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Sample records for nematic lyotropic liquid

  1. Surface alignment and anchoring transitions in nematic lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Nazarenko, V G; Boiko, O P; Park, H-S; Brodyn, O M; Omelchenko, M M; Tortora, L; Nastishin, Yu A; Lavrentovich, O D

    2010-07-01

    The surface alignment of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals can not only be planar (tangential) but also homeotropic, with self-assembled aggregates perpendicular to the substrate, as demonstrated by mapping optical retardation and by three-dimensional imaging of the director field. With time, the homeotropic nematic undergoes a transition into a tangential state. The anchoring transition is discontinuous and can be described by a double-well anchoring potential with two minima corresponding to tangential and homeotropic orientation. PMID:20867479

  2. Polar Switching in a Lyotropic Columnar Nematic Liquid Crystal Made of Bowl-Shaped Molecules.

    PubMed

    Guilleme, Julia; Cavero, Emma; Sierra, Teresa; Ortega, Josu; Folcia, César L; Etxebarria, Jesus; Torres, Tomás; González-Rodríguez, David

    2015-08-01

    A polar response in a lyotropic columnar nematic material is reported. The material accommodates bowl-shaped molecules with strong axial dipole moments in column segments without head-to-tail invariance. Optical second-harmonic-generation methods confirm that the nematic columns align unidirectionally under an applied electric field and the material develops remnant macroscopic polarization observable for hours. The switching takes place by a flip of the columns. PMID:26078047

  3. Annihilation dynamics of stringlike topological defects in a nematic lyotropic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, R R; Mendes, R S; Fernandes, P R G; Mukai, H

    2013-10-01

    Topological defects can appear whenever there is some type of ordering. Its ubiquity in nature has been the subject of several studies, from early Universe to condensed matter. In this work, we investigated the annihilation dynamics of defects and antidefects in a lyotropic nematic liquid crystal (ternary mixture of potassium laurate, decanol and deionized-destillated water) using the polarized optical light microscopy technique. We analyzed Schlieren textures with topological defects produced due to a symmetry breaking in the transition of the isotropic to nematic calamitic phase after a temperature quench. As result, we obtained for the distance D between two annihilating defects (defect-antidefect pair), as a function of time t remaining for the annihilation, the scaling law D ∝ t(α), with α = 0.390 and standard deviation σ = 0.085. Our findings go in the direction to extend experimental results related to dynamics of defects in liquid crystals since only thermotropic and polymerics ones had been investigated. In addition, our results are in good quantitative agreement with previous investigations on the subject. PMID:24025970

  4. Anomalous behavior in the crossover between the negative and positive biaxial nematic mesophases in a lyotropic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Erol; Reis, Dennys; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio M

    2014-05-19

    A novel quaternary lyotropic liquid-crystalline mixture of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DDTMABr)/sodium bromide/1-dodecanol/water, presenting the biaxial nematic phase (NB ) in addition to two uniaxial discotic (ND) and calamitic (NC) nematic ones, was synthesized. The partial phase diagram of this new mixture was constructed as a function of the DDTMABr molar-fraction concentration. The phase transitions from uniaxial to biaxial nematic phases were studied by means of the temperature dependence of the optical birefringence. In a particular region of the phase diagram, anomalous behavior was observed in the crossover from N-B to N+b: the contrast of the conoscopic fringes, which allows the birefringence measurements, almost vanishes, and the sample loses its alignment. This behavior, which was not observed before in lyotropics, was interpreted as a decrease in the mean diamagnetic susceptibility anisotropy (Δχ) of the sample, which was related to the shape anisotropy of the micelles. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed to evaluate the micellar shape anisotropy; these revealed that this mixture presented a smaller shape anisotropy than those of other lyotropic micellar systems presenting the NB phase. PMID:24692308

  5. Stereochemical control of nonamphiphilic lyotropic liquid crystals: chiral nematic phase of assemblies separated by six nanometers of aqueous solvents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sijie; Wang, Bing; Cui, Dawei; Kerwood, Deborah; Wilkens, Stephan; Han, Junjie; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2013-06-13

    Unlike conventional thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals, nonamphiphilic lyotropic liquid crystals consist of hydrated assemblies of nonamphiphilic molecules that are aligned with a separation of about 6 nm between assemblies in an aqueous environment. This separation raises the question of how chirality, either from chiral mesogens or chiral dopants, would impact the phase as the assemblies that need to interact with each other are about 6 nm apart. Here, we report the synthesis of three stereoisomers of disodium chromonyl carboxylate, 5'DSCG-diviol, and the correlation between the molecular structure, bulk assembly, and liquid crystal formation. We observed that the chiral isomers (enantiomers 5'DSCG-(R,R)-diviol and 5'DSCG-(S,S)-diviol) formed liquid crystals while the achiral isomer 5'DSCG-meso-diviol did not. Circular dichroism indicated a chiral conformation with bisignate cotton effect. The nuclear Overhauser effect in proton NMR spectroscopy revealed conformations that are responsible for liquid crystal formation. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy showed that chiral 5'DSCG-diviols form assemblies with crossings. Interestingly, only planar alignment of the chiral nematic phase was observed in liquid crystal cells with thin spacers. The homeotropic alignment that permitted a fingerprint texture was obtained only when the thickness of the liquid crystal cell was increase to above ~500 μm. These studies suggest that hydrated assemblies of chiral 5'DSCG-diviol can interact with each other across a 6 nm separation in an aqueous environment by having a twist angle of about 0.22° throughout the sample between the neighboring assemblies. PMID:23688325

  6. Electrolyte effects on the chiral induction and on its temperature dependence in a chiral nematic lyotropic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Dawin, Ute C; Osipov, Mikhail A; Giesselmann, Frank

    2010-08-19

    We present a study on the effect of added CsCl and of temperature variation on the chiral induction in a chiral nematic lyotropic liquid crystal (LC) composed of the surfactant cesium perfluorooctanoate (CsPFO), water, and the chiral dopant d-Leucine (d-Leu). The chiral induction was measured as the helical pitch P. The role of the additives CsCl and d-Leu on the phase behavior is investigated and discussed. The thermal stabilization effect of CsCl is shown to lead to an apparent salt effect on the pitch when the pitch is compared at a constant temperature. This apparent effect is removed by comparing the pitch measured for different salt concentrations at a temperature relative to the phase-transition temperatures; thus, the real salt effect on the pitch is described. High salt concentrations are shown to increase the pitch, that is, hinder the chiral induction. The effect is discussed in terms of a decreased solubilization of the amphiphilic chiral solute d-Leu in the micelles due to the salt-induced screening of the surfactant head groups and the consequential denser packing of the surfactants. The temperature variation of the pitch is investigated for all CsCl concentrations and is found to be essentially independent of the salt concentration. The temperature variation is analyzed and discussed in the context of a theoretical model taking into account specific properties of lyotropic liquid crystals. A hyperbolic decrease of the pitch is found with increasing temperature, which is known, from thermotropic liquid crystals, to stem from pretransitional critical fluctuations close to the lamellar phase. However, the experimental data confirmed the theoretical prediction that, at high temperature, that is, far away from the transition into the lamellar phase, the pitch is characterized by a linear temperature dependence which is determined by a combination of steric and dispersion chiral interactions. The parameters of the theoretical expression for the pitch have

  7. Brownian Dynamics of Colloidal Particles in Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Angel; Collings, Peter J.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    We employ video microscopy to study the Brownian dynamics of colloidal particles in the nematic phase of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs). These LCLCs (in this case, DSCG) are water soluble, and their nematic phases are characterized by an unusually large elastic anisotropy. Our preliminary measurements of particle mean-square displacement for polystyrene colloidal particles (~5 micron-diameter) show diffusive and sub-diffusive behaviors moving parallel and perpendicular to the nematic director, respectively. In order to understand these motions, we are developing models that incorporate the relaxation of elastic distortions of the surrounding nematic field. Further experiments to confirm these preliminary results and to determine the origin of these deviations compared to simple diffusion theory are ongoing; our results will also be compared to previous diffusion experiments in nematic liquid crystals. We gratefully acknowledge financial support through NSF DMR12-05463, MRSEC DMR11-20901, and NASA NNX08AO0G.

  8. Optical characterization of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) represent a special class of lyotropic mesophases markedly different from conventional amphiphilic mesogens. Materials forming LCLCs are composed of plank-like molecules with a polyaromatic central core and hydrophilic ionic groups at the periphery. The individual molecules tend to assemble into rodlike aggregates that form the N phase once the concentration exceeds about 0.1M. The LCLC materials show a tremendous potential for applications in optics as self-assembling polarizing and compensating films and in the area of real-time biological sensing. The emerging applications require an understanding of basic properties of LCLC. This work addresses these needs by providing the optical characterization of LCLC. We studied in detail the optical anisotropic properties of three different nematic LCLCs: disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), Blue 27, and Violet 20. We determined the birefringence of these three materials as the function of the temperature T and wavelength lambda and the corresponding dependencies of the absorption coefficients for Blue 27 and Violet 20. The birefringence is negative and significantly lower in the absolute value as compared to the birefringence of typical thermotropic N materials. We determined the scalar order parameter of the nematic phase of Blue 27 and its temperature dependence. The scalar order parameter is close to the one predicted by the classic Onsager theory for solutions of rigid rods. However, this similarity is not complete, as the measured scalar order parameter depends on temperature. The I-N pretransitional fluctuations in an aqueous solution of DSCG were studied by light scattering. We obtained the correlation length of the orientational order-parameter fluctuations of isotropic DSCG solution. The pretransitional behavior of light scattering does not completely follow the classic Landau-de Gennes model. This feature is explained by the variable length of DSCG aggregates as a function

  9. Homeotropic alignment of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals using noncovalent interactions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Han, Ganghee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Collings, Peter J; Lubensky, Tom C; Yodh, Arjun G

    2014-03-18

    We report on the homeotropic alignment of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs). Homeotropic anchoring of LCLCs is difficult to achieve, and this challenge has limited development of applications for LCLCs. In this work, homeotropic alignment is achieved using noncovalent interactions between the LCLC molecules and various alignment layers including graphene, parylene films, poly(methyl methacrylate) films, and fluoropolymer films. The LCLC molecules are unique in that they self-assemble via noncovalent interactions in water into elongated aggregates which, in turn, form nematic and columnar liquid crystal (LC) phases. Here we exploit these same noncovalent interactions to induce homeotropic anchoring of the nematic LCLC. Homeotropic alignment is confirmed by polarized optical microscopy and conoscopy. We also report on novel transient stripe textures that occur when an initial flow-induced planar alignment transforms into the equilibrium homeotropic alignment required by boundary conditions. An understanding of this behavior could be important for switching applications. PMID:24559290

  10. Liquid crystalline thermotropic and lyotropic nanohybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Sarmenio; Mingotaud, Christophe; Kahn, Myrtil L.; Marty, Jean-Daniel

    2013-07-01

    This review is meant to give the reader an insight into hybrids incorporating different types of nanoparticles, e.g. metallic or metal oxides, within different types of lyotropic and thermotropic liquid crystals, from relatively small calamitic molecules to the larger discotics and polymers. In particular, this review highlights the importance of nanoparticle-liquid crystal interactions in accessing hybrid materials that exhibit synergetic properties.

  11. Nematic liquid crystal bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Susannah; Ellis, Perry; Vallamkondu, Jayalakshmi; Danemiller, Edward; Vernon, Mark; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    We study the effects of confining a nematic liquid crystal between two parallel glass plates with homeotropic boundary conditions for the director at all bounding surfaces. We find that the free surface of the nematic bridge is a surface of constant mean curvature. In addition, by changing the distance between the plates and the contact angle with the glass plates, we transition between loops and hedgehogs that can be either radial or hyperbolic.

  12. Organized composites of Carbon Nanotubes and Lyotropic Liquid Crystals at very low Surfactant Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalia, Giusy; Jo, Hyeran; Park, Ji Hyun; Lagerwall, Jan

    The difficulties in dispersing and organizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be efficiently tackled using surfactant-based lyotropic liquid crystals, combining high nanotube loading with long-range order. A problem with surfactants is, however, that their residues negatively affect CNT device performance. Here we show aligned CNT-lyotropic composites at reduced surfactant concentration. By combining cat- and anionic surfactants a lyotropic nematic phase forms at just 8% surfactant concentration, and CNTs can be well dispersed and aligned in it. The CNTs themselves were first dispersed below the Krafft temperature of the surfactant used for their stabilization, minimizing also its concentration. The composites exhibit very interesting properties with strong sensitivity to the surfactant ratios. They were investigated by Polarized Optical Microscopy and Polarized Raman spectroscopy, and also the electrical properties were studied

  13. Uniaxial-to-biaxial cholesteric and nematic phase transitions on a lyotropic alcohol-free mixture

    SciTech Connect

    de Sant'Ana, Z.A.; Figueiredo Neto, A.M. )

    1992-12-15

    Interferometric measurements of the chirality-induced biaxiality in the vicinity of the uniaxial-to-biaxial cholesteric transition of the lyotropic system potassium laurate, decylammonium chloride, H[sub 2]O, and brucine sulfate are reported. The mean-field approach to describe the cholesteric-to-cholesteric transition allows an estimate of the ratio between coefficients of the Landau expansion. The values of the bare correlation length, [xi][sub 0][similar to]1000 A, calculated are larger than in lyotropic systems with alcohol. The chirality-induced biaxiality measurements in the limit of zero elastic field ([ital q][sup 2]=0) and the birefringence measurements in the nematic phase confirm critical properties of the uniaxial-to-biaxial nematic transition. The critical exponents for the order parameter ([beta]) and the susceptibility ([gamma]) are in good agreement with the values calculated for the [ital XY] model.

  14. Kerr response of nematic liquids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. R.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the results of recent observations of the Kerr effect in nematic liquid crystals in a temperature range just above their nematic-isotropic transition. These results indicate that the intermolecular ordering forces in a nematic substance can enhance the Kerr effect just above the nematic transition in their isotropic state. It is felt that existing theory provides a useful approximation for relating molecular size to response time.

  15. Adding Mono- and Multivalent Ions to Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, Luana; Park, Heung-Shik; Antion, Kelly; Woolwerton, Chris; Finotello, Daniele; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2006-03-01

    Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals (LCLCs) are a distinct class of liquid crystals formed in aqueous solutions by molecules with rigid polyaromatic cores and ionic groups at the periphery [1-4]. The phase diagrams of these materials should depend on entropic factors (as in the Onsager model) and electrostatic interactions. Using optical polarizing microscopy, we studied the effects of mono- and multivalent ions on the phase diagrams of Blue 27 [3] and Sunset Yellow [2]. The monovalent ions change the temperatures of phase transitions, as described in [4], while the effect of multivalent ions is more dramatic and, in addition to the changed temperatures of phase transitions by tens of degrees, it often involves condensation of LCLC aggregates into domains with birefringence much higher than that in a normal nematic phase. Work supported by OBR B-7844. [1]J. Lydon, Current Opin. Colloid & Interface Sci. 3, 458 (1998);8, 480-489 (2004); [2]V. R. Horowitz, L. A. Janowitz, A. L. Modic, P. J. Heiney, and P. J. Collings, 2005, Phys. Rew. E 72, 041710; [3]Yu. A. Nastishin, H. Liu, T. Schneider, T., V. Nazarenko, R. Vasyuta, S. V. Shiyanovskii, and O. D. Lavrentovich, 2005, Phys. Rev. E 72, 041711; [4]A.F. Kostko, B. H. Cipriano, O. A. Pinchuk, L. Ziserman, M. A. Anisimov, D. Danino, and S. R. Raghavan. J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 19126-19133 (2005)

  16. Phase states and thermomorphologic, thermotropic, and magnetomorphologic properties of lyotropic mesophases: Sodium lauryl sulphate-water-1-decanol liquid-crystalline system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özden, Pınar; Nesrullajev, Arif; Oktik, Şener

    2010-12-01

    Phase states in sodium lauryl sulphate-water-1-decanol lyotropic liquid-crystalline system have been investigated for different temperature ranges. The dependence of triangle phase diagram types, phase boundaries, and sequence of lyotropic mesophases vs temperature has been found. The thermomorphologic, thermotropic, and magnetomorphologic properties of hexagonal E, lamellar D, nematic-calamitic NC , nematic-discotic ND , and biaxial nematic Nbx mesophases have been studied in detail. Dynamics of transformations of magnetically induced textures has been investigated. Peculiarities of typical and magnetically induced textures have been investigated in detail. Triangle phase diagrams of sodium lauryl sulphate-water-1-decanol lyotropic liquid-crystalline system for different temperatures and typical and magnetically induced textures of E, D, NC , ND , and Nbx mesophases are presented.

  17. Orientational Order of a Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystal Measured by Polarized Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuxia; Nayani, Karthik; Park, Jung Ok; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2016-05-19

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals are distinct from thermotropic nematics from a fundamental standpoint as the structure of the aggregating columns is a function of both the temperature and concentration. We report on the thermal evolution of orientational order parameters, both the second (=scalar) (⟨P200⟩ (=S)) and fourth (⟨P400⟩) order, of sunset yellow FCF aqueous solutions, measured using polarized Raman spectroscopy for different concentrations. The order parameter increases with the concentration, and their values are high in comparison with those of thermotropic liquid crystals. On the basis of Raman spectroscopy, we provide the strongest evidence yet that the hydrozone tautomer of SSY is the predominant form in aqueous solutions in the isotropic, nematic, and columnar phases, as well as what we believe to be the first measurements of (⟨P400⟩) for this system. PMID:27074395

  18. Thermotropic and lyotropic behaviour of new liquid-crystalline materials with different hydrophilic groups: synthesis and mesomorphic properties

    PubMed Central

    Kašpar, Miroslav; Hamplová, Věra; Dawin, Ute; Giesselmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Summary Several new calamitic liquid-crystalline (LC) materials with flexible hydrophilic chains, namely either hydroxy groups or ethylene glycol units, or both types together, have been synthesized in order to look for new functional LC materials exhibiting both, thermotropic and lyotropic behaviour. Such materials are of high potential interest for challenging issues such as the self-organization of carbon nanotubes or various nanoparticles. Thermotropic mesomorphic properties have been studied by using polarizing optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray scattering. Four of these nonchiral and chiral materials exhibit nematic and chiral nematic phases, respectively. For some molecular structures, smectic phases have also been detected. A contact sample of one of the prepared compounds with diethylene glycol clearly shows the lyotropic behaviour; namely a lamellar phase was observed. The relationship between the molecular structure and mesomorphic properties of these new LCs with hydrophilic chains is discussed. PMID:23504455

  19. Phase and Topological Behavior of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals in Double Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Zoey S.; Jeong, Joonwoo; Tu, Fuquan; Lohr, Matt; Lee, Daeyeon; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals, assembled by non-covalent interactions, have fascinating temperature- and concentration-dependent phase behavior. Using water-oil-water double emulsions, we are able control the inner droplet chromonic phase concentration by osmosis through the oil phase. We then study the configurations of the chromonic liquid crystal phases in droplets by varying the oil types, oil soluble surfactants, and inner droplet diameter. We employ polarization microscopy to observe resulting nematic and columnar phases of Sunset Yellow FCF, and we deduce the liquid crystal configuration of both phases within the droplets. Simulations based on Jones matrices confirm droplet appearance, and preliminary observations of chromonic liquid crystal shells in oil-water-oil double emulsions are reported. Supported by UPenn MRSEC DMR 11-20901 and NSF DMR 12-05463

  20. Boundary Stability of a Nematic Liquid Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, William; Santangelo, Chris

    2014-03-01

    We consider a nematic liquid crystal droplet in air confined between two parallel plates with homeotropic boundary conditions. The boundary conditions at the nematic-plate and nematic-air interfaces induce either a hedgehog or planar ring disclination within the nematic bridge, depending on the plate separation and bridge radius. We study the stability of the liquid crystal-air boundary of a nearly cylindrical nematic bridge by minimizing the Frank elastic energy.

  1. Escaped-radial configuration with a twist: lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals confined to cylindrical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Kang, Louis; Davidson, Zoey S.; Lohr, Matthew; Beller, Daniel A.; Kamien, Randall D.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.; Collings, Peter J.

    2014-03-01

    We report new chiral-symmetry-broken configurations of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) confined to cylindrical cavities with a homeotropic boundary condition. In order to relieve high splay deformation in the center of the cylinder with the homeotropic boundary condition, many nematic LCs adopt an escaped-radial configuration where LC directors are radial near the cavity wall but parallel to the cylindrical axis near the center. Interestingly, we find that achiral lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) having an unusually small twist modulus can have a configuration that is both escaped and twisted radially. Sunset Yellow FCF, a nematic LCLC, is introduced into capillaries coated with a homeotropic alignment layer, and its configurations are investigated by polarized optical microscopy and numerical calculations. Additionally, we discuss other newly observed structures: 1) domain-wall-like defects separating regions of opposite handedness in the twisted- and escaped-radial configuration and 2) another chiral configuration having a double helix of disclination lines along the cylindrical axis. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation: DGE-1321851, DMR-1104707, DMR-1205463, and MRSEC DMR-1120901.

  2. Spontaneous emergence of chirality in achiral lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals confined to cylinders.

    PubMed

    Nayani, Karthik; Chang, Rui; Fu, Jinxin; Ellis, Perry W; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Park, Jung Ok; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    The presumed ground state of a nematic fluid confined in a cylindrical geometry with planar anchoring corresponds to that of an axial configuration, wherein the director, free of deformations, is along the long axis of the cylinder. However, upon confinement of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals in cylindrical geometries, here we uncover a surprising ground state corresponding to a doubly twisted director configuration. The stability of this ground state, which involves significant director deformations, can be rationalized by the saddle-splay contribution to the free energy. We show that sufficient anisotropy in the elastic constants drives the transition from a deformation-free ground state to a doubly twisted structure, and results in spontaneous symmetry breaking with equal probability for either handedness. Enabled by the twist angle measurements of the spontaneous twist, we determine the saddle-splay elastic constant for chromonic liquid crystals for the first time. PMID:26287517

  3. Spontaneous emergence of chirality in achiral lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals confined to cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nayani, Karthik; Chang, Rui; Fu, Jinxin; Ellis, Perry W.; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Park, Jung Ok; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    The presumed ground state of a nematic fluid confined in a cylindrical geometry with planar anchoring corresponds to that of an axial configuration, wherein the director, free of deformations, is along the long axis of the cylinder. However, upon confinement of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals in cylindrical geometries, here we uncover a surprising ground state corresponding to a doubly twisted director configuration. The stability of this ground state, which involves significant director deformations, can be rationalized by the saddle-splay contribution to the free energy. We show that sufficient anisotropy in the elastic constants drives the transition from a deformation-free ground state to a doubly twisted structure, and results in spontaneous symmetry breaking with equal probability for either handedness. Enabled by the twist angle measurements of the spontaneous twist, we determine the saddle-splay elastic constant for chromonic liquid crystals for the first time. PMID:26287517

  4. Ionic-content dependence of viscoelasticity of the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal sunset yellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuang; Cervenka, Adam J.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2014-10-01

    A lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal (LCLC) is an orientationally ordered system made by self-assembled aggregates of charged organic molecules in water, bound by weak noncovalent attractive forces and stabilized by electrostatic repulsions. We determine how the ionic content of the LCLC, namely, the presence of mono- and divalent salts and p H enhancing agent, alter the viscoelastic properties of the LCLC. Aqueous solutions of the dye sunset yellow with a uniaxial nematic order are used as an example. By applying a magnetic field to impose orientational deformations, we measure the splay K1, twist K2, and bend K3 elastic constants and rotation viscosity γ1 as a function of concentration of additives. The data indicate that the viscoelastic parameters are influenced by ionic content in dramatic and versatile ways. For example, the monovalent salt NaCl decreases K3 and K2 and increases γ1, while an elevated p H decreases all the parameters. We attribute these features to the ion-induced changes in length and flexibility of building units of LCLC, the chromonic aggregates, a property not found in conventional thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals formed by covalently bound units of fixed length.

  5. Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals: From viscoelastic properties to living liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuang

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal (LCLC) represents a broad range of molecules, from organic dyes and drugs to DNA, that self-assemble into linear aggregates in water through face-to-face stacking. These linear aggregates of high aspect ratio are capable of orientational order, forming, for example nematic phase. Since the microscopic properties (such as length) of the chromonic aggregates are results of subtle balance between energy and entropy, the macroscopic viscoelastic properties of the nematic media are sensitive to change of external factors. In the first part of this thesis, by using dynamic light scattering and magnetic Frederiks transition techniques, we study the Frank elastic moduli and viscosity coefficients of LCLC disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and sunset yellow (SSY) as functions of concentration c , temperature T and ionic contents. The elastic moduli of splay (K1) and bend (K3) are in the order of 10pN, about 10 times larger than the twist modulus (K2). The splay modulus K1 and the ratio K1/K3 both increase substantially as T decreases or c increases, which we attribute to the elongation of linear aggregates at lower T or higher c . The bend viscosity is comparable to that of thermotropic liquid crystals, while the splay and twist viscosities are several orders of magnitude larger, changing exponentially with T . Additional ionic additives into the system influence the viscoelastic properties of these systems in a dramatic and versatile way. For example, monovalent salt NaCl decreases bend modulus K3 and increases twist viscosity, while an elevated pH decreases all the parameters. We attribute these features to the ion-induced changes in length and flexibility of building units of LCLC, the chromonic aggregates, a property not found in conventional thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals form by covalently bound units of fixed length. The second part of the thesis studies a new active bio-mechanical hybrid system called living liquid crystal

  6. Chirality Amplification in Tactoids of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chenhui; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate an effective chirality amplification based on the long-range forces, extending over the scales of tens of micrometers, much larger than the single molecule (nanometer) scale. The mechanism is rooted in the long-range elastic nature of orientational order in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) that represent water solutions of achiral disc-like molecules. Minute quantities of chiral molecules such as amino acid L-alanine and limonene added to the droplets of LCLC lead to chiral amplification characterized by an increase of optical activity by a factor of 103 - 104. This effect allows one to discriminate and detect the absolute configuration of chiral molecules in an aqueous system, thus opening new possibilities in biosensing and other biological applications.

  7. Interaction between lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xuxia; Park, Jung; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2010-03-01

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) consist of various dyes, drugs, etc., so their importance is self-evident. The interaction of chromonic molecules and polymers is involved in their real applications, such as the dyeing process of fibers, textiles and food, and the functionalization of drugs in vivo. In our research, polymer dispersed LCLC droplets and polymer coated LCLC cells have been fabricated. Effect of interaction was observed by optical texture of LCLCs, as the different polymers induce different director configuration of LCLCs. A textile dye-Benzopurpurine 4B, food dye-Sunset Yellow FCF, and drug-Disodium Cromoglycate mixed with water soluble polymers, proteins and textile polymers have been all studied and compared.

  8. Electro-osmosis in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Tovkach, O M; Calderer, M Carme; Golovaty, Dmitry; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Walkington, Noel J

    2016-07-01

    We derive a mathematical model of a nematic electrolyte based on a variational formulation of nematodynamics. We verify the model by comparing its predictions to the results of the experiments on the substrate-controlled liquid-crystal-enabled electrokinetics. In the experiments, a nematic liquid crystal confined to a thin planar cell with surface-patterned anchoring conditions exhibits electro-osmotic flows along the "guiding rails" imposed by the spatially varying director. Extending our previous work, we consider a general setup which incorporates dielectric anisotropy of the liquid-crystalline matrix and the full set of nematic viscosities. PMID:27575193

  9. Electro-osmosis in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovkach, O. M.; Calderer, M. Carme; Golovaty, Dmitry; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Walkington, Noel J.

    2016-07-01

    We derive a mathematical model of a nematic electrolyte based on a variational formulation of nematodynamics. We verify the model by comparing its predictions to the results of the experiments on the substrate-controlled liquid-crystal-enabled electrokinetics. In the experiments, a nematic liquid crystal confined to a thin planar cell with surface-patterned anchoring conditions exhibits electro-osmotic flows along the "guiding rails" imposed by the spatially varying director. Extending our previous work, we consider a general setup which incorporates dielectric anisotropy of the liquid-crystalline matrix and the full set of nematic viscosities.

  10. Macroscopic dynamics of polar nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Brand, Helmut R; Pleiner, Harald; Ziebert, Falko

    2006-08-01

    We present the macroscopic equations for polar nematic liquid crystals. We consider the case where one has both, the usual nematic director, n[over ] , characterizing quadrupolar order as well as the macroscopic polarization, P , representing polar order, but where their directions coincide and are rigidly coupled. In this case one has to choose P as the independent macroscopic variable. Such equations are expected to be relevant in connection with nematic phases with unusual properties found recently in compounds composed of banana-shaped molecules. Among the effects predicted, which are absent in conventional nematic liquid crystals showing only quadrupolar order, are pyro-electricity and its analogs for density and for concentration in mixtures as well as a flow alignment behavior, which is more complex than in usual low molecular weight nematics. We also discuss the formation of defect structures expected in such systems. PMID:17025458

  11. Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals as materials for optical and biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, L.; Park, H.-S.; Antion, K.; Finotello, D.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    2007-02-01

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) are formed by molecules with rigid polyaromatic cores and ionic groups at the periphery that form aggregates while in water. Most of the LCLCs are not toxic to the biological cells and can be used as an amplifying medium in real-time biosensors. The detector is based on the principle that the immune aggregates growing in the LCLC bulk trigger the director distortions. Self-assembly of LCLC molecules into oriented structures allows one to use them in various structured films. For example, layer-by-layer electrostatic deposition produces monomolecular layers and stacks of layers of LCLC with long-range in-plane orientational order which sets them apart from the standard Langmuir-Blodgett films. We demonstrate that divalent and multivalent salts as well as acidic and basic materials that alter pH of the LCLC water solutions, are drastically modifying the phase diagrams of LCLC, from shifting the phase transition temperatures by tens of degrees, to causing condensation of the LCLC aggregates into more compact structures, such as birefringent bundles or formation of a columnar hexagonal phase from the nematic phase.

  12. Fine structure of the topological defect core: Disclination in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuang; Shiyanovskii, Sergij; Park, Heung-Shik; Kim, Young-Ki; Hearn, Tristan; Reichel, Lothar; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    Topological defects represent an important concept in many branches of modern physics ranging from cosmology and optics to hard and soft matter. One of the most difficult problems is the fine structure of the so-called core region of defects, where the deformations of the order parameter are so strong that the phenomenological description valid in the far field becomes invalid. Experimental exploration of the fine core structure is usually hindered by the small size (atomic/molecular level) of the core, where optical or even electron microscopy techniques are invalid. In this work, we take advantage of the peculiar nature of the so-called lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLC) of a nematic type that carry disclinations with a core extending over macroscopic distances (tens of micrometers), large enough to explore their spatial variation by optical and electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the director and the scalar order parameter (associated with the degree of orientational order) show a profound change in the core region. In particular, as one approaches the center of the defect, the azimuthal dependency of the director field changes dramatically and the scalar order parameter shows a strong dependence on the strength of splay and bend deformations. This work is supported by NSF Grant DMS-1434185.

  13. Chirality amplification and detection by tactoids of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chenhui; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-10-01

    Detection of chiral molecules requires amplification of chirality to measurable levels. Typically, amplification mechanisms are considered at the microscopic scales of individual molecules and their aggregates. Here we demonstrate chirality amplification and visualization of structural handedness in water solutions of organic molecules that extends over the scale of many micrometers. The mechanism is rooted in the long-range elastic nature of orientational order in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) formed in water solutions of achiral disc-like molecules. The nematic LCLC coexists with its isotropic counterpart, forming elongated tactoids; the spatial confinement causes a structural twist even when the material is nonchiral. Minute quantities of chiral molecules such as the amino acid l-alanine and limonene transform the racemic array of left- and right-twisted tactoids into a homochiral set. The left and right chiral enantiomers are readily distinguished from each other as the induced structural handedness is visualized through a simple polarizing microscope observation. The effect is important for developing our understanding of chirality amplification mechanisms; it also might open up new possibilities in biosensing. PMID:26238525

  14. Self-assembly, Condensation, and Order in Aqueous Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals Crowded with Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Tortora, L.; Park, H; Kang, S; Savaryn, V; Hong, S; Kaznatcheev, K; Finotello, D; Sprunt, S; Kumar, S; Lavrentovich, O

    2010-01-01

    Dense multicomponent systems with macromolecules and small solutes attract a broad research interest as they mimic the molecularly crowded cellular interiors. The additives can condense and align the macromolecules, but they do not change the degree of covalent polymerization. We chose a lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal with reversibly and non-covalently assembled aggregates as a much softer system, reminiscent of 'living polymers', to demonstrate that small neutral and charged additives cause condensation of aggregates with ensuing orientational and positional ordering and nontrivial morphologies of phase separation, such as tactoids and toroids of the nematic and hexagonal columnar phase coexisting with the isotropic melt. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) analysis as well as fluorescent microscopy demonstrates segregation of the components. The observations suggest that self-assembly of chromonic aggregates in the presence of additives is controlled by both entropy effects and by specific molecular interactions and provide a new route to the regulated reversible assembly of soft materials formed by low-molecular weight components.

  15. Self-assembly, condensation, and order in aqueous lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals crowded with additives

    SciTech Connect

    Tortora, Luana; Park, Heung-Shik; Kang, Shin-Woong; Savaryn, Victoria; Hong, Seung-Ho; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Finotello, Daniele; Sprunt, Samuel; Kumar, Satyendra; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2012-09-06

    Dense multicomponent systems with macromolecules and small solutes attract a broad research interest as they mimic the molecularly crowded cellular interiors. The additives can condense and align the macromolecules, but they do not change the degree of covalent polymerization. We chose a lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal with reversibly and non-covalently assembled aggregates as a much softer system, reminiscent of 'living polymers', to demonstrate that small neutral and charged additives cause condensation of aggregates with ensuing orientational and positional ordering and nontrivial morphologies of phase separation, such as tactoids and toroids of the nematic and hexagonal columnar phase coexisting with the isotropic melt. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) analysis as well as fluorescent microscopy demonstrates segregation of the components. The observations suggest that self-assembly of chromonic aggregates in the presence of additives is controlled by both entropy effects and by specific molecular interactions and provide a new route to the regulated reversible assembly of soft materials formed by low-molecular weight components.

  16. Polycontinuous Lyotropic Liquid Crystalline Network Phases from Gemini Dicarboxylate Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanthappa, Mahesh; Sorenson, Gregory; Schmitt, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Arising from the water concentration-dependent self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules, lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) form a wide variety of structurally periodic nanoscale morphologies including discontinuous micellar phases (I), hexagonally-packed cylinders (C), and lamellar (L) phases. In intermediate amphiphile concentration windows between the L and C phases, one typically observes three bicontinuous cubic network phases: gyroid (G), diamond (D), and primitive (P). Recent theoretical work has suggested the possible stability of a variety of non-cubic network phase LLCs, yet none of these phases have been previously observed. In this presentation, we describe the experimental discovery of the first triply periodic network phase LLC with 3D-hexagonal symmetry (space group #193) in binary mixtures of water with a simple gemini dicarboxylate surfactant based on dodecanoic acid. Using a combination of SAXS and rheological methods, we structurally characterize this new phase and show that it is comprised of three interpenetrating lipidic networks of 3-fold connectors in a matrix of water. This finding highlights the unusual aqueous phase behavior of gemini surfactants and suggests new methods for discovering and stabilizing new network phase LLCs beyond the gyroid.

  17. Hexagonal Lyotropic Liquid Crystal from Simple “Abiotic” Foldamers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Jin, Rizhe; Kang, Chuanqing; Qiu, Xuepeng; Guo, Haiquan; Du, Zhijun; Gao, Lianxun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The motivation of foldamer chemistry is to identify novel building blocks that have the potential to imitate natural species. Peptides and peptide mimetics can form stable helical conformations and further self‐assemble into diverse aggregates in water, where it is difficult to isolate a single helix. In contrast, most “abiotic” foldamers may fold into helical structures in solution, but are difficult to assemble into tertiary ones. It remains a challenge to obtain “abiotic” species similar to peptides. In this paper, a novel foldamer scaffold, in which p‐phenyleneethynylene units are linked by chiral carbon atoms, was designed and prepared. In very dilute solutions, these oligomers were random coils. The hexamer and octamers could form a hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystal (LC) in CH2Cl2 when the concentrations reached the critical values. The microscopic observations indicated that they could assemble into the nanofibers in the LC. Interestingly, after some LC phases were diluted at room temperature, the nanofibers could be preserved. The good stabilities of the assemblies are possibly attributed to a more compact backbone and more rigid side chains. PMID:27547649

  18. Hexagonal Lyotropic Liquid Crystal from Simple "Abiotic" Foldamers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Bian, Zheng; Jin, Rizhe; Kang, Chuanqing; Qiu, Xuepeng; Guo, Haiquan; Du, Zhijun; Gao, Lianxun

    2016-08-01

    The motivation of foldamer chemistry is to identify novel building blocks that have the potential to imitate natural species. Peptides and peptide mimetics can form stable helical conformations and further self-assemble into diverse aggregates in water, where it is difficult to isolate a single helix. In contrast, most "abiotic" foldamers may fold into helical structures in solution, but are difficult to assemble into tertiary ones. It remains a challenge to obtain "abiotic" species similar to peptides. In this paper, a novel foldamer scaffold, in which p-phenyleneethynylene units are linked by chiral carbon atoms, was designed and prepared. In very dilute solutions, these oligomers were random coils. The hexamer and octamers could form a hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystal (LC) in CH2Cl2 when the concentrations reached the critical values. The microscopic observations indicated that they could assemble into the nanofibers in the LC. Interestingly, after some LC phases were diluted at room temperature, the nanofibers could be preserved. The good stabilities of the assemblies are possibly attributed to a more compact backbone and more rigid side chains. PMID:27547649

  19. Micellar structures in lyotropic liquid crystals and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saupe, A.; Xu, S. Y.; Plumley, Sulakshana; Zhu, Y. K.; Photinos, P.

    1991-05-01

    The formation of micellar nematics is discussed with emphasis on the transitions between nematic phases and nematic-smectic transitions. Phase diagrams for MTAB/l-decanol/D,O systems show a direct transition between uniaxial nematics. Electrical conductivity and birefringence measurements on a mixture of sodium decylsulfate. 1-decanol, D,O demonstrate, on the other hand, the existence of a biaxial nemantic range that separates the Uniaxial nematics. On a mixture of cesium perflouroctanoate and H 2O the electrical conductivity and rotational viscosity are used to discuss the relevant features of nematic-lamellar-smectic transitions. The formation of elongated ribbon-like micelles at the nematic-smectic transition is suggested. Transitions between different nematic phases in the MTAB system may be connected with a structural change from long micelles with a fairly circular cross section to similar micelles with a more elliptical cross section.

  20. Homeotropic alignment of the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal Sunset Yellow FCF using pi-pi stacking chemical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Han, Ganghee; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Lubensky, Tom C.; Collings, Peter J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the homeotropic alignment of the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal, Sunset Yellow FCF (SSY), using pi-pi stacking interactions between the SSY molecules and (1) thin parylene films or (2) a graphene monolayer. The nematic and columnar phases of SSY molecules arise via self-assembly in water into stacks through non-covalent attractions between the SSY molecules. Interestingly, we find that the same non-covalent interactions between SSY molecules and a parylene or graphene alignment layer lead to homeotropic anchoring of these stacks. The nematic phase of SSY is introduced between two glass substrates coated with parylene films or graphene monolayers, and homeotropic alignment of SSY is confirmed by polarized optical microscopy and conoscopy. Additionally, we observe and can explain the stripe domains that occur during cooling of the sample in this cell, and we consider possible novel applications for homeotropically aligned chromonic liquid crystals. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the National Science Foundation through NSF DMR-1205463 and UPENN MRSEC DMR-1120901

  1. Simulation of electrically controlled nematic liquid crystal Rochon prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczkowska, M.; Derfel, G.

    2016-09-01

    Operation of an electrically controlled beam steering device based on Rochon prism made by use of nematic liquid crystal is modelled numerically. Deflection angles and angular distribution of light intensity in the deflected beam are calculated. Dynamics of the device is studied. Advantage of application of dual frequency nematic liquid crystal is demonstrated. Role of flexoelectric properties of the nematic is analyzed.

  2. Pattern formation from consistent dynamical closures of uniaxial nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Híjar, Humberto; de Hoyos, Diego Marquina; Santamaría-Holek, Iván

    2012-03-21

    Pattern formation in uniaxial polymeric liquid crystals is studied for different dynamic closure approximations. Using the principles of mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics in a mean-field approach, we derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the single-particle non-homogeneous distribution function of particle orientations and the evolution equations for the second and fourth order orientational tensor parameters. Afterwards, two dynamic closure approximations are discussed, one of them considering the relaxation of the fourth order orientational parameter and leading to a novel expression for the free-energy like function in terms of the scalar order parameter. Considering the evolution equation of the density of the system and values of the interaction parameter for which isotropic and nematic phases coexist, our analysis predicts that patterns and traveling waves can be produced in lyotropic uniaxial nematics even in the absence of external driving. PMID:22443750

  3. Triply Periodic Multiply Continuous Lyotropic Liquid Crystals Derived from Gemini Dicarboxylate Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorenson, Gregory; Mahanthappa, Mahesh

    2013-03-01

    A delicate balance of non-covalent interactions drives the supramolecular assembly of hydrated small molecule amphiphiles into aqueous lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs). High symmetry multiply continuous phases, exemplified by the gyroid phase, are particularly desirable for many applications due to their interpenetrating hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains with well-defined chemical functionality decorating the interface between the two domains. However, these high symmetry assemblies are often difficult to obtain due to limited levels of hydration and temperature ranges over which they are accessible. Recent work suggests that small molecule amphiphiles known as ``gemini'' surfactants readily form these lyotropic network phases. Herein we report the lyotropic phase behaviors of a new class of dicarboxylate gemini surfactants that form stable, multiply continuous, high symmetry network structures over broad hydration and temperature ranges.

  4. Stochastic rotation dynamics for nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuang-Wu Mazza, Marco G.

    2015-04-28

    We introduce a new mesoscopic model for nematic liquid crystals (LCs). We extend the particle-based stochastic rotation dynamics method, which reproduces the Navier-Stokes equation, to anisotropic fluids by including a simplified Ericksen-Leslie formulation of nematodynamics. We verify the applicability of this hybrid model by studying the equilibrium isotropic-nematic phase transition and nonequilibrium problems, such as the dynamics of topological defects and the rheology of sheared LCs. Our simulation results show that this hybrid model captures many essential aspects of LC physics at the mesoscopic scale, while preserving microscopic thermal fluctuations.

  5. Electric heating effects in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.; Shiyanovskii, S. V.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    2006-07-01

    Electric heating effects in the nematic liquid crystal change the liquid crystal physical properties and dynamics. We propose a model to quantitatively describe the heating effects caused by dielectric dispersion and ionic conductivity in the nematic liquid crystals upon the application of an ac electric field. The temperature increase of the liquid crystal cell is related to the properties of the liquid crystal such as the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity, thermal properties of the bounding plates, and the surrounding medium as well as frequency and amplitude of the electric field. To study the temperature dynamics experimentally, we use a small thermocouple inserted directly into the nematic bulk; we assure that the thermocouple does not alter the thermal behavior of the system by comparing the results to those obtained by a noncontact birefringent probing technique recently proposed by Wen and Wu [Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 231104 (2005)]. We determine how the temperature dynamics and the stationary value of the temperature increase depend on the parameters of the materials and the applied field. We used different surrounding media, from extremely good heat conductors such as aluminum cooling device to extremely poor conductor, Styrofoam; these two provide two limiting cases as compared to typical conditions of nematic cell exploitation in a laboratory or in commercial devices. The experiments confirm the theoretical predictions, namely, that the temperature rise is controlled not only by the heat transfer coefficient of the surrounding medium (as in the previous model) but also by the thickness and the thermal conductivity coefficient of the bounding plates enclosing the nematic layer. The temperature increase strongly depends on the director orientation and can change nonmonotonously with the frequency of the applied field.

  6. Molecular reorientation of a nematic liquid crystal by thermal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Ki; Senyuk, Bohdan; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2012-01-01

    A unique feature of nematic liquid crystals is orientational order of molecules that can be controlled by electromagnetic fields, surface modifications and pressure gradients. Here we demonstrate a new effect in which the orientation of nematic liquid crystal molecules is altered by thermal expansion. Thermal expansion (or contraction) causes the nematic liquid crystal to flow; the flow imposes a realigning torque on the nematic liquid crystal molecules and the optic axis. The optical and mechanical responses activated by a simple temperature change can be used in sensing, photonics, microfluidic, optofluidic and lab-on-a-chip applications as they do not require externally imposed gradients of temperature, pressure, surface realignment, nor electromagnetic fields. The effect has important ramifications for the current search of the biaxial nematic phase as the optical features of thermally induced structural changes in the uniaxial nematic liquid crystal mimic the features expected of the biaxial nematic liquid crystal. PMID:23072803

  7. Lyotropic liquid crystalline L3 phase silicated nanoporous monolithic composites and their production

    DOEpatents

    McGrath, Kathryn M.; Dabbs, Daniel M.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2003-10-28

    A mesoporous ceramic material is provided having a pore size diameter in the range of about 10-100 nanometers produced by templating with a ceramic precursor a lyotropic liquid crystalline L.sub.3 phase consisting of a three-dimensional, random, nonperiodic network packing of a multiple connected continuous membrane. A preferred process for producing the inesoporous ceramic material includes producing a template of a lyotropic liquid crystalline L.sub.3 phase by mixing a surfactant, a co-surfactant and hydrochloric acid, coating the template with an inorganic ceramic precursor by adding to the L.sub.3 phase tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) or tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and then converting the coated template to a ceramic by removing any remaining liquids.

  8. Continuous Rotation of Achiral Nematic Liquid Crystal Droplets Driven by Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; Poy, Guilhem; Oswald, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Suspended droplets of cholesteric (chiral nematic) liquid crystals spontaneously rotate in the presence of a heat flux due to a temperature gradient, a phenomenon known as the Lehmann effect. So far, it is not clear whether this effect is due to the chirality of the phase and the molecules or only to the chirality of the director field. Here, we report the continuous rotation in a temperature gradient of nematic droplets of a lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal featuring a twisted bipolar configuration. The achiral nature of the molecular components leads to a random handedness of the spontaneous twist, resulting in the coexistence of droplets rotating in the two senses, with speeds proportional to the temperature gradient and inversely proportional to the droplet radius. This result shows that a macroscopic twist of the director field is sufficient to induce a rotation of the droplets, and that the phase and the molecules do not need to be chiral. This suggests that one can also explain the Lehmann rotation in cholesteric liquid crystals without introducing the Leslie thermomechanical coupling—only present in chiral mesophases. An explanation based on the Akopyan and Zeldovich theory of thermomechanical effects in nematics is proposed and discussed.

  9. Continuous Rotation of Achiral Nematic Liquid Crystal Droplets Driven by Heat Flux.

    PubMed

    Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; Poy, Guilhem; Oswald, Patrick

    2016-07-29

    Suspended droplets of cholesteric (chiral nematic) liquid crystals spontaneously rotate in the presence of a heat flux due to a temperature gradient, a phenomenon known as the Lehmann effect. So far, it is not clear whether this effect is due to the chirality of the phase and the molecules or only to the chirality of the director field. Here, we report the continuous rotation in a temperature gradient of nematic droplets of a lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal featuring a twisted bipolar configuration. The achiral nature of the molecular components leads to a random handedness of the spontaneous twist, resulting in the coexistence of droplets rotating in the two senses, with speeds proportional to the temperature gradient and inversely proportional to the droplet radius. This result shows that a macroscopic twist of the director field is sufficient to induce a rotation of the droplets, and that the phase and the molecules do not need to be chiral. This suggests that one can also explain the Lehmann rotation in cholesteric liquid crystals without introducing the Leslie thermomechanical coupling-only present in chiral mesophases. An explanation based on the Akopyan and Zeldovich theory of thermomechanical effects in nematics is proposed and discussed. PMID:27517793

  10. Selective Sequence for the Peptide-Triggered Phase Transition of Lyotropic Liquid-Crystalline Structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingtao; Dong, Yao-Da; Boyd, Ben J

    2016-05-24

    A novel concept of using mixed lipids to construct selective peptide-sequence-sensing lyotropic liquid-crystalline (LLC) dispersion systems was investigated. The LLC systems were constructed using a mixture of phytantriol, a lipid that forms lyotropic liquid-crystalline phases, and a novel synthesized peptide-lipid (peplipid) for sensing a target peptide with the RARAR sequence. The internal structure of the dispersed LLC particles was converted from the lamellar structure (liposomes) to the inverse bicontinuous cubic phase (cubosomes) in the presence of the target peptide. The addition of common human proteins did not induce any structural change, indicating a high selectivity of interaction with the target peptide. The concept has potential for the design of targeted controlled release drug delivery agents. PMID:27148806

  11. Lyotropic liquid crystal engineering-ordered nanostructured small molecule amphiphile self-assembly materials by design.

    PubMed

    Fong, Celesta; Le, Tu; Drummond, Calum J

    2012-02-01

    Future nanoscale soft matter design will be guided to a large extent by the teachings of amphiphile (lipid or surfactant) self-assembly. Ordered nanostructured lyotropic liquid crystalline mesophases may form in select mixtures of amphiphile and solvent. To reproducibly engineer the low energy amphiphile self-assembly of materials for the future, we must first learn the design principles. In this critical review we discuss the evolution of these design rules and in particular discuss recent key findings regarding (i) what drives amphiphile self-assembly, (ii) what governs the self-assembly structures that are formed, and (iii) how can amphiphile self-assembly materials be used to enhance product formulations, including drug delivery vehicles, medical imaging contrast agents, and integral membrane protein crystallisation media. We focus upon the generation of 'dilutable' lyotropic liquid crystal phases with two- and three-dimensional geometries from amphiphilic small molecules (225 references). PMID:21975366

  12. Free surface dynamics of nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Linda; Kondic, Lou; Lam, Michael; Lin, Te-Sheng

    2014-11-01

    Spreading thin films of nematic liquid crystal (NLC) are known to behave very differently to those of isotropic fluids. The polar interactions of the rod-like molecules with each other, and the interactions with the underlying substrate, can lead to intricate patterns and instabilities that are not yet fully understood. The physics of a system even as simple as a film of NLC spreading slowly over a surface (inclined or horizontal) are remarkably complex: the outcome depends strongly on the details of the NLC's behavior at both the substrate and the free surface (so-called ``anchoring'' effects). We will present a dynamic flow model that takes careful account of such nematic-substrate and nematic-free surface interactions. We will present model simulations for several different flow scenarios that indicate the variety of behavior that can emerge. Spreading over a horizontal substrate may exhibit a range of unstable behavior. Flow down an incline also exhibits intriguing instabilities: in addition to the usual transverse fingering, instabilities can be manifested behind the flowing front in a manner reminiscent of Newtonian flow down an inverted substrate. NSF DMS-1211713.

  13. pH-responsive lyotropic liquid crystals for the preparation of pure cubic zirconia nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei Yan; Liu, Jin Rong; He, Zhang; Cao, Zhen Zhu; Li, Cai Hong; Gao, Yan Fang

    2016-07-01

    We present a lyotropic liquid crystal system consisting of SDS/Triton X-100/water at 25 °C. This system is respond to pH variations with a phase switch. When pH is altered from alkaline (pH 13) to acidic (pH 2) conditions, phase change occurs from a bicontinuous hexagonal phase to a partially hexagonal phase until it disappears. The hexagonal phase under alkaline conditions is stable. Thus, this system is an ideal candidate for the preparation of pure cubic ZrO2 nanoparticles. XRD results confirm that the as-synthesized powder is composed of pure cubic ZrO2. These nanoparticles also exhibit a thermal stability of up to 800 °C. The size and morphological characteristics of the nanoparticles are greatly affected by ZrOCl2 concentration. The mechanism of zirconia nanoparticle synthesis in a lyotropic hexagonal phase was proposed.

  14. Thermal diode made by nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, Djair; Fernandes, Ivna; Moraes, Fernando; Fumeron, Sébastien; Pereira, Erms

    2016-09-01

    This work investigates how a thermal diode can be designed from a nematic liquid crystal confined inside a cylindrical capillary. In the case of homeotropic anchoring, a defect structure called escaped radial disclination arises. The asymmetry of such structure causes thermal rectification rates up to 3.5% at room temperature, comparable to thermal diodes made from carbon nanotubes. Sensitivity of the system with respect to the heat power supply, the geometry of the capillary tube and the molecular anchoring angle is also discussed.

  15. Isotropization of nematic liquid crystals by TMDSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Dadmun, M.; Zhang, Ge; Boller, A.; Wunderlich, B. |

    1997-12-01

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) and traditional DSC are used to study the transition between the nematic liquid crystalline state and the isotropic liquid for two small molecules [4,4{prime}-azoxyanisole and N,N`-bis(4-n-octyloxybenzal)-1,4-phenylenediamine] and one macromolecule (4,4{prime}-dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene copolymerized with a 1:1 molar mixture of 1,7-dibromoheptane and 1,9-dibromononane). The DSC measurements with 4,4{prime}-azoxyanisole were used for temperature calibration with varying heating and cooling rates. Quasi-isothermal TMDSC with small temperature amplitude and standard TMDSC with underlying heating and cooling rates were utilized to analyze the breadth of the transitions. It could be verified that the isotropization transition of a nematic liquid crystal is, indeed, reversible for all three molecules. The nature of the transition changes, however, from relatively sharp, for small, rigid molecules, to about three kelvins wide for the small molecule with flexible ends, to as broad as 20 K for the macromolecule. It was also demonstrated that quantitative heats of fusion of sharp transitions can be extracted from TMDSC, but only from the time-domain heat-flow signal.

  16. Particles and curvatures in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Francesca; Luo, Yimin; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall D.; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    Elastic interactions in anisotropic fluids can be harnessed to direct particle interactions. A strategy to smoothly manipulate the director field in nematic liquid crystals is to vary the topography of the bounding surfaces. A rugged landscape with peaks and valleys create local deformations of the director field which can interact with particles in solution. We study this complex interaction in two different settings. The first consists of an array of shallow pores in a poly-dimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) membrane, whose curvature can be tuned either by swelling the PDMS membrane or by mechanical stretching. The second is a set of grooves with wavy walls, fabricated by photolithography, with various parameters of curvature and shapes. In this contexts we study how the motion of colloidal particles in nematic liquid crystals can be influenced by their interaction with the peaks and valleys of the bottom substrate or of the side walls. Particles with different associated topological defects (hedgehogs or Saturn rings) behave differently as they interact with the topographical features, favoring the docking on peaks or valleys. These experimental systems are also ideal to study the ``lock and key'' mechanism of particles in holes and to investigate a possible route for particle sorting.

  17. Role of Molecular Structure on X-ray Diffraction in Thermotropic Uniaxial and Biaxial Nematic Liquid Crystal Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bharat R.; Kang, Shin-Woong; Prasad, Veena; Kumar, Satyendra

    2009-08-27

    X-ray diffraction is one of the most definitive methods to determine the structure of condensed matter phases, and it has been applied to unequivocally infer the structures of conventional calamitic and lyotropic liquid crystals. With the advent of bent-core and tetrapodic mesogens and the discovery of the biaxial nematic phase in them, the experimental results require more careful interpretation and analysis. Here, we present ab-initio calculations of X-ray diffraction patterns in the isotropic, uniaxial nematic, and biaxial nematic phases of bent-core mesogens. A simple Meier-Saupe-like molecular distribution function is employed to describe both aligned and unaligned mesophases. The distribution function is decomposed into two, polar and azimuthal, distribution functions to calculate the effect of the evolution of uniaxial and biaxial nematic orientational order. The calculations provide satisfactory semiquantitative interpretations of experimental results. The calculations presented here should provide a pathway to more refined and quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction data from the biaxial nematic phase.

  18. Chromonic liquid crystalline nematic phase exhibited in binary mixture of two liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaiah, T. N. Sreepad, H. R.; Sridhar, K. N.; Sridhara, G. R.; Nagaraja, N.

    2015-06-24

    A binary mixture of abietic acid and orthophosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) exhibits co-existence of biphasic region of Nematic+Isotropic (N+I), lyotropic Nematic (ND) and Smectic-G (SmG) phases. The mixture exhibits N+I, N and SmG phases at different concentrations and at different temperatures. Mixtures with all concentrations of abietic acid exhibit I→N+I→N→SmG phases sequentially when the specimen is cooled from its isotropic melt. These phases have been characterized by using differential scanning calorimetric, X-ray diffraction, and optical texture studies.

  19. Lattice model for biaxial and uniaxial nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerwein, Ricardo A.; de Oliveira, Mário J.

    2016-05-01

    We use a lattice gas model to describe the phase transitions in nematic liquid crystals. The phase diagram displays, in addition to the isotropic phase, the two uniaxial nematics, the rod-like and discotic nematics, and the biaxial nematic. Each site of the lattice has a constituent unit that takes only six orientations and is understood as being a parallelepiped brick with the three axes distinct. The possible orientations of a brick are those in which its axes are parallel to the axes of a Cartesian reference frame. The analysis of the model is performed by the use of a mean-field approximation and a Landau expansion of the free energy.

  20. Simulated Textures of Toroidal Nematic Liquid Crystal Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Perry; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Nematic liquid crystals under confinement by curved surfaces can produce complex hierarchical structures whose design principles and properties have yet to be unraveled. Here we focus on toroidal geometries and perform computer simulations of the nematic textures seen between crossed-polarizers. We find agreement with experiments using director fields that exhibit pronounced twist deformations with contributions from bend and splay.

  1. Light-scattering study of a polymer nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taratuta, Victor G.; Hurd, Alan J.; Meyer, Robert B.

    1985-07-01

    We study the relaxation of thermally excited orientation fluctuations in a polymer nematic liquid crystal using photon correlation spectroscopy. The material studied is poly-γ-benzyl glutamate at a concentration just above the isotropic to nematic transition point. The relaxation rates of elastic deformation modes exhibit large anisotropies. Quantitative measurements of ratios of Frank elastic constants and Leslie viscosities are described.

  2. Nonionic diethanolamide amphiphiles with isoprenoid-type hydrocarbon chains: thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Krodkiewska, Irena; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    The thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behaviour of a series of diethanolamide amphiphiles with isoprenoid-type hydrocarbon chains (geranoyl, H-farnesoyl, and phytanoyl) has been investigated. When neat, both H-farnesoyl and phytanoyl diethanolamide form a smectic liquid crystalline structure at sub-zero temperatures. In addition, all three diethanolamides exhibit a glass transition temperature at around -73 C. Geranoyl diethanolamide forms a lamellar crystalline phase with a lattice parameter of 17.4 {angstrom} following long term storage accompanied by the loss of the glass transition. In the presence of water, H-farnesoyl and phytanoyl diethanolamide form lyotropic liquid crystalline phases, whilst geranoyl diethanolamide forms an L{sub 2} phase. H-farnesoyl diethanolamide forms a fluid lamellar phase (L{sub {alpha}}) at room temperature and up to {approx} 40 C. Phytanoyl diethanolamide displays a rich mesomorphism forming the inverse diamond (Q{sub II}{sup D}) and gyroid (Q{sub II}{sup G}) bicontinuous cubic phases in addition to an L{sub {alpha}} phase.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Liquid Crystals: Nematic Droplets and Coarsening Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behabtu, Natnael; Senyuk, Bohdan; Smalyukh, Ivan; Pasquali, Matteo

    2012-02-01

    On a fundamental basis, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offer a new model molecule to explore the dynamics and phases of rigid rods and test theories. Their large aspect ratio (100 to 100,000) and persistence length (˜ 100 microns) allow exploring the physics of nematic phases with high Frank elastic constant. Moreover, understanding of CNT liquid crystals is key to their rational processing into ordered materials such as fibers. Here we report the formation of elongated nematic droplets of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid. In nematic droplets, a continuous transition from a homogeneous to bipolar nematic director field is expected theoretically, as a function of droplet volume; yet, experimental determination of such transition has been elusive. We show that CNT nematic droplets display such transition. We study the coarsening dynamics of positive and negative nematic droplets and observe that two or more droplets merge by matching their nematic director. Merging scenarios that lead to defect formation are not observed. Negative tactoids (isotropic phase in liquid crystalline continuum) merge through attractive forces induced by the nematic director distortion with quadrupolar symmetry.

  4. Light diffraction by acoustically induced domains in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kapustina, O. A.

    2006-05-15

    The phenomenon of light diffraction by a system of linear domains formed in planar layers of nematic liquid crystals in an oscillating Couette flow, acoustically induced at sound frequencies, is investigated.

  5. Nematic liquid crystals for optical shutters: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imus, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Nonmechanical shutter utilizes nematic crystals to attenuate illumination, thus protecting light-sensitive devices such as vidicon or image orthicon tubes and phototubes. Opacity of liquid crystals is controlled by photosensor.

  6. Oriental transitions in nematic liquid crystals on grooved substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Krekhov, A.P.; Khasimullin, M.V.; Lebedev, Y.A.

    1995-12-31

    An expression for the surface energy of a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) on a fine-grooved substrate is obtained with the phenomenological approach. Temperature-induced orientational transitions in nematic liquid crystals are analyzed as functions of the surface-profile parameters. A planar{yields}tilted{yields}homeotropic alignment transition was observed near the clearing point of an MBBA layer sandwiched between two grooved glass substrates, with a microrelief obtained by oblique evaporation of silicon monoxide. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Laser damage resistant nematic liquid crystal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raszewski, Z.; Piecek, W.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Soms, L.; Marczak, J.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Perkowski, P.; Kedzierski, J.; Miszczyk, E.; Olifierczuk, M.; Morawiak, P.; Mazur, R.

    2013-08-01

    There exists a problem in diagnostics of a dense plasma (so-called Thomson diagnostics). For this purpose, the plasma is illuminated by series of high energy laser pulses. Such pulses are generated by several independent lasers operating sequentially, and these pulses are to be directed along an exactly the same optical path. In this case, the energy of each separate pulse is as large as 3 J, so it is impossible to generate a burst of such pulses by a single laser. In this situation, several independent lasers have to be used. To form optical path with λ = 1.064 μm and absolute value of the energy of laser pulse through of 3 J, a special refractive index matched twisted Nematic Liquid Crystal Cell (NLCC) of type LCNP2 with switching on time τON smaller than 5 μs might be applied. High laser damage resistance of NLCC and short τON can be fulfilled by preparation of liquid crystal cells with Liquid Crystal Mixture (LCM), well tuned to twisted nematic electro-optical effect, and well tuned all optical interfaces (Air - Antireflection - Quartz Plate - Electrode - Blocking Film - Aligning Layer - LCM - Aligning Layer - Blocking Film - Electrode - Quartz Plate - Antireflection - Air). In such LCNP2 cell, the transmission is higher than 97% at λ = 1.064 μm, as it is presented by Gooch and Tarry [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 8, 1575 (1975)]. The safe laser density energy is about 0.6 J/cm2 for a train of laser pulses (λ = 1.064 μm, pulse duration 10 ns FWHM, pulse repetition rate 100 pps, train duration 10 s), so the area of liquid crystal cell tolerating 3 J through it shall be as large as 5 cm2. Due to the presence of two blocking film layers between electrodes, LCNP2 can be driven by high voltages. Switching on time smaller than τON = 5 μs was obtained under 200 V switching voltage.

  8. Transmission characteristics of a twisted nematic liquid-crystal layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinberg, J.; Jacobson, A. D.

    1976-01-01

    An approximate analytical expression is calculated for the transmission of thin twisted nematic layers situated between a polarizer/analyzer pair. The approximation assumes that the twist angle of the nematic liquid crystal is smaller than the maximum retardation of the cell. The direction of the incident light is assumed to be parallel to the normal of the electrode. This configuration is analyzed for a general arrangement of polarizer and analyzer; the general result is evaluated for the case of the polarizer parallel and analyzer perpendicular to the liquid-crystal optical axis on the input and output electrodes, respectively. The results show that in the case of a thin twisted nematic layer the transmission depends on the thickness of the layer, on the birefringence of the liquid crystal, and on the wavelength of the light. This is a departure from the well-known independence of the transmission on these parameters for a thick twisted nematic layer.

  9. Tuning Lyotropic Liquid Crystalline Phase Behavior of Gemini Surfactants by Linker Parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perroni, Dominic; Baez-Cotto, Carlos; Mantha, Sriteja; Sorenson, Gregory; Yethiraj, Arun; Mahanthappa, Mahesh

    2015-03-01

    Aqueous bicontinuous lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) derived from small molecule surfactants are useful nanostructured materials with myriad applications, in fields ranging from structural biology to membrane science. However, access to these coveted phases is limited by the fact that few surfactant platforms readily stabilize these network phases over the wide amphiphile concentration and temperature phase windows necessary for their widespread applications. We have recently shown that gemini (``twin tail'') dicarboxylate surfactants, comprising two single tail amphiphiles covalently linked near the headgroup by a hydrophobic bridge, exhibit a greatly increased propensity to form stable double gyroid LLC phases. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the unusual sensitivity of gemini dicarboxylate surfactant lyotropic self-assembly to the length of the hydrophobic bridge: odd-carbon linkers produce stable double gyroid phases over amphiphile composition windows as wide as 40 wt% that are stable between T = 22-100 °C. We rationalize these results in terms of the detailed molecular conformations of the surfactants that stem from the length of the bridging moiety, which suggests that this molecular design strategy may generally extend to other surfactant classes.

  10. Alignment and Graphene-Assisted Decoration of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals Containing DNA Origami Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Martens, Kevin; Funck, Timon; Kempter, Susanne; Roller, Eva-Maria; Liedl, Tim; Blaschke, Benno M; Knecht, Peter; Garrido, José Antonio; Zhang, Bingru; Kitzerow, Heinz

    2016-03-01

    Composites of DNA origami nanostructures dispersed in a lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal are studied by polarizing optical microscopy. The homogeneous aqueous dispersions can be uniformly aligned by confinement between two glass substrates, either parallel to the substrates owing to uniaxial rubbing or perpendicular to the substrates using ozonized graphene layers. These opportunities of uniform alignment may pave the way for tailored anisometric plasmonic DNA nanostructures to photonic materials. In addition, a decorated texture with nonuniform orientation is observed on substrates coated with pristine graphene. When the water is allowed to evaporate slowly, microscopic crystal needles appear, which are aligned along the local orientation of the director. This decoration method can be used for studying the local orientational order and the defects in chromonic liquid crystals. PMID:26849188

  11. Domain Structures in Nematic Liquid Crystals on a Polycarbonate Surface

    PubMed Central

    Parshin, Alexander M.; Gunyakov, Vladimir A.; Zyryanov, Victor Y.; Shabanov, Vasily F.

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  12. Domain structures in nematic liquid crystals on a polycarbonate surface.

    PubMed

    Parshin, Alexander M; Gunyakov, Vladimir A; Zyryanov, Victor Y; Shabanov, Vasily F

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  13. Nematic liquid crystals exhibiting high birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingujam, Kiranmala; Bhattacharjee, Ayon; Choudhury, Basana; Dabrowski, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Two fluorinated isothiocyanato nematic liquid crystalline compounds, 4'-butylcyclohexyl-3, 5-difluoro-4-isothiocyanatobiphenyl and 4'-pentylcyclohexyl-3, 5-difluoro-4-isothiocynatobiphenyl are studied in detail to obtain their different physical parameters. Optical polarizing microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, density and dielectric studies have been carried out for the two samples. Both the samples were found to have high clearing temperature (>100 °C) and exhibit small enthalpy of transition. The two samples exhibit high optical birefringence (Δ n > 0.2). The values of order parameters for the two samples were obtained using different approaches, namely, Vuks', Neugebauer's, modified Vuks' and direct extrapolation method from birefringence data. Experimentally obtained values of order parameters have also been compared with theoretical Maier-Saupe values. The parallel and perpendicular components of dielectric permittivity values of the two compounds were also calculated and their anisotropy values were found to be small. The effect of temperature on the molecular dipole moment μ and the angle of inclination β of the dipole axis with the director have also been investigated in this work.

  14. Characterization of the phase behaviour of a novel polymerizable lyotropic ionic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Goujon, Nicolas; Forsyth, Maria; Dumée, Ludovic F; Bryant, Gary; Byrne, Nolene

    2015-09-21

    The development of new polymerizable lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) utilizing charged amphiphilic molecules such as those based on long chain imidazolium compounds, is a relatively new design direction for producing robust membranes with controllable nano-structures. Here we have developed a novel polymerizable ionic liquid based LLC, 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium acrylate (C16mimAcr), where the acrylate anion acts as the polymerizable moiety. The phase behaviour of the C16mimAcr upon the addition of water was characterized using small and wide angle X-ray scatterings, differential scanning calorimetry and polarized optical microscopy. We compare the phase behaviour of this new polymerizable LLC to that of the well known LLC chloride analogue, 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16mimCl). We find that the C16mimAcr system has a more complex phase behaviour compared to the C16mimCl system. Additional lyotropic liquid crystalline mesophases such as hexagonal phase (H1) and discontinuous cubic phase (I1) are observed at 20 °C for the acrylate system at 50 and 65 wt% water respectively. The appearance of the hexagonal phase (H1) and discontinuous cubic phase (I1) for the acrylate system is likely due to the strong hydrating nature of the acrylate anion, which increases the head group area. The formation of these additional mesophases seen for the acrylate system, especially the hexagonal phase (H1), coupled with the polymerization functionality offers great potential in the design of advanced membrane materials with selective and anisotropic transport properties. PMID:26271610

  15. Thin liquid crystal films on liquids in the nematic range of temperatures.

    PubMed

    Delabre, Ulysse; Richard, Céline; Sang, Yann Yip Cheung; Cazabat, Anne-Marie

    2010-08-17

    Hybrid nematic films deposited on liquid substrates reveal a complex behavior, which is not fully understood. Here, the behavior of the n-cyanobiphenyl series on water and glycerol has been studied in a wide temperature range, including the vicinity of the nematic-isotropic (NI) transition. Wettability, allowed film thicknesses, and line tension of nematic domains have been investigated. The study provides a coherent picture of hybrid nematic films, allowing us to account for lower thickness threshold, structure of the film edge, and line tension of domains in the whole nematic range of temperatures. PMID:20695580

  16. Lyotropic Liquid Crystalline Cubic Phases as Versatile Host Matrices for Membrane-Bound Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Vallooran, Jijo J; Fong, Wye-Khay; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-04-21

    Lyotropic liquid crystalline cubic mesophases can function as host matrices for enzymes because of their biomimetic structural characteristics, optical transparency, and capability to coexist with water. This study demonstrates that the in meso immobilized membrane-bound enzyme d-fructose dehydrogenase (FDH) preserves its full activity, follows ideal Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and shows improved stability compared to its behavior in solution. Even after 5 days, the immobilized FDH retained its full activity in meso, whereas a model hydrophilic enzyme, horseradish peroxidase, maintained only 21% of its original activity. We reason that the lipidic bilayers in the three-dimensional structures of cubic mesophases provide an ideal environment for the reconstitution of a membrane-bound enzyme. The preserved activity, long-term stability, and reusability demonstrate that these hybrid nanomaterials are ideal matrices for biosensing and biocatalytic fuel cell applications. PMID:27050734

  17. Positron lifetime measurements in chiral nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Parmar, Devendra S.

    1991-01-01

    Positron lifetimes in the isotropic phases of chiral nematic liquid crystal formulations and their mixtures up to the racemic level were measured. The lifetime spectra for all liquid crystal systems were analyzed into three components. Although the individual spectra in the left- and right-handed components are identical, their racemic mixtures exhibit much larger orthopositronium lifetimes; these larger lifetimes indicate the presence of larger microvoids. This result is consistent with the reportedly higher thermodynamic stability and color play range in the racemic mixtures of chiral nematic liquid crystals.

  18. The Nematic Phases of Bent-Core Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, Helen F; Kaur, Sarabjot; Görtz, Verena; Belaissaoui, Abdel; Cowling, Stephen; Goodby, John W

    2014-01-01

    Over the last ten years, the nematic phases of liquid crystals formed from bent-core structures have provoked considerable research because of their remarkable properties. This Minireview summarises some recent measurements of the physical properties of these systems, as well as describing some new data. We concentrate on oxadiazole-based materials as exemplars of this class of nematogens, but also describe some other bent-core systems. The influence of molecular structure on the stability of the nematic phase is described, together with progress in reducing the nematic transition temperatures by modifications to the molecular structure. The physical properties of bent-core nematic materials have proven difficult to study, but patterns are emerging regarding their optical and dielectric properties. Recent breakthroughs in understanding the elastic and flexoelectric behaviour are summarised. Finally, some exemplars of unusual electric field behaviour are described. PMID:24700653

  19. Flexoelectric polarization studies in bent-core nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Sreenilayam, S P; Panarin, Yu P; Vij, J K; Torgova, S I; Lehmann, A; Tschierske, C

    2015-08-01

    The flexoelectric polarization (Pf) of four bent-core nematic liquid crystals (LCs) has been measured using the pyroelectric effect. Hybrid aligned nematic cells are fabricated for measuring the pyroelectric response over the entire range of the nematic phase. It is found that the magnitude of flexoelectric polarization Pf and the sum of the flexoelectric coefficients |e1+e3| for the bent-core LCs studied here are three to six times higher than for the calamitics. Pf is found to depend on the transverse dipole moment of LC molecules. However, |e1+e3| values are by no means giant as |e3| alone had been reported for a bent-core nematic system previously. The dependence of the sum of "splay and bend flexoelectric coefficients" is discussed in terms of the shape of the molecule and of the dipole moment directed normal to the molecular axis. PMID:26382418

  20. Lattice model for biaxial and uniaxial nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Sauerwein, Ricardo A; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2016-05-21

    We use a lattice gas model to describe the phase transitions in nematic liquid crystals. The phase diagram displays, in addition to the isotropic phase, the two uniaxial nematics, the rod-like and discotic nematics, and the biaxial nematic. Each site of the lattice has a constituent unit that takes only six orientations and is understood as being a parallelepiped brick with the three axes distinct. The possible orientations of a brick are those in which its axes are parallel to the axes of a Cartesian reference frame. The analysis of the model is performed by the use of a mean-field approximation and a Landau expansion of the free energy. PMID:27208971

  1. Statistical mechanics of the flexoelectric effect in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Subas; Selinger, Jonathan V.

    2009-03-01

    Flexoelectricity is the phenomenon in which polarization is induced by imposed deformations of the director field in nematic liquid crystals. Recent experiments [1,2] have found that the flexoelectric effect is three orders of magnitude greater for bent-core liquid crystals than for conventional rod-like liquid crystals. To understand this experimental result, we develop a lattice model for the statistical mechanics of the flexoelectric effect. We perform Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field calculations to find the behavior as a function of interaction parameters, temperature, and applied electric field. The resulting phase diagram has four phases: isotropic, uniaxial nematic, biaxial nematic, and polar. In the uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases, there is a large splay or bend flexoelectric effect, which diverges as the system approaches the nematic-polar transition. This model may explain the large bend flexoelectric coefficient observed in bent-core liquid crystals, which have a tendency toward polar order. [1] J. Harden, B. Mbanga, N. Eber, K. Fodor-Csorba, S. Sprunt, J. T. Gleeson, and A. Jakli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97,157802 (2006). [2] J. Harden, R. Teeling, J. T. Gleeson, S. Sprunt, and A.Jakli, Phys. Rev. E 78, 031702 (2008).

  2. Dynamics of a disc in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Antipova, Alena; Denniston, Colin

    2016-01-28

    We use lattice Boltzmann simulations to study the dynamics of a disc immersed in a nematic liquid crystal. In the absence of external torques, discs with homeotropic anchoring align with their surface normal parallel to the director of the nematic liquid crystal. In the presence of a weak magnetic field a ferromagnetic disc will rotate to equilibrate the elastic torque due to the distortion of the nematic director and the magnetic torque. When the magnetic field rotates the disc so that the angle θ between normal to the surface of the disc â and director of the liquid crystal n[combining circumflex] becomes greater than π/2, the disc flips around the axis perpendicular to the rotation axis so that â sweeps through π radians. An analysis of this behaviour was performed. In particular, we look at the impact of the disc thickness and edges on defect creation and the flipping transition. We also analyse the importance of backflow. PMID:26575160

  3. Colloidal spirals in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Pandey, Manoj B; Liu, Qingkun; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2015-12-01

    One of the central experimental efforts in nematic colloids research aims to explore how the interplay between the geometry of particles along with the accompanying nematic director deformations and defects around them can provide a means of guiding particle self-assembly and controlling the structure of particle-induced defects. In this work, we design, fabricate, and disperse low-symmetry colloidal particles with shapes of spirals, double spirals, and triple spirals in a nematic fluid. These spiral-shaped particles, which are controlled by varying their surface functionalization to provide tangential or perpendicular boundary conditions of the nematic molecular alignment, are found inducing director distortions and defect configurations with non-chiral or chiral symmetry. Colloidal particles also exhibit both stable and metastable multiple orientational states in the nematic host, with a large number of director configurations featuring both singular and solitonic nonsingular topological defects accompanying them, which can result in unusual forms of colloidal self-assembly. Our findings directly demonstrate how the symmetry of particle-generated director configurations can be further lowered, or not, as compared to the low point group symmetry of solid micro-inclusions, depending on the nature of induced defects while satisfying topological constraints. We show that achiral colloidal particles can cause chiral symmetry breaking of elastic distortions, which is driven by complex three-dimensional winding of induced topological line defects and solitons. PMID:26358649

  4. Reverse lyotropic liquid crystals from europium nitrate and P123 with enhanced luminescence efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sijing; Li, Qintang; Liu, Hongguo; Chen, Xiao

    2014-10-01

    Fabrication of lyotropic aggregates containing the lanthanide ions is becoming a preferable way to prepare novel functional materials. Here, the lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) of reverse hexagonal, reverse bicontinuous cubic, and lamellar phases have been constructed in sequence directly from the mixtures of Eu(NO3)3·6H2O and Pluronic P123 amphiphilc block copolymer with increasing the salt proportion. Their phase types and structural characteristics were analyzed using polarized optical microscopy (POM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements. The driving forces of reverse LLC phase formation were investigated using Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and rheological measurements. The hydrated europium salt was found to act not only as a solvent here, but also as the bridge to form hydrogen bonding between coordinated water molecules and PEO blocks, which played a key role in the reverse LLCs formation. Compared to those in aqueous solutions and solid state, the enhanced luminescence quantum yields and prolonged excited state lifetimes were observed in two europium containing reverse mesophases. The luminescence quenching effect of lanthanide ions was efficiently suppressed, probably due to the substitution of coordinated water molecules by oxyethyl groups of P123 and ordered phase structures of LLCs, where the coordinated europium ions were confined and isolated by PEO blocks. The optimum luminescence performance was then found to exist in the reverse hexagonal phase. The obtained results on such lanthanide-induced reverse LLCs should be referable for designing new luminescent soft materials construction to expand their application fields. PMID:25215923

  5. Templated synthesis of ZnSe nanostructures using lyotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Karanikolos, Georgios N; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Mallory, Robert; Petrou, Athos; Mountziaris, T J

    2005-10-01

    We report a technique for controlled synthesis of zero-, one-, and two-dimensional compound semiconductor nanostructures by using cubic, hexagonal, and lamellar lyotropic liquid crystals as templates, respectively. The liquid crystals were formed by self-assembly in a ternary system consisting of a poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) amphiphilic block copolymer as the surfactant, heptane as the non-polar dispersed phase, and formamide as the polar continuous phase. ZnSe quantum dots and nanowires with diameters smaller than 10 nm, as well as free-standing, disc-like quantum wells, were grown inside the spherical, cylindrical, and planar nanodomains, respectively, by reacting diethylzinc that was dissolved in the heptane domains with hydrogen selenide gas that was brought into contact with the liquid crystal in a sealed chamber at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The shape and size of the resulting nanostructures can be manipulated by selecting the templating phase of the liquid crystal, the size of the dispersed nanodomains that is controlled by the composition of the template, and the concentration of diethylzinc in them. PMID:20818020

  6. Templated synthesis of ZnSe nanostructures using lyotropic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanikolos, Georgios N.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Mallory, Robert; Petrou, Athos; Mountziaris, T. J.

    2005-10-01

    We report a technique for controlled synthesis of zero-, one-, and two-dimensional compound semiconductor nanostructures by using cubic, hexagonal, and lamellar lyotropic liquid crystals as templates, respectively. The liquid crystals were formed by self-assembly in a ternary system consisting of a poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) amphiphilic block copolymer as the surfactant, heptane as the non-polar dispersed phase, and formamide as the polar continuous phase. ZnSe quantum dots and nanowires with diameters smaller than 10 nm, as well as free-standing, disc-like quantum wells, were grown inside the spherical, cylindrical, and planar nanodomains, respectively, by reacting diethylzinc that was dissolved in the heptane domains with hydrogen selenide gas that was brought into contact with the liquid crystal in a sealed chamber at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The shape and size of the resulting nanostructures can be manipulated by selecting the templating phase of the liquid crystal, the size of the dispersed nanodomains that is controlled by the composition of the template, and the concentration of diethylzinc in them.

  7. In situ synthesis of mesoporous CdS nanoparticles in ternary cubic phase lyotropic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, N. M.; Kan, C. S.; Radiman, S.

    An in situ technique for the synthesis of CdS nanoparticles in a ternary lyotropic cubic phase liquid crystal has been carried out. The extremely viscous cubic phase liquid-crystal system consists of poly(oxyethylene)10 nonyl phenol ether as non-ionic surfactant, octane as oil phase and an aqueous phase containing reactant ions (Cd2+ and S2-). Thioacetamide (TAA) has been utilized as a source for slow release of sulfur in the in situ synthesis of CdS. Rheological results show that CdS nanoparticle growth did not disrupt the structure of the cubic phase liquid-crystal system. This indicates that homogenous synthesis of CdS in the liquid crystal had been achieved. The final products were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy. It was found that the CdS nanoparticles formed have a mesoporous structure with a size dependent on the TAA decomposition aging time.

  8. Lyotropic Phase Behavior of Polybutadiene-Poly(ethylene oxide) Diblock Copolymers in Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Peter M.; Lodge, Timothy P.

    2008-08-26

    The lyotropic phase behavior of three poly(1,2-butadiene-b-ethylene oxide) diblock copolymers (PB-PEO) with different monomer volume fractions has been studied in two different ionic liquids, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMI][TFSI]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMI][PF{sub 6}]), across the complete concentration range. The ordered microstructures present in the solutions were characterized via small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The phase diagrams for the PB-PEO/ionic liquid solutions include regions corresponding to the classical copolymer microstructures: body-centered-cubic lattices of spheres, hexagonally ordered cylinders, and lamellae. Additionally, the phase diagrams also include wide regions of coexisting microstructures and regions apparently corresponding to a disordered network microstructure. The phase behavior of the PB-PEO copolymers in both ionic liquids was comparable to their previously reported aqueous solution behavior. The temperature dependence of the phase diagrams was very modest, indicative of a highly segregated system. The level of solvent selectivity was also investigated via cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) on dilute solutions. On the basis of the morphology of the dilute solution copolymer aggregate structures in the ionic liquid solvents, and on the structural length scales of the concentrated solutions, it was concluded that for PB-PEO [BMI][PF{sub 6}] behaves as a more selective solvent than [EMI][TFSI].

  9. Bonded boojum-colloids in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Zahra; Silvestre, Nuno M; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2013-08-20

    We investigate bonded boojum-colloids in nematic liquid crystals, configurations where two colloids with planar degenerate anchoring are double-bonded through line defects connecting their surfaces. This bonded structure promotes the formation of linear chains aligned with the nematic director. We show that the bonded configuration is the global minimum in systems that favor twist deformations. In addition, we investigate the influence of confinement on the stability of bonded boojum-colloids. Although the unbonded colloid configuration, where the colloids bundle at oblique angles, is favored by confinement, the bonded configuration is again the global minimum for liquid crystals with sufficiently small twist elastic constants. PMID:23859624

  10. Simulation of weak anchoring effects on nematic liquid crystal hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, Sean; Somers, David A. T.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    The free energy of a nematic liquid crystal droplet depends on an interplay between elastic and surface interactions. When the two contributions are of similar magnitude, there exists a transition of the nematic structure of the droplet. Because the two contributions scale differently with length scales, this transition is visible as a function of the size of the droplet. We carry out numerical simulations to explore the use of this transition in measuring surface anchoring energies. This technique could help elucidate alignment forces on liquid crystals, such as those caused by rubbed surfaces, electric fields, or even the Casimir torque. Electrical and Computer Engineering.

  11. Dynamic arrest of nematic liquid-crystal colloid networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Lu; Hwang, Jeoung-Yeon; Kim, Chanjoong

    2013-10-01

    We report interesting self-assembly structures of nematic liquid-crystal colloid (NLCC) networks, which are arrested during cooling from the isotropic temperature to room temperature. The NLCC is composed of sterically stabilized colloidal particles and a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) with nematic-isotropic transition temperature (TNI) that is much higher than those of previously studied 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl and N-(4-Methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline. We find that the structure of NLCCs depends on TNI, cooling rates, and boundary conditions, varying from cellular network to hierarchical fern structures in different length scales. Our time-lapse study shows that the transition from the cellular network to the fern structure directly corresponds to the transition from a spinodal demixing to a nucleation-and-growth mechanism.

  12. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of the mixture of isotropic and nematic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Dong; Lee, Bomi; Kang, Shin-Woong; Song, Jang-Kun

    2015-08-01

    In various applications involving liquid crystals, the manipulation of the nanoscale molecular assembly and microscale director alignment is highly useful. Here we show that a nematic-isotropic mixture, a unique bi-liquid system, has potential for the fabrication of microstructures having an ordered phase within a disordered phase, or vice versa. The volume expansion and shrinkage, migration, splitting, mergence and elongation of one phase within the other are easily accomplished via thermal treatment and dielectrophoretic manipulation. This is particularly achievable when one phase is suspended in the middle. In that case, a highly biased ordered-phase preference of surfaces, that is, the nematic-philic nature of a polyimide layer and the nematic-phobic nature of a self-assembled monolayer of chlorosilane derivatives, is used. Further, by combining this approach with photopolymerization, the patterned microstructure is solidified as a patterned polymer film having both isotropic and anisotropic molecular arrangements simultaneously, or as a template with a morphological variation.

  13. Controlling materials architecture on the nanometer-scale: PPV nanocomposites via polymerizable lyotropic liquid crystals[Poly(p-phenylenevinylene)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.C.; Deng, H.; Fischer, W.M.; Gin, D.L.

    1998-07-01

    The authors have developed a general strategy for the construction of ordered nanocomposites with hexagonal symmetry, using polymerizable lyotropic (i.e., amphiphilic) liquid crystals. In this approach, self-organizing lyotropic liquid-crystalline monomers are used to form an ordered template matrix in the presence of a reactive hydrophilic solution. Subsequent photopolymerization to lock-in the matrix architecture, followed by initiation of chemistry within the ordered hydrophilic domains to afford solid-state fillers, yields the anisotropic nanocomposites. Composites have been synthesized that have a regular hexagonal arrangement of extended poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) domains, with a regular interchannel spacing of 4 nm. The photoluminescence of these materials is significantly altered from that of bulk PPV. The dimensions of these nanocomposites can be tuned by varying the size of the hydrophobic tails and/or the nature of the counterion associated with the hydrophilic headgroup of the monomer.

  14. Brownian motion of particles in nematic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xuxia; Nayani, Karthik; Park, Jung; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2011-03-01

    We studied the brownian motion of both charged and neutral polystyrene particles in two nematic fluids, a thermotropic liquid crystal, E7, and a lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal, Sunset Yellow FCF (SSY). Homogeneous planar alignment of E7 was easliy achieved by using rubbed polyimide film coated on the glass. For SSY planar mondomain, we used the capillary method recently developed in our lab. By tracking a single particle, the direction dependent diffussion coefficients and Stokes drag were measured in the nematic phase and isotropic phase for both systems.

  15. Metric approach for sound propagation in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, E.; Fumeron, S.; Moraes, F.

    2013-02-01

    In the eikonal approach, we describe sound propagation near topological defects of nematic liquid crystals as geodesics of a non-Euclidian manifold endowed with an effective metric tensor. The relation between the acoustics of the medium and this geometrical description is given by Fermat's principle. We calculate the ray trajectories and propose a diffraction experiment to retrieve information about the elastic constants.

  16. A Liquid Crystalline Oligomer Exhibiting Nematic and Twist-Bend Nematic Mesophases.

    PubMed

    Mandle, Richard J; Goodby, John W

    2016-04-01

    The twist-bend nematic phase (NTB ) has been described as the structural link between the untilted uniaxial nematic phase (N) and the helical chiral nematic phase (N*). The NTB phase exhibits phenomena of fundamental importance to science, that is, 1) the spontaneous formation of a helical pitch on the nanometer scale in a fluid and 2) the spontaneous breaking of mirror symmetry, leading to the emergence of chiral domains in an achiral system. In this Communication, we present a study on T49 [bis(4-(9-(4-((4-cyanobenzoyl)oxy)phenyl)nonyl)phenyl) 4,4'-(nonane-1,9-diyl)dibenzoate], a liquid-crystalline oligomer exhibiting the twist-bend nematic phase, which has a molecular length that is of comparable dimensions to the sub-10 nm pitch determined for CB9CB, and provide new insights into the differentiation between the nano- and macro-science for self-assembling supermolecular systems. PMID:26777310

  17. Rayleigh Light Scattering from Nematic Liquid Crystals at Oblique Incidence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da, Xiao-Yi.

    Ryuichi Akiyama 1980 and his co-workers first showed the possibility that light scattering experiments on nematic liquid crystals could be carried out preferably by using oblique incidence rather than the conventional normal incidence. Miraldi, et al 1980 strongly recommended the application of oblique incidence, and gave a discussion in detail. The present work starts from an attempt to obtain the three Frank elastic constants and viscosity coefficients of nematic liquid crystals by Rayleigh light scattering. A suitable scattering geometry has been chosen; a systematic method of measuring these constants and coefficients has been developed by measuring the linewidths of the scattered light from a single sample at various incidence angles and fitting the measured linewidths with appropriate theoretical expressions. It is shown in the present work that the light scattering experiments on nematic liquid crystals at oblique incidence have many advantages over the same kind of experiments at normal incidence so far widely employed, and show a promising future. After a brief introduction to the general theory of the dynamic light scattering, nematic liquid crystals and light scattering from nematic liquid crystals in Chapters 1, 2, and 3, and a brief review of the measurements of elastic constants and viscosity coefficients of nematic liquid crystals by light scattering in Chapter 4, a straightforward method concerning the calculation of variations of the wave vectors upon scattering is developed in Chapter 5. This method assumes that a nematic liquid crystal behaves optically like a uniaxial crystal. In doing so, all we have to know is the ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices n(,o) and n(,e) of the sample under consideration. The linewidth and intensity distributions of the scattered light can then be determined by inserting the variations in wave vectors into appropriate equations for a known material for which the knowledge of the elastic constants as well

  18. Global defect topology in nematic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Machon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We give the global homotopy classification of nematic textures for a general domain with weak anchoring boundary conditions and arbitrary defect set in terms of twisted cohomology, and give an explicit computation for the case of knotted and linked defects in R3, showing that the distinct homotopy classes have a 1–1 correspondence with the first homology group of the branched double cover, branched over the disclination loops. We show further that the subset of those classes corresponding to elements of order 2 in this group has representatives that are planar and characterize the obstruction for other classes in terms of merons. The planar textures are a feature of the global defect topology that is not reflected in any local characterization. Finally, we describe how the global classification relates to recent experiments on nematic droplets and how elements of order 4 relate to the presence of τ lines in cholesterics. PMID:27493576

  19. Hybrid graphene nematic liquid crystal light scattering device.

    PubMed

    Qasim, M M; Khan, A A; Kostanyan, A; Kidambi, P R; Cabrero-Vilatela, A; Braeuninger-Weimer, P; Gardiner, D J; Hofmann, S; Wilkinson, T D

    2015-09-01

    A hybrid graphene nematic liquid crystal (LC) light scattering device is presented. This device exploits the inherent poly-crystallinity of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene films to induce directional anchoring and formation of LC multi-domains. This thereby enables efficient light scattering without the need for crossed polarisers or separate alignment layers/additives. The hybrid LC device exhibits switching thresholds at very low electric fields (< 1 V μm(-1)) and repeatable, hysteresis free characteristics. This exploitation of LC alignment effects on CVD graphene films enables a new generation of highly efficient nematic LC scattering displays as well as many other possible applications. PMID:26243047

  20. Propagating director bend fluctuations in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Humpert, Anja; Allen, Michael P

    2015-01-16

    We show, by molecular simulation, that for a range of standard, coarse-grained, nematic liquid crystal models, the director bend fluctuation is a propagating mode. This is in contrast to the generally accepted picture of nematic hydrodynamics, in which all the director modes (splay, twist, bend, and combinations thereof) are overdamped. By considering the various physical parameters that enter the equations of nematodynamics, we propose an explanation of this effect and conclude that propagating bend fluctuations may be observable in some experimental systems. PMID:25635566

  1. Anomalous light transmission by nematic liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konshina, E. A.; Fedorov, M. A.; Ivanova, N. L.; Amosova, L. P.

    2008-01-01

    Light transmission through nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cells with a planar alignment and various boundary conditions has been studied as a function of the bias voltage in the regimes of maximum transmittance and complete extinction. The phenomenon of anomalous light leakage in the regime of complete extinction has been observed in the NLC sells with alignment layers of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), in which an anisotropy was induced by rubbing the electrode surface (for a-C:H) and the alignment layer (for PVA). The anomalous transmission is caused by the deformation of nematic molecules, which are situated near the surface, in the direction perpendicular to the direction of rubbing. The magnitude of anomalous transmission increases with the bias voltage. This behavior is explained by the anisotropy of the surface anchoring energy of nematic molecules at the interface.

  2. Dispersions of ellipsoidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Tasinkevych, Mykola; Mondiot, Frédéric; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Loudet, Jean-Christophe

    2014-03-28

    Colloidal particles dispersed in a partially ordered medium, such as a liquid crystal (LC) phase, disturb its alignment and are subject to elastic forces. These forces are long-ranged, anisotropic and tunable through temperature or external fields, making them a valuable asset to control colloidal assembly. The latter is very sensitive to the particle geometry since it alters the interactions between the colloids. We here present a detailed numerical analysis of the energetics of elongated objects, namely prolate ellipsoids, immersed in a nematic host. The results, complemented with qualitative experiments, reveal novel LC configurations with peculiar topological properties around the ellipsoids, depending on their aspect ratio and the boundary conditions imposed on the nematic order parameter. The latter also determine the preferred orientation of ellipsoids in the nematic field, because of elastic torques, as well as the morphology of particle aggregates. PMID:24651907

  3. Fluctuation Modes of a Twist-Bend Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsouzi, Z.; Shamid, S. M.; Borshch, V.; Challa, P. K.; Baldwin, A. R.; Tamba, M. G.; Welch, C.; Mehl, G. H.; Gleeson, J. T.; Jakli, A.; Lavrentovich, O. D.; Allender, D. W.; Selinger, J. V.; Sprunt, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report a dynamic light-scattering study of the fluctuation modes in a thermotropic liquid crystalline mixture of monomer and dimer compounds that exhibits the twist-bend nematic (NTB ) phase. The results reveal a spectrum of overdamped fluctuations that includes two nonhydrodynamic modes and one hydrodynamic mode in the NTB phase, and a single nonhydrodynamic mode plus two hydrodynamic modes (the usual nematic optic axis or director fluctuations) in the higher temperature, uniaxial nematic phase. The properties of these fluctuations and the conditions for their observation are comprehensively explained by a Landau-de Gennes expansion of the free-energy density in terms of heliconical director and helical polarization fields that characterize the NTB structure, with the latter serving as the primary order parameter. A "coarse-graining" approximation simplifies the theoretical analysis and enables us to demonstrate quantitative agreement between the calculated and experimentally determined temperature dependence of the mode relaxation rates.

  4. Structure of nematic liquid crystalline elastomers under uniaxial deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Fan; Heiney, Paul A.; Srinivasan, Amritha; Naciri, Jawad; Ratna, Banahalli

    2006-02-15

    We have used in situ x-ray diffraction and calorimetry to study liquid crystalline elastomers prepared using a one-step photopolymerization method. We used suspended weights to stretch free-standing crystalline elastomer films. With the mechanical stress parallel to the initial director, we observed a gradual nematic to isotropic transition with increasing temperature. The thermal evolution of the nematic order parameter on cooling, together with the observation of isotropic-nematic coexistence over a broad temperature range, suggests that the heterogeneity in the samples introduces a distribution of transition temperatures. With the mechanical stress perpendicular to the initial director, we observed both uniform director rotation and stripe formation, depending on the details of sample preparation.

  5. Dynamic-Mechanical Analysis of Monodomain Nematic Liquid Crystalline Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Atsushi; Terentjev, Eugene

    2003-03-01

    Dynamic-mechanical analysis was performed in the glassy, nematic and isotropic states of several monodomain nematic liquid crystalline elastomers (LCE) which differ in their degrees of anisotropy and internal microstructure. It was found that the type of network crosslinker makes a significant difference in the equilibrium properties of these elastomers, in particular, in their effective anisotropy. In spite of these differences, the observed dynamic-mechanical behaviour was very similar. The fact that there is a consistently high and wide loss over the whole nematic region, where storage modulus G' behaves non-monotonically, is most likely an indicator of the fact that the dynamic-mechanical response is not linear. Master curves have been built between the glassy state and the nematic-isotropic phase transition, where the modulus reaches a low-level soft plateau. Above the nematic-isotropic transition temperature Tni, the modulus rises substantially, since internal relaxation is no longer able to reduce the elastic response - and further time-temperature superposition fails. The dynamics of these elastomers are dominated by power laws, which was confirmed by the successful procedure of the master curve inversion (time-frequency inversion) to describe the static stress relaxation. Interestingly, it was found that mechanical properties characterized by power laws (in time) of stress relaxation match very well with the dynamic properties, where power laws (in frequency) were also observed in the dynamic modulus in the appropriate range of temperatures. The work demonstrates the potential for the use of nematic liquid crystalline elastomers in many acoustic and vibration damping applications.

  6. Photorefractivity in polymer-stabilized nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R. |

    1998-07-01

    Polymer-stabilized liquid crystals, consisting of low concentrations of a polymeric electron acceptor, are shown to exhibit significantly enhanced photorefractive properties. The charge generation and transport properties of these composite systems are strongly modified from nematic liquid crystals doped with electron donors and acceptors. The new composites are produced by polymerizing a small quantity of a 1,4:5,8-naphthalenediimide electron acceptor functionalized with an acrylate group in an aligned nematic liquid crystal. Photopolymerization creates an anisotropic gel-like medium in which the liquid crystal is free to reorient in the presence of a space charge field, while maintaining charge trapping sites in the polymerized regions of the material. The presence of these trapping sites results in the observation of longer lived, higher resolution holographic gratings in the polymer-stabilized liquid crystals than observed in nematic liquid crystals alone. These gratings display Bragg regime diffraction. Asymmetric beam coupling, photo-conductivity, and four-wave mixing experiments are performed to characterize the photophysics of these novel materials.

  7. Photorefractivity in polymer-stabilized nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    1998-10-01

    Polymer-stabilized liquid crystals, consisting of low concentrations of a polymeric electron acceptor, are shown to exhibit significantly enhanced photorefractive properties. The charge generation and transport properties of these composite systems are strongly modified from nematic liquid crystals doped with electron donors and acceptors. The new composites are produced by polymerizing a small quantity of a 1,4:5,8-naphthalenediimide electron acceptor functionalized with an acrylate group in an aligned nematic liquid crystal. Photopolymerization creates an anisotropic gel-like medium in which the liquid crystal is free to reorient in the presence of a space charge field, while maintaining charge trapping sites in the polymerized regions of the material. The presence of these trapping sites results in the observation of longer lived, higher resolution holographic gratings in the polymer-stabilized liquid crystals than observed in nematic liquid crystals alone. These gratings display Bragg regime diffraction. Asymmetric beam coupling, photo-conductivity, and four-wave mixing experiments are performed to characterize the photophysics of these novel materials.

  8. Spiral textures in lyotropic liquid crystals : first order transition between normal hexagonal and lamellar gel phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, K. M.; Kékicheff, P.; Kléman, M.

    1993-06-01

    The first order transition between the normal hexagonal phase (H{α}) and lamellar gel phase (L{β}, L{β'}, L{δ}, ... type) in lyotropic liquid crystals of binary surfactant/water systems is investigated. Structural transformations and epitaxial relations are investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering on powdered and oriented samples. By slow evaporation of water, growth of the gel layered structure from the two-dimensional packing of surfactant cylinders of the hexagonal mesophase in the presence of a solid wall reveals a spectacular new texture composed of interwoven spirals. It is demonstrated that the layers grow from the rods of the hexagonal phase, in planes coplanar with the hexagonal packing and perpendicular to the wall. The configuration is such that line wedge disclinations of strength s= + 1/2 of the hexagonal phase are preserved through the phase transition. Estimates of the radii for the developable domain and cores, and also for the bending elastic constant are obtained. A mechanism for the phase transformation is discussed in view of topological structural transformations and a modification of the short-range order associated to the disorder order transition of the configuration of the paraffinic chains.

  9. Oil and drug control the release rate from lyotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Martiel, Isabelle; Baumann, Nicole; Vallooran, Jijo J; Bergfreund, Jotam; Sagalowicz, Laurent; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-04-28

    The control of the diffusion coefficient by the dimensionality d of the structure appears as a most promising lever to efficiently tune the release rate from lyotropic liquid crystalline (LLC) phases and dispersed particles towards sustained, controlled and targeted release. By using phosphatidylcholine (PC)- and monolinoleine (MLO)-based mesophases with various apolar structural modifiers and water-soluble drugs, we present a comprehensive study of the dimensional structural control of hydrophilic drug release, including 3-d bicontinuous cubic, 2-d lamellar, 1-d hexagonal and 0-d micellar cubic phases in excess water. We investigate how the surfactant, the oil properties and the drug hydrophilicity mitigate or even cancel the effect of structure variation on the drug release rate. Unexpectedly, the observed behavior cannot be fully explained by the thermodynamic partition of the drug into the lipid matrix, which points out to previously overlooked kinetic effects. We therefore interpret our results by discussing the mechanism of structural control of the diffusion rate in terms of drug permeation through the lipid membrane, which includes exchange kinetics. A wide range of implications follow regarding formulation and future developments, both for dispersed LLC delivery systems and topical applications in bulk phase. PMID:25744826

  10. Structural characterization of lyotropic liquid crystals containing a dendrimer for solubilization and release of gallic acid.

    PubMed

    Bitan-Cherbakovsky, Liron; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2013-12-01

    The role of 2nd generation polypropyleneimine (PPIG2) dendrimer in controlling the release of gallic acid (GA) as a model drug from lyotropic liquid crystal was explored. GA (0.2wt%) was solubilized in three types of mesophases: lamellar (Lα), cubic (space group of Ia3d, Q(G)), and reverse hexagonal (HII), composed of GMO and water (and d-α-tocopherol, or tricaprylin in the case of HII mesophases). Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) along with UV spectrophotometry were utilized to elucidate the structure modifications and release resulting from the cosolubilization of GA and PPIG2. Solubilization of PPIG2 into Lα and Q(G) phases caused transformation of both structures to HII. The diffusion of GA out of the mesophases was found to be dependent on water content and PPIG2 concentration. Rapid release from Lα+PPIG2 and Q(G)+PPIG2 mesophases was recorded. The release from both HII mixtures (with d-α-tocopherol and tricaprylin) was shown to be dependent on the type of oil. Release studies conducted for 72h showed that GA release can be modulated and sustained by the presence of PPIG2, supposedly due to the electrostatic interactions between the dendrimer and the drug molecule. PMID:23973908

  11. Photoalignment of a Nematic Liquid Crystal Fluid and Glassy-Nematic Oligofluorenes on Coumarin-Containing Polymer Films

    SciTech Connect

    Trajkovska, A.; Kim, C.; Marshall, K.L.; Mourey, T.H.; Chen, S.H.

    2007-03-19

    The orientations of both a nematic liquid crystal fluid and a series of monodisperse glassy-nematic oligofluorenes were investigated on photoalignment films comprising a polymethacrylate backbone with 7-benzoyloxycoumarin pendants. Both classes of liquid crystalline material were found to undergo a transition from a parallel to a perpindicular orientation with reference to the polarization axis of UV-irradiation at a sufficiently high extent of dimerization.

  12. Two-Dimensional NMR Study of a Liquid-Crystal Solution under Magic-Angle Spinning. Conformation of Carboxylic Ionophore Lasalocid A Dissolved in a Lyotropic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Atsuomi; Kano, Tetsushi; Fujiwara, Hideaki

    1996-07-01

    The conformation of a carboxylic ionophore, lasalocid A, has been determined in a lyotropic liquid crystal by means of magic-angle spinning (MAS) and two-dimensional NMR experiments. The information extracted from ROESY spectra measured under MAS was analyzed according to the distance-geometry algorithm. The liquid crystal used for the solvent is cesium perfluorooctanoate dissolved in D2O, and the resulting structure of lasalocid A is a cyclic one, indicating cation complexation within a hydrophobic region of the liquid crystal. In this way, the two-dimensional MAS NMR experiment is proved to be a useful technique in conformational studies of complex molecules dissolved in lyotropic liquid crystal which may be regarded as offering a membrane-like environment.

  13. Orientational dynamics of nematic liquid crystals under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rienäcker, G.; Hess, S.

    The orientational dynamics of low molecular weight and polymeric nematic liquid crystals in a flow field is investigated, based on a nonlinear relaxation equation for the second rank alignment tensor. Various approximations are discussed: Assuming uniaxial alignment with a constant order parameter, the results of the Ericksen-Leslie theory are recovered. The detailed analysis to be presented here for plane Couette flow concerns (i) uniaxial alignment with a variable degree of order and (ii) the tensorial analysis involving the three symmetry-adapted components of the five components of the alignment tensor. The transitions between tumbling, wagging and aligning behavior observed in polymeric liquid crystals and described by the Doi theory of rod-like nematic polymers are recovered. Consequences for the rheological behavior are indicated.

  14. Optical Fluctuation of Texture in Nematic Liquid Crystal Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Jo; Back, Sang-In; Lev, Bohdan; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    We report the observation of texture of a nematic liquid crystal droplet using a high-speed camera mounted on a polarizing optical microscope. The dark crossed texture obtained by the polarizing optical microscope of a nematic liquid crystal droplet has texture wobbles, which are related to the director field fluctuation excited by thermal energy. We confirm relaxation and oscillation modes. An exact solution of the director fluctuation modes with one-constant approximation and an external electric field is proposed. The theoretical predictions of the relaxation time match with our experimental results when varying the temperature, droplet size, and electric field. Relaxation time was insensitive to the temperature, increased with radius of droplet and slightly decreased with electric field. Several oscillation modes, which have no specific trend, were also found. The external electric field freezes the oscillation modes.

  15. Simulation and visualization of topological defects in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Callan-Jones, A C; Pelcovits, Robert A; Slavin, V A; Zhang, S; Laidlaw, D H; Loriot, G B

    2006-12-01

    We present a method of visualizing topological defects arising in numerical simulations of liquid crystals. The method is based on scientific visualization techniques developed to visualize second-rank tensor fields, yielding information not only on the local structure of the field but also on the continuity of these structures. We show how these techniques can be used to first locate topological defects in fluid simulations of nematic liquid crystals where the locations are not known a priori and then study the properties of these defects including the core structure. We apply these techniques to simulation data obtained by previous authors who studied a rapid quench and subsequent equilibration of a Gay-Berne nematic. The quench produces a large number of disclination loops which we locate and track with the visualization methods. We show that the cores of the disclination lines have a biaxial region and the loops themselves are of a hybrid wedge-twist variety. PMID:17280078

  16. Simulation and visualization of topological defects in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, A. C.; Pelcovits, Robert A.; Slavin, V. A.; Zhang, S.; Laidlaw, D. H.; Loriot, G. B.

    2006-12-01

    We present a method of visualizing topological defects arising in numerical simulations of liquid crystals. The method is based on scientific visualization techniques developed to visualize second-rank tensor fields, yielding information not only on the local structure of the field but also on the continuity of these structures. We show how these techniques can be used to first locate topological defects in fluid simulations of nematic liquid crystals where the locations are not known a priori and then study the properties of these defects including the core structure. We apply these techniques to simulation data obtained by previous authors who studied a rapid quench and subsequent equilibration of a Gay-Berne nematic. The quench produces a large number of disclination loops which we locate and track with the visualization methods. We show that the cores of the disclination lines have a biaxial region and the loops themselves are of a hybrid wedge-twist variety.

  17. Spinodal dewetting of a nematic liquid crystal film

    PubMed

    Braun; Yokoyama

    2000-08-01

    We discuss spinodal dewetting of a nematic film destabilized by Van der Waals forces, focusing on the case of non-antagonistic anchoring conditions. Using physical parameters pertinent to low-molecular-weight thermotropic liquid crystals, we predict a small damping effect. In the presence of an antagonistic applied magnetic field, the anchoring conditions become more significant, and can influence the shape and dynamics of the unstable modes. PMID:11088786

  18. Metric approach for sound propagation in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E; Fumeron, S; Moraes, F

    2013-02-01

    In the eikonal approach, we describe sound propagation near topological defects of nematic liquid crystals as geodesics of a non-Euclidian manifold endowed with an effective metric tensor. The relation between the acoustics of the medium and this geometrical description is given by Fermat's principle. We calculate the ray trajectories and propose a diffraction experiment to retrieve information about the elastic constants. PMID:23496534

  19. Orientational behaviour of thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystal polymer systems under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, E. M.; Mitchell, G. R.

    1998-08-01

    A comparison is made of the development of global orientation during shearing of lyotropic solutions of hydroxypropylcellulose with that observed for the thermotropic phase of hydroxypropylcellulose. At shear rates > 10 s-1 the behaviour of the two systems is similar, both during steady-state shear, and in terms of relaxation following cessation of shear flow. At low shear rates, the levels of orientation observed for the thermotropic system are substantially greater than observed for the lyotropic solutions. The relationship of these differences to variations in molecular parameters, viscous stress and to director tumbling is discussed.

  20. Photoluminescence analysis of self induced planer alignment in azo dye dispersed nematic liquid crystal complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rishi Sood, Srishti Raina, K. K.

    2014-04-24

    We have developed azo dye doped nematic liquid crystal complex for advanced photonic liquid crystal display technology aspects. Disperse orange azo dye self introduced planer alignment in the nematic liquid crystal without any surface anchoring treatment. Planer alignment was characterized by optical polarizing microscopy. The electro-optical switching response of dye disperse planer aligned nematic cell was investigated as a function of applied voltage with the help of photoluminescence spectrophotometer for the tuning of photoluminescence contrast.

  1. Controlled polymer nanostructure and properties through photopolymerization in lyotropic liquid crystal templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, Bradley Steven

    Incorporating nanotechnology into polymers has tremendous potential to improve the functionality and performance of polymer materials for use in a wide range of biomedical and industrial applications. This research uses lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) to control polymer structure on the nanometer scale in order to improve material properties. The overall goal of this research is to establish fundamental methods of synthesizing polymers with controlled nanostructured architectures in order to understand and utilize useful property relationships that result from the organized polymer morphologies. This work aims to establish a fundamental understanding of the reaction conditions needed to control polymer nanostructure and determine the benefits of organized polymer network structures on mechanical and transport properties. The synthesis of nanostructured polymers for improved material performance has utilized LLCs and photopolymerization kinetics to direct polymer structure. Self-assembled LLC phases provide a useful template that may be used as a photopolymerization platform to control polymer morphology on the nanometer size scale. Photopolymerization kinetics were used as a tool to examine the thermodynamics and phase structure evolution that occurs during the polymerization reaction. Additionally, several methods were developed to control polymer morphology and prevent loss of LLC order that can occur during polymerization. LLCs were also used to generate nanocomposite polymers with two distinct polymer networks to impart improvements in material properties. Other useful property relationships including increases in mechanical integrity, greater diffusive transport, and larger water uptake were established in this research. Finally, the LLC templating process was applied to solve performance problems associated with stimuli-sensitive polymer materials. Dramatic improvements in the response rate, dynamic range, and mechanical properties were achieved using LLCs

  2. Polypeptide-Coated Silica Particles Dispersed in Lyotropic Liquid Crystals of the Same Polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Cornelia; Balamurugan, Sreelatha; Cueto, Rafael; Roy, Amitava; Russo, Paul S

    2016-07-28

    When a particle is introduced into a liquid crystal (LC), it distorts the LC director field, leading to new arrangements of the particles. This phenomenon is ordinarily studied using >100 nm particles and ∼2 nm mesogens. Usually the particle surface and mesogens are chemically distinct, which adds an enthalpic effect, even though the more interesting interactions are entropic. To raise the structures to the visible regime, while minimizing chemical differences between the particle surface and mesogen, silica particles coated with an α-helical polypeptide have been prepared and dispersed in lyotropic polypeptide LCs. The polypeptide is poly(γ-stearyl-α,l-glutamate) or PSLG. To make the particles easy to manipulate and easy to find, the silica core included superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) and covalently attached dye. Two methods were used to place polypeptides on these magnetic, fluorescent particles: a multistep grafting-to approach in which whole polypeptides were attached and a one-pot grafting-from approach in which the polymerization of the monomers was initiated from the particle surface. These approaches resulted in sparse and dense surface coverages, respectively. The influence of surface curvature and polypeptide molecular weight on the design of sparsely covered particles was investigated using the grafting-to approach. The aggregated grafting-from particles when freshly dispersed in a PSLG/solvent matrix disrupted the orientation of the characteristic cholesteric LC (ChLC) phase directors. In time, the hybrid particles were expelled from some domains, enabling the return of the familiar helical twist of the cholesteric mesophase. The sparsely coated grafting-to hybrid particles when inserted in the PSLG/solvent matrix assembled into stable islet-like formations that could not be disrupted even by an external magnetic field. The bulk particles aligned in chains that were easily manipulated by a magnetic field. These results indicate that

  3. Thermal Characterization of Thermotropic Nematic Liquid-Crystalline Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David; Cardarelli, Matt; Sanchez-Ferrer, Antoni; Mbanga, Badel L.; Atherton, Timothy J.; Cebe, Peggy

    Nematic Liquid-Crystallline Elastomers (LCEs) are weakly crosslinked polymeric networks that exhibit rubber elasticity and liquid-crystalline orientational order due to the presence of mesogenic groups. Three end-on side-chain nematic LCEs were investigated using real-time synchrotron wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetry (TG) to correlate thermal behavior with structural and chemical differences among them. The elastomers differed in crosslinking density and mesogen composition. Thermally reversible glass transition temperature, Tg, and nematic-to-isotropic transition temperature, Tni, were observed upon heating and cooling for all samples. By varying the heating rate, Tg0 and Tni0 were determined at zero heating rate. The temperature dependence of the orientational order parameter was determined from the anisotropic azimuthal angular distribution of the equatorial reflection seen during real-time WAXS experiments. Our results show that the choice of crosslinking unit, its shape, density, as well as the structure of co-monomers, all influence the temperature range over which the thermal transitions take place.

  4. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of the mixture of isotropic and nematic liquid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Dong; Lee, Bomi; Kang, Shin-Woong; Song, Jang-Kun

    2015-01-01

    In various applications involving liquid crystals, the manipulation of the nanoscale molecular assembly and microscale director alignment is highly useful. Here we show that a nematic-isotropic mixture, a unique bi-liquid system, has potential for the fabrication of microstructures having an ordered phase within a disordered phase, or vice versa. The volume expansion and shrinkage, migration, splitting, mergence and elongation of one phase within the other are easily accomplished via thermal treatment and dielectrophoretic manipulation. This is particularly achievable when one phase is suspended in the middle. In that case, a highly biased ordered-phase preference of surfaces, that is, the nematic-philic nature of a polyimide layer and the nematic-phobic nature of a self-assembled monolayer of chlorosilane derivatives, is used. Further, by combining this approach with photopolymerization, the patterned microstructure is solidified as a patterned polymer film having both isotropic and anisotropic molecular arrangements simultaneously, or as a template with a morphological variation. PMID:26242251

  5. Dynamics of an overdamped active nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, Elias; Baskaran, Aparna

    2015-03-01

    A continuum model for the dynamics of an overdamped (often termed ``dry'') active nematic liquid crystal will be presented here. This talk will focus on how such a model can be used to describe the formation and self-propulsion of defects which has been seen in active liquid crystals in experiments and simulations. We will start with a general model which shows phase-separations and structure formation near the critical density (for the isotropic-nematic phase transition), and show how this model can be extended to describe extensile active nematics which are deeper within the ordered phase. The spontaneous formation of defects occurs when the contribution of the extensile stresses, to the dynamics of the order parameter, gives rise to a bend instability. This leads to a steady state of defect formation and annihilation, and the self-propulsion of defects, as is seen in experiments and simulation. This work was supported through the NSF (NSF-DMR-1149266), Brandeis-MRSEC through the NSF (DMR-0820492), and the HPC cluster at Brandeis which provided computing time. EFP also acknowledges support through (NIH-5T32EB009419) and IGERT (DGE-1068620).

  6. Propylammonium nitrate as a solvent for amphiphile self-assembly into micelles, lyotropic liquid crystals, and microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Atkin, Rob; Bobillier, Sophie M C; Warr, Gregory G

    2010-01-28

    The phase behavior and self-assembled microstructures of a range of oligo(oxyethylene)-n-alkyl ether (C(i)E(j)) surfactants has been investigated in propylammonium nitrate (PAN), a room temperature ionic liquid. Micelles and single-phase microemulsions were all found to form at alkyl chain lengths from dodecyl to octadecyl, and lyotropic liquid crystals formed with hexadecyl chains or longer. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) shows that self-assembly occurs by solvophobic interactions driving the aggregation of the alkyl chains, but several results indicate that these are weaker in PAN than in water or ethylammonium nitrate, due chiefly to the hydrophobicity of PAN. Longer alkyl chains are needed for lyotropic liquid crystals to form, and higher surfactant concentrations are needed to form a single phase microemulsion. Conductivity shows these microemulsions to be weakly structured, and relatively insensitive to oil or surfactant molecular structure, unlike water-based systems. However, SANS contrast variation reveals a nanosegregation of oil from the alkyl tails of surfactants within the microemulsion, and may suggest a cosurfactant-like role for the propylammonium cation. Molecular areas within microemulsions and lamellar phases are larger than corresponding water- or ethylammonium nitrate-based systems due to the large molecular volume of the solvating PANs. PMID:20039680

  7. Enhanced energy transfer efficiency and stability of europium β-diketonate complex in ionic liquid-based lyotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sijing; Wang, Jiao; Chen, Xiao

    2015-08-21

    Luminescent materials from europium β-diketonate complex in ionic liquids (ILs) could achieve enhanced luminescence efficiencies and photostabilities. However, the question of how to provide a feasible and environmentally-friendly way to distribute these lanthanide complexes uniformly and stably within IL-based matrix remains a significant challenge. Here, a soft luminescent material from IL-mediated lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) doped with [Bmim][Eu(TTA)4] (Bmim = 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium, TTA = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone) has been constructed by a convenient self-assembling method. The hexagonal or lamellar LLC phases could be identified by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements. All LLC samples exhibited intense red luminescence upon exposure to ultraviolet radiation. The good dispersibility of the complexes in LLC matrices and their good photostability (as in ILs) was verified by steady-state luminescence spectroscopy. The isolated and unique characteristics of the microenvironment within the LLCs were noteworthy to decrease the nonradiative deactivation of the excited states, thereby allowing more efficient energy transfer and longer lifetimes than those in pure complex or IL solutions. Both the luminescent property and the stability of the LLC materials were different in different phase structures, the complexes behaving better in the lamellar phase than in the hexagonal one. The findings reported herein will not only present an easy way to design novel luminescent lanthanide β-diketonate soft materials, but also provide a useful reference to better understand the LLC phase structure effects on the luminescence properties. PMID:26190789

  8. Rheology of a Twist-bend Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salili, Seyyed Muhammad; Kim, Chanjoong; Sprunt, Samuel; Gleeson, James; Parri, Owain; Jakli, Antal; Kim Lab Team; Merck Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    First detailed flow shear alignment studies and rheological measurements in the twist-bend nematic (Ntb) liquid crystalline phase of odd numbered flexible dimer molecules is presented. It is found that the Ntb phase is strongly shear-thinning. At shear stresses below 1 Pa the apparent viscosity of the Ntb phase is 1000 times larger than in the nematic phase. At stresses above 10 Pa the Ntb viscosity drops by two orders of magnitude and the material exhibits Newtonian fluid behavior. The results are consistent with the behavior of a system with pseudo-layer structure with layer spacing determined by the heliconical pitch. From the measurements of dynamic modulus we estimate the compression modulus of the pseudo-layers to be B ~ 2 kPa this value is discussed within the context of a simple theoretical model based upon a coarse-grained elastic free energy. www.jakligroup.com.

  9. Geometry of nematic liquid crystals under shearing flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, M.; Alves, F. S.; Palangana, A. J.

    2009-09-01

    In this work, an extended version of the Hess-Baalss conformal approach is used to propose a relation connecting the viscosity coefficients of the nematic liquid crystals. Starting from the well-known fact that, in its usual form, the conformal transformation leads to results which are not observed experimentally, it is shown that, when the director field of an ordered nematic phase under sheared motion is taken as a three-dimensional surface with torsion, the resulting theory describes the observed experimental data efficiently. Moreover, this model predicts that the five viscosity coefficients of the Leslie ah hoc model are not independent, but connected. A comparison of the deduced relationship with experimental data is performed and an excellent agreement is obtained.

  10. Isotropic and nematic liquid crystalline phases of adaptive rotaxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hao; Sevick, Edith M.; Williams, David R. M.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the thermodynamics of a solution of rotaxanes which can change their length from a short state of length L to a long state of length qL in response to their surrounding environment. We call these rotaxanes "adaptive." We show that such a system can exhibit both isotropic and nematic liquid crystalline phases. The system shows several interesting kinds of behaviour. First we predict that the fraction of short-length rotaxanes increases linearly with concentration and is a maximum at the critical concentration that marks the isotropic to nematic transition. Second, the critical concentration shows a minimum at a certain value of q. Our model suggests that the effect of adaptive length changes is most dramatic at small q and where the long state is slightly favoured.

  11. Compatibility of lyotropic liquid crystals with viruses and mammalian cells that support the replication of viruses.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Lin; Luk, Yan-Yeung; Murphy, Christopher J; Israel, Barbara A; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2005-12-01

    We report a study that investigates the biocompatibility of materials that form lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs) with viruses and mammalian cells that support the replication of viruses. This study is focused on aqueous solutions of tetradecyldimethyl-amineoxide (C(14)AO) and decanol (D), or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG; C(23)H(14)O(11)Na(2)), which can form optically birefringent, liquid crystalline phases. The influence of these materials on the ability of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to infect human epitheloid cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells was examined by two approaches. First, VSV was dispersed in aqueous C(14)AO+ D or DSCG, and then HeLa cells were inoculated by contacting the cells with the aqueous C(14)AO + D or DSCG containing VSV. The infectivity of VSV to the HeLa cells was subsequently determined. Second, VSV was incubated in LC phases of either C(14)AO + D or DSCG for 4 h, and the concentration (titer) of infectious virus in the LC was determined by dilution into cell culture medium and subsequent inoculation of HeLa cells. Using these approaches, we found that the LC containing C(14)AO + D caused inactivation of virus as well as cell death. In contrast, we determined that VSV retained its infectivity in the presence of aqueous DSCG, and that greater than 74-82% of the HeLa cells survived contact with aqueous DSCG (depending on concentration of DSCG). Because VSV maintained its function (and we infer structure) in LCs formed from DSCG, we further explored the influence of the virus on the ordering of the LC. Whereas the LC formed from DSCG was uniformly aligned on surfaces prepared from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of HS(CH(2))(11)(OCH(2)CH(2))(4)OH on obliquely deposited films of gold in the absence of VSV, the introduction of 10(7)-10(8) infectious virus particles per milliliter caused the LC to assume a non-uniform orientation and a colorful appearance that was readily distinguished from the uniformly aligned LCs. Control experiments using

  12. Twisted quasiperiodic textures of biaxial nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Golo, V L; Kats, E I; Sevenyuk, A A; Sinitsyn, D O

    2013-10-01

    Textures (i.e., smooth space nonuniform distributions of the order parameter) in biaxial nematics turned out to be much more complex and interesting than expected. Scanning the literature we find only a very few publications on this topic. Thus, the immediate motivation of the present paper is to develop a systematic procedure to study, classify, and visualize possible textures in biaxial nematics. Based on the elastic energy of a biaxial nematic (written in the most simple form that involves the least number of phenomenological parameters) we derive and solve numerically the Lagrange equations of the first kind. It allows one to visualize the solutions and offers a deep insight into their geometrical and topological features. Performing Fourier analysis we find some particular textures possessing two or more characteristic space periods (we term such solutions quasiperiodic ones because the periods are not necessarily commensurate). The problem is not only of intellectual interest but also of relevance to optical characteristics of the liquid-crystalline textures. PMID:24229198

  13. Topological transitions in unidirectional flow of nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Linda; Anderson, Thomas; Mema, Ensela; Kondic, Lou

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments by Sengupta et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2013) revealed interesting transitions that can occur in flow of nematic liquid crystal under carefully controlled conditions within a long microfluidic channel of rectangular cross-section, with homeotropic anchoring at the walls. At low flow rates the director field of the nematic adopts a configuration that is dominated by the surface anchoring, being nearly parallel to the channel height direction over most of the cross-section; but at high flow rates there is a transition to a flow-dominated state, where the director configuration at the channel centerline is aligned with the flow (perpendicular to the channel height direction). We analyze simple channel-flow solutions to the Leslie-Ericksen model for nematics. We demonstrate that two solutions exist, at all flow rates, but that there is a transition between the elastic free energies of these solutions: the anchoring-dominated solution has the lowest energy at low flow rates, and the flow-dominated solution has lowest energy at high flow rates. NSF DMS 1211713.

  14. Material Flows in an Active Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decamp, Stephen; Redner, Gabriel; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael; Dogic, Zvonimir

    Active matter systems are composed of energy consuming constituent components which drive far-from-equilibrium dynamics. As such, active materials exhibit energetic states which would be unfavorable in passive, equilibrium materials. We study one such material; an active nematic liquid crystal which exists in a dynamical steady state where +/-1/2 defects are continuously generated and annihilated at a constant rate. The active nematic is composed of micron-sized microtubule filaments which are highly concentrated into a quasi-2D film that resides on an oil-water interface. Kinesin motor proteins drive inter-filament sliding which results in net extensile motion of the microtubule film. Notably, we find a mesophase in which motile +1/2 defects, acquire system-spanning orientational order. Currently, we are tracking material flows generated by the active stresses in the system to measure length scales at which energy is dissipated, and to measure the relation between internally generated flows and bend in the nematic field.

  15. Nematic quantum liquid crystals of bosons in frustrated lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guanyu; Koch, Jens; Martin, Ivar

    2016-04-01

    The problem of interacting bosons in frustrated lattices is an intricate one due to the absence of a unique minimum in the single-particle dispersion where macroscopic number of bosons can condense. Here, we consider a family of tight-binding models with macroscopically degenerate lowest energy bands, separated from other bands by a gap. We predict the formation of exotic states that spontaneously break rotational symmetry at relatively low filling. These states belong to three nematic phases: Wigner crystal, supersolid, and superfluid. The Wigner crystal phase is established exactly at low filling. Supersolid and superfluid phases, at larger filling, are obtained by making use of a projection onto the flat band, construction of an appropriate Wannier basis, and subsequent mean-field treatment. The nematic superfluid that we predict is uniform in real space but has an anisotropic momentum distribution, providing a novel scenario for Bose condensation with an additional nematic order. Our findings open up a promising direction of studying microscopic quantum liquid crystalline phases of bosons.

  16. Flexoelectricity in an oxadiazole bent-core nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, S. Panov, V. P.; Gleeson, H. F.; Greco, C.; Ferrarini, A.; Görtz, V.; Goodby, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    We have determined experimentally the magnitude of the difference in the splay and bend flexoelectric coefficients, |e{sub 1} − e{sub 3}|, of an oxadiazole bent-core liquid crystal by measuring the critical voltage for the formation of flexodomains together with their wave number. The coefficient |e{sub 1} − e{sub 3}| is found to be a factor of 2–3 times higher than in most conventional calamitic nematic liquid crystals, varying from 8 pCm{sup −1} to 20 pCm{sup −1} across the ∼60 K—wide nematic regime. We have also calculated the individual flexoelectric coefficients e{sub 1} and e{sub 3}, with the dipolar and quadrupolar contributions of the bent-core liquid crystal by combining density functional theory calculations with a molecular field approach and atomistic modelling. Interestingly, the magnitude of the bend flexoelectric coefficient is found to be rather small, in contrast to common expectations for bent-core molecules. The calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental values, offering an insight into how molecular parameters contribute to the flexoelectric coefficients and illustrating a huge potential for the prediction of flexoelectric behaviour in bent-core liquid crystals.

  17. Triply Periodic Multiply Continuous Lyotropic Liquid Crystals Derived from Gemini Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorenson, Gregory P.

    A subtle balance of non-covalent interactions directs the self-assembly of small molecule amphiphiles in aqueous media into supramolecular assemblies known as aqueous lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs). Aqueous LLCs form many intricate, ordered nanoscale morphologies comprising distinct and structurally periodic hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains. Triply periodic multiply continuous (TPMC) LLC morphologies, which exhibit continuous hydrophobic and aqueous domains that percolate in three-dimensions, are of particular interest by virtue of their potentially wide ranging technological applications including advanced membranes for electrical energy storage and utilization, therapeutic delivery, and templates for new organic and inorganic mesoporous materials. However, robust molecular design criteria for amphiphiles that readily form TMPC morphologies are notably lacking in the literature. Recent reports have described the increased propensity for quaternary ammonium and phosphonium gemini surfactants, derived from dimerization of traditional single-tail surfactants at or near the hydrophilic headgroups through a hydrophobic linker, to stabilize TMPC mesophases. The generality of this surfactant design strategy remains untested in other amphiphiles classes bearing different headgroup chemistries. In this thesis, we describe the unusual aqueous LLC phase behavior of series of gemini dicarboxylate amphiphiles as a function of the alkyl tail length, hydrophobic linker length, and the charge-compensating counterion. These dicarboxylate surfactants unexpectedly exhibit a strong propensity to form TPMC LLCs over amphiphile concentration windows as wide as 20 wt% over a temperature range T = 25--100 °C. Through systematic modifications of the length of the hydrophobic linker and alkyl tails, we use small-angle X-ray scattering to demonstrate that these surfactants adopt new LLC mesophases including the first report of a single-gyroid phase (I4132 symmetry) and a new

  18. Factors affecting order, photopolymerization behavior, and nanostructure development of reactive lyotropic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievens Figueroa, Lucas

    2009-10-01

    Polymerization of reactive lyotropic liquid crystals (LLC) provides a facile means for the synthesis of nanostructured organic materials. In this work the photopolymerization kinetics and polymer structure evolution have been investigated. By studying the polymerization behavior and the order retention after polymerization, the contribution of the type of reactive surfactant, cross-linking, pH, and ionic strength on the LLC order preservation has been determined. Polymerization rates are higher in more highly ordered LLC phases compared to isotropic phases. In turn, reactive LLC phases that exhibit higher reaction rates also preserve the order to a greater extent during polymerization. Reactive surfactants with longer aliphatic tails exhibit lower order and lower reaction rates. The polymerization kinetics are highly driven by segregation of the reactive groups. Lower polymerization rates are observed in isotropic discontinuous phases for the surfactant monomer bearing the reactive group near the polar head while the opposite behavior is observed for surfactant monomer bearing the reactive group in the aliphatic tail. The effect of polymerization kinetics on the resulting polymer order has also been determined using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). By using high light intensity and a more efficient initiator, the LLC order is more likely to be retained after polymerization. LLC phases that exhibit higher degrees of order are formed at low ionic strength and low pH. Higher polymerization rates are observed as the ionic strength increases due to an increase in the propagation rate. Higher polymerization rates are also observed as the pH increases due to an increase in the propagation rates and decrease in termination rates. The addition of a crosslinker enables the retention of LLC phases after polymerization. Competing effects between crosslinking and order are observed in the polymerization kinetics as a decrease in polymerization rate is observed at high

  19. Dispersion and Excluded Volume Interactions in Nematic Liquid Crystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliks, Mark David

    1988-12-01

    The effectiveness of the potential of mean torque in accounting for solute orientation is explored. It is described by repulsive (excluded volume) and attractive forces (dispersion) and is tested using rigid, semi-flexible and flexible solutes dissolved in nematic phases. For rigid molecules (benzenes and anthracene) the attractive short range potential gave the best results. For anthracene the results indicated that the potential can discriminate between solute/solvent interactions. For wholly aliphatic solvents the excluded volume forces gave excellent agreement, as did the attractive forces for the aromatic solvents. For the semi-flexible molecule, biphenyl, quadrupole splittings were simulated using the internal torsion angle as a parameter. The values of this angle were predicted to vary systematically with temperature. Using crystallographic and idealized structural data as the starting points for the calculation, the structure of PAA in the nematic phase was estimated. Both the internal angle and the aromatic proton valence angles were determined. Flexible, "siamese-twin" liquid crystals having an internal per-deuterated spacer consisting of ten methylenes were studied. They differed only in the length of the aliphatic tails (5105, 101010). The quadrupole splittings of both twins dissolved in the nematic phase of BCH-S1131 were identical. Quantitative simulations of the splittings using standard RIS geometry and excluded volume forces were successful. In the bulk nematic phase the order parameter of 5105 was greater than 101010. The difference was interpreted as a dilution effect of the mesogenic cores by aliphatic tails. Simulations indicated the conformation of the spacer is highly extended. As parameterized the required strength of the mean field is a strong function of the molecular dimensions, suggesting that the current description still is incomplete.

  20. Programmable lattices of optical vortices in nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, R.; Assanto, G.; Bortolozzo, U.; Clerc, M. G.; Residori, S.; Vidal-Henriquez, E.

    2015-09-01

    Using self-induced vortex-like defects in the nematic liquid crystal layer of a light valve with photo-sensible wall, we demonstrate the realization of programable optical vortices lattices with arbitrary configuration in space. On each lattice site, every matter vortex acts as a photonic spin-to-orbital momentum coupler and an array of circularly polarized input beams is converted into an output array of vortex beams with topological charges consistent with the vortex matter lattice. The vortex arrangements are explained the basis of light-induced matter defects and topological rules.

  1. Polarization converters based on axially symmetric twisted nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Ko, Shih-Wei; Ting, Chi-Lun; Fuh, Andy Y-G; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2010-02-15

    An axially symmetric twisted nematic liquid crystal (ASTNLC) device, based on axially symmetric photoalignment, was demonstrated. Such an ASTNLC device can convert axial (azimuthal) to azimuthal (axial) polarization. The optical properties of the ASTNLC device are analyzed and found to agree with simulation results. The ASTNLC device with a specific device can be adopted as an arbitrary axial symmetric polarization converter or waveplate for axially, azimuthally or vertically polarized light. A design for converting linear polarized light to axially symmetric circular polarized light is also demonstrated. PMID:20389369

  2. Numerical bifurcation study of electrohydrodynamic convection in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Tavener, S J; Mullin, T; Blake, G I; Cliffe, K A

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of a numerical investigation of the Ericksen-Leslie equations for the problem of electrohydrodynamic convection in a nematic liquid crystal. The combination of a finite element approach and numerical bifurcation techniques allows us to provide details of the basic flow and include the physically relevant effect of nonslip side walls. We are also able to include material properties as parameters and this permits us to draw comparisons with available experimental data. We then compare and contrast the bifurcation structure with that of Rayleigh-Bénard and Taylor-Couette flows and explore the role of symmetries by including a fringing electric field. PMID:11304279

  3. Surface-induced structures in nematic liquid crystal colloids.

    PubMed

    Chernyshuk, S B; Tovkach, O M; Lev, B I

    2014-08-01

    We predict theoretically the existence of a class of colloidal structures in nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cells, which are induced by surface patterns on the plates of the cell (like cells with UV-irradiated polyamide surfaces using micron sized masks in front of the cell). These bulk structures arise from nonuniform boundary conditions for the director distortions at the confining surfaces. In particular, we demonstrate that quadrupole spherical particles (like spheres with boojums or Saturn-ring director configurations) form a square lattice inside a planar NLC cell, which has checkerboard patterns on both its plates. PMID:25215675

  4. Surfactant-induced nematic wetting layer at a thermotropic liquid crystal/water interface.

    PubMed

    Bahr, Ch

    2006-03-01

    An ellipsometric study of the interface between a thermotropic liquid crystal and water near the nematic-isotropic phase transition of the liquid crystal is presented. At temperatures above the transition, a nematic wetting layer appears at the interface if the water phase contains a surfactant inducing a homeotropic alignment of the nematic phase. The detailed behavior is significantly influenced by the concentration of the surfactant. The results can be described by a Landau model of nematic wetting in which the surfactant concentration tunes the magnitude of an ordering interface potential. PMID:16605490

  5. Substrate-induced gliding in a nematic liquid crystal layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mema, E.; Kondic, L.; Cummings, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the interaction between nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) and polymer substrates. Such substrates can interact with NLCs, exhibiting a phenomenon known as director gliding: the preferred orientation of the NLC molecules at the interface changes on time scales that are slow relative to the elastic relaxation time scale of the NLC. We present two models for gliding, inspired by experiments that investigate the interaction between the NLC and a polymer substrate. These models, though simple, lead to nontrivial results, including loss of bistability under gliding. Perhaps surprisingly, we find that externally imposed switching between the steady states of a bistable system may reverse the effect of gliding, preventing loss of bistability if switching is sufficiently frequent. Our findings may be of relevance to a variety of technological applications involving liquid crystal devices, and particularly to a new generation of flexible liquid crystal displays that implement polymeric substrates.

  6. Substrate-induced gliding in a nematic liquid crystal layer.

    PubMed

    Mema, E; Kondic, L; Cummings, L J

    2015-12-01

    We consider the interaction between nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) and polymer substrates. Such substrates can interact with NLCs, exhibiting a phenomenon known as director gliding: the preferred orientation of the NLC molecules at the interface changes on time scales that are slow relative to the elastic relaxation time scale of the NLC. We present two models for gliding, inspired by experiments that investigate the interaction between the NLC and a polymer substrate. These models, though simple, lead to nontrivial results, including loss of bistability under gliding. Perhaps surprisingly, we find that externally imposed switching between the steady states of a bistable system may reverse the effect of gliding, preventing loss of bistability if switching is sufficiently frequent. Our findings may be of relevance to a variety of technological applications involving liquid crystal devices, and particularly to a new generation of flexible liquid crystal displays that implement polymeric substrates. PMID:26764717

  7. Simulation of coherent backscattering of light in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenova, E. V. Kokorin, D. I. Romanov, V. P.

    2012-08-15

    Multiple scattering of light by the fluctuations of the director in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) aligned by a magnetic field is considered. A peak of coherent backscattering is calculated by numerical simulation. Since the indicatrix of single scattering for a liquid crystal (LC) is known exactly, the calculations are carried out without any simplifying assumptions on the parameters of the liquid crystal. Multiple scattering is simulated as a random walk of photons in the medium. A peak of coherent backscattering in such a medium is very narrow; therefore, the so-called semianalytical method is applied. The parameters of the backscattering peak obtained by numerical simulation are compared with the available experimental data and with the results of analytical approximations. It turns out that the experimental data are in good agreement with the results of simulation. The results of numerical simulation adequately describe the anisotropy and the width of the backscattering peak.

  8. The Viscoelastic Properties of Nematic Monodomains Containing Liquid Crystal Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dongfeng

    The work presented here investigates the viscoelastic properties of nematic materials containing liquid crystal polymers (LCP). We focus on how the elastic constants and the viscosity coefficients of the mixture systems are influenced by polymer architectures. In dynamic light scattering studies of the relaxation of the director orientation fluctuations for the splay, twist, and bend deformation modes, decrease of the relaxation rates was observed when LCPs were dissolved into low molar mass nematics (LMMN). For the side-chain LCPs, the slowing down in the bend mode is comparable to or larger than those of the splay and twist modes. For main-chain LCPs, the relative changes in the relaxation rates for the twist and splay modes are about one order of magnitude larger than that for the bend mode. The results of light scattering under an electric field show that the decrease in the twist relaxation rate is due to a large increase in the twist viscosity and a minor decrease in the twist elastic constant. These changes were found to increase with decrease of the spacer length, with increase of molecular weight, and with decrease of the backbone flexibility. In Freedericksz transition measurements, the splay and bend elastic constants and the dielectric anisotropies of the nematic mixtures were determined and the values are 5~15% lower than those of the pure solvent. From the analysis of the results of Freedericksz transition and light scattering experiments, a complete set of the elastic constants and viscosity coefficients corresponding to the three director deformation modes were obtained for the LCP mixtures. The changes in the viscosity coefficients due to addition of LCPs were analysed to estimate the anisotropic shapes of the polymer backbone via a hydrodynamic model. The results suggest that an oblate backbone configuration is maintained by the side-chain LCPs and a prolate chain configuration appears for the main-chain LCPs. The rheological behavior of a side

  9. Photoinduced extrinsic electrical conduction of nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedov, O. V.; Krivoschekov, V. A.

    1996-05-01

    During recent years the interest in media with strong nonlinear response is growing. These media allow the user to observe different nonlinear optic effects using small intensities of light. It is well known that liquid crystals are rather promising media for this research. This paper is devoted to the experimental research of the photoinduced conduction of a mixture of a nematic liquid crystal and a dye. Dependence of the conduction on the intensity of light was studied for different concentrations of a dye added to the nematic crystal. Also the problem of the optimum type of a dye for observing the photorefractive nonlinearity using Ar+- ion laser was considered. We made the experiments using the following available laser dyes: rhodamine '6G,' rhodamine 'G,' rhodamine 'C' and two ocsasine-type dyes also. The mixture of the nematic crystal 5CB and a dye was placed in a cell of 100 micrometer width, with the plates filmed with the transparent electrodes of SnO2. The dc voltage on the order of magnitude 1 V was applied to decrease the influence of the cell capacity on the conduction measurements of the samples. We used the light of two wavelengths: lambda1 equals 488 nm, lambda2 equals 514.5 nm. The best dyes for these wavelengths were the rhodamine- type dyes. Taking the other two dyes we observed much smaller effect of influence of the laser radiation on conduction of the samples. Maybe the reason was that the pump wavelength of ocsasine dyes is too far way from the wavelength of the radiation used. So the optimum dye must have the wavelength of the pump near to the wavelength used. Using rhodamine 'C' we obtained the dependencies of the induced conduction on laser light intensity for three different concentrations of the dye.

  10. Dendritic Growth in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua; Garg, Shila

    2000-03-01

    The experimental study of the onset of electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) through a dendritic growth is reported. If a magnetic Freedericksz-distorted liquid crystal of negative dielectric anisotropy is subjected to an electric field parallel to the magnetic field, EHC sets in through the nucleation of dendrites [1,2]. Measurements of tip speeds of the dendrites as a function of applied voltage at a fixed magnetic field are made. The goal is to explore the effect of the magnetic and electric fields on the dendritic growth. In addition, pattern dynamics is monitored once the final state of spatio-temporal chaos is reached by the system. [1] J. T. Gleeson, Nature 385, 511 (1997). [2] J. T. Gleeson, Physica A 239, 211 (1997). This research was supported by NSF grants DMR 9704579 and DMR 9619406.

  11. Interaction between two spherical particles in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Jun-Ichi; Stark, Holger; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    We numerically investigate the interaction between two spherical particles in a nematic liquid crystal mediated by elastic distortions in the orientational order. We pay attention to the cases where two particles with equal radii R0 impose rigid normal anchoring on their surfaces and carry a pointlike topological defect referred to as a hyperbolic hedgehog. To describe the geometry of our system, we use bispherical coordinates, which prove useful in the implementation of boundary conditions at the particle surfaces and at infinity. We adopt the Landau de Gennes continuum theory in terms of a second-rank tensor order parameter Qij for the description of the orientational order of a nematic liquid crystal. We also utilize an adaptive mesh refinement scheme that has proven to be an efficient way of dealing with topological defects whose core size is much smaller than the particle size. When the two “dipoles,” composed of a particle and a hyperbolic hedgehog, are in parallel directions, the two-particle interaction potential is attractive for large interparticle distances D and proportional to D-3 as expected from the form of the dipole-dipole interaction, until the well-defined potential minimum at D≃2.46 R0 is reached. For the antiparallel configuration with no hedgehogs between the two particles, the interaction potential is repulsive and behaves as D-2 for D≲10 R0 , which is stronger than the dipole-dipole repulsion ( ˜ D-3 ) expected theoretically as an asymptotic behavior for large D .

  12. A Numerical Investigation on Configurational Distortions in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, Anna; Napoli, Gaetano

    2011-10-01

    When subjected to magnetic or electric fields, nematic liquid crystals confined between two parallel glass plates and initially uniformly oriented may undergo homogeneous one-dimensional spatial distortions (Fréedericksz and Zolina, Trans. Faraday Soc. 29:919, 1933) or periodic distortions (Lonberg and Meyer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55(7):718-721, 1985; and Srajer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 67(9):1102-1105, 1991). According to the experimental observations, periodic phases are stable configurations at intermediate intensity of the acting field, while homogeneous phases are stable at higher strengths. We present a fully nonlinear finite element approach able to describe homogeneous and periodic configurational phases in a cell of confined nematic liquid crystal with strong planar anchoring boundary conditions. Stationary configurations are obtained by setting to zero the first variation of the discretized total energy of the system. Unstable configurations are identified by evaluating the behavior of the solution under small numerical perturbations. Numerical calculations are able to describe the evolution of the configurational distortions as a function of the applied field and are able to capture the critical points between homogeneous and periodic phases. The proposed approach has been proved to be an excellent tool to predict the existence of unstable or metastable distortions, characterized by higher energy levels.

  13. Hysteresis upon light-induced hydrodynamic reorientation of the director of a nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Akopyan, R S; Alaverdyan, R B; Vardanyan, A S; Chilingaryan, Yu S

    2000-08-31

    Oscillations and hysteresis in the behaviour of the director of a nematic liquid crystal were observed upon its light-induced hydrodynamic reorientation caused by direct volume expansion. The light propagated through the liquid crystal placed between crossed polarisers provides the feedback. This light falls back on the liquid crystal and is absorbed by producing the volume expansion. A theory is suggested that describes the observed behaviour of the director of the nematic liquid crystal. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Retrieving the saddle-splay elastic constant K24 of nematic liquid crystals from an algebraic approach.

    PubMed

    Fumeron, Sébastien; Moraes, Fernando; Pereira, Erms

    2016-09-01

    The physics of light interference experiments is well established for nematic liquid crystals. Using well-known techniques, it is possible to obtain important quantities, such as the differential scattering cross section and the saddl-splay elastic constant K24. However, the usual methods to retrieve the latter involve adjusting of computational parameters through visual comparisons between the experimental light interference pattern or a (2) H-NMR spectral pattern produced by an escaped-radial disclination, and their computational simulation counterparts. To avoid such comparisons, we develop an algebraic method for obtaining of saddle-splay elastic constant K24. Considering an escaped-radial disclination inside a capillary tube with radius R0 of tens of micrometers, we use a metric approach to study the propagation of the light (in the scalar wave approximation), near the surface of the tube and to determine the light interference pattern due to the defect. The latter is responsible for the existence of a well-defined interference peak associated to a unique angle [Formula: see text] . Since this angle depends on factors such as refractive indexes, curvature elastic constants, anchoring regime, surface anchoring strength and radius R0, the measurement of [Formula: see text] from the interference experiments involving two different radii allows us to algebraically retrieve K24. Our method allowed us to give the first reported estimation of K24 for the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal Sunset Yellow FCF: K 24 = 2.1 pN. PMID:27589980

  15. Electro-optic phenomena in nematic liquid crystals studied experimentally and by Monte-Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Komorowska, K.; Pawlik, G.; Mitus, A. C.; Miniewicz, A.

    2001-08-15

    In this article we compare results of experiments on light self-diffraction in nematic liquid crystal panels with corresponding results of the Monte-Carlo simulations of a two-dimensional nematic liquid crystal model in the presence of a spatially modulated electric field. In the simulations molecular interactions were described by the Lebwohl--Lasher Hamiltonian. The results obtained on the diffraction efficiency and spatial and temporal behavior of refractive index changes in nematic liquid crystal are satisfactorily reproduced by Monte-Carlo simulations. We discuss the complementarity of both methods in studying and designing systems for optical information processing using liquid crystals. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Substrate induced gliding for a nematic liquid crystal layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mema, Ensela; Cummings, Linda; Kondic, Lou

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between nematic liquid crystals (NLC) and polymer substrates is of current industrial interest, due to a desire to manufacture a new generation of flexible Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) for use in portable electronic devices. Polymer substrates present challenges because they can interact with the NLC, exhibiting a phenomenon known as gliding: the preferred orientation of the NLC molecules at the interface changes over timescales of minutes to hours. We present two models for gliding, inspired by the physics and chemistry of the interaction between the NLC and polymer substrate. These models, though simple, lead to non-trivial results, including loss of bistability, a finding that may have implications for display devices. Supported by NSF Grant No. DMS-1211713.

  17. Disc-shaped colloids interacting in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipova, Alena; Denniston, Colin

    2014-11-01

    We studied the behavior of pairs of disc-shaped colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal using Lattice Boltzmann algorithm. Without any external forces the position of the disc with respect to the liquid crystal director minimizes the free energy of the system and no distortion of the director field is observed. When the rotating magnetic field is present, the torque on the disc with homeotropic surface anchoring should change with analogy to electrostatic energy, which implies the disc continues turning following the field. However, when the disc reaches some critical position and the director field around it is highly distorted, the disc suddenly flips to minimize the free energy. Position and motion of pairs of such discs under similar conditions can be controlled by the angular velocity of magnetic field, it's magnitude and initial configuration of the system. As a result of analysis of discs' dynamics, a new way to control self-organization of disc particles was produced.

  18. Chiral power change upon photoisomerization in twisted nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoncelli, Sabrina; Aramendía, Pedro F.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we use the photoisomerization of azobenzenes, a phenanthrospirooxazine, and a fulgide in a twisted nematic liquid crystalline phase to change the chiral twisting power of the system. The changes are probed by the rotatory power of linearly polarized light. Time resolved and steady state experiments are carried out. The chiral change and the photoisomerization process have similar characteristic recovery times and activation energy, thus probing that the change is induced by the modification in the chemical composition of the photochromic dopant system. The amplitude of the light twisting power change correlates with the order change in the liquid crystal (LC) but not with the modification in the absorption characteristics of the system. This indicates that the driving force of the chiral change is the microscopic order modification in the LC phase that affects the helical pitch of the phase.

  19. Chiral power change upon photoisomerization in twisted nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Simoncelli, Sabrina; Aramendía, Pedro F

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we use the photoisomerization of azobenzenes, a phenanthrospirooxazine, and a fulgide in a twisted nematic liquid crystalline phase to change the chiral twisting power of the system. The changes are probed by the rotatory power of linearly polarized light. Time resolved and steady state experiments are carried out. The chiral change and the photoisomerization process have similar characteristic recovery times and activation energy, thus probing that the change is induced by the modification in the chemical composition of the photochromic dopant system. The amplitude of the light twisting power change correlates with the order change in the liquid crystal (LC) but not with the modification in the absorption characteristics of the system. This indicates that the driving force of the chiral change is the microscopic order modification in the LC phase that affects the helical pitch of the phase. PMID:25699698

  20. Mesogenic linear azobenzene polymer-stabilized nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bagramyan, Arutyun; Thibault-Maheu, Olivier; Galstian, Tigran; Bessette, Andre; Zhao, Yue

    2011-03-15

    We describe the detailed study of a polymer stabilized liquid crystal compound, which was created by using a reactive (monofunctional) azobenzene mesogenic guest and a nematic liquid crystal host. The resonant interaction of light with the azobenzene segment of the guest and the mesogenic nature of the latter enable the optical alignment of host molecules and the permanent fixing of that orientation by means of UV polymerization of the guest. We use dynamic spectral, polarimetric, and scattering techniques to study the orientational ordering and interaction of the guest-host system. We show that the uniform UV polymerization of this compound results in a low scattering material system with dielectric and elastic properties that are relatively close to those of the host, while still providing the capacity for optical configuration of its morphology.

  1. Design of Light-Triggered Lyotropic Liquid Crystal Mesophases and Their Application as Molecular Switches in "On Demand" Release.

    PubMed

    Aleandri, Simone; Speziale, Chiara; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Landau, Ehud M

    2015-06-30

    Here, we present the design and assembly of a new light-responsive functional lyotropic liquid crystal system using host-guest lipidic mesophases (LMPs). Light as an external stimulus has many advantages in comparison to other stimuli: it is milder than acids or bases, and variation of intensity and duration can provide a high level of pharmacological control. The LMPs are composed of monoolein (MO) and oleic acid (OA) as host lipids and a small amount of a judiciously synthesized lipid bearing an azobenzene photoactive unit as a guest. While preserving the structure and stability of the host lipidic aggregates, the guest lipids render them specific functionalities. Single-step and sequential light-triggered release and retention of the embedded dye molecules are demonstrated, thereby achieving exquisite temporal, spatial, and dosage control of the release, opening up the possibility of using such lipidic biomaterials as effective matrices in therapy, when a continuous release of active drugs might be toxic. PMID:26039728

  2. Theory of the acoustic realignment of nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanoski, A. P.; Greanya, V. A.; Weslowski, B. T.; Spector, M. S.; Selinger, J. V.; Shashidhar, R.

    2004-02-01

    When an ultrasonic wave is applied to a nematic liquid-crystal cell, the molecules change their orientation, leading to a change in the optical intensity transmitted through the cell. Modeling this acousto-optic effect involves three separate theoretical issues: (a) calculating the intensity of sound transmitted through the cell walls into the liquid crystal, (b) determining the consequent realignment of the liquid crystal, and (c) deriving the change in optical transmission through the cell. In this paper, we present a theory that addresses all three of these issues, and thereby reproduces the behavior seen in experiments. The theory shows how the performance depends not only on the liquid-crystal material properties, but also on the geometrical parameters of the system, such as the thickness of the glass walls, thickness of the liquid-crystal layer, angle of the ultrasonic wave, viewing angle, and boundary condition at the glass-liquid crystal interface. The theory predicts that the strong dependence on viewing angle still allows an optical image to be seen for realistic dimensions.

  3. Elastic constants and dynamics in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpert, Anja; Allen, Michael P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present molecular dynamics calculations of the Frank elastic constants, and associated time correlation functions, in nematic liquid crystals. We study two variants of the Gay-Berne potential, and use system sizes of half a million molecules, significantly larger than in previous studies of elastic behaviour. Equilibrium orientational fluctuations in reciprocal (k-) space were calculated, to determine the elastic constants by fitting at low |k|; our results indicate that small system size may be a source of inaccuracy in previous work. Furthermore, the dynamics of the Gay-Berne nematic were studied by calculating time correlation functions of components of the order tensor, together with associated components of the velocity field, for a set of wave vectors k. Confirming our earlier work, we found exponential decay for splay and twist correlations, and oscillatory exponential decay for the bend correlation. In this work, we confirm similar behaviour for the corresponding velocity components. In all cases, the decay rates, and oscillation frequencies, were found to be accurately proportional to k2 for small k, as predicted by the equations of nematodynamics. However, the observation of oscillatory bend fluctuations, and corresponding oscillatory shear flow decay, is in contradiction to the usual assumptions appearing in the literature, and in standard texts. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of using large systems in these calculations.

  4. Liquid crystal gratings from nematic to blue phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan-qing; Hu, Wei; Lin, Xiao-wen; Srivastava, Abhishek; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2012-10-01

    Some of our recent progress on liquid crystal (LC) gratings, from nematic to blue phase, is reviewed in this invited talk. The first kind of grating is fabricated by periodically adjusting the LC directors to form alternate micro phase retarders and polarization rotators in a cell placed between crossed polarizers. The second one is demonstrated by means of photoalignment technique with alternate orthogonal homogeneously-aligned domains. To improve the response time of the gratings, several approaches are also proposed by using dual-frequency addressed nematic LC, ferroelectric LC and blue phase LC, which shows great performance including high transmittance, polarization independency and submillisecond response. At last, to obtain other controllable LC microstructures rather than simple 1D/2D gratings, we develop a micro-lithography system with a digital micro-mirror device as dynamic mask forms. It may instantly generate arbitrary micro-images on photoalignment layers and further guides the LC molecule orientations. Besides normal phase gratings, more complex patterns such as quasicrystal structures are demonstrated. Some new applications such as tunable multiport optical switching and vector beam generations are expected.

  5. Rheological properties of a reentrant nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Ananthaiah, J; Rajeswari, M; Sastry, V S S; Dabrowski, R; Dhara, Surajit

    2012-07-01

    We report experimental studies on small angle light scattering (SALS), and rheodielectric and electrorheological properties of a binary mixture of octyloxy cyanobiphenyl and hexyloxy cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals. The mixture exhibits nematic (N) to smectic-A (SmA) phase transitions, and then again to a reentrant nematic (N(R)) phase transition. Rapid shear thinning in the quenched samples in the low shear rate region in the N and SmA phases observed from SALS experiments is attributed to the realignment of the director within the domains. The domains are elongated along the shear direction at higher shear rates. The temperature variation of the effective viscosity and static dielectric constant reveals the changes in the director orientation across N-SmA-N(R) phase transitions. At a steady shear rate the effective viscosity increases with the electric field in all the phases and saturates at much higher fields. It also exhibits two anomalous peaks across N-SmA-N(R) phase transitions beyond a particular field. The shear modulus of the SmA phase in an intermediate field is significantly larger than that measured at both low and high fields. This enhanced viscoelasticity of the SmA phase is argued to originate from the increased dislocation density. PMID:23005440

  6. Rheological properties of a reentrant nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthaiah, J.; Rajeswari, M.; Sastry, V. S. S.; Dabrowski, R.; Dhara, Surajit

    2012-07-01

    We report experimental studies on small angle light scattering (SALS), and rheodielectric and electrorheological properties of a binary mixture of octyloxy cyanobiphenyl and hexyloxy cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals. The mixture exhibits nematic (N) to smectic-A (SmA) phase transitions, and then again to a reentrant nematic (NR) phase transition. Rapid shear thinning in the quenched samples in the low shear rate region in the N and SmA phases observed from SALS experiments is attributed to the realignment of the director within the domains. The domains are elongated along the shear direction at higher shear rates. The temperature variation of the effective viscosity and static dielectric constant reveals the changes in the director orientation across N-SmA-NR phase transitions. At a steady shear rate the effective viscosity increases with the electric field in all the phases and saturates at much higher fields. It also exhibits two anomalous peaks across N-SmA-NR phase transitions beyond a particular field. The shear modulus of the SmA phase in an intermediate field is significantly larger than that measured at both low and high fields. This enhanced viscoelasticity of the SmA phase is argued to originate from the increased dislocation density.

  7. Multi-Scale Characterization of Lyotropic Liquid Crystals Using 2H and Diffusion MRI with Spatial Resolution in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Bernin, Diana; Koch, Vanessa; Nydén, Magnus; Topgaard, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The ability of lyotropic liquid crystals to form intricate structures on a range of length scales can be utilized for the synthesis of structurally complex inorganic materials, as well as in devices for controlled drug delivery. Here we employ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for non-invasive characterization of nano-, micro-, and millimeter scale structures in liquid crystals. The structure is mirrored in the translational and rotational motion of the water, which we assess by measuring spatially resolved self-diffusion tensors and spectra. Our approach differs from previous works in that the MRI parameters are mapped with spatial resolution in all three dimensions, thus allowing for detailed studies of liquid crystals with complex millimeter-scale morphologies that are stable on the measurement time-scale of 10 hours. The data conveys information on the nanometer-scale structure of the liquid crystalline phase, while the combination of diffusion and data permits an estimate of the orientational distribution of micrometer-scale anisotropic domains. We study lamellar phases consisting of the nonionic surfactant C10E3 in O, and follow their structural equilibration after a temperature jump and the cessation of shear. Our experimental approach may be useful for detailed characterization of liquid crystalline materials with structures on multiple length scales, as well as for studying the mechanisms of phase transitions. PMID:24905818

  8. Shear Alignment Behavior of Nematic Solutions Induced by Ultralong Side-Group Liquid Crystal Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempe, M. D.; Kornfield, J. A.

    2003-03-01

    Addition of a low concentration of a very long (430 kg/mol) side group liquid crystal polymer is shown to produce dramatic changes in the flow characteristics of a calamitic nematic liquid crystal. This polymer causes a typical flow-aligning nematic liquid crystal to align near the velocity gradient direction rather than near the velocity direction, corresponding to having a tumbling parameter λ<-1, for concentrations greater than 7.5% polymer. Such flow-aligning behavior has not been reported previously in a calamitic nematic. The large molecular weight of the present polymer relative to those examined in the prior literature is responsible for these new phenomena.

  9. Fast switching from isotropic liquids to nematic liquid crystals: rotaxanes as smart fluids.

    PubMed

    He, Hao; Sevick, Edith M; Williams, David R M

    2015-11-28

    We examine a solution of rod-like piston-rotaxanes, which can switch their length by external excitation (for example optically) from a short state of length L to a long state of length qL. We show that this solution can exhibit a number of different behaviours. In particular it can rapidly switch from an isotropic to a nematic liquid crystalline state. There is a minimum ratio q* = 1.13 for which transitions from a pure isotropic state to a pure nematic state are possible. We present a phase-switching diagram, which gives the six possible behaviours for this system. It turns out that a large fraction of the phase switching diagram is occupied by the transition from a pure isotropic to a pure nematic state. PMID:26419821

  10. Chemically induced twist-bend nematic liquid crystals, liquid crystal dimers, and negative elastic constants.

    PubMed

    Adlem, K; Čopič, M; Luckhurst, G R; Mertelj, A; Parri, O; Richardson, R M; Snow, B D; Timimi, B A; Tuffin, R P; Wilkes, D

    2013-08-01

    Here we report the chemical induction of the twist-bend nematic phase in a nematic mixture of ether-linked liquid crystal dimers by the addition of a dimer with methylene links; all dimers have an odd number of groups in the spacer connecting the two mesogenic groups. The twist-bend phase has been identified from its optical texture and x-ray scattering pattern as well as NMR spectroscopy, which demonstrates the phase chirality. Theory predicts that the key macroscopic property required for the stability of this chiral phase formed from achiral molecules is for the bend elastic constant to tend to be negative; in addition the twist elastic constant should be smaller than half the splay elastic constant. To test these important aspects of the prediction we have measured the bend and splay elastic constants in the nematic phase preceding the twist-bend nematic using the classic Frederiks methodology and all three elastic constants employing the dynamic light scattering approach. Our results show that, unlike the splay, the bend elastic constant is small and decreases significantly as the transition to the induced twist-bend nematic phase is approached, but then exhibits unexpected behavior prior to the phase transition. PMID:24032852

  11. Nonlinear flow behaviors of nematic liquid crystals in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Takeaki

    2013-02-01

    We study nematic liquid crystals flowing in a regular-shaped porous medium by means of lattice Boltzmann simulations. With strong anchoring, the director field cannot align uniformly and topological defects are stably formed with a large number of possible configurations. In a quiescent state, each configuration is arrested since the energy barriers between possible configurations are higher than the thermal energy. If the flow speed is slow enough, the defect pattern is not changed from the initial quiescent configuration. Above a critical flow speed, the defect pattern transforms to a new stable configuration. In a regular-shaped porous matrix, there remain regularly aligned disclination loops. This regular pattern is maintained even after the flow is stopped.

  12. Breakup of partially wetting nanoscale nematic liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael; Linda Cummings Collaboration; Lou Kondic Collaboration; Te-Sheng Lin Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The breakup of nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) films with thicknesses less than a micrometer is studied. Particular attention is paid to the interplay between the bulk elasticity and the anchoring (boundary) conditions at the substrate and free surface. Within the framework of the long wave approximation, a fourth order nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) is derived for the free surface height. Numerical simulations of a perturbed flat film show that, depending on the initial average thickness of the film, satellite droplets form and persist on time scales much longer than dewetting. Formulating the model in terms of an effective disjoining pressure (elastic response and van der Waals interaction), simulations further suggest that satellite droplets form when the initial average film thickness corresponds to a positive effective disjoining pressure. Our results may shed light on the so-called ''forbidden film thicknesses'' seen in experiments. Supported by NSF grant DMS-1211713.

  13. Phase diagrams of orientational transitions in absorbing nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zolot’ko, A. S. Ochkin, V. N.; Smayev, M. P.; Shvetsov, S. A.

    2015-05-15

    A theory of orientational transitions in nematic liquid crystals (NLCs), which employs the expansion of optical torques acting on the NLC director with respect to the rotation angle, has been developed for NLCs with additives of conformationally active compounds under the action of optical and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Phase diagrams of NLCs are constructed as a function of the intensity and polarization of the light field, the strength of low-frequency electric field, and a parameter that characterizes the feedback between the rotation of the NLC director and optical torque. Conditions for the occurrence of first- and second-order transitions are determined. The proposed theory agrees with available experimental data.

  14. Control of the bias tilt angles in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yablonskii, S. V.; Nakayama, K.; Okazaki, S.; Ozaki, M.; Yoshino, K.; Palto, S. P.; Baranovich, M. Yu.; Michailov, A. S.

    1999-03-01

    The pretilt angle controlled by electric field was studied by the modulation ellipsometry technique. The easy direction of compensated nematic liquid crystals was controlled by surface flexoelectric torque created by the linear coupling of the director deformation and electric field. The weak anchoring energy necessary for the occurrence of flexoelectric distortion was produced by unidirectional rubbing of the clean indium-tin-oxide covered glasses with a cotton cloth. The pretilt angle was measured as a function of electric field. Long relaxation times of the optical response (hundreds of seconds) were observed. The rubbed thin polyvinyl alcohol and polyimide aligning layers were seen to promote strong anchoring energy (>0.5 erg/cm2) preventing any deviation of pretilt angle and, consequently, to suppress the optical response. The probable applications of the obtained results are discussed.

  15. Orientational defects near colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Feng, James J; Zhou, Chixing

    2004-01-01

    We study the interaction between a surface-anchoring colloidal particle and a liquid-crystalline host, and in particular the formation of orientational defects near the particle. A mean-field theory based on the nonlocal Marrucci-Greco nematic potential is used to represent molecular interactions in an inhomogeneous orientational field. An evolution equation for the molecular configuration tensor is solved numerically whose steady state minimizes the total free energy of the system. With strong homeotropic anchoring on the particle surface, three types of solutions may appear depending on initial conditions and particle size: Saturn rings, satellite point defects, and polar rings. The Saturn ring remains stable on micrometer-sized particles, contrary to previous calculations but consistent with experiments. A phase diagram is constructed for the three regimes. Based on the free energy, the most stable state is the Saturn ring for smaller particles and the satellite defect for larger ones. PMID:14651897

  16. Dielectric Anisotropy of Gold Nanoparticle Colloids in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, Angelo; Foust, Jon; Mahmood, Rizwan

    We present electrical and optical studies of hexanethiol-treated gold nanoparticle (GNPs) colloids in 4-cyano-4 '-pentyl-biphenyl (5CB) liquid crystals. Preliminary data analysis suggests an unusual behavior of sudden drop and then rise in the dielectric anisotropy at a critical concentration of 0.0862% by wt. GNPs and a sudden rise and then drop in the nematic to isotropic transition temperature. Above the critical concentration the data level off to within the uncertainty of the experimental errors. This colloidal system will help us to understand the interaction and the effects of nanoparticles on the self-assembly of LC molecules and the manner in which these particles organize in LC. This study is important for further developments in nanotechnology, sharp and fast display panels, and within the medical field.

  17. Spatiotemporal complexity of electroconvection patterns in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krekhov, Alexei; Dressel, Bernd; Pesch, Werner; Delev, Vladimir; Batyrshin, Eduard

    2015-12-01

    We investigate a number of complex patterns driven by the electroconvection instability in a planarly aligned layer of a nematic liquid crystal. They are traced back to various secondary instabilities of the ideal roll patterns bifurcating at onset of convection, whereby the basic nematohydrodynamic equations are solved by common Galerkin expansion methods. Alternatively these equations are systematically approximated by a set of coupled amplitude equations. They describe slow modulations of the convection roll amplitudes, which are coupled to a flow field component with finite vorticity perpendicular to the layer and to a quasihomogeneous in-plane rotation of the director. It is demonstrated that the Galerkin stability diagram of the convection rolls is well reproduced by the corresponding one based on the amplitude equations. The main purpose of the paper is, however, to demonstrate that their direct numerical simulations match surprisingly well new experiments, which serves as a convincing test of our theoretical approach.

  18. The electrohydrodynamic instability in twisted nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertrich, A.; Krekhov, A. P.; Scaldin, O. A.

    1994-02-01

    We present some experiments on electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) in nematic liquid crystals with a planar, but twisted configuration (MBBA). The threshold voltage is shown to depend only weakly on the twist angle. A theoretical analysis of the onset behaviour agrees well with the experiments. More sensitive is a secondary transition to modulation structures, which are not easily observed in untwisted geometries. A rough estimate of the secondary instability based on the behaviour of the most rapidly growing modulation mode seems to account well for the observations. Additional theoretical investigations for materials with positive dielectric anisotropy concerning the competition between the Fréedericksz transition and EHC are included. We predict the existence of a crossover codimension-2 point, which could easily be tested by variation of the twist angle.

  19. Spatiotemporal complexity of electroconvection patterns in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Krekhov, Alexei; Dressel, Bernd; Pesch, Werner; Delev, Vladimir; Batyrshin, Eduard

    2015-12-01

    We investigate a number of complex patterns driven by the electroconvection instability in a planarly aligned layer of a nematic liquid crystal. They are traced back to various secondary instabilities of the ideal roll patterns bifurcating at onset of convection, whereby the basic nematohydrodynamic equations are solved by common Galerkin expansion methods. Alternatively these equations are systematically approximated by a set of coupled amplitude equations. They describe slow modulations of the convection roll amplitudes, which are coupled to a flow field component with finite vorticity perpendicular to the layer and to a quasihomogeneous in-plane rotation of the director. It is demonstrated that the Galerkin stability diagram of the convection rolls is well reproduced by the corresponding one based on the amplitude equations. The main purpose of the paper is, however, to demonstrate that their direct numerical simulations match surprisingly well new experiments, which serves as a convincing test of our theoretical approach. PMID:26764714

  20. Coherent backscattering of light in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenova, E. V. Kuz'min, V. L.; Romanov, V. P.

    2009-03-15

    Multiple light scattering by director fluctuations in nematic liquid crystals is considered. A uniform director orientation is assumed to be specified by an applied magnetic field. The coherent backscattering effect, which consists in the presence of a sharp light backscattering peak, is studied. The Bethe-Salpeter equation is used to calculate the multiple scattering intensity taking into account the contributions of ladder and cyclic diagrams. An analytical expression for the angular and polarization dependences of the coherent backscattering intensity is obtained in terms of the diffusion approximation. The calculation and experimental results are compared. The developed theory is shown to qualitatively describe the elliptical shape of the backscattering cone, to explain the absence of a coherent contribution for crossed polarizations, and to calculate the relative peak height.

  1. Shape-dependent dispersion and alignment of nonaggregating plasmonic gold nanoparticles in lyotropic and thermotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingkun; Tang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yuan; Martinez, Angel; Wang, Shaowei; He, Sailing; White, Timothy J; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2014-05-01

    We use both lyotropic liquid crystals composed of prolate micelles and thermotropic liquid crystals made of rod-like molecules to uniformly disperse and unidirectionally align relatively large gold nanorods and other complex-shaped nanoparticles at high concentrations. We show that some of these ensuing self-assembled orientationally ordered soft matter systems exhibit polarization-dependent plasmonic properties with strongly pronounced molar extinction exceeding that previously achieved in self-assembled composites. The long-range unidirectional alignment of gold nanorods is mediated mainly by anisotropic surface anchoring interactions at the surfaces of gold nanoparticles. Polarization-sensitive absorption, scattering, and extinction are used to characterize orientations of nanorods and other nanoparticles. The experimentally measured unique optical properties of these composites, which stem from the collective plasmonic effect of the gold nanorods with long-range order in a liquid crystal matrix, are reproduced in computer simulations. A simple phenomenological model based on anisotropic surface interaction explains the alignment of gold nanorods dispersed in liquid crystals and the physical underpinnings behind our observations. PMID:25353813

  2. Electric field generation of Skyrmion-like structures in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Laura; Kos, Žiga; Savoini, Matteo; Kouwer, Paul; Rowan, Alan; Ravnik, Miha; Muševič, Igor; Rasing, Theo

    2016-01-21

    Skyrmions are particle-like topological objects that are increasingly drawing attention in condensed matter physics, where they are connected to inversion symmetry breaking and chirality. Here we report the generation of stable Skyrmion-like structures in a thin nematic liquid crystal film on chemically patterned patchy surfaces. Using the interplay of material elasticity and surface boundary conditions, we use a strong electric field to quench the nematic liquid crystal from a fully aligned phase to vortex-like nematic liquid crystal structures, centered on patterned patches, which carry two different sorts of topological defects. Numerical calculations reveal that these are Skyrmion-like structures, seeded from the surface boojum topological defects and swirling towards the second confining surface. These observations, supported by numerical methods, demonstrate the possibility to generate, manipulate and study Skyrmion-like objects in nematic liquid crystals on patterned surfaces. PMID:26549212

  3. Optical security devices using nonuniform schlieren texture of UV-curable nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Keizo; Ohtsubo, Junji

    2016-02-10

    We proposed and quantitatively evaluated an optical security device that provides nonuniform or random patterns of schlieren texture in nematic liquid crystal as unique identification information with a design by employing computer image processing and normalized cross correlation. Using the same photomask as the first author's university logo, the written patterns, which were composed of polymerized isotropic areas and polymerized nematic areas, were stable among different cells. Judging from the maximum correlation coefficient of 0.09, the patterns of the schlieren texture were unique in different cells. These results indicate that photocurable nematic liquid crystal materials have the potential to be applied to security devices for anticounterfeiting measures. PMID:26906368

  4. ESR studies of the slow tumbling of vanadyl spin probes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, M. P.; Bruno, G. V.; Lawson, J. O.

    1977-01-01

    ESR line shapes that are appropriate for slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in viscous nematic liquid crystals were calculated by the stochastic Liouville method. Because of the symmetry possessed by vanadyl, the analysis and interpretation of these line shapes was simplified considerably. Spectral line shapes agreed well with experimental spectra of VOAcAc in the nematic liquid crystal Phase V and BEPC. Deviations from Brownian rotational diffusion were noted. A slowly fluctuating torque analysis yielded good agreement with the experimental spectra.

  5. Water-in-water emulsions stabilized by non-amphiphilic interactions: polymer-dispersed lyotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen A; Sejwal, Preeti; Gerecht, Ryan B; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2007-01-30

    Emulsion systems involving surfactants are mainly driven by the separation of the hydrophobic interactions of the aliphatic chains from the hydrophilic interactions of amphiphilic molecules in water. In this study, we report an emulsion system that does not include amphiphilic molecules but molecules with functional groups that are completely solvated in water. These functional groups give rise to molecular interactions including hydrogen bonding, pi stacking, and salt bridging and are segregated into a dispersion of droplets forming a water-in-water emulsion. This water-in-water emulsion consists of dispersing droplets of a water-solvated biocompatible liquid crystal--disodium cromoglycate (DSCG)--in a continuous aqueous solution containing specific classes of water-soluble polymers. Whereas aqueous solutions of polyols support the formation of emulsions of spherical droplets consisting of lyotropic liquid crystal DSCG with long-term stability (for at least 30 days), aqueous solutions of polyamides afford droplets of DSCG in the shape of prolate ellipsoids that are stable for only 2 days. The DSCG liquid crystal in spherical droplets assumes a radial configuration in which the optical axis of the liquid crystal aligns perpendicular to the surface of the droplets but assumes a tangential configuration in prolate ellipsoids in which the optical axis of the liquid crystal aligns parallel to the surface of the droplet. Other classes of water-soluble polymers including polyethers, polycations, and polyanions do not afford a stable emulsion of DSCG droplets. Both the occurrence and the stability of this unique emulsion system can be rationalized on the basis of the functional groups of the polymer. The different configurations of the liquid crystal (DSCG) droplets were also found to correlate with the strength of the hydrogen bonding that can be formed by the functional groups on the polymer. PMID:17241072

  6. Elementary statistical models for nematic transitions in liquid-crystalline systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Salinas, Silvio R.

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a simple Maier-Saupe-Zwanzig (MSZ) model to describe the well-known first-order nematic-isotropic transition in liquid-crystalline systems. We then use the MSZ model, with the addition of disorder degrees of freedom, to investigate the stability of a biaxial nematic phase in a mixture of rods and disks. There is a biaxial nematic structure if we consider a fixed distribution of rods and disks. For a thermalized distribution of shapes, however, this biaxial structure becomes thermodynamically unstable. We then resort to a formalism that accounts for two sets of relaxation times, and show that a small departure from complete thermalization is enough to recover a stable biaxial structure. As another application of the MSZ model, we report an investigation of some properties of nematic elastomers. We point out the possibility of continuous nematic transitions, and reproduce a characteristic stress-strain response, with a plateau that indicates a polydomain-monodomain transition.

  7. Chirality Detection Using Nematic Liquid Crystal Droplets on Anisotropic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rudquist, Per; Dietrich, Clarissa F; Mark, Andrew G; Giesselmann, Frank

    2016-06-21

    Nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) form helical macroscopic structures through chiral induction when doped with chiral species. We describe a very simple, though highly sensitive method for determination of handedness and pitch of the induced twist in the case of very weak twisting powers of such chiral dopants. A tiny drop-typically less than 10 nL-of the chiral doped NLC is placed on a plate promoting a uniform planar surface anchoring of the liquid crystal director. At the curved NLC-air interface the anchoring is homeotropic and in the sessile droplets we get a locally twisted hybrid director structure with a disclination line extending across the droplet. The configuration of the disclination line (S-like or backwards S-like) reveals the sign of twisting power and extremely large pitch values in the range of 10 mm can easily be measured. We demonstrate the method using the standard NLC 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB), weakly doped with the chiral material 2-hydroxy-2-phenylacetic acid (mandelic acid). PMID:27244587

  8. Nematic liquid crystal interfaces for chemical and biological detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Most, Darrin R.; VanTreeck, Heidi J.; Grinwald, Bart A.; Kupcho, Kurt A.; Sen, Avijit; Bonds, Michael D.; Anhalt, Karla; Israel, Barbara A.; Acharya, Bharat R.

    2011-03-01

    Nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) have traditionally been used in displays and other electro-optical applications where the orientation of NLC is manipulated by using an external electric field to display the information. In recent years, there have been significant advances in unconventional applications of NLCs in photonics, sensors, and diagnostics. In this paper, the application of NLCs for detection of vapor phase chemicals and biological entities is presented. When NLCs are in contact with another medium (solid, liquid or air) the delicate interplay between the properties of medium and NLCs determines the nature of the alignment assumed by NLCs at the interface. Interfaces functionalized with select chemical or biological entities promote alignment of NLCs in predetermined orientations (perpendicular or parallel to that interface) that are primarily dictated by local interactions at the interface. When these interfaces are exposed to target analytes, the interactions at the interfaces are perturbed and the NLC films undergo orientational transitions from perpendicular to parallel alignment, or vice versa. The orientational transition can be detected by viewing the film of NLCs between crossed polarizers (optical signal) or by measuring the differential capacitance associated with the change in alignment of NLCs (electrical signal). By engineering surfaces with different interfacial properties, sensors based on this principle have been demonstrated to selectively detect a wide variety of chemical and biological analytes that have relevance in industrial hygiene, environmental monitoring, homeland security, diagnostics, and biomedical applications.

  9. Generation of harmonics and supercontinuum in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nyushkov, B N; Trashkeev, S I; Klementyev, Vasilii M; Pivtsov, V S; Kobtsev, Sergey M

    2013-02-28

    Nonlinear optical properties of nematic liquid crystals (NLC) have been investigated. A technique for efficient laser frequency conversion in a microscopic NLC volume deposited on an optical fibre end face is experimentally demonstrated. An efficient design of a compact NLC-based IR frequency converter with a fibre input and achromatic collimator is proposed and implemented. Simultaneous generation of the second and third harmonics is obtained for the first time under pumping NLC by a 1.56-mm femtosecond fibre laser. The second-harmonic generation efficiency is measured to be about 1 %, while the efficiency of third-harmonic generation is several tenths of percent. A strong polarisation dependence of the third-harmonic generation efficiency is revealed. When pumping NLC by a cw laser, generation of spectral supercontinua (covering the visible and near-IR spectral ranges) is observed. The nonlinear effects revealed can be due to the light-induced change in the orientational order in liquid crystals, which breaks the initial symmetry and leads to formation of disclination structures. The NLC optical nonlinearity is believed to be of mixed orientationalelectronic nature as a whole. (laser optics 2012)

  10. Dynamics of water confined in lyotropic liquid crystals: Molecular dynamics simulations of the dynamic structure factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantha, Sriteja; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-02-01

    The properties of water under confinement are of practical and fundamental interest. In this work, we study the properties of water in the self-assembled lyotropic phases of Gemini surfactants with a focus on testing the standard analysis of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments. In QENS experiments, the dynamic structure factor is measured and fit to models to extract the translational diffusion constant, DT, and rotational relaxation time, τR. We test this procedure by using simulation results for the dynamic structure factor, extracting the dynamic parameters from the fit as is typically done in experiments, and comparing the values to those directly measured in the simulations. We find that the de-coupling approximation, where the intermediate scattering function is assumed to be a product of translational and rotational contributions, is quite accurate. The jump-diffusion and isotropic rotation models, however, are not accurate when the degree of confinement is high. In particular, the exponential approximations for the intermediate scattering function fail for highly confined water and the values of DT and τR can differ from the measured value by as much as a factor of two. Other models have more fit parameters, however, and with the range of energies and wave-vectors accessible to QENS, the typical analysis appears to be the best choice. In the most confined lamellar phase, the dynamics are sufficiently slow that QENS does not access a large enough time scale.

  11. Acoustooptic Effects of Nematic Liquid Crystals Induced by Elastic Wave Propagating in Glass Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritake, Hiroshi; Seike, Tadaaki; Toda, Kohji

    1999-05-01

    An elastic wave delay line with a glass plate as a propagation medium is investigated in relations to acoustooptic effects of nematic liquid crystals. A nematic liquid crystal cell is mounted on the central region of a glass plate for elastic wave propagation. The elastic wave propagating in the glass plate interacts with the liquid crystal in a wide frequency range. Two types of periodical domain structures are observed in the nematic liquid crystal cell under the existence of the elastic wave. One exists in both homeotropically and homogeneously aligned cells, and depends not on the kind of liquid crystal but on the carrier frequency of the elastic wave. The other is recognized only in homogeneously aligned cells and depends on the layer thickness and the kind of liquid crystal, but not on the carrier frequency of the elastic wave. Both periodical domain structures are induced by the elastic wave propagating in the glass plate.

  12. Chiral symmetry breaking by spatial confinement in tactoidal droplets of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Tortora, Luana; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2011-01-01

    In many colloidal systems, an orientationally ordered nematic (N) phase emerges from the isotropic (I) melt in the form of spindle-like birefringent tactoids. In cases studied so far, the tactoids always reveal a mirror-symmetric nonchiral structure, sometimes even when the building units are chiral. We report on chiral symmetry breaking in the nematic tactoids formed in molecularly nonchiral polymer-crowded aqueous solutions of low-molecular weight disodium cromoglycate. The parity is broken by twisted packing of self-assembled molecular aggregates within the tactoids as manifested by the observed optical activity. Fluorescent confocal microscopy reveals that the chiral N tactoids are located at the boundaries of cells. We explain the chirality induction as a replacement of energetically costly splay packing of the aggregates within the curved bipolar tactoidal shape with twisted packing. The effect represents a simple pathway of macroscopic chirality induction in an organic system with no molecular chirality, as the only requirements are orientational order and curved shape of confinement. PMID:21402929

  13. Influence of shear flow on the Fréedericksz transition in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Makarov, D V; Zakhlevnykh, A N

    2006-10-01

    Within the framework of Ericksen-Leslie continuum theory we analyze the influence of shear flow on the magnetic-field-induced Fréedericksz transition in nematic liquid crystal with rodlike molecules. We consider three basic orientational configurations of a nematic planar layer in the uniform magnetic field. Conditions of rigid director coupling on the boundaries of the layer and constant shear flow gradient inside the layer are used. We exhibit some flow aligning effects for nematic liquid crystals with various ratio of rotary viscosities and investigate how unequal elastic constants (elastic anisotropy) alter the magnetic Fréedericksz transition in sheared nematics. Our calculations predict that surface boundary effects in nematic films and magnetic field action lead to existence of stationary flow regimes in the so-called nonflow aligning nematics, otherwise, surface and magnetic forces extend the range of viscous coefficient values corresponding to the flow aligning regimes. We show that imposing of shear flow on the Fréedericksz transition leads to a threshold behavior or to a "smoothing" of the transition. It depends on the orientation of the nematic layer in magnetic field and magnitudes of rotary viscous coefficients. PMID:17155081

  14. Two-point particle tracking microrheology of nematic complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Manuel; Del Álamo, Juan C

    2016-06-29

    Many biological and technological complex fluids exhibit tight microstructural alignment that confers them nematic mechanical properties. Among these we count liquid crystals and biopolymer networks, which are often available in microscopic amounts. However, current microrheological methods cannot measure the directional viscoelastic coefficients that appear in the constitutive relation of nematic complex fluids. This article presents directional two-point particle-tracking microrheology (D2PTM) - a novel microrheology technique to determine these coefficients. We establish the theoretical foundation for D2PTM by analyzing the motion of a probing microscopic particle embedded in a nematic complex fluid, and the mutual hydrodynamic interactions between pairs of distant particles. From this analysis, we generalize the formulation of two-point particle tracking microrheology for nematic complex fluids, and demonstrate that the new formulation provides sufficient information to fully characterize the anisotropic viscoelastic coefficients of such materials. We test D2PTM by simulating the Brownian motion of particles in nematic viscoelastic fluids with prescribed directional frequency-dependent shear moduli, showing that D2PTM accurately recovers the prescribed shear moduli. Furthermore, we experimentally validate D2PTM by applying it to a lyotropic nematic liquid crystal, and demonstrate that this new microrheology method provides results in agreement with dynamic light scattering measurements. Lastly, we illustrate the experimental application of the new technique to characterize nematic F-actin solutions. These experiments constitute the first microrheological measurement of the directional viscoelastic coefficients of an anisotropic soft material. PMID:27270816

  15. Predicting photoisomerization profile of the highly polymerized nematic azobenzene liquid crystal network: First principle calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, J.; Li, C.; Chung, H.; Choi, J.; Cho, M.

    2015-05-01

    The cis profile of azobenzene is a key factor in predicting the photodeformation of the nematic azobenzene liquid crystal network (LCN). An ab initio based method for predicting the photoisomerization profile of azobenzene is developed by coupling the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) method with non-linear Beers law, and compared with experimental data. Using this combined method, we calculate the photoisomerization profile of azobenzene with various light input conditions. We identify the cis profile of the nematic LCN structure evolves into a step-like decaying shape when the direction of polarized light is parallel to the nematic direction.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, G. V.; Harrington, J. K.; Eastman, M. P.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of EPR line shapes by the method of Polnaszek, Bruno, and Freed is made for slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in viscous nematic liquid crystals. The use of typical vanadyl complexes as spin probes for nematic liquid crystals is shown to simplify the theoretical analysis and the subsequent interpretation. Rotational correlation times tau and orientational ordering parameters S sub Z where slow tumbling effects are expected to be observed in vanadyl EPR spectra are indicated in a plot. Analysis of the inertial effects on the probe reorientation, which are induced by slowly fluctuating torque components of the local solvent structure, yield quantitative values for tau and S sub Z. The weakly ordered probe VOAA is in the slow tumbling region and displays these inertial effects throughout the nematic range of BEPC and Phase V. VOAA exhibits different reorientation behavior near the isotropic-nematic transition temperature than that displayed far below this transition temperature.

  17. Direct mapping of local director field of nematic liquid crystals at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yu; Serra, Francesca; Kamien, Randall D; Stebe, Kathleen J; Yang, Shu

    2015-12-15

    Liquid crystals (LCs), owing to their anisotropy in molecular ordering, are of wide interest in both the display industry and soft matter as a route to more sophisticated optical objects, to direct phase separation, and to facilitate colloidal assemblies. However, it remains challenging to directly probe the molecular-scale organization of nonglassy nematic LC molecules without altering the LC directors. We design and synthesize a new type of nematic liquid crystal monomer (LCM) system with strong dipole-dipole interactions, resulting in a stable nematic phase and strong homeotropic anchoring on silica surfaces. Upon photopolymerization, the director field can be faithfully "locked," allowing for direct visualization of the LC director field and defect structures by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in real space with 100-nm resolution. Using this technique, we study the nematic textures in more complex LC/colloidal systems and calculate the extrapolation length of the LCM. PMID:26621729

  18. Direct mapping of local director field of nematic liquid crystals at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yu; Serra, Francesca; Kamien, Randall D.; Stebe, Kathleen J.; Yang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs), owing to their anisotropy in molecular ordering, are of wide interest in both the display industry and soft matter as a route to more sophisticated optical objects, to direct phase separation, and to facilitate colloidal assemblies. However, it remains challenging to directly probe the molecular-scale organization of nonglassy nematic LC molecules without altering the LC directors. We design and synthesize a new type of nematic liquid crystal monomer (LCM) system with strong dipole–dipole interactions, resulting in a stable nematic phase and strong homeotropic anchoring on silica surfaces. Upon photopolymerization, the director field can be faithfully “locked,” allowing for direct visualization of the LC director field and defect structures by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in real space with 100-nm resolution. Using this technique, we study the nematic textures in more complex LC/colloidal systems and calculate the extrapolation length of the LCM. PMID:26621729

  19. From the microscopic to the mesoscopic properties of lyotropic reverse hexagonal liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Libster, Dima; Ishai, Paul Ben; Aserin, Abraham; Shoham, Gil; Garti, Nissim

    2008-03-01

    In the present study we aimed to explore a correlation between the microstructural properties of the lyotropic reverse hexagonal phase (HII) of the GMO/tricaprylin/phosphatidylcholine/water system and its mesoscopic structure. The mesoscopic organization of discontinuous and anisotropic domains was examined, in the native state, using environmental scanning electron microscopy. The topography of the HII mesophases was imaged directly in their hydrated state, as a function of aqueous-phase concentration and composition, when a proline amino acid was solubilized into the systems as a kosmotropic (water-structure maker) guest molecule. The domain structures of several dozen micrometers in size, visualized in the environmental scanning electron microscopy, were found to possess fractal characteristics, indicating a discontinuous and disordered alignment of the corresponding internal water rods on the mesoscale. On the microstructural level, SAXS measurements revealed that as water content (Cw) increases the characteristic lattice parameter of the mesophases increases as well. Using the water concentration as the mass measure of the mixtures, a scaling relationship between the lattice parameter and the concentration was found to obey a power law whereby the derived fractal dimension was the relevant exponent, confirming the causal link between the microscopic and mesoscopic organizations. The topography of the HII mesophase was found to be affected by the microstructural parameters and the composition of the samples. Thermal analysis experiments involving these systems further confirmed that the behavior of water underpins both microscopical and mesoscopic features of the systems. It was shown that both the swelling of the lattice parameter and the mesoscopic domains is correlated to the bulk water concentration in the water rods. PMID:18197712

  20. High-Throughput Screening of Saturated Fatty Acid Influence on Nanostructure of Lyotropic Liquid Crystalline Lipid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nhiem; Hawley, Adrian M; Zhai, Jiali; Muir, Benjamin W; Fong, Celesta; Drummond, Calum J; Mulet, Xavier

    2016-05-10

    Self-assembled lyotropic liquid crystalline lipid nanoparticles have been developed for a wide range of biomedical applications with an emerging focus for use as delivery vehicles for drugs, genes, and in vivo imaging agents. In this study, we report the generation of lipid nanoparticle libraries with information regarding mesophase and lattice parameter, which can aid the selection of formulation for a particular end-use application. In this study we elucidate the phase composition parameters that influence the internal structure of lipid nanoparticles produced from monoolein, monopalmitolein and phytantriol incorporating a variety of saturated fatty acids (FA) with different chain lengths at varying concentrations and temperatures. The material libraries were established using high throughput formulation and screening techniques, including synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering. The results demonstrate the rich polymorphism of lipid nanoparticles with nonlamellar mesophases in the presence of saturated FAs. The inclusion of saturated FAs within the lipid nanoparticles promotes a gradual phase transition at all temperatures studied toward structures with higher negative surface curvatures (e.g., from inverse bicontinuous cubic phase to hexagonal phase and then emulsified microemulsion). The three partial phase diagrams produced are discussed in terms of the influence of FA chain length and concentration on nanoparticle internal mesophase structure and lattice parameters. The study also highlights a compositionally dependent coexistence of multiple mesophases, which may indicate the presence of multicompartment nanoparticles containing cubic/cubic and cubic/hexagonal mesophases. PMID:27023315

  1. Dual-Responsive Viscoelastic Lyotropic Liquid Crystal Fluids to Control the Diffusion of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Cao, Yueying; Cao, Meiwen; Sun, Yawei; Wang, Jiqian; Hao, Jingcheng

    2016-07-01

    A smart lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) system was prepared to control the diffusion rate of hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules. The LLC system is composed of a nonionic surfactant (tetraethylene glycol monododecylether; C12 EO4 ) and an anionic azobenzene surfactant (Azo-surfactant). C12 EO4 was the main component of the LLC system. The Azo-surfactant, which can undergo photo-isomerization, played the role of trigger in this system. LLC gels formed in a solution comprised of Azo-surfactant (10 mm) and C12 EO4 (300 mm). The LLC gels became broken when more Azo-surfactant was added (e.g., up to 15 mm) and the viscoelasticity was lost. Surprisingly, when we used UV light to irradiate the 300 mm C12 EO4 /15 mm Azo-surfactant sample, the gel was recovered and high viscoelasticity was observed. However, under visible-light irradiation, the gel became broken again. The gel formation could also be triggered by heating the sample. On heating the 300 mm C12 EO4 /15 mm Azo-surfactant sample, the system thickened to a point at which typical gel behavior was registered. When the sample was cooled, the gel broke again. The LLC could be used for controlled release of hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules, and could be considered as a versatile vehicle for the delivery of actives in systems of practical importance. PMID:27028313

  2. Nematic Director Reorientation at Solid and Liquid Interfaces under Flow: SAXS Studies in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate the interplay between flow and boundary condition effects on the orientation field of a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal under flow and confinement in a microfluidic device. Two types of experiments were performed using synchrotron small-angle X-ray-scattering (SAXS). In the first, a nematic liquid crystal flows through a square-channel cross section at varying flow rates, while the nematic director orientation projected onto the velocity/velocity gradient plane is measured using a 2D detector. At moderate-to-high flow rates, the nematic director is predominantly aligned in the flow direction, but with a small tilt angle of ∼±11° in the velocity gradient direction. The director tilt angle is constant throughout most of the channel width but switches sign when crossing the center of the channel, in agreement with the Ericksen–Leslie–Parodi (ELP) theory. At low flow rates, boundary conditions begin to dominate, and a flow profile resembling the escaped radial director configuration is observed, where the director is seen to vary more smoothly from the edges (with homeotropic alignment) to the center of the channel. In the second experiment, hydrodynamic focusing is employed to confine the nematic phase into a sheet of liquid sandwiched between two layers of Triton X-100 aqueous solutions. The average nematic director orientation shifts to some extent from the flow direction toward the liquid boundaries, although it remains unclear if one tilt angle is dominant through most of the nematic sheet (with abrupt jumps near the boundaries) or if the tilt angle varies smoothly between two extreme values (∼90 and 0°). The technique presented here could be applied to perform high-throughput measurements for assessing the influence of different surfactants on the orientation of nematic phases and may lead to further improvements in areas such as boundary lubrication and clarifying the nature of defect structures in LC displays. PMID

  3. Nematic director reorientation at solid and liquid interfaces under flow: SAXS studies in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno F B; Zepeda-Rosales, Miguel; Venkateswaran, Neeraja; Fletcher, Bretton J; Carter, Lester G; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Han, Jun; Li, Youli; Olsson, Ulf; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2015-04-14

    In this work we investigate the interplay between flow and boundary condition effects on the orientation field of a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal under flow and confinement in a microfluidic device. Two types of experiments were performed using synchrotron small-angle X-ray-scattering (SAXS). In the first, a nematic liquid crystal flows through a square-channel cross section at varying flow rates, while the nematic director orientation projected onto the velocity/velocity gradient plane is measured using a 2D detector. At moderate-to-high flow rates, the nematic director is predominantly aligned in the flow direction, but with a small tilt angle of ∼±11° in the velocity gradient direction. The director tilt angle is constant throughout most of the channel width but switches sign when crossing the center of the channel, in agreement with the Ericksen-Leslie-Parodi (ELP) theory. At low flow rates, boundary conditions begin to dominate, and a flow profile resembling the escaped radial director configuration is observed, where the director is seen to vary more smoothly from the edges (with homeotropic alignment) to the center of the channel. In the second experiment, hydrodynamic focusing is employed to confine the nematic phase into a sheet of liquid sandwiched between two layers of Triton X-100 aqueous solutions. The average nematic director orientation shifts to some extent from the flow direction toward the liquid boundaries, although it remains unclear if one tilt angle is dominant through most of the nematic sheet (with abrupt jumps near the boundaries) or if the tilt angle varies smoothly between two extreme values (∼90 and 0°). The technique presented here could be applied to perform high-throughput measurements for assessing the influence of different surfactants on the orientation of nematic phases and may lead to further improvements in areas such as boundary lubrication and clarifying the nature of defect structures in LC displays. PMID

  4. Electrically controllable Fresnel lens in 90° twisted nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chie-Tong; Li, Chien-Yu; Lin, Shih-Hung; Yeh, Hui-Chen

    2015-10-01

    This study presents a theoretical analysis and experimental demonstration of an electrically controllable Fresnel lens in a 90° twisted nematic liquid crystal cell. The cell gap was chosen to satisfy the Gooch-Tarry conditions, and therefore, the polarization rotation effect was valid regardless of the incident polarization direction. The polarization sensitivity of the diffraction efficiency of the 90° twisted nematic Fresnel lens was dependent on the applied voltage regime. Theoretical calculations effectively explain the experimental results. PMID:26480119

  5. Stability of the Melting Hedgehog in the Landau-de Gennes Theory of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat, Radu; Nguyen, Luc; Slastikov, Valeriy; Zarnescu, Arghir

    2014-09-01

    We investigate stability properties of the radially symmetric solution corresponding to the vortex defect (the so called "melting hedgehog") in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes model of nematic liquid crystals. We prove local stability of the melting hedgehog under arbitrary Q-tensor valued perturbations in the temperature regime near the critical supercooling temperature. As a consequence of our method, we also rediscover the loss of stability of the vortex defect in the deep nematic regime.

  6. Stability of the Melting Hedgehog in the Landau-de Gennes Theory of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat, Radu; Nguyen, Luc; Slastikov, Valeriy; Zarnescu, Arghir

    2015-02-01

    We investigate stability properties of the radially symmetric solution corresponding to the vortex defect (the so called "melting hedgehog") in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes model of nematic liquid crystals. We prove local stability of the melting hedgehog under arbitrary Q-tensor valued perturbations in the temperature regime near the critical supercooling temperature. As a consequence of our method, we also rediscover the loss of stability of the vortex defect in the deep nematic regime.

  7. Anomalous swimming behavior of bacteria in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Aranson, Igor

    2015-03-01

    Flagellated bacteria stop swimming in isotropic media of viscosity higher than 0.06kgm-1s-1. However, Bacillus Subtilis slows down by only about 30% in a nematic chromonic liquid crystal (CLC, 14wt% DSCG in water), where the anisotropic viscosity can be as high as 6kgm-1s-1. The bacteria velocity (Vb) is linear with the flagella rotation frequency. The phase velocity of the flagella Vf ~ 2Vb in LC, as compared to Vf ~ 10Vb in water. The flow generated by the bacteria is localized along the bacterial body axis, decaying slowly over tens of micrometers along, but rapidly over a few micrometers across this axis. The concentrated flow grants the bacteria new ability to carry cargo particles in LC, ability not seen in their habitat isotropic media. We attribute these anomalous features to the anisotropy of viscosity of the CLC, namely, the viscosities of splay and twist is hundreds times higher than that of bend deformation, which provides extra boost of swimming efficiency and enables the bacteria swim at considerable speed in a viscous medium. Our findings can potentially lead to applications such as particle transportation in microfluidic devices. A.S and I.A are supported by the US DOE, Office of Science, BES, Materials Science and Engineering Division. S.Z. and O.D.L are supported by NSF DMR 1104850, DMS-1434185.

  8. Polarization converting textures of nematic liquid crystal in glass cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiahui; Xu, Miao; Ren, Hongwen

    2014-01-01

    When a nematic liquid crystal (LC) is filled in a glass cavity, the LC molecules present azimuthal orientations in the cavity. If the surface of the cavity is coated with a homeotropic polyimide, then the LC molecules exhibit radial orientations. By treating the LC on one side of the cavity with homogeneous alignment, the former orientations change to a twisted-azimuthal texture, while the latter orientations change to a twisted-radial texture. Both textures are verified experimentally, and they can convert a linearly polarization light to an azimuthal and/or radial polarization light, depending on the polarization direction of the incident light. In contrast to previous approaches, various LC textures can be easily formed in a cavity, and the fabrication procedure is simple. Since the LC texture is confined in a cavity, an array pattern of the texture can be obtained, if the employed substrate has multiple cavities. A LC with twisted-azimuthal and/or twisted-radial textures in a cavity array has potential applications in phase modulation, polarization compensating, sharp focus, and material processing.

  9. Amplitude equations for the electrohydrodynamic instability in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M.; Pesch, W.

    1993-12-01

    We study the near-threshold behavior of electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) in planarly aligned nematic liquid crystals in the (low-frequency) conduction regime. The investigations are based on a rigorous and systematic weakly nonlinear analysis of the standard hydrodynamic equations leading to a reduced description in terms of order-parameter equations. The typical experimental stability regimes in control parameter and wave-number space are identified for normal rolls near threshold. In particular, the decisive role of mean-flow effects in triggering the typical secondary zigzag instability leading to oblique rolls is emphasized. Subsequently, a set of coupled amplitude equations is derived directly from the basic equations that includes the mean-flow effects and higher-order gradient terms important at least in EHC. Simulations of the amplitude equations point to the possible existence of more than one attractor beyond the zigzag destabilization line, which might explain the sometimes conflicting experimental results. The scenario of ``weak turbulence'' (sometimes called ``defect turbulence'') is well accounted for by the theory.

  10. A new insight into the isotropic-nematic phase transition in lyotropic solutions of semiflexible polymers: density-functional theory tested by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Egorov, Sergei A; Milchev, Andrey; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2016-06-14

    Semiflexible polymers in solution are studied for a wide range of both contour length L and persistence length lp as a function of monomer concentration under good solvent conditions. Both density-functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods are used, and a very good agreement between both techniques is observed for rather stiff polymers. Evidence for a new mechanism of order parameter fluctuations in the nematic phase is presented, namely collective deformations of bundles of wormlike chains twisted around each other, and the typical wavelengths and amplitudes of these modes are estimated. These long wavelength fluctuations cause a reduction of the order parameter in comparison with the DFT prediction. It is also found that DFT becomes unreliable for rather flexible polymers in predicting that the transition from the isotropic (I)-phase to the nematic (N)-phase still exists at very high monomer concentrations (which in reality does not occur). However, under conditions when DFT is accurate, it provides reliable predictions also for the width of the I-N two-phase coexistence region, which are difficult to obtain from MD in spite of the use of very large systems (up to 500 000 monomers) by means of graphics processing units (GPU). For short and not very stiff chains, a pre-transitional chain stretching is found in the isotropic phase near the I-N-transition, not predicted by theories. A comparison with theoretical predictions by Khokhlov-Semenov, Odijk, and Chen reveals that the scaled transition densities are not simply functions of L/lp only, as these theories predict, but depend on d/lp (where d is the chain diameter) as well. Chain properties in the nematically ordered phase are compared to those of chains confined in tubes, and the deflection length concept is tested. Eventually, some consequences for the interpretation of experiments are spelled out. PMID:27249320

  11. Pattern formation in electrohydrodynamic convection of a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Nadina

    2003-10-01

    The first part of this dissertation is a study of the selection mechanism for the dendritic growth pattern of electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC). The cell gap d, the magnetic field H, and the voltage V are systematically varied. The transition from the non-convective state to the convective state is first order-like, although in this case it occurs in a nonequilibrium one-phase system. In the layer plane, the two-fold dendritic pattern grows about the only anisotropy direction, perpendicular to the homogeneous director alignment. While for crystalline dendrites the tip radius of curvature rho and the growth speed v are sharply selected, these dendrites show partial selection. At fixed d, H, and V, rho or v for different dendrites varies each within a band. There is no systematic dependence of rho on V. Thus, these dendrites represent an entirely new selection problem for pattern formation. The non-convective state is anisotropic in the plane of the pattern within a (magnetic coherence) length xim of each substrate. The degree of anisotropy decays with xim/d and the selection becomes less sharp. In contrast to sharply interfaced solidification patterns, these dendrites are outlined by a diffuse boundary, which width w ˜ 2xim. While anisotropic surface tension stabilizes crystalline growth, the magnetic field stabilizes this dendritic growth. Finding where and what scale convection first starts is important for understanding pattern selection in EHC. In the second part of this dissertation, fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy (FCPM) is employed to study normal dielectric rolls (NDRs) in a NLC. While polarizing microscopy gives a two-dimensional information of the integrated three-dimensional (3D) pattern of optical birefringence, FCPM can uniquely map 3D orientational patterns in LC. FCPM visualizes the intensity of polarized fluorescence light emitted by the dye molecules aligned by the LC molecules. The fluorescence

  12. Liquid relaxation: A new Parodi-like relation for nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscari, Paolo; DiCarlo, Antonio; Turzi, Stefano S.

    2016-05-01

    We put forward a hydrodynamic theory of nematic liquid crystals that includes both anisotropic elasticity and dynamic relaxation. Liquid remodeling is encompassed through a continuous update of the shear-stress free configuration. The low-frequency limit of the dynamical theory reproduces the classical Ericksen-Leslie theory, but it predicts two independent identities between the six Leslie viscosity coefficients. One replicates Parodi's relation, while the other—which involves five Leslie viscosities in a nonlinear way—is new. We discuss its significance, and we test its validity against evidence from physical experiments, independent theoretical predictions, and molecular-dynamics simulations.

  13. Self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on gold prepared in a hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystalline phase of Triton X-100/water system.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, V; Lakshminarayanan, V

    2006-02-14

    In this paper, we have reported a new method of preparing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of decanethiol and hexadecanethiol on gold surface by using a lyotropic liquid crystalline phase as an adsorbing medium. The stability and blocking ability of these SAMs were characterized using grazing angle Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The lyotropic liquid crystalline medium possesses a hexagonal structure consisting of a nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, water, and the corresponding thiol, which provides a highly hydrophobic environment to solubilize the alkanethiols and later to facilitate their delivery to the gold surface. We find that the SAMs formed from the hexagonal liquid crystalline phase are highly compact and have excellent electrochemical blocking ability towards the redox probes compared to conventional SAMs prepared from commonly used organic solvents such as ethanol. From the impedance studies, we have determined the capacitance of the monolayer-coated electrodes and the surface coverage of the SAM, which has been found to be >99.98% on gold surface. We have also estimated the extent of ionic permeability through the film and measured the rate constants for the redox reactions on the SAM-modified electrodes. Our results show that the rate constants of [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) and [Ru(NH3)6](2+/3+) redox couples are very much lower in the case of monolayers prepared in liquid crystalline phase compared to the SAM formed in 1 mM thiol in ethanol solution, suggesting a better blocking ability of the SAMs in the former case. From the grazing angle FTIR spectroscopic studies and capacitance measurements, we have ruled out any coadsorption of surfactant molecules on the Au surface. These results suggest that SAMs of very low defect density and extremely low ionic permeability can be obtained when a hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystalline phase is used as

  14. Reversible switching of liquid crystal micro-particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Koki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-01-21

    Liquid crystal micro-particles are functional materials possessing optical and dielectric anisotropies originating from the arrangement of rod-like molecules within the particles. Although they can be switched by an electric field, particles dispersed in isotropic hosts usually cannot return to their original state, because there is no restoration force acting on the particles. Here, we describe reversible switching of liquid crystal micro-particles by dispersing them in a nematic liquid crystal host. We fabricate square micro-particles with unidirectional molecular alignment and investigate their static and dynamic electro-optic properties by applying an in-plane electric field. The behavior of the micro-particles is well-described by the theoretical model we construct, making this study potentially useful for the development of liquid crystal-liquid crystal particle composites with engineered properties. PMID:26514389

  15. Disposition and association of the steric stabilizer Pluronic® F127 in lyotropic liquid crystalline nanostructured particle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Adam J; Drummond, Calum J; Boyd, Ben J

    2013-02-15

    Liquid crystalline nanostructured particles, such as cubosomes and hexosomes, are most often colloidally stabilised using the tri-block co-polymer Pluronic® F127. Although the effect of F127 on the internal particle nanostructure has been well studied, the associative aspects of F127 with cubosomes and hexosomes are poorly understood. In this study the quantitative association of F127 with phytantriol-based cubosomes and hexosomes was investigated. The amount of free F127 in the dispersions was determined using pressure ultra-filtration. The percentage of F127 associated with the particles plateaued with increasing F127 concentration above the critical aggregation concentration. Hence the free concentration of F127 in the dispersion medium was proposed as a key factor governing association below the CMC, and partitioning of F127 between micelles and particles occurred above the CMC. The association of F127 with the particles was irreversible on dilution. The F127 associated with both the external and internal surfaces of the phytantriol cubosomes. The effects of lipid and F127 concentration, lipid type, dilution of the dispersions and internal nanostructure were also elucidated. A greater amount of F127 was associated with cubosomes comprised of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) than those prepared using phytantriol. Hexosomes prepared using a mixture of phytantriol and vitamin E acetate (vitEA) had a greater amount of F127 associated with them than phytantriol cubosomes. Hexosomes prepared using selachyl alcohol had less F127 associated with them than phytantriol:vitEA-based hexosomes and GMO-based cubosomes. This indicated that both the lipid from which the particles are composed and the particle internal nanostructure have an influence on the association of F127 with lyotropic liquid crystalline nanostructured particles. PMID:23137909

  16. Long Range Order of Motile Defects in Active Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decamp, Stephen; Redner, Gabriel; Hagan, Michael; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-03-01

    Active 2D nematic liquid crystals exist in a dynamical steady state in which +1/2 and -1/2 defects are spontaneously generated and annihilated at a constant rate. Active stresses in the material are thought to destroy nematic order through the generation of these defects. We present an active nematic mesophase in which motile defects of charge +1/2 spontaneously acquire long range order. The system is composed of microtubule filaments and kinesin motor protein clusters which are confined to a flat, 2D oil-water interface. The addition of ATP results in microtubule bundles which exhibit kinesin-driven extensile motion. By tuning the density of the nematic material at the 2D interface, we can tune the order parameter of the +1/2 defect ordered mesophase. Additionally, the defect alignment persists over samples at the centimeter scale.

  17. High Magnetic Field-Induced Birefringence in Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapenko, T.; Nastishin, Yu.; Gleeson, J. T.; Sprunt, S. N.; Lavrentovich, O. D.; Collings, P. J.

    2009-03-01

    We studied the effect of magnetic-field induced birefringence of a 14% solution of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) in water at temperatures above the nematic-isotropic coexistence region. According to Landau-deGennes mean field theory, we expect to find a linear relationship between the inverse of the induced birefringence, δn, and the quantity (T-T*), where T* is the stability limit of the isotropic phase. Using the 31 T resistive magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, we observed that, as we increase the temperature above the coexistence region, we deviate from this linear dependence. Our data shows that δn goes to zero, whereas Landau-deGennes predicts that δn should decrease asymptotically. This may be due to the lack of isodesmic aggregate formation at a finite temperature above the coexistence region.Supported by NSF (DMR-0710544 and DMR-0606160). Work performed at NHMFL, supported by NSF cooperative agreements DMR-0084173, the State of Florida and the DOE.

  18. Recent developments of analysis for hydrodynamic flow of nematic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fanghua; Wang, Changyou

    2014-01-01

    The study of hydrodynamics of liquid crystals leads to many fascinating mathematical problems, which has prompted various interesting works recently. This article reviews the static Oseen–Frank theory and surveys some recent progress on the existence, regularity, uniqueness and large time asymptotic of the hydrodynamic flow of nematic liquid crystals. We will also propose a few interesting questions for future investigations. PMID:25332384

  19. In situ laser-imprinted surface realignment of a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Mirri, Giorgio; Škarabot, Miha; Muševič, Igor

    2015-05-01

    We present a new method for the in-plane realignment of nematic liquid crystals in already fully assembled cells with uni-directionally rubbed polyimide as an aligning layer. We use nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) with a relatively high nematic-isotropic transition temperature and we focus the IR laser beam of the laser tweezers selectively onto one or the other of the inner interfaces. The heat generated by the IR absorption locally melts the liquid crystal and creates an isotropic island with well-defined molecular anchoring at the nematic-isotropic interface. By scanning the laser beam along a pre-defined line, the moving isotropic-nematic interface leaves behind a well oriented LC domain, with LC molecules aligned at 45° to the rubbing direction. If we in addition move the sample with respect to this scanning line, we would be able to selectively realign micro-domains of the liquid crystal with respect to the original alignment induced by the PI rubbing. The realignment can be performed independently on each LC-glass interface, thereby producing predefined domains with customized and controllable alignment within an otherwise uniformly aligned cell. PMID:25790268

  20. Straining soft colloids in aqueous nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushenheim, Peter C.; Pendery, Joel S.; Weibel, Douglas B.; Spagnolie, Saverio E.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2016-05-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs), because of their long-range molecular ordering, are anisotropic, elastic fluids. Herein, we report that elastic stresses imparted by nematic LCs can dynamically shape soft colloids and tune their physical properties. Specifically, we use giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) as soft colloids and explore the interplay of mechanical strain when the GUVs are confined within aqueous chromonic LC phases. Accompanying thermal quenching from isotropic to LC phases, we observe the elasticity of the LC phases to transform initially spherical GUVs (diameters of 2–50 µm) into two distinct populations of GUVs with spindle-like shapes and aspect ratios as large as 10. Large GUVs are strained to a small extent (R/r < 1.54, where R and r are the major and minor radii, respectively), consistent with an LC elasticity-induced expansion of lipid membrane surface area of up to 3% and conservation of the internal GUV volume. Small GUVs, in contrast, form highly elongated spindles (1.54 < R/r < 10) that arise from an efflux of LCs from the GUVs during the shape transformation, consistent with LC-induced straining of the membrane leading to transient membrane pore formation. A thermodynamic analysis of both populations of GUVs reveals that the final shapes adopted by these soft colloids are dominated by a competition between the LC elasticity and an energy (˜0.01 mN/m) associated with the GUV–LC interface. Overall, these results provide insight into the coupling of strain in soft materials and suggest previously unidentified designs of LC-based responsive and reconfigurable materials.

  1. Straining soft colloids in aqueous nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Mushenheim, Peter C; Pendery, Joel S; Weibel, Douglas B; Spagnolie, Saverio E; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-05-17

    Liquid crystals (LCs), because of their long-range molecular ordering, are anisotropic, elastic fluids. Herein, we report that elastic stresses imparted by nematic LCs can dynamically shape soft colloids and tune their physical properties. Specifically, we use giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) as soft colloids and explore the interplay of mechanical strain when the GUVs are confined within aqueous chromonic LC phases. Accompanying thermal quenching from isotropic to LC phases, we observe the elasticity of the LC phases to transform initially spherical GUVs (diameters of 2-50 µm) into two distinct populations of GUVs with spindle-like shapes and aspect ratios as large as 10. Large GUVs are strained to a small extent (R/r < 1.54, where R and r are the major and minor radii, respectively), consistent with an LC elasticity-induced expansion of lipid membrane surface area of up to 3% and conservation of the internal GUV volume. Small GUVs, in contrast, form highly elongated spindles (1.54 < R/r < 10) that arise from an efflux of LCs from the GUVs during the shape transformation, consistent with LC-induced straining of the membrane leading to transient membrane pore formation. A thermodynamic analysis of both populations of GUVs reveals that the final shapes adopted by these soft colloids are dominated by a competition between the LC elasticity and an energy (∼0.01 mN/m) associated with the GUV-LC interface. Overall, these results provide insight into the coupling of strain in soft materials and suggest previously unidentified designs of LC-based responsive and reconfigurable materials. PMID:27140607

  2. Instability of a Biaxial Nematic Liquid Crystal Formed by Homeotropic Anchoring on Surface Grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Dong; Xuan, Li

    2011-10-01

    A method used to treat the elastic distortion of a uniaxial nematic liquid crystal induced by homogeneous anchoring on the surface grooves is generalized to biaxial nematic liquid crystals under the homeotropic anchoring condition. Employing some approximations for the elastic constants, we obtain an additional term in the elastic energy per unit area which depends on the angle between the minor director at infinity and the direction of the grooves, with a period of π/2. This leads to instability on the surface grooves so that two states with crossed minor directors are energetically indistinguishable. Our theoretical study explains why the homeotropic alignment method developed for uniaxial liquid crystals loses efficacy for biaxial nematics.

  3. Photorefractive Bragg gratings in nematic liquid crystals aligned by a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R. |

    1999-06-01

    Photorefractive Bragg gratings are observed in low-molar-mass nematic liquid crystals doped with electron donor and acceptor molecules. This is accomplished by alignment of the nematic liquid crystals in a 0.3 T magnetic field, which produces thicker homeotropic aligned samples than traditional surfactant techniques. Grating fringe spacings as low as 3.7 {mu}m are achieved with 176-{mu}m-thick samples, producing grating {ital Q} values of 33. Up to this point, low molar mass nematic liquid crystals have exhibited photorefractive gratings with Q{le}1. Asymmetric two-beam coupling and photoconductivity experiments are performed to verify the photorefractive origin of the gratings. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Colloidal interactions and self-assembly of plasmonic metal pyramids in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungoh; Smalyukh, Ivan

    Combining ordered structure of soft matter systems, such as liquid crystals, with the unique optical properties of metal nano- and micro-particles is a promising approach of designing and realizing mesostructured composites with pre-engineered properties. In this work, we disperse nanofabricated pyramid-shaped plasmonic particles in a nematic host fluid and demonstrate that the particles spontaneously align with respect to the uniform far-field liquid crystal director. This alignment is driven by minimization of the surface anchoring and bulk elastic free energies of the nematic host. Interestingly, multiple stable and metastable orientations of these particles can be controllably observed. Using laser tweezers and video microscopy, we explore inter-particle pair interaction forces as well as the ensuing colloidal self-assembly. We analyze this experimentally observed rich physical behavior of our soft matter composite by invoking electrostatic multipole analogy of elastic distortions induced by the particles in a nematic liquid crystal host and discuss potential practical uses.

  5. Dynamics and Instabilities of an overdamped active nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, Elias; Baskaran, Aparna

    Active nematics have been studied extensively in the context of suspensions of active particles, with a Stokes equation describing the flow of the surrounding fluid. Here we will present a continuum model of an overdamped (often termed 'dry') active nematic, where activity enters through self-induced flows. These flows represent the ability of the internal forces to convect, shear, or rotate the nematic order. The self-induced shear gives rise to an instability in the homogeneous ordered state which is analogous to that seen in active suspensions. The self-induced rotation gives rise to a new instability. A phase diagram from this model will be presented, and the phenomenology will be compared with what is seen in experimental and simulated active systems. We would like to acknowledge Grant support through NSF (NSF-DMR-1149266), (DMR-0820492), (NIH-5T32EB009419) and IGERT (DGE-1068620).

  6. Orientational optical nonlinearity induced by comb-shaped polymers in a nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Budagovsky, I. A.; Zolot'ko, A. S. Ochkin, V. N.; Smayev, M. P.; Bobrovsky, A. Yu.; Shibaev, V. P.; Barnik, M. I.

    2008-01-15

    The effect of optical orientation in nematic liquid crystals containing small additions of high-molecular compounds, i.e., comb-shaped polymers with light-absorbing azobenzene side fragments, was studied. The effects of light-induced reorientation of the director of nematic liquid crystals caused by light absorption of polymers and a low-molecular compound with a structure similar to side fragments of the polymers were compared in detail. An explanation was proposed for large values of the orientational nonlinearity induced by polymers.

  7. Photoinduced in-plane switching of a photochromic nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Komitov, L.; Yamamoto, J.; Yokoyama, H.

    2001-06-15

    Photoinduced fast in-plane switching of the optic axis of a photochromic nematic liquid crystal is found in a sandwich cell with substrates promoting a twofold degenerate anchoring. The switching process is governed by the modification of the anchoring conditions associated with the photoisomerization of the photochromic nematic liquid crystal. Photoinduced in-plane reorientation of the sample optic axis of about 80{degree} has been found. Together with the model of photoinduced in-plane switching, some implementations of this effect are briefly discussed. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Control on the anomalous interactions of Airy beams in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ming; Li, Wei; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2016-04-18

    We reveal a controllable manipulation of anomalous interactions between Airy beams in nonlocal nematic liquid crystals numerically. With the help of an in-phase fundamental Gaussian beam, attraction between in-phase Airy beams can be suppressed or become a repulsive one to each other; whereas the attraction can be strengthened when the Gaussian beam is out-of-phase. In contrast to the repulsive interaction in local media, stationary bound states of breathing Airy soliton pairs are found in nematic liquid crystals. PMID:27137288

  9. Vitrified chiral-nematic liquid crystalline films for selective reflection and circular polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Katsis, D.; Chen, P.H.M.; Mastrangelo, J.C.; Chen, S.H.; Blanton, T.N.

    1999-06-01

    Nematic and left-handed chiral-nematic liquid crystals comprising methoxybiphenylbenzoate and (S)-(-)-1-phenylethylamine pendants to a cyclohexane core were synthesized and characterized. Although pristine samples were found to be polycrystalline, thermal quenching following heating to and annealing at elevated temperatures permitted the molecular orders characteristic of liquid crystalline mesomorphism to be frozen in the glassy state. Left at room temperature for 6 months, the vitrified liquid crystalline films showed no evidence of recrystallization. An orientational order parameter of 0.65 was determined with linear dichroism of a vitrified nematic film doped with Exalite 428 at a mole fraction of 0.0025. Birefringence dispersion of a blank vitrified nematic film was determined using a phase-difference method complemented by Abbe refractometry. A series of vitrified chiral-nematic films were prepared to demonstrate selective reflection and circular polarization with a spectral region tunable from blue to the infrared region by varying the chemical composition. The experimentally measured circular polarization spectra were found to agree with the Good-Karali theory in which all four system parameters were determined a priori: optical birefringence, average refractive index, selective reflection wavelength, and film thickness.

  10. Deuterium NMR investigations of field-induced director alignment in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Akihiko; Luckhurst, Geoffrey R

    2016-05-01

    There have been many investigations of the alignment of nematic liquid crystals by either a magnetic and/or an electric field. The basic features of the important hydrodynamic processes for low molar mass nematics have been characterized for the systems in their equilibrium and non-equilibrium states. These have been created using electric and magnetic fields to align the director and deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H NMR) spectroscopy has been used to explore this alignment. Theoretical models based on continuum theory have been developed to complement the experiments and found to describe successfully the static and the dynamic phenomena observed. Such macroscopic behaviour has been investigated with (2)H NMR spectroscopy, in which an electric field in addition to the magnetic field of the spectrometer is used to rotate the director and produce a non-equilibrium state. This powerful technique has proved to be especially valuable for the investigation of nematic liquid crystals. Since the quadrupolar splitting for deuterons observed in the liquid crystal phase is determined by the angle between the director and the magnetic field, time-resolved and time-averaged (2)H NMR spectroscopies can be employed to investigate the dynamic director alignment process in a thin nematic film following the application or removal of an electric field. In this article, we describe some seminal studies to illustrate the field-induced static and dynamic director alignment for low molar mass nematics. PMID:27247284

  11. Anisotropic mechanical properties of a polymer nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taratuta, Victor G.; Lonberg, Franklin; Meyer, Robert B.

    1988-03-01

    A concentration dependence of elastic and viscous properties of nematic poly-γ-benzyl glutamate (PBG) was studied experimentally. The splay and bend constants are similar in magnitude, both linear in concentration. The twist constant is much smaller and constant. Viscosities exhibit large anisotropies. γ1 and ηc are roughly quadratic in concentration, ηa is linear, while ηb is constant. The data are self-consistently interpreted in terms of the theoretical models for nematics of semi flexible chains rather than those of rigid rods.

  12. Edge pinning and transformation of defect lines induced by faceted colloidal rings in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Liu, Qingkun; Yuan, Ye; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-06-01

    Nematic colloids exhibit a large diversity of topological defects and structures induced by colloidal particles in the orientationally ordered liquid crystal host fluids. These defects and field configurations define elastic interactions and medium-mediated self-assembly, as well as serve as model systems in exploiting the richness of interactions between topologies and geometries of colloidal surfaces, nematic fields, and topological singularities induced by particles in the nematic bulk and at nematic-colloidal interfaces. Here we demonstrate formation of quarter-strength surface-pinned disclinations, as well as a large variety of director field configurations with splitting and reconnections of singular defect lines, prompted by colloidal particles with sharp edges and size large enough to define strong boundary conditions. Using examples of faceted ring-shaped particles of genus g =1 , we explore transformation of defect lines as they migrate between locations in the bulk of the nematic host to edge-pinned locations at the surfaces of particles and vice versa, showing that this behavior is compliant with topological constraints defined by mathematical theorems. We discuss how transformation of bulk and surface defect lines induced by faceted colloids can enrich the diversity of elasticity-mediated colloidal interactions and how these findings may impinge on prospects of their controlled reconfigurable self-assembly in nematic hosts.

  13. Edge pinning and transformation of defect lines induced by faceted colloidal rings in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Liu, Qingkun; Yuan, Ye; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2016-06-01

    Nematic colloids exhibit a large diversity of topological defects and structures induced by colloidal particles in the orientationally ordered liquid crystal host fluids. These defects and field configurations define elastic interactions and medium-mediated self-assembly, as well as serve as model systems in exploiting the richness of interactions between topologies and geometries of colloidal surfaces, nematic fields, and topological singularities induced by particles in the nematic bulk and at nematic-colloidal interfaces. Here we demonstrate formation of quarter-strength surface-pinned disclinations, as well as a large variety of director field configurations with splitting and reconnections of singular defect lines, prompted by colloidal particles with sharp edges and size large enough to define strong boundary conditions. Using examples of faceted ring-shaped particles of genus g=1, we explore transformation of defect lines as they migrate between locations in the bulk of the nematic host to edge-pinned locations at the surfaces of particles and vice versa, showing that this behavior is compliant with topological constraints defined by mathematical theorems. We discuss how transformation of bulk and surface defect lines induced by faceted colloids can enrich the diversity of elasticity-mediated colloidal interactions and how these findings may impinge on prospects of their controlled reconfigurable self-assembly in nematic hosts. PMID:27415331

  14. The inherent dynamics of isotropic- and nematic-phase liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frechette, Layne; Stratt, Richard M.

    2016-06-01

    The geodesic (shortest) pathways through the potential energy landscape of a liquid can be thought of as defining what its dynamics would be if thermal noise were removed, revealing what we have called the "inherent dynamics" of the liquid. We show how these inherent paths can be located for a model liquid crystal former, showing, in the process, how the molecular mechanisms of translation and reorientation compare in the isotropic and nematic phases of these systems. These mechanisms turn out to favor the preservation of local orientational order even under macroscopically isotropic conditions (a finding consistent with the experimental observation of pseudonematic domains in these cases), but disfavor the maintenance of macroscopic orientational order, even in the nematic phase. While the most efficient nematic pathways that maintain nematic order are indeed shorter than those that do not, it is apparently difficult for the system to locate these paths, suggesting that molecular motion in liquid-crystal formers is dynamically frustrated, and reinforcing the sense that there are strong analogies between liquid crystals and supercooled liquids.

  15. The inherent dynamics of isotropic- and nematic-phase liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Frechette, Layne; Stratt, Richard M

    2016-06-21

    The geodesic (shortest) pathways through the potential energy landscape of a liquid can be thought of as defining what its dynamics would be if thermal noise were removed, revealing what we have called the "inherent dynamics" of the liquid. We show how these inherent paths can be located for a model liquid crystal former, showing, in the process, how the molecular mechanisms of translation and reorientation compare in the isotropic and nematic phases of these systems. These mechanisms turn out to favor the preservation of local orientational order even under macroscopically isotropic conditions (a finding consistent with the experimental observation of pseudonematic domains in these cases), but disfavor the maintenance of macroscopic orientational order, even in the nematic phase. While the most efficient nematic pathways that maintain nematic order are indeed shorter than those that do not, it is apparently difficult for the system to locate these paths, suggesting that molecular motion in liquid-crystal formers is dynamically frustrated, and reinforcing the sense that there are strong analogies between liquid crystals and supercooled liquids. PMID:27334177

  16. Shape-controlled orientation and assembly of colloids with sharp edges in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Beller, Daniel A; Gharbi, Mohamed A; Liu, Iris B

    2015-02-14

    The assembly of colloids in nematic liquid crystals via topological defects has been extensively studied for spherical particles, and investigations of other colloid shapes have revealed a wide array of new assembly behaviors. We show, using Landau-de Gennes numerical modeling, that nematic defect configurations and colloidal assembly can be strongly influenced by fine details of colloid shape, in particular the presence of sharp edges. For cylinder, microbullet, and cube colloid geometries, we obtain the particles' equilibrium alignment directions and effective pair interaction potentials as a function of simple shape parameters. We find that defects pin at sharp edges, and that the colloid consequently orients at an oblique angle relative to the far-field nematic director that depends on the colloid's shape. This shape-dependent alignment, which we confirm in experimental measurements, raises the possibility of selecting self-assembly outcomes for colloids in liquid crystals by tuning particle geometry. PMID:25523158

  17. Seeing and Sculpting Nematic Liquid Crystal Textures with the Thom construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bryan; Alexander, Gareth

    2012-02-01

    Nematic liquid crystals are the foundation for modern display technology and also exhibit topological defects that can readily be seen under a microscope. Recently, experimentalists have been able to create and control several new families of interesting defect textures, including reconfigurably knotted defect lines around colloids (Ljubljana) and the ``toron,'' a pair of hedgehogs bound together with a ring of double-twist between them (CU Boulder). We apply the Thom construction from algebraic topology to visualize 3 dimensional molecular orientation fields as certain colored surfaces in the sample. These surfaces turn out to be a generalization to 3 dimensions of the dark brushes seen in Schlieren textures of two-dimensional samples of nematics. Manipulations of these surfaces correspond to deformations of the nematic orientation fields, giving a hands-on way to classify liquid crystal textures which is also easily computable from data and robust to noise.

  18. Chiral conglomerates observed for a binary mixture of a nematic liquid crystal trimer and 6OCB.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Atsushi; Kato, Yusuke; Sasaki, Haruna; Takanishi, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Dark conglomerates of domains with opposite handedness, which are designated as dark conglomerate phases (DC phases), have attracted much attention. After designing an achiral liquid crystal trimer, 4,4′-bis{7-[4-(5-octyloxypyrimidin-2-yl)phenyloxy]heptyloxy}biphenyl (1), which exhibits only a nematic phase, we prepared binary mixtures with some typical rod-like nematic liquid crystals, i.e., 4′-hexyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl (6OCB), 2-(4-hexyloxyphenyl)-5-pentyloxypyrimidine (PPY), or 4-methyloxyphenyl 4-hexyloxycyclohexanecarboxylate (PCA), and investigated their phase transition behaviour. The binary mixtures containing 55–90 mol% of 6OCB were found to exhibit a nematic phase and a DC phase of chiral domains with opposite handedness. However, neither PPY nor PCA induced such a chiral conglomerate phase in the mixture with trimer 1. We discuss how core–core interactions contribute to produce such a chiral conglomerate phase. PMID:26395546

  19. Self-assembly via branching morphologies in nematic liquid-crystal nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Sebastian; Soule, Ezequiel; Rey, Alejandro; Reven, Linda; Provatas, Nikolas

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate that the morphological diversity in liquid-crystal hybrid systems is much richer than previously anticipated. More importantly, we reveal the existence of a dual mechanism for self-assembly of nanoparticles via morphological instabilities at phase boundaries. Using numerical simulations, we study the growth of isolated nematic droplets in an isotropic liquid crystal (LC) doped with nanoparticles (NPs) and provide insight into the nature of microstructure evolution in LC hybrids. Our work expands the numerically accessible time and length scales in these systems, capturing morphologies which develop under the competition of nonequilibrium elastic interactions, diffusive instabilities mediated by NP transport, and the anisotropy of the nematic field. By mapping nematic morphologies, we also propose a methodology for estimating various important LC material parameters that are difficult to obtain experimentally.

  20. Nanofabrication of highly ordered, tunable metallic mesostructures via quasi-hard-templating of lyotropic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyi; Lu, Wei; Dai, Jiyan; Bourgeois, Laure; Yao, Jianfeng; Wang, Huanting; Friend, James R.; Zhao, Dongyuan; MacFarlane, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of metal frameworks perforated with nanotunnels is a challenge because metals have high surface energies that favor low surface area structures; traditional liquid-crystal templating techniques cannot achieve the synthetic control required. We report a synthetic strategy to fabricate metal nanomaterials with highly ordered, tunable mesostructures in confined systems based on a new quasi-hard-templating liquid-crystals mechanism. The resulting platinum nanowires exhibit long range two-dimensional hexagonally ordered mesopore structures. In addition, single crystalline hexagonal mesoporous platinum nanowires with dominant {110} facets have been synthesized. Finally, we demonstrate that the mesostructures of metal nanomaterials can be tuned from hexagonal to lamellar mesostructures. PMID:25502015

  1. Possible enhancement of physical properties of nematic liquid crystals by doping of conducting polymer nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manda, R.; Dasari, V.; Sathyanarayana, P.; Rasna, M. V.; Paik, P.; Dhara, Surajit

    2013-09-01

    We report on the preparation and physical characterization of the colloidal suspension of conducting polyaniline (PANI) nanofibres and a nematic liquid crystal (5CB). The ac electrical conductivity anisotropy increases significantly and the rotational viscosity decreases with increasing wt. % of PANI nanofibres, while other physical properties such as birefringence, dielectric anisotropy, splay, and bend elastic constants are changed moderately. The high conductivity anisotropy of liquid crystal nano-composites is very useful for magnetically steered liquid crystal-nanofibre switch.

  2. Effects of temperature on the alignment and electrooptical responses of a nematic nanoscale liquid crystalline film.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lay Min; Kwon, Hye J; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Schweizer, Ken S

    2006-08-17

    The surface-induced alignment and electrooptical (EO) dynamics of a 50-nm-thick liquid crystalline (4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl; 5CB) film were studied at three temperatures: 25 and 33 degrees C (near the crystalline-nematic and nematic-isotropic transition temperatures, respectively) and 29 degrees C (a median temperature in the stability region of the nematic phase). The ZnSe surfaces that entrap the liquid crystal (LC) film have been polished unidirectionally to produce a grooved surface presenting nanometer-scale corrugations, a structure that induces a planar and homogeneous orientation in the nematic phase. The present work attempts to understand the influences of temperature on the surface-induced alignment and corresponding EO dynamics of the material. Step-scan time-resolved spectroscopy measurements were made to determine the rate constants for the electric-field-induced orientation and thermal relaxation of the 5CB film. The field-driven orientation rates vary sensitively with temperature across a range that spans the stability limits of the nematic phase; the relaxation rates, however, vary very little across this same temperature range. We propose that these differences in LC behavior arise as consequence of the interplay of the temperature dependence of the elastic constants, viscosity, and degree of orientational order of the LC medium. A simple theoretical model provides some understanding of these behaviors. PMID:16898726

  3. Xanthan Gum-a lyotropic, liquid crystalline polymer and its properties as a suspending agent

    SciTech Connect

    Salamone, J.C.; Clough, S.B.; Jamison, D.E.; Reid, K.I.G.; Salamone, A.B.

    1982-08-01

    Studies a variety of xanthan solutions of various polymer concentrations in the presence and absence of various salts under a polarized light microscope (100X) in order to test xanthan gum for liquid crystalline order. Xanthan gum, a polysaccharide used in drilling fluids and in tertiary recovery, has relatively stable viscosity properties as a function of salt concentration, pH, temperature, and shear degradation. With solutions from 2 to 10% (wt/vol) xanthan gum in distilled water at room temperature, birefringent, ordered domains were observed at 10% concentration, with a decrease in birefringence as the polymer concentration decreased. When the xanthan solution is sheared between a glass slide and a cover slip, the optic axis (chain direction) aligns using the shear direction (as determined by the colors displayed using a first-order red plate). Examines liquid crystalline behavior of other naturally occurring polymers.

  4. Tunable terahertz fishnet metamaterials based on thin nematic liquid crystal layers for fast switching

    PubMed Central

    Zografopoulos, Dimitrios C.; Beccherelli, Romeo

    2015-01-01

    The electrically tunable properties of liquid-crystal fishnet metamaterials are theoretically investigated in the terahertz spectrum. A nematic liquid crystal layer is introduced between two fishnet metallic structures, forming a voltage-controlled metamaterial cavity. Tuning of the nematic molecular orientation is shown to shift the magnetic resonance frequency of the metamaterial and its overall electromagnetic response. A shift higher than 150 GHz is predicted for common dielectric and liquid crystalline materials used in terahertz technology and for low applied voltage values. Owing to the few micron-thick liquid crystal cell, the response speed of the tunable metamaterial is calculated as orders of magnitude faster than in demonstrated liquid-crystal based non-resonant terahertz components. Such tunable metamaterial elements are proposed for the advanced control of electromagnetic wave propagation in terahertz applications. PMID:26272652

  5. Nematicons deflection through interaction with disclination lines in chiral nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Laudyn, Urszula A.; Karpierz, Miroslaw A.

    2013-11-25

    In this work, we study experimentally the interaction of spatial optical soliton in chiral nematic liquid crystals with disclination line created in a wedge shaped cell. We show that in most cases the self-confined beam preserves this interaction. We demonstrate that this interaction can be employed for efficient bending of the soliton trajectory, as a result of reflection and refraction.

  6. Surface charge and interactions of 20-nm nanocolloids in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkova, A. V.; Škarabot, M.; Muševič, I.

    2015-04-01

    We studied real-time motion of individual 20-nm silica nanoparticles in a thin layer of a nematic liquid crystal using a dark-field optical videomicroscopy. By tracking the positions of individual nanoparticles we observed that particle pair interactions are not only mediated by strong thermal fluctuations of the nematic liquid crystal, but also with a repulsive force of electric origin. We determined the total electric charge of silanated silica particles in the nematic liquid crystal 5CB by observing the electric-force-driven drift. Surprisingly, the surface electric charge density depends on colloidal size and is ˜4.5 ×10-3C/m2 for 20-nm nanocolloids, and two orders of magnitude lower, i.e., ˜2.3 ×10-5C/m2 , for 1 -μ m colloids. We conclude that electrostatic repulsion between like-charged particles prevents the formation of permanent colloidal assemblies of nanometer size. We also observed strong attraction of 20-nm silica nanoparticles to confining polyimide surfaces and larger clusters, which gradually results in complete expulsion of nanoparticles from the nematic liquid crystal to the surfaces of the confining cell.

  7. A new method for solid surface topographical studies using nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baber, N.; Strugalski, Z.

    1984-03-01

    A new simple method has been developed to investigate the topography of a wide range of solid surfaces using nematic liquid crystals. Polarizing microscopy is employed. The usefulness of the method for detecting weak mechanical effects has been demonstrated. An application in criminology is foreseen.

  8. Surface charge and interactions of 20-nm nanocolloids in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Ryzhkova, A V; Škarabot, M; Muševič, I

    2015-04-01

    We studied real-time motion of individual 20-nm silica nanoparticles in a thin layer of a nematic liquid crystal using a dark-field optical videomicroscopy. By tracking the positions of individual nanoparticles we observed that particle pair interactions are not only mediated by strong thermal fluctuations of the nematic liquid crystal, but also with a repulsive force of electric origin. We determined the total electric charge of silanated silica particles in the nematic liquid crystal 5CB by observing the electric-force-driven drift. Surprisingly, the surface electric charge density depends on colloidal size and is ∼4.5×10(-3)C/m(2) for 20-nm nanocolloids, and two orders of magnitude lower, i.e., ∼2.3×10(-5)C/m(2), for 1-μm colloids. We conclude that electrostatic repulsion between like-charged particles prevents the formation of permanent colloidal assemblies of nanometer size. We also observed strong attraction of 20-nm silica nanoparticles to confining polyimide surfaces and larger clusters, which gradually results in complete expulsion of nanoparticles from the nematic liquid crystal to the surfaces of the confining cell. PMID:25974514

  9. Shear rheology and in-vitro release kinetic study of apigenin from lyotropic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jun; Liu, Feng; Wang, Zhongni

    2016-01-30

    Apigenin is a flavonoid compound with diverse pharmacological functions which could develop health benefit products, but its formulation is hampered by its poor water solubility and bioavailability. In this paper, in order to overcome these difficulties, apigenin was encapsulated in LLC formed by polyoxyethylene-10-oleyl ether (Brij 97) and sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) mixtures. The hexagonal liquid crystalline phase (H) and the cubic liquid crystalline phase (C) were found in this system. The shear rheology was used to study the structure change with temperature. It was shown that C3 (Brij 97-NaDC/IPM-PEG400/H2O=36:9:55) was C at low temperature. But above 35.6°C, the matrix of C3 completely transformed to polymer solution. The matrix of H3 was H (Brij 97-NaDC:IPM-PEG 400:H2O=50:9:41) below 50°C, but the structural strength change was obvious. Vitro release experiment was used to study drug release kinetics. It was indicated that apigenin encapsulated in LLC conformed to the concentration diffusion model, and cumulative percentage of apigenin released from C3 and H3 had corresponding relationship with the shear rheology at different temperatures. PMID:26657272

  10. Periodic saddle-splay Freedericksz transition in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Kralj, S; Rosso, R; Virga, E G

    2005-05-01

    By use of a local stability criterion recently introduced, we predict the existence of a periodic saddle-splay Freedericksz (PSSF) transition that adds to the existing class of classical Freedericksz transitions driven in a nematic cell by an external field. Occurrence of the PSSF transition requires a saddle-splay elastic constant with a large enough magnitude and different anchoring strengths at the plates confining the nematic cell. Otherwise, either the PSSF transition does not occur at all, or it requires a field higher than that associated with the classical aperiodic splay Freedericksz (ASF) transition, in which case it is not observable. Here, we determine the threshold field for which the PSSF precedes the ASF transition, as well as the structure of the destabilizing mode. PMID:15864725