriptional organization and the presence of non-coding RNAs in gonococci. We performed RNA sequencing to define the transcriptome and the transcriptional start sites of all gonococcal genes and operons. Numerous new transcripts including 253 potentially non-coding RNAs transcribed from intergenic regions or antisense to coding genes were identified. Strikingly, strong antisense transcription was detected for the phase-variable opa genes coding for a family of adhesins and invasins in pathogenic Neisseria, that may have regulatory functions. Based on the defined transcriptional start sites, promoter motifs were identified. We further generated and sequenced a high density Tn5 transposon library to predict a core of 827 gonococcal essential genes, 133 of which have no known function. Our combined RNA-Seq and Tn-Seq approach establishes a detailed map of gonococcal genes and defines the first core set of essential gonococcal genes. PMID:25143534

  5. Current and future antimicrobial treatment of gonorrhoea - the rapidly evolving Neisseria gonorrhoeae continues to challenge.

    PubMed

    Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has developed antimicrobial resistance (AMR) to all drugs previously and currently recommended for empirical monotherapy of gonorrhoea. In vitro resistance, including high-level, to the last option ceftriaxone and sporadic failures to treat pharyngeal gonorrhoea with ceftriaxone have emerged. In response, empirical dual antimicrobial therapy (ceftriaxone 250-1000 mg plus azithromycin 1-2 g) has been introduced in several particularly high-income regions or countries. These treatment regimens appear currently effective and should be considered in all settings where local quality assured AMR data do not support other therapeutic options. However, the dual antimicrobial regimens, implemented in limited geographic regions, will not entirely prevent resistance emergence and, unfortunately, most likely it is only a matter of when, and not if, treatment failures with also these dual antimicrobial regimens will emerge. Accordingly, novel affordable antimicrobials for monotherapy or at least inclusion in new dual treatment regimens, which might need to be considered for all newly developed antimicrobials, are essential. Several of the recently developed antimicrobials deserve increased attention for potential future treatment of gonorrhoea. In vitro activity studies examining collections of geographically, temporally and genetically diverse gonococcal isolates, including multidrug-resistant strains particularly with resistance to ceftriaxone and azithromycin, are important. Furthermore, understanding of effects and biological fitness of current and emerging (in vitro induced/selected and in vivo emerged) genetic resistance mechanisms for these antimicrobials, prediction of resistance emergence, time-kill curve analysis to evaluate antibacterial activity, appropriate mice experiments, and correlates between genetic and phenotypic laboratory parameters, and clinical treatment outcomes, would also be valuable. Subsequently, appropriately designed

  6. Regulation of catalase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Effects of oxidant stress and exposure to human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H Y; Hassett, D J; Bean, K; Cohen, M S

    1992-09-01

    We studied the effects of oxidant stress on the catalase activity and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. N. gonorrhoeae is an obligate pathogen of man that evokes a remarkable but ineffective neutrophil response. Gonococci make no superoxide dismutase but express high catalase activity. Gonococcal catalase activity increased threefold when organisms were subjected to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide. This increase in catalase activity was marked by a parallel increase in protein concentration recognized by a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against the purified gonococcal enzyme. Catalase was primarily localized to the gonococcal cytoplasm in the presence or absence of stress; only a single isoenzyme of catalase could be identified. Exposure of gonococci to neutrophil-derived oxidants was accomplished by stimulating neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate or by using gonococcal Opa variants that interacted with neutrophils with different degrees of efficiency. Gonococci exposed to neutrophils demonstrated a twofold increase in catalase activity in spite of some reduction in viability. Exposure of gonococci to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide made the organisms significantly more resistant to higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and to neutrophils than control organisms. These results suggest that catalase is an important defense for N. gonorrhoeae during attack by human neutrophils. The rapid response of this enzyme to hydrogen peroxide should be taken into consideration in studies designed to evaluate the interaction between neutrophils and gonococci. PMID:1522209

  7. Mechanisms of iron acquisition by the human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Kyle H; Dyer, David W

    2003-09-01

    It is well established that bacterial pathogenesis is dependent on the ability to acquire iron within the host. The success of the highly adapted obligate human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis (NM) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) can be attributed in part to the efficient utilization of multiple host iron (Fe) sources, allowing replication on mucosal surfaces, in the bloodstream, and intracellularly. Most Gram-negative bacterial strategies for scavenging iron from the human host rely on the TonB protein to energize active iron transport across the outer membrane. Pathogenic Neisseria express multiple high-affinity iron transporters including a family of two-component TonB-dependent receptors as well as multiple single-component TonB-dependent Fe transporters. This review describes our current understanding of the mechanisms Neisseria have evolved to utilize various iron sources encountered during infection of the human host. Recent studies have provided insight into the interaction of neisserial outer membrane receptors with host iron carrier proteins. Emerging structural information on neisserial iron transporters will be compared with the crystal structures and biochemical data available for homologous Escherichia coli TonB-dependent Fe-siderophore receptors. In the process, we will highlight the aspects of the iron transport process that are unique and those that remain to be experimentally demonstrated in Neisseria. These include receptor structure/function, the mechanism of iron removal from protein ligands, the fate of Fe and heme-Fe after traversing the outer membrane, and the role of TonB-associated energy in receptor functions. Finally, we will discuss regulatory mechanisms that control the expression of iron scavenging systems. The investigation of iron metabolism in NM and NG is important for understanding the biochemistry of this virulence factor, the development of vaccines targeted at outer membrane iron receptors, and therapeutic interventions

  8. Evidence for a reserpine-affected mechanism of resistance to tetracycline in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Joaquim; Ribera, Anna; Jurado, Angels; Marco, Francesc; Vila, Jordi

    2005-10-01

    The presence of a reserpine-affected mechanism of tetracycline resistance was investigated in 17 Neisseria gonorrhoeae clinical isolates. To establish this fact the MIC of tetracycline in the presence and absence of reserpine was determined, and, in addition, mechanisms of tetracycline resistance were analyzed by PCR. The results showed that reserpine affects the MIC of tetracycline at least 4-fold in all isolates, including those containing the tetM gene. An inhibitory effect of reserpine against the MtrCDE efflux system was ruled out by using strains either with an inactive or with an unrepressed MtrCDE system. The results suggest the presence of a constitutive system of resistance to tetracycline, by a possible efflux pump, which may be inhibited by reserpine. Further studies are required to determine the exact nature of the action of reserpine on the MIC of tetracycline. PMID:16309425

  9. Neisseria gonorrhoeae suppresses the oxidative burst of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Criss, Alison K.; Seifert, H. Steven

    2008-01-01

    Symptomatic infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) results in a potent polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-driven inflammatory response, but the mechanisms by which Gc withstands PMN attack are poorly defined. Here we report that Gc can suppress the PMN oxidative burst, a central component of the PMN antimicrobial arsenal. Primary human PMNs remained viable after exposure to liquid-grown, exponential-phase, opacity-associated protein (Opa)-negative Gc of strains FA1090 and MS11 but did not generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), even after bacterial opsonization. Liquid-grown FA1090 Gc expressing OpaB, an Opa protein previously correlated with PMN ROS production, elicited a minor PMN oxidative burst. PMN ROS production in response to Opa− and OpaB+ Gc was markedly enhanced if bacteria were agar-grown or if liquid-grown bacteria were heat killed. Liquid-grown Opa- Gc inhibited the PMN oxidative burst elicited by isogenic dead bacteria, formylated peptides or Staphylococcus aureus but did not inhibit PMN ROS production by OpaB+ Gc or phorbol esters. Suppression of the oxidative burst required Gc-PMN contact and bacterial protein synthesis but not phagocytosis. These results suggest that viable Gc directly inhibits PMN signaling pathways required for induction of the oxidative burst, which may contribute to gonococcal pathogenesis during inflammatory stages of gonorrheal disease. PMID:18684112

  10. Radioimmunoassay for detection of antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Usategui, M; Savard, E V; Mondabaugh, S M; Keigher, N L

    1982-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed and evaluated for the serological diagnosis of gonorrhea. Purified gonococcal antigen was obtained from a culture of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (B370) and labeled with 125I for use in a double-antibody test system. The test was evaluated in populations segregated by sex and risk. The specificity of the assay in females was 90.2% (55/61) in low risk, 82.2% (2,245/ 2,732) in medium risk, and 54.1% (335/619) in high risk. The sensitivity was 69% (20/29) in medium risk and 78.3% (288/367) in high risk. In males, test specificity was 92.3% (24/26) in low risk and 50% (48/96) in high risk. The sensitivity was 70.8% (143/202) in the high-risk group. The data in this study indicate that this assay should not be employed for screening of either high- or medium-risk populations. PMID:6809784

  11. Neisseria gonorrhoeae prepilin export studied in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, B; Taha, M K; Pugsley, A P; Marchal, C

    1991-01-01

    The pilE gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11 and a series of pilE-phoA gene fusions were expressed in Escherichia coli. The PhoA hybrid proteins were shown to be located in the membrane fraction of the cells, and the prepilin product of the pilE gene was shown to be located exclusively in the cytoplasmic membrane. Analysis of the prepilin-PhoA hybrids showed that the first 20 residues of prepilin can function as an efficient export (signal) sequence. This segment of prepilin includes an unbroken sequence of 8 hydrophobic or neutral residues that form the N-terminal half of a 16-residue hydrophobic region of prepilin. Neither prepilin nor the prepilin-PhoA hybrids were processed by E. coli leader peptidase despite the presence of two consensus cleavage sites for this enzyme just after this hydrophobic region. Comparisons of the specific molecular activities of the four prepilin-PhoA hybrids and analysis of their susceptibility to proteolysis by trypsin and proteinase K in spheroplasts allow us to propose two models for the topology of prepilin in the E. coli cytoplasmic membrane. The bulk of the evidence supports the simplest of the two models, in which prepilin is anchored in the membrane solely by the N-terminal hydrophobic domain, with the extreme N terminus facing the cytoplasm and the longer C terminus facing the periplasm. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:1938955

  12. Genetic transformation of genes for protein II in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Schwalbe, R S; Cannon, J G

    1986-01-01

    The protein II (PII) outer membrane proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae are a family of heat-modifiable proteins that are subject to phase variation, in which the synthesis of different PII species is turned on and off at a high frequency. Transformation of PII genes from a donor gonococcal strain into a recipient strain was detected with monoclonal antibodies specific for the PII proteins of the donor. Individual PII protein-expressing transformants generally bound only one donor-specific PII monoclonal antibody. Recovery of transformants expressing a donor-specific PII protein depended on the PII protein expression state of the donor: the transformed population bound only monoclonal antibodies specific for PII proteins that were expressed in the donor. Colony variants with an altered frequency of switching of PII protein expression were isolated, but the altered switch phenotype did not cotransform with the PII structural gene. These results provide genetic evidence that PII proteins are the products of different genes and that expressed and unexpressed forms of the PII gene are different from each other. Images PMID:3087951

  13. Neisseria gonorrhoeae cell envelope: permeability to hydrophobic molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Lysko, P G; Morse, S A

    1981-01-01

    Isogenic variants of antibiotic-resistant and -sensitive Neisseria gonorrhoeae were examined for differences in the inhibition of oxygen uptake by steroid hormones. Mutants designated as env, which possessed cell envelope mutations allowing phenotypic suppression of low-level antibiotic resistance, were more sensitive to steroid hormone inhibition of oxygen uptake than the wild-type parental strains. Possession of an mtr locus, which confers nonspecific resistance to multiple antibiotics, dyes, and detergents, was also associated with an increase in resistance to steroid hormone inhibition of oxygen uptake. The penA2 locus, which confers an eightfold increase in resistance to penicillin, was not responsible for the increased resistance to steroid hormones. Phospholipids in the outer membrane of intact env-2 cells were susceptible to digestion by phospholipase C, indicating exposure of phospholipid head groups on the outer surface. Cells of a wild-type and mtr-2 strain were not susceptible to phospholipase C digestion unless they were pretreated with mixed exoglycosidases. This pretreatment also increased the sensitivity of mtr-2 cells to progesterone inhibition of O2 uptake. These data suggest that the permeability of the gonococcus to hydrophobic antibiotic and steroid molecules is mediated by the degree of phospholipid exposure on the outer membrane. PMID:6780535

  14. Characterization of the ftsZ cell division gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: expression in Escherichia coli and N. gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Salimnia, H; Radia, A; Bernatchez, S; Beveridge, T J; Dillon, J R

    2000-01-01

    We cloned the cell division gene ftsZ of the gram-negative coccus Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) strain CH811, characterized it genetically and phenotypically, and studied its localization in N. gonorrhoeae and Escherichia coli (Ec). The 1,179-bp ORF of ftsZ(Ng) encodes a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 41.5 kDa. Protein sequence alignments indicate that FtsZ(Ng) is similar to other FtsZ proteins and contains the conserved GTP binding motif. FtsZ homologues were identified in several N. gonorrhoeae strains and in Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria sicca, Neisseria polysaccharae and Neisseria cinerea either by Western blot or by PCR-Southern blot analysis. Attempts to inactivate the ftsZ(Ng) on the chromosome failed, indicating that it is essential for gonococcal growth. FtsZ(Ng) was synthesized in an in vitro transcription/translation system and was shown to be 43 kDa, the same size as in Western blots. Expression of the ftsZ(Ng) gene from nongonococcal promoters resulted in a filamentous phenotype in E. coli. Under controlled expression, the FtsZ(Ng)-GFP fusion protein localized at the mid-cell division site in E. coli. E. coli expressing high levels of the FtsZ(Ng)-GFP fusion protein formed filaments and exhibited different fluorescent structures including helices, spiral tubules extending from pole to pole, and regularly spaced dots or bands that did not localize at the middle of the cell. Expression of the FtsZ(Ng)-GFP fusion protein in N. gonorrhoeae resulted in abnormal cell division as shown by electron microscopy. FtsZ(Ng)-GFP fusions were also expressed in a gonococcal background using a unique shuttle vector. PMID:10648099

  15. Efficacy of a Novel Tricyclic Topoisomerase Inhibitor in a Murine Model of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Infection.

    PubMed

    Savage, Victoria J; Charrier, Cédric; Salisbury, Anne-Marie; Box, Helen; Chaffer-Malam, Nathan; Huxley, Anthony; Kirk, Ralph; Noonan, Gary M; Mohmed, Sarfraz; Craighead, Mark W; Ratcliffe, Andrew J; Best, Stuart A; Stokes, Neil R

    2016-09-01

    There is an urgent need for new antibiotics to treat multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae In this report, the microbiology, in vivo pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of REDX05931, a representative novel tricyclic topoisomerase inhibitor, were evaluated. REDX05931 demonstrated high oral bioavailability in mice and reduced N. gonorrhoeae infection after a single dose in a mouse model of gonorrhea. These data support the potential of this series of small molecules as a new treatment for drug-resistant gonorrheal infections. PMID:27324777

  16. Anaerobic survival of clinical isolates and laboratory strains of Neisseria gonorrhoea: use in transfer and storage.

    PubMed Central

    Short, H B; Clark, V L; Kellogg, D S; Young, F E

    1982-01-01

    Eleven laboratory strains and 67 clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were tested for the ability to survive during anaerobic incubation. The survival of the laboratory strains was dependent on auxotype, temperature, and cell density on agar plates. For both the laboratory strains and the clinical isolates, anaerobic survival was better at lower temperatures. We concluded that anaerobic incubation, for as long as 7 days, is useful when transporting or storing N. gonorrhoeae. Images PMID:6808019

  17. Electron capture gas chromatographic detection of acethylmethylcarbinol produced by neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Morse, C D; Brooks, J B; Kellogg, D S

    1976-01-01

    Acetylmethylcarbinol (acetoin) production by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and other Neisseria species was established by gas-liquid chromatography and by mass spectrometric data. Sixty-nine isolates of Neisseria were tested by incubating them in a chemically defined fluid medium. The medium was extracted with organic solvents and derivatized with heptafluorobutryic anhydride for gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Cultures of 58 of the same strains were tested with the conventional Voges-Proskauer reagents, and results were compared with those of gas-liquid chromatography. When glucose was used as an energy source, N. gonorrhoeae, some N. meningitidis, and N. lactamica produced enough acetoin in 16 h to be detectable by either method, whereas other Neisseria species produce amounts detectable only by gas chromatography. The conventional acetylmethylcarbinol test with the chemically defined medium and maltose as an energy source might be used to develop methods that would differentiate certain members of the genus, including the pathogenic species. PMID:815266

  18. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay with High-Resolution Melting Analysis for Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Donà, Valentina; Kasraian, Sara; Lupo, Agnese; Guilarte, Yuvia N; Hauser, Christoph; Furrer, Hansjakob; Unemo, Magnus; Low, Nicola; Endimiani, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to antibiotics used against Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections is a major public health concern. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) testing relies on time-consuming culture-based methods. Development of rapid molecular tests for detection of AMR determinants could provide valuable tools for surveillance and epidemiological studies and for informing individual case management. We developed a fast (<1.5-h) SYBR green-based real-time PCR method with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. One triplex and three duplex reactions included two sequences for N. gonorrhoeae identification and seven determinants of resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs), azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and spectinomycin. The method was validated by testing 39 previously fully characterized N. gonorrhoeae strains, 19 commensal Neisseria species strains, and an additional panel of 193 gonococcal isolates. Results were compared with results of culture-based AMR determination. The assay correctly identified N. gonorrhoeae and the presence or absence of the seven AMR determinants. There was some cross-reactivity with nongonococcal Neisseria species, and the detection limit was 10(3) to 10(4) genomic DNA (gDNA) copies/reaction. Overall, the platform accurately detected resistance to ciprofloxacin (sensitivity and specificity, 100%), ceftriaxone (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 90%), cefixime (sensitivity, 92%; specificity, 94%), azithromycin (sensitivity and specificity, 100%), and spectinomycin (sensitivity and specificity, 100%). In conclusion, our methodology accurately detects mutations that generate resistance to antibiotics used to treat gonorrhea. Low assay sensitivity prevents direct diagnostic testing of clinical specimens, but this method can be used to screen collections of gonococcal isolates for AMR more quickly than current culture-based AMR testing. PMID:27225407

  19. Induction and repression of outer membrane proteins by anaerobic growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, V L; Campbell, L A; Palermo, D A; Evans, T M; Klimpel, K W

    1987-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is generally considered to be an obligate aerobe; it can, however, grow in the absence of oxygen by anaerobic respiration by using nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor. The outer membrane protein compositions of aerobically and anaerobically grown N. gonorrhoeae strains were compared by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Anaerobically grown strains expressed at least three proteins (Pan 1 to Pan 3) at much higher levels than did aerobically grown cells. Conversely, at least five other proteins (Pox 1 to Pox 5) were found to be expressed at significantly higher levels in aerobically grown cells. None of the Pan or Pox proteins were heat modifiable, and none of the heat-modifiable protein IIs or other major outer membrane proteins (protein I, protein III, pilin, or H-8 protein) were significantly altered in expression by anaerobic growth. There were also no apparent differences in lipopolysaccharide composition in aerobically and anaerobically grown gonococci. The regulation of protein expression by oxygen availability suggests that anaerobic growth is a physiologically significant state for this organism. Images PMID:3106220

  20. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Connor, Daniel O; Zantow, Jonas; Hust, Michael; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:26859666

  1. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Daniel O.; Zantow, Jonas; Hust, Michael; Bier, Frank F.; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:26859666

  2. An evaluation of the role of properdin in alternative pathway activation on Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sarika; Ferreira, Viviana P; Cortes, Claudio; Pangburn, Michael K; Rice, Peter A; Ram, Sanjay

    2010-07-01

    Properdin, a positive regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement is important in innate immune defenses against invasive neisserial infections. Recently, commercially available unfractionated properdin was shown to bind to certain biological surfaces, including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which facilitated C3 deposition. Unfractionated properdin contains aggregates or high-order oligomers, in addition to its physiological "native" (dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric) forms. We examined the role of properdin in AP activation on diverse strains of Neisseria meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae specifically using native versus unfractionated properdin. C3 deposition on Neisseria decreased markedly when properdin function was blocked using an anti-properdin mAb or when properdin was depleted from serum. Maximal AP-mediated C3 deposition on Neisseriae even at high (80%) serum concentrations required properdin. Consistent with prior observations, preincubation of bacteria with unfractionated properdin, followed by the addition of properdin-depleted serum resulted in higher C3 deposition than when bacteria were incubated with properdin-depleted serum alone. Unexpectedly, none of 10 Neisserial strains tested bound native properdin. Consistent with its inability to bind to Neisseriae, preincubating bacteria with native properdin followed by the addition of properdin-depleted serum did not cause detectable increases in C3 deposition. However, reconstituting properdin-depleted serum with native properdin a priori enhanced C3 deposition on all strains of Neisseria tested. In conclusion, the physiological forms of properdin do not bind directly to either N. meningitidis or N. gonorrhoeae but play a crucial role in augmenting AP-dependent C3 deposition on the bacteria through the "conventional" mechanism of stabilizing AP C3 convertases. PMID:20530262

  3. Transcript analysis of nrrF, a Fur repressed sRNA of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Like most microorganisms, Neisseria gonorrhoeae alters gene expression in response to iron availability. The ferric uptake regulator Fur has been shown to be involved in controlling this response, but the extent of this involvement remains unknown. It is known that in addition to working directly to...

  4. Decline in Decreased Cephalosporin Susceptibility and Increase in Azithromycin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Sawatzky, P.; Liu, G.; Allen, V; Lefebvre, B.; Hoang, L.; Drews, S.; Horsman, G.; Wylie, J.; Haldane, D.; Garceau, R.; Ratnam, S.; Wong, T.; Archibald, C.; Mulvey, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance profiles were determined for Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains isolated in Canada during 2010–2014. The proportion of isolates with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins declined significantly between 2011 and 2014, whereas azithromycin resistance increased significantly during that period. Continued surveillance of antimicrobial drug susceptibilities is imperative to inform treatment guidelines. PMID:26689114

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Sequence Type 1407, a Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, A; Ciammaruconi, A; Carannante, A; Neri, A; Fazio, C; Fortunato, A; Palozzi, A M; Vacca, P; Fillo, S; Lista, F; Stefanelli, P

    2015-01-01

    Gonorrhea may become untreatable due to the spread of resistant or multidrug-resistant strains. Cefixime-resistant gonococci belonging to sequence type 1407 have been described worldwide. We report the genome sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain G2891, a multidrug-resistant isolate of sequence type 1407, collected in Italy in 2013. PMID:26272575

  6. A modified reduced transport fluid for the preservation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae during transport.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, M H; Koralewski, F F; Kindermann, R A

    1975-10-11

    Reduced transport fluid (RTF) was modified by altering its pH and by the addition of a yeast dialysate. This reduced transport yeast-containing fluid (RTYF) was shown to be superior to RTF in maintaining viability of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in cultures and in clinical material. PMID:242082

  7. Microbiological Characteristics of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Infections in South African Women

    PubMed Central

    de Waaij, Dewi J.; Bos, Myrte; van der Eem, Lisette; Bébéar, Cécile; Mbambazela, Nontembeko; Ouburg, Sander; Peters, Remco P. H.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed data of 263 women with at least one genital or anorectal sexually transmitted infection from a cross-sectional study conducted in rural South Africa. We provide new insights concerning the concurrence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, and Trichomonas vaginalis infections as well as the characteristics of bacterial loads. PMID:26511740

  8. Alterations in Dihydropteroate Synthetase in Cell-Free Extracts of Sulfanilamide-Resistant Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Richard I.; Corman, Leonard; Morse, Stephen A.; Artenstein, Malcolm S.

    1974-01-01

    Extracts from Neisseria meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae with varying susceptibility to sulfanilamide have been investigated for dihydropteroate synthetase activity. Sulfanilamide was a competitive inhibitor of dihydropteroate synthetase with respect to p-aminobenzoate in extracts from both species. Though the Km for p-aminobenzoate was unaffected, the Ki for sulfanilamide increased and the Vmax decreased as the strains' resistance to sulfanilamide increased. Temperature studies have revealed differences in the dihydropteroate synthetase from N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae. A direct relationship was observed between the minimal inhibitory concentration of sulfanilamide determined in vitro and the ratio of Ki/Km. This ratio may be a molecular explanation of sulfanilamide resistance for both N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:15825393

  9. Purification and biochemical characterization of DnaK and its transcriptional activator RpoH from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Shalini; Beckham, Simone A; Davies, John K; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2014-12-01

    DnaK plays a central role in stress response in the important human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The genes encoding the DnaK chaperone machine (DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE) in N. gonorrhoeae are transcribed from RpoH (σ(32))-dependent promoters. In this study, we cloned, purified and biochemically characterised N. gonorrhoeae DnaK (NgDnaK) and RpoH. The NgDnaK and RpoH sequences are 73 and 50 % identical to the sequences of their respective E. coli counterparts. Similar to EcDnaK, nucleotide-free NgDnaK exists as a mix of monomers, dimers and higher oligomeric species in solution, and dissociates into monomers on addition of ATP. Like E. coli σ(32), RpoH of N. gonorrhoeae is monomeric in solution. Kinetic analysis of the basal ATPase activity of purified NgDnaK revealed a V max of 193 pmol phosphate released per minute per microgram DnaK (which is significantly higher than reported basal ATPase activity of EcDnaK), and the turnover number against ATP was 0.4 min(-1) under our assay conditions. Nucleotide-free NgDnaK bound a short model substrate, NR-peptide, with micromolar affinity close to that reported for EcDnaK. Our analysis showed that interaction between N. gonorrhoeae RpoH and DnaK appears to be ATP-dependent and non-specific, in stark contrast to the E. coli DnaK system where σ(32) and DnaK interact as monomers even in the absence of ATP. Sequence comparison showed that the DnaK-binding site of σ(32) is not conserved in RpoH. Our findings suggest that the mechanism of DnaK/RpoH recognition in N. gonorrhoeae is different from that in E. coli. PMID:25156536

  10. Accurate detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae ciprofloxacin susceptibility directly from genital and extragenital clinical samples: towards genotype-guided antimicrobial therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Marcus J.; Hall, Catherine L.; Miari, Victoria F.; Cole, Michelle; Laing, Ken G.; Jagatia, Heena; Harding-Esch, Emma; Monahan, Irene M.; Planche, Timothy; Hinds, Jason; Ison, Catherine A.; Chisholm, Stephanie; Butcher, Philip D.; Sadiq, Syed Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increasing use of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) as the primary means of diagnosing gonococcal infection has resulted in diminished availability of Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial susceptibility data. We conducted a prospective diagnostic assessment of a real-time PCR assay (NGSNP) enabling direct detection of gonococcal ciprofloxacin susceptibility from a range of clinical sample types. Methods NGSNP, designed to discriminate an SNP associated with ciprofloxacin resistance within the N. gonorrhoeae genome, was validated using a characterized panel of geographically diverse isolates (n = 90) and evaluated to predict ciprofloxacin susceptibility directly on N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT lysates derived from genital (n = 174) and non-genital (n = 116) samples (n = 290), from 222 culture-confirmed clinical episodes of gonococcal infection. Results NGSNP correctly genotyped all phenotypically susceptible (n = 49) and resistant (n = 41) panel isolates. Ciprofloxacin-resistant N. gonorrhoeae was responsible for infection in 29.7% (n = 66) of clinical episodes evaluated. Compared with phenotypic susceptibility testing, NGSNP demonstrated sensitivity and specificity of 95.8% (95% CI 91.5%–98.3%) and 100% (95% CI 94.7%–100%), respectively, for detecting ciprofloxacin-susceptible N. gonorrhoeae, with a positive predictive value of 100% (95% CI 97.7%–100%). Applied to urogenital (n = 164), rectal (n = 40) and pharyngeal samples alone (n = 30), positive predictive values were 100% (95% CI 96.8%–100%), 100% (95% CI 87.2%–100%) and 100% (95% CI 82.4%–100%), respectively. Conclusions Genotypic prediction of N. gonorrhoeae ciprofloxacin susceptibility directly from clinical samples was highly accurate and, in the absence of culture, will facilitate use of tailored therapy for gonococcal infection, sparing use of current empirical treatment regimens and enhancing acquisition of susceptibility data for

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strain NG_869 with Penicillin, Tetracycline and Ciprofloxacin Resistance Determinants Isolated from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ang, Geik Yong; Yu, Choo Yee; Yong, Delicia Ann; Cheong, Yuet Meng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-06-01

    Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted infection caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the increasing reports of multidrug-resistant gonococcal isolates are a global public health care concern. Herein, we report the genome sequence of N. gonorrhoeae strain NG_869 isolated from Malaysia which may provide insights into the drug resistance determinants in gonococcal bacteria. PMID:27570316

  12. Multicenter Investigation of Gepotidacin (GSK2140944) Agar Dilution Quality Control Determinations for Neisseria gonorrhoeae ATCC 49226.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Fedler, Kelley A; Scangarella-Oman, Nicole E; Ross, James E; Flamm, Robert K

    2016-07-01

    Gepotidacin, a novel triazaacenaphthylene antibacterial agent, is the first in a new class of type IIA topoisomerase inhibitors with activity against many biothreat and conventional pathogens, including Neisseria gonorrhoeae To assist ongoing clinical studies of gepotidacin to treat gonorrhea, a multilaboratory quality assurance investigation determined the reference organism (N. gonorrhoeae ATCC 49226) quality control MIC range to be 0.25 to 1 μg/ml (88.8% of gepotidacin MIC results at the 0.5 μg/ml mode). PMID:27161642

  13. Induction of HIV-1 long terminal repeat-mediated transcription by Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Adrienne; Boulton, Ian C; Pongoski, Jodi; Cochrane, Alan; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2003-03-01

    Gonorrhoea enhances the transmission of HIV through increased viral shedding and the increased probability of seroconversion among previously HIV-negative individuals. However, the mechanism(s) underlying these influences remain poorly understood. We demonstrated that exposure to Neisseria gonorrhoeae induces the nuclear factor kappa B-dependent transcription from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat in derivatives of the Jurkat CD4 T cell line. These data suggest that gonococcal infection directly impacts HIV-1 transmission through the localized stimulation of viral expression. PMID:12598784

  14. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection protects human endocervical epithelial cells from apoptosis via expression of host antiapoptotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Follows, S A; Murlidharan, J; Massari, P; Wetzler, L M; Genco, C A

    2009-09-01

    Several microbial pathogens can modulate the host apoptotic response to infection, which may contribute to immune evasion. Various studies have reported that infection with the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae can either inhibit or induce apoptosis. N. gonorrhoeae infection initiates at the mucosal epithelium, and in women, cells from the ectocervix and endocervix are among the first host cells encountered by this pathogen. In this study, we defined the antiapoptotic effect of N. gonorrhoeae infection in human endocervical epithelial cells (End/E6E7 cells). We first established that N. gonorrhoeae strain FA1090B failed to induce cell death in End/E6E7 cells. Subsequently, we demonstrated that stimulation with N. gonorrhoeae protected these cells from staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis. Importantly, only End/E6E7 cells incubated with live bacteria and in direct association with N. gonorrhoeae were protected from STS-induced apoptosis, while heat-killed and antibiotic-killed bacteria failed to induce protection. Stimulation of End/E6E7 cells with live N. gonorrhoeae induced NF-kappaB activation and resulted in increased gene expression of the NF-kappaB-regulated antiapoptotic genes bfl-1, cIAP-2, and c-FLIP. Furthermore, cIAP-2 protein levels also increased in End/E6E7 cells incubated with gonococci. Collectively, our results indicate that the antiapoptotic effect of N. gonorrhoeae in human endocervical epithelial cells results from live infection via expression of host antiapoptotic proteins. Securing an intracellular niche through the inhibition of apoptosis may be an important mechanism utilized by N. gonorrhoeae for microbial survival and immune evasion in cervical epithelial cells. PMID:19546192

  15. Inversion of Moraxella lacunata type 4 pilin gene sequences by a Neisseria gonorrhoeae site-specific recombinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rozsa, F W; Meyer, T F; Fussenegger, M

    1997-01-01

    A plasmid library of Neisseria gonorrhoeae sequences was screened for the ability to mediate recombinations on a sequence containing the Moraxella lacunata type 4 pilin gene invertible region in Escherichia coli. A plasmid containing the N. gonorrhoeae sequence encoding the putative recombinase (gcr) was identified and sequenced. Plasmids containing gcr were able to mediate site-specific recombinations despite a weak amino acid homology to Piv, the native M. lacunata pilin gene invertase. The gcr gene is present only in pathogenic strains of Neisseria tested; however, in our assays gene knockouts of gcr did not alter the variation of surface features that play a role in the pathogenesis of N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:9079926

  16. Comparative characterization of the iga gene encoding IgA1 protease in Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Lomholt, H; Poulsen, K; Kilian, M

    1995-02-01

    Cloning and sequencing of the IgA1 protease gene (iga) from Neisseria meningitidis strain HF13 showed an overall structure equivalent to iga genes from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae, although no region corresponding to the gonococcal alpha-peptide was evident. An additional 18 N. meningitidis and 3 H. influenzae iga genes were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction technique and sequenced corresponding approximately to the N-terminal half of the mature enzyme. Comparative analyses of a total of 29 iga genes showed that pathogenic Neisseria have iga genes with a significantly lower degree of heterogeneity than H. influenzae iga genes. Recombinational events indicated by mosaic-like structures corresponding to those found among N. gonorrhoeae protease genes were detected among N. meningitidis iga genes. One region showed characteristic differences in sequence and length which correlated with each of the different cleavage specificities. Meningococci were extremely conserved in this region with no evidence of recombination between isolates of different cleavage specificities. Sequences further downstream showed no obvious relationship with enzyme cleavage type. This region consisted of conserved areas interspersed with highly variable areas. Amino acid sequence homologies in the variable regions of meningococci reflected the antigenic types defined by using polyclonal neutralizing antibodies. PMID:7783620

  17. Non-cytotoxic nanomaterials enhance antimicrobial activities of cefmetazole against multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan-Hui; Yen, Muh-Yong; Ho, Chao-Chi; Wu, Ping; Wang, Chien-Chun; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Chen, Pai-Shan; Chen, Wei; Hsieh, Wan-Yu; Chen, Huei-Wen

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae has led to difficulties in treating patients, and novel strategies to prevent and treat this infection are urgently needed. Here, we examined 21 different nanomaterials for their potential activity against N. gonorrhoeae (ATCC 49226). Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 120 nm) showed the greatest potency for reducing N. gonorrhoeae colony formation (MIC: 12.5 µg/ml) and possessed the dominant influence on the antibacterial activity with their properties of the nanoparticles within a concentration range that did not induce cytotoxicity in human fibroblasts or epithelial cells. Electron microscopy revealed that the Ag NPs significantly reduced bacterial cell membrane integrity. Furthermore, the use of clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae showed that combined treatment with 120 nm Ag NPs and cefmetazole produced additive effects. This is the first report to screen the effectiveness of nanomaterials against N. gonorrhoeae, and our results indicate that 120 nm Ag NPs deliver low levels of toxicity to human epithelial cells and could be used as an adjuvant with antibiotic therapy, either for topical use or as a coating for biomaterials, to prevent or treat multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:23705013

  18. Non-Cytotoxic Nanomaterials Enhance Antimicrobial Activities of Cefmetazole against Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan-Hui; Yen, Muh-Yong; Ho, Chao-Chi; Wu, Ping; Wang, Chien-Chun; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Chen, Pai-Shan; Chen, Wei; Hsieh, Wan-Yu; Chen, Huei-Wen

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae has led to difficulties in treating patients, and novel strategies to prevent and treat this infection are urgently needed. Here, we examined 21 different nanomaterials for their potential activity against N. gonorrhoeae (ATCC 49226). Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 120 nm) showed the greatest potency for reducing N. gonorrhoeae colony formation (MIC: 12.5 µg/ml) and possessed the dominant influence on the antibacterial activity with their properties of the nanoparticles within a concentration range that did not induce cytotoxicity in human fibroblasts or epithelial cells. Electron microscopy revealed that the Ag NPs significantly reduced bacterial cell membrane integrity. Furthermore, the use of clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae showed that combined treatment with 120 nm Ag NPs and cefmetazole produced additive effects. This is the first report to screen the effectiveness of nanomaterials against N. gonorrhoeae, and our results indicate that 120 nm Ag NPs deliver low levels of toxicity to human epithelial cells and could be used as an adjuvant with antibiotic therapy, either for topical use or as a coating for biomaterials, to prevent or treat multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:23705013

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility and genotyping analysis of Hungarian Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains in 2013.

    PubMed

    Nemes-Nikodém, Éva; Brunner, Alexandra; Pintér, Dóra; Mihalik, Noémi; Lengyel, György; Marschalkó, Márta; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Szabó, Dóra; Ostorházi, Eszter

    2014-12-01

    Emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a major public health concern worldwide. The current study aims to determine the antimicrobial resistance in N. gonorrhoeae and associated molecular typing to enhance gonococcal antimicrobial surveillance in Hungary. In the National N. gonorrhoeae Reference Laboratory of Hungary 187 N. gonorrhoeae infections were detected in 2013, antibiograms were determined for all the isolated strains, and 52 (one index strain from every sexually contact related group) of them were also analysed by the N. gonorrhoeae multi-antigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) method. Twenty-two different NG-MAST sequence types (STs) were identified, of which 8 STs had not been previously described. In Hungary, the highly diversified gonococcal population displayed high resistance to penicillin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline (the antimicrobials previously recommended for gonorrhoea treatment). Resistance to the currently recommended extended spectrum cephalosporines were rare: only two of the expected strains, an ST 1407 and an ST 210, had cefixime MIC above the resistance breakpoint. By the revision of our National Treatment Guideline, it must be considered, that the azithromycin resistance is about 60% among the four most frequently isolated STs in Hungary. PMID:25496972

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from Vietnam, 2011

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a major public health concern worldwide. In Vietnam, knowledge regarding N. gonorrhoeae prevalence and AMR is limited, and data concerning genetic characteristics of N. gonorrhoeae is totally lacking. Herein, we investigated the phenotypic AMR (previous, current and possible future treatment options), genetic resistance determinants for extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs), and genotypic distribution of N. gonorrhoeae isolated in 2011 in Hanoi, Vietnam. Methods N. gonorrhoeae isolates from Hanoi, Vietnam isolated in 2011 (n = 108) were examined using antibiograms (Etest for 10 antimicrobials), Neisseria gonorrhoeae multi-antigen sequence typing (NG-MAST), and sequencing of ESC resistance determinants (penA, mtrR and penB). Results The levels of in vitro resistance were as follows: ciprofloxacin 98%, tetracycline 82%, penicillin G 48%, azithromycin 11%, ceftriaxone 5%, cefixime 1%, and spectinomycin 0%. The MICs of gentamicin (0.023-6 mg/L), ertapenem (0.002-0.125 mg/L) and solithromycin (<0.016-0.25 mg/L) were relatively low. No penA mosaic alleles were found, however, 78% of the isolates contained an alteration of amino acid A501 (A501V (44%) and A501T (34%)) in the encoded penicillin-binding protein 2. A single nucleotide (A) deletion in the inverted repeat of the promoter region of the mtrR gene and amino acid alterations in MtrR was observed in 91% and 94% of the isolates, respectively. penB resistance determinants were detected in 87% of the isolates. Seventy-five different NG-MAST STs were identified, of which 59 STs have not been previously described. Conclusions In Vietnam, the highly diversified gonococcal population displayed high in vitro resistance to antimicrobials previously recommended for gonorrhoea treatment (with exception of spectinomycin), but resistance also to the currently recommended ESCs were found. Nevertheless, the MICs of three potential future treatment

  1. Zabofloxacin (DW-224a) activity against Neisseria gonorrhoeae including quinolone-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Biedenbach, Douglas J; Ambrose, Paul G; Wikler, Matthew A

    2008-09-01

    Zabofloxacin, a new fluoroquinolone compound (DW-224a), was tested by reference agar dilution methods against 35 strains of multiresistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The potency of zabofloxacin (MIC(50), 0.016 microg/mL) was generally comparable with azithromycin but 8-fold superior to ciprofloxacin. This novel naphthyridine should be explored as an alternative therapy for quinolone-nonsusceptible gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis infections. PMID:18620833

  2. In Vitro selection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae mutants with elevated MIC values and increased resistance to cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven R; Grad, Yonatan; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Burroughs, Mark; Frace, Mike; Lipsitch, Marc; Weil, Ryan; Trees, David

    2014-11-01

    Strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with mosaic penA genes bearing novel point mutations in penA have been isolated from ceftriaxone treatment failures. Such isolates exhibit significantly higher MIC values to third-generation cephalosporins. Here we report the in vitro isolation of two mutants with elevated MICs to cephalosporins. The first possesses a point mutation in the transpeptidase region of the mosaic penA gene, and the second contains an insertion mutation in pilQ. PMID:25199775

  3. Studies on gonococcus infection. XV. Identification of surface proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae correlated with leukocyte association.

    PubMed Central

    King, G J; Swanson, J

    1978-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae which exhibit high levels of leukocyte association have a surface protein which is considerably diminished in isogenic gonococci which exhibit low levels of leukocyte association (LA). The LA protein exhibits strain variation in molecular weight and immunogenicity. Membranes derived from LA+ and LA- organisms show quantitative differences in their adsorption to leukocytes; these differences are analogous to those found for the intact organisms regarding their association with leukocytes. Images PMID:211086

  4. Neisseria gonorrhoea, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Treponema pallidum infection in antenatal and gynecological patients at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Apea-Kubi, Kwasi Akyem; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Sakyi, Bright; Kishimoto, Toshio; Ofori-Adjei, David; Hagiwara, Toshikatsu

    2004-12-01

    Five hundred and seventeen women attending the gynecology and obstetrics clinics of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital were examined for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Vaginal swabs were examined for Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida albicans, and Gardnerella vaginalis infection. Endocervical swabs were examined for Neisseria gonorrhoea and Chlamydia trachomatis using a recently developed RNA detection kit. Strain typing was performed to identify serovars of C. trachomatis. Sera were analyzed for Treponema pallidum with a passive-particle agglutination assay kit. The prevalence of infection with N. gonorrhoea was 0.6%, C. trachomatis 3.0%, and T. pallidum 5.6%. Eight samples were PCR-positive for C. trachomatis. Five of these were serovar G, and the rest were serovar E. All cases of mixed infections occurred in pregnant women. In conclusion, a high transmissible risk of T. pallidum infection was observed among our study population and in particular among our pregnant women. The absence of association between the presenting symptoms, clinical findings, and specific pathogens has implications for the syndromic approach to STI case management. The low prevalence of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoea may be due to self medication and requires further research in primary health institutions in rural areas to compare rates. PMID:15623949

  5. Construtcion of Neisseria gonorrhoeae porin B plasmid recombinant and its expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Song, Qifa; Liao, Fang; Ye, Siying; Cui, Bing; Xiong, Ping

    2005-01-01

    A prokaryotic expression recombinant plasmid pET-PIB to express porin B (PIB) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in E. coli DE3 was constructed in order to provide a basis of research in detection, prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine against the pathogen infection. The gene encoding PIB was amplified by PCR from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and cloned into prokaryotic expression plasmid pET-28a(+) to construct a pET-PIB recombinant, which was verified by restriction endonuclease and DNA sequencing. Protein PIB was expressed in E. coli DE3 induced with IPTG. The antigenicity of the expressed protein was evaluated by indirect ELISA. Rabbits were immunized with the protein and serum was collected after immunization. To assess the immunogenicity of the protein, the titer of serum to protein PIB was determined by ELISA. DNA sequence analysis showed that the nucleic acid sequence of PIB gene was 99.28% of homology compared with that (NGPIB18) published in GenBank. A 41 kD fused protein was detected by SDS-PAGE and was proven to have reactivity with anti-PIB polyclonal antibody from mouse. A polyclonal antibody to PIB of 1:4000 titer determined by indirect EISA was obtained from rabbit immunized with the purified product. Recombinant plasmid encoding PIB of Neisseria gonorrhoeae was constructed. Protein PIB with antigenicity and immunogenicity was successfully expressed. PMID:16201262

  6. Crystal structure of the open state of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrE outer membrane channel.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hsiang-Ting; Chou, Tsung-Han; Su, Chih-Chia; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Long, Feng; Delmar, Jared A; Do, Sylvia V; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Shafer, William M; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Active efflux of antimicrobial agents is one of the most important strategies used by bacteria to defend against antimicrobial factors present in their environment. Mediating many cases of antibiotic resistance are transmembrane efflux pumps, composed of one or more proteins. The Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux pump, belonging to the hydrophobic and amphiphilic efflux resistance-nodulation-cell division (HAE-RND) family, spans both the inner and outer membranes of N. gonorrhoeae and confers resistance to a variety of antibiotics and toxic compounds. We here describe the crystal structure of N. gonorrhoeae MtrE, the outer membrane component of the MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux system. This trimeric MtrE channel forms a vertical tunnel extending down contiguously from the outer membrane surface to the periplasmic end, indicating that our structure of MtrE depicts an open conformational state of this channel. PMID:24901251

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and implications for epidemiology and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, T

    1993-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae has been under development since the early days of antimicrobial agents. However, it is rarely applied to clinical isolates today. The history of the various in vitro tests to determine the susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to antibiotics is rich with evidence that these results predict response to therapy for almost all agents tested. Further, AST is a useful and important aspect of strain characterization and disease epidemiology in conjunction with the more specific but laborious techniques of auxotyping, serotyping, and plasmid analysis. Current technology has overcome many of the objections to AST for N. gonorrhoeae with standardization of test media and the development of an accurate disk diffusion AST method that is suited to most clinical laboratories regardless of volume or level of technical expertise. Ironically, the very low level of resistance to the current primary treatment strategy in the United States, ceftriaxone or another potent cephalosporin, makes the use of AST somewhat superfluous. PMID:8457978

  8. Changing antimicrobial resistance profiles among Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates in Italy, 2003 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Carannante, Anna; Renna, Giovanna; Dal Conte, Ivano; Ghisetti, Valeria; Matteelli, Alberto; Prignano, Grazia; Impara, Giampaolo; Cusini, Marco; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Vocale, Caterina; Antonetti, Raffaele; Gaino, Marina; Busetti, Marina; Latino, Maria Agnese; Mencacci, Antonella; Bonanno, Carmen; Cava, Maria Carmela; Giraldi, Cristina; Stefanelli, Paola

    2014-10-01

    The emergence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates displaying resistance to antimicrobial agents is a major public health concern and a serious issue related to the occurrence of further untreatable gonorrhea infections. A retrospective analysis on 1,430 N. gonorrhoeae isolates, collected from 2003 through 2012, for antimicrobial susceptibility by Etest and molecular characterization by Neisseria gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) was carried out in Italy. Azithromycin-resistant gonococci decreased from 14% in 2007 to 2.2% in 2012. Similarly, isolates with high MICs to cefixime (>0.125 mg/liter) decreased from 11% in 2008 to 3.3% in 2012. The ciprofloxacin resistance rate remains quite stable, following an increasing trend up to 64% in 2012. The percentage of penicillinase-producing N. gonorrhoeae (PPNG) significantly declined from 77% in 2003 to 7% in 2012. A total of 81 multidrug-resistant (MDR) gonococci were identified, showing 11 different antimicrobial resistance patterns. These were isolated from men who have sex with men (MSM) and from heterosexual patients. Two sequence types (STs), ST661 and ST1407, were the most common. Genogroup 1407, which included cefixime-, ciprofloxacin-, and azithromycin-resistant isolates, was found. In conclusion, a change in the antimicrobial resistance profiles among gonococci was identified in Italy together with a percentage of MDR isolates. PMID:25070110

  9. Antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: origin, evolution, and lessons learned for the future.

    PubMed

    Unemo, Magnus; Shafer, William M

    2011-08-01

    The strict human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae has caused gonorrhea for thousands of years, and currently gonorrhea is the second most prevalent bacterial sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Given the ancient nature of N. gonorrhoeae and its unique obligate relationship with humankind over the millennia, its remarkable ability to adapt to the host immune system and cause repeated infections, and its propensity to develop resistance to all clinically useful antibiotics, the gonococcus is an ideal pathogen on which to study the evolution of bacterial pathogenesis, including antimicrobial resistance, over the long term and within the host during infection. Recently, the first gonococcus displaying high-level resistance to ceftriaxone, identified in Japan, was characterized in detail. Ceftriaxone is the last remaining option for empirical first-line treatment, and N. gonorrhoeae now seems to be evolving into a true "superbug." In the near future, gonorrhea may become untreatable in certain circumstances. Herein, the history of antibiotics used for treatment of gonorrhea, the evolution of resistance emergence in N. gonorrhoeae, the linkage between resistance and biological fitness of N. gonorrhoeae, lessons learned, and future perspectives are reviewed and discussed. PMID:22239555

  10. Ligase chain reaction for detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in urogenital swabs.

    PubMed Central

    Ching, S; Lee, H; Hook, E W; Jacobs, M R; Zenilman, J

    1995-01-01

    The ligase chain reaction (LCR) is an in vitro nucleic acid amplification technique that exponentially amplifies targeted DNA sequences. In a multicenter study, we evaluated the use of a 4-h LCR-based assay for the diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection of the cervix and male urethra. The LCR results were compared with those of culture for N. gonorrhoeae by using selective media. This assay amplifies target sequences within the N. gonorrhoeae opacity gene. Discordant LCR-positive and culture-negative specimens were further evaluated by testing by another LCR assay which used N. gonorrhoeae-specific pilin probe sets. A total of 1,539 female endocervical specimens and 808 male urethral swab specimens were evaluated in the study. An expanded "gold standard" was defined to include all culture-positive as well as culture-negative, confirmed LCR-positive specimens. After resolution of discrepant samples, the sensitivities of the N. gonorrhoeae LCR assays for the female and male specimens were 97.3 and 98.5%, respectively, with specificities of 99.6 and 99.8%, respectively. Resolved culture sensitivities were 83.9 and 96.5% for the female and male specimens, respectively. The LCR assay for gonorrhea is a rapid, highly sensitive nonculture method for detecting gonococcal infection of the cervix and male urethra. PMID:8586683

  11. Preliminary evaluation of the ligase chain reaction for specific detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Birkenmeyer, L; Armstrong, A S

    1992-01-01

    Rapid identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in clinical specimens is essential for effective control. Traditional culture requires a minimum of 24 h, and for some specimens harboring gonococci, the gonococci fail to grow or are misidentified. The recently described ligase chain reaction (LCR) is a highly specific and sensitive DNA amplification technique which was evaluated as an alternative to routine culture. Three LCR probe sets were used. Two of the probe sets were directed against the multi-copy Opa genes (Omp-II), while the third set was targeted against the multicopy Pilin genes. Each LCR probe set was evaluated with 260 microorganisms including 136 global isolates of N. gonorrhoeae, 41 isolates of N. meningitidis, and 10 isolates of N. lactamica; 26 nonpathogenic Neisseria strains; and 47 isolates of non-Neisseria species that may reside in clinical specimens. Amplification products were detected by using the IMx LCR format (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Ill.). Strains of N. gonorrhoeae were assayed at 270 cells per LCR (approximately 6.7 x 10(4) CFU/ml) with the Opa and Pilin probes, producing signals at least 21 and 15 times above background, respectively. In contrast, only background values were observed when testing the probe sets with 124 nongonococcal strains at 1.3 x 10(6) cells per LCR (approximately 3.2 x 10(8) CFU/ml). One hundred urogenital specimens were assayed by LCR, and compared with culture, the three probes were 100% sensitive (8 of 8) and 97.8% specific (90 of 92), resulting in an agreement of 98% (98 of 100). On the basis of the results of these preliminary studies, LCR has the potential to be an accurate and rapid DNA probe assay for the detection of N. gonorrhoeae in clinical specimens. PMID:1452689

  12. Molecular Assay for Detection of Genetic Markers Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Cephalosporins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, S. W.; Martin, I.; Demczuk, W.; Bharat, A.; Hoang, L.; Wylie, J.; Allen, V.; Lefebvre, B.; Tyrrell, G.; Horsman, G.; Haldane, D.; Garceau, R.; Wong, T.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae continues to rise in Canada; however, antimicrobial resistance data are lacking for approximately 70% of gonorrhea infections that are diagnosed directly from clinical specimens by nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). We developed a molecular assay for surveillance use to detect mutations in genes associated with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins that can be applied to both culture isolates and clinical samples. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ponA, mtrR, penA, porB, and one N. gonorrhoeae-specific marker (porA). We tested the real-time PCR assay with 252 gonococcal isolates, 50 nongonococcal isolates, 24 N. gonorrhoeae-negative NAAT specimens, and 34 N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens. Twenty-four of the N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens had matched culture isolates. Assay results were confirmed by comparison with whole-genome sequencing data. For 252 N. gonorrhoeae strains, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porA, ponA, and penA, 99.6% for mtrR, and 95.2% for porB. The presence of ≥2 SNPs correlated with decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone (sensitivities of >98%) and cefixime (sensitivities of >96%). Of 24 NAAT specimens with matched cultures, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porB, 95.8% for ponA and mtrR, and 91.7% for penA. We demonstrated the utility of a real-time PCR assay for sensitive detection of known markers for the decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins in N. gonorrhoeae. Preliminary results with clinical NAAT specimens were also promising, as they correlated well with bacterial culture results. PMID:25878350

  13. Molecular Assay for Detection of Genetic Markers Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Cephalosporins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S W; Martin, I; Demczuk, W; Bharat, A; Hoang, L; Wylie, J; Allen, V; Lefebvre, B; Tyrrell, G; Horsman, G; Haldane, D; Garceau, R; Wong, T; Mulvey, M R

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae continues to rise in Canada; however, antimicrobial resistance data are lacking for approximately 70% of gonorrhea infections that are diagnosed directly from clinical specimens by nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). We developed a molecular assay for surveillance use to detect mutations in genes associated with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins that can be applied to both culture isolates and clinical samples. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ponA, mtrR, penA, porB, and one N. gonorrhoeae-specific marker (porA). We tested the real-time PCR assay with 252 gonococcal isolates, 50 nongonococcal isolates, 24 N. gonorrhoeae-negative NAAT specimens, and 34 N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens. Twenty-four of the N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens had matched culture isolates. Assay results were confirmed by comparison with whole-genome sequencing data. For 252 N. gonorrhoeae strains, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porA, ponA, and penA, 99.6% for mtrR, and 95.2% for porB. The presence of ≥2 SNPs correlated with decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone (sensitivities of >98%) and cefixime (sensitivities of >96%). Of 24 NAAT specimens with matched cultures, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porB, 95.8% for ponA and mtrR, and 91.7% for penA. We demonstrated the utility of a real-time PCR assay for sensitive detection of known markers for the decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins in N. gonorrhoeae. Preliminary results with clinical NAAT specimens were also promising, as they correlated well with bacterial culture results. PMID:25878350

  14. Antibiotic-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Spread Faster with More Treatment, Not More Sexual Partners.

    PubMed

    Fingerhuth, Stephanie M; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian; Low, Nicola; Althaus, Christian L

    2016-05-01

    The sexually transmitted bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae has developed resistance to all antibiotic classes that have been used for treatment and strains resistant to multiple antibiotic classes have evolved. In many countries, there is only one antibiotic remaining for empirical N. gonorrhoeae treatment, and antibiotic management to counteract resistance spread is urgently needed. Understanding dynamics and drivers of resistance spread can provide an improved rationale for antibiotic management. In our study, we first used antibiotic resistance surveillance data to estimate the rates at which antibiotic-resistant N. gonorrhoeae spread in two host populations, heterosexual men (HetM) and men who have sex with men (MSM). We found higher rates of spread for MSM (0.86 to 2.38 y-1, mean doubling time: 6 months) compared to HetM (0.24 to 0.86 y-1, mean doubling time: 16 months). We then developed a dynamic transmission model to reproduce the observed dynamics of N. gonorrhoeae transmission in populations of heterosexual men and women (HMW) and MSM. We parameterized the model using sexual behavior data and calibrated it to N. gonorrhoeae prevalence and incidence data. In the model, antibiotic-resistant N. gonorrhoeae spread with a median rate of 0.88 y-1 in HMW and 3.12 y-1 in MSM. These rates correspond to median doubling times of 9 (HMW) and 3 (MSM) months. Assuming no fitness costs, the model shows the difference in the host population's treatment rate rather than the difference in the number of sexual partners explains the differential spread of resistance. As higher treatment rates result in faster spread of antibiotic resistance, treatment recommendations for N. gonorrhoeae should carefully balance prevention of infection and avoidance of resistance spread. PMID:27196299

  15. Antibiotic-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Spread Faster with More Treatment, Not More Sexual Partners

    PubMed Central

    Bonhoeffer, Sebastian; Low, Nicola; Althaus, Christian L.

    2016-01-01

    The sexually transmitted bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae has developed resistance to all antibiotic classes that have been used for treatment and strains resistant to multiple antibiotic classes have evolved. In many countries, there is only one antibiotic remaining for empirical N. gonorrhoeae treatment, and antibiotic management to counteract resistance spread is urgently needed. Understanding dynamics and drivers of resistance spread can provide an improved rationale for antibiotic management. In our study, we first used antibiotic resistance surveillance data to estimate the rates at which antibiotic-resistant N. gonorrhoeae spread in two host populations, heterosexual men (HetM) and men who have sex with men (MSM). We found higher rates of spread for MSM (0.86 to 2.38 y−1, mean doubling time: 6 months) compared to HetM (0.24 to 0.86 y−1, mean doubling time: 16 months). We then developed a dynamic transmission model to reproduce the observed dynamics of N. gonorrhoeae transmission in populations of heterosexual men and women (HMW) and MSM. We parameterized the model using sexual behavior data and calibrated it to N. gonorrhoeae prevalence and incidence data. In the model, antibiotic-resistant N. gonorrhoeae spread with a median rate of 0.88 y−1 in HMW and 3.12 y−1 in MSM. These rates correspond to median doubling times of 9 (HMW) and 3 (MSM) months. Assuming no fitness costs, the model shows the difference in the host population’s treatment rate rather than the difference in the number of sexual partners explains the differential spread of resistance. As higher treatment rates result in faster spread of antibiotic resistance, treatment recommendations for N. gonorrhoeae should carefully balance prevention of infection and avoidance of resistance spread. PMID:27196299

  16. Oral ciprofloxacin versus ceftriaxone for the treatment of urethritis from resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Zambia.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, J P; Hira, S K; Brady, W; Luo, N; Mwale, C; Mpoko, G; Krieg, R; Siwiwaliondo, E; Reichart, C; Waters, C

    1990-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains resistant to treatment with penicillin, tetracycline, and/or spectinomycin are increasing in prevalence in many parts of the world. In Zambia, 52% of N. gonorrhoeae isolates produced beta-lactamase in 1986. Few oral regimens have proven effective for treatment of resistant N. gonorrhoeae. We conducted a prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trial of 250 mg of ciprofloxacin given orally versus 250 mg of ceftriaxone given intramuscularly for treatment of uncomplicated gonococcal urethritis in adult males. Two hundred men were enrolled and treated. The two groups were comparable in age (27.5 years), prevalence of latent syphilis (14 and 10%), and human immunodeficiency virus infection (32 and 38%). Of 165 patients with cultures positive for N. gonorrhoeae who returned for follow-up, ciprofloxacin cured 83 of 83 (100%), including 26 with penicillinase-producing N. gonorrhoeae (PPNG) and 21 with N. gonorrhoeae with chromosomally mediated resistance to multiple antibiotics (CMRNG), and ceftriaxone cured 81 of 82 (98.7%), including 30 with PPNG and 19 with CMRNG. Both treatment regimens were well tolerated. Chlamydia trachomatis in urethral exudate was found by direct fluorescent-antibody microscopic examination or by culture in 10 (5%) participants. All N. gonorrhoeae isolates were inhibited by ceftriaxone at 0.06 micrograms/ml, except one which was inhibited at 0.125 micrograms/ml, while ciprofloxacin inhibited all isolates at 0.03 micrograms/ml. Ciprofloxacin is a safe and effective therapy for uncomplicated gonococcal urethritis, including that caused by PPNG and CMRNG in human immunodeficiency virus-infected men. PMID:2113796

  17. Neisseria meningitidis C114 contains silent, truncated pilin genes that are homologous to Neisseria gonorrhoeae pil sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, A C; Nicolson, I J; Saunders, J R

    1988-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis pili can be classified into two groups: those (referred to here as class I pili) which are similar to gonococcal pili in that they react with monoclonal antibody SM1 and those that are dissimilar to gonococcal pili in that they lack the SM1-reactive epitope (class II pili). Pilus expression in N. meningitidis C114, a class II pilus-producing isolate, was investigated. The sole genomic segment of this strain that bore extensive homology with the pilE locus of Neisseria gonorrhoeae P9 was cloned in Escherichia coli. The production of the pilus structural subunit (pilin) from this meningococcal segment could not be detected by immunological and coupled in vitro transcription-translation analyses. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the presence in the C114 genome of two variant, tandemly arranged pilin genes (copies 1 and 2). Copies 1 and 2 are partial pilin genes that constitute part of a silent meningococcal pilin gene (pil gene) region, designated pilS. Both copies are truncated, corresponding to variable domains of the gonococcal pilE gene but lacking homologous N-terminal coding sequences. Located within sequences surrounding copies 1 and 2 were several classes of repeated elements that are associated with pil loci in N. gonorrhoeae. Images PMID:2895102

  18. Azithromycin resistance and its mechanism in Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains in Hyogo, Japan.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Osawa, Kayo; Miura, Makiko; Tanaka, Kazushi; Arakawa, Soichi; Shirakawa, Toshiro; Fujisawa, Masato

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic options are limited for Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection, especially for oral drugs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to oral azithromycin (AZM) and the correlation between AZM resistance-related gene mutations and MIC. We examined the AZM MICs of clinical strains of N. gonorrhoeae, sequenced the peptidyltransferase loop in domain V of 23S rRNA, and investigated the statistical correlation between AZM MIC and the presence and number of the mutations. Among 59 N. gonorrhoeae strains, our statistical data showed that a deletion mutation was seen significantly more often in the higher-MIC group (0.5 μg/ml or higher) (35/37; 94.6%) than in the lower-MIC group (0.25 μg/ml or less) (4/22; 18.2%) (P < 0.0001). However, a mutation of codon 40 (Ala → Asp) in the mtrR gene (helix-turn-helix) was seen significantly more often in the lower-MIC group (12/22; 54.5%) (P < 0.0001). In N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) analyses, ST4777 was representative of the lower-MIC group and ST1407, ST6798, and ST6800 were representative of the higher-MIC group. NG-MAST type 1407 was detected as the most prevalent type in AZM-resistant or -intermediate strains, as previously described. In conclusion, a deletion mutation in the mtrR promoter region may be a significant indicator for higher MIC (0.5 μg/ml or higher). ST4777 was often seen in the lower-MIC group, and ST1407, ST6798, and ST6800 were characteristic of the higher-MIC group. Further research with a greater number of strains would help elucidate the mechanism of AZM resistance in N. gonorrhoeae infection. PMID:25712352

  19. Extragenital Infections Caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Chan, Philip A; Robinette, Ashley; Montgomery, Madeline; Almonte, Alexi; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Lonks, John R; Chapin, Kimberle C; Kojic, Erna M; Hardy, Erica J

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, sexually transmitted diseases due to Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae continue to be a major public health burden. Screening of extragenital sites including the oropharynx and rectum is an emerging practice based on recent studies highlighting the prevalence of infection at these sites. We reviewed studies reporting the prevalence of extragenital infections in women, men who have sex with men (MSM), and men who have sex only with women (MSW), including distribution by anatomical site. Among women, prevalence was found to be 0.6-35.8% for rectal gonorrhea (median reported prevalence 1.9%), 0-29.6% for pharyngeal gonorrhea (median 2.1%), 2.0-77.3% for rectal chlamydia (median 8.7%), and 0.2-3.2% for pharyngeal chlamydia (median 1.7%). Among MSM, prevalence was found to be 0.2-24.0% for rectal gonorrhea (median 5.9%), 0.5-16.5% for pharyngeal gonorrhea (median 4.6%), 2.1-23.0% for rectal chlamydia (median 8.9%), and 0-3.6% for pharyngeal chlamydia (median 1.7%). Among MSW, the prevalence was found to be 0-5.7% for rectal gonorrhea (median 3.4%), 0.4-15.5% for pharyngeal gonorrhea (median 2.2%), 0-11.8% for rectal chlamydia (median 7.7%), and 0-22.0% for pharyngeal chlamydia (median 1.6%). Extragenital infections are often asymptomatic and found in the absence of reported risk behaviors, such as receptive anal and oral intercourse. We discuss current clinical recommendations and future directions for research. PMID:27366021

  20. Differential response of human monocytes to Neisseria gonorrhoeae variants expressing pili and opacity proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Knepper, B; Heuer, I; Meyer, T F; van Putten, J P

    1997-01-01

    Experiments in vitro suggest that Neisseria gonorrhoeae surface variation plays a key role in gonococcal pathogenesis by providing the appropriate bacterial phenotypes to go through different stages of the infection. Here we report on the effects of phase and antigen variation of two major gonococcal adhesins, pili and opacity (Opa) outer membrane proteins, on the interaction of the gonococci with human monocytes. Using a set of recombinants of gonococcus strain MS11 that each express 1 of 11 genetically defined Opa proteins or a defined type of pilus, we found that both Opa proteins and pili promote bacterial phagocytosis by monocytes in the absence of serum and that this feature largely depends on the type of protein that is expressed. One of the Opa proteins (Opa[50]) strongly promoted uptake by monocytes but had little effect on the interaction with polymorphonuclear leukocytes under the conditions employed. Similarly, the phagocytosis-promoting effect of the pili was much more pronounced in monocytes than in neutrophils (4-fold versus 22-fold stimulation of uptake, respectively). Only a subpopulation of both types of phagocytes actively ingested bacteria, as has been observed during natural infections. Measurements of luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence demonstrated that phagocytosis of opaque but not piliated gonococci was accompanied by an increase in oxygen-reactive metabolites. These findings demonstrate that the monocyte response towards gonococci is highly dependent on the bacterial phenotype and differs from the neutrophil response. This diversity in bacterial behavior towards various types of human phagocytic cells underlines the biological impact of gonococcal surface variation and may explain previous contradictory results on this subject. PMID:9317017

  1. Extragenital Infections Caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Philip A.; Montgomery, Madeline; Almonte, Alexi; Lonks, John R.; Chapin, Kimberle C.; Kojic, Erna M.; Hardy, Erica J.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, sexually transmitted diseases due to Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae continue to be a major public health burden. Screening of extragenital sites including the oropharynx and rectum is an emerging practice based on recent studies highlighting the prevalence of infection at these sites. We reviewed studies reporting the prevalence of extragenital infections in women, men who have sex with men (MSM), and men who have sex only with women (MSW), including distribution by anatomical site. Among women, prevalence was found to be 0.6–35.8% for rectal gonorrhea (median reported prevalence 1.9%), 0–29.6% for pharyngeal gonorrhea (median 2.1%), 2.0–77.3% for rectal chlamydia (median 8.7%), and 0.2–3.2% for pharyngeal chlamydia (median 1.7%). Among MSM, prevalence was found to be 0.2–24.0% for rectal gonorrhea (median 5.9%), 0.5–16.5% for pharyngeal gonorrhea (median 4.6%), 2.1–23.0% for rectal chlamydia (median 8.9%), and 0–3.6% for pharyngeal chlamydia (median 1.7%). Among MSW, the prevalence was found to be 0–5.7% for rectal gonorrhea (median 3.4%), 0.4–15.5% for pharyngeal gonorrhea (median 2.2%), 0–11.8% for rectal chlamydia (median 7.7%), and 0–22.0% for pharyngeal chlamydia (median 1.6%). Extragenital infections are often asymptomatic and found in the absence of reported risk behaviors, such as receptive anal and oral intercourse. We discuss current clinical recommendations and future directions for research. PMID:27366021

  2. Mutation in ribosomal protein S5 leads to spectinomycin resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Ilina, Elena N; Malakhova, Maya V; Bodoev, Ivan N; Oparina, Nina Y; Filimonova, Alla V; Govorun, Vadim M

    2013-01-01

    Spectinomycin remains a useful reserve option for therapy of gonorrhea. The emergence of multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains with decreased susceptibility to cefixime and to ceftriaxone makes it the only medicine still effective for treatment of gonorrhea infection in analogous cases. However, adoption of spectinomycin as a routinely used drug of choice was soon followed by reports of spectinomycin resistance. The main molecular mechanism of spectinomycin resistance in N. gonorrhoeae was C1192T substitution in 16S rRNA genes. Here we reported a Thr-24→Pro mutation in ribosomal protein S5 (RPS5) found in spectinomycin resistant clinical N. gonorrhoeae strain, which carried no changes in 16S rRNA. In a series of experiments, the transfer of rpsE gene allele encoding the mutant RPS5 to the recipient N. gonorrhoeae strains was analyzed. The relatively high rate of transformation [ca. 10(-5) colony-forming units (CFUs)] indicates the possibility of spread of spectinonycin resistance within gonococcal population due to the horizontal gene transfer (HGT). PMID:23847609

  3. Cloning and organization of seven arginine biosynthesis genes from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, F J; Dillon, J R

    1989-01-01

    A genomic library for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, constructed in the lambda cloning vector EMBL4, was screened for clones carrying arginine biosynthesis genes by complementation of Escherichia coli mutants. Clones complementing defects in argA, argB, argE, argG, argIF, carA, and carB were isolated. An E. coli defective in the acetylornithine deacetylase gene (argE) was complemented by the ornithine acetyltransferase gene (argJ) from N. gonorrhoeae. This heterologous complementation is reported for the first time. The carAB operon from E. coli hybridized with the gonococcal clones that carried carA or carB genes under conditions of high stringency, detecting 80% or greater similarity and showing that the nucleotide sequence of the carbamoylphosphate synthetase genes is very similar in these two organisms. Under these conditions for hybridization, the gonococcal clones carrying argB or argF genes did not hybridize with plasmids containing the corresponding E. coli gene. Cocomplementation experiments established gene linkage between carA and carB. Clones complementing a gene defect in argE were also able to complement an argA mutation. This suggests that the enzyme ornithine acetyltransferase from N. gonorrhoeae (encoded by argJ) may be able to complement both argA and argE mutations in E. coli. The arginine biosynthesis genes in N. gonorrhoeae appear to be scattered as in members of the family Pseudomonadaceae. Images PMID:2493452

  4. Evaluation of the Microcult system for isolating and identifying Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R J; Ratnatunga, C S; Hamilton-Miller, J M; Brumfitt, W

    1978-01-01

    Specimens from 95 patients attending a venereal diseases clinic were examined for gonococci by three methods--a conventional culture technique using modified Thayer-Martin medium, microscopy of a Gram-stained direct smear, and the Microcult system. For 56% of the specimens the results by all three methods agreed. Assuming the results obtained by culture on Thayer-Martin medium to be correct, the largest source of error was due to false-positive results: microscopy gave 26 and Microcult gave 15 such results. False-negative results were less common: Microcult gave 14, microscopy six. Microcult gave positive results more quickly than the conventional Thayer-Martin cultural method, but the gonococci were difficult to isolate by subculture from the Microcult culture pads. The Microcult medium was not absolutely specific for Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Nevertheless, the Microcult test may well prove to be a useful adjunct to the diagnosis of gonorrhoea, especially when laboratory facilities are not readily available. PMID:417090

  5. Population structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae based on whole genome data and its relationship with antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Ezewudo, Matthew N; Joseph, Sandeep J; Castillo-Ramirez, Santiago; Dean, Deborah; Del Rio, Carlos; Didelot, Xavier; Dillon, Jo-Anne; Selden, Richard F; Shafer, William M; Turingan, Rosemary S; Unemo, Magnus; Read, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted infection (STI) of major importance. As a result of antibiotic resistance, there are now limited options for treating patients. We collected draft genome sequence data and associated metadata data on 76 N. gonorrhoeae strains from around the globe and searched for known determinants of antibiotics resistance within the strains. The population structure and evolutionary forces within the pathogen population were analyzed. Our results indicated a cosmopolitan gonoccocal population mainly made up of five subgroups. The estimated ratio of recombination to mutation (r/m = 2.2) from our data set indicates an appreciable level of recombination occurring in the population. Strains with resistance phenotypes to more recent antibiotics (azithromycin and cefixime) were mostly found in two of the five population subgroups. PMID:25780762

  6. High-level azithromycin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae clinical isolate in France, March 2014.

    PubMed

    Bercot, B; Belkacem, A; Goubard, A; Mougari, F; Sednaoui, P; La Ruche, G; Cambau, E

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case in France of a high-level azithromycin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 96 mg/L) assigned to MLST7363 (NG-MAST ST6360), also resistant to ciprofloxacin and tetracycline but susceptible to ceftriaxone. The patient was a 51 year-old heterosexual man who returned following 1g azithromycin monotherapy. Mechanisms of azithromycin resistance were a C2599T mutation in the four copies of the rrl gene and a novel mutation in the promoter of the mtrR gene. PMID:25394255

  7. Recommendations for the Laboratory-Based Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae — 2014

    PubMed Central

    Papp, John R.; Schachter, Julius; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Van Der Pol, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Summary This report updates CDC's 2002 recommendations regarding screening tests to detect Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections (CDC. Screening tests to detect Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections—2002. MMWR 2002;51[No. RR-15]) and provides new recommendations regarding optimal specimen types, the use of tests to detect rectal and oropharyngeal C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae infections, and circumstances when supplemental testing is indicated. The recommendations in this report are intended for use by clinical laboratory directors, laboratory staff, clinicians, and disease control personnel who must choose among the multiple available tests, establish standard operating procedures for collecting and processing specimens, interpret test results for laboratory reporting, and counsel and treat patients. The performance of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) with respect to overall sensitivity, specificity, and ease of specimen transport is better than that of any of the other tests available for the diagnosis of chlamydial and gonococcal infections. Laboratories should use NAATs to detect chlamydia and gonorrhea except in cases of child sexual assault involving boys and rectal and oropharyngeal infections in prepubescent girls and when evaluating a potential gonorrhea treatment failure, in which case culture and susceptibility testing might be required. NAATs that have been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the detection of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae infections are recommended as screening or diagnostic tests because they have been evaluated in patients with and without symptoms. Maintaining the capability to culture for both N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis in laboratories throughout the country is important because data are insufficient to recommend nonculture tests in cases of sexual assault in prepubescent boys and extragenital anatomic site exposure in prepubescent girls. N

  8. Characterization of the alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a key control point in lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wakarchuk, Warren; Schur, Melissa J; St Michael, Frank; Li, Jinjuan; Eichler, Eva; Whitfield, Dennis

    2004-06-01

    The biosynthesis of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) in Neisseria meningitidis has a control point that regulates the extension of the alpha-chain on heptose (I) of the LOS. The gene that encodes the protein responsible for this control had been identified elsewhere, but the enzyme encoded by the gene was not characterized. We have now shown that this same control mechanism operates in the related species, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, using a gene knockout and subsequent characterization of the LOS species produced. We also cloned and expressed the enzyme from both of these pathogens. Using a synthetic acceptor substrate, we have shown unequivocally that the enzyme is an alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase. Experiments with both the core oligosaccharide and the synthetic acceptors suggests that the addition of the alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosamine moiety on the heptose (II) residue precedes the addition of the ethanolamine phosphate at the O3 position on this heptose (II), and that in the absence of the alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosamine moiety leads to the addition of an extra ethanolamine phosphate on the heptose (II) residue. Our data do not support the hypothesis that ethanolamine phosphate at O3 of heptose (II) is added and is then required for the addition of the N-acetylglucosamine at O2 by the LgtK enzyme. This enzyme represents a control point in the biosynthesis of the LOS of this pathogen and is a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15044393

  9. In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Jakarta, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Lesmana, Murad; Lebron, Carlos I.; Taslim, Djufri; Tjaniadi, Periska; Subekti, Decy; Wasfy, Momtaz O.; Campbell, James R.; Oyofo, Buhari A.

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined for 122 Neisseria gonorrheae isolates obtained from 400 sex workers in Jakarta, Indonesia, and susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin, cefuroxime, cefoxitin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, and spectinomycin were found. All isolates were resistant to tetracycline. A number of the isolates demonstrated decreased susceptibilities to erythromycin (MIC ≥ 1.0 μg/ml), thiamphenicol (MIC ≥ 1.0 μg/ml), kanamycin (MIC ≥ 16.0 μg/ml), penicillin (MIC ≥ 2.0 μg/ml), gentamicin (MIC ≥ 16.0 μg/ml), and norfloxacin (MIC = 0.5 μg/ml). These data showed that certain antibiotics previously used in the treatment of gonorrhea are no longer effective. PMID:11120999

  10. Common antigenic domains in transferrin-binding protein 2 of Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, P; Williams, P; Griffiths, E

    1992-06-01

    There is now considerable evidence to show that in the Neisseria and Haemophilus species, membrane receptors specific for either transferrin or lactoferrin are involved in the acquisition of iron from these glycoproteins. In Neisseria meningitidis, the transferrin receptor appears to consist of two proteins, one of which (TBP 1) has an M(r) of 95,000 and the other of which (TBP 2) has an M(r) ranging from 68,000 to 85,000, depending on the strain; TBP 2 binds transferrin after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electroblotting, but TBP 1 does not do so. The relative contributions of these two proteins to the binding reaction observed with intact cells and to iron uptake are presently unknown. However, they are being considered as potential components of a group B meningococcal vaccine. Analogous higher- and lower-molecular-weight proteins associated with transferrin binding have been found in N. gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae. Previous work with polyclonal antibodies raised in mice with whole cells of iron-restricted N. meningitidis showed that the meningococcal TBP 2 exhibits considerable antigenic heterogeneity. Here, we report that antiserum against purified TBP 2 from one strain of N. meningitidis cross-reacts on immunoblotting with the TBP 2 of all meningococcal isolates examined, as well as with the TBP 2 of N. gonorrhoeae. This antiserum also cross-reacted with the TBP 2 of several strains of H. influenzae type b, thus showing the presence of common antigenic domains among these functionally equivalent proteins in different pathogens; no cross-reaction was detected with a purified sample of the human transferrin receptor. PMID:1587606

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pilus Expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Effects of Pilin Subunit Composition on Function and Organelle Dynamics▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Winther-Larsen, Hanne C.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; van Putten, Jos P. M.; Roos, Norbert; Aas, Finn Erik; Egge-Jacobsen, Wolfgang M.; Maier, Berenike; Koomey, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Type IV pili (TFP) play central roles in the expression of many phenotypes including motility, multicellular behavior, sensitivity to bacteriophages, natural genetic transformation, and adherence. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, these properties require ancillary proteins that act in conjunction with TFP expression and influence organelle dynamics. Here, the intrinsic contributions of the pilin protein itself to TFP dynamics and associated phenotypes were examined by expressing the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PilAPAK pilin subunit in N. gonorrhoeae. We show here that, although PilAPAK pilin can be readily assembled into TFP in this background, steady-state levels of purifiable fibers are dramatically reduced relative those of endogenous pili. This defect is due to aberrant TFP dynamics as it is suppressed in the absence of the PilT pilus retraction ATPase. Functionally, PilAPAK pilin complements gonococcal adherence for human epithelial cells but only in a pilT background, and this property remains dependent on the coexpression of both the PilC adhesin and the PilV pilin-like protein. Since P. aeruginosa pilin only moderately supports neisserial sequence-specific transformation despite its assembly proficiency, these results together suggest that PilAPAK pilin functions suboptimally in this environment. This appears to be due to diminished compatibility with resident proteins essential for TFP function and dynamics. Despite this, PilAPAK pili support retractile force generation in this background equivalent to that reported for endogenous pili. Furthermore, PilAPAK pili are both necessary and sufficient for bacteriophage PO4 binding, although the strain remains phage resistant. Together, these findings have significant implications for TFP biology in both N. gonorrhoeae and P. aeruginosa. PMID:17573479

  12. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the WHO Western Pacific and South East Asian Regions, 2009.

    PubMed

    2011-03-01

    Long-term surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae has been conducted in the World Health Organization (WHO) Western Pacific Region (WPR) to optimise antibiotic treatment of gonococcal disease since 1992. From 2007, the Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (GASP) has been enhanced by the inclusion of data from the South East Asian Region (SEAR) and recruitment of additional centres in the WPR. Approximately 8,704 isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were examined for their susceptibility to one or more antibiotics used for the treatment of gonorrhoea, incorporating External Quality Assurance controlled methods, from reporting centres in 21 countries and/or jurisdictions. A high proportion of penicillin and/or quinolone resistance was again detected amongst isolates tested in North Asia and the WHO SEAR. In contrast, from the Pacific Island states Fiji reported low penicillin and quinolone resistance, New Caledonia again reported no penicillin resistance and little quinolone resistance, Tonga reported no penicillin resistance and there was a continued absence of quinolone resistance reported in Papua New Guinea in 2009. The proportion of gonococci reported as 'decreased susceptibility' and 'resistant' to the third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic ceftriaxone varied widely but no major changes were evident in cephalosporin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) patterns in 2009. Altered cephalosporin susceptibility has been associated with treatment failures following therapy with oral third-generation cephalosporins. There is a need for revision and clarification of some of the in vitro criteria that are currently used to categorise the clinical importance of gonococci with different ceftriaxone and oral cephalosporin MIC levels. The number of instances of spectinomycin resistance remained low. A high proportion of strains tested continued to exhibit high-level plasmid mediated resistance to tetracyclines. The continuing emergence and

  13. A Novel Factor H-Fc Chimeric Immunotherapeutic Molecule against Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Gulati, Sunita; Agarwal, Sarika; Unemo, Magnus; Ohnishi, Makoto; Su, Xia-Hong; Monks, Brian G; Visintin, Alberto; Madico, Guillermo; Lewis, Lisa A; Golenbock, Douglas T; Reed, George W; Rice, Peter A; Ram, Sanjay

    2016-02-15

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea, has developed resistance to almost every conventional antibiotic. There is an urgent need to develop novel therapies against gonorrhea. Many pathogens, including N. gonorrhoeae, bind the complement inhibitor factor H (FH) to evade complement-dependent killing. Sialylation of gonococcal lipooligosaccharide, as occurs in vivo, augments binding of human FH through its domains 18-20 (FH18-20). We explored the use of fusing FH18-20 with IgG Fc (FH18-20/Fc) to create a novel anti-infective immunotherapeutic. FH18-20 also binds to select host glycosaminoglycans to limit unwanted complement activation on host cells. To identify mutation(s) in FH18-20 that eliminated complement activation on host cells, yet maintained binding to N. gonorrhoeae, we created four mutations in domains 19 or 20 described in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome that prevented binding of mutated fH to human erythrocytes. One of the mutant proteins (D to G at position 1119 in domain 19; FHD1119G/Fc) facilitated complement-dependent killing of gonococci similar to unmodified FH18-20/Fc but, unlike FH18-20/Fc, did not lyse human erythrocytes. FHD1119G/Fc bound to all (100%) of 15 sialylated clinical N. gonorrhoeae isolates tested (including three contemporary ceftriaxone-resistant strains), mediated complement-dependent killing of 10 of 15 (67%) strains, and enhanced C3 deposition (≥10-fold above baseline levels) on each of the five isolates not directly killed by complement. FHD1119G/Fc facilitated opsonophagocytic killing of a serum-resistant strain by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. FHD1119G/Fc administered intravaginally significantly reduced the duration and burden of gonococcal infection in the mouse vaginal colonization model. FHD1119G/Fc represents a novel immunotherapeutic against multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:26773149

  14. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Immunity by Polarizing Human Macrophages to a M2 Profile.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, María Carolina; Lefimil, Claudia; Rodas, Paula I; Vernal, Rolando; Lopez, Mercedes; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Imarai, Mónica; Escobar, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Current data suggest that Neisseria gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. The present report is focused on gonococcus evasion mechanism on macrophages (MФ) and its impact in the subsequent immune response. In response to various signals MФ may undergo classical-M1 (M1-MФ) or alternative-M2 (M2-MФ) activation. Until now there are no reports of the gonococcus effects on human MФ polarization. We assessed the phagocytic ability of monocyte-derived MФ (MDM) upon gonococcal infection by immunofluorescence and gentamicin protection experiments. Then, we evaluated cytokine profile and M1/M2 specific-surface markers on MФ challenged with N. gonorrhoeae and their proliferative effect on T cells. Our findings lead us to suggest N. gonorrhoeae stimulates a M2-MФ phenotype in which some of the M2b and none of the M1-MФ-associated markers are induced. Interestingly, N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1), widely known as an immunosuppressive molecule. Moreover, functional results showed that N. gonorrhoeae-treated MФ are unable to induce proliferation of human T-cells, suggesting a more likely regulatory phenotype. Taken together, our data show that N. gonorroheae interferes with MФ polarization. This study has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of clearance versus long-term persistence of N. gonorroheae infection and might be applicable for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26125939

  15. The effectiveness of gentamicin in the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A high level of resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae has developed against penicillins, sulphonamides, tetracyclines and quinolones, and recent surveillance data have shown a gradual reduction in sensitivity to current first-line agents with an upward drift in the minimum inhibitory concentration of ceftriaxone. Laboratory sensitivity testing suggests that gentamicin, an aminoglycoside, may be an effective treatment option for gonorrhoea infection when used as a single intramuscular dose. Methods A search of electronic reference databases and grey literature was used to identify randomised trials and well-conducted prospective studies with concurrent controls evaluating single-dose gentamicin against placebo or a comparator regimen in the treatment of uncomplicated gonorrhoea infection in men and women aged 16 years and over. The primary outcome was microbiological cure of N. gonorrhoeae. Results Eight hundred and thirty-nine studies were identified, of which five (1,063 total participants) were included. All five studies administered single-dose gentamicin via intramuscular injection to men with uncomplicated gonococcal urethritis. Three studies were randomised trials, one was quasi-randomised and one was non-randomised but included a comparator arm. Comparator antibiotics included an alternative aminoglycoside or antibiotic used in the syndromic management of male urethritis. Methodology was poorly described in all five included studies. The high risk of bias within studies and clinical heterogeneity between studies meant that it was inappropriate to pool data for meta-analysis. Cure rates of 62% to 98% were reported with gentamicin treatment. The relative risk of cure was comparable between gentamicin and comparator antibiotics. Conclusions The studies identified provide insufficient data to support or refute the efficacy and safety of single-dose intramuscular gentamicin in the treatment of uncomplicated gonorrhoea infection. Additional randomised

  16. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Immunity by Polarizing Human Macrophages to a M2 Profile

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, María Carolina; Lefimil, Claudia; Rodas, Paula I.; Vernal, Rolando; Lopez, Mercedes; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Imarai, Mónica; Escobar, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Current data suggest that Neisseria gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. The present report is focused on gonococcus evasion mechanism on macrophages (MФ) and its impact in the subsequent immune response. In response to various signals MФ may undergo classical-M1 (M1-MФ) or alternative-M2 (M2-MФ) activation. Until now there are no reports of the gonococcus effects on human MФ polarization. We assessed the phagocytic ability of monocyte-derived MФ (MDM) upon gonococcal infection by immunofluorescence and gentamicin protection experiments. Then, we evaluated cytokine profile and M1/M2 specific-surface markers on MФ challenged with N. gonorrhoeae and their proliferative effect on T cells. Our findings lead us to suggest N. gonorrhoeae stimulates a M2-MФ phenotype in which some of the M2b and none of the M1-MФ-associated markers are induced. Interestingly, N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1), widely known as an immunosuppressive molecule. Moreover, functional results showed that N. gonorrhoeae-treated MФ are unable to induce proliferation of human T-cells, suggesting a more likely regulatory phenotype. Taken together, our data show that N. gonorroheae interferes with MФ polarization. This study has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of clearance versus long-term persistence of N. gonorroheae infection and might be applicable for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26125939

  17. Proteomics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: the treasure hunt for countermeasures against an old disease.

    PubMed

    Baarda, Benjamin I; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an exquisitely adapted, strictly human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea. This ancient human disease remains a serious problem, occurring at high incidence globally and having a major impact on reproductive and neonatal health. N. gonorrhoeae is rapidly evolving into a superbug and no effective vaccine exists to prevent gonococcal infections. Untreated or inadequately treated gonorrhea can lead to severe sequelae, including pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility in women, epididymitis in men, and sight-threatening conjunctivitis in infants born to infected mothers. Therefore, there is an immediate need for accelerated research toward the identification of molecular targets for development of drugs with new mechanisms of action and preventive vaccine(s). Global proteomic approaches are ideally suited to guide these studies. Recent quantitative proteomics (SILAC, iTRAQ, and ICAT) have illuminated the pathways utilized by N. gonorrhoeae to adapt to different lifestyles and micro-ecological niches within the host, while comparative 2D SDS-PAGE analysis has been used to elucidate spectinomycin resistance mechanisms. Further, high-throughput examinations of cell envelopes and naturally released membrane vesicles have unveiled the ubiquitous and differentially expressed proteins between temporally and geographically diverse N. gonorrhoeae isolates. This review will focus on these different approaches, emphasizing the role of proteomics in the search for vaccine candidates. Although our knowledge of N. gonorrhoeae has been expanded, still far less is known about this bacterium than the closely related N. meningitidis, where genomics- and proteomics-driven studies have led to the successful development of vaccines. PMID:26579097

  18. Proteomics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: the treasure hunt for countermeasures against an old disease

    PubMed Central

    Baarda, Benjamin I.; Sikora, Aleksandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an exquisitely adapted, strictly human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea. This ancient human disease remains a serious problem, occurring at high incidence globally and having a major impact on reproductive and neonatal health. N. gonorrhoeae is rapidly evolving into a superbug and no effective vaccine exists to prevent gonococcal infections. Untreated or inadequately treated gonorrhea can lead to severe sequelae, including pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility in women, epididymitis in men, and sight-threatening conjunctivitis in infants born to infected mothers. Therefore, there is an immediate need for accelerated research toward the identification of molecular targets for development of drugs with new mechanisms of action and preventive vaccine(s). Global proteomic approaches are ideally suited to guide these studies. Recent quantitative proteomics (SILAC, iTRAQ, and ICAT) have illuminated the pathways utilized by N. gonorrhoeae to adapt to different lifestyles and micro-ecological niches within the host, while comparative 2D SDS-PAGE analysis has been used to elucidate spectinomycin resistance mechanisms. Further, high-throughput examinations of cell envelopes and naturally released membrane vesicles have unveiled the ubiquitous and differentially expressed proteins between temporally and geographically diverse N. gonorrhoeae isolates. This review will focus on these different approaches, emphasizing the role of proteomics in the search for vaccine candidates. Although our knowledge of N. gonorrhoeae has been expanded, still far less is known about this bacterium than the closely related N. meningitidis, where genomics- and proteomics-driven studies have led to the successful development of vaccines. PMID:26579097

  19. Synthesis of a select group of proteins by Neisseria gonorrhoeae in response to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Woods, M L; Bonfiglioli, R; McGee, Z A; Georgopoulos, C

    1990-03-01

    We report the thermal conditions that induce the heat shock response in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Under conditions of thermal stress, Neisseria gonorrhoeae synthesizes heat shock proteins (hsps), which differ quantitatively from conventionally studied gonococcal proteins. Gonococci accelerate the rate of synthesis of the hsps as early as 5 min after the appropriate stimulus is applied, with synthesis continuing for 30 min, as demonstrated by in vivo labeling experiments with L-[35S]methionine. Two of the gonococcal hsps are immunologically cross-reactive with the hsps of Escherichia coli, DnaK and GroEL, as demonstrated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. Ten hsps can be identified on two-dimensional autoradiograms of whole gonococci (total protein). Four hsps can be identified on two-dimensional autoradiograms of 1% N-lauroylsarcosine (sodium salt) (Sarkosyl)-insoluble membrane fractions. Two of the hsps from the 1% Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction are found exclusively in this fraction, suggesting that they are membrane proteins. The identification of this group of proteins will facilitate further study of the function of these proteins and provide insight into the possible role of hsps in disease pathogenesis. PMID:2106493

  20. Pili-mediated Interactions between Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Bacteria are the Driving Mechanism of Microcolony Merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenisch, Wolfram; Weber, Christoph; Alzurqa, Khaled; Nasrollahi, Hadi; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily; Collective Dynamics of Cells Team; Mechano-Micro-Biology Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    During the early infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae the bacteria form microcolonies consisting of a few hundreds to a few thousands of cells. The formation of colonies is mediated by type IV pili, thin and long filaments that are also involved in the motion of single cells over a substrate. A related process causes attractive cell-cell-interactions. While the motion of single cells has been extensively studied during the past years, the physical principles driving the growth of these colonies are poorly understood. One key mechanism of colony growth is coalescence of smaller colonies. Therefore we experimentally examine the process of merging of two Neisseria gonorrhoeae colonies. We develop a theoretical microscopic model of single cells interacting solely by their pili. The experimental data and the results obtained from our model are in excellent quantitative agreement. We observe a fast initial approach of the two merging colonies within a few minutes, that is followed by a slow relaxation of the colony shape with a characteristic time of several hours. These findings suggest that pili-mediated interactions are the primary driving mechanism of the microcolony merging process.

  1. Activation of NOD receptors by Neisseria gonorrhoeae modulates the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Mavrogiorgos, Nikolaos; Mekasha, Samrawit; Yang, Yibin; Kelliher, Michelle A; Ingalls, Robin R

    2014-05-01

    NOD1 and NOD2 are members of the NOD-like receptor family of cytosolic pattern recognition receptors that recognize specific fragments of the bacterial cell wall component peptidoglycan. Neisseria species are unique amongst Gram-negative bacteria in that they turn over large amounts of peptidoglycan during growth. We examined the ability of NOD1 and NOD2 to recognize Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and determined the role of NOD-dependent signaling in regulating the immune response to gonococcal infection. Gonococci, as well as conditioned medium from mid-logarithmic phase grown bacteria, were capable of activating both human NOD1 and NOD2, as well as mouse NOD2, leading to the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and polyubiquitination of the adaptor receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase 2. We identified a number of cytokines and chemokines that were differentially expressed in wild type versus NOD2-deficient macrophages in response to gonococcal infection. Moreover, NOD2 signaling up-regulated complement pathway components and cytosolic nucleic acid sensors, suggesting a broad impact of NOD activation on innate immunity. Thus, NOD1 and NOD2 are important intracellular regulators of the immune response to infection with N. gonorrhoeae. Given the intracellular lifestyle of this pathogen, we believe these cytosolic receptors may provide a key innate immune defense mechanism for the host during gonococcal infection. PMID:23884094

  2. Incidence, epidemiology and evolution of reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop; Erdenechemeg, L.; Soon Song, Kyung; Hun Shin, Kwang

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To verify the decrease of susceptibility to ciprofloxacin in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, determine the size of the recently reported new beta-lactamase plasmid and explain the high prevalence of penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG). METHODS: Gonococci were isolated from prostitutes in Korea. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by NCCLS disk diffusion and agar dilution methods. Plasmid was isolated by an alkaline lysis method. Patterns of Nhel-digested genomic DNA were compared after pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). RESULTS: The minimum inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin for 50% of the isolates rose from 0.015 mg/L in 1993 to 0.12 mg/L in 1996. The proportion of PPNG remained at 70% or over during the 5-year period. The size of a novel beta-lactamase plasmid, first reported in 1994, was determined to be approximately 3.2 MDa, and 48% of the PPNG isolates contained it. Twelve of 50 isolates had the same PFGE pattern and nine others another pattern. CONCLUSION: The rapid decrease of fluoroquinolone-susceptible gonococci suggests that in the near future the drug may become less useful for gonorrhea treatment. The new 3.2-MDa plasmid may have been introduced as a result of the recent increase in overseas travel. The PFGE pattern suggests that high prevalence of PPNG may be due to dissemination of a few resistant clones among the high-risk groups. PMID:11864261

  3. Synthesis of a select group of proteins by Neisseria gonorrhoeae in response to thermal stress.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, M L; Bonfiglioli, R; McGee, Z A; Georgopoulos, C

    1990-01-01

    We report the thermal conditions that induce the heat shock response in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Under conditions of thermal stress, Neisseria gonorrhoeae synthesizes heat shock proteins (hsps), which differ quantitatively from conventionally studied gonococcal proteins. Gonococci accelerate the rate of synthesis of the hsps as early as 5 min after the appropriate stimulus is applied, with synthesis continuing for 30 min, as demonstrated by in vivo labeling experiments with L-[35S]methionine. Two of the gonococcal hsps are immunologically cross-reactive with the hsps of Escherichia coli, DnaK and GroEL, as demonstrated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. Ten hsps can be identified on two-dimensional autoradiograms of whole gonococci (total protein). Four hsps can be identified on two-dimensional autoradiograms of 1% N-lauroylsarcosine (sodium salt) (Sarkosyl)-insoluble membrane fractions. Two of the hsps from the 1% Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction are found exclusively in this fraction, suggesting that they are membrane proteins. The identification of this group of proteins will facilitate further study of the function of these proteins and provide insight into the possible role of hsps in disease pathogenesis. Images PMID:2106493

  4. Bacteriocins and other bioactive substances of probiotic lactobacilli as biological weapons against Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Ruíz, Francisco O; Pascual, Liliana; Giordano, Walter; Barberis, Lucila

    2015-04-01

    In the search of new antimicrobial agents against Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacteriocins-producing probiotic lactobacilli deserve special attention. The inhibitory effects of biosubstances such as organic acids, hydrogen peroxide and each bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) L23 and L60 on the growth of different gonococcal strains were investigated. Different non-treated and treated cell-free supernatants of two probiotic lactobacilli containing these metabolites were used. The aims of this work were (i) to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the biosubstances produced by two probiotic lactobacilli, estimating the proportion in which each of them is responsible for the inhibitory effect, (ii) to define their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and, (iii) to determine the potential interactions between these biosubstances against N. gonorrhoeae. The main antimicrobial metabolites were the BLIS-es L23 and L60 in comparison with other biosubstances. Proportionally, their contributions to the inhibition on the gonococcal growth were 87.28% and 80.66%, respectively. The MIC values of bacteriocins were promising since these substances, when diluted, showed considerable inhibitory activity for all gonococci. In the interaction between bacteriocins, 100% of synergism was found on the gonococcal growth. In summary, this study indicates that both L23 and L60 could potentially serve to design new bioproducts against N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:25673666

  5. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Iron-Limiting Innate Immune Defenses in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zughaier, Susu M.; Kandler, Justin L.; Shafer, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strict human pathogen that causes the sexually transmitted infection termed gonorrhea. The gonococcus can survive extracellularly and intracellularly, but in both environments the bacteria must acquire iron from host proteins for survival. However, upon infection the host uses a defensive response by limiting the bioavailability of iron by a number of mechanisms including the enhanced expression of hepcidin, the master iron-regulating hormone, which reduces iron uptake from the gut and retains iron in macrophages. The host also secretes the antibacterial protein NGAL, which sequesters bacterial siderophores and therefore inhibits bacterial growth. To learn whether intracellular gonococci can subvert this defensive response, we examined expression of host genes that encode proteins involved in modulating levels of intracellular iron. We found that N. gonorrhoeae can survive in association (tightly adherent and intracellular) with monocytes and macrophages and upregulates a panel of its iron-responsive genes in this environment. We also found that gonococcal infection of human monocytes or murine macrophages resulted in the upregulation of hepcidin, NGAL, and NRAMP1 as well as downregulation of the expression of the gene encoding the short chain 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH2); BDH2 catalyzes the production of the mammalian siderophore 2,5-DHBA involved in chelating and detoxifying iron. Based on these findings, we propose that N. gonorrhoeae can subvert the iron-limiting innate immune defenses to facilitate iron acquisition and intracellular survival. PMID:24489950

  6. CD66 carcinoembryonic antigens mediate interactions between Opa-expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae and human polymorphonuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Gray-Owen, S D; Dehio, C; Haude, A; Grunert, F; Meyer, T F

    1997-06-16

    Colonization of urogenital tissues by the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae is characteristically associated with purulent exudates of polymorphonuclear phagocytes (PMNs) containing apparently viable bacteria. Distinct variant forms of the phase-variable opacity-associated (Opa) outer membrane proteins mediate the non-opsonized binding and internalization of N. gonorrhoeae by human PMNs. Using overlay assays and an affinity isolation technique, we demonstrate the direct interaction between Opa52-expressing gonococci and members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family which express the CD66 epitope. Gonococci and recombinant Escherichia coli strains synthesizing Opa52 showed specific binding and internalization by transfected HeLa cell lines expressing the CD66 family members BGP (CD66a), NCA (CD66c), CGM1 (CD66d) and CEA (CD66e), but not that expressing CGM6 (CD66b). Bacterial strains expressing either no opacity protein or the epithelial cell invasion-associated Opa50 do not bind these CEA family members. Consistent with their different receptor specificities, Opa52-mediated interactions could be inhibited by polyclonal anti-CEA sera, while Opa50 binding was instead inhibited by heparin. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we observed a marked recruitment of CD66 antigen by Opa52-expressing gonococci on both the transfected cell lines and infected PMNs. These data indicate that members of the CEA family constitute the cellular receptors for the interaction with, and internalization of, N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:9218786

  7. Reference map and comparative proteomic analysis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae displaying high resistance against spectinomycin.

    PubMed

    Nabu, Sunanta; Lawung, Ratana; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Patcharee; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-03-01

    A proteome reference map of Neisseria gonorrhoeae was successfully established using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in conjunction with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. This map was further applied to compare protein expression profiles of high-level spectinomycin-resistant (clinical isolate) and -susceptible (reference strain) N. gonorrhoeae following treatment with subminimal inhibitory concentrations (subMICs) of spectinomycin. Approximately 200 protein spots were visualized by Coomassie brilliant blue G-250 staining and 66 spots representing 58 unique proteins were subsequently identified. Most of the identified proteins were analysed as cytoplasmic proteins and belonged to the class of energy metabolism. Comparative proteomic analysis of whole protein expression of susceptible and resistant gonococci showed up to 96% similarity while eight proteins were found to be differentially expressed in the resistant strain. In the presence of subMICs of spectinomycin, it was found that 50S ribosomal protein L7/L12, an essential component for ribosomal translocation, was upregulated in both strains, ranging from 1.5- to 3.5-fold, suggesting compensatory mechanisms of N. gonorrhoeae in response to antibiotic that inhibits protein synthesis. Moreover, the differential expression of proteins involved in energy metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and the cell envelope was noticeably detected, indicating significant cellular responses and adaptation against antibiotic stress. Such knowledge provides valuable data, not only fundamental proteomic data, but also knowledge of the mode of action of antibiotic and secondary target proteins implicated in adaptation and compensatory mechanisms. PMID:24567501

  8. Serotype and serovar distribution of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated from high-risk populations in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Alam, M A; Chowdhury, M Z; Ahmed, F; Alam, A; Hossain, M A

    2012-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonococcal infection, is known to frequently change their characteristics to evade host immune mechanism. Characterization of the clinical isolates of the organism can lead to identification of the circulating strains and often a sexual network in a community to help in designing the control strategy. Keeping in mind the above consideration, a total of 239 N. gonorrhoeae, isolated from high-risk populations, were characterized for serotypes and serovars by monoclonal antibodies against protein 1 of the organism. Majority of the serotypes were serotype B (142, 59.4%). Majority of the isolates showing resistance to at least one of the antibiotics tested were also serotype B (139, 59.2%), whereas, majority of the isolates showing resistance to any three of the antibiotics (multidrug resistant, MDR) (63%) was serotype A. A total of 41 different serovars were also identified and five of which (Arst, Bropt, Bopt, Arost, and Brop) included the highest percent (49.3%) of the isolates. Many serovars (23/41, 56.1%) were new emergent and included 58 (24.3%) of the isolates investigated. All of the new serovars were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics tested and the highest rate (40/102, 39.2%) was MDR. Serotyping and serovar determination was found contributory to understand the microepidemics of the N. gonorrhoeae isolates. Further studies including antibiogram and contact tracing can efficiently help in control of the disease. PMID:23540188

  9. Genetic characterization of the nucleotide excision repair system of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    LeCuyer, Brian E; Criss, Alison K; Seifert, H Steven

    2010-02-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is universally used to recognize and remove many types of DNA damage. In eubacteria, the NER system typically consists of UvrA, UvrB, UvrC, the UvrD helicase, DNA polymerase I, and ligase. In addition, when DNA damage blocks transcription, transcription-repair coupling factor (TRCF), the product of the mfd gene, recruits the Uvr complex to repair the damage. Previous work using selected mutants and assays have indicated that pathogenic Neisseria spp. carry a functional NER system. In order to comprehensively examine the role of NER in Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA recombination and repair processes, the predicted NER genes (uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, uvrD, and mfd) were each disrupted by a transposon insertion, and the uvrB and uvrD mutants were complemented with a copy of each gene in an ectopic locus. Each uvr mutant strain was highly sensitive to UV irradiation and also showed sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide killing, confirming that all of the NER genes in N. gonorrhoeae are functional. The effect of RecA expression on UV survival was minor in uvr mutants but much larger in the mfd mutant. All of the NER mutants demonstrated wild-type levels of pilin antigenic variation and DNA transformation. However, the uvrD mutant exhibited higher frequencies of PilC-mediated pilus phase variation and spontaneous mutation, a finding consistent with a role for UvrD in mismatch repair. We conclude that NER functions are conserved in N. gonorrhoeae and are important for the DNA repair capabilities of this strict human pathogen. PMID:19933360

  10. VDAC and the bacterial porin PorB of Neisseria gonorrhoeae share mitochondrial import pathways.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anne; Rassow, Joachim; Grimm, Jan; Machuy, Nikolaus; Meyer, Thomas F; Rudel, Thomas

    2002-04-15

    The human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae induces host cell apoptosis during infection by delivering the outer membrane protein PorB to the host cell's mitochondria. PorB is a pore-forming beta-barrel protein sharing several features with the mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which is involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Here we show that PorB of pathogenic Neisseria species produced by host cells is efficiently targeted to mitochondria. Imported PorB resides in the mitochondrial outer membrane and forms multimers with similar sizes as in the outer bacterial membrane. The mitochondria completely lose their membrane potential, a characteristic previously observed in cells infected with gonococci or treated with purified PorB. Closely related bacterial porins of non-pathogenic Neisseria mucosa or Escherichia coli remain in the cytosol. Import of PorB into mitochondria in vivo is independent of a linear signal sequence. Insertion of PorB into the mitochondrial outer membrane in vitro depends on the activity of Tom5, Tom20 and Tom40, but is independent of Tom70. Our data show that human VDAC and bacterial PorB are imported into mitochondria by a similar mechanism. PMID:11953311

  11. Identification of sRNAs expressed by the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae under disparate growth conditions.

    PubMed

    McClure, Ryan; Tjaden, Brian; Genco, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    In the last several years, bacterial gene regulation via small RNAs (sRNAs) has been recognized as an important mechanism controlling expression of essential proteins that are critical to bacterial growth and metabolism. Technologies such as RNA-seq are rapidly expanding the field of sRNAs and are enabling a global view of the "sRNAome" of several bacterial species. While numerous sRNAs have been identified in a variety of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, only a very small number have been fully characterized in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the etiological agent of the STD gonorrhea. Here we present the first analysis of N. gonorrhoeae specifically focused on the identification of sRNAs through RNA-seq analysis of the organism cultured under different in vitro growth conditions. Using a new computational program, Rockhopper, to analyze prokaryotic RNA-seq data obtained from N. gonorrhoeae we identified several putative sRNAs and confirmed their expression and size through Northern blot analysis. In addition, RNA was collected from four different growth conditions (iron replete and deplete, as well as with and without co-culture with human endocervical cells). Many of the putative sRNAs identified shoed varying expression levels relative to the different growth conditions examine or were detected only under certain conditions but not others. Comparisons of identified sRNAs with the regulatory pattern of putative mRNA targets revealed possible functional roles for these sRNAs. These studies are the first to carry out a global analysis of N. gonorrhoeae specifically focused on sRNAs and show that RNA-mediated regulation may be an important mechanism of gene control in this human pathogen. PMID:25221548

  12. Alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae survival during experimental murine genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Jerse, Ann E

    2006-07-01

    The addition of host-derived sialic acid to Neisseria gonorrhoeae lipooligosaccharide is hypothesized to be an important mechanism by which gonococci evade host innate defenses. This hypothesis is based primarily on in vitro assays of complement-mediated and phagocytic killing. Here we report that a nonpolar alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase (lst) mutant of N. gonorrhoeae was significantly attenuated in its capacity to colonize the lower genital tract of 17-beta estradiol-treated female BALB/c mice during competitive infection with the wild-type strain. Genetic complementation of the lst mutation restored recovery of the mutant to wild-type levels. Studies with B10.D2-HC(o)H2(d)H(2)-T18c/OSN (C5-deficient) mice showed that attenuation of the lst mutant was not due to increased sensitivity to complement-mediated bacteriolysis, a result that is consistent with recently reported host restrictions in the complement cascade. However, Lst-deficient gonococci were killed more rapidly than sialylated wild-type gonococci following intraperitoneal injection into normal mice, which is consistent with sialylation conferring protection against killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). As reported for human PMNs, sialylated gonococci were more resistant to killing by murine PMNs, and sialylation led to reduced association with and induction of a weaker respiratory burst in PMNs from estradiol-treated mice. In summary, these studies suggest sialylation confers a survival advantage to N. gonorrhoeae in mice by increasing resistance to PMN killing. This report is the first direct demonstration that alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase contributes to N. gonorrhoeae pathogenesis in an in vivo model. This study also validates the use of experimental murine infection to study certain aspects of gonococcal pathogenesis. PMID:16790783

  13. Inhibition of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type II Topoisomerases by the Novel Spiropyrimidinetrione AZD0914.

    PubMed

    Kern, Gunther; Palmer, Tiffany; Ehmann, David E; Shapiro, Adam B; Andrews, Beth; Basarab, Gregory S; Doig, Peter; Fan, Jun; Gao, Ning; Mills, Scott D; Mueller, John; Sriram, Shubha; Thresher, Jason; Walkup, Grant K

    2015-08-21

    We characterized the inhibition of Neisseria gonorrhoeae type II topoisomerases gyrase and topoisomerase IV by AZD0914 (AZD0914 will be henceforth known as ETX0914 (Entasis Therapeutics)), a novel spiropyrimidinetrione antibacterial compound that is currently in clinical trials for treatment of drug-resistant gonorrhea. AZD0914 has potent bactericidal activity against N. gonorrhoeae, including multidrug-resistant strains and key Gram-positive, fastidious Gram-negative, atypical, and anaerobic bacterial species (Huband, M. D., Bradford, P. A., Otterson, L. G., Basrab, G. S., Giacobe, R. A., Patey, S. A., Kutschke, A. C., Johnstone, M. R., Potter, M. E., Miller, P. F., and Mueller, J. P. (2014) In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of AZD0914: A New Spiropyrimidinetrione DNA Gyrase/Topoisomerase Inhibitor with Potent Activity against Gram-positive, Fastidious Gram-negative, and Atypical Bacteria. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 59, 467-474). AZD0914 inhibited DNA biosynthesis preferentially to other macromolecules in Escherichia coli and induced the SOS response to DNA damage in E. coli. AZD0914 stabilized the enzyme-DNA cleaved complex for N. gonorrhoeae gyrase and topoisomerase IV. The potency of AZD0914 for inhibition of supercoiling and the stabilization of cleaved complex by N. gonorrhoeae gyrase increased in a fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant enzyme. When a mutation, conferring mild resistance to AZD0914, was present in the fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant, the potency of ciprofloxacin for inhibition of supercoiling and stabilization of cleaved complex was increased greater than 20-fold. In contrast to ciprofloxacin, religation of the cleaved DNA did not occur in the presence of AZD0914 upon removal of magnesium from the DNA-gyrase-inhibitor complex. AZD0914 had relatively low potency for inhibition of human type II topoisomerases α and β. PMID:26149691

  14. Binding of vitronectin to opa-expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae mediates invasion of HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Duarte, O G; Dehio, M; Guzmán, C A; Chhatwal, G S; Dehio, C; Meyer, T F

    1997-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae induces local infections in the human genitourinary tract and can disseminate to other organs to cause severe disease. Blood-derived factors present in the genital mucosa have been suggested to facilitate the spread of N. gonorrhoeae in disseminated gonococcal infections. Using gentamicin invasion assays and confocal microscopy, we observed a strong stimulatory effect of fetal calf serum (FCS) on the gonococcal invasion of HeLa cells. FCS-mediated invasion was dependent on the expression of the epithelial cell invasion-associated Opa protein (plasmid-encoded Opa50 or its chromosomal homolog Opa30), while N. gonorrhoeae expressing noninvasive Opa proteins (Opa(51-60)) or no Opa protein (Opa-) was not invasive even in the presence of FCS. Incubation of N. gonorrhoeae MS11 with biotinylated FCS revealed a 78-kDa protein as the prominent protein binding to Opa50- or Opa30-expressing gonococci. This protein was recognized by antibodies against vitronectin (VN) in Western blots. Purified human or bovine VN efficiently bound to Opa50-expressing gonococci, while binding to noninvasive Opa- or Opa52-expressing gonococci was significantly lower. Binding of VN was inhibited by heparin in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that the heparin binding sites present in VN or Opa50 may play an essential role in this interaction. Based on gentamicin invasion assays and confocal microscopy studies, VN binding was associated with an increased invasion of Opa50- and Opa30-expressing gonococci into HeLa cells. The ability of VN to mediate entry into epithelial cells may constitute an important event in the pathogenesis of local as well as disseminated gonococcal infections. PMID:9284164

  15. Oral Immunization of Rabbits with S. enterica Typhimurium Expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae Filamentous Phage Φ6 Induces Bactericidal Antibodies Against N. gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Piekarowicz, Andrzej; Kłyż, Aneta; Majchrzak, Michał; Stein, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    All Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains whose DNA sequences have been determined possess filamentous phage DNA sequences. To ascertain if phage encoded proteins could form the basis of a gonococcal vaccine, rabbits were orally infected with S. enterica Typhimurium strain χ3987 harboring phagemid NgoΦ6 fm. The elicited sera contained large quantities of anti-phage IgG and IgA antibodies that bound to the surface of N. gonorrhoeae cells, as shown by indirect fluorescent analysis and flow cytometry. The elicited sera was able to bind to several phage proteins. The sera also had bactericidal activity. These data demonstrate that N. gonorrhoeae filamentous phage can induce antibodies with anti-gonococcal activity and that phage proteins may be a candidate for vaccine development. PMID:26939573

  16. Oral Immunization of Rabbits with S. enterica Typhimurium Expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae Filamentous Phage Φ6 Induces Bactericidal Antibodies Against N. gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Piekarowicz, Andrzej; Kłyż, Aneta; Majchrzak, Michał; Stein, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    All Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains whose DNA sequences have been determined possess filamentous phage DNA sequences. To ascertain if phage encoded proteins could form the basis of a gonococcal vaccine, rabbits were orally infected with S. enterica Typhimurium strain χ3987 harboring phagemid NgoΦ6 fm. The elicited sera contained large quantities of anti-phage IgG and IgA antibodies that bound to the surface of N. gonorrhoeae cells, as shown by indirect fluorescent analysis and flow cytometry. The elicited sera was able to bind to several phage proteins. The sera also had bactericidal activity. These data demonstrate that N. gonorrhoeae filamentous phage can induce antibodies with anti-gonococcal activity and that phage proteins may be a candidate for vaccine development. PMID:26939573

  17. Vigorous response of human innate functioning IgM memory B cells upon infection by Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    So, Nancy S Y; Ostrowski, Mario A; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2012-04-15

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the cause of the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea, elicits low levels of specific Ig that decline rapidly after the bacteria are cleared. Reinfection with the same serovar can occur, and prior gonococcal infection does not alter the Ig response upon subsequent exposure, suggesting that protective immunity is not induced. The mucosal Ig response apparent during gonorrhea does not correlate with that observed systemically, leading to a suggestion that it is locally generated. In considering whether N. gonorrhoeae directly influences B cells, we observed that gonococcal infection prolonged viability of primary human B cells in vitro and elicited robust activation and vigorous proliferative responses in the absence of T cells. Furthermore, we observed the specific expansion of IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells in response to gonococcal infection. These cells are innate in function, conferring protection against diverse microbes by producing low-affinity, broadly reactive IgM without inducing classical immunologic memory. Although gonococcal infection of B cells produced small amounts of gonococcal-specific IgM, IgM specific for irrelevant Ags were also produced, suggesting a broad, polyspecific Ig response. The gonococci were effectively bound and engulfed by B cells. TLR9-inhibitory CpGs blocked B cell responses, indicating that intracellular bacterial degradation allows for innate immune detection within the phagolysosome. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a bacterial pathogen having specific affinity for the human IgM memory B cells, driving their potent activation and polyclonal Ig response. This unfocused T-independent response explains the localized Ig response that occurs, despite an absence of immunologic memory elicited during gonorrhea. PMID:22427638

  18. The dam replacing gene product enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 viability and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Bacal, Pawel; Wasiluk, Adrian; Trybunko, Anastasiya; Adamczyk-Poplawska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Many Neisseriaceae do not exhibit Dam methyltransferase activity and, instead of the dam gene, possess drg (dam replacing gene) inserted in the leuS/dam locus. The drg locus in Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 has a lower GC-pairs content (40.5%) compared to the whole genome of N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 (52%). The gonococcal drg gene encodes a DNA endonuclease Drg, with GmeATC specificity. Disruption of drg or insertion of the dam gene in gonococcal genome changes the level of expression of genes as shown by transcriptome analysis. For the drg-deficient N. gonorrhoeae mutant, a total of 195 (8.94% of the total gene pool) genes exhibited an altered expression compared to the wt strain by at least 1.5 fold. In dam-expressing N. gonorrhoeae mutant, the expression of 240 genes (11% of total genes) was deregulated. Most of these deregulated genes were involved in translation, DNA repair, membrane biogenesis and energy production as shown by cluster of orthologous group analysis. In vivo, the inactivation of drg gene causes the decrease of the number of live neisserial cells and long lag phase of growth. The insertion of dam gene instead of drg locus restores cell viability. We have also shown that presence of the drg gene product is important for N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 in adhesion, including human epithelial cells, and biofilm formation. Biofilm produced by drg-deficient strain is formed by more dispersed cells, compared to this one formed by parental strain as shown by scanning electron and confocal microscopy. Also adherence assays show a significantly smaller biomass of formed biofilm (OD570 = 0.242 ± 0.038) for drg-deficient strain, compared to wild-type strain (OD570 = 0.378 ± 0.057). Dam-expressing gonococcal cells produce slightly weaker biofilm with cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. This strain has also a five times reduced ability for adhesion to human epithelial cells. In this context, the presence of Drg is more advantageous for N. gonorrhoeae biology than

  19. In vitro growth of multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates is inhibited by ETX0914, a novel spiropyrimidinetrione.

    PubMed

    Papp, John R; Lawrence, Kenneth; Sharpe, Samera; Mueller, John; Kirkcaldy, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae has severely limited the number of treatment options, and the emergence of extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance threatens the effectiveness of the last remaining recommended treatment regimen. This study assessed the in vitro susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to ETX0914, a novel spiropyrimidinetrione that inhibits DNA biosynthesis. In vitro activity was determined by agar dilution against 100 N. gonorrhoeae isolates collected from men presenting with urethritis in the USA during 2012-2013 through the Gonococcal Isolate Surveillance Project. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) that inhibited growth in 50% (MIC50) and 90% (MIC90) of isolates was calculated for each antimicrobial agent. ETX0914 demonstrated a high level of antimicrobial activity against N. gonorrhoeae, including isolates with decreased susceptibility or resistance to currently available agents. The ability of ETX0914 to inhibit the growth of N. gonorrhoeae was similar to ceftriaxone, which is currently recommended in combination with azithromycin to treat gonorrhoea. The data presented in this study strongly suggest that ETX0914 should be evaluated in a clinical trial for the treatment of N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:27499432

  20. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Cell Death in Human Endocervical Epithelial Cells through Export of Exosome-Associated cIAP2

    PubMed Central

    Nudel, Kathleen; Massari, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens persist and survive in the host by modulating host cell death pathways. We previously demonstrated that Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea, protects against exogenous induction of apoptosis in human cervical epithelial cells. However, induction of cell death by N. gonorrhoeae has also been reported in other cell types. The mechanisms by which N. gonorrhoeae modulates cell death are not clear, although a role for the inhibitor of apoptosis-2 (cIAP2) has been proposed. In this study, we confirmed that N. gonorrhoeae induces production of cIAP2 in human cervical epithelial cells. High levels of intracellular cIAP2 were detected early after N. gonorrhoeae stimulation, which was followed by a marked decrease at 24 h. At this time point, we observed increased levels of extracellular cIAP2 associated with exosomes and an overall increase in production of exosomes. Inhibition of cIAP2 in N. gonorrhoeae-stimulated epithelial cells resulted in increased cell death and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Collectively these results indicate that N. gonorrhoeae stimulation of human endocervical epithelial cells induces the release of cIAP2, an essential regulator of cell death and immune signaling. PMID:26077759

  1. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Cell Death in Human Endocervical Epithelial Cells through Export of Exosome-Associated cIAP2.

    PubMed

    Nudel, Kathleen; Massari, Paola; Genco, Caroline A

    2015-09-01

    Several bacterial pathogens persist and survive in the host by modulating host cell death pathways. We previously demonstrated that Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea, protects against exogenous induction of apoptosis in human cervical epithelial cells. However, induction of cell death by N. gonorrhoeae has also been reported in other cell types. The mechanisms by which N. gonorrhoeae modulates cell death are not clear, although a role for the inhibitor of apoptosis-2 (cIAP2) has been proposed. In this study, we confirmed that N. gonorrhoeae induces production of cIAP2 in human cervical epithelial cells. High levels of intracellular cIAP2 were detected early after N. gonorrhoeae stimulation, which was followed by a marked decrease at 24 h. At this time point, we observed increased levels of extracellular cIAP2 associated with exosomes and an overall increase in production of exosomes. Inhibition of cIAP2 in N. gonorrhoeae-stimulated epithelial cells resulted in increased cell death and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Collectively these results indicate that N. gonorrhoeae stimulation of human endocervical epithelial cells induces the release of cIAP2, an essential regulator of cell death and immune signaling. PMID:26077759

  2. Supplementary testing is not required in the cobas 4800 CT/NG test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae weak-positive urogenital samples.

    PubMed

    Bromhead, Collette; Liyanarachchy, Nadika; Mayes, Julia; Upton, Arlo; Balm, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Weak-positive Neisseria gonorrhoeae nucleic acid amplification test results are difficult to interpret. We show that the frequency of unconfirmed N. gonorrhoeae results from the cobas 4800 test rises exponentially after 38.0 cycles, where the likelihood of an unconfirmed result exceeds 29%. Supplementary testing of such samples should be avoided; instead, treatment should be based on clinical pretest probability. PMID:25392357

  3. Supplementary Testing Is Not Required in the cobas 4800 CT/NG Test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae Weak-Positive Urogenital Samples

    PubMed Central

    Liyanarachchy, Nadika; Mayes, Julia; Upton, Arlo; Balm, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Weak-positive Neisseria gonorrhoeae nucleic acid amplification test results are difficult to interpret. We show that the frequency of unconfirmed N. gonorrhoeae results from the cobas 4800 test rises exponentially after 38.0 cycles, where the likelihood of an unconfirmed result exceeds 29%. Supplementary testing of such samples should be avoided; instead, treatment should be based on clinical pretest probability. PMID:25392357

  4. Characteristics of antisera against periodate-resistant membrane antigens from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Røe, S F; Eggset, G; Iversen, O J; Maeland, J A

    1980-12-01

    Crude outer membrane (OM) was prepared by extraction of bacteria of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains 8551. V, and VII, with an EDTA-containing buffer. The preparations contained the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and at least 10 proteins as shown by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunization of rabbits with untreated OM resulted in production of antibodies against several antigens, including LPS. Antisera raised against periodate-treated OM did not contain antibodies against LPS. These latter antisera agglutinated heat-treated (100 degrees C, 60 min) gonoccal cells by means of antibodies to one or more common agglutinogens and against a strain-specific agglutinogen that was susceptible to digestion with proteolytic enzymes. Both side agglutination and a plate agglutination test could be used to detect antibodies against these agglutinogens. PMID:6261525

  5. [Electron microscopic representation of the pili structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Müller, G; Klug, H

    1979-01-01

    The technique of negative staining and ultra-thin section has been used for investigations of 30 Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains in order to represent the structure of pili (fimbriae) electron microscopically. The staining of the gonococci was effected by phosphotungstic acid (0,5%). The pili ascertained were 30 to 60 A thick. In course of in vitro passages up to 10. subculture morphological changes of the pili have been observed. The application of trisbuffer or solution of Hylase (hyaluronidase) showed not any improved results in comparison with buffered NaCl-solution as suspension medium. The investigation of ultra-thin sections showed that the structure of the pili could be exhibited not clearly. Therefore, these technique seems to be not suitable for qualitative representative of the pili. PMID:86464

  6. Evaluation of the phadebact gonococcus test, a coagglutination procedure for confirmation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, J S; Martin, J E

    1980-01-01

    Rapid and accurate immunological confirmation of presumptively positive gonococci could be facilitated with the Phadebact Gonococcus Test, a slide coagglutination procedure. The test was compared with carbohydrate utilization and fluorescent-antibody tests on 235 clinical isolates. With the coagglutination procedure, 97.1% of the isolates were identified as compared with 93.1% by carbohydrate utilization and 98.7% by fluorescent antibody. The Phadebact test was highly specific, showing no cross-reactions with 55 other Neisseria species or with 50 miscellaneous organisms occasionally found growing on selective culture media. Because of its high sensitivity and specificity, ease of performance, and ability to provide results in 2 to 3 min, this procedure provides a suitable alternative to the carbohydrate utilization and fluorescent-antibody tests for confirmation of N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:6766952

  7. Neisseria gonorrhoeae enhances infection of dendritic cells by HIV type 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jizhong; Li, Geling; Bafica, Andre; Pantelic, Milica; Zhang, Pei; Broxmeyer, Hal; Liu, Ying; Wetzler, Lee; He, Johnny J; Chen, Tie

    2005-06-15

    Clinical studies indicate that Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococci (GC)) has the capacity to enhance HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection. We studied whether GC enhances HIV infection of activated dendritic cells (DCs). The results show that GC can dramatically enhance HIV replication in human DCs during coinfection. The GC component responsible for HIV infection enhancement may be peptidoglycan, which activates TLR2. TLR2 involvement is suggested by bacterial lipoprotein, a TLR2-specific inducer, which stimulates a strong enhancement of HIV infection by human DCs. Moreover, participation of TLR2 is further implicated because GC is unable to stimulate expression of HIV in DCs of TLR2-deficient HIV-1-transgenic mice. These results provide one potential mechanism through which GC infection increases HIV replication in patients infected with both GC and HIV. PMID:15944306

  8. Proteins that appear to be associated with pili in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Muir, L L; Strugnell, R A; Davies, J K

    1988-01-01

    Pili of Neisseria gonorrhoeae are thought to be composed entirely of identical subunits, called pilin, that self-assemble in vitro. Previous pilus purification methods have relied on this latter point, and dissociation and reassociation of pilin subunits has yielded pilin preparations of high purity. Such a procedure could result in the loss of any pilus-associated proteins. We have developed a procedure for the isolation of intact native pili in a deoxycholate-urea buffer in which the pili are fractionated on the basis of size and hydrophobicity. Electron microscopy indicates that the pili are largely free from outer membrane vesicles and other cellular material. Electrophoretic analysis has shown that a number of proteins copurify with pilin. Antibodies to these proteins could be removed from an antiserum against whole piliated cells by absorption with piliated cells but not by absorption with nonpiliated cells. Hence, our results indicate that these proteins could be pilus associated. Images PMID:2898429

  9. Ofloxacin susceptibilities of 5,667 Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains isolated in Hong Kong.

    PubMed Central

    Kam, K M; Lo, K K; Lai, C F; Lee, Y S; Chan, C B

    1993-01-01

    Of 5,667 strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated from the Government Social Hygiene (sexually transmitted disease) Clinics in Hong Kong from 1990 to 1992, there was a trend toward an increase in the percentage of strains resistant in vitro to 0.01 and 0.1 microgram of ofloxacin per ml, with 54.3 and 5.5% resistant strains, respectively, in January 1990, rising to 95.3 and 41.5%, respectively, in December 1992. The percentage of strains for which the MIC is > 1 microgram/ml remains stable, and no clinical failure has yet been seen. This trend of decreasing susceptibility warrants close monitoring when ofloxacin is used as first-line treatment for gonorrhea. PMID:8239622

  10. Novel meningococcal 4CMenB vaccine antigens - prevalence and polymorphisms of the encoding genes in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Hadad, Ronza; Jacobsson, Susanne; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Fredlund, Hans; Olcén, Per; Unemo, Magnus

    2012-09-01

    The first cross-protective Neisseria meningitidis vaccine (focus on serogroup B), the protein-based 4 component meningococcus serogroup B (4CMenB), includes the New Zealand outer membrane vesicle and three main genome-derived neisserial antigens (GNAs). These GNAs are fHbp (fused to GNA2091), NHBA (fused to GNA1030) and NadA. In this study, the prevalence and polymorphisms of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the 4CMenB antigens in a temporally and geographically diverse collection of N. gonorrhoeae isolates (n = 111) were investigated. All the examined GNA genes, except the nadA gene, were present in all gonococcal isolates. However, 25 isolates contained premature stop codons in the fHbp gene and/or the nhba gene, resulting in truncated proteins. Compared with the 4CMenB antigen sequences in reference strain MC58, the gonococcal strains displayed 67.0-95.4% and 60.9-94.9% identity in nucleotide sequence and amino acid sequence, respectively, in the equivalent GNA antigens. The absence of NadA, lack of universal expression of fHbp and NHBA and the uncertainty regarding the surface exposure of fHbp as well as the function of NHBA in N. gonorrhoeae will likely limit the use of the identical 4CMenB antigens in a gonococcal vaccine. However, possible cross-immunity of 4CMenB with gonococci and expression and function of the equivalent gonococcal GNAs, as well as of more appropriate GNAs for a gonococcal vaccine, need to be further examined. PMID:22882265

  11. Activation of NOD receptors by Neisseria gonorrhoeae modulates the innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Mavrogiorgos, Nikolaos; Mekasha, Samrawit; Yang, Yibin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Ingalls, Robin R.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-1 and NOD2 are members of the NOD-like receptor family of cytosolic pattern recognition receptors that recognize specific fragments of the bacterial cell wall component peptidoglycan. Neisseria species are unique amongst Gram-negative bacteria in that they turn over large amounts of peptidoglycan during growth. In this study we examined the ability of NOD1 and NOD2 to recognize N. gonorrhoeae, and determined the role of NOD-dependent signaling in regulating the immune response to gonococcal infection. We found that gonococci, as well as conditioned medium from mid-logarithmic phase grown bacteria, were capable of activating both human NOD1 and NOD2, as well as mouse NOD2, leading to the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and polyubiquitination of the adaptor receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase 2 (RIPK2). We identified a number of cytokines and chemokines that were differentially expressed in wild type vs. NOD2 deficient macrophages in response to gonococcal infection. Moreover, NOD2 signaling upregulated complement pathway components and cytosolic nucleic acid sensors, suggesting a broad impact of NOD activation on innate immunity. These data demonstrate that NOD1 and NOD2 are important intracellular regulators of the immune response to infection with N. gonorrhoeae. Given the intracellular lifestyle of this pathogen, we believe these cytosolic receptors may provide a key innate immune defense mechanism for the host during gonococcal infection. PMID:23884094

  12. Structure and function of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrF illuminates a class of antimetabolite efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Su, Chih-Chia; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Long, Feng; Delmar, Jared A; Chou, Tsung-Han; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Shafer, William M; Yu, Edward W

    2015-04-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. The control of this disease has been compromised by the increasing proportion of infections due to antibiotic-resistant strains, which are growing at an alarming rate. N. gonorrhoeae MtrF is an integral membrane protein that belongs to the AbgT family of transporters for which no structural information is available. Here, we describe the crystal structure of MtrF, revealing a dimeric molecule with architecture distinct from all other families of transporters. MtrF is a bowl-shaped dimer with a solvent-filled basin extending from the cytoplasm to halfway across the membrane bilayer. Each subunit of the transporter contains nine transmembrane helices and two hairpins, posing a plausible pathway for substrate transport. A combination of the crystal structure and biochemical functional assays suggests that MtrF is an antibiotic efflux pump mediating bacterial resistance to sulfonamide antimetabolite drugs. PMID:25818299

  13. Neisseria gonorrhoeae phagosomes delay fusion with primary granules to enhance bacterial survival inside human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M Brittany; Criss, Alison K

    2013-08-01

    Symptomatic infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) promotes inflammation driven by polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs, neutrophils), yet some Gc survive PMN exposure during infection. Here we report a novel mechanism of gonococcal resistance to PMNs: Gc phagosomes avoid maturation into phagolysosomes by delayed fusion with primary (azurophilic) granules, which contain antimicrobial components including serine proteases. Reduced phagosome-primary granule fusion was observed in gonorrheal exudates and human PMNs infected ex vivo. Delayed phagosome-granule fusion could be overcome by opsonizing Gc with immunoglobulin. Using bacterial viability dyes along with antibodies to primary granules revealed that Gc survival in PMNs correlated with early residence in primary granule-negative phagosomes. However, when Gc was killed prior to PMN exposure, dead bacteria were also found in primary granule-negative phagosomes. These results suggest that Gc surface characteristics, rather than active bacterial processes, influence phagosome maturation and that Gc death inside PMNs occurs after phagosome-granule fusion. Ectopically increasing primary granule-phagosome fusion, by immunoglobulin opsonization or PMN treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine, reduced intracellular Gc viability, which was attributed in part to serine protease activity. We conclude that one method for Gc to avoid PMN clearance in acute gonorrhoea is by delaying primary granule-phagosome fusion, thus preventing formation of a degradative phagolysosome. PMID:23374609

  14. Enhancement of adaptive immunity to Neisseria gonorrhoeae by local intravaginal administration of microencapsulated interleukin 12.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingru; Egilmez, Nejat K; Russell, Michael W

    2013-12-01

    Gonorrhea remains one of the most frequent infectious diseases, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae is emerging as resistant to most available antibiotics, yet it does not induce a state of specific protective immunity against reinfection. Our recent studies have demonstrated that N. gonorrhoeae proactively suppresses host T-helper (Th) 1/Th2-mediated adaptive immune responses, which can be manipulated to generate protective immunity. Here we show that intravaginally administered interleukin 12 (IL-12) encapsulated in sustained-release polymer microspheres significantly enhanced both Th1 and humoral immune responses in a mouse model of genital gonococcal infection. Treatment of mice with IL-12 microspheres during gonococcal challenge led to faster clearance of infection and induced resistance to reinfection, with the generation of gonococcus-specific circulating immunoglobulin G and vaginal immunoglobulin A and G antibodies. These results suggest that local administration of microencapsulated IL-12 can serve as a novel therapeutic and prophylactic strategy against gonorrhea, with implications for the development of an effective vaccine. PMID:24048962

  15. In silico identification of candidate drug and vaccine targets from various pathways in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Barh, Debmalya; Kumar, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is responsible for causing gonorrhea, one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases prevailing globally. Although extensive researches are in progress in order to control the transmission of the disease and to develop drug(s) against the pathogen, till date no effective vaccine or specific drug could be developed and only antibiotic treatment is in use. Perhaps, due to excess use of antibiotics, several resistant strains have been found. In the present study, metabolic pathways-related candidate drug and vaccine targets have been identified in N. gonorrhoeae virulent strain FA 1090 using an in silico subtractive genomics approach. 106 putative drug targets out of 537 essential genes have been predicted. 67 cytoplasmic and 9 membrane enzymes, along with 10 membrane transporters are found to be the potential drug targets from the host-pathogen common metabolic pathways. Among these targets, competence lipoproteins (NGO0277) and cysW have been identified as candidate vaccine targets. 20 drug targets have been identified from pathogen specific unique metabolic pathways. Out of these, 6 enzymes are involved in dual metabolic pathways and 2 are expressed in cell wall and fimbrium. These gonococci-specific proteins are expected to be better possible drug targets. Screening of the functional inhibitors against these novel targets may result in discovery of novel therapeutic compounds that can be effective against antibiotic resistant strains. PMID:20109152

  16. Antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the 21st century: past, evolution, and future.

    PubMed

    Unemo, Magnus; Shafer, William M

    2014-07-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is evolving into a superbug with resistance to previously and currently recommended antimicrobials for treatment of gonorrhea, which is a major public health concern globally. Given the global nature of gonorrhea, the high rate of usage of antimicrobials, suboptimal control and monitoring of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and treatment failures, slow update of treatment guidelines in most geographical settings, and the extraordinary capacity of the gonococci to develop and retain AMR, it is likely that the global problem of gonococcal AMR will worsen in the foreseeable future and that the severe complications of gonorrhea will emerge as a silent epidemic. By understanding the evolution, emergence, and spread of AMR in N. gonorrhoeae, including its molecular and phenotypic mechanisms, resistance to antimicrobials used clinically can be anticipated, future methods for genetic testing for AMR might permit region-specific and tailor-made antimicrobial therapy, and the design of novel antimicrobials to circumvent the resistance problems can be undertaken more rationally. This review focuses on the history and evolution of gonorrhea treatment regimens and emerging resistance to them, on genetic and phenotypic determinants of gonococcal resistance to previously and currently recommended antimicrobials, including biological costs or benefits; and on crucial actions and future advances necessary to detect and treat resistant gonococcal strains and, ultimately, retain gonorrhea as a treatable infection. PMID:24982323

  17. Use of New York City medium for improved recovery of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Granato, P A; Schneible-Smith, C; Weiner, L B

    1981-01-01

    New York City (NYC) and Martin-Lewis (ML) media were evaluated comparatively for their ability to support the growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from clinical specimens. A total of 1,010 urethral, cervical, pharyngeal, and rectal specimens were collected from walk-in patients attending a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases. A total of 187 and 165 isolates of gonococci were cultivated on NYC and ML media, respectively, with 161 of these isolates being recovered on both media. Overall, the use of NYC medium resulted in a 13.3% increased recovery rate of gonococci. When gonococci were recovered on both media from primary isolation, the NYC medium supported a more luxuriant growth and a greater number of colonies, which usually resulted in the detection of positive cultures 1 day sooner than on ML medium. Both media were comparable in their ability to suppress the growth of saprophytic microorganisms. The results of this study demonstrated that the use of NYC medium markedly enhanced the recovery of N. gonorrhoeae from clinical specimens as compared to ML medium. Images PMID:6787078

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the 21st Century: Past, Evolution, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Unemo, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Neisseria gonorrhoeae is evolving into a superbug with resistance to previously and currently recommended antimicrobials for treatment of gonorrhea, which is a major public health concern globally. Given the global nature of gonorrhea, the high rate of usage of antimicrobials, suboptimal control and monitoring of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and treatment failures, slow update of treatment guidelines in most geographical settings, and the extraordinary capacity of the gonococci to develop and retain AMR, it is likely that the global problem of gonococcal AMR will worsen in the foreseeable future and that the severe complications of gonorrhea will emerge as a silent epidemic. By understanding the evolution, emergence, and spread of AMR in N. gonorrhoeae, including its molecular and phenotypic mechanisms, resistance to antimicrobials used clinically can be anticipated, future methods for genetic testing for AMR might permit region-specific and tailor-made antimicrobial therapy, and the design of novel antimicrobials to circumvent the resistance problems can be undertaken more rationally. This review focuses on the history and evolution of gonorrhea treatment regimens and emerging resistance to them, on genetic and phenotypic determinants of gonococcal resistance to previously and currently recommended antimicrobials, including biological costs or benefits; and on crucial actions and future advances necessary to detect and treat resistant gonococcal strains and, ultimately, retain gonorrhea as a treatable infection. PMID:24982323

  19. Characterisation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in semen during urethral infection in men.

    PubMed Central

    Isbey, S F; Alcorn, T M; Davis, R H; Haizlip, J; Leone, P A; Cohen, M S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the number of Neisseria gonorrhoeae organisms in urine and semen in men with gonococcal urethritis, and to compare selected phenotypic characteristics of organisms harvested from the urethra and semen. DESIGN: Samples from two groups of subjects were examined. Patients with symptomatic urethritis receiving treatment at an STD clinic, as well as six subjects with experimental urethritis. Semen and urine specimens were obtained after the urethral exudate was sampled. RESULTS: Using quantitative cultures, we found an average of 6 x 10(6) gonococci in urine or semen of 17 men with symptomatic urethritis seeking treatment at an STD clinic, and 2 x 10(4) gonococci in secretions of six male subjects with early experimental infection. Gonococcal outer membrane opacity (Opa) proteins and lipo-oligosaccharide (LOS) recovered from urine and semen of these subjects were very similar. CONCLUSIONS: Men with symptomatic gonorrhoea excrete a large number of gonococci in semen which is not affected by the duration of symptoms. The similar phenotype of organisms in urine and semen suggests the bacteria come from the same compartment. These data help to explain the efficiency of gonococcal transmission from men to their partners, and identify an appropriate target for a preventative vaccine or immunotherapy designed to reduce the inoculum in infected patients. Images PMID:9534748

  20. Pilin regulation in the pilT mutant of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain MS11

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Manuela; Mollenkopf, Hans; So, Magdalene; Friedrich, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    The ATPase protein PilT mediates retraction of type IV pili (Tfp). Tfp retraction of Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes many signal transduction events and changes in gene expression in infected epithelial cells. To find out whether a pilT mutation and lack of Tfp retraction, respectively, lead also to gene regulation in bacteria we performed microarrays comparing the transcriptional profiles of the N. gonorrhoeae parent strain MS11 and its isogenic pilT mutant during growth in vitro. A loss-of-function-mutation in pilT led to altered transcript levels of 63 open reading frames. Levels of pilE transcripts and its deduced protein the major Tfp subunit pilin, were increased most markedly by a mutation in pilT. Further studies revealed that pilE expression was also controlled by two other genes encoding Tfp biogenesis proteins, pilD and pilF. Our studies strongly suggest that pilE expression is a finely-tuned process. PMID:19486161

  1. Coupling electrochemical response of a DNA biosensor with PCR for Neisseria gonorrhoeae detection.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rachna; Sood, Seema; Singh, Renu; Sumana, Gajjala; Bala, Manju; Sharma, Vinod K; Samantaray, Jyotish C; Pandey, Ravindra M; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of gonococcal infections is important with regard to a patient's health and stage of infection. In this context, we report the development of an opa-gene-based electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by monitoring redox peak of methylene blue indicator. The fabricated biosensor has been shown to be highly sensitive and specific when evaluated with complementary, non-complementary, and 1-base mismatch DNA sequences and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified products (amplicons) of standard strain of N. gonorrhoeae (ATCC49226). The biosensor has been further evaluated using amplicons of known positive and negative clinical samples, and cut-off for positives has been determined using receiver operating characteristic curve. The sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP), positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the biosensor have been found to be 96.2%, 88.2%, 92.6%, and 93.8%, respectively. We conclude that the combination of PCR amplification with electrochemical detection shows distinct advantage of high SN and increased SP for gonococcal detection. PMID:24207077

  2. Identification, localization, and distribution of the PilT protein in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Brossay, L; Paradis, G; Fox, R; Koomey, M; Hébert, J

    1994-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb) directed against a highly conserved protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with a molecular size of 40 kDa was isolated and characterized. The protein antigen detected by this MAb was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting in all strains of N. gonorrhoeae tested across a wide range of serovars. The 40-kDa protein was found to be expressed at relatively low levels and localized to both the cytosolic and cytoplasmic membrane fractions. Screening of a lambda gt11 expression library derived from gonococcal genomic DNA with the anti-40-kDa MAb and DNA sequence analysis suggested that the 40-kDa protein and the product of the gonococcal pilT gene were identical. Immunoblotting analysis of gonococcal mutants carrying defined mutations in the pilT gene confirmed that the 40-kDa protein was indeed PilT. The N-terminal sequence derived by microsequencing of the protein purified from gonococci led to the correction of the previously published pilT gene sequence. Sequencing of the pilT gene from three different strains revealed an extremely high degree of conservation at both the amino acid and DNA levels. Images PMID:8188352

  3. Identification and arrangement of the DNA sequence recognized in specific transformation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, S D; Scocca, J J

    1988-01-01

    DNA segments from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, cloned and propagated in Escherichia coli, were tested for the ability to competitively inhibit gonococcal transformation. The nucleotide sequences of active segments were determined and compared; these sequences contained the sequence 5' GCCGTCTGAA 3' in common. Subcloning studies confirmed the identity of this sequence as the gonococcal DNA recognition site. The three instances of the recognition sequence isolated from N. gonorrhoeae chromosomal DNA contain the sequence in the immediate neighborhood of its inverted repeat. Because a single copy of the sequence functions as a recognition site, the inverted duplication is not required for specific binding. The dyad symmetric arrangements of the chromosomal recognition sequences may form stable stem-loop structures that can function as terminators or attenuators of transcription. These inverted repeats are located at the boundaries of long open reading frames. The recognition sequence also constitutes part of two other probable terminators of gonococcal genes. We conclude that the signal for recognition of transforming DNA by gonococci is a frequent component of transcriptional terminator sequences. This regulatory function might account for the origin and maintenance of recognition sequences in the chromosomes of Gram-negative transformable bacteria. PMID:3137581

  4. Identification and characterization of a Neisseria gonorrhoeae gene encoding a glycolipid-binding adhesin.

    PubMed Central

    Paruchuri, D K; Seifert, H S; Ajioka, R S; Karlsson, K A; So, M

    1990-01-01

    We recently identified a set of mammalian cell receptors for Neisseria gonorrhoeae that are glycolipids. These receptors, lactosylceramide [Gal(beta 1-4)Glc(beta 1-1)Cer], gangliotriosylceramide [GalNAc( beta 1-4)Gal(beta 1-4)Glc(beta 1-1)Cer], and gangliotetraosylceramide [Gal(beta 1-3)GalNAc(beta 1-4)Gal(beta 1-4)Glc(beta 1-1)Cer], were shown to be specifically bound by a gonococcal outer membrane protein distinct from pilin and protein II. Here we report the isolation of the gene encoding the gangliotetraosylceramide-binding adhesin from a N. gonorrhoeae MS11 gene bank in Escherichia coli. Transposon mutagenesis studies in E. coli indicate that the adhesion is a protein with a molecular mass of 36,000 Da. The gene encoding the 36-kDa protein is duplicated in MS11 since two transposon insertions were required to abolish expression of the gene in this bacterium. This protein is present on the surface of the gonococcus and is not associated with the pilus. Images PMID:2153292

  5. Identification and characterization of a Neisseria gonorrhoeae gene encoding a glycolipid-binding adhesin.

    PubMed

    Paruchuri, D K; Seifert, H S; Ajioka, R S; Karlsson, K A; So, M

    1990-01-01

    We recently identified a set of mammalian cell receptors for Neisseria gonorrhoeae that are glycolipids. These receptors, lactosylceramide [Gal(beta 1-4)Glc(beta 1-1)Cer], gangliotriosylceramide [GalNAc( beta 1-4)Gal(beta 1-4)Glc(beta 1-1)Cer], and gangliotetraosylceramide [Gal(beta 1-3)GalNAc(beta 1-4)Gal(beta 1-4)Glc(beta 1-1)Cer], were shown to be specifically bound by a gonococcal outer membrane protein distinct from pilin and protein II. Here we report the isolation of the gene encoding the gangliotetraosylceramide-binding adhesin from a N. gonorrhoeae MS11 gene bank in Escherichia coli. Transposon mutagenesis studies in E. coli indicate that the adhesion is a protein with a molecular mass of 36,000 Da. The gene encoding the 36-kDa protein is duplicated in MS11 since two transposon insertions were required to abolish expression of the gene in this bacterium. This protein is present on the surface of the gonococcus and is not associated with the pilus. PMID:2153292

  6. Comparison of Direct Inoculation and Copan Transport Systems for Isolation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from Endocervical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, C. C.; Schwebke, J. R.; Benjamin, W. H.; Beverly, A.; Waites, K. B.

    1999-01-01

    Two commercial swab transport systems, Copan Amies gel agar with and without charcoal (Copan Diagnostics, Corona, Calif.), were compared to direct inoculation onto modified Thayer-Martin medium for detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in 1,490 endocervical specimens obtained from women attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic. Copan swabs were held in the transport system for 24 h at room temperature prior to inoculation onto modified Thayer-Martin medium. All cultures were incubated at 35°C in 5% CO2, and bacteria were identified on the basis of Gram stain, oxidase, and biochemical reactions. Copan Amies gel agar transport system without charcoal detected 77 of 81 (95%) direct inoculation culture-positive specimens, and Copan Amies gel agar transport system with charcoal detected 53 of 56 (95%) directly inoculated culture-positive specimens. Copan Amies gel agar without charcoal inoculated after 6 h supported growth of 56 (98%) positive cultures out of only 55 directly inoculated culture-positive specimens. This study demonstrates that Copan swabs represent a reasonable alternative, providing convenience, low cost, and ease of use while still maintaining a satisfactory recovery rate of N. gonorrhoeae from clinical specimens, if specimens can be inoculated onto selective media within a relatively short time period not involving overnight shipment. PMID:10523556

  7. Assessment of Etest as an alternative to agar dilution for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsi; Taylor, Thomas H; Pettus, Kevin; Trees, David

    2014-05-01

    We studied whether the Etest can be used as an alternative to agar dilution to determine antimicrobial susceptibilities of ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime in Neisseria gonorrhoeae surveillance. One hundred fifteen clinical and laboratory isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were tested following the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-approved CLSI standard agar dilution method and, separately, by the Etest according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The MICs were determined and compared. Ten laboratory-generated mutants were used to simulate substantially nonsusceptible specimens. The Etest and agar dilution methods were well correlated. Statistical tests produced regression R2 values of 88%, 82%, and 85% and Pearson correlation coefficients of 92%, 91%, and 92% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. When paired comparisons were made, the two tests were 88.7%, 80%, and 87% within 1 log2 dilution from each other for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. The within-2-log2 agreements were 99.1%, 98.3%, and 94.8% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. Notwithstanding the good correlations and the within-2-log2 general agreement, the Etest results produced slightly lower MICs than the agar dilution results. In conclusion, we found that the Etest can be effectively used as an alternative to agar dilution testing to determine the susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, although we recommend further research into extremely resistant isolates. For isolates within the typical range of clinical MICs, reexamination of the Etest interpretation of susceptible and nonsusceptible categories would likely allow for successful transition from agar dilution to the Etest. PMID:24554750

  8. In Vitro Activity of Delafloxacin against Clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates and Selection of Gonococcal Delafloxacin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Soge, Olusegun O; Salipante, Stephen J; No, David; Duffy, Erin; Roberts, Marilyn C

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the in vitro activity of delafloxacin against a panel of 117 Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains, including 110 clinical isolates collected from 2012 to 2015 and seven reference strains, compared with the activities of seven antimicrobials currently or previously recommended for treatment of gonorrhea. We examined the potential for delafloxacin to select for resistant mutants in ciprofloxacin-susceptible and ciprofloxacin-resistant N. gonorrhoeae We characterized mutations in the gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes and the multidrug-resistant efflux pumps (MtrC-MtrD-MtrE and NorM) by PCR and sequencing and by whole-genome sequencing. The MIC50, MIC90, and MIC ranges of delafloxacin were 0.06 μg/ml, 0.125 μg/ml, and ≤0.001 to 0.25 μg/ml, respectively. The frequency of spontaneous mutation ranged from 10(-7) to <10(-9) The multistep delafloxacin resistance selection of 30 daily passages resulted in stable resistant mutants. There was no obvious cross-resistance to nonfluoroquinolone comparator antimicrobials. A mutant with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC, 0.25 μg/ml) obtained from the ciprofloxacin-susceptible parental strain had a novel Ser91Tyr alteration in the gyrA gene. We also identified new mutations in the gyrA and/or parC and parE genes and the multidrug-resistant efflux pumps (MtrC-MtrD-MtrE and NorM) of two mutant strains with elevated delafloxacin MICs of 1 μg/ml. Although delafloxacin exhibited potent in vitro activity against N. gonorrhoeae isolates and reference strains with diverse antimicrobial resistance profiles and demonstrated a low tendency to select for spontaneous mutants, it is important to establish the correlation between these excellent in vitro data and treatment outcomes through appropriate randomized controlled clinical trials. PMID:26976873

  9. Reduced uptake and accumulation of norfloxacin in resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated in Japan.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, M; Fukuda, H; Hirai, K; Hosaka, M; Matsumoto, T; Kumazawa, J

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the alteration of cell permeability toward fluoroquinolones in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which is a major quinolone-resistance mechanism along with the alteration of DNA gyrase in gram-negative bacteria. The prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant N gonorrhoeae strains is rapidly increasing in Japan. MATERIALS AND METHODS--The uptake and accumulation of norfloxacin by gonococcal cells, including six clinical and five World Health Organization (WHO) reference strains, were measured. Of the six clinical strains, two were highly resistant to norfloxacin (MIC 8.0 and 4.0 micrograms/ml), two were moderately resistant (MIC 1.0 and 0.5 microgram/ml), and two were sensitive (MIC 0.063 and 0.004 microgram/ml). All five WHO reference strains were sensitive to norfloxacin (MIC < or = 0.001 to 0.063 microgram/ml). RESULTS--Mean initial norfloxacin uptake in the four resistant strains (104 ng/mg of dry cells) was significantly lower than that in the seven sensitive strains (158 ng/mg of dry cells) (p < 0.05). The mean uptake after 20 minutes was also significantly lower in the four resistant strains (130 ng/mg of dry cells) than in the seven sensitive strains (194 ng/mg of dry cells) (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in mean norfloxacin accumulation after 20 minutes between the four resistant strains (26 ng/mg of dry cells) and the seven sensitive strains (36 ng/mg of dry cells). The accumulation of norfloxacin after 20 minutes was almost zero in two of the four resistant strains, while the remaining two strains accumulated norfloxacin as well as the sensitive strains. CONCLUSIONS--These findings suggest that alteration of bacterial cell permeability is a quinolone-resistance mechanism in N gonorrhoeae isolated in Japan, and that this bacteria may exhibit other mechanisms such as alteration of DNA gyrase. PMID:7959709

  10. Assessment of Etest as an Alternative to Agar Dilution for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Thomas H.; Pettus, Kevin; Trees, David

    2014-01-01

    We studied whether the Etest can be used as an alternative to agar dilution to determine antimicrobial susceptibilities of ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime in Neisseria gonorrhoeae surveillance. One hundred fifteen clinical and laboratory isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were tested following the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-approved CLSI standard agar dilution method and, separately, by the Etest according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The MICs were determined and compared. Ten laboratory-generated mutants were used to simulate substantially nonsusceptible specimens. The Etest and agar dilution methods were well correlated. Statistical tests produced regression R2 values of 88%, 82%, and 85% and Pearson correlation coefficients of 92%, 91%, and 92% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. When paired comparisons were made, the two tests were 88.7%, 80%, and 87% within 1 log2 dilution from each other for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. The within-2-log2 agreements were 99.1%, 98.3%, and 94.8% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. Notwithstanding the good correlations and the within-2-log2 general agreement, the Etest results produced slightly lower MICs than the agar dilution results. In conclusion, we found that the Etest can be effectively used as an alternative to agar dilution testing to determine the susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, although we recommend further research into extremely resistant isolates. For isolates within the typical range of clinical MICs, reexamination of the Etest interpretation of susceptible and nonsusceptible categories would likely allow for successful transition from agar dilution to the Etest. PMID:24554750

  11. Stemming the tide of drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae: the need for an individualized approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Buono, Sean A; Watson, Tyler D; Borenstein, Lee A; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Pandori, Mark W; Godwin, Hilary A

    2015-02-01

    Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae poses a significant public health challenge. In recent years, gonococci resistant to first- and second-line antibiotics have spread worldwide and new strains have developed that are increasingly resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, which are currently our last line of available treatments. Given the timeline required to develop new drugs or an effective vaccine for N. gonorrhoeae, a top priority is to use the drugs that are available as effectively as possible. Currently, clinical management of gonorrhoea is based upon treatment guidelines informed by international gonococcal antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance programmes. This approach, although currently the most practical, is subject to a number of limitations since surveillance data inherently provide population-level information. As a result, basing treatment guidelines on these data can result in the prescription of more aggressive or broader treatment than is needed by individual patients and hence inadvertently contribute to the development and spread of resistance to important drugs. Clearly, methods are needed that provide patient-specific drug susceptibility information in a time frame that would allow clinicians to prescribe individualized treatment regimens for gonorrhoea. Fortunately, in recent years, there have been a number of advances in the development of rapid methods for characterizing both the genotype and the drug resistance phenotype of N. gonorrhoeae strains. Here, we review these advances and propose additional studies that would help facilitate a transition towards an individualized treatment approach for gonorrhoea. PMID:25331059

  12. Trends in antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated from Guangzhou, China, 2000 to 2005 and 2008 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wen-Ling; Liang, Jing-Yao; Li, Xiao-Dong; Bi, Chao; Yang, Ri-Dong; Liang, Yan-Hua; Li, Ping; Zhong, Dao-Qing; Ye, Xing-Dong; Zhang, Xi-Bao

    2015-01-01

    A total of 1224 Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from Guangzhou in 2 periods (2000-2005 and 2008-2013) were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The percentage of penicillin- and ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates increased from 71.1% (473/665) to 90.9% (508/559) and 88.9% (591/665) to 98.0% (548/559), respectively. All isolates remain susceptible to spectinomycin and ceftriaxone, with increasing minimum inhibitory concentrations. PMID:25504297

  13. Single 1 g dose of cefotaxime in the treatment of infections due to penicillinase-producing strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, G A; Tio, D; van den Hoek, J A; van Klingeren, B

    1983-01-01

    One hundred and two patients with an uncomplicated infection due to penicillinase-producing strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) were treated with a single 1 g dose of cefotaxime. At follow-up within 15 days all genital and rectal infections were cured. Pharyngeal infections also seemed to respond to this treatment. A relatively high proportion (30.9%) of patients, however, developed post-gonococcal urethritis. PMID:6299449

  14. Construction of prokaryotic expression plasmid of mtrC protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxiang; Tu, Yating; Lin, Nengxing; Huang, Changzheng

    2005-01-01

    In order to provide a rational research basis for detection of resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to antimicrobial hydrophobic agents and study on the resistant mechanism of multiple transferable resistance (mtr) efflux system, plasmid pET-28a(+) encoding mtrC gene was constructed and the related target protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) DE3. The fragments of mtrC gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from the standard strains were amplified and cloned into prokaryotic expression plasmid pET-28a(+) with restriction endonuclease to construct recombinant pET-mtrC which was verified by restriction endonuclease and DNA sequencing. The recombinant was transformed into E. coli DE3 to express the protein mtrC induced by IPTG. The results showed mtrC DNA fragment was proved correct through restriction endonuclease and DNA sequencing. Its sequence was 99.5% homologus to that published on GeneBank (U14993). A 48.5 kD fusion protein which was induced by IPTG was detected by SDS-PAGE. It was concluded that the construction of prokaryotic expression plasmid of mtrC protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae was correct and the fusion protein was successively expressed in E. coli. PMID:16463681

  15. A Role for Lactate Dehydrogenases in the Survival of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes and Cervical Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Atack, John M.; Ibranovic, Ines; Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y.; Djoko, Karrera Y.; Chen, Nathan H.; vanden Hoven, Rachel; Jennings, Michael P.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; McEwan, Alastair G.

    2014-01-01

    Lactate is an abundant metabolite, produced by host tissues and commensal organisms, and it represents an important potential carbon source for bacterial pathogens. In the case of Neisseria spp., the importance of the lactate permease in colonization of the host has been demonstrated, but there have been few studies of lactate metabolism in pathogenic Neisseria in the postgenomic era. We describe herein the characterization of genome-annotated, respiratory, and substrate-level lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) from the obligate human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Biochemical assays using N. gonorrhoeae 1291 wild type and isogenic mutant strains showed that cytoplasmic LdhA (NAD+-dependent D-lactate dehydrogenase) and the membrane-bound respiratory enzymes, LdhD (D-lactate dehydrogenase) and LldD (L-lactate dehydrogenase) are correctly annotated. Mutants lacking LdhA and LdhD showed greatly reduced survival in neutrophils compared with wild type cells, highlighting the importance of D-lactate metabolism in gonococcal survival. Furthermore, an assay of host colonization using the well-established human primary cervical epithelial cell model revealed that the two respiratory enzymes make a significant contribution to colonization of and survival within the microaerobic environment of the host. Taken together, these data suggest that host-derived lactate is critical for the growth and survival of N. gonorrhoeae in human cells. PMID:24737798

  16. Mutation of the Conserved Calcium-Binding Motif in Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 Impacts Adhesion but Not Piliation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan; Johnson, Michael D. L.; Burillo-Kirch, Christine; Mocny, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, James E.; Garrett, Christopher K.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 is a member of the PilC family of type IV pilus-associated adhesins found in Neisseria species and other type IV pilus-producing genera. Previously, a calcium-binding domain was described in the C-terminal domains of PilY1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in PilC1 and PilC2 of Kingella kingae. Genetic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae revealed a similar calcium-binding motif in PilC1. To evaluate the potential significance of this calcium-binding region in N. gonorrhoeae, we produced recombinant full-length PilC1 and a PilC1 C-terminal domain fragment. We show that, while alterations of the calcium-binding motif disrupted the ability of PilC1 to bind calcium, they did not grossly affect the secondary structure of the protein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both full-length wild-type PilC1 and full-length calcium-binding-deficient PilC1 inhibited gonococcal adherence to cultured human cervical epithelial cells, unlike the truncated PilC1 C-terminal domain. Similar to PilC1 in K. kingae, but in contrast to the calcium-binding mutant of P. aeruginosa PilY1, an equivalent mutation in N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 produced normal amounts of pili. However, the N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 calcium-binding mutant still had partial defects in gonococcal adhesion to ME180 cells and genetic transformation, which are both essential virulence factors in this human pathogen. Thus, we conclude that calcium binding to PilC1 plays a critical role in pilus function in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:24002068

  17. Identification of an EF-Tu protein that is periplasm-associated and processed in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Porcella, S F; Belland, R J; Judd, R C

    1996-09-01

    A 44 kDa protein is a dominant component of periplasmic extracts of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Peptide sequence generated from a cyanogen-bromide-cleaved fragment of this protein indicated sequence homology with elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu). Polyclonal antiserum was made against the 44 kDa protein purified from periplasm extracts of N. gonorrhoeae. The preabsorbed antiserum was immunoblotted against whole-cell lysates on two-dimensional gels. A 44 kDa protein and a smaller 37 kDa protein were recognized by this antiserum. A N. gonorrhoeae gamma phage DNA library was screened and a clone expressing a 44 kDa protein was identified. The DNA insert in this clone contained several genes homologous to genes contained in the str operon of Escherichia coli. One ORF product with a calculated molecular mass of 43 kDa was highly homologous to the EF-TuA of E. coli. A synthetic peptide antiserum specific for a portion of the C terminus of EF-Tu confirmed that the 37 kDa protein in whole-cell lysates of N. gonorrhoeae was a processed form of EF-Tu. Deletion of the tufA gene homologue in N. gonorrhoeae was attempted but was unsuccessful. PMID:8828215

  18. Specificity of antibodies against Neisseria gonorrhoeae that stimulate neutrophil chemotaxis. Role of antibodies directed against lipooligosaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Densen, P; Gulati, S; Rice, P A

    1987-01-01

    Five strains each of Neisseria gonorrhoeae sensitive or resistant to complement (C) dependent killing by normal human serum (NHS) were examined for their ability to stimulate chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) after preincubation with NHS; or IgM or IgG derived from NHS. Serum-sensitive N. gonorrhoeae stimulated C-dependent chemotaxis when opsonized with IgM, but not IgG, however, serum-resistant strains, taken as a whole, failed to promote chemotaxis when opsonized with either isotype. IgM titers in NHS against lipooligosaccharide (LOS) antigens from individual serum-sensitive, but not serum-resistant strains, correlated with the magnitude of chemotaxis generated by the corresponding opsonized strains (r = 0.99). Western blots demonstrated that IgM and IgG from NHS recognized different antigenic determinants on LOS from serum-sensitive gonococci. IgM from NHS immunopurified against serum-sensitive LOS accounted for two-thirds of the chemotaxis promoting activity present in whole serum. IgG titers in NHS against LOS antigens from individual serum-resistant strains also correlated with magnitude of chemotaxis generated by the corresponding opsonized strains (r = 0.87), although most opsonized serum-resistant strains did not generate significantly higher magnitudes of chemotaxis than controls. In contrast, a serum-resistant isolate from a patient with disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) stimulated chemotaxis when opsonized with IgG obtained from the patient's convalescent serum. By Western blot, convalescent IgG antibody recognized an additional determinant on serum-resistant LOS not seen by normal IgG. Images PMID:2439546

  19. Assembly and antigenicity of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilus mapped with antibodies.

    PubMed

    Forest, K T; Bernstein, S L; Getzoff, E D; So, M; Tribbick, G; Geysen, H M; Deal, C D; Tainer, J A

    1996-02-01

    The relationship between the sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilin and its quaternary assembly into pilus fibers was studied with a set of site-directed antibody probes and by mapping the specificities of antipilus antisera with peptides. Buried and exposed peptides in assembled pili were identified by competitive immunoassays and immunoelectron microscopy with polyclonal antibodies raised against 11 peptides spanning the pilin sequence. Pili did not compete significantly with pilin subunits for binding to antibodies against residues 13 to 31 (13-31) and 18-36. Pilus fibers competed well with pilin protein subunits for binding to antibodies raised against peptides 37-56, 58-78, 110-120, 115-127, 122-139, and 140-159 and competed weakly for antibodies against residues 79-93 and 94-108. Antibodies to sequence-conserved residues 37-56 and to semiconserved residues 94-108 preferentially bound pilus ends as shown by immunoelectron microscopy. The exposure of pilus regions to the immune system was tested by peptide mapping of antiserum specificities against sets of overlapping peptides representing all possible hexameric or octameric peptides from the N. gonorrhoeae MS11 pilin sequence. The immunogenicity of exposed peptides incorporating semiconserved residues 49-56 and 121-126 was revealed by strong, consistent antigenic reactivity to these regions measured in antipilus sera from rabbits, mice, and human and in sera from human volunteers with gonorrhea. The conservation and variation of antigenic responses among these three species clarify the relevance of immunological studies of other species to the human immune response against pathogens. Overall, our results explain the extreme conservation of the entire N-terminal one-third of the pilin protein by its dominant role in pilus assembly: hydrophobic residues 1-36 are implicated in buried lateral contacts, and polar residues 37-56 are implicated in longitudinal contacts within the pilus fiber. PMID:8550220

  20. Assembly and antigenicity of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilus mapped with antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Forest, K T; Bernstein, S L; Getzoff, E D; So, M; Tribbick, G; Geysen, H M; Deal, C D; Tainer, J A

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between the sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilin and its quaternary assembly into pilus fibers was studied with a set of site-directed antibody probes and by mapping the specificities of antipilus antisera with peptides. Buried and exposed peptides in assembled pili were identified by competitive immunoassays and immunoelectron microscopy with polyclonal antibodies raised against 11 peptides spanning the pilin sequence. Pili did not compete significantly with pilin subunits for binding to antibodies against residues 13 to 31 (13-31) and 18-36. Pilus fibers competed well with pilin protein subunits for binding to antibodies raised against peptides 37-56, 58-78, 110-120, 115-127, 122-139, and 140-159 and competed weakly for antibodies against residues 79-93 and 94-108. Antibodies to sequence-conserved residues 37-56 and to semiconserved residues 94-108 preferentially bound pilus ends as shown by immunoelectron microscopy. The exposure of pilus regions to the immune system was tested by peptide mapping of antiserum specificities against sets of overlapping peptides representing all possible hexameric or octameric peptides from the N. gonorrhoeae MS11 pilin sequence. The immunogenicity of exposed peptides incorporating semiconserved residues 49-56 and 121-126 was revealed by strong, consistent antigenic reactivity to these regions measured in antipilus sera from rabbits, mice, and human and in sera from human volunteers with gonorrhea. The conservation and variation of antigenic responses among these three species clarify the relevance of immunological studies of other species to the human immune response against pathogens. Overall, our results explain the extreme conservation of the entire N-terminal one-third of the pilin protein by its dominant role in pilus assembly: hydrophobic residues 1-36 are implicated in buried lateral contacts, and polar residues 37-56 are implicated in longitudinal contacts within the pilus fiber. PMID:8550220

  1. The Pilin N-terminal Domain Maintains Neisseria gonorrhoeae Transformation Competence during Pilus Phase Variation.

    PubMed

    Obergfell, Kyle P; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-05-01

    The obligate human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the sole aetiologic agent of the sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhea. Required for gonococcal infection, Type IV pili (Tfp) mediate many functions including adherence, twitching motility, defense against neutrophil killing, and natural transformation. Critical for immune escape, the gonococcal Tfp undergoes antigenic variation, a recombination event at the pilE locus that varies the surface exposed residues of the major pilus subunit PilE (pilin) in the pilus fiber. This programmed recombination system has the potential to produce thousands of pilin variants and can produce strains with unproductive pilin molecules that are completely unable to form Tfp. Saturating mutagenesis of the 3' third of the pilE gene identified 68 unique single nucleotide mutations that each resulted in an underpiliated colony morphology. Notably, all isolates, including those with undetectable levels of pilin protein and no observable surface-exposed pili, retained an intermediate level of transformation competence not exhibited in ΔpilE strains. Site-directed, nonsense mutations revealed that only the first 38 amino acids of the mature pilin N-terminus (the N-terminal domain or Ntd) are required for transformation competence, and microscopy, ELISAs and pilus purification demonstrate that extended Tfp are not required for competence. Transformation in strains producing only the pilin Ntd has the same genetic determinants as wild-type transformation. The Ntd corresponds to the alternative product of S-pilin cleavage, a specific proteolysis unique to pathogenic Neisseria. Mutation of the S-pilin cleavage site demonstrated that S-pilin cleavage mediated release of the Ntd is required for competence when a strain produces unproductive pilin molecules that cannot assemble into a Tfp through mutation or antigenic variation. We conclude that S-pilin cleavage evolved as a mechanism to maintain competence in nonpiliated antigenic variants

  2. The Pilin N-terminal Domain Maintains Neisseria gonorrhoeae Transformation Competence during Pilus Phase Variation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The obligate human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the sole aetiologic agent of the sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhea. Required for gonococcal infection, Type IV pili (Tfp) mediate many functions including adherence, twitching motility, defense against neutrophil killing, and natural transformation. Critical for immune escape, the gonococcal Tfp undergoes antigenic variation, a recombination event at the pilE locus that varies the surface exposed residues of the major pilus subunit PilE (pilin) in the pilus fiber. This programmed recombination system has the potential to produce thousands of pilin variants and can produce strains with unproductive pilin molecules that are completely unable to form Tfp. Saturating mutagenesis of the 3’ third of the pilE gene identified 68 unique single nucleotide mutations that each resulted in an underpiliated colony morphology. Notably, all isolates, including those with undetectable levels of pilin protein and no observable surface-exposed pili, retained an intermediate level of transformation competence not exhibited in ΔpilE strains. Site-directed, nonsense mutations revealed that only the first 38 amino acids of the mature pilin N-terminus (the N-terminal domain or Ntd) are required for transformation competence, and microscopy, ELISAs and pilus purification demonstrate that extended Tfp are not required for competence. Transformation in strains producing only the pilin Ntd has the same genetic determinants as wild-type transformation. The Ntd corresponds to the alternative product of S-pilin cleavage, a specific proteolysis unique to pathogenic Neisseria. Mutation of the S-pilin cleavage site demonstrated that S-pilin cleavage mediated release of the Ntd is required for competence when a strain produces unproductive pilin molecules that cannot assemble into a Tfp through mutation or antigenic variation. We conclude that S-pilin cleavage evolved as a mechanism to maintain competence in nonpiliated antigenic

  3. Transcript analysis of nrrF, a Fur repressed sRNA of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Ducey, Thomas F.; Jackson, Lydgia; Orvis, Joshua; Dyer, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Like most microorganisms, Neisseria gonorrhoeae alters gene expression in response to iron availability. The ferric uptake regulator Fur has been shown to be involved in controlling this response, but the extent of this involvement remains unknown. It is known that in addition to working directly to repress gene expression, Fur may also work indirectly by controlling additional regulatory elements. Using in silico analysis, we identified a putative small RNA (sRNA) homolog of the meningococcal nrrF locus, and demonstrate that this sRNA is iron-repressible, suggesting that this is the gonococcal analog of the rhyB locus in Escherichia coli. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis indicates that this transcript may also be temporally regulated. Transcript analysis identified the 5′ start of the transcript, using a single reaction, fluorescent-based, primer extension assay. This protocol allows for the rapid identification of transcriptional start sites of RNA transcripts, and could be used for high-throughput transcript mapping. PMID:19162160

  4. Phosphoethanolamine Modification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipid A Reduces Autophagy Flux in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zughaier, Susu M; Kandler, Justin L; Balthazar, Jacqueline T; Shafer, William M

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an ancient homeostasis mechanism for macromolecule degradation, performs an important role in host defense by facilitating pathogen elimination. To counteract this host defense strategy, bacterial pathogens have evolved a variety of mechanisms to avoid or otherwise dysregulate autophagy by phagocytic cells so as to enhance their survival during infection. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strictly human pathogen that causes the sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhea. Phosphoethanolamine (PEA) addition to the 4' position of the lipid A (PEA-lipid A) moiety of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) produced by gonococci performs a critical role in this pathogen's ability to evade innate defenses by conferring decreased susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial (or host-defense) peptides, complement-mediated killing by human serum and intraleukocytic killing by human neutrophils compared to strains lacking this PEA decoration. Heretofore, however, it was not known if gonococci can evade autophagy and if so, whether PEA-lipid A contributes to this ability. Accordingly, by using murine macrophages and human macrophage-like phagocytic cell lines we investigated if PEA decoration of gonococcal lipid A modulates autophagy formation. We report that infection with PEA-lipid A-producing gonococci significantly reduced autophagy flux in murine and human macrophages and enhanced gonococcal survival during their association with macrophages compared to a PEA-deficient lipid A mutant. Our results provide further evidence that PEA-lipid A produced by gonococci is a critical component in the ability of this human pathogen to evade host defenses. PMID:26641098

  5. Identification and molecular analysis of a 63-kilodalton stress protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Pannekoek, Y; van Putten, J P; Dankert, J

    1992-01-01

    Iron limitation, glucose deprivation, and growth under low oxygen supply (environmental stress) increased the expression of several proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, including a 63-kilodalton protein identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This gonococcal stress protein (GSP63) was detected in the cytosol and copurified with lithium acetate-derived outer membranes. Successful purification of the protein was achieved by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and by chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose. Gel filtration of the purified protein revealed a molecular weight of approximately 450,000, suggesting that in its native state, the protein consists of a multimer of six to eight subunits. Isoelectric focusing indicated a pI of 5.2. Immunoblotting experiments using a polyclonal antiserum raised against the purified protein demonstrated cross-reactivity with a protein of the same electrophoretic mobility as GSP63 in all eight gonococcal isolates tested. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the protein revealed up to 65% homology with members of the Hsp60 heat shock protein family, suggesting that GSP63 is related to this group of proteins. This relationship was further substantiated by the immunological cross-reactivity of GSP63 with mycobacterial Hsp60 and the ATP-binding activity of the gonococcal stress protein. Images PMID:1400243

  6. Identification and molecular analysis of a 63-kilodalton stress protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Pannekoek, Y; van Putten, J P; Dankert, J

    1992-11-01

    Iron limitation, glucose deprivation, and growth under low oxygen supply (environmental stress) increased the expression of several proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, including a 63-kilodalton protein identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This gonococcal stress protein (GSP63) was detected in the cytosol and copurified with lithium acetate-derived outer membranes. Successful purification of the protein was achieved by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and by chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose. Gel filtration of the purified protein revealed a molecular weight of approximately 450,000, suggesting that in its native state, the protein consists of a multimer of six to eight subunits. Isoelectric focusing indicated a pI of 5.2. Immunoblotting experiments using a polyclonal antiserum raised against the purified protein demonstrated cross-reactivity with a protein of the same electrophoretic mobility as GSP63 in all eight gonococcal isolates tested. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the protein revealed up to 65% homology with members of the Hsp60 heat shock protein family, suggesting that GSP63 is related to this group of proteins. This relationship was further substantiated by the immunological cross-reactivity of GSP63 with mycobacterial Hsp60 and the ATP-binding activity of the gonococcal stress protein. PMID:1400243

  7. Ultrastructural analysis of primary human urethral epithelial cell cultures infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Harvey, H A; Ketterer, M R; Preston, A; Lubaroff, D; Williams, R; Apicella, M A

    1997-06-01

    In men with gonococcal urethritis, the urethral epithelial cell is a site of infection. To study the pathogenesis of gonorrhea in this cell type, we have developed a method to culture primary human urethral epithelial cells obtained at the time of urologic surgery. Fluorescent analysis demonstrated that 100% of the cells stained for keratin. Microscopic analyses indicated that these epithelial cells arrayed in a pattern similar to that seen in urethral epithelium. Using immunoelectron and confocal microscopy, we compared the infection process seen in primary cells with events occurring during natural infection of the same cell type in men with gonococcal urethritis. Immunoelectron microscopy studies of cells infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae 1291 Opa+ P+ showed adherence of organisms to the epithelial cell membrane, pedestal formation with evidence of intimate association between the gonococcal and the epithelial cell membranes, and intracellular gonococci present in vacuoles. Confocal studies of primary urethral epithelial cells showed actin polymerization upon infection. Polyclonal antibodies to the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) demonstrated the presence of this receptor on infected cells in the primary urethral cell culture. In situ hybridization using a fluorescent-labeled probe specific to the ASGP-R mRNA demonstrated this message in uninfected and infected cells. These features were identical to those seen in urethral epithelial cells in exudates from males with gonorrhea. Infection of primary urethral cells in culture mimics events seen in natural infection and will allow detailed molecular analysis of gonococcal pathogenesis in a human epithelial cell which is commonly infected. PMID:9169783

  8. Functional analysis of NsrR, a nitric oxide sensing Rrf2 repressor in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Isabella, Vincent M.; Lapek, John D.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Clark, Virginia L.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been shown to be an important component of the human immune response, and as such, it is important to understand how pathogenic organisms respond to its presence. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, recent work has revealed that NsrR, an Rrf2-type transcriptional repressor, can sense NO and control the expression of genes responsible for NO metabolism. A highly pure extract of epitope tagged NsrR was isolated and mass spectroscopic analysis suggested that the protein contained a [2Fe-2S] cluster. NsrR/DNA interactions were thoroughly analyzed in vitro. Using EMSA analysis, NsrR::FLAG was shown to interact with predicted operators in the norB, aniA, and nsrR upstream regions with a Kd of 7 nM, 19 nM, and 35 nM respectively. DNase I footprint analysis was performed on the upstream regions of norB and nsrR, where NsrR was shown to protect the predicted 29 bp binding sites. The presence of exogenously added NO inhibited DNA binding by NsrR. Alanine substitution of C90, C97, or C103 in NsrR abrogated repression of norB::lacZ and inhibited DNA binding, consistent with their presumed role in coordination of a NO-sensitive Fe-S center required for DNA binding. PMID:19007408

  9. A Systematic Review of Point of Care Testing for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Herbst de Cortina, Sasha; Bristow, Claire C; Joseph Davey, Dvora; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Systematic review of point of care (POC) diagnostic tests for sexually transmitted infections: Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV). Methods. Literature search on PubMed for articles from January 2010 to August 2015, including original research in English on POC diagnostics for sexually transmitted CT, NG, and/or TV. Results. We identified 33 publications with original research on POC diagnostics for CT, NG, and/or TV. Thirteen articles evaluated test performance, yielding at least one test for each infection with sensitivity and specificity ≥90%. Each infection also had currently available tests with sensitivities <60%. Three articles analyzed cost effectiveness, and five publications discussed acceptability and feasibility. POC testing was acceptable to both providers and patients and was also demonstrated to be cost effective. Fourteen proof of concept articles introduced new tests. Conclusions. Highly sensitive and specific POC tests are available for CT, NG, and TV, but improvement is possible. Future research should focus on acceptability, feasibility, and cost of POC testing. While pregnant women specifically have not been studied, the results available in nonpregnant populations are encouraging for the ability to test and treat women in antenatal care to prevent adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. PMID:27313440

  10. Microwave-accelerated method for ultra-rapid extraction of Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA for downstream detection.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Johan H; Santaus, Tonya M; Brinsley, Gregory; Kiang, Daniel; Mali, Buddha; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Geddes, Chris D

    2016-10-01

    Nucleic acid-based detection of gonorrhea infections typically require a two-step process involving isolation of the nucleic acid, followed by detection of the genomic target often involving polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approaches. In an effort to improve on current detection approaches, we have developed a unique two-step microwave-accelerated approach for rapid extraction and detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonorrhea, GC) DNA. Our approach is based on the use of highly focused microwave radiation to rapidly lyse bacterial cells, release, and subsequently fragment microbial DNA. The DNA target is then detected by a process known as microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF), an ultra-sensitive direct DNA detection analytical technique. In the current study, we show that highly focused microwaves at 2.45 GHz, using 12.3-mm gold film equilateral triangles, are able to rapidly lyse both bacteria cells and fragment DNA in a time- and microwave power-dependent manner. Detection of the extracted DNA can be performed by MAMEF, without the need for DNA amplification, in less than 10 min total time or by other PCR-based approaches. Collectively, the use of a microwave-accelerated method for the release and detection of DNA represents a significant step forward toward the development of a point-of-care (POC) platform for detection of gonorrhea infections. PMID:27325503

  11. Arginine- and Polyamine-Induced Lactic Acid Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Tang, M Matt; Wu, Xueliang; Phillips, Nancy; Galkowski, Dariusz; Jarvis, Gary A; Fan, Huizhou

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-derived lactic acid protects women from pathogens in their genital tract. The purpose of this study was to determine lactic acid susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and identify potential acid resistance mechanisms present in this pathogen. Tested in vitro, lactic acid killed all 10 gonococcal strains analyzed in a low pH-dependent manner. Full inactivation occurred at pH 4.5. At low pH, lactic acid treatment resulted in the entry of the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide into the microbial cells, suggesting that hydrogen ions from lactic acid compromise the integrity of the bacterial cell wall/membrane. Most likely, hydrogen ions also inactivate intracellular proteins since arginine rendered significant protection against lactic acid presumably through action of the gonococcal arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme located in the bacterial cytoplasm. Surprisingly, arginine also lessened lactic acid-mediated cell wall/membrane disruption. This effect is probably mediated by agmatine, a triamine product of arginine decarboxylase, since agmatine demonstrated a stronger protective effect on GC than arginine at equal molar concentration. In addition to agmatine, diamines cadaverine and putrescine, which are generated by bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes, also induced significant resistance to lactic acid-mediated GC killing and cell wall/membrane disruption. These findings suggest that the arginine-rich semen protects gonococci through both neutralization-dependent and independent mechanisms, whereas polyamine-induced acid resistance contributes to the increased risk of gonorrhea in women with bacterial vaginosis. PMID:26808268

  12. Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that the ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) functions as a transcriptional repressor in diverse microorganisms. Recent studies demonstrated that Fur also functions as a transcriptional activator. In this study we defined Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Analysis of 37 genes which were previously determined to be iron induced and which contained putative Fur boxes revealed that only 30 of these genes exhibited reduced transcription in a gonococcal fur mutant strain. Fur-mediated activation was established by examining binding of Fur to the putative promoter regions of 16 Fur-activated genes with variable binding affinities observed. Only ∼50% of the newly identified Fur-regulated genes bound Fur in vitro, suggesting that additional regulatory circuits exist which may function through a Fur-mediated indirect mechanism. The gonococcal Fur-activated genes displayed variable transcription patterns in a fur mutant strain, which correlated with the position of the Fur box in each (promoter) region. These results suggest that Fur-mediated direct transcriptional activation is fulfilled by multiple mechanisms involving either competing with a repressor or recruiting RNA polymerase. Collectively, our studies have established that gonococcal Fur functions as an activator of gene transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:22287521

  13. DC-SIGN (CD209) recognition of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is circumvented by lipooligosaccharide variation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Schwartz, Olivier; Pantelic, Milica; Li, Geling; Knazze, Quita; Nobile, Cinzia; Radovich, Milan; He, Johnny; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Klena, John; Chen, Tie

    2006-04-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) or Escherichia coli HB101 (hereafter referred to as E. coli) expressing opacity (Opa) proteins adhere to human host cells and stimulate phagocytosis as a result of the interaction of certain Opa proteins to carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1; CD66a) receptors. Our experiments show that the Opa-CEACAM1 interaction does not play a significant role in adherence between these bacteria and dendritic cells (DCs). Instead, phagocytosis of GC and E. coli by DCs is mediated by the DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-grabbing nonintegrin, (SIGN; CD209) receptor. DC-SIGN recognition and subsequent phagocytosis of GC are limited, however, to a lipooligosaccharide (LOS) mutant (lgtB) of GC. This conclusion is supported by experiments demonstrating that HeLa cells expressing human DC-SIGN (HeLa-DC-SIGN) bind exclusively to and engulf an lgtB mutant of GC, and this interaction is blocked specifically by an anti-DC-SIGN antibody. The experiments suggest that LOS variation may have evolved as a mechanism for GC to avoid phagocytosis by DCs. PMID:16461738

  14. Isolation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae on selective and nonselective media in a sexually transmitted disease clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, P; Tanino, T T; Handsfield, H H

    1984-01-01

    To assess the practical significance of reported increases in the prevalence of vancomycin-susceptible strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae on isolation of this organism, antibiotic-free chocolate agar (CA), modified Thayer-Martin medium (MTM), and a vancomycin-free selective medium (VFSM) were compared in a sexually transmitted disease clinic. Among 326 cervical gonococcal infections detected in a comparison of CA with MTM, 92.0% were detected on CA, compared with 98.2% on MTM (P less than 0.001). Similarly, among 306 cervical infections detected in a comparison of MTM and VFSM, 95.8% of infections were detected with VFSM, compared with 98.4% for MTM (P = 0.10). For 1,632 urethral infections in men, all three media were equivalent, with none detecting fewer than 98% of the infections. Compared with a single inoculation, dual inoculation of MTM increased the diagnostic yield by 1.5% for 206 urethral infections and 2.4% for 83 cervical infections. In our clinic population, MTM is superior to CA or VFSM for the diagnosis of genital gonococcal infections, especially in women. The increased yield that accrued from inoculation of both MTM and either of the other media was not sufficiently high to warrant routine use of this practice in our clinic. PMID:6421872

  15. Trends in susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to ceftriaxone from 1985 through 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Schwebke, J R; Whittington, W; Rice, R J; Handsfield, H H; Hale, J; Holmes, K K

    1995-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 16,441 gonococcal isolates from Seattle-King County were determined for ceftriaxone, cefoxitin, penicillin G, and tetracycline. From 1985 to 1989, ceftriaxone, in combination with doxycycline, was increasingly used for treatment of gonorrhea, and by 1989, it was used as therapy for > 80% of cases in Seattle-King County. MICs of ceftriaxone correlated significantly (P < 0.001) with those of the other beta-lactam antibodies included in this study. Geometric mean MICs of penicillin G for isolates that did not produce beta-lactamase increased from 1985 to 1991. The geometric mean MICs of cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline began to decline in 1987 but increased in 1990 and 1991. The percentage of strains with decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone (MIC, 0.06 to 0.25 microgram/ml) rose from 0.3% in 1985 to 5.3% in 1987 but subsequently declined steadily to 2.6% in 1991, despite increased use of ceftriaxone as routine therapy for gonorrhea. Changes in patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility may be related not only to antimicrobial selection pressures but also to less well understood population shifts among Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains within a community. PMID:7785995

  16. Antigen-specific serotyping of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: characterization based upon principal outer membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, T M; Hildebrandt, J F

    1981-01-01

    Principal outer membrane protein (protein I) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae was prepared nearly free of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and substantially purified from other membrane proteins by chromatography of partially purified gonococcal outer membranes over Sepharose 6B in the presence of deoxycholate at pH 9.0. This protein I of nine separate antigenic types was coated to polystyrene tubes and used in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure antibody to protein I or in inhibition tests to quantitate protein I antigen. No significant inhibition of the ELISA test was produced by purified LPS from the strain used to prepare each of the protein I types or by whole gonococci bearing the same LPS but different protein I antigens as the strain used to produce a given protein I antigen. Of 125 strains of gonococci used as whole organisms to inhibit the protein I ELISA, 124 (99%) typed with one or more of the nine protein I types, and 35% of these typed with a single protein I serotype. Sixty-one of 65 (94%) strains from Seattle and Atlanta patients with disseminated gonococcal infection contained protein I serotype 1, and 16 of 24 (64%) strains from Seattle patients with salpingitis bore one or both of protein I serotypes 1 and 2. Images PMID:6166568

  17. Manganese regulation of virulence factors and oxidative stress resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsing-Ju; Seib, Kate L.; Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Edwards, Jennifer; Kidd, Stephen P.; Maguire, Tina L .; Hamilton, Amanda; Pan, Kuan-Tin; Hsiao, He-Hsuan; Yao, Chen-Wen; Grimmond, Sean M.; Apicella, Michael A.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Wang, Andrew H-J.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has evolved a complex and novel network of oxidative stress responses, including defense mechanisms that are dependent on manganese (Mn). We performed systematic analyses at the transcriptomic and proteomic (1D SDS-PAGE and Isotope-Coded Affinity Tag [ICAT]) levels to investigate the global expression changes that take place in a high Mn environment, which results in a Mn-dependent oxidative stress resistance phenotype. These studies revealed that 97 proteins are regulated at the post-transcriptional level under conditions of increased Mn concentration, including proteins involved in virulence (eg. Pilin, a key adhesin), oxidative stress defence (eg. superoxide dismutase), cellular metabolism, protein synthesis, RNA processing and cell division. Mn regulation of inorganic pyrophosphatase (Ppa) indicated the potential involvement of phosphate metabolism in the Mn-dependent oxidative stress defense. A detailed analysis of the role of Ppa and polyphosphate kinase (Ppk) in the gonococcal oxidative stress response revealed that ppk and ppa mutant strains showed increased resistance to oxidative stress. Investigation of these mutants grown with high Mn suggests that phosphate and pyrophosphate are involved in Mn-dependent oxidative stress resistance. PMID:20004262

  18. Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilin glycan contributes to CR3 activation during challenge of primary cervical epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Michael P.; Jen, Freda E.-C.; Roddam, Louise F.; Apicella, Michael A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Expression of type IV pili by Neisseria gonorrhoeae plays a critical role in mediating adherence to human epithelial cells. Gonococcal pilin is modified with an O-linked glycan, which may be present as a di- or monosaccharide because of phase variation of select pilin glycosylation genes. It is accepted that bacterial proteins may be glycosylated; less clear is how the protein glycan may mediate virulence. Using primary, human, cervical epithelial (i.e. pex) cells, we now provide evidence to indicate that the pilin glycan mediates productive cervical infection. In this regard, pilin glycan-deficient mutant gonococci exhibited an early hyper-adhesive phenotype but were attenuated in their ability to invade pex cells. Our data further indicate that the pilin glycan was required for gonococci to bind to the I-domain region of complement receptor 3, which is naturally expressed by pex cells. Comparative, quantitative, infection assays revealed that mutant gonococci lacking the pilin glycan did not bind to the I-domain when it is in a closed, low-affinity conformation and cannot induce an active conformation to complement receptor 3 during pex cell challenge. To our knowledge, these are the first data to directly demonstrate how a protein-associated bacterial glycan may contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:21371235

  19. Multiple protein differences exist between Neisseria gonorrhoeae type 1 and type 4.

    PubMed Central

    Klimpel, K W; Clark, V L

    1988-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae undergoes a spontaneous conversion from a form which is virulent, competent for DNA-mediated transformation, and piliated (type 1) to a form which is avirulent and neither piliated nor competent (type 4). This phase variation has become thought of as simply a conversion from piliated to nonpiliated. Using the techniques of cell fractionation, two-dimensional electrophoresis, and nonequilibrium pH gradient gel electrophoresis, we identified differences in the expression levels of multiple proteins between type 1 and type 4 cells. A total of 26 type 1-specific (T1S) and 23 type 4-specific (T4S) cytoplasmic or cytoplasmic membrane proteins were identified in O'Farrell two-dimensional gels. Using nonequilibrium pH gradient gel electrophoresis, we detected a minimum of eight T1S outer membrane proteins and four T4S outer membrane proteins which were not detected in the O'Farrell gels. Thus, the conversion from type 1 to type 4 is a complex event involving many different proteins of all cellular locations. Images PMID:3126144

  20. Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC expression provides a selective mechanism for structural diversity of pili.

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, A B; Pfeifer, J; Normark, S

    1992-01-01

    Pili of Neisseria gonorrhoeae undergo both phase and structural variation. Phase variation of gonococcal pili can be caused by a RecA-independent on/off switch in PilC, a protein involved in pilus biogenesis. We show here that spontaneous nonpiliated PilC- derivatives as well as PilC- insertional mutants have also acquired sequence alterations in pilE relative to the pilE gene of the piliated MS11mk(P+)-u parent, so that the pilin produced is processed to soluble S-pilin and can be released into the medium. It is proposed that pilin alterations are selected for in PilC- bacteria if the parental nonassembled pilin is toxic to the cells--i.e., is not degradable to S-pilin at rates sufficient to allow viability of the cells. Toxicity is indicated by the extreme instability of certain unassembled pilin sequences and by the low frequency of nonpiliated, pilin+, PilC- variants that emerge from piliated recA- cells. The presence of a point mutation changing leucine-39 to phenylalanine at the cleavage site for S-pilin in one nonpiliated, PilC-, recA- variant relative to its piliated parent is a further argument for a selective mechanism of structural diversity of the gonococcal pilin. Images PMID:1348857

  1. Identification of carbohydrate structures that are possible receptors for Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Stromberg, N; Deal, C; Nyberg, G; Normark, S; So, M; Karlsson, K A

    1988-01-01

    Different strains and isogenic variants of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were assayed for their ability to bind glycolipids extracted from various sources. Among a large number of reference glycolipids, binding was observed only to lactosylceramide [Gal(beta 1-4)Glc(beta 1-1)Cer], isoglobotriaosylceramide [Gal(alpha 1-3)Gal(beta 1-4)Glc(beta 1-1)Cer], gangliotriaosylceramide [GalNAc(beta 1-4)Gal(beta 1-4)Glc(beta 1-1)Cer], and gangliotetraosylceramide [Gal(beta 1-3)GalNAc(beta 1-4)Gal(beta 1-4)Glc(beta 1-1)Cer]. The latter two glycolipids bound gonococci with the highest affinity. Lactosylceramide and gangliotriaosylceramide were found in glycolipid preparations from ME180 cells, an epithelial cell line derived from a human cervical carcinoma, and thus are possible receptors for gonococci. The gonococcal surface component that bound the above glycolipids is a protein distinct from pilin and protein II. Images PMID:2898784

  2. Release of soluble pilin antigen coupled with gene conversion in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, R; Schwarz, H; Meyer, T F

    1987-01-01

    Gene conversion appears to be the frequent mechanism in Neisseria gonorrhoeae that leads to an altered expression of pilin, the subunit component of the pili. In this process segments of variable sequence information, the minicassettes, are transferred from silent storage loci into an expression locus. As a putative consequence of the rearrangement in the pilE gene, gonococci can enter a different phase of pilin production. Although the removal of a 7-amino acid leader peptide results in the production of typical P+ pilin used to form pili, the loss of an additional 39 amino acids yields S-pilin, a soluble form of pilin that is efficiently secreted into the extracellular environment. Both pilin types can coexist in an apparently homogeneous culture. Ps cells usually are piliated, although less extensively with regard to the length and the number of the pili when compared with P+ cells. Ps cells form T3/T4-type colonies also typical of nonpiliated cells (P-). The observations further suggest that the classical nonsecretory P- phenotype is not generated as a rule by precise gene conversion but rather by genetic changes that cause the production of an over-length pilin (L-pilin). Images PMID:2892194

  3. Arginine- and Polyamine-Induced Lactic Acid Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zheng; Tang, M. Matt; Wu, Xueliang; Phillips, Nancy; Galkowski, Dariusz; Jarvis, Gary A.; Fan, Huizhou

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-derived lactic acid protects women from pathogens in their genital tract. The purpose of this study was to determine lactic acid susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and identify potential acid resistance mechanisms present in this pathogen. Tested in vitro, lactic acid killed all 10 gonococcal strains analyzed in a low pH-dependent manner. Full inactivation occurred at pH 4.5. At low pH, lactic acid treatment resulted in the entry of the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide into the microbial cells, suggesting that hydrogen ions from lactic acid compromise the integrity of the bacterial cell wall/membrane. Most likely, hydrogen ions also inactivate intracellular proteins since arginine rendered significant protection against lactic acid presumably through action of the gonococcal arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme located in the bacterial cytoplasm. Surprisingly, arginine also lessened lactic acid-mediated cell wall/membrane disruption. This effect is probably mediated by agmatine, a triamine product of arginine decarboxylase, since agmatine demonstrated a stronger protective effect on GC than arginine at equal molar concentration. In addition to agmatine, diamines cadaverine and putrescine, which are generated by bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes, also induced significant resistance to lactic acid-mediated GC killing and cell wall/membrane disruption. These findings suggest that the arginine-rich semen protects gonococci through both neutralization-dependent and independent mechanisms, whereas polyamine-induced acid resistance contributes to the increased risk of gonorrhea in women with bacterial vaginosis. PMID:26808268

  4. Phosphoethanolamine Modification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipid A Reduces Autophagy Flux in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zughaier, Susu M.; Kandler, Justin L.; Balthazar, Jacqueline T.; Shafer, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an ancient homeostasis mechanism for macromolecule degradation, performs an important role in host defense by facilitating pathogen elimination. To counteract this host defense strategy, bacterial pathogens have evolved a variety of mechanisms to avoid or otherwise dysregulate autophagy by phagocytic cells so as to enhance their survival during infection. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strictly human pathogen that causes the sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhea. Phosphoethanolamine (PEA) addition to the 4' position of the lipid A (PEA-lipid A) moiety of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) produced by gonococci performs a critical role in this pathogen’s ability to evade innate defenses by conferring decreased susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial (or host-defense) peptides, complement-mediated killing by human serum and intraleukocytic killing by human neutrophils compared to strains lacking this PEA decoration. Heretofore, however, it was not known if gonococci can evade autophagy and if so, whether PEA-lipid A contributes to this ability. Accordingly, by using murine macrophages and human macrophage-like phagocytic cell lines we investigated if PEA decoration of gonococcal lipid A modulates autophagy formation. We report that infection with PEA-lipid A-producing gonococci significantly reduced autophagy flux in murine and human macrophages and enhanced gonococcal survival during their association with macrophages compared to a PEA-deficient lipid A mutant. Our results provide further evidence that PEA-lipid A produced by gonococci is a critical component in the ability of this human pathogen to evade host defenses. PMID:26641098

  5. A Systematic Review of Point of Care Testing for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Herbst de Cortina, Sasha; Bristow, Claire C.; Joseph Davey, Dvora; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Systematic review of point of care (POC) diagnostic tests for sexually transmitted infections: Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV). Methods. Literature search on PubMed for articles from January 2010 to August 2015, including original research in English on POC diagnostics for sexually transmitted CT, NG, and/or TV. Results. We identified 33 publications with original research on POC diagnostics for CT, NG, and/or TV. Thirteen articles evaluated test performance, yielding at least one test for each infection with sensitivity and specificity ≥90%. Each infection also had currently available tests with sensitivities <60%. Three articles analyzed cost effectiveness, and five publications discussed acceptability and feasibility. POC testing was acceptable to both providers and patients and was also demonstrated to be cost effective. Fourteen proof of concept articles introduced new tests. Conclusions. Highly sensitive and specific POC tests are available for CT, NG, and TV, but improvement is possible. Future research should focus on acceptability, feasibility, and cost of POC testing. While pregnant women specifically have not been studied, the results available in nonpregnant populations are encouraging for the ability to test and treat women in antenatal care to prevent adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. PMID:27313440

  6. The outer membrane localization of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae MsrA/B is involved in survival against reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Eric P.; Tobiason, Deborah M.; Quick, J.; Judd, Ralph C.; Weissbach, Herbert; Etienne, Frantzy; Brot, Nathan; Seifert, H. Steven

    2002-01-01

    The PilB protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae has been reported to be involved in the regulation of pilin gene transcription, but it also possesses significant homology to the peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase family of enzymes, specifically MsrA and MsrB from Escherichia coli. MsrA and MsrB in E. coli are able to reduce methionine sulfoxide residues in proteins to methionines. In addition, the gonococcal PilB protein encodes for both MsrA and MsrB activity associated with the repair of oxidative damage to proteins. In this work, we demonstrate that the PilB protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is not involved in pilus expression. Additionally, we show that wild-type N. gonorrhoeae produces two forms of this polypeptide, one of which contains a signal sequence and is secreted from the bacterial cytoplasm to the outer membrane; the other lacks a signal sequence and is cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that the secreted form of the PilB protein is involved in survival in the presence of oxidative damage. PMID:12096194

  7. New treatment options for infections caused by increasingly antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyukmin; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of high-level resistance to ceftriaxone is giving rise to serious concern about absence of effective treatment options to cure gonococcal infections. Increasing the dosage regimen can be applied to ceftriaxone and azithromycin, but the emergence of high-level resistance has already been reported. Spectinomycin is another active drug but has low efficacy in the treatment of pharyngeal gonorrhoea. Conventional antibiotics could be introduced for gonococcal treatment, but they have some limitations, such as the absence of clinical trials and breakpoint. Combining antibiotics is another promising method to cure patients and to prevent the emergence of resistance. The most important strategy to maintain the efficacy of antibiotics is rapid detection and dissemination control of novel resistant isolate. PMID:26690658

  8. Beyond the Crystal Structure: Insight into the Function and Vaccine Potential of TbpA Expressed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Cash, Devin R; Noinaj, Nicholas; Buchanan, Susan K; Cornelissen, Cynthia Nau

    2015-11-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea, is not preventable by vaccination and is rapidly developing resistance to antibiotics. However, the transferrin (Tf) receptor system, composed of TbpA and TbpB, is an ideal target for novel therapeutics and vaccine development. Using a three-dimensional structure of gonococcal TbpA, we investigated two hypotheses, i.e., that loop-derived antibodies can interrupt ligand-receptor interactions in the native bacterium and that the loop 3 helix is a critical functional domain. Preliminary loop-derived antibodies, as well as optimized second-generation antibodies, demonstrated similar modest ligand-blocking effects on the gonococcal surface but different effects in Escherichia coli. Mutagenesis of loop 3 helix residues was employed, generating 11 mutants. We separately analyzed the mutants' abilities to (i) bind Tf and (ii) internalize Tf-bound iron in the absence of the coreceptor TbpB. Single residue mutations resulted in up to 60% reductions in ligand binding and up to 85% reductions in iron utilization. All strains were capable of growing on Tf as the sole iron source. Interestingly, in the presence of TbpB, only a 30% reduction in Tf-iron utilization was observed, indicating that the coreceptor can compensate for TbpA impairment. Complete deletion of the loop 3 helix of TbpA eliminated the abilities to bind Tf, internalize iron, and grow with Tf as the sole iron source. Our studies demonstrate that while the loop 3 helix is a key functional domain, its function does not exclusively rely on any single residue. PMID:26351283

  9. Beyond the Crystal Structure: Insight into the Function and Vaccine Potential of TbpA Expressed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Devin R.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea, is not preventable by vaccination and is rapidly developing resistance to antibiotics. However, the transferrin (Tf) receptor system, composed of TbpA and TbpB, is an ideal target for novel therapeutics and vaccine development. Using a three-dimensional structure of gonococcal TbpA, we investigated two hypotheses, i.e., that loop-derived antibodies can interrupt ligand-receptor interactions in the native bacterium and that the loop 3 helix is a critical functional domain. Preliminary loop-derived antibodies, as well as optimized second-generation antibodies, demonstrated similar modest ligand-blocking effects on the gonococcal surface but different effects in Escherichia coli. Mutagenesis of loop 3 helix residues was employed, generating 11 mutants. We separately analyzed the mutants' abilities to (i) bind Tf and (ii) internalize Tf-bound iron in the absence of the coreceptor TbpB. Single residue mutations resulted in up to 60% reductions in ligand binding and up to 85% reductions in iron utilization. All strains were capable of growing on Tf as the sole iron source. Interestingly, in the presence of TbpB, only a 30% reduction in Tf-iron utilization was observed, indicating that the coreceptor can compensate for TbpA impairment. Complete deletion of the loop 3 helix of TbpA eliminated the abilities to bind Tf, internalize iron, and grow with Tf as the sole iron source. Our studies demonstrate that while the loop 3 helix is a key functional domain, its function does not exclusively rely on any single residue. PMID:26351283

  10. Neisseria gonorrhoeae triggers the PGE2/IL-23 pathway and promotes IL-17 production by human memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Stefanelli, Paola; Teloni, Raffaela; Carannante, Anna; Mariotti, Sabrina; Nisini, Roberto; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina

    2012-10-01

    PGE2 is a potent modulator of the T helper (Th)17 immune response that plays a critical role in the host defense against bacterial, fungal and viral infections. We recently showed high serum levels of interleukin (IL)-17 in patients with gonococcal infection and we hypothesized that Neisseria gonorrhoeae could exploit a PGE2 mediated mechanism to promote IL-17 production. Here we show that N. gonorrhoeae induces human dendritic cell (DC) maturation, secretion of prostaglandin E2 and proinflammatory cytokines, including the pro-Th17 cytokine IL-23. Blocking PGE2 endogenous synthesis selectively reduces IL-23 production by DC in response to gonococcal stimulation, confirming recent data on PGE2/IL-23 crosstalk. N. gonorrhoeae stimulated DC induce a robust IL-17 production by memory CD4(+) T cells and this function correlates with PGE2 production. Our findings delineate a previously unknown role for PGE2 in the immune response to N. gonorrhoeae, suggesting its contribute via Th17 cell expansion. PMID:22542425

  11. New concepts in immunity to Neisseria gonorrhoeae: innate responses and suppression of adaptive immunity favor the pathogen, not the host.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingru; Feinen, Brandon; Russell, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    It is well-known that gonorrhea can be acquired repeatedly with no apparent development of protective immunity arising from previous episodes of infection. Symptomatic infection is characterized by a purulent exudate, but the host response mechanisms are poorly understood. While the remarkable antigenic variability displayed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its capacity to inhibit complement activation allow it to evade destruction by the host's immune defenses, we propose that it also has the capacity to avoid inducing specific immune responses. In a mouse model of vaginal gonococcal infection, N. gonorrhoeae elicits Th17-driven inflammatory-immune responses, which recruit innate defense mechanisms including an influx of neutrophils. Concomitantly, N. gonorrhoeae suppresses Th1- and Th2-dependent adaptive immunity, including specific antibody responses, through a mechanism involving TGF-β and regulatory T cells. Blockade of TGF-β alleviates the suppression of specific anti-gonococcal responses and allows Th1 and Th2 responses to emerge with the generation of immune memory and protective immunity. Genital tract tissues are naturally rich in TGF-β, which fosters an immunosuppressive environment that is important in reproduction. In exploiting this niche, N. gonorrhoeae exemplifies a well-adapted pathogen that proactively elicits from its host innate responses that it can survive and concomitantly suppresses adaptive immunity. Comprehension of these mechanisms of gonococcal pathogenesis should allow the development of novel approaches to therapy and facilitate the development of an effective vaccine. PMID:21833308

  12. A Neisseria gonorrhoeae Immunoglobulin A1 Protease Mutant Is Infectious in the Human Challenge Model of Urethral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Johannsen, Diana B.; Johnston, David M.; Koymen, Hakan O.; Cohen, Myron S.; Cannon, Janne G.

    1999-01-01

    Many mucosal pathogens, including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, produce proteases that cleave immunoglobulin A (IgA), the predominant immunoglobulin class produced at mucosal surfaces. While considerable circumstantial evidence suggests that IgA1 protease contributes to gonococcal virulence, there is no direct evidence that N. gonorrhoeae requires IgA1 protease activity to infect a human host. We constructed a N. gonorrhoeae iga mutant without introducing new antibiotic resistance markers into the final mutant strain and used human experimental infection to test the ability of the mutant to colonize the male urethra and to cause gonococcal urethritis. Four of the five male volunteers inoculated with the Iga− mutant became infected. In every respect—clinical signs and symptoms, incubation period between inoculation and infection, and the proportion of volunteers infected—the outcome of human experimental infection with FA1090iga was indistinguishable from that previously reported for a variant of parent strain FA1090 matching the mutant in expression of Opa proteins, lipooligosaccharide, and pilin. These results indicate that N. gonorrhoeae does not require IgA1 protease production to cause experimental urethritis in males. PMID:10338512

  13. Cloning of the recA gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and construction of gonococcal recA mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Koomey, J M; Falkow, S

    1987-01-01

    Interspecific complementation of an Escherichia coli recA mutant was used to identify recombinant plasmids within a genomic cosmid library derived from Neisseria gonorrhoeae that carry the gonococcal recA gene. These plasmids complement the E. coli recA mutation in both homologous recombination functions and resistance to DNA damaging agents. Subcloning, deletion mapping, and transposon Tn5 mutagenesis were used to localize the gonococcal gene responsible for suppression of the E. coli RecA- phenotype. Defined mutations in and near the cloned gonococcal recA gene were constructed in vitro and concurrently associated with a selectable genetic marker for N. gonorrhoeae and the mutated alleles were then reintroduced into the gonococcal chromosome by transformation-mediated marker rescue. This work resulted in the construction of two isogenic strains of N. gonorrhoeae, one of which expresses a reduced proficiency in homologous recombination activity and DNA repair function while the other displays an absolute deficiency in these capacities. These gonococcal mutants behaved similarly to recA mutants of other procaryotic species and displayed phenotypes consistent with the data obtained by heterospecific complementation in an E. coli recA host. The functional activities of the recA gene products of N. gonorrhoeae and E. coli appear to be highly conserved. Images PMID:3100504

  14. Mannose-binding lectin is present in human semen and modulates cellular adhesion of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wing, J B; Jack, D L; Lee, M E; Pacey, A A; Kinghorn, G R; Read, R C

    2009-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an innate immune molecule present in blood and some mucosal tissues, which can influence microbial attachment and inflammatory responses of host cells during infection. In this study MBL was found to be present at a low concentration in semen samples in the range 1·2–24·9 ng/ml. Co-incubation of bacteria with semen resulted in the binding of MBL to the bacterial surface. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a common cause of genitourinary infection. MBL bound to N. gonorrhoeae with strain-to-strain variation in the intensity of binding and nature of the bacterial receptor. Pretreatment with MBL concentrations similar to those found in human serum modulated the adhesion of N. gonorrhoeae strain FA1090 but not strain MS11 to epithelial cells. This effect was dose-dependent. This work demonstrates that MBL is present in human semen and modifies cellular responses to N. gonorrhoeae in a concentration-dependent manner. PMID:19664150

  15. Type IV prepilin peptidase gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11: presence of a related gene in other piliated and nonpiliated Neisseria strains.

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, B; Pugsley, A P

    1994-01-01

    The assembly of type IV pili in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a complex process likely to require the products of many genes. One of these is the enzyme prepilin peptidase, which cleaves and then N methylates the precursor pilin subunits prior to their assembly into pili. We have used a PCR amplification strategy to clone the N. gonorrhoeae prepilin peptidase gene, pilDNg. A single copy of the gene is shown to be present in the chromosome. Its product promotes correct cleavage of the gonococcal prepillin in Escherichia coli cells carrying both the prepilin peptidase gene and the pilin structural gene. PilDNg also cleaves prePulG, a type IV pilin-like protein of Klebsiella oxytoca. Moreover, PilDNg complements a mutation in the gene coding for the prepilin peptidase-like protein of K. oxytoca, pulO, partially restoring PulG-PulO-dependent extracellular secretion of the enzyme pullulanase. Finally, we show that genes homologous to pilDNg are present and expressed in a variety of species in the genus Neisseria, including some commensal strains. Images PMID:7906688

  16. New Ceftriaxone- and Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strain with a Novel Mosaic penA Gene Isolated in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shu-Ichi; Shimuta, Ken; Furubayashi, Kei-Ichi; Kawahata, Takuya; Unemo, Magnus; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    We have characterized in detail a new ceftriaxone- and multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain (FC428) isolated in Japan in 2015. FC428 differed from previous ceftriaxone-resistant strains and contained a novel mosaic penA allele encoding a new mosaic penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2). However, the resistance-determining 3'-terminal region of penA was almost identical to the regions of two previously reported ceftriaxone-resistant strains from Australia and Japan, indicating that both ceftriaxone-resistant strains and conserved ceftriaxone resistance-determining PBP 2 regions might spread. PMID:27067334

  17. Importance of multidrug efflux pumps in the antimicrobial resistance property of clinical multidrug-resistant isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Golparian, Daniel; Shafer, William M; Ohnishi, Makoto; Unemo, Magnus

    2014-06-01

    The contribution of drug efflux pumps in clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae that express extensively drug-resistant or multidrug-resistant phenotypes has heretofore not been examined. Accordingly, we assessed the effect on antimicrobial resistance of loss of the three gonococcal efflux pumps associated with a known capacity to export antimicrobials (MtrC-MtrD-MtrE, MacA-MacB, and NorM) in such clinical isolates. We report that the MIC of several antimicrobials, including seven previously and currently recommended for treatment was significantly impacted. PMID:24733458

  18. Comparison of three real-time PCR assays for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in young pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Peuchant, Olivia; de Diego, Sabrina; Le Roy, Chloé; Frantz-Blancpain, Sandrine; Hocké, Claude; Bébéar, Cécile; de Barbeyrac, Bertille

    2015-12-01

    We compared 3 commercial real-time PCR assays, the Abbott RealTime CT/NG, the cobas® 4800 CT/NG, and the Cepheid Xpert® CT/NG, for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in vaginal swabs collected prospectively from pregnant women aged <25 years. The overall agreement among 2 assays ranged from 98.9% to 99.5% with a kappa score between 0.94 and 0.97 for C. trachomatis. For N. gonorrhoeae, the overall agreement was 100%. All kits allowed prompt and specific results for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae in young pregnant women. PMID:26423658

  19. Phase variation of the opacity outer membrane protein controls invasion by Neisseria gonorrhoeae into human epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Makino, S; van Putten, J P; Meyer, T F

    1991-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a facultative intracellular bacterium capable of penetrating into certain human epithelial cell types. In order to identify gonococcal factors essential for invading Chang human conjunctiva cells, a gentamicin selection assay for the quantification of viable intracellular bacteria was used in conjunction with microscopy. The results demonstrate a correlation between the invasive behaviour of gonococci and the expression of Opa proteins, a family of variable outer membrane proteins present in all pathogenic Neisseria species. However, only particular Opa proteins supported invasion into Chang cells as indicated by the use of two unrelated gonococcal strains. Invasion was sensitive to cytochalasin D, and strong adherence mediated by the Opa proteins appeared to be essential for the internalization of gonococci. In contrast pili, which also conferred binding to Chang conjunctiva cells, did not support cellular invasion but rather were inhibitory. Images PMID:1673923

  20. The lipopolysaccharide (R type) as a common antigen of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. II. Use of hen antiserum to gonococcal lipopolysaccharide in a rapid slide test for the identification of N. gonorrhoeae from primary isolates and secondary cultures.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R; Ashton, F E; Ryan, A; Diena, B B

    1978-02-01

    An antiserum has been prepared in hens to R-type gonococcal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and used in a simple slide-agglutination test for the identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Anti-LPS serum agglutinated gonococcal cells representative of the four colony types of N. gonorrhoeae. Absorption of the antiserum with LPS removed the agglutinating activity. Secondary cultures (1120) were tested without observation of the colony type and all were agglutinated. No agglutination occurred with strains of Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria lactamica, non-pathogenic Neisseria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Branhamella catarrhalis, or with species of lactobacilli and Acinetobacter. Cross-reactivity of the antiserum occurred with some streptococci. The anti-LPS serum was used to identify N. gonorrhoeae in primary isolates from the cervix, urethra, and pharynx. Of 251 gonococcal isolates tested, 249 were agglutinated by the antiserum, while all of the corresponding second cultures were agglutinated. The antiserum did not agglutinate N. meningitidis found in primary isolates from pharyngeal specimens. Anti-LPS hen serum should be useful for the rapid identification of N. gonorrhoeae in primary isolates or secondary cultures. PMID:417781

  1. Expression of Opacity Proteins Interferes with the Transmigration of Neisseria gonorrhoeae across Polarized Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Stein, Daniel C; LeVan, Adriana; Hardy, Britney; Wang, Liang-Chun; Zimmerman, Lindsey; Song, Wenxia

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) establishes infection at the mucosal surface of the human genital tract, most of which is lined with polarized epithelial cells. GC can cause localized as well as disseminated infections, leading to various complications. GC constantly change their surface structures via phase and antigenic variation, which has been implicated as a means for GC to establish infection at various anatomic locations of male and female genital tracks. However, the exact contribution of each surface molecule to bacterial infectivity remains elusive due to their phase variation. Using a GC derivative that is genetically devoid of all opa genes (MS11∆Opa), this study shows that Opa expression interferes with GC transmigration across polarized human epithelial cells. MS11∆Opa transmigrates across polarized epithelial cells much faster and to a greater extent than MS11Opa+, while adhering at a similar level as MS11Opa+. When MS11Opa+, able to phase vary Opa expression, was inoculated, only those bacteria that turn off Opa expression transmigrate across the polarized epithelial monolayer. Similar to bacteria alone or co-cultured with non-polarized epithelial cells, MS11∆Opa fails to form large microcolonies at the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. Apical inoculation of MS11Opa+, but not MS11∆Opa, induces the recruitment of the Opa host-cell receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) to the apical junction and the vicinity of bacterial adherent sites. Our results suggest that Opa expression limits gonococcal ability to invade into subepithelial tissues by forming tight interactions with neighboring bacteria and by inducing CEACAM redistribution to cell junctions. PMID:26244560

  2. Expression of Opacity Proteins Interferes with the Transmigration of Neisseria gonorrhoeae across Polarized Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Daniel C.; LeVan, Adriana; Hardy, Britney; Wang, Liang-Chun; Zimmerman, Lindsey; Song, Wenxia

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) establishes infection at the mucosal surface of the human genital tract, most of which is lined with polarized epithelial cells. GC can cause localized as well as disseminated infections, leading to various complications. GC constantly change their surface structures via phase and antigenic variation, which has been implicated as a means for GC to establish infection at various anatomic locations of male and female genital tracks. However, the exact contribution of each surface molecule to bacterial infectivity remains elusive due to their phase variation. Using a GC derivative that is genetically devoid of all opa genes (MS11∆Opa), this study shows that Opa expression interferes with GC transmigration across polarized human epithelial cells. MS11∆Opa transmigrates across polarized epithelial cells much faster and to a greater extent than MS11Opa+, while adhering at a similar level as MS11Opa+. When MS11Opa+, able to phase vary Opa expression, was inoculated, only those bacteria that turn off Opa expression transmigrate across the polarized epithelial monolayer. Similar to bacteria alone or co-cultured with non-polarized epithelial cells, MS11∆Opa fails to form large microcolonies at the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. Apical inoculation of MS11Opa+, but not MS11∆Opa, induces the recruitment of the Opa host-cell receptor carcinoembryonic antigen–related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) to the apical junction and the vicinity of bacterial adherent sites. Our results suggest that Opa expression limits gonococcal ability to invade into subepithelial tissues by forming tight interactions with neighboring bacteria and by inducing CEACAM redistribution to cell junctions. PMID:26244560

  3. Mismatch correction modulates mutation frequency and pilus phase and antigenic variation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Criss, Alison K; Bonney, Kevin M; Chang, Rhoda A; Duffin, Paul M; LeCuyer, Brian E; Seifert, H Steven

    2010-01-01

    The mismatch correction (MMC) system repairs DNA mismatches and single nucleotide insertions or deletions postreplication. To test the functions of MMC in the obligate human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae, homologues of the core MMC genes mutS and mutL were inactivated in strain FA1090. No mutH homologue was found in the FA1090 genome, suggesting that gonococcal MMC is not methyl directed. MMC mutants were compared to a mutant in uvrD, the helicase that functions with MMC in Escherichia coli. Inactivation of MMC or uvrD increased spontaneous resistance to rifampin and nalidixic acid, and MMC/uvrD double mutants exhibited higher mutation frequencies than any single mutant. Loss of MMC marginally enhanced the transformation efficiency of DNA carrying a single nucleotide mismatch but not that of DNA with a 1-kb insertion. Unlike the exquisite UV sensitivity of the uvrD mutant, inactivating MMC did not affect survival after UV irradiation. MMC and uvrD mutants exhibited increased PilC-dependent pilus phase variation. mutS-deficient gonococci underwent an increased frequency of pilin antigenic variation, whereas uvrD had no effect. Recombination tracts in the mutS pilin variants were longer than in parental gonococci but utilized the same donor pilS loci. These results show that gonococcal MMC repairs mismatches and small insertion/deletions in DNA and also affects the recombination events underlying pilin antigenic variation. The differential effects of MMC and uvrD in gonococci unexpectedly reveal that MMC can function independently of uvrD in this human-specific pathogen. PMID:19854909

  4. Identification of Regulatory Elements That Control Expression of the tbpBA Operon in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Vélez Acevedo, Rosuany N.; Ronpirin, Chalinee; Kandler, Justin L.; Shafer, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for survival and establishment of infection by Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The neisserial transferrin binding proteins (Tbps) comprise a bipartite system for iron acquisition from human transferrin. TbpA is the TonB-dependent transporter that accomplishes iron internalization. TbpB is a surface-exposed lipoprotein that makes the iron uptake process more efficient. Previous studies have shown that the genes encoding these proteins are arranged in a bicistronic operon, with the tbpB gene located upstream of tbpA and separated from it by an inverted repeat. The operon is under the control of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur); however, promoter elements necessary for regulated expression of the genes have not been experimentally defined. In this study, putative regulatory motifs were identified and confirmed by mutagenesis. Further examination of the sequence upstream of these promoter/operator motifs led to the identification of several novel repeats. We hypothesized that these repeats are involved in additional regulation of the operon. Insertional mutagenesis of regions upstream of the characterized promoter region resulted in decreased tbpB and tbpA transcript levels but increased protein levels for both TbpA and TbpB. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology, we determined that a long RNA was produced from the region upstream of tbpB. We localized the 5′ endpoint of this transcript to between the two upstream insertions by qualitative RT-PCR. We propose that expression of this upstream RNA leads to optimized expression of the gene products from within the tbpBA operon. PMID:24837286

  5. Chemical characterization of binding properties of opacity-associated protein II from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Bessen, D; Gotschlich, E C

    1987-01-01

    Binding of an opacity-associated protein II (PIIop) from Neisseria gonorrhoeae to eucaryotic macromolecules was studied. HeLa cell extracts were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose, and purified PIIop bound to approximately 50 distinct molecular species. The binding of PIIop to HeLa cell components was stable in high salt and nonionic detergent and was not inhibited by a variety of monosaccharides and polyionic substances. PIIop binding behavior was compared with that of two model carbohydrate-binding proteins, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and concanavalin A (ConA). Model glycoproteins (ovomucoid, fetuin, mucin, ovalbumin) inhibited binding by PIIop, WGA, and ConA to various degrees. HeLa cell glycopeptides, generated by pronase digestion of chloroform-methanol-extracted cells, were tested for their ability to inhibit binding by PIIop to Western blots of HeLa cell macromolecules. HeLa cell extracts inhibited PIIop binding before pronase treatment, but inhibitory activity was lost as a result of pronase digestion. Direct binding to defined glycosylated and nonglycosylated proteins revealed that ConA and WGA bound only glycoproteins, whereas PIIop bound to proteins lacking carbohydrate as well. PIIop binding to human and bovine serum albumins was of high affinity and required partial unfolding of albumin; native albumin was not bound by PIIop; however, both the denatured, reduced form of albumin and the compact, nonreduced form of carboxymethylated albumin were bound strongly by PIIop. Albumin-PIIop interaction did not involve covalent bond formation through sulfhydryl groups. The predominant binding interactions of PIIop found in this study were with protein rather than carbohydrate, and the chemical nature of the interactions is more complex than involvement of purely ionic or hydrophobic forces. Images PMID:3098683

  6. Molecular characterization of the interaction between sialylated Neisseria gonorrhoeae and factor H.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Ram, Sanjay; Bhattacharjee, Arnab; Pedrosa, Joana; Tran, Connie; Horvath, Gabor; Monks, Brian; Visintin, Alberto; Jokiranta, T Sakari; Rice, Peter A

    2011-06-24

    Human factor H (HufH), a key inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement, binds to Neisseria gonorrhoeae and constitutes an important mechanism of human-specific complement evasion. The C-terminal domain 20 of HufH contains the binding site for sialylated gonococci. We exploited differences in amino acid sequences between human and non-binding chimpanzee fH domain 20 to create cross-species mutations to define amino acids important for binding to sialylated gonococci. We used fH/Fc fusion constructs that contained contiguous fH domains 18-20 fused to Fc fragments of murine IgG2a. The Fc region was used both as a tag for detection of each fusion molecule on the bacterial surface and as an indicator for complement-dependent killing. Arg-1203 was critical for binding to both porin (Por) B.1A and PorB.1B strains. Modeling of the R1203N human-to-chimpanzee mutation using the crystal structure of HufH19-20 as a template showed a loss of positive charge that protrudes at the C terminus of domain 20. We tested the functional importance of Arg-1203 by incubating sialylated gonococci with normal human serum, in the presence of wild-type HufH18-20/Fc or its R1203A mutant. Gonococci bound and were killed by wild-type HufH18-20/Fc but not by the R1203A mutant. A recombinant fH/Fc molecule that contained chimpanzee domain 20, humanized only at amino acid 1203 (N1203R) also bound to sialylated gonococci and restored killing. These findings provide further insights into the species specificity of gonococcal infections and proof-of-concept of a novel therapeutic approach against gonorrhea, a disease rapidly becoming resistant to conventional antibiotics. PMID:21531728

  7. Identification of TbpA residues required for transferrin-iron utilization by Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Noto, Jennifer M; Cornelissen, Cynthia Nau

    2008-05-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae requires iron for survival in the human host and therefore expresses high-affinity receptors for iron acquisition from host iron-binding proteins. The gonococcal transferrin-iron uptake system is composed of two transferrin binding proteins, TbpA and TbpB. TbpA is a TonB-dependent, outer membrane transporter critical for iron acquisition, while TbpB is a surface-exposed lipoprotein that increases the efficiency of iron uptake. The precise mechanism by which TbpA mediates iron acquisition has not been elucidated; however, the process is distinct from those of characterized siderophore transporters. Similar to these TonB-dependent transporters, TbpA is proposed to have two distinct domains, a beta-barrel and a plug domain. We hypothesize that the TbpA plug coordinates iron and therefore potentially functions in multiple steps of transferrin-mediated iron acquisition. To test this hypothesis, we targeted a conserved motif within the TbpA plug domain and generated single, double, and triple alanine substitution mutants. Mutagenized TbpAs were expressed on the gonococcal cell surface and maintained wild-type transferrin binding affinity. Single alanine substitution mutants internalized iron at wild-type levels, while the double and triple mutants showed a significant decrease in iron uptake. Moreover, the triple alanine substitution mutant was unable to grow on transferrin as a sole iron source; however, expression of TbpB compensated for this defect. These data indicate that the conserved motif between residues 120 and 122 of the TbpA plug domain is critical for transferrin-iron utilization, suggesting that this region plays a role in iron acquisition that is shared by both TbpA and TbpB. PMID:18347046

  8. Neisseria gonorrhoeae-induced human defensins 5 and 6 increase HIV infectivity: role in enhanced transmission.

    PubMed

    Klotman, Mary E; Rapista, Aprille; Teleshova, Natalia; Micsenyi, Amanda; Jarvis, Gary A; Lu, Wuyuan; Porter, Edith; Chang, Theresa L

    2008-05-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) increase the likelihood of HIV transmission. Defensins are part of the innate mucosal immune response to STIs and therefore we investigated their role in HIV infection. We found that human defensins 5 and 6 (HD5 and HD6) promoted HIV infection, and this effect was primarily during viral entry. Enhancement was seen with primary viral isolates in primary CD4(+) T cells and the effect was more pronounced with R5 virus compared with X4 virus. HD5 and HD6 promoted HIV reporter viruses pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus and murine leukemia virus envelopes, indicating that defensin-mediated enhancement was not dependent on CD4 and coreceptors. Enhancement of HIV by HD5 and HD6 was influenced by the structure of the peptides, as loss of the intramolecular cysteine bonds was associated with loss of the HIV-enhancing effect. Pro-HD5, the precursor and intracellular form of HD5, also exhibited HIV-enhancing effect. Using a cervicovaginal tissue culture system, we found that expression of HD5 and HD6 was induced in response to Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC, for gonococcus) infection and that conditioned medium from GC-exposed cervicovaginal epithelial cells with elevated levels of HD5 also enhanced HIV infection. Introduction of small interfering RNAs for HD5 or HD6 abolished the HIV-enhancing effect mediated by GC. Thus, the induction of these defensins in the mucosa in the setting of GC infection could facilitate HIV infection. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the complexity of defensins as innate immune mediators in HIV transmission and warrants further investigation of the mechanism by which defensins modulate HIV infection. PMID:18424739

  9. Neisseria gonorrhoeae induced disruption of cell junction complexes in epithelial cells of the human genital tract.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tirado, Carolina; Maisey, Kevin; Rodríguez, Felipe E; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Reyes-López, Felipe E; Imarai, Mónica

    2012-03-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, have developed mechanisms to alter epithelial barriers in order to reach subepithelial tissues for host colonization. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of gonococci on cell junction complexes of genital epithelial cells of women. Polarized Ishikawa cells, a cell line derived from endometrial epithelium, were used for experimental infection. Infected cells displayed a spindle-like shape with an irregular distribution, indicating potential alteration of cell-cell contacts. Accordingly, analysis by confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation revealed that gonococci induced redistribution of the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and its adapter protein β-catenin from the membrane to a cytoplasmic pool, with no significant differences in protein levels. In contrast, gonococcal infection did not induce modification of either expression or distribution of the tight junction proteins Occludin and ZO-1. Similar results were observed for Fallopian tube epithelia. Interestingly, infected Ishikawa cells also showed an altered pattern of actin cytoskeleton, observed in the form of stress fibers across the cytoplasm, which in turn matched a strong alteration on the expression of fibronectin, an adhesive glycoprotein component of extracellular matrix. Interestingly, using western blotting, activation of the ERK pathway was detected after gonococcal infection while p38 pathway was not activated. All effects were pili and Opa independent. Altogether, results indicated that gonococcus, as a mechanism of pathogenesis, induced disruption of junction complexes with early detaching of E-cadherin and β-catenin from the adherens junction complex, followed by a redistribution and reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and fibronectin within the extracellular matrix. PMID:22146107

  10. Instability of expression of lipooligosaccharides and their epitopes in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, H; Hammack, C A; Apicella, M A; Griffiss, J M

    1988-01-01

    We assessed variation in the expression of lipooligosaccharide (LOS) components and their epitopes within populations of a strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by using the monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) O6B4 and 3F11 and immunoenzymatic, immuno-colloidal gold electron microscopic, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic procedures. Wild-type organisms varied in binding of both MAbs. We used the intensity of immunoenzymatic colony blot color to distinguish four binding variants for each MAb: red (R), pink (P), and colorless (nonreactive [N]) and an N back to R (N-R) revertant. R to P to R and R to N to R variation occurred at frequencies of 0.2% and 0.02%, respectively. The electrophoretic LOS profiles and MAb immunoblot patterns of the R, P, and N-R variants were the same as those of the wild type. LOSs of the N variants, in contrast, were of lower Mr, bound neither 3F11 nor O6B4 MAb, and contained as their major component the 3.6-kilodalton LOS that bears the L8LOS epitope of N. meningitidis. Results of immunoelectron microscopic studies were consistent with LOS binding patterns. Large number of colloidal gold particles were deposited about both R and P variants, distally from R organisms, but proximally from P organisms. N variant organisms, like their LOS, bound neither of the MAbs. N-R variant organisms were like the wild type in that they showed much variation in the amounts of MAb they bound. Images PMID:3126149

  11. Differential recognition of members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family by Opa variants of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Bos, M P; Grunert, F; Belland, R J

    1997-01-01

    Opacity (Opa) protein variation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is implicated in the pathogenesis of gonorrhea, possibly by mediating adherence and entry of the bacteria into human tissues. One particular Opa protein mediates adherence to epithelial cells through cell surface proteoglycans. Recently, two other eukaryotic cell receptors for Opa proteins have been reported. These receptors are members of a subgroup of the carcinoembryonic (CEA) gene family that express CD66 antigens. CEA family members vary in their distribution in human tissues. In order to understand whether interactions between Opa and CEA-like molecules play any role in pathogenesis, we must investigate which CEA family members are able to serve as Opa receptors and which Opa proteins recognize CEA-like molecules. We therefore studied HeLa cells that were stably transfected with five different members of the CEA family, i.e., CEA, CEA gene family member 1a (CGM1a), CGM6, nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA), and biliary glycoprotein a (BGPa). We infected these transfectants with all possible 11 Opa variants of gonococcal strain MS11 and determined the numbers of bacteria that were bound and internalized. To account for proteoglycan-mediated adherence, infection assays were also performed in the presence of heparin. Our results show that of the 11 Opa variants of MS11, the same 4 recognized CGM1a and NCA. CGM6, however, was not recognized by any Opa variant of MS11. CEA was recognized by at least 9 of 11 Opa variants, and the BGP transfectants specifically bound and internalized 10 of 11 Opa variants and also bound Opa-negative gonococci. Immunofluorescence experiments showed that clustering of CEA-like molecules occurred upon infection of HeLa transfectants with those Opa variants that interacted specifically with the CEA family member. Together these data show that CEA family members are differentially recognized by gonococcal Opa variants, suggesting that this phenomenon may contribute to cell

  12. [Laboratory practices: diagnostics and antibiotics resistance testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Germany].

    PubMed

    Loenenbach, Anna; Dudareva-Vizule, S; Buder, S; Sailer, A; Kohl, P K; Bremer, V

    2015-08-01

    Recent years have seen a world-wide increase in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in cases of infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG). NG infection is not notifiable in Germany and there is a lack of information available about the spread and AMR of NG infections. The objective of the study was to provide information on diagnostic methods and AMR testing in cases of NG infections in German laboratories. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in Germany between June and August 2013 using an online questionnaire. Laboratories performing NG diagnostics were identified and described with regard to the diagnostic methods used, the number of tests performed, the antibiotics tested and the AMR observed, in addition to general laboratory information. In total, 188 of the 521 participating laboratories performed NG diagnostics; these were included in the further statistical analysis. 92.6 % of the 188 laboratories performed culture. A median of 60 (IQR 15-270) samples per quarter (SPQ) were tested, with an overall positivity rate of 4.1 and 6.9 % among men. Most (82.1 %) of the 151 laboratories performing NG culture tested for AMR as well. The most frequently tested antibiotics were ciprofloxacin (94.8 %), penicillin (93.1 %), doxycycline (70.0 %) and ceftriaxone (67.2 %). The most frequently observed AMR ever were those against ciprofloxacin (87.1 %), penicillin (78.3 %), doxycycline (56.6 %) and azithromycin (35.1 %; all percentages refer to laboratories). The laboratories used different standards regarding susceptibility criteria. The emergence and spread of AMR shows that it is crucial to assess and monitor the scope and trends of multidrug-resistant gonorrhea. The data collected on diagnostic methods and AMR testing in cases of NG infections in German laboratories constitute an important basis for future monitoring. PMID:26112875

  13. Global gene expression and the role of sigma factors in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in interactions with epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Ying; Lenz, Jonathan; Arvidson, Cindy Grove

    2005-08-01

    Like many bacterial pathogens, Neisseria gonorrhoeae must adapt to environmental changes in order to successfully colonize and proliferate in a new host. Modulation of gene expression in response to environmental signals is an efficient mechanism used by bacteria to achieve this goal. Using DNA microarrays and a tissue culture model for gonococcal infection, we examined global changes in gene expression in N. gonorrhoeae in response to adherence to host cells. Among those genes induced upon adherence to human epithelial cells in culture was rpoH, which encodes a homolog of the heat shock sigma factor, sigma(32) (RpoH), as well as genes of the RpoH regulon, groEL and groES. Attempts to construct an rpoH null mutant in N. gonorrhoeae were unsuccessful, suggesting that RpoH is essential for viability of N. gonorrhoeae. The extracytoplasmic sigma factor, RpoE (sigma(E)), while known to regulate rpoH in other bacteria, was found not to be necessary for the up-regulation of rpoH in gonococci upon adherence to host cells. To examine the role of RpoH in host cell interactions, an N. gonorrhoeae strain conditionally expressing rpoH was constructed. The results of our experiments showed that while induction of rpoH expression is not necessary for adherence of gonococci to epithelial cells, it is important for the subsequent invasion step, as gonococci depleted for rpoH invade cells two- to threefold less efficiently than a wild-type strain. Taken together, these results indicate that sigma(32), but not sigma(E), is important for the response of gonococci in the initial steps of an infection. PMID:16040997

  14. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Neisseria gonorrhoeae Laboratory Reference Strains, Determined Using PacBio Single-Molecule Real-Time Technology

    PubMed Central

    Trees, David L.; Nicholas, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the etiological agent that causes the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea, is a significant public health concern due to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. We report the complete genome sequences of three reference isolates with varied antimicrobial susceptibility that will aid in elucidating the genetic mechanisms that confer resistance. PMID:26358608

  15. Novel cost-effective quality control approach for the Cepheid Xpert CT/NG assay for the detection of Chlamydia Trachomatis and Neisseria Gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Chan, Maurice; Jiang, Boran; Ng, Siew Yong Lily; Tan, Thean Yen

    2016-06-01

    The Xpert CT/NG is a rapid assay for detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. QC materials must be formulated to emulate human specimens, and are prohibitively expensive. A creative, cost-effective QC approach is proposed. The acceptable sample types for the Xpert CT/NG assay were extended to include eye swabs. PMID:27091503

  16. Antibodies directed to Neisseria gonorrhoeae impair nerve growth factor-dependent neurite outgrowth in Rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Reuss, B

    2014-03-01

    In children born from mothers with prenatal infections with the Gram-negative bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, schizophrenia risk is increased in later life. Since cortical neuropil formation is frequently impaired during this disease, actions of a rabbit polyclonal antiserum directed to N. gonorrhoeae on neurite outgrowth in nerve growth factor-stimulated PC12 cells were investigated here. It turned out that 10 μg/ml of the antiserum leads indeed to a significant reduction in neurite outgrowth, whereas an antiserum directed to Neisseria meningitidis had no such effect. Furthermore, reduction in neurite outgrowth could be reversed by the neuroleptic drugs haloperidol, clozapine, risperidone, and olanzapine. On the molecular level, the observed effects seem to include the known neuritogenic transcription factors FoxO3a and Stat3, since reduced neurite outgrowth caused by the antiserum was accompanied by a reduced phosphorylation of both factors. In contrast, restitution of neurite outgrowth by neuroleptic drugs revealed no correlation to the phosphorylation state of these factors. The present report gives a first hint that bacterial infections could indeed lead to impaired neuropil formation in vitro; however, the in vivo relevance of this finding for schizophrenia pathogenesis remains to be clarified in the future. PMID:24203572

  17. Genomic Epidemiology and Molecular Resistance Mechanisms of Azithromycin-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Canada from 1997 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Demczuk, Walter; Martin, Irene; Peterson, Shelley; Bharat, Amrita; Van Domselaar, Gary; Graham, Morag; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Allen, Vanessa; Hoang, Linda; Tyrrell, Greg; Horsman, Greg; Wylie, John; Haldane, David; Archibald, Chris; Wong, Tom; Unemo, Magnus; Mulvey, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins and azithromycin (AZM) resistance (AZM(r)) represents a public health threat of untreatable gonorrhea infections. Genomic epidemiology through whole-genome sequencing was used to describe the emergence, dissemination, and spread of AZM(r) strains. The genomes of 213 AZM(r) and 23 AZM-susceptible N. gonorrhoeae isolates collected in Canada from 1989 to 2014 were sequenced. Core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) phylogenomic analysis resolved 246 isolates into 13 lineages. High-level AZM(r) (MICs ≥ 256 μg/ml) was found in 5 phylogenetically diverse isolates, all of which possessed the A2059G mutation (Escherichia coli numbering) in all four 23S rRNA alleles. One isolate with high-level AZM(r) collected in 2009 concurrently had decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone (MIC = 0.125 μg/ml). An increase in the number of 23S rRNA alleles with the C2611T mutations (E. coli numbering) conferred low to moderate levels of AZM(r) (MICs = 2 to 4 and 8 to 32 μg/ml, respectively). Low-level AZM(r) was also associated with mtrR promoter mutations, including the -35A deletion and the presence of Neisseria meningitidis-like sequences. Geographic and temporal phylogenetic clustering indicates that emergent AZM(r) strains arise independently and can then rapidly expand clonally in a region through local sexual networks. PMID:26935729

  18. Increasing Incidence of High-Level Tetracycline-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae due to Clonal Spread and Foreign Import

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyukmin; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Hyo Jin; Suh, Young Hee; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Chong, Yunsop

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The detection of high-level tetracycline-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (TRNG) can make important epidemiological contributions that are relevant to controlling infections from this pathogen. In this study, we aimed to determine the incidence of TRNG isolates over time and also to investigate the characteristics and genetic epidemiology of these TRNG isolates in Korea. Materials and Methods The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 601 isolates of N. gonorrhoeae from 2004 to 2011 were tested by standard Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods. To determine the molecular epidemiological relatedness, N. gonorrhoeae multi-antigen sequence typing was performed. Results The incidence of TRNG increased from 2% in 2004 to 21% in 2011. The minimum inhibitory concentration distributions of ceftriaxone and susceptibility of ciprofloxacin in TRNG were different from non-TRNG and varied according to the year of isolation. Most of the TRNG isolates collected from 2004 to 2007 exhibited genetic relatedness, with sequence type (ST) 1798 being the most common. From 2008 to 2011, the STs of the isolates became more variable and introduction of genetically unrelated TRNG were noted. Conclusion The increased incidence of TRNG strains until 2007 appears to be due, at least in part, to clonal spread. However, we propose that the emergence of various STs since 2008 could be associated with foreign import. PMID:26847286

  19. Determination of in vitro synergy for dual antimicrobial therapy against resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae using Etest and agar dilution.

    PubMed

    Wind, Carolien M; de Vries, Henry J C; van Dam, Alje P

    2015-03-01

    In response to antimicrobial resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to last-resort extended-spectrum cephalosporins, combination therapy of azithromycin+ceftriaxone is now recommended. Dual therapy can be effective to treat monoresistant strains as well as multidrug-resistant strains, preferably employing the effect of in vitro synergy. As reports on in vitro synergy of azithromycin+ceftriaxone in N. gonorrhoeae are conflicting, in this study an evaluation of this combination was performed using a cross-wise Etest method and agar dilution. Synergy was defined as a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of ≤0.5. To identify other dual treatment options for gonorrhoea, in vitro synergy was evaluated for 65 dual antimicrobial combinations using Etest. Azithromycin, cefixime, ceftriaxone, colistin, ertapenem, fosfomycin, gentamicin, minocycline, moxifloxacin, rifampicin, spectinomycin and tigecycline were screened for synergy in all possible combinations. No synergy or antagonism was found for any of the 65 combinations. The geometric mean FICI ranged from 0.82 to 2.00. The mean FICI of azithromycin+ceftriaxone was 1.18 (Etest) and 0.55 (agar dilution). The difference between both methods did not result in a difference in interpretation of synergy. Ceftriaxone-resistant strain F89 was tested in all combinations and no synergy was found for any of them. Most importantly, the ceftriaxone minimum inhibitory concentration of F89 was not decreased below the breakpoint with any concentration of azithromycin. PMID:25532741

  20. The second nationwide surveillance of the antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from male urethritis in Japan, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Hamasuna, Ryoichi; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Ishikawa, Kiyohito; Uehara, Shinya; Hayami, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Yamamoto, Shingo; Minamitani, Shinichi; Watanabe, Akira; Iwata, Satoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kadota, Junichi; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Sato, Junko; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Egawa, Shin; Tanaka, Kazushi; Arakawa, Soichi; Fujisawa, Masato; Kumon, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Kanao; Matsubara, Akio; Naito, Seiji; Kuroiwa, Kentaro; Hirayama, Hideo; Narita, Harunori; Hosobe, Takahide; Ito, Shin; Ito, Kenji; Kawai, Shuichi; Ito, Masayasu; Chokyu, Hirofumi; Matsumura, Masaru; Yoshioka, Masaru; Uno, Satoshi; Monden, Koichi; Takayama, Kazuo; Kaji, Shinichi; Kawahara, Motoshi; Sumii, Toru; Kadena, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Takamasa; Maeda, Shinichi; Nishi, Shohei; Nishimura, Hirofumi; Shirane, Takeshi; Yoh, Mutsumasa; Akiyama, Kikuo; Imai, Toshio; Kano, Motonori

    2015-05-01

    Worldwide, the most important concern in the treatment of sexually transmitted infections is the increase in antimicrobial resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains including resistance to cephalosporins, penicillins, fluoroquinolones or macrolides. To investigate the trends of antimicrobial susceptibility among N. gonorrhoeae strains isolated from male patients with urethritis, a Japanese surveillance committee conducted the second nationwide surveillance study. Urethral discharge was collected from male patients with urethritis at 26 medical facilities from March 2012 to January 2013. Of the 151 specimens, 103 N. gonorrhoeae strains were tested for susceptibility to 20 antimicrobial agents. None of the strains was resistant to ceftriaxone, but the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 90% of ceftriaxone increased to 0.125 μg/ml, and 11 (10.7%) strains were considered less susceptible with an MIC of 0.125 μg/ml. There were 11 strains resistant to cefixime, and the MICs of these strains were 0.5 μg/ml. The distributions of the MICs of fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and tosufloxacin, were bimodal. Sitafloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, showed strong activity against all strains, including strains resistant to other three fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and tosufloxacin. The azithromycin MICs in 2 strains were 1 μg/ml. PMID:25727286

  1. Novel Genes Related to Ceftriaxone Resistance Found among Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains Selected In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zijian; Lai, Wei; Liu, Min; Hua, Zhengshuang; Sun, Yayin; Xu, Qingfang; Xia, Yue; Zhao, Yue; Xie, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of ceftriaxone-resistantNeisseria gonorrhoeaeis currently a global public health concern. However, the mechanism of ceftriaxone resistance is not yet fully understood. To investigate the potential genes related to ceftriaxone resistance inNeisseria gonorrhoeae, we subcultured six gonococcal strains with increasing concentrations of ceftriaxone and isolated the strains that became resistant. After analyzing several frequently reported genes involved in ceftriaxone resistance, we found only a single mutation inpenA(A501V). However, differential analysis of the genomes and transcriptomes between pre- and postselection strains revealed many other mutated genes as well as up- and downregulated genes. Transformation of the mutatedpenAgene into nonresistant strains increased the MIC between 2.0- and 5.3-fold, and transformation of mutatedftsXincreased the MIC between 3.3- and 13.3-fold. Genes encoding the ABC transporters FarB, Tfq, Hfq, and ExbB were overexpressed, whilepilM,pilN, andpilQwere downregulated. Furthermore, the resistant strain developed cross-resistance to penicillin and cefuroxime, had an increased biochemical metabolic rate, and presented fitness defects such as prolonged growth time and downregulated PilMNQ. In conclusion, antimicrobial pressure could result in the emergence of ceftriaxone resistance, and the evolution of resistance ofNeisseria gonorrhoeaeto ceftriaxone is a complicated process at both the pretranscriptional and posttranscriptional levels, involving several resistance mechanisms of increased efflux and decreased entry. PMID:26787702

  2. Control of pili and sialyltransferase expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is mediated by the transcriptional regulator CrgA.

    PubMed

    Matthias, Kathryn A; Rest, Richard F

    2014-03-01

    Contact-regulated gene A (CrgA) is a transcriptional regulator present in the pathogenic Neisseria that functions as both an activator and a repressor of transcription following contact with host cells. While its mechanism of action has been studied extensively in Neisseria meningitidis, the specific subset of genes that CrgA targets has been debated. Although the majority of these constitute virulence genes, suggesting that CrgA is important in pathogenesis, no study to date has examined the effects of CrgA in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. In this report, we generated a knockout mutant of crgA (ΔcrgA) in the serum-sensitive gonococcal strain F62. crgA deletion resulted in a reduction in the transcript and protein levels of the primary pilin component pilE via mechanisms that were both contact-dependent and -independent. In contrast, ΔcrgA overexpressed the main determinant of serum resistance in F62, lipooligosaccharide sialyltransferase (Lst). CrgA-mediated lst repression was direct as both recombinant and native CrgA bound to the lst promoter at multiple locations in EMSA and ChIP assays respectively. The increase in Lst levels associated with crgA deletion correlated with enhanced protection against killing by normal human serum. These data suggest a role for CrgA in virulence regulation during both cell adherence and planktonic growth. PMID:24433334

  3. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the WHO Western Pacific and South East Asian Regions, 2010.

    PubMed

    Lahra, Monica M

    2012-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (GASP) has conducted continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the WHO Western Pacific Region (WPR) to optimise antibiotic treatment and control of gonococcal disease since 1992. From 2007, this has been enhanced by the inclusion of data from the WHO South East Asian Region (SEAR). Over time, there has been recruitment of additional centres in both regions. This report provides an analysis of antimicrobial resistance in N. gonorrhoeae in the WHO WPR and SEAR derived from results of the 2010 GASP surveillance. In 2010 there were 9,744 N. gonorrhoeae isolates examined for their susceptibility to one or more of the antibiotics used for the treatment of gonorrhoea, incorporating External Quality Assurance controlled methods, from reporting centres in 19 countries and/or jurisdictions. A high proportion of penicillin and quinolone resistance was again detected amongst isolates tested in the 'Asian' countries of WHO WPR and SEAR. In contrast, lower levels of penicillin and quinolone resistance were reported from the Pacific Islands of Fiji and New Caledonia. The proportion of gonococci reported as having 'decreased susceptibility' to the third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic ceftriaxone varied widely, ranging from 1.3% to 55.8%. There is a continued need for revision and clarification of some of the in vitro criteria that are currently used to categorise the clinical importance of gonococci with different ceftriaxone and oral cephalosporin MIC levels, and to relate these to treatment outcome. Azithromycin resistance was very low in most countries reporting, except in Mongolia where it was 34%. The number of instances of spectinomycin resistance remained low. A high proportion of strains tested continued to exhibit high-level plasmid mediated resistance to tetracyclines. The continuing emergence and spread of antibiotic resistant gonococci in and

  4. Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacterioferritin: structural heterogeneity, involvement in iron storage and protection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Morse, S A

    1999-10-01

    The iron-storage protein bacterioferritin (Bfr) from Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain F62 was identified in cell-free extracts and subsequently purified by column chromatography. Gonococcal Bfr had an estimated molecular mass of 400 kDa by gel filtration; however, analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that it was composed of 18 kDa (BfrA) and 22 kDa (BfrB) subunits. DNA encoding BfrB was amplified by PCR using degenerate primers derived from the N-terminal amino acid sequence of BfrB and from a C-terminal amino acid sequence of Escherichia coli Bfr. The DNA sequence of bfrA was subsequently obtained by genome walking using single-specific-primer PCR. The two Bfr genes were located in tandem with an intervening gap of 27 bp. A potential Fur-binding sequence (12 of 19 bp identical to the consensus neisserial fur sequence) was located within the 5' flanking region of bfrA in front of a putative -35 hexamer. The homology between the DNA sequences of bfrA and bfrB was 55.7%; the deduced amino acid sequences of BfrA (154 residues) and BfrB (157 residues) showed 39.7% identity, and showed 41.3% and 56.1% identity, respectively, to E. coli Bfr. Expression of recombinant BfrA and BfrB in E. coli strain DH5alpha was detected on Western blots probed with polyclonal anti-E. coli Bfr antiserum. Most Bfrs are homopolymers with identical subunits; however, the evidence presented here suggests that gonococcal Bfr was composed of two similar but not identical subunits, both of which appear to be required for the formation of a functional Bfr. A Bfr-deficient mutant was constructed by inserting the omega fragment into the BfrB gene. The growth of the BfrB-deficient mutant in complex medium was reduced under iron-limited conditions. The BfrB-deficient mutant was also more sensitive to killing by H2O2 and paraquat than the isogenic parent strain. These results demonstrate that gonococcal Bfr plays an important role in iron storage and protection from iron-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:10537219

  5. Azithromycin resistance is coevolving with reduced susceptibility to cephalosporins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Allen, Vanessa G; Seah, Christine; Martin, Irene; Melano, Roberto G

    2014-05-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) is routinely recommended as a component of dual therapy for gonorrhea in combination with third-generation cephalosporins (3GC). In this study, we examined the prevalence of AZM-resistant (AZM(r)) Neisseria gonorrhoeae from July 2010 to February 2013, assessed the rate of concurrent cephalosporin resistance under the current treatment recommendations, and analyzed the clonal distribution of AZM(r) isolates in Ontario, Canada. Nineteen AZM(r) clinical isolates (one per patient; MIC, ≥2 μg/ml) were included in the study. Susceptibility profiles of these isolates to 11 antibiotics, molecular typing, characterization of macrolide resistance mechanisms, and penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) patterns were determined for all the isolates. Two groups were defined based on AZM(r) level; group A isolates displayed high-level resistance (MIC, ≥2,048 μg/ml) due to mutations (A2143G) in the four copies of the 23S rRNA rrl gene, and group B isolates had moderate resistance to AZM (MICs, 2 to 8 μg/ml, C2599T mutation in the rrl gene), with a subgroup belonging to sequence type 3158 (ST3158) (n = 8), which also showed reduced susceptibility to 3GC (MICs, 0.12 to 0.25 μg/ml, PBP2 pattern XXXIV). This AZM(r) phenotype was not observed in previous provincial surveillance in 2008 (the ST3158 clone was found, with AZM MICs of 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml associated with mtrR mutations). We hypothesized that the AZM mutant prevention concentration (MPC) in the ST3158 subpopulation we found in 2008 was higher than the MPC in wild-type isolates (AZM MIC, ≤0.031 μg/ml), increasing the chances of additional selection of AZM(r) mutations. Full AZM resistance is now emerging in this clone together with reduced susceptibility to 3GC, threatening the future efficacy of these antibiotics as therapeutic options for treatment of gonorrhea. PMID:24514092

  6. In vitro activity of fosfomycin alone and in combination with ceftriaxone or azithromycin against clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Christoph; Hirzberger, Lea; Unemo, Magnus; Furrer, Hansjakob; Endimiani, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    New therapeutic strategies are needed to combat the emergence of infections due to multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae. In this study, fosfomycin (FOS) was tested against 89 N. gonorrhoeae isolates using the Etest method, showing MIC50/MIC90s of only 8/16 μg/ml (range, ≤1 to 32 μg/ml). FOS in combination with ceftriaxone (CRO) or azithromycin (AZT) was then evaluated using the checkerboard method for eight strains, including N. gonorrhoeae F89 (CRO-resistant) and AZT-HLR (high-level AZT-resistant). All combinations that included FOS gave indifferent effects (fractional inhibitory concentration [FIC] index values, 1.2 to 2.3 for FOS plus CRO, 1.8 to 3.2 for FOS plus AZT). Time-kill experiments for FOS, CRO, AZT, and their combinations (at 0.5×, 1×, 2×, and 4× the MIC) were performed against N. gonorrhoeae strain ATCC 49226, one N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) sequence type 1407 (ST1407) strain, F89, and AZT-HLR. For all strains, at 24 h, the results indicated that (i) FOS was bactericidal at 2× the MIC, but after >24 h, there was regrowth of bacteria; (ii) CRO was bactericidal at 0.5× the MIC; (iii) AZT was bactericidal at 4× the MIC; (iv) CRO plus AZT was less bactericidal than was CRO alone; (v) FOS plus AZT was bactericidal at 2× the MIC; and (vi) CRO plus AZT and FOS plus CRO were both bactericidal at 0.5× the MIC, but FOS plus CRO had more rapid effects. FOS is appealing for use in the management of N. gonorrhoeae infections because of its single and oral formulation. However, our results suggest it be used in combination with CRO. After the appropriate clinical trials are conducted, this strategy could be implemented for the treatment of infections due to isolates possessing resistance to CRO and/or AZT. PMID:25547354

  7. In Vitro Activity of Fosfomycin Alone and in Combination with Ceftriaxone or Azithromycin against Clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Christoph; Hirzberger, Lea; Unemo, Magnus; Furrer, Hansjakob

    2014-01-01

    New therapeutic strategies are needed to combat the emergence of infections due to multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae. In this study, fosfomycin (FOS) was tested against 89 N. gonorrhoeae isolates using the Etest method, showing MIC50/MIC90s of only 8/16 μg/ml (range, ≤1 to 32 μg/ml). FOS in combination with ceftriaxone (CRO) or azithromycin (AZT) was then evaluated using the checkerboard method for eight strains, including N. gonorrhoeae F89 (CRO-resistant) and AZT-HLR (high-level AZT-resistant). All combinations that included FOS gave indifferent effects (fractional inhibitory concentration [FIC] index values, 1.2 to 2.3 for FOS plus CRO, 1.8 to 3.2 for FOS plus AZT). Time-kill experiments for FOS, CRO, AZT, and their combinations (at 0.5×, 1×, 2×, and 4× the MIC) were performed against N. gonorrhoeae strain ATCC 49226, one N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) sequence type 1407 (ST1407) strain, F89, and AZT-HLR. For all strains, at 24 h, the results indicated that (i) FOS was bactericidal at 2× the MIC, but after >24 h, there was regrowth of bacteria; (ii) CRO was bactericidal at 0.5× the MIC; (iii) AZT was bactericidal at 4× the MIC; (iv) CRO plus AZT was less bactericidal than was CRO alone; (v) FOS plus AZT was bactericidal at 2× the MIC; and (vi) CRO plus AZT and FOS plus CRO were both bactericidal at 0.5× the MIC, but FOS plus CRO had more rapid effects. FOS is appealing for use in the management of N. gonorrhoeae infections because of its single and oral formulation. However, our results suggest it be used in combination with CRO. After the appropriate clinical trials are conducted, this strategy could be implemented for the treatment of infections due to isolates possessing resistance to CRO and/or AZT. PMID:25547354

  8. α-2,3-Sialyltransferase Expression Level Impacts the Kinetics of Lipooligosaccharide Sialylation, Complement Resistance, and the Ability of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to Colonize the Murine Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sunita; Burrowes, Elizabeth; Zheng, Bo; Ram, Sanjay; Rice, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae modify the terminal lacto-N-neotetraose moiety of their lipooligosaccharide (LOS) with sialic acid. N. gonorrhoeae LOS sialylation blocks killing by complement, which is mediated at least in part by enhanced binding of the complement inhibitor factor H (FH). The role of LOS sialylation in resistance of N. meningitidis to serum killing is less well defined. Sialylation in each species is catalyzed by the enzyme LOS α-2,3-sialyltransferase (Lst). Previous studies have shown increased Lst activity in N. gonorrhoeae compared to N. meningitidis due to an ~5-fold increase in lst transcription. Using isogenic N. gonorrhoeae strains engineered to express gonococcal lst from either the N. gonorrhoeae or N. meningitidis lst promoter, we show that decreased expression of lst (driven by the N. meningitidis promoter) reduced LOS sialylation as determined by less incorporation of tritium-labeled cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NANA; the donor molecule for sialic acid). Diminished LOS sialylation resulted in reduced rates of FH binding and increased pathway activation compared to N. gonorrhoeae promoter-driven lst expression. The N. meningitidis lst promoter generated sufficient Lst to sialylate N. gonorrhoeae LOS in vivo, and the level of sialylation after 24 h in the mouse genital tract was sufficient to mediate resistance to human serum ex vivo. Despite demonstrable LOS sialylation in vivo, gonococci harboring the N. meningitidis lst promoter were outcompeted by those with the N. gonorrhoeae lst promoter during coinfection of the vaginal tract of estradiol-treated mice. These data highlight the importance of high lst expression levels for gonococcal pathogenesis. PMID:25650401

  9. Potential impact of vaccination against Neisseria meningitidis on Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the United States: results from a decision-analysis model.

    PubMed

    Régnier, Stéphane A; Huels, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Components in 4CMenB vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B have shown to potentially cross-react with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. We modeled the theoretical impact of a US 4CMenB vaccination program on gonorrhea outcomes. A decision-analysis model was populated using published healthcare utilization and cost data. A two-dose adolescent vaccination campaign was assumed, with protective immunity starting at age 15 years and a base-case efficacy against gonorrhea of 20%. The 20%-efficacy level is an assumption since no clinical data have yet quantified the efficacy of 4CMenB against Neisseria gonorrhoea. Key outcome measures were reductions in gonorrhea and HIV infections, reduction in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) lost, and the economically justifiable price assuming a willingness-to-pay threshold of $75,000 per QALY gained. Adolescent vaccination with 4CMenB would prevent 83,167 (95% credible interval [CrI], 44,600-134,600) gonorrhea infections and decrease the number of HIV infections by 55 (95% CrI, 2-129) per vaccinated birth cohort in the USA. Excluding vaccination costs, direct medical costs for gonorrhea would reduce by $28.7 million (95% CrI, $6.8-$70.0 million), and income and productivity losses would reduce by $40.0 million (95% CrI, $8.2-$91.7 million). Approximately 83% of the reduction in lost productivity is generated by avoiding HIV infections. At a cost of $75,000 per QALY gained, and incremental to the vaccine's effect on meningococcal disease, a price of $26.10 (95% CrI, $9.10-$57.20) per dose, incremental to the price of the meningococcal vaccine, would be justified from the societal perspective. At this price, the net cost per infection averted would be $1,677 (95% CrI, $404-$2,564). Even if the cross-immunity of 4CMenB vaccine and gonorrhea is only 20%, the reduction in gonorrhea infections and associated costs would be substantial. PMID:25483706

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of a Dominant, Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strain, TCDC-NG08107, from a Sexual Group at High Risk of Acquiring Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Syphilis▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Chen; Hsia, Ko-Chiang; Huang, Chung-Ter; Wong, Wing-Wai; Yen, Muh-Yong; Li, Lan-Hui; Lin, Kun-Yen; Chen, Kuo-Wei; Li, Shu-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection is the second major cause of sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. Development of resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials in N. gonorrhoeae has compromised treatment and disease control. Herein, we report the availability of the draft genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae isolate, TCDC-NG08107, which spread in groups of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Taiwan. PMID:21257765

  11. Analysis of antibodies in local and disseminated Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections by means of gel electrophoresis-derived ELISA.

    PubMed

    Hadfield, S G; Glynn, A A

    1982-10-01

    Major antigens in Neisseria gonorrhoeae were identified by surface labelling the organisms with 125I and electrophoresing extracts in polyacrylamide with sodium dodecyl sulphate. Horizontal slices of the gels were cut out and tested in individual wells against patients' sera using ELISA. Serum from local gonococcal infections reacted with Protein II and, probably, lipopolysaccharide, but not with Protein I in deoxycholate (DOC) extracts and gave no reaction with Triton X-100 extracts. Serum from disseminated gonococcal infections reacted with Protein I in the DOC extract and with pili and a number of undefined possibly cytoplasmic membrane antigens in the Triton X-100 extract. The significance of the results and the potential of the method are discussed. PMID:6811421

  12. Building a web-based tool to support clinical decisions in the control of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kun; Qiu, Fasheng; Chen, Guantao

    2013-12-20

    Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) are the agents of two common, sexually transmitted diseases afflicting women in the United States (http://www.cdc.gov). We designed a novel web-based application that offers simple recommendations to help optimize medical outcomes with CT and GC prevention and control programs. This application takes population groups, prevalence rates, parameters for available screening assays and treatment regimens (costs, sensitivity, and specificity), as well as budget limits as inputs. Its output suggests optimal screening and treatment strategies for selected at-risk groups, commensurate with the clinic's budget allocation. Development of this tool illustrates how a clinical informatics application based on rigorous mathematics might have a significant impact on real-world clinical issues. PMID:24564848

  13. Performance and Verification of a Real-Time PCR Assay Targeting the gyrA Gene for Prediction of Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Hemarajata, P; Yang, S; Soge, O O; Humphries, R M; Klausner, J D

    2016-03-01

    In the United States, 19.2% of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates are resistant to ciprofloxacin. We evaluated a real-time PCR assay to predict ciprofloxacin susceptibility using residual DNA from the Roche Cobas 4800 CT/NG assay. The results of the assay were 100% concordant with agar dilution susceptibility test results for 100 clinical isolates. Among 76 clinical urine and swab specimens positive for N. gonorrhoeae by the Cobas assay, 71% could be genotyped. The test took 1.5 h to perform, allowing the physician to receive results in time to make informed clinical decisions. PMID:26739156

  14. Infection of human fallopian tube epithelial cells with Neisseria gonorrhoeae protects cells from tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Priscilla; Reyes, Paz; Vargas, Macarena; Rios, Miguel; Imarai, Mónica; Cardenas, Hugo; Croxatto, Horacio; Orihuela, Pedro; Vargas, Renato; Fuhrer, Juan; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron; Velasquez, Luis

    2006-06-01

    Following infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, bacteria may ascend into the Fallopian tubes (FT) and induce salpingitis, a major cause of infertility. In the FT, interactions between mucosal epithelial cells and gonococci are pivotal events in the pathogen's infection cycle and the inflammatory response. In the current study, primary FT epithelial cells were infected in vitro with different multiplicities of infection (MOI) of Pil+ Opa+ gonococci. Bacteria showed a dose-dependent association with cells and induced the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). A significant finding was that gonococcal infection (MOI = 1) induced apoptosis in approximately 30% of cells, whereas increasing numbers of bacteria (MOI = 10 to 100) did not induce apoptosis. Apoptosis was observed in only 11% of cells with associated bacteria, whereas >84% of cells with no adherent bacteria were apoptotic. TNF-alpha was a key contributor to apoptosis, since (i) culture supernatants from cells infected with gonococci (MOI = 1) induced apoptosis in naïve cultures, suggesting that a soluble factor was responsible; (ii) gonococcal infection-induced apoptosis was inhibited with anti-TNF-alpha antibodies; and (iii) the addition of exogenous TNF-alpha induced apoptosis, which was inhibited by the presence of increasing numbers of bacteria (MOI = 10 to 100). These data suggest that TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis of FT epithelial cells is likely a primary host defense mechanism to prevent pathogen colonization. However, epithelial cell-associated gonococci have evolved a mechanism to protect the cells from undergoing TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis, and this modulation of the host innate response may contribute to establishment of infection. Understanding the antiapoptotic mechanisms used by Neisseria gonorrhoeae will inform the pathogenesis of salpingitis and could suggest new intervention strategies for prevention and treatment of the disease. PMID:16714596

  15. The pilE gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11 is transcribed from a sigma 70 promoter during growth in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, J A; Carrick, C S; Davies, J K

    1995-01-01

    Type 4 pili are essential for virulence in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The gonococcal pilin subunit is encoded by pilE, upstream of which three putative promoter sequences (P1, P2, and P3) have been identified. P1 and P2 are sigma 70-like promoters and are functional when a PpiE::cat transcriptional fusion is expressed in Escherichia coli DH5 alpha. P3 is sigma 54 dependent and overlaps the P1 sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis of the pilE promoters followed by transcriptional analysis in E. coli indicated that in the absence of an appropriate activator protein, binding of RNA polymerase-sigma 54 to P3 inhibits transcription from P1 on the order of 30-fold. Transcription from P3 was undetectable in E. coli. However, PilR-dependent, P3-associated expression was detected in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAK containing a PpilE::cat fusion, with P3 the only intact promoter. A similar analysis was performed on gonococcal reporter strains containing wild-type and mutated PpilE::cat cassettes recombined into the chromosome. In such piliated gonococcal recombinants cultured in vitro, P1 was responsible for cat expression and almost certainly for transcription of pilE. Transcription from P2 and P3 was not detectable under these conditions. Inhibition of transcription from P1 by sigma 54 binding to P3 was not apparent in N. gonorrhoeae MS11-A, suggesting that sigma 54 was either absent or unable to bind to P3 in these cells. PMID:7601844

  16. An insight into the drug resistance profile & mechanism of drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Chaudhry, Uma; Sachdev, Divya; Sachdeva, Poonam Nagpal; Bala, Manju; Saluja, Daman

    2011-10-01

    Among the aetiological agents of treatable sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Neissseria gonorrhoeae is considered to be most important because of emerging antibiotic resistant strains that compromise the effectiveness of treatment of the disease - gonorrhoea. In most of the developing countries, treatment of gonorrhoea relies mainly on syndromic management rather than the aetiological based therapy. Gonococcal infections are usually treated with single-dose therapy with an agent found to cure > 95 per cent of cases. Unfortunately during the last few decades, N. gonorrhoeae has developed resistance not only to less expensive antimicrobials such as sulphonamides, penicillin and tetracyclines but also to fluoroquinolones. The resistance trend of N. gonorrhoeae towards these antimicrobials can be categorised into pre-quinolone, quinolone and post-quinolone era. Among the antimicrobials available so far, only the third-generation cephalosporins could be safely recommended as first-line therapy for gonorrhoea globally. However, resistance to oral third-generation cephalosporins has also started emerging in some countries. Therefore, it has become imperative to initiate sustained national and international efforts to reduce infection and misuse of antibiotics so as to prevent further emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. It is necessary not only to monitor drug resistance and optimise treatment regimens, but also to gain insight into how gonococcus develops drug resistance. Knowledge of mechanism of resistance would help us to devise methods to prevent the occurrence of drug resistance against existing and new drugs. Such studies could also help in finding out new drug targets in N. gonorrhoeae and also a possibility of identification of new drugs for treating gonorrhoea. PMID:22089602

  17. An insight into the drug resistance profile & mechanism of drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Chaudhry, Uma; Sachdev, Divya; Sachdeva, Poonam Nagpal; Bala, Manju; Saluja, Daman

    2011-01-01

    Among the aetiological agents of treatable sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Neissseria gonorrhoeae is considered to be most important because of emerging antibiotic resistant strains that compromise the effectiveness of treatment of the disease - gonorrhoea. In most of the developing countries, treatment of gonorrhoea relies mainly on syndromic management rather than the aetiological based therapy. Gonococcal infections are usually treated with single-dose therapy with an agent found to cure > 95 per cent of cases. Unfortunately during the last few decades, N. gonorrhoeae has developed resistance not only to less expensive antimicrobials such as sulphonamides, penicillin and tetracyclines but also to fluoroquinolones. The resistance trend of N. gonorrhoeae towards these antimicrobials can be categorised into pre-quinolone, quinolone and post-quinolone era. Among the antimicrobials available so far, only the third-generation cephalosporins could be safely recommended as first-line therapy for gonorrhoea globally. However, resistance to oral third-generation cephalosporins has also started emerging in some countries. Therefore, it has become imperative to initiate sustained national and international efforts to reduce infection and misuse of antibiotics so as to prevent further emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. It is necessary not only to monitor drug resistance and optimise treatment regimens, but also to gain insight into how gonococcus develops drug resistance. Knowledge of mechanism of resistance would help us to devise methods to prevent the occurrence of drug resistance against existing and new drugs. Such studies could also help in finding out new drug targets in N. gonorrhoeae and also a possibility of identification of new drugs for treating gonorrhoea. PMID:22089602

  18. Inhibition of IgA1 proteinases from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Hemophilus influenzae by peptide prolyl boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, W W; Plaut, A G; Flentke, G R; Lynch, M; Kettner, C A

    1990-03-01

    The alpha-aminoboronic acid analog of proline has been synthesized and incorporated into a number of peptides as the COOH-terminal residue. These peptide prolyl boronic acids are potent inhibitors of both the type 1 and type 2 IgA proteinases from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Hemophilus influenzae, but not of the functionally similar IgA proteinase from Streptococcus sanguis. The best inhibitors synthesized thus far have Ki values in the nanomolar range (4.0 to 60 nM). These results indicate that the N. gonorrhoeae and the H. influenzae enzymes belong to the serine protease family of proteolytic enzymes while that from S. sanguis does not. As a group, the IgA proteinases have been noted for their remarkable specificity; thus, the peptide prolyl boronic acids reported here are the first small synthetic molecules to exhibit a relatively high affinity for the active site of an IgA proteinase and are therefore the first to yield some insight into the active site structure and specificity requirements of these enzymes. PMID:2105953

  19. The crystal structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae PriB reveals mechanistic differences among bacterial DNA replication restart pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jinlan; George, Nicholas P.; Duckett, Katrina L.; DeBeer, Madeleine A.P.; Lopper, Matthew E.

    2010-05-25

    Reactivation of repaired DNA replication forks is essential for complete duplication of bacterial genomes. However, not all bacteria encode homologs of the well-studied Escherichia coli DNA replication restart primosome proteins, suggesting that there might be distinct mechanistic differences among DNA replication restart pathways in diverse bacteria. Since reactivation of repaired DNA replication forks requires coordinated DNA and protein binding by DNA replication restart primosome proteins, we determined the crystal structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae PriB at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution and investigated its ability to physically interact with DNA and PriA helicase. Comparison of the crystal structures of PriB from N. gonorrhoeae and E. coli reveals a well-conserved homodimeric structure consisting of two oligosaccharide/oligonucleotide-binding (OB) folds. In spite of their overall structural similarity, there is significant species variation in the type and distribution of surface amino acid residues. This correlates with striking differences in the affinity with which each PriB homolog binds single-stranded DNA and PriA helicase. These results provide evidence that mechanisms of DNA replication restart are not identical across diverse species and that these pathways have likely become specialized to meet the needs of individual organisms.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the multidrug efflux transporter NorM from Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chih-Chia; Long, Feng; McDermott, Gerry; Shafer, William M.; Yu, Edward W.

    2008-04-01

    The multidrug efflux transporter NorM from N. gonorrhoeae has been crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to a resolution of 6.5 Å. The crystallization and preliminary X-ray data analysis of the NorM multidrug efflux pump produced by Neisseria gonorrhoeae are reported. NorM is a cytoplasmic membrane protein that consists of 459 amino-acid residues. It is a member of the recently classified multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family of transporters and recognizes a number of cationic toxic compounds such as ethidium bromide, acriflavin, 2-N-methylellipticinium and ciprofloxacin. Recombinant NorM protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by metal-affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. The protein was crystallized using hanging-drop vapor diffusion. X-ray diffraction data were collected from cryocooled crystals at a synchrotron light source. The best crystal diffracted anisotropically to 3.8 Å and diffraction data were complete to 6.5 Å resolution. The space group was determined to be C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.5, b = 164.4, c = 111.5 Å.

  1. Five years of experience with a national external quality control program for the culture and identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, C W; Mehaffey, M A; Cook, E C

    1983-01-01

    In response to a need for monitoring the proficiency of public health laboratories in isolating and identifying Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a national external quality control program was developed. Essentially, three types of freeze-dried samples, representing different levels of challenge for identification, were sent to laboratories for testing. The quality of the samples was confirmed by external reference laboratories, and stability of the samples was confirmed by thermal degradation tests before the samples were sent to laboratories enrolled in the program. By analyzing laboratory results, we identified common errors and chronic problems in testing samples. As a group, laboratories testing small numbers of actual patient specimens did not perform as well in the program as did laboratories testing large numbers of specimens; however, the performance of laboratories testing small numbers of specimens improved over time. Overall, laboratories experienced the most difficulty with samples containing N. gonorrhoeae mixed with other microbial species. Laboratories that performed confirmatory tests committed fewer errors than did laboratories that performed presumptive tests only, but the failure to use pure cultures of gonococci for inoculation of cystine tryptic digest agar appeared to be a chronic problem in confirmatory carbohydrate testing. A review of the use of different plating media and confirmatory tests showed that the use of certain media and tests changed over time. PMID:6417161

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Zaire: high level plasmid-mediated tetracycline resistance in central Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyck, E; Rossau, R; Duhamel, M; Behets, F; Laga, M; Nzila, M; Bygdeman, S; Van Heuverswijn, H; Piot, P

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of gonococcal strains isolated in 1988 among female prostitutes in Kinshasa, Zaire and to characterise strains with high level tetracycline resistance. METHODS--Minimal inhibitory concentrations of 8 antimicrobials were measured by agar dilution technique. Plasmid-profiles and serovars were determined. RESULTS--Two hundred and thirteen strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were tested of which 59% were beta-lactamase producers and an additional 21% showed intermediate or chromosomal resistance to penicillin (MIC = 0.5-8 mg/l). Eleven percent of the strains were resistant to the combination sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (MIC greater than 8 mg/l) and 57% of the isolates showed decreased susceptibility to thiamphenicol (MIC = 1-4 mg/l). All strains were sensitive to spectinomycin, norfloxacin and ceftriaxone and moderately sensitive to kanamycin. Chromosomal resistance to tetracycline was observed in 45% of strains (MIC = 2-8 mg/l). Ten percent were highly resistant to tetracycline (TRNG, MIC = 16-128 mg/l) and were shown to carry a plasmid borne Tet M determinant; such strains were not found in Kinshasa in 1985. TRNG belonged to 4 different serovars, which were also the dominant serovars in non-TRNG. CONCLUSION--These findings illustrate the high frequency of multiresistant gonococci in Zaire and suggest that high level tetracycline resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae have become endemic in Central Africa. Images PMID:1582653

  3. Identification of penicillinase producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Chile during clinical and microbiological study of gonococcal susceptibility to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Moreno, J; Dillon, J R; Arroyave, R; Maldonado, A; Fich, F; Salvo, A; Villalobos, D; Vincent, P; Pauze, M

    1987-01-01

    The first penicillinase producing isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) identified in Chile were discovered during a clinical and microbiological study to compare the efficacy of penicillin (4.8 MIU aqueous procaine penicillin G plus 1 g oral probenecid) and tetracycline (1.5 g followed by 500 mg four times daily for four days) treatment regimens for acute uncomplicated gonorrhoea. Penicillin treatment was effective in 93.1% (282) of 303 patients, whereas tetracycline was effective in 98.3% (233) of 237 patients. Six of the penicillin treatment failures were attributable to PPNG strains. In all, 21 PPNG strains were identified during the study. They were genetically identical, having a wild type auxotype, a WII/III serotype (serovar Bajk), and carrying cryptic and transfer plasmids and an Asian type penicillinase producing plasmid. In addition, 674 non-PPNG isolates were tested for their susceptibility to eight antimicrobials. Over 95% were sensitivie to 1 mg/l of penicillin, ampicillin, cefotaxime, cefuroxime, and erythromycin, over 90% were sensitive to 1 mg/l of tetracycline and 2 mg/l of thiamphenicol, and all were sensitive to spectinomycin. Of 226 non-PPNG isolates characterised for plasmid content and auxotype, 90% (205) were either wild type or proline requiring, 67% (153) carried only the cryptic plasmid, and a further 31% (71) carried both cryptic and transfer plasmids. Unusually, three of four isolates lacking the cryptic plasmid carried only the transfer plasmid. Images PMID:3102348

  4. Selection for a CEACAM receptor-specific binding phenotype during Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection of the human genital tract.

    PubMed

    Sintsova, Anna; Wong, Henry; MacDonald, Kelly S; Kaul, Rupert; Virji, Mumtaz; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2015-04-01

    Infections by Neisseria gonorrhoeae are increasingly common, are often caused by antibiotic-resistant strains, and can result in serious and lasting sequelae, prompting the reemergence of gonococcal disease as a leading global health concern. N. gonorrhoeae is a human-restricted pathogen that primarily colonizes urogenital mucosal surfaces. Disease progression varies greatly between the sexes: men usually present with symptomatic infection characterized by a painful purulent urethral discharge, while in women, the infection is often asymptomatic, with the most severe pathology occurring when the bacteria ascend from the lower genital tract into the uterus and fallopian tubes. Classical clinical studies demonstrated that clinically infectious strains uniformly express Opa adhesins; however, their specificities were unknown at the time. While in vitro studies have since identified CEACAM proteins as the primary target of Opa proteins, the gonococcal specificity for this human family of receptors has not been addressed in the context of natural infection. In this study, we characterize a collection of low-passage-number clinical-specimen-derived N. gonorrhoeae isolates for Opa expression and assess their CEACAM-binding profiles. We report marked in vivo selection for expression of phase-variable Opa proteins that bind CEACAM1 and CEACAM5 but selection against expression of Opa variants that bind to the neutrophil-restricted decoy receptor CEACAM3. This is the first study showing phenotypic selection for distinct CEACAM-binding phenotypes in vivo, and it supports the opposing functions of CEACAMs that facilitate infection versus driving inflammation within the genital tract. PMID:25605771

  5. Distinct defensin profiles in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis urethritis reveal novel epithelial cell-neutrophil interactions.

    PubMed

    Porter, Edith; Yang, Huixia; Yavagal, Sujata; Preza, Gloria C; Murillo, Omar; Lima, Heriberto; Greene, Sheila; Mahoozi, Laily; Klein-Patel, Marcia; Diamond, Gill; Gulati, Sunita; Ganz, Tomas; Rice, Peter A; Quayle, Alison J

    2005-08-01

    Defensins are key participants in mucosal innate defense. The varied antimicrobial activity and differential distribution of defensins at mucosal sites indicate that peptide repertoires are tailored to site-specific innate defense requirements. Nonetheless, few studies have investigated changes in peptide profiles and function after in vivo pathogen challenge. Here, we determined defensin profiles in urethral secretions of healthy men and men with Chlamydia trachomatis- and Neisseria gonorrhoeae-mediated urethritis by immunoblotting for the epithelial defensins HBD1, HBD2, and HD5 and the neutrophil defensins HNP1 to -3 (HNP1-3). HBD1 was not detectable in secretions, and HBD2 was only induced in a small proportion of the urethritis patients; however, HD5 and HNP1-3 were increased in C. trachomatis infection and significantly elevated in N. gonorrhoeae infection. When HNP1-3 levels were low, HD5 appeared mostly as the propeptide; however, when HNP1-3 levels were >10 microg/ml, HD5 was proteolytically processed, suggesting neutrophil proteases might contribute to HD5 processing. HD5 and HNP1-3 were bactericidal against C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae, but HD5 activity was dependent upon N-terminal processing of the peptide. In vitro proteolysis of proHD5 by neutrophil proteases and analysis of urethral secretions by surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization substantiated that neutrophils contribute the key convertases for proHD5 in the urethra during these infections. This contrasts with the small intestine, where Paneth cells secrete both proHD5 and its processing enzyme, trypsin. In conclusion, we describe a unique defensin expression repertoire in response to inflammatory sexually transmitted infections and a novel host defense mechanism wherein epithelial cells collaborate with neutrophils to establish an antimicrobial barrier during infection. PMID:16040996

  6. Distinct Defensin Profiles in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis Urethritis Reveal Novel Epithelial Cell-Neutrophil Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Edith; Yang, Huixia; Yavagal, Sujata; Preza, Gloria C.; Murillo, Omar; Lima, Heriberto; Greene, Sheila; Mahoozi, Laily; Klein-Patel, Marcia; Diamond, Gill; Gulati, Sunita; Ganz, Tomas; Rice, Peter A.; Quayle, Alison J.

    2005-01-01

    Defensins are key participants in mucosal innate defense. The varied antimicrobial activity and differential distribution of defensins at mucosal sites indicate that peptide repertoires are tailored to site-specific innate defense requirements. Nonetheless, few studies have investigated changes in peptide profiles and function after in vivo pathogen challenge. Here, we determined defensin profiles in urethral secretions of healthy men and men with Chlamydia trachomatis- and Neisseria gonorrhoeae-mediated urethritis by immunoblotting for the epithelial defensins HBD1, HBD2, and HD5 and the neutrophil defensins HNP1 to -3 (HNP1-3). HBD1 was not detectable in secretions, and HBD2 was only induced in a small proportion of the urethritis patients; however, HD5 and HNP1-3 were increased in C. trachomatis infection and significantly elevated in N. gonorrhoeae infection. When HNP1-3 levels were low, HD5 appeared mostly as the propeptide; however, when HNP1-3 levels were >10 μg/ml, HD5 was proteolytically processed, suggesting neutrophil proteases might contribute to HD5 processing. HD5 and HNP1-3 were bactericidal against C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae, but HD5 activity was dependent upon N-terminal processing of the peptide. In vitro proteolysis of proHD5 by neutrophil proteases and analysis of urethral secretions by surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization substantiated that neutrophils contribute the key convertases for proHD5 in the urethra during these infections. This contrasts with the small intestine, where Paneth cells secrete both proHD5 and its processing enzyme, trypsin. In conclusion, we describe a unique defensin expression repertoire in response to inflammatory sexually transmitted infections and a novel host defense mechanism wherein epithelial cells collaborate with neutrophils to establish an antimicrobial barrier during infection. PMID:16040996

  7. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the WHO Western Pacific and South East Asian regions, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Tapsall, J W; Limnios, E A; Abu Bakar, Hjh Mahani Hj; Darussalam, Brunei; Ping, Yin Yue; Buadromo, E M; Kumar, P; Singh, S; Lo, J; Bala, M; Risbud, A; Deguchi, T; Tanaka, M; Watanabe, Y; Lee, K; Chong, Y; Noikaseumsy, S; Phouthavane, T; Sam, I-Ching; Tundev, O; Lwin, K M; Eh, P H; Goarant, C; Goursaud, R; Bathgate, T; Brokenshire, M; Latorre, L; Velemu, E; Carlos, C; Leano, S; Telan, E O; Goh, S S; Koh, S T; Ngan, C; Tan, A L; Mananwatte, S; Piyanoot, N; Lokpichat, S; Sirivongranson, P; Fakahau, M; Sitanilei, H; Hung, Le Van

    2010-03-01

    Long-term surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae has been conducted in the World Health Organization (WHO) Western Pacific Region (WPR) to optimise antibiotic treatment of gonococcal disease since 1992. In 2007 and 2008, this Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (GASP) was enhanced by the inclusion of data from the South East Asian Region (SEAR) and recruitment of additional centres within the WPR. Approximately 17,450 N. gonorrhoeae were examined for their susceptibility to one or more antibiotics used for the treatment of gonorrhoea by external quality controlled methods in 24 reporting centres in 20 countries and/or jurisdictions. A high proportion of penicillin and/or quinolone resistance was again detected amongst isolates tested in North Asia and the WHO SEAR, but much lower rates of penicillin resistance and little quinolone resistance was present in most of the Pacific Island countries. The proportion of gonococci reported as 'resistant', 'less susceptible' or 'non-susceptible' gonococci to the third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic ceftriaxone lay in a wide range, but no major changes were evident in cephalosporin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) patterns in 2007-2008. Altered cephalosporin susceptibility was associated with treatment failures following therapy with oral third-generation cephalosporins. There is a need for revision and clarification of some of the in vitro criteria that are currently used to categorise the clinical importance of gonococci with different ceftriaxone and oral cephalosporin MIC levels. The number of instances of spectinomycin resistance remained low. A high proportion of strains tested continued to exhibit a form of plasmid mediated high level resistance to tetracyclines. The continuing emergence and spread of antibiotic resistant gonococci in and from the WHO WPR and SEAR supports the need for gonococcal antimicrobial resistance surveillance programs such as GASP to be

  8. Neisseria gonorrhoeae filamentous phage NgoΦ6 is capable of infecting a variety of Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Piekarowicz, Andrzej; Kłyż, Aneta; Majchrzak, Michał; Szczêsna, Ewa; Piechucki, Marcin; Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Maugel, Timothy K; Stein, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a phagemid consisting of the whole genome of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteriophage NgoΦ6 cloned into a pBluescript plasmid derivative lacking the f1 origin of replication (named pBS::Φ6). Escherichia coli cells harboring pBS::Φ6 were able to produce a biologically active phagemid, NgoΦ6fm, capable of infecting, integrating its DNA into the chromosome of, and producing progeny phagemids in, a variety of taxonomically distant Gram-negative bacteria, including E. coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria sicca, Pseudomonas sp., and Paracoccus methylutens. A derivative of pBS::Φ6 lacking the phage orf7 gene, a positional homolog of filamentous phage proteins that mediate the interaction between the phage and the bacterial pilus, was capable of producing phagemid particles that were able to infect E. coli, Haemophilus influenzae, N. sicca, Pseudomonas sp., and Paracoccus methylutens, indicating that NgoΦ6 infects cells of these species using a mechanism that does not involve the Orf7 gene product and that NgoΦ6 initiates infection through a novel process in these species. We further demonstrate that the establishment of the lysogenic state does not require an active phage integrase. Since phagemid particles were capable of infecting diverse hosts, this indicates that NgoΦ6 is the first broad-host-range filamentous bacteriophage described. PMID:24198404

  9. Role of pili and the phase-variable PilC protein in natural competence for transformation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Rudel, T; Facius, D; Barten, R; Scheuerpflug, I; Nonnenmacher, E; Meyer, T F

    1995-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae is naturally competent for transformation with species-related DNA. We show here that two phase-variable pilus-associated proteins, the major pilus subunit (pilin, or PilE) and PilC, a factor known to function in the assembly and adherence of gonococcal pili, are essential for transformation competence. The PilE and PilC proteins are necessary for the conversion of linearized plasmid DNA carrying the Neisseria-specific DNA uptake signal into a DNase-resistant form. The biogenesis of typical pilus fibers is neither essential nor sufficient for this process. DNA uptake deficiency of defined piliated pilC1,2 double mutants can be complemented by expression of a cloned pilC2 gene in trans. The PilC defect can also be restored by the addition of purified PilC protein, or better, pili containing PilC protein, to the mutant gonococci. Our data suggest that the two phase-variable Pil proteins act on the bacterial cell surface and cooperate in DNA recognition and/or outer membrane translocation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7644525

  10. Successful Combination of Nucleic Acid Amplification Test Diagnostics and Targeted Deferred Neisseria gonorrhoeae Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wind, Carolien M.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are recommended for the diagnosis of N. gonorrhoeae infections because of their superior sensitivity. Increasing NAAT use causes a decline in crucial antimicrobial resistance (AMR) surveillance data, which rely on culture. We analyzed the suitability of the ESwab system for NAAT diagnostics and deferred targeted N. gonorrhoeae culture to allow selective and efficient culture based on NAAT results. We included patients visiting the STI Clinic Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in 2013. Patient characteristics and urogenital and rectal samples for direct N. gonorrhoeae culture, standard NAAT, and ESwab were collected. Standard NAAT and NAAT on ESwab samples were performed using the Aptima Combo 2 assay for N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis. Two deferred N. gonorrhoeae cultures were performed on NAAT-positive ESwab samples after storage at 4°C for 1 to 3 days. We included 2,452 samples from 1,893 patients. In the standard NAAT, 107 samples were N. gonorrhoeae positive and 284 were C. trachomatis positive. The sensitivities of NAAT on ESwab samples were 83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 75 to 90%) and 87% (95% CI, 82 to 90%), respectively. ESwab samples were available for 98 of the gonorrhea-positive samples. Of these, 82% were positive in direct culture and 69% and 56% were positive in the 1st and 2nd deferred cultures, respectively (median storage times, 27 and 48 h, respectively). Deferred culture was more often successful in urogenital samples or when the patient had symptoms at the sampling site. Deferred N. gonorrhoeae culture of stored ESwab samples is feasible and enables AMR surveillance. To limit the loss in NAAT sensitivity, we recommend obtaining separate samples for NAAT and deferred culture. PMID:25832300

  11. Phenotypic and genotypic properties of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates in Norway in 2009: antimicrobial resistance warrants an immediate change in national management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hjelmevoll, S O; Golparian, D; Dedi, L; Skutlaberg, D H; Haarr, E; Christensen, A; Jørgensen, S; Nilsen, Ø J; Unemo, M; Skogen, V

    2012-06-01

    Despite rapidly diminishing treatment options for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and high levels of ciprofloxacin resistance worldwide, Norwegian guidelines still recommend ciprofloxacin as empirical treatment for gonorrhea. The present study aimed to characterize phenotypical and genotypical properties of N. gonorrhoeae isolates in Norway in 2009. All viable N. gonorrhoeae isolates (n = 114) from six university hospitals in Norway (2009) were collected, representing 42% of all notified gonorrhea cases. Epidemiological data were collected from the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases and linked to phenotypical and genotypical characteristics for each N. gonorrhoeae isolate. Resistance levels to the antimicrobials examined were: ciprofloxacin 78%, azithromycin 11%, cefixime 3.5%, ceftriaxone 1.8%, and spectinomycin 0%. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin varied from 1.5 to 8 mg/L. Forty-one (36%) of the isolates were β-lactamase-producing, 17 displayed penA mosaic alleles, and 72 different N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence types (ST; 37 novel) were identified. The most common ST was ST1407 (n = 11), containing penA mosaic allele. Four of these isolates displayed intermediate susceptibility/resistance to cefixime. The N. gonorrhoeae strains circulating in Norway were highly diverse. The level of ciprofloxacin resistance was high and the Norwegian management guidelines should promptly exclude ciprofloxacin as an empirical treatment option for gonorrhea. PMID:21960034

  12. ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N resonance assignment of the soluble form of the lipid-modified Azurin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Cláudia S; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2013-10-01

    Lipid-modified azurin (Laz) from Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a type 1 copper protein proposed to be the electron donor to several enzymes involved in the resistance mechanism to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Here we report the backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of Laz in the reduced form, which has been complete at 97%. The predicted secondary structure indicates that this protein belongs to the azurin subfamily of type 1 copper proteins. PMID:23070845

  13. Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Nanjing, China, Are Sensitive to Killing by a Novel DNA Gyrase Inhibitor, ETX0914 (AZD0914).

    PubMed

    Su, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Bao-Xi; Le, Wen-Jing; Liu, Yu-Rong; Wan, Chuan; Li, Sai; Alm, Richard A; Mueller, John P; Rice, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    We tested the activity of ETX0914 against 187 Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from men with urethritis in Nanjing, China, in 2013. The MIC50, MIC90, and MIC range for ETX0914 were 0.03 μg/ml, 0.06 μg/ml, and ≤0.002 to 0.125 μg/ml, respectively. All isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, and 36.9% (69/187) were resistant to azithromycin. Of the isolates, 46.5% were penicillinase-producing N. gonorrhoeae (PPNG), 36% were tetracycline-resistant N. gonorrhoeae (TRNG), and 13% (24 isolates) had an MIC of 0.125 μg/ml for ceftriaxone. ETX0914 may be an effective treatment option for gonorrhea. PMID:26482313

  14. Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Nanjing, China, Are Sensitive to Killing by a Novel DNA Gyrase Inhibitor, ETX0914 (AZD0914)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiao-Hong; Le, Wen-Jing; Liu, Yu-Rong; Wan, Chuan; Li, Sai; Alm, Richard A.; Mueller, John P.; Rice, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested the activity of ETX0914 against 187 Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from men with urethritis in Nanjing, China, in 2013. The MIC50, MIC90, and MIC range for ETX0914 were 0.03 μg/ml, 0.06 μg/ml, and ≤0.002 to 0.125 μg/ml, respectively. All isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, and 36.9% (69/187) were resistant to azithromycin. Of the isolates, 46.5% were penicillinase-producing N. gonorrhoeae (PPNG), 36% were tetracycline-resistant N. gonorrhoeae (TRNG), and 13% (24 isolates) had an MIC of 0.125 μg/ml for ceftriaxone. ETX0914 may be an effective treatment option for gonorrhea. PMID:26482313

  15. Molecular tests for human papillomavirus (HPV), Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in liquid-based cytology specimen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Veronica S; Pappu, Suri

    2009-01-01

    Background Laboratory detection of Human papillomavirus (HPV), Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in liquid-based cervicovaginal cytology specimens is now based on identification of the DNA sequences unique to these infectious agents. However, current commercial test kits rely on nucleotide probe hybridization to determine DNA sequences, which may lead to diagnostic errors due to cross-reactivity. The aim of this study was to find a practical approach to perform automated Sanger DNA sequencing in clinical laboratories for validation of the DNA tests for these three infectious agents. Methods A crude proteinase K digestate of 5% of the cells collected in a liquid-based cervicovaginal cytology specimen was used for the detection of DNA molecules specific for HPV, C trachomatis and N gonorrhoeae, and for preparation of materials suitable for direct automated DNA sequencing. Several sets of commercially available polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were used to prepare nested PCR amplicons for direct DNA sequencing. Results Some variants of HPV-16 and HPV-31 were found to share an at least 34-base long sequence homology downstream of the GP5+ binding site, and all HPV-6 and HPV-11 variants shared an upstream 34-base sequence including part of the GP5+ primer. Accurate HPV genotyping frequently required more than 34-bases for sequence alignments to distinguish some of the HPV genotype variants with closely related sequences in this L1 gene hypervariable region. Using the automated Sanger DNA sequencing method for parallel comparative studies on split samples and to retest the residues of samples previously tested positive for C trachomatis and/or for N gonorrhoeae, we also found false-negative and false-positive results as reported by two commercial nucleic acid test kits. Conclusion Identification of a signature DNA sequence by the automated Sanger method is useful for validation of HPV genotyping and for molecular testing of C trachomatis and N

  16. Incidence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates negative by Syva direct fluorescent-antibody test but positive by Gen-Probe accuprobe test in a sexually transmitted disease clinic population.

    PubMed

    Beebe, J L; Rau, M P; Flageolle, S; Calhoon, B; Knapp, J S

    1993-09-01

    To determine the accuracy of the Syva (Palo Alto, Calif.) direct fluorescent-antibody (DFA) test in comparison with the Gen-Probe (San Diego, Calif.) Accuprobe culture confirmation test, we tested 395 isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from cultures obtained from patients attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic from 1 July 1991 through 30 June 1992. All isolates were tested for DFA reactivity with a polyclonal reagent (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.) and a monoclonal reagent (Syva, Inc., direct specimen test) and for specific molecular probe reactivity by the Gen-Probe Accuprobe culture confirmation test for N. gonorrhoeae. The 395 isolates gave positive results for the Gen-Probe culture confirmation test and the Difco polyclonal direct specimen test. However, 18 (4.6%) of the isolates were negative for N. gonorrhoeae by the Syva DFA test. With the exception of six beta-lactamase-positive isolates, all isolates that were negative by Syva DFA were sensitive to penicillin, tetracycline, spectinomycin, and ceftriaxone by disk-diffusion susceptibility testing. Auxotyping and serotyping studies indicated that strains negative by Syva DFA consisted of several variants. The frequency of N. gonorrhoeae isolates showing negative results by Syva DFA in this patient population ranged from 0 to 11.5%/month. Laboratories using only the Syva DFA test for confirmation of N. gonorrhoeae may incur a significant risk of misidentification. PMID:8408585

  17. Characterization of the novel DNA gyrase inhibitor AZD0914: low resistance potential and lack of cross-resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Alm, Richard A; Lahiri, Sushmita D; Kutschke, Amy; Otterson, Linda G; McLaughlin, Robert E; Whiteaker, James D; Lewis, Lisa A; Su, Xiaohong; Huband, Michael D; Gardner, Humphrey; Mueller, John P

    2015-03-01

    The unmet medical need for novel intervention strategies to treat Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections is significant and increasing, as rapidly emerging resistance in this pathogen is threatening to eliminate the currently available treatment options. AZD0914 is a novel bacterial gyrase inhibitor that possesses potent in vitro activities against isolates with high-level resistance to ciprofloxacin and extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and it is currently in clinical development for the treatment of N. gonorrhoeae infections. The propensity to develop resistance against AZD0914 was examined in N. gonorrhoeae and found to be extremely low, a finding supported by similar studies with Staphylococcus aureus. The genetic characterization of both first-step and second-step mutants that exhibited decreased susceptibilities to AZD0914 identified substitutions in the conserved GyrB TOPRIM domain, confirming DNA gyrase as the primary target of AZD0914 and providing differentiation from fluoroquinolones. The analysis of available bacterial gyrase and topoisomerase IV structures, including those bound to fluoroquinolone and nonfluoroquinolone inhibitors, has allowed the rationalization of the lack of cross-resistance that AZD0914 shares with fluoroquinolones. Microbiological susceptibility data also indicate that the topoisomerase inhibition mechanisms are subtly different between N. gonorrhoeae and other bacterial species. Taken together, these data support the progression of AZD0914 as a novel treatment option for the oral treatment of N. gonorrhoeae infections. PMID:25534723

  18. Induction of reaginic (IgE) gonococcal antibodies in the rat by a common antigen of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Ashton, F E; Vijay, H M; Lavergne, G; Brodeur, B R; Diena, B B

    1979-02-01

    An antigen (ZAB) common to Neisseria gonorrhoeae was prepared by stepwise elution of a crude gonococcal antigen (ZA) from columns of diethylaminoethyl cellulose employing 0.02 M phosphate buffers, pH 7.6, containing increasing concentrations of sodium chloride. Rats immunized with ZAB produced reaginic (IgE) antibody which cross-reacted with ZA prepared from eight gonococcal strains by the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) test. Heating of the sera at 56 degrees C for 4 h destroyed the PCA activity. The PCA activity of the anti-ZAB rat serum was removed after absorption with ZAB antigen or with rabbit anti-rat IgE but not after absorption with gonococcal lipopolysaccharide or with heat-killed or formalinized gonococci. Treatment of ZAB with trypsin or heating at 100 degrees C for 30 min destroyed or reduced the antigenic activity respectively. Further purification of ZAB by filtration through Sephadex G-100 gave a preparation (ZAB2) which contained the common antigen as shown by the cross-reactivity of anti-ZAB2 rat serum with seven stains of N. gonorrhoeae. Fraction ZAB2 contained material which had a molecular weight less than 13,700 and was associated with the presence of material absorbing at 260 nm. The results of this study indicate that a low molecular weight antigen, which appears to be protein in nature and associated with nuclei acid, is common to the gonococcus and is the main antigenic component inducing reaginic (IgE) antibody in the rat. PMID:108009

  19. Comparison of Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Pharyngeal, Rectal, and Urethral Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Akbar; Asbel, Lenore; Baldwin, Tamara; Gratzer, Beau; Guerry, Sarah; Kerani, Roxanne P.; Pathela, Preeti; Pettus, Kevin; Soge, Olusegun O.; Stirland, Ali; Weinstock, Hillard S.

    2015-01-01

    U.S. surveillance for Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial susceptibilities is based exclusively on male urethral isolates. These data inform gonorrhea treatment guidelines, including recommendations for the treatment of extragenital infections, but data on the susceptibilities of extragenital isolates are limited. We compared the antimicrobial susceptibilities of pharyngeal, rectal, and urethral gonococcal isolates collected from men who have sex with men (MSM), at five sentinel sites throughout the United States. MICs were determined by the agar dilution method. Generalized linear models were used to compare (i) the proportions of isolates with elevated MICs and (ii) geometric mean MICs according to anatomic site, adjusted for city. In December 2011 to September 2013, totals of 205 pharyngeal, 261 rectal, and 976 urethral isolates were obtained. The proportions of isolates with elevated ceftriaxone MICs (≥0.125 μg/ml) did not differ according to anatomic site (0.5% of pharyngeal isolates, 1.5% of rectal isolates, and 1.7% of urethral isolates, with a city-adjusted odds ratio [aOR] of 0.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.0 to 3.9] for pharyngeal versus urethral isolates and an aOR of 0.9 [95% CI, 0.2 to 4.2] for rectal versus urethral isolates). The city-adjusted geometric mean ceftriaxone MICs of pharyngeal (0.0153 μg/ml) and rectal (0.0157 μg/ml) isolates did not differ from that of urethral isolates (0.0150 μg/ml) (ratios of geometric mean MICs of 1.02 [95% CI, 0.90 to 1.17] and 1.05 [95% CI, 0.93 to 1.19], respectively). Similar results were observed for other antimicrobials, including cefixime and azithromycin. These findings suggest that, at the population level, gonococcal antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance based on urethral isolates from MSM adequately reflects the susceptibilities of N. gonorrhoeae strains circulating among MSM. PMID:25691638

  20. Identification of a cell envelope protein (MtrF) involved in hydrophobic antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Veal, Wendy L; Shafer, William M

    2003-01-01

    The mtrCDE-encoded efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae provides gonococci with a mechanism to resist structurally diverse antimicrobial hydrophobic agents (HAs). Strains of N. gonorrhoeae that display hypersusceptibility to HAs often contain mutations in the efflux pump genes, mtrCDE. Such strains frequently contain a phenotypically suppressed mutation in mtrR, a gene that encodes a repressor (MtrR) of mtrCDE gene expression, and one that would normally result in HA resistance. We have recently examined HA-hypersusceptible clinical isolates of gonococci that contain such phenotypically suppressed mtrR mutations, in order to determine whether genes other than mtrCDE are involved in HA resistance. These studies led to the discovery of a gene that we have designated mtrF, located downstream of the mtrR gene, that is predicted to encode a 56.1 kDa cytoplasmic membrane protein containing 12 transmembrane domains. Expression of mtrF was enhanced in a strain deficient in MtrR production, indicating that this gene, together with the closely linked mtrCDE operon, is subject to MtrR-dependent transcriptional control. Orthologues of mtrF were identified in a number of diverse bacteria. Except for the AbgT protein of Escherichia coli, their products have been identified as hypothetical proteins with unknown function(s). Genetic evidence is presented that MtrF is important in the expression of high-level detergent resistance by gonococci. We propose that MtrF acts in conjunction with the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE efflux pump, to confer on gonococci high-level resistance to certain HAs. PMID:12493784

  1. Genetic and functional analyses of PptA, a phospho-form transferase targeting type IV pili in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Naessan, Cecilia L; Egge-Jacobsen, Wolfgang; Heiniger, Ryan W; Wolfgang, Matthew C; Aas, Finn Erik; Røhr, Asmund; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Koomey, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The PilE pilin subunit protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae undergoes unique covalent modifications with phosphoethanolamine (PE) and phosphocholine (PC). The pilin phospho-form transferase A (PptA) protein, required for these modifications, shows sequence relatedness with and architectural similarities to lipopolysaccharide PE transferases. Here, we used regulated expression and mutagenesis as means to better define the relationships between PptA structure and function, as well as to probe the mechanisms by which other factors impact the system. We show here that pptA expression is coupled at the level of transcription to its distal gene, murF, in a division/cell wall gene operon and that PptA can act in a dose-dependent fashion in PilE phospho-form modification. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis provided the first direct evidence that PptA is a member of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily of metalloenzymes with similar metal-binding sites and conserved structural folds. Through phylogenetic analyses and sequence alignments, these conclusions were extended to include the lipopolysaccharide PE transferases, including members of the disparate Lpt6 subfamily, and the MdoB family of phosphoglycerol transferases. Each of these enzymes thus likely acts as a phospholipid head group transferase whose catalytic mechanism involves a trans-esterification step generating a protein-phospho-form ester intermediate. Coexpression of PptA with PilE in Pseudomonas aeruginosa resulted in high levels of PE modification but was not sufficient for PC modification. This and other findings show that PptA-associated PC modification is governed by as-yet-undefined ancillary factors unique to N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:17951381

  2. The Incidence and Correlates of Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Infections in Selected Populations in Five Countries

    PubMed Central

    Detels, Roger; Green, Annette M.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Katzenstein, David; Gaydos, Charlotte; Handsfield, H. Hunter; Pequegnat, Willo; Mayer, Kenneth; Hartwell, Tyler D.; Quinn, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonorrhea) infections pose diagnostic and control problems in developing countries. Methods Participants in China, India, Peru, Russia, and Zimbabwe were screened for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae infections and symptoms. Results A total of 18,014 participants were evaluated at baseline, 15,054 at 12 months, and 14,243 at 24 months. The incidence of chlamydia in men was 2.0 per 100 person years both from baseline to 12 months and from 12 to 24 months, and in women, 4.6 from baseline to 12 months and 3.6 from 12 to 24 months; a range of 31.2% to 100% reported no symptoms across the 5 countries. The incidence of gonorrhea in men was 0.3 per 100 person years both from baseline to 12 months and from 12 to 24 months, and in women, 1.4 from baseline to 12 months and 1.1 from 12 to 24 months; a range of 66.7% to 100% reported no symptoms. Being female, aged 18 to 24 years, and having more than 1 partner were associated with both the infections. In addition, being divorced, separated, or widowed was associated with gonorrhea. Being male, having 6+ years of education, and reporting only 1 partner were associated with having no symptoms among those infected with chlamydia. No variables correlated with asymptomatic gonorrhea among those infected. Conclusion A high prevalence and incidence of asymptomatic sexually transmitted infections was identified among men and women in a wide variety of settings. More effective programs are needed to identify and treat chlamydia and gonorrhea infections, especially among women, young adults, those with multiple partners, those repeatedly infected, and particularly those at risk without symptoms. The risk of transmission from persons with no symptoms requires further study. PMID:22256336

  3. Comparison of antimicrobial susceptibilities of pharyngeal, rectal, and urethral Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates among men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Sarah; Zaidi, Akbar; Asbel, Lenore; Baldwin, Tamara; Gratzer, Beau; Guerry, Sarah; Kerani, Roxanne P; Pathela, Preeti; Pettus, Kevin; Soge, Olusegun O; Stirland, Ali; Weinstock, Hillard S

    2015-05-01

    U.S. surveillance for Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial susceptibilities is based exclusively on male urethral isolates. These data inform gonorrhea treatment guidelines, including recommendations for the treatment of extragenital infections, but data on the susceptibilities of extragenital isolates are limited. We compared the antimicrobial susceptibilities of pharyngeal, rectal, and urethral gonococcal isolates collected from men who have sex with men (MSM), at five sentinel sites throughout the United States. MICs were determined by the agar dilution method. Generalized linear models were used to compare (i) the proportions of isolates with elevated MICs and (ii) geometric mean MICs according to anatomic site, adjusted for city. In December 2011 to September 2013, totals of 205 pharyngeal, 261 rectal, and 976 urethral isolates were obtained. The proportions of isolates with elevated ceftriaxone MICs (≥ 0.125 μg/ml) did not differ according to anatomic site (0.5% of pharyngeal isolates, 1.5% of rectal isolates, and 1.7% of urethral isolates, with a city-adjusted odds ratio [aOR] of 0.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.0 to 3.9] for pharyngeal versus urethral isolates and an aOR of 0.9 [95% CI, 0.2 to 4.2] for rectal versus urethral isolates). The city-adjusted geometric mean ceftriaxone MICs of pharyngeal (0.0153 μg/ml) and rectal (0.0157 μg/ml) isolates did not differ from that of urethral isolates (0.0150 μg/ml) (ratios of geometric mean MICs of 1.02 [95% CI, 0.90 to 1.17] and 1.05 [95% CI, 0.93 to 1.19], respectively). Similar results were observed for other antimicrobials, including cefixime and azithromycin. These findings suggest that, at the population level, gonococcal antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance based on urethral isolates from MSM adequately reflects the susceptibilities of N. gonorrhoeae strains circulating among MSM. PMID:25691638

  4. Whole-Genome Phylogenomic Heterogeneity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates with Decreased Cephalosporin Susceptibility Collected in Canada between 1989 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Tarah; Martin, Irene; Van Domselaar, Gary; Graham, Morag; Bharat, Amrita; Allen, Vanessa; Hoang, Linda; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Tyrrell, Greg; Horsman, Greg; Haldane, David; Garceau, Richard; Wylie, John; Wong, Tom; Mulvey, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale, whole-genome comparison of Canadian Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates with high-level cephalosporin MICs was used to demonstrate a genomic epidemiology approach to investigate strain relatedness and dynamics. Although current typing methods have been very successful in tracing short-chain transmission of gonorrheal disease, investigating the temporal evolutionary relationships and geographical dissemination of highly clonal lineages requires enhanced resolution only available through whole-genome sequencing (WGS). Phylogenomic cluster analysis grouped 169 Canadian strains into 12 distinct clades. While some N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence types (NG-MAST) agreed with specific phylogenomic clades or subclades, other sequence types (ST) and closely related groups of ST were widely distributed among clades. Decreased susceptibility to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC-DS) emerged among a group of diverse strains in Canada during the 1990s with a variety of nonmosaic penA alleles, followed in 2000/2001 with the penA mosaic X allele and then in 2007 with ST1407 strains with the penA mosaic XXXIV allele. Five genetically distinct ESC-DS lineages were associated with penA mosaic X, XXXV, and XXXIV alleles and nonmosaic XII and XIII alleles. ESC-DS with coresistance to azithromycin was observed in 5 strains with 23S rRNA C2599T or A2143G mutations. As the costs associated with WGS decline and analysis tools are streamlined, WGS can provide a more thorough understanding of strain dynamics, facilitate epidemiological studies to better resolve social networks, and improve surveillance to optimize treatment for gonorrheal infections. PMID:25378573

  5. Potent and rapid antigonococcal activity of the venom peptide BmKn2 and its derivatives against different Maldi biotype of multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Arpornsuwan, Teerakul; Buasakul, Brisana; Jaresitthikunchai, Janthima; Roytrakul, Sittiruk

    2014-03-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae constitutes a serious threat to public health and necessitates the discovery of new types of antimicrobial agents. Among the 18 clinical isolates of N. gonorrhoeae with susceptible to spectinomycin, ceftriaxone and cefixime, 14 isolates were resistance to penicillin, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin, while 2 isolates were susceptible to tetracycline and another was penicillin intermediate isolate. Significant differences between laboratory strain and multidrug resistant strains were revealed by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry profiling and bioinformatics examination using the MALDI BioTyper software. However, Maldi Biotyper was not successfully separated ciprofloxacin-penicillin resistance and ciprofloxacin-tetracycline resistance from ciprofloxacin-penicillin-tetracycline resistant N. gonorrhoeae isolates. BmKn2 is a basic, alpha-helical peptide with no disulfide-bridge venom peptides that was first isolated from Buthus martensii Kasch. A panel of BmKn2 scorpion venom peptide and its derivatives of varying length and characteristics were synthesized chemically and evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of clinical N. gonorrhoeae isolates. Synthetic BmKn2 displayed potent activity against 18 clinical isolates of N. gonorrhoeae with MIC50 values of 6.9-27.6 μM. BmKn2 exerted its antibacterial activity via a bactericidal mechanism. Cyclic BmKn1 did not show antigonococcal activity. Decreasing the cationicity and helix percentage at the C-terminus of BmKn2 reduced the potency against N. gonorrhoeae. Taken together, the BmKn1 peptide can be developed as a topical therapeutic agent for treating multidrug-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae infections. PMID:24184420

  6. Neisseria-Avoiding the Jump to Conclusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivey, Maria I.; Paschall, Robert T.; Ferrett, Rhonda; Alexander, Randell

    2011-01-01

    "Neisseria gonorrhoeae" infection in a prepubertal child is virtually diagnostic of sexual abuse, provided perinatal infection has been excluded. Therefore, it is imperative that "Neisseria gonorrhoeae" be correctly identified. We present two cases of false positive "Neisseria gonorrhoeae" meningitis encountered at two different children's…

  7. The MisR Response Regulator Is Necessary for Intrinsic Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide and Aminoglycoside Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Kandler, Justin L; Holley, Concerta L; Reimche, Jennifer L; Dhulipala, Vijaya; Balthazar, Jacqueline T; Muszyński, Artur; Carlson, Russell W; Shafer, William M

    2016-08-01

    During infection, the sexually transmitted pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae (the gonococcus) encounters numerous host-derived antimicrobials, including cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) produced by epithelial and phagocytic cells. CAMPs have both direct and indirect killing mechanisms and help link the innate and adaptive immune responses during infection. Gonococcal CAMP resistance is likely important for avoidance of host nonoxidative killing systems expressed by polymorphonuclear granulocytes (e.g., neutrophils) and intracellular survival. Previously studied gonococcal CAMP resistance mechanisms include modification of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine by LptA and export of CAMPs by the MtrCDE efflux pump. In the related pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, a two-component regulatory system (2CRS) termed MisR-MisS has been shown to contribute to the capacity of the meningococcus to resist CAMP killing. We report that the gonococcal MisR response regulator but not the MisS sensor kinase is involved in constitutive and inducible CAMP resistance and is also required for intrinsic low-level resistance to aminoglycosides. The 4- to 8-fold increased susceptibility of misR-deficient gonococci to CAMPs and aminoglycosides was independent of phosphoethanolamine decoration of lipid A and the levels of the MtrCDE efflux pump and seemed to correlate with a general increase in membrane permeability. Transcriptional profiling and biochemical studies confirmed that expression of lptA and mtrCDE was not impacted by the loss of MisR. However, several genes encoding proteins involved in membrane integrity and redox control gave evidence of being MisR regulated. We propose that MisR modulates the levels of gonococcal susceptibility to antimicrobials by influencing the expression of genes involved in determining membrane integrity. PMID:27216061

  8. Susceptibility to ceftriaxone and occurrence of penicillinase plasmids in Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains isolated in Poland in 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczyk-Bonikowska, Beata; Kujawa, Marlena; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Majewski, Slawomir

    2016-07-01

    Recent years have seen rising concerns over increasing antibiotic resistance of the gonorrhea-causing bacterium, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This is especially true for third-generation cephalosporins, which are currently recommended for the treatment of such infections. Therefore, susceptibility to these antibiotics should be monitored internationally to the greatest extent possible. The susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae strains to ceftriaxone and penicillin, as well as production of beta-lactamase by the Cefinase test was determined. Moreover, the presence and type of penicillinase plasmids were determined by PCR. All strains were susceptible to ceftriaxone, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranged from 0.002 to 0.125 mg/L; MIC50 was =0.016 mg/L and MIC90 was =0.064 mg/L. As much as 7.7 % of the strains demonstrated ceftriaxone MIC of 0.125 mg/L. For penicillin, the MICs ranged from 0.064 to 32 mg/L; MIC50 was =0.5 mg/L and MIC90 was =4 mg/L. It was shown that only 1.5 % of the strains were sensitive to penicillin according to The European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Among the penicillin-resistant strains, six (30.0 %) produced penicillinase. The MICs of penicillin were substantially higher for penicillinase-producing than for penicillin-resistant, penicillinase-negative strains. MICs of ceftriaxone for penicillinase-producing strains were low (0.002-0.016 mg/L). Three of the penicillinase-producing strains possessed plasmids of African type (50 %) and three Toronto/Rio type (50 %). An increase of the proportion of beta-lactamase-positive strains in the last years as well as emergence of strains with elevated MIC of ceftriaxone indicate a need to constantly monitor N. gonorrhoeae strains for their susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics, as well as for their ability to produce beta-lactamases. PMID:26597276

  9. Type III Methyltransferase M.NgoAX from Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 Regulates Biofilm Formation and Interactions with Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Mrozek, Agnieszka; Bacal, Pawel; Piekarowicz, Andrzej; Adamczyk-Popławska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the etiological factor of the sexually transmitted gonorrhea disease that may lead, under specific conditions, to systemic infections. The gonococcal genome encodes many restriction modification (RM) systems, which main biological role is to defend the pathogen from potentially harmful foreign DNA. However, RM systems seem also to be involved in several other functions. In this study, we examined the effect of inactivation the N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 ngoAXmod gene encoding M.NgoAX methyltransferase on the global gene expression, biofilm formation, interactions with human epithelial host cells and overall bacterial growth. Expression microarrays showed at least a twofold deregulation of a total of 121 genes in the NgoAX knock-out mutant compared to the wild-type (wt) strain under standard grow conditions. Genes with changed expression levels encoded mostly proteins involved in cell metabolism, DNA replication and repair or regulating cellular processes and signaling (such as cell wall/envelop biogenesis). As determined by the assay with crystal violet, the NgoAX knock-out strain formed a slightly larger biofilm biomass per cell than the wt strain. Live biofilm observations showed that the biofilm formed by the gonococcal ngoAXmod gene mutant is more relaxed, dispersed and thicker than the one formed by the wt strain. This more relaxed feature of the biofilm, in respect to adhesion and bacterial interactions, can be involved in pathogenesis. Moreover, the overall adhesion of mutant bacterial cells to human cells was lower than adhesion of the wt gonococci [adhesion index = 0.672 (±0.2) and 2.15 (±1.53), respectively]; yet, a higher number of mutant than wt bacteria were found inside the Hec-1-B epithelial cells [invasion index = 3.38 (±0.93) × 10(5) for mutant and 4.67 (±3.09) × 10(4) for the wt strain]. These results indicate that NgoAX knock-out cells have lower ability to attach to human cells, but more easily penetrate inside the host

  10. Type III Methyltransferase M.NgoAX from Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 Regulates Biofilm Formation and Interactions with Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Mrozek, Agnieszka; Bacal, Pawel; Piekarowicz, Andrzej; Adamczyk-Popławska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the etiological factor of the sexually transmitted gonorrhea disease that may lead, under specific conditions, to systemic infections. The gonococcal genome encodes many restriction modification (RM) systems, which main biological role is to defend the pathogen from potentially harmful foreign DNA. However, RM systems seem also to be involved in several other functions. In this study, we examined the effect of inactivation the N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 ngoAXmod gene encoding M.NgoAX methyltransferase on the global gene expression, biofilm formation, interactions with human epithelial host cells and overall bacterial growth. Expression microarrays showed at least a twofold deregulation of a total of 121 genes in the NgoAX knock-out mutant compared to the wild-type (wt) strain under standard grow conditions. Genes with changed expression levels encoded mostly proteins involved in cell metabolism, DNA replication and repair or regulating cellular processes and signaling (such as cell wall/envelop biogenesis). As determined by the assay with crystal violet, the NgoAX knock-out strain formed a slightly larger biofilm biomass per cell than the wt strain. Live biofilm observations showed that the biofilm formed by the gonococcal ngoAXmod gene mutant is more relaxed, dispersed and thicker than the one formed by the wt strain. This more relaxed feature of the biofilm, in respect to adhesion and bacterial interactions, can be involved in pathogenesis. Moreover, the overall adhesion of mutant bacterial cells to human cells was lower than adhesion of the wt gonococci [adhesion index = 0.672 (±0.2) and 2.15 (±1.53), respectively]; yet, a higher number of mutant than wt bacteria were found inside the Hec-1-B epithelial cells [invasion index = 3.38 (±0.93) × 105 for mutant and 4.67 (±3.09) × 104 for the wt strain]. These results indicate that NgoAX knock-out cells have lower ability to attach to human cells, but more easily penetrate inside the host

  11. Protocol for Gene Expression Profiling Using DNA Microarrays in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Lydgia A.; Dyer, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays has become commonplace in current molecular biology practices, and has dramatically enhanced our understanding of the biology of Neisseria spp., and the interaction of these organisms with the host. With the choice of microarray platforms offered for gene expression profiling and commercially available arrays, investigators must ask several central questions to make decisions based on their research focus. Are arrays on hand for their organism and if not then would it be cost-effective to design custom arrays. Other important considerations; what types of specialized equipment for array hybridization and signal detection are required and is the specificity and sensitivity of the array adequate for your application. Here, we describe the use of a custom 12K CombiMatrix ElectraSense™ oligonucleotide microarray format for assessing global gene expression profiles in Neisseria spp. PMID:22782831

  12. Opa+ Neisseria gonorrhoeae Exhibits Reduced Survival in Human Neutrophils Via Src Family Kinase-Mediated Bacterial Trafficking Into Mature Phagolysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. Brittany; Ball, Louise M.; Daily, Kylene P.; Martin, Jennifer N.; Columbus, Linda; Criss, Alison K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary During gonorrheal infection, there is a heterogeneous population of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) varied in their expression of opacity-associated (Opa) proteins. While Opa proteins are important for bacterial attachment and invasion of epithelial cells, Opa+ Gc has a survival defect after exposure to neutrophils. Here, we use constitutively Opa- and OpaD+ Gc in strain background FA1090 to show that Opa+ Gc is more sensitive to killing inside adherent, chemokine-treated primary human neutrophils due to increased bacterial residence in mature, degradative phagolysosomes that contain primary and secondary granule antimicrobial content. Although Opa+ Gc stimulates a potent oxidative burst, neutrophil killing of Opa+ Gc was instead attributable to non-oxidative components, particularly neutrophil proteases and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein. Blocking interaction of Opa+ Gc with carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) or inhibiting Src family kinase signaling, which is downstream of CEACAM activation, enhanced the survival of Opa+ Gc in neutrophils. Src family kinase signaling was required for fusion of Gc phagosomes with primary granules to generate mature phagolysosomes. Conversely, ectopic activation of Src family kinases or coinfection with Opa+ Gc resulted in decreased survival of Opa- Gc in neutrophils. From these results, we conclude that Opa protein expression is an important modulator of Gc survival characteristics in neutrophils by influencing phagosome dynamics and thus bacterial exposure to neutrophils’ full antimicrobial arsenal. PMID:25346239

  13. Physical map of the chromosome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 with locations of genetic markers, including opa and pil genes.

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, J A; Litaker, W; Madhure, A; Snodgrass, T L; Cannon, J G

    1991-01-01

    A physical map of the chromosome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 has been constructed. Digestion of strain FA1090 DNA with NheI, SpeI, BglII, or PacI resulted in a limited number of fragments that were resolved by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis. The estimated genome size was 2,219 kb. To construct the map, probes corresponding to single-copy chromosomal sequences were used in Southern blots of digested DNA separated on pulsed-field gels, to determine how the fragments from different digests overlapped. Some of the probes represented identified gonococcal genes, whereas others were anonymous cloned fragments of strain FA1090 DNA. By using this approach, a macrorestriction map of the strain FA1090 chromosome was assembled, and the locations of various genetic markers on the map were determined. Once the map was completed, the repeated gene families encoding Opa and pilin proteins were mapped. The 11 opa loci of strain FA1090 were distributed over approximately 60% of the chromosome. The pil loci were more clustered and were located in two regions separated by approximately one-fourth of the chromosome. Images PMID:1679431

  14. Multiplex Strand Invasion Based Amplification (mSIBA) assay for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Eboigbodin, Kevin E; Hoser, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests have become a common method for diagnosis of STIs due to their improved sensitivity over immunoassays and traditional culture-based methods. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR) because they do not require sophisticated instruments needed for thermal cycling of PCR. We recently reported a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method, Strand Invasion-Based Amplification (SIBA), which exhibited high analytical sensitivity and specificity for amplification of DNA. However, because the reactions were detected using an intercalating dye, this method was only suitable for amplifying a single genomic target. Here, we report the development of multiplexed SIBA (mSIBA) that allows simultaneous detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and an internal control in the same reaction tube. SIBA is compatible with probes, allowing the detection of multiple DNA targets in the same reaction tube. The IC was developed to assess the quality of the isolated DNA and the integrity of the enzyme system, as well as to test oligonucleotides. The mSIBA assay retained high analytical sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CT and NG. The development of mSIBA enables rapid screening for CT and NG within point-of-care or central laboratory settings. PMID:26837460

  15. Incident and recurrent Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Owings, Alfred J; Clark, Leslie L; Rohrbeck, Patricia

    2016-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections impose a significant clinical and public health burden on the Military Health System. Repeat infections contribute significantly to that burden. This report summarizes rates and relative risks of true incident (i.e., initial or "first time ever") and recurrent (i.e., repeat) chlamydia and gonorrhea infections among active component members between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2014. During the surveillance period, a total of 66,396 initial chlamydia and 9,138 initial gonorrhea cases were diagnosed. Annual crude rates of initial chlamydia infections increased by 23%. Crude rates of initial gonorrhea infections remained stable overall, but female rates decreased by 28.3% over the period. Among the incident cohorts, 11,699 cases of repeat chlamydia, and 1,138 cases of repeat gonorrhea were diagnosed over the period, accounting for 15.0% and 11.1% of overall cohort chlamydia and gonorrhea infections, respectively. The Army branch, those aged 17-19 years, females, non-Hispanic black service members, junior enlisted ranks, and single/never-married service members had the highest crude rates of initial chlamydia and gonorrhea infection, and (single/never-married service members excepted) highest adjusted relative risk of repeat chlamydia infection. PMID:26930148

  16. The lgtABCDE gene cluster, involved in lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, contains multiple promoter sequences.

    PubMed

    Braun, Derek C; Stein, Daniel C

    2004-02-01

    Biosynthesis of the variable core domain of lipooligosaccharide (LOS) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is mediated by glycosyl transferases encoded by lgtABCDE. Changes within homopolymeric runs within lgtA, lgtC, and lgtD affect the expression state of these genes, with the nature of the LOS expressed determined by the functionality of these genes. However, the mechanism for modulating the amount of multiple LOS chemotypes expressed in a single cell is not understood. Using mutants containing polar disruptions within the lgtABCDE locus, we determined that the expression of this locus is mediated by multiple promoters and that disruption of transcription from these promoters alters the relative levels of simultaneously expressed LOS chemotypes. Expression of the lgtABCDE locus was quantified by using xylE transcriptional fusions, and the data indicate that this locus is transcribed in trace amounts and that subtle changes in transcription result in phenotypic changes. By using rapid amplification of 5' cDNA ends, transcriptional start sites and promoter sequences were identified within lgtABCDE. Most of these promoters possessed 50 to 67% homology with the consensus gearbox promoter sequence of Escherichia coli. PMID:14761998

  17. A novel relaxase homologue is involved in chromosomal DNA processing for type IV secretion in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Jain, Samta; Turner, Nicholas; van der Does, Chris; Dillard, Joseph P

    2007-11-01

    The Neisseria gonorrhoeae type IV secretion system secretes chromosomal DNA that acts in natural transformation. To examine the mechanism of DNA processing for secretion, we made mutations in the putative relaxase gene traI and used nucleases to characterize the secreted DNA. The nuclease experiments demonstrated that the secreted DNA is single-stranded and blocked at the 5' end. Mutation of traI identified Tyr93 as required for DNA secretion, while substitution of Tyr201 resulted in intermediate levels of DNA secretion. TraI exhibits features of relaxases, but also has features that are absent in previously characterized relaxases, including an HD phosphohydrolase domain and an N-terminal hydrophobic region. The HD domain residue Asp120 was required for wild-type levels of DNA secretion. Subcellular localization studies demonstrated that the TraI N-terminal region promotes membrane interaction. We propose that Tyr93 initiates DNA processing and Tyr201 is required for termination or acts in DNA binding. Disruption of an inverted-repeat sequence eliminated DNA secretion, suggesting that this sequence may serve as the origin of transfer for chromosomal DNA secretion. The TraI domain architecture, although not previously described, is present in 53 uncharacterized proteins, suggesting that the mechanism of TraI function is a widespread process for DNA donation. PMID:17927698

  18. Structure of the complex of Neisseria gonorrhoeae N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase with a bound bisubstrate analog.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-25

    N-Acetyl-L-glutamate synthase catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), the first step of the arginine biosynthetic pathway in lower organisms. In mammals, NAG is an obligate cofactor of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I in the urea cycle. We have previously reported the structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) with various substrates bound. Here we reported the preparation of the bisubstrate analog, CoA-S-acetyl-L-glutamate, the crystal structure of ngNAGS with CoA-NAG bound, and kinetic studies of several active site mutants. The results are consistent with a one-step nucleophilic addition-elimination mechanism with Glu353 as the catalytic base and Ser392 as the catalytic acid. The structure of the ngNAGS-bisubstrate complex together with the previous ngNAGS structures delineates the catalytic reaction path for ngNAGS. PMID:23261468

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the multidrug efflux transporter NorM from Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    SciTech Connect

    Su, C.C.; Long, F.; McDermott, G.; Shafer, W.M.; Yu, E.W.

    2008-06-03

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray data analysis of the NorM multidrug efflux pump produced by Neisseria gonorrhoeae are reported. NorM is a cytoplasmic membrane protein that consists of 459 amino-acid residues. It is a member of the recently classified multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family of transporters and recognizes a number of cationic toxic compounds such as ethidium bromide, acriflavin, 2-N-methylellipticinium and ciprofloxacin. Recombinant NorM protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by metal-affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. The protein was crystallized using hanging-drop vapor diffusion. X-ray diffraction data were collected from cryocooled crystals at a synchrotron light source. The best crystal diffracted anisotropically to 3.8 {angstrom} and diffraction data were complete to 6.5 {angstrom} resolution. The space group was determined to be C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.5, b = 164.4, c = 111.5 {angstrom}.

  20. Structure of the complex of Neisseria gonorrhoeae N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase with a bound bisubstrate analog

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, GENGXIANG; ALLEWELL, NORMA M.; TUCHMAN, MENDEL; SHI, DASHUANG

    2013-01-01

    N -acetyl-L-glutamate synthase catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), the first step of the arginine biosynthetic pathway in lower organisms. In mammals, NAG is an obligate cofactor of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I in the urea cycle. We have previously reported the structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) with various substrates bound. Here we reported the preparation of the bisubstrate analog, CoA-S-acetyl-L-glutamate, the crystal structure of ngNAGS with CoA-NAG bound, and kinetic studies of several active site mutants. The results are consistent with a one-step nucleophilic addition-elimination mechanism with Glu353 as the catalytic base and Ser392 as the catalytic acid. The structure of the ngNAGS-bisubstrate complex together with the previous ngNAGS structures delineates the catalytic reaction path for ngNAGS. PMID:23261468

  1. Positive Testing for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis and the Risk of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease in IUD Users

    PubMed Central

    Birgisson, Natalia E.; Zhao, Qiuhong; Secura, Gina M.; Madden, Tessa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Unintended pregnancies are a major public health problem in the United States, and intrauterine devices (IUDs) are among the most effective reversible birth control methods available. Historically, there have been concerns about IUD use and infection among young and/or high-risk women that may increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and subsequent infertility. Methods: The Contraceptive CHOICE Project (CHOICE) was a prospective cohort study of over 9,000 women 14–45 years of age residing in the St. Louis area who were interested in initiating a new form of reversible contraception. At enrollment, participants were counseled regarding long-acting contraceptive methods with the goal of increasing awareness of all reversible methods available. Participants were also tested for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) during enrollment and were provided with contraception at no cost for 2–3 years. Results: We estimate the frequency of self-reported PID in new IUD users compared with women using other contraceptive methods. Among both new IUD users who tested positive for GC and/or CT and those who tested negative, the PID rate was 1% or below. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that IUD use is safe for all women, including women at high risk for sexually transmitted infections. PMID:25836384

  2. Multiplex Strand Invasion Based Amplification (mSIBA) assay for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Eboigbodin, Kevin E.; Hoser, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests have become a common method for diagnosis of STIs due to their improved sensitivity over immunoassays and traditional culture-based methods. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR) because they do not require sophisticated instruments needed for thermal cycling of PCR. We recently reported a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method, Strand Invasion-Based Amplification (SIBA), which exhibited high analytical sensitivity and specificity for amplification of DNA. However, because the reactions were detected using an intercalating dye, this method was only suitable for amplifying a single genomic target. Here, we report the development of multiplexed SIBA (mSIBA) that allows simultaneous detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and an internal control in the same reaction tube. SIBA is compatible with probes, allowing the detection of multiple DNA targets in the same reaction tube. The IC was developed to assess the quality of the isolated DNA and the integrity of the enzyme system, as well as to test oligonucleotides. The mSIBA assay retained high analytical sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CT and NG. The development of mSIBA enables rapid screening for CT and NG within point-of-care or central laboratory settings. PMID:26837460

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of the structural gene for protein I, the major outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Carbonetti, N H; Sparling, P F

    1987-01-01

    Protein I (P.I) is the major outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and serves as a porin. By using oligonucleotide probes derived from the known amino-terminal sequence of the mature protein, we have cloned the gene encoding the P.I of gonococcal strain FA19 in three overlapping fragments and determined the DNA sequence. The gene sequence predicts a protein with characteristics typical of the porins of other Gram-negative bacteria. A clone expressing P.I in Escherichia coli was obtained by removing a portion of the P.I gene promoter and reconstructing the entire P.I gene in a position just downstream from a phage T7 promoter. Expression of P.I was then achieved by introducing this recombinant plasmid into an E. coli strain containing an inducible T7 polymerase gene. The clone produced a protein that was identical in size to native P.I and reacted with anti-P.I monoclonal antibodies. Prolonged expression of the protein apparently was lethal for E. coli, possibly explaining failures to clone an intact P.I gene with its own promoter. Images PMID:3122212

  4. Characterization of a spermine/spermidine transport system reveals a novel DNA sequence duplication in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Goytia, Maira; Hawel, Leo; Dhulipala, Vijaya L.; Joseph, Sandeep J.; Read, Timothy D.; Shafer, William M.

    2015-01-01

    During infection, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, comes into contact with numerous host compounds including polyamines (e.g. spermine and spermidine). Here, we show that spermine and spermidine concentrations in the growth medium decrease to undetectable levels in the presence of gonococci over time, but not when proteins of the putative polyamine transport system are lost due to mutation. We propose that gonococci have a functional and sole polyamine transport system (PotFGHI) that specifically imports spermine and spermidine. Bioinformatics and molecular analyses showed that the transporter's potGHI genes are organized as an operon while the gene encoding the necessary cognate periplasmic polyamine-binding protein (PotF) is located elsewhere on the chromosome. Interestingly, within the potGHI locus, we identified a novel duplicated sequence, which we term the Pot-Gene-Associated-Duplication-Element, present in variable copy numbers in different gonococcal strains that was likely formed from the 5′ and 3′ ends of the coding sequences of the tandemly linked potH and potG genes, respectively. PMID:26229069

  5. Antimicrobial Resistance Expressed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: A Major Global Public Health Problem in the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Unemo, Magnus; Del Rio, Carlos; Shafer, William M

    2016-06-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strictly human pathogen that is typically transmitted by sexual contact. The associated disease gonorrhea has plagued humankind for thousands of years, with a current estimated incidence of 78 million cases per year. Advances in antimicrobial discovery in the 1920s and 1930s leading to the discovery of sulfonamides and penicillin begun the era of effective antimicrobial treatment of gonorrhea. Unfortunately, the gonococcus developed decreased susceptibility or even resistance to these initially employed antibiotics, a trend that continued over subsequent decades with each new antibiotic that was brought into clinical practice. As this pattern of resistance has continued into the 21st century, there is now reason for great concern, especially in an era when few new antibiotics have prospects for use as treatment of gonorrhea. Here, we review the history of gonorrhea treatment regimens and gonococcal resistance to antibiotics, the mechanisms of resistance, resistance monitoring schemes that exist in different international settings, global responses to the challenge of resistance, and prospects for future treatment regimens in the 21st century. PMID:27337478

  6. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Based on Data Collected by a Network of Clinical Microbiology Laboratories, in Italy.

    PubMed

    Salfa, Maria Cristina; Suligoi, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial and protozoal sexually transmitted infections (STIs), such as Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, may cause acute symptoms, chronic infections and severe long-term complications. The complications of these infections in women include pelvic inflammatory disease, chronic pelvic pain, tubal infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility. Moreover, infection during pregnancy is associated with premature rupture of the membranes, low birth weight and miscarriage.In Italy, Chlamydia trachomatis and Trichomonas vaginalis infections are not subject to mandatory reporting; while gonorrhoea is subject to mandatory reporting.To extend surveillance to STIs that are widespread yet often asymptomatic and to improve the knowledge on the epidemiology of these infections in Italy, in 2009 the "Centro Operativo AIDS of the Istituto Superiore di SanitÁ", in collaboration with the Association of Italian Clinical Microbiologists (AMCLI, Associazione Microbiologi Clinici Italiani), launched the sentinel STIs surveillance system based on a network of 13 clinical microbiology laboratories.The main objective of the surveillance was to assess the prevalence and risk factors associated with Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis and Neisseria gonorrhoea infections among individuals attending microbiology laboratories in Italy. PMID:26691509

  7. Emergence of quinolone resistance and cephalosporin MIC creep in Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from a cohort of young men in Kisumu, Kenya, 2002 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Supriya D; Maclean, Ian; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah O; Moses, Stephen; Martin, Irene; Ronald, Allan; Agunda, Lawrence; Murugu, Ruth; Bailey, Robert C; Melendez, Johan; Zenilman, Jonathan M

    2011-08-01

    We evaluated antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated from men enrolled in a randomized trial of male circumcision to prevent HIV. Urethral specimens from men with discharge were cultured for N. gonorrhoeae. MICs were determined by agar dilution. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria defined resistance: penicillin, tetracycline, and azithromycin MICs of ≥2.0 μg/ml; a ciprofloxacin MIC of ≥1.0 μg/ml; and a spectinomycin MIC of ≥128.0 μg/ml. Susceptibility to ceftriaxone and cefixime was shown by an MIC of ≤0.25 μg/ml. Additionally, PCR amplification identified mutations in parC and gyrA genes in selected isolates. From 2002 to 2009, 168 N. gonorrhoeae isolates were obtained from 142 men. Plasmid-mediated penicillin resistance was found in 65%, plasmid-mediated tetracycline resistance in 97%, and 11% were ciprofloxacin resistant (quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae [QRNG]). QRNG appeared in November 2007, increasing from 9.5% in 2007 to 50% in 2009. Resistance was not detected for spectinomycin, cefixime, ceftriaxone, or azithromycin, but MICs of cefixime (P = 0.018), ceftriaxone (P < 0.001), and azithromycin (P = 0.097) increased over time. In a random sample of 51 men, gentamicin MICs were as follows: 4 μg/ml (n = 1), 8 μg/ml (n = 49), and 16 μg/ml (n = 1). QRNG increased rapidly and alternative regimens are required for N. gonorrhoeae treatment in this area. Amid emerging multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae, antimicrobial resistance surveillance is essential for effective drug choice. High levels of plasmid-mediated resistance and increasing MICs for cephalosporins suggest that selective pressure from antibiotic use is a strong driver of resistance emergence. PMID:21606224

  8. Emergence of Quinolone Resistance and Cephalosporin MIC Creep in Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from a Cohort of Young Men in Kisumu, Kenya, 2002 to 2009▿

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Supriya D.; Maclean, Ian; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah O.; Moses, Stephen; Martin, Irene; Ronald, Allan; Agunda, Lawrence; Murugu, Ruth; Bailey, Robert C.; Melendez, Johan; Zenilman, Jonathan M.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated from men enrolled in a randomized trial of male circumcision to prevent HIV. Urethral specimens from men with discharge were cultured for N. gonorrhoeae. MICs were determined by agar dilution. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria defined resistance: penicillin, tetracycline, and azithromycin MICs of ≥2.0 μg/ml; a ciprofloxacin MIC of ≥1.0 μg/ml; and a spectinomycin MIC of ≥128.0 μg/ml. Susceptibility to ceftriaxone and cefixime was shown by an MIC of ≤0.25 μg/ml. Additionally, PCR amplification identified mutations in parC and gyrA genes in selected isolates. From 2002 to 2009, 168 N. gonorrhoeae isolates were obtained from 142 men. Plasmid-mediated penicillin resistance was found in 65%, plasmid-mediated tetracycline resistance in 97%, and 11% were ciprofloxacin resistant (quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae [QRNG]). QRNG appeared in November 2007, increasing from 9.5% in 2007 to 50% in 2009. Resistance was not detected for spectinomycin, cefixime, ceftriaxone, or azithromycin, but MICs of cefixime (P = 0.018), ceftriaxone (P < 0.001), and azithromycin (P = 0.097) increased over time. In a random sample of 51 men, gentamicin MICs were as follows: 4 μg/ml (n = 1), 8 μg/ml (n = 49), and 16 μg/ml (n = 1). QRNG increased rapidly and alternative regimens are required for N. gonorrhoeae treatment in this area. Amid emerging multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae, antimicrobial resistance surveillance is essential for effective drug choice. High levels of plasmid-mediated resistance and increasing MICs for cephalosporins suggest that selective pressure from antibiotic use is a strong driver of resistance emergence. PMID:21606224

  9. Association of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Opa(CEA) with dendritic cells suppresses their ability to elicit an HIV-1-specific T cell memory response.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qigui; Chow, Edith M C; McCaw, Shannon E; Hu, Ningjie; Byrd, Daniel; Amet, Tohti; Hu, Sishun; Ostrowski, Mario A; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    Infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae) can trigger an intense local inflammatory response at the site of infection, yet there is little specific immune response or development of immune memory. Gonococcal surface epitopes are known to undergo antigenic variation; however, this is unlikely to explain the weak immune response to infection since individuals can be re-infected by the same serotype. Previous studies have demonstrated that the colony opacity-associated (Opa) proteins on the N. gonorrhoeae surface can bind human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) on CD4⁺ T cells to suppress T cell activation and proliferation. Interesting in this regard, N. gonorrhoeae infection is associated with impaired HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1)-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses and with transient increases in plasma viremia in HIV-1-infected patients, suggesting that N. gonorrhoeae may also subvert immune responses to co-pathogens. Since dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) that play a key role in the induction of an adaptive immune response, we investigated the effects of N. gonorrhoeae Opa proteins on human DC activation and function. While morphological changes reminiscent of DC maturation were evident upon N. gonorrhoeae infection, we observed a marked downregulation of DC maturation marker CD83 when the gonococci expressing CEACAM1-specific Opa(CEA), but not other Opa variants. Consistent with a gonococcal-induced defect in maturation, Opa(CEA) binding to CEACAM1 reduced the DCs' capacity to stimulate an allogeneic T cell proliferative response. Moreover, Opa(CEA)-expressing N. gonorrhoeae showed the potential to impair DC-dependent development of specific adaptive immunity, since infection with Opa(CEA)-positive gonococci suppressed the ability of DCs to stimulate HIV-1-specific memory CTL responses. These results reveal a novel mechanism to explain why

  10. Current concepts in the management of gonorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Tapsall, John

    2002-02-01

    The incidence of gonorrhoea is again rising in developed countries and a high disease rate has been maintained in less developed regions for a number of years. The need not only for treatment of the individual but also for control of gonorrhoea at a community level has increased significantly following recognition of its role in the amplification of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. A sustainable decrease in the incidence of gonorrhoea and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) requires an integrated approach combining improved prevention, better diagnosis and optimal treatment. Effective antibiotic treatment is an essential element of this approach. However, antibiotic treatment of gonorrhoea has been severely hampered by the development of antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, to the extent that many therapies are no longer effective. Those treatments that retain acceptable efficacy are often unaffordable where they are most needed. Penicillins and tetracyclines should no longer be used in gonococcal disease, there are limitations on the effectiveness of newer macrolides and spectinomycin and in many parts of the world quinolones have been withdrawn from schedules for the treatment of gonorrhoea. Of all the current agents used to treat all forms of gonococcal disease, only the third generation cephalosporins (most notably ceftriaxone) have retained their efficacy; however, decreased susceptibility to these antibiotics has also appeared. Continuing reliance on antibiotic treatment for controlling gonorrhoea in the absence of other necessary approaches will see a further deterioration in the situation. In these circumstances the possibility that gonorrhoea will be untreatable becomes more real. PMID:11829728

  11. Distinct Proinflammatory Host Responses to Neisseria gonorrhoeae Infection in Immortalized Human Cervical and Vaginal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fichorova, Raina Nakova; Desai, Pragnya Jasvantrai; Gibson, Frank C.; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2001-01-01

    In this study we utilized immortalized morphologically and functionally distinct epithelial cell lines from normal human endocervix, ectocervix, and vagina to characterize gonococcal epithelial interactions pertinent to the lower female genital tract. Piliated, but not nonpiliated, N. gonorrhoeae strain F62 variants actively invaded these epithelial cell lines, as demonstrated by an antibiotic protection assay and confocal microscopy. Invasion of these cells by green fluorescent protein-expressing gonococci was characterized by colocalization of gonococci with F actin, which were initially detected 30 min postinfection. In all three cell lines, upregulation of interleukin 8 (IL-8) and IL-6, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (CD54), and the nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (CD66c) were detected 4 h after infection with piliated and nonpiliated gonococci. Furthermore, stimulation of all three cell lines with gonococcal whole-cell lysates resulted in a similar upregulation of IL-6 and IL-8, confirming that bacterial uptake is not essential for this response. Increased levels of IL-1 were first detected 8 h after infection with gonococci, suggesting that the earlier IL-8 and IL-6 responses were not mediated through the IL-1 signaling pathway. The IL-1 response was limited to cultures infected with piliated gonococci and was more vigorous in the endocervical epithelial cells. The ability of gonococci to stimulate distinct proinflammatory host responses in these morphologically and functionally different compartments of the lower female genital tract may contribute directly to the inflammatory signs and symptoms characteristic of disease caused by N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:11500462

  12. Genetic Resistance Determinants, In Vitro Time-Kill Curve Analysis and Pharmacodynamic Functions for the Novel Topoisomerase II Inhibitor ETX0914 (AZD0914) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Sunniva; Golparian, Daniel; Jacobsson, Susanne; Hathaway, Lucy J; Low, Nicola; Shafer, William M; Althaus, Christian L; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae to all available therapeutic antimicrobials has emerged and new efficacious drugs for treatment of gonorrhea are essential. The topoisomerase II inhibitor ETX0914 (also known as AZD0914) is a new spiropyrimidinetrione antimicrobial that has different mechanisms of action from all previous and current gonorrhea treatment options. In this study, the N. gonorrhoeae resistance determinants for ETX0914 were further described and the effects of ETX0914 on the growth of N. gonorrhoeae (ETX0914 wild type, single step selected resistant mutants, and efflux pump mutants) were examined in a novel in vitro time-kill curve analysis to estimate pharmacodynamic parameters of the new antimicrobial. For comparison, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline were also examined (separately and in combination with ETX0914). ETX0914 was rapidly bactericidal for all wild type strains and had similar pharmacodynamic properties to ciprofloxacin. All selected resistant mutants contained mutations in amino acid codons D429 or K450 of GyrB and inactivation of the MtrCDE efflux pump fully restored the susceptibility to ETX0914. ETX0914 alone and in combination with azithromycin and ceftriaxone was highly effective against N. gonorrhoeae and synergistic interaction with ciprofloxacin, particularly for ETX0914-resistant mutants, was found. ETX0914, monotherapy or in combination with azithromycin (to cover additional sexually transmitted infections), should be considered for phase III clinical trials and future gonorrhea treatment. PMID:26696986

  13. Decreased susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from Switzerland to Cefixime and Ceftriaxone: antimicrobial susceptibility data from 1990 and 2000 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neisseria gonorrhoeae can rapidly develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. Over the last years, decreased gonococcal susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins, especially cefixime, emerged worldwide. Therefore, current international guidelines recommend dual therapy for gonorrhoea with ceftriaxone plus either azithromycin or doxycycline. Gonococcal susceptibility data in Switzerland are sparse. Methods We investigated the prevalence of antibiotic susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae in specimens collected between 1990 and 2012 at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for cefixime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, and penicillin were determined by Etests. The European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints were used to define reduced susceptibility. Results A total of 320 isolates were tested. Between 1990 and 2006 all tested samples were susceptible to both cephalosporins. Subsequently, the prevalence of elevated MICs for cefixime increased to 10.4% (2007/2008), 11.5% (2009/2010), and 11.4% (2011/2012); and for ceftriaxone to 2.4% (2007/2008), 4.7% (2009/2010), and 0% (2011/2012), respectively. The prevalence of resistance to ciprofloxacin (72.7%) and penicillin (22.7%) was high in 2011/2012. Conclusions Decreasing susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to third-generation cephalosporins in Switzerland supports treatment recommendations with ceftriaxone plus azithromycin or doxycycline. Health-care providers need to be aware of possible treatment failures with cephalosporins. Continued surveillance of gonococcal antimicrobial resistance is essential. PMID:24369054

  14. Review and International Recommendation of Methods for Typing Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates and Their Implications for Improved Knowledge of Gonococcal Epidemiology, Treatment, and Biology

    PubMed Central

    Unemo, Magnus; Dillon, Jo-Anne R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Gonorrhea, which may become untreatable due to multiple resistance to available antibiotics, remains a public health problem worldwide. Precise methods for typing Neisseria gonorrhoeae, together with epidemiological information, are crucial for an enhanced understanding regarding issues involving epidemiology, test of cure and contact tracing, identifying core groups and risk behaviors, and recommending effective antimicrobial treatment, control, and preventive measures. This review evaluates methods for typing N. gonorrhoeae isolates and recommends various methods for different situations. Phenotypic typing methods, as well as some now-outdated DNA-based methods, have limited usefulness in differentiating between strains of N. gonorrhoeae. Genotypic methods based on DNA sequencing are preferred, and the selection of the appropriate genotypic method should be guided by its performance characteristics and whether short-term epidemiology (microepidemiology) or long-term and/or global epidemiology (macroepidemiology) matters are being investigated. Currently, for microepidemiological questions, the best methods for fast, objective, portable, highly discriminatory, reproducible, typeable, and high-throughput characterization are N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) or full- or extended-length porB gene sequencing. However, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Opa typing can be valuable in specific situations, i.e., extreme microepidemiology, despite their limitations. For macroepidemiological studies and phylogenetic studies, DNA sequencing of chromosomal housekeeping genes, such as multilocus sequence typing (MLST), provides a more nuanced understanding. PMID:21734242

  15. The solution structure of the soluble form of the lipid-modified azurin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the electron donor of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Cláudia S; Saraiva, Ivo H; Carreira, Cíntia; Devreese, Bart; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2016-02-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae colonizes the genitourinary track, and in these environments, especially in the female host, the bacteria are subjected to low levels of oxygen, and reactive oxygen and nitrosyl species. Here, the biochemical characterization of N. gonorrhoeae Laz is presented, as well as, the solution structure of its soluble domain determined by NMR. N. gonorrhoeae Laz is a type 1 copper protein of the azurin-family based on its spectroscopic properties and structure, with a redox potential of 277±5 mV, at pH7.0, that behaves as a monomer in solution. The globular Laz soluble domain adopts the Greek-key motif, with the copper center located at one end of the β-barrel coordinated by Gly48, His49, Cys113, His118 and Met122, in a distorted trigonal geometry. The edge of the His118 imidazole ring is water exposed, in a surface that is proposed to be involved in the interaction with its redox partners. The heterologously expressed Laz was shown to be a competent electron donor to N. gonorrhoeae cytochrome c peroxidase. This is an evidence for its involvement in the mechanism of protection against hydrogen peroxide generated by neighboring lactobacilli in the host environment. PMID:26589091

  16. Genetic Resistance Determinants, In Vitro Time-Kill Curve Analysis and Pharmacodynamic Functions for the Novel Topoisomerase II Inhibitor ETX0914 (AZD0914) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Sunniva; Golparian, Daniel; Jacobsson, Susanne; Hathaway, Lucy J.; Low, Nicola; Shafer, William M.; Althaus, Christian L.; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae to all available therapeutic antimicrobials has emerged and new efficacious drugs for treatment of gonorrhea are essential. The topoisomerase II inhibitor ETX0914 (also known as AZD0914) is a new spiropyrimidinetrione antimicrobial that has different mechanisms of action from all previous and current gonorrhea treatment options. In this study, the N. gonorrhoeae resistance determinants for ETX0914 were further described and the effects of ETX0914 on the growth of N. gonorrhoeae (ETX0914 wild type, single step selected resistant mutants, and efflux pump mutants) were examined in a novel in vitro time-kill curve analysis to estimate pharmacodynamic parameters of the new antimicrobial. For comparison, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline were also examined (separately and in combination with ETX0914). ETX0914 was rapidly bactericidal for all wild type strains and had similar pharmacodynamic properties to ciprofloxacin. All selected resistant mutants contained mutations in amino acid codons D429 or K450 of GyrB and inactivation of the MtrCDE efflux pump fully restored the susceptibility to ETX0914. ETX0914 alone and in combination with azithromycin and ceftriaxone was highly effective against N. gonorrhoeae and synergistic interaction with ciprofloxacin, particularly for ETX0914-resistant mutants, was found. ETX0914, monotherapy or in combination with azithromycin (to cover additional sexually transmitted infections), should be considered for phase III clinical trials and future gonorrhea treatment. PMID:26696986

  17. Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain with high-level resistance to spectinomycin due to a novel resistance mechanism (mutated ribosomal protein S5) verified in Norway.

    PubMed

    Unemo, Magnus; Golparian, Daniel; Skogen, Vegard; Olsen, Anne Olaug; Moi, Harald; Syversen, Gaute; Hjelmevoll, Stig Ove

    2013-02-01

    Gonorrhea may become untreatable, and new treatment options are essential. Verified resistance to spectinomycin is exceedingly rare. However, we describe a high-level spectinomycin-resistant (MIC, >1,024 μg/ml) Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain from Norway with a novel resistance mechanism. The resistance determinant was a deletion of codon 27 (valine) and a K28E alteration in the ribosomal protein 5S. The traditional spectinomycin resistance gene (16S rRNA) was wild type. Despite this exceedingly rare finding, spectinomycin available for treatment of ceftriaxone-resistant urogenital gonorrhea would be very valuable. PMID:23183436

  18. Concordance of auxotype/serovar classes of Neisseria gonorrhoeae between sexual contacts.

    PubMed Central

    Ison, C. A.; Whitaker, L.; Renton, A.

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and three known sexual-contact pairs of patients with culture-proven gonorrhoea who attended St Mary's Hospital, London between May 1989 and February 1991 were identified. All isolates from these patients were serotyped and auxotyped and compared for type concordance within sexual-contact pairs. Serotype was concordant in 80 (78%) of 103 sexual-contact pairs, auxotype in 88 (85%) and auxotype/serovar (A/S) class in 66 (64%) on the first screening. All pairs of isolates showed concordance in both serotype and auxotype when typing was repeated using a single set of serotyping reagents and of auxotyping media. Seventeen serovars, 9 auxotypes and 36 A/S classes were found in this population. Our results suggest that both serotyping and auxotyping may be used as markers to allow tracing of sexual-contact pairs, but that a single set of reagents should be used to ensure maximum reliability. PMID:1397115

  19. The C-terminal domain of the MutL homolog from Neisseria gonorrhoeae forms an inverted homodimer.

    PubMed

    Namadurai, Sivakumar; Jain, Deepti; Kulkarni, Dhananjay S; Tabib, Chaitanya R; Friedhoff, Peter; Rao, Desirazu N; Nair, Deepak T

    2010-01-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) pathway serves to maintain the integrity of the genome by removing mispaired bases from the newly synthesized strand. In E. coli, MutS, MutL and MutH coordinate to discriminate the daughter strand through a mechanism involving lack of methylation on the new strand. This facilitates the creation of a nick by MutH in the daughter strand to initiate mismatch repair. Many bacteria and eukaryotes, including humans, do not possess a homolog of MutH. Although the exact strategy for strand discrimination in these organisms is yet to be ascertained, the required nicking endonuclease activity is resident in the C-terminal domain of MutL. This activity is dependent on the integrity of a conserved metal binding motif. Unlike their eukaryotic counterparts, MutL in bacteria like Neisseria exist in the form of a homodimer. Even though this homodimer would possess two active sites, it still acts a nicking endonuclease. Here, we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the MutL homolog of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NgoL) determined to a resolution of 2.4 Å. The structure shows that the metal binding motif exists in a helical configuration and that four of the six conserved motifs in the MutL family, including the metal binding site, localize together to form a composite active site. NgoL-CTD exists in the form of an elongated inverted homodimer stabilized by a hydrophobic interface rich in leucines. The inverted arrangement places the two composite active sites in each subunit on opposite lateral sides of the homodimer. Such an arrangement raises the possibility that one of the active sites is occluded due to interaction of NgoL with other protein factors involved in MMR. The presentation of only one active site to substrate DNA will ensure that nicking of only one strand occurs to prevent inadvertent and deleterious double stranded cleavage. PMID:21060849

  20. Quantitative proteomics of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae cell envelope and membrane vesicles for the discovery of potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Zielke, Ryszard A; Wierzbicki, Igor H; Weber, Jacob V; Gafken, Philip R; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2014-05-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) is a human-specific pathogen, and the agent of a sexually transmitted disease, gonorrhea. There is a critical need for new approaches to study and treat GC infections because of the growing threat of multidrug-resistant isolates and the lack of a vaccine. Despite the implied role of the GC cell envelope and membrane vesicles in colonization and infection of human tissues and cell lines, comprehensive studies have not been undertaken to elucidate their constituents. Accordingly, in pursuit of novel molecular therapeutic targets, we have applied isobaric tagging for absolute quantification coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for proteome quantitative analyses. Mining the proteome of cell envelopes and native membrane vesicles revealed 533 and 168 common proteins, respectively, in analyzed GC strains FA1090, F62, MS11, and 1291. A total of 22 differentially abundant proteins were discovered including previously unknown proteins. Among those proteins that displayed similar abundance in four GC strains, 34 were found in both cell envelopes and membrane vesicles fractions. Focusing on one of them, a homolog of an outer membrane protein LptD, we demonstrated that its depletion caused loss of GC viability. In addition, we selected for initial characterization six predicted outer membrane proteins with unknown function, which were identified as ubiquitous in the cell envelopes derived from examined GC isolates. These studies entitled a construction of deletion mutants and analyses of their resistance to different chemical probes. Loss of NGO1985, in particular, resulted in dramatically decreased GC viability upon treatment with detergents, polymyxin B, and chloramphenicol, suggesting that this protein functions in the maintenance of the cell envelope permeability barrier. Together, these findings underscore the concept that the cell envelope and membrane vesicles contain crucial, yet under-explored determinants of GC

  1. Quantitative Proteomics of the Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Cell Envelope and Membrane Vesicles for the Discovery of Potential Therapeutic Targets*

    PubMed Central

    Zielke, Ryszard A.; Wierzbicki, Igor H.; Weber, Jacob V.; Gafken, Philip R.; Sikora, Aleksandra E.

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) is a human-specific pathogen, and the agent of a sexually transmitted disease, gonorrhea. There is a critical need for new approaches to study and treat GC infections because of the growing threat of multidrug-resistant isolates and the lack of a vaccine. Despite the implied role of the GC cell envelope and membrane vesicles in colonization and infection of human tissues and cell lines, comprehensive studies have not been undertaken to elucidate their constituents. Accordingly, in pursuit of novel molecular therapeutic targets, we have applied isobaric tagging for absolute quantification coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for proteome quantitative analyses. Mining the proteome of cell envelopes and native membrane vesicles revealed 533 and 168 common proteins, respectively, in analyzed GC strains FA1090, F62, MS11, and 1291. A total of 22 differentially abundant proteins were discovered including previously unknown proteins. Among those proteins that displayed similar abundance in four GC strains, 34 were found in both cell envelopes and membrane vesicles fractions. Focusing on one of them, a homolog of an outer membrane protein LptD, we demonstrated that its depletion caused loss of GC viability. In addition, we selected for initial characterization six predicted outer membrane proteins with unknown function, which were identified as ubiquitous in the cell envelopes derived from examined GC isolates. These studies entitled a construction of deletion mutants and analyses of their resistance to different chemical probes. Loss of NGO1985, in particular, resulted in dramatically decreased GC viability upon treatment with detergents, polymyxin B, and chloramphenicol, suggesting that this protein functions in the maintenance of the cell envelope permeability barrier. Together, these findings underscore the concept that the cell envelope and membrane vesicles contain crucial, yet under-explored determinants of GC

  2. Tetrapac (tpc), a novel genotype of Neisseria gonorrhoeae affecting epithelial cell invasion, natural transformation competence and cell separation.

    PubMed

    Fussenegger, M; Kahrs, A F; Facius, D; Meyer, T F

    1996-03-01

    We characterized a novel mutant phenotype (tetrapac, tpc) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ngo) associated with a distinctive rough-colony morphology and bacterial growth in clusters of four. This phenotype, suggesting a defect in cell division, was isolated from a mutant library of Ngo MS11 generated with the phoA minitransposon TnMax4. The tpc mutant shows a 30% reduction in the overall murein hydrolase activity using Escherichia coli murein as substrate. Tetrapacs can be resolved by co-cultivation with wild-type Ngo, indicating that Tpc is a diffusible protein. Interestingly, Tpc is absolutely required for the natural transformation competence of piliated Ngo. Mutants in tpc grow normally, but show a approximately 10-fold reduction in their ability to invade human epithelial cells. The tpc sequence reveals an open reading frame of approximately 1 kb encoding a protein (Tpc) of 37 kDa. The primary gene product exhibits an N-terminal leader sequence typical of lipoproteins, but palmitoylation of Tpc could not be demonstrated. The ribosomal binding site of tpc is immediately downstream of the translational stop codon of the folC gene coding for an enzyme involved in folic acid biosynthesis and one-carbon metabolism. The tpc gene is probably co-transcribed from the folC promoter and a promoter located within the folC gene. The latter promoter sequence shares significant homology with E. coli gearbox consensus promoters. All three mutant phenotypes, i.e. the cell separation defect, the transformation deficiency and the defect in cell invasion can be restored by complementation of the mutant with an intact tpc gene. To some extent the tcp phenotype is reminiscent of iap in Listeria, lytA in Streptococcus pneumoniae and lyt in Bacillus subtilis, all of which are considered to represent murein hydrolase defects. PMID:8730876

  3. Coordinated regulation of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae-truncated denitrification pathway by the nitric oxide-sensitive repressor, NsrR, and nitrite-insensitive NarQ-NarP.

    PubMed

    Overton, Tim W; Whitehead, Rebekah; Li, Ying; Snyder, Lori A S; Saunders, Nigel J; Smith, Harry; Cole, Jeff A

    2006-11-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae survives anaerobically by reducing nitrite to nitrous oxide catalyzed by the nitrite and nitric oxide reductases, AniA and NorB. P(aniA) is activated by FNR (regulator of fumarate and nitrate reduction), the two-component regulatory system NarQ-NarP, and induced by nitrite; P(norB) is induced by NO independently of FNR by an uncharacterized mechanism. We report the results of microarray analysis, bioinformatic analysis, and chromatin immunoprecipitation, which revealed that only five genes with readily identified NarP-binding sites are differentially expressed in narP(+) and narP strains. These include three genes implicated in the truncated gonococcal denitrification pathway: aniA, norB, and narQ. We also report that (i) nitrite induces aniA transcription in a narP mutant; (ii) nitrite induction involves indirect inactivation by nitric oxide of a gonococcal repressor, NsrR, identified from a multigenome bioinformatic study; (iii) in an nsrR mutant, aniA, norB, and dnrN (encoding a putative reactive nitrogen species response protein) were expressed constitutively in the absence of nitrite, suggesting that NsrR is the only NO-sensing transcription factor in N. gonorrhoeae; and (iv) NO rather than nitrite is the ligand to which NsrR responds. When expressed in Escherichia coli, gonococcal NarQ and chimaeras of E. coli and gonococcal NarQ are ligand-insensitive and constitutively active: a "locked-on" phenotype. We conclude that genes involved in the truncated denitrification pathway of N. gonorrhoeae are key components of the small NarQP regulon, that NarP indirectly regulates P(norB) by stimulating NO production by AniA, and that NsrR plays a critical role in enabling gonococci to evade NO generated as a host defense mechanism. PMID:16954205

  4. Nuclear factor-kappa B directs carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 receptor expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae-infected epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Muenzner, Petra; Billker, Oliver; Meyer, Thomas F; Naumann, Michael

    2002-03-01

    The human-specific pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae expresses opacity-associated (Opa) protein adhesins that bind to various members of the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family. In this study, we have analyzed the mechanism underlying N. gonorrhoeae-induced CEACAM up-regulation in epithelial cells. Epithelial cells represent the first barrier for the microbial pathogen. We therefore characterized CEACAM expression in primary human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells and found that CEACAM1-3 (L, S) and CEACAM1-4 (L, S) splice variants mediate an increased Opa(52)-dependent gonoccocal binding to HOSE cells. Up-regulation of these CEACAM molecules in HOSE cells is a direct process that takes place within 2 h postinfection and depends on close contact between microbial pathogen and HOSE cells. N. gonorrhoeae-triggered CEACAM1 up-regulation involves activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), which translocates as a p50/p65 heterodimer into the nucleus, and an NF-kappaB-specific inhibitory peptide inhibited CEACAM1-receptor up-regulation in N. gonorrhoeae-infected HOSE cells. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides did not induce NF-kappaB and CEACAM up-regulation, which corresponds to our findings that HOSE cells do not express toll-like receptor 4. The ability of N. gonorrhoeae to up-regulate its epithelial receptor CEACAM1 through NF-kappaB suggests an important mechanism allowing efficient bacterial colonization during the initial infection process. PMID:11751883

  5. Is Neisseria gonorrhoeae initiating a future era of untreatable gonorrhea?: detailed characterization of the first strain with high-level resistance to ceftriaxone.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Makoto; Golparian, Daniel; Shimuta, Ken; Saika, Takeshi; Hoshina, Shinji; Iwasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakayama, Shu-ichi; Kitawaki, Jo; Unemo, Magnus

    2011-07-01

    Recently, the first Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain (H041) that is highly resistant to the extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC) ceftriaxone, the last remaining option for empirical first-line treatment, was isolated. We performed a detailed characterization of H041, phenotypically and genetically, to confirm the finding, examine its antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and elucidate the resistance mechanisms. H041 was examined using seven species-confirmatory tests, antibiograms (30 antimicrobials), porB sequencing, N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and sequencing of ESC resistance determinants (penA, mtrR, penB, ponA, and pilQ). Transformation, using appropriate recipient strains, was performed to confirm the ESC resistance determinants. H041 was assigned to serovar Bpyust, MLST sequence type (ST) ST7363, and the new NG-MAST ST4220. H041 proved highly resistant to ceftriaxone (2 to 4 μg/ml, which is 4- to 8-fold higher than any previously described isolate) and all other cephalosporins, as well as most other antimicrobials tested. A new penA mosaic allele caused the ceftriaxone resistance. In conclusion, N. gonorrhoeae has now shown its ability to also develop ceftriaxone resistance. Although the biological fitness of ceftriaxone resistance in N. gonorrhoeae remains unknown, N. gonorrhoeae may soon become a true superbug, causing untreatable gonorrhea. A reduction in the global gonorrhea burden by enhanced disease control activities, combined with wider strategies for general AMR control and enhanced understanding of the mechanisms of emergence and spread of AMR, which need to be monitored globally, and public health response plans for global (and national) perspectives are important. Ultimately, the development of new drugs for efficacious gonorrhea treatment is necessary. PMID:21576437

  6. Comparative assessment of CDS, CLSI disc diffusion and Etest techniques for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: a 6-year study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vikram; Kakran, Monika; Ramesh, V

    2012-01-01

    Background A variety of techniques are available for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Objective The aim of this study was to find a cost-effective, reliable and easily applicable microbiological method to detect antimicrobial susceptibilities of N. gonorrhoeae in resource-poor countries. Design Prospective study. Setting Male and female STD clinic of Regional STD Teaching, Training and Research Centre, New Delhi, India. Participants N. gonorrhoeae isolates from all male and female patients presenting with acute gonococcal urethritis and cervical discharge. Material and methods A total of 295 consecutive N. gonorrhoeae isolates during 2005–2010 was used to compare the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and CDS disc diffusion technique with Etest by performing antimicrobial susceptibility testing in parallel for penicillin, tetracycline, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and spectinomycin. WHO reference strains were used as controls. Results CDS disc diffusion zones of inhibition showed that complete percentage agreement for penicillin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline was high with their analogous Etest minimal inhibitory concentrations in comparison to CLSI disc diffusion technique, that is, 91.5%, 92.9% and 99.3% versus 87.5%, 88.5% and 74.9%, respectively. CDS results had less number of major and minor category discrepancies in comparison to CLSI and CDS method showed excellent correlation coefficient (r=1) with Etest for all five antimicrobial agents tested in comparison to CLSI (r=0.92). It was very poor (r=0.61) by CLSI method for tetracycline. The correlation coefficients between the two methods and the Etest were identical if tetracycline was removed from the CLSI analysis. Conclusions The CDS technique is an attractive alternative for N. gonorrhoeae susceptibility testing and is recommended for monitoring the antimicrobial susceptibility in less developed and resource-poor settings to facilitate enhanced antimicrobial

  7. Infection of human urethral epithelium with Neisseria gonorrhoeae elicits an upregulation of host anti-apoptotic factors and protects cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Binnicker, Matthew J; Williams, Richard D; Apicella, Michael A

    2003-08-01

    In order to better understand the host response to an infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, microarray technology was used to analyse the gene expression profile between uninfected and infected human urethral epithelium. The anti-apoptotic genes bfl-1, cox-2 and c-IAP-2 were identified to be upregulated approximately eight-, four- or twofold, respectively, following infection. Subsequent assays including RT-PCR, real time RT-PCR and RNase protection confirmed the increased expression of these apoptotic regulators, and identified that a fourth anti-apoptotic factor, mcl-1, is also upregulated. RT-PCR and RNase protection also showed that key pro-apoptotic factors including bax, bad and bak do not change in expression. Furthermore, our studies demonstrated that infection with the gonococcus partially protects urethral epithelium from apoptosis induced by the protein kinase inhibitor, staurosporine (STS). This work shows that following infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, several host anti-apoptotic factors are upregulated. In addition, a gonococcal infection protects host cells from subsequent STS-induced death. The regulation of host cell death by the gonococcus may represent a mechanism employed by this pathogen to survive and proliferate in host epithelium. PMID:12864814

  8. Phosphoethanolamine substitution of lipid A and resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to cationic antimicrobial peptides and complement-mediated killing by normal human serum.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lisa A; Choudhury, Biswa; Balthazar, Jacqueline T; Martin, Larry E; Ram, Sanjay; Rice, Peter A; Stephens, David S; Carlson, Russell; Shafer, William M

    2009-03-01

    The capacity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to cause disseminated gonococcal infection requires that such strains resist the bactericidal action of normal human serum. The bactericidal action of normal human serum against N. gonorrhoeae is mediated by the classical complement pathway through an antibody-dependent mechanism. The mechanism(s) by which certain strains of gonococci resist normal human serum is not fully understood, but alterations in lipooligosaccharide structure can affect such resistance. During an investigation of the biological significance of phosphoethanolamine extensions from lipooligosaccharide, we found that phosphoethanolamine substitutions from the heptose II group of the lipooligosaccharide beta-chain did not impact levels of gonococcal (strain FA19) resistance to normal human serum or polymyxin B. However, loss of phosphoethanolamine substitution from the lipid A component of lipooligosaccharide, due to insertional inactivation of lptA, resulted in increased gonococcal susceptibility to polymyxin B, as reported previously for Neisseria meningitidis. In contrast to previous reports with N. meningitidis, loss of phosphoethanolamine attached to lipid A rendered strain FA19 susceptible to complement killing. Serum killing of the lptA mutant occurred through the classical complement pathway. Both serum and polymyxin B resistance as well as phosphoethanolamine decoration of lipid A were restored in the lptA-null mutant by complementation with wild-type lptA. Our results support a role for lipid A phosphoethanolamine substitutions in resistance of this strict human pathogen to innate host defenses. PMID:19114544

  9. The NarE protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae catalyzes ADP-ribosylation of several ADP-ribose acceptors despite an N-terminal deletion.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Paula I; Álamos-Musre, A Said; Álvarez, Francisca P; Escobar, Alejandro; Tapia, Cecilia V; Osorio, Eduardo; Otero, Carolina; Calderón, Iván L; Fuentes, Juan A; Gil, Fernando; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Christodoulides, Myron

    2016-09-01

    The ADP-ribosylating enzymes are encoded in many pathogenic bacteria in order to affect essential functions of the host. In this study, we show that Neisseria gonorrhoeae possess a locus that corresponds to the ADP-ribosyltransferase NarE, a previously characterized enzyme in N. meningitidis The 291 bp coding sequence of gonococcal narE shares 100% identity with part of the coding sequence of the meningococcal narE gene due to a frameshift previously described, thus leading to a 49-amino-acid deletion at the N-terminus of gonococcal NarE protein. However, we found a promoter region and a GTG start codon, which allowed expression of the protein as demonstrated by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Using a gonococcal NarE-6xHis fusion protein, we demonstrated that the gonococcal enzyme underwent auto-ADP-ribosylation but to a lower extent than meningococcal NarE. We also observed that gonoccocal NarE exhibited ADP-ribosyltransferase activity using agmatine and cell-free host proteins as ADP-ribose acceptors, but its activity was inhibited by human β-defensins. Taken together, our results showed that NarE of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a functional enzyme that possesses key features of bacterial ADP-ribosylating enzymes. PMID:27465490

  10. Uncovering the mechanism of trapping and cell orientation during Neisseria gonorrhoeae twitching motility.

    PubMed

    Zaburdaev, Vasily; Biais, Nicolas; Schmiedeberg, Michael; Eriksson, Jens; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Sheetz, Michael P; Weitz, David A

    2014-10-01

    Neisseria gonorrheae bacteria are the causative agent of the second most common sexually transmitted infection in the world. The bacteria move on a surface by means of twitching motility. Their movement is mediated by multiple long and flexible filaments, called type IV pili, that extend from the cell body, attach to the surface, and retract, thus generating a pulling force. Moving cells also use pili to aggregate and form microcolonies. However, the mechanism by which the pili surrounding the cell body work together to propel bacteria remains unclear. Understanding this process will help describe the motility of N. gonorrheae bacteria, and thus the dissemination of the disease which they cause. In this article we track individual twitching cells and observe that their trajectories consist of alternating moving and pausing intervals, while the cell body is preferably oriented with its wide side toward the direction of motion. Based on these data, we propose a model for the collective pili operation of N. gonorrheae bacteria that explains the experimentally observed behavior. Individual pili function independently but can lead to coordinated motion or pausing via the force balance. The geometry of the cell defines its orientation during motion. We show that by changing pili substrate interactions, the motility pattern can be altered in a predictable way. Although the model proposed is tangibly simple, it still has sufficient robustness to incorporate further advanced pili features and various cell geometries to describe other bacteria that employ pili to move on surfaces. PMID:25296304

  11. Asymptomatic gonorrhoea in a male patient.

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, B.; Teli, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A case of asymptomatic gonorrhoea in a male patient is described. Failure to isolate Neisseria gonorrhoea from his wife possibly demonstrates inhibitory effect of Candida albicans in vivo on the former organism. PMID:6436805

  12. Neisseria gonorrhoeae in a London sexually transmitted infection clinic not fully sensitive to quinolones: are isolates imported and how effective is ciprofloxacin as a first-line therapy?

    PubMed

    Ivens, D; Martin, I; Ison, C

    2000-12-01

    Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae not fully sensitive to ciprofloxacin from a sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic in London and where the isolates were acquired from. Data of antibiotic sensitivities of N. gonorrhoeae from 292 patients were reviewed over a 6-month period at St Mary's Genitourinary Medicine (GUM) Clinic, London. Isolates which exhibited reduced susceptibility (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] 0.03-0.12 mg/l) and high level resistance (MIC>0.12 mg/l) to ciprofloxacin represented 10% and 1.3% of the total respectively. All patients infected with a high level resistant isolate to ciprofloxacin had had a recent sexual partner from abroad but 18 of the 28 patients infected with a reduced susceptibility isolate denied recent travel. None of the 20 patients with a non-sensitive isolate who re-attended for post treatment cultures had persistant gonococcal infection. From this study we concluded that although N. gonorrhoeae resistant to ciprofloxacin was rare and probably always acquired abroad, isolates exhibiting reduced susceptibility were more common and were mainly as a result of infection from the UK. A stat dose of ciprofloxacin 500 mg and doxycycline 100 mg twice a day for one week was effective treatment. PMID:11138910

  13. A critical role for the cccA gene product, cytochrome c2, in diverting electrons from aerobic respiration to denitrification in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Hopper, Amanda C; Li, Ying; Cole, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a microaerophile that, when oxygen availability is limited, supplements aerobic respiration with a truncated denitrification pathway, nitrite reduction to nitrous oxide. We demonstrate that the cccA gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain F62 (accession number NG0292) is expressed, but the product, cytochrome c2, accumulates to only low levels. Nevertheless, a cccA mutant reduced nitrite at about half the rate of the parent strain. We previously reported that cytochromes c4 and c5 transfer electrons to cytochrome oxidase cbb3 by two independent pathways and that the CcoP subunit of cytochrome oxidase cbb3 transfers electrons to nitrite. We show that mutants defective in either cytochrome c4 or c5 also reduce nitrite more slowly than the parent. By combining mutations in cccA (Δc2), cycA (Δc4), cycB (Δc5), and ccoP (ccoP-C368A), we demonstrate that cytochrome c2 is required for electron transfer from cytochrome c4 via the third heme group of CcoP to the nitrite reductase, AniA, and that cytochrome c5 transfers electrons to nitrite reductase by an independent pathway. We propose that cytochrome c2 forms a complex with cytochrome oxidase. If so, the redox state of cytochrome c2 might regulate electron transfer to nitrite or oxygen. However, our data are more consistent with a mechanism in which cytochrome c2 and the CcoQ subunit of cytochrome oxidase form alternative complexes that preferentially catalyze nitrite and oxygen reduction, respectively. Comparison with the much simpler electron transfer pathway for nitrite reduction in the meningococcus provides fascinating insights into niche adaptation within the pathogenic neisseriae. PMID:23543713

  14. Genotyping as a tool for antibiotic resistance surveillance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in New Caledonia: evidence of a novel genotype associated with reduced penicillin susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Vernel-Pauillac, Frédérique; Nandi, Sobhan; Nicholas, Robert A; Goarant, Cyrille

    2008-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae continues to be a major concern in public health. Resistance of N. gonorrhoeae bacteria to penicillin G is widespread in most developed countries, which has necessitated a change to newer drugs for treatment of gonococcal infections. Recent reports indicate that resistance to these newer drugs is increasing, highlighting the need for accurate therapeutic recommendations. In some countries or communities, however, N. gonorrhoeae isolates are still susceptible to penicillin, so the use of this antibiotic for single-dose treatments of medically under-resourced patients is beneficial. In order to evaluate the adequacy and sustainability of this treatment approach, we explored the presence and prevalence of chromosomally mediated resistance determinants in N. gonorrhoeae isolates collected from 2005 to 2007 in New Caledonia. We developed two new real-time PCR assays targeting the penB and mtrR determinants, to be used together with a previously described duplex assay targeting the penA and ponA determinants. The results of this study provided evidence that neither the most-common mtrR determinants nor the most-resistance-associated penB alleles are currently circulating in New Caledonia, suggesting that penicillin should still be considered a valuable treatment strategy. Additionally, using our genotyping assay, we observed an unexpected penB genotype at a relatively high frequency that was associated with a decreased susceptibility to penicillin (average MIC, 0.15 mug/ml). Sequencing revealed that this genotype corresponded to an A102S mutation in the penB gene. The molecular tools developed in this study can be used successfully for prospective epidemiological monitoring and surveillance of penicillin susceptibility. PMID:18591264

  15. Community-Based Sexually Transmitted Infection Screening and Increased Detection of Pharyngeal and Urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Infections in Female Sex Workers in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Horas T.H.; Lee, Krystal C.K.; Chan, Denise P.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Female sex workers (FSWs) are vulnerable to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and are one of the key populations being infected most by Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections. In Hong Kong, limited data on the burden of chlamydial and gonococcal infections exist because regular screenings are not offered. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae in FSWs and to assess predictors associated with unprotected fellatio. Methods A cross-sectional study was conduct on 340 FSWs attending a community organization for HIV/STI screening, and a questionnaire addressing sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics was administered to all FSWs. Results The prevalence of syphilis infection was 2.1%, and none was tested positive for HIV. The positivity for pharyngeal C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae was 3.2% and 4.4%, respectively, whereas that for urogenital chlamydial and gonococcal infection was 10.6% and 0.9%, respectively. Of 313 FSWs offering fellatio, having unprotected fellatio with clients was significantly associated with the perceived low risk of contracting STI via fellatio (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.88), working in clubs (adjusted OR, 11.14), working on streets (adjusted OR, 3.28), recently started working in the sex industry for 1 year or less (adjusted OR, 3.05), and reporting group sex in the previous year (adjusted OR, 11.03). Conclusions The prevalence of HIV and syphilis infection remains low. This study reveals a relatively high prevalence of N. gonorrhoeae detected mostly in the pharynx. Offering pharyngeal screening for STI would facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of gonococcal infection in FSWs in Hong Kong. PMID:25768859

  16. Utilizing CMP-Sialic Acid Analogs to Unravel Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipooligosaccharide-Mediated Complement Resistance and Design Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Sunita; Schoenhofen, Ian C; Whitfield, Dennis M; Cox, Andrew D; Li, Jianjun; St Michael, Frank; Vinogradov, Evgeny V; Stupak, Jacek; Zheng, Bo; Ohnishi, Makoto; Unemo, Magnus; Lewis, Lisa A; Taylor, Rachel E; Landig, Corinna S; Diaz, Sandra; Reed, George W; Varki, Ajit; Rice, Peter A; Ram, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae deploys a novel immune evasion strategy wherein the lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT) structure of lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is capped by the bacterial sialyltransferase, using host cytidine-5'-monophosphate (CMP)-activated forms of the nine-carbon nonulosonate (NulO) sugar N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a sialic acid (Sia) abundant in humans. This allows evasion of complement-mediated killing by recruiting factor H (FH), an inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, and by limiting classical pathway activation ("serum-resistance"). We utilized CMP salts of six additional natural or synthetic NulOs, Neu5Gc, Neu5Gc8Me, Neu5Ac9Ac, Neu5Ac9Az, legionaminic acid (Leg5Ac7Ac) and pseudaminic acid (Pse5Ac7Ac), to define structural requirements of Sia-mediated serum-resistance. While all NulOs except Pse5Ac7Ac were incorporated into the LNnT-LOS, only Neu5Gc incorporation yielded high-level serum-resistance and FH binding that was comparable to Neu5Ac, whereas Neu5Ac9Az and Leg5Ac7Ac incorporation left bacteria fully serum-sensitive and did not enhance FH binding. Neu5Ac9Ac and Neu5Gc8Me rendered bacteria resistant only to low serum concentrations. While serum-resistance mediated by Neu5Ac was associated with classical pathway inhibition (decreased IgG binding and C4 deposition), Leg5Ac7Ac and Neu5Ac9Az incorporation did not inhibit the classical pathway. Remarkably, CMP-Neu5Ac9Az and CMP-Leg5Ac7Ac each prevented serum-resistance despite a 100-fold molar excess of CMP-Neu5Ac in growth media. The concomitant presence of Leg5Ac7Ac and Neu5Ac on LOS resulted in uninhibited classical pathway activation. Surprisingly, despite near-maximal FH binding in this instance, the alternative pathway was not regulated and factor Bb remained associated with bacteria. Intravaginal administration of CMP-Leg5Ac7Ac to BALB/c mice infected with gonorrhea (including a multidrug-resistant isolate) reduced clearance times and infection burden. Bacteria recovered from CMP

  17. Phase-Variable Heptose I Glycan Extensions Modulate Efficacy of 2C7 Vaccine Antibody Directed against Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipooligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Srinjoy; Lewis, Lisa A; Cox, Andrew D; St Michael, Frank; Li, Jianjun; Rice, Peter A; Ram, Sanjay

    2016-06-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhea, has developed resistance to most conventional antibiotics. Safe and effective vaccines against gonorrhea are needed urgently. A candidate vaccine that targets a lipooligosaccharide (LOS) epitope recognized mAb 2C7 attenuates gonococcal burden in the mouse vaginal colonization model. Glycan extensions from the LOS core heptoses (HepI and HepII) are controlled by phase-variable LOS glycosyltransferase (lgt) genes; we sought to define how HepI glycan extensions affect mAb 2C7 function. Isogenic gonococcal mutants in which the lgt required for mAb 2C7 reactivity (lgtG) was genetically locked on and the lgt loci required for HepI variation (lgtA, lgtC, and lgtD) were genetically locked on or off in different combinations were created. We observed 100% complement-dependent killing by mAb 2C7 of a mutant that expressed lactose (Gal-Glc) from HepI, whereas a mutant that expressed Gal-Gal-Glc-HepI fully resisted killing (>100% survival). Mutants that elaborated 4- (Gal-GlcNAc-Gal-Glc-HepI) and 5-glycan (GalNAc-Gal-GlcNAc-Gal-Glc-HepI) structures displayed intermediate phenotypes (<50% killing with 2 μg/ml and >95% killing with 4 μg/ml mAb 2C7). The contrasting phenotypes of the lactose-HepI and the Gal-Gal-Glc-HepI LOS structures were recapitulated with phase variants of a recently isolated clinical strain. Despite lack of killing of the Gal-Gal-Glc-HepI mutants, mAb 2C7 deposited sufficient C3 on these bacteria for opsonophagocytic killing by human neutrophils. In conclusion, mAb 2C7 showed functional activity against all gonococcal HepI LOS structures defined by various lgtA/C/D on/off combinations, thereby providing further impetus for use of the 2C7 epitope in a gonococcal vaccine. PMID:27183633

  18. Utilizing CMP-Sialic Acid Analogs to Unravel Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipooligosaccharide-Mediated Complement Resistance and Design Novel Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sunita; Schoenhofen, Ian C.; Whitfield, Dennis M.; Cox, Andrew D.; Li, Jianjun; St. Michael, Frank; Vinogradov, Evgeny V.; Stupak, Jacek; Zheng, Bo; Ohnishi, Makoto; Unemo, Magnus; Lewis, Lisa A.; Taylor, Rachel E.; Landig, Corinna S.; Diaz, Sandra; Reed, George W.; Varki, Ajit; Rice, Peter A.; Ram, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae deploys a novel immune evasion strategy wherein the lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT) structure of lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is capped by the bacterial sialyltransferase, using host cytidine-5’-monophosphate (CMP)-activated forms of the nine-carbon nonulosonate (NulO) sugar N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a sialic acid (Sia) abundant in humans. This allows evasion of complement-mediated killing by recruiting factor H (FH), an inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, and by limiting classical pathway activation (“serum-resistance”). We utilized CMP salts of six additional natural or synthetic NulOs, Neu5Gc, Neu5Gc8Me, Neu5Ac9Ac, Neu5Ac9Az, legionaminic acid (Leg5Ac7Ac) and pseudaminic acid (Pse5Ac7Ac), to define structural requirements of Sia-mediated serum-resistance. While all NulOs except Pse5Ac7Ac were incorporated into the LNnT-LOS, only Neu5Gc incorporation yielded high-level serum-resistance and FH binding that was comparable to Neu5Ac, whereas Neu5Ac9Az and Leg5Ac7Ac incorporation left bacteria fully serum-sensitive and did not enhance FH binding. Neu5Ac9Ac and Neu5Gc8Me rendered bacteria resistant only to low serum concentrations. While serum-resistance mediated by Neu5Ac was associated with classical pathway inhibition (decreased IgG binding and C4 deposition), Leg5Ac7Ac and Neu5Ac9Az incorporation did not inhibit the classical pathway. Remarkably, CMP-Neu5Ac9Az and CMP-Leg5Ac7Ac each prevented serum-resistance despite a 100-fold molar excess of CMP-Neu5Ac in growth media. The concomitant presence of Leg5Ac7Ac and Neu5Ac on LOS resulted in uninhibited classical pathway activation. Surprisingly, despite near-maximal FH binding in this instance, the alternative pathway was not regulated and factor Bb remained associated with bacteria. Intravaginal administration of CMP-Leg5Ac7Ac to BALB/c mice infected with gonorrhea (including a multidrug-resistant isolate) reduced clearance times and infection burden. Bacteria recovered from

  19. Public health measures to control the spread of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Xiridou, M; Soetens, L C; Koedijk, F D H; VAN DER Sande, M A B; Wallinga, J

    2015-06-01

    Gonorrhoea is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections. The control of gonorrhoea is extremely challenging because of the repeated development of resistance to the antibiotics used for its treatment. We explored different strategies to control the spread of antimicrobial resistance and prevent increases in gonorrhoea prevalence. We used a mathematical model that describes gonorrhoea transmission among men who have sex with men and distinguishes gonorrhoea strains sensitive or resistant to three antibiotics. We investigated the impact of combination therapy, switching first-line antibiotics according to resistance thresholds, and other control efforts (reduced sexual risk behaviour, increased treatment rate). Combination therapy can delay the spread of resistance better than using the 5% resistance threshold. Increased treatment rates, expected to enhance gonorrhoea control, may reduce gonorrhoea prevalence only in the short term, but could lead to more resistance and higher prevalence in the long term. Re-treatment of resistant cases with alternative antibiotics can substantially delay the spread of resistance. In conclusion, combination therapy and re-treatment of resistant cases with alternative antibiotics could be the most effective strategies to prevent increases in gonorrhoea prevalence due to antimicrobial resistance. PMID:25275435

  20. Population prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the Netherlands. should asymptomatic persons be tested during Population-based chlamydia Screening also for gonorrhoea or only if chlamydial infection is found?

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Jan EAM; Spaargaren, Joke; Götz, Hannelore M; Veldhuijzen, Irene K; Bindels, Patrick JE; Coenen, Ton J; Broer, Jan; de Groot, Fetzen; Hoebe, Christian JPA; Richardus, Jan-Hendrik; van Schaik, Daniel; Verhooren, Marije

    2006-01-01

    Background Screening and active case finding for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) is recommended to prevent reproductive morbidity. However insight in community prevalence of gonococcal infections and co-infections with Neisseria gonorrhoea (NG) is lacking. Methods Nested study within a large population-based Chlamydia Screening Pilot among 21.000 persons 15–29 year. All CT-positive (166) and a random sample of 605 CT-negative specimens were as well tested for gonococcal infection. Results Overall Chlamydia prevalence in the Pilot was 2.0% (95% CI: 1.7–2.3), highest in very urban settings (3.2%; 95% CI: 2.4–4.0) and dependent of several risk factors. Four gonococcal infections were found among 166 participants with CT infection (4/166 = 2.4%; 95% CI: 0.1%–4.7%). All four had several risk factors and reported symptoms. Among 605 CT-negative persons, no infection with NG could be confirmed. Conclusion A low rate of co-infections and a very low community prevalence of gonococcal infections were found in this population based screening programme among young adults in the Netherlands. Population screening for asymptomatic gonococcal infections is not indicated in the Netherlands. Although co-infection with gonorrhoea among CT-positives is dependent on symptoms and well-known algorithms for elevated risks, we advise to test all CT-positives also for NG, whether symptomatic or asymptomatic. PMID:16522201

  1. Molecular and epidemiological analysis of penicillinase producing strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated in Canada 1976-84: evolution of new auxotypes and beta lactamase encoding plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, J R; Pauzé, M; Yeung, K H

    1986-01-01

    Though the number of penicillinase producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) strains isolated in Canada comprises under 1% of all gonococcal isolates, it continues to increase appreciably each year. Most strains are imported from areas of endemic infection with PPNG strains. Two local outbreaks in 1984, however, were notable for the number of patients infected and for the distinctive phenotypes of the strains. One outbreak was caused by a wild type strain, of serovar BACJK with a new 3.05 megadalton penicillinase encoding plasmid, whereas the other was caused by strains with the Asia+ plasmid type, serovar AE and with a proline and ornithine requiring auxotype. Five plasmid patterns (Africa+, Africa-, Asia+, Asia-, and Toronto+) were observed among the PPNG strains. The association between plasmid content and specific auxotype (such as Asia plasmid with proline requiring auxotype or Africa plasmid with wild type auxotype) and inhibition by phenylalanine continues to be unexplained. PMID:3089904

  2. The effect of hyperimmunization with Neisseria gonorrhoeae on the presence of gonococcal antibody in serum, tissues, and secretions of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Ashton, F E; Collins, F; Wallace, R; Ryan, A; Diena, B B; Lavergne, G

    1977-03-01

    Antibody responses in sera, tissues, and secretions of the urogenital tract and lower respiratory tract of rabbits hyperimmunized with Neisseria gonorrhoeae were examined. Antibody was detected by passive hemagglutination, whole-cell agglutination, bentonite flocculation, and in some cases immunodiffusion-in-gel. Immunization of rabbits either intravenously or intramuscularly resulted in the presence of gonococcal antibodies in the sera, spleens, and tissue of the urogenital tract (vagina, cervix, uterus, and fallopian tubes). Gonococcal antibody was also found in secretions bathing the mucosa of the urogenital tract and lower respiratory tract. Antibodies were not detected in sera, tissues, and secretions of non-immunized rabbits. The spleen was shown to synthesize gonococcal antibody in vitro in response to hyperimmunization. Tissues of the urogenital tract did not appear to synthesize gonococcal antibody thus suggesting and antibodies present in secretions of the urogenital tract were derived mainly from serum. PMID:404007

  3. Sequence analysis of the NgoPII methyltransferase gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae P9: homologies with other enzymes recognizing the sequence 5'-GGCC-3'.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, K M; Saunders, J R

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant plasmids harbouring the functional M.NgoPII methyltransferase (specificity 5'-GGCC-3') were isolated from amplified gene libraries of gonococcal chromosomal DNA cloned in pBR322 and in Escherichia coli RR1. The M.NgoPII gene was localized by sub-cloning and the nucleotide sequence of a cloned 1.6 kb segment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA harbouring the methylase gene was determined. This data, coupled with sub-cloning experiments and in vitro transcription-translation studies, indicates a theoretical size of 38.5 kd for the methylase protein. The predicted amino acid sequence of the methylase contains significant regions of homology with the projected sequences of other cytosine-modifying methylases, upon which the activity of these enzymes is likely to depend. Images PMID:2837733

  4. Production, purification, and characterization of a fusion protein of carbonic anhydrase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and cellulose binding domain from Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhu; Bartlow, Patrick; Dilmore, Robert M; Soong, Yee; Pan, Zhiwei; Koepsel, Richard; Ataai, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture technologies have the potential to become an important climate change mitigation option through sequestration of gaseous CO2. A new concept for CO2 capture involves use of immobilized carbonic anhydrase (CA) that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-) and H+. Cost-efficient production of the enzyme and an inexpensive immobilization system are critical for development of economically feasible CA-based CO2 capture processes. An artificial, bifunctional enzyme containing CA from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and a cellulose binding domain (CBD) from Clostridium thermocellum was constructed with a His6 tag. The chimeric enzyme exhibited both CA activity and CBD binding affinity. This fusion enzyme is of particular interest due to its binding affinity for cellulose and retained CA activity, which could serve as the basis for improved technology to capture CO2 from flue gasses. PMID:19224556

  5. Highly specific and efficient primers for in-house multiplex PCR detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although sophisticated methodologies are available, the use of endpoint polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect 16S rDNA genes remains a good approach for estimating the incidence and prevalence of specific infections and for monitoring infections. Considering the importance of the early diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), the development of a sensitive and affordable method for identifying pathogens in clinical samples is needed. Highly specific and efficient primers for a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) system were designed in silico to detect the 16S rDNA genes of four bacteria that cause genital infections, and the PCR method was developed. Methods The Genosensor Probe Designer (GPD) (version 1.0a) software was initially used to design highly specific and efficient primers for in-house m-PCR. Single-locus PCR reactions were performed and standardised, and then primers for each locus in turn were added individually in subsequent amplifications until m-PCR was achieved. Amplicons of the expected size were obtained from each of the four bacterial gene fragments. Finally, the analytical specificity and limits of detection were tested. Results Because they did not amplify any product from non-STI tested species, the primers were specific. The detection limits for the Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum primer sets were 5.12 × 105, 3.9 × 103, 61.19 × 106 and 6.37 × 105 copies of a DNA template, respectively. Conclusions The methodology designed and standardised here could be applied satisfactorily for the simultaneous or individual detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum. This method is at least as efficient as other previously described methods; however, this method is more affordable for low-income countries. PMID:24997675

  6. TraK and TraB are conserved outer membrane proteins of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type IV secretion system and are expressed at low levels in wild-type cells.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Meghan E; Hackett, Kathleen T; Bender, Tobias; Kotha, Chaitra; van der Does, Chris; Dillard, Joseph P

    2014-08-15

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae uses a type IV secretion system (T4SS) to secrete chromosomal DNA into the medium, and this DNA is effective in transforming other gonococci via natural transformation. In addition, the T4SS is important in the initial stages of biofilm development and mediates intracellular iron uptake in the absence of TonB. To better understand the mechanism of type IV secretion in N. gonorrhoeae, we examined the expression levels and localization of two predicted T4SS outer membrane proteins, TraK and TraB, in the wild-type strain as well as in overexpression strains and in a strain lacking all of the T4SS proteins. Despite very low sequence similarity to known homologues, TraB (VirB10 homolog) and TraK (VirB9 homolog) localized similarly to related proteins in other systems. Additionally, we found that TraV (a VirB7 homolog) interacts with TraK, as in other T4SSs. However, unlike in other systems, neither TraK nor TraB required the presence of other T4SS components for proper localization. Unlike other gonococcal T4SS proteins we have investigated, protein levels of the outer membrane proteins TraK and TraB were extremely low in wild-type cells and were undetectable by Western blotting unless overexpressed or tagged with a FLAG3 triple-epitope tag. Localization of TraK-FLAG3 in otherwise wild-type cells using immunogold electron microscopy of thin sections revealed a single gold particle on some cells. These results suggest that the gonococcal T4SS may be present in single copy per cell and that small amounts of T4SS proteins TraK and TraB are sufficient for DNA secretion. PMID:24914183

  7. TraK and TraB Are Conserved Outer Membrane Proteins of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type IV Secretion System and Are Expressed at Low Levels in Wild-Type Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Meghan E.; Hackett, Kathleen T.; Bender, Tobias; Kotha, Chaitra; van der Does, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae uses a type IV secretion system (T4SS) to secrete chromosomal DNA into the medium, and this DNA is effective in transforming other gonococci via natural transformation. In addition, the T4SS is important in the initial stages of biofilm development and mediates intracellular iron uptake in the absence of TonB. To better understand the mechanism of type IV secretion in N. gonorrhoeae, we examined the expression levels and localization of two predicted T4SS outer membrane proteins, TraK and TraB, in the wild-type strain as well as in overexpression strains and in a strain lacking all of the T4SS proteins. Despite very low sequence similarity to known homologues, TraB (VirB10 homolog) and TraK (VirB9 homolog) localized similarly to related proteins in other systems. Additionally, we found that TraV (a VirB7 homolog) interacts with TraK, as in other T4SSs. However, unlike in other systems, neither TraK nor TraB required the presence of other T4SS components for proper localization. Unlike other gonococcal T4SS proteins we have investigated, protein levels of the outer membrane proteins TraK and TraB were extremely low in wild-type cells and were undetectable by Western blotting unless overexpressed or tagged with a FLAG3 triple-epitope tag. Localization of TraK-FLAG3 in otherwise wild-type cells using immunogold electron microscopy of thin sections revealed a single gold particle on some cells. These results suggest that the gonococcal T4SS may be present in single copy per cell and that small amounts of T4SS proteins TraK and TraB are sufficient for DNA secretion. PMID:24914183

  8. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif phosphorylation during engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by the neutrophil-restricted CEACAM3 (CD66d) receptor.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Shannon E; Schneider, Jutta; Liao, Edward H; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2003-08-01

    Gonorrhea is characterized by a purulent urethral or cervical discharge consisting primarily of neutrophils associated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. These interactions are facilitated by gonococcal colony opacity-associated (Opa) protein binding to host cellular CEACAM receptors. Of these, CEACAM3 is restricted to neutrophils and contains an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) reminiscent of that found within certain phagocytic Fc receptors. CEACAM3 was tyrosine phosphorylated by a Src family kinase-dependent process upon infection by gonococci expressing CEACAM-specific Opa proteins. This phosphorylation was necessary for efficient bacterial uptake; however, a less efficient uptake process became evident when kinase inhibitors or mutagenesis of the ITAM were used to prevent phosphorylation. Ligated CEACAM3 was recruited to a cytoskeleton-containing fraction, intense foci of polymerized actin were evident where bacteria attached to HeLa-CEACAM3, and disruption of polymerized actin by cytochalasin D blocked all bacterial uptake by these cells. These data support a model whereby CEACAM3 can mediate the Opa-dependent uptake of N. gonorrhoeae via either an efficient, ITAM phosphorylation-dependent process that resembles phagocytosis or a less efficient, tyrosine phosphorylation-independent mechanism. PMID:12864848

  9. Prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and human papillomavirus in a sexual health clinic setting in urban Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Samarawickrema, N A; Tabrizi, S N; Young, E; Gunawardena, P; Garland, S M

    2015-09-01

    The prevalences of Trichomonas vaginalis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and human papillomavirus (HPV) in Sri Lanka are not well reported; the objective of this study is to describe the prevalences of these four sexually transmitted infections among attendees of sexual health clinic in an urban setting. Vaginal swabs were collected from consenting women attending a sexual health clinic and tested for the presence of the above sexually transmitted infections using nucleic acid amplification techniques. Basic demographic details were sought from each participant (483 women of age range 14-61, median 30 years, IQR 12 years) via a research assistant-administered questionnaire. Overall, a prevalence of T. vaginalis, C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae and HPV was 2.3%, (95% CI: 1.2-4.1%), 8.2% (95% CI: 5.6-11.4%), 7.6% (95% CI: 5.2-10.8%), and 44.4% (95% CI: 39.8-49.1%), respectively. Among the 197 positive for HPV, HPV6 accounted for 23.1%, HPV16 (12.5%), then HPV11, HPV66 and HPV58 were the commonest. Vaccine-related types (6/11/16/18) were detected in 59.9% of cases (95%CI: 52.7-66.8%). The high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (45.2%) is a potential risk factor for an increase in HIV infections in the country and the high carriage of HPV supports the need for cervical cancer screening and prevention programmes. PMID:25258396

  10. Characterization of an ntrX Mutant of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Reveals a Response Regulator That Controls Expression of Respiratory Enzymes in Oxidase-Positive Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Atack, John M.; Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Djoko, Karrera Y.; Welch, Jessica P.; Hasri, Norain H. M.; Steichen, Christopher T.; Vanden Hoven, Rachel N.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Othman, Dk Seti Maimonah Pg; Kappler, Ulrike; Apicella, Michael A.; Jennings, Michael P.; Edwards, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    NtrYX is a sensor-histidine kinase/response regulator two-component system that has had limited characterization in a small number of Alphaproteobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of the response regulator NtrX showed that this two-component system is extensively distributed across the bacterial domain, and it is present in a variety of Betaproteobacteria, including the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of several components of the respiratory chain was reduced in an N. gonorrhoeae ntrX mutant compared to that in the isogenic wild-type (WT) strain 1291. These included the cytochrome c oxidase subunit (ccoP), nitrite reductase (aniA), and nitric oxide reductase (norB). Enzyme activity assays showed decreased cytochrome oxidase and nitrite reductase activities in the ntrX mutant, consistent with microarray data. N. gonorrhoeae ntrX mutants had reduced capacity to survive inside primary cervical cells compared to the wild type, and although they retained the ability to form a biofilm, they exhibited reduced survival within the biofilm compared to wild-type cells, as indicated by LIVE/DEAD staining. Analyses of an ntrX mutant in a representative alphaproteobacterium, Rhodobacter capsulatus, showed that cytochrome oxidase activity was also reduced compared to that in the wild-type strain SB1003. Taken together, these data provide evidence that the NtrYX two-component system may be a key regulator in the expression of respiratory enzymes and, in particular, cytochrome c oxidase, across a wide range of proteobacteria, including a variety of bacterial pathogens. PMID:23564168

  11. High-level cefixime- and ceftriaxone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in France: novel penA mosaic allele in a successful international clone causes treatment failure.

    PubMed

    Unemo, Magnus; Golparian, Daniel; Nicholas, Robert; Ohnishi, Makoto; Gallay, Anne; Sednaoui, Patrice

    2012-03-01

    Recently, the first Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain (H041) highly resistant to the expanded-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) ceftriaxone and cefixime, which are the last remaining options for first-line gonorrhea treatment, was isolated in Japan. Here, we confirm and characterize a second strain (F89) with high-level cefixime and ceftriaxone resistance which was isolated in France and most likely caused a treatment failure with cefixime. F89 was examined using six species-confirmatory tests, antibiograms (33 antimicrobials), porB sequencing, N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and sequencing of known gonococcal resistance determinants (penA, mtrR, penB, ponA, and pilQ). F89 was assigned to MLST sequence type 1901 (ST1901) and NG-MAST ST1407, which is a successful gonococcal clone that has spread globally. F89 has high-level resistance to cefixime (MIC = 4 μg/ml) and ceftriaxone (MIC = 1 to 2 μg/ml) and resistance to most other antimicrobials examined. A novel penA mosaic allele (penA-CI), which was penA-XXXIV with an additional A501P alteration in penicillin-binding protein 2, was the primary determinant for high-level ESC resistance, as determined by transformation into a set of recipient strains. N. gonorrhoeae appears to be emerging as a superbug, and in certain circumstances and settings, gonorrhea may become untreatable. Investigations of the biological fitness and enhanced understanding and monitoring of the ESC-resistant clones and their international transmission are required. Enhanced disease control activities, antimicrobial resistance control and surveillance worldwide, and public health response plans for global (and national) perspectives are also crucial. Nevertheless, new treatment strategies and/or drugs and, ideally, a vaccine are essential to develop for efficacious gonorrhea management. PMID:22155830

  12. High in vitro susceptibility to the novel spiropyrimidinetrione ETX0914 (AZD0914) among 873 contemporary clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from 21 European countries from 2012 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Unemo, Magnus; Ringlander, Johan; Wiggins, Catherine; Fredlund, Hans; Jacobsson, Susanne; Cole, Michelle

    2015-09-01

    Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae against all antimicrobials available for the treatment of gonorrhea has emerged. The first gonococcal strains with high-level resistance to ceftriaxone, the last option for first-line empirical antimicrobial monotherapy, were recently described. Consequently, new treatment options are essential. In this study, the in vitro activity of the novel spiropyrimidinetrione ETX0914 (AZD0914), a DNA topoisomerase II inhibitor, was investigated among contemporary consecutive clinical N. gonorrhoeae isolates obtained in 21 European countries and compared to the activities of antimicrobials currently or previously recommended for treatment. Consecutive clinical N. gonorrhoeae isolates (n = 873) cultured in 21 European countries from 2012 to 2014 were examined for their susceptibility to ETX0914. The MICs of ETX0914 were determined using the agar dilution method. For comparison, the MICs of ceftriaxone, cefixime, azithromycin, and ciprofloxacin were determined using Etest or the agar dilution method. For ETX0914, the MIC range, modal MIC, MIC50, and MIC90 were ≤0.002 to 0.25 mg/liter, 0.125 mg/liter, 0.064 mg/liter, and 0.125 mg/liter, respectively. The MIC values were substantially lower than those of the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin and most other antimicrobials examined. No cross-resistance with any other examined antimicrobial was observed. In conclusion, the in vitro susceptibility to the novel spiropyrimidinetrione ETX0914 (AZD0914) among 873 contemporary clinical isolates from 21 European countries was high, and no cross-resistance to antimicrobials currently or previously used for gonorrhea treatment was indicated. Additional studies investigating the in vitro and in vivo induction and mechanisms of ETX0914 resistance in gonococci, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics in modeling/simulations and in humans, and performance in randomized controlled gonorrhea treatment trials are essential. PMID:26077246

  13. Rapid detection of gyrA and parC mutations in fluoroquinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Shirakawa, Toshiro; Okada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazushi; Udaka, Tohru; Kamidono, Sadao; Arakawa, Soichi; Gotoh, Akinobu

    2004-12-01

    The detection of DNA sequence variation is fundamental to the identification of the genomic basis of phenotypic variability. Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) is a novel technique that is used to detect mutations in human DNA. This is the first report that this technique is used as a tool to detect mutations in genes encoding fluoroquinolone resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Eighty-one strains of N. gonorrhoeae were used in this study. Genomic DNA from each strain was subjected to PCR amplification of 225 bp in gyrA and 166 bp in parC spanning the fluoroquinolone-resistance determining regions (QRDRs). After we performed DNA sequencing of these amplicons and identification of mutations in the QRDRs, DHPLC was undertaken to investigate whether its results correlate the distinctive chromatogram with their DNA mutations pattern. The profilings detected by DHPLC completely corresponded to the results of the DNA sequencing in mutation patters in gyrA and parC genes. They resulted in the following amino acid substitutions: Ser-91Phe, Asp-95Gly, and Asp-95Asn in gyrA; and Gly-85Asp, Asp-86Asn, Ser-87Arg, and Ser-88Pro in parC, respectively. These mutations existed alone or as combinations, and we identified five mutations patterns in gyrA and six in parC including wild-type. These mutations and their patterns could be rapidly and reproducibly identified from the PCR products using DHPLC, producing specific peak patterns that correlate with genotypes. This novel detection system facilitates the detection of resistance alleles, providing a rapid (5 min per sample), economic (96 sample per run), and reliable technique for characterizing fluoroquinolone resistance in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:15488283

  14. Rapid spread of Neisseria gonorrhoeae ciprofloxacin resistance due to a newly introduced resistant strain in Nuuk, Greenland, 2012–2015: a community-based prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Michael Lynge; Poulsen, Peter; Berthelsen, Lene; Nørgaard, Christina; Hoffmann, Steen; Jensen, Jørgen Skov

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the antimicrobial susceptibility and genotype distribution of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains isolated from a cohort of patients in Nuuk, Greenland in order to assess the risk of rapid spread in the event of introduction of new strains. Methods Gonococcal isolates (n=102) obtained from a prospective cohort study of ciprofloxacin resistance were collected between March 2012 and February 2013. Etest minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, ceftriaxone, penicillin, tetracycline, spectinomycin and gentamicin. All isolates were subjected to molecular typing using N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST). After the introduction of a ciprofloxacin-resistant strain in early 2014, an additional 18 isolates were characterised. Results During the study period, all 102 isolates were fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin (≤0.03 mg/L), azithromycin, spectinomycin, gentamicin and ceftriaxone. 10 different NG-MAST types circulated in Nuuk but 7 were found as single isolates, and 3 of the 7 belonged to 1 of the 3 major genogroups (G210, G9816 and G9817) together comprising 96% of the 102 isolates. ST210 accounted for 55% of the 102 strains. The newly introduced ciprofloxacin resistant strain belonged to ST2400 and dominated the population with 59% resistant strains within 6 months after its introduction. All G2400 strains had MICs≥2 mg/L. Conclusions Introduction of a ciprofloxacin-resistant strain into a very homogeneous N. gonorrhoeae population led to an explosive spread of the resistant clone, probably as a result of large sexual networks suggested by the strain homogeneity. Careful surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility is essential to avoid widespread treatment failure in closed populations. PMID:27577587

  15. Neisseria gonorrhoeae MutS Affects Pilin Antigenic Variation through Mismatch Correction and Not by pilE Guanine Quartet Binding

    PubMed Central

    Rotman, Ella

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many pathogens use homologous recombination to vary surface antigens to avoid immune surveillance. Neisseria gonorrhoeae achieves this in part by changing the properties of its surface pili in a process called pilin antigenic variation (AV). Pilin AV occurs by high-frequency gene conversion reactions that transfer silent pilS sequences into the expressed pilE locus and requires the formation of an upstream guanine quartet (G4) DNA structure to initiate this process. The MutS and MutL proteins of the mismatch correction (MMC) system act to correct mismatches after replication and prevent homeologous (i.e., partially homologous) recombination, but MutS orthologs can also bind to G4 structures. A previous study showed that mutation of MutS resulted in a 3-fold increase in pilin AV, which could be due to the loss of MutS antirecombination properties or loss of G4 binding. We tested two site-directed separation-of-function MutS mutants that are both predicted to bind to G4s but are not able to perform MMC. Pilus phase variation assays and DNA sequence analysis of pilE variants produced in these mutants showed that all three mutS mutants and a mutL mutant had similar increased frequencies of pilin AV. Moreover, the mutS mutants all showed similar increased levels of pilin AV-dependent synthetic lethality. These results show that antirecombination by MMC is the reason for the effect that MutS has on pilin AV and is not due to pilE G4 binding by MutS. IMPORTANCE Neisseria gonorrhoeae continually changes its outer surface proteins to avoid recognition by the immune system. N. gonorrhoeae alters the antigenicity of the pilus by directed recombination between partially homologous pilin copies in a process that requires a guanine quartet (G4) structure. The MutS protein of the mismatch correction (MMC) system prevents recombination between partially homologous sequences and can also bind to G4s. We confirmed that loss of MMC increases the frequency of pilin antigenic

  16. An in vitro-differentiated human cell line as a model system to study the interaction of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with phagocytic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hauck, C R; Lorenzen, D; Saas, J; Meyer, T F

    1997-01-01

    The extreme host specificity of pathogenic neisseriae limits investigations aimed at the analysis of bacterial-host interactions almost completely to the use of in vitro models. Although permanent epithelial and endothelial cell lines are already indispensable tools with respect to initial infection processes, studies concerning the interaction of neisseriae with phagocytic cells have been confined to primary human blood cells. We investigated the use of human leukemia-derived monocytic and myelomonocytic cell lines that can be differentiated in vitro towards phagocytic cells by a panel of chemical and biological reagents including cytokines, vitamin analogs, and antileukemia drugs. Whereas tumor necrosis factor alpha, gamma interferon, bufalin, or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor only marginally increased the ability of monocytic MonoMac-6 and myelomonocytic JOSK-M cells to interact with the bacteria, retinoic acid and vitamin D3 treatment for 2 to 4 days led to highly phagocytic cells that internalized gonococci in an Opa protein-specific manner. This is comparable to the phagocytosis by primary monocytes from human blood, where more than 80% of cells are infected with intracellular bacteria. The increased phagocytic activity of JOSK-M cells following in vitro differentiation was paralleled by enhanced oxidative burst capacity. Whereas undifferentiated cells responded to neither phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate nor other known soluble and particulate stimuli, cells incubated with retinoic acid and bufalin showed the same pattern and the same intensity of oxidative burst activity in response to Neisseria gonorrhoeae as primary cells: Opa-expressing gonococci elicited an oxidative burst, whereas Opa- gonococci did not. The surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules was only slightly changed after retinoic acid treatment. Also, phagocytosis of gonococci had no influence on MHC class II surface expression. Taken

  17. Determination of Disk Diffusion and MIC Quality Control Guidelines for Solithromycin, a Novel Fluoroketolide Antibacterial, against Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Ross, James E.; Farrell, David J.; Flamm, Robert K.; Jones, Ronald N.

    2015-01-01

    This solithromycin quality control study was performed to establish quality control (QC) ranges for the N. gonorrhoeae ATCC 49226 control strain for MIC agar dilution testing (AD) and zones by disk diffusion testing (DD). The following ranges were established: AD, 0.03 to 0.25 μg/ml, and DD, 33 to 43 mm. In January 2015, the CLSI Subcommittee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing approved these ranges, which will be important when evaluating solithromycin against clinical isolates of N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:26378286

  18. Superoxide dismutase and oxygen toxicity defenses in the genus Neisseria.

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, F S; Duong, M N

    1986-01-01

    Among aerotolerant cells, Neisseria gonorrhoeae is very unusual because despite its obligately aerobic lifestyle and frequent isolation from purulent exudates containing polymorphonuclear leukocytes vigorously evolving O2- and H2O2, it contains no superoxide dismutase (SOD). Strains (14) of N. gonorrhoeae were compared with each other and with strains of Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria mucosa, and Neisseria subflava under identical growth conditions for their contents of the oxy-protective enzymes catalase, peroxidase, and SOD, as well as respiratory chain proteins and activity. The absence of SOD from N. gonorrhoeae strains was demonstrated under a variety of oxygen-stress conditions. The neisserial species showed very different SOD, catalase, and peroxidase profiles. These profiles correlated well with the tolerance of the species to various intra- and extracellular oxygen insults. The high tolerance of N. gonorrhoeae for extracellular O2- and H2O2 appeared to be due to very high constitutive levels of peroxidase and catalase activity combined with a cell envelope impervious to O2-. Nevertheless, N. gonorrhoeae 19424 was much more sensitive to an intracellular flux of O2- than were the other (SOD-containing) neisserial species. The responses of N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis respiratory and oxy-protective enzymes to growth under high and low oxygen tensions were followed, and a novel response, the apparent repression of the respiratory chain intermediates, respiration, and SOD, peroxidase, and catalase activity, was observed. The gonococcal catalase was partially purified and characterized. The results suggest that the very active terminal oxidase, low pO2 natural habitat, O2-stable catalase, and possibly the high glutathione content of the organism explain its aerobic survival in the absence of SOD. PMID:3943903

  19. Absence of mucosal immunity in the human upper respiratory tract to the commensal bacteria Neisseria lactamica but not pathogenic Neisseria meningitidis during the peak age of nasopharyngeal carriage.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Andrew T; Gorringe, Andrew; Davenport, Victoria; Williams, Neil A; Heyderman, Robert S

    2009-02-15

    The normal flora that colonizes the mucosal epithelia has evolved diverse strategies to evade, modulate, or suppress the immune system and avoid clearance. Neisseria lactamica and Neisseria meningitidis are closely related obligate inhabitants of the human upper respiratory tract. N. lactamica is a commensal but N. meningitidis is an opportunistic pathogen that occasionally causes invasive disease such as meningitis and septicemia. We demonstrate that unlike N. meningitidis, N. lactamica does not prime the development of mucosal T or B cell memory during the peak period of colonization. This cannot be explained by the induction of peripheral tolerance or regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell activity. Instead, N. lactamica mediates a B cell-dependent mitogenic proliferative response that is absent to N. meningitidis. This mitogenic response is associated with the production of T cell-independent polyclonal IgM that we propose functions by shielding colonizing N. lactamica from the adaptive immune system, maintaining immunological ignorance in the host. We conclude that, in contrast to N. meningitidis, N. lactamica maintains a commensal relationship with the host in the absence of an adaptive immune response. This may prolong the period of susceptibility to colonization by both pathogenic and nonpathogenic Neisseria species. PMID:19201877

  20. Biochemical characterization of the O-linked glycosylation pathway in Neisseria gonorrhoeae responsible for biosynthesis of protein glycans containing N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Meredith D; Morrison, Michael J; Aas, Finn Erik; Børud, Bente; Koomey, Michael; Imperiali, Barbara

    2011-06-01

    The O-linked protein glycosylation pathway in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is responsible for the synthesis of a complex oligosaccharide on undecaprenyl diphosphate and subsequent en bloc transfer of the glycan to serine residues of select periplasmic proteins. Protein glycosylation (pgl) genes have been annotated on the basis of bioinformatics and top-down mass spectrometry analysis of protein modifications in pgl-null strains [Aas, F. E., et al. (2007) Mol. Microbiol. 65, 607-624; Vik, A., et al. (2009) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 4447-4452], but relatively little biochemical analysis has been performed to date. In this report, we present the expression, purification, and functional characterization of seven Pgl enzymes. Specifically, the enzymes studied are responsible for synthesis of an uncommon uridine diphosphate (UDP)-sugar (PglD, PglC, and PglB-acetyltransferase domain), glycan assembly (PglB-phospho-glycosyltransferase domain, PglA, PglE, and PglH), and final oligosaccharide transfer (PglO). UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-α-d-hexose (DATDH), which is the first sugar in glycan biosynthesis, was produced enzymatically, and the stereochemistry was assigned as uridine diphosphate N'-diacetylbacillosamine (UDP-diNAcBac) by nuclear magnetic resonance characterization. In addition, the substrate specificities of the phospho-glycosyltransferase, glycosyltransferases, and oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase) were analyzed in vitro, and in most cases, these enzymes exhibited strong preferences for the native substrates relative to closely related glycans. In particular, PglO, the O-linked OTase, and PglB(Cj), the N-linked OTase from Campylobacter jejuni, preferred the native N. gonorrhoeae and C. jejuni substrates, respectively. This study represents the first comprehensive biochemical characterization of this important O-linked glycosylation pathway and provides the basis for further investigations of these enzymes as antibacterial targets. PMID:21542610

  1. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of the gene (aniA) encoding the major anaerobically induced outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Hoehn, G T; Clark, V L

    1992-11-01

    When grown under anaerobic conditions, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, expresses several novel outer membrane proteins. One of these, Pan 1, has an apparent molecular mass of 54 kDa in electrophoresis and is recognized by serum samples from patients with gonococcal infection. The presence of antibodies to this protein in patient sera suggests that Pan 1 is expressed during gonococcal infection and, more importantly, that N. gonorrhoeae grows anaerobically in vivo. We have cloned the Pan 1 structural gene, aniA, by screening a gonococcal lambda gt11 expression library with monospecific, polyclonal anti-Pan 1 antiserum. Three distinct immunoreactive recombinants, containing overlapping fragments of DNA, were isolated and confirmed to be coding for Pan 1 protein sequences. Northern (RNA blot) hybridization of an insert from an aniA recombinant to total gonococcal cellular RNA revealed the presence of a 1.5-kb transcript that was specific to RNA from anaerobically grown gonococci, indicating that the aniA gene is regulated at the transcriptional level and is monocistronic. To characterize the aniA gene, we have sequenced the entire 2-kb region spanned by the overlapping recombinants. We have also performed primer extension analysis on RNA isolated from aerobically and anaerobically grown gonococci in order to define the aniA promoter region. Two putative primer extension products specific to organisms grown anaerobically were identified by homology to known Escherichia coli promoter sequences, suggesting that the regulation of aniA expression involves multiple promoter regions. PMID:1383156

  2. Opa binding to cellular CD66 receptors mediates the transcellular traversal of Neisseria gonorrhoeae across polarized T84 epithelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Gray-Owen, S D; Knorre, A; Meyer, T F; Dehio, C

    1998-11-01

    We have analysed the capacity of the 11 phase-variable, opacity-associated (Opa) proteins encoded by Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11 to mediate traversal across polarized monolayers of the human colonic carcinoma T84 cell line. Gonococci expressing either the heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG) binding Opa protein (Opa50) or no Opa protein (Opa-) did not interact with the apical pole of T84 monolayers, whereas the 10 variant Opa proteins previously shown to bind CD66 receptors were found to mediate efficient gonococcal adherence and transepithelial traversal. Consistent with this, T84 cells were shown by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting to co-express CD66a (BGP), CD66c (NCA) and CD66e (CEA). The recruitment of CD66 receptors by Opa-expressing gonococci indicates their involvement in mediating adherence to the surface of T84 cells, and these bacterial interactions could be inhibited completely using polyclonal antibodies cross-reacting with all of the CD66 proteins co-expressed on T84 cells. Consistent results were obtained when Opa proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, suggesting that the Opa-CD66 interaction is sufficient to mediate bacterial traversal. Transcytosis of Opa-expressing N. gonorrhoeae or E. coli did not disrupt the barrier function of infected monolayers, as indicated by a sustained transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) throughout the course of infection, and confocal laser scanning and electron microscopy both suggest a transcellular rather than a paracellular route of traversal across the monolayers. Parallels between the results seen here and previous work done with organ cultures confirm that T84 monolayers provide a valid model for studying neisserial interactions with the mucosal surface, and suggest that CD66 receptors contribute to this process in vivo. PMID:9822830

  3. Amidase Activity of AmiC Controls Cell Separation and Stem Peptide Release and Is Enhanced by NlpD in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Jonathan D; Stohl, Elizabeth A; Robertson, Rosanna M; Hackett, Kathleen T; Fisher, Kathryn; Xiong, Kalia; Lee, Mijoon; Hesek, Dusan; Mobashery, Shahriar; Seifert, H Steven; Davies, Christopher; Dillard, Joseph P

    2016-05-13

    The human-restricted pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae encodes a single N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase involved in cell separation (AmiC), as compared with three largely redundant cell separation amidases found in Escherichia coli (AmiA, AmiB, and AmiC). Deletion of amiC from N. gonorrhoeae results in severely impaired cell separation and altered peptidoglycan (PG) fragment release, but little else is known about how AmiC functions in gonococci. Here, we demonstrated that gonococcal AmiC can act on macromolecular PG to liberate cross-linked and non-cross-linked peptides indicative of amidase activity, and we provided the first evidence that a cell separation amidase can utilize a small synthetic PG fragment as substrate (GlcNAc-MurNAc(pentapeptide)-GlcNAc-MurNAc(pentapeptide)). An investigation of two residues in the active site of AmiC revealed that Glu-229 is critical for both normal cell separation and the release of PG fragments by gonococci during growth. In contrast, Gln-316 has an autoinhibitory role, and its mutation to lysine resulted in an AmiC with increased enzymatic activity on macromolecular PG and on the synthetic PG derivative. Curiously, the same Q316K mutation that increased AmiC activity also resulted in cell separation and PG fragment release defects, indicating that activation state is not the only factor determining normal AmiC activity. In addition to displaying high basal activity on PG, gonococcal AmiC can utilize metal ions other than the zinc cofactor typically used by cell separation amidases, potentially protecting its ability to function in zinc-limiting environments. Thus gonococcal AmiC has distinct differences from related enzymes, and these studies revealed parameters for how AmiC functions in cell separation and PG fragment release. PMID:26984407

  4. Mating pair formation homologue TraG is a variable membrane protein essential for contact-independent type IV secretion of chromosomal DNA by Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Petra L; Chan, Yolande A; Hackett, Kathleen T; Turner, Nicholas; Hamilton, Holly L; Cloud-Hansen, Karen A; Dillard, Joseph P

    2013-04-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae uses a type IV secretion system (T4SS) to secrete chromosomal DNA into the surrounding milieu. The DNA is effective in transforming gonococci in the population, and this mechanism of DNA donation may contribute to the high degree of genetic diversity in this species. Similar to other F-like T4SSs, the gonococcal T4SS requires a putative membrane protein, TraG, for DNA transfer. In F-plasmid and related systems, the homologous protein acts in pilus production, mating pair stabilization, and entry exclusion. We characterized the localization, membrane topology, and variation of TraG in N. gonorrhoeae. TraG was found to be an inner-membrane protein with one large periplasmic region and one large cytoplasmic region. Each gonococcal strain carried one of three different alleles of traG. Strains that carried the smallest allele of traG were found to lack the peptidoglycanase gene atlA but carried a peptidoglycan endopeptidase gene in place of atlA. The purified endopeptidase degraded gonococcal peptidoglycan in vitro, cutting the peptide cross-links. Although the other two traG alleles functioned for DNA secretion in strain MS11, the smallest traG did not support DNA secretion. Despite the requirement for a mating pair stabilization homologue, static coculture transformation experiments demonstrated that DNA transfer was nuclease sensitive and required active uptake by the recipient, thus demonstrating that transfer occurred by transformation and not conjugation. Together, these results demonstrate the TraG acts in a process of DNA export not specific to conjugation and that different forms of TraG affect what substrates can be transported. PMID:23378511

  5. An inhibitor of DNA binding and uptake events dictates the proficiency of genetic transformation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: mechanism of action and links to Type IV pilus expression.

    PubMed

    Aas, Finn Erik; Løvold, Cecilia; Koomey, Michael

    2002-12-01

    Although natural genetic transformation is a widely disseminated form of genetic exchange in prokaryotic species, the proficiencies with which DNA recognition, uptake and processing occur in nature vary greatly. However, the molecular factors and interactions underlying intra- and interspecies diversity in levels of competence for natural genetic transformation are poorly understood. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the Gram-negative aetiologic agent of gonorrhoea, DNA binding and uptake involve components required for Type IV pilus (Tfp) biogenesis as well as those which are structurally related to Tfp biogenesis components but dispensable for organelle expression. We demonstrate here that the gonococcal PilV protein, structurally related to Tfp pilin subunits, is an intrinsic inhibitor of natural genetic transformation which acts ultimately by reducing the levels of sequence-specific DNA uptake into the cell. Specifically, we show that DNA uptake is enhanced in strains bearing pilV mutations and reduced in strains overexpressing PilV. Furthermore, we show that PilV exerts its effect by acting as an antagonist of ComP, a positive effector of sequence-specific DNA binding. As it prevents the accumulation of ComP at a site where it can be purified by shear extraction of intact cells, the data are most consistent with PilV either obstructing ComP trafficking or altering ComP stability. In addition, we report that ComP and PilV play overlapping and partially redundant roles in Tfp biogenesis and document other genetic interactions between comP and pilV together with the pilE and pilT genes required for the expression of retractile Tfp. Together, the results reveal a novel mechanism by which the levels of competence are governed in prokaryotic species and suggest unique ways by which competence might be modulated. PMID:12453228

  6. Integration Host Factor is required for FarR repression of the farAB-encoded efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Hill, Stuart A; Napier, Ruth; Shafer, William M

    2006-06-01

    The farAB operon encodes an efflux pump system that mediates the resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to antimicrobial long-chain fatty acids. We previously observed that expression of farAB is negatively regulated by the FarR repressor. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism by which FarR represses expression of farAB. DNase I footprinting analysis, coupled with a deletion analysis of the farAB promoter region, indicated that FarR binds to three sites (termed sites A, B and C) within the DNA sequence upstream of farA; genetic analysis revealed, however, that site B is not required for FarR repression of farAB. This repression also required the presence of Integration Host Factor (IHF), which was found to bind to sequences located between FarR binding sites A and C. We determined that IHF binding to the farAB promoter region could inhibit transcription in vitro and that such binding induced a bending of the target DNA, which we propose to be important in regulating this operon. IHF binding to the promoter region was found to stabilize the binding of FarR to its binding sites A and C and as a consequence, enhanced repression of farAB expression mediated by FarR. We propose a model in which expression of the farAB-encoded efflux pump in N. gonorrhoeae is modulated by the DNA binding activities of FarR and IHF. PMID:16796676

  7. Elaboration of a 3.6-kilodalton lipooligosaccharide, antibody against which is absent from human sera, is associated with serum resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, H; Griffiss, J M; Mandrell, R E; Jarvis, G A

    1985-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains that resist lysis by normal human sera (NHS) do so, in part, because NHS contain immunoglobulin M (IgM) specific for lipooligosaccharide (LOS) antigens of serum-sensitive strains, but lack antibodies for LOS antigens that can serve as loci for immune lysis of serum-resistant (serr) strains. We used a monoclonal antibody (McAb), specific for an epitope within a 3.6-kilodalton (kDa) component of Neisseria meningitidis L8 LOS, that binds a 3.6-kDa gonococcal LOS component so that we could explore further serr gonococcal strains. The McAb bound to the LOS of 6 of 7 serr of strains but not to the LOS of 0 of 14 serum-sensitive and serum-intermediate gonococcal strains of diverse origin. We studied three serr strains further. Strain 7134 does not elaborate the 3.6-kDa LOS component and does not bind the McAb; strains WR220 and WR302 do elaborate the 3.6-kDa LOS component. The titer (log2) at which the McAb, diluted in NHS, lysed strain WR220 was 7.7; for WR302 it was 3.7, and for 7134 it was 0. Addition of McAb to NHS caused increased classical and alternative-pathway C3 deposition onto strain WR220, but only classical-pathway-activated C3 deposition onto strain WR302. The difference in lytic effectiveness of the McAb for the two strains, therefore, may result from differences in alternative-pathway augmentation of McAb-dependent classical-pathway activation on their surfaces. None of 40 randomly selected normal young adults had serum antibody that could compete with the McAb for binding to WR220 LOS in a solid-phase RIA. We conclude that the 3.6-kDa LOS component is commonly expressed by serr strains of N. gonorrhoeae and that antibody to it would be lytic if present in human serum, but that it is infrequently, if ever, present. As a result, strains elaborating this LOS are resistant to lysis by NHS. Images PMID:3934078

  8. Association of human papillomavirus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis co-infections on the risk of high-grade squamous intraepithelial cervical lesion

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, André LP; Malaguti, Natália; Souza, Raquel P; Uchimura, Nelson S; Ferreira, Érika C; Pereira, Monalisa W; Carvalho, Maria DB; Pelloso, Sandra M; Bonini, Marcelo G; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia EL

    2016-01-01

    The link between high-risk human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the risk of developing cervical cancer still unclear. Thus, in this report we investigated the rates of co-infections between HPV and other important non-HPV STDs in different cervical findings using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) to simultaneously detect Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, HSV-1 and -2, and Treponema pallidum. A total of 838 women aged 18 to 68 years were screened using Papanicolaou smears for cervical abnormalities, HPV and non-HPV STDs using PCR and M-PCR methods. A total of 614 (73.3%) of the women had normal cytology (NILM) and 224 (26.7%) women exhibited abnormal cytology (≥ ASC-US). HPV-DNA prevalence was 33.9%, and HPV-16 was the most prevalent genotype in women with NILM and ≥ ASC-US cytology. Non-HPV STDs were detected in 30.4% women and T. vaginalis was the most prevalent one (11.6%). A higher increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL occurred in co-infections of HR-HPV with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with HSV-2 exhibited a similar increased risk but only with ≥ ASC-US. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with T. vaginalis demonstrated a similar increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL. We found that C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae were the primary pathogens associated with HR-HPV for the increased risk for all grades of cervical abnormalities but mainly for HSIL, suggesting a possible synergistic action in cervical lesions progression. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that some non-HPV STDs might play a role as co-factors in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis. These data improve our understanding of the etiology of SCC and may also be useful for disease prevention. PMID:27429850

  9. Association of human papillomavirus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis co-infections on the risk of high-grade squamous intraepithelial cervical lesion.

    PubMed

    de Abreu, André Lp; Malaguti, Natália; Souza, Raquel P; Uchimura, Nelson S; Ferreira, Érika C; Pereira, Monalisa W; Carvalho, Maria Db; Pelloso, Sandra M; Bonini, Marcelo G; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia El

    2016-01-01

    The link between high-risk human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the risk of developing cervical cancer still unclear. Thus, in this report we investigated the rates of co-infections between HPV and other important non-HPV STDs in different cervical findings using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) to simultaneously detect Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, HSV-1 and -2, and Treponema pallidum. A total of 838 women aged 18 to 68 years were screened using Papanicolaou smears for cervical abnormalities, HPV and non-HPV STDs using PCR and M-PCR methods. A total of 614 (73.3%) of the women had normal cytology (NILM) and 224 (26.7%) women exhibited abnormal cytology (≥ ASC-US). HPV-DNA prevalence was 33.9%, and HPV-16 was the most prevalent genotype in women with NILM and ≥ ASC-US cytology. Non-HPV STDs were detected in 30.4% women and T. vaginalis was the most prevalent one (11.6%). A higher increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL occurred in co-infections of HR-HPV with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with HSV-2 exhibited a similar increased risk but only with ≥ ASC-US. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with T. vaginalis demonstrated a similar increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL. We found that C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae were the primary pathogens associated with HR-HPV for the increased risk for all grades of cervical abnormalities but mainly for HSIL, suggesting a possible synergistic action in cervical lesions progression. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that some non-HPV STDs might play a role as co-factors in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis. These data improve our understanding of the etiology of SCC and may also be useful for disease prevention. PMID:27429850

  10. Influence of storage time on DNA of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae for accurate detection by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Rong, C Z; Zhao, J Y; Lao, X J; Xie, L; Li, S; Qin, X

    2016-01-01

    The shipment and storage conditions of clinical samples pose a major challenge to the detection accuracy of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) when using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of storage time at 4°C on the DNA of these pathogens and its effect on their detection by qRT-PCR. CT, NG, and UU positive genital swabs from 70 patients were collected, and DNA of all samples were extracted and divided into eight aliquots. One aliquot was immediately analyzed with qRT-PCR to assess the initial pathogen load, whereas the remaining samples were stored at 4°C and analyzed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. No significant differences in CT, NG, and UU DNA loads were observed between baseline (day 0) and the subsequent time points (days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28) in any of the 70 samples. Although a slight increase in DNA levels was observed at day 28 compared to day 0, paired sample t-test results revealed no significant differences between the mean DNA levels at different time points following storage at 4°C (all P>0.05). Overall, the CT, UU, and NG DNA loads from all genital swab samples were stable at 4°C over a 28-day period. PMID:27580005

  11. Opacity proteins of neisseria gonorrhoeae in lipooligosaccharide mutants lost ability to interact with neutrophil-restricted CEACAM3 (CD66d).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song; Tu, Ya-Ting; Cai, Hua-Hua; Ding, Hong-Hui; Li, Qiao; He, Ying-Xia; Liu, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin; Hu, Feng; Chen, Tie; Chen, Hong-Xiang

    2016-06-01

    Lipooligosacharide (LOS) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococci, GC) is involved in the interaction of GC with host cells. Deletion of the alpha-oligosaccharide (alpha-OS) moiety of LOS (lgtF mutant) significantly impairs invasion of GC into epithelial cell lines. GC opacity (Opa) proteins, such as OpaI, mediate phagocytosis and stimulate chemiluminescence responses in neutrophils in part through interaction with members of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family, which includes CEACAM3 (CD66d), a human neutrophil specific receptor for phagocytosis of bacteria. In the present work, we examined the effects of OpaI-expressing lgtF mutant on phagocytosis by HeLa-CEACAM3 cells and chemiluminescence responses in neutrophils. The results showed that lgtF mutant even expressing OpaI completely lost the ability to promote either phagocytosis mediated by CEACAM3 interaction in HeLa cells or chemiluminescence responses in neutrophils. These data indicated that Opa proteins in the lgtF mutant, which might result from the conformational change, cannot be functional. PMID:27376801

  12. Type I Interferon Induction by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Dual Requirement of Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase and Toll-like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Warrison A; Agarwal, Sarika; Mo, Shunyan; Shaffer, Scott A; Dillard, Joseph P; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Golenbock, Douglas T

    2016-06-14

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC). Exposure of cells to GC lipooligosaccharides induces a strong immune response, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production via TLR4/MD-2. In addition to living freely in the extracellular space, GC can invade the cytoplasm to evade detection and elimination. Double-stranded DNA introduced into the cytosol binds and activates the enzyme cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), which produces 2'3'-cGAMP and triggers STING/TBK-1/IRF3 activation, resulting in type I IFN expression. Here, we reveal a cytosolic response to GC DNA that also contributes to type I IFN induction. We demonstrate that complete IFN-β induction by live GC depends on both cGAS and TLR4. Type I IFN is detrimental to the host, and dysregulation of iron homeostasis genes may explain lower bacteria survival in cGAS(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) cells. Collectively, these observations reveal cooperation between TLRs and cGAS in immunity to GC infection. PMID:27264171

  13. N terminus determinants of MinC from Neisseria gonorrhoeae mediate interaction with FtsZ but do not affect interaction with MinD or homodimerization.

    PubMed

    Greco-Stewart, V; Ramirez-Arcos, S; Liao, M; Dillon, J R

    2007-06-01

    While bacterial cell division has been widely studied in rod-shaped bacteria, the mechanism of cell division in round (coccal) bacteria remains largely enigmatic. In the present study, interaction between the cell division inhibitor MinC from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (MinC(Ng)) and the gonococcal cell division proteins MinD(Ng) and FtsZ(Ng) are demonstrated. Protein truncation and site-directed mutagenic approaches determined which N-terminal residues were essential for cell division inhibition by MinC(Ng) using cell morphology as an indicator of protein functionality. Truncation from or mutation at the 13th amino acid of the N terminus of MinC(Ng) resulted in loss of protein function. Bioinformatic analyses predicted that point mutations of L35P and L68P would affect the alpha-helical conformation of the protein and we experimentally showed that these mutations alter the functionality of MinC(Ng). The bacterial two-hybrid system showed that interaction of MinC(Ng) with FtsZ(Ng) is abrogated upon truncation of 13 N-terminal residues while MinC(Ng)-MinD(Ng) interaction or MinC(Ng) homodimerization is unaffected. These data confirm interactions among gonococcal cell division proteins and determine the necessity of the 13th amino acid for MinC(Ng) function. PMID:17287984

  14. Functional cloning and characterization of the multidrug efflux pumps NorM from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and YdhE from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Long, Feng; Rouquette-Loughlin, Corinne; Shafer, William M; Yu, Edward W

    2008-09-01

    Active efflux of antimicrobial agents is one of the most important adapted strategies that bacteria use to defend against antimicrobial factors that are present in their environment. The NorM protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the YdhE protein of Escherichia coli have been proposed to be multidrug efflux pumps that belong to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family. In order to determine their antimicrobial export capabilities, we cloned, expressed, and purified these two efflux proteins and characterized their functions both in vivo and in vitro. E. coli strains expressing norM or ydhE showed elevated (twofold or greater) resistance to several antimicrobial agents, including fluoroquinolones, ethidium bromide, rhodamine 6G, acriflavine, crystal violet, berberine, doxorubicin, novobiocin, enoxacin, and tetraphenylphosphonium chloride. When they were expressed in E. coli, both transporters reduced the levels of ethidium bromide and norfloxacin accumulation through a mechanism requiring the proton motive force, and direct measurements of efflux confirmed that NorM behaves as an Na(+)-dependent transporter. The capacities of NorM and YdhE to recognize structurally divergent compounds were confirmed by steady-state fluorescence polarization assays, and the results revealed that these transporters bind to antimicrobials with dissociation constants in the micromolar region. PMID:18591276

  15. Regulation of the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE efflux-pump system modulates the in vivo fitness of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Warner, Douglas M; Folster, Jason P; Shafer, William M; Jerse, Ann E

    2007-12-15

    The Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrC-MtrD-MtrE multidrug-resistance efflux pump expels macrolide antibiotics, penicillin, and antimicrobial effectors of the innate defense. Mutation of the mtrR locus, which encodes a transcriptional repressor of the mtrCDE operon, increases gonococcal resistance to these agents. Here we report that, in a mouse infection model, an mtrR mutant is more fit than the wild-type bacteria. Consistent with derepression of the mtrCDE operon as the primary reason for the fitness benefit, an mtrR,mtrE double mutant and an mtrE mutant showed no difference in survival phenotype. Gonococcal mutants deficient in MtrA, an activator of the mtrCDE operon, exhibited significantly reduced fitness in vivo, and mtrA mutants with spontaneous compensatory mtrR mutations were selected during infection. These results confirm the importance of the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE efflux-pump system during experimental gonococcal genital-tract infection and also illustrate an antibiotic-resistance mechanism that is accompanied by a fitness benefit rather than a fitness cost. PMID:18190261

  16. Influence of storage time on DNA of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae for accurate detection by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y.; Rong, C.Z.; Zhao, J.Y.; Lao, X.J.; Xie, L.; Li, S.; Qin, X.

    2016-01-01

    The shipment and storage conditions of clinical samples pose a major challenge to the detection accuracy of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) when using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of storage time at 4°C on the DNA of these pathogens and its effect on their detection by qRT-PCR. CT, NG, and UU positive genital swabs from 70 patients were collected, and DNA of all samples were extracted and divided into eight aliquots. One aliquot was immediately analyzed with qRT-PCR to assess the initial pathogen load, whereas the remaining samples were stored at 4°C and analyzed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. No significant differences in CT, NG, and UU DNA loads were observed between baseline (day 0) and the subsequent time points (days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28) in any of the 70 samples. Although a slight increase in DNA levels was observed at day 28 compared to day 0, paired sample t-test results revealed no significant differences between the mean DNA levels at different time points following storage at 4°C (all P>0.05). Overall, the CT, UU, and NG DNA loads from all genital swab samples were stable at 4°C over a 28-day period. PMID:27580005

  17. Production, purification, and characterization of a fusion protein of carbonic anhydrase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and cellulose binding domain from Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhu; Bartlow, Patrick; Dilmore, Robert M.; Soong, Yee; Pan, Zhiwei; Koepsel, Richard; Ataai, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture technologies have the potential to become an important climate change mitigation option through sequestration of gaseous CO2, A new concept for CO2 capture involves use of immobilized carbonic anhydrase (CA) that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3- and H+. Cost-efficient production of the enzyme and an inexpensive immobilization system are critical for development of economically feasible CA-based CO2 capture processes. An artificial, bifunctional enzyme containing CA from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and a cellulose binding domain (CBD) from Clostridium thermocellum was constructed with a His6 tag. The chimeric enzyme exhibited both CA activity and CBD binding affinity. This fusion enzyme is of particular interest due to its binding affinity for cellulose and retained CA activity, which could serve as the basis for improved technology to capture CO2 from flue gasses.

  18. Variable opacity (Opa) outer membrane proteins account for the cell tropisms displayed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae for human leukocytes and epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kupsch, E M; Knepper, B; Kuroki, T; Heuer, I; Meyer, T F

    1993-01-01

    Opacity proteins (Opa) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a family of variant outer membrane proteins implicated in pathogenesis, are subject to phase variation. In strain MS11, 11 different opa gene alleles have been identified, the expression of which can be turned on and off independently. Using a reverse genetic approach, we demonstrate that a single Opa protein variant of strain MS11, Opa50, enables gonococci to invade epithelial cells. The remaining variant Opa proteins show no, or very little, specificity for epithelial cells but instead confer interaction with human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Thus, depending on the opa allele expressed, gonococci are capable of invading epithelial cells or of interacting with human leukocytes. The respective properties of Opa proteins are maintained independent of the gonococcal strain; thus, the specificity for epithelial cells or leukocytes is intrinsic to Opa proteins. Significant homology exists in the surface exposed variable regions of two invasion supporting Opa proteins from independent strains. Efficient epithelial cell invasion is favoured by high level Opa production, however, a 10-fold reduction still allows significant invasion by gonococci. In contrast, recombinant Escherichia coli expressing Opa proteins adhered or invaded poorly under similar experimental conditions, thus indicating that additional factors besides Opa are required in the Opa-mediated interaction with human cells. Images PMID:8440254

  19. Prevalence of HIV, syphilis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoea, Trichomonas vaginalis and candidiasis among pregnant women attending an antenatal clinic in Khartoum, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Ortashi, O M; El Khidir, I; Herieka, E

    2004-08-01

    Antenatal screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) has shown some benefits in countries where the practice is adopted. To date the prevalence of STIs in the Sudan is unknown. Our aims were to establish the prevalence of STIs among pregnant women in Khartoum (Sudan), to identify any risk factors and to suggest management. One hundred and fifty-one pregnant women were recruited for the study in an antenatal clinic in Khartoum in 1999. The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis, HIV, Trichomonas vaginalis, syphilis, Neisseria gonorrhoea and vulvo-vaginal candidiasis among the study population was established; 7.3% of patients suffered multiple infections. No risk factors for acquiring an STI were identified apart from genital ulcer disease. These findings suggest that a syndromic approach for treating STIs during pregnancy might not be possible. We conclude that STIs have a high prevalence among pregnant Sudanese women in Khartoum. The providers of health care in the Sudan need to revise their priority list. PMID:15369929

  20. cis- and trans-acting elements involved in regulation of aniA, the gene encoding the major anaerobically induced outer membrane protein in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Householder, T C; Belli, W A; Lissenden, S; Cole, J A; Clark, V L

    1999-01-01

    AniA (formerly Pan1) is the major anaerobically induced outer membrane protein in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. AniA has been shown to be a major antigen in patients with gonococcal disease, and we have been studying its regulation in order to understand the gonococcal response to anaerobiosis and its potential role in virulence. This study presents a genetic analysis of aniA regulation. Through deletion analysis of the upstream region, we have determined the minimal promoter region necessary for aniA expression. This 130-bp region contains a sigma 70-type promoter and an FNR (fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator protein) binding site, both of which are absolutely required for anaerobic expression. Also located in the minimal promoter region are three T-rich direct repeats and several potential NarP binding sites. This 80-bp region is required for induction by nitrite. By site-directed mutagenesis of promoter sequences, we have determined that the transcription of aniA is initiated only from the sigma 70-type promoter. The gearbox promoter, previously believed to be the major promoter, does not appear to be active during anaerobiosis. The gonococcal FNR and NarP homologs are involved in the regulation of aniA, and we demonstrate that placing aniA under the control of the tac promoter compensates for the inability of a gonococcal fnr mutant to grow anaerobically. PMID:9882668

  1. Evaluation of the NucliSens Basic Kit for Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Genital Tract Specimens Using Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, J. B.; Song, X.; Chong, S.; Faught, M.; Salonga, T.; Kapala, J.

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated a new RNA amplification and detection kit, the NucliSens Basic Kit (Organon Teknika), for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in genitourinary specimens. The Basic Kit provides an open platform for RNA amplification and detection and contains isolation reagents for nucleic acid extraction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reagents (enzymes and buffers), and a generic ruthenium-labeled probe for electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection of amplified product. Using freshly purified and titrated stocks of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae and in vitro-generated RNA transcripts for sensitivity determinations, the Basic Kit detected 1 inclusion-forming unit of C. trachomatis, 1 CFU of N. gonorrhoeae, and 100 RNA molecules of 16S rRNA for both bacteria. The clinical performance of the Basic Kit was evaluated by testing a total of 250 specimens for N. gonorrhoeae by culture and NASBA and a total of 96 specimens for C. trachomatis by PCR and NASBA. The Basic Kit detected 139 of 142 N. gonorrhoeae culture-positive specimens and gave a negative result for 73 of 74 culture-negative specimens, for a sensitivity and specificity of 97.9 and 98.7%, respectively. For C. trachomatis, the Basic Kit detected 24 of 24 PCR-positive specimens and gave a negative result for 71 of 72 PCR-negative specimens, for a sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 98.6%, respectively. The Basic Kit also detected specimens containing both N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis, using a multiplex NASBA assay using primers for both bacteria. The NucliSens Basic Kit offers a versatile platform for the development of sensitive RNA detection assays for sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:11283067

  2. Neisseria gonorrhoeae PIII has a role on NG1873 outer membrane localization and is involved in bacterial adhesion to human cervical and urethral epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein PIII is one of the major outer membrane proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 95% identical to RmpM (reduction modifiable protein M) or class 4 protein of Neisseria meningitidis. RmpM is known to be a membrane protein associated by non-covalent bonds to the peptidoglycan layer and interacting with PorA/PorB porin complexes resulting in the stabilization of the bacterial membrane. The C-terminal domain of PIII (and RmpM) is highly homologous to members of the OmpA family, known to have a role in adhesion/invasion in many bacterial species. The contribution of PIII in the membrane architecture and its role in the interaction with epithelial cells has never been investigated. Results We generated a ΔpIII knock-out mutant strain and evaluated the effects of the loss of PIII expression on bacterial morphology and on outer membrane composition. Deletion of the pIII gene does not cause any alteration in bacterial morphology or sensitivity to detergents. Moreover, the expression profile of the main membrane proteins remains the same for the wild-type and knock-out strains, with the exception of the NG1873 which is not exported to the outer membrane and accumulates in the inner membrane in the ΔpIII knock-out mutant strain. We also show that purified PIII protein is able to bind human cervical and urethral cells and that the ΔpIII knock-out mutant strain has a lower ability to adhere to human cervical and urethral cells. Conclusion Here we demonstrated that the PIII protein does not play a key structural role in the membrane organization of gonococcus and does not induce major effects on the expression of the main outer membrane proteins. However, in the PIII knock-out strain, the NG1873 protein is not localized in the outer membrane as it is in the wild-type strain suggesting a possible interaction of PIII with NG1873. The evidence that PIII binds to human epithelial cells derived from the female and male genital tract highlights a possible role of PIII

  3. Interaction of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilA protein with the pilE promoter involves multiple sites on the DNA.

    PubMed

    Arvidson, C G; So, M

    1995-05-01

    PilA is the putative DNA-binding component of a two-component system that regulates transcription of the pilin expression locus (pilE) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Here we report the purification of the PilA protein and characterization of its DNA-binding activity. PilA was overproduced in Escherichia coli with an isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible expression vector. Cell extracts were prepared by sonication and fractionated by anion-exchange chromotography, followed by dye affinity chromatography with Cibacron Blue. Proteins were eluted by using a gradient of KCl, and PilA-containing fractions were identified by immunoblot analysis with a polyclonal anti-PilA antiserum. Purified PilA was judged to be > 90% pure, as determined by Coomassie blue staining and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PilA purified in this manner was used to develop a gel retardation assay with a 301-bp fragment containing the pilE promoter (PpilE) and upstream sequences as a probe. A fragment of similar size containing the E. coli aroH promoter was used as a negative control. Competition experiments using a 100- to 1,000-fold excess of unlabelled DNA fragments confirmed the specificity of PilA binding to the pilE promoter. To localize the PilA binding site within the 301-bp PpilE fragment, stepwise deletions were generated by PCR and the fragments were examined in the gel shift assay. The results of these experiments show that there are two regions upstream of PpilE that are required for binding by PilA. Taken together, these data indicate that while PilA binds specifically to the upstream region of the pilE gene, this interaction is complex and likely involves multiple regions of this DNA sequence. PMID:7730283

  4. cis- and trans-acting elements involved in regulation of norB (norZ), the gene encoding nitric oxide reductase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Isabella, Vincent; Wright, Lori F; Barth, Kenneth; Spence, Janice M; Grogan, Susan; Genco, Caroline A; Clark, Virginia L

    2008-01-01

    The ability of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to reduce nitric oxide (NO) may have important immunomodulatory effects on the host during infection. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the nitric oxide reductase gene (norB) needs to be elucidated. To accomplish this, we analysed the functional regions of the norB upstream region. The promoter contains an extended -10 motif (TGNTACAAT) that is required for high-level expression. Deletion and substitution analysis of the norB upstream region revealed that no sequence upstream of the -10 motif is involved in norB regulation under anaerobic conditions or in the presence of NO. However, replacement of a 29 bp inverted repeat sequence immediately downstream of the extended -10 motif gave high levels of aerobic expression of a norB : : lacZ fusion. Insertional inactivation of gonococcal nsrR, predicted to bind to this inverted repeat sequence, resulted in the loss of norB repression and eliminated NO induction capacity. Single-copy complementation of nsrR in trans restored regulation of both norB transcription and NorB activity by NO. In Escherichia coli, expression of a gonococcal nsrR gene repressed gonococcal norB; induction of norB occurred in the presence of exogenously added NO. NsrR also regulates aniA and dnrN, as well as its own expression. We also determined that Fur regulates norB by a novel indirect activation method, by preventing the binding of a gonococcal ArsR homologue, a second repressor whose putative binding site overlaps the Fur binding site. PMID:18174141

  5. FarR regulates the farAB-encoded efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae via an MtrR regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, E-H; Rouquette-Loughlin, C; Folster, J P; Shafer, W M

    2003-12-01

    The farAB operon of Neisseria gonorrhoeae encodes an efflux pump which mediates gonococcal resistance to antibacterial fatty acids. It was previously observed that expression of the farAB operon was positively regulated by MtrR, which is a repressor of the mtrCDE-encoded efflux pump system (E.-H. Lee and W. M. Shafer, Mol. Microbiol. 33:839-845, 1999). This regulation was believed to be indirect since MtrR did not bind to the farAB promoter. In this study, computer analysis of the gonococcal genome sequence database, lacZ reporter fusions, and gel mobility shift assays were used to elucidate the regulatory mechanism by which expression of the farAB operon is modulated by MtrR in gonococci. We identified a regulatory protein belonging to the MarR family of transcriptional repressors and found that it negatively controls expression of farAB by directly binding to the farAB promoter. We designated this regulator FarR to signify its role in regulating the farAB operon. We found that MtrR binds to the farR promoter, thereby repressing farR expression. Hence, MtrR regulates farAB in a positive fashion by modulating farR expression. This MtrR regulatory cascade seems to play an important role in adjusting levels of the FarAB and MtrCDE efflux pumps to prevent their excess expression in gonococci. PMID:14645274

  6. Structure of FitAB from Neisseria gonorrhoeae bound to DNA reveals a tetramer of toxin-antitoxin heterodimers containing pin domains and ribbon-helix-helix motifs.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Kirsten; Wilbur, J Scott; So, Magdalene; Brennan, Richard G

    2006-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a sexually transmitted pathogen that initiates infections in humans by adhering to the mucosal epithelium of the urogenital tract. The bacterium then enters the apical region of the cell and traffics across the cell to exit into the subepithelial matrix. Mutations in the fast intracellular trafficking (fitAB) locus cause the bacteria to transit a polarized epithelial monolayer more quickly than the wild-type parent and to replicate within cells at an accelerated rate. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the toxin-antitoxin heterodimer, FitAB, bound to a high affinity 36-bp DNA fragment from the fitAB promoter. FitA, the antitoxin, binds DNA through its ribbon-helix-helix motif and is tethered to FitB, the toxin, to form a heterodimer by the insertion of a four turn alpha-helix into an extensive FitB hydrophobic pocket. FitB is composed of a PIN (PilT N terminus) domain, with a central, twisted, 5-stranded parallel beta-sheet that is open on one side and flanked by five alpha-helices. FitB in the context of the FitAB complex does not display nuclease activity against tested PIN substrates. The FitAB complex points to the mechanism by which antitoxins with RHH motifs can block the activity of toxins with PIN domains. Interactions between two FitB molecules result in the formation of a tetramer of FitAB heterodimers, which binds to the 36-bp DNA fragment and provides an explanation for how FitB enhances the DNA binding affinity of FitA. PMID:16982615

  7. Engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: revealing distinct processes of bacterial entry by individual carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule family receptors.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Shannon E; Liao, Edward H; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2004-05-01

    Individual Neisseria gonorrhoeae colony opacity-associated (Opa) protein variants can bind up to four different carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule (CEACAM) receptors. Most human cells encountered by gonococci express a combination of CEACAM receptors, thereby complicating the elucidation of intracellular signaling pathways triggered by individual receptors. Here, we compare the process of bacterial engulfment by a panel of stably transfected HeLa epithelial cell lines expressing each CEACAM receptor in isolation. CEACAM1 and CEACAM3 each contain proteinaceous transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains; however, the processes of neisserial uptake mediated by these receptors differ with respect to their susceptibilities to both tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the actin microfilament-disrupting agent cytochalasin D. Neisserial uptake mediated by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored CEACAM5 and CEACAM6 was not significantly affected by any of a broad spectrum of inhibitors tested. However, cleavage of the GPI anchor by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C reduced bacterial uptake by HeLa cells expressing CEACAM5, consistent with a single zipper-like mechanism of uptake mediated by this receptor. Regardless of the CEACAM receptor expressed, internalized gonococci were effectively killed by a microtubule-dependent process that required acidification of the bacterium-containing phagosome. Given the phase-variable nature of neisserial Opa proteins, these results indicate that the mechanism of bacterial engulfment and the cellular response to gonococcal infection depend on both the receptor specificities of the neisserial Opa protein variants expressed and the spectrum of CEACAM receptors present on target cells, each of which determines the combination of receptors ultimately engaged. PMID:15102784

  8. Porin-mediated antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: ion, solute, and antibiotic permeation through PIB proteins with penB mutations.

    PubMed

    Olesky, Melanie; Zhao, Shuqing; Rosenberg, Robert L; Nicholas, Robert A

    2006-04-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has two porins, PIA and PIB, whose genes (porA and porB, respectively) are alleles of a single por locus. We recently demonstrated that penB mutations at positions 120 and 121 in PIB, which are presumed to reside in loop 3 that forms the pore constriction zone, confer intermediate-level resistance to penicillin and tetracycline (M. Olesky, M. Hobbs, and R. A. Nicholas, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 46:2811-2820, 2002). In the present study, we investigated the electrophysiological properties as well as solute and antibiotic permeation rates of recombinant PIB proteins containing penB mutations (G120K, G120D/A121D, G120P/A121P, and G120R/A121H). In planar lipid bilayers, the predominant conducting state of each porin variant was 30 to 40% of the wild type, even though the anion selectivity and maximum channel conductance of each PIB variant was similar to that of the wild type. Liposome-swelling experiments revealed no significant differences in the permeation of sugars or beta-lactam antibiotics through the wild type or PIB variants. Although these results are seemingly contradictory with the ability of these variants to increase antibiotic resistance, they are consistent with MIC data showing that these porin mutations confer resistance only in strains containing an mtrR mutation, which increases expression of the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE efflux pump. Moreover, both the mtrR and penB mutations were required to decrease in vivo permeation rates below those observed in the parental strain containing either mtrR or porin mutations alone. Thus, these data demonstrate a novel mechanism of porin-mediated resistance in which mutations in PIB have no affect on antibiotic permeation alone but instead act synergistically with the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE efflux pump in the development of antibiotic resistance in gonococci. PMID:16547016

  9. MpeR regulates the mtr efflux locus in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and modulates antimicrobial resistance by an iron-responsive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mercante, Alexandra Dubon; Jackson, Lydgia; Johnson, Paul J T; Stringer, Virginia A; Dyer, David W; Shafer, William M

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that the MpeR transcriptional regulator produced by Neisseria gonorrhoeae represses the expression of mtrF, which encodes a putative inner membrane protein (MtrF). MtrF works as an accessory protein with the Mtr efflux pump, helping gonococci to resist high levels of diverse hydrophobic antimicrobials. Regulation of mpeR has been reported to occur by an iron-dependent mechanism involving Fur (ferric uptake regulator). Collectively, these observations suggest the presence of an interconnected regulatory system in gonococci that modulates the expression of efflux pump protein-encoding genes in an iron-responsive manner. Herein, we describe this connection and report that levels of gonococcal resistance to a substrate of the mtrCDE-encoded efflux pump can be modulated by MpeR and the availability of free iron. Using microarray analysis, we found that the mtrR gene, which encodes a direct repressor (MtrR) of mtrCDE, is an MpeR-repressed determinant in the late logarithmic phase of growth when free iron levels would be reduced due to bacterial consumption. This repression was enhanced under conditions of iron limitation and resulted in increased expression of the mtrCDE efflux pump operon. Furthermore, as judged by DNA-binding analysis, MpeR-mediated repression of mtrR was direct. Collectively, our results indicate that both genetic and physiologic parameters (e.g., iron availability) can influence the expression of the mtr efflux system and modulate levels of gonococcal susceptibility to efflux pump substrates. PMID:22214775

  10. The Crystal Structure of N-Acetyl-l-glutamate Synthase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae Provides Insights into Mechanisms of Catalysis and Regulation*†

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dashuang; Sagar, Vatsala; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, and Mendel

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structures of N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) in the arginine biosynthetic pathway of Neisseria gonorrhoeae complexed with acetyl-CoA and with CoA plus N-acetylgluta-mate have been determined at 2.5- and 2.6-Å resolution, respectively. The monomer consists of two separately folded domains, an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain connected through a 10-Å linker. The monomers assemble into a hexameric ring that consists of a trimer of dimers with 32-point symmetry, inner and outer ring diameters of 20 and 100Å, respectively, and a height of 110Å. Each AAK domain interacts with the cognate domains of two adjacent monomers across two 2-fold symmetry axes and with the NAT domain from a second monomer of the adjacent dimer in the ring. The catalytic sites are located within the NAT domains. Three active site residues, Arg316, Arg425, and Ser427, anchor N-acetylglutamate in a position at the active site to form hydrogen bond interactions to the main chain nitrogen atoms of Cys356 and Leu314, and hydrophobic interactions to the side chains of Leu313 and Leu314. The mode of binding of acetyl-CoA and CoA is similar to other NAT family proteins. The AAK domain, although catalytically inactive, appears to bind argi-nine. This is the first reported crystal structure of any NAGS, and it provides insights into the catalytic function and arginine regulation of NAGS enzymes. PMID:18184660

  11. The crystal structure of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae provides insights into mechanisms of catalysis and regulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dashuang; Sagar, Vatsala; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel

    2008-03-14

    The crystal structures of N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) in the arginine biosynthetic pathway of Neisseria gonorrhoeae complexed with acetyl-CoA and with CoA plus N-acetylglutamate have been determined at 2.5- and 2.6-A resolution, respectively. The monomer consists of two separately folded domains, an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain connected through a 10-A linker. The monomers assemble into a hexameric ring that consists of a trimer of dimers with 32-point symmetry, inner and outer ring diameters of 20 and 100A, respectively, and a height of 110A(.) Each AAK domain interacts with the cognate domains of two adjacent monomers across two 2-fold symmetry axes and with the NAT domain from a second monomer of the adjacent dimer in the ring. The catalytic sites are located within the NAT domains. Three active site residues, Arg316, Arg425, and Ser427, anchor N-acetylglutamate in a position at the active site to form hydrogen bond interactions to the main chain nitrogen atoms of Cys356 and Leu314, and hydrophobic interactions to the side chains of Leu313 and Leu314. The mode of binding of acetyl-CoA and CoA is similar to other NAT family proteins. The AAK domain, although catalytically inactive, appears to bind arginine. This is the first reported crystal structure of any NAGS, and it provides insights into the catalytic function and arginine regulation of NAGS enzymes. PMID:18184660

  12. Molecular and structural analysis of mosaic variants of penicillin-binding protein 2 conferring decreased susceptibility to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: role of epistatic mutations†

    PubMed Central

    Tomberg, Joshua; Unemo, Magnus; Davies, Christopher; Nicholas, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2) encoded by mosaic penA alleles are critical for intermediate resistance to the expanded-spectrum cephalosporins ceftriaxone and cefixime in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Three of the ~60 mutations present in mosaic alleles of penA, G545S, I312M, and V316T, have been reported to be responsible for increased resistance, especially to cefixime (Takahata et al. 2006. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 50:3638-45). However, we observed that the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of penicillin, ceftriaxone, and cefixime for a wild type strain (FA19) containing a penA gene with these three mutations increased only 1.5-, 1.5-, and 3.5-fold, respectively. In contrast, when these three mutations in a mosaic penA allele (penA35) were reverted back to wild type and the gene transformed into FA19, the MICs of the three antibiotics were reduced to near wild type levels. Thus, these three mutations display epistasis, in that their capacity to increase resistance to β-lactam antibiotics is dependent on the presence of other mutations in the mosaic alleles. We also identified an additional mutation, N512Y, that contributes to decreased susceptibility to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins. Finally, we investigated the effects of a mutation (A501V) currently found only in non-mosaic penA alleles on decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone and cefixime, under the expectation that this mutation may arise in mosaic alleles. Transfer of the mosaic penA35 allele containing an A501V mutation into FA6140, a chromosomally mediated penicillin-resistant isolate, increased the MICs of ceftriaxone (0.4 μg/ml) and cefixime (1.2μg/ml) to levels above their respective breakpoints. The proposed structural mechanisms of these mutations are discussed in light of the recently published structure of PBP 2. PMID:20704258

  13. The Crystal Structure of N-Acetyl-L-glutamate Synthase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae Provides Insights into Mechanisms of Catalysis and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Dashuang; Sagar, Vatsala; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2010-01-07

    The crystal structures of N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) in the arginine biosynthetic pathway of Neisseria gonorrhoeae complexed with acetyl-CoA and with CoA plus N-acetylglutamate have been determined at 2.5- and 2.6-A resolution, respectively. The monomer consists of two separately folded domains, an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain connected through a 10-A linker. The monomers assemble into a hexameric ring that consists of a trimer of dimers with 32-point symmetry, inner and outer ring diameters of 20 and 100A, respectively, and a height of 110A(.) Each AAK domain interacts with the cognate domains of two adjacent monomers across two 2-fold symmetry axes and with the NAT domain from a second monomer of the adjacent dimer in the ring. The catalytic sites are located within the NAT domains. Three active site residues, Arg316, Arg425, and Ser427, anchor N-acetylglutamate in a position at the active site to form hydrogen bond interactions to the main chain nitrogen atoms of Cys356 and Leu314, and hydrophobic interactions to the side chains of Leu313 and Leu314. The mode of binding of acetyl-CoA and CoA is similar to other NAT family proteins. The AAK domain, although catalytically inactive, appears to bind arginine. This is the first reported crystal structure of any NAGS, and it provides insights into the catalytic function and arginine regulation of NAGS enzymes.

  14. Interaction of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilA protein with the pilE promoter involves multiple sites on the DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, C G; So, M

    1995-01-01

    PilA is the putative DNA-binding component of a two-component system that regulates transcription of the pilin expression locus (pilE) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Here we report the purification of the PilA protein and characterization of its DNA-binding activity. PilA was overproduced in Escherichia coli with an isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible expression vector. Cell extracts were prepared by sonication and fractionated by anion-exchange chromotography, followed by dye affinity chromatography with Cibacron Blue. Proteins were eluted by using a gradient of KCl, and PilA-containing fractions were identified by immunoblot analysis with a polyclonal anti-PilA antiserum. Purified PilA was judged to be > 90% pure, as determined by Coomassie blue staining and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PilA purified in this manner was used to develop a gel retardation assay with a 301-bp fragment containing the pilE promoter (PpilE) and upstream sequences as a probe. A fragment of similar size containing the E. coli aroH promoter was used as a negative control. Competition experiments using a 100- to 1,000-fold excess of unlabelled DNA fragments confirmed the specificity of PilA binding to the pilE promoter. To localize the PilA binding site within the 301-bp PpilE fragment, stepwise deletions were generated by PCR and the fragments were examined in the gel shift assay. The results of these experiments show that there are two regions upstream of PpilE that are required for binding by PilA. Taken together, these data indicate that while PilA binds specifically to the upstream region of the pilE gene, this interaction is complex and likely involves multiple regions of this DNA sequence. PMID:7730283

  15. The "3 in 1" Study: Pooling Self-Taken Pharyngeal, Urethral, and Rectal Samples into a Single Sample for Analysis for Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis in Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Sultan, B; White, J A; Fish, R; Carrick, G; Brima, N; Copas, A; Robinson, A; Gilson, R; Mercey, D; Benn, P

    2016-03-01

    Triple-site testing (using pharyngeal, rectal, and urethral/first-void urine samples) for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis using nucleic acid amplification tests detects greater numbers of infections among men who have sex with men (MSM). However, triple-site testing represents a cost pressure for services. MSM over 18 years of age were eligible if they requested testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), reported recent sexual contact with either C. trachomatis or N. gonorrhoeae, or had symptoms of an STI. Each patient underwent standard-of-care (SOC) triple-site testing, and swabs were taken to form a pooled sample (PS) (pharyngeal, rectal, and urine specimens). The PS was created using two methods during different periods at one clinic, but we analyzed the data in combination because the sensitivity of the two methods did not differ significantly for C. trachomatis (P = 0.774) or N. gonorrhoeae (P = 0.163). The sensitivity of PS testing (92%) was slightly lower than that of SOC testing (96%) for detecting C. trachomatis (P = 0.167). For N. gonorrhoeae, the sensitivity of PS testing (90%) was significantly lower than that of SOC testing (99%) (P < 0.001). When pharynx-only infections were excluded, the sensitivity of PS testing to detect N. gonorrhoeae infections increased to 94%. Our findings show that pooling of self-taken samples could be an effective and cost-saving method, with high negative predictive values. (Interim results of this study were presented at the BASHH 2013 summer meeting.). PMID:26719439

  16. A co-operative interaction between Neisseria gonorrhoeae and complement receptor 3 mediates infection of primary cervical epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jennifer L; Brown, Eric J; Uk-Nham, Sang; Cannon, Janne G; Blake, Milan S; Apicella, Michael A

    2002-09-01

    Little is known about the pathogenesis of gonococcal infection within the lower female genital tract. We recently described the distribution of complement receptor 3 (CR3) on epithelia of the female genital tract. Our studies further indicate that CR3-mediated endocytosis serves as a primary mechanism by which N. gonorrhoeae elicits membrane ruffling and cellular invasion of primary, human, cervical epithelial cells. We have extended these studies to describe the nature of the gonococcus-CR3 interaction. Western Blot analysis demonstrated production of alternative pathway complement components by ecto- and endocervical cells which allows C3b deposition on gonococci and its rapid conversion to iC3b. Anti-iC3b and -factor I antibodies significantly inhibited adherence and invasion of primary cervical cells, suggesting that iC3b covalently bound to the gonococcus serves as a primary ligand for CR3 adherence. However, gonococcal porin and pili also bound to the I-domain of CR3 in a non-opsonic manner. Binding of porin and pili to CR3 were required for adherence to and invasion of cervical epithelia. Collectively, these data suggest that gonococcal adherence to CR3 occurs in a co-operative manner, which requires gonococcal iC3b-opsonization, porin and pilus. In conjunction, these molecules facilitate targeting to and successful infection of the cervical epithelium. PMID:12390350

  17. Type IV Pilus Assembly Proficiency and Dynamics Influence Pilin Subunit Phospho-Form Macro- and Microheterogeneity in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Vik, Åshild; Haug Anonsen, Jan; Aas, Finn Erik; Hegge, Finn Terje; Roos, Norbert; Koomey, Michael; Aspholm, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The PilE pilin subunit protein of the gonococcal Type IV pilus (Tfp) colonization factor undergoes multisite, covalent modification with the zwitterionic phospho-form modification phosphoethanolamine (PE). In a mutant lacking the pilin-like PilV protein however, PilE is modified with a mixture of PE and phosphocholine (PC). Moreover, intrastrain variation of PilE PC modification levels have been observed in backgrounds that constitutively express PptA (the protein phospho-form transferase A) required for both PE and PC modification. The molecular basis underlying phospho-form microheterogeneity in these instances remains poorly defined. Here, we examined the effects of mutations at numerous loci that disrupt or perturb Tfp assembly and observed that these mutants phenocopy the pilV mutant vis a vis phospho-form modification status. Thus, PC modification appears to be directly or indirectly responsive to the efficacy of pilin subunit interactions. Despite the complexity of contributing factors identified here, the data favor a model in which increased retention in the inner membrane may act as a key signal in altering phospho-form modification. These results also provide an alternative explanation for the variation in PilE PC levels observed previously and that has been assumed to be due to phase variation of pptA. Moreover, mass spectrometry revealed evidence for mono- and di-methylated forms of PE attached to PilE in mutants deficient in pilus assembly, directly implicating a methyltransferase-based pathway for PC synthesis in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:24797914

  18. Neisseria gonorrhoeae enhances HIV-1 infection of primary resting CD4+ T cells through TLR2 activation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Rapista, Aprille; Teleshova, Natalia; Mosoyan, Goar; Jarvis, Gary A; Klotman, Mary E; Chang, Theresa L

    2010-03-15

    Sexually transmitted infections increase the likelihood of HIV-1 transmission. We investigated the effect of Neisseria gonorrheae (gonococcus [GC]) exposure on HIV replication in primary resting CD4(+) T cells, a major HIV target cell during the early stage of sexual transmission of HIV. GC and TLR2 agonists, such as peptidylglycan (PGN), Pam(3)CSK(4), and Pam(3)C-Lip, a GC-derived synthetic lipopeptide, but not TLR4 agonists including LPS or GC lipooligosaccharide enhanced HIV-1 infection of primary resting CD4(+) T cells after viral entry. Pretreatment of CD4(+) cells with PGN also promoted HIV infection. Anti-TLR2 Abs abolished the HIV enhancing effect of GC and Pam(3)C-Lip, indicating that GC-mediated enhancement of HIV infection of resting CD4(+) T cells was through TLR2. IL-2 was required for TLR2-mediated HIV enhancement. PGN and GC induced cell surface expression of T cell activation markers and HIV coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. The maximal postentry HIV enhancing effect was achieved when PGN was added immediately after viral exposure. Kinetic studies and analysis of HIV DNA products indicated that GC exposure and TLR2 activation enhanced HIV infection at the step of nuclear import. We conclude that GC enhanced HIV infection of primary resting CD4(+) T cells through TLR2 activation, which both increased the susceptibility of primary CD4(+) T cells to HIV infection as well as enhanced HIV-infected CD4(+) T cells at the early stage of HIV life cycle after entry. This study provides a molecular mechanism by which nonulcerative sexually transmitted infections mediate enhancement of HIV infection and has implication for HIV prevention and therapeutics. PMID:20147631

  19. Chlamydia Trachomatis and Neisseria Gonorrhoeae prevalence among women of reproductive age living in urogenital schistosomiasis endemic area in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies have shown an overlap in the epidemiology of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and urogenital schistosomiasis among young women living in schistosomiasis endemic areas. Yet we found no study assessing the prevalence of STI infections in urogenital schistosomiasis endemic areas in Ghana. As part of an epidemiological study on urogenital schistosomiasis and HIV, we sought to assess the prevalence of both Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorhoeae (NG) infections among women living in schistosomiasis endemic communities and explore the relationship between the sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and demographic characteristics, sexual behaviour and self-reported symptoms. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in which endocervical samples were collected from 191 women aged 15–49 years from October 2005 to March 2006. Samples were examined for CT and NG using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). A structured questionnaire was also used to elicit information on study participant’s gynaecological and obstetric history and symptoms for genital infection. Chi-square test and binary logistic regression were used to assess association between CT and NG and other variables such as age, sexual behaviour and self-reported symptoms. Results The overall prevalence of CT and NG were 6.3% and 2.6% respectively.The highest prevalence rates of CT were in the 15 to 19 year group while only individuals between 15 and 39 years were positive for NG. There was no association between CT and age, contraceptive use and the other variables assessed. NG on the other hand was found to be associated with age, number of births and number of sexual partners only by chi-square test. Conclusions Our research revealed higher prevalence of CT and NG infections when compared to previous studies conducted among higher risk groups in non-urogenital schistosomiasis areas in Ghana. We therefore recommend further studies of these STIs in urogenital

  20. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of gonorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Turner, Rosemarie; Brown, Leonie; Davidson, Clare; Roberts, Colin

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a Gram-negative bacteria responsible for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhoea, which is increasingly common in the UK. Drug-resistant strains of the bacteria have emerged, which is making gonorrhoea difficult to treat. Therefore, preventing infection is important. This article identifies people at increased risk of contracting the infection, and explores how nurses can offer testing and treatment as well as helping to prevent infection through education and health promotion. PMID:24593108

  1. Performance evaluation of the PelvoCheck CT/NG test kit for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Thomas; Klos, Christian; Kofler, Regina; Kilic, Annett; Hänel, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Objective Assessment of the performance of the PelvoCheck CT/NG test (Greiner-Bio-One GmbH) to detect Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) in first-void urine (FVU) of females. Design A cross-sectional study to compare the PelvoCheck CT/NG with COBAS TaqMan CT Test V.2.0 (Roche) for the detection of CT and with an in-house porA-based PCR for the detection of NG in FVU specimens. In addition, pools of 5 FVU specimens containing only CT-negative or 1 CT-positive and 4 CT-negative samples were tested. Abbott RealTime CT/NG was used as an additional test to resolve discordant results. Setting Samples sent from six laboratories were tested at the University Medical Center Hamburg. Participants Urine samples were from 1622 female patients attending gynaecological practices for chlamydia screening, another 120 urine samples were from patients pretested for NG at Synlab, Medical Service Center, Weiden GmbH. In addition, 50 urine samples spiked with various concentrations of reference material were used. Results For the detection of CT and NG, the sensitivity and specificity of the PelvoCheck CT/NG test were 98.8% and 100%, and 98.3% and 98.2%, respectively. The data obtained with the PelvoCheck CT/NG for pooled urine specimens resulted in a positive agreement of 90.9% and a negative agreement of 100%. Conclusions The PelvoCheck CT/NG assay is a suitable test method for the detection of CT and NG in female FVU samples, with sensitivity and specificity comparable with other Food and Drug Administration approved CT/NG nucleic acid amplification tests. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first commercial test system validated for the analysis of pooled urine specimens. No false-positive or invalid result was observed in 55 analysed pools. Nevertheless, 5 samples were false negative due to a target concentration below the limit of detection of the PelvoCheck CT/NG test as a consequence of pooling-associated dilution. PMID:26729391

  2. High-level azithromycin resistance occurs in Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a result of a single point mutation in the 23S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Stephanie A; Dave, Jayshree; Ison, Catherine A

    2010-09-01

    High-level azithromycin resistance (AZM-HR), defined as a MIC of > or = 256 mg/liter, emerged in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the United Kingdom in 2004. To determine the mechanism of this novel phenotype, isolates from the United Kingdom that were AZM-HR (n, 19), moderately AZM resistant (MICs, 2 to 8 mg/liter) (n, 26), or sensitive (MICs, 0.12 to 0.25 mg/liter) (n, 4) were screened for methylase (erm) genes and for mutations in the mtrR promoter region, associated with efflux pump upregulation. All AZM-resistant isolates and 12 sensitive isolates were screened for mutations in domain V of each 23S rRNA allele. All AZM-HR isolates contained the A2059G mutation (Escherichia coli numbering) in three (3 isolates) or four (16 isolates) 23S rRNA alleles. Most (22/26) moderately AZM resistant isolates contained the C2611T mutation in at least 3/4 alleles. The remainder contained four wild-type alleles, as did 8/12 sensitive isolates, while one allele was mutated in the remaining four sensitive isolates. Serial passage of AZM-sensitive colonies on an erythromycin-containing medium selected AZM-HR if the parent strain already contained mutation A2059G in one 23S rRNA allele. The resultant AZM-HR strains contained four mutated alleles. Eight isolates (five moderately AZM resistant and three AZM-HR) contained mutations in the mtrR promoter. No methylase genes were detected. This is the first evidence that AZM-HR in gonococci may result from a single point mutation (A2059G) in the peptidyltransferase loop in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. Mutation of a single allele is insufficient to confer AZM-HR, but AZM-HR can develop under selection pressure. The description of a novel resistance mechanism will aid in screening for the AZM-HR phenotype. PMID:20585125

  3. Behavioral and Socioeconomic Risk Factors Associated with Probable Resistance to Ceftriaxone and Resistance to Penicillin and Tetracycline in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Trecker, Molly A.; Waldner, Cheryl; Jolly, Ann; Liao, Mingmin; Gu, Weiming; Dillon, Jo-Anne R.

    2014-01-01

    Globally, incidence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection is once again the highest of the bacterial sexually transmitted infections. The bacterium can produce serious complications in those infected, and emerging resistance to third generation cephalosporins could usher in an era of potentially untreatable gonorrhea. This research aimed to identify risk factors for antibiotic resistant gonorrhea infection among clients at a Shanghai sexually transmitted infection clinic over two time periods, 2004–2005 and 2008–2011. Demographic and risk factor behavior data, and biological samples for antimicrobial resistance analysis, were collected. Statistical models were built to identify risk factors associated with probable resistance to ceftriaxone and resistance to penicillin and tetracycline. High levels of ciprofloxacin resistance (98%) in our sample precluded examining its risk factors; all isolates were susceptible to spectinomycin. Overall (P<0.001), chromosomal (P<0.001), and plasmid-mediated (P = 0.01) penicillin resistance decreased from the first to second period of the study. For tetracycline, chromosomal resistance decreased (P = 0.01) and plasmid-mediated resistance increased (P<0.001) between the first and second periods of study. In multi-level multivariable regression models, male gender (P = 0.03) and older age (P = 0.01) were associated with increased minimum inhibitory concentrations to ceftriaxone. Male gender (P = 0.03) and alcohol use (P = 0.02) were associated with increased odds of overall tetracycline resistance. Male gender was associated with increased odds of chromosomally-mediated tetracycline resistance (P = 0.04), and alcohol use was associated with increased odds of plasmid-mediated tetracycline resistance (P = 0.02). Additionally, individuals in middle-salary categories were found to have lower odds of plasmid-mediated resistance to tetracycline compared with those in the lowest salary category (P≤0

  4. Behavioral and socioeconomic risk factors associated with probable resistance to ceftriaxone and resistance to penicillin and tetracycline in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Trecker, Molly A; Waldner, Cheryl; Jolly, Ann; Liao, Mingmin; Gu, Weiming; Dillon, Jo-Anne R

    2014-01-01

    Globally, incidence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection is once again the highest of the bacterial sexually transmitted infections. The bacterium can produce serious complications in those infected, and emerging resistance to third generation cephalosporins could usher in an era of potentially untreatable gonorrhea. This research aimed to identify risk factors for antibiotic resistant gonorrhea infection among clients at a Shanghai sexually transmitted infection clinic over two time periods, 2004-2005 and 2008-2011. Demographic and risk factor behavior data, and biological samples for antimicrobial resistance analysis, were collected. Statistical models were built to identify risk factors associated with probable resistance to ceftriaxone and resistance to penicillin and tetracycline. High levels of ciprofloxacin resistance (98%) in our sample precluded examining its risk factors; all isolates were susceptible to spectinomycin. Overall (P<0.001), chromosomal (P<0.001), and plasmid-mediated (P = 0.01) penicillin resistance decreased from the first to second period of the study. For tetracycline, chromosomal resistance decreased (P = 0.01) and plasmid-mediated resistance increased (P<0.001) between the first and second periods of study. In multi-level multivariable regression models, male gender (P = 0.03) and older age (P = 0.01) were associated with increased minimum inhibitory concentrations to ceftriaxone. Male gender (P = 0.03) and alcohol use (P = 0.02) were associated with increased odds of overall tetracycline resistance. Male gender was associated with increased odds of chromosomally-mediated tetracycline resistance (P = 0.04), and alcohol use was associated with increased odds of plasmid-mediated tetracycline resistance (P = 0.02). Additionally, individuals in middle-salary categories were found to have lower odds of plasmid-mediated resistance to tetracycline compared with those in the lowest salary category (P≤0.02). This

  5. High prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections in anal and pharyngeal sites among a community-based sample of men who have sex with men and transgender women in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Segundo R; Segura, Eddy R; Konda, Kelika A; Flores, Juan A; Silva-Santisteban, Alfonso; Galea, Jerome T; Coates, Thomas J; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Caceres, Carlos F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise the epidemiology of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) infections among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TW) in Lima, Peru. Setting Cross-sectional study in Lima, Peru. Participants We recruited a group of 510 MSM and 208 TW for a subsequent community-based randomised controlled trial. The presence of CT and NG were evaluated using Aptima Combo2 in pharyngeal and anal swabs. We also explored correlates of these infections. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Study end points included overall prevalence of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae in anal and pharyngeal sites. Results Overall prevalence of CT was 19% (95% CI 16.1% to 22.1%) and 4.8% (95% CI 3.3% to 6.6%) in anal and pharyngeal sites, respectively, while prevalence of NG was 9.6% (95% CI 7.5% to 12.0%) and 6.5% (95% CI 4.8% to 8.5%) in anal and pharyngeal sites, respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of each infection declined significantly among participants older than 34 years (p<0.05). Efforts towards prevention and treatment of extraurogenital chlamydial and gonococcal infections in high-risk populations like MSM and TW in Lima, Peru, are warranted. Trial registration number NCT00670163; Results. PMID:26739719

  6. Antibodies directed to the gram-negative bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae cross-react with the 60 kDa heat shock protein and lead to impaired neurite outgrowth in NTera2/D1 cells.

    PubMed

    Reuss, B; Asif, A R

    2014-09-01

    Children of mothers with prenatal gonococcal infections are of increased risk to develop schizophrenic psychosis in later life. The present study hypothesizes an autoimmune mechanism for this, investigating interactions of a commercial rabbit antiserum directed to Neisseria gonorrhoeae (α-NG) with human NTera2/D1 cells, an established in vitro model for human neuronal differentiation. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated α-NG to label antigens on an intracellular organelle, which by Western blot analysis showed a molecular weight shortly below 72 kDa. An antiserum directed to Neisseria meningitidis (α-NM) reacts with an antigen shortly below 95 kDa, confirming antibody specificity of these interactions. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and partial Western transfer, allowed to localize an α-NG reactive protein spot which was identified by LC-Q-TOF MS/MS analysis as mitochondrial heat shock protein Hsp60. This was confirmed by Western blot analysis of α-NG immunoreactivity with a commercial Hsp60 protein sample, with which α-NM failed to interact. Finally, analysis of neurite outgrowth in retinoic acid-stimulated differentiating NTera2-D1 cells, demonstrates that α-NG but not α-NM treatment reduces neurite length. These results demonstrate that α-NG can interact with Hsp60 in vitro, whereas pathogenetic relevance of this interaction for psychotic symptomatology remains to be clarified. PMID:24577885

  7. Identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by the Bruker Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System Is Improved by a Database Extension.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Valentijn A; van Dam, Alje P; Hananta, I Putu Yuda; Schuurman, Rob; Kusters, Johannes G; Rentenaar, Rob J

    2016-04-01

    Identification ofNeisseria gonorrhoeaeby the Bruker matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system may be affected by "B consistency categorization." A supplementary database of 17N. gonorrhoeaemain spectra was constructed. Twelve of 64N. gonorrhoeaeidentifications were categorized with B consistency, which disappeared using the supplementary database. Database extension did not result in misidentification ofNeisseria meningitidis. PMID:26763972

  8. The Biology of Neisseria Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Christodoulides, Myron

    2013-01-01

    Members of the genus Neisseria include pathogens causing important human diseases such as meningitis, septicaemia, gonorrhoea and pelvic inflammatory disease syndrome. Neisseriae are found on the exposed epithelia of the upper respiratory tract and the urogenital tract. Colonisation of these exposed epithelia is dependent on a repertoire of diverse bacterial molecules, extending not only from the surface of the bacteria but also found within the outer membrane. During invasive disease, pathogenic Neisseriae also interact with immune effector cells, vascular endothelia and the meninges. Neisseria adhesion involves the interplay of these multiple surface factors and in this review we discuss the structure and function of these important molecules and the nature of the host cell receptors and mechanisms involved in their recognition. We also describe the current status for recently identified Neisseria adhesins. Understanding the biology of Neisseria adhesins has an impact not only on the development of new vaccines but also in revealing fundamental knowledge about human biology. PMID:24833056

  9. Substrate Ambiguity of 3-Deoxy-d-manno-Octulosonate 8-Phosphate Synthase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the Context of Its Membership in a Protein Family Containing a Subset of 3-Deoxy-d-arabino-Heptulosonate 7-Phosphate Synthases†

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Prem S.; Xie, Gang; Xia, Tianhui; Jensen, Roy A.

    1998-01-01

    3-Deoxy-d-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate (KDOP) synthase and 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase catalyze similar phosphoenolpyruvate-utilizing reactions. The genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae contains one gene encoding KDOP synthase and one gene encoding DAHP synthase. Of the two nonhomologous DAHP synthase families known, the N. gonorrhoeae protein belongs to the family I assemblage. KDOP synthase exhibited an ability to replace arabinose-5-P with either erythrose-4-P or ribose-5-P as alternative substrates. The results of periodate oxidation studies suggested that the product formed by KDOP synthase with erythrose-4-P as the substrate was 3-deoxy-d-ribo-heptulosonate 7-P, an isomer of DAHP. As expected, this product was not utilized as a substrate by dehydroquinate synthase. The significance of the ability of KDOP synthase to substitute erythrose-4-P for arabinose-5-P is (i) recognition of the possibility that the KDOP synthase might otherwise be mistaken for a species of DAHP synthase and (ii) the possibility that the broad-specificity type of KDOP synthase might be a relatively vulnerable target for antimicrobial agents which mimic the normal substrates. An analysis of sequences in the database indicates that the family I group of DAHP synthase has a previously unrecognized membership which includes the KDOP synthases. The KDOP synthases fall into a subfamily grouping which includes a small group of DAHP synthases. Thus, family I DAHP synthases separate into two subfamilies, one of which includes the KDOP synthases. The two subfamilies appear to have diverged prior to the acquisition of allosteric-control mechanisms for DAHP synthases. These allosteric control specificities are highly diverse and correlate with the presence of N-terminal extensions which lack homology with one another. PMID:9422601

  10. Evaluation of the Bio-Rad Dx CT/NG/MG® assay for simultaneous detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Mycoplasma genitalium in urine.

    PubMed

    Ursi, D; Crucitti, T; Smet, H; Ieven, M

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Bio-Rad real-time Dx CT/NG/MG® assay for detection of C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae and M. genitalium on a collection of 441 urine samples from sexually transmitted infections, or travellers consultations and from anonymous sperm donors that were previously analysed with the Abbott RealTime CT/NG assay. Samples positive for C. trachomatis or N. gonorrhoeae with the Abbott assay had all previously been confirmed with an in-house real-time PCR assay. Samples positive for M. genitalium with the Bio-Rad assay were subsequently analysed by an in-house real-time PCR. On a total of 441 urines, 104 samples were positive for C. trachomatis, 12 were positive for N. gonorrhoeae and seven were positive for M. genitalium. After retesting of discrepant results, the test results were completely concordant, resulting in a calculated sensitivity and specificity of the Bio-Rad assay of 98.1 % and 100 % for C. trachomatis and of 91.7 % and 100 % for N. gonorrhoeae. Results for M. genitalium with the Bio-Rad assay were also concordant with the results of an in house PCR. We also evaluated the performance of automated nucleic acid extractions of urine samples with the NucliSENS easyMAG (bioMérieux) compared to the manual DNA extraction prescribed by the insert of the kit. The easyMAG extraction gave lower Ct values, relieved inhibition and had a lower hands-on time. PMID:27116008

  11. The anti-inflammatory compound curcumin inhibits Neisseria gonorrhoeae-induced NF-kappaB signaling, release of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and attenuates adhesion in late infection.

    PubMed

    Wessler, Silja; Muenzner, Petra; Meyer, Thomas F; Naumann, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ngo) is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium responsible for an array of diseases ranging from urethritis to disseminated gonococcal infections. Early events in the establishment of infection involve interactions between Ngo and the mucosal epithelium, which induce a local inflammatory response. Here we analyzed the molecular mechanism involved in the Ngo-induced induction of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-8. We identified the immediate early response transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) as a key molecule for the induction of cytokine release. Ngo-induced activation of direct upstream signaling molecules was demonstrated for IkappaB kinase alpha and beta (IKKalpha and IKKbeta) by phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha as a substrate and IKK autophosphorylation. Using dominant negative cDNAs encoding kinase-dead IKKalpha, IKKbeta, and NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK), Ngo-induced NF-kappaB activity was significantly inhibited. Curcumin, the yellow pigment derived from Curcuma longa, inhibited IKKalpha, IKKbeta and NIK, indicating its strong potential to block NF-kappaB-mediated cytokine release and the innate immune response. In addition to the inhibition of Ngo-induced signaling, curcumin treatment of cells completely abolished the adherence of bacteria to cells in late infection, underlining the high potential of curcumin as an anti-microbial compound without cytotoxic side effects. PMID:15927892

  12. Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial susceptibility in Barcelona: penA, ponA, mtrR, and porB mutations and NG-MAST sequence types associated with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Serra-Pladevall, J; Barberá, M J; Rodriguez, S; Bartolomé-Comas, R; Roig, G; Juvé, R; Andreu, A

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) in our area, to analyze the molecular mechanisms involved in cephalosporins resistance, and to undertake molecular typing of our NG strains. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using the Etest. The genes penA, mtrR, penB, and ponA were studied. Molecular typing was performed by N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing. Of 329 strains analyzed in 2013, none showed high-level cephalosporin resistance, but 8.2 % had resistance to cefixime [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) > 0.125 μg/mL] and 0.6 % to ceftriaxone (MIC > 0.125 μg/mL). Azithromycin resistance was documented in 4.3 % and ciprofloxacin resistance in 49.2 %. Among 48 strains with an MIC ≥ 0.125 μg/mL to cefixime, 58.3 % showed the penA mosaic pattern XXXIV, 98 % a Leu → Pro substitution at position 421 of the ponA gene, 100 % amino acid changes at positions 101 and 102 of the PorB1b porin, and 87.5 % of strains an adenine deletion in the promoter region of the MtrC-D-E efflux pump. A significant difference between strains with and without decreased cephalosporin susceptibility (MIC ≥ 0.125 μg/mL) was observed for these four genes. Of the 48 strains with an MIC ≥ 0.125 μg/mL to cefixime, 43.8 % belonged to the genogroup G1407 and 27.1 % belonged to the genogroup G2400. A significant association of G1407 with decreased susceptibility (MIC ≥ 0.125 μg/mL) and G2992 with susceptibility was found, and also between G1407 and mosaic pattern XXXIV and between G2400 and A501T substitution in penA. The NG resistance rate in our area is higher than the median of Europe. We have detected the emergence of G2400, which may be a source of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27255221

  13. Crystal structures of penicillin-binding protein 2 from penicillin-susceptible and -resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae reveal an unexpectedly subtle mechanism for antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ailsa J; Tomberg, Joshua; Deacon, Ashley M; Nicholas, Robert A; Davies, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) from N. gonorrhoeae is the major molecular target for beta-lactam antibiotics used to treat gonococcal infections. PBP2 from penicillin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae harbors an aspartate insertion after position 345 (Asp-345a) and 4-8 additional mutations, but how these alter the architecture of the protein is unknown. We have determined the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-susceptible strain FA19, which shows that the likely effect of Asp-345a is to alter a hydrogen-bonding network involving Asp-346 and the SXN triad at the active site. We have also solved the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-resistant strain FA6140 that contains four mutations near the C terminus of the protein. Although these mutations lower the second order rate of acylation for penicillin by 5-fold relative to wild type, comparison of the two structures shows only minor structural differences, with the positions of the conserved residues in the active site essentially the same in both. Kinetic analyses indicate that two mutations, P551S and F504L, are mainly responsible for the decrease in acylation rate. Melting curves show that the four mutations lower the thermal stability of the enzyme. Overall, these data suggest that the molecular mechanism underlying antibiotic resistance contributed by the four mutations is subtle and involves a small but measurable disordering of residues in the active site region that either restricts the binding of antibiotic or impedes conformational changes that are required for acylation by beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:18986991

  14. Crystal Structures of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 From Penicillin-Susceptible And -Resistant Strains of Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Reveal An Unexpectedly Subtle Mechanism for Antibiotic Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.J.; Tomberg, J.; Deacon, A.M.; Nicholas, R.A.; Davies, C.

    2009-05-21

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) from N. gonorrhoeae is the major molecular target for {beta}-lactam antibiotics used to treat gonococcal infections. PBP2 from penicillin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae harbors an aspartate insertion after position 345 (Asp-345a) and 4-8 additional mutations, but how these alter the architecture of the protein is unknown. We have determined the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-susceptible strain FA19, which shows that the likely effect of Asp-345a is to alter a hydrogen-bonding network involving Asp-346 and the SXN triad at the active site. We have also solved the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-resistant strain FA6140 that contains four mutations near the C terminus of the protein. Although these mutations lower the second order rate of acylation for penicillin by 5-fold relative to wild type, comparison of the two structures shows only minor structural differences, with the positions of the conserved residues in the active site essentially the same in both. Kinetic analyses indicate that two mutations, P551S and F504L, are mainly responsible for the decrease in acylation rate. Melting curves show that the four mutations lower the thermal stability of the enzyme. Overall, these data suggest that the molecular mechanism underlying antibiotic resistance contributed by the four mutations is subtle and involves a small but measurable disordering of residues in the active site region that either restricts the binding of antibiotic or impedes conformational changes that are required for acylation by {beta}-lactam antibiotics.

  15. Gonorrhoea diagnostics: An update.

    PubMed

    Verma, R; Sood, S

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of gonorrhoea is an ongoing challenge. The organism is fastidious requiring meticulous collection and transport for successful cultivation. Asymptomatic infections are common which go undetected by conventional methods thereby leading to continued transmission and the risk of complications. The nucleic acid amplification tests, now increasingly used in developed countries, offer improved sensitivity compared to bacterial culture. However, these continue to suffer sequence related problems leading to false positive and false negative results. Further, these cannot be used for generation of data on antibiotic susceptibility because genetic markers of antibiotic resistance to recommended therapies have not been fully characterised. They are unaffordable in a setting like ours where reliance is placed on syndromic approach for sexually transmitted infection (STI) management. The use of syndromic approach has resulted in a considerable decline in the number of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates that have been cultured for diagnostic purposes. Many laboratories formerly doing so are no longer performing culture for gonococci, and the basic skills have been lost. There is a need to not only revive this skill but also adopt newer technologies that can aid in accurate diagnosis in a cost-effective manner. There is room for innovation that can facilitate the development of a point-of-care test for this bacterial STI. PMID:27080763

  16. An unusual Neisseria isolated from conjunctival cultures in rural Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mazloum, H; Totten, P A; Brooks, G F; Dawson, C R; Falkow, S; James, J F; Knapp, J S; Koomey, J M; Lammel, C J; Peters, D

    1986-08-01

    Seven isolates of an unusual Neisseria sp. were obtained from eye cultures of children in two rural Egyptian villages. These Neisseria utilized only glucose, they exhibited a positive reaction when tested with antisera to crude antigen from Neisseria meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae, and they did not react with the fluorescent antibody tests for N. gonorrhoeae or with the monoclonal antibodies used to serotype gonococci. The Egyptian isolates had colony morphology more typical of meningococci than gonococci and showed opaque and transparent colony variants. On SDS-PAGE, the major outer-membrane proteins had different patterns than those noted for comparable proteins of meningococci and gonococci; heat-modifiable outer-membrane proteins were present. Four of the six isolates examined had cryptic plasmids of 2.8 megadaltons, which were slightly larger than the cryptic plasmid of N. gonorrhoeae. These plasmids were homologous to the gonococcal cryptic plasmid, but had different restriction enzyme fragment patterns. The DNA from the Egyptian isolates, like DNA from N. meningitidis but unlike DNA from N. gonorrhoeae, could be cut with the restriction enzyme HaeIII. The frequency of transformation into a temperature-sensitive mutant of N. gonorrhoeae was 0.2 for the Egyptian isolates and 0.1 for N. meningitidis, a frequency that was 5-10-fold lower than that for the N. gonorrhoeae control isolates. Whole-cell DNA from the Egyptian isolates showed 68%-73% homology with N. gonorrhoeae and 57%-63% with N. meningitidis. On the basis of our observations, the Egyptian isolates are distinct from N. meningitidis and may represent a variant of N. gonorrhoeae. We suggest that the isolates be called Neisseria gonorrhoeae ssp. kochii. PMID:2873189

  17. Biochemical and genomic analysis of the denitrification pathway within the genus Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Barth, Kenneth R; Isabella, Vincent M; Clark, Virginia L

    2009-12-01

    Since Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis are obligate human pathogens, a comparison with commensal species of the same genus could reveal differences important in pathogenesis. The recent completion of commensal Neisseria genome draft assemblies allowed us to perform a comparison of the genes involved in the catalysis, assembly and regulation of the denitrification pathway, which has been implicated in the virulence of several bacteria. All species contained a highly conserved nitric oxide reductase (NorB) and a nitrite reductase (AniA or NirK) that was highly conserved in the catalytic but divergent in the N-terminal lipid modification and C-terminal glycosylation domains. Only Neisseria mucosa contained a nitrate reductase (Nar), and only Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria cinerea, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria flavescens and Neisseria sicca contained a nitrous oxide reductase (Nos) complex. The regulators of the denitrification genes, FNR, NarQP and NsrR, were highly conserved, except for the GAF domain of NarQ. Biochemical examination of laboratory strains revealed that all of the neisserial species tested except N. mucosa had a two- to fourfold lower nitrite reductase activity than N. gonorrhoeae, while N. meningitidis and most of the commensal Neisseria species had a two- to fourfold higher nitric oxide (NO) reductase activity. For N. meningitidis and most of the commensal Neisseria, there was a greater than fourfold reduction in the NO steady-state level in the presence of nitrite as compared with N. gonorrhoeae. All of the species tested generated an NO steady-state level in the presence of an NO donor that was similar to that of N. gonorrhoeae. The greatest difference between the Neisseria species was the lack of a functional Nos system in the pathogenic species N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis. PMID:19762442

  18. The penC mutation conferring antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae arises from a mutation in the PilQ secretin that interferes with multimer stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuqing; Tobiason, Deborah M.; Hu, Mei; Seifert, H. Steven; Nicholas, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    The penC resistance gene was previously characterized in a FA19 penA mtrR penB gonococcal strain (PR100) as a spontaneous mutation that increased resistance to penicillin and tetracycline. We show here that antibiotic resistance mediated by penC is the result of a Glu-666 to Lys missense mutation in the pilQ gene that interferes with the formation of the SDS-resistant high-molecular-mass PilQ secretin complex, disrupts piliation, and decreases transformation frequency by 50-fold. Deletion of pilQ in PR100 confers the same level of antibiotic resistance as the penC mutation, but increased resistance was observed only in strains containing the mtrR and penB resistance determinants. Site-saturation mutagenesis of Glu-666 revealed that only acidic or amidated amino acids at this position preserved PilQ function. Consistent with early studies suggesting the importance of cysteine residues on stability of the PilQ multimer, mutation of either of the two cysteine residues in FA19 PilQ led to a similar phenotype as penC: increased antibiotic resistance, loss of piliation, intermediate levels of transformation competence, and absence of SDS-resistant PilQ oligomers. These data show that a functional secretin complex can enhance the entry of antibiotics into the cell and suggest that the PilQ oligomer forms a pore in the outer membrane through which antibiotics diffuse into the periplasm. PMID:16101998

  19. Piliation control mechanisms in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, S; Robbins, K; Koomey, J M; Swanson, J

    1986-01-01

    Gonococci (Gc) undergo pilus+ to pilus- "phase transitions" readily in vitro. In the present study we sequenced pilin mRNA from reverting, pilus- Gc by oligonucleotide primer extension and compared these pilin mRNA sequences with those expressed by their pilus+ predecessors and pilus+ revertants. The results suggest that genetic rearrangement within the pilin structural gene can generate defective pilin gene products, resulting in a pilus- phenotype. These pilus- Gc give rise to pilus+ revertants upon reconstitution of their modified pilin gene. PMID:2872674

  20. Characterization of a stress protein from group B Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed Central

    Arakere, G; Kessel, M; Nguyen, N; Frasch, C E

    1993-01-01

    Increased levels of a 65-kDa stress protein (Msp65) were observed in group B Neisseria meningitidis grown under stationary-growth conditions. Electron microscopy showed two apposing rings of seven subunits, a structure typical of Escherichia coli GroEL. Msp65 was not found in either the periplasmic space or the outer membrane. Several important differences between the GroEL analogs of N. meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are discussed. Images PMID:8099073

  1. Interaction of pathogenic neisseriae with nonphagocytic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nassif, X; So, M

    1995-01-01

    The ability to interact with nonphagocytic cells is a crucial virulence attribute of the meningococcus and the genococcus. Like most bacterial pathogens, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae initiate infections by colonizing the mucosal epithelium, which serves as the site of entry. After this step, both bacteria cross the intact mucosal barrier. While N. gonorrhoeae is likely to remain in the subepithelial matrix, where it initiates an intense inflammatory reaction, N. meningitidis enters the bloodstream, and eventually the cerebrospinal fluid to cause meningitis. Both pathogens have evolved very similar mechanisms for interacting with host cells. Surface structures that influence bacterium-host interactions include pili, the meningococcal class 5 outer membrane proteins or the gonococcal opacity proteins, lipooligosaccharide, and the meningococcal capsule. This review examines what is known about the roles these structures play in bacterial adhesion and invasion, with special emphasis, on pilus-mediated adhesion. Finally, the importance of these structures in neisserial pathogenesis is discussed. PMID:7553571

  2. Historical perspectives and identification of Neisseria and related species.

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, J S

    1988-01-01

    The pathogenic Neisseria spp., N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis, have been studied extensively and rapid identification procedures have been designed to distinguish these species from the commensal Neisseria and related species that are normal flora of the oro- and nasopharynx. The commensal Neisseria spp. have been largely ignored except for isolated studies. It is important that we know about these species, however, because not only may some be misidentified as pathogenic species if identified with inappropriate procedures, but also they may occasionally be isolated from unusual sites and must be correctly identified to the species level for clinical purposes. PMID:3069201

  3. NeisseriaBase: a specialised Neisseria genomic resource and analysis platform.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenning; Mutha, Naresh V R; Heydari, Hamed; Dutta, Avirup; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Wee, Wei Yee; Tan, Shi Yang; Ang, Mia Yang; Wong, Guat Jah; Choo, Siew Woh

    2016-01-01

    Background. The gram-negative Neisseria is associated with two of the most potent human epidemic diseases: meningococcal meningitis and gonorrhoea. In both cases, disease is caused by bacteria colonizing human mucosal membrane surfaces. Overall, the genus shows great diversity and genetic variation mainly due to its ability to acquire and incorporate genetic material from a diverse range of sources through horizontal gene transfer. Although a number of databases exist for the Neisseria genomes, they are mostly focused on the pathogenic species. In this present study we present the freely available NeisseriaBase, a database dedicated to the genus Neisseria encompassing the complete and draft genomes of 15 pathogenic and commensal Neisseria species. Methods. The genomic data were retrieved from National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and annotated using the RAST server which were then stored into the MySQL database. The protein-coding genes were further analyzed to obtain information such as calculation of GC content (%), predicted hydrophobicity and molecular weight (Da) using in-house Perl scripts. The web application was developed following the secure four-tier web application architecture: (1) client workstation, (2) web server, (3) application server, and (4) database server. The web interface was constructed using PHP, JavaScript, jQuery, AJAX and CSS, utilizing the model-view-controller (MVC) framework. The in-house developed bioinformatics tools implemented in NeisseraBase were developed using Python, Perl, BioPerl and R languages. Results. Currently, NeisseriaBase houses 603,500 Coding Sequences (CDSs), 16,071 RNAs and 13,119 tRNA genes from 227 Neisseria genomes. The database is equipped with interactive web interfaces. Incorporation of the JBrowse genome browser in the database enables fast and smooth browsing of Neisseria genomes. NeisseriaBase includes the standard BLAST program to facilitate homology searching, and for Virulence Factor

  4. NeisseriaBase: a specialised Neisseria genomic resource and analysis platform

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wenning; Mutha, Naresh V.R.; Heydari, Hamed; Dutta, Avirup; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Jakubovics, Nicholas S.; Wee, Wei Yee; Tan, Shi Yang; Ang, Mia Yang; Wong, Guat Jah

    2016-01-01

    Background. The gram-negative Neisseria is associated with two of the most potent human epidemic diseases: meningococcal meningitis and gonorrhoea. In both cases, disease is caused by bacteria colonizing human mucosal membrane surfaces. Overall, the genus shows great diversity and genetic variation mainly due to its ability to acquire and incorporate genetic material from a diverse range of sources through horizontal gene transfer. Although a number of databases exist for the Neisseria genomes, they are mostly focused on the pathogenic species. In this present study we present the freely available NeisseriaBase, a database dedicated to the genus Neisseria encompassing the complete and draft genomes of 15 pathogenic and commensal Neisseria species. Methods. The genomic data were retrieved from National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and annotated using the RAST server which were then stored into the MySQL database. The protein-coding genes were further analyzed to obtain information such as calculation of GC content (%), predicted hydrophobicity and molecular weight (Da) using in-house Perl scripts. The web application was developed following the secure four-tier web application architecture: (1) client workstation, (2) web server, (3) application server, and (4) database server. The web interface was constructed using PHP, JavaScript, jQuery, AJAX and CSS, utilizing the model-view-controller (MVC) framework. The in-house developed bioinformatics tools implemented in NeisseraBase were developed using Python, Perl, BioPerl and R languages. Results. Currently, NeisseriaBase houses 603,500 Coding Sequences (CDSs), 16,071 RNAs and 13,119 tRNA genes from 227 Neisseria genomes. The database is equipped with interactive web interfaces. Incorporation of the JBrowse genome browser in the database enables fast and smooth browsing of Neisseria genomes. NeisseriaBase includes the standard BLAST program to facilitate homology searching, and for Virulence Factor

  5. Testing commercial sex workers for chlamydia and gonorrhoea on outreach.

    PubMed

    Macauley, S; Creighton, S

    2009-06-01

    To assess the feasibility of testing indoor commercial sex workers (CSW) for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in an outreach setting. All CSW seen on outreach over a 6-week period were offered self-taken vulval swabs for chlamydia and gonorrhoea testing. Feasibility was assessed by all the outreach workers on a standardised proforma. Of the 93 women offered the service, 40 accepted, of whom five (12%) had not previously accessed sexual health services. The majority of women declining the service had recently attended a sexual health clinic. Three cases of chlamydia and one of gonorrhoea were diagnosed. The cost per sexually transmitted infection (STI) was pound 392.50. Most of this group of women were knowledgeable about sexual health and were already having regular check-ups, but a significant minority did not know how to access STI care. Offering STI testing on outreach was feasible and cost effective. PMID:19155241

  6. Emerging cephalosporin and multidrug-resistant gonorrhoea in Europe.

    PubMed

    Cole, M J; Spiteri, G; Chisholm, S A; Hoffmann, S; Ison, C A; Unemo, M; Van de Laar, M

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has consistently developed resistance to antimicrobials used therapeutically for gonorrhoea and few antimicrobials remain for effective empiric first-line therapy. Since 2009 the European gonococcal antimicrobial surveillance programme (Euro-GASP) has been running as a sentinel surveillance system across Member States of the European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA) to monitor antimicrobial susceptibility in N. gonorrhoeae. During 2011, N. gonorrhoeae isolates were collected from 21 participating countries, and 7.6% and 0.5% of the examined gonococcal isolates had in vitro resistance to cefixime and ceftriaxone, respectively. The rate of ciprofloxacin and azithromycin resistance was 48.7% and 5.3%, respectively. Two (0.1%) isolates displayed high-level resistance to azithromycin, i.e. a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥256 mg/L. The current report further highlights the public health need to implement the European response plan, including further strengthening of Euro-GASP, to control and manage the threat of multidrug resistant N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:25411689

  7. Functional significance of factor H binding to Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Muriel C; Exley, Rachel M; Chan, Hannah; Feavers, Ian; Kang, Yu-Hoi; Sim, Robert B; Tang, Christoph M

    2006-06-15

    Neisseria meningitidis is an important cause of septicemia and meningitis. To cause disease, the bacterium must successfully survive in the bloodstream where it has to avoid being killed by host innate immune mechanisms, particularly the complement system. A number of pathogenic microbes bind factor H (fH), the negative regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, to promote their survival in vivo. In this study, we show that N. meningitidis binds fH to its surface. Binding to serogroups A, B, and C N. meningitidis strains was detected by FACS and Far Western blot analysis, and occurred in the absence of other serum factors such as C3b. Unlike Neisseria gonorrhoeae, binding of fH to N. meningitidis was independent of sialic acid on the bacterium, either as a component of its LPS or its capsule. Characterization of the major fH binding partner demonstrated that it is a 33-kDa protein; examination of insertion mutants showed that porins A and B, outer membrane porins expressed by N. meningitidis, do not contribute significantly to fH binding. We examined the physiological consequences of fH bound to the bacterial surface. We found that fH retains its activity as a cofactor of factor I when bound to the bacterium and contributes to the ability of N. meningitidis to avoid complement-mediated killing in the presence of human serum. Therefore, the recruitment of fH provides another mechanism by which this important human pathogen evades host innate immunity. PMID:16751403

  8. The transferrin-iron import system from pathogenic Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Buchanan, Susan K; Cornelissen, Cynthia Nau

    2012-10-01

    Two pathogenic species within the genus Neisseria cause the diseases gonorrhoea and meningitis. While vaccines are available to protect against four N. meningitidis serogroups, there is currently no commercial vaccine to protect against serogroup B or against N. gonorrhoeae. Moreover, the available vaccines have significant limitations and with antibiotic resistance becoming an alarming issue, the search for effective vaccine targets to elicit long-lasting protection against Neisseria species is becoming more urgent. One strategy for vaccine development has targeted the neisserial iron import systems. Without iron, the Neisseriae cannot survive and, therefore, these iron import systems tend to be relatively well conserved and are promising vaccine targets, having the potential to offer broad protection against both gonococcal and meningococcal infections. These efforts have been boosted by recent reports of the crystal structures of the neisserial receptor proteins TbpA and TbpB, each solved in complex with human transferrin, an iron binding protein normally responsible for delivering iron to human cells. Here, we review the recent structural reports and put them into perspective with available functional studies in order to derive the mechanism(s) for how the pathogenic Neisseriae are able to hijack human iron transport systems for their own survival and pathogenesis. PMID:22957710

  9. Erythrocyte gangliosides act as receptors for Neisseria subflava: identification of the Sia-1 adhesin.

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, G; Strömberg, N; Jonsson, A; Karlsson, K A; Normark, S

    1990-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae was recently shown to bind to a subset of lactose-containing glycolipids (N. Strömberg, C. Deal, G. Nyberg, S. Normark, M. So, and K.-A. Karlsson, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:4902-4906, 1988). A number of commensal Neisseria strains were also shown to be lactose binders. In addition, Neisseria subflava bound to immobilized gangliosides, such as hematoside and sialosyl paragloboside, carrying the NeuAc alpha 2-3Gal beta 1-4Glc sequence. To a lesser extent, N. gonorrhoeae also bound to this receptor in vitro. In N. subflava GN01, this binding property mediated agglutination of human erythrocytes in a neuraminidase-sensitive fashion. Nitrosoguanidine-induced nonhemagglutinative mutants of N. subflava GN01 had lost the ability to bind hematoside and sialosylparagloboside but remained able to bind lactosylceramide and gangliotetraosylceramide. These mutants fell into three classes with respect to their outer membrane protein profiles in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Class 1 mutants were identical to the parent strain save for the loss of a 27-kilodalton (kDa) protein. Class 2 mutants showed an outer membrane protein profile identical to that of the wild type, whereas mutants belonging to class 3 showed a number of changes, including the apparent absence of the 27-kDa protein. The 27-kDa protein from N. subflava GN01 was purified from the supernatant. A polyclonal antiserum to the purified Sia-1 protein as well as a Sia-1-specific monoclonal antibody inhibited hemagglutination by strain GN01. The purified Sia-1 protein in the presence of diluted anti-Sia-1 antiserum mediated a neuraminidase-sensitive hemagglutination. The purified Sia protein from a class 2 mutant was not able to hemagglutinate when cross-linked with antibodies, suggesting that it is a mutant form of Sia-1 affected in the receptor-binding site. Immunoelectron microscopy with a Sia-1-specific monoclonal antibody revealed that the adhesin was

  10. N. elongata produces type IV pili that mediate interspecies gene transfer with N. gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Dustin L; Biais, Nicolas; Weyand, Nathan J; Agellon, Al; Sisko, Jennifer L; Brown, Lewis M; So, Magdalene

    2011-01-01

    The genus Neisseria contains at least eight commensal and two pathogenic species. According to the Neisseria phylogenetic tree, commensals are basal to the pathogens. N. elongata, which is at the opposite end of the tree from N. gonorrhoeae, has been observed to be fimbriated, and these fimbriae are correlated with genetic competence in this organism. We tested the hypothesis that the fimbriae of N. elongata are Type IV pili (Tfp), and that Tfp functions in genetic competence. We provide evidence that the N. elongata fimbriae are indeed Tfp. Tfp, as well as the DNA Uptake Sequence (DUS), greatly enhance N. elongata DNA transformation. Tfp allows N. elongata to make intimate contact with N. gonorrhoeae and to mediate the transfer of antibiotic resistance markers between these two species. We conclude that Tfp functional for genetic competence is a trait of a commensal member of the Neisseria genus. Our findings provide a mechanism for the horizontal gene transfer that has been observed among Neisseria species. PMID:21731720

  11. Role of phosphoglucomutase in lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Sandlin, R C; Stein, D C

    1994-01-01

    A region of pSG30 that complements the pyocin-derived gonococcal lipooligosaccharide (LOS) mutants 1291d and 1291e was characterized by DNA sequence analysis and an open reading frame of 1,380 bases was identified that is 89% similar and 56% identical over 452 amino acids to the algC gene product from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that encodes phosphomannomutase. Enzymatic analysis of gonococcal crude protein extracts demonstrated that pSG30 encodes phosphoglucomutase (PGM) and phosphomannomutase activity. This activity is absent in 1291d and 1291e but is restored upon introduction of pSG30. PGM encoded by pSG34, a subclone of pSG30, was able to complement Escherichia coli PGM1, a strain deficient in PGM, as determined by bacteriophage C21 plaque formation. A revertant of 1291d that binds monoclonal antibody 2-1-L8 (specific for a 3.6-kDa LOS component) was isolated. The construction of a site-specific deletion of this region in the chromosome of 1291 confirms the role of this open reading frame in LOS biosynthesis. Images PMID:8188595

  12. Crystallographic analysis of Neisseria meningitidis PorB extracellular loops potentially implicated in TLR2 recognition.

    PubMed

    Kattner, Christof; Toussi, Deana N; Zaucha, Jan; Wetzler, Lee M; Rüppel, Nadine; Zachariae, Ulrich; Massari, Paola; Tanabe, Mikio

    2014-03-01

    Among all Neisseriae species, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are the only human pathogens, causative agents of bacterial meningitis and gonorrhoea, respectively. PorB, a pan-Neisseriae trimeric porin that mediates diffusive transport of essential molecules across the bacterial outer membrane, is also known to activate host innate immunity via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-mediated signaling. The molecular mechanism of PorB binding to TLR2 is not known, but it has been hypothesized that electrostatic interactions contribute to ligand/receptor binding. Strain-specific sequence variability in the surface-exposed loops of PorB which are potentially implicated in TLR2 binding, may explain the difference in TLR2-mediated cell activation in vitro by PorB homologs from the commensal Neisseriae lactamica and the pathogen N. meningitidis. Here, we report a comparative structural analysis of PorB from N. meningitidis serogroup B strain 8765 (63% sequence homology with PorB from N. meningitidis serogroup W135) and a mutant in which amino acid substitutions in the extracellular loop 7 lead to significantly reduced TLR2-dependent activity in vitro. We observe that this mutation both alters the loop conformation and causes dramatic changes of electrostatic surface charge, both of which may affect TLR2 recognition and signaling. PMID:24361688

  13. Two cases of verified clinical failures using internationally recommended first-line cefixime for gonorrhoea treatment, Norway, 2010.

    PubMed

    Unemo, M; Golparian, D; Syversen, G; Vestrheim, D F; Moi, H

    2010-11-25

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has developed resistance to most of the available therapeutic antimicrobials. The susceptibility to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, the last remaining first-line treatment option, is decreasing globally. This report describes the first two cases outside Japan of verified gonorrhoea clinical failures using internationally recommended first-line cefixime treatment. Enhanced awareness and more frequent follow-up examination, test-of-cure and appropriate verification/falsification of presumed clinical treatment failures, involving several clinical and laboratory parameters should be strongly emphasised worldwide. PMID:21144442

  14. Sigma factor RpoN (σ54) regulates pilE transcription in commensal Neisseria elongata.

    PubMed

    Rendón, María A; Hockenberry, Alyson M; McManus, Steven A; So, Magdalene

    2013-10-01

    Human-adapted Neisseria includes two pathogens, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis, and at least 13 species of commensals that colonize many of the same niches as the pathogens. The Type IV pilus plays an important role in the biology of pathogenic Neisseria. In these species, Sigma factor RpoD (σ(70)), Integration Host Factor, and repressors RegF and CrgA regulate transcription of pilE, the gene encoding the pilus structural subunit. The Type IV pilus is also a strictly conserved trait in commensal Neisseria. We present evidence that a different mechanism regulates pilE transcription in commensals. Using Neisseria elongata as a model, we show that Sigma factor RpoN (σ(54)), Integration Host Factor, and an activator we name Npa regulate pilE transcription. Taken in context with previous reports, our findings indicate pilE regulation switched from an RpoN- to an RpoD-dependent mechanism as pathogenic Neisseria diverged from commensals during evolution. Our findings have implications for the timing of Tfp expression and Tfp-mediated host cell interactions in these two groups of bacteria. PMID:23899162

  15. Using laser tweezers to measure twitching motility in Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Maier, Berenike

    2005-06-01

    Dynamic properties of type IV pili are essential for their function in bacterial infection, twitching motility and gene transfer. Laser tweezers are versatile tools to study the molecular mechanism underlying pilus dynamics at the single molecule level. Recently, these optical tweezers have been used to monitor pilus elongation and retraction in vivo at a resolution of several nanometers. The force generated by type IV pili exceeds 100 pN making pili the strongest linear motors characterized to date. The study of pilus dynamics at the single molecule level sheds light on kinetics, force generation, switching and mechanics of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilus motor. PMID:15939360

  16. Comparison of E-test with agar dilution methods in testing susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to azithromycin.

    PubMed

    Yasin, R M; Suan, K A; Meng, C Y

    1997-05-01

    A single dose of a new antibiotic, azithromycin, has been shown to be effective in the treatment of uncomplicated Neisseria gonorrhoeae. A clinical study was conducted to assess the in vitro susceptibility of N gonorrhoeae to azithromycin and compare the reliability of results obtained using the new E-test methodology for determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antibiotic with those obtained through the standard agar dilution method. 135 clinical isolates of N gonorrhoeae were obtained from patients attending hospital-based sexually transmitted disease clinics in five geographic locations in Malaysia. 76 of the isolates were penicillinase-producing N gonorrhoeae and 69 were high-level tetracycline-resistant N gonorrhoeae. All isolates were susceptible to azithromycin based on the susceptible MIC breakpoint of 2.0 mcg/ml. The MICs ranged from 0.0078-0.25 mcg/ml by agar dilution method and from 0.016-0.50 mcg/ml by E-test. Agreement between these two methods was 97.8%. The single-dose regime and good antigonococcal and antichlamydial activity of azithromycin make this antibiotic a suitable treatment choice. Moreover, the findings of this study suggest that the simpler, faster E-test is as reliable as the agar dilution method. Given the tendency of the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of N gonorrhoeae to change rapidly, it is important to monitor MICs to detect the emergence of resistance. PMID:9153733

  17. Shared antigenicity and immunogenicity of type 4 pilins expressed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Moraxella bovis, Neisseria gonorrhoaea, Dichelobacter nodosus, and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Patel, P; Marrs, C F; Mattick, J S; Ruehl, W W; Taylor, R K; Koomey, M

    1991-12-01

    Immunoblotting with polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against pilins expressed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Moraxella bovis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Dichelobacter nodosus, and Vibrio cholerae was used to demonstrate that these polypeptides display conserved antigenic and, in most cases, immunogenic determinants. These determinants appear to be localized to the highly homologous amino-terminal domains (residues 1 to 25). PMID:1682267

  18. Pili-Induced Clustering of N. gonorrhoeae Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Taktikos, Johannes; Lin, Yen Ting; Stark, Holger; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-01-01

    Type IV pili (Tfp) are prokaryotic retractable appendages known to mediate surface attachment, motility, and subsequent clustering of cells. Tfp are the main means of motility for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea. Tfp are also involved in formation of the microcolonies, which play a crucial role in the progression of the disease. While motility of individual cells is relatively well understood, little is known about the dynamics of N. gonorrhoeae aggregation. We investigate how individual N. gonorrhoeae cells, initially uniformly dispersed on flat plastic or glass surfaces, agglomerate into spherical microcolonies within hours. We quantify the clustering process by measuring the area fraction covered by the cells, number of cell aggregates, and their average size as a function of time. We observe that the microcolonies are also able to move but their mobility rapidly vanishes as the size of the colony increases. After a certain critical size they become immobile. We propose a simple theoretical model which assumes a pili-pili interaction of cells as the main clustering mechanism. Numerical simulations of the model quantitatively reproduce the experimental data on clustering and thus suggest that the agglomeration process can be entirely explained by the Tfp-mediated interactions. In agreement with this hypothesis mutants lacking pili are not able to form colonies. Moreover, cells with deficient quorum sensing mechanism show similar aggregation as the wild-type bacteria. Therefore, our results demonstrate that pili provide an essential mechanism for colony formation, while additional chemical cues, for example quorum sensing, might be of secondary importance. PMID:26355966

  19. Pili-Induced Clustering of N. gonorrhoeae Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Taktikos, Johannes; Lin, Yen Ting; Stark, Holger; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-01-01

    Type IV pili (Tfp) are prokaryotic retractable appendages known to mediate surface attachment, motility, and subsequent clustering of cells. Tfp are the main means of motility for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea. Tfp are also involved in formation of the microcolonies, which play a crucial role in the progression of the disease. While motility of individual cells is relatively well understood, little is known about the dynamics of N. gonorrhoeae aggregation. We investigate how individual N. gonorrhoeae cells, initially uniformly dispersed on flat plastic or glass surfaces, agglomerate into spherical microcolonies within hours. We quantify the clustering process by measuring the area fraction covered by the cells, number of cell aggregates, and their average size as a function of time. We observe that the microcolonies are also able to move but their mobility rapidly vanishes as the size of the colony increases. After a certain critical size they become immobile. We propose a simple theoretical model which assumes a pili-pili interaction of cells as the main clustering mechanism. Numerical simulations of the model quantitatively reproduce the experimental data on clustering and thus suggest that the agglomeration process can be entirely explained by the Tfp-mediated interactions. In agreement with this hypothesis mutants lacking pili are not able to form colonies. Moreover, cells with deficient quorum sensing mechanism show similar aggregation as the wild-type bacteria. Therefore, our results demonstrate that pili provide an essential mechanism for colony formation, while additional chemical cues, for example quorum sensing, might be of secondary importance. PMID:26355966

  20. Structural basis for iron piracy by pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Easley, Nicole C; Oke, Muse; Mizuno, Naoko; Gumbart, James; Boura, Evzen; Steere, Ashley N; Zak, Olga; Aisen, Philip; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Evans, Robert W; Gorringe, Andrew R; Mason, Anne B; Steven, Alasdair C; Buchanan, Susan K

    2012-03-01

    Neisseria are obligate human pathogens causing bacterial meningitis, septicaemia and gonorrhoea. Neisseria require iron for survival and can extract it directly from human transferrin for transport across the outer membrane. The transport system consists of TbpA, an integral outer membrane protein, and TbpB, a co-receptor attached to the cell surface; both proteins are potentially important vaccine and therapeutic targets. Two key questions driving Neisseria research are how human transferrin is specifically targeted, and how the bacteria liberate iron from transferrin at neutral pH. To address these questions, we solved crystal structures of the TbpA-transferrin complex and of the corresponding co-receptor TbpB. We characterized the TbpB-transferrin complex by small-angle X-ray scattering and the TbpA-TbpB-transferrin complex by electron microscopy. Our studies provide a rational basis for the specificity of TbpA for human transferrin, show how TbpA promotes iron release from transferrin, and elucidate how TbpB facilitates this process. PMID:22327295

  1. Membrane cofactor protein (MCP or CD46) is a cellular pilus receptor for pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Källström, H; Liszewski, M K; Atkinson, J P; Jonsson, A B

    1997-08-01

    Pili of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis mediate binding of the bacteria to human cell-surface receptors. We found that purified pili bound to a 55- to 60-kDa doublet band on SDS-PAGE of separated human epithelial cell extracts. This is a migration pattern typical of membrane cofactor protein (MCP or CD46). MCP is a widely distributed human complement regulatory protein. Attachment of the bacteria to epithelial cells was blocked by polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies directed against MCP, suggesting that this complement regulator is a receptor for piliated Neisseria. We proved this hypothesis by demonstrating that piliated, but not non-piliated, gonococci bound to CHO cells transfected with human MCP-cDNA. We also demonstrated a direct interaction between purified recombinant MCP and piliated Neisseria. Finally, recombinant MCP protein produced in E. coli inhibited attachment of the bacteria to target cells. Taken together, our data show that MCP is a human cell-surface receptor for piliated pathogenic Neisseria. PMID:9379894

  2. Distribution and diversity of the haemoglobin–haptoglobin iron-acquisition systems in pathogenic and non-pathogenic Neisseria

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Odile B.; Bennett, Julia S.; Derrick, Jeremy P.; Bayliss, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    A new generation of vaccines containing multiple protein components that aim to provide broad protection against serogroup B meningococci has been developed. One candidate, 4CMenB (4 Component MenB), has been approved by the European Medicines Agency, but is predicted to provide at most 70–80 % strain coverage; hence there is a need for second-generation vaccines that achieve higher levels of coverage. Prior knowledge of the diversity of potential protein vaccine components is a key step in vaccine design. A number of iron import systems have been targeted in meningococcal vaccine development, including the HmbR and HpuAB outer-membrane proteins, which mediate the utilization of haemoglobin or haemoglobin–haptoglobin complexes as iron sources. While the genetic diversity of HmbR has been described, little is known of the diversity of HpuAB. Using whole genome sequences deposited in a Bacterial Isolate Genome Sequence Database (BIGSDB), the prevalence and diversity of HpuAB among Neisseria were investigated. HpuAB was widely present in a range of Neisseria species whereas HmbR was mainly limited to the pathogenic species Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Patterns of sequence variation in sequences from HpuAB proteins were suggestive of recombination and diversifying selection consistent with strong immune selection. HpuAB was subject to repeat-mediated phase variation in pathogenic Neisseria and the closely related non-pathogenic Neisseria species Neisseria lactamica and Neisseria polysaccharea but not in the majority of other commensal Neisseria species. These findings are consistent with HpuAB being subject to frequent genetic transfer potentially limiting the efficacy of this receptor as a vaccine candidate. PMID:23813677

  3. The association of gonorrhoea and syphilis with premature birth and low birthweight.

    PubMed Central

    Donders, G G; Desmyter, J; De Wet, D H; Van Assche, F A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--Provide evidence from prospective data that Neisseria gonorrhoeae may be an important cause of premature delivery and low birth weight in areas with high prevalence of genital infections. SETTING--Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kalafong University Hospital, Pretoria, South Africa in collaboration with the Departments of Microbiology and of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium. SUBJECTS--Two hundred and fifty six consecutive black pregnant women were examined during the first antenatal visit, and one to four weeks later a second culture for N gonorrhoeae was taken at random in 67 of them. Hundred and sixty seven were analysable, 75 were lost to follow up. METHODS--After obtaining detailed clinical history, an endocervical specimen for N gonorrhoeae culture (Thayer-Martin) and C trachomatis antigen detection (Chlamydiazyme (R)) was taken. Syphilis was diagnosed when both reactive plasma protein (RPR) and T pallidum haemagglutination inhibition assay (TPHA) were positive. Prematurity was defined as delivery at less than 37 gestational weeks. RESULTS--Infection with N gonorrhoeae (n = 9) and untreated syphilis (n = 7) were both associated with prematurity and low birth weight. After multi-variate regression analysis, age-adjusted parity, late sexual debut, number of recent sexual partners, infection with N gonorrhoeae and infection with syphilis revealed significant associations with low birth weight. However, infection with C trachomatis, presence of abundant vaginal discharge, social class, Trichomonas vaginalis infection, gestational weeks at first antenatal visit and number of previous miscarriages did not reveal such an association. Attributable risk of untreated gonorrhoea for premature birth was 72% and routine cultures were cost-benefit efficient. CONCLUSIONS--At least in countries where the prevalence is high, genital infections as well as the risk factors for acquiring them (young age, late sexual debut

  4. Notes from the Field: Increase in Neisseria meningitidis-Associated Urethritis Among Men at Two Sentinel Clinics - Columbus, Ohio, and Oakland County, Michigan, 2015.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Jose A; Peterson, Amy S; Kirkcaldy, Robert D; Briere, Elizabeth C; Maierhofer, Courtney; Turner, Abigail Norris; Licon, Denisse B; Parker, Nicole; Dennison, Amanda; Ervin, Melissa; Johnson, Laura; Weberman, Barbara; Hackert, Pamela; Wang, Xin; Kretz, Cecilia B; Abrams, A Jeanine; Trees, David L; Del Rio, Carlos; Stephens, David S; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; DiOrio, Mary; Roberts, Mysheika Williams

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) urogenital infections, although less common than infections caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng), have been associated with urethritis, cervicitis, proctitis, and pelvic inflammatory disease. Nm can appear similar to Ng on Gram stain analysis (gram-negative intracellular diplococci) (1-5). Because Nm colonizes the nasopharynx, men who receive oral sex (fellatio) can acquire urethral Nm infections (1,3,5). This report describes an increase in Nm-associated urethritis in men attending sexual health clinics in Columbus, Ohio, and Oakland County, Michigan. PMID:27254649

  5. A genetic screen reveals a periplasmic copper chaperone required for nitrite reductase activity in pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Jen, Freda E-C; Djoko, Karrera Y; Bent, Stephen J; Day, Christopher J; McEwan, Alastair G; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-09-01

    Under conditions of low oxygen availability, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are able to respire via a partial denitrification pathway in which nitrite is converted to nitrous oxide. In this process, nitrite reductase (AniA), a copper (Cu)-containing protein converts nitrite to NO, and this product is converted to nitrous oxide by nitric oxide reductase (NorB). NorB also confers protection against toxic NO, and so we devised a conditional lethal screen, using a norB mutant, to identify mutants that were resistant to nitrite-dependent killing. After random-deletion mutagenesis of N. meningitidis, this genetic screen identified a gene encoding a Cu chaperone that is essential for AniA function, AccA. Purified AccA binds one Cu (I) ion and also possesses a second binding site for Cu (II). This novel periplasmic Cu chaperone (AccA) appears to be essential for provision of Cu ions to AniA of pathogenic Neisseria to generate an active nitrite reductase. Apart from the Neisseria genus, AccA is distributed across a wide range of environmental Proteobacteria species. PMID:26031293

  6. Vaccine potential of the Neisseria meningitidis 2086 lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Leah D; Bernfield, Liesel; Barniak, Vicki; Farley, John E; Howell, Alan; Knauf, Melissa; Ooi, Peggy; Smith, Robert P; Weise, Paige; Wetherell, Mike; Xie, Xiaoling; Zagursky, Robert; Zhang, Ying; Zlotnick, Gary W

    2004-04-01

    A novel antigen that induces cross-reactive bactericidal antibodies against a number of Neisseria meningitidis strains is described. This antigen, a approximately 28-kDa lipoprotein called LP2086, was first observed within a complex mixture of soluble outer membrane proteins (sOMPs) following a series of fractionation, protein purification, and proteomics steps. Approximately 95 different neisserial isolates tested positive by Western blotting and PCR screening methods for the presence of the protein and the gene encoding LP2086. The strains tested included isolates of N. meningitidis serogroups A, B, C, W135, and Y, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Neisseria lactamica. To better understand the microheterogeneity of this protein, the 2086 genes from 63 neisserial isolates were sequenced. Two different subfamilies of LP2086 were identified based on deduced amino acid sequence homology. A high degree of amino acid sequence similarity exists within each 2086 subfamily. The highest degree of genetic diversity was seen between the two subfamilies which share approximately 60 to 75% homology at the nucleic acid level. Flow cytometry (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) analyses and electron microscopy indicated that the LP2086 is localized on the outer surface of N. meningitidis. Antiserum produced against a single protein variant was capable of eliciting bactericidal activity against strains expressing different serosubtype antigens. Combining one recombinant lipidated 2086 (rLP2086) variant from each subfamily with two rPorA variants elicited bactericidal activity against all strains tested. The rLP2086 family of antigens are candidates worthy of further vaccine development. PMID:15039331

  7. Distribution of a protein antigenically related to the major anaerobically induced gonococcal outer membrane protein among other Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Hoehn, G T; Clark, V L

    1990-12-01

    The Pan 1 protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a novel 54-kDa outer membrane protein expressed only when gonococci are grown in the absence of oxygen. It is a major antigen recognized by sera from patients with gonococcal infection. We raised mouse monospecific polyclonal antiserum to gel-purified Pan 1 from gonococcal strain F62. The antiserum was broadly cross-reactive among gonococcal strains; all strains tested reacted in immunoblot analysis proportionate to the amount of Pan 1 visible in silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. In immunoblot experiments, N. lactamica and N. cinerea reacted very strongly to the anti-Pan 1 antiserum, whereas N. sicca, N. flava, and N. mucosa did not react at all. The other commensals tested, N. subflava and N. perflava, exhibited only a minor reaction. These results correlated with the apparent amount of Pan 1 seen on SDS-polyacrylamide gels of outer membranes. SDS-polyacrylamide gel analysis of six meningococcal strains revealed no visible anaerobically induced outer membrane proteins, and the subsequent immunoblots showed only slight or no reaction to the anti-Pan 1 antibody. In the four meningococcal strains that did react slightly with the antiserum, a Pan 1-like protein was seen only in anaerobically grown cells. Thus, meningococci did not express Pan 1 at levels comparable to that found in gonococci; however, when Pan 1 was expressed in meningococcal strains, it was oxygen regulated. This is the first example of a protein found in the gonococcal outer membrane that, under identical growth conditions, is not expressed at similar levels in the meningococcus. PMID:2123827

  8. Distribution of a protein antigenically related to the major anaerobically induced gonococcal outer membrane protein among other Neisseria species.

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, G T; Clark, V L

    1990-01-01

    The Pan 1 protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a novel 54-kDa outer membrane protein expressed only when gonococci are grown in the absence of oxygen. It is a major antigen recognized by sera from patients with gonococcal infection. We raised mouse monospecific polyclonal antiserum to gel-purified Pan 1 from gonococcal strain F62. The antiserum was broadly cross-reactive among gonococcal strains; all strains tested reacted in immunoblot analysis proportionate to the amount of Pan 1 visible in silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. In immunoblot experiments, N. lactamica and N. cinerea reacted very strongly to the anti-Pan 1 antiserum, whereas N. sicca, N. flava, and N. mucosa did not react at all. The other commensals tested, N. subflava and N. perflava, exhibited only a minor reaction. These results correlated with the apparent amount of Pan 1 seen on SDS-polyacrylamide gels of outer membranes. SDS-polyacrylamide gel analysis of six meningococcal strains revealed no visible anaerobically induced outer membrane proteins, and the subsequent immunoblots showed only slight or no reaction to the anti-Pan 1 antibody. In the four meningococcal strains that did react slightly with the antiserum, a Pan 1-like protein was seen only in anaerobically grown cells. Thus, meningococci did not express Pan 1 at levels comparable to that found in gonococci; however, when Pan 1 was expressed in meningococcal strains, it was oxygen regulated. This is the first example of a protein found in the gonococcal outer membrane that, under identical growth conditions, is not expressed at similar levels in the meningococcus. Images PMID:2123827

  9. The Use of High-Throughput DNA Sequencing in the Investigation of Antigenic Variation: Application to Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Davies, John K.; Harrison, Paul F.; Lin, Ya-Hsun; Bartley, Stephanie; Khoo, Chen Ai; Seemann, Torsten; Ryan, Catherine S.; Kahler, Charlene M.; Hill, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Antigenic variation occurs in a broad range of species. This process resembles gene conversion in that variant DNA is unidirectionally transferred from partial gene copies (or silent loci) into an expression locus. Previous studies of antigenic variation have involved the amplification and sequencing of individual genes from hundreds of colonies. Using the pilE gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae we have demonstrated that it is possible to use PCR amplification, followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing and a novel assembly process, to detect individual antigenic variation events. The ability to detect these events was much greater than has previously been possible. In N. gonorrhoeae most silent loci contain multiple partial gene copies. Here we show that there is a bias towards using the copy at the 3′ end of the silent loci (copy 1) as the donor sequence. The pilE gene of N. gonorrhoeae and some strains of Neisseria meningitidis encode class I pilin, but strains of N. meningitidis from clonal complexes 8 and 11 encode a class II pilin. We have confirmed that the class II pili of meningococcal strain FAM18 (clonal complex 11) are non-variable, and this is also true for the class II pili of strain NMB from clonal complex 8. In addition when a gene encoding class I pilin was moved into the meningococcal strain NMB background there was no evidence of antigenic variation. Finally we investigated several members of the opa gene family of N. gonorrhoeae, where it has been suggested that limited variation occurs. Variation was detected in the opaK gene that is located close to pilE, but not at the opaJ gene located elsewhere on the genome. The approach described here promises to dramatically improve studies of the extent and nature of antigenic variation systems in a variety of species. PMID:24466206

  10. Identification of Neisseria by electron capture gas-liquid chromatography of metabolites in a chemically defined growth medium.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, C D; Brooks, J B; Kellogg, D S

    1977-01-01

    A dual-purpose study was carried out in an attempt to develop a rapid, sensitive method to identify Neisseria species by gas chromatography and to learn more about the metabolism of these organisms. Sixty-nine isolates of Neisseria were grown in a chemically defined fluid medium; the spent medium was extracted sequentially at pH 2 with diethyl ether and at pH 10 with chloroform. The pH 10 extracts were derivatized with heptafluorobutyric anhydride and analyzed by electron capture gas-liquid chromatography. The resulting spent culture medium electron capture gas-liquid chromatography profiles showed several qualitative and significant quantitative differences among the Neisseria species potentially useful in separating and identifying these organisms. Putrescine and cadaverine which were present in the spent culture medium of some Neisseria, including N. gonorrhoeae, were tentatively identified. Substituting carbohydrates for the chemically defined medium containing glucose in the base medium produced altered profiles with increased quantitative and qualitative differences. PMID:21889

  11. Absence seizure

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, ... 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap ...

  12. Absence seizure

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  13. Evolution of an autotransporter: domain shuffling and lateral transfer from pathogenic Haemophilus to Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Davis, J; Smith, A L; Hughes, W R; Golomb, M

    2001-08-01

    The genomes of pathogenic Haemophilus influenzae strains are larger than that of Rd KW20 (Rd), the nonpathogenic laboratory strain whose genome has been sequenced. To identify potential virulence genes, we examined genes possessed by Int1, an invasive nonencapsulated isolate from a meningitis patient, but absent from Rd. Int1 was found to have a novel gene termed lav, predicted to encode a member of the AIDA-I/VirG/PerT family of virulence-associated autotransporters (ATs). Associated with lav are multiple repeats of the tetranucleotide GCAA, implicated in translational phase variation of surface molecules. Laterally acquired by H. influenzae, lav is restricted in distribution to a few pathogenic strains, including H. influenzae biotype aegyptius and Brazilian purpuric fever isolates. The DNA sequence of lav is surprisingly similar to that of a gene previously described for Neisseria meningitidis. Sequence comparisons suggest that lav was transferred relatively recently from Haemophilus to Neisseria, shortly before the divergence of N. meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Segments of lav predicted to encode passenger and beta-domains differ sharply in G+C base content, supporting the idea that AT genes have evolved by fusing domains which originated in different genomes. Homology and base sequence comparisons suggest that a novel biotype aegyptius AT arose by swapping an unrelated sequence for the passenger domain of lav. The unusually mobile lav locus joins a growing list of genes transferred from H. influenzae to Neisseria. Frequent gene exchange suggests a common pool of hypervariable contingency genes and may help to explain the origin of invasiveness in certain respiratory pathogens. PMID:11443098

  14. A theory of the epidemiology of gonorrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Felton, W F

    1979-01-01

    Gonorrhoea is a typical endemic disease. Its continuity has been traditionally attributed to the existence of a pool of infected promiscuous women. Alternative theories have suggested a dynamic approach which gives equal importance to the man and the woman. Models constructed to simulate the epidemiology of gonorrhoea have so far failed to be realistic. An hypothesis that the distribution of infections is limited by the number of opportunities for transmission presented by the pattern of sexual behaviour may explain the low prevalence of the disease in England. PMID:427517

  15. NadA, a Novel Vaccine Candidate of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Brunelli, Brunella; Adu-Bobie, Jeannette; Aricò, Beatrice; Capecchi, Barbara; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Masignani, Vega; Santini, Laura; Savino, Silvana; Granoff, Dan M.; Caugant, Dominique A.; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Mora, Marirosa

    2002-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen, which, in spite of antibiotic therapy, is still a major cause of mortality due to sepsis and meningitis. Here we describe NadA, a novel surface antigen of N. meningitidis that is present in 52 out of 53 strains of hypervirulent lineages electrophoretic types (ET) ET37, ET5, and cluster A4. The gene is absent in the hypervirulent lineage III, in N. gonorrhoeae and in the commensal species N. lactamica and N. cinerea. The guanine/cytosine content, lower than the chromosome, suggests acquisition by horizontal gene transfer and subsequent limited evolution to generate three well-conserved alleles. NadA has a predicted molecular structure strikingly similar to a novel class of adhesins (YadA and UspA2), forms high molecular weight oligomers, and binds to epithelial cells in vitro supporting the hypothesis that NadA is important for host cell interaction. NadA induces strong bactericidal antibodies and is protective in the infant rat model suggesting that this protein may represent a novel antigen for a vaccine able to control meningococcal disease caused by three hypervirulent lineages. PMID:12045242

  16. NadA, a novel vaccine candidate of Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Brunelli, Brunella; Adu-Bobie, Jeannette; Aricò, Beatrice; Capecchi, Barbara; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Masignani, Vega; Santini, Laura; Savino, Silvana; Granoff, Dan M; Caugant, Dominique A; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Mora, Marirosa

    2002-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen, which, in spite of antibiotic therapy, is still a major cause of mortality due to sepsis and meningitis. Here we describe NadA, a novel surface antigen of N. meningitidis that is present in 52 out of 53 strains of hypervirulent lineages electrophoretic types (ET) ET37, ET5, and cluster A4. The gene is absent in the hypervirulent lineage III, in N. gonorrhoeae and in the commensal species N. lactamica and N. cinerea. The guanine/cytosine content, lower than the chromosome, suggests acquisition by horizontal gene transfer and subsequent limited evolution to generate three well-conserved alleles. NadA has a predicted molecular structure strikingly similar to a novel class of adhesins (YadA and UspA2), forms high molecular weight oligomers, and binds to epithelial cells in vitro supporting the hypothesis that NadA is important for host cell interaction. NadA induces strong bactericidal antibodies and is protective in the infant rat model suggesting that this protein may represent a novel antigen for a vaccine able to control meningococcal disease caused by three hypervirulent lineages. PMID:12045242

  17. High prevalence of ciprofloxacin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Teng, Lee-Jene; Ho, Shen-Wu

    2005-01-01

    Among 55 preserved isolates collected in northern Taiwan from 1999 through 2003, ciprofloxacin resistance (minimum inhibitory concentration, >or=1 microg/mL) was found in 1 (25%) of 4 isolates obtained in 1999-2000 and in 27 (93.1%) of 29 isolates obtained in 2003. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that several clones predominated among the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates. PMID:15614711

  18. Activity of faropenem tested against Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates including fluoroquinolone-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Critchley, Ian A; Whittington, William L H; Janjic, Nebojsa; Pottumarthy, Sudha

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated the anti-gonococcal potency of faropenem along with 7 comparator reference antimicrobials against a preselected collection of clinical isolates. The 265 isolates were inclusive of 2 subsets: 1) 76 well-characterized resistant phenotypes of gonococcal strains (53 quinolone-resistant strains--31 with documented quinolone resistance-determining region changes from Japan, 15 strains resistant to penicillin and tetracycline, and 8 strains with intermediate susceptibility to penicillin) and 2) 189 recent isolates from clinical specimens in 2004 from 6 states across the United States where quinolone resistance is prevalent. Activity of faropenem was adversely affected by l-cysteine hydrochloride in IsoVitaleX (4-fold increase in [minimal inhibitory concentration] MIC50; 0.06 versus 0.25 microg/mL). The rank order of potency of the antimicrobials for the entire collection was ceftriaxone (MIC90, 0.06 microg/mL) > faropenem (0.25 microg/mL) > azithromycin (0.5 microg/mL) > cefuroxime (1 microg/mL) > tetracycline (2 microg/mL) > penicillin = ciprofloxacin = levofloxacin (4 microg/mL). Using MIC90 for comparison, faropenem was 4-fold more potent than cefuroxime (0.25 versus 1 microg/mL), but was 4-fold less active than ceftriaxone (0.25 versus 0.06 microg/mL). Although the activity of faropenem was not affected by either penicillinase production (MIC90, 0.12 microg/mL, penicillinase-positive) or increasing ciprofloxacin MIC (0.25 microg/mL, ciprofloxacin-resistant), increasing penicillin MIC was associated with an increase in MIC90 values (0.016 microg/mL for penicillin-susceptible to 0.25 microg/mL for penicillin-resistant strains). Among the recent (2004) clinical gonococcal isolates tested, reduced susceptibility to penicillins, tetracycline, and fluoroquinolones was high (28.0-94.2%). Geographic distribution of the endemic resistance rates of gonococci varied considerably, with 16.7-66.7% of the gonococcal isolates being ciprofloxacin-resistant in Oregon, California, Washington, and Hawaii. Faropenem retained its potency against these recent clinical strains and also quinolone-resistant strains from Japan (MIC90, < or =0.25 microg/mL). In summary, the excellent activity of faropenem against the gonococcal strains analyzed irrespective of the resistance phenotype, along with its beta-lactamase stability, makes it an ideal contender for further development as an oral beta-lactam agent to treat uncomplicated gonococcal infections due to strains emerging with resistant to penicillins, tetracyclines, and fluoroquinolones. PMID:16269221

  19. Pilin expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is under both positive and negative transcriptional control.

    PubMed Central

    Taha, M K; So, M; Seifert, H S; Billyard, E; Marchal, C

    1988-01-01

    We have identified two closely linked genes, pilA and pilB, which act in trans on the pilin promoter. pilA-pilB map downstream of expression loci pilE1 and opaE1 in the gonococcal chromosome. Subcloning data indicate that pilB acts negatively on the pilin promoter, and insertional inactivation of pilB results in hyperpiliated gonococci. A pilA clone activates the pilin promoter in Escherichia coli, and a pilA-/pilA+ heterodiploid gonococcus exhibits a P- phenotype. Our inability to obtain simple pilA- mutants strongly suggests that pilA is an essential gene in the gonococcus. In an in vitro coupled transcription/translation system, inserts spanning the pilA and pilB region direct the synthesis of two proteins of 40 and 58 kd. DNA sequence analysis shows that the pilA and pilB loci encode proteins of 38.6 kd (with a putative DNA binding domain) and 57.9 kd respectively. The pilA and pilB genes are in opposite orientation relative to each other, and the 5' ends of the two genes overlap. We discuss how these two loci may interact to control pilin expression in the gonococcus. Images PMID:2854063

  20. How often are gonorrhoea and genital yeast infection sexually transmitted?

    PubMed

    Thin, R N; Rendell, P; Wadsworth, J

    1979-08-01

    Although gonorrhoea is often regarded as the sexually transmitted disease against which others are measured, its infectivity is not clearly understood. Estimates of the infection rate have varied from 5--90%. In this study, 50 couples with gonorrhoea were matched with 50 couples with genital yeast infection. Gonorrhoea was diagnosed in both partners of 32 couples and genital yeast infection in both partners of 21 couples. These figures provide an indication of the sexual transmission of these conditions. The higher figure for gonorrhoea may be related to a greater urgency in tracing contacts. PMID:486247

  1. Slam is an outer membrane protein that is required for the surface display of lipidated virulence factors in Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Hooda, Yogesh; Lai, Christine Chieh-Lin; Judd, Andrew; Buckwalter, Carolyn M; Shin, Hyejin Esther; Gray-Owen, Scott D; Moraes, Trevor F

    2016-01-01

    Lipoproteins decorate the surface of many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, playing essential roles in immune evasion and nutrient acquisition. In Neisseria spp., the causative agents of gonorrhoea and meningococcal meningitis, surface lipoproteins (SLPs) are required for virulence and have been extensively studied as prime candidates for vaccine development. However, the machinery and mechanism that allow for the surface display of SLPs are not known. Here, we describe a transposon (Tn5)-based search for the proteins required to deliver SLPs to the surface of Neisseria meningitidis, revealing a family of proteins that we have named the surface lipoprotein assembly modulator (Slam). N. meningitidis contains two Slam proteins, each exhibiting distinct substrate preferences. The Slam proteins are sufficient to reconstitute SLP transport in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli, which are otherwise unable to efficiently display these lipoproteins on their cell surface. Immunoprecipitation and domain probing experiments suggest that the SLP, TbpB, interacts with Slam during the transit process; furthermore, the membrane domain of Slam is sufficient for selectivity and proper surface display of SLPs. Rather than being a Neisseria-specific factor, our bioinformatic analysis shows that Slam can be found throughout proteobacterial genomes, indicating a conserved but until now unrecognized virulence mechanism. PMID:27572441

  2. Single-dose ampicillin/sulbactam versus ceftriaxone as treatment for uncomplicated gonorrhoea in a Ugandan STD clinic population with a high prevalence of PPNG infection.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, N S; Nsubuga, P S; Baingana-Baingi, D J; Desmond-Hellmann, S D; Mbidde, E K; Granowitz, C B; Sande, M A

    1995-04-01

    During the period November 1989 to March 1991 a total of 330 patients (269 males and 61 females) with signs and symptoms of uncomplicated lower genital tract infections with Neisseria gonorrhoeae were treated at a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Kampala, Uganda. Patients were randomized for treatment with either intramuscular ampicillin/sulbactam (1 g ampicillin/0.5 g sulbactam), plus 1 g probenecid orally, or ceftriaxone (250 mg). In those cases where N. gonorrhoeae was isolated and the patients returned for a follow-up visit, 70/74 (95%) of the patients treated with ampicillin/sulbactam and 71/72 (99%) of those treated with ceftriaxone had favourable clinical outcomes. All 24 patients with penicillinase-producing N. gonorrhoeae (PPNG) treated with ampicillin/sulbactam had a favourable clinical outcome compared with 95% (20/21) of those with PPNG treated with ceftriaxone. The infecting pathogen was eradicated in 65/71 (92%) of the evaluable patients treated with ampicillin/sulbactam and in 60/63 (95%) of the ceftriaxone group. Both drug regimens were well tolerated and there were no reports of adverse drug effects. In summary, in a predominantly male group of clinic patients in Kampala, Uganda, ampicillin/sulbactam was as safe and effective as ceftriaxone in treating uncomplicated gonococcal infections of the lower genital tract caused by either PPNG or non-PPNG strains. PMID:7714943

  3. Presenilin/gamma-secretase cleaves CD46 in response to Neisseria infection.

    PubMed

    Weyand, Nathan J; Calton, Christine M; Higashi, Dustin L; Kanack, Kristen J; So, Magdalene

    2010-01-15

    CD46 is a type I transmembrane protein with complement and T cell regulatory functions in human cells. CD46 has signaling and receptor properties in immune and nonimmune cells, many of which are dependent on the expression of cytoplasmic tail (cyt) isoforms cyt1 or cyt2. Little is known about how cyt1 and cyt2 mediate cellular responses. We show that CD46-cyt1 and CD46-cyt2 are substrates for presenilin/gamma-secretase (PS/gammaS), an endogenous protease complex that regulates many important signaling proteins through proteolytic processing. PS/gammaS processing of CD46 releases immunoprecipitable cyt1 and cyt2 tail peptides into the cell, is blocked by chemical inhibitors, and is prevented in dominant negative presenilin mutant cell lines. Two human pathogens, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis, stimulate PS/gammaS processing of CD46-cyt1 and CD46-cyt2. This stimulation requires type IV pili and PilT, the type IV pilus retraction motor, implying that mechanotransduction plays a role in this event. We present a model for PS/gammaS processing of CD46 that provides a mechanism by which signals are transduced via the cyt1 and cyt2 tails to regulate CD46-dependent cellular responses. Our findings have broad implications for understanding the full range of CD46 functions in infection and noninfection situations. PMID:20018629

  4. Analysis of protein binding to the Sma/Cla DNA repeat in pathogenic Neisseriae.

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, L A; Frangipane, J V; Seifert, H S

    1997-01-01

    Antigenic variation of the pilus is an essential component of Neisseria gonorrhoeae pathogenesis. Unidirectional recombination of silent pilin DNA into an expressed pilin gene allows for substantial sequence variation of this highly immunogenic surface structure. While the RecA protein is required for pilin gene recombination, the factors which maintain the silent reservoir of pilin sequences and/or allow unidirectional recombination from silent to expression loci remain undefined. We have previously shown that a conserved sequence at the 3'end of all pilin loci (the Sma/Cla repeat) is required to be present at the expression locus for efficient recombination from the silent loci. In this study, the binding of gonococcal proteins to this DNA sequence was investigated. Gel mobility shift assays and competition experiments using deletion derivatives of the repeat, show that multiple activities bind to different regions of the Sma/Cla repeat and define the boundaries of the binding sequences. Moreover, only the pathogenic Neisseria harbor proteins which specifically bind to this repeat, suggesting a correlation between the expression of these DNA binding proteins and the potential to cause disease. PMID:9060430

  5. Rifampin resistance in Neisseria meningitidis due to alterations in membrane permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, F J; Carter, P E; Cash, P; Pennington, T H

    1996-01-01

    Rifampin-resistant (Rifr) Neisseria meningitidis strains are known to have single point mutations in the central conserved regions of the rpoB gene. We have demonstrated two distinct resistance phenotypes in strains with identical mutations in this region, an intermediate level of resistance in Rifr clinical isolates and a high level of resistance in mutants selected in vitro. The possible role of membrane permeability in the latter was investigated by measuring MICs in the presence of Tween 80; values for high-level-resistance mutants were reduced to intermediate levels, whereas those for intermediate-level-resistance strains were unaffected. The highly resistant mutants were also found to have increased resistance to Triton X-100 and gentian violet. Sequencing of the meningococcal mtrR gene and its promoter region (which determine resistance to hydrophobic agents in Neisseria gonorrhoeae) from susceptible or intermediate strains and highly resistant mutants generated from them showed no mutation within this region. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of two parent and Rif mutant strains showed identical shifts in the pI of one protein, indicating that differences between the parent and the highly Rifr mutant are not confined to the rpoB gene. These results indicate that both permeability and rpoB mutations play a role in determining the resistance of N. meningitidis to rifampin. PMID:8851587

  6. Expression of epithelial cell iron-related genes upon infection by Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Bonnah, Robert A; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Carlson, Hanqian; Minana, Belen; Enns, Caroline A; Hentze, Matthias W; So, Magdalene

    2004-05-01

    Infection by the obligate human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis (MC) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) reduces the expression of host epithelial cell transferrin receptor 1 (TfR-1) (Bonnah et al., 2000, Cellular Microbiology 2: