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Sample records for neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy

  1. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and pathological complete response in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Linda; Fichera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The management of rectal cancer has evolved significantly in the last few decades. Significant improvements in local disease control were achieved in the 1990s, with the introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Level 1 evidence has shown that, with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) the rates of local recurrence can be lower than 6% and, as a result, neoadjuvant CRT currently represents the accepted standard of care. This approach has led to reliable tumor down-staging, with 15–27% patients with a pathological complete response (pCR)—defined as no residual cancer found on histological examination of the specimen. Patients who achieve pCR after CRT have better long-term outcomes, less risk of developing local or distal recurrence and improved survival. For all these reasons, sphincter-preserving procedures or organ-preserving options have been suggested, such as local excision of residual tumor or the omission of surgery altogether. Although local recurrence rate has been stable at 5–6% with this multidisciplinary management method, distal recurrence rates for locally-advanced rectal cancers remain in excess of 25% and represent the main cause of death in these patients. For this reason, more recent trials have been looking at the administration of full-dose systemic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting (in order to offer early treatment of disseminated micrometastases, thus improving control of systemic disease) and selective use of radiotherapy only in non-responders or for low rectal tumors smaller than 5 cm. PMID:26290512

  2. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for borderline pancreatic adenocarcinoma: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Galindo, José; Gabrielli, Mauricio; Guerra, Juan Francisco; Cassina, Juan Carlos; Garrido, Marcelo; Jarufe, Nicolás; Borghero, Yerko; Madrid, Jorge; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Roa, Juan Carlos; Martínez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains as one of the most aggressive human neoplasms, with overall poor survival rates. Radical surgery of the primary lesion is the best option for treatment. Borderline resectable pancreatic tumors (BRPT), defined as partial involvement of peripancreatic vasculature, may benefit from neoadjuvant therapy. We report on the first two BRPT cases treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation at our institution. Preoperative CT and MRI demonstrated pancreatic tumors encasing the porto-mesenteric confluence suggestive of BRPT. Patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (gemcitabine/cisplatin), followed by radiochemotherapy. After treatment, follow-up images demonstrated tumor downsize, allowing for the tumors to be considered then as resectable. They underwent partial pancreatoduodenectomies (Whipple procedure). In case 1, histopathology revealed a complete, margin-free resection, whereas in case 2 there was a complete pathological response, with no evidence of residual tumor. According to the literature, our initial experience using neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy on BRPT allowed us to downsize the tumor and, subsequently, to perform a curative surgery. PMID:23379413

  3. [A Case of Pancreatic Head Cancer Showing Pathological Complete Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy].

    PubMed

    Nakama, Yohei; Kawahara, Ryuichi; Nomura, Yoriko; Muroya, Daisuke; Arai, Shoichiro; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Yasunaga, Masafumi; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Akagi, Yoshito; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Yasumoto, Makiko; Okabe, Yoshinobu; Torimura, Takuji; Naito, Yoshiki; Okuda, Koji

    2015-11-01

    The patient was a 64-year-old woman. She was referred to our institute because of a chief complaint of upper abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomographic scan revealed a 35 mm hypovascular tumor in the pancreatic head and superior mesenteric vein (SMV), as well as thrombosis. We chose neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NACRT) (S-1/RT, 50.4 Gy/28 Fr) and anticoagulants. After the treatment, the primary lesion showed a partial response, and the SMV thrombosis was reduced. We performed pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histopathological examination revealed no cancer cells in the pancreas. Pathological evaluation revealed grade Ⅳ tumor according to the Evans classification. The patient had had no recurrence for 10 months after the pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:26805369

  4. Intensity modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost based dose escalation on neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced distal esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ming; Aguila, Fernando N; Patel, Taral; Knapp, Mark; Zhu, Xue-Qiang; Chen, Xi-Lin; Price, Phillip D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate impact of radiation therapy dose escalation through intensity modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the patients who underwent four-dimensional-based IMRT-SIB-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation protocol. During the concurrent chemoradiation therapy, radiation therapy was through IMRT-SIB delivered in 28 consecutive daily fractions with total radiation doses of 56 Gy to tumor and 5040 Gy dose-painted to clinical tumor volume, with a regimen at the discretion of the treating medical oncologist. This was followed by surgical tumor resection. We analyzed pathological completion response (pCR) rates its relationship with overall survival and event-free survival. RESULTS: Seventeen patients underwent dose escalation with the IMRT-SIB protocol between 2007 and 2014 and their records were available for analysis. Among the IMRT-SIB-treated patients, the toxicity appeared mild, the most common side effects were grade 1-3 esophagitis (46%) and pneumonitis (11.7%). There were no cardiac events. The Ro resection rate was 94% (n = 16), the pCR rate was 47% (n = 8), and the postoperative morbidity was zero. There was one mediastinal failure found, one patient had local failure at the anastomosis site, and the majority of failures were distant in the lung or bone. The 3-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 41% (n = 7) and 53% (n = 9), respectively. CONCLUSION: The dose escalation through IMRT-SIB in the chemoradiation regimen seems responsible for down-staging the distal esophageal with well-tolerated complications. PMID:27190587

  5. Residual Tumor After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Outside the Radiation Therapy Target Volume: A New Prognostic Factor for Survival in Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Muijs, Christina; Smit, Justin; Karrenbeld, Arend; Beukema, Jannet; Mul, Veronique; Dam, Go van; Hospers, Geke; Kluin, Phillip; Langendijk, Johannes; Plukker, John

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation and clinical target volume (CTV) margins for neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (neo-CRT) in esophageal carcinoma at pathologic examination and to determine the impact on survival. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 63 esophageal cancer patients treated with neo-CRT. GTV and CTV borders were demarcated in situ during surgery on the esophagus, using anatomical reference points to provide accurate information regarding tumor location at pathologic evaluation. To identify prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS), a Cox regression analysis was performed. Results: After resection, macroscopic residual tumor was found outside the GTV in 7 patients (11%). Microscopic residual tumor was located outside the CTV in 9 patients (14%). The median follow-up was 15.6 months. With multivariate analysis, only microscopic tumor outside the CTV (hazard ratio [HR], 4.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-15.36), and perineural growth (HR, 5.77; 95% CI, 1.27-26.13) were identified as independent prognostic factors for OS. The 1-year OS was 20% for patients with tumor outside the CTV and 86% for those without (P<.01). For DFS, microscopic tumor outside the CTV (HR, 5.92; 95% CI, 1.89-18.54) and ypN+ (HR, 3.36; 95% CI, 1.33-8.48) were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. The 1-year DFS was 23% versus 77% for patients with or without tumor outside the CTV (P<.01). Conclusions: Microscopic tumor outside the CTV is associated with markedly worse OS after neo-CRT. This may either stress the importance of accurate tumor delineation or reflect aggressive tumor behavior requiring new adjuvant treatment modalities.

  6. MRI Risk Stratification for Tumor Relapse in Rectal Cancer Achieving Pathological Complete Remission after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Honsoul; Myoung, Sungmin; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Ahn, Joong Bae; Hur, Hyuk; Lim, Joon Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Rectal cancer patients achieving pCR are known to have an excellent prognosis, yet no widely accepted consensus on risk stratification and post-operative management (e.g., adjuvant therapy) has been established. This study aimed to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) high-risk factors for tumor relapse in pathological complete remission (pCR) achieved by rectal cancer patients who have undergone neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and curative resection. Materials and Methods We analyzed 88 (male/female = 55/33, median age, 59.5 years [range 34–78]) pCR-proven rectal cancer patients who had undergone pre-CRT MRI, CRT, post-CRT MRI and curative surgery between July 2005 and December 2012. Patients were observed for post-operative tumor relapse. We analyzed the pre/post-CRT MRIs for parameters including mrT stage, mesorectal fascia (mrMRF) status, tumor volume, tumor regression grade (mrTRG), nodal status (mrN), and extramural vessel invasion (mrEMVI). We performed univariate analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results Post-operative tumor relapse occurred in seven patients (8.0%, n = 7/88) between 5.7 and 50.7 (median 16.8) months. No significant relevance was observed between tumor volume, volume reduction rate, mrTRG, mrT, or mrN status. Meanwhile, positive mrMRF (Ppre-CRT = 0.018, Ppre/post-CRT = 0.006) and mrEMVI (Ppre-CRT = 0.026, Ppre-/post-CRT = 0.008) were associated with higher incidence of post-operative tumor relapse. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a higher risk of tumor relapse in patients with positive mrMRF (Ppre-CRT = 0.029, Ppre-/post-CRT = 0.009) or mrEMVI (Ppre-CRT = 0.024, Ppre-/post-CRT = 0.003). Conclusion Positive mrMRF and mrEMVI status was associated with a higher risk of post-operative tumor relapse of pCR achieved by rectal cancer patients, and therefore, can be applied for risk stratification and to individualize treatment plans. PMID:26730717

  7. MRI Predictive Factors for Tumor Response in Rectal Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy - Implications for Induction Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Stanley K.T.; Tait, Diana

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics at baseline and following chemoradiation therapy (CRT) most strongly associated with histopathologic response were investigated and survival outcomes evaluated in accordance with imaging and pathological response. Methods and Materials: Responders were defined as mrT3c/d-4 downstaged to ypT0-2 on pathology or low at risk mrT2 downstaged to ypT1 or T0. Multivariate logistic regression of baseline and posttreatment MRI: T, N, extramural venous invasion (EMVI), circumferential resection margin, craniocaudal length <5 cm, and MRI tumor height ≤5 cm were used to identify independent predictor(s) for response. An association between induction chemotherapy and EMVI status was analyzed. Survival outcomes for pathologic and MRI responders and nonresponders were analyzed. Results: Two hundred eighty-one patients were eligible; 114 (41%) patients were pathology responders. Baseline MRI negative EMVI (odds ratio 2.94, P=.007), tumor height ≤5 cm (OR 1.96, P=.02), and mrEMVI status change (positive to negative) following CRT (OR 3.09, P<.001) were the only predictors for response. There was a strong association detected between induction chemotherapy and ymrEMVI status change after CRT (OR 9.0, P<.003). ymrT0-2 gave a positive predictive value of 80% and OR of 9.1 for ypT0-2. ymrN stage accuracy of ypN stage was 75%. Three-year disease-free survival for pathology and MRI responders were similar at 80% and 79% and significantly better than poor responders. Conclusions: Tumor height and mrEMVI status are more important than baseline size and stage of the tumor as predictors of response to CRT. Both MRI- and pathologic-defined responders have significantly improved survival. “Good response” to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer with ypT0-2 carries significantly better 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival. Use of induction chemotherapy for improving mrEMVI status and knowledge of MRI

  8. Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuremsky, Jeffrey G.; Tepper, Joel E.; McLeod, Howard L. Phar

    2009-07-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is currently treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Although approximately 45% of patients respond to neoadjuvant therapy with T-level downstaging, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond. Molecular biomarkers have been investigated for their ability to predict outcome in LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. A literature search using PubMed resulted in the initial assessment of 1,204 articles. Articles addressing the ability of a biomarker to predict outcome for LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation were included. Six biomarkers met the criteria for review: p53, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), thymidylate synthase, Ki-67, p21, and bcl-2/bax. On the basis of composite data, p53 is unlikely to have utility as a predictor of response. Epidermal growth factor receptor has shown promise as a predictor when quantitatively evaluated in pretreatment biopsies or when EGFR polymorphisms are evaluated in germline DNA. Thymidylate synthase, when evaluated for polymorphisms in germline DNA, is promising as a predictive biomarker. Ki-67 and bcl-2 are not useful in predicting outcome. p21 needs to be further evaluated to determine its usefulness in predicting outcome. Bax requires more investigation to determine its usefulness. Epidermal growth factor receptor, thymidylate synthase, and p21 should be evaluated in larger prospective clinical trials for their ability to guide preoperative therapy choices in LARC.

  9. Spatial-Temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Features for Predicting Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Shan; Kligerman, Seth; Chen, Wengen; Lu, Minh; Kim, Grace; Feigenberg, Steven; D'Souza, Warren D.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Lu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To extract and study comprehensive spatial-temporal {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) features for the prediction of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with esophageal cancer were treated with trimodal therapy (CRT plus surgery) and underwent [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT scans both before (pre-CRT) and after (post-CRT) CRT. The 2 scans were rigidly registered. A tumor volume was semiautomatically delineated using a threshold standardized uptake value (SUV) of ≥2.5, followed by manual editing. Comprehensive features were extracted to characterize SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns (texture), tumor geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT. The usefulness of each feature in predicting pathologic tumor response to CRT was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) value. Results: The best traditional response measure was decline in maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}; AUC, 0.76). Two new intensity features, decline in mean SUV (SUV{sub mean}) and skewness, and 3 texture features (inertia, correlation, and cluster prominence) were found to be significant predictors with AUC values ≥0.76. According to these features, a tumor was more likely to be a responder when the SUV{sub mean} decline was larger, when there were relatively fewer voxels with higher SUV values pre-CRT, or when [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake post-CRT was relatively homogeneous. All of the most accurate predictive features were extracted from the entire tumor rather than from the most active part of the tumor. For SUV intensity features and tumor size features, changes were more predictive than pre- or post-CRT assessment alone. Conclusion: Spatial-temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET features were found to be useful predictors of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant CRT in esophageal cancer.

  10. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P < 0.05). Our result suggested that pretreatment status of TP and HIF-1α were found to predict pathologic response and outcomes in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study. PMID:26617778

  11. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy Using Concurrent S-1 and Irinotecan in Rectal Cancer: Impact on Long-Term Clinical Outcomes and Prognostic Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Takatoshi; Yamashita, Keishi; Sato, Takeo; Ema, Akira; Naito, Masanori; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term outcomes of patients with rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NCRT) with concurrent S-1 and irinotecan (S-1/irinotecan) therapy. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 115 patients with clinical stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Patients received pelvic radiation therapy (45 Gy) plus concurrent oral S-1/irinotecan. The median follow-up was 60 months. Results: Grade 3 adverse effects occurred in 7 patients (6%), and the completion rate of NCRT was 87%. All 115 patients (100%) were able to undergo R0 surgical resection. Twenty-eight patients (24%) had a pathological complete response (ypCR). At 60 months, the local recurrence-free survival was 93%, disease-free survival (DFS) was 79%, and overall survival (OS) was 80%. On multivariate analysis with a proportional hazards model, ypN2 was the only independent prognostic factor for DFS (P=.0019) and OS (P=.0064) in the study group as a whole. Multivariate analysis was additionally performed for the subgroup of 106 patients with ypN0/1 disease, who had a DFS rate of 85.3%. Both ypT (P=.0065) and tumor location (P=.003) were independent predictors of DFS. A combination of these factors was very strongly related to high risk of recurrence (P<.0001), which occurred most commonly in the lung. Conclusions: NCRT with concurrent S-1/irinotecan produced high response rates and excellent long-term survival, with acceptable adverse effects in patients with rectal cancer. ypN2 is a strong predictor of dismal outcomes, and a combination of ypT and tumor location can identify high-risk patients among those with ypN0/1 disease.

  12. Relationship Between Radiation Therapy Dose and Outcome in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Surgery for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Population-Based, Comparative Effectiveness Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Fidler, Mary Jo; Seder, Christopher W.; Liptay, Michael J.; Koshy, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To compare, using the National Cancer Database, survival, pathologic, and surgical outcomes in patients with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with differential doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, with the aim to discern whether radiation dose escalation was associated with a comparative effectiveness benefit and/or toxicity risk. Methods and Materials: Patients in the National Cancer Database with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and surgery between 1998 and 2005 were analyzed. Dose strata were divided between 36 to 45 Gy (low-dose radiation therapy, LD-RT), 45 to 54 Gy (inclusive, standard-dose, SD-RT), and 54 to 74 Gy (high-dose, HD-RT). Outcomes included overall survival, residual nodal disease, positive surgical margin status, hospital length of stay, and adverse surgical outcomes (30-day mortality or readmission). Results: The cohort consisted of 1041 patients: 233 (22%) LD-RT, 584 (56%) SD-RT, and 230 (22%) HD-RT. The median, 3-year, and 5-year overall survival outcomes were 34.9 months, 48%, and 37%, respectively. On univariable analysis, patients treated with SD-RT experienced prolonged overall survival (median 38.3 vs 31.8 vs 29.0 months for SD-RT, LD-RT, and HD-RT, respectively, P=.0089), which was confirmed on multivariable analysis (hazard ratios 0.77 and 0.81 vs LD and HD, respectively). Residual nodal disease was seen less often after HD-RT (25.5% vs 31.8% and 37.5% for HD-RT, LD-RT, and SD-RT, respectively, P=.0038). Patients treated with SD-RT had fewer prolonged hospital stays. There were no differences in positive surgical margin status or adverse surgical outcomes between the cohorts. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy between 45 and 54 Gy was associated with superior survival in comparison with doses above and below this threshold. Although this conclusion is limited by selection bias, clear candidates for trimodality therapy do not seem to

  13. The spectrum of histopathological changes encountered in pancreatectomy specimens after neoadjuvant chemoradiation, including subtle and less-well-recognised changes.

    PubMed

    Kalimuthu, Sangeetha N; Serra, Stefano; Dhani, Neesha; Chetty, Runjan

    2016-06-01

    Preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemoradiation therapy/treatment (NCRT) is emerging as an important treatment modality in borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The constellation of histopathological changes secondary to chemoradiation is diverse and has been well documented, particularly in other gastrointestinal organs such as the oesophagus and colorectum. However, the histological changes specific to the pancreas have not been fully characterised and described. This review aims to provide a detailed catalogue of histological features associated with NCRT-treated PDAC and highlight any subtle, less-recognised changes. PMID:26915370

  14. Association of statin use with a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Matthew S.; Minsky, Bruce D. . E-mail: minskyb@mskcc.org; Saltz, Leonard B.; Riedel, Elyn; Chessin, David B.; Guillem, Jose G.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To assess whether 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, or statins, might enhance the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2001, 358 patients with clinically resectable, nonmetastatic rectal cancer underwent surgery at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for either locally advanced tumors or low-lying tumors that would require abdominoperineal resection. We excluded 9 patients for radiation therapy dose <45 Gy or if statin use was unknown, leaving 349 evaluable patients. Median radiation therapy dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45-55.8 Gy), and 308 patients (88%) received 5-flurouracil-based chemotherapy. Medication use, comorbid illnesses, clinical stage as assessed by digital rectal examination and ultrasound, and type of chemotherapy were analyzed for associations with pathologic complete response (pCR), defined as no microscopic evidence of tumor. Fisher's exact test was used for categoric variables, Mantel-Haenszel test for ordered categoric variables, and logistic regression for multivariate analysis. Results: Thirty-three patients (9%) used a statin, with no differences in clinical stage according to digital rectal examination or ultrasound compared with the other 324 patients. At the time of surgery, 23 nonstatin patients (7%) were found to have metastatic disease, compared with 0% for statin patients. The unadjusted pCR rates with and without statin use were 30% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.10). Variables significant univariately at the p = 0.15 level were entered into a multivariate model, as were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which were strongly associated with statin use. The odds ratio for statin use on pCR was 4.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.7-12.1; p = 0.003) after adjusting for NSAID use, clinical stage, and type of chemotherapy. Conclusion: In multivariate analysis, statin use is associated with an improved p

  15. Neoadjuvant therapy before surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Chau, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Neoadjuvant treatment in terms of preoperative radiotherapy reduces local recurrence in rectal cancer, but this improvement has little if any impact on overall survival. Currently performed optimal quality-controlled total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery for patients in the trial setting can be associated with very low local recurrence rates of less than 10% whether the patients receive radiotherapy or not. Hence metastatic disease is now the predominant issue. The concept of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is a potentially attractive additional or alternative strategy to radiotherapy to deal with metastases. However, randomised phase III trials, evaluating the addition of oxaliplatin at low doses plus preoperative fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT), have in the main failed to show a significant improvement on early pathological response, with the exception of the German CAO/ARO/AIO-04 study. The integration of biologically targeted agents into preoperative CRT has also not fulfilled expectations. The addition of cetuximab appears to achieve relatively low rates of pathological complete responses, and the addition of bevacizumab has raised concerns for excess surgical morbidity. As an alternative to concurrent chemoradiation (which delivers only 5–6 weeks of chemotherapy), potential options include an induction component of 6–12 weeks of NACT prior to radiotherapy or chemoradiation, or the addition of chemotherapy after short-course preoperative radiotherapy (SCPRT) or chemoradiation (defined as consolidation chemotherapy) which utilises the “dead space” of the interval between the end of chemoradiation and surgery, or delivering chemotherapy alone without any radiotherapy. PMID:26217113

  16. Local Recurrence After Complete Clinical Response and Watch and Wait in Rectal Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Impact of Salvage Therapy on Local Disease Control

    SciTech Connect

    Habr-Gama, Angelita; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; São Julião, Guilherme P.; Proscurshim, Igor; Sabbagh, Charles; Lynn, Patricio B.; Perez, Rodrigo O.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To review the risk of local recurrence and impact of salvage therapy after Watch and Wait for rectal cancer with complete clinical response (cCR) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer treated with CRT (50.4-54 Gy + 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy) and cCR at 8 weeks were included. Patients with cCR were enrolled in a strict follow-up program with no immediate surgery (Watch and Wait). Local recurrence-free survival was compared while taking into account Watch and Wait strategy alone and Watch and Wait plus salvage. Results: 90 of 183 patients experienced cCR at initial assessment after CRT (49%). When early tumor regrowths (up to and including the initial 12 months of follow-up) and late recurrences were considered together, 28 patients (31%) experienced local recurrence (median follow-up time, 60 months). Of those, 26 patients underwent salvage therapy, and 2 patients were not amenable to salvage. In 4 patients, local re-recurrence developed after Watch and Wait plus salvage. The overall salvage rate for local recurrence was 93%. Local recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 69% (all local recurrences) and 94% (after salvage procedures). Thirteen patients (14%) experienced systemic recurrence. The 5-year cancer-specific overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients (including all recurrences) were 91% and 68%, respectively. Conclusions: Local recurrence may develop in 31% of patients with initial cCR when early regrowths (≤12 months) and late recurrences are grouped together. More than half of these recurrences develop within 12 months of follow-up. Salvage therapy is possible in ≥90% of recurrences, leading to 94% local disease control, with 78% organ preservation.

  17. Liver Transplantation with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation is More Effective than Resection for Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rea, David J.; Heimbach, Julie K.; Rosen, Charles B.; Haddock, Michael G.; Alberts, Steven R.; Kremers, Walter K.; Gores, Gregory J.; Nagorney, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Compare survival after neoadjuvant therapy and liver transplantation with survival after resection for patients with hilar CCA. Summary Background Data: We developed a protocol combining neoadjuvant radiotherapy, chemosensitization, and orthotopic liver transplantation for patients with operatively confirmed stage I and II hilar CCA in 1993. Since then, patients with unresectable CCA or CCA arising in the setting of PSC have been enrolled in the transplant protocol. Patients with tumors amenable to resection have undergone excision of the extrahepatic duct with lymphadenectomy and liver resection. Methods: We reviewed our experience between January 1993 and August 2004 and compared patient survival between the treatment groups. Results: Seventy-one patients entered the transplant treatment protocol and 38 underwent liver transplantation. Fifty-four patients were explored for resection. Twenty-six (48%) underwent resection, and 28 (52%) had unresectable disease. One-, 3-, and 5-year patient survival were 92%, 82%, and 82% after transplantation and 82%, 48%, and 21% after resection (P = 0.022). There were fewer recurrences in the transplant patients (13% versus 27%). Conclusions: Liver transplantation with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieved better survival with less recurrence than conventional resection and should be considered as an alternative to resection for patients with localized, node-negative hilar CCA. PMID:16135931

  18. [Certain aspects of neoadjuvant therapy of locally advanced breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Voznyĭ, E K; Gurov, S N; Dobrovol'skaia, N Iu

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a complex investigation of patients with locally-advanced breast cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation at initial stage. The clinical and pathomorphological effects, nature of neoadjuvant therapy and number of courses were followed up for 5- and 10-year periods. A direct correlation was found between number of courses for chemotherapy-sensitive patients, on the one hand, and greater effect, more intensive medicinal pathomorphism and longer recurrence-free survival, particularly, at later stages, on the other. PMID:11826490

  19. Rectal Cancer: Mucinous Carcinoma on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Poor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberholzer, Katja; Menig, Matthias; Kreft, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Junginger, Theodor; Heintz, Achim; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Hoetker, Andreas M.; Hansen, Torsten; Dueber, Christoph; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To assess response of locally advanced rectal carcinoma to chemoradiation with regard to mucinous status and local tumor invasion found at pretherapeutic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients were included in this prospective study of patients with advanced mrT3 and mrT4 carcinomas. Carcinomas were categorized by MRI as mucinous (mucin proportion >50% within the tumor volume), and as nonmucinous. Patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation consisting of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and 5-fluorouracil on Days 1 to 5 and Days 29 to 33. Therapy response was assessed by comparing pretherapeutic MRI with histopathology of surgical specimens (minimum distance between outer tumor edge and circumferential resection margin = CRM, T, and N category). Results: A mucinous carcinoma was found in 21 of 88 patients. Pretherapeutic mrCRM was 0 mm (median) in the mucinous and nonmucinous group. Of the 88 patients, 83 underwent surgery with tumor resection. The ypCRM (mm) at histopathology was significantly lower in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (p {<=} 0.001). Positive resection margins (ypCRM {<=} 1 mm) were found more frequently in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous ones (p {<=} 0.001). Treatment had less effect on local tumor stage in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (for T downsizing, p = 0.012; for N downstaging, p = 0.007). Disease progression was observed only in patients with mucinous carcinomas (n = 5). Conclusion: Mucinous status at pretherapeutic MRI was associated with a noticeably worse response to chemoradiation and should be assessed by MRI in addition to local tumor staging to estimate response to treatment before it is initiated.

  20. The Quality-of-Life Effects of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Joseph M.; Narang, Amol K.; Griffith, Kent A.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Reese, Jennifer B.; Gearhart, Susan L.; Azad, Nolifer S.; Chan, June; Olsen, Leah; Efron, Jonathan E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Existing studies that examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer on patient quality of life (QOL) are limited. Our goals were to prospectively explore acute changes in patient-reported QOL endpoints during and after treatment and to establish a distribution of scores that could be used for comparison as new treatment modalities emerge. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled at 2 institutions. Validated cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-CR30) and colorectal cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-CR38 and EORTC QLQ-CR 29) QOL questionnaires were administered to patients 1 month before they began CRT, at week 4 of CRT, and 1 month after they had finished CRT. The questionnaires included multiple symptom scales, functional domains, and a composite global QOL score. Additionally, a toxicity scale was completed by providers 1 month before the beginning of CRT, weekly during treatment, and 1 month after the end of CRT. Results: Global QOL showed a statistically significant and borderline clinically significant decrease during CRT (-9.50, P=.0024) but returned to baseline 1 month after the end of treatment (-0.33, P=.9205). Symptoms during treatment were mostly gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting +9.94, P<.0001; and diarrhea +16.67, P=.0022), urinary (dysuria +13.33, P<.0001; and frequency +11.82, P=.0006) or fatigue (+16.22, P<.0001). These symptoms returned to baseline after therapy. However, sexual enjoyment (P=.0236) and sexual function (P=.0047) remained persistently diminished after therapy. Conclusions: Rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT may experience a reduction in global QOL along with significant gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms during treatment. Moreover, provider-rated toxicity scales may not fully capture this decrease in patient-reported QOL. Although most symptoms are transient

  1. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to preoperative chemoradiation or radiation in rectal cancer: should we be more cautious?

    PubMed Central

    Glynne-Jones, R; Grainger, J; Harrison, M; Ostler, P; Makris, A

    2006-01-01

    before surgical resection. In contrast, the data in favour of NACT before radiation or chemoradiation (CRT) is inconclusive, despite the suggestion that response to induction chemotherapy can predict response to subsequent radiotherapy. The observation that spectacular responses to chemotherapy before radical radiotherapy did not result in improved survival, was noted 25 years ago. However, multiple trials in head and neck cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer, small-cell lung cancer and cervical cancer do not support the routine use of NACT either as an alternative, or as additional benefit to CRT. The addition of NACT does not appear to enhance local control over concurrent CRT or radiotherapy alone. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy before CRT or radiation should be used with caution, and only in the context of clinical trials. The evidence base suggests that concurrent CRT with early positioning of radiotherapy appears the best option for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and in all disease sites where radiation is the primary local therapy. PMID:16465172

  2. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Updated Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Combined Modality Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Paulus, Rebecca; Mitchell, Edith; Hanna, Nader; Yuen, Albert; Nichols, Romaine; Yalavarthi, Salochna; Hayostek, Cherie; Willett, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of 2 different approaches to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for distal rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: One hundred six patients with T3/T4 distal rectal cancers were randomized in a phase 2 study. Patients received either continuous venous infusion (CVI) of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, 7 days per week plus pelvic hyperfractionated radiation (HRT), 45.6 Gy at 1.2 Gy twice daily plus a boost of 9.6 to 14.4 Gy for T3 or T4 cancers (Arm 1), or CVI of 5-FU, 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, Monday to Friday, plus irinotecan, 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly × 4, plus pelvic radiation therapy (RT), 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy per day and a boost of 5.4 Gy for T3 and 9 Gy for T4 cancers (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4 to 10 weeks later. Results: All eligible patients (n=103) are included in this analysis; 2 ineligible patients were excluded, and 1 patient withdrew consent. Ninety-eight of 103 patients (95%) underwent resection. Four patients did not undergo surgery for either disease progression or patient refusal, and 1 patient died during induction chemotherapy. The median time of follow-up was 6.4 years in Arm 1 and 7.0 years in Arm 2. The pathological complete response (pCR) rates were 30% in Arm 1 and 26% in Arm 2. Locoregional recurrence rates were 16% in Arm 1 and 17% in Arm 2. Five-year survival rates were 61% and 75% and Disease-specific survival rates were 78% and 85% for Arm1 and Arm 2, respectively. Five second primaries occurred in patients on Arm 1, and 1 second primary occurred in Arm 2. Conclusions: High rates of disease-specific survival were seen in each arm. Overall survival appears affected by the development of unrelated second cancers. The high pCR rates with 5-FU and higher dose radiation in T4 cancers provide opportunity for increased R0 resections and improved survival.

  3. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  4. Focal adhesion kinase: predictor of tumour response and risk factor for recurrence after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez Del Pulgar, Teresa; Cebrián, Arancha; Fernández-Aceñero, Maria Jesús; Borrero-Palacios, Aurea; Del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Martínez-Useros, Javier; Marín-Arango, Juan Pablo; Caramés, Cristina; Vega-Bravo, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Remírez, María; Cruz-Ramos, Marlid; Manzarbeitia, Félix; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Rectal cancer represents about 30% of colorectal cancers, being around 50% locally advanced at presentation. Chemoradiation (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision is the standard of care for these locally advanced stages. However, it is not free of adverse effects and toxicity and the complete pathologic response rate is between 10% and 30%. This makes it extremely important to define factors that can predict response to this therapy. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression has been correlated with worse prognosis in several tumours and its possible involvement in cancer radio- and chemosensitivity has been suggested; however, its role in rectal cancer has not been analysed yet. To analyse the association of FAK expression with tumour response to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer. This study includes 73 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving standard neoadjuvant CRT followed by total mesorectal excision. Focal adhesion kinase protein levels were immunohistochemically analysed in the pre-treatment biopsies of these patients and correlated with tumour response to CRT and patients survival. Low FAK expression was significantly correlated with local and distant recurrence (P = 0.013). Low FAK expression was found to be a predictive marker of tumour response to neoadjuvant therapy (P = 0.007) and patients whose tumours did not express FAK showed a strong association with lower disease-free survival (P = 0.01). Focal adhesion kinase expression predicts neoadjuvant CRT response in rectal cancer patients and it is a clinically relevant risk factor for local and distant recurrence. PMID:27171907

  5. Neoadjuvant therapy for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rachit D; Cassano, Anthony D; Neifeld, James P

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is increasing in incidence more than any other visceral malignancy in North America. Adenocarcinoma has become the most common cell type. Surgery remains the primary treatment modality for locoregional disease. Overall survival with surgery alone has been dismal, with metastatic disease the primary mode of treatment failure after an R0 surgical resection. Cure rates with chemotherapy or radiation therapy alone have been disappointing as well. For these reasons, over the last decade multi-modality treatment has gained increasing acceptance as the standard of care. This review examines the present data and role of neoadjuvant treatment using chemotherapy and radiation therapy followed by surgery for the treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:25320656

  6. Primary resection versus neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by resection for locally resectable or potentially resectable pancreatic carcinoma without distant metastasis. A multi-centre prospectively randomised phase II-study of the Interdisciplinary Working Group Gastrointestinal Tumours (AIO, ARO, and CAO)

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Thomas B; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G; Meyer, Thomas; Golcher, Henriette; Sauer, Rolf; Hohenberger, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Background The disappointing results of surgical therapy alone of ductal pancreatic cancer can only be improved using multimodal approaches. In contrast to adjuvant therapy, neoadjuvant chemoradiation is able to facilitate resectability with free margins and to lower lymphatic spread. Another advantage is better tolerability which consecutively allows applying multimodal treatment in a higher number of patients. Furthermore, the synopsis of the overall survival results of neoadjuvant trials suggests a higher rate compared to adjuvant trials. Methods/Design As there are no prospectively randomised studies for neoadjuvant therapy, the Interdisciplinary Study Group of Gastrointestinal Tumours of the German Cancer Aid has started such a trial. The study investigates the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally resectable or probably resectable cancer of the pancreatic head without distant metastasis on median overall survival time compared to primary surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapy is integrated into both arms. Discussion The protocol of the study is presented in condensed form after an introducing survey on adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:17338829

  7. Restaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancers: is histology the key in patient selection?

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Nitin; Vallam, Karthik; Engineer, Reena; Ostwal, Vikas; Arya, Supreeta

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemoradiation is the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, there is no clarity regarding the necessity for restaging scans to rule out systemic progression of disease post chemoradiation with existing literature being divided on the need for the same. Methods Data from a prospectively maintained database was retrospectively analysed. All locally advanced rectal cancers (node positive/T4/T3 with threatened or involved CRM) were included. Biopsy proof of adenocarcinoma and CT scan of abdomen and chest were mandatory. Grade of tumor and response to CTRT on restaging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were documented. Results Out of 119 patients subjected to CTRT, 72 underwent definitive total mesorectal excision while 13 patients progressed locoregionally on restaging MR pelvis and 15 other patients progressed systemically while the rest defaulted. Patients with poorly differentiated (PD) cancers were compared to those with well/moderately differentiated (WMD) tumors. PD tumors had a significantly higher rate of local progression (32.1% vs. 5.6% %, P=0.0011) and systemic progression (35.7% vs. 6.9%, P=0.0008) as compared to WMD tumors. Only one-third (9/28) of PD patients underwent TME while the rest progressed. Conclusions Selecting poorly differentiated tumors alone for restaging CECT abdomen and thorax will be a cost effective strategy as the rate of progression is very high. Also patients with PD tumors need to be consulted about the high probability of progression of disease. PMID:27284467

  8. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by orthotopic liver transplantation in cholangiocarcinomas: the emory experience

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Jerome C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a bile duct tumor with a grim prognosis. The median survival after radiotherapy of unresectable disease is 9-12 months. The following is a review of our experience with neoadjuvant (NEO) chemoradiation followed by orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for CCA. Methods Ten patients with CCAs were selected as candidates for NEO-OLT between 2008-2011. Patients with unresectable CCA above the cystic duct without intra or extrahepatic metastases were eligible. Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients were included due to their poor resection response. Patients initially received external-beam radiation [via conventional fields or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)] plus capecitabine (XEL) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), followed by either Iridium192 (Ir192) brachytherapy high dose rate (HDR) or external boost. 5-FU or XEL was administered until OLT. Patients underwent periodic surveillance computed tomography (CT)/MRIs after OLT. Primary endpoints included actuarial rates (AR)/crude rates (CR) of overall survival (OS), and local control (LC) at 6, 12, and 24 months. Results Five males and five females were identified. Mean age was 58.3 years (range, 38-71 years). Mean composite radiation dose delivered was 59.0 Gy (range, 54-71.4 Gy). Forty percent of patients had an HDR boost. Fifty percent of patients received XEL during NEO. Two patients were excluded from the analysis as they did not go on to OLT due to metastases (n=1) and death due to GI bleed (n=1). Thirty-eight percent of the OLT patients had a pathological complete response (pCR) after NEO, while 25% required a Whipple due to positive margins. Median follow-up for the OLT group was 23 months (range, 6.5-37 months). Six, twelve, and twenty-four months LC AR was 100%. LC CR was 100% at longest interval (30 months). Six, twelve, and twenty-four months OS AR was 100%, 87.5%, and 87.5%, respectively. Mean OS AR was 30.2 months (95% CI: 22.8-37.7). OS CR was 75% at longest

  9. Surgical treatment for locally advanced lower third rectal cancer after neoadjuvent chemoradiation with capecitabine: prospective phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Elwanis, Mostafa Abd; Maximous, Doaa W; Elsayed, Mohamed Ibrahim; Mikhail, Nabiel NH

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach with standardized surgical, pathological and radiotherapeutic procedures. Sphincter preserving surgery for cancer of the lower rectum needs a long-course of neoadjuvant treatments to reduce tumor volume, to induce down-staging that increases circumferential resection margin, and to facilitate surgery. Aim To evaluate the rate of anal sphincter preservation in low lying, resectable, locally advanced rectal cancer and the resectability rate in unresectable cases after neoadjuvent chemoradiation by oral Capecitabine. Patients and methods This trial included 43 patients with low lying (4–7 cm from anal verge) locally advanced rectal cancer, of which 33 were resectable. All patients received preoperative concurrent chemoradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions over 5 weeks with oral capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily on radiotherapy days), followed after 4–6 weeks by total mesorectal excision technique. Results Preoperative chemoradiation resulted in a complete pathologic response in 4 patients (9.3%; 95% CI 3–23.1) and an overall downstaging in 32 patients (74.4%; 95% CI 58.5–85). Sphincter sparing surgical procedures were done in 20 out of 43 patients (46.5%; 95% CI 31.5–62.2). The majority (75%) were of clinical T3 disease. Toxicity was moderate and required no treatment interruption. Grade II anemia occurred in 4 patients (9.3%, 95% CI 3–23.1), leucopenia in 2 patients (4.7%, 95% CI 0.8–17) and radiation dermatitis in 4 patients (9.3%, 95% CI 3–23.1) respectively. Conclusion In patients with low lying, locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative chemoradiation using oral capecitabine 825 mg/m2, twice a day on radiotherapy days, was tolerable and effective in downstaging and resulted in 46.5% anal sphincter preservation rate. PMID:19508705

  10. Adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: defining subgroups who may benefit after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and resection

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Monique; Nelemans, Patty J; Valentini, Vincenzo; Crane, Christopher H; Capirci, Carlo; Rödel, Claus; Nash, Garrett M; Kuo, Li-Jen; Glynne-Jones, Rob; García-Aguilar, Julio; Suárez, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Biondo, Sebastiano; Theodoropoulos, George; Lambregts, Doenja MJ; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Beets, Geerard L

    2016-01-01

    Recent literature suggests that the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy (aCT) for rectal cancer patients might depend on the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT). Aim was to evaluate whether the effect of aCT in rectal cancer is modified by response to CRT and to identify which patients benefit from aCT after CRT, by means of a pooled analysis of individual patient data from 13 datasets. Patients were categorised into 3 groups: pCR (ypT0N0), ypT1-2 tumour and ypT3-4 tumour. Hazard ratios for the effect of aCT were derived from multivariable Cox regression analyses. Primary outcome measure was recurrence-free survival (RFS). 1723(52%) of 3313 included patients received aCT. 898 patients had a pCR, 966 had a ypT1-2 tumour and 1302 had a ypT3-4 tumour. For 122 patients response category was missing and 25 patients had ypT0N+. Median follow-up for all patients was 51 (0-219) months. Hazard ratios for RFS with 95%CI for patients treated with aCT were 1.25(0.68-2.29), 0.58(0.37-0.89) and 0.83(0.66-1.10) for patients with pCR, ypT1-2 and ypT3-4 tumours, respectively. The effect of aCT in rectal cancer patients treated with CRT differs between subgroups. Patients with a pCR after CRT may not benefit from aCT, whereas patients with residual tumour had superior outcomes when aCT was administered. The test for interaction did not reach statistical significance, but the results support further investigation of a more individualized approach to administer aCT after CRT and surgery based on pathologic staging. PMID:25418551

  11. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, T.A.; Skibber, J.M.; Ajani, J.A.

    1995-07-15

    To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3, N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further. 22 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Evaluating Mesorectal Lymph Nodes in Rectal Cancer Before and After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Using Thin-Section T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Dow-Mu Chau, Ian; Tait, Diana; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Cunningham, David; Brown, Gina

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To apply thin-section T2-weighted magnetic resoance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the number, size, distribution, and morphology of benign and malignant mesorectal lymph nodes before and after chemoradiation treatment compared with histopathologic findings. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with poor-risk adenocarcinoma of the rectum treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation were evaluated prospectively. Thin-section T2-weighted MR images obtained before and after chemoradiation treatment were independently reviewed in consensus by 2 expert radiologists to determine the tumor stage, nodal size, nodal distribution, and nodal stage. Total mesorectal excision surgery after chemoradiation allowed MR nodal stage to be compared with histopathology using {kappa} statistics. Nodal downstaging was compared using the Chi-square test. Results: Before chemoradiation, 152 mesorectal nodes were visible (mean, 6.2 mm; 100 benign, 52 malignant) and 4 of 52 malignant nodes were in contact with the mesorectal fascia. The nodal staging was 7/25 N0, 10/25 N1, and 7/25 N2. After chemoradiation, only 29 nodes (mean, 4.1 mm; 24 benign, 5 malignant) were visible, and none were in contact with the mesorectal fascia. Nodal downstaging was observed: 20/25 N0 and 5/25 N1 (p < 0.01, Chi-square test). There was good agreement between MRI and pathologic T-staging ({kappa} = 0.64) and N-staging ({kappa} = 0.65) after chemoradiation. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation treatment resulted in a decrease in size and number of malignant- and benign-appearing mesorectal nodes on MRI. Nodal downstaging and nodal regression from the mesorectal fascia were observed after treatment. MRI is a useful tool for assessing nodal response to neoadjuvant treatment.

  13. Pathological complete response after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer and the role of adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Valerie M; Benson, Al B

    2013-04-01

    Both the addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and improvements in surgical techniques have improved local control and overall survival for locally advanced rectal cancer patients over the past few decades. The addition of adjuvant chemotherapy has likely improved outcomes as well, though the contribution has been more difficult to quantify. At present, the majority of resected locally advanced rectal cancer patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy, though there is great variability in this practice based on both patient and institution characteristics. Recently, questions have been raised regarding which sub-groups of patients benefit most from adjuvant chemotherapy. As pathologic complete response (pCR) is increasingly found to be a reasonable surrogate for long-term favorable outcomes, some have questioned the need for adjuvant therapy in this select group of patients. Multiple retrospective analyses have shown minimal to no benefit for adjuvant chemotherapy in this group. Indeed, the patients most consistently shown to benefit from adjuvant therapy both in terms of disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) are those who achieve an intermediate pathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment. Tumors that have high expression of thymidylate synthetase have also shown to benefit from adjuvant therapy. More study is needed into clinical and molecular features that predict patient benefit from adjuvant therapy. PMID:23381584

  14. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: A Disappointing Therapeutic Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Carolin; Folprecht, Gunnar; Zips, Daniel; Pilarsky, Christian; Saeger, Hans Detlev; Grutzmann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Germany. The incidence in 2003/2004 was 16 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Of all carcinomas, pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rate, with one- and five-year survival rates of 25% and less than 5%, respectively, regardless of the stage at diagnosis. These low survival rates demonstrate the poor prognosis of this carcinoma. Previous therapeutic approaches including surgical resection combined with adjuvant therapy or palliative chemoradiation have not achieved satisfactory results with respect to overall survival. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate new therapeutic approaches. Neoadjuvant therapy is an interesting therapeutic option for patients with pancreatic cancer. For selected patients with borderline or unresectable disease, neoadjuvant therapy offers the potential for tumor downstaging, increasing the probability of a margin-negative resection and decreasing the occurrence of lymph node metastasis. Currently, there is no universally accepted approach for treating patients with pancreatic cancer in the neoadjuvant setting. In this review, the most common neoadjuvant strategies will be described, compared and discussed. PMID:24212810

  15. Small Bowel Dose Parameters Predicting Grade ≥3 Acute Toxicity in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: An Independent Validation Study Comparing Peritoneal Space Versus Small Bowel Loop Contouring Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Robyn; Chakraborty, Santam; Nygren, Ian; Sinha, Richie

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether volumes based on contours of the peritoneal space can be used instead of individual small bowel loops to predict for grade ≥3 acute small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A standardized contouring method was developed for the peritoneal space and retrospectively applied to the radiation treatment plans of 67 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data were extracted and analyzed against patient toxicity. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were carried out for both contouring methods. Results: Grade ≥3 small bowel toxicity occurred in 16% (11/67) of patients in the study. A highly significant dose-volume relationship between small bowel irradiation and acute small bowel toxicity was supported by the use of both small bowel loop and peritoneal space contouring techniques. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that, for both contouring methods, the greatest sensitivity for predicting toxicity was associated with the volume receiving between 15 and 25 Gy. Conclusion: DVH analysis of peritoneal space volumes accurately predicts grade ≥3 small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, suggesting that the contours of the peritoneal space provide a reasonable surrogate for the contours of individual small bowel loops. The study finds that a small bowel V15 less than 275 cc and a peritoneal space V15 less than 830 cc are associated with a less than 10% risk of grade ≥3 acute toxicity.

  16. Buschke-Löwenstein tumor with squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemo-radiation therapy and local surgical excision: report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of anorectal Buschke-Löwenstein tumor (BLT) with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) transformation is not univocal given the rarity of the disease. BLT is characterized by its large size and tendency to infiltrate into underlying tissues. Malignant transformation can occur and it is important to identify the presence of neoplastic foci to decide the proper treatment. Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy (CRT) and local excision in order to avoid abdomino-perineal resection (APR). Three cases of anorectal BLT with SCC transformation are presented. All patients were HIV positive and treated with antiretroviral drugs. They underwent preoperative endoanal ultrasound, biopsies, total body tomography and anal brushing. Treatment consisted of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy (45 Gy to the pelvis plus a boost with 14.40 Gy to the primary tumor for a total of 59.40 Gy, and mitomycin-C in bolus on the first day, plus 5-fluorouracil by continuous infusion in the first and in the sixth week) and subsequent local surgical excision. During the follow-up, patients were subjected to the same preoperative diagnostic investigations and high resolution anoscopy. All patients showed a complete regression of the lesion after CRT and were treated by local surgical excision, thus avoiding permanent colostomy. In conclusion neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy with local surgical excision could be considered an effective therapy in the treatment of anorectal BLT with SCC transformation to avoid APR. PMID:24040860

  17. Buschke-Löwenstein tumor with squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemo-radiation therapy and local surgical excision: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Indinnimeo, Marileda; Impagnatiello, Alessio; D'Ettorre, Gabriella; Bernardi, Gloria; Moschella, Cosima Maria; Gozzo, Paolo; Ciardi, Antonio; Bangrazi, Caterina; De Felice, Francesca; Musio, Daniela; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of anorectal Buschke-Löwenstein tumor (BLT) with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) transformation is not univocal given the rarity of the disease. BLT is characterized by its large size and tendency to infiltrate into underlying tissues. Malignant transformation can occur and it is important to identify the presence of neoplastic foci to decide the proper treatment. Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy (CRT) and local excision in order to avoid abdomino-perineal resection (APR). Three cases of anorectal BLT with SCC transformation are presented. All patients were HIV positive and treated with antiretroviral drugs. They underwent preoperative endoanal ultrasound, biopsies, total body tomography and anal brushing. Treatment consisted of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy (45 Gy to the pelvis plus a boost with 14.40 Gy to the primary tumor for a total of 59.40 Gy, and mitomycin-C in bolus on the first day, plus 5-fluorouracil by continuous infusion in the first and in the sixth week) and subsequent local surgical excision. During the follow-up, patients were subjected to the same preoperative diagnostic investigations and high resolution anoscopy. All patients showed a complete regression of the lesion after CRT and were treated by local surgical excision, thus avoiding permanent colostomy. In conclusion neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy with local surgical excision could be considered an effective therapy in the treatment of anorectal BLT with SCC transformation to avoid APR. PMID:24040860

  18. Identification of Predictive Markers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Carcinomas by Proteomic Isotope Coded Protein Label (ICPL) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Croner, Roland S.; Sevim, Müzeyyen; Metodiev, Metodi V.; Jo, Peter; Ghadimi, Michael; Schellerer, Vera; Brunner, Maximillian; Geppert, Carol; Rau, Tilman; Stürzl, Michael; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Matzel, Klaus E.; Hohenberger, Werner; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kellermann, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) is an established procedure in stage union internationale contre le cancer (UICC) II/III rectal carcinomas. Around 53% of the tumours present with good tumor regression after nCRT, and 8%–15% are complete responders. Reliable selection markers would allow the identification of poor or non-responders prior to therapy. Tumor biopsies were harvested from 20 patients with rectal carcinomas, and stored in liquid nitrogen prior to therapy after obtaining patients’ informed consent (Erlangen-No.3784). Patients received standardized nCRT with 5-Fluoruracil (nCRT I) or 5-Fluoruracil ± Oxaliplatin (nCRT II) according to the CAO/ARO/AIO-04 protocol. After surgery, regression grading (Dworak) of the tumors was performed during histopathological examination of the specimens. Tumors were classified as poor (Dworak 1 + 2) or good (Dworak 3 + 4) responders. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) for tumor enrichment was performed on preoperative biopsies. Differences in expressed proteins between poor and good responders to nCRT I and II were identified by proteomic analysis (Isotope Coded Protein Label, ICPL™) and selected markers were validated by immunohistochemistry. Tumors of 10 patients were classified as histopathologically poor (Dworak 1 or 2) and the other 10 tumor samples as histopathologically good (Dworak 3 or 4) responders to nCRT after surgery. Sufficient material in good quality was harvested for ICPL analysis by LCM from all biopsies. We identified 140 differentially regulated proteins regarding the selection criteria and the response to nCRT. Fourteen of these proteins were synchronously up-regulated at least 1.5-fold after nCRT I or nCRT II (e.g., FLNB, TKT, PKM2, SERINB1, IGHG2). Thirty-five proteins showed a complete reciprocal regulation (up or down) after nCRT I or nCRT II and the rest was regulated either according to nCRT I or II. The protein expression of regulated proteins such as PLEC1, TKT, HADHA and TAGLN was

  19. Effect of adding mFOLFOX6 after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer: a multicentre, phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Chow, Oliver S; Smith, David D; Marcet, Jorge E; Cataldo, Peter A; Varma, Madhulika G; Kumar, Anjali S; Oommen, Samuel; Coutsoftides, Theodore; Hunt, Steven R; Stamos, Michael J; Ternent, Charles A; Herzig, Daniel O; Fichera, Alessandro; Polite, Blase N; Dietz, David W; Patil, Sujata; Avila, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who achieve a pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation have an improved prognosis. The need for surgery in these patients has been questioned, but the proportion of patients achieving a pathological complete response is small. We aimed to assess whether adding cycles of mFOLFOX6 between chemoradiation and surgery increased the proportion of patients achieving a pathological complete response. Methods We did a phase 2, non-randomised trial consisting of four sequential study groups of patients with stage II–III locally advanced rectal cancer at 17 institutions in the USA and Canada. All patients received chemoradiation (fluorouracil 225 mg/m2 per day by continuous infusion throughout radiotherapy, and 45.0 Gy in 25 fractions, 5 days per week for 5 weeks, followed by a minimum boost of 5.4 Gy). Patients in group 1 had total mesorectal excision 6–8 weeks after chemoradiation. Patients in groups 2–4 received two, four, or six cycles of mFOLFOX6, respectively, between chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision. Each cycle of mFOLFOX6 consisted of racemic leucovorin 200 mg/m2 or 400 mg/m2, according to the discretion of the treating investigator, oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2 in a 2-h infusion, bolus fluorouracil 400 mg/m2 on day 1, and a 46-h infusion of fluorouracil 2400 mg/m2. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved a pathological complete response, analysed by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00335816. Findings Between March 24, 2004, and Nov 16, 2012, 292 patients were registered, 259 of whom (60 in group 1, 67 in group 2, 67 in group 3, and 65 in group 4) met criteria for analysis. 11 (18%, 95% CI 10–30) of 60 patients in group 1, 17 (25%, 16–37) of 67 in group 2, 20 (30%, 19–42) of 67 in group 3, and 25 (38%, 27–51) of 65 in group 4 achieved a pathological complete response (p=0.0036). Study group was

  20. Prognostic significance of SUV on PET/CT in patients with localised oesophagogastric junction cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy/chemoradiation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, W; Xing, L; Yue, J; Sun, X; Sun, X; Zhao, H; Yu, J

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to comprehensively review the evidence for use of pre-treatment, post-treatment and changes in tumour glucose uptake that were assessed by 18-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) early, during or immediately after neoadjuvant chemotherapy/chemoradiation to predict prognosis of localised oesophagogastric junction (AEG) cancer. Methods We searched for articles published in English; limited to AEG; 18F-FDG uptake on PET performed on a dedicated device; dealt with the impact of standard uptake value (SUV) on survival. We extracted an estimate of the log hazard ratios (HRs) and their variances and performed meta-analysis. Results 798 patients with AEG were included. And the scan time for 18F-FDG-PET was as follows: prior to therapy (PET1, n=646), exactly 2 weeks after initiation of neoadjuvant therapy (PET2, n=245), and pre-operatively (PET3, n=278). In the two meta-analyses for overall survival, including the studies that dealt with reduction of tumour maximum SUV (SUVmax) (from PET1 to PET2/PET3 and from PET1 to PET2), the results were similar, with the overall HR for non-responders being 1.83 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.41–2.36] and 2.62 (95% CI, 1.61–4.26), respectively; as for disease-free survival, the combined HR was 2.92 (95% CI, 2.08–4.10) and 2.39 (95% CI, 1.57–3.64), respectively. The meta-analyses did not attribute significant prognostic values to SUVmax before and during therapy in localised AEG. Conclusion Relative changes in FDG-uptake of AEG are better prognosticators. Early metabolic changes from PET1 to PET2 may provide the same accuracy for prediction of treatment outcome as late changes from PET1 to PET3. PMID:22337686

  1. Neoadjuvant therapy for gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samalin, Emmanuelle; Ychou, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas are one of the main causes of cancer-related death worldwide. While the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma is decreasing, the incidence of gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma is rising rapidly in Western countries. Considering that surgical resection is currently the major curative treatment, and that the 5-year survival rate highly depends on the pTNM stage at diagnosis, gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma management is very challenging for oncologists. Several treatment strategies are being evaluated, and among them systemic chemotherapy, to decrease recurrences and improve overall survival. The MAGIC and FNCLCC-FFCD trials showed a survival benefit of perioperative chemotherapy in patients with operable gastric and lower esophageal cancer, and these results had an impact on the European clinical practice. New strategies, including induction chemotherapy followed by preoperative chemoradiotherapy, targeted therapies in combination with perioperative chemotherapy and the new cytotoxic regimens, are currently assessed to improve current standards and help developing patient-tailored therapeutic interventions. PMID:27298768

  2. Neoadjuvant therapy for gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Samalin, Emmanuelle; Ychou, Marc

    2016-06-10

    Gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas are one of the main causes of cancer-related death worldwide. While the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma is decreasing, the incidence of gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma is rising rapidly in Western countries. Considering that surgical resection is currently the major curative treatment, and that the 5-year survival rate highly depends on the pTNM stage at diagnosis, gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma management is very challenging for oncologists. Several treatment strategies are being evaluated, and among them systemic chemotherapy, to decrease recurrences and improve overall survival. The MAGIC and FNCLCC-FFCD trials showed a survival benefit of perioperative chemotherapy in patients with operable gastric and lower esophageal cancer, and these results had an impact on the European clinical practice. New strategies, including induction chemotherapy followed by preoperative chemoradiotherapy, targeted therapies in combination with perioperative chemotherapy and the new cytotoxic regimens, are currently assessed to improve current standards and help developing patient-tailored therapeutic interventions. PMID:27298768

  3. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. PMID:24794266

  4. Chemotherapy: Does Neoadjuvant or Adjuvant Therapy Improve Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Canter, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    Since preoperative chemotherapy has been clearly shown to improve outcomes for patients with Ewing sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and osteosarcoma, practitioners have attempted to extend the use of adjuvant/neoadjuvant chemotherapy to other types of adult soft tissue sarcoma. Given the high risk of distant recurrence and disease-specific death for patients with soft tissue sarcoma tumors larger than 10 cm, these patients should be considered candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy as well as investigational therapies. Yet, potential toxicity from cytotoxic chemotherapy is substantial, and there remains little consensus and wide variation regarding the indications for use of chemotherapy in the adjuvant/neoadjuvant setting. PMID:27591503

  5. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yifan; Jaklitsch, Michael T; Bueno, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    Locally advanced (stage IIIA) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is confined to the chest, but requires more than surgery to maximize cure. Therapy given preoperatively is termed neoadjuvant, whereas postoperative therapy is termed adjuvant. Trimodality therapy (chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery) has become the standard treatment regimen for resectable, locally advanced NSCLC. During the past 2 decades, several prospective, randomized, and nonrandomized studies have explored various regimens for preoperative treatment of NSCLC. The evaluation of potential candidates with NSCLC for neoadjuvant therapy as well as the currently available therapeutic regimens are reviewed. PMID:27261916

  6. Diffuse Optical Monitoring of the Neoadjuvant Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Regine; Durduran, Turgut

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the use of diffuse optical techniques for monitoring the hemodynamic, metabolic and physiological signatures of the neoadjuvant breast cancer therapy effectiveness is critically reviewed. An extensive discussion of the state-of-theart diffuse optical mammography is presented alongside a discussion of the current approaches to breast cancer therapies. Overall, the diffuse optics field is growing rapidly with a great deal of promise to fill an important niche in the current approaches to monitor, predict and personalize neoadjuvant breast cancer therapies. PMID:23243386

  7. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation With Paclitaxel/Carboplatin for Selected Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Trimodality Phase II Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Hehr, Thomas; Friedel, Godehard; Steger, Volker; Spengler, Werner; Eschmann, Susanne M.; Bamberg, Michael; Budach, Wilfried

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a Phase II trial conducted August 1998 through January 2001, the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and definitive surgery in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC), Stages IIIA bulky and selected Stage IIIB. Patients and Methods: Staging of LA-NSCLC included computed tomography of cranium, thorax, and abdomen, whole-body positron emission tomography, and video mediastinoscopy. Induction chemotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin was followed by hyperfractionated accelerated thoracic radiotherapy (45 Gy) with simultaneous weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin. Four to six weeks after completion of induction therapy, restaging and resection of primary tumor and lymph nodes was intended. Results: A total of 59 consecutive patients were enrolled, 25% with Stage IIIA bulky disease, 65% with Stage IIIB, and 10% with Stage IV (excluded from further analysis). Forty-one patients completed induction therapy; in 52.4% a functional (positron emission tomography) downstaging was proven. Thirty-two patients (59.3%) underwent complete tumor resection, and 5 patients had an exploratory thoracotomy only. Histopathologic downstaging was proven in 59.4% and complete response in 21.9%. Hospital mortality was 5.4%. Median duration of follow-up for living patients was 62.1 months. Overall median survival was 22.6 months, 58.2 months for completely resected patients. During induction chemotherapy, Grade 3/4 granulocytopenia occurred in 8% of patients; the most common Grade 3/4 toxicity of chemoradiation was esophagitis, in 26.4% of patients. Conclusions: Induction paclitaxel/carboplatin with hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiotherapy followed by complete tumor resection demonstrates high efficacy in LA-NSCLC and offers a promising chance of long-term survival.

  8. Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer: medical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M J

    2001-12-01

    The indolent nature of estrogen-dependent breast cancer is the most important obstacle for development of new adjuvant endocrine treatments. Clinical trials require thousands of study participants and at least a decade of clinical investigation. How can we be sure that a new endocrine agent warrants this extraordinary level of investment? Traditionally, we have relied on advanced breast cancer trials to determine which drugs are suitable for adjuvant studies. However, with endocrine agents the high incidence of resistance in metastatic breast cancer may mask important advances in efficacy. Recent clinical results with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole suggest that neoadjuvant endocrine therapy is a highly informative additional approach to consider when planning adjuvant studies. In this report, new neoadjuvant endocrine therapy study designs are discussed that address the following issues: (a) the scientific opportunities afforded by gene microarray studies and other genetic technologies to investigate the molecular basis of estrogen-dependent breast cancer; (b) studies that address critical drug development questions as a prelude to adjuvant studies; and (c) the conduct of randomized trials that compare neoadjuvant chemotherapy with neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy to establish a place for neoadjuvant endocrine therapy in routine clinical practice. PMID:11916229

  9. Role of neoadjuvant therapy in management of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-07-01

    Surgery remains the only curative treatment for pancreatic cancer; however, majority of patients present with advanced unresectable disease upon diagnosis. Treatment of nonmetastatic, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) continues to require multidisciplinary bimodality or trimodality approach. Neoadjuvant therapies have been investigated for LAPC given its established role in other solid cancers such as breast cancer, gastric cancer, and rectal cancer. This strategy is now moving forward to management of potentially resectable disease as well. This meeting highlight focuses on recent updates on neoadjuvant therapy for both borderline resectable disease and potentially resectable disease, Abstracts #4120, #e15189, #e15226 and #TPS4158 will be discussed. PMID:25076342

  10. Optimal Timing for Assessment of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer: Do All Patients Benefit From Waiting Longer Than 6 Weeks?

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Rodrigo O.; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Sao Juliao, Guilherme P.; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; Sousa, Afonso H.S.; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; Imperiale, Antonio R.; Lynn, Patricio B.; Proscurshim, Igor; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Ono, Carla Rachel; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate the metabolic activity of rectal cancers at 6 and 12 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([{sup 18}FDG]PET/CT) imaging and correlate with response to CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal adenocarcinoma treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT (54 Gy, 5-fluouracil-based) were prospectively studied ( (ClinicalTrials.org) identifier (NCT00254683)). All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies (at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks from CRT completion). Clinical assessment was at 12 weeks. Maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured and recorded at each PET/CT study after 1 h (early) and 3 h (late) from {sup 18}FDG injection. Patients with an increase in early SUVmax between 6 and 12 weeks were considered 'bad' responders and the others as 'good' responders. Results: Ninety-one patients were included; 46 patients (51%) were 'bad' responders, whereas 45 (49%) patients were 'good' responders. 'Bad' responders were less likely to develop complete clinical response (6.5% vs. 37.8%, respectively; P=.001), less likely to develop significant histological tumor regression (complete or near-complete pathological response; 16% vs. 45%, respectively; P=.008) and exhibited greater final tumor dimension (4.3 cm vs. 3.3 cm; P=.03). Decrease between early (1 h) and late (3 h) SUVmax at 6-week PET/CT was a significant predictor of 'good' response (accuracy of 67%). Conclusions: Patients who developed an increase in SUVmax after 6 weeks were less likely to develop significant tumor downstaging. Early-late SUVmax variation at 6-week PET/CT may help identify these patients and allow tailored selection of CRT-surgery intervals for individual patients.

  11. Neoadjuvant therapy for localized pancreatic cancer: guiding principles.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Amir; Christians, Kathleen K; George, Ben; Ritch, Paul S; Erickson, Beth A; Tolat, Parag; Johnston, Fabian M; Evans, Douglas B; Tsai, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The management of localized pancreatic cancer (PC) remains controversial. Historically, patients with localized disease have been treated with surgery followed by adjuvant therapy (surgery-first approach) under the assumption that surgical resection is necessary, even if not sufficient for cure. However, a surgery-first approach is associated with a median overall survival of only 22-24 months, suggesting that a large proportion of patients with localized PC have clinically occult metastatic disease. As a result, adjuvant therapy has been recommended for all patients with localized PC, but in actuality, it is often not received due to the high rates of perioperative complications associated with pancreatic resections. Recognizing that surgery may be necessary but usually not sufficient for cure, there has been growing interest in neoadjuvant treatment sequencing, which benefits patients with both localized and metastatic PC by ensuring the delivery of oncologic therapies which are commensurate with the stage of disease. For patients who have clinically occult metastatic disease, neoadjuvant therapy allows for the early delivery of systemic therapy and avoids the morbidity and mortality of a surgical resection which would provide no oncologic benefit. For patients with truly localized disease, neoadjuvant therapy ensures the delivery of all components of the multimodality treatment. This review details the rationale for a neoadjuvant approach to localized PC and provides specific recommendations for both pretreatment staging and treatment sequencing for patients with resectable and borderline resectable (BLR) disease. PMID:26261728

  12. Selective Changes in the Immune Profile of Tumor-Draining Lymph Nodes After Different Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Regimens for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Martinelli, Enrica; Fanelli, Mara; Petrillo, Marco; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess how neoadjuvant chemoradiation regimens modulate the immune system state in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN), in the setting of advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Tumor-draining lymph nodes of patients undergoing chemotherapy only (nonirradiated, NI-TDLN) and chemoradiation with lower-dose (39.6 Gy, LD-TDLN) and higher-dose radiation (50 Gy, HD-TDLN) were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry. Results: Enlarging our previous data, LD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an enhanced antitumor response as compared with NI-TDLN, namely a significant Th1 and Tc1 polarization and a lower amount of the potent CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup high} regulatory T cell (Treg) subset identified by neuropilin-1 expression. Conversely, compared with NI-TDLN, HD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an impaired antitumor response, namely a significantly inverted CD4/CD8 cell ratio, a higher Nrp1{sup +}Treg frequency, and a higher frequency of CCR4{sup +}Treg, a Treg subset facilitated in migrating out from TDLN to suppress the immune response against distant cancer cells. Moreover, the Th1 and Tc1 polarization induced by LD radiation was lost, and there was an unfavorable tolerogenic/immunogenic dendritic cell ratio compared with LD-TDLN. Conclusions: Even minor differences in radiation dose in neoadjuvant regimens for locally advanced cervical cancer are crucial for determining the balance between a tolerogenic and an efficacious antitumor immune response in TDLN. Because most of the anticancer immune response takes place in TDLN, the present findings also emphasize the importance of chemoradiation protocols in the context of immunotherapeutic trials.

  13. Symptomatic Pericardial Effusion After Chemoradiation Therapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, Junichi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Ohashi, Toshio; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Takaishi, Hiromasa; Hanada, Takashi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Yuko; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated clinical and treatment-related factors as predictors of symptomatic pericardial effusion in esophageal cancer patients after concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 214 consecutive primary esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy between 2001 and 2010 in our institute. Pericardial effusion was detected on follow-up computed tomography. Symptomatic effusion was defined as effusion ≥grade 3 according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 criteria. Percent volume irradiated with 5 to 65 Gy (V5-V65) and mean dose to the pericardium were evaluated employing dose-volume histograms. To evaluate dosimetry for patients treated with two-dimensional planning in the earlier period (2001-2005), computed tomography data at diagnosis were transferred to a treatment planning system to reconstruct three-dimensional plans without modification. Optimal dosimetric thresholds for symptomatic pericardial effusion were calculated by receiver operating characteristic curves. Associating clinical and treatment-related risk factors for symptomatic pericardial effusion were detected by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up was 29 (range, 6-121) months for eligible 167 patients. Symptomatic pericardial effusion was observed in 14 (8.4%) patients. Dosimetric analyses revealed average values of V30 to V45 for the pericardium and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those with asymptomatic pericardial effusion (P<.05). Pericardial V5 to V55 and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those without pericardial effusion (P<.001). Mean pericardial doses of 36.5 Gy and V45 of 58% were selected as optimal cutoff values for predicting symptomatic pericardial effusion. Multivariate analysis identified mean pericardial dose as the

  14. (Neo)-adjuvant chemo(-radio) therapy for adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction and the stomach in the West.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Hansjochen; Lordick, Florian; Meyer, Hans-Joachim; Stahl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, the treatment of adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction and stomach has changed over the past decades. It is no longer surgery alone. Nowadays, most patients undergo surgery plus pre- and/or postoperative therapies. However, there are still marked differences in surgical procedures between the East and the West which might influence the surgical prognosis and thereby also the choice of perioperative treatment strategies. In the East, with its more extended surgical procedures, including standard D2 dissections, the current treatment philosophy is primary surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant approaches are restricted to really advanced tumors, and perioperative chemoradiation is not routinely used (at least to date). This clearly differs from treatment strategies currently recommended in Western countries. In Europe and North America, pre- plus postoperative chemotherapy has become the recommended treatment for locally more advanced tumors, and preoperative chemoradiation is increasingly administered to patients with adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction (Siewert type I/II). However, the role of postoperative chemotherapy (despite its increasing use) is still under discussion in the West (especially Europe) and not generally recommended/accepted as a standard treatment. Postoperative chemoradiation, which is one standard treatment in North America, is only regarded as a treatment option for patients after 'inadequate surgery' (i.e.

  15. Neoadjuvant therapy for gastric cancer: current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Andrew D.; Datta, Jashodeep; Loaiza-Bonilla, Arturo; Karakousis, Giorgos C.

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment for gastric cancer (GC), poor long-term outcomes with resection alone compel a multimodality approach to this disease. Multimodality strategies vary widely; while adjuvant approaches are typically favored in Asia and the United States (USA), a growing body of evidence supports neoadjuvant and/or perioperative strategies in locally advanced tumors. Neoadjuvant approaches are particularly attractive given the morbidity associated with surgical management of GC and the substantial risk of omission of adjuvant therapy. The specific advantages of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) compared to chemotherapy have not been well defined, particularly in the preoperative setting and trials aimed at determining the optimal elements and sequencing of therapy are underway. Future studies will also define the role of targeted and biologic therapies. PMID:26487948

  16. CLOSURE OF LARYNGECTOMY DEFECTS IN THE AGE OF CHEMORADIATION THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Hanasono, Matthew M.; Lin, Derrick; Wax, Mark K.

    2014-01-01

    The use of chemoradiation therapy in laryngeal cancer has resulted in significant reconstructive challenges. Although reconstruction of salvage laryngectomy defects remains controversial, current literature supports aggressive management of these defects with vascularized tissue, even when there is sufficient pharyngeal tissue present for primary closure. Significant advancement in reconstructive techniques has permitted improved outcomes in patients with advanced disease who require total laryngopharyngectomy or total laryngoglossectomy. Use of enteric and fasciocutaneous flaps result in good patient outcomes. Finally, wound complication rates after salvage surgery approach 60% depending on comorbid conditions such as cardiac insufficiency, hypothyroidism, or extent of previous treatment. Neck dehiscence, great vessel exposure, fistula formation, or cervical skin necrosis results in complex wounds that can often be treated initially with negative pressure dressings followed by definitive reconstruction. The timing of repair and approach to the vessel-depleted neck also present challenges in this patient population. Currently, there is significant institutional bias in the management of the patient with postchemoradiation salvage laryngectomy. Future prospective multi-institutional studies are certainly needed to more clearly define optimal treatment of these difficult patients. PMID:21416549

  17. Outcomes and Tolerability of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer Patients Aged 75 Years or Older

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, David T.; Mamon, Harvey J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To review the outcomes and tolerability of full-dose chemoradiation in elderly patients aged 75 years or older with localized pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed patients aged 75 years or older with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy at two institutions from 2002 to 2007. Patients were analyzed for treatment toxicity, local recurrences, distant metastases, and survival. Results: A total of 42 patients with a median age of 78 years (range, 75-90 years) who received chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer were identified. Of the patients, 24 had locally advanced disease treated with definitive chemoradiation, and 18 had disease treated with surgery and chemoradiation. Before chemoradiotherapy, the mean Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 1.0 {+-} 0.8, and the mean 6-month weight loss was 5.3 {+-} 3.8 kg. The mean radiation dose delivered was 48.1 {+-} 9.2 Gy. All patients received fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy. In all, 8 patients (19%) were hospitalized, 7 (17%) had an emergency room visit, 15 (36%) required a radiation treatment break, 3 (7%) required a chemotherapy break, 9 (21%) did not complete therapy, and 22 (49%) had at least one of these adverse events. The most common toxicities were nausea, pain, and failure to thrive. Median overall survival was 8.6 months (95% confidence interval, 7.2-13.1) in patients who received definitive chemoradiation therapy and 20.6 months (95% confidence interval, 9.5-{infinity}) in patients who underwent resection and chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: In this dataset of very elderly patients with pancreatic cancer and good Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, outcomes after chemoradiotherapy were similar to those among historic controls for patients with locally advanced and resected pancreatic cancer, although many patients experienced substantial treatment

  18. Patient-reported outcomes after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gavaruzzi, Teresa; Lotto, Lorella; Giandomenico, Francesca; Perin, Alessandro; Pucciarelli, Salvatore

    2014-08-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy followed by total mesorectal excision is standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, this approach has been previously shown to be associated with high rate of morbidity and it may have a negative effect on patients' reported outcomes (PROs). In order to summarize findings on the effect of the neoadjuvant approach on PROs, we systematically reviewed articles published in the last five years. Thirty-five articles met the inclusion criteria. Ten articles compared the effect of surgery with and without neoadjuvant therapy, six articles compared different neoadjuvant therapies, ten articles reported on patients who were all treated with neoadjuvant therapy, and nine articles examined the effect of neoadjuvant therapy in the analyses. The results are summarized by function investigated and critically commented. PMID:24745308

  19. Circulating mRNA Profiling in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Identifies FAM84B As A Biomarker In Predicting Pathological Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Feng-Ming; Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason; Chang, Yih-Leong; Lee, Jang-Ming; Koong, Albert C.; Chuang, Eric Y.

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer patients with pathological complete response (pCR) to neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) have favorable outcomes. Currently, there was no reliable biomarker predicting the response to CRT. Perioperative circulating mRNA may be associated with prognosis, but its application for predicting treatment response is unclear. We prospectively assessed the value of circulating messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling in predicting pCR for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Patients with ESCC completing CRT followed by surgery were enrolled for analysis. Venous peripheral blood was obtained before and after CRT, and total RNA was extracted for hybridization-based whole genome expression analysis and quantitative RT-PCR. We found circulating expression profiling was significantly altered after CRT. Altered FAM84B expression was significantly predictive of pCR. The decrease of serum FAM84B protein level after CRT was also associated with pCR. Immunohistochemistry and western blot confirmed that FAM84B protein was overexpressed in the majority of patients and ESCC cell lines. Furthermore, knockdown of FAM84B delayed tumor growth in ectopic xenografts. We demonstrated the decreased of circulating FAM84B mRNA and protein after neoadjuvant CRT may predict pCR, and FAM84B protein is overexpressed in ESCC. The potential of FAM84B as a novel predictive biomarker, and its biological functions deserve further investigation. PMID:25980316

  20. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation versus perioperative chemotherapy followed by surgery in resectable adenocarcinomas of the esophagogastric junction: A retrospective single center analysis

    PubMed Central

    SCHULZE, BJÖRN; BERGIS, DOMINIK; BALERMPAS, PANAGIOTIS; TROJAN, JÖRG; WOESTE, GUIDO; BECHSTEIN, WOLF OTTO; RÖDEL, CLAUS; WEISS, CHRISTIAN

    2014-01-01

    The current study presents a retrospective comparison, performed at a single academic center, of preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) and perioperative chemotherapy (CT) in addition to surgery in locally advanced but resectable adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction (AEG). A total of 29 consecutive patients with locally advanced AEGs were retrospectively analyzed. Treatment consisted of preoperative CRT (mean dose, 45.0 Gy) plus two cycles of CT with cisplatin and 5-FU or perioperative CT with epirubicin, cisplatin and capecitabine (three cycles preoperatively and postoperatively). Within four to six weeks following preoperative treatment, surgical therapy was performed. Median overall survival was 21.0 months in the perioperative CT group versus 41.7 months in the CRT group [P=0.36; hazard ratio (HR), 1.50; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.58–3.84]. Three-year survival rates were 55 and 38%, respectively, in favor of the CRT group, and progression-free survival was 20.0 months in the CT group compared with 24.1 months in the CRT group (P=0.71; HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.46–3.05). The total number of major surgical complications was almost equal in the two groups. Margin-free resections were achieved in all patients of the CRT group, but only 76.9% of the CT group (P=0.05). In addition, significantly higher R0 resection rates and an increased number of pathological complete remissions were demonstrated in the CRT group compared with those of the CT group. These results appear to indicate a trend for improved progression-free and overall survival for the CRT group. As postoperative morbidity and mortality rates were similar in the two groups, the results support the use of CRT for patients with advanced AEG tumors. PMID:24396483

  1. HIFU as a Neoadjuvant Therapy in Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, P.; Xing, F.; Huang, X.; Zhu, H.; Lo, H. W.; Zhong, X.; Pruitt, S.; Robertson, C.

    2011-09-01

    To broaden the application spectrum of HIFU in cancer therapy, we performed a pilot experiment to evaluate the potential of using HIFU as a neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Mice bearing wild-type B16F10 melanoma inoculated subcutaneously were either untreated (control) or treated by HIFU, CPA-7 or HIFU+CPA-7 before surgical resection of the primary tumor two days after HIFU treatment. The animals were then followed for four weeks or up to the humane endpoint to determine local recurrence, distant metastasis, and survival rate. The results demonstrate that animals treated by HIFU+CPA-7 (which is a small molecule that suppresses STAT3 activity) had a significantly lower recurrence rate, and slower growth of the recurrent tumor, with concomitantly higher survival rate, followed by those treated with CPA-7 and HIFU, respectively. Immunological assays revealed that CPA-7 treatment could significantly lower STAT3, and subsequently, Treg activities. In particular, the combination of HIFU and CPA-7 can induce a much stronger anti-tumor immune response than HIFU or surgery alone, as assessed by CTL and IFN-γ secretion. Overall, our results suggest that HIFU in combination with immunotherapy strategies has the potential to be used as a neoadjuvant therapy to prime the host with a strong anti-tumor immune response before surgical resection of the primary tumor. This multimodality, combinational therapy has the potential to greatly broaden the range of HIFU applications in cancer therapy with lower tumor recurrence and improved survival rate.

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Low-Dose-Rate Endorectal Brachytherapy as a Boost to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Distal Rectal Cancer: A Phase-II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Omidvari, Shapour; Zohourinia, Shadi; Ansari, Mansour; Ghahramani, Leila; Zare-Bandamiri, Mohammad; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Pourahmad, Saeedeh; Nasrolahi, Hamid; Hamedi, Sayed Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite advances in rectal cancer treatment over the last decade, local control and risk of late side effects due to external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) remain as concerns. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy and the safety of low-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (LDRBT) as a boost to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for use in treating locally advanced distal rectal adenocarcinomas. Methods This phase-II clinical trial included 34 patients (as the study arm) with newly diagnosed, locally advanced (clinical T3-T4 and/or N1/N2, M0) lower rectal cancer. For comparative analysis, 102 matched patients (as the historical control arm) with rectal cancer were also selected. All the patients were treated with LDRBT (15 Gy in 3 fractions) and concurrent chemoradiation (45-50.4 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 intravenously on day 1 plus oral capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily during LDRBT and EBRT. Results The study results revealed a significant differences between the study arm and the control arm in terms in the pathologic tumor size (2.1 cm vs. 3.6 cm, P = 0.001), the pathologic tumor stage (35% T3-4 vs. 65% T3-4, P = 0.003), and the pathologic complete response (29.4% vs. 11.7%, P < 0.028). Moreover, a significantly higher dose of EBRT (P = 0.041) was found in the control arm, and a longer time to surgery was observed in the study arm (P < 0.001). The higher rate of treatment-related toxicities, such as mild proctitis and anemia, in the study arm was tolerable and easily manageable. Conclusion A boost of LDRBT can optimize the pathologic complete response, with acceptable toxicities, in patients with distal rectal cancer. PMID:26361613

  3. Neoadjuvant radiotherapeutic strategies in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roeder, Falk

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the current status of neoadjuvant radiation approaches in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, including a description of modern radiation techniques, and an overview on the literature regarding neoadjuvant radio- or radiochemotherapeutic strategies both for resectable and irresectable pancreatic cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation for locally-advanced, primarily non- or borderline resectable pancreas cancer results in secondary resectability in a substantial proportion of patients with consecutively markedly improved overall prognosis and should be considered as possible alternative in pretreatment multidisciplinary evaluations. In resectable pancreatic cancer, outstanding results in terms of response, local control and overall survival have been observed with neoadjuvant radio- or radiochemotherapy in several phase I/II trials, which justify further evaluation of this strategy. Further investigation of neoadjuvant chemoradiation strategies should be performed preferentially in randomized trials in order to improve comparability of the current results with other treatment modalities. This should include the evaluation of optimal sequencing with newer and more potent systemic induction therapy approaches. Advances in patient selection based on new molecular markers might be of crucial interest in this context. Finally modern external beam radiation techniques (intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiation therapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy), new radiation qualities (protons, heavy ions) or combinations with alternative boosting techniques widen the therapeutic window and contribute to the reduction of toxicity. PMID:26909133

  4. [Neoadjuvant therapy for tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract : Complication management].

    PubMed

    Gockel, I; Hoffmeister, A; Lordick, F

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies could demonstrate that neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiochemotherapy for esophageal and gastric cancer do not significantly increase the risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality as compared to surgery alone. With respect to patient safety and effectiveness of neoadjuvant concepts, quality assured performance of each treatment modality and close interdisciplinary cooperation play an important role. The majority of potential side effects and complications, which might occur during neoadjuvant therapy can be adequately controlled by correct prophylaxis and professional medical complication management. Complications before, during and after neoadjuvant therapy of upper gastrointestinal tract tumors can also be caused by the tumor itself or by medicinal therapy. These comprise bleeding, fistulas, perforations and stenoses. Modern endoscopic techniques are the therapy of choice in these situations. Preoperative conditioning during the period of neoadjuvant therapy opens the possibility of reduced postoperative complications to patients with tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26374651

  5. High preoperative serum globulin in rectal cancer treated with neoadjunctive chemoradiation therapy is a risk factor for poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingguo; Meng, Xianke; Liang, Lei; Xu, Ye; Cai, Guoxiang; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-01-01

    An elevated serum albumin (ALB) and albumin/globulin ratio (AGR) has been reported to be associated with a favorable prognosis for certain malignancies; however, little is known about the prognostic significance of globulin (GLB) in rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NCRT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether GLB analysis could predict the prognosis of patients received NCRT. A retrospective cohort of 293 locally advanced rectal cancer patients receiving NCRT followed by radical surgery was recruited between January 2006 and December 2012 at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. Levels for preoperative GLB and ALB were obtained and used to calculate the AGR. Survival analysis was used to evaluate the predictive value of GLB. X-tile program determined 28.50, 36.20 and 1.20 as optimal cut-off value for GLB, ALB and AGR in terms of survival. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that low GLB levels were significantly associated with favorable rectal cancer-specific survival (RCSS) (P < 0.05). Conversely, low ALB levels were associated with a significantly worse RCSS (P = 0.010). Collectively, high preoperative GLB level was a significantly unfavorable factor for rectal cancer patients treated with NCRT. This easily obtained variable may serve as a valuable marker to predict the outcomes of such patient population. PMID:26609491

  6. Pathologic Evaluation of Breast Cancer after Neoadjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Cheol Keun; Jung, Woo-Hee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, one of the most common cancers in women, has various treatment modalities. Neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) has been used in many clinical trials because it is easy to evaluate the treatment response to therapeutic agents in a short time period; consequently, NAT is currently a standard treatment modality for large-sized and locally advanced breast cancers, and its use in early-stage breast cancer is becoming more common. Thus, chances to encounter breast tissue from patients treated with NAT is increasing. However, systems for handling and evaluating such specimens have not been established. Several evaluation systems emphasize a multidisciplinary approach to increase the accuracy of breast cancer assessment. Thus, detailed and systematic evaluation of clinical, radiologic, and pathologic findings is important. In this review, we compare the major problems of each evaluation system and discuss important points for handling and evaluating NAT-treated breast specimens. PMID:27068026

  7. Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy: Patient selection, treatment duration and surrogate endpoints.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Belinda; Dowsett, Mitch

    2015-11-01

    Neoadjuvant endocrine treatment has become of increasing interest for downstaging primary ER+ breast cancers as it has become clear that the pathologic complete response rate of luminal tumours to chemotherapy is much lower than that of non-luminal and differs little from that to endocrine therapy. There is much more experience in postmenopausal than premenopausal women. Aromatase inhibitors are generally the agent of choice. Responses are lower in those with the low levels of ER. While duration of endocrine treatment in clinical trials has usually been standardized at around three to four months it is clear that volume reductions continue to occur beyond that time in a large proportion of cases and routine clinical practice is often to treat to maximum response. This relatively slow emergence of downstaging relates to the absence of any increase in apoptosis with endocrine therapy and dependence of responses on the antiproliferative effects of oestrogen withdrawal: apoptosis occurs but at a slightly lower rate such that cell loss is attritional. The dependence of responses on the reduced proliferation underpins the value of Ki67 as an intermediate end-point for treatment benefit with multiple studies having found that relative effects on proliferation by different drugs in neoadjuvant trials match their relative impact on recurrence. While change in Ki67 is now accepted as a validated endpoint for comparing endocrine agents in the neoadjuvant scenario, on-treatment levels of Ki67 are related to long-term prognosis more closely than pretreatment Ki67. The Preoperative Endocrine Prognostic Index (PEPI) that combines residual Ki67 score with measures of on-treatment ER and other clinicopathologic factors has also found application in clinical trials. The potential to make longitudinal assessments of both clinical and biomarker responses has encouraged the development of novel clinical trial designs for assessing the impact of agents that aim to enhance response

  8. The prognostic significance of tumor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression change after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dvořák, Josef; Urbanec, Marek; Bluml, Antonin; Čermáková, Eva; Bartoš, Jiří; Petera, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the prognostic impact of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression changes during neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Material and methods Fifty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were evaluated. All the patients were administered the total dose of 44 Gy. Capecitabine has been concomitantly administered in the dose 825 mg/m2 in two daily oral administrations. Surgery was indicated 4–8 weeks from the chemoradiotherapy completion. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in the pretreatment biopsies and in the resected specimens was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Results All of 50 patients received radiotherapy without interruption up to the total planned dose. In 30 patients sphincter-saving surgery was performed, 20 patients underwent amputation of the rectum. Downstaging was described in 30 patients. Four patients have had complete pathologic remission. Twenty-six patients have had partial remission, the disease was stable in 15 patients. Progression was reported in 5 patients. The median disease-free survival was 64.9 months, median overall survival was 76.4 months. Increased EGFR expression was found in 12 patients (26.1%). A statistically significantly shorter overall survival (p < 0.0001) and disease-free survival (p < 0.0001) was found in patients with increased expression of EGFR compared with patients where no increase in the expression of EGFR during neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was observed. Conclusions The overexpression of EGFR during neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal adenokarcinoma associated with significant shorter overall survival and disease free survival. PMID:26199571

  9. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy followed by surgery is superior to that followed by definitive chemoradiation or radiotherapy in stage IIIA (N2) nonsmall-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis and system review

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Ling; Dan, Li; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Shuang-Mei; Mao, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 30% of all cases of nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are of a locally advanced (IIIA or IIIB) stage. However, surgical therapy for patients with stage IIIA (N2) NSCLC is associated with a disappointing 5-year survival rate. The optimal treatment for stage IIIA (N2) NSCLC is still in dispute. Methods A literature search was performed in the PubMed, Embase, and MEDLINE databases (last search updated in March 2015), and a meta-analysis of the available data was conducted. Two authors independently extracted data from each eligible study. Results A total of nine studies, including five randomized controlled trials and four retrospective studies, were enrolled in this meta-analysis. Significant homogeneity (χ2=49.62, P=0.000, I2=81.9%) was detected between four of the studies, including a total of 11,948 selected cases. Among the nine studies that investigated overall survival, the pooled hazard ratio (HR) was 0.70 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56–0.87; P=0.000). Subgroup analyses were performed according to the study design and the extent of resection. We observed a statistically significant better outcome after lobectomy (pooled HR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.47–0.58; P=0.000) than after pneumonectomy (pooled HR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.69–0.98; P=0.028). Unfortunately, there was no significant difference between the randomized controlled studies, as the pooled HR was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.81–1.09; P=0.440). Conclusion Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy followed by surgery (particularly lobectomy) is superior to following these therapies with definitive chemoradiation or radiotherapy, particularly in patients undergoing lobectomy. PMID:26955282

  10. The influence of neoadjuvant therapy for the prognosis in patients with rectal carcinoma: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Peng, Yu; Wang, Lin-Ang; Wei, Xi; Li, Meng-Xia; Qing, Yi; Xia, Wei; Cheng, Ming; Zi, Dan; Li, Chun-Xue; Wang, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Rectal cancer, defined as a cancerous lesion of the colon distal to the rectosigmoid junction, is the fourth most common cancer cause of death globally. There were 474 patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgery between October 2007 and May 2013 enrolled in our center. Patients were respectively categorized by neoadjuvant therapy. This study aimed to explore the predictive factors that affected the Progression-free survival and overall survival of the patients with rectal cancer. Clinical characteristics of patients were compared with the groups and potential prognostic factors were analyzed by SPSS 19.0. In our study, neoadjuvant therapy increased the anus-retained rate (64.4 vs 53.4 % P = 0.016) and remission rate in the treatment group, compared to the non-treatment group (62.6 vs 34.8 %; P = 0.000). The neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy, more operative duration, anus retained and micturition damaged are positive prognostic factors of PFS to patients. Poor differentiation, the tumor of ulcer, invasive, and pT4 stage, contributed the poor factors for PFS of patients (P < 0.05). Additionally, the patients with neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy underwent the better prognosis of OS. Adjuvant chemotherapy cannot increase PFS of the patients who accepted neoadjuvant therapy after surgery get pCR, but can improve OS. The anus-retained and neoadjuvant radiotherapy, duration of surgery in rectal cancer have the positive correlation. Micturition damaged and neoadjuvant radiotherapy were positively correlated as well. In conclusion, adjuvant chemotherapy does not improve the PFS of patients with pCR to neoadjuvant therapy, but is good for OS. Further prospective and large population-based clinical studies are needed to establish clinical guidelines for the use of neoadjuvant therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. PMID:26449827

  11. Translating neoadjuvant therapy into survival benefits: one size does not fit all.

    PubMed

    De Mattos-Arruda, Leticia; Shen, Ronglai; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Cortés, Javier

    2016-09-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy has been established as an effective therapeutic approach for patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Similar outcomes between neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy have been demonstrated in several trials. Nevertheless, neoadjuvant therapy has some advantages over adjuvant therapy, including tumour downstaging, in vivo assessment of therapeutic efficacy, reduced treatment durations, and the need to enrol fewer patients for clinical trials to reach their preplanned objectives. The number of neoadjuvant trials in patients with breast cancer has increased substantially in the past 5 years, particularly in the context of HER2-positive disease. Substantial improvements in the pathological complete response rate to anti-HER2 therapy, a proposed surrogate end point for long-term clinical benefit, have been observed with neoadjuvant dual-agent HER2 blockade. Thus, it was hypothesized that this approach would provide additional survival benefits over standard-of-care therapy with the anti-HER2 antibody trastuzumab in the adjuvant setting. Emerging data, however, are calling this notion into question. We discuss potential reasons why results of neoadjuvant trials of targeted therapies have not been mirrored in the adjuvant setting, and other than inherent differences in clinical-trial designs and statistical power, we consider how the biology of the disease, patient characteristics, and drug administration and schedule might influence the results. PMID:27000962

  12. Clinical and Molecular Methods in Drug Development: Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy in Breast Cancer as a Model.

    PubMed

    Braga, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NAET), and neoadjuvant targeted therapy (NATT), more recently, have been adopted worldwide as standard of care in locally advanced and inoperable BC. These modalities, collectively called neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NAST), are also used for organ preservation and for mechanistic biological studies on drug response and resistance, drug development, and clinical trials. Furthermore, the response to NACT is a valuable indicator of long-term survival. In this work, the advantages and pitfalls of using NAST in BC for studying drug response and resistance for drug development and clinical trials are discussed as well as practical points on how to set up a NAST clinical trial in BC. PMID:26910079

  13. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Moughan, Jennifer; Garofalo, Michael C.; Bendell, Johanna; Berger, Adam C.; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Perera, Francisco; Jabbour, Salma K.; Nowlan, Adam; DeNittis, Albert; Crane, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  14. Resection of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation does not depend on improved radiographic appearance of tumor–vessel relationships

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Aaron T.; Raman, Siva P.; Wood, Laura D.; Huang, Peng; Laheru, Daniel A.; Zheng, Lei; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Le, Dung T.; Schulick, Richard; Edil, Barish; Ellsworth, Susannah; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Cameron, John L.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neoadjuvant therapy increases rates of margin-negative resection of borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BL-PDAC). Criteria for BL-PDAC resection following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy (NCRT) have not been clearly defined. Methods Fifty consecutive patients with BL-PDAC who received NCRT from 2007 to 2012 were identified. Computed tomography (CT) scans pre- and post-treatment were centrally reviewed. Results Twenty-nine patients (58 %) underwent resection following NCRT, while 21 (42 %) remained unresected. Patients selected for and successfully undergoing resection were more likely to have better performance status and absence of the following features on pre- and post-treatment CT: superior mesenteric vein/portal vein encasement, superior mesenteric artery involvement, tumor involvement of two or more vessels, and questionable/overt metastases (all p <0.05). Tumor volume and degree of tumor–vessel involvement did not significantly change in both groups after NCRT (all p > 0.05). The median overall survival was 22.9 months in resected versus 13.0 months in unresected patients (p < 0.001). Of patients undergoing resection, 93 % were margin-negative, 72 % were node-negative, and 54 % demonstrated moderate pathologic response to NCRT. Conclusion Apparent radiographic extent of vascular involvement does not change significantly after NCRT. Patients without metastatic disease should be chosen for surgical exploration based on adequate performance status and lack of disease progression. PMID:25755849

  15. Neoadjuvant Sandwich Treatment With Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine Administered Prior to, Concurrently With, and Following Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuan-Hong; Lin, Jun-Zhong; An, Xin; Luo, Jie-Lin; Cai, Mu-Yan; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Kong, Ling-Heng; Liu, Guo-Chen; Tang, Jing-Hua; Chen, Gong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consisting of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen

  16. Targets for Neoadjuvant Therapy – The Preferences of Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thill, M.; Pisa, G.; Isbary, G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Therapists and administrative bodies consider a pathological complete remission as an independent and relevant endpoint in evaluations of the clinical utility of neoadjuvant therapy for early breast cancer. The present study aims to investigate which treatment outcomes of a neoadjuvant therapy are considered by the patients themselves to be relevant. Materials and Methods: With the help of analytic hierarchy process (AHP) methods patient preferences about the treatment targets of neoadjuvant therapy were assessed quantitatively. All participants had undergone a neoadjuvant therapy in the form of chemotherapy and, in HER2-positive cases, as a targeted antibody therapy against HER2 for the primary diagnosis of early breast cancer 12–36 months prior to the interview. The criteria for the hierarchy model were identified in an earlier qualitative survey. The patient interviews were conducted by 4 experienced female interviewers. Results: Forty-one patients participated in the quantitative survey, of these 15 (36.6 %) had suffered from HER2-positive disease. The achievement of pCR was the most important therapeutic target for the patients, even before disease-free survival, overall survival and the option for breast-preserving operation. Avoidance of side effects was considered to be the least important. In a comparison of the side effects the patients judged fatigue to be most important before nausea and loss of hair. Conclusion: For the patients the achievement of a pathological complete remission is considered to be an independent, relevant and highly desired target of neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:27239064

  17. AKT expression is associated with degree of pathologic response in adenocarcinoma of the esophagus treated with neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Nadia; Shridhar, Ravi; Hoffe, Sarah; Almhanna, Khaldoun

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (NCRT) has become standard in the treatment of locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) with survival correlated to degree of pathologic response. The phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mTOR pathway plays an important role in tumorgenesis and resistance. We sought to elucidate the role of this pathway in patients with EAC who received NCRT. Methods After IRB approval, a prospective trial was initiated in which patients with EAC underwent endoscopic biopsies of normal and tumor tissue prior to instituting NCRT. Patients then proceeded to esophagectomy. The pre-treatment tissues underwent gene expression profiling. SAM method was used to analyze expression of AKT within normal and tumor tissue. Expression was then correlated to degree of pathologic response. Results One-hundred patients were consented for the study, of which 67 met final eligibility. Nineteen patient’s tumors ultimately underwent gene expression profiling via microarray. The differential expression of all AKT isoforms in tumor tissue was markedly overexpressed compared to normal tissue (P=6×10−5). There were 3 patients designated as pNR, 6 as pPR, and 10 as pCR. Partial and non-responders had higher expressions of AKT compared to pCR with the non-responders consistently illustrated the highest expression of AKT (P=0.02). There was a significant correlation between individual isoforms of AKT-1, AKT-2, and AKT-3 and degree of pathologic response (P=0.002, 0.04, and 0.04 respectively). Conclusions AKT is overexpressed in patients with AC of the esophagus. Moreover, pathologic response to NCRT may be correlated with degree of AKT expression. Additional data is needed to clarify this relationship to potentially add targeted therapies to the neoadjuvant regimen. PMID:27034781

  18. The neutrophil to albumin ratio as a predictor of pathological complete response in rectal cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Bernard; Mokdad, Ali A; Patel, Prachi M; Li, Hsiao C; Huerta, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Pathological complete response (pCR) following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) and total mesorectal excision (TME), in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, occurs in 15-27% of patients. Because blood cell counts and albumin are a direct indicator of the host environment, a response to nCRT might be predicted by these markers. This study was carried out to determine whether the neutrophil to albumin ratio (NAR) was predictive of pCR in veteran patients. Ninety-eight patients with rectal cancer who underwent standard nCRT, followed by TME were analyzed. Pre-nCRT and post-nCRT hematologic data were collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed with our primary endpoint of pCR. Male patients (99%), age 62.4±9.1 years, BMI=27.4±5.9 kg/m, rectal cancer distance from anal verge=7.1±4.5 cm (SD), interval between nCRT and TME=8 weeks, 55% patients=low anterior resection, 95% received 5-fluorouracil, and all patients received radiation, with 15% achieving a pCR. Univariate analysis showed that pre-nCRT carcinoembryonic antigen (15.8±45.1 vs. 3.5±5.3 ng/dl; P=0.002) and the pre-nCRT NAR (16.4±4.8 vs. 14.2±1.6; P=0.002) were associated with pCR. On multivariate analysis, pre-nCRT carcinoembryonic antigen (odds ratio=0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.22-0.77) and pre-nCRT NAR (odds ratio=0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.60-0.97) remained independent predictors of pCR. Overall survival between nonresponders and pCR patients at 1, 5, and 10 years was 96, 62, and 44% versus 93, 85, and 61%, P=0.13, and disease-free survival was 95, 60, and 47% versus 93, 85, and 61%, P=0.17; respectively. Our study shows that the pre-nCRT NAR is an independent predictor of pCR. These findings should be applied to other cohorts to determine its validity and reliability for use as a potential predictor of pCR. PMID:27434664

  19. The role of neoadjuvant therapy in the management of locally advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Borregales, Leonardo D.; Adibi, Mehrad; Thomas, Arun Z.; Wood, Christopher G.; Karam, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the armamentarium of targeted therapy agents for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has significantly increased. Improvements in response rates and survival, with more manageable side effects compared with interleukin 2/interferon immunotherapy, have been reported with the use of targeted therapy agents, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors (everolimus and temsirolimus) and VEGF receptor antibodies (bevacizumab). Current guidelines reflect these new therapeutic approaches with treatments based on risk category, histology and line of therapy in the metastatic setting. However, while radical nephrectomy remains the standard of care for locally advanced RCC, the migration and use of these agents from salvage to the neoadjuvant setting for large unresectable masses, high-level venous tumor thrombus involvement, and patients with imperative indications for nephron sparing has been increasingly described in the literature. Several trials have recently been published and some are still recruiting patients in the neoadjuvant setting. While the results of these trials will inform and guide the use of these agents in the neoadjuvant setting, there still remains a considerable lack of consensus in the literature regarding the effectiveness, safety and clinical utility of neoadjuvant therapy. The goal of this review is to shed light on the current body of evidence with regards to the use of neoadjuvant treatments in the setting of locally advanced RCC. PMID:27034725

  20. The role of neoadjuvant therapy in the management of locally advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Borregales, Leonardo D; Adibi, Mehrad; Thomas, Arun Z; Wood, Christopher G; Karam, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, the armamentarium of targeted therapy agents for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has significantly increased. Improvements in response rates and survival, with more manageable side effects compared with interleukin 2/interferon immunotherapy, have been reported with the use of targeted therapy agents, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors (everolimus and temsirolimus) and VEGF receptor antibodies (bevacizumab). Current guidelines reflect these new therapeutic approaches with treatments based on risk category, histology and line of therapy in the metastatic setting. However, while radical nephrectomy remains the standard of care for locally advanced RCC, the migration and use of these agents from salvage to the neoadjuvant setting for large unresectable masses, high-level venous tumor thrombus involvement, and patients with imperative indications for nephron sparing has been increasingly described in the literature. Several trials have recently been published and some are still recruiting patients in the neoadjuvant setting. While the results of these trials will inform and guide the use of these agents in the neoadjuvant setting, there still remains a considerable lack of consensus in the literature regarding the effectiveness, safety and clinical utility of neoadjuvant therapy. The goal of this review is to shed light on the current body of evidence with regards to the use of neoadjuvant treatments in the setting of locally advanced RCC. PMID:27034725

  1. Current treatment of early breast cancer: adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth; Lee, Hee Jin; Lulla, Amriti; Hernandez, Liz; Gokare, Prashanth; Lim, Bora

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. The latest world cancer statistics calculated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) revealed that 1,677,000 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 and 577,000 died. The TNM classification of malignant tumor (TNM) is the most commonly used staging system for breast cancer. Breast cancer is a group of very heterogeneous diseases. The molecular subtype of breast cancer carries important predictive and prognostic values, and thus has been incorporated in the basic initial process of breast cancer assessment/diagnosis. Molecular subtypes of breast cancers are divided into human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2 +), hormone receptor positive (estrogen or progesterone +), both positive, and triple negative breast cancer. By virtue of early detection via mammogram, the majority of breast cancers in developed parts of world are diagnosed in the early stage of the disease. Early stage breast cancers can be completely resected by surgery. Over time however, the disease may come back even after complete resection, which has prompted the development of an adjuvant therapy. Surgery followed by adjuvant treatment has been the gold standard for breast cancer treatment for a long time. More recently, neoadjuvant treatment has been recognized as an important strategy in biomarker and target evaluation. It is clinically indicated for patients with large tumor size, high nodal involvement, an inflammatory component, or for those wish to preserve remnant breast tissue. Here we review the most up to date conventional and developing treatments for different subtypes of early stage breast cancer. PMID:25400908

  2. Significance and problems in evaluations of pathological responses to neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurosumi, Masafumi

    2006-01-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy consists of systemic drug treatments before surgery for a primary cancer. Currently, several neoadjuvant therapy regimens for breast cancer that use various cytotoxic as well as endocrine-therapeutic and molecular-targeting agents have been performed in clinical practice and/or studies. In neoadjuvant therapy, pre-treatment pathological examination using materials obtained by a core needle biopsy (CNB) is necessary, and pathological diagnosis and evaluation of the biological status, such as hormone receptors and HER-2 over-expression are confirmed. In addition, CNB in the inter-phase of chemotherapy is also thought to be useful for assessment of therapeutic effects before regimens have been completed. After surgery, the therapeutic effects of neoadjuvant therapy have been mainly evaluated on the basis of pathological findings and a pathological complete response (pCR) is considered to be the main target of neoadjuvant therapy. Results of most of clinical studies including NSABP protocol B-18 and B-27 have confirmed the prognostic significance of pCR in neoadjuvant therapy and indicated the significance of pathological evaluation. However, universally accepted pathological response criteria have not been established, but evaluations of the main invasive tumor, intraductal components and regional lymph nodes are thought to be necessary. Additionally, evaluation of the effects below pCR also need examining in a study using a mild anti-cancer drug, such as hormone-therapeutic agent, and the survival outcomes of patients below pCR need to be examined and compared between each grade. PMID:16929118

  3. Nanoparticles based brachytherapy spacers for delivery of localized combined chemo-radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Materials and Methods Here we have fabricated Implantable Nanoplatforms or Chemo-Radiation Therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemo-radiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-coglycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix, were physically identical (size) to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5mm×0.8mm). The silica nanoparticles with diameter 250nm conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with anticancer drug, docetaxel. We have evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked using optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue as opposed to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth as opposed to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions The imaging with the Cy7.5-spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel-spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, as opposed to rapid clearance of the drugs when administered systemically. The results demonstrate

  4. Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G.; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Methods and Materials: Here we have fabricated implantable nanoplatforms or chemoradiation therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow-release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemoradiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix and are physically identical in size to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5 mm × 0.8 mm). The silica nanoparticles, 250 nm in diameter, were conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug, and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology, and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with an anticancer drug, docetaxel. We evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results: The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked by the use of optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue in contrast to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer, which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth in contrast to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions: The imaging with the Cy7.5 spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in a slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, in contrast to the rapid clearance of the drugs when

  5. Low miR-187 expression promotes resistance to chemoradiation therapy in vitro and correlates with treatment failure in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lynam-Lennon, Niamh; Bibby, Becky A; Mongan, Ann Marie; Marignol, Laure; Paxton, Christian N; Geiersbach, Katherine; Bronner, Mary P; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; Reynolds, John; Maher, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has a poor prognosis and is increasing in incidence in many western populations. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by surgery is increasingly the standard of care for locally advanced EAC; however, resistance to treatment is a significant clinical problem. The identification of both novel biomarkers predicting response to treatment and novel therapeutic targets to enhance the efficacy of CRT are key to improving survival rates in EAC. In this study we performed global microRNA (miRNA) profiling of pre-treatment EAC biopsies and identified 67 miRNA significantly altered in patients who are resistant to CRT. One of these miRNA, miR-187, was significantly decreased in pre-treatment EAC tumors from patients having a poor response to neoadjuvant CRT, highlighting downregulation of miR-187 as a potential mechanism of treatment resistance in EAC. In vitro, miR-187 was demonstrated to play a functional role in modulating sensitivity to X-ray radiation and cisplatin in EAC and its dysregulation was demonstrated to be due to chromosomal alterations. In vitro, miR-187 altered expression of a diverse array of pathways, including the immune regulator complement component 3 (C3), serum levels of which we have previously demonstrated to predict patient response to CRT. In vivo, expression of C3 was significantly increased in tumors from patients having a poor response to CRT. This study highlights for the first time a role for miR-187 as a novel biomarker of response to CRT and a potential therapeutic target for enhancing the efficacy of CRT in EAC. PMID:27254108

  6. Do Elderly Patients Experience Increased Perioperative or Postoperative Morbidity or Mortality When Given Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Before Esophagectomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Fogh, Shannon E.; Yu, Anthony; Kubicek, Gregory J.; Scott, Walter; Mitchell, Edith; Rosato, Ernest L.; Berger, Adam C.

    2011-08-01

    Background: The use of induction chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery has been widely used for the treatment of esophageal cancer. The presumed risk of increased postoperative morbidity and mortality with this regimen has led to reluctance to offer this therapy to elderly patients. We compared the perioperative morbidity and mortality of patients 70 years old and older with those of patients younger than 70 who received CRT followed by esophagectomy and sought to identify preoperative risk factors that may predict higher risk of postoperative death or complications. Methods and Materials: We identified 260 patients who underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy. The association of age with postoperative death and complications was evaluated. The Charlson index, prior cardiac history, and diabetes were identified as preoperative risk factors and were evaluated as potential confounders or effect modifiers. Results: Cardiac disease and the Charlson index were potential modifiers of the effect of age on length of hospital stay (p = 0.08 and p = 0.07, respectively) and postoperative complications (p = 0.1 and p = 0.2) but were not statistically significant. There was a slight nonsignificant decrease in the risk of death in elderly patients after adjustment for the Charlson index (p = 0.2). Conclusion: No significant differences were detected with respect to morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. The presence of cardiac disease, higher scores on the Charlson index, or diabetes did not significantly influence length of stay, postoperative complications, or postoperative death. Given the potential to improve outcomes, this regimen should not be discounted in elderly patients.

  7. Pathologic Assessment of Rectal Carcinoma after Neoadjuvant Radio(chemo)therapy: Prognostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hav, Monirath; Libbrecht, Louis; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Geboes, Karen; Pattyn, Piet; Cuvelier, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radio(chemo)therapy is increasingly used in rectal cancer and induces a number of morphologic changes that affect prognostication after curative surgery, thereby creating new challenges for surgical pathologists, particularly in evaluating morphologic changes and tumour response to preoperative treatment. Surgical pathologists play an important role in determining the many facets of rectal carcinoma patient care after neoadjuvant treatment. These range from proper handling of macroscopic specimens to accurate microscopic evaluation of pathological features associated with patients' prognosis. This review presents the well-established pathological prognostic indicators and discusses challenging features in order to provide both surgical pathologists and treating physicians with a checklist that is useful in a neoadjuvant setting. PMID:26509160

  8. Modern radiation therapy and potential fertility preservation strategies in patients with cervical cancer undergoing chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Budach, Volker; Köhler, Christhardt; Jantke, Andreas; Marnitz, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Young patients with cervical cancer who undergo chemoradiation might be interested in fertility preservation, not only dependent upon the use of a gestational carrier as maybe achieved by the use of ovarian transposition and cryo-conservation of oocytes or ovarian tissue, but may prefer to carry pregnancy to term after cancer treatment. The latter approach is a non-established concept needing both modern radiation therapy approaches as well as modifications -if at all possible- in current recommendations for target volume delineation to spare dose to the unaffected uterus. Future strategies to serve selected patients in this respect should only be conducted in prospective clinical evaluations and are critically discussed in this article. PMID:25890342

  9. Neo-adjuvant therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma before liver transplantation: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Masato; Aucejo, Federico; Choi, Minsig; Kim, Richard

    2014-05-14

    Liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) within Milan criteria is a widely accepted optimal therapy. Neo-adjuvant therapy before transplantation has been used as a bridging therapy to prevent dropout during the waiting period and as a down-staging method for the patient with intermediate HCC to qualify for liver transplantation. Transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation are the most commonly used method for locoregional therapy. The data associated with newer modalities including drug-eluting beads, radioembolization with Y90, stereotactic radiation therapy and sorafenib will be discussed as a tool for converting advanced HCC to LT candidates. The concept "ablate and wait" has gained the popularity where mandated observation period after neo-adjuvant therapy allows for tumor biology to become apparent, thus has been recommended after down-staging. The role of neo-adjuvant therapy with conjunction of "ablate and wait" in living donor liver transplantation for intermediate stage HCC is also discussed in the paper. PMID:24833861

  10. Prevalence and Predictors of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the National Cancer Database: Importance of Socioeconomic Status and Treating Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Liptay, Michael J.; Fidler, Mary Jo

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The optimal locoregional therapy for stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial, with definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery (NT-S) serving as competing strategies. In this study, we used the National Cancer Database to determine the prevalence and predictors of NT in a large, modern cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage IIIA NSCLC treated with CRT or NT-S between 2003 and 2010 at programs accredited by the Commission on Cancer were included. Predictors were categorized as clinical, time/geographic, socioeconomic, and institutional. In accord with the National Cancer Database, institutions were classified as academic/research program and as comprehensive and noncomprehensive community cancer centers. Logistic regression and random effects multilevel logistic regression were performed for univariable and multivariable analyses, respectively. Results: The cohort consisted of 18,581 patients, 3,087 (16.6%) of whom underwent NT-S (10.6% induction CRT, 6% induction chemotherapy). The prevalence of NT-S was constant over time, but there were significant relative 31% and 30% decreases in pneumonectomy and right-sided pneumonectomy, respectively, over time (P trend <.02). In addition to younger age, lower T stage, and favorable comorbidity score, indicators of higher socioeconomic status were strong independent predictors of NT-S, including white race, higher income, and private/managed insurance. The type of institution (academic/research program vs comprehensive or noncomprehensive community cancer centers, odds ratio 1.54 and 2.08, respectively) strongly predicted NT-S, but treatment volume did not. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery was an uncommon treatment approach in Commission on Cancer programs, and the prevalence of postinduction pneumonectomy decreased over time. Higher socioeconomic status and treatment at academic institutions were significant

  11. Neoadjuvant Therapy of DOF Regimen Plus Bevacizumab Can Increase Surgical Resection Ratein Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junxun; Yao, Sheng; Li, Xiao-Song; Kang, Huan-Rong; Yao, Fang-Fang; Du, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Locally advanced gastric cancer (LAGC) is best treated with surgical resection. Bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy has shown promising results in treating advanced gastric cancer. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy using the docetaxel/oxaliplatin/5-FU (DOF) regimen and bevacizumab in LAGC patients. Eighty LAGC patients were randomized to receive DOF alone (n = 40) or DOF plus bevacizumab (n = 40) as neoadjuvant therapy before surgery. The lesions were evaluated at baseline and during treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were counted using the FISH test. Patients were followed up for 3 years to analyze the disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The total response rate was significantly higher in the DOF plus bevacizumab group than the DOF group (65% vs 42.5%, P = 0.0436). The addition of bevacizumab significantly increased the surgical resection rate and the R0 resection rate (P < 0.05). The DOF plus bevacizumab group showed significantly greater reduction in CTC counts after neoadjuvant therapy in comparison with the DOF group (P = 0.0335). Although the DOF plus bevacizumab group had significantly improved DFS than the DOF group (15.2 months vs 12.3 months, P = 0.013), the 2 groups did not differ significantly in OS (17.6 ± 1.8 months vs 16.4 ± 1.9 months, P = 0.776. Cox proportional model analysis showed that number of metastatic lymph nodes, CTC reduction, R0 resection, and neoadjuvant therapy are independent prognostic factors for patients with LAGC. Neoadjuvant of DOF regimen plus bevacizumab can improve the R0 resection rate and DFS in LAGC. These beneficial effects might be associated with the reduction in CTC counts. PMID:26496252

  12. The indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase pathway controls complement-dependent enhancement of chemo-radiation therapy against murine glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an enzyme with immune-suppressive properties that is commonly exploited by tumors to evade immune destruction. Anti-tumor T cell responses can be initiated in solid tumors, but are immediately suppressed by compensatory upregulation of immunological checkpoints, including IDO. In addition to these known effects on the adaptive immune system, we previously showed widespread, T cell-dependent complement deposition during allogeneic fetal rejection upon maternal treatment with IDO-blockade. We hypothesized that IDO protects glioblastoma from the full effects of chemo-radiation therapy by preventing vascular activation and complement-dependent tumor destruction. Methods To test this hypothesis, we utilized a syngeneic orthotopic glioblastoma model in which GL261 glioblastoma tumor cells were stereotactically implanted into the right frontal lobes of syngeneic mice. These mice were treated with IDO-blocking drugs in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Results Pharmacologic inhibition of IDO synergized with chemo-radiation therapy to prolong survival in mice bearing intracranial glioblastoma tumors. We now show that pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of IDO allowed chemo-radiation to trigger widespread complement deposition at sites of tumor growth. Chemotherapy treatment alone resulted in collections of perivascular leukocytes within tumors, but no complement deposition. Adding IDO-blockade led to upregulation of VCAM-1 on vascular endothelium within the tumor microenvironment, and further adding radiation in the presence of IDO-blockade led to widespread deposition of complement. Mice genetically deficient in complement component C3 lost all of the synergistic effects of IDO-blockade on chemo-radiation-induced survival. Conclusions Together these findings identify a novel mechanistic link between IDO and complement, and implicate complement as a major downstream effector mechanism for the beneficial

  13. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice. PMID:26451609

  14. [Successful chemoradiation therapy for local control of rectal cancer with multiple bone metastases--a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tetsu; Kamigaki, Takashi; Takase, Shiro; Sakai, Tetsuya; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Sumi, Yasuo; Matsuda, Yoshiko; Imanishi, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Satoshi; Iwatani, Yoshiteru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Kuroda, Yoshikazu

    2009-11-01

    A 78-year-old man was admitted to our institute with the symptom of melena. The patient was diagnosed as having advanced rectal cancer (T4N2M1) with multiple bone metastases. Chemoradiation therapy was chosen for the local control because our proposal of colostomy was rejected. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy [46 Gy/23 Fr+tegafur/uraci (l UFT 400 mg/m2)/calcium folinate (Leucovorin: LV 75 mg/body)] resulted in a good partial response and the patient became asymptomatic. UFT/LV were administrated and most of the bone metastases were diminished. After 3 years of disease remission with good quality of life, local tumor recurred with the symptoms of melena and bowel obstruction. Colostomy and additional radiotherapy were performed for the palliation. He died after 4 years from the initial treatment. In advanced rectal cancer with distant metastases, chemoradiation therapy for local control plus systemic chemotherapy could be an alternative to improve quality of life. PMID:20037328

  15. Low-Dose Neoadjuvant External Beam Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Devisetty, Kiran; Kobayashi, Wendy; Suit, Herman D.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Schwab, Joseph H.; Springfield, Dempsey S.; Yoon, Sam S.; Hornicek, Francis J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: For soft tissue sarcoma, neoadjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to 50 Gy has the same local control (LC) and overall survival as postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) to 60 Gy, but with increased wound complications. We examined whether low-dose neoadjuvant EBRT would decrease acute toxicity while maintaining LC. Methods and Materials: From 1971 to 2008, 1,765 patients with nonmetastatic soft tissue sarcoma were treated with radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital. We identified 42 patients treated with low-dose neoadjuvant EBRT (median, 20 Gy; range, 16-26) followed by surgical resection and PORT. PORT included EBRT (25 patients; median, 40 Gy; range, 20-56.2), brachytherapy (13 patients; median, 42 Gy; range, 26-50), and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) (4 patients; median, 12.5 Gy; range, 8-20). The median total dose was 63.3 Gy (range, 28-78.4). Results: Median follow-up was 36 months (range, 4-318). Severe acute wound complications were reported in 15 patients (36%) and correlated to PORT technique (16% EBRT, 69% brachytherapy, 50% IORT, p = 0.004). The 5-year LC was 73% and correlated to PORT technique (68% EBRT, 100% brachytherapy, 50% IORT, p = 0.03) and histology (p = 0.05), with a trend to improvement if >60 Gy (p = 0.10). The 5-year overall survival was 65% and correlated to extent of resection (p < 0.001) and margin status (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Despite using low-dose neoadjuvant EBRT, we report a high rate of severe acute wound complications that was strongly associated with brachytherapy. Modification of the brachytherapy technique may decrease acute toxicity while maintaining excellent local control. Further study must be conducted before recommending broader application.

  16. Cisplatin, Gemcitabine, and Lapatinib as Neoadjuvant Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Vivek; Mamtani, Ronac; Keefe, Stephen; Guzzo, Thomas; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Vaughn, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to investigate the safety and efficacy of gemcitabine, cisplatin, and lapatinib (GCL) as neoadjuvant therapy in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) planned for radical cystectomy. Materials and Methods Four cycles of GCL were administered as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with MIBC. Although initially designed as a phase II efficacy study with a primary endpoint of pathologic complete response at the time of radical cystectomy, the dose selected for investigation proved excessively toxic. A total of six patients were enrolled. Results The initial four patients received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1 and 8 and cisplatin 70 mg/m2 intravenously on day 1 of each 21-day treatment cycle. Lapatinib was administered as 1,000 mg orally daily starting one week prior to the initiation of cycle 1 of gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) and continuing until the completion of cycle 4 of GC. These initial doses were poorly tolerated, and the final two enrolled patients received a reduced lapatinib dose of 750 mg orally daily. However, reduction of the lapatinib dose did not result in improved tolerance or drug-delivery, and the trial was terminated early due to excessive toxicity. Grade 3/4 toxicities included diarrhea (33%), nausea/vomiting (33%), and thrombocytopenia (33%). Conclusion The addition of lapatinib to GC as neoadjuvant therapy for MIBC was limited by excessive treatment-related toxicity. These findings highlight the importance of thorough dose-escalation investigation of combination therapies prior to evaluation in the neoadjuvant setting, as well as the limitations of determination of maximum tolerated dose for novel targeted combination regimens. PMID:26639198

  17. Phase 3 Trial of Postoperative Chemotherapy Alone Versus Chemoradiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Gastric Cancer Treated With R0 Gastrectomy and D2 Lymph Node Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Sook Ryun; Ryu, Keun Won; Kim, Young-Woo; Bae, Jae-Moon; Lee, Jun Ho; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Dae Yong

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To compare chemotherapy alone with chemoradiation therapy in stage III-IV(M0) gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection. Methods and Materials: The chemotherapy arm received 5 cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL), and the chemoradiation therapy arm received 1 cycle of FL, then radiation therapy of 45 Gy concurrently with 2 cycles of FL, followed by 2 cycles of FL. Intent-to-treat analysis and per-protocol analyses were performed. Results: Between May 6, 2002 and June 29, 2006, a total of 90 patients were enrolled. Forty-four were randomly assigned to the chemotherapy arm and 46 to the chemoradiation therapy arm. Treatment was completed as planned by 93.2% of patients in the chemotherapy arm and 87.0% in the chemoradiation therapy arm. Overall intent-to-treat analysis showed that addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy significantly improved locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) but not disease-free survival. In subgroup analysis for stage III, chemoradiation therapy significantly prolonged the 5-year LRRFS and disease-free survival rates compared with chemotherapy (93.2% vs 66.8%, P=.014; 73.5% vs 54.6%, P=.056, respectively). Conclusions: Addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy could improve the LRRFS in stage III gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection.

  18. Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy After Pancreaticoduodenectomy in Elderly Patients With Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, David P.; Hsu, Charles C.; Wang Jingya; Makary, Martin A.; Winter, Jordan M.; Robinson, Ray; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients {>=}75 years of age. Methods: The study group of 655 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital over a 12-year period (8/30/1993 to 2/28/2005). Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, intraoperative data, pathology data, and patient outcomes were collected and analyzed by adjuvant treatment status and age {>=}75 years. Cox proportional hazards analysis determined clinical predictors of mortality and morbidity. Results: We identified 166 of 655 (25.3%) patients were {>=}75 years of age and 489 of 655 patients (74.7%) were <75 years of age. Forty-nine patients in the elderly group (29.5%) received adjuvant CRT. For elderly patients, node-positive metastases (p = 0.008), poor/anaplastic differentiation (p = 0.012), and undergoing a total pancreatectomy (p = 0.010) predicted poor survival. The 2-year survival for elderly patients receiving adjuvant therapy was improved compared with surgery alone (49.0% vs. 31.6%, p = 0.013); however, 5-year survival was similar (11.7% vs. 19.8%, respectively, p = 0.310). After adjusting for major confounders, adjuvant therapy in elderly patients had a protective effect with respect to 2-year survival (relative risk [RR] 0.58, p = 0.044), but not 5-year survival (RR 0.80, p = 0.258). Among the nonelderly, CRT was significantly associated with 2-year survival (RR 0.60, p < 0.001) and 5-year survival (RR 0.69, p < 0.001), after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions: Adjuvant therapy after PD is significantly associated with increased 2-year but not 5-year survival in elderly patients. Additional studies are needed to select which elderly patients are likely to benefit from adjuvant CRT.

  19. Phase 1 Trial of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Before Prostatectomy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, Bridget F.; Quaranta, Brian P.; Pura, John A.; Lee, W.R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Gerber, Leah; Haake, Michael; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J.; Moul, Judd W.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 1 study, the safety of neoadjuvant whole-pelvis radiation therapy (RT) administered immediately before radical prostatectomy in men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve men enrolled and completed a phase 1 single-institution trial between 2006 and 2010. Eligibility required a previously untreated diagnosis of localized but high-risk prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 46 months (range, 14-74 months). Radiation therapy was dose-escalated in a 3 × 3 design with dose levels of 39.6, 45, 50.4, and 54 Gy. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated up to 45 Gy with any additional dose given to the prostate and seminal vesicles. Radical prostatectomy was performed 4-8 weeks after RT completion. Primary outcome measure was intraoperative and postoperative day-30 morbidity. Secondary measures included late morbidity and oncologic outcomes. Results: No intraoperative morbidity was seen. Chronic urinary grade 2+ toxicity occurred in 42%; 2 patients (17%) developed a symptomatic urethral stricture requiring dilation. Two-year actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival was 67% (95% confidence interval 34%-86%). Patients with pT3 or positive surgical margin treated with neoadjuvant RT had a trend for improved biochemical recurrence-free survival compared with a historical cohort with similar adverse factors. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT is feasible with moderate urinary morbidity. However, oncologic outcomes do not seem to be substantially different from those with selective postoperative RT. If this multimodal approach is further evaluated in a phase 2 setting, 54 Gy should be used in combination with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy to improve biochemical outcomes.

  20. Effects of Treatment Duration During Concomitant Chemoradiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shaverdian, Narek; Gondi, Vinai; Sklenar, Kathryn L.; Dunn, Emily F.; Petereit, Daniel G.; Straub, Margaret R.; Bradley, Kristin A.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether extended treatment duration (TD) impacts in-field relapse and survival in the setting of concomitant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 480 consecutive cervical cancer patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone or concomitant CRT for curative intent were retrospectively analyzed. Relapse was defined as in-field with respect to external beam radiation therapy fields. The effects of TD on in-field relapse, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were assessed continuously and categorically within the separate RT and CRT cohorts. Covariates included age, histology, stage, and cumulative dose to point A. In-field relapse, DFS, and OS rates were estimated with Kaplan-Meier analysis; comparisons used log–rank statistic. Multivariate analysis used the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: A total of 372 patients (RT n=206, CRT n=166) were evaluable, with a median follow-up for relapse-free patients of 4.2 years (RT 4.4 years, CRT 4.2 years; P=.807). Treatment duration was longer in the RT cohort (median 55 days; range 35-99 days) versus the CRT cohort (median 51 days; range 35-92 days) (P=.001). In the RT cohort, TD ≥62 days trended to significance for predicting inferior DFS (hazard ratio 1.42, 95% confidence interval 0.86-1.98, P=.086). However, in the CRT cohort, TD assessed continuously or categorically across multiple cutoff thresholds did not predict for in-field relapse, DFS, or OS. Conclusion: With RT alone, extended TD ≥62 days may adversely impact treatment efficacy. With the addition of concomitant chemotherapy to RT, however, extended TD has no effect on treatment efficacy.

  1. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Combination With Panitumumab for Patients With Resectable Esophageal Cancer: The PACT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kordes, Sil; Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van; Hulshof, Maarten C.; Bergman, Jacques J.G.H.M.; Vliet, Hans J. van der; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van; Richel, Dick J.; Klinkenbijl, Jean H.G.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Wilmink, Johanna W.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment strategy for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase 2 study investigated the efficacy of the addition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor panitumumab to a preoperative CRT regimen with carboplatin, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with resectable esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable cT1N1M0 or cT2-3N0 to -2M0 tumors received preoperative CRT consisting of panitumumab (6 mg/kg) on days 1, 15, and 29, weekly administrations of carboplatin (area under the curve [AUC] = 2), and paclitaxel (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for 5 weeks and concurrent radiation therapy (41.4 Gy in 23 fractions, 5 days per week), followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. We aimed at a pCR rate of more than 40%. Furthermore, we explored the predictive value of biomarkers (EGFR, HER 2, and P53) for pCR. Results: From January 2010 until December 2011, 90 patients were enrolled. Patients were diagnosed predominantly with adenocarcinoma (AC) (80%), T3 disease (89%), and were node positive (81%). Three patients were not resected due to progressive disease. The primary aim was unmet, with a pCR rate of 22%. Patients with AC and squamous cell carcinoma reached a pCR of 14% and 47%, respectively. R0 resection was achieved in 95% of the patients. Main grade 3 toxicities were rash (12%), fatigue (11%), and nonfebrile neutropenia (11%). None of the biomarkers was predictive for response. Conclusions: The addition of panitumumab to CRT with carboplatin and paclitaxel was safe and well tolerated but could not improve pCR rate to the preset criterion of 40%.

  2. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  3. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  4. Neo-adjuvant chemo(radio)therapy in gastric cancer: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Alberto; Lirosi, Maria C; D'Ugo, Domenico; Fico, Valeria; Ricci, Riccardo; Santullo, Francesco; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cananzi, Ferdinando Cm; Persiani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    In the last 20 years, several clinical trials on neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy as a therapeutic approach for locally advanced gastric cancer have been performed. Even if more data are necessary to define the roles of these approaches, the results of preoperative treatments in the combined treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma are encouraging because this approach has led to a higher rate of curative surgical resection. Owing to the results of most recent randomized phase III studies, neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced resectable gastric cancer has satisfied the determination of level I evidence. Remaining concerns pertain to the choice of the optimal therapy regimen, strict patient selection by accurate pre-operative staging, standardization of surgical procedures, and valid criteria for response evaluation. New well-designed trials will be necessary to find the best therapeutic approach in pre-operative settings and the best way to combine old-generation chemotherapeutic drugs with new-generation molecules. PMID:26690252

  5. Neo-adjuvant chemo(radio)therapy in gastric cancer: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Alberto; Lirosi, Maria C; D’Ugo, Domenico; Fico, Valeria; Ricci, Riccardo; Santullo, Francesco; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cananzi, Ferdinando CM; Persiani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, several clinical trials on neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy as a therapeutic approach for locally advanced gastric cancer have been performed. Even if more data are necessary to define the roles of these approaches, the results of preoperative treatments in the combined treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma are encouraging because this approach has led to a higher rate of curative surgical resection. Owing to the results of most recent randomized phase III studies, neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced resectable gastric cancer has satisfied the determination of level I evidence. Remaining concerns pertain to the choice of the optimal therapy regimen, strict patient selection by accurate pre-operative staging, standardization of surgical procedures, and valid criteria for response evaluation. New well-designed trials will be necessary to find the best therapeutic approach in pre-operative settings and the best way to combine old-generation chemotherapeutic drugs with new-generation molecules. PMID:26690252

  6. Role of Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy in Adenocarcinomas of the Ampulla of Vater

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sunil Rana, Vishal; Evans, Douglas B.; Varadhachary, Gauri; Das, Prajnan; Bhatia, Sumita; Delclos, Marc E.; Janjan, Nora A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Crane, Christopher H.; Pisters, Peter W.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: The role of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in the treatment of ampullary cancers remains undefined. We retrospectively compared treatment outcomes in patients treated with pancreaticoduodenectomy alone versus those who received additional adjuvant CRT. Methods and Materials: Between May 1990 and January 2006, 54 of 96 patients with ampullary adenocarcinoma who underwent potentially curative pancreaticoduodenectomy also received adjuvant CRT. The median preoperative radiation dose was 45 Gy (range, 30-50.4 Gy) and median postoperative dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45-55.8 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy included primarily 5-fluorouracil (52%) and capecitabine (43%). Median follow-up was 31 months. Univariate and multivariate statistical methodologies were used to determine significant prognostic factors for local control (LC), distant control (DC), and overall survival (OS). Results: Actuarial 5-year LC, DC, and OS were 77%, 69%, and 64%, respectively. On univariate analysis, age, gender, race/ethnicity, tumor grade, use of adjuvant treatment, and sequencing of adjuvant therapy were not significantly associated with LC, DC, or OS. However, on univariate analysis, T3/T4 tumor stage was prognostic for poorer LC and OS (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively); node-positive disease was prognostic for poorer LC (p = 0.03). On multivariate analysis, T3/T4 tumor stage was independently prognostic for decreased OS (p = 0.002). Among these patients (n = 34), those who received adjuvant CRT had a trend toward improved OS (median, 35.2 vs. 16.5 months; p = 0.06). Conclusions: Ampullary cancers have a distinctly better treatment outcome than pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Higher primary tumor stage (T3/T4), an independent adverse risk factor for poorer treatment outcomes, may warrant the addition of adjuvant CRT to pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  7. Gastroduodenal Complications After Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Endoscopic Findings and Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Chon, Young Eun; Seong, Jinsil; Kim, Beom Kyung; Cha, Jihye; Kim, Seung Up; Park, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Shin, Sung Kwan; Kim, Do Young

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) is useful in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications following therapy. To determine risk factors, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of gastroduodenal complications following CCRT using endoscopy. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 123 patients treated with CCRT for unresectable HCC between January 1998 and December 2005. Radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were defined as radiation gastritis/duodenitis, radiation gastric/duodenal ulcer, or other gastroduodenal toxicity associated with radiation, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0). Serious gastroduodenal complications were defined as events occurring within 12 months from completion of CCRT, those requiring prompt therapeutic intervention, or symptoms equivalent to Grade 3 or 4 radiation-related gastroduodenal toxicity, including nausea or vomiting, based on CTCAE 3.0. Results: A month after completion of CCRT, 65 (52.8%) patients displayed endoscopic evidence of radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications. Radiation gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 32 (26.0%) and 20 (16.3%) patients, respectively; radiation gastritis and duodenitis were found in 50 (40.7%) and 42 (34.1%) patients, respectively. Radiation-related bleeding was observed in 13 patients (10.6%). Serious gastroduodenal complications occurred in 18 patients (14.6%) and were significantly more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis than in those without cirrhosis (p = 0.043). There were no radiation-related deaths. Conclusions: Endoscopically detectable radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were common in HCC following CCRT. Although serious complications were uncommon, the frequency was higher in patients with liver cirrhosis; thus, these patients should be closely monitored when receiving CCRT.

  8. Rationale for and Review of Neoadjuvant Therapy Prior to Radical Prostatectomy for Patients with High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Rana R.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Taplin, Mary-Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Despite state of the art local therapy a significant portion of men with high-risk prostate cancer develop progressive disease. Neoadjuvant systemic therapy prior to radical prostatectomy (RP) is an approach which can potentially maximize survival outcomes in patients with localized disease. This approach is under investigation with a wide array of agents and provides an opportunity to assess pathologic and biologic activity of novel treatments. The aim of this review is to explore the past and present role of neoadjuvant therapy prior to definitive therapy with RP in patients with high-risk localized or locally advanced disease. The results of neoadjuvant ADT, including use of newer agents such as abiraterone and enzalutamide, are promising. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, primarily with docetaxel, with or without ADT has also demonstrated efficacy in men with high-risk disease. Other novel agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), clusterin, and the immune system are currently under investigation and have led to variable results in early clinical trials. Despite optimistic data, approval of neoadjuvant therapy prior to RP in patients with high-risk prostate cancer will depend on positive results from well designed phase III trials. PMID:23943203

  9. The role of neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment for adenocarcinoma of the upper gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Both locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the stomach and gastro-esophageal junction are associated with poor prognosis due to the lack of effective treatment. Recently multimodal treatment consisting of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy is reported to improve survival when compared to surgery alone. Neoadjuvant therapy in these locally advanced tumors allows for early tumor responses and the extent of tumor regression that can be achieved is considered a significant prognostic factor. This, in turn, increases the resectability of these tumors. Also due to the high frequency of lymph node metastasis, patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma should undergo a D2 lymphadenectomy. Postoperative chemoradiation and perioperative chemotherapy have been studied in gastric adenocarcinomas and showed a survival benefit. However, the surgical techniques used in these trials are no longer considered to be standard by today's surgical practice. In addition, there are no standard recommendations for adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation after R0 resection and adequate lymph node dissection. PMID:21810561

  10. Capecitabine-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis under neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Bryan K.; Tetzlaff, Michael T.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of capecitabine-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a patient with locally advanced rectal cancer under curative neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation using capecitabine. After 5 days of the initiation of capecitabine the patient developed a pruritic maculopapular rash in her extremities consistent with vasculitis which was confirmed on skin biopsy without any signs of systemic involvement. Capecitabine was held and the rash was treated with topical steroids with complete resolution of both rash and pruritus. Due to a lack of other alternative chemotherapeutic options and the cutaneous-only involvement of vasculitis, the capecitabine was re-introduced. Two days later, the patient developed an identical maculopapular rash with a similar distribution. Prednisone was initiated while the capecitabine was continued with complete resolution of the rash. The patient successfully completed her curative neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy treatment without the need to permanently discontinue the capecitabine. PMID:26029464

  11. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Appelt, Ane L.; Ploen, John; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D{sub 50,i}, and the normalized dose-response gradient, {gamma}{sub 50,i}. Results: A highly significant dose-response relationship was found (P=.002). For complete response (TRG1), the dose-response parameters were D{sub 50,TRG1} = 92.0 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.3-144.9 Gy), {gamma}{sub 50,TRG1} = 0.982 (CI 0.533-1.429), and for major response (TRG1-2) D{sub 50,TRG1} and {sub 2} = 72.1 Gy (CI 65.3-94.0 Gy), {gamma}{sub 50,TRG1} and {sub 2} = 0.770 (CI 0.338-1.201). Tumor size and N category both had a significant effect on the dose-response relationships. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a significant dose-response relationship for tumor regression after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer for tumor dose levels in the range of 50.4-70 Gy, which is higher than the dose range usually considered.

  12. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Carrington, Rhys; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  13. Caveolin-1 as a Prognostic Marker for Local Control After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Franz Capalbo, Gianni; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Caveolin-1 is a protein marker for caveolae organelles and has an essential impact on cellular signal transduction pathways (e.g., receptor tyrosine kinases, adhesion molecules, and G-protein-coupled receptors). In the present study, we investigated the expression of caveolin-1 in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma and correlated its expression pattern with the risk for disease recurrences after preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and surgical resection. Methods and Materials: Caveolin-1 mRNA and protein expression were evaluated by Affymetrix microarray analysis (n = 20) and immunohistochemistry (n = 44) on pretreatment biopsy samples of patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum, and were correlated with clinical and histopathologic characteristics as well as with 5-year rates of local failure and overall survival. Results: A significantly decreased median caveolin-1 intracellular mRNA level was observed in tumor biopsy samples as compared with noncancerous mucosa. Individual mRNA levels and immunohistologic staining, however, revealed an overexpression in 7 of 20 patients (35%) and 17 of 44 patients (38.6%), respectively. Based on immunohistochemical evaluation, local control rates at 5 years for patients with tumors showing low caveolin-1 expression were significantly better than for patients with high caveolin-1-expressing carcinoma cells (p = 0.05; 92%, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 82-102% vs. 72%, 95% CI = 49-84%). A low caveolin-1 protein expression was also significantly related to an increased overall survival rate (p = 0.05; 45%, 95% CI 16-60% vs. 82%, 95% CI = 67-97%). Conclusion: Caveolin-1 may provide a novel prognostic marker for local control and survival after preoperative CRT and surgical resection in rectal cancer.

  14. Initial Experience of Sorafenib Neoadjuvant Therapy Combined with Retroperitoneoscopy in Treating T2 Large Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-hua; Yuan, He-jia; Wang, Ke; Wu, Ji-tao; Liu, Qing-zuo; Yu, Sheng-qiang; Men, Chang-ping; Gao, Zhen-li; Wang, Jiahui

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the safety and feasibility of sorafenib neoadjuvant therapy combined with retroperitoneoscopic radical nephrectomy (RRN) in treating T2 large renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods. Retrospectively analyzed 5 cases (2 males and 3 females, aged 52–73 years) of T2 stage large RCC who receive preoperative sorafenib targeted treatment (400 mg bid for 1–3 months) and RRN between March, 2013, and July, 2014. Patient information, therapeutic regimen, drug adverse effect, tumor changes before and after surgery, and perioperative parameters were recorded. Results. During the sorafenib therapy adverse effects included 2 cases of hypertension (Grade I toxicity), 1 case of hand-foot syndrome (Grade I), and 1 case of diarrhea (Grade II), which were all tolerable for patients. CT scan and histopathological tests confirmed significant reduction in the longest dimension (LD) and medium density (MD) of the tumor after therapy as well as tumor hemorrhage, necrosis, and cystic degeneration. All 5 patients received RRN surgery successfully around 2 weeks after drug discontinuation with only 1 case of perioperative complication. Conclusions. Sorafenib neoadjuvant therapy could significantly reduce the size and aggressiveness of T2 large renal tumors, thus reducing the operative challenge and enabling patients who were previously disqualified for operation to receive surgical treatment. PMID:26421296

  15. Sorafenib Neoadjuvant Therapy in the Treatment of High Risk Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yushi; Li, Yongqiang; Deng, Jianhua; Ji, Zhigang; Yu, Hongyan; Li, Hanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of sorafenib as preoperative neoadjuvant therapy in patients with high risk renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and Methods Clinical data of 18 patients with high risk RCC who received surgery done successfully after preoperative neoadjuvant therapy with sorafenib in Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) from April 2007 to October 2013 have been reviewed and analyzed in this study. Results Among the 18 patients there were 13 male and 5 female, with a median age of 54.6 years. The objective response rate (ORR) of the operation on the selected patients is very high (94.4%), including 4 cases (22.2%) of partial response (PR) and 13 cases (72.2%) of stable disease (SD). After preoperative sorafenib treatment, the average tumor size of the 18 patients decreased from 7.8 cm (ranging from 3.6 to 19.2 cm) to 6.2 cm (ranging from 2.4 to 16.8 cm), and the median value of average tumor CT value decreased from 61HU to 52 HU. Among the 5 patients who had IVC tumor thrombi, the grades of tumor thrombi in 2 patients who were grade II before sorafenib treatment became grade I and grade 0 respectively, 2 patients of grade III both became grade II. Conclusion Preoperative neoadjuvant therapy with sorafenib for high risk RCC patients can significantly decrease primary tumor volume as well as tumor thrombus, which could help the nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) or radical nephrectomy to be done successfully. PMID:25647522

  16. Does gap-free intensity modulated chemoradiation therapy provide a greater clinical benefit than 3D conformal chemoradiation in patients with anal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chemoradiation is the standard treatment for anal cancer. 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is usually split in 2 sequences with a therapeutic break (gap) in between. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) makes it possible to reduce treatment time by abandoning this gap. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes and toxicities in patients treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Methods Between 2004 and 2011, the data of 51 patients treated with exclusive radiotherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy for non-metastatic anal carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-seven patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 24 patients with IMRT, with a median dose delivered to the tumor of 59.4Gy [30.6-66.6], whatever the radiotherapy technique (p= 0.99). The median follow-up was 40 months [26.4-51.6]. Results There was no difference between the two groups for response to treatment (p= 0.46). Two-year overall survival, locoregional relapse-free survival and colostomy-free survival rates were 88.5%, 63% and 60.3%, respectively for the IMRT group and 81%, 76.5% and 81.1% for the 3D-CRT group (all NS). Ten patients (37%) in 3D-CRT and 11 patients (45.8%) in IMRT (p= 0.524) had grade 3 acute toxicity. No grade 4 toxicity occurred. Conclusions Our study suggests that further investigations concerning the use of IMRT to treat cancer of the anus are warranted. IMRT makes it possible to remove the gap, but with no impact on the prognosis. Nonetheless, a longer follow-up is essential to determine whether or not IMRT has an impact on late toxicity, local control and survival compared with conventional 3D-CRT. PMID:23190693

  17. Clinical usefulness and relevance of intermediate endpoints for cytotoxic neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, Caterina; Loibl, Sibylle; von Minckwitz, Gunter

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate endpoints are surrogate markers of treatment efficacy assessed earlier than the true outcome of interest. Tumor response after systemic neoadjuvant therapy is considered a suitable intermediate endpoint, especially for specific breast cancer subtypes. Response can be evaluated either after only 1 cycle of treatment by clinical evaluation or at the end of the planned neoadjuvant treatment by histomorphologic examination of all surgically removed tissues from the breast and regional nodes. Although several meta-analyses showed a lower risk of death among patients who attain a pathologic complete response (pCR) compared with patients with residual tumor in breast and/or lymph nodes after neoadjuvant therapy, a statistically significant linkage between increased pCR rate by a specific treatment and improvement of survival by the same treatment has not been demonstrated yet. Therefore, formal surrogacy of pCR is not established. Moreover, the better definition of pCR is still an open issue: a large pooled analysis demonstrated that patients who attained ypT0 ypN0 (no invasive or non-invasive residual cancer in breast and nodes) experienced longer DFS (p < 0.001) compared with patients who attained ypTis ypN0 (no invasive residual in breast and nodes irrespective of residual non-invasive disease). Nevertheless, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently allowed using pCR as a surrogate endpoint for accelerated approval process. Several meta-analyses demonstrated the greatest prognostic value of pCR in more aggressive breast cancer subtypes (i.e. triple-negative, HER2-positive, or high grade breast cancer). Usefulness of an earlier intermediate endpoints was prospectively demonstrated in the GeparTrio trial in which patients showing an early response achieved 4-times more frequently a pCR than those without early response. PMID:26279131

  18. Post operative stereotactic radiosurgery for positive or close margins after preoperative chemoradiation and surgery for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dagoglu, Nergiz; Nedea, Elena; Poylin, Vitaliy; Nagle, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of positive margins after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and adequate surgery is very low. However, when patients do present with positive or close margins, they are at a risk of local failure and local therapy options are limited. We evaluated the role of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with positive or close margins after induction chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision. Methods This is a retrospective evaluation of patients treated with SBRT after induction chemoradiation and surgery for positive or close margins. Seven evaluable patients were included. Fiducial seeds were place at surgery. The CyberknifeTM system was used for planning and treatment. Patients were followed 1 month after treatment and 3-6 months thereafter. Descriptive statistics and Kaplan-Meir method was used to repot the findings. Results Seven patients (3 men and 4 women) were included in the study with a median follow-up of 23.5 months. The median initial radiation dose was 5,040 cGy (in 28 fractions) and the median SBRT dose was 2,500 cGy (in 5 fractions). The local control at 2 years was 100%. The overall survival at 1 and 2 years was 100% and 71% respectively. There was no Grade III or IV toxicity. Conclusions SBRT reirradiation is an effective and safe method to address positive or close margins after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and surgery for rectal cancer. PMID:27284461

  19. Modeling Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Chemoradiation Therapy Using Spatial-Temporal {sup 18}F-FDG PET Features, Clinical Parameters, and Demographics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hao; Tan, Shan; Chen, Wengen; Kligerman, Seth; Kim, Grace; D'Souza, Warren D.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct predictive models using comprehensive tumor features for the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: This study included 20 patients who underwent trimodality therapy (CRT + surgery) and underwent {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) both before and after CRT. Four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) conventional PET/CT response measures (eg, standardized uptake value [SUV]{sub max}, tumor diameter); (2) clinical parameters (eg, TNM stage, histology) and demographics; (3) spatial-temporal PET features, which characterize tumor SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns, geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT; and (4) all features combined. An optimal feature set was identified with recursive feature selection and cross-validations. Support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) models were constructed for prediction of pathologic tumor response to CRT, cross-validations being used to avoid model overfitting. Prediction accuracy was assessed by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and precision was evaluated by confidence intervals (CIs) of AUC. Results: When applied to the 4 groups of tumor features, the LR model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.10), 0.73 (0.07), 0.90 (0.06), and 0.90 (0.06). The SVM model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.56 (0.07), 0.60 (0.06), 0.94 (0.02), and 1.00 (no misclassifications). With the use of spatial-temporal PET features combined with conventional PET/CT measures and clinical parameters, the SVM model achieved very high accuracy (AUC 1.00) and precision (no misclassifications)—results that were significantly better than when conventional PET/CT measures or clinical parameters and demographics alone were used. For groups with many tumor features (groups 3 and 4), the SVM model achieved significantly higher

  20. Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy in breast cancer: current role and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Barroso-Sousa, Romualdo; Silva, Danilo DA Fonseca Reis; Alessi, Joao Victor Machado; Mano, Max Senna

    2016-01-01

    Luminal breast cancer, as defined by oestrogen and/or progesterone expression by immunohistochemistry, accounts for up to 75% of all breast cancers. In this population, endocrine therapy is likely to account for most of the gains obtained with the administration of adjuvant systemic treatment. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in these patients remains debatable since it is known that only a small fraction of patients will derive meaningful benefit from this treatment whilst the majority will be exposed to significant and unnecessary chemotherapy-related toxicities, in particular the elderly and frail. Therefore, neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET) becomes an attractive option for selected patients with hormonal-receptor positive locally advanced breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the current role of NET and future perspectives in the field. PMID:26823678

  1. Rising prostate-specific antigen values during neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy: The importance of monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Niblock, Paddy; Pickles, Tom . E-mail: tpickles@bccancer.bc.ca

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in patients receiving neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT) before external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From prospectively collected data, we identified 182 patients who received between 3 and 12 months of N-ADT before definitive external beam radiotherapy and who had at least three PSA readings during the neoadjuvant period. One hundred fifty patients had PSA values that continued to fall (Non-Rise group), but 32 had a PSA value that started to rise (Rise group). The two groups were compared by Mann-Whitney U and Pearson chi-square tests. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank analyses were performed for time to treatment failure, cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: The median follow-up was 62.5 months for the Non-Rise group and 53 months for the Rise group. Patients who sustained a PSA rise during the N-ADT period had a shorter time to PSA relapse (p = 0.013), poorer CSS (p = 0.027), and poorer OS (p = 0.03). Multivariate analysis confirms the significance of a PSA rise during the N-ADT period for CSS (p = 0.035) and OS (p = 0.038). Conclusions:: A subset of patients treated with N-ADT develop a rising PSA profile that likely represents early androgen resistance. They have significantly worse outcome.

  2. Quality of Life in a Prospective, Multicenter Phase 2 Trial of Neoadjuvant Full-Dose Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Radiation in Patients With Resectable or Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Pablo E.; Herman, Joseph M.; Griffith, Kent A.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Kim, Edward J.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Dawson, Laura A.; Ringash, Jolie; Wei, Alice C.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the health-related quality of life (QOL) during and after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and surgery for patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Participants of a prospective, phase 2 multi-institutional trial treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery completed QOL questionnaires (European Organization for Research and Treatment in Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire version 3.0 [EORTC-QLQ C30], EORTC-Pancreatic Cancer module [EORTC-PAN 26], and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic subscale [FACT-Hep]) at baseline, after 2 cycles of neoadjuvant therapy, after surgery, at 6 months from initiation of therapy, and at 6-month intervals for 2 years. Mean scores were compared with baseline. A change >10% was considered a minimal clinically important difference. Results: Of 71 participants in the trial, 55 were eligible for QOL analysis. Compliance ranged from 32% to 74%. The EORTC-QLQ C30 global QOL did not significantly decline after neoadjuvant therapy, whereas the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy global health measure showed a statistically, but not clinically significant decline (−8, P=.02). This was in parallel with deterioration in physical functioning (−14.1, P=.001), increase in diarrhea (+16.7, P=.044), and an improvement in pancreatic pain (−13, P=.01) as per EORTC-PAN 26. Because of poor patient compliance in the nonsurgical group, long-term analysis was performed only from surgically resected participants (n=36). Among those, global QOL returned to baseline levels after 6 months, remaining near baseline through the 24-month visit. Conclusions: The study regimen consisting of 2 cycles of neoadjuvant therapy was completed without a clinically significant QOL deterioration. A transient increase in gastrointestinal symptoms and a decrease in physical functioning were seen after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. In those patients who underwent surgical

  3. [Efficacy of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Involving the Superior Mesenteric Artery].

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Hiroyoshi; Shiozaki, Shigehiro; Satoh, Daisuke; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Araki, Hiroyuki; Idani, Hitoshi; Ojima, Yasutomo; Harano, Masao; Kanazawa, Takashi; Tokumoto, Noriaki; Choda, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Michihiro; Miyoshi, Hisanobu; Okajima, Masazumi; Ninomiya, Motoki

    2015-11-01

    Multidisciplinary therapy is essential in the treatment of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer involving the superior mesenteric artery (BR-SMA). We analyzed the outcomes of multidisciplinary treatment for BR-SMA and evaluated the efficacy of neoadjuvant therapy (NAT). We reviewed the clinical courses of 10 patients with BR-SMA. Seven patients were treated with preoperative neoadjuvant therapy (NAT group), and 3 patients underwent radical pancreaticoduodenectomy first (SF group). In the NAT group, the rate of R0 was 7/7 (100%), the induction rate of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) was 6/7 (86%), and the first recurrence sites were the lung in 4 patients, and the liver and peritoneum in one patient each, respectively. In the SF group, the rate of R0 was 2/3 (67%) because of a positive pathological dissecting peripancreatic margin in 1 case. The induction rate of AC was 3/3 (100%), and the first recurrence sites were the liver in 2 patients, the peritoneum in 1, and a local site in 1. The disease free survival of the NAT group (median survival time [MST] 19.3 months) was significantly better than that of the SF group (MST 5.7 months) (log rank test, p=0.002). The median overall survival of the NAT and SF groups was 51.6 months and 19.5 months, respectively (p=0.128). An R0 resection could be performed in all cases in the NAT group. The NAT extended disease-free survival. We conclude that NAT is recommended in the treatment of BR-SMA. PMID:26805071

  4. SU-E-J-268: Change of CT Number During the Course of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Dalah, E; Liu, F; Li, X; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It has been observed radiation can induce changes in CT number (CTN) inside tumor during the course of radiation therapy (RT) for several tumor sites including lung and head and neck, suggesting that the CTN change may be potentially used to assess RT response. In this study, we investigate the CTN changes inside tumor during the course of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Daily diagnostic-quality CT data acquired during IGRT for 17 pancreatic head cancer patients using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were analyzed. All patients were treated with a radiation dose of 50.4 in 1.8 Gy per fraction. On each daily CT set, The contour of the pancreatic head, included in the treatment target, was generated by populating the pancreatic head contour from the planning CT or MRI using an auto-segmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing if necessary. The CTN at each voxel in the pancreatic head contour was extracted and the 3D distribution of the CTNs was processed using MATLAB. The mean value of CTN distribution was used to quantify the daily CTN change in the pancreatic head. Results: Reduction of CTN in pancreatic head was observed during the CRT delivery in 14 out the 17 (82%) patients studied. Although the average reduction is only 3.5 Houncefield Unit (HU), this change is significant (p<0.01). Among them, there are 7 patients who had a CTN drop larger than 5 HU, ranging from 6.0 to 11.8 HU. In contrast to this trend, CTN was increased in 3 patients. Conclusion: Measurable changes in the CT number in tumor target were observed during the course of chemoradiation therapy for the pancreas cancer patients, indicating this radiation-induced CTN change may be used to assess treatment response.

  5. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 02-29: A Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Full-Dose Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgical Resection and Consolidative Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Suntharalingam, Mohan; Paulus, Rebecca; Edelman, Martin J.; Krasna, Mark; Burrows, Whitney; Gore, Elizabeth; Wilson, Lynn D.; Choy, Hak

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mediastinal nodal clearance (MNC) rates after induction chemotherapy and concurrent, full-dose radiation therapy (RT) in a phase II trimodality trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0229). Patients and Methods: Patients (n=57) with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (pathologically proven N2 or N3) were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of weekly carboplatin (AUC = 2.0) and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2}. Concurrent RT was prescribed, with 50.4 Gy to the mediastinum and primary tumor and a boost of 10.8 Gy to all gross disease. The mediastinum was pathologically reassessed after completion of chemoradiation. The primary endpoint of the study was MNC, with secondary endpoints of 2-year overall survival and postoperative morbidity/mortality. Results: The grade 3/4 toxicities included hematologic 35%, gastrointestinal 14%, and pulmonary 23%. Forty-three patients (75%) were evaluable for the primary endpoint. Twenty-seven patients achieved the primary endpoint of MNC (63%). Thirty-seven patients underwent resection. There was a 14% incidence of grade 3 postoperative pulmonary complications and 1 30-day, postoperative grade 5 toxicity (3%). With a median follow-up of 24 months for all patients, the 2-year overall survival rate was 54%, and the 2-year progression-free survival rate was 33%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 75% for those who achieved nodal clearance, 52% for those with residual nodal disease, and 23% for those who were not evaluable for the primary endpoint (P=.0002). Conclusions: This multi-institutional trial confirms the ability of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation with full-dose RT to sterilize known mediastinal nodal disease.

  6. Neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy for resectable gastric cancer? A practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Earle, Craig C.; Maroun, Jean; Zuraw, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Objective To make recommendations on the use of neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy in addition to surgery in patients with resectable gastric cancer (T1–4, N1–2, M0). Options Neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatments compared with “curative” surgery alone. Outcomes Overall survival, disease-free survival, and adverse effects. Evidence The MEDLINE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases and relevant conference proceedings were searched to identify randomized trials. Values Evidence was selected and reviewed by one member of the Cancer Care Ontario Practice Guidelines Initiative (CCOPGI) Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group and methodologists. A systematic review of the published literature was combined with a consensus process around the interpretation of the evidence in the context of conventional practice, to develop an evidence-based practice guideline. This report has been reviewed and approved by the Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group, comprising medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, surgeons, a pathologist and 2 community representatives. Benefits, harms and costs When compared with surgery alone, at 3 years adjuvant chemoradiotherapy has been shown to increase overall survival by 9% (50% v. 41%, p = 0.005) and to improve relapse-free survival from 31% to 48% (p = 0.001). At 5 years, it has been shown to increase overall survival by 11.6% (40% v. 28.4%) and to improve relapse-free survival from 25% to 38% (p < 0.001). Treatment has been associated with toxic deaths in 1% of patients. The most frequent adverse effects (> grade 3 [Southwest Oncology Group toxicity scale] are hematologic (54%), gastrointestinal (33%), influenza-like (9%), infectious (6%) and neurologic (4%). The radiation fields used can possibly damage the left kidney, resulting in hypertension and other renal problems. Furthermore, this therapy could increase the demand on radiation resources. Physicians and patients should understand the tradeoffs between survival benefit

  7. Clinical potential for vitamin D as a neoadjuvant for photodynamic therapy of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Rollakanti, Kishore

    2015-03-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), comprising basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is the most common form of human cancer worldwide. Effective therapies include surgical excision, cryotherapy, and ionizing radiation, but all of these cause scarring. ALA-based PDT is a non-scarring modality used routinely for NMSC in Europe but not in the USA, primarily due to lingering uncertainties about efficacy. We have identified three agents (methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, and vitamin D) that can be used as neoadjuvants, i.e., can be given as a pretreatment prior to ALA-PDT, to improve the efficacy of tumor killing in mouse models of NMSC. Vitamin D (VD3) is the most recent neoadjuvant on this list. In this presentation we make the case that VD3 may be superior to the other agents to improve results of ALA-PDT skin cancer treatment. The active form of VD3 (calcitriol) is available topically as a pharmaceutical grade cream or ointment (FDA-approved for psoriasis), and works well for boosting ALA-PDT tumor treatment in mouse models. For deep tumors not reachable by a topical route, calcitriol can be given systemically and is very effective, but carries a risk of causing hypercalcemia as a side effect. To circumvent this risk, we have conducted experiments with the natural dietary form of VD3 (cholecalciferol), and showed that this improves ALA-PDT efficacy almost to the same extent as calcitriol. Because cholecalciferol does not increase serum calcium levels, this represents a potentially extremely safe approach. Data in mouse models of BCC and SCC will be presented.

  8. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental. PMID:23584263

  9. Intra-arterial chemoradiation therapy with weekly low-dose cisplatin for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, T; Tada, Y; Maruya, S; Takeishi, E; Miura, K; Masubuchi, T; Fushimi, C; Hasegawa, H; Kamata, S

    2015-06-01

    A new intra-arterial chemoradiation regimen that involves infusing low-dose cisplatin in combination with definitive irradiation was used in 36 patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. The safety and therapeutic efficacy of this regimen were reviewed retrospectively. An intra-arterial catheter was inserted in a retrograde manner into the target artery via the superficial temporal artery or occipital artery. Intra-arterial infusion was performed using cisplatin at a dose of 20-50mg/m(2) per week for 6-8 weeks. At the same time, sodium thiosulphate was infused as a neutralizing agent. Irradiation was performed at 60Gy in 30 fractions. All 36 patients completed treatment. Grade 3 adverse events occurred in only seven patients (19.4%) and no grade 4 events were noted. As a primary therapy, the complete response rate was 83.3%, the partial response rate was 16.7%, and the overall response rate was 100%. The 2-year local control rate was 63.0%, and the 2-year overall survival rate was 75.5%. The 2-year preservation rate of the hard palate was 97.1%, that of the eyeball was 97.2%, and that of visual function was 94.4%. This treatment regimen can contribute to improving the quality of life of patients without reducing the curability of the therapy. PMID:25843537

  10. Neoadjuvant transcatheter arterial chemoembolization does not provide survival benefit compared to curative therapy alone in single hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Ching-I; Huang, Chung-Feng; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Huang, Jee-Fu; Dai, Chia-Yen; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Yu, Ming-Lung; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2015-02-01

    The role of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) prior to curative therapy is still unclear. The aim of our study was to elucidate the survival of single hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and also to clarify whether TACE plus sequential curative therapy provides benefits in single HCC. A total of 470 patients with a diagnosis of single HCC between 2005 and 2010 were studied. The factors associated with clinical outcomes were analyzed. The outcomes between patients who underwent neoadjuvant TACE and those who did not were also compared. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates of all patients were 92.6%, 73.3%, and 59.6%, respectively. Child-Pugh class A [HR: 2.04, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.277-3.254, p = 0.003], very early stage Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) (HR: 2.03, 95% CI: 1.021-4.025, p = 0.043), tumor size < 5 cm (HR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.115-2.751, p = 0.015), alpha fetoprotein (AFP) level < 200 ng/mL (HR: 2.07, 95% CI: 1.346-3.182, p = 0.001), and curative-based therapy (HR: 2.16, 95% CI: 1.442-3.224, p < 0.001) were factors associated with better OS. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates of all the patients were 75.4%, 53.7%, and 36.3%, respectively. Only Child-Pugh class A (HR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.068-2.294, p = 0.022) and curative-based therapy (HR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.128-2.028, p = 0.006) were significantly associated with better DFS. Neoadjuvant TACE did not provide benefit compared with curative therapy alone in subgroup analysis. In conclusion, neoadjuvant TACE is not recommended in single HCC patients who may indicate for curative therapy. PMID:25645985

  11. Comparison of neoadjuvant versus a surgery first approach for gastric and esophagogastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Russell, Maria C

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer remains a significant worldwide health concern. While surgery is required for cure, all but the earliest of cancers will require multimodality therapy. Chemotherapy and chemoradiation in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings have shown to improve overall survival, but the sequencing of treatment is controversial. As healthcare expenses surge, it is increasingly important to impart value to these treatments. This review will look at the intersection of effective treatment and costs for gastric cancer. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:296-303. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27511285

  12. Relevance of Pathological Complete Response after Neoadjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Angela; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Makhoul, Issam; Hutchins, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and the different biological subtypes have different prognostic impacts. Neoadjuvant trials have recently become popular as they offer several advantages compared to traditional adjuvant trials. Studies have shown that patients who achieve pathological complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant treatment have a better long-term outcome. Consequently, increasing the rate of pCR became the end point of neoadjuvant trials with the expectation of translation into improved survival. However, the definition of pCR has lacked uniformity, and the prognostic impact of achievement of pCR on survival in different breast cancer subtypes is uncertain. In this review, we present the controversies associated with the use of pCR as an end point in neoadjuvant trials. PMID:27478380

  13. Relevance of Pathological Complete Response after Neoadjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pennisi, Angela; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Makhoul, Issam; Hutchins, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and the different biological subtypes have different prognostic impacts. Neoadjuvant trials have recently become popular as they offer several advantages compared to traditional adjuvant trials. Studies have shown that patients who achieve pathological complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant treatment have a better long-term outcome. Consequently, increasing the rate of pCR became the end point of neoadjuvant trials with the expectation of translation into improved survival. However, the definition of pCR has lacked uniformity, and the prognostic impact of achievement of pCR on survival in different breast cancer subtypes is uncertain. In this review, we present the controversies associated with the use of pCR as an end point in neoadjuvant trials. PMID:27478380

  14. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Operable Breast Cancer: Application to Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ademuyiwa, Foluso O.; Ellis, Matthew J.; Ma, Cynthia X.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic treatment for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC: negative for the expression of estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and HER2 amplification) has been limited to chemotherapy options. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy induces tumor shrinkage and improves the surgical outcomes of patients with locally advanced disease and also identifies those at high risk of disease relapse despite today's standard of care. By using pathologic complete response as a surrogate endpoint, novel treatment strategies can be efficiently assessed. Tissue analysis in the neoadjuvant setting is also an important research tool for the identification of chemotherapy resistance mechanisms and new therapeutic targets. In this paper, we review data on completed and ongoing neoadjuvant clinical trials in patients with TNBC and discuss treatment controversies that face clinicians and researchers when neoadjuvant chemotherapy is employed. PMID:23983689

  15. A study about different findings of PET-CT between neoadjuvant and non-neoadjuvant therapy: SUVmax is not a reliable predictor of lymphatic involvement after neoadjuvant therapy for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Kil; Moon, Seok Whan

    2016-01-01

    Background No definitive findings or established guidelines have been published for the evaluation of esophageal tumors (tumor) and regional lymph nodes (LN) using positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT) in patients with esophageal cancer. In addition, it remains unclear whether PET-CT findings vary between neoadjuvant (NT) and non-neoadjuvant (non-NT) therapy cases. Therefore, preoperative evaluation using PET-CT might provide unreliable information and influence the management plan for esophageal cancer. The purpose of the present study is to clarify the different findings of PET-CT between NT and non-NT in surgical esophageal cancer cases and to predict LN metastasis. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 192 consecutive cases that met this study’s inclusion criteria from January 2009 to December 2014. All patients underwent curative and complete esophagectomy for intra-thoracic esophageal cancer at the department of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery in a single tertiary Korean hospital. We compiled and analyzed maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax) of tumor and LNs with other clinical information (chronic lung disease, history of previous other primary cancer, sex, pathological findings, NT, and other clinical data). Results (I) In NT, a positive correlation between T stage and SUVmax was found (tumor SUVmax P<0.001, LN SUVmax P=0.010); however, no relationship between N stage and SUVmax was found. In non-NT, a positive correlation between pathological stage (T and N stage) and SUVmax was found (T stage, tumor SUVmax P<0.001, LN SUVmax P=0.001; N stage, tumor SUVmax P=0.003, LN SUVmax P=0.021); (II) In NT, the low SUVmax group had higher disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) than the high SUVmax group (DFS, tumor SUVmax P<0.001, LN SUVmax P=0.142; OS, tumor SUVmax P<0.001, LN SUVmax P=0.002). In non-NT, the low SUVmax group also had higher DFS and OS than the high SUVmax group (DFS, tumor SUVmax P<0

  16. Temporal Patterns of Fatigue Predict Pathologic Response in Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hee Chul; Janjan, Nora A.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Lin, Edward H.; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hundal, Mandeep; Zhang Yiqun; Delclos, Marc E.; Crane, Christopher H.; Das, Prajnan; Wang, Xin Shelley; Cleeland, Charles S.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether symptom burden before and during preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer predicts for pathologic tumor response. Methods and Materials: Fifty-four patients with T3/T4/N+ rectal cancers were treated on a Phase II trial using preoperative capecitabine and concomitant boost radiotherapy. Symptom burden was prospectively assessed before (baseline) and weekly during CRT by patient self-reported questionnaires, the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI), and Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI). Survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Symptom scores according to tumor downstaging (TDS) were compared using Student's t tests. Logistic regression was used to determine whether symptom burden levels predicted for TDS. Lowess curves were plotted for symptom burden across time. Results: Among 51 patients evaluated for pathologic response, 26 patients (51%) had TDS. Fatigue, pain, and drowsiness were the most common symptoms. All symptoms increased progressively during treatment. Patients with TDS had lower MDASI fatigue scores at baseline and at completion (Week 5) of CRT (p = 0.03 for both) and lower levels of BFI 'usual fatigue' at baseline. Conclusion: Lower levels of fatigue at baseline and completion of CRT were significant predictors of pathologic tumor response gauged by TDS, suggesting that symptom burden may be a surrogate for tumor burden. The relationship between symptom burden and circulating cytokines merits evaluation to characterize the molecular basis of this phenomenon.

  17. New Perspectives on Predictive Biomarkers of Tumor Response and Their Clinical Application in Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Kyu; Hur, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and can improve local control and survival outcomes. However, the responses of individual tumors to CRT are not uniform and vary widely, from complete response to disease progression. Patients with resistant tumors can be exposed to irradiation and chemotherapy that are both expensive and at times toxic without benefit. In contrast, about 60% of tumors show tumor regression and T and N down-staging. Furthermore, a pathologic complete response (pCR), which is characterized by sterilization of all tumor cells, leads to an excellent prognosis and is observed in approximately 10-30% of cases. This variety in tumor response has lead to an increased need to develop a model predictive of responses to CRT in order to identify patients who will benefit from this multimodal treatment. Endoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, serum carcinoembryonic antigen, and molecular biomarkers analyzed using immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling are the most commonly used predictive models in preoperative CRT. Such modalities guide clinicians in choosing the best possible treatment options and the extent of surgery for each individual patient. However, there are still controversies regarding study outcomes, and a nomogram of combined models of future trends is needed to better predict patient response. The aim of this article was to review currently available tools for predicting tumor response after preoperative CRT in rectal cancer and to explore their applicability in clinical practice for tailored treatment. PMID:26446626

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression As Prognostic Marker in Patients With Anal Carcinoma Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fraunholz, Ingeborg; Falk, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in pretreatment tumor biopsy specimens of patients with anal cancer treated with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C-based chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemical staining for EGFR was performed in pretreatment biopsy specimens of 103 patients with anal carcinoma. EGFR expression was correlated with clinical and histopathologic characteristics and with clinical endpoints, including local failure-free survival (LFFS), colostomy-free survival (CFS), distant metastases-free survival (DMFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: EGFR staining intensity was absent in 3%, weak in 23%, intermediate in 36% and intense in 38% of the patients. In univariate analysis, the level of EGFR staining was significantly correlated with CSS (absent/weak vs intermediate/intense expression: 5-year CSS, 70% vs 86%, P=.03). As a trend, this was also observed for DMFS (70% vs 86%, P=.06) and LFFS (70% vs 87%, P=.16). In multivariate analysis, N stage, tumor differentiation, and patients’ sex were independent prognostic factors for CSS, whereas EGFR expression only reached borderline significance (hazard ratio 2.75; P=.08). Conclusion: Our results suggest that elevated levels of pretreatment EGFR expression could be correlated with favorable clinical outcome in anal cancer patients treated with CRT. Further studies are warranted to elucidate how EGFR is involved in the response to CRT.

  19. New Perspectives on Predictive Biomarkers of Tumor Response and Their Clinical Application in Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and can improve local control and survival outcomes. However, the responses of individual tumors to CRT are not uniform and vary widely, from complete response to disease progression. Patients with resistant tumors can be exposed to irradiation and chemotherapy that are both expensive and at times toxic without benefit. In contrast, about 60% of tumors show tumor regression and T and N down-staging. Furthermore, a pathologic complete response (pCR), which is characterized by sterilization of all tumor cells, leads to an excellent prognosis and is observed in approximately 10-30% of cases. This variety in tumor response has lead to an increased need to develop a model predictive of responses to CRT in order to identify patients who will benefit from this multimodal treatment. Endoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, serum carcinoembryonic antigen, and molecular biomarkers analyzed using immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling are the most commonly used predictive models in preoperative CRT. Such modalities guide clinicians in choosing the best possible treatment options and the extent of surgery for each individual patient. However, there are still controversies regarding study outcomes, and a nomogram of combined models of future trends is needed to better predict patient response. The aim of this article was to review currently available tools for predicting tumor response after preoperative CRT in rectal cancer and to explore their applicability in clinical practice for tailored treatment. PMID:26446626

  20. Enteral Feeding Tubes in Patients Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Adelstein, David J.

    2012-11-01

    Definitive chemoradiation therapy has evolved as the preferred organ preservation strategy in the treatment of locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LA-HNC). Dry mouth and dysphagia are among the most common and most debilitating treatment-related toxicities that frequently necessitate the placement of enteral feeding tubes (FT) in these patients to help them meet their nutritional requirements. The use of either a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube or a nasogastric tube, the choice of using a prophylactic vs a reactive approach, and the effects of FTs on weight loss, hospitalization, quality of life, and long-term functional outcomes are areas of continued controversy. Considerable variations in practice patterns exist in the United States and abroad. This critical review synthesizes the current data for the use of enteral FTs in this patient population and clarifies the relative advantages of different types of FTs and the timing of their use. Recent developments in the biologic understanding and treatment approaches for LA-HNC appear to be favorably impacting the frequency and severity of treatment-related dysphagia and may reduce the need for enteral tube feeding in the future.

  1. Role of Genetic Polymorphisms in NFKB-Mediated Inflammatory Pathways in Response to Primary Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhugashvili, Maia; Luengo-Gil, Ginés; García, Teresa; González-Conejero, Rocío; Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; Escolar, Pedro Pablo; Calvo, Felipe; Vicente, Vicente; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether polymorphisms of genes related to inflammation are associated with pathologic response (primary endpoint) in patients with rectal cancer treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (PCRT). Methods and Materials: Genomic DNA of 159 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with PCRT was genotyped for polymorphisms rs28362491 (NFKB1), rs1213266/rs5789 (PTGS1), rs5275 (PTGS2), and rs16944/rs1143627 (IL1B) using TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays. The association between each genotype and pathologic response (poor response vs complete or partial response) was analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: The NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype was associated with pathologic response (odds ratio [OR], 6.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78-52.65; P=.03) after PCRT. No statistically significant associations between other polymorphisms and response to PCRT were observed. Patients with the NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype showed a trend for longer disease-free survival (log-rank test, P=.096) and overall survival (P=.049), which was not significant in a multivariate analysis that included pathologic response. Analysis for 6 polymorphisms showed that patients carrying the haplotype rs28362491-DEL/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G (13.7% of cases) had a higher response rate to PCRT (OR, 8.86; 95% CI, 1.21-64.98; P=.034) than the reference group (rs28362491-INS/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G). Clinically significant (grade ≥2) acute organ toxicity was also more frequent in patients with that same haplotype (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.11-15.36; P=.037). Conclusions: Our results suggest that genetic variation in NFKB-related inflammatory pathways might influence sensitivity to primary chemoradiation for rectal cancer. If confirmed, an inflammation-related radiogenetic profile might be used to select patients with rectal cancer for preoperative combined-modality treatment.

  2. Chemoradiation for gastric cancer: controversies, updates and novel techniques

    PubMed Central

    Fan, M; Hu, W

    2015-01-01

    The INT0116 trial established the role of adjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) in the multidisciplinary approach to the management of locally advanced gastric cancer. However, whether adjuvant CRT is indispensable for patients undergoing D2 dissection remains undefined. The adjuvant chemoradiation therapy in stomach cancer (ARTIST) trial, which was designed to compare adjuvant chemotherapy to CRT, failed to demonstrate differences in disease-free and overall survival in the whole study group; however, subgroup analysis indicated that patients with lymph node metastasis may benefit from additional radiation. A follow-up ARTIST II trial is currently under way. The efficacy of adjuvant CRT remains controversial because of variation among studies in the inclusion criteria and treatment delivery methods; however, the identification of patients who would benefit from CRT is critical. Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy protect normal tissues via motion management and decreased radiation-induced toxicity and contribute to plan optimization. Further studies integrating clinical and molecular factors as well as neoadjuvant CRT are warranted. PMID:25827208

  3. Neoadjuvant Down-Sizing of Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma with Photodynamic Therapy--Long-Term Outcome of a Phase II Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andrej; Wiedmann, Marcus; Tannapfel, Andrea; Mayr, Christian; Kiesslich, Tobias; Wolkersdörfer, Gernot W; Berr, Frieder; Hauss, Johann; Witzigmann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is non-resectable in the majority of patients often due to intrahepatic extension along bile duct branches/segments, and even after complete resection (R0) recurrence can be as high as 70%. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established palliative local tumor ablative treatment for non-resectable hilar CC. We report the long-term outcome of curative resection (R0) performed after neoadjuvant PDT for downsizing of tumor margins in seven patients (median age 59 years) with initially non-resectable hilar CC. Photofrin(®) was injected intravenously 24-48 h before laser light irradiation of the tumor stenoses and the adjacent bile duct segments. Major resective surgery was done with curative intention six weeks after PDT. All seven patients had been curatively (R0) resected and there were no undue early or late complications for the neoadjuvant PDT and surgery. Six of seven patients died from tumor recurrence at a median of 3.2 years after resection, the five-year survival rate was 43%. These results are comparable with published data for patients resected R0 without pre-treatment, indicating that neoadjuvant PDT is feasible and could improve overall survival of patients considered non-curatively resectable because of initial tumor extension in bile duct branches/segments--however, this concept needs to be validated in a larger trial. PMID:26561801

  4. Neoadjuvant Treatment Strategies for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gollins, S; Sebag-Montefiore, D

    2016-02-01

    Improved surgical technique plus selective preoperative radiotherapy have decreased rectal cancer pelvic local recurrence from, historically, 25% down to about 5-10%. However, this improvement has not reduced distant metastatic relapse, which is the main cause of death and a key issue in rectal cancer management. The current standard is local pelvic treatment (surgery ± preoperative radiotherapy) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, depending on resection histology. For circumferential resection margin (CRM)-threatened cancer on baseline magnetic resonance imaging, downstaging long-course preoperative chemoradiation (LCPCRT) is generally used. However, for non-CRM-threatened disease, varying approaches are currently adopted in the UK, including straight to surgery, short-course preoperative radiotherapy and LCPCRT. Clinical trials are investigating intensification of concurrent chemoradiation. There is also increasing interest in investigating preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) as a way of exposing micro-metastatic disease to full-dose systemic chemotherapy as early as possible and potentially reducing metastatic relapse. Phase II trials suggest that this strategy is feasible, with promising histological response and low rates of tumour progression during NAC. Phase III trials are needed to determine the benefit of NAC when added to standard therapy and also to determine if it can be used instead of neoadjuvant radiotherapy-based schedules. Although several measures of neoadjuvant treatment response assessment based on imaging or pathology are promising predictive biomarkers for long-term survival, none has been validated in prospective phase III studies. The phase III setting will enable this, also providing translational opportunities to examine molecular predictors of response and survival. PMID:26645661

  5. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Kruser, Tim J.; Traynor, Anne M.; Khuntia, Deepak; Yang, David T.; Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Wiederholt, Peggy A.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Hoang, Tien; Jeraj, Robert; and others

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials: All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m{sup 2} and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [{sup 61}Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results: Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions: The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging

  6. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: An International Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Tsujino, Kayoko; Barriger, Robert B.; Rengan, Ramesh; Moreno, Marta; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ramella, Sara; Marks, Lawrence B.; De Petris, Luigi; Stitt, Larry; Rodrigues, George

    2013-02-01

    Background: Radiation pneumonitis is a dose-limiting toxicity for patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed an individual patient data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 836 patients who underwent CCRT in Europe, North America, and Asia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (two-thirds vs one-third of patients). Factors predictive of symptomatic pneumonitis (grade {>=}2 by 1 of several scoring systems) or fatal pneumonitis were evaluated using logistic regression. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to define risk groups. Results: The median radiation therapy dose was 60 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.3 years. Most patients received concurrent cisplatin/etoposide (38%) or carboplatin/paclitaxel (26%). The overall rate of symptomatic pneumonitis was 29.8% (n=249), with fatal pneumonitis in 1.9% (n=16). In the training set, factors predictive of symptomatic pneumonitis were lung volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}) (odds ratio [OR] 1.03 per 1% increase, P=.008), and carboplatin/paclitaxel chemotherapy (OR 3.33, P<.001), with a trend for age (OR 1.24 per decade, P=.09); the model remained predictive in the validation set with good discrimination in both datasets (c-statistic >0.65). On RPA, the highest risk of pneumonitis (>50%) was in patients >65 years of age receiving carboplatin/paclitaxel. Predictors of fatal pneumonitis were daily dose >2 Gy, V{sub 20}, and lower-lobe tumor location. Conclusions: Several treatment-related risk factors predict the development of symptomatic pneumonitis, and elderly patients who undergo CCRT with carboplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy are at highest risk. Fatal pneumonitis, although uncommon, is related to dosimetric factors and tumor location.

  7. A Phase 1/2 and Biomarker Study of Preoperative Short Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine Followed By Early Surgery for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Theodore S.; Ryan, David P.; Borger, Darrell R.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Deshpande, Vikram; Shinagare, Shweta; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Boucher, Yves; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Adams, Judith; Winrich, Barbara; Grillo, Tarin; Jain, Rakesh K.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-del; Duda, Dan G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Methods and Materials Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. Results The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). Conclusions This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRASG12D status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival. PMID:24867540

  8. High response rates to neoadjuvant platinum-based therapy in ovarian cancer patients carrying germ-line BRCA mutation.

    PubMed

    Gorodnova, Tatiana V; Sokolenko, Anna P; Ivantsov, Alexandr O; Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Aleksakhina, Svetlana N; Yanus, Grigory A; Togo, Alexandr V; Maximov, Sergey Ya; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-12-28

    Preoperative therapy provides an advantage for clinical drug assessment, as it involves yet untreated patients and facilitates access to the post-treatment biological material. Testing for Slavic founder BRCA mutations was performed for 225 ovarian cancer (OC) patients, who were treated by platinum-based neoadjuvant therapy. 34 BRCA1 and 1 BRCA2 mutation carriers were identified. Complete clinical response was documented in 12/35 (34%) mutation carriers and 8/190 (4%) non-carriers (P = 0.000002). Histopathologic response was observed in 16/35 (46%) women with the germ-line mutation versus 42/169 (25%) patients with the wild-type genotype (P = 0.02). Somatic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for the remaining wild-type BRCA1 allele was detected only in 7/24 (29%) post-neoadjuvant therapy residual tumor tissues as compared to 9/11 (82%) BRCA1-associated OC, which were not exposed to systemic treatment before the surgery (P = 0.009). Furthermore, comparison of pre- and post-treatment tumor material obtained from the same patients revealed restoration of BRCA1 heterozygosity in 2 out of 3 sample pairs presenting with LOH at diagnosis. The obtained data confirm high sensitivity of BRCA-driven OC to platinating agents and provide evidence for a rapid selection of tumor cell clones without LOH during the course of therapy. PMID:26342406

  9. Selecting Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer for Neoadjuvant Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dewdney, Alice; Cunningham, David

    2013-01-01

    Rectal cancer remains a significant problem worldwide. Outcomes vary significantly according to the stage of disease and prognostic factors, including the distance of the tumor from the circumferential resection margin. Accurate staging, including high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, allows stratification of patients into low-, moderate-, and high-risk disease; this information can be used to inform multidisciplinary team decisions regarding the role of neoadjuvant therapy. Both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation reduce the risk of local recurrence compared with surgery alone, but they have little impact on survival. Although there remains a need to reduce overtreatment of those patients at moderate risk, evaluation of intensified regimens for those with high-risk disease is still required to reduce distant failure rates and improve survival in these patients with an otherwise poor prognosis. PMID:23821325

  10. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Courdi, Adel; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial.

  11. Factors Predicting Effectiveness of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Yu; Ueno, Masaki; Iizuka, Toshiro; Haruta, Shusuke; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Udagawa, Harushi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate pretreatment factors that can predict the outcome of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy (NAC(R)T) and help us choose treatment strategies appropriate for individual patients.Few studies have investigated whether clinical data obtainable before the treatment can predict the efficacy of NAC(R)T.Of 1540 patients treated for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) at our department between January 2000 and June 2014, those who underwent surgical resection of cStage II or more advanced ESCC after NAC(R)T (113 NACRT and 146 NACT patients) were enrolled in this study. Information all available before the treatment was analyzed to extract factors that can predict the effectiveness of NAC(R)T. NAC(R)T was considered effective when Grade 2 or greater treatment efficacy was achieved based on the histological grading system.NACRT was effective in 51 (45%) of 113 patients. The analysis of 35 pretreatment factors showed that female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.650; 1.181-11.236), absence of dyslipidemia (HR = 3.284; 1.341-8.041), and histologically poorly differentiated tumor (HR = 2.431; 1.052-5.619) were factors predicting NACRT effectiveness. On the other hand, NACT was effective in 21 (14%) of 146 patients. The analysis of pretreatment factors showed that absence of dyslipidemia (HR = 10.204; 1.302-83.33) and therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (HR = 2.097; 1.027-4.280) were factors predicting NACT effectiveness.The findings of this study investigating factors that could predict the outcome of NAC(R)T suggest that the prevalence of dyslipidemia influences the outcome of NAC(R)T for ESCC. PMID:27082598

  12. Factors Predicting Effectiveness of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ohkura, Yu; Ueno, Masaki; Iizuka, Toshiro; Haruta, Shusuke; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Udagawa, Harushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to elucidate pretreatment factors that can predict the outcome of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy (NAC(R)T) and help us choose treatment strategies appropriate for individual patients. Few studies have investigated whether clinical data obtainable before the treatment can predict the efficacy of NAC(R)T. Of 1540 patients treated for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) at our department between January 2000 and June 2014, those who underwent surgical resection of cStage II or more advanced ESCC after NAC(R)T (113 NACRT and 146 NACT patients) were enrolled in this study. Information all available before the treatment was analyzed to extract factors that can predict the effectiveness of NAC(R)T. NAC(R)T was considered effective when Grade 2 or greater treatment efficacy was achieved based on the histological grading system. NACRT was effective in 51 (45%) of 113 patients. The analysis of 35 pretreatment factors showed that female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.650; 1.181–11.236), absence of dyslipidemia (HR = 3.284; 1.341–8.041), and histologically poorly differentiated tumor (HR = 2.431; 1.052–5.619) were factors predicting NACRT effectiveness. On the other hand, NACT was effective in 21 (14%) of 146 patients. The analysis of pretreatment factors showed that absence of dyslipidemia (HR = 10.204; 1.302–83.33) and therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (HR = 2.097; 1.027–4.280) were factors predicting NACT effectiveness. The findings of this study investigating factors that could predict the outcome of NAC(R)T suggest that the prevalence of dyslipidemia influences the outcome of NAC(R)T for ESCC. PMID:27082598

  13. Performance of a Nomogram Predicting Disease-Specific Survival After an R0 Resection for Gastric Cancer in Patients Receiving Postoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dikken, Johan L.; Coit, Daniel G.; Baser, Raymond E.; Gönen, Mithat; Goodman, Karyn A.; Brennan, Murray F.; Jansen, Edwin P.M.; Boot, Henk; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Cats, Annemieke; Verheij, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The internationally validated Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) gastric carcinoma nomogram was based on patients who underwent curative (R0) gastrectomy, without any other therapy. The purpose of the current study was to assess the performance of this gastric cancer nomogram in patients who received chemoradiation therapy after an R0 resection for gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: In a combined dataset of 76 patients from the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), and 63 patients from MSKCC, who received postoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) after an R0 gastrectomy, the nomogram was validated by means of the concordance index (CI) and a calibration plot. Results: The concordance index for the nomogram was 0.64, which was lower than the CI of the nomogram for patients who received no adjuvant therapy (0.80). In the calibration plot, observed survival was approximately 20% higher than the nomogram-predicted survival for patients receiving postoperative CRT. Conclusions: The MSKCC gastric carcinoma nomogram significantly underpredicted survival for patients in the current study, suggesting an impact of postoperative CRT on survival in patients who underwent an R0 resection for gastric cancer, which has been demonstrated by randomized controlled trials. This analysis stresses the need for updating nomograms with the incorporation of multimodal strategies.

  14. Phase II Study of Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy With S-1 in Patients With T4 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Tomoko; Murakami, Ryuji; Toya, Ryo; Teshima, Keiko; Nakahara, Aya; Hirai, Toshinori; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Nakayama, Hideki; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Ota, Kazutoshi; Obayashi, Takehisa; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo; Shinohara, Masanori

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, in patients with T4 oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: Only patients with histologically proven T4 oral SCC were included. Radiotherapy (total dose, 30 Gy) was delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions over a period of 3 weeks. Concurrently, S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was administered orally twice daily for 14 consecutive days. Results: We enrolled 46 patients. All underwent radiotherapy as planned; however, oral S-1 was discontinued in 3 patients who manifested acute toxicity. Grade 3 toxicities were mucositis (20%), anorexia (9%), and neutropenia (4%). We encountered no Grade 4 adverse events or serious postoperative morbidity requiring surgical intervention. After CCRT, 32 of the 46 patients underwent radical resection; in 17 (53%) of the operated patients, the pathologic response was complete. During follow-up ranging from 7 to 58 months (median, 22 months), tumor control failed in 5 (16%) of the 32 operated patients; there were 3 local and 2 regional failures. Of the 14 non-operated patients, 8 (57%) manifested local (n = 7) or regional failure (n = 1). The 3-year overall survival rate for all 46 patients was 69%; it was significantly higher for operated than for non-operated patients (82% vs. 48%; p = 0.0288). Conclusion: Preoperative CCRT with S-1 is feasible and effective in patients with T4 oral SCC. Even in inoperable cases, CCRT with S-1 provides adequate tumor control.

  15. Treatment Outcomes, Growth Height, and Neuroendocrine Functions in Patients With Intracranial Germ Cell Tumors Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Odagiri, Kazumasa; Omura, Motoko; Hata, Masaharu; Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu; Ogino, Ichiro; Kigasawa, Hisato; Adachi, Masataka; Inoue, Tomio

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: We carried out a retrospective review of patients receiving chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for intracranial germ cell tumor (GCT) using a lower dose than those previously reported. To identify an optimal GCT treatment strategy, we evaluated treatment outcomes, growth height, and neuroendocrine functions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GCT, including 4 patients with nongerminomatous GCT (NGGCT) were treated with CRT. The median age at initial diagnosis was 11.5 years (range, 6-19 years). Seventeen patients initially received whole brain irradiation (median dose, 19.8 Gy), and 5 patients, including 4 with NGGCT, received craniospinal irradiation (median dose, 30.6 Gy). The median radiation doses delivered to the primary site were 36 Gy for pure germinoma and 45 Gy for NGGCT. Seventeen patients had tumors adjacent to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA), and 5 had tumors away from the HPA. Results: The median follow-up time was 72 months (range, 18-203 months). The rates of both disease-free survival and overall survival were 100%. The standard deviation scores (SDSs) of final heights recorded at the last assessment tended to be lower than those at initial diagnosis. Even in all 5 patients with tumors located away from the HPA, final height SDSs decreased (p = 0.018). In 16 patients with tumors adjacent to the HPA, 8 showed metabolic changes suggestive of hypothalamic obesity and/or growth hormone deficiency, and 13 had other pituitary hormone deficiencies. In contrast, 4 of 5 patients with tumors away from the HPA did not show any neuroendocrine dysfunctions except for a tendency to short stature. Conclusions: CRT for GCT using limited radiation doses resulted in excellent treatment outcomes. Even after limited radiation doses, insufficient growth height was often observed that was independent of tumor location. Our study suggests that close follow-up of neuroendocrine functions, including growth hormone, is essential for all patients with

  16. Novel Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin C.; Ha, Ye J.; Roh, Seon A.; Cho, Dong H.; Choi, Eun Y.; Kim, Tae W.; Kim, Jong H.; Kang, Tae W.; Kim, Seon Y.; Kim, Yong S.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Studies aimed at predicting individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) are urgently needed, especially considering the risks associated with poorly responsive patients. Methods and Materials: A 3-step strategy for the determination of CRT sensitivity is proposed based on (1) the screening of a human genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade (TRG); (2) clinical association analysis of 113 patients treated with preoperative CRT; and (3) a cell-based functional assay for biological validation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 9 SNPs associated with preoperative CRT responses. Positive responses (TRG 1-3) were obtained more frequently in patients carrying the reference allele (C) of the SNP CORO2A rs1985859 than in those with the substitution allele (T) (P=.01). Downregulation of CORO2A was significantly associated with reduced early apoptosis by 27% (P=.048) and 39% (P=.023) in RKO and COLO320DM colorectal cancer cells, respectively, as determined by flow cytometry. Reduced radiosensitivity was confirmed by colony-forming assays in the 2 colorectal cancer cells (P=.034 and .015, respectively). The SNP FAM101A rs7955740 was not associated with radiosensitivity in the clinical association analysis. However, downregulation of FAM101A significantly reduced early apoptosis by 29% in RKO cells (P=.047), and it enhanced colony formation in RKO cells (P=.001) and COLO320DM cells (P=.002). Conclusion: CRT-sensitive SNP markers were identified using a novel 3-step process. The candidate marker CORO2A rs1985859 and the putative marker FAM101A rs7955740 may be of value for the prediction of radiosensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts.

  17. Epigenetic Regulation of KLHL34 Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Ye J.; Kim, Chan W.; Roh, Seon A.; Cho, Dong H.; Park, Jong L.; Kim, Seon Y.; Kim, Jong H.; Choi, Eun K.; Kim, Yong S.; Kim, Jin C.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Prediction of individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is urgently needed in patients with poorly responsive locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Candidate methylation genes associated with radiosensitivity were identified using a 3-step process. In the first step, genome-wide screening of methylation genes was performed in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade in 45 patients with LARC. In the second step, the methylation status of selected sites was analyzed by pyrosequencing in 67 LARC patients, including 24 patients analyzed in the first step. Finally, colorectal cancer cell clones with stable KLHL34 knockdown were generated and tested for cellular sensitivity to radiation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 7 hypermethylated CpG sites (DZIP1 cg24107021, DZIP1 cg26886381, ZEB1 cg04430381, DKK3 cg041006961, STL cg00991794, KLHL34 cg01828474, and ARHGAP6 cg07828380) associated with preoperative CRT responses. Radiosensitivity in patients with hypermethylated KLHL34 cg14232291 was confirmed by pyrosequencing in additional cohorts. Knockdown of KLHL34 significantly reduced colony formation (KLHL34 sh#1: 20.1%, P=.0001 and KLHL34 sh#2: 15.8%, P=.0002), increased the cytotoxicity (KLHL34 sh#1: 14.8%, P=.019 and KLHL34 sh#2: 17.9%, P=.007) in LoVo cells, and increased radiation-induced caspase-3 activity and the sub-G1 population of cells. Conclusions: The methylation status of KLHL34 cg14232291 may be a predictive candidate of sensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts using various cell types.

  18. Immune gene therapy as a neoadjuvant to surgical excision to control metastatic cancers.

    PubMed

    Cashman, J P; Larkin, J O; Casey, G; Whelan, M C; Collins, C; Aarons, S; Tangney, M; O'Sullivan, G C

    2008-04-01

    We investigated if the range of efficacy of a gene-based immunotherapy of solid tumours against systemic disease could be extended when used as a neoadjuvant to surgery. Hundred percent mice whose subcutaneous tumours were surgically removed 4 days post-electroporation with GM-CSF and B7-1 plasmid were systemically resistance to tumour rechallenge. In mice bearing both subcutaneous and hepatic tumours, neoadjuvant treatment of the primary tumour resulted in significant reduction in, or elimination of, hepatic tumour growth, with a significant increase in survival, indicating that control of the primary tumour by immunotherapy was not a prerequisite for containment of systemic disease. PMID:18179863

  19. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  20. Esophageal Cancer: Role of Imaging in Primary Staging and Response Assessment Post Neoadjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Yvette

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the early detection and treatment of esophageal cancer have meant improved survival rates for patients with esophageal cancer. Accurate pretreatment and post-neoadjuvant treatment staging of esophageal cancer is essential for assessing operability and determining the optimum treatment plan. This article reviews the multimodality imaging approach in the diagnosis, staging, and assessment of treatment response in esophageal cancer. PMID:27342898

  1. Nomogram Prediction of Survival and Recurrence in Patients With Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer Undergoing Curative Resection Followed by Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Changhoon; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Jin Ho; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Ha, Sung W.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To develop nomograms for predicting the overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation therapy after curative resection. Methods and Materials: From January 1995 through August 2006, a total of 166 consecutive patients underwent curative resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards regression was performed, and this Cox model was used as the basis for the nomograms of OS and RFS. We calculated concordance indices of the constructed nomograms and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Results: The OS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 60.8% and 42.5%, respectively, and the RFS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 52.5% and 38.2%, respectively. The model containing age, sex, tumor location, histologic differentiation, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement was selected for nomograms. The bootstrap-corrected concordance index of the nomogram for OS and RFS was 0.63 and 0.62, respectively, and that of AJCC staging for OS and RFS was 0.50 and 0.52, respectively. Conclusions: We developed nomograms that predicted survival and recurrence better than AJCC staging. With caution, clinicians may use these nomograms as an adjunct to or substitute for AJCC staging for predicting an individual's prognosis and offering tailored adjuvant therapy.

  2. Health-Related Quality of Life in SCALOP, a Randomized Phase 2 Trial Comparing Chemoradiation Therapy Regimens in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Christopher N.; Mukherjee, Somnath; Bridgewater, John; Falk, Stephen; Crosby, Tom; McDonald, Alec; Joseph, George; Staffurth, John; Abrams, Ross A.; Blazeby, Jane M.; Bridges, Sarah; Dutton, Peter; Griffiths, Gareth; Maughan, Tim; Johnson, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) provides survival benefits but may result in considerable toxicity. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) measurements during CRT have not been widely reported. This paper reports HRQL data from the Selective Chemoradiation in Advanced Localised Pancreatic Cancer (SCALOP) trial, including validation of the QLQ-PAN26 tool in CRT. Methods and Materials Patients with locally advanced, inoperable, nonmetastatic carcinoma of the pancreas were eligible. Following 12 weeks of induction gemcitabine plus capecitabine (GEMCAP) chemotherapy, patients with stable and responding disease were randomized to a further cycle of GEMCAP followed by capecitabine- or gemcitabine-based CRT. HRQL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the EORTC Pancreatic Cancer module (PAN26). Results A total of 114 patients from 28 UK centers were registered and 74 patients randomized. There was improvement in the majority of HRQL scales during induction chemotherapy. Patients with significant deterioration in fatigue, appetite loss, and gastrointestinal symptoms during CRT recovered within 3 weeks following CRT. Differences in changes in HRQL scores between trial arms rarely reached statistical significance; however, where they did, they favored capecitabine therapy. PAN26 scales had good internal consistency and were able to distinguish between subgroups of patients experiencing toxicity. Conclusions Although there is deterioration in HRQL following CRT, this resolves within 3 weeks. HRQL data support the use of capecitabine- over gemcitabine-based chemoradiation. The QLQ-PAN26 is a reliable and valid tool for use in patients receiving CRT. PMID:26530749

  3. Predicting Esophagitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Oberije, Cary; Belderbos, Jose; Dios, Núria Rodríguez de; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Barriger, R. Bryan; Moreno-Jiménez, Marta; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ramella, Sara; Everitt, Sarah; Rengan, Ramesh; Marks, Lawrence B.; De Ruyck, Kim; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) improves survival compared with sequential treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but it increases toxicity, particularly radiation esophagitis (RE). Validated predictors of RE for clinical use are lacking. We performed an individual-patient-data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant RE. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 1082 patients who underwent CCRT, including patients from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (2/3 vs 1/3 of patients). Factors predictive of RE (grade ≥2 and grade ≥3) were assessed using logistic modeling, with the concordance statistic (c statistic) used to evaluate the performance of each model. Results: The median radiation therapy dose delivered was 65 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.1 years. Most patients (91%) received platinum-containing CCRT regimens. The development of RE was common, scored as grade 2 in 348 patients (32.2%), grade 3 in 185 (17.1%), and grade 4 in 10 (0.9%). There were no RE-related deaths. On univariable analysis using the training set, several baseline factors were statistically predictive of RE (P<.05), but only dosimetric factors had good discrimination scores (c > .60). On multivariable analysis, the esophageal volume receiving ≥60 Gy (V60) alone emerged as the best predictor of grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 RE, with good calibration and discrimination. Recursive partitioning identified 3 risk groups: low (V60 <0.07%), intermediate (V60 0.07% to 16.99%), and high (V60 ≥17%). With use of the validation set, the predictive model performed inferiorly for the grade ≥2 endpoint (c = .58) but performed well for the grade ≥3 endpoint (c = .66). Conclusions: Clinically significant RE is common, but life-threatening complications occur in <1% of patients. Although several factors

  4. [Retrospective Study of Induction Chemotherapy and Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Asakage, Takahiro; Ando, Mizuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Saito, Yuki; Omura, Go; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-10-01

    We carried out this study to clarify the treatment outcomes and problems associated with induction chemotherapy (using taxotere, cisplatin and 5-FU [TPF therapy]) and chemoradiotherapy in patients with oropharyngeal cancer. The data of 44 patients receiving their initial treatment for oropharyngeal cancer (including 2, 9 and 33 patients with stage II, stage III and stage IV disease, respectively, and 31, 8 and 3 patients with side wall, front wall and upper wall (soft palate and uvula) involvement) were examined. Of the 44 patients, 33 received induction chemotherapy and 11 received chemoradiotherapy. The feasibility, incidence of neutropenia, response rate, and 3 year disease-specific survival rate in the induction chemotherapy group vs. chemoradiotherapy group were 70%, 88%, 82% and 73%, respectively, vs. 63%, 91%, 82% and 55%, respectively. A statistically significant difference in the 3-year disease-specific survival rate was seen between the p16-positive and p16-negative patients in the induction chemotherapy group: while the rate was 100% in the p16-positive patients, it was only 51% in the p16-negative patients (p=0.004). Of the patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy, 3 developed mandibular osteomyelitis, which was considered as one of the important problems associated with this therapy. PMID:26727822

  5. Thymidylate Synthase Gene Polymorphism Affects the Response to Preoperative 5-Fluorouracil Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Hyuk; Kang, Jeonghyun; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Shin, Sang Joon; Keum, Ki Chang; Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Hoguen; Choi, Sung Ho; Lee, Mi-Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: This study aims to correlate thymidylate synthase (TS) gene polymorphisms with the tumor response to preoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU-based preoperative CRT were prospectively enrolled in this study. Thymidylate synthase expression and TS gene polymorphisms were evaluated in tumor obtained before preoperative CRT and were correlated with the pathologic response, as assessed by histopathologic staging (pTNM) and tumor regression grade. Results: Patients exhibited 2R/3R and 3R/3R tandem repeat polymorphisms in the TS gene. With regard to TS expression in these genotypes, 2R/3RC and 3RC/3RC were defined as the low-expression group and 2R/3RG, 3RC/3RG, and 3RG/3RG as the high-expression group. There was no significant correlation between TS expression and tumor response. There was no significant difference in the tumor response between patients homozygous for 3R/3R and patients heterozygous for 2R/3R. However, 13 of 14 patients in the low-expression group with a G>C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (2R/3RC [n = 5] or 3RC/3RC [n = 9]) exhibited a significantly greater tumor downstaging rate, as compared with only 12 of 30 patients in the high-expression group without the SNP (2R/3RG [n = 10], 3RC/3RG [n = 9], or 3RG/3RG [n = 11]) (p = 0.001). The nodal downstaging rate was also significantly greater in this low-expression group, as compared with the high-expression group (12 of 14 vs. 14 of 30, p = 0.014). However, there was no significant difference in the tumor regression grade between these groups. Conclusions: This study suggests that SNPs within the TS enhancer region affect the tumor response to preoperative 5-FU-based CRT in rectal cancer.

  6. Neoadjuvant Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer: Systematic Review of Postoperative Morbidity, Mortality, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Li, Jinluan; Lin, Chi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to assess whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy (CRT) result in differential postoperative morbidity and mortality as compared with pancreatic tumor resection surgery alone. Using PRISMA guidelines and the PubMed search engine, we reviewed all prospective phase II trials of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and CRT for pancreatic cancer that examined postoperative morbidities and mortalities. A total of 30 articles were identified, collated, and analyzed. Risks of postoperative complications vary based on trial. With surgery alone, the most common postoperative complications included delayed gastric emptying (DGE) (17% to 24%), pancreatic fistula (10% to 20%), anastomotic leaks (0% to 15%), postoperative bleeding (2% to 13%), and infections/sepsis (17% to 20%). With surgery alone, the mortality was <5%. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy showed comparable fistula rates (3% to 4%), leaks (3% to 11%), infection (3% to 7%), with mortality 0% to 4% in all but 1 study. CRT for resectable/borderline resectable patients also showed comparable complication rates: DGE (6% to 15%), fistulas (2% to 3%), leaks (3% to 7%), bleeding/hemorrhage (2% to 13%), infections/sepsis (3% to 19%), with 9/13 studies showing a mortality of ≤4%. As compared with initially borderline/resectable tumors, CRT for initially unresectable tumors (despite less data) showed higher complication rates: DGE (13% to 33%), fistulas (3% to 25%), infections/sepsis (3% to 16%). However, the confounding factor of the potentially higher tumor burden as an associative agent remains. The only parameters slightly higher than historical surgery-only complication rates were leaks and bleeding/hemorrhage (13% to 20%). Mortality rates in these patients were consistently 0%, with 2 outliers. Hence, neoadjuvant chemotherapy/CRT is safe from a postoperative complication standpoint, without significant increases in complication rates compared with surgery alone. Resectable and borderline

  7. Network Meta-Analysis of the Effectiveness of Neoadjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Postmenopausal, HR-Positive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Chenghao; Zhou, Wenbin; Xia, Tiansong; Xie, Hui; Wang, Shui

    2016-01-01

    In clinical practice, it is necessary to define an optimal choice from many different therapeutic regimens. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET) for breast cancer patients. Randomized clinical trials were included. Nine studies comprising 2133 patients were included in the final analysis. Network meta-analysis showed that everolimus plus letrozole was more easily accepted by patients than exemestane (≥20wks) (odds ratio (OR): 856697.02, 95% confidence intervals (95%CI): 1.88 to 87242934...); exemestane (≥20wks) had worse acceptability than letrozole (OR: 0.00, 95%CI: 0.00 to 0.98). Letrozole produced a better clinical objective response (COR) than tamoxifen (OR: 1.99, 95%CI: 1.04 to 3.80). The incidence of fatigue between the anastrozole plus gefitinib group and the everolimus plus letrozole group was significantly different (OR: 0.08, 95%CI: 0.01 to 0.83). The exemestane (<20wks) plus celecoxib group had fewer hot flushes than others. Ranking showed the everolimus plus letrozole was most likely rank first in comparisons of COR and acceptability, and had a 64% possibility to rank first after stochastic multi-criteria acceptability analysis. In conclusion, our study showed that letrozole plus everolimus is the most effective treatment for postmenopausal, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in the neoadjuvant setting. PMID:27174543

  8. Network Meta-Analysis of the Effectiveness of Neoadjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Postmenopausal, HR–Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Chenghao; Zhou, Wenbin; Xia, Tiansong; Xie, Hui; Wang, Shui

    2016-01-01

    In clinical practice, it is necessary to define an optimal choice from many different therapeutic regimens. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET) for breast cancer patients. Randomized clinical trials were included. Nine studies comprising 2133 patients were included in the final analysis. Network meta-analysis showed that everolimus plus letrozole was more easily accepted by patients than exemestane (≥20wks) (odds ratio (OR): 856697.02, 95% confidence intervals (95%CI): 1.88 to 87242934...); exemestane (≥20wks) had worse acceptability than letrozole (OR: 0.00, 95%CI: 0.00 to 0.98). Letrozole produced a better clinical objective response (COR) than tamoxifen (OR: 1.99, 95%CI: 1.04 to 3.80). The incidence of fatigue between the anastrozole plus gefitinib group and the everolimus plus letrozole group was significantly different (OR: 0.08, 95%CI: 0.01 to 0.83). The exemestane (<20wks) plus celecoxib group had fewer hot flushes than others. Ranking showed the everolimus plus letrozole was most likely rank first in comparisons of COR and acceptability, and had a 64% possibility to rank first after stochastic multi-criteria acceptability analysis. In conclusion, our study showed that letrozole plus everolimus is the most effective treatment for postmenopausal, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in the neoadjuvant setting. PMID:27174543

  9. Risk Factors for Pericardial Effusion in Inoperable Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiong; Liu, H. Helen Tucker, Susan L.; Wang Shulian; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and dosimetric factors influencing the risk of pericardial effusion (PCE) in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Data for 101 patients with inoperable esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and RT from 2000 to 2003 at our institution were analyzed. The PCE was confirmed from follow-up chest computed tomography scans and radiologic reports, with freedom from PCE computed from the end of RT. Log-rank tests were used to identify clinical and dosimetric factors influencing freedom from PCE. Dosimetric factors were calculated from the dose-volume histogram for the whole heart and pericardium. Results: The crude rate of PCE was 27.7% (28 of 101). Median time to onset of PCE was 5.3 months (range, 1.0-16.7 months) after RT. None of the clinical factors investigated was found to significantly influence the risk of PCE. In univariate analysis, a wide range of dose-volume histogram parameters of the pericardium and heart were associated with risk of PCE, including mean dose to the pericardium, volume of pericardium receiving a dose greater than 3 Gy (V3) to greater than 50 Gy (V50), and heart volume treated to greater than 32-38 Gy. Multivariate analysis selected V30 as the only parameter significantly associated with risk of PCE. Conclusions: High-dose radiation to the pericardium may strongly increase the risk of PCE. Such a risk may be reduced by minimizing the dose-volume of the irradiated pericardium and heart.

  10. PSA Response to Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is a Strong Independent Predictor of Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer in the Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Era

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.; Cerne, Jasmina Z.; Munsell, Mark F.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Choi, Seungtaek L.; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Frank, Steven J.; Corn, Paul G.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) prior to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) and long-term ADT in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of all patients diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer and treated with a combination of long-term ADT (median, 24 months) and dose-escalated (median, 75.6 Gy) RT between 1990 and 2007. The associations among patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics with biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT and their effects on failure-free survival (FFS), time to distant metastasis (TDM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: A total of 196 patients met criteria for inclusion. Median follow-up time for patients alive at last contact was 7.0 years (range, 0.5-18.1 years). Multivariate analysis identified the pre-RT PSA concentration (<0.5 vs {>=}0.5 ng/mL) as a significant independent predictor of FFS (P=.021), TDM (P=.009), PCSM (P=.039), and OS (P=.037). On multivariate analysis, pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and African-American race were significantly associated with failure to achieve a pre-RT PSA of <0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions: For high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with long-term ADT and dose-escalated RT, a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL after neoadjuvant ADT predicts for worse survival measures. Both elevated iPSA and African-American race are associated with increased risk of having a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL. These patients should be considered for clinical trials that test newer, more potent androgen-depleting therapies such as abiraterone and MDV3100 in combination with radiation.

  11. A Phase 1/2 and Biomarker Study of Preoperative Short Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine Followed By Early Surgery for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Ryan, David P.; Borger, Darrell R.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Deshpande, Vikram; Shinagare, Shweta; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Boucher, Yves; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. Results: The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). Conclusions: This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRAS{sup G12D} status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival.

  12. Outcomes for patients with anaplastic astrocytoma treated with chemoradiation, radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy: a retrospective review within the era of temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Shonka, Nicole A; Theeler, Brett; Cahill, Daniel; Yung, Alfred; Smith, Lynette; Lei, Xiudong; Gilbert, Mark R

    2013-06-01

    Treatment for anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) is controversial. To assess three primary treatment approaches, patients from a single institution were retrospectively evaluated. To represent modern treatment selection, patients diagnosed with AA from December 2003 to December 2009 were selected. Those with insufficient data, incomplete pathology, and transformation or reclassification to glioblastoma in fewer than 6 months were excluded. A total of 163 patients were included in the final analyses. Median follow-up time was 4.2 years (range 0.5-7.8 years). Median age and Karnofsky performance status at diagnosis were 39.2 years and 90, respectively. 23.6 % of patients underwent biopsy, and 72.2 % underwent resection. Approximately 31 % received concurrent chemoradiation (CRT), 26.1 % had radiation therapy alone (RT), 38.2 % had radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy (RT-C), and 3 % were treated only with chemotherapy. Temozolomide was used almost exclusively during CRT (94.2 %) and adjuvantly. A median of 9.5 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy was given. The combination of radiation and chemotherapy, either concurrent or sequential trended toward a higher rate of radiation necrosis. Median progression free survival (PFS) favored RT (not reached) over CRT (1.5 years) and RT-C (3.6 years) adjusted for pairwise comparison (p = 0.033, p = 0.050). Median overall survival (OS) was 5.7 years, and did not differ significantly by treatment group. OS for patients with AA did not vary by initial treatment selection. Although the longer PFS in those receiving RT versus CRT may be confounded by pseudoprogression, the equivalent OS among groups supports RT. PMID:23526410

  13. Predictive Value of Ercc1 and Xpd Polymorphisms for Clinical Outcomes of Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Therapy: A Prisma-Compliant Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Qixing, Mao; Gaochao, Dong; Wenjie, Xia; Rong, Yin; Feng, Jiang; Lin, Xu; Mantang, Qiu; Qiang, Chen

    2015-09-01

    Excision repair cross complementing 1 (ERCC1) and xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) play important roles in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The correlation between ERCC1 polymorphisms (rs11615 and rs3212986) and XPD polymorphisms (rs13181 and rs1799793) with the response rate and overall survival of cancer patients who accept neoadjuvant therapy has been extensively investigated. However, the results are inconclusive. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis to determine the strength of this correlation. A comprehensive literature search was conducted in Medline, PubMed, and Embase up to February 2015. A review of all titles and abstracts was performed by 2 of the authors to screen the articles based on the eligibility criteria. Clinical trials, observational studies, and epidemiological studies describing ERCC polymorphisms and neoadjuvant treatment were considered for review. The response rate was analyzed using pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Overall survival was assessed using the hazard ratio (HR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. In the present meta-analysis, we demonstrated that the ERCC1 rs3212986 polymorphism was significantly correlated with the response rate of esophageal cancer patients to neoadjuvant therapy (OR =  .49, 95% CI = 0.31-0.76, heterogeneity P = 0.480). Furthermore, a considerable correlation was observed between ERCC1 rs11615 and the response rate of esophageal cancer patients to neoadjuvant therapy (OR = 0.228, 95% CI = 0.125-0.418, heterogeneity P = 0.291). No correlation was observed in the meta-analysis of overall survival. The individual studies included in our study differed in their patient selection and therapeutic protocols, which might lead to some bias in the results. These findings indicate that the ERCC1 rs11615 and ERCC1 rs312986 polymorphisms may be candidate pharmacogenomic factors capable of predicting the response rate of esophageal cancer

  14. Neoadjuvant Radiation Is Associated With Improved Survival in Patients With Resectable Pancreatic Cancer: An Analysis of Data From the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Stessin, Alexander M.; Meyer, Joshua E.; Sherr, David L.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer of the exocrine pancreas is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation has been investigated in several trials as a strategy for downstaging locally advanced disease to resectability. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of neoadjuvant radiation therapy (RT) vs. other treatments on long-term survival for patients with resectable pancreatic cancer in a large population-based sample group. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry database (1994-2003) was queried for cases of surgically resected pancreatic cancer. Retrospective analysis was performed. The endpoint of the study was overall survival. Results: Using Kaplan-Meier analysis we found that the median overall survival of patients receiving neoadjuvant RT was 23 months vs. 12 months with no RT and 17 months with adjuvant RT. Using Cox regression and controlling for independent covariates (age, sex, stage, grade, and year of diagnosis), we found that neoadjuvant RT results in significantly higher rates of survival than other treatments (hazard ratio [HR], 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.79; p = 0.001). Specifically comparing adjuvant with neoadjuvant RT, we found a significantly lower HR for death in patients receiving neoadjuvant RT rather than adjuvant RT (HR, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.90; p = 0.03). Conclusions: This analysis of SEER data showed a survival benefit for the use of neoadjuvant RT over surgery alone or surgery with adjuvant RT in treating pancreatic cancer. Therapeutic strategies that use neoadjuvant RT should be further explored for patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

  15. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Haoran; Zhong, Wenzhao; Yang, Xuening

    2015-01-01

    The Lung Adjuvant Cisplatin Evaluation (LACE) meta-analysis and the meta-analysis of individual participant data reported by non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) Meta-analysis Collaborative Group in neo-adjuvant setting validated respectively that adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy would significantly improve overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival for resectable NSCLC. However, chemotherapy has reached a therapeutic plateau. It has been confirmed that epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) targeting therapy provides a dramatic response to patients with advanced EGFR-mutation positive NSCLC. Researchers have paid more attention to exploring applications of TKIs to early resectable NSCLCs. Several studies on adjuvant TKI treatment concluded its safety and feasibility. But there existed certain limitations of these studies as inference factors to interpret data accurately: the BR19 study recruited patients among which almost 52% had stage IB and only 15 (3.0%, 15/503) had been confirmed with EGFR-mutant type; retrospective studies performed at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) selected EGFR mutant-type NSCLC patients but couldn’t avoid inherent defects inside retrospective researches; the RADIANT study revised endpoints from targeting at EGFR immunohistochemistry (IHC)+ and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)+ mutation to only EGFR IHC+ mutation, leading to selective bias; despite that the SELECT study validated efficacy of adjuvant TKI and second round of TKI after resistance occurred, a single-arm clinical trial is not that persuasive in the absence of comparison with chemotherapy. Taking all these limitations into account, CTONG1104 in China and IMPACT in Japan have been conducted and recruiting patients to offer higher level of evidences to explore efficacy of preoperative TKI therapy for early resectable EGFR mutation positive NSCLC patients (confirmed by pathological results of tumor tissue or

  16. Carboxylesterase 2 as a Determinant of Response to Irinotecan and Neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX Therapy in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Capello, Michela; Lee, Minhee; Wang, Hong; Babel, Ingrid; Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B.; Maitra, Anirban; Wang, Huamin; Tian, Weihua; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Serine hydrolases (SHs) are among the largest classes of enzymes in humans and play crucial role in many pathophysiological processes of cancer. We have undertaken a comprehensive proteomic analysis to assess the differential expression and cellular localization of SHs, which uncovered distinctive expression of Carboxylesterase 2 (CES2), the most efficient carboxyl esterase in activating the prodrug irinotecan into SN-38, in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We therefore assessed the extent of heterogeneity in CES2 expression in PDAC and its potential relevance to irinotecan based therapy. Methods: CES2 expression in PDAC and paired nontumor tissues was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. CES2 activity was assessed by monitoring the hydrolysis of the substrate p-NPA and correlated with irinotecan IC50 values by means of Pearson’s correlation. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were applied to assess the association between overall survival and CES2 expression in patients who underwent neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX treatment. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Statistically significant overexpression of CES2, both at the mRNA and protein levels, was observed in PDAC compared with paired nontumor tissue (P < .001), with 48 of 118 (40.7%) tumors exhibiting high CES2 expression. CES2 activity in 11 PDAC cell lines was inversely correlated with irinotecan IC50 values (R = -0.68, P = .02). High CES2 expression in tumor tissue was associated with longer overall survival in resectable and borderline resectable patients who underwent neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX treatment (hazard ratio = 0.14, 95% confidence interval = 0.04 to 0.51, P = .02). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that CES2 expression and activity, by mediating the intratumoral activation of irinotecan, is a contributor to FOLFIRINOX sensitivity in pancreatic cancer and CES2 assessment may define a subset of patients likely to respond to irinotecan based therapy. PMID:26025324

  17. Neoadjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer: the clinical utility of pertuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Gollamudi, Jahnavi; Parvani, Jenny G; Schiemann, William P; Vinayak, Shaveta

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of breast cancer patients harbor tumors that overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; also known as ErbB2), a receptor tyrosine kinase that belongs to the epidermal growth factor receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases. HER2 amplification and hyperactivation drive the growth and survival of breast cancers through the aberrant activation of proto-oncogenic signaling systems, particularly the Ras/MAP kinase and PI3K/AKT pathways. Although HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer was originally considered to be a highly aggressive form of the disease, the clinical landscape of HER2+ breast cancers has literally been transformed by the approval of anti-HER2 agents for adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Indeed, pertuzumab is a novel monoclonal antibody that functions as an anti-HER2 agent by targeting the extracellular dimerization domain of the HER2 receptor; it is also the first drug to receive an accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in neoadjuvant settings in early-stage HER2+ breast cancer. Here, we review the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to the pathophysiology of HER2 in breast cancer, as well as summarize the landmark preclinical and clinical findings underlying the approval and use of pertuzumab in the neoadjuvant setting. Finally, the molecular mechanisms operant in mediating resistance to anti-HER2 agents, and perhaps to pertuzumab as well, will be discussed, as will the anticipated clinical impact and future directions of pertuzumab in breast cancer patients. PMID:26937204

  18. Neoadjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer: the clinical utility of pertuzumab.

    PubMed

    Gollamudi, Jahnavi; Parvani, Jenny G; Schiemann, William P; Vinayak, Shaveta

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of breast cancer patients harbor tumors that overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; also known as ErbB2), a receptor tyrosine kinase that belongs to the epidermal growth factor receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases. HER2 amplification and hyperactivation drive the growth and survival of breast cancers through the aberrant activation of proto-oncogenic signaling systems, particularly the Ras/MAP kinase and PI3K/AKT pathways. Although HER2-positive (HER2(+)) breast cancer was originally considered to be a highly aggressive form of the disease, the clinical landscape of HER2(+) breast cancers has literally been transformed by the approval of anti-HER2 agents for adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Indeed, pertuzumab is a novel monoclonal antibody that functions as an anti-HER2 agent by targeting the extracellular dimerization domain of the HER2 receptor; it is also the first drug to receive an accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in neoadjuvant settings in early-stage HER2(+) breast cancer. Here, we review the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to the pathophysiology of HER2 in breast cancer, as well as summarize the landmark preclinical and clinical findings underlying the approval and use of pertuzumab in the neoadjuvant setting. Finally, the molecular mechanisms operant in mediating resistance to anti-HER2 agents, and perhaps to pertuzumab as well, will be discussed, as will the anticipated clinical impact and future directions of pertuzumab in breast cancer patients. PMID:26937204

  19. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin and Cetuximab in Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Conradi, Lena; Weiss, Christian; Sprenger, Thilo; Middel, Peter; Rau, Tillman; Dellas, Kathrin; Kitz, Julia; Rödel, Franz; Sauer, Rolf; Rüschoff, Josef; Beissbarth, Tim; Arnold, Dirk; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Rödel, Claus; Liersch, Torsten

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the addition of cetuximab to chemoradiation therapy failed to improve complete response rates (pCR) in rectal cancer. Here we report the long-term results of the cetuximab added to preoperative radiation therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CET-CAPOX-RT) phase 1/2 study that evaluated preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The median follow-up was 63 months (range, 5-73 months). Sixty patients were enrolled; 3 patients were excluded due to protocol violation, and 4 died before surgery. Total mesorectal excision was performed in 53 patients, in 85% (n=45) with curative intention (M0-status). Secondary end points including overall survival (OS) disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were calculated. The prognostic value of KRAS mutation status was also assessed. Results: Histopathological examination confirmed ypUICC stages 0 (n=4; pCR), I (n=17), II (n=10), III (n=14), and IV (n=8). For patients who underwent surgery (n=53), OS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.7%, 83%, and 75.5%, respectively, whereas CSS rates were 94.1%, 88.1%, and 78.1%, respectively. In the 45 patients who were treated with curative intent (M0), the OS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91.1%, 88.9%, and 86.7%, respectively; whereas CSS rates were 97.6%, 95.2%, and 90.3%, respectively; and DFS rates were 90.7%, 88.3%, and 88.3%, respectively. We did not find any locoregional failure in patients with M0-status (n=45). Chronic toxicity was rare. KRAS mutations, as detected in 33.3%, showed no correlation with the clinicopathological parameters nor significance for either OS (P=.112), CSS (P=.264), or DFS (P=.565). Conclusions: Taken together, chemoradiation therapy combined with cetuximab is safe, feasible, and offers excellent survival rates. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor. Importantly, lack of improvement in pCR rate did not

  20. Improving the efficacy of chemoradiation with targeted agents

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Meredith A.; Parsels, Leslie A.; Maybaum, Jonathan; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the standard therapy for the majority of inoperable, locally advanced cancers. While there is a need to improve chemoradiation efficacy, normal tissue toxicity limits our ability to give additional chemotherapy or higher doses of radiation. Thus, there is excitement about the addition of molecularly targeted agents, which tend to be less toxic than chemotherapy, to chemoradiation regimens. Unfortunately, initial empiric attempts have not been successful. This review will focus on the evidence that supports rational combinations of targeted agents with chemoradiation, with an emphasis on agents that target the DNA damage response and radiation-induced membrane signaling. PMID:24550033

  1. Esophageal involvement by extranodal natural killer T cell lymphoma, nasal type, mimicking Ebstein Barr viral esophagitis in a tonsillar lymphoma patient undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se Ryeon; Park, Eun Kyung; Won, Nam Hee; Kim, Byung Soo

    2010-09-01

    Esophageal involvement by extranodal natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, is rare. As a result, esophageal symptoms in these patients might at first be thought to originate from a benign condition, such as viral esophagitis. It is important to note, however, that benign conditions may mask esophageal involvement by lymphoma. Until now, there has been no report documenting esophageal involvement by lymphoma mimicking viral esophagitis in an extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma patient undergoing active treatment. Here, we report a case of esophageal involvement by extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, initially misdiagnosed as Ebstein Barr virus esophagitis. Lymphoma invasion of the esophagus should be considered if esophageal symptoms do not respond to usual medical esophagitis therapy in an extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, patient undergoing chemoradiation. PMID:20887494

  2. Phase I Study of Preoperative Short-Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Head

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Adams, Judith; Yeap, Beow; Winrich, Barbara; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety of 1 week of chemoradiation with proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with localized resectable, pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the head were enrolled from May 2006 to September 2008. Patients received radiation with proton beam. In dose level 1, patients received 3 GyE x 10 (Week 1, Monday-Friday; Week 2, Monday-Friday). Patients in Dose Levels 2 to 4 received 5 GyE x 5 in progressively shortened schedules: level 2 (Week 1, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; Week 2, Tuesday and Thursday), Level 3 (Week 1, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday; Week 2, Monday), Level 4 (Week 1, Monday through Friday). Capecitabine was given as 825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d. Weeks 1 and 2 Monday through Friday for a total of 10 days in all dose levels. Surgery was performed 4 to 6 weeks after completion of chemotherapy for Dose Levels 1 to 3 and then after 1 to 3 weeks for Dose Level 4. Results: Three patients were treated at Dose Levels 1 to 3 and 6 patients at Dose Level 4, which was selected as the MTD. No dose limiting toxicities were observed. Grade 3 toxicity was noted in 4 patients (pain in 1; stent obstruction or infection in 3). Eleven patients underwent resection. Reasons for no resection were metastatic disease (3 patients) and unresectable tumor (1 patient). Mean postsurgical length of stay was 6 days (range, 5-10 days). No unexpected 30-day postoperative complications, including leak or obstruction, were found. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with 1 week of proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery is feasible. A Phase II study is underway.

  3. A Canadian national expert consensus on neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer: linking practice to evidence and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, C.E.; Hogeveen, S.; Leonard, R.; Rajmohan, Y.; Han, D.; Wong, A.; Lee, J.; Brackstone, M.; Boileau, J.F.; Dinniwell, R.; Gandhi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of the neoadjuvant approach to treat breast cancer patients has increased since the early 2000s, but the overall pathway of care for such patients can be highly variable. The aim of our project was to establish a multidisciplinary consensus among clinicians with expertise in neoadjuvant therapy (nat) for breast cancer and to determine if that consensus reflects published methods used in randomized controlled trials (rcts) in this area. Methods A modified Delphi protocol, which used iterative surveys administered to 85 experts across Canada, was established to obtain expert consensus concerning all aspects of the care pathway for patients undergoing nat for breast cancer. All rcts published between January 1, 1967, and December 1, 2012, were systematically reviewed. Data extracted from the rcts were analyzed to determine if the methods used matched the expert consensus for specific areas of nat management. A scoring system determined the strength of the agreement between the literature and the expert consensus. Results Consensus was achieved for all areas of the pathway of care for patients undergoing nat for breast cancer, with the exception of the role of magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-treatment or preoperative setting. The levels of agreement between the consensus statements and the published rcts varied, primarily because specific aspects of the pathway of care were not well described in the reviewed literature. Conclusions A true consensus of expert opinion concerning the pathway of care appropriate for patients receiving nat for breast cancer has been achieved. A review of the literature illuminated gaps in the evidence about some elements of nat management. Where evidence is available, agreement with expert opinion is strong overall. Our study is unique in its approach to establishing consensus among medical experts in this field and has established a pathway of care that can be applied in practice for patients receiving nat. PMID

  4. Prognostic factors in non-small cell lung cancer patients who received neoadjuvant therapy and curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chen-Ping; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Wu, Ching-Feng; Fu, Jui-Ying; Liu, Yun-Hen; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Yang, Cheng-Ta

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the world, and more and more treatment modalities have been introduced in order to improve patients’ survival. For patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), survival prognosis is poor and multimodality neoadjuvant therapies are given to improve patients’ survival. However, the possibility of occult metastases may lead to discrepancy between clinical and pathologic staging and underestimation of the disease severity. This discrepancy could be the reason for poor survival prediction reported by previous studies which conducted their analysis from the point of view of clinical stage. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between clinico-pathologic factors and survival from the pathologic point of view and to try to identify survival prognostic factors. Methods From January 2005 to June 2011, 88 patients received neoadjuvant therapy because of initial locally advanced disease, followed by anatomic resection and mediastinal lymph node (LN) dissection. All their clinico-pathologic data were collected from a retrospective review of the medical records and subjected to further analysis. Results We found that total metastatic LN ratio (P=0.01) and tumor size (P=0.02) were predictive factors for disease free survival (DFS). We used these two prognostic factors to stratify all patients into four groups. Group 4 (tumor size ≤5, total metastatic LN ratio ≤0.065) had the best DFS curve, while the DFS curve progressively deteriorated across group 3 (tumor size ≤5, total metastatic LN ratio >0.065), group 2 (tumor size >5, total metastatic LN ratio ≤0.065) and group 1 (tumor size >5, total metastatic LN ratio >0.065). However, no definitive prognostic factor could be identified in this study. Conclusions In conclusion, tumor size greater than 5 cm and total metastatic LN ratio greater than 0.065 could predict the DFS of patients with advanced NSCLC after multimodality

  5. DNA Repair Biomarkers Predict Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Brian M.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Weaver, David T.; Mak, Raymond H.; Fidias, Panagiotis; Wain, John; Choi, Noah C.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy prior to surgical resection for esophageal cancer has improved clinical outcomes in some trials. Pathologic complete response (pCR) following neoadjuvant therapy is associated with better clinical outcome in these patients, but only 22% to 40% of patients achieve pCR. Because both chemotherapy and radiotherapy act by inducing DNA damage, we analyzed proteins selected from multiple DNA repair pathways, using quantitative immunohistochemistry coupled with a digital pathology platform, as possible biomarkers of treatment response and clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: We identified 79 patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer between October 1994 and September 2002, with biopsy tissue available, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy prior to surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital and used their archived, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsy samples to create tissue microarrays (TMA). TMA sections were stained using antibodies against proteins in various DNA repair pathways including XPF, FANCD2, PAR, MLH1, PARP1, and phosphorylated MAPKAP kinase 2 (pMK2). Stained TMA slides were evaluated using machine-based image analysis, and scoring incorporated both the intensity and the quantity of positive tumor nuclei. Biomarker scores and clinical data were assessed for correlations with clinical outcome. Results: Higher scores for MLH1 (p = 0.018) and lower scores for FANCD2 (p = 0.037) were associated with pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation on multivariable analysis. Staining of MLH1, PARP1, XPF, and PAR was associated with recurrence-free survival, and staining of PARP1 and FANCD2 was associated with overall survival on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: DNA repair proteins analyzed by immunohistochemistry may be useful as predictive markers for response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. These results are hypothesis generating and need

  6. Laparoscopic en bloc excision of gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the rectum after neoadjuvant imatinib therapy: anteriorly extended intersphincteric resection combined with partial resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Ueki, T; Nagayoshi, K; Manabe, T; Maeyama, R; Yokomizo, A; Yamamoto, H; Oda, Y; Tanaka, M

    2015-04-01

    We herein present a novel technique for laparoscopic en bloc excision involving anteriorly extended intersphincteric resection with partial resection of the posterior lobe of the prostate for large rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The sequence of neoadjuvant imatinib therapy and this less invasive surgery for marginally resectable rectal GISTs has the potential to obviate the need for urinary reconstruction and permanent stomas without jeopardizing the tumor margin status. PMID:25550117

  7. Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, Christopher H.; Eng, Cathy; Feig, Barry W.; Das, Prajnan; Skibber, John M.; Chang, George J.; Wolff, Robert A.; Krishnan, Sunil; Hamilton, Stanley; Janjan, Nora A.; Maru, Dipen M.; Ellis, Lee M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We designed this Phase II trial to assess the efficacy and safety of the addition of bevacizumab to concurrent neoadjuvant capecitabine-based chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Between April 2004 and December 2007, 25 patients with clinically staged T3N1 (n = 20) or T3N0 (n = 5) rectal cancer received neoadjuvant therapy with radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks), bevacizumab every 2 weeks (3 doses of 5 mg/kg), and capecitabine (900 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily only on days of radiation), followed by surgical resection a median of 7.3 weeks later. Results: Procedures included abdominoperineal resection (APR; 6 patients), proctectomy with coloanal anastamosis (8 patients), low anterior resection (10 patients), and local excision (1 patient). Eight (32%) of 25 patients had a pathologic complete response, and 6 (24%) of 25 had <10% viable tumor cells in the specimen. No patient had Grade 3 hand-foot syndrome, gastrointestinal toxicity, or significant hematologic toxicity. Three wound complications required surgical intervention (one coloanal anastamostic dehiscence requiring completion APR and two perineal wound dehiscences after initial APR). Five minor complications occurred that resolved without operative intervention. With a median follow-up of 22.7 months (range, 4.5-32.4 months), all patients were alive; one patient has had a recurrence in the pelvis (2-year actuarial rate, 6.2%) and 3 had distant recurrences. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemoradiation resulted in encouraging pathologic complete response without an increase in acute toxicity. The impact of bevacizumab on perineal wound and anastamotic healing due to concurrent bevacizumab requires further study.

  8. Predictive and prognostic biomarkers for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, S H; Chua, W; Henderson, C; Ng, W; Shin, J-S; Chantrill, L; Asghari, R; Lee, C S; Spring, K J; de Souza, P

    2015-10-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer is regularly treated with trimodality therapy consisting of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. There is a need for biomarkers to assess treatment response, and aid in stratification of patient risk to adapt and personalise components of the therapy. Currently, pathological stage and tumour regression grade are used to assess response. Experimental markers include proteins involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and microsatellite instability. As yet, no single marker is sufficiently robust to have clinical utility. Microarrays that screen a tumour for multiple promising candidate markers, gene expression and microRNA profiling will likely have higher yield and it is expected that a combination or panel of markers would prove most useful. Moving forward, utilising serial samples of circulating tumour cells or circulating nucleic acids can potentially allow us to demonstrate tumour heterogeneity, document mutational changes and subsequently measure treatment response. PMID:26032919

  9. Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Das, Prajnan; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina; Pham, Mary; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Improving local control is critical to improving survival and quality of life for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC). However, previous attempts at radiation dose escalation have been limited by duodenal toxicity. In order to guide future studies, we analyzed the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with duodenal toxicity in patients undergoing fractionated chemoradiation for LAPC. Methods and Materials: Medical records and treatment plans of 106 patients with LAPC who were treated with chemoradiation between July 2005 and June 2010 at our institution were reviewed. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy. Seventy-eight patients were treated with conventional radiation to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions; 28 patients received dose-escalated radiation therapy (range, 57.5-75.4 Gy in 28-39 fractions). Treatment-related toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess prognostic influence of clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors by using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results: Twenty patients had treatment-related duodenal toxicity events, such as duodenal inflammation, ulceration, and bleeding. Four patients had grade 1 events, 8 had grade 2, 6 had grade 3, 1 had grade 4, and 1 had grade 5. On univariate analysis, a toxicity grade ≥2 was associated with tumor location, low platelet count, an absolute volume (cm{sup 3}) receiving a dose of at least 55 Gy (V{sub 55} {sub Gy} > 1 cm{sup 3}), and a maximum point dose >60 Gy. Of these factors, only V{sub 55} {sub Gy} ≥1 cm{sup 3} was associated with duodenal toxicity on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 6.7; range, 2.0-18.8; P=.002). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a duodenal V{sub 55} {sub Gy} >1 cm{sup 3} is an important dosimetric predictor of grade 2 or greater duodenal toxicity and establishes it as a

  10. Helical Tomotherapy Versus Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer Patients: An Intraindividual Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Marnitz, Simone; Lukarski, Dusko; Koehler, Christhardt; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Ebert, Andreas; Budach, Volker; Schneider, Achim; Stromberger, Carmen

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivered by helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional IMRT for primary chemoradiation in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty cervical cancer patients undergoing primary chemoradiation received radiation with HT; 10 patients underwent pelvic irradiation (PEL) and 10 extended-field irradiation (EXT). For treatment planning, the simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) concept was applied. Tumor, pelvic, with or without para-aortic lymph nodes were defined as planning target volume A (PTV-A) with a prescribed dose of 1.8/50.4 Gy (28 fractions). The SIB dose for the parametrium (PTV-B), was 2.12/59.36 Gy. The lower target constraints were 95% of the prescribed dose in 95% of the target volume, and the upper dose constraint was 107%. The irradiated small-bowel volumes were kept as low as possible. For every HT plan, a conventional IMRT plan was calculated and compared with regard to dose-volume histogram, conformity index and conformity number, and homogeneity index. Results: Both techniques allowed excellent target volume coverage and sufficient SB sparing. Conformity index and conformity number results for both PTV-A and PTV-B, homogeneity index for PTV-B, and SB sparing for V45, V50, Dmax, and D1% were significantly better with HT. SB sparing was significantly better for conventional IMRT at low doses (V10). Conclusions: Both HT and conventional IMRT provide optimal treatment of cervical cancer patients. The HT technique was significantly favored with regard to target conformity, homogeneity, and SB sparing. Randomized trials are needed to assess the oncological outcome, toxicity, and clinical relevance of these differences.

  11. Dose-Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Killoran, Joseph H.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose-volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman's correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU-based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

  12. Health-related quality of life and psychological distress during neoadjuvant endocrine therapy with letrozole to determine endocrine responsiveness in postmenopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Taira, Naruto; Iwata, Hiroji; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Sakai, Takehiko; Higaki, Kenji; Kihara, Kiyohiro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Ohsumi, Shozo; Shimozuma, Kojiro; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2014-05-01

    Trials of adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer have shown that aromatase inhibitors have little impact on global health-related quality of life (HRQoL), but have significant effects on patient-reported endocrine symptoms (ESs). There are few studies of HRQoL and psychological distress during preoperative endocrine therapy performed to determine endocrine responsiveness. The NEOS trial is a multicenter, phase 3 randomized controlled trial in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. The primary aim of the trial was to evaluate the need for adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with clinical T1c-T2N0M0, hormone receptor-positive tumors who responded to neoadjuvant letrozole (LET) administered for 24-28 weeks before surgery. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival and the secondary endpoints included adverse events, HRQoL, and cost-effectiveness. In a HRQoL sub-study, subjects were assessed at baseline and 4 and 16 weeks after starting neoadjuvant LET, using the functional assessment of cancer therapy-breast and its ES subscale, and the hospital anxiety and depression scale. HRQoL and psychosocial distress were analyzed in the uncontrolled phase during 24-28 weeks of neoadjuvant LET therapy in the NEOS trial. From May 16, 2008, to December 14, 2011, 503 patients were recruited into the HRQoL sub-study. The full analysis set included 497 patients with a mean age of 63-years old. The questionnaire response rates at enrollment and 4 and 16 weeks were 94.4, 90.7, and 89.1 %, respectively. There were no significant changes in the FACT-G or B-trial outcome index over time, but the social and family well-being score and the ES subscale deteriorated significantly, and the number of patients with clinically significant hot flush increased significantly. Anxiety, depression, and emotional well-being improved significantly after neoadjuvant LET. Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy with LET had no impact on global HRQoL, but did influence endocrine

  13. The Effect of Neoadjuvant Therapy on Early Complications of Esophageal Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi Mashhadi, Mohammadtaghi; Bagheri, Reza; Abdollahi, Abbas; Ghamari, Mohammad Javad; Shahidsales, Soudabeh; Salehi, Maryam; Shahkaram, Reza; Majidi, Mohamad Reza; Sheibani, Shima

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is required in esophageal cancer due to its invasive nature. The aim of this study was to evaluate early post-esophagectomy complications in patients with esophageal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACR). Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was carried out between 2009 and 2011. Patients with lower-third esophageal cancer were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group consisted of 50 patients receiving standard chemoradiotherapy (Group A) and then undergoing surgery, and the second group consisted of 50 patients undergoing surgery only (Group B). Patients were evaluated with respect to age, gender, clinical symptoms, type of pathology, time of surgery, perioperative blood loss, and number of lymph nodes resected as well as early post-operative complicate including leakage at the anastomosis site, chylothorax and pulmonary complications, hospitalization period, and mortality rate within the first 30 days after surgery. Results: The mean age of patients was 55 years. Seventy-two patients had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 28 patients had adenocarcinoma (ACC). There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to age, gender, time of surgery, complications including anastomotic leakage, chylothorax, pulmonary complications, cardiac complications, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), or mortality. However, there was a significant difference between the two groups regarding hospital stay, time of surgery, perioperative blood loss, and number of lymph nodes resected. Conclusion: The use of NACR did not increase early post-operative complications or mortality among patients with esophageal cancer. PMID:26788476

  14. Postmastectomy radiation therapy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: review and interpretation of available data

    PubMed Central

    Kishan, Amar U.; McCloskey, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) has been shown to decrease locoregional recurrence and improve overall survival in patients with tumors greater than 5 cm or positive nodes. Because neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) can cause significant downstaging, the indications for PMRT in the setting of NAC remain controversial and thus careful consideration of clinical stage at presentation, pathologic response to NAC, and other clinical characteristics, such as grade and biomarker status is required. The current review synthesizes both prospective and retrospective data to provide evidence for recommending PMRT after NAC for patients presenting with cT3–4 disease, cN2–3 disease, and residual nodal disease, as well as rationale for omitting PMRT in patients with cT1-2N0-1 disease who achieve a pathologic complete response. Other scenarios, including nodal complete response in the presence of other risk factors, are also explored. The topics of pre-NAC clinical staging and pathologic axillary nodal staging are reviewed, and radiation portal design is briefly discussed. PMID:26753007

  15. Prostate-Specific Antigen Halving Time While on Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is Associated With Biochemical Control in Men Treated With Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, Renuka; Jani, Ashesh B.; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To assess whether the PSA response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is associated with biochemical control in men treated with radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In a cohort of men treated with curative-intent RT for localized prostate cancer between 1988 and 2005, 117 men had PSA values after the first and second months of neoadjuvant ADT. Most men had intermediate-risk (45%) or high-risk (44%) disease. PSA halving time (PSAHT) was calculated by first order kinetics. Median RT dose was 76 Gy and median total duration of ADT was 4 months. Freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF, nadir + 2 definition) was analyzed by PSAHT and absolute PSA nadir before the start of RT. Results: Median follow-up was 45 months. Four-year FFBF was 89%. Median PSAHT was 2 weeks. A faster PSA decline (PSAHT {<=}2 weeks) was associated with greater FFBF (96% vs. 81% for a PSAHT >2 weeks, p = 0.0110). Those within the fastest quartile of PSAHTs ({<=} 10 days) achieved a FFBF of 100%. Among high-risk patients, a PSAHT {<=}2 weeks achieved a 4-yr FFBF of 93% vs. 70% for those with PSAHT >2 weeks (p = 0.0508). Absolute PSA nadir was not associated with FFBF. On multivariable analysis, PSAHT (p = 0.0093) and Gleason score (p = 0.0320) were associated with FFBF, whereas T-stage (p = 0.7363) and initial PSA level (p = 0.9614) were not. Conclusions: For men treated with combined ADT and RT, PSA response to the first month of ADT may be a useful criterion for prognosis and treatment modification.

  16. Lymph nodes regression grade is a predictive marker for rectal cancer after neoadjuvant therapy and radical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Yuan, Jiatian; Liu, Hao; Yin, Jie; Liu, Sai; Du, Feng; Hu, Junjie; Li, Ci; Niu, Xiangke; Lv, Bo; Xing, Shasha

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for rectal cancer (RC) reduces primary tumors and involved lymph nodes. While a prognostic value of tumor regression grade (TRG) has been identified, involved lymph node regression grade (LRG) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, we evaluated the association of LRG with oncologic outcomes of RC patients after NT followed by radical surgery. 347 patients with locally advanced RC who received NT and then underwent radical surgery were retrospectively recruited between 2004 and 2011. Response to NT was evaluated by a 3-tier LRG and TRG based on the ratio of residual tumor to fibrosis. LRG was assessed in all patients (LRG 0, 170 patients [49.0%]; LRG 1, 100 patients [28.8%]; and LRG 2, 77 patients [22.2%]). LRG correlated with 5-year distant metastasis and 5-year disease free survival (p=0.029 and 0.023, respectively). LRG also correlated with TRG (p=0.017). We conclude that the LRG system may be an independent predictive factor of long-term oncologic outcomes of rectal cancer patients after NT and radical surgery. PMID:26934651

  17. Nanomedicine in chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Seth M; Wang, Andrew Z

    2013-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy, the concurrent administration of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, is a treatment paradigm in oncology. It is part of the standard of care and curative treatment of many cancers. Given its importance, one of the primary goals of cancer research has been to identify agents and/or strategies that can improve the therapeutic index of chemoradiation. Recent advances in nanomedicine have provided a unique and unprecedented opportunity for improving chemoradiotherapy. Nanoparticles possess properties that are ideally suited for delivering chemotherapy in the chemoradiation setting. The goal of this review is to examine the role of incorporating nanomedicine into chemoradiation and the potential impact of nanomedicine to chemoradiotherapy. PMID:23343162

  18. MRI for Assessing Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Using DCE-MR and DW-MR Data Sets: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Mario; Fusco, Roberta; Catalano, Orlando; Sansone, Mario; Avallone, Antonio; Delrio, Paolo; Pecori, Biagio; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate MRI for neoadjuvant therapy response assessment in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), we have compared magnetic resonance volumetry based on DCE-MRI (V(DCE)) and on DWI (V(DWI)) scans with conventional T2-weighted volumetry (V(C)) in LARC patients after neoadjuvant therapy. Twenty-nine patients with LARC underwent MR examination before and after neoadjuvant therapy. A manual segmentation was performed on DCE-MR postcontrast images, on DWI (b-value 800 s/mm(2)), and on conventional T2-weighted images by two radiologists. DCE-MRI, DWI, and T2-weigthed volumetric changes before and after treatment were evaluated. Nonparametric sample tests, interobserver agreement, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) were performed. Diagnostic performance linked to DCE-MRI volumetric change was superior to T2-w and DW-MRI volumetric changes performance (specificity 86%, sensitivity 93%, and accuracy 93%). Area Under ROC (AUC) of V(DCE) was greater than AUCs of V(C) and V(DWI) resulting in an increase of 15.6% and 11.1%, respectively. Interobserver agreement between two radiologists was 0.977, 0.864, and 0.756 for V(C), V(DCE), and V(DWI), respectively. V(DCE) seems to be a promising tool for therapy response assessment in LARC. Further studies on large series of patients are needed to refine technique and evaluate its potential value. PMID:26413528

  19. MRI for Assessing Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Using DCE-MR and DW-MR Data Sets: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Mario; Fusco, Roberta; Catalano, Orlando; Sansone, Mario; Avallone, Antonio; Delrio, Paolo; Pecori, Biagio; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate MRI for neoadjuvant therapy response assessment in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), we have compared magnetic resonance volumetry based on DCE-MRI (V(DCE)) and on DWI (V(DWI)) scans with conventional T2-weighted volumetry (V(C)) in LARC patients after neoadjuvant therapy. Twenty-nine patients with LARC underwent MR examination before and after neoadjuvant therapy. A manual segmentation was performed on DCE-MR postcontrast images, on DWI (b-value 800 s/mm2), and on conventional T2-weighted images by two radiologists. DCE-MRI, DWI, and T2-weigthed volumetric changes before and after treatment were evaluated. Nonparametric sample tests, interobserver agreement, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) were performed. Diagnostic performance linked to DCE-MRI volumetric change was superior to T2-w and DW-MRI volumetric changes performance (specificity 86%, sensitivity 93%, and accuracy 93%). Area Under ROC (AUC) of V(DCE) was greater than AUCs of V(C) and V(DWI) resulting in an increase of 15.6% and 11.1%, respectively. Interobserver agreement between two radiologists was 0.977, 0.864, and 0.756 for V(C), V(DCE), and V(DWI), respectively. V(DCE) seems to be a promising tool for therapy response assessment in LARC. Further studies on large series of patients are needed to refine technique and evaluate its potential value. PMID:26413528

  20. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Following Surgical Resection or Radiosurgery Plus Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Synchronous Solitary Brain Metastasis: A Curative Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Parlak, Cem; Mertsoylu, Hüseyin; Güler, Ozan Cem; Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of definitive thoracic chemoradiation therapy following surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) on the outcomes of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with synchronous solitary brain metastasis (SSBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 63 NSCLC patients with SSBM were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were staged using positron emission tomography-computed tomography in addition to conventional staging tools. Thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) with a total dose of 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was delivered along with 2 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy following either surgery plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=33) or SRS plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=30) for BM. Results: Overall, the treatment was well tolerated. All patients received planned TRT, and 57 patients (90.5%) were also able to receive 2 cycles of chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 25.3 months (7.1-52.1 months), the median months of overall, locoregional progression-free, neurological progression-free, and progression-free survival were 28.6, 17.7, 26.4, and 14.6, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that patients with a T1-T2 thoracic disease burden (P=.001), a nodal stage of N0-N1 (P=.003), and no weight loss (P=.008) exhibited superior survival. Conclusions: In the present series, surgical and radiosurgical treatments directed toward SSBM in NSCLC patients were equally effective. The similarities between the present survival outcomes and those reported in other studies for locally advanced NSCLC patients indicate the potentially curative role of definitive chemoradiation therapy for highly selected patients with SSBM.

  1. Clinical Usefulness of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Planned to Undergo Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jee Suk; Choi, Seo Hee; Lee, Youngin; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Jeong Youp; Song, Si Young; Cho, Arthur; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Seong, Jinsil

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of coregistered {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in detecting radiographically occult distant metastasis (DM) at staging in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and to study whether FDG-PET parameters can predict relatively long-term survival in patients who are more likely to benefit from chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: From our institutional database, we identified 388 LAPC patients with M0 on conventional computed tomography (CT) who were planned to undergo CRT. Coregistered FDG-PET staging was offered to all patients, and follow-up FDG-PET was used at the clinical discretion of the physician. Results: FDG-PET detected unsuspected CT-occult DM in 33% of all 388 patients and allowed them to receive systemic therapy immediately. The remaining 260 patients (PET-M0) underwent CRT selectively as an initial treatment. Early DM arose in 13.1% of 260 patients, and the 1-year estimated locoregional recurrence rate was 5.4%. Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 14.6 and 9.3 months, respectively, at a median follow-up time of 32.3 months (range, 10-99.1 months). Patients with a baseline standardized uptake value (SUV) <3.5 and/or SUV decline ≥60% had significantly better OS and PFS than those having none, even after adjustment for all potential confounding variables (all P<.001). Conclusions: FDG-PET can detect radiographically occult DM at staging in one-third of patients and spare them from the potentially toxic therapy. Additionally, FDG-PET parameters including baseline SUV and SUV changes may serve as useful clinical markers for predicting the prognosis in LAPC patients.

  2. Preoperative Short-Course Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Multicenter Study (KROG 10-01)

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min Ju; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Nam, Taek-Keun

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 multicenter trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative short-course concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiation therapy of 25 Gy in 5 fractions was delivered over 5 consecutive days using helical tomotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered on the same 5 days with intravenous bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 to 8 weeks, total mesorectal excision was performed. The primary endpoint was the pathologic downstaging (ypStage 0-I) rate, and secondary endpoints included tumor regression grade, tumor volume reduction rate, and toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients completed the planned preoperative CRT and surgery. Downstaging occurred in 20 (28.2%) patients, including 1 (1.4%) with a pathologic complete response. Favorable tumor regression (grade 4-3) was observed in 4 (5.6%) patients, and the mean tumor volume reduction rate was 62.5 ± 21.3%. Severe (grade ≥3) treatment toxicities were reported in 27 (38%) patients from CRT until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative short-course concurrent CRT followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer demonstrated poor pathologic responses compared with conventional long-course CRT, and it yielded considerable toxicities despite the use of an advanced radiation therapy technique.

  3. Pathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment in locally advanced rectal cancer and impact on outcome

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sidney; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza; Sugamaran, Bhuvana; Porter, Ian W.; Bell, Stephen; Warrier, Satish K.; Wale, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Background Downstaging and pathologic complete response (pCR) after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) may improve progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) after curative therapy of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of rectum. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the pathologic response subsequent to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma and any impact of response on oncological outcome [disease-free survival (DFS), OS]. Methods A total of 127 patients with histologically-proven rectal adenocarcinoma, locally advanced, were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5 FU), and followed by curative surgery. Pathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment was evaluated by comparing pathologic TN (tumour and nodal) staging (yp) with pre-treatment clinical staging. DFS and OS were compared in patients with: pCR, partial pathologic response and no response to neoadjuvant therapy. Results 14.96% (19 patients) had a pCR, 58.27% [74] showed downstaging and 26.77% [34] had no change in staging. At follow-up (range, 4–9 years, median 6 years 2 months or 74 months), 17.32% [22] showed recurrence: 15.74% [20] distant metastasis, 1.57% [2] pelvic failure. 10.5% [2] of the patients with pCR showed distant metastasis, none showed local recurrence. In the downstaged group, nine developed distant failure and two had local recurrence (14.86%). Distant failure was seen in 26.47% [9] of those with no response to neoadjuvant treatment. DFS and OS rates for all groups were 82.67% and 88.97% respectively. Patients with pCR showed 89.47% DFS and 94.7% OS. In partial responders, DFS was 85.1% and OS was 90.5%. In non-responders, DFS and OS were 73.5% and 82.3% respectively. Patients with pCR had a significantly greater probability of DFS and OS than non-responders. Rectal cancer-related death was 11.02% [14]: one patient (5.26%) with pCR, 9.47% [7] in the downstaged group and 17.64% [6] of non-responders. Conclusions The majority

  4. The Use of Molecular Breast Imaging to Assess Response in Women Undergoing Neoadjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L.; Boughey, Judy C.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Chen, Beiyun; Rhodes, Deborah J.; Tortorelli, Cindy L.; Maxwell, Robert W.; Cha, Stephen S.; O’Connor, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Report To report our findings from a prospective pilot study evaluating the accuracy of molecular breast imaging (MBI) in assessing tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for breast cancer. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who were scheduled to receive NT underwent MBI before beginning and after completing NT prior to surgery. MBI was performed using a dual-detector cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera system mounted on a modified mammography gantry after patients had received an intravenous injection of 20 mCi of technetium-99m (Tc-99m) sestamibi. Tumor extent was measured on MBI, and tumor-to-background (T/B) ratios of radiotracer uptake were determined through region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. Pathologic measurement of tumor size was used as a standard and compared to post-NT tumor size derived from MBI. Results Three patients in whom post-NT MBI could not be performed because of scheduling problems were excluded from analysis. Eighteen cancers were diagnosed in 17 patients. A correlation coefficient of r=0.681 (P=.002) was found between MBI and residual tumor size. The average T/B ratio on MBI decreased from a pretreatment value of 3.0 to a posttreatment value of 1.4. The relative decrease in T/B ratio did not appear to be predictive of response. Conclusions Measurements of tumor size by MBI and T/B ratios are limited in their predictive value regarding the pathologic extent of residual disease in women treated with NT for breast cancer. Alternate tumor-specific radiopharmaceuticals should be evaluated to provide information to improve planning and monitoring of breast cancer treatment. PMID:22391702

  5. A Decision Aid for Women Considering Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Operable Invasive Breast Cancer: Development and Protocol of a Phase II Evaluation Study (ANZ1301 DOMINO)

    PubMed Central

    Butow, Phyllis; Hutchings, Elizabeth; Douglas, Charles; Coll, Joseph R; Boyle, Frances M

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant systemic therapy is offered to selected women with large and/or highly proliferative operable breast cancers. This option adds further complexity to an already complex breast cancer treatment decision tree. Patient decision aids are an established method of increasing patient involvement and knowledge while decreasing decisional conflict. There is currently no decision aid available for women considering neoadjuvant systemic therapy. Objective We aimed to develop a decision aid for women diagnosed with operable breast cancer and considered suitable for neoadjuvant systemic therapy, and the protocol for a multicenter pre-post study evaluating the acceptability and feasibility of the decision aid. Methods The decision aid was developed through literature review, expert advisory panel, adherence to the International Patient Decision Aid Standards, and iterative review. The protocol for evaluation of the decision aid consists of the following: eligible women will undertake a series of questionnaires prior to and after using the decision aid. The primary endpoint is decision aid acceptability to patients and investigators and the feasibility of use. Secondary endpoints include change in decisional conflict, participant knowledge, and information involvement preference. Feasibility is defined as the proportion of eligible participants who use the decision aid to help inform their treatment decision. Results This study has recruited 29 out of a planned 50 participants at four Australian sites. A 12-month recruitment period is expected with a further 12-months follow-up. Conclusions The decision aid has the potential to allow patients with operable breast cancer, who have been offered neoadjuvant systemic therapy, decreased decisional conflict, and greater involvement in the decision. If this study finds that an online decision aid is feasible and acceptable, it will be made widely available for routine clinical practice. Trial Registration

  6. Laparoscopic resection of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the lower rectum in a patient with coronary artery disease following long-term neoadjuvant imatinib treatment and anticoagulation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). However, complete resection of rectal GISTs is sometimes difficult because of bulkiness and/or anatomical reasons. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy has gained attention as an alternative treatment to increase the chance of en bloc resection of rectal GISTs, although it usually takes several months. In this case report, we first demonstrated that neoadjuvant imatinib therapy can be performed safely not only to downsize tumors, but also to allow adequate time for the effective treatment of major comorbid illnesses. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with a 45 mm GIST of the lower rectum. He also had severe stenosis in the proximal segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Following the implantation of a drug-eluting stent, the patient received imatinib together with dual anti-platelet therapy for 12 months without obvious side effects. Follow-up image studies revealed tumor shrinkage as well as stent patency. En bloc resection of the GIST was performed laparoscopically, which preserved the anus. The patient is currently alive without any evidence of relapse for 12 months after surgery. PMID:25022862

  7. The Efficacy of Hepatic Resection after Neoadjuvant Transarterial Chemoembolization (TACE) and Radiation Therapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Greater Than 5 cm in Size

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sae Byeol; Park, Young Nyun; Choi, Jin Sub; Lee, Woo Jung; Seong, Jinsil; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Lee, Jong Tae

    2009-01-01

    In cases of large hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), neoadjuvant treatment such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radiation therapy can be performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of these treatments prior to hepatic resection. Between January 1994 and May 2007, 16 patients with HCC greater than 5 cm in size were treated with TACE and radiation therapy prior to hepatic resection. The clinicopathologic factors were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 16 patients, there were 14 men and two women, and the median age was 52.5 yr. TACE was performed three times in average, and the median radiation dosage was 45 Gy. The median diameter of tumor on specimen was 9.0 cm. The degree of tumor necrosis was more than 90% in 14 patients. The median survival time was 13.3 months. Five patients had survived more than 2 yr and there were two patients who had survived more than 5 yr. Although the prognosis of large HCC treated with neoadjuvant therapy is not satisfactory, some showed long-term survival loger than 5 yr. Further research will be required to examine the survival and disease control effect in a prospective randomized study. PMID:19399265

  8. A Phase 1/2 Study of Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Using Docetaxel, Nedaplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil (DNF-R) for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Okagawa, Yutaka; Osuga, Takahiro; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Miyanishi, Koji; Kobune, Masayoshi; Takimoto, Rishu; Sagawa, Tamotsu; Hori, Masakazu; Someya, Masanori; Nakata, Kensei; Sakata, Koh-ichi; Takayama, Tetsuji; Kato, Junji

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Patient survival in esophageal cancer (EC) remains poor. The purpose of this study was to investigate a regimen of definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) that exerts good local control of EC. We performed a phase 1/2 study to assess the safety and efficacy of CRT with docetaxel, nedaplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DNF-R). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients presented with stage IB to IV EC. Patients received 2 cycles of docetaxel (20, 30, or 40 mg/m{sup 2}) and nedaplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1 and 8 and a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 to 5 and 8 to 12, every 5 weeks, with concurrent radiation therapy (59.4 Gy/33 fractions). The recommended dose (RD) was determined using a 3 + 3 design. Results: In the phase 1 study, the dose-limiting toxicities were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. The RD of docetaxel was determined to be 20 mg/m{sup 2}. In the phase 2 study, grade 3 to 4 acute toxicities included neutropenia (42.8%), febrile neutropenia (7.14%), thrombocytopenia (17.9%), and esophagitis (21.4%). Grade 3 to 4 late radiation toxicity included esophagostenosis (10.7%). The complete response rate was 82.1% (95% confidence interval: 67.9-96.3%). Both the median progression-free survival and overall survival were 41.2 months. Conclusions: DNF-R showed good tolerability and strong antitumor activity, suggesting that it is a potentially effective therapeutic regimen for EC.

  9. Nuclear NF-κB Expression Correlates With Outcome Among Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Primary Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Michel, Yvonne; Wagenblast, Jens; Seitz, Oliver; Sipek, Florian; Rödel, Franz; Rödel, Claus; Fokas, Emmanouil

    2013-07-15

    Background: To examine whether nuclear NF-κB expression correlates with outcome in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 101 patients with locally advanced primary HNSCC were treated with definitive simultaneous CRT. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were analyzed for NF-κB p65 (RelA) nuclear immunoreactivity. A sample was assigned to be positive with more than 5% positive nuclear expression. The predictive relevance of NF-κB and clinicopathologic factors for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to age, sex, total radiation dose, fractionation mode, total chemotherapy applied, T stage or grading. Patients with p65 nuclear positive biopsy specimens showed significantly a higher rate of lymph node metastasis (cN2c or cN3 status, P=.034). Within a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range, 2.33-62.96 months) OS, PFS, and DMFS were significantly poorer in the p65 nuclear positive group (P=.008, P=.027, and P=.008, respectively). These correlations remained significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: NF-κB/p65 nuclear expression is associated with increased lymphatic and hematogenous tumor dissemination and decreased survival in HNSCC patients treated with primary CRT. Our results may foster further investigation of a predictive relevance of NF-κB/p65 and its role as a suitable target for a molecular-based targeted therapy in HNSCC cancer.

  10. Impact of Weight Change During the Course of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy on Outcomes in Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Retrospective Analysis of 425 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Parlak, Cem; Selek, Ugur

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively investigated the impact of weight change (WC) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) on clinical outcomes of stage 3B non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 425 patients treated with C-CRT were included. All patients received 60 to 66 Gy of thoracic radiation therapy concurrently with 1 to 3 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy. Pre- and posttreatment weight measurements on first and last days of C-CRT were used for WC. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 = weight loss (WL); group 2 = weight preservation/gain (WP) for comparative analyses. Results: Following C-CRT, 252 patients (59.3%) experienced WL, while 89 patients (20.9%) and 84 patients (19.8%) showed WP or WG. At median 24.2 months of follow-up, 142 patients (33.4%) were alive (84 WP [48.6%] and 58 WL [23.0%]), and 58 (13.6%) of them were free of disease progression (41 [23.7%] for WP and 17 [6.7%] for WL). Median overall survival (OS), locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) for the entire population were 22.8, 14.4, 10.6, and 11.7 months, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between WP and WL cohorts revealed significantly superior OS, LRPFS, PFS, and DMFS in WP patients (P<.05 for each). On multivariate analyses, only WL and advanced T stage were associated with poor prognosis (P<.05). Conclusions: Present results in 425 stage 3B NSCLC patients demonstrated that WL during C-CRT is strongly associated with inferior survival outcomes compared to WP. This emerging finding might be useful by forming an encouraging basis for future investigations in facilitating a way to improve the outcomes of these patients experiencing WL during C-CRT.

  11. Robotic versus laparoscopic surgery for mid or low rectal cancer in male patients after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy: comparison of short-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Serin, Kursat Rahmi; Gultekin, Fatma Ayca; Batman, Burçin; Ay, Serden; Kapran, Yersu; Saglam, Sezer; Asoglu, Oktar

    2015-09-01

    The aim of our study was to compare short-term outcomes of robotic and laparoscopic sphincter-saving total mesorectal excision (TME) in male patients with mid-low rectal cancer (RC) after neadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT). The study was conducted as a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database, and we analyzed 14 robotic and 65 laparoscopic sphincter saving TME (R-TME and L-TME, respectively) performed by one surgeon between 2005 and 2013. Patient characteristics, perioperative recovery, postoperative complications and and pathology results were compared between the two groups. The patient characteristics did not differ significantly between the two groups. Median operating time was longer in the R-TME than in the L-TME group (182 min versus 140 min). Only two conversions occurred in the L-TME group. No difference was found between groups regarding perioperative recovery and postoperative complication rates. The median number of harvested lymph nodes was higher in the RTME than in the L-TME group (32 versus 23, p = 0.008). The median circumferential margin (CRM) was 10 mm in the R-TME group, 6.5 mm in the L-TME group (p = 0.047. The median distal resection margin (DRM) was 27.5 mm in the R-TME, 15 mm in the L-TME group (p = 0.014). Macroscopic grading of the specimen in the R-TME group was complete in all patients. In the L-TME group, grading was complete in 52 (80%) and incomplete in 13 (20%) cases (p = 0.109). R-TME is a safe and feasible procedure that facilitates performing of TME in male patients with mid-low RC after NCRT. PMID:26531198

  12. Complete Remission of Metastatic Neuroendocrine Paragastric Carcinoma After "Neoadjuvant" Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Matthias C; Uhrhan, Klara; Fischer, Thomas; Schmitz, Stephan; Markiefka, Birgid; Drzezga, Alexander; Stippel, Dirk

    2015-08-01

    A 48-year-old man presenting with upper abdominal pain was diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumor after biopsy of a paragastric mass with multiple liver metastases. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed intense uptake in the paragastric tumor and in multiple liver metastases not allowing primary surgery. Two cycles with cumulative 14.6 GBq (177)Lu-DOTATATE were given resulting in a considerable improvement. Subsequent surgery resulted in a complete remission as demonstrated by (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT. Usually, peptide receptor radionuclide (PRRT) therapy is considered a palliative treatment. Few patients demonstrate a very favorable response allowing resection of the primary tumor after downstaging metastatic disease burden. PMID:26053706

  13. A Randomized Trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01) Comparing Short Versus Protracted Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, John G.; Gillham, Charles M.; Dunne, Mary T.; Fitzpatrick, David A.; Finn, Marie A.; Cannon, Mairin E.; Taylor, Judy C.; O'Shea, Carmel M.; Buckney, Steven J.; Thirion, Pierre G.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the long-term outcomes of a randomized trial comparing short (4 months; Arm 1) and long (8 months; Arm 2) neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2001, 276 patients were enrolled and the data from 261 were analyzed. The stratification risk factors were prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, Gleason score {>=}7, and Stage T3 or more. The intermediate-risk stratum had one factor and the high-risk stratum had two or more. Staging was done from the bone scan and computed tomography findings. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure-free survival. Results: The median follow-up was 102 months. The overall survival, biochemical failure-free survival. and prostate cancer-specific survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms, overall or at 5 years. The cumulative probability of overall survival at 5 years was 90% (range, 87-92%) in Arm 1 and 83% (range, 80-86%) in Arm 2. The biochemical failure-free survival rate at 5 years was 66% (range, 62-71%) in Arm 1 and 63% (range, 58-67%) in Arm 2. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference was found in biochemical failure-free survival between 4 months and 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

  14. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In Ja; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Seon-Hahn; Oh, Seung Taek; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Woo Yong; Lee, Jung Bok; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits.

  15. Neoadjuvant intratumoral immuno-gene therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Predina, Jarrod D; Keating, Jane; Venegas, Ollin; Nims, Sarah; Singhal, Sunil

    2016-04-01

    Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) remains a deadly disease despite aggressive treatment protocols which incorporate chemotherapy, radiation and surgery. These traditional approaches have reached a plateau in therapeutic benefit. There is emerging evidence suggesting that immunotherapy can serve as an alternative treatment modality for NSCLC. Our group has nearly two decades of experience involving immuno-gene therapy with Ad.hIFN-α and Ad.hIFN-β in human mesothelioma trials, and has observed both safety and efficacy in treatment of Thoracic malignancies. We have expanded the scope of our work and have obtained encouraging pre-clinical evidence suggesting a role for immunotherapy as a surgical adjuvant for NSCLC cancers. By combining immunotherapy with surgery, synergistic results have been observed. Based on these observations, we have prepared a Phase I Clinical Trial that pairs Ad.hIFN-α with surgery for patients with resectable NSCLC. Patient enrollment is likely to begin in the Summer of 2016. We hope that this trial will serve as a platform for future trials aimed at pairing immunotherapy with surgery for patients diagnosed with NSCLC. PMID:27232513

  16. Successful surgical resection of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor post neoadjuvent therapy.

    PubMed

    Kamil, Sm; Biswas, M; Imran, Ak; Islam, R; Mukhtar, Aa; Joshi, Sc

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 48-year-old Indian male who presented with swelling and firmness in his left upper part of the abdomen of one month duration with anorexia and weight loss. Initial examination revealed an intra abdominal mass of around 16.8x11.0x24.5cm with minimal left sided pleural effusion. A biopsy from the mass confirmed the diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GISTs) as supported by immmunohistochemistry results which showed strong positivity for c-kit while stains for smooth muscle actin, desmin, myoglobin, S100 Protein and cytokerstin remained negative. The patient was not suitable for surgical intervention in view of advanced tumor, and Imatinib Mesylate 400mg daily was started with the aim of making the tumor operable. Such therapy lasted for twenty months and was tolerated well by the patient. It then resulted in gradual tumor regression, following which the patient underwent successful tumor resection. Post surgical resection patient had no radiological evidence of intra abdominal tumor but mild left sided pleural effusion with left lower lobe atelectasis. The patient had uneventful post operative recovery and he is currently on Imatinib mesylate and tolerating treatment well with mild skin rash. The experience with preoperative imatinib on surgical resection rates and post operative outcomes is limited especially with primary locally advanced GISTs. In our case successful surgical resection was possible for a huge locally advanced GIST with unusually prolonged treatment of twenty months with imatinib preoperatively. PMID:21483516

  17. Phase I/II study of neoadjuvant bevacizumab, erlotinib and 5-fluorouracil with concurrent external beam radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blaszkowsky, L. S.; Ryan, D. P.; Szymonifka, J.; Borger, D. R.; Zhu, A. X.; Clark, J. W.; Kwak, E. L.; Mamon, H. J.; Allen, J. N.; Vasudev, E.; Shellito, P. C.; Cusack, J. C.; Berger, D. L.; Hong, T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the maximal tolerated dose of erlotinib when added to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemoradiation and bevacizumab and safety and efficacy of this combination in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients and methods Patients with Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound defined T3 or T4 adenocarcinoma of the rectum and without evidence of metastatic disease were enrolled. Patients received infusional 5-FU 225 mg/M2/day continuously, along with bevacizumab 5 mg/kg days 14, 1, 15 and 29. Standard radiotherapy was administered to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Erlotinib started at a dose of 50 mg orally daily and advanced by 50 mg increments in the subsequent cohort. Open total mesorectal excision was carried out 6–9 weeks following the completion of chemoradiation. Results Thirty-two patients received one of three dose levels of erlotinib. Erlotinib dose level of 100 mg was determined to be the maximally tolerated dose. Thirty-one patients underwent resection of the primary tumor, one refused resection. Twenty-seven patients completed study therapy, all of whom underwent resection. At least one grade 3–4 toxicity occurred in 46.9% of patients. Grade 3–4 diarrhea occurred in 18.8%. The pathologic complete response (pCR) for all patients completing study therapy was 33%. With a median follow-up of 2.9 years, there are no documented local recurrences. Disease-free survival at 3 years is 75.5% (confidence interval: 55.1–87.6%). Conclusions Erlotinib added to infusional 5-FU, bevacizumab and radiation in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is relatively well tolerated and associated with an encouraging pCR. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00307736. PMID:24356623

  18. Failure to Achieve a PSA Level {<=}1 ng/mL After Neoadjuvant LHRHA Therapy Predicts for Lower Biochemical Control Rate and Overall Survival in Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darren M. McAleese, Jonathan; Park, Richard M.; Stewart, David P.; Stranex, Stephen; Eakin, Ruth L.; Houston, Russell F.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether failure to suppress the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to {<=}1 ng/mL after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy in patients scheduled to undergo external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate carcinoma is associated with reduced biochemical failure-free survival. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case note review of consecutive patients with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer treated between January 2001 and December 2002 with neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy, followed by concurrent hormonal therapy and radiotherapy was performed. Patient data were divided for analysis according to whether the PSA level in Week 1 of radiotherapy was {<=}1.0 ng/mL. Biochemical failure was determined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (Phoenix) definition. Results: A total of 119 patients were identified. The PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy was {<=}1 ng/mL in 67 patients and >1 ng/mL in 52. At a median follow-up of 49 months, the 4-year actuarial biochemical failure-free survival rate was 84% vs. 60% (p = 0.0016) in favor of the patients with a PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy of {<=}1 ng/mL. The overall survival rate was 94% vs. 77.5% (p = 0.0045), and the disease-specific survival rate at 4 years was 98.5% vs. 82.5%. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that patients with a PSA level >1 ng/mL at the beginning of external beam radiotherapy after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy have a significantly greater rate of biochemical failure and lower survival rate compared with those with a PSA level of {<=}1 ng/mL. Patients without adequate PSA suppression should be considered a higher risk group and considered for dose escalation or the use of novel treatments.

  19. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbour, Salma K.; Kim, Sinae; Haider, Syed A.; Xu, Xiaoting; Wu, Alson; Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph; Langenfeld, John; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes.

  20. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy With Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil (DCF-R) in Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Phase 2 Trial (KDOG 0501-P2)

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Katsuhiko; Komori, Shouko; Tanabe, Satoshi; Katada, Chikatoshi; Azuma, Mizutomo; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Sasaki, Tohru; Ishido, Kenji; Katada, Natsuya; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: A previous phase 1 study suggested that definitive chemoradiation therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DCF-R) is tolerable and active in patients with advanced esophageal cancer (AEC). This phase 2 study was designed to confirm the efficacy and toxicity of DCF-R in AEC. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously untreated thoracic AEC who had T4 tumors or M1 lymph node metastasis (M1 LYM), or both, received intravenous infusions of docetaxel (35 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and a continuous intravenous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 to 5, every 2 weeks, plus concurrent radiation. The total radiation dose was initially 61.2 Gy but was lowered to multiple-field irradiation with 50.4 Gy to decrease esophagitis and late toxicity. Consequently, the number of cycles of DCF administered during radiation therapy was reduced from 4 to 3. The primary endpoint was the clinical complete response (cCR) rate. Results: Characteristics of the 42 subjects were: median age, 62 years; performance status, 0 in 14, 1 in 25, 2 in 3; TNM classification, T4M0 in 20, non-T4M1LYM in 12, T4M1LYM in 10; total scheduled radiation dose: 61.2 Gy in 12, 50.4 Gy in 30. The cCR rate was 52.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37.3%-67.5%) overall, 33.3% in the 61.2-Gy group, and 60.0% in the 50.4-Gy group. The median progression-free survival was 11.1 months, and the median survival was 29.0 months with a survival rate of 43.9% at 3 years. Grade 3 or higher major toxicity consisted of leukopenia (71.4%), neutropenia (57.2%), anemia (16.7%), febrile neutropenia (38.1%), anorexia (31.0%), and esophagitis (28.6%). Conclusions: DCF-R frequently caused myelosuppression and esophagitis but was highly active and suggested to be a promising regimen in AEC. On the basis of efficacy and safety, a radiation dose of 50.4 Gy is recommended for further studies of DCF-R.

  1. FDG-PET/CT Imaging Predicts Histopathologic Treatment Responses after Neoadjuvant Therapy in Adult Primary Bone Sarcomas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Benz, Matthias R.; Czernin, Johannes; Tap, William D.; Eckardt, Jeffrey J.; Seeger, Leanne L.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.; Dry, Sarah M.; Phelps, Michael E.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Eilber, Fritz C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose . Tmore » he aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate whether FDG-PET allows an accurate assessment of histopathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment in adult patients with primary bone sarcomas. Methods . Twelve consecutive patients with resectable, primary high grade bone sarcomas were enrolled prospectively. FDG-PET/CT imaging was performed prior to the initiation and after completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic response. Results . Histopathologic responders showed significantly more pronounced decreases in tumor FDG-SUVmax from baseline to late follow up than non-responders ( 64 ± 19 % versus 29 ± 30 %, resp.; P = .03 ). Using a 60% decrease in tumor FDG-uptake as a threshold for metabolic response correctly classified 3 of 4 histopathologic responders and 7 of 8 histopathologic non-responders as metabolic responders and non-responders, respectively (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 88%). Conclusion . These results suggest that changes in FDG-SUVmax at the end of neoadjuvant treatment can identify histopathologic responders and non-responders in adult primary bone sarcoma patients.« less

  2. Factors Predictive of Protracted Course of Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated with Definitive Chemoradiation for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dominello, Michael; Morris, Robert; Miller, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a benefit to completing definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for cervical cancer within 56 days. However, many patients experience delays due to missed radiation treatments that prolong the overall course of therapy. In order to improve patient care, we performed a quality improvement project to determine factors predictive of protracted treatment and develop strategies to enable timely treatment completion. Methods  Seventy-one patients treated for cervical cancer with CRT were identified. Medical records were reviewed to gather demographic, clinical, and treatment data. Prolonged treatment was defined as >56 days per the American Brachytherapy Society guidelines. The following variables were evaluated using paired t-tests and univariate logistic regression: demographics, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) versus conventional radiation technique, use of a boost, time to stent placement, time to first brachytherapy (BT), and genitourinary (GU) or gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Results The median treatment length for all patients was 59 days. Factors associated with prolonged treatment were time to cervical stent placement (p=0.001), delay ≥2 days between final external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and initial BT (p=0.0195), any grade GU toxicity (p=0.0007), or GI toxicity (p=0.0002), and the presence of a boost (p=0.0006). Age, stage, and IMRT versus conventional technique were not associated with protracted treatment. Conclusion  In this series of patients, acute toxicity, increased time to cervical stent placement, and time to first BT treatment were associated with prolonged treatment time. The patients who completed treatment in ≤56 days had a lower average time to cervical stent placement, 27 versus 31 days. Our results suggest that cervical stent placement during week four of treatment can enhance patient care and improve outcomes.  PMID:27182472

  3. Prognostic Significance of Tumor Response as Assessed by Sequential {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography During Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Dongryul; Lee, Jeong Eun; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Nam, Heerim; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic role of metabolic response by the use of serial sets of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with cervical cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 60 patients who were treated with CCRT between February 2009 and December 2010 were analyzed. Three sequential PET/CT images were acquired for each patient: pre-CCRT, during-CCRT at 4 weeks of CCRT, and 1 month post-CCRT PET/CT. Metabolic responses were assessed qualitatively. The percentage changes in the maximum values of standardized uptake value (ΔSUV{sub max}%) from the PET/CT images acquired pre-CCRT and during-CCRT were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate whether ΔSUV{sub max}% could predict complete response (CR) on the post-CCRT PET/CT and to identify the best cutoff value. Prognostic factors of progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed. Results: During-CCRT PET/CT showed that 8 patients (13%) had CR, and the other 52 patients (87%) had partial response (PR). On the post-CCRT PET/CT, 43 patients (73%) had CR, 12 patients (20%) had PR, and 4 patients (7%) had progressive disease. The average SUV{sub max} in primary tumors was 16.3 (range, 6.4-53.0) on the pre-CCRT PET/CT images and 5.3 (range, 0-19.4) on the during-CCRT PET/CT images. According to ROC curve analysis, ΔSUV{sub max}% could predict CR response on post-CCRT PET/CT (P<.001, cutoff value of 59.7%). In all patients, the PFS rate was 71.9% at 2 years. Multivariate analysis showed that ΔSUV{sub max}% ≥60% (P=.045) and CR response on the post-CCRT PET/CT (P=.012) were statistically significant predictors of PFS. Conclusion: Metabolic responses on the during-CCRT images at 4 weeks of treatment and 1-month post-CCRT PET/CT images may predict treatment outcomes in patients with cervical cancer. ΔSUV{sub max}% ≥60% at 4 weeks of CCRT may predict CR response

  4. The Significance of Tumoral ERCC1 Status in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy: A Multicenter Clinicopathologic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, Corinne M.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Pintilie, Melania; Petrillo, Stephanie K.; Milosevic, Michael; Craighead, Peter S.; Clarke, Blaise; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Fyles, Anthony W.; Magliocco, Anthony M.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) expression has been shown to be a molecular marker of cisplatin resistance in many tumor sites, but has not been well studied in cervical cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to measure tumoral ERCC1 in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in a large multicenter cohort, and to correlate expression with clinical outcome parameters. Methods and Materials: A total of 264 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated with curative-intent radical CRT from 3 major Canadian cancer centers were evaluated. Pretreatment formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens were retrieved, and tissue microarrays were constructed. Tumoral ERCC1 (FL297 antibody) was measured using AQUA (R) technology. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the significance of clinical factors and ERCC1 status with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. Results: The majority of patients had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage II disease (n=119, 45%); median tumor size was 5 cm. OS was associated with tumor size (HR 1.16, P=.018), pretreatment hemoglobin status (HR 2.33, P=.00027), and FIGO stage. In addition, tumoral ERCC1 status (nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio) was associated with PFS (HR 2.33 [1.05-5.18], P=.038) and OS (HR 3.13 [1.27-7.71], P=.013). ERCC1 status was not significant on multivariate analysis when the model was adjusted for the clinical factors: for PFS (HR 1.49 [0.61-3.6], P=.38); for OS (HR 2.42 [0.94-6.24] P=.067). Conclusions: In this large multicenter cohort of locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with radical CRT, stage, tumor size, and pretreatment hemoglobin status were significantly associated with PFS and OS. ERCC1 status appears to have prognostic impact on univariate analysis in these patients, but was not independently associated with outcome on

  5. SU-C-BRA-04: Use of Esophageal Wall Thickness in Evaluation of the Response to Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Kligerman, S; Lu, W; Kang, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the esophageal cancer response to chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by measuring the esophageal wall thickness in CT. Method: Two datasets were used in this study. The first dataset is composed of CT scans of 15 esophageal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. The second dataset is composed of 20 esophageal cancer patients who underwent PET/CT scans before (Pre-CRT) and after CRT (Post-CRT). We first segmented the esophagus using a multi-atlas-based algorithm. The esophageal wall thickness was then computed, on each slice, as the equivalent circle radius of the segmented esophagus excluding the lumen. To evaluate the changes of wall thickness, we computed the standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (COV, SD/Mean), and flatness [(Max–Min)/Mean] of wall thickness along the entire esophagus. Results: For the first dataset, the mean wall thickness of cancer patients and normal controls were 6.35 mm and 6.03 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness of the wall thickness were 2.59, 0.21, and 1.27 for the cancer patients and 1.99, 0.16, and 1.13 for normal controls. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were identified in SD and flatness. For the second dataset, the mean wall thickness of pre-CRT and post-CRT patients was 7.13 mm and 6.84 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness were 1.81, 0.26, and 1.06 for pre-CRT and 1.69, 0.26, and 1.06 for post-CRT. Statistically significant difference was not identified for these measurements. Current results are based on the entire esophagus. We believe significant differences between pre- and post-CRT scans could be obtained, if we conduct the measurements at tumor sites. Conclusion: Results show thicker wall thickness in pre-CRT scans and differences in wall thickness changes between normal and abnormal esophagus. This demonstrated the potential of esophageal wall thickness as a marker in the tumor CRT response evaluation. This work was supported in part by

  6. Gender-based analysis of esophageal cancer patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiation: differences in presentation and therapy outcome.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, P R; Correa, A M; Swisher, S G; Wu, T T; Liao, Z; Komaki, R; Walsh, G L; Vaporciyan, A A; Lee, J H; Rice, D C; Roth, J A; Ajani, J A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify gender-dependent differences in presentation at baseline and therapy outcome in esophageal carcinoma patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CTRT). We stratified patients according to gender and statistically compared pretreatment clinical stage, post-CTRT effect on carcinoma in the resected specimen, overall survival (OS), and patterns of failure. Of the 235 patients who underwent preoperative CTRT, 203 were men and 32 were women. Carcinomas in women correlated significantly with clinical stage II classification (78%vs. 55%) while cancers in men correlated significantly with clinical stage III classification (39%vs. 16%; P = 0.02). Carcinomas in women also correlated significantly with lower clinical N classification; more women had cN0 (52%) compared to men (28%; P = 0.01). Similarly, in the surgical specimens, more women had pN0 (78%) compared to men (64%; P = 0.06). At a median follow-up of 37 months, 10% more women than men remain alive (63%vs. 53%; P = 0.3). Distant metastases-free survival time was longer for women than men. Our results suggest that localized esophageal carcinoma is diagnosed in more advanced stages in men than in women. The reasons for these differences remain unclear and further expansion of these observations and study of biologic differences that might exist are warranted. PMID:16722991

  7. Is Biochemical Response More Important Than Duration of Neoadjuvant Hormone Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer? An Analysis of the 3- Versus 8-Month Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Abraham; Crook, Juanita; Jones, Stuart; Malone, Shawn; Bowen, Julie; Truong, Pauline; Pai, Howard; Ludgate, Charles

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To ascertain whether biochemical response to neoadjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) before radiotherapy (RT), rather than duration, is the critical determinant of benefit in the multimodal treatment of localized prostate cancer, by comparing outcomes of subjects from the Canadian multicenter 3- vs 8-month trial with a pre-RT, post-hormone PSA (PRPH-PSA) <=0.1 ng/ml vs those >0.1 ng/ml. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2001, 378 men with localized prostate cancer were randomized to 3 or 8 months of neoadjuvant ADT before RT. On univariate analysis, survival indices were compared between those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml vs >0.1 ng/ml, for all patients and subgroups, including treatment arm, risk group, and gleason Score. Multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of outcome. Results: Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was significantly higher for those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (55.3% vs 49.4%, p = 0.014). No difference in survival indices was observed between treatment arms. There was no difference in bDFS between patients in the 3- and 8-month arms with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml nor those with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml. bDFS was significantly higher for high-risk patients with PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (57.0% vs 29.4%, p = 0.017). Multivariate analysis identified PRPH-PSA (p = 0.041), Gleason score (p = 0.001), initial PSA (p = 0.025), and T-stage (p = 0.003), not ADT duration, as independent predictors of outcome. Conclusion: Biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT before RT, not duration, appears to be the critical determinant of benefit in the setting of combined therapy. Individually tailored ADT duration based on PRPH-PSA would maximize therapeutic gain, while minimizing the duration of ADT and its related toxicities.

  8. Clinical outcomes in elderly patients with human papillomavirus–positive squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hanasoge, Sheela; Magliocca, Kelly R.; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Saba, Nabil F.; Wadsworth, J. Trad; El-Deiry, Mark W.; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Higgins, Kristin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefit of combined chemoradiation in elderly patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive locally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) must be balanced with the potential for higher toxicity rates. We performed a retrospective review of our institutional experience. Methods Patients 70 years or older with p16-positive oropharyngeal SCC treated with definitive chemoradiation from 2005 to 2013 were evaluated. Overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and locoregional failure–free survival were calculated. Results Twenty-one eligible patients had a follow-up of 22.4 months. Estimated 5-year OS, DFS, and locoregional failure–free survival were 76.0%, 40%, and 95%, respectively. There was 1 death from acute toxicity, and 50% had unplanned hospitalizations. Sixty percent had late toxicity, and 6-month feeding tube dependence was 25%. Conclusion Elderly patients with HPV-positive locally advanced SCC of the oropharynx treated with definitive chemoradiation had good OS but high rates of acute and long-term toxicity. PMID:25899391

  9. Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors and Residual Nodal Disease following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy without Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kandula, Shravan; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Harari, Saul; Fasola, Carolina; Mister, Donna; Yu, David S.; Zelnak, Amelia B.; Torres, Mylin A.

    2015-01-01

    Among breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy, locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates are unclear in women with ER+ tumors treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy without postmastectomy radiation (PMRT). To determine if PMRT is needed in these patients, we compared LRR rates of patients with ER+ tumors (treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy) with women who have non-ER+ tumors. 85 consecutive breast cancer patients (87 breast tumors) treated with NAC and mastectomy without PMRT were reviewed. Patients were divided by residual nodal disease (ypN) status (ypN+ versus ypN0) and then stratified by receptor subtype. Among ypN+ patients (n = 35), five-year LRR risk in patients with ER+, Her2+, and triple negative tumors was 5%, 33%, and 37%, respectively (p = 0.02). Among ypN+/ER+ patients, lymphovascular invasion and grade three disease increased the five-year LRR risk to 13% and 11%, respectively. Among ypN0 patients (n = 52), five-year LRR risk in patients with ER+, Her2+, and triple negative tumors was 7%, 22%, and 6%, respectively (p = 0.71). In women with ER+ tumors and residual nodal disease, endocrine therapy may be sufficient adjuvant treatment, except in patients with lymphovascular invasion or grade three tumors where PMRT may still be indicated. PMID:26266050

  10. Short- and Long-Term Quality of Life and Bowel Function in Patients With MRI-Defined, High-Risk, Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With an Intensified Neoadjuvant Strategy in the Randomized Phase 2 EXPERT-C Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Sclafani, Francesco; Peckitt, Clare; Cunningham, David; Tait, Diana; Giralt, Jordi; Glimelius, Bengt; Keränen, Susana Roselló; Bateman, Andrew; Hickish, Tamas; Tabernero, Josep; Thomas, Janet; Brown, Gina; Oates, Jacqueline; Chau, Ian

    2015-10-01

    Objective: Intensified preoperative treatments have been increasingly investigated in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), but limited data are available for the impact of these regimens on quality of life (QoL) and bowel function (BF). We assessed these outcome measures in EXPERT-C, a randomized phase 2 trial of neoadjuvant capecitabine combined with oxaliplatin (CAPOX), followed by chemoradiation therapy (CRT), total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant CAPOX with or without cetuximab in magnetic resonance imaging-defined, high-risk LARC. Methods and Materials: QoL was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 questionnaires. Bowel incontinence was assessed using the modified Fecal Incontinence Severity Index questionnaire. Results: Compared to baseline, QoL scores during preoperative treatment were better for symptoms associated with the primary tumor in the rectum (blood and mucus in stool, constipation, diarrhea, stool frequency, buttock pain) but worse for global health status, role functioning, and symptoms related to the specific safety profile of each treatment modality. During follow-up, improved emotional functioning and lessened anxiety and insomnia were observed, but deterioration of body image, increased urinary incontinence, less sexual interest (men), and increased impotence and dyspareunia were observed. Cetuximab was associated with a deterioration of global health status during neoadjuvant chemotherapy but did not have any long-term detrimental effect. An improvement in bowel continence was observed after preoperative treatment and 3 years after sphincter-sparing surgery. Conclusions: Intensifying neoadjuvant treatment by administering induction systemic chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy improves tumor-related symptoms and does not appear to have a significantly detrimental effect on QoL and BF, in both the short and the long term.

  11. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  12. Results of Neoadjuvant Short-Course Radiation Therapy Followed by Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery for T1-T2 N0 Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arezzo, Alberto; Arolfo, Simone; Allaix, Marco Ettore; Munoz, Fernando; Cassoni, Paola; Monagheddu, Chiara; Ricardi, Umberto; Ciccone, Giovannino; Morino, Mario

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess the short-term outcomes of neoadjuvant short-course radiation therapy (SCRT) followed by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) for T1-T2 N0 extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Recent studies suggest that neoadjuvant radiation therapy followed by TEM is safe and has results similar to those with abdominal rectal resection for the treatment of extraperitoneal early rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We planned a prospective pilot study including 25 consecutive patients with extraperitoneal T1-T2 N0 M0 rectal adenocarcinoma undergoing SCRT followed by TEM 4 to 10 weeks later (SCRT-TEM). Safety, efficacy, and acceptability of this treatment modality were compared with historical groups of patients with similar rectal cancer stage and treated with long-course radiation therapy (LCRT) followed by TEM (LCRT-TEM), TEM alone, or laparoscopic rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) at our institution. Results: The study was interrupted after 14 patients underwent SCRT of 25 Gy in 5 fractions followed by TEM. Median time between SCRT and TEM was 7 weeks (range: 4-10 weeks). Although no preoperative complications occurred, rectal suture dehiscence was observed in 7 patients (50%) at 4 weeks follow-up, associated with an enterocutaneous fistula in the sacral area in 2 cases. One patient required a colostomy. Quality of life at 1-month follow-up, according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 survey score, was significantly worse in SCRT-TEM patients than in LCRT-TEM patients (P=.0277) or TEM patients (P=.0004), whereas no differences were observed with TME patients (P=.604). At a median follow-up of 10 months (range: 6-26 months), we observed 1 (7%) local recurrence at 6 months that was treated with abdominoperineal resection. Conclusions: SCRT followed by TEM for T1-T2 N0 rectal cancer is burdened by a high rate of painful dehiscence of the suture line and enterocutaneous

  13. Comparison of risk of local-regional recurrence after mastectomy or breast conservation therapy for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation stratified according to a prognostic index score

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eugene H.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Chen, Allen M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hunt, Kelly K.; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A. . E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: We previously developed a prognostic index that stratified patients treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy into groups with different risks for local-regional recurrence (LRR). The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of LRR as a function of prognostic index score for patients treated with BCT or mastectomy plus radiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 815 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation. Patients were assigned an index score from 0 to 4 and given 1 point for the presence of each factor: clinical N2 to N3 disease, lymphovascular invasion, pathologic size >2 cm, and multifocal residual disease. Results: The 10-year LRR rates were very low and similar between the mastectomy and BCT groups for patients with an index score of 0 or 1. For patients with a score of 2, LRR trended lower for those treated with mastectomy vs. BCT (12% vs. 28%, p = 0.28). For patients with a score of 3 to 4, LRR was significantly lower for those treated with mastectomy vs. BCT (19% vs. 61%, p = 0.009). Conclusions: This analysis suggests that BCT can provide excellent local-regional treatment for the vast majority of patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For the few patients with a score of 3 to 4, LRR was >60% after BCT and was <20% with mastectomy. If these findings are confirmed in larger randomized studies, the prognostic index may be useful in helping to select the type of surgical treatment for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation.

  14. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended. PMID:27523418

  15. The Role of Chemoradiation for Patients with Resectable or Potentially Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kimple, Randall J.; Russo, Suzanne; Monjazeb, Arta; Blackstock, A. William

    2013-01-01

    Conflicting data and substantial controversy exist regarding optimal adjuvant treatment for those patients with resectable or potentially resectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Despite improvements in short-term surgical outcomes, the use of newer chemotherapeutic agents, development of targeted agents, and more precise delivery of radiation, the 5-year survival rates for early stage patients remains less than 25%. This article critically reviews the existing data for various adjuvant treatment approaches for patients with surgically resectable pancreatic cancer. Our review confirms that despite several randomized clinical trials, the optimal adjuvant treatment approach for these patients remains unclear. Summary Despite improvements in short-term surgical outcomes, use of newer chemotherapeutic agents, development of targeted agents, and more precise delivery of radiation, the 5-year survival rates for early stage patients remains less than 25%. Despite several randomized clinical trials in these patients, the optimal treatment approach remains unclear. We review data the data regarding adjuvant therapy for patients with early stage pancreas cancer and discuss potential tumor factors that can be used to select patients for optimal adjuvant therapy. The probability of long-term survival is higher in patients who undergo margin-negative resections but local and distant failures are common, indicating the need for adjuvant therapies. Improved systemic treatment is desperately needed and the role of adjuvant radiation remains unclear. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation is being studied as an alternative to postoperative therapy. Potential molecular targets have been identified and the benefit of the addition of biologic agents to adjuvant treatments is being explored. PMID:22500684

  16. Chemoradiation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rajarshi; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the exocrine pancreas has an annual incidence of 7,400 cases in the U.K. In comparison with other common cancers of solid organs, namely, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer has a high morbidity and mortality. Radical resection is possible in only 15%-20% of patients, and only 3%-4% of all patients presenting with this condition achieve long-term control and cure. Various strategies in the form of neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment have been employed over the years to improve outcome, with limited success. Systemic chemotherapy remains the gold standard in the metastatic setting in good performance status patients, and adjuvant chemotherapy after resection of localized and locally advanced cancer has been found to improve outcome. The role of radiotherapy, however, remains controversial and is an area that merits further investigation in well-conducted multicenter trials at various stages of the disease in combination with systemic agents and exploiting recent advances in the delivery of radiotherapy. In this article, we review the published literature on the use of chemoradiation as a modality in various stages of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and highlight areas that future trials in this field should target for a way forward in this malignancy. PMID:20203172

  17. Early Salvage Hormonal Therapy for Biochemical Failure Improved Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients After Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Plus Radiation Therapy-A Secondary Analysis of Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01

    SciTech Connect

    Mydin, Aminudin R.; Dunne, Mary T.; Finn, Marie A.; Armstrong, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival benefit of early vs late salvage hormonal therapy (HT), we performed a secondary analysis on patients who developed recurrence from Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01, a randomized trial comparing 4 vs 8 months neoadjuvant HT plus radiation therapy (RT) in intermediate- and high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients from the trial who recurred were analyzed at a median follow-up of 8.5 years. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the timing of salvage HT: 57 patients had prostate-specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 1, early), 21 patients had PSA >10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 2, late), and 24 patients had distant metastases (group 3, late). The endpoint analyzed was overall survival (OS) calculated from 2 different time points: date of enrolment in the trial (OS1) and date of initiation of salvage HT (OS2). Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and a Cox regression model. Results: The OS1 differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS1 at 10 years was 78% in group 1, 42% in group 2, and 29% in group 3. The OS2 also differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS2 at 6 years was 70% in group 1, 47% in group 2, and 22% in group 3. Group 1 had the longest median time from end of RT to biochemical failure compared with groups 2 and 3 (3.3, 0.9, and 1.7 years, respectively; P<.0005). Group 1 also had the longest median PSA doubling time compared with groups 2 and 3 (9.9, 3.6, and 2.4 months, respectively; P<.0005). On multivariate analysis, timing of salvage HT, time from end of RT to biochemical failure, and PSA nadir on salvage HT were significant predictors of survival. Conclusion: Early salvage HT based on PSA {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases improved survival in patients with prostate cancer after failure of initial treatment with neoadjuvant HT plus RT.

  18. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arbea, Leire; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Moreno, Marta; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Ramos, Luis Isaac; Subtil, Jose Carlos; Nunez, Jorge; Chopitea, Ana; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Aristu, Javier

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96-100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  19. Long-term Follow-up Results of a Multi-institutional Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in East and Southeast Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Thephamongkhol, Kullathorn; Chansilpa, Yaowalak; Cao, Jianping; Xu, Xiaoting; Devi, C. R. Beena; Swee, Tang Tieng; Calaguas, Miriam J.C.; Reyes, Rey H. de los; Cho, Chul-Koo; Dung, To Anh; Supriana, Nana; Erawati, Dyah; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term survival and toxicity of a multi-institutional phase 2 study of concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. Methods and Materials: Ten institutions from 8 Asian countries participated in the study. Between April 2003 and March 2006, 120 patients (60 with bulky stage IIB and 60 with stage IIIB) were treated with CCRT. Radiation therapy consisted of pelvic external beam radiation therapy and either high-dose-rate or low-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Five cycles of weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) were administered during the course of radiation therapy. Treatment results were evaluated by the rates of local control, overall survival, and late toxicities. Results: Median follow-up was 63.7 months, and the follow-up rate at 5 years was 98%. The 5-year local control and overall survival rates for all patients were 76.8% and 55.1%, respectively. The 5-year rates of major late toxicities of the rectum and bladder were 7.9% and 0%, respectively. Conclusions: The long-term results have suggested that CCRT is safe and effective for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. However, further efforts are needed to improve overall survival.

  20. Current strategies in chemoradiation for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has an important role in the treatment of esophageal cancer in both the inoperable and the pre-operative settings. Pre-operative chemoradiation therapy is generally given to 41.4-50.4 Gy with platinum or paclitaxel based chemotherapy. The most common definitive dose in the U.S. is 50-50.4 Gy. New advances in CRT for esophageal cancer have come from looking for ways to minimize toxicity and maximize efficacy. Recent investigations for minimizing toxicity have focused advanced radiation techniques such as IMRT and proton therapy, have sought to further define normal tissue tolerances, and have examined the use of tighter fields with less elective clinical target volume coverage. Efforts to maximize efficacy have included the use of early positron emission tomography (PET) response directed therapy, molecularly targeted therapies, and the use of tumor markers that predict response. PMID:24982764

  1. The status of targeted agents in the setting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hadaki, Maher; Harrison, Mark

    2013-01-01

    or even molecular imaging. These shortcomings probably explain our current relative lack of success in the arena of combining these agents with chemoradiation. PMID:23997939

  2. The status of targeted agents in the setting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Hadaki, Maher; Harrison, Mark

    2013-09-01

    even molecular imaging. These shortcomings probably explain our current relative lack of success in the arena of combining these agents with chemoradiation. PMID:23997939

  3. Clinical impact of neoadjuvant treatment in resectable pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-chan; Ahn, Soyeon; Paik, Kyu-hyun; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Kang, Jingu; Kim, Jaihwan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although the only curative strategy for pancreatic cancer is surgical resection, up to 85% of patients relapse after surgery. The efficacy of neoadjuvant treatment in resectable pancreatic cancer (RPC) remains unclear and there is no systematic review focusing fully on this issue. Recently, two prospective trials of neoadjuvant treatment in RPC were terminated early because of slow recruiting and existing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have too small sample sizes. Therefore, to overcome probable biases, it would be more reasonable to include both RCTs and non-randomised studies (NRSs) with selected criteria. This review aims to investigate the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CTx) and chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in RPC using RCTs and specific NRSs. Method and analysis This systematic review will include conventional RCTs as group I, and quasi-randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials and prospective cohort studies as group II. Two groups will be assessed and analysed separately. Comprehensive literature search will use Medline, Embase, Cochrane library and Scopus databases. Additionally, we will search references from relevant studies and abstracts from major conferences. Two authors will independently identify, screen, include studies, extract data and assess the risk of bias. Discrepancies will be resolved by consensus with another author. An independent methodologist will categorise and assess NRSs to minimise heterogeneity. In each study group, meta-analysis will be conducted using a random-effect model and statistical heterogeneity will be evaluated using I2-statistics. Publication bias will be visualised with contour-enhanced funnel plots and analysed with Egger's test. In group I, cumulative meta-analysis will be considered because the CTx regimen and CRT protocol have changed. The quality of evidence will be summarised using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach

  4. Relationship between prostate volume changes and treatment duration of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation during intensity-modulated radiation therapy for Japanese patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tomida, Masashi; Okudaira, Kuniyasu; Kamomae, Takeshi; Oguchi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Yoshikazu; Yoneda, Kazuo; Itoh, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The application of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (NAD) in prostate cancer leads to a reduction in prostate volume, and the trends in volume reduction differ according to the treatment duration of NAD. A reduction in volume during external beam radiation therapy may lead to the exposure of normal tissues to an unexpected dose. In fact, prostate volume reductions have primarily been reported in European and American institutions. Although the prostate volume of Japanese patients is known to be small, the trends in prostate volume change during radiation therapy remain unclear. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the changes in prostate volume of Japanese patients during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with NAD. Nineteen Japanese patients with prostate cancer underwent IMRT with NAD. Kilovoltage computed tomography (CT) images were obtained for treatment planning and verification of the treatment position for each treatment fraction. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the duration of NAD, as follows: NAD < 3 months (short NAD: S-NAD), 3 months ≤ NAD < 6 months (middle NAD: M-NAD), and NAD ≥ 6 months (long NAD: L-NAD). The prostate volume reductions at the 36th treatment fraction, relative to the planning CT, were 7.8%, 2.0%, and 1.7% for the S-NAD, M-NAD, and L-NAD groups, respectively. Prostate volume shrunk greater in the S-NAD group than in the M-NAD and L-NAD groups; this finding was consistent with those of previous studies. The prostate volume changes in Japanese patients were smaller compared to those in European and American patients. PMID:27578915

  5. Relationship between prostate volume changes and treatment duration of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation during intensity-modulated radiation therapy for Japanese patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tomida, Masashi; Okudaira, Kuniyasu; Kamomae, Takeshi; Oguchi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Yoshikazu; Yoneda, Kazuo; Itoh, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    The application of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (NAD) in prostate cancer leads to a reduction in prostate volume, and the trends in volume reduction differ according to the treatment duration of NAD. A reduction in volume during external beam radiation therapy may lead to the exposure of normal tissues to an unexpected dose. In fact, prostate volume reductions have primarily been reported in European and American institutions. Although the prostate volume of Japanese patients is known to be small, the trends in prostate volume change during radiation therapy remain unclear. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the changes in prostate volume of Japanese patients during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with NAD. Nineteen Japanese patients with prostate cancer underwent IMRT with NAD. Kilovoltage computed tomography (CT) images were obtained for treatment planning and verification of the treatment position for each treatment fraction. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the duration of NAD, as follows: NAD < 3 months (short NAD: S-NAD), 3 months ≤ NAD < 6 months (middle NAD: M-NAD), and NAD ≥ 6 months (long NAD: L-NAD). The prostate volume reductions at the 36th treatment fraction, relative to the planning CT, were 7.8%, 2.0%, and 1.7% for the S-NAD, M-NAD, and L-NAD groups, respectively. Prostate volume shrunk greater in the S-NAD group than in the M-NAD and L-NAD groups; this finding was consistent with those of previous studies. The prostate volume changes in Japanese patients were smaller compared to those in European and American patients. PMID:27578915

  6. Phase 2 Study of Temozolomide-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for High-Risk Low-Grade Gliomas: Preliminary Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0424

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Barbara J.; Hu, Chen; Macdonald, David R.; Lesser, Glenn J.; Coons, Stephen W.; Brachman, David G.; Ryu, Samuel; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Liu, Junfeng; Chakravarti, Arnab; Mehta, Minesh

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0424 was a phase 2 study of a high-risk low-grade glioma (LGG) population who were treated with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), and outcomes were compared to those of historical controls. This study was designed to detect a 43% increase in median survival time (MST) from 40.5 to 57.9 months and a 20% improvement in 3-year overall survival (OS) rate from 54% to 65% at a 10% significance level (1-sided) and 96% power. Methods and Materials: Patients with LGGs with 3 or more risk factors for recurrence (age ≥40 years, astrocytoma histology, bihemispherical tumor, preoperative tumor diameter of ≥6 cm, or a preoperative neurological function status of >1) were treated with RT (54 Gy in 30 fractions) and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Results: From 2005 to 2009, 129 evaluable patients (75 males and 54 females) were accrued. Median age was 49 years; 91% had a Zubrod score of 0 or 1; and 69%, 25%, and 6% of patients had 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. Patients had median and minimum follow-up examinations of 4.1 years and 3 years, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 73.1% (95% confidence interval: 65.3%-80.8%), which was significantly improved compared to that of prespecified historical control values (P<.001). Median survival time has not yet been reached. Three-year progression-free survival was 59.2%. Grades 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 43% and 10% of patients, respectively. One patient died of herpes encephalitis. Conclusions: The 3-year OS rate of 73.1% for RTOG 0424 high-risk LGG patients is higher than that reported for historical controls (P<.001) and the study-hypothesized rate of 65%.

  7. Hemoglobin levels do not predict biochemical outcome for localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy and external-beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Howard Huaihan . E-mail: hpai@bccancer.bc.ca; Ludgate, Charles; Pickles, Tom; Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc.; Agranovich, Alex; Berthelet, Eric; Duncan, Graeme; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Kwan, Winkle; Lim, Jan; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether hemoglobin (Hb) levels affect outcome in men with localized prostate adenocarcinoma (LPA) treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy (NAST) and external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 563 men with LPA treated with NAST (median: 5.3 months) and EBRT who had Hb levels during treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables, including the following Hb variables, were subjected to univariate and multivariable analyses to identify factors that predict biochemical control (bNED) and overall survival (OS): pre-EBRT Hb, Hb nadir during EBRT, and change in Hb from pre-EBRT to nadir during EBRT. Results: Median PSA follow-up was 4.25 years. Forty-nine percent of men were anemic during EBRT, with a median Hb of 13.4 g/dL, and 68% experienced a decline in Hb from pre-EBRT to during EBRT of median 0.6 g/dL. Five-year Nadir + 2 bNED and OS rates were similar for anemic and nonanemic patients during EBRT. High percent-positive biopsies, PSA and Gleason score, and use of AA monotherapy predicted worse bNED. High stage and age predicted worse OS. Hb variables were not predictive of bNED or OS. Conclusions: Anemia is a common side effect of NAST and is usually mild. Hb levels, however, do not predict biochemical control or survival.

  8. ER-Poor and HER2-Positive: A Potential Subtype of Breast Cancer to Avoid Axillary Dissection in Node Positive Patients after Neoadjuvant Chemo-Trastuzumab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Can-ming; Hu, Zhen; Hou, Yi-feng; Di, Gen-hong; Wu, Jiong; Shen, Zhen-zhou; Shao, Zhi-ming; Liu, Guang-yu

    2014-01-01

    evaluation after effective downstaging by neoadjuvant chemo-trastuzumab therapy. PMID:25504233

  9. Disentangling the aneuploidy and senescence paradoxes: a study of triploid breast cancers non-responsive to neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Gerashchenko, B I; Salmina, K; Eglitis, J; Huna, A; Grjunberga, V; Erenpreisa, J

    2016-04-01

    Aneuploid cells should have a reduced proliferation rate due to difficulty in proceeding through mitosis. However, contrary to this, high aneuploidy is associated with aggressive tumour growth and poor survival prognosis, in particular in triploid breast cancer. A further paradox revolves around the observation that, while cell senescence should inhibit proliferation, the senescence marker p16INK4a correlates with poor treatment outcome in patients with a very aggressive triple-negative breast carcinoma (TNBC). In this study, we aim to pour light on the possible relationship of these conundrums with polyploidy of tumour cells. We performed detailed analysis of DNA histogram profiles in diagnostic core biopsies of 30 cases of operable breast cancer and found that near triploidy in TNBC and other forms correlated with weak or no response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) as scored by Miller-Payne index. Polyploid cells in operation samples from tumours that were non-responsive to NAC treatment were Ki67 and CD44 positive. In addition, polyploid cells were positive for markers of embryonic stemness (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG) and senescence (p16INK4a). The relationship patterns between p16INK4a and NANOG were heterogeneous, with predominantly mutually exclusive expression but also synergistic and intermediate variants in the same samples. We conclude that the aneuploidy and senescence paradoxes can be explained by the mutual platform of polyploidy, conferring genomic and epigenetic instability as a survival advantage. Such cells are able to bypass aneuploidy restrictions of conventional mitosis and overcome the barrier of senescence by a shift to self-renewal, resulting in progression of cancer. PMID:26860864

  10. Extended Intervals after Neoadjuvant Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: The Key to Improved Tumor Response and Potential Organ Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Christian P; Becerra, Adan Z; Aquina, Christopher T; Tejani, Mohamedtaki A; Wexner, Steven D; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Remzi, Feza H; Dietz, David W; Monson, John RT; Fleming, Fergal J

    2016-01-01

    Background Many rectal cancer patients experience tumor downstaging and some are found to achieve a pathological complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT). Previous data suggest that there is an association between the time interval from nCRT completion to surgery and tumor response rates, including pCR. However, these studies have been primarily from single institutions with small sample sizes. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between a longer interval after nCRT and pCR in a nationally representative cohort of rectal cancer patients. Study Design Clinical stage II–III rectal cancer patients undergoing nCRT with a documented surgical resection were selected from the 2006 – 2011 National Cancer Data Base. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between nCRT-surgery interval time (<6 weeks, 6–8 weeks, >8 weeks) and the odds of pCR. The relationship between nCRT-surgery interval, surgical morbidity, and tumor downstaging was also examined. Results Overall, 17,255 patients met the inclusion criteria. A nCRT-surgery interval time >8 weeks was associated with higher odds of pCR (OR=1.12, 95%CI=1.01–1.25) and tumor downstaging (OR=1.11, 95%CI =1.02–1.25). The longer time delay was also associated with lower odds of 30-day readmission (OR=0.82, 95%CI: 0.70–0.92). Conclusions A nCRT-surgery interval time >8 weeks results in increased odds of pCR with no evidence of associated increased surgical complications compared to 6–8 weeks. This data supports the implementation of a lengthened interval after nCRT to optimize the chances of pCR and perhaps add to the possibility of ultimate organ preservation (non-operative management). PMID:26206642

  11. Response to Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Breast Cancer in BRCA Mutation Carriers and Noncarriers: A Single-Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Banu; Bayraktar, Soley; Liu, Diane D.; Gutierrez Barrera, Angelica M.; Atchley, Deann; Pusztai, Lajos; Litton, Jennifer Keating; Valero, Vicente; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Albarracin, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate and relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) after neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy (NST) in patients with breast cancer with and without deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Patients and Methods A total of 317 women who underwent BRCA genetic testing and were treated with NST for breast cancer between 1997 and 2009 were included in the study. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to estimate RFS and OS rates. Logistic regression models were fit to determine the associations between BRCA status, pCR, and survival. Results Fifty-seven (18%) and 23 (7%) patients had BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Twenty-six (46%) of 57 BRCA1 carriers achieved a pCR, compared with three (13%) of 23 BRCA2 carriers and 53 (22%) of 237 BRCA noncarriers (P < .001). In the multivariate logistic model, BRCA1 status (odds ratio [OR] = 3.16; 95% CI, 1.55 to 6.42; P = .002), estrogen receptor (ER) negativity (OR = 1.96; 95% CI:1.05 to 3.65; P = .03) and concurrent trastuzumab use (OR = 4.18; 95% CI, 2.04 to 8.57; P < .001) remained as independent significant predictors for a pCR. At a median follow-up of 3.2 years, 69 patients (22%) experienced a disease recurrence or death. No significant differences were noted in survival outcomes with respect to BRCA status and type of NST received. However, among BRCA1 carriers, patients who achieved a pCR had better 5-year RFS (P = .001) and OS (P = .01) rates than patients who did not. Conclusion BRCA1 status and ER negativity are independently associated with higher pCR rates in patients with breast cancer. Overall prognosis of breast cancer in BRCA carriers is similar to sporadic breast cancers. PMID:21900106

  12. Surgical downstaging and neo-adjuvant therapy in metastatic colorectal carcinoma with irinotecan drug-eluting beads: a multi-institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Matthew; Metzger, Tiffany; Robbins, Ken; Tomalty, Dana; Válek, Vlatimil; Boudný, Jean; Andrasina, Tomas; Tatum, Cliff; Martin, Robert CG

    2010-01-01

    Background: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for potentially resectable metastatic colorectal cancer (MCC) is becoming a more common treatment algorithm. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of precision hepatic arterial Irinotecan therapy in unresectable MCC. Methods: An open-label, multi-centre, multi-national single arm study of MCC patients, who received hepatic arterial irinotecan. Primary endpoints were safety, tolerance and metastatic tumour resection. Results: Fifty-five patients with metastatic colorectal to the liver underwent a total of 90 hepatic arterial irinotecan treatments. The extent of liver involvement was <25% in 75% of the patients (n= 41), between 26 and 50% in 15% of the patients (n= 11) and >50% in 10% of the patients (n= 24). The median number of hepatic lesions was four (range 1–20), with a median total size of all target lesions of 9 cm (range 5.5–28 cm) with 50% of patients having bilobar tumour distribution. The median number of irinotecan treatments was two (range 1–5). The median treatment dose was 100 mg (range 100–200) with a median total hepatic treatment of 200 mg (range 200–650). The majority of treatments (86%) were performed as lobar infusion treatments, and 30% of patients were treated with concurrent simultaneous chemotherapy. Eleven (20%) patients demonstrated significant response and downstage of their disease or demonstrated stable disease without extra-hepatic disease progression allowing resection, ablation or resection and ablation. There were no post-operative deaths. Post-operative complications morbidity occurred in 18% of patients, with none of them hepatic related. Non-tumorous liver resected demonstrated no evidence of steatohepatitis from the irinotecan arterial infusion. Conclusions: Hepatic arterial infusion irinotecan drug-eluting beads is safe and effective in pre-surgical therapy and helpful in evaluating the biology of metastatic colorectal cancer to the liver prior to planned hepatic

  13. Phase II Study of the Addition of Bevacizumab to Standard Chemoradiation for Loco-regionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Trial 0615

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy Y.; Zhang, Ed; Pfister, David. G.; Kim, John; Garden, Adam. S.; Mechalakos, James; Hu, Kenneth; Le, Quynh T.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Ang, K. Kian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to improve the outcomes for loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by testing the feasibility/safety of adding bevacizumab to chemoradiation. Patients/Methods Eligible patients with ≥T2b and/or positive node(s) were prescribed 3 cycles of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) and cisplatin (100 mg/m2) both given on days 1, 22, and 43 of radiation (70 Gy) using IMRT delivered over 33 days on a daily basis, Monday through Friday. This is followed by 3 cycles of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg), cisplatin (80 mg/m2) both were given on days 64, 85, and 106 and fluorouracil (1000 mg/m2/d) on days 64–67, 85–88, 106–109 after radiation. The primary endpoint was to evaluate the safety of the addition of bevacizumab to chemoradiation, specifically looking at treatment-related Grade 4 hemorrhage and/or any Grade 5 adverse event in the first year. Toxicity during and after treatment were collected along with tumor control endpoints. The analysis was done per protocol. This protocol has completed its target accrual. Results There were a total of 46 patients enrolled in this study of whom 44 patients were eligible for analysis. No grade 3–4 hemorrhage or grade 5 adverse events were observed; 9 patients (20.5%) experienced grade 1–2 hemorrhage. Grade 4 adverse events were experienced by the following numbers of patients: leukopenia NOS – 6; lymphopenia – 5; neutrophil count – 5; pharyngolaryngeal pain – 2; hemoglobin – 1; infection with grade 3–4 neutrophils (blood) – 1; infection with grade 3–4 neutrophils [skin (cellulitis)] – 1; tinnitus – 1; thrombosis – 1; radiation mucositis – 1. The most common grade 3 adverse events were radiation mucositis – 33; dysphagia – 25; and mucositis/stomatitis (clinical exam) (pharynx) – 15. Two patients experienced late grade 3 xerostomia. Other late grade 3 adverse events were: dysphagia – 5; hearing impaired – 3; neuralgia NOS – 2; constitutional symptoms (other) – 1; dehydration

  14. Combined Chemoradiation Therapy With Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin for Organ Preservation in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase 1 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Azria, David; Riou, Olivier; Rebillard, Xavier; Thezenas, Simon; Thuret, Rodolphe; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Pouessel, Damien; Culine, Stephane

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concomitant treatment with radiation therapy and cisplatin (CDDP) remains the gold standard for bladder preservation in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We present the long-term results of a phase 1 clinical trial to assess the association of twice-weekly gemcitabine with CDDP and radiation therapy in this setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with pT2-pT4N0M0 MIBC without hydronephrosis or diffuse carcinoma in situ were enrolled in this study. After maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor, patients received concomitant radiation therapy (63 Gy in 1.8 fractions) and chemotherapy (CDDP 20 mg/m²/day over 4 days every 21 days and gemcitabine twice a week). The starting dose of gemcitabine was 15 mg/m² with dose escalation to 20, 25, and 30 mg/m². The primary endpoint was the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Secondary endpoints included toxicity and tumor control. Results: Fourteen patients were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 2 patients treated with 30 mg/m² gemcitabine (grade 4 thrombocytopenia and severe impairment of World Health Organization performance status, respectively). Nine patients received the complete chemoradiation therapy protocol. The recommended dose of gemcitabine was 25 mg/m². The median follow-up time was 53 months, and the overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rates were 62% and 77%, respectively. Among the patients who received the complete treatment, bladder-intact survival was 76% at 5 years, and the median overall survival was 69.6 months. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated. The gemcitabine MTD was 25 mg/m². Bladder preservation and disease control were promising. A multicenter phase 2 randomized trial is ongoing.

  15. Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, Tse-Kuan

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were {<=}40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

  16. A Phase I study of weekly intravenous oxaliplatin in combination with oral daily capecitabine and radiation therapy in the neoadjuvant treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Marwan G. . E-mail: marwan.fakih@roswellpark.org; Rajput, Ashwani; Yang, Gary Y.; Pendyala, Lakshmi; Toth, Karoly; Smith, Judy L.; Lawrence, David D.; Rustum, Youcef M.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: We conducted a Phase I study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of neoadjuvant capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy (RT) in Stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Capecitabine was given orally twice daily Monday through Friday concurrently with RT. Oxaliplatin was given i.v. once weekly x 5 (for 5 weeks) starting the first day of RT. RT was given daily except on weekends and holidays at 1.8 Gy per fraction x 28. Escalation for capecitabine or oxaliplatin was to occur in cohorts of three patients until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined. Endorectal tumor biopsy samples were obtained before and on Day 3 of treatment to explore the effects of treatment on thymidine phosphorylase, thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled on this study. Two of 6 patients at dose level (DL) 1 (capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally (p.o.) given twice daily (b.i.d.); oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) had a dose-limiting diarrhea. One of 6 patients at DL (-)1 (capecitabine 725 mg/m{sup 2} p.o., b.i.d.; oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) experienced-dose-limiting diarrhea. Three of 11 patients who underwent resection had a complete pathologic response. No remarkable variations in rectal tumor biologic endpoints were noted on Day 3 of treatment in comparison to baseline. However, a higher apotosis index was observed at baseline and on Day 3 in complete pathologic responders (no statistical analysis performed). Conclusions: Capecitabine 725 mg/m{sup 2} p.o., twice daily in combination with oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week and RT 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions is the recommended dose for future studies.

  17. Prostate Stem Cell Antigen Expression in Radical Prostatectomy Specimens Predicts Early Biochemical Recurrence in Patients with High Risk Prostate Cancer Receiving Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Han; Park, Weon Seo; Kim, Sun Ho; Park, Boram; Joo, Jungnam; Lee, Geon Kook; Joung, Jae Young; Seo, Ho Kyung; Chung, Jinsoo; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify tissue biomarkers that predict early biochemical recurrence (BCR) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PC), toward the goal of increasing the benefits of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT). In 2005-2012, prostatectomy specimens were collected from 134 PC patients who had received NHT and radical prostatectomy. The expression of 13 tissue biomarkers was assessed in the specimens via immunohistochemistry. Time to BCR and factors predictive of BCR were determined by using the Cox proportional hazards model. During the follow-up period (median, 57.5 months), 67 (50.0%) patients experienced BCR. Four (3.0%) patients were tumor-free in the final pathology assessment, and 101 (75.4%) had negative resection margins. Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) was the only significant prognostic tissue biomarker of BCR [hazard ratio (HR), 2.58; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-6.27; p = 0.037] in a multivariable analysis adjusted by the clinicopathological variables that also significantly predicted BCR; these were seminal vesicle invasion (HR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.32-4.34), initial prostate serum antigen level (HR 1.01; 95% CI, 1.001-1.020), prostate size (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.90-0.97), and the Gleason score of preoperative biopsies (HR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.01-1.79). We suggest that PSCA is a useful tissue marker for predicting BCR in patients with high risk PC receiving NHT and radical prostatectomy. PMID:26982980

  18. Esophagectomy Compared to Chemoradiation for Early Stage Esophageal Cancer in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Julian A.; Buono, Donna L.; Strauss, Joshua; McBride, Russell B.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2009-01-01

    Background Esophagectomy has been the traditional treatment of choice for early stage esophageal cancer. However, esophagectomy is associated with high mortality and morbidity in the elderly, and these patients often receive chemoradiation instead. We compared outcomes of esophagectomy versus chemoradiation in a population-based sample of elderly patients with early stage esophageal cancer. Methods We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify patients ≥65 years diagnosed with stage 1 or 2 esophageal cancer from 1991–2002. We assessed associations of treatment with esophagectomy or chemoradiation with demographic and clinical variables. We performed survival analyses to compare outcomes with treatment modality, adjusted for potential confounders. Results We identified 730 patients with stage 1 or 2 esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy (n=341; 46.7%) or chemoradiation (n=389, 53.3%). Older age, squamous cell histology, and lower socioeconomic status were associated with increased odds of receipt of chemoradiation. In multivariable analyses, chemoradiation was associated with worse disease-specific (HR 2.08, 95%CI 1.64–2.64) and overall survival (HR 1.92, 95%CI 1.58–2.34). Receipt of chemoradiation was associated with worse survival for adenocarcinoma (HR 3.01, 95%CI 2.24–4.04), but there was no significant difference for squamous cell (HR 1.33, 95%CI 0.98–1.80). Conclusion Compared to chemoradiation, esophagectomy may be associated with improved survival for early stage esophageal cancer in the elderly. The results suggest that there may also be a subset of squamous cell patients for whom chemoradiation is adequate therapy. A randomized trial would be useful to determine optimal treatment for elderly patients with early stage esophageal cancer. PMID:19637343

  19. The Role of Dual-Time Combined 18-Fluorideoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography in the Staging and Restaging Workup of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer, Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Capirci, Carlo Rubello, Domenico; Pasini, Felice; Galeotti, Fabrizio; Bianchini, Enzo; Del Favero, Giuseppe; Panzavolta, Riccardo; Crepaldi, Giorgio; Rampin, Lucia; Facci, Enzo; Gava, Marcello; Banti, Elena; Marano, Gianfranco

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: In patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) staging and, after preoperative chemo-radiation therapy (CRT), restaging workup could be useful to tailor therapeutic approaches. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG-PET) is a promising tool for monitoring the effect of antitumor therapy. This study was aimed to evaluate the possible role of dual time sequential FDG-PET scans in the staging and restaging workup of LARC. Methods and Materials: Eighty-seven consecutive patients with LARC were enrolled. CRT consisted of external-beam intensified radiotherapy (concurrent boost), with concomitant chemotherapy PVI 5-FU (300mg/m{sup 2}/day) followed 8-10 weeks later by surgery. All patients underwent [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT before and 5-6 weeks later after the completion of CRT. Measurements of FDG uptake (SUV{sub max}), and percentage of SUV{sub max} difference (Response Index = RI) between pre- and post-CRT [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET scans were evaluated. Results: Six of 87 patients were excluded due to protocol deviation. Following CRT, 40/81 patients (49%) were classified as responders according to Mandard's criteria (TRG1-2). The mean pre-CRT SUV{sub max} was significantly higher than post-CRT (15.8, vs 5.9; p < 0.001). The mean RI was significantly higher in responders than in nonresponder patients (71.3% vs 38%; p = 0.0038). Using a RI cut-off of 65% for defining response to therapy, the following parameters have been obtained: 84.5% sensitivity, 80% specificity, 81.4% positive predictive value, 84.2% negative predictive value, and 81% overall accuracy. Conclusion: These results suggest the potential role of [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET in the restaging workup after preoperative CRT in LARC. RI seems the best predictor to identify CRT response.

  20. Sequential FDG-PET and induction chemotherapy in locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the Oesophago-gastric junction (AEG): The Heidelberg Imaging program in Cancer of the oesophago-gastric junction during Neoadjuvant treatment: HICON trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET (18F-FDG-PET) can be used for early response assessment in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the oesophagogastric junction (AEG) undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. It has been recently shown in the MUNICON trials that response-guided treatment algorithms based on early changes of the FDG tumor uptake detected by PET are feasible and that they can be implemented into clinical practice. Only 40%-50% of the patients respond metabolically to therapy. As metabolic non-response is known to be associated with a dismal prognosis, metabolic non-responders are increasingly treated with alternative neoadjuvant chemotherapies or chemoradiation in order to improve their clinical outcome. We plan to investigate whether PET can be used as response assessment during radiochemotherapy given as salvage treatment in early metabolic non-responders to standard chemotherapy. Methods/Design The HICON trial is a prospective, non-randomized, explorative imaging study evaluating the value of PET as a predictor of histopathological response in metabolic non-responders. Patients with resectable AEG type I and II according to Siewerts classification, staged cT3/4 and/or cN+ and cM0 by endoscopic ultrasound, spiral CT or MRI and FDG-PET are eligible. Tumors must be potentially R0 resectable and must have a sufficient FDG-baseline uptake. Only metabolic non-responders, showing a < 35% decrease of SUV two weeks after the start of neoadjuvant chemotherapy are eligible for the study and are taken to intensified taxane-based RCT (chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy) before surgery. 18FDG-PET scans will be performed before ( = Baseline) and after 14 days of standard neoadjuvant therapy as well as after the first cycle of salvage docetaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy (PET 1) and at the end of radiochemotherapy (PET2). Tracer uptake will be assessed semiquantitatively using standardized uptake values (SUV). The percentage difference ΔSUV = 100 (SUVBaseline - SUV

  1. Predictors of Surgery Types after Neoadjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Breast Cancer: Analysis from Florida Population-Based Cancer Registry (1996–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azhri, Jamila; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Miao, Feng; Saclarides, Constantine; Byrne, Margaret M.; Avisar, Eli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the established guidelines for breast cancer treatment, there is still variability in surgical treatment after neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for women with large breast tumors. Our objective was to identify predictors of the type of surgical treatment: mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in women with T3/T4 breast cancer who received NT. METHODS Population-based Florida Cancer Data System Registry, Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration, and US census from 1996 to 2009 were linked for women diagnosed with T3/T4 breast cancer and received NT followed by either BCS or mastectomy. Analysis of multiple variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics (race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age, marital status, and urban/rural residency), tumor’s characteristics (estrogen/progesterone receptor status, histology, grade, SEER stage, and regional nodes positivity), treatment facilities (hospital volume and teaching status), patients’ comorbidities, and type of NT, was performed. RESULTS Of 1,056 patients treated with NT for T3/T4 breast cancer, 107 (10%) had BCS and 949 (90%) had mastectomy. After adjusting with extensive covariables, Hispanic patients (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = [3.50], 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38–8.84, P = 0.008) were more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to localized SEER stage, regional stage with direct extension (aOR = [3.24], 95% CI: 1.60–6.54, P = 0.001), regional stage with direct extension and nodes (aOR = [4.35], 95% CI: 1.72–11.03, P = 0.002), and distant stage (aOR = [4.44], 95% CI: 1.81–10.88, P = 0.001) were significantly more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to patients who received both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, patients who received hormonal NT only (aOR = [0.29], 95% CI: 0.12–0.68, P = 0.004) were less likely to receive mastectomy. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that Hispanic ethnicity, advanced SEER stage, and type of NT are significant

  2. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT after two cycles of neoadjuvant therapy may predict response in HER2-negative, but not in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Miao; Bao, Xiao; Zhang, Yingjian; Liu, Guangyu; Zhang, Jun; Geng, Daoying

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the ability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning to predict pathological complete response (pCR) in breast cancer, and to investigate whether timing of the scan and trastuzumab treatment influence the accuracy of pCR prediction in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer patients. We treated 81 locally advanced breast cancer patients with four cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). HER2-negative breast cancer patients received NAC alone, while HER2-positive breast cancer patients received NAC plus trastuzumab. 18FDG PET/CT scans were scheduled at baseline and after the second cycle of NAC. Axillary lymph node (ALN) dissection was performed after the last cycle of neoadjuvant therapy. Relative changes in standardized uptake values (SUV) between the two PET/CT scans (ΔSUV) in primary tumors and ALN metastases were calculated. There were 75 patients with 150 PET/CT scans in the final analysis, including 41 HER2-negative and 34 HER2-positive cases. In the HER2-negative group, the ΔSUV predicted overall and ALN pCR; the receiver operating characteristics-areas under curve (ROC-AUC) were 0.87 and 0.80 (P = 0.0014 and 0.031, respectively) and the negative predictive values were 94% and 89% respectively. However, in the HER2-positive group, ΔSUV could predict neither overall nor ALN pCR; the ROC-AUCs were only 0.56 and 0.53, with P = 0.53 and 0.84, respectively. Hence, the ΔSUV after two cycles of neoadjuvant therapy could predict pCR in HER2-negative patients treated with NAC alone, but not in HER2-positive patients treated with NAC plus trastuzumab. PMID:26336821

  3. Is there a role for neoadjuvant targeted therapy to downsize primary tumors for organ sparing strategies in renal cell carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Bex, A; Kroon, B K; de Bruijn, R

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of small renal masses being diagnosed organ-preserving treatment strategies such as nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) or radiofrequency and cryoablation are gaining importance. There is evidence that preserving renal function reduces the risk of death of any cause, cardiovascular events, and hospitalization. Some patients have unfavourable tumor locations or large tumors unsuitable for NSS or ablation which is a clinical problem especially in those with imperative indications to preserve renal function. These patients may benefit from downsizing primary tumors by targeted therapy. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence, safety, controversies, and ongoing trials. PMID:22778936

  4. The effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy on airway colonization and postoperative respiratory complications in patients undergoing oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Reza; RajabiMashhadi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghazvini, Kiyarash; Asnaashari, Amir; Zahediyan, Ali; Sahebi, Mehdi Abasi

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory complication is one of the important postoperative complications of oesophageal cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery is effective for postoperative respiratory complications. In this study, patients with oesophageal cancer were divided into two group: one with neoadjuvant therapy and the other without neoadjuvant therapy. Before surgery, they all underwent bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage. We evaluated respiratory complications and the effects of preoperative neoadjuvant therapy. Forty patients (M/F = 23/17 and mean age 61 years) were enrolled in this study. Twenty-two cases had cancer in the middle part and 18 in the lower part of the oesophagus. Significant correlation was observed between the number of positive micro-organism and difficulty in weaning and receiving neoadjuvant therapy. But no significant correlation was found between neoadjuvant therapy and respiratory complications. PMID:22392934

  5. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Standard Uptake Value as a Metabolic Predictor of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation: Impact on Acute and Late Hematological Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Elicin, Olgun; Callaway, Sharon; Prior, John O.; Bourhis, Jean; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Herrera, Fernanda G.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between bone marrow (BM) response to radiation and radiation dose by using {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET standard uptake values (SUV) and to correlate these findings with hematological toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer (CC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen women with a diagnosis of CC were treated with standard doses of CRT. All patients underwent pre- and post-therapy [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT). Hemograms were obtained before and during treatment and 3 months after treatment and at last follow-up. Pelvic bone was autosegmented as total bone marrow (BM{sub TOT}). Active bone marrow (BM{sub ACT}) was contoured based on SUV greater than the mean SUV of BM{sub TOT}. The volumes (V) of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40}, respectively) were calculated. Metabolic volume histograms and voxel SUV map response graphs were created. Relative changes in SUV before and after therapy were calculated by separating SUV voxels into radiation therapy dose ranges of 5 Gy. The relationships among SUV decrease, radiation dose, and HT were investigated using multiple regression models. Results: Mean relative pre-post-therapy SUV reductions in BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} were 27% and 38%, respectively. BM{sub ACT} volume was significantly reduced after treatment (from 651.5 to 231.6 cm{sup 3}, respectively; P<.0001). BM{sub ACT} V{sub 30} was significantly correlated with a reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV (R{sup 2}, 0.14; P<.001). The reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV significantly correlated with reduction in white blood cells (WBCs) at 3 months post-treatment (R{sup 2}, 0.27; P=.04) and at last follow-up (R{sup 2}, 0.25; P=.04). Different dosimetric parameters of BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} correlated with long-term hematological outcome. Conclusions: The volumes of BM

  6. Neoadjuvant nab-paclitaxel in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Naoto T; Mamounas, Eleftherios P

    2016-04-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has the advantage of converting unresectable breast tumors to resectable tumors and allowing more conservative surgery in some mastectomy candidates. Chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, which are recommended in the adjuvant setting, are also considered in the neoadjuvant setting. Here, we review studies of nab-paclitaxel as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with breast cancer. PubMed and conference or congress proceedings were searched for clinical studies of nab-paclitaxel in the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov for ongoing trials of nab-paclitaxel as a neoadjuvant agent in breast cancer. Twenty studies of nab-paclitaxel in the neoadjuvant setting were identified. In addition to reviewing key efficacy and safety data, we discuss how each trial assessed response, focusing on pathologic complete response and residual cancer burden scoring. Safety profiles are also reviewed. nab-Paclitaxel demonstrated antitumor activity and an acceptable safety profile in the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Ongoing and future trials will further evaluate preoperative nab-paclitaxel in breast cancer, including in combination with many novel immunological targeted therapies. PMID:27072366

  7. Apolipoprotein C-II Is a Potential Serum Biomarker as a Prognostic Factor of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer After Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harima, Yoko; Ikeda, Koshi; Utsunomiya, Keita; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kanno, Shohei; Shiga, Toshiko; Tanigawa, Noboru

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine pretreatment serum protein levels for generally applicable measurement to predict chemoradiation treatment outcomes in patients with locally advanced squamous cell cervical carcinoma (CC). Methods and Materials: In a screening study, measurements were conducted twice. At first, 6 serum samples from CC patients (3 with no evidence of disease [NED] and 3 with cancer-caused death [CD]) and 2 from healthy controls were tested. Next, 12 serum samples from different CC patients (8 NED, 4 CD) and 4 from healthy controls were examined. Subsequently, 28 different CC patients (18 NED, 10 CD) and 9 controls were analyzed in the validation study. Protein chips were treated with the sample sera, and the serum protein pattern was detected by surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS). Then, single MS-based peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and tandem MS (MS/MS)-based peptide/protein identification methods, were used to identify protein corresponding to the detected peak. And then, turbidimetric assay was used to measure the levels of a protein that indicated the best match with this peptide peak. Results: The same peak 8918 m/z was identified in both screening studies. Neither the screening study nor the validation study had significant differences in the appearance of this peak in the controls and NED. However, the intensity of the peak in CD was significantly lower than that of controls and NED in both pilot studies (P=.02, P=.04) and validation study (P=.01, P=.001). The protein indicated the best match with this peptide peak at 8918 m/z was identified as apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) using PMF and MS/MS methods. Turbidimetric assay showed that the mean serum levels of ApoC-II tended to decrease in CD group when compared with NED group (P=.078). Conclusion: ApoC-II could be used as a biomarker for detection in predicting and estimating the radiation treatment outcome of patients with CC.

  8. Correlation Among Six Biologic Factors (p53, p21{sup WAF1}, MIB-1, EGFR, HER2, and Bcl-2) and Clinical Outcomes After Curative Chemoradiation Therapy in Squamous Cell Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Murakami, Naoya; Asari, Takao; Okuma, Kae; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: The expressions of six cell-cycle-associated proteins were analyzed in cervical squamous cell carcinomas in correlation in a search for prognostic correlations in tumors treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (cCRT). Methods and Materials: The expressions of p53, p21/waf1/cip1, molecular immunology borstel-1 (MIB-1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and Bcl-2 were studied using an immunohistochemical method in 57 cases of cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with cCRT. Patients received cCRT between 1998 and 2005. The mean patient age was 61 years (range, 27-82 years). The number of patients with Stage II, III, and IVA disease was 18, 29, and 10, respectively. Results: The number of patients with tumors positive for p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, HER2, and Bcl-2 was 26, 24, 49, 26, 13, and 11, respectively; no significant correlation was noted. The 5-year overall survival rates of HER2-positive and -negative patients was 76% vs. 44%, which was of borderline significance (p = 0.0675). No significant correlation was noted between overall survival and expressions of p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, and Bcl-2. No correlation was observed between local control and expression of any of the proteins. Conclusion: Expression of HER2 protein had a weak impact of borderline significance on overall survival in squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with cCRT. However, no clinical associations could be established for p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, and Bcl-2 protein expressions.

  9. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem; Pehlivan, Berrin; Selek, Ugur

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  10. Neoadjuvant treatment for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, John; Solomon, Naveenraj L; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-02-10

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States in both men and women, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection remains the only curative treatment, but most patients develop systemic recurrence within 2 years of surgery. Adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival, but the delivery of treatment remains problematic with up to 50% of patients not receiving postoperative treatment. Neoadjuvant therapy can provide benefits of eradication of micrometastasis and improved delivery of intended treatment. We have reviewed the findings from completed neoadjuvant clinical trials, and discussed the ongoing studies. Combinational cytotoxic chemotherapy such as fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab)-paclitaxel, active in the metastatic setting, are being studied in the neoadjuvant setting. In addition, novel targeted agents such as inhibitor of immune checkpoint are incorporated with cytotoxic chemotherapy in early-phase clinical trial. Furthermore we have explored the utility of biomarkers which can personalize treatment and select patients for target-driven therapy to improve treatment outcome. The treatment of resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma requires multidisciplinary approach and novel strategies including innovative trials to make progress. PMID:26862486

  11. Neoadjuvant treatment for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, John; Solomon, Naveenraj L; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States in both men and women, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection remains the only curative treatment, but most patients develop systemic recurrence within 2 years of surgery. Adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival, but the delivery of treatment remains problematic with up to 50% of patients not receiving postoperative treatment. Neoadjuvant therapy can provide benefits of eradication of micrometastasis and improved delivery of intended treatment. We have reviewed the findings from completed neoadjuvant clinical trials, and discussed the ongoing studies. Combinational cytotoxic chemotherapy such as fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab)-paclitaxel, active in the metastatic setting, are being studied in the neoadjuvant setting. In addition, novel targeted agents such as inhibitor of immune checkpoint are incorporated with cytotoxic chemotherapy in early-phase clinical trial. Furthermore we have explored the utility of biomarkers which can personalize treatment and select patients for target-driven therapy to improve treatment outcome. The treatment of resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma requires multidisciplinary approach and novel strategies including innovative trials to make progress. PMID:26862486

  12. Efficacy Endpoints of Radiation Therapy Group Protocol 0247: A Randomized, Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Plus Concurrent Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stuart J.; Moughan, Jennifer; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith P.; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report secondary efficacy endpoints of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0247, primary endpoint analysis of which demonstrated that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin achieved a pathologic complete remission prespecified threshold (21%) to merit further study, whereas RT with capecitabine plus irinotecan did not (10%). Methods and Materials: A randomized, phase 2 trial evaluated preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with 2 concurrent chemotherapy regimens: (1) capecitabine (1200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday-Friday) plus irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk × 4); and (2) capecitabine (1650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday-Friday) plus oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk × 5) for clinical T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after chemoradiation, then 4 to 6 weeks later, adjuvant chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m{sup 2}; leucovorin 400 mg/m{sup 2}; 5-fluorouracil 400 mg/m{sup 2}; 5-fluorouracil 2400 mg/m{sup 2}) every 2 weeks × 9. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method. Local–regional failure (LRF), distant failure (DF), and second primary failure (SP) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. No statistical comparisons were made between arms because each was evaluated individually. Results: A total of 104 patients (median age, 57 years) were treated; characteristics were similar for both arms. Median follow-up for RT with capecitabine/irinotecan arm was 3.77 years and for RT with capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm was 3.97 years. Four-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP estimates for capecitabine/irinotecan arm were 68%, 85%, 16%, 24%, and 2%, respectively. The 4-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP failure estimates for capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm were 62%, 75%, 18%, 30%, and 6%, respectively. Conclusions: Efficacy results for both arms are similar to other reported studies but suggest that pathologic complete remission is an

  13. Clinical observation of gene expression-guided chemoradiation therapy for nonsurgical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients: a retrospective analysis of 36 cases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Dai, Honghai; Lv, Dongxiao; Feng, A Lei; Shu, Weibin; Han, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To make an informed choice of chemotherapy drugs according to the oncogene mRNA expression and to explore whether it could increase the survival rate of patients. Patients and methods The study retrospectively analyzed 36 cases of nonsurgical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated at the Center for Oncology of Shandong Provincial Hospital from December 1, 2010, to November 1, 2013. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used for the treatment with a conventional radiotherapy dose of 60–66 Gy. Chemotherapy started 1–5 weeks after radiation therapy. The selection of the chemotherapy drug was based on the mRNA expression levels of excision repair cross-complementation 1, thymidylate synthetase, ribonucleotide reductase M1, and β-tubulin isotype III. The objective response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival were observed. Results The reason for poor prognosis of patients with high expression of excision repair cross-complementation 1 was unknown. No correlation was observed between patient survival and expression of thymidylate synthetase, ribonucleotide reductase M1, and β-tubulin isotype III. Complete response, partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease were observed in 25, five, three, and three patients, respectively. The objective response rate was 83.3%. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year progression-free survival rates were 79.8%, 58.9%, and 54.4%, respectively. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year overall survival rates were 83.3%, 68.1%, and 58.4%, respectively. Conclusion Selecting the chemotherapy drug according to the oncogene expression, combined with radiation therapy, could increase the 3-year survival rate in nonsurgical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients. Such conclusion needs to be further confirmed using a larger sample size. PMID:27524911

  14. Surgical Patterns of Care in Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer Treated with Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy and Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Results of a Secondary Analysis of TBCRC 017

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Kandace P.; Hwang, E. Shelley; Cantor, Alan; Golshan, Mehra; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Horton, Janet K.; Nanda, Rita; Amos, Keith D.; Forero, Andres; Hudis, Cliff A.; Meszoely, Ingrid; De Los Santos, Jennifer F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) down-stages advanced primary tumors, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) being the most sensitive imaging predictor of response. However, the impact of MRI evaluation on surgical treatment decisions in the neoadjuvant setting has not been well described. We report surgical patterns of care across 8 National Cancer Institute comprehensive cancer centers in women receiving both NCT and MRI to evaluate the impact of MRI findings on surgical planning. Methods Seven hundred seventy women from 8 institutions received NCT with MRI obtained both before and after systemic treatment. Univariate and multivariate analyses of imaging, patient-, and tumor-related covariates associated with choice of breast surgery were conducted. Results MRI and surgical data were available on 759 of 770 patients. A total of 345 of 759 (45 %) patients received breast-conserving surgery and 414 of 759 (55 %) received mastectomy. Mastectomy occurred more commonly in patients with incomplete MRI response versus complete (58 vs. 43 %) (p = 0.0003). On multivariate analysis, positive estrogen receptor status (p = 0.02), incomplete MRI response (p = 0.0003), higher baseline T classification (p < 0.0001), younger age (p < 0.0006), and institution (p = 0.003) were independent predictors of mastectomy. A statistically significant trend toward increasing use of mastectomy with increasing T stage at presentation (p < 0.0001) was observed in patients with incomplete response by MRI only. Among women with complete response on MRI, 43 % underwent mastectomy. Conclusions Within a multi-institutional cohort of women undergoing neoadjuvant treatment for breast cancer, MRI findings were not clearly associated with extent of surgery. This study shows that receptor status, T stage at diagnosis, young age, and treating institution are more significant determinants of surgical treatment choice than MRI response data. PMID:25059792

  15. Different methods of pretreatment Ki-67 labeling index evaluation in core biopsies of breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their relation to response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Vörös, András; Csörgő, Erika; Kővári, Bence; Lázár, Péter; Kelemen, Gyöngyi; Rusz, Orsolya; Nyári, Tibor; Cserni, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    Increased proliferation activity of breast cancer cells evaluated by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry, i.e. a high Ki-67 labeling index (Ki-67 LI), may predict better tumor regression in case of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Despite recommendations for the evaluation of Ki-67 LI, there are variations in methodology. We assessed the effect of different evaluation methods on the Ki-67 LI in patients with different response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Thirty pretreatment core-biopsy samples of patients receiving neoadjuvant docetaxel-epirubicin chemotherapy with or without capecitabine were evaluated for their Ki-67 LI. Pathologic regression was categorized as no regression, partial regression and complete regression, with 10 cases in each category. Three antibodies (MIB1, B56, SP6), 4 observers and 4 methods (counting or estimating on glass slides and counting or estimating on representative digital images) were compared. The Kruskal-Wallis test and analyses of variance were performed to investigate the differences in Ki-67 LIs between different clinical outcomes (tumor regression categories). Breast carcinomas with pathological complete regression had a higher mean Ki-67 LI than tumors not achieving complete regression with any methods, observers and antibodies investigated, although there was a variation between different evaluations in what may represent high proliferation. Estimating the Ki-67 LI on digital images representing the highest proliferation in the core biopsy seemed the best in separating complete responders from non-responders. High Ki-67 LI values were more likely associated with pathological complete regression independently of the method of evaluation used, although the definition of high proliferation is problematic. Estimating the Ki-67 LI may be an adequate method of evaluation. PMID:24859973

  16. Preservation of Immune Function in Cervical Cancer Patients during Chemoradiation using a Novel Integrative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Mullen-Houser, Elizabeth; Russell, Daniel; DeGeest, Koen; Jacobson, Geraldine; Hart, Laura; Bender, David; Anderson, Barrie; Buekers, Thomas E.; Goodheart, Michael J.; Antoni, Michael H.; Sood, Anil K.; Lubaroff, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Patients receiving chemoradiation for cervical cancer are at risk for distress, chemoradiation-related side-effects, and immunosuppression. This prospective randomized clinical trial examined effects of a complementary therapy, Healing Touch (HT), versus relaxation training (RT) and usual care (UC) for 1) supporting cellular immunity, 2) improving mood and quality of life (QOL), and 3) reducing treatment-associated toxicities and treatment delay in cervical cancer patients receiving chemoradiation. Sixty women with stages IB1 to IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned to receive UC or 4×/weekly individual sessions of either HT or RT immediately following radiation during their 6-week chemoradiation treatment. Patients completed psychosocial assessments and blood sampling before chemoradiation at baseline, weeks 4 and 6. Multilevel regression analyses using orthogonal contrasts tested for differences between treatment conditions over time. HT patients had a minimal decrease in natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) over the course of treatment whereas NKCC of RT and UC patients declined sharply during chemoradiation (group by time interaction: p=0.018). HT patients showed greater decreases in 2 different indicators of depressed mood (CESD depressed mood subscale and POMS depression scale) compared to RT and UC (group by time interactions: p < 0.05). No between group differences were observed in QOL, treatment delay, or clinically-rated toxicities. HT may benefit cervical cancer patients by moderating effects of chemoradiation on depressed mood and cellular immunity. Effects of HT on toxicities, treatment delay, QOL, and fatigue were not observed. Long-term clinical implications of findings are not known. PMID:20600809

  17. Changes in serum levels of miR-21, miR-210, and miR-373 in HER2-positive breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy: a translational research project within the Geparquinto trial.

    PubMed

    Müller, Volkmar; Gade, Stephan; Steinbach, Bettina; Loibl, Sibylle; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Untch, Michael; Schwedler, Kathrin; Lübbe, Kristina; Schem, Christian; Fasching, Peter A; Mau, Christine; Pantel, Klaus; Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2014-08-01

    Trastuzumab and lapatinib are established treatments for patients with HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)-positive breast cancer with different mechanisms of action. The focus of this study is to investigate, whether altered expression levels of potentially relevant microRNAs (miRs) in serum are associated with response to trastuzumab or lapatinib. Circulating miR-21, miR-210, and miR-373 were quantified with TaqMan MicroRNA assays in serum of 127 HER2-postive breast cancer patients before and after neoadjuvant therapy and in 19 healthy controls. Patients received chemotherapy combined with either trastuzumab or lapatinib within the prospectively randomized Geparquinto trial. The association between miR levels and pathological response (pCR) to therapy and type of therapy was examined. Serum levels of miR-21 (p = 5.04e-08, p = 1.43e-10), miR-210 (p = 0.00151, p = 1.6e-05), and miR-373 (p = 7.87e-06, p = 1.75e-07) were significantly higher in patients before and after chemotherapy than in healthy women. Concentrations of miR-21 (p = 5.73e-08), miR-210 (p = 0.000724), and miR-373 (p = 0.00209) increased further after chemotherapy. A significant association of higher serum levels of miR-373 with advanced clinical tumor stage could be detected (p < 0.002). An association of miR-21 levels before (p = 0.0091) and after (p = 0.037) chemotherapy with overall survival of the patients could be detected, independent of type of anti-HER2 therapy. No association of circulating miRs with pCR was found. Our findings demonstrate a specific influence of neoadjuvant therapy on the serum levels of miR-21, miR-210, and miR-373 in breast cancer patients together with a prognostic value of miR-21. PMID:25086636

  18. Higher Biologically Effective Dose of Radiotherapy Is Associated With Improved Outcomes for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation: An Analysis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Machtay, Mitchell; Movsas, Benjamin; Paulus, Rebecca; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Albain, Kathy; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (LA-NSCLC) were analyzed for local-regional failure (LRF) and overall survival (OS) with respect to radiotherapy dose intensity. Methods and Materials: This study combined data from seven Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials in which chemoradiotherapy was used for LA-NSCLC: RTOG 88-08 (chemoradiation arm only), 90-15, 91-06, 92-04, 93-09 (nonoperative arm only), 94-10, and 98-01. The radiotherapeutic biologically effective dose (BED) received by each individual patient was calculated, as was the overall treatment time-adjusted BED (tBED) using standard formulae. Heterogeneity testing was done with chi-squared statistics, and weighted pooled hazard ratio estimates were used. Cox and Fine and Gray's proportional hazard models were used for OS and LRF, respectively, to test the associations between BED and tBED adjusted for other covariates. Results: A total of 1,356 patients were analyzed for BED (1,348 for tBED). The 2-year and 5-year OS rates were 38% and 15%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year LRF rates were 46% and 52%, respectively. The BED (and tBED) were highly significantly associated with both OS and LRF, with or without adjustment for other covariates on multivariate analysis (p < 0.0001). A 1-Gy BED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 4% relative improvement in survival; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio for survival as a function of BED was 0.96. Similarly, a 1-Gy tBED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 3% relative improvement in local-regional control; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio as a function of tBED was 0.97. Conclusions: Higher radiotherapy dose intensity is associated with improved local-regional control and

  19. In vivo Quantification of the Effects of Radiation and Presence of Hair Follicle Pores on the Proliferation of Fibroblasts in an Acellular Human Dermis in a Dorsal Skinfold Chamber: Relevance for Tissue Reconstruction following Neoadjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Patrick; Hohenberger, Peter; Roessner, Eric Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In neoadjuvant therapy, irradiation has a deleterious effect on neoangiogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine the post-implantation effects of neoadjuvant irradiation on the survival and proliferation of autologous cells seeded onto an acellular human dermis (hAD; Epiflex). Additionally, we examined the influence of dermal hair follicle pores on viability and proliferation. We used dorsal skinfold chambers implanted in rats and in-situ microscopy to quantify cell numbers over 9 days. Methods 24 rats received a skinfold chamber and were divided into 2 main groups; irradiated and unirradiated. In the irradiated groups 20Gy were applied epicutaneously at the dorsum. Epiflex pieces were cut to size 5x5mm such that each piece had either one or more visible hair follicle pores, or no such visible pores. Fibroblasts were transduced lentiviral with a fluorescent protein for cell tracking. Matrices were seeded statically with 2.5x104 fluorescent fibroblasts and implanted into the chambers. In each of the two main groups, half of the rats received Epiflex with hair follicle pores and half received Epiflex without pores. Scaffolds were examined in-situ at 0, 3, 6 and 9 days after transplantation. Visible cells on the surface were quantified using ImageJ. Results In all groups cell numbers were decreased on day 3. A treatment-dependent increase in cell numbers was observed at subsequent time points. Irradiation had an adverse effect on cell survival and proliferation. The number of cells detected in both irradiated and non-irradiated subjects was increased in those subjects that received transplants with hair follicle pores. Discussion This in-vivo study confirms that radiation negatively affects the survival and proliferation of fibroblasts seeded onto a human dermis transplant. The presence of hair follicle pores in the dermis transplants is shown to have a positive effect on cell survival and proliferation even in irradiated subjects. PMID:25955842

  20. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, ranking 4th among causes for cancer-related death in the Western world including the United States. Surgical resection offers the only chance of cure, but only 15 to 20 percent of cases are potentially resectable at presentation. Different studies demonstrate and confirm that advanced pancreatic cancer is among the most complex cancers to treat and that these tumors are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently there is no consensus around the world on what constitutes “standard” adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer. This controversy derives from several studies, each fraught with its own limitations. Standards of care also vary somewhat with regard to geography and economy, for instance chemo-radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or vice versa is considered the optimal therapy in North America while chemotherapy alone is the current standard in Europe. Regardless of the efforts in adjuvant and neoadjuvant improved therapy, the major goal to combat pancreatic cancer is to find diagnostic markers, identifying the disease in a pre-metastatic stage and making a curative treatment accessible to more patients. In this review, authors examined the different therapy options for advanced pancreatic patients in recent years and the future directions in adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments for these patients. PMID:22529684

  1. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Gambacorta, Antonietta; Gallotta, Valerio; Smaniotto, Daniela; Fagotti, Anna; Tagliaferri, Luca; Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco; Autorino, Rosa; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6 Gy (1.8 cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8 Gy administered with CBs (0.9 cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300 mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2 weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8 weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if >45 pCR were registered (α error = 0.05; β error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36 months (range: 7-85 months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or 2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very

  2. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tadashi; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Matsu, Akira; Masamura, Shigeru; Kitajima, Masaki

    2002-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has become popular, especially for patients with advanced breast cancer. The pros and cons of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for treating breast cancer patients are reviewed. The advantages of neoadjuvant chemotherapy are 1) overall survival and recurrence-free survival rate are the same as post-operative chemotherapy, 2) serves as an in vivo sensitivity test, 3) increases the rate of breast conserving therapy, 4) facilitates the study of cancer biology. On the other hand, the disadvantages of neoadjuvant chemotherapy are 1) it modifies the stage, 2) treatment delay of PD cases, 3) residual intraductal component may be left behind after breast conserving surgery, 4) there are some cases of over-treatment. Combination chemotherapy is one possible way to increase the pathological CR rate, although the optimal order and cycles have not been determined. To avoid residual cancer cells after breast conserving surgery, the shrinkage pattern should be evaluated by MRI. Core needle biopsy should be performed before neoadjuvant chemotherapy to avoid over-treatment. It is essential to develop more effective regimens and stratify patients based on predictive factors. PMID:12196715

  3. Iyengar-Yoga Compared to Exercise as a Therapeutic Intervention during (Neo)adjuvant Therapy in Women with Stage I–III Breast Cancer: Health-Related Quality of Life, Mindfulness, Spirituality, Life Satisfaction, and Cancer-Related Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Lötzke, Désirée; Wiedemann, Florian; Rodrigues Recchia, Daniela; Ostermann, Thomas; Sattler, Daniel; Ettl, Johannes; Kiechle, Marion; Büssing, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to test the effects of yoga on health-related quality of life, life satisfaction, cancer-related fatigue, mindfulness, and spirituality compared to conventional therapeutic exercises during (neo)adjuvant cytotoxic and endocrine therapy in women with breast cancer. In a randomized controlled trial 92 women with breast cancer undergoing oncological treatment were randomly enrolled for a yoga intervention (YI) (n = 45) or for a physical exercise intervention (PEI) (n = 47). Measurements were obtained before (t0) and after the intervention (t1) as well as 3 months after finishing intervention (t2) using standardized questionnaires. Life satisfaction and fatigue improved under PEI (p < 0.05) but not under YI (t0 to t2). Regarding quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) a direct effect (t0 to t1; p < 0.001) of YI was found on role and emotional functioning, while under PEI only emotional functioning improved. Significant improvements (p < 0.001) were observed at both t1 and t2 also for symptom scales in both groups: dyspnea, appetite loss, constipation, and diarrhea. There was no significant difference between therapies for none of the analyzed variables neither for t1 nor for t2. During chemotherapy, yoga was not seen as more helpful than conventional therapeutic exercises. This does not argue against its use in the recovery phase. PMID:27019663

  4. The Association Between Chemoradiation-related Lymphopenia and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Aaron T.; Ye, Xiaobu; Ellsworth, Susannah G.; Smith, Jessica A.; Narang, Amol K.; Garg, Tanu; Campian, Jian; Laheru, Daniel A.; Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Grossman, Stuart A.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Lymphopenia is a common consequence of chemoradiation therapy yet is seldom addressed clinically. This study was conducted to determine if patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with definitive chemoradiation develop significant lymphopenia and if this affects clinical outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis of patients with LAPC treated with chemoradiation at a single institution from 1997 to 2011 was performed. Total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) were recorded at baseline and then monthly during and after chemoradiation. The correlation between treatment-induced lymphopenia, established prognostic factors, and overall survival was analyzed using univariate Cox regression analysis. Important factors identified by univariate analysis were selected as covariates to construct a multivariate proportional hazards model for survival. Results A total of 101 patients met eligibility criteria. TLCs were normal in 86% before chemoradiation. The mean reduction in TLC per patient was 50.6% (SD, 40.6%) 2 months after starting chemoradiation (P< 0.00001), and 46% had TLC< 500 cells/mm3. Patients with TLC < 500 cells/mm3 2 months after starting chemoradiation had inferior median survival (8.7 vs. 13.3mo, P= 0.03) and PFS (4.9 vs. 9.0mo, P = 0.15). Multivariate analysis revealed TLC< 500 cells/mm3 to be an independent predictor of inferior survival (HR= 2.879, P= 0.001) along with baseline serum albumin (HR= 3.584, P = 0.0002), BUN (HR = 1.060, P= 0.02), platelet count (HR= 1.004, P = 0.005), and radiation planning target volume (HR= 1.003, P= 0.0006). Conclusions Severe treatment-related lymphopenia occurs frequently after chemoradiation for LAPC and is an independent predictor of inferior survival. PMID:23648440

  5. Improved outcomes for rectal cancer in the era of preoperative chemoradiation and tailored mesorectal excision: a series of 338 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Pacelli, Fabio; Sanchez, Alejandro M; Covino, Marcello; Tortorelli, Antonio P; Bossola, Maurizio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Gambacorta, Maria A; Doglietto, Giovanni B

    2013-02-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT), tailored mesorectal excision, and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) have become the leading measures for rectal cancer treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate early and long-term results of a multimodal treatment model for rectal cancer followed by curative surgery. Prospectively collected hospital records of 338 patients surgically treated for rectal cancer between January 1998 and December 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with high rectum level cancers and those with middle and low rectum cancers with clinical stage T1 to T2 underwent surgery, whereas those with T3 to T4 and N+ disease at the middle and low rectum received neoadjuvant CRT in 96.2 per cent of cases. Short-course neoadjuvant radiotherapy was not considered for neoadjuvant treatment. Postoperative major complications and mortality rates were 12.7 and 2.3 per cent, respectively. Overall 5-year disease-specific and disease-free survival were 80 and 73.1 per cent, respectively, whereas local recurrence rate was 6.1 per cent. At multivariate analysis, nodal status and circumferential margin status were independently associated with poor survival; local recurrence rates were independently affected by nodal and marginal status and tumor stage. The extent of mesorectal excision should be tailored depending on tumor location and the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, combined with IORT in advanced middle and low rectal cancer, leading to remarkable tumor downstaging with excellent prognosis in responding patients. PMID:23336654

  6. A phase II study of capecitabine and irinotecan in combination with concurrent pelvic radiotherapy (CapIri-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Willeke, F; Horisberger, K; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, U; Wenz, F; Leitner, A; Hochhaus, A; Grobholz, R; Willer, A; Kähler, G; Post, S; Hofheinz, R-D

    2007-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety data of a combination regimen using weekly irinotecan in combination with capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy (CapIri-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer in a phase-II trial. Patients with rectal cancer clinical stages T3/4 Nx or N+ were recruited to receive irinotecan (50 mg m−2 weekly) and capecitabine (500 mg m−2 bid days 1–38) with a concurrent RT dose of 50.4 Gy. Surgery was scheduled 4–6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. A total of 36 patients (median age 62 years; m/f: 27:9) including three patients with local recurrence were enclosed onto the trial. The median distance of the tumour from the anal verge was 5 cm. The main toxicity observed was (NCI-CTC grades 1/2/3/4 (n)): Anaemia 23/9/−/−; leucocytopenia 12/7/7/2, diarrhoea 13/15/4/−, nausea/vomiting 9/10/2/−, and increased activity of transaminases 3/3/1/−. One patient had a reversible episode of ventricular fibrillation during chemoradiation, most probably caused by capecitabine. The relative dose intensity was (median/mean (%)): irinotecan 95/91, capecitabine 100/92). Thirty-four patients underwent surgery (anterior resection n=25; abdomino-perineal resection n=6; Hartmann's procedure n=3). R0-resection was accomplished in all patients. Two patients died in the postoperative course from septic complications. Pathological complete remission was observed in five out of 34 resected patients (15%), and nine patients showed microfoci of residual tumour (26%). After a median follow-up of 28 months one patient had developed a local recurrence, and five patients distant metastases. Three-year overall survival for all patients with surgery (excluding three patients treated for local relapse or with primary metastatic disease) was 80%. In summary, preoperative chemoradiation with CapIri-RT exhibits promising efficacy whereas showing managable toxicity. The local recurrence and distant failure rates observed after

  7. Safety and efficacy of quadrapeutics versus chemoradiation in head and neck carcinoma xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Boulikas, Teni; Phan, Jack; Hung, Mien-Chie; Torchilin, Vladimir P; O'Neill, Brian E; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2015-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the strongest anti-tumor therapy but in resistant unresectable cancers it often lacks safety and efficacy. We compared our recently developed cell-level combination approach, quadrapeutics, to chemoradiation therapy to establish pre-clinical data for its biodistribution, safety and efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as a clinically challenging aggressive and resistant cancer. In vitro and in vivo models of four carcinomas were treated with standard chemoradiation and quadrapeutics using identical drug and radiation doses. We applied liposomal cisplatin or doxorubicin, colloidal gold, near-infrared laser pulses and radiation, all at low safe doses. The final evaluation used a xenograft model of HNSCC. Quadrapeutics enhanced standard chemoradiation in vitro by reducing head and neck cancer cell proliferation by 1000-fold, inhibiting tumor growth in vivo by 34-fold and improving animal survival by 5-fold, and reducing the side effects to a negligible level. In quadrapeutics, we observed an "inversion" of the drug efficacy of two standard drugs: doxorubicin, a low efficacy drug for the cancers studied, was two times more efficient than cisplatin, the first choice drug in clinic for HNSCC. The radical therapeutic gain of quadrapeutics resulted from the intracellular synergy of the four components employed which we administered in a specific sequence, while the reduction in the toxicity was due to the low doses of all four components. The biodistribution, safety and efficacy data for quadrapeutics in HNSCC ensure its high translational potential and justify the possibility of clinical trials. PMID:26885444

  8. Safety and efficacy of quadrapeutics versus chemoradiation in head and neck carcinoma xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Boulikas, Teni; Phan, Jack; Hung, Mien-Chie; Torchilin, Vladimir P; O’Neill, Brian E; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2015-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the strongest anti-tumor therapy but in resistant unresectable cancers it often lacks safety and efficacy. We compared our recently developed cell-level combination approach, quadrapeutics, to chemoradiation therapy to establish pre-clinical data for its biodistribution, safety and efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as a clinically challenging aggressive and resistant cancer. In vitro and in vivo models of four carcinomas were treated with standard chemoradiation and quadrapeutics using identical drug and radiation doses. We applied liposomal cisplatin or doxorubicin, colloidal gold, near-infrared laser pulses and radiation, all at low safe doses. The final evaluation used a xenograft model of HNSCC. Quadrapeutics enhanced standard chemoradiation in vitro by reducing head and neck cancer cell proliferation by 1000-fold, inhibiting tumor growth in vivo by 34-fold and improving animal survival by 5-fold, and reducing the side effects to a negligible level. In quadrapeutics, we observed an “inversion” of the drug efficacy of two standard drugs: doxorubicin, a low efficacy drug for the cancers studied, was two times more efficient than cisplatin, the first choice drug in clinic for HNSCC. The radical therapeutic gain of quadrapeutics resulted from the intracellular synergy of the four components employed which we administered in a specific sequence, while the reduction in the toxicity was due to the low doses of all four components. The biodistribution, safety and efficacy data for quadrapeutics in HNSCC ensure its high translational potential and justify the possibility of clinical trials. PMID:26885444

  9. Pancreatic Cancer: Progress in Systemic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Perkhofer, Lukas; Ettrich, Thomas J.; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the Western world. Due to lack of specific symptoms and no accessible precursor lesions, primary diagnosis is commonly delayed, resulting in the identification of only 15-20% of patients with potentially curable disease. The major limiting factor is an already locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Consequently, systemic therapy forms the backbone of treatment strategy for the majority of patients. Summary A deeper understanding of the molecular characteristics of pancreatic cancer has led to the identification of several potential therapeutic targets. A variety of targeted therapies are currently under clinical evaluation as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy for PDAC. This review highlights the current state of chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer and provides an outlook on its future perspectives. Key Message This review focuses on the current chemotherapy regimens for the systemic treatment of PDAC. Practical Implications Various neoadjuvant approaches have been explored, including chemoradiation, chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation or intensified chemotherapy without defining a standard of care so far. The standard of care is gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil. The oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 may be a promising new agent in this setting. For first-line treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer, no targeted therapy has yet demonstrated clinical benefit apart from the combination of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib plus gemcitabine. Recently, novel chemotherapeutic regimens such as FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel have been introduced. Both combinations have proved to be superior to the standard gemcitabine regimen. For second-line treatment the combination of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and oxaliplatin yields improved results compared to best supportive care. PMID:26672477

  10. Neoadjuvant treatment in advanced renal cell carcinoma: current situation and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Timsit, Marc-Olivier; Albiges, Laurence; Méjean, Arnaud; Escudier, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    Neoadjuvant approaches in renal cell carcinoma are currently under investigation, following the demonstration of targeted therapy efficacy in the metastatic setting. It raises the issues of downsizing locally advanced or nonresectable tumor and offering organ-sparing surgery, safety and its potential role in early micrometastatic disease. Relevant studies of the neoadjuvant setting in renal cell carcinoma with targeted therapies were identified from the literature, clinical trial databases and conference abstracts. To date, a neoadjuvant approach appears feasible in terms of safety. Currently available drugs do not achieve major tumor downsizing with primary tumor diameters response rate of 10%. Neoadjuvants should only be considered in clinical trials or as a litmus test in locally advanced patients. PMID:23253222

  11. Neoadjuvant endocrine treatment in early breast cancer: An overlooked alternative?

    PubMed

    van Dam, P A; van Dam, V C N; Altintas, S; Papadimitriou, K; Rolfo, C; Trinh, X B

    2016-03-01

    During the last decade neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET) has moved from being reserved for elderly and frail non-chemotherapy candidates to a primary systemic modality in selected patients with hormone sensitive breast cancer. Neoadjuvant hormonal treatment in patients with hormone receptor positive, HER-2 negative early breast cancer is proven to be an effective and safe option; it is associated with a higher rate of breast conserving surgery (BCS), may reduce the need for adjuvant chemotherapy and enables a delay of surgery for medical or practical reasons. Clinical responses range from 13% to 100% with at least 3 months of NET. Methods of assessing response should include MRI of the breast, particularly in lobular tumours. In studies comparing tamoxifen with aromatase inhibitors (AI), AI proved to be superior in terms of tumour response and rates of BCS. Change in Ki67 is accepted as a validated endpoint for comparing endocrine neoadjuvant agents. Levels of Ki67 during treatment are more closely related to long-term prognosis than pretreatment Ki67. Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy provides a unique opportunity for studies of endocrine responsiveness and the development of new experimental drugs combined with systemic hormonal treatment. PMID:26776766

  12. Long-term outcomes of neoadjuvant treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingnan; Hurvitz, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Long-term outcomes for women with a diagnosis of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-driven early-stage breast cancer have significantly improved since the advent of HER2-targeted therapy. Although the first studies in the early-stage setting focused on the adjuvant use of trastuzumab plus chemotherapy, clinical trials increasingly are using a neoadjuvant design to evaluate novel HER2-targeted therapies. Neoadjuvant therapy downstages locally advanced breast cancer, improves rates of breast conservation, and provides information regarding the responsiveness of a cancer to systemic therapy; in addition, studies have shown that the pathologic response to neoadjuvant therapy is correlated with event-free and overall survival. Given these advantages, multiple studies of neoadjuvant therapy, several of which have reported longer-term outcomes, have been conducted to evaluate HER2-targeted therapies. This review summarizes available data from prior and ongoing neoadjuvant trials in HER2-positive breast cancer, focusing on those studies that have reported not only pathologic response rates but also event-free, disease-free, and/or overall survival. The long-term outcomes associated with the achievement of a pathologic complete response are explored, and the comparisons of pathologic complete response rates, event-free survival, and overall survival reported for different HER2-targeted regimens are reviewed. PMID:27379947

  13. PRRT as neoadjuvant treatment in NET.

    PubMed

    Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Tomaszuk, Monika

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the possibility of using peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) as neoadjuvant treatment. PRRT is acknowledged to be a palliative treatment. Recently it has been reported that tumor size decrease followed by surgical intervention might be achieved in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) treated with somatostatin analogs labeled with beta emitters. Such outcome of therapy has been described in a relatively small group of patients. In those patients, the treatment enabled total or partial excision of the tumor, also with liver metastases. Reduction of tumor dimensions or total excision of the tumor corresponded with prolongation of overall survival. The discussed papers on this subject differ in details of treatment (utilization of various isotopes, total activity of the isotope, or combination with radiosensitizing chemotherapy). The chapter presents a brief review of recently published manuscripts. PMID:22918777

  14. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma: postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation improves survival. A prospective, single-institution experience.

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, C J; Abrams, R A; Grochow, L B; Sohn, T A; Ord, S E; Hruban, R H; Zahurak, M L; Dooley, W C; Coleman, J; Sauter, P K; Pitt, H A; Lillemoe, K D; Cameron, J L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to evaluate prospectively survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, comparing two different postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation protocol to those of no adjuvant therapy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Based on limited data from the Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group, adjuvant chemoradiation therapy has been recommended after pancreaticoduodenectomy for adenocarcinoma of the head, neck, or uncinate process of the pancrease. However, many patients continue to receive no such therapy. METHODS: From October 1991 through September 1995, all patients with resected, pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the head, neck, or uncinate process of the pancreas were reviewed by a multidisciplinary group (surgery, radiation oncology, medical oncology, and pathology) and were offered three options for postoperative treatment after pancreaticoduodenectomy: 1) standard therapy: external beam radiation therapy to the pancreatic bed (4000-4500 cGy) given with two 3-day fluorouracil (5-FU) courses and followed by weekly bolus 5-FU (500 mg/m2 per day) for 4 months; 2) intensive therapy: external beam radiation therapy to the pancreatic bed (5040-5760 cGy) with prophylactic hepatic irradiation (2340-2700 cGy) given with and followed by infusional 5-FU (200 mg/m2 per day) plus leucovorin (5 mg/m2 per day) for 5 of 7 days for 4 months; or 3) no therapy: no postoperative radiation therapy or chemotherapy. RESULTS: Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed in 174 patients, with 1 in-hospital death (0.6%). Ninety-nine patients elected standard therapy, 21 elected intensive therapy, and 53 patients declined therapy. The three groups were comparable with respect to race, gender, intraoperative blood loss, tumor differentiation, lymph node status, tumor diameter, and resection margin status. Univariate analyses indicated that tumor diameter < 3 cm, intraoperative blood loss < 700 mL, absence of intraoperative blood transfusions, and use

  15. [Neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer: implications for the pathologist].

    PubMed

    Le Guellec, Sophie; Perallon, Romain; Alunni, Jean-Philippe; Charitansky, Hélène; Leaha, Christina; Gonzalez, Aurélie Maran; Chateau, Marie-Christine; Simony-Lafontaine, Joelle; Jacot, William; Gutowski, Marian; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Dalenc, Florence; Lacroix-Triki, Magali

    2011-12-01

    These past few years, neoadjuvant strategy has taken an increasing place in the management of breast cancer patients. This strategy is mainly indicated to obtain a tumour bulk regression allowing a breast conserving surgery in patients that otherwise would have undergone mastectomy. Of note, development of new chemotherapy agents and targeted therapies has critically helped in the progress of neoadjuvant strategy as it is currently associated with better pathological response rates. In this context, the pathologist is at the crossroad of this multidisciplinary process. First, he provides on the initial core needle biopsy the tumour pathological characteristics that are critical for the choice of treatment strategy, i.e. histological type, histological grade, proliferative activity (mitotic count and Ki67/MIB1 index labeling), hormone receptor status (oestrogen receptor and progesterone receptor) and HER2 status. Secondly, the pathologist evaluates the pathological response and the status of surgical margins with regards to the residual tumour on the surgical specimen after neoadjuvant treatment. These parameters are important for the management of the patient, since it has been shown that complete pathological response is associated with improved disease free survival. Several grading systems are used to assess the pathological response in breast and axillary lymph nodes. The most frequently used in France are currently the systems described by Sataloff et al. and Chevallier et al. In this review, we detail the different steps involving the pathologist in neoadjuvant setting, with special regards to the quality process and future perspectives such as emerging predictive biomarkers. PMID:22172117

  16. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by liver transplantation for unresectable cholangiocarcinoma: a single-centre national experience

    PubMed Central

    Duignan, Sophie; Maguire, Donal; Ravichand, Chamarajanagar S; Geoghegan, Justin; Hoti, Emir; Fennelly, David; Armstrong, John; Rock, Kathy; Mohan, Helen; Traynor, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Background Unresectable cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) has a dismal prognosis. Initial studies of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) alone for CCA yielded disappointing outcomes. The Mayo Clinic demonstrated long-term survival using neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by OLT in selected patients with unresectable CCA. This study reports the Irish National Liver Transplant Programme experience of neoadjuvant therapy and OLT for unresectable CCA. Materials and methods Twenty-seven patients with CCA were selected for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in a single centre from October 2004 to September 2011. Patients were given brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), followed by liver transplantation if progression free (20 patients). Results Twenty progression-free patients after neoadjuvant therapy underwent OLT. Hospital mortality was 20%. Of the 16 patients who left hospital, survival rates were 94% and 61% at 1 and 4 years. Seven patients developed recurrent disease and died at intervals of 10–58 months after OLT, whereas 9 are disease free with a median follow-up of 37 months (18–76). Predictors of disease recurrence were a tumour in explant specimen and high CA 19.9 levels. Discussion In selected patients with unresectable CCA, long-term survival can be achieved using neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and OLT although short-term mortality is high. Prospective international registries may aid patient selection and refinement of neoadjuvant regimens. PMID:23600750

  17. Prognostic Cell Biological Markers in Cervical Cancer Patients Primarily Treated With (Chemo)radiation: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Noordhuis, Maartje G.; Eijsink, Jasper J.H.; Roossink, Frank; Graeff, Pauline de; Pras, Elisabeth; Schuuring, Ed; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Zee, Ate G.J. van der

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the prognostic and predictive significance of cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation. A PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane literature search was performed. Studies describing a relation between a cell biological marker and survival in {>=}50 cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation were selected. Study quality was assessed, and studies with a quality score of 4 or lower were excluded. Cell biological markers were clustered on biological function, and the prognostic and predictive significance of these markers was described. In total, 42 studies concerning 82 cell biological markers were included in this systematic review. In addition to cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-ag) levels, markers associated with poor prognosis were involved in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling (EGFR and C-erbB-2) and in angiogenesis and hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase 9 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}). Epidermal growth factor receptor and C-erbB-2 were also associated with poor response to (chemo)radiation. In conclusion, EGFR signaling is associated with poor prognosis and response to therapy in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation, whereas markers involved in angiogenesis and hypoxia, COX-2, and serum SCC-ag levels are associated with a poor prognosis. Therefore, targeting these pathways in combination with chemoradiation may improve survival in advanced-stage cervical cancer patients.

  18. Prospective phase II trial of pre-resection thoracoscopic mediastinal restaging following neoadjuvant therapy for IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer: Results of CALGB Protocol # 39803

    PubMed Central

    Jaklitsch, Michael T; Gu, Lin; Demmy, Todd; Harpole, David H; D’Amico, Thomas A; McKenna, Robert J; Krasna, Mark J; Kohman, Leslie J; Swanson, Scott J; DeCamp, Malcolm M; Wang, Xiaofei; Sutherland, Susan; Sugarbaker, David J

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate pathologic re-staging of N2 stations following neoadjuvant therapy in IIIA(N2) NSCLC is needed. Methods A prospective multi-institutional trial was designed to judge feasibility of VATS restaging ipsilateral nodes in mediastinoscopy proven IIIA(N2) NSCLC following 2 cycles platinum-based chemotherapy and/or > 40 Gy radiotherapy. Goals included biopsy 3 negative N2 node stations, or identify 1 positive N2 node or pleural carcinomatosis. Results Ten institutions accrued 68 subjects. Forty-six (68%) underwent radiation and 66 (97%) had chemotherapy. VATS successfully met pre-study feasibility in 27 pts (40%): three negative stations and confirmed at thoracotomy (7); persistent N2 disease (16) and pleural carcinomatosis (4). Twenty (29 %) found no N2 disease, but did not biopsy 3 stations due to unanticipated nodal obliteration. Thus, 47 VATS (69%, 95% CI: 57 - 80) restaged the mediastinum. VATS was unsuccessful in 21 (31 %) patients: abort procedure (11), or false negative stations (10). Of 21 failures, 15 were right-sided, and 10 had a positive 4R node. Sensitivity of VATS was 67% (95% CI: 47 – 83), and negative predictive value (NPV) was 73% (95% CI: 56 – 86) if including patients with obliterated nodal tissue. Sensitivity was 83% (95% CI: 63 – 95), NPV was 64% (95% CI: 31 – 89) if excluding those patients. Specificity was 100%. There was 1death after thoracotomy Conclusions VATS restaging was within 90% CI of “feasible” and provided pathology of ipsilateral nodes. VATS restaging is limited by radiation and the 4R nodal station. PMID:23768804

  19. Final Report of Multicenter Canadian Phase III Randomized Trial of 3 Versus 8 Months of Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Before Conventional-Dose Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita Ludgate, Charles; Malone, Shawn; Perry, Gad; Eapen, Libni; Bowen, Julie; Robertson, Susan; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of 3 vs. 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before conventional-dose radiotherapy (RT) on disease-free survival for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 1995 and June 2001, 378 men were randomized to either 3 or 8 months of flutamide and goserelin before 66 Gy RT at four participating centers. The median baseline prostate-specific antigen level was 9.7 ng/mL (range, 1.3-189). Of the 378 men, 26% had low-, 43% intermediate-, and 31% high-risk disease. The two arms were balanced in terms of age, Gleason score, clinical T category, risk group, and presenting prostate-specific antigen level. The median follow-up for living patients was 6.6 years (range, 1.6-10.1). Of the 378 patients, 361 were evaluable, and 290 were still living. Results: The 5-year actuarial freedom from failure rate for the 3- vs. 8-month arms was 72% vs. 75%, respectively (p = 0.18). No difference was found in the failure types between the two arms. The median prostate-specific antigen level at the last follow-up visit for patients without treatment failure was 0.6 ng/mL in the 3-month arm vs. 0.50 ng/mL in the 8-month arm. The disease-free survival rate at 5 years was improved for the high-risk patients in the 8-month arm (71% vs. 42%, p = 0.01). Conclusion: A longer period of NHT before standard-dose RT did not alter the patterns of failure when combined with 66-Gy RT. High-risk patients in the 8-month arm had significant improvement in the 5-year disease-free survival rate.

  20. Recombine Endostatin With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Followed by Concurrent Chemoradiation in Advanced Nasopharynx Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-11

    1、Enough Cases; 2、Elekta Precise 1343 Digital Control Electron Linear Accelerator; Can Undertake Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Specimens in the Materia,; Image Department of Nose Pharynx Ministry MRI Dynamic Testing,

  1. Surgery is an essential component of multimodality therapy for patients with locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Correa, Arlene M.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Welsh, James W.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience with neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CXRT) has raised questions regarding the additional benefit of surgery after locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma patients achieve a clinical response to CXRT. We sought to quantify the value of surgery by comparing the overall (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of trimodality eligible patients treated with definitive CXRT versus CXRT followed by esophagectomy. Methods We identified 143 clinical stage III esophageal adenocarcinoma patients that were eligible for trimodality therapy. All patients successfully completed neoadjuvant CXRT and were considered appropriate candidates for resection. Patients that were medically inoperable were excluded. Cox regression models were used to identify significant predictors of survival. Results Among the 143 patients eligible for surgery after completing CXRT, 114 underwent resection and 29 did not. Poorly differentiated tumors (HR=2.041, 95% CI 1.235–3.373) and surgical resection (HR=0.504, 95% CI 0.283–0.899) were the only independent predictors of OS. Patients treated with surgery had a 50% and 54% risk reduction in overall and cancer-specific mortality, respectively. Median OS (41.2 months vs. 20.3 months, p=0.012) and DFS (21.5 months vs. 11.4 months, p=0.007) were significantly improved with the addition of surgery compared to definitive CXRT. Conclusions Surgery provides a significant survival benefit to trimodality-eligible esophageal adenocarcinoma patients with locally advanced disease. PMID:23715646

  2. Case Report: En Bloc Resection of Pancoast Tumor with Adjuvant Aortic Endograft and Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tony; Fischer, Uwe M.; Marco, Rex A.; Naoum, Joseph J.; Reardon, Michael J.; Lumsden, Alan B.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Davies, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    “Pancoast” tumors frequently require a multidisciplinary approach to therapy and are still associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to their sensitive anatomic location, complex resections and chemoradiation regimens are typically required for treatment. Those with signs of aortic invasion pose an even greater challenge, given the added risks of cardiopulmonary bypass for aortic resection and interposition. Placement of an aortic endograft can facilitate resection if the tumor is in close proximity to or is invading the aorta. Prophylactic endografting to prevent radiation-associated aortic rupture has also been described. This case describes a 60-year-old female who presented with a stage IIIa left upper lobe undifferentiated non-small-cell carcinoma encasing the subclavian artery with thoracic aorta and bony invasion. Following carotid-subclavian bypass with Dacron, en bloc resection of the affected lung, ribs, and vertebral bodies was performed. The aorta was prophylactically reinforced with a Gore TAG thoracic endograft prior to adjuvant chemoradiation. The patient remains disease-free at more than 5 years follow-up after completing her treatment course. Endovascular stenting with subsequent chemoradiation may prove to be a viable alternative to palliation or open operative management and prevention of aortic injury during tumor resection and/or adjuvant therapy in select patients with aortic involvement. PMID:26306134

  3. Neoadjuvant Treatment Does Not Influence Perioperative Outcome in Rectal Cancer Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Alexis; Weitz, Juergen Slodczyk, Matthias; Koch, Moritz; Jaeger, Dirk; Muenter, Marc; Buechler, Markus W.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To identify the risk factors for perioperative morbidity in patients undergoing resection of primary rectal cancer, with a specific focus on the effect of neoadjuvant therapy. Methods and Materials: This exploratory analysis of prospectively collected data included all patients who underwent anterior resection/low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection for primary rectal cancer between October 2001 and October 2006. The study endpoints were perioperative surgical and medical morbidity. Univariate and multivariate analyses of potential risk factors were performed. Results: A total of 485 patients were included in this study; 425 patients (88%) underwent a sphincter-saving anterior resection/low anterior resection, 47 (10%) abdominoperineal resection, and 13 (2%) multivisceral resection. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was performed in 100 patients (21%), and 168 (35%) underwent neoadjuvant short-term radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy). Patient age and operative time were independently associated with perioperative morbidity, and operative time, body mass index >27 kg/m{sup 2} (overweight), and resection type were associated with surgical morbidity. Age and a history of smoking were confirmed as independent prognostic risk factors for medical complications. Neoadjuvant therapy was not associated with a worse outcome. Conclusion: The results of this prospective study have identified several risk factors associated with an adverse perioperative outcome after rectal cancer surgery. In addition, neoadjuvant therapy was not associated with increased perioperative complications.

  4. Favorable perioperative outcomes after resection of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant stereotactic radiation and chemotherapy compared with upfront pancreatectomy for resectable cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Eric A.; Strom, Tobin J.; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Frakes, Jessica M.; Springett, Gregory M.; Hodul, Pamela J.; Malafa, Mokenge P.; Chuong, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are utilized to increase margin negative (R0) resection rates in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) or locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients. Concerns persist that these neoadjuvant therapies may worsen perioperative morbidities and mortality. Methods Upfront resection patients (n=241) underwent resection without neoadjuvant treatment for resectable disease. They were compared to BRPC or LAPC patients (n=61) who underwent resection after chemotherapy and 5 fraction SBRT. Group comparisons were performed by Mann-Whitney U or Fisher’s exact test. Overall Survival (OS) was estimated by Kaplan-Meier and compared by log-rank methods. Results In the neoadjuvant therapy group, there was significantly higher T classification, N classification, and vascular resection/repair rate. Surgical positive margin rate was lower after neoadjuvant therapy (3.3% vs. 16.2%, P=0.006). Post-operative morbidities (39.3% vs. 31.1%, P=0.226) and 90-day mortality (2% vs. 4%, P=0.693) were similar between the groups. Median OS was 33.5 months in the neoadjuvant therapy group compared to 23.1 months in upfront resection patients who received adjuvant treatment (P=0.057). Conclusions Patients with BRPC or LAPC and sufficient response to neoadjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and SBRT have similar or improved peri-operative and long-term survival outcomes compared to upfront resection patients. PMID:27563444

  5. The Role of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Clinical Stage II-III Breast Cancer Patients With pN0: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study (KROG 12-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Su Jung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Nam Kwon; Suh, Chang-Ok; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Su Ssan; Ha, Sung W.; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyubo; Shin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients with pN0. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 417 clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients who achieved an ypN0 at surgery after receiving NAC between 1998 and 2009. Of these, 151 patients underwent mastectomy after NAC. The effect of PMRT on disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log–rank test and Cox proportional regression analysis. Results: Of the 151 patients who underwent mastectomy, 105 (69.5%) received PMRT and 46 patients (30.5%) did not. At a median follow-up of 59 months, 5 patients (3.3%) developed LRR (8 sites of recurrence) and 14 patients (9.3%) developed distant metastasis. The 5-year DFS, LRRFS, and OS rates were 91.2, 98.1, and 93.3% with PMRT and 83.0%, 92.3%, and 89.9% without PMRT, respectively (all P values not significant). By univariate analysis, only age (≤40 vs >40 years) was significantly associated with decreased DFS (P=.027). By multivariate analysis, age (≤40 vs >40 years) and pathologic T stage (0-is vs 1 vs 2-4) were significant prognostic factors affecting DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.353, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.135-0.928, P=.035; HR 2.223, 95% CI 1.074-4.604, P=.031, respectively). PMRT showed no correlation with a difference in DFS, LRRFS, or OS by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: PMRT might not be necessary for pN0 patients after NAC, regardless of clinical stage. Prospective randomized clinical trial data are needed to assess whether PMRT can be safely omitted in pN0 patients after NAC and mastectomy for clinical stage II-III breast cancer.

  6. [Neoadjuvant treatment in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinhua; Liu, Shiwei; Zhang, Hong; Xu, Ling; Li, Ting; Duan, Xuening

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among females worldwide. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer represents a subtype with aggressive behavior, poor response to treatment and unfavorable prognosis. Anti-HER2-based neoadjuvant treatment has improved clinical outcomes of patients with HER2-positive disease. Pathological complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant treatment indicates a favorable prognosis. With the development of HER2-targeted therapy and neoadjuvant treatment, numerous studies focus on the predictive factors of pCR or therapeutic resistance of anti-HER2 therapy. Identification of novel predictive factors in HER2-positive breast cancer, such as tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, will be helpful for clinical decision. PMID:26850663

  7. [A Case of Advanced Gastric Cancer Responding to Neoadjuvant Docetaxel/CDDP/S-1 Therapy with Metallic Stent Placement, Leading to Curative Surgery].

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Keiichi; Kunisaki, Chikara; Kimura, Jun; Takagawa, Ryo; Minami, Yuta; Makino, Hirochika; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Tsuburaya, Akira; Akiyama, Hirotoshi; Endo, Itaru

    2015-11-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with epigastralgia. A diagnosis of advanced gastric cancer MLU, Circ, Type 3, 160 mm, tub2, cT4b (SI: panc), cN1, cM0, cH0, cP0, cCY0, cStage ⅢB was made. Because of difficulty with oral intake due to malignant outlet obstruction and tumor bleeding, endoscopic self-expanding metallic stent placement was performed. We administered chemotherapy involving docetaxel, cisplatin, and S-1(DCS). After 2 courses of chemotherapy, the primary lesion and regional lymph nodes had reduced in size. His response was judged as SD according to the RECIST criteria. The patient elected to undergo explorative laparotomy for assessment of the gastric cancer. The intraoperative findings showed that there was no pancreatic invasion, peritoneal dissemination, or distal metastasis, so a total gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection was performed. The pathological findings showed that there were very few cancer cells in the primary lesion, and a lymph node metastasis was found. The final stage was gastric cancer MLU, Circ, Type 3, 100 mm, muc, ypT4a(SE), ypN3a (13/51), ypM0, ypH0, ypP0, ypCY0, ypStage ⅢC. The therapy evaluation was Grade 1b. In summary, we encountered a patient with gastric cancer in whom curative surgery was made possible by undergoing chemotherapy and metallic stent placement. PMID:26805260

  8. Who Benefits From Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Gastric Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nitin; Garg, Madhur K.; Aparo, Santiago; Kaubisch, Andreas; Tome, Wolfgang; Kennedy, Timothy J.; Kalnicki, Shalom; Guha, Chandan

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have demonstrated significant survival benefits with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy for gastric cancer. The importance of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) remains unclear. We performed an up-to-date meta-analysis of randomized trials testing the use of RT for resectable gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized trials testing adjuvant (including neoadjuvant) RT for resectable gastric cancer. Hazard ratios describing the impact of adjuvant RT on overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were extracted directly from the original studies or calculated from survival curves. Pooled estimates were obtained using the inverse variance method. Subgroup analyses were performed to determine whether the efficacy of RT varies with chemotherapy use, RT timing, geographic region, type of nodal dissection performed, or lymph node status. Results: Thirteen studies met all inclusion criteria and were used for this analysis. Adjuvant RT was associated with a significant improvement in both OS (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.70-0.86, P<.001) and DFS (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.63-0.80, P<.001). In the 5 studies that tested adjuvant chemoradiation therapy against adjuvant chemotherapy, similar effects were seen for OS (HR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.67-1.03, P=.087) and DFS (HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.91-0.65, P=.002). Available data did not reveal any subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Conclusion: In randomized trials for resectable gastric cancer, adjuvant RT provides an approximately 20% improvement in both DFS and OS. Available data do not reveal a subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Further study is required to optimize the implementation of adjuvant RT for gastric cancer with regard to patient selection and integration with systemic therapy.

  9. Concomitant boost IMRT-based neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for clinical stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma: results of a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aim This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of concomitant boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) along with capecitabine and oxaliplatin, followed by a cycle of Xelox, in neoadjuvant course for locally advanced rectal cancer. Materials and methods Patients with histologically confirmed, newly diagnosed, locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma (cT3-T4 and/or cN+) located within 12 cm of the anal verge were included in this study. Patients received IMRT to the pelvis of 50 Gy and a concomitant boost of 5 Gy to the primary tumor in 25 fractions, and concurrent with oxaliplatin (50 mg/m2 d1 weekly) and capecitabine (625 mg/m2 bid d1–5 weekly). One cycle of Xelox (oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 on d1 and capecitabine 1000 mg/m2 twice daily d1–14) was given two weeks after the completion of chemoradiation, and radical surgery was scheduled eight weeks after chemoradiation. Tumor response was evaluated by tumor regression grade (TRG) system and acute toxicities were evaluated by NCI-CTC 3.0 criteria. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with Log-rank test. Results A total of 78 patients were included between March 2009 and May 2011 (median age 54 years; 62 male). Seventy-six patients underwent surgical resection. Twenty-eight patients underwent sphincter-sparing lower anterior resection and 18 patients (23.7%) were evaluated as pathological complete response (pCR). The incidences of grade 3 hematologic toxicity, diarrhea, and radiation dermatitis were 3.8%, 10.3%, and 17.9%, respectively. The three-year LR (local recurrence), DFS (disease-free survival) and OS (overall survival) rates were 14.6%, 63.8% and 77.4%, respectively. Initial clinical T stage and tumor regression were independent prognostic factors to DFS. Conclusion An intensified regimen of concomitant boost radiotherapy plus concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin, followed by one cycle of Xelox, can be safely administered in patients

  10. Protection of organs at risk during neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer based on a comparison between conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    HAWRYLEWICZ, LESZEK; LESZCZYŃSKI, WOJCIECH; NAMYSŁ-KALETKA, AGNIESZKA; BRONCLIK, IWONA; WYDMAŃSKI, JERZY

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the techniques of dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in patients with gastric cancer. Implementation of the IMRT technique does not significantly affect the minimum and maximum dose levels in the planning target volume (PTV), but more effectively protects the critical organs. The study group consisted of 25 patients. The results of the analysis of the conformity index (CI) and the homogeneity index (HI) showed that the doses in the PTV regions were at a comparable level. The CI for the PTV was 0.95 for the 2-field technique, 0.95 for the 3-field technique, 0.96 for the 4-field technique and 0.94 for the IMRT technique. The CIs for these techniques for the clinical target volume (CTV) were 0.96, 0.96, 0.97 and 0.96, respectively, and the CIs for the gross tumor volume (GTV) were 0.99, 0.99, 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. The HI values for the PTV were 1.12 for the 2-field technique, 1.12 for the 3-field technique, 1.09 for the 4-field technique and 1.09 for the IMRT technique, and the HI values for the CTV were 1.12, 1.12, 1.09 and 1.08 for the same techniques, respectively. The HI values for the GTV were 1.09, 1.09, 1.07 and 1.06, respectively, which indicated significantly superior performance in the regions of healthy tissue. Statistical study was based on Friedman's rank analysis of variance to determine the level of reliability of the tested groups of variables (P<0.001). The present study demonstrated that the IMRT technique in the pre-operative radiotherapy of gastric cancer patients results in superior treatment tolerance and reduces the risk of damage to healthy tissue that is in close proximity to the irradiated area. PMID:27347202

  11. Relief of dysphagia during neoadjuvant treatment for cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction.

    PubMed

    Sunde, B; Ericson, J; Kumagai, K; Lundell, L; Tsai, J A; Lindblad, M; Rouvelas, I; Friesland, S; Wang, N; Nilsson, M

    2016-07-01

    Dysphagia is the main symptom of cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction and causing nutritional problems and weight loss, often counteracted by insertion of self-expandable metal stents or nutrition via an enteral route. Clinical observations indicate that neoadjuvant therapy may effectively and promptly alleviate dysphagia, making such nutrition supportive interventions redundant before surgical resection. The objective of the current study was to carefully study the effects of induction neoadjuvant therapy on dysphagia and its subsequent course and thereby investigate the actual need for alimentary gateways for nutritional support. Thirty-five consecutive patients scheduled for neoadjuvant therapy were recruited and assessed regarding dysphagia and appetite at baseline, after the first cycle of preoperative treatment with either chemotherapy alone or with chemoradiotherapy and before surgery. Platinum-based therapy in combination with 5-fluorouracil was administered intravenously days 1-5 every 3 weeks and consisted of three treatments. Patients receiving combined chemoradiotherapy started radiotherapy on day one of second chemotherapy cycle. They received fractions of 2 Gy/day each up to a total dose of 40 Gy. Watson and Ogilvie dysphagia scores were used to assess dysphagia, while appetite was assessed by the Edmonton Assessment System Visual analogue scale-appetite questionnaire. Patients were evaluated at regular outpatient clinic visits or by telephone. The histological tumor response in the surgical specimen was assessed using the Chirieac scale. Ten patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 25 patients scheduled for chemoradiotherapy were included in the analysis. There was a significant improvement in dysphagia in both treatment groups, according to both scales, already from baseline to the completion of the first chemotherapy cycle which remained to the end of the neoadjuvant treatment (P < 0.001). Appetite also improved

  12. Accuracy of Physical Examination, Ultrasonography, and Mammography in Predicting Residual Pathologic Tumor Size in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chagpar, Anees B.; Middleton, Lavinia P.; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Dempsey, Peter; Buzdar, Aman U.; Mirza, Attiqa N.; Ames, Fredrick C.; Babiera, Gildy V.; Feig, Barry W.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Ross, Merrick I.; Singletary, S Eva

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the accuracy of physical examination, ultrasonography, and mammography in predicting residual size of breast tumors following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Background: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is an accepted part of the management of stage II and III breast cancer. Accurate prediction of residual pathologic tumor size after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is critical in guiding surgical therapy. Although physical examination, ultrasonography, and mammography have all been used to predict residual tumor size, there have been conflicting reports about the accuracy of these methods in the neoadjuvant setting. Methods: We reviewed the records of 189 patients who participated in 1 of 2 protocols using doxorubicin-containing neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and who had assessment by physical examination, ultrasonography, and/or mammography no more than 60 days before their surgical resection. Size correlations were performed using Spearman rho analysis. Clinical and pathologic measurements were also compared categorically using the weighted kappa statistic. Results: Size estimates by physical examination, ultrasonography, and mammography were only moderately correlated with residual pathologic tumor size after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (correlation coefficients: 0.42, 0.42, and 0.41, respectively), with an accuracy of ±1 cm in 66% of patients by physical examination, 75% by ultrasonography, and 70% by mammography. Kappa values (0.24–0.35) indicated poor agreement between clinical and pathologic measurements. Conclusion: Physical examination, ultrasonography, and mammography were only moderately useful for predicting residual pathologic tumor size after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:16432360

  13. On-demand intracellular amplification of chemoradiation with cancer-specific plasmonic nanobubbles

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Wu, Xiangwei; Torchilin, Vladimir P; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiation-resistant cancers limit treatment efficacy and safety. We show here the cancer cell–specific, on-demand intracellular amplification of chemotherapy and chemoradiation therapy via gold nanoparticle– and laser pulse–induced mechanical intracellular impact. Cancer aggressiveness promotes the clustering of drug nanocarriers and gold nanoparticles in cancer cells. This cluster, upon exposure to a laser pulse, generates a plasmonic nanobubble, the mechanical explosion that destroys the host cancer cell or ejects the drug into its cytoplasm by disrupting the liposome and endosome. The same cluster locally amplifies external X-rays. Intracellular synergy of the mechanical impact of plasmonic nanobubble, ejected drug and amplified X-rays improves the efficacy of standard chemoradiation in resistant and aggressive head and neck cancer by 100-fold in vitro and 17-fold in vivo, reduces the effective entry doses of drugs and X-rays to 2–6% of their clinical doses and efficiently spares normal cells. The developed quadrapeutics technology combines four clinically validated components and transforms a standard macrotherapy into an intracellular on-demand theranostic microtreatment with radically amplified therapeutic efficacy and specificity. PMID:24880615

  14. On-demand intracellular amplification of chemoradiation with cancer-specific plasmonic nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Ren, Xiaoyang; Sawant, Rupa R; Wu, Xiangwei; Torchilin, Vladimir P; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2014-07-01

    Chemoradiation-resistant cancers limit treatment efficacy and safety. We show here the cancer cell-specific, on-demand intracellular amplification of chemotherapy and chemoradiation therapy via gold nanoparticle- and laser pulse-induced mechanical intracellular impact. Cancer aggressiveness promotes the clustering of drug nanocarriers and gold nanoparticles in cancer cells. This cluster, upon exposure to a laser pulse, generates a plasmonic nanobubble, the mechanical explosion that destroys the host cancer cell or ejects the drug into its cytoplasm by disrupting the liposome and endosome. The same cluster locally amplifies external X-rays. Intracellular synergy of the mechanical impact of plasmonic nanobubble, ejected drug and amplified X-rays improves the efficacy of standard chemoradiation in resistant and aggressive head and neck cancer by 100-fold in vitro and 17-fold in vivo, reduces the effective entry doses of drugs and X-rays to 2-6% of their clinical doses and efficiently spares normal cells. The developed quadrapeutics technology combines four clinically validated components and transforms a standard macrotherapy into an intracellular on-demand theranostic microtreatment with radically amplified therapeutic efficacy and specificity. PMID:24880615

  15. Molecular Markers Predict Distant Metastases After Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Yong Bae; Choi, Jun Jeong; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lee, Ikjae; Cho, Jae Ho; Keum, Ki Chang

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The outcomes of adjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer are nonuniform among patients with matching prognostic factors. We explored the role of molecular markers for predicting the outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The study included 68 patients with stages II to III rectal adenocarcinoma who were treated with total mesorectal excision and adjuvant chemoradiation. Chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was intravenously administered each month for 6-12 cycles. Radiation therapy consisted of 54 Gy delivered in 30 fractions. Immunostaining of surgical specimens for COX-2, EGFR, VEGF, thymidine synthase (TS), and Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 65 months. Eight locoregional (11.8%) and 13 distant (19.1%) recurrences occurred. Five-year locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 83.9%, 78.7%, 66.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. LRFFS was not correlated with TNM stage, surgical margin, or any of the molecular markers. VEGF overexpression was significantly correlated with decreased DMFS (P=.045), while RKIP-positive results were correlated with increased DMFS (P=.025). In multivariate analyses, positive findings for COX-2 (COX-2+) and VEGF (VEGF+) and negative findings for RKIP (RKIP-) were independent prognostic factors for DMFS, DFS, and OS (P=.035, .014, and .007 for DMFS; .021, .010, and <.0001 for DFS; and .004, .012, and .001 for OS). The combination of both COX-2+ and VEGF+ (COX-2+/VEGF+) showed a strong correlation with decreased DFS (P=.007), and the combinations of RKIP+/COX-2- and RKIP+/VEGF- showed strong correlations with improved DFS compared with the rest of the patients (P=.001 and <.0001, respectively). Conclusions: Molecular markers can be valuable in predicting treatment outcome of adjuvant

  16. Neoadjuvant Treatment of High-Risk, Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Prior to Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Pietzak, Eugene J; Eastham, James A

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal strategies combining local and systemic therapy offer the greatest chance of cure for many with men with high-risk prostate cancer who may harbor occult metastatic disease. However, no systemic therapy combined with radical prostatectomy has proven beneficial. This was in part due to a lack of effective systemic agents; however, there have been several advancements in the metastatic and castrate-resistant prostate cancer that might prove beneficial if given earlier in the natural history of the disease. For example, novel hormonal agents have recently been approved for castration-resistant prostate cancer with some early phase II neoadjuvant showing promise. Additionally, combination therapy with docetaxel-based chemohormonal has demonstrated a profound survival benefit in metastatic hormone-naïve patients and might have a role in eliminating pre-existing ADT-resistant tumor cells in the neoadjuvant setting. The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB)/Alliance 90203 trial has finished accrual and should answer the question as to whether neoadjuvant docetaxel-based chemohormonal therapy provides an advantage over prostatectomy alone. There are also several promising targeted agents and immunotherapies under investigation in phase I/II trials with the potential to provide benefit in the neoadjuvant setting. PMID:26968417

  17. Radiotherapy and chemoradiation after surgery for early cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Linda; Siu, Shing Shun N; Luesley, David; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review first published in Issue 4, 2009. There is an ongoing debate about the indications for, and value of, adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy after radical surgery in women with early cervical cancer. Certain combinations of pathological risk factors are thought to represent sufficient risk for recurrence, that they justify the use of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy, though this has never been shown to improve overall survival, and use of more than one type of treatment (surgery and radiotherapy) increases the risks of side effects and complications. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, chemoradiation) after radical hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer (FIGO stages IB1, IB2 or IIA). Search methods For the original review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 4, 2008. The Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE (January 1950 to November 2008), EMBASE (1950 to November 2008). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. For this update, we extended the database searches to September 2011 and searched the MetaRegister for ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, or chemoradiation) with no radiotherapy or chemoradiation, in women with a confirmed histological diagnosis of early cervical cancer who had undergone radical hysterectomy and dissection of the pelvic lymph nodes. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Information on grade 3 and 4 adverse events was collected from the trials. Results were pooled using random-effects meta-analyses. Main results Two RCTs

  18. Partial Cystectomy after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Contemporary Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Ryan P.; Donahue, Timothy F.; Russo, Paul; Bochner, Bernard H.; Donat, Sherri M.; Dalbagni, Guido; Herr, Harry W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To report our contemporary experience with partial cystectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods. Retrospective review of patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and partial cystectomy for urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 1995 to 2013. Log-rank test and Cox regression models were used to analyze variables possibly associated with recurrence-free, advanced recurrence-free (free from recurrence beyond salvage with intravesical therapy or radical cystectomy), and overall survival. Results. All 36 patients had a solitary tumor <5 cm in size. Twenty-one patients (58%) achieved cT0 following neoadjuvant chemotherapy with 7 (33%) having residual disease at PC. At last follow-up, 19 (53%) patients had recurrence, 15 (42%) had advanced recurrence, 10 (28%) died of disease, and 22 (61%) maintained an intact bladder. Median follow-up of those who were with no evidence of disease was 17 months. On univariable analysis, after neoadjuvant chemotherapy positive nodes on imaging and positive surgical margin at partial cystectomy were both associated with worse recurrence-free, advanced recurrence-free, and overall survival. Five-year recurrence-free, advanced recurrence-free, and overall survival were 28%, 51%, and 63%, respectively. Conclusion. Partial cystectomy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy provides acceptable oncologic outcomes in highly selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  19. Feasibility of preoperative combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in potentially resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma: The French SFRO-FFCD 97-04 Phase II trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mornex, Francoise . E-mail: francoise.mornex@chu-lyon.fr; Girard, Nicolas; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Bossard, Nadine; Ychou, Marc; Smith, Denis; Seitz, Jean-Francois; Valette, Pierre-Jean; Roy, Pascal; Rouanet, Philippe; Ducreux, Michel; Partensky, Christian

    2006-08-01

    Purpose More than 80% of patients who undergo a potentially curative resection for pancreatic cancer develop local or distant recurrence. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy might offer potential benefits regarding local and systemic control and survival. This multi-institutional Phase II trial explored the feasibility of preoperative chemoradiation in this situation. Methods and Materials Treatment consisted of concurrent radiotherapy (50 Gy within 5 weeks), and chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 5 days/week, 5 consecutive weeks) and cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day, Days 1-5 and 29-33), followed by surgical resection of the pancreatic tumor in patients without progression. Results A total of 41 patients were enrolled. Of these, 38 (93%) received {>=}47 Gy; 30 patients (73%) received {>=}75% of the prescribed doses of chemotherapy. Surgical resection was performed in 26 patients (63%). Because of local or metastatic progression, 5 patients (12%) did not undergo surgery and 10 underwent surgery without resection of the pancreatic tumor. Operative mortality was 2.8%. Among 40 evaluable patients, 27 were successfully treated (67.5%; 95% CI, 50.9-81.4%). Conclusions Pancreatic cancer is chemo-radiosensitive. The proposed pre-operative scheme is feasible, does not prevent successful surgery, and must be tested on a Phase III setting. Yet, the large proportion of tumor progression during and after chemoradiation justifies the use of more efficient drugs such as Gemcitabine, and optimized radiotherapy including new techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

  20. Can Fluorine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Be Used As a Useful Method to Evaluate the Treatment Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy Combined With Sorafenib and Anti-VEGF in Children Diagnosed With Metastatical Bone Sarcoma?

    PubMed Central

    Tacyildiz, Nurdan; Tanyildiz, Hikmet Gulsah; Dincaslan, Handan Ugur; Yavuz, Gulsan; Unal, Emel; Ozkan, Elgin; Soydal, Cigdem; Kucuk, Ozlem; Yildiz, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognosis is still poor for patients with a metastatic bone tumor and new treatment approaches (anti-VEGF and tyrosine kinase inhibitors vs) are therefore needed. Objectives The aim of our study was to evaluate how the primary and metastatic lesions of our patients with a bone tumor were affected by these treatments and to determine the importance of the 18F-FDG PET method. Patients and Methods Twenty metastatic bone tumor cases were included. Sorafenib and anti-VEGF were added to the standard treatment in cases with widespread metastatic disease at diagnosis or after neoadjuvant chemotherapy showing less than 90% tumor necrosis in the surgical sample. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at diagnosis, the preoperative period following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, during postoperative follow-up, and when treatment was discontinued. Results The primary treatment region median SUVmax level decreased from 7.35 to 2.5 in the living patients (n = 16) while there was no significant decrease in the patients who succumbed to the disease (P < 0.001). Comparison of the pre- and post-treatment metastasis region median SUVmax levels in patients with metastatic involvement showed a decrease from 2.1 to 0 in the surviving patients but only from 4.8 to 3.2 in the deceased patients (P < 0.01). Survival results indicated that 28.6% of the patients receiving classical treatment only died while all the patients receiving additional sorafenib and anti-VEGF survived. Conclusions 18F-PET may be a useful technique before and during the follow-up of neoadjuvant treatment in pediatric metastatic bone tumor patients. The addition of sorafenib and anti-VEGF to classical treatment has a favorable contribution to the response and therefore the survival duration. PMID:27307968

  1. Efficacy and safety analysis of trastuzumab and paclitaxel based regimen plus carboplatin or epirubicin as neoadjuvant therapy for clinical stage II-III, HER2-positive breast cancer patients: a phase 2, open-label, multicenter, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Chen, Sheng; Yang, Wentao; Xu, Binghe; Huang, Tao; Yang, Hongjian; Zheng, Hong; Wang, Yongsheng; Song, Erwei; Zhang, Jin; Cui, Shude; Pang, Da; Tang, Lili; Lei, Yutao; Geng, Cuizhi; Shao, Zhiming

    2015-07-30

    This trial was designed to compare the efficacy and safety between epirubicin (E) and carboplatin (C) in combination with paclitaxel (P) and trastuzumab (H) in neoadjuvant setting. In 13 Chinese cancer centers, 100 patients with HER2-positive, locally advanced breast cancer were 1:1 randomized to receive medication as follows: trastuzumab and paclitaxel weekly combined with carboplatin weekly for PCH group, or epirubicin every 3 weeks for PEH group. Patients were given 4 to 6 cycles of chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate, which was no significant difference in PCH and PEH regimen (39.1% vs. 48.8%; p=0.365). However, PEH regimen achieved higher pCR in luminal-B (HER2-poitive) subgroup (55.0% vs. 24.0%; p = 0.033), but not in ERBB2+ subgroup (42.9% vs. 57.1%; p = 0.355). PEH regimen showed a favorable efficacy in PIK3CA mutated subgroup (69.2% vs.23.5%, p=0.012). No significant difference was observed in the subgroup analysis of TP53 mutation status, PTEN expression, FCGR2A SNP and FCGR3A SNP. Both regimens as neoadjuvant chemotherapy achieve similar efficacy and safety. PEH might improve pCR rate, especially in the luminal-B subtype and PIK3CA mutation subtype. PEH is feasible and less likely to increase the incidence of acute cardiac events compared to PCH. PMID:26084292

  2. Standardizing of Pathology in Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bossuyt, Veerle; Symmans, W Fraser

    2016-10-01

    The use of neoadjuvant systemic therapy for the treatment of breast cancer patients is increasing. Pathologic response in the form of pathologic complete response (pCR) and grading systems of partial response, such as the residual cancer burden (RCB) system, gives valuable prognostic information for patients and is used as a primary endpoint in clinical trials. The breast cancer and pathology communities are responding with efforts to standardize pathology in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In this review, we summarize the challenges that postneoadjuvant systemic therapy surgical specimens pose and how pathologists and the multidisciplinary team can work together to optimize handling of these specimens. Multidisciplinary communication is essential. A single, standardized approach to macroscopic and microscopic pathologic examination makes it possible to provide reliable response information. This approach employs a map of tissue sections to correlate clinical, gross, microscopic, and imaging findings in order to report the presence of pCR (ypT0 ypN0 and ypT0/is ypN0) versus residual disease, the ypT and ypN stage using the current AJCC/UICC staging system, and the RCB. PMID:27380637

  3. The Role of Neoadjuvant Trials in Drug Development for Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Funt, Samuel A; Chapman, Paul B

    2016-05-15

    The relatively low success rate of phase II oncology trials in predicting success of novel drugs in phase III trials and in gaining regulatory approval may be due to reliance on the endpoint of response rate defined by the RECIST. The neoadjuvant treatment paradigm allows the antitumor activity of a novel therapy to be determined on a pathologic basis at the time of surgery instead of by RECIST, which was not developed to guide clinical decision making or correlate with long-term outcomes. Indeed, the FDA endorsed pathologic complete response (pCR) as a surrogate for overall survival (OS) in early-stage breast cancer and granted accelerated approval to pertuzumab based on this endpoint. We propose that pCR is a biologically rational method of determining treatment effect that may be more likely to predict OS. We discuss some advantages of the neoadjuvant trial design, review the use of neoadjuvant therapy as standards of care, and consider the neoadjuvant platform as a method for drug development. Clin Cancer Res; 22(10); 2323-8. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26842238

  4. [Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced rectal tumors].

    PubMed

    Rápolti, Edit; Szigeti, András; Farkas, Róbert; Bellyei, Szabolcs; Boronkai, Arpád; Papp, András; Gömöri, Eva; Horváth, Ors Péter; Mangel, László

    2009-12-01

    We investigated the response rate and side effects of simultaneous, neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCT) in locally advanced rectal cancer. Between 2005 and 2007, we treated 112 patients in stage II-III rectal carcinoma at the Institute of Oncotherapy, University of Pécs. For staging abdomino-pelvic CT (112) and transrectal US (49) or pelvic MR (10), or PET-CT (1) was performed. Radiation therapy was delivered with 3D CRT-based technique using belly-board with 18 MV photon energy, while patients in prone position. A total dose of 45 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy) was delivered to the tumor and the pelvic lymph nodes. 5-FU and Ca-folinate was administered concomitantly in the 1st and 5th week of radiotherapy. Four weeks after delivering neoadjuvant RCT the patients' control CT was evaluated according to RECIST criteria. RCT was followed by surgery in 6-9 weeks. We graded the histology using the Mandard regression score system. Side effects were registered using CTCAE v 3.0. Grade 1, 2 or 3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 12%, grade 3 hematological toxicity in 9.5% of the patients. The response rate determined by using control CT was 64.85%. According to the Mandard regression score, TRG1 occurred in 15%, TRG2 in 30.4%, TRG3 in 28%, TRG4 in 24% and TRG5 in 2.6% of the cases. Radical surgery was performed in 89 cases, 72 with R0 resection. By assessing the histological samples we found downstaging in 46% of the T and 34.5% of the N stage. We have no information on increased postoperative complications. We followed 86 patients after neoadjuvant therapy. Until March 2009 there was no progression in 48 of our patients. In 13 cases local relapse occurred, and in 25 cases the disease progressed because of distant metastasis, although local control was maintained. 10 patients had local relapse and distant metastases. 17 patients passed away. As a conclusion, neoadjuvant RCT of Stage II-III patients is an effective and well tolerated treatment, allowing for high R0

  5. Nab-paclitaxel and trastuzumab combination: a promising approach for neoadjuvant treatment in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ricciardi, Giuseppina Rosaria Rita; Franchina, Tindara; Russo, Alessandro; Schifano, Silvia; Ferraro, Giuseppa; Adamo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy is a well-established approach for the treatment of locally advanced or inflammatory breast cancer (BC) and has been increasingly used in recent years not only as a management strategy but also as a research tool. Recently, nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel)/trastuzumab combinations have been associated with promising activity in different clinical settings. In the present case, we report a complete pathological response after neoadjuvant treatment with the trastuzumab/nab-paclitaxel combination in a locally advanced human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive BC patient, with a good toxicity profile. This combination may represent a valid therapeutic option in the neoadjuvant therapy for HER2-positive locally advanced BC. PMID:27499629

  6. A PHASE II STUDY OF A PACLITAXEL-BASED CHEMORADIATION REGIMEN WITH SELECTIVE SURGICAL SALVAGE FOR RESECTABLE LOCOREGIONALLY ADVANCED ESOPHAGEAL CANCER: INITIAL REPORTING OF RTOG 0246

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Stephen G.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Wu, Tsung T.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Konski, Andre A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The strategy of definitive chemoradiation with selective surgical salvage in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer was evaluated in a Phase II trial in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-affiliated sites. Methods and Materials The study was designed to detect an improvement in 1-year survival from 60% to 77.5% (α= 0.05; power = 80%). Definitive chemoradiation involved induction chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (650 mg/mg2/day), cisplatin (15 mg/mg2/day), and paclitaxel (200 mg/mg2/day) for two cycles, followed by concurrent chemoradiation with 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and daily 5-FU (300 mg/mg2/day) with cisplatin (15 mg/mg2/day) over the first 5 days. Salvage surgical resection was considered for patients with residual or recurrent esophageal cancer who did not have systemic disease. Results Forty-three patients with nonmetastatic resectable esophageal cancer were entered from Sept 2003 to March 2006. Forty-one patients were eligible for analysis. Clinical stage was ≥T3 in 31 patients (76%) and N1 in 29 patients (71%), with adenocarcinoma histology in 30 patients (73%). Thirty-seven patients (90%) completed induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation. Twenty-eight patients (68%) experienced Grade 3+ nonhematologic toxicity. Four treatment-related deaths were noted. Twenty-one patients underwent surgery following definitive chemoradiation because of residual (17 patients) or recurrent (3 patients) esophageal cancer,and 1 patient because of choice. Median follow-up of live patients was 22 months, with an estimated 1-year survival of 71%. Conclusions In this Phase II trial (RTOG 0246) evaluating selective surgical salvage after definitive chemoradiation in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer, the hypothesized 1-year RTOG survival rate (77.5%) was not achieved (1 year, 71%; 95% confidence interval< 54%–82%). PMID:21507583

  7. Neoadjuvant treatment of colorectal liver metastases is associated with altered contrast enhancement on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Anne; Kühne, Katrin; Platzek, Ivan; Stroszczynski, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant systemic therapy may induce steatosis or sinusoid obstruction syndrome in the liver. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of systemic therapy with irinotecan, oxaliplatin and cetuximab on conspicuity of liver metastases on computed tomography (CT). CT scans of 48 patients with initial unresectable colorectal liver metastases which were treated in a Europe-wide, opened, randomized phase II trial receiving oxaliplatin or irinotecan combined with folinic acid and cetuximab were analysed. The density of the metastases and the liver parenchyma before and after systemic therapy were analysed by region-of-interest technique and the tumour-to-liver difference (dHU TLD). The mean density of liver parenchyma and liver metastases did not vary significantly before and after neoadjuvant therapy on plain (56.3 ± 8.1 HU, 54.8 ± 13.5 HU) and arterial enhanced CT (76.0 ± 15.7 HU, 70.5 ± 20.4 HU). There was a significant reduction (105.6 ± 17.3 HU, 93.3 ± 18.2 HU) in the density of liver parenchyma on portal venous scans after systemic therapy (p < 0.0001) and a reduction of dHU TLD, consecutively. In patients with colorectal liver metastases, neoadjuvant chemotherapy may have a toxic impact on liver parenchyma resulting in reduced tumour-to-liver contrast in contrast-enhanced CT. This may lead to underestimation of real lesion size. PMID:21771709

  8. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures After Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Course

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Michael P.; Kopetz, Scott; Bhosale, Priya R.; Eng, Cathy; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.; Das, Prajnan

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency (SI) fractures can occur as a late side effect of pelvic radiation therapy. Our goal was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of SI fractures in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 1989 and 2004, 562 patients with non-metastatic rectal adenocarcinoma were treated with preoperative chemoradiation followed by mesorectal excision. The median radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy. The hospital records and radiology reports of these patients were reviewed to identify those with pelvic fractures. Radiology images of patients with pelvic fractures were then reviewed to identify those with SI fractures. Results: Among the 562 patients, 15 had SI fractures. The 3-year actuarial rate of SI fractures was 3.1%. The median time to SI fractures was 17 months (range, 2-34 months). The risk of SI fractures was significantly higher in women compared to men (5.8% vs. 1.6%, p = 0.014), and in whites compared with non-whites (4% vs. 0%, p = 0.037). On multivariate analysis, gender independently predicted for the risk of SI fractures (hazard ratio, 3.25; p = 0.031). Documentation about the presence or absence of pain was available for 13 patients; of these 7 (54%) had symptoms requiring pain medications. The median duration of pain was 22 months. No patient required hospitalization or invasive intervention for pain control. Conclusions: SI fractures were uncommon in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. The risk of SI fractures was significantly higher in women. Most cases of SI fractures can be managed conservatively with pain medications.

  9. Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Weekly Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Biweekly Bevacizumab Therapy in Women With Clinical Stage II or III HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mrózek, Ewa; Layman, Rachel; Ramaswamy, Bhuvaneswari; Lustberg, Maryam; Vecchione, Andrea; Knopp, Michael V.; Shapiro, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    This phase II trial tested the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) achieved by women with stage II–III human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-negative) breast cancer (BC) treated with neo-adjuvant nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-P), carboplatin and bevacizumab. The rate of pCR was 18%, all pCRs were observed in patients with triple negative BC. Background We hypothesized that adding bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) with nab-P and carboplatin would increase the rates of pCR in BC patients and that early changes in tumor vascularity imaged by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) would predict pCR. Methods Thirty-three women with clinical stage II or III HER2-negative BC received nab-P 100 mg/m2 and carboplatin area under the curve = 2 on days 1, 8, and 15 in combination with bevacizumab 10 mg/kg on days 1 and 15 administered every 28 days. Results Six patients (18%) achieved pCR, all pCRs occurred in triple-negative BC (TNBC) (pCR = 50% for TNBC). At the end of cycle 2, the changes in relative angiogenic volume were significantly different between responders and non-responders (P = .001). The major toxicity of this NCT was myelosuppression. Conclusion NCT with weekly nab-P, carboplatin, and biweekly bevacizumab resulted in a pCR rate that was neither superior to the historical data with anthracycline- or taxane-containing NCT nor to carboplatin and taxane combinations in patients with HER2-negative BC. In patients with TNBC, the observed pCR rate was 50%. The early changes in the relative angiogenic volume imaged by DCE-MRI could predict pCR. PMID:24703985

  10. SOLTI NeoPARP: a phase II randomized study of two schedules of iniparib plus paclitaxel versus paclitaxel alone as neoadjuvant therapy in patients with triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Llombart-Cussac, Antonio; Bermejo, Begoña; Villanueva, Cristian; Delaloge, Suzette; Morales, Serafín; Balmaña, Judith; Amillano, Kepa; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Casas, Ana; Manso, Luis; Roché, Henri; Gonzalez-Santiago, Santiago; Gavilá, Joaquín; Sánchez-Rovira, Pedro; Di Cosimo, Serena; Harbeck, Nadia; Charpentier, Eric; Garcia-Ribas, Ignacio; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Aura, Claudia; Baselga, Jose

    2015-11-01

    Iniparib is an investigational agent with antitumor activity of controversial mechanism of action. Two previous trials in advanced triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) in combination with gemcitabine and carboplatin showed some evidence of efficacy that was not confirmed. This phase II randomized neoadjuvant study was designed to explore its activity and tolerability with weekly paclitaxel (PTX) as neoadjuvant treatment in TNBC patients. 141 patients with Stage II-IIIA TNBC were randomly assigned to receive PTX (80 mg/m(2), d1; n = 47) alone or in combination with iniparib, either once-weekly (PWI) (11.2 mg/kg, d1; n = 46) or twice-weekly (PTI) (5.6 mg/kg, d1, 4; n = 48) for 12 weeks. Primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) in the breast. pCR rate was similar among the three arms (21, 22, and 19 % for PTX, PWI, and PTI, respectively). Secondary efficacy endpoints were comparable: pCR in breast and axilla (21, 17, and 19 %); best overall response in the breast (60, 61, and 63 %); and breast conservation rate (53, 54, and 50 %). Slightly more patients in the PTI arm presented grade 3/4 neutropenia (4, 0, and 10 %). Grade 1/2 (28, 22, and 29 %), but no grade 3/4 neuropathy, was observed. There were no differences in serious adverse events and treatment-emergent adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation among the three arms. Addition of iniparib to weekly PTX did not add relevant antitumor activity or toxicity. These results do not support further evaluation of the combination of iniparib at these doses plus paclitaxel in early TNBC. PMID:26536871

  11. Survival After Chemoradiation in Resected Pancreatic Cancer: The Impact of Adjuvant Gemcitabine

    SciTech Connect

    Baschnagel, Andrew; Shah, Chirag; Margolis, Jeffrey; Nadeau, Laura; Stein, Julie; Jury, Robert; Robertson, John M.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation with or without adjuvant gemcitabine (Gem). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 86 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent resection were treated with adjuvant concurrent chemoradiation. Thirty-four patients received concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiation (5-FU/RT) with traditional field radiation (range, 45-61.2 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) without further adjuvant therapy. Thirty patients received traditional field 5-FU/RT (range, 45-60.4 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) with Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly) either before and after radiotherapy or only after radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients received concurrent full-dose Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly)-based chemoradiation (Gem/RT), consisting of involved-field radiation (range, 27-38 Gy; median, 36 Gy) followed by further adjuvant Gem. Results: The median age of the cohort was 65 years (range, 40-80 years). Of the patients, 58 had T3 tumors (67%), 22 had T2 tumors (26%), and 6 had T1 tumors (7%). N1 disease was present in 61 patients (71%), whereas 18 patients (21%) had R1 resections. Performance status, lymph node status, and margin status were all similar among the treatment groups. Median follow-up was 19.0 months. Median overall survival (OS) (19.2 months, 19.0 months, and 21.0 months) and 3-year OS rates (26.5%, 27.2%, and 32.1%) were similar among patients with 5-FU/RT with no adjuvant Gem, those with 5-FU/RT with adjuvant Gem, and those with Gem/RT with adjuvant Gem, respectively (p = 0.88). Patients who received adjuvant Gem had a similar median OS (22.1 months) and 3-year OS rate (29%) compared to patients who did not (19.2 months and 26.5%, respectively) (p = 0.62). There was a trend for improved 3-year OS rates in patients with R0 vs. R1 resections (28.1% vs. 14.2%, p = 0.06) and in patients with T1 and T2 vs. T3 tumors (38% vs. 20%, p = 0.09). Node-negative patients had an improved 3

  12. Neoadjuvant treatment for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Masayuki; Yoshida, Naoya; Baba, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma are types of esophageal cancer, one of the most aggressive malignant diseases. Since both histological types present entirely different diseases with different epidemiology, pathogenesis and tumor biology, separate therapeutic strategies should be developed against each type. While surgical resection remains the dominant therapeutic intervention for patients with operable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), alternative strategies are actively sought to reduce the frequency of post-operative local or distant disease recurrence. Such strategies are particularly sought in the preoperative setting. Currently, the optimal management of resectable ESCC differs widely between Western and Asian countries (such as Japan). While Western countries focus on neoadjuvant or definitive chemoradiotherapy, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery is the standard treatment in Japan. Importantly, each country and region has established its own therapeutic strategy from the results of local randomized control trials. This review discusses the current knowledge, available data and information regarding neoadjuvant treatment for operable ESCC. PMID:24834142

  13. Comparison of three different concurrent chemoradiation regimens for treatment of laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Aydil, Utku; Akmansu, Müge; Gumusay, Özge; Bakkal, Faruk Kadri; Yazıcı, Ömer; Kızıl, Yusuf; Köybaşıoğlu, Ahmet; Yıldız, Ramazan; Büyükberber, Süleyman; İnal, Erdoğan

    2016-09-01

    During last decades, laryngeal organ preservation strategies have emerged. The data about the oncological outcomes mainly come from multi-institutional prospective studies. In this study, we aimed to determine the oncological outcomes of different organ preservation regimens applied in routine practice. Patients who had definitive concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) for treatment of laryngeal cancer between January 2001 and June 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. There were 139 subjects who met the inclusion criteria. Three groups were defined: group A (n = 59) consisted of subjects who had concurrent cisplatin and radiotherapy (RT), group B (n = 47) consisted of subjects who had cisplatin/docetaxel-based concurrent CRT, and group C (n = 33) had induction chemotherapy before concurrent cisplatin and RT. The Kaplan-Meier estimated 5-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rates for the whole study group were 66.5, 69.2, 69.6, and 88.9 %, respectively. None of these survival rates were statistically different when the treatment arms were compared. The 3- and 5-year LRFS rates were significantly lower in subjects with a T4a tumor (p = 0.030). According to our results, the oncological outcomes of three different platinum-based concurrent chemotherapy schemes were similar and high local control rates could be achieved with the use of these protocols. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy before concurrent CRT was not superior to conventional concurrent treatment. PMID:26683470

  14. Evaluating the Role of Interdigitated Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Radiation in the Management of High-Grade Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Raju R.; Frassica, Deborah; Thornton, Katherine; Meyer, Christian; Ettinger, David S.; Frassica, Frank; Weber, Kristin; Terezakis, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives High-grade soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) has a poor prognosis. The goal of this study was to review treatment outcomes of patients with high-grade STS treated with interdigitated neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CT) and radiation at our institution. Materials and Methods Patients with high-grade STS (1997 to 2010) were planned for treatment with 3 cycles of neoadjuvant CT, interdigitated preoperative radiation therapy (44 Gy administered in split courses with a potential 16 Gy postoperative boost), and 3 cycles of postoperative CT. Cancer control outcomes at 3 years were analyzed. Results Sixteen patients with high-grade STS were evaluated. Median age was 53 years, the median longest tumor diameter was 14.6 cm, and median follow-up was 33 months. All 16 patients received 2 or 3 cycles of neoadjuvant CT and all patients completed neoadjuvant RT. The estimated 3-year rate for local control was 100%, disease-free survival 62.5%, and overall survival 73.4%. Conclusions Patients with high-grade STS treated with interdigitated neoadjuvant CT and radiation before surgical resection had excellent rates of local control, along with disease-free survival and overall survival similar to previously published reports. This combined-modality approach continues to have a role in the treatment of patients with high-grade STS. PMID:25268069

  15. Neoadjuvant imatinib: longer the better, need to modify risk stratification for adjuvant imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Anant; Jain, Deepak; Sahu, Arvind; Ghosh, Joydeep; Prasad, Priya; Deodhar, Kedar; Shetty, Nitin; Banavali, Shripad; Shrikhande, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Background Multimodality treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) with surgery and adjuvant imatinib mesylate (IM), along with an emerging role for neoadjuvant IM prior to evaluation for resectability has resulted in high survival rates. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of patients who underwent surgery for GIST, prior to or followed by IM therapy. A total of 112 patients underwent surgery between January 2009 and March 2015 at our centre. This included 27 patients with upfront resectable disease, 76 patients with locally advanced GIST who received neoadjuvant IM followed by surgery and 9 patients with metastatic disease who had excellent response to IM and were taken for surgery. Results The primary tumor in the non metastatic patients was in the stomach (53%), duodenum (16%), rectum (12%), jejunum (11%), ileum (7%), and others (2%). Median duration of neoadjuvant IM was 5 months with 4 patients showing disease progression during neoadjuvant IM. Ninety-three percent of all patients had R0 resections, while 7% had R+ resections. The estimated 3- and 5-year DFS in non-metastatic patients was 86.1% and 67% respectively with a 3- and 5-year median OS of 95.4% and 91.7% respectively. Five-year PFS and OS for the metastatic patients was 88.8% and 100% respectively. Lack of adjuvant IM was the only factor related to inferior PFS and OS. Conclusions Longer duration of neoadjuvant IM should be considered in locally advanced GIST prior to surgery and resection may be considered in responding metastatic patients. PMID:27563454

  16. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Neuroendocrine Bladder Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Prelaj, Arsela; Rebuzzi, Sara Elena; Magliocca, Fabio Massimo; Speranza, Iolanda; Corongiu, Emanuele; Borgoni, Giuseppe; Perugia, Giacomo; Liberti, Marcello; Bianco, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 71 Final Diagnosis: Neuroendocrine cancer bladder Symptoms: Dysuria • haematuria Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Transurethral resection of the bladder tumor Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare and aggressive form of bladder cancer that mainly presents at an advanced stage. As a result of its rarity, it has been described in many case reports and reviews but few retrospective and prospective trials, showing there is no standard therapeutic approach. In the literature the best therapeutic strategy for limited disease is the multimodality treatment and most authors have extrapolated treatment algorithms from the therapy recommendations of small cell lung cancer. Case Report: A 71-year-old male patient was referred to our hospital with gross hematuria and dysuria. Imaging and cystoscopy revealed a vegetative lesion of the bladder wall. A transurethral resection of the bladder was performed. Pathological examination revealed a pT2 high-grade urothelial carcinoma with widespread neuroendocrine differentiation. Multimodal treatment with neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy was performed. A CT scan performed after chemotherapy demonstrated a radiological complete response. The patient underwent radical cystectomy and lymphadenectomy. The histopathological finding of bladder and node specimen confirmed a pathological complete response. A post-surgery CT scan showed no evidence of local or systemic disease. Six months after surgery, the patient is still alive and disease-free. Conclusions: A standard treatment strategy of small cell cancer of the urinary bladder is not yet well established, but a multimodal treatment of this disease is the best option compared to surgical therapy alone. The authors confirm the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in limited disease of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. PMID:27072610

  17. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Neuroendocrine Bladder Cancer: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Prelaj, Arsela; Rebuzzi, Sara Elena; Magliocca, Fabio Massimo; Speranza, Iolanda; Corongiu, Emanuele; Borgoni, Giuseppe; Perugia, Giacomo; Liberti, Marcello; Bianco, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare and aggressive form of bladder cancer that mainly presents at an advanced stage. As a result of its rarity, it has been described in many case reports and reviews but few retrospective and prospective trials, showing there is no standard therapeutic approach. In the literature the best therapeutic strategy for limited disease is the multimodality treatment and most authors have extrapolated treatment algorithms from the therapy recommendations of small cell lung cancer. CASE REPORT A 71-year-old male patient was referred to our hospital with gross hematuria and dysuria. Imaging and cystoscopy revealed a vegetative lesion of the bladder wall. A transurethral resection of the bladder was performed. Pathological examination revealed a pT2 high-grade urothelial carcinoma with widespread neuroendocrine differentiation. Multimodal treatment with neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy was performed. A CT scan performed after chemotherapy demonstrated a radiological complete response. The patient underwent radical cystectomy and lymphadenectomy. The histopathological finding of bladder and node specimen confirmed a pathological complete response. A post-surgery CT scan showed no evidence of local or systemic disease. Six months after surgery, the patient is still alive and disease-free. CONCLUSIONS A standard treatment strategy of small cell cancer of the urinary bladder is not yet well established, but a multimodal treatment of this disease is the best option compared to surgical therapy alone. The authors confirm the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in limited disease of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. PMID:27072610

  18. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for high-grade advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, Y; Sawa, T; Kinoshita, K; Matsuki, N; Fushida, S; Tanaka, S; Ohoyama, S; Takashima, T; Kimura, H; Kamata, T

    1993-01-01

    Fifty-five patients with high-grade advanced gastric cancer in whom the presence of stage IV was confirmed by preoperative diagnostic imaging were treated with PMUE therapy by a combined use of cisplatin (CDDP) 75 mg/m2, mitomycin C (MMC) 10 mg/body, etoposide 150 mg/body, and UFT (a combination of 1-(2-tetrahydrofuryl)-5-fluorouracil and uracil in a molar ratio of 1:4) 400 mg/day. CDDP and MMC was administered intravenously on the first day, followed by etoposide 50 mg/day on the 3rd, 4th, and 5th days. All the patients had measurable lesions that were evaluated by computed tomography scanning before and after the treatments. These patients were allocated randomly to two groups. Of these cases, 29 belonged to the neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) group to whom PMUE therapy was given preoperatively; the remaining 26 patients underwent operation first and received PMUE thereafter (control group). Background factors did not differ significantly between the two groups. The response rate was higher in the NAC group than in the control group (62% in the former versus 35% in the latter). The resectability rates were 79% and 88% in the NAC and control groups, respectively. However, the rate of potentially curable cases was higher in the NAC group than in the control group (38% in the former versus 15% in the latter). Among the nonresection cases, the prognosis was highly unfavorable in both groups. In the resection cases, however, the survival rate was significantly better in the NAC group than in the control group. These results may indicate that in patients with high-grade, advanced gastric cancer initial chemotherapy (neoadjuvant chemotherapy) and then surgery should be considered. PMID:8511923

  19. Hypersensitivity reaction to cisplatin during chemoradiation therapy for gynecologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Koren, Claude; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Katz, Alan; Malik, Hana; Sulkes, Aaron; Fenig, Eyal

    2002-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous cisplatin are rare. The appearance of hypersensitivity reactions in 4 of 25 consecutive patients treated with concomitant pelvic radiation and weekly intravenous cisplatin for gynecologic malignancies is reported. The reactions appeared within hours of cisplatin delivery and included primarily fever, rash, and pruritus. Infection was ruled out by blood cultures and other laboratory studies. Affected patients were treated prophylactically with an antihistamine before subsequent courses of cisplatin, with excellent results. The high rate of hypersensitivity reactions in our series may be attributable to tumor necrosis and cytokine release caused by the pelvic irradiation. Clinicians should be aware of this potential side effect so that early premedication regimens can be instituted to prevent unnecessary toxicity. PMID:12478013

  20. Sequential chemoradiation in locally advanced head and neck cancer after induction chemotherapy: an induction chemotherapy schedule more suited to a limited resource setting

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Aparna; Nath, Partha; Biswas, Jaydip

    2015-01-01

    Background In our experience, induction docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy and sequential chemoradiation in locally advanced head and neck cancer lowers compliance owing to their considerable toxicity. Most of our head and neck cancer patients have locally advanced disease at presentation. Physicians frequently prefer paclitaxel–cisplatin induction chemotherapy instead, because of better patient tolerance. Materials and methods A total of 207 locally advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving paclitaxel and cisplatin prior to chemoradiation from November 2010 to October 2013 were studied retrospectively. Parameters like febrile neutropaenia, treatment compliance, and response rates were compared to our institutional retrospective data with TPF chemotherapy. Response was assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (Recist) version 1.1. Toxicity was assessed by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0 during chemotherapy. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute toxicity criteria were used for assessment during chemoradiation. Results Febrile neutropaenia with paclitaxel– cisplatin was significantly lower 3.4% (7/207) versus 44.5% (73/164) with TPF chemotherapy (two-tailed P value < 0.0001). A 95.7 % (198/207) paclitaxel–cisplatin patients completed chemoradiation versus 87% with TPF. The difference was significant (two-tailed P value = 0.0070). Response rate at treatment completion with paclitaxel –cisplatin was 89.7% versus 88% with TPF chemotherapy. No significant differences were observed (two-tailed P value = 0.7007). Conclusion Induction paclitaxel and cisplatin with sequential chemoradiation in locally advanced head and neck cancer is more suitable in a limited resource setting. Lower toxicity, better compliance, and comparable response are encouraging in our study cohort. PMID:26082800

  1. KRAS Mutation Status and Clinical Outcome of Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of 2 Phase II Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Shim, Eun Kyung; Yeo, Hyun Yang; Baek, Ji Yeon; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seock-Ah; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab-containing chemotherapy is known to be effective for KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer; however, it is not clear whether cetuximab-based preoperative chemoradiation confers an additional benefit compared with chemoradiation without cetuximab in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status with direct sequencing and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression status with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples of 82 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were enrolled in the IRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine; n=44) or the ERBIRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine plus cetuximab; n=38). Both trials were similarly designed except for the administration of cetuximab; radiation therapy was administered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions and irinotecan and capecitabine were given at doses of 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly and 1650 mg/m{sup 2}/day, respectively, for 5 days per week. In the ERBIRIX trial, cetuximab was additionally given with a loading dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} on 1 week before radiation, and 250 mg/m{sup 2} weekly thereafter. Results: Baseline characteristics before chemoradiation were similar between the 2 trial cohorts. A KRAS mutation in codon 12, 13, and 61 was noted in 15 (34%) patients in the IRIX cohort and 5 (13%) in the ERBIRIX cohort (P=.028). Among 62 KRAS wild-type cancer patients, major pathologic response rate, disease-free survival and pathologic stage did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts. No mutations were detected in BRAF exon 11 and 15, PIK3CA exon 9 and 20, or EGFR exon 18-24 in any of the 82 patients, and PTEN and EGFR expression were not predictive of clinical outcome. Conclusions: In patients with KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer, the addition of cetuximab to the chemoradiation with

  2. Efficacy Endpoints of RTOG 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Plus Concurrent Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stuart J.; Moughan, J.; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith P.; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Primary endpoint analysis of RTOG 0247 demonstrated preoperative RT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin achieved a pCR pre-specified threshold (21%) to merit further study, whereas the RT with capecitabine plus irinotecan arm did not (10%). Secondary efficacy endpoints are reported here. Methods and Materials A randomized phase II trial evaluated preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions) with two concurrent chemotherapy regimens: 1—capecitabine (1200 mg/m2/d M-F) plus irinotecan (50 mg/m2 /week × 4); and 2—capecitabine (1650 mg/m2/d M-F) plus oxaliplatin (50 mg/m2 /week × 5) for clinical T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks following chemoradiation, then 4-6 weeks later, adjuvant chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2; leucovorin 400 mg/m2; 5FU 400 mg/m2; 5FU 2400 mg/m2) every 2 weeks × 9. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method. Local-regional failure (LRF), distant failure (DF), and second primary failure (SP) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. No statistical comparisons were made between arms as each was evaluated individually. Results 104 patients (median age 57) were treated; characteristics were similar for both arms. Median follow-up for RT with capecitabine/irinotecan arm was 3.77 years and for RT with capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm was 3.97 years. Four-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP estimates for capecitabine/irinotecan arm are 68%, 85%, 16%, 24%, and 2%, respectively. The 4-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP failure estimates for capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm are 62%, 75%, 18%, 30%, and 6%, respectively. Conclusions Efficacy results for both arms are similar to other reported studies but suggest that pCR is an unsuitable surrogate for traditional survival metrics of clinical outcome. While it remains uncertain if the addition of a second cytotoxic agent enhances the effectiveness of fluorouracil plus RT, these results suggest further

  3. [Retrospective analysis of 24 recurrent glioblastoma after chemoradiation and treated with nitrosoureas or irinotecan and bevacizumab].

    PubMed

    Vauleon, Elodie; Mesbah, Habiba; Gedouin, Daniel; Lecouillard, Isabelle; Louvel, Guillaume; Hamlat, Abderrahmane; Riffaud, Laurent; Carsin, Béatrice; Quillien, Véronique; Audrain, Odile; Lesimple, Thierry

    2012-02-01

    Despite progress in the initial management of glioblastoma (GB), the vast majority of patients will experience recurrence within 2-3 years. The medical treatment of these recurrences is being modified by the use of antiangiogenic therapies. Twenty-four patients, who relapsed from GB after chemoradiation followed by adjuvant temozolomide in Rennes, were treated by conventional chemotherapy (nitrosourea) or by the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab. In this retrospective analysis, overall survival from diagnosis of recurrence was significantly longer in patients treated with the combination of bevacizumab and irinotecan than with nitrosourea (5 months versus 11.5 months). The combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab appeared to provide clinical benefit to patients with recurrent GB. PMID:22257744

  4. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  5. [Role of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer : Is MRI-based selection a future model?].

    PubMed

    Kulu, Y; Hackert, T; Debus, J; Weber, M-A; Büchler, M W; Ulrich, A

    2016-07-01

    Following the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) in the curative treatment of rectal cancer, the role of neoadjuvant therapy has evolved. By improving the surgical technique the local recurrence rate could be reduced by TME surgery alone to below 8 %. Even if local control was further improved by additional preoperative irradiation this did not lead to a general survival benefit. Guidelines advocate that all patients in UICC stage II and III should be pretreated; however, the stage-based indications for neoadjuvant therapy have limitations. This is mainly attributable to the facts that patients with T3 tumors comprise a very heterogeneous prognostic group and preoperative lymph node diagnostics lack accuracy. In contrast, in recent years the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has become an important prognostic parameter. Patients with tumors that are very close to or infiltrate the pelvic fascia (positive CRM) have a higher rate of local recurrence and poorer survival. With high-resolution pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination in patients with rectal cancer, the preoperative CRM can be determined with a high sensitivity and specificity. Improved T staging and better prediction of the resection margins by pelvic MRI potentially facilitate the selection of patients for study-based treatment strategies omitting neoadjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:27339645

  6. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer: Long-term results of a phase I trial

    SciTech Connect

    Allal, Abdelkarim S. . E-mail: abdelkarim.allal@hcuge.ch; Zwahlen, Daniel; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Peyer, Raymond de; Morel, Philippe; Huber, Olivier; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term results of radiation therapy (RT) when added preoperatively to systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients presenting with T3-4 or N+ gastric cancer received two cycles of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} d1, 5FU 800 mg/m{sup 2} d1-4, and Leucovorin 60 mg twice daily d1-4; one cycle before and one concomitantly with hyperfractionated RT (median dose, 38.4; range, 31.2-45.6 Gy). All patients underwent a total or subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node resection. Results: Nineteen patients were accrued and 18 completed the neoadjuvant therapeutic program. All patients were subsequently operated and no fatality occurred. At a mean follow-up of 8 years for the surviving patients, no severe late toxicity was observed. The 5-year locoregional control, disease-free, and overall survival were of 85%, 41%, and 35%, respectively. The peritoneum was the most frequent site of relapse. Among long terms survivors, no severe (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3-4) late complication was reported. Conclusions: The present neoadjuvant treatment does not seem to increase the operative risk, nor the late side effects. The encouraging locoregional control rate suggests that the neoadjuvant approach should be considered for future trials in locally advanced gastric cancer. Also, the frequency of peritoneal recurrence stresses the need for a more efficient systemic or intraperitoneal treatment.

  7. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva

    PubMed Central

    GAUDINEAU, A.; WEITBRUCH, D.; QUETIN, P.; HEYMANN, S.; PETIT, T.; VOLKMAR, P.; BODIN, F.; VELTEN, M.; RODIER, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative therapies have been sought to alleviate mutilation and morbidity associated with surgery for vulvar neoplasms. Our prime objective was to assess tumor absence in pathological vulvar and nodal specimens following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced vulvar neoplasms. Data were retrospectively collected from January 2001 to May 2009 from 22 patients treated with neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of inguino-pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy) in association with chemotherapy when possible. Surgery occurred at intervals of between 5 to 8 weeks. The median age of patients at diagnosis was 74.1 years. All patients were primarily treated with radiotherapy and 15 received a concomitant chemotherapy. Additionally, all patients underwent radical vulvectomy and bilateral inguino-femoral lymphadenectomy. Tumor absence in the vulvar and nodal pathological specimens was achieved for 6 (27%) patients, while absence in the vulvar pathological specimens was only achieved for 10 (45.4%) patients. Postoperative follow-up revealed breakdown of groin wounds, vulvar wounds and chronic lymphedema in 3 (14.3%), 7 (31.8%) and 14 cases (63.6%), respectively. Within a median follow-up time of 2.3 years [interquartile range (IQR), 0.6–4.6], 12 (54.6%) patients experienced complete remission and 6 cases succumbed to metastatic evolution within a median of 2.2 years (IQR, 0.6–4.6), with 1 case also experiencing perineal recurrence. Median survival time, estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, was 5.1 years (IQR, 1.0–6.8). We suggest that neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy may represent a reliable and promising strategy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. PMID:23205089

  8. Sensitization of Pancreatic Cancers to Gemcitabine Chemoradiation by WEE1 Kinase Inhibition Depends on Homologous Recombination Repair12

    PubMed Central

    Kausar, Tasneem; Schreiber, Jason S.; Karnak, David; Parsels, Leslie A.; Parsels, Joshua D.; Davis, Mary A.; Zhao, Lili; Maybaum, Jonathan; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Morgan, Meredith A.

    2015-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer and begin to establish patient selection criteria, we investigated the combination of the WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 with gemcitabine-radiation in homologous recombination (HR) repair proficient and deficient pancreatic cancers. Sensitization to gemcitabine-radiation by AZD1775 was assessed in pancreatic cancer cells by clonogenic survival and in patient-derived xenografts by tumor growth. The contributions of HR repair inhibition and G2 checkpoint abrogation to sensitization were assessed by γH2AX, BRCA2 manipulation, and RAD51 focus formation and pHistone H3 flow cytometry, respectively. We found that AZD1775 sensitized to gemcitabine-radiation in BRCA2 wild-type but not BRCA2 mutant pancreatic cancer cells. In all cells, AZD1775 caused inhibition of CDK1 phosphorylation and G2 checkpoint abrogation. However, sensitization by AZD1775 was associated with persistent γH2AX and inhibition of RAD51 focus formation. In HR-proficient (BRCA2 wild-type) or -deficient (BRAC2 null) isogenic cells, AZD1775 sensitized to gemcitabine-radiation in BRCA2 wild-type, but not in BRCA2 null cells, despite significant G2 checkpoint abrogation. In patient-derived pancreatic tumor xenografts, AZD1775 significantly inhibited tumor growth and impaired RAD51 focus formation in response to gemcitabine-radiation. In conclusion, WEE1 inhibition by AZD1775 is an effective strategy for sensitizing pancreatic cancers to gemcitabine chemoradiation. Although this sensitization is accompanied by inhibition of CDK1 phosphorylation and G2 checkpoint abrogation, this mechanism is not sufficient for sensitization. Our findings demonstrate that sensitization to chemoradiation by WEE1 inhibition results from inhibition of HR repair and suggest that patient tumors without underlying HR defects would benefit most from this therapy. PMID:26585231

  9. Neo-adjuvant chemo-(immuno-)therapy of advanced squamous-cell head and neck carcinoma: a multicenter, phase III, randomized study comparing cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with cisplatin + 5-FU + recombinant interleukin 2.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, G; Gebbia, V; Airoldi, M; Bumma, C; Contu, P; Bianchi, A; Ghiani, M; Dessì, D; Massa, E; Curreli, L; Lampis, B; Lai, P; Mulas, C; Testa, A; Proto, E; Cadeddu, G; Tore, G

    1998-11-01

    We carried out an open, randomized, phase III, multicenter clinical trial to compare, in neo-adjuvant setting, the clinical response and toxicity of the combination chemotherapy cisplatin + 5-FU with the same combination plus s.c. recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) in patients with advanced (stage III IV) head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Regimen A was the classical Al Sarraf treatment: 100 mg/m2 cisplatin i.v. on day 1 plus 1000 mg m(-2) day(-1) 5-FU on days 1-5 as a continuous infusion. Regimen B was the same as regimen A plus 4.5 MIU/day rIL-2 s.c. on days 8-12 and 15-19. Treatment was repeated every 3 weeks for three cycles. A total of 33 patients were enrolled in the study; 30 were evaluable for toxicity and 28 for response. Seventeen patients were assigned to group A and 16 were assigned to group B. Three patients (20%) of group A and 4 (31%) of group B had a complete response, 9 patients (60%) of group A and 6 (46%) of group B had a partial response, with an overall response rate of 12 patients (80%) for group A and 10 patients (77%) for group B. Two patients (13%) of group A and 3 patients (23%) group B had stable disease; 1 patient (7%) of group A had progressive disease. Thus, there was not a statistically significant difference in response rate between the two groups and therefore there was no benefit from the addition of immunotherapy with rIL-2 to the standard chemotherapy. Both regimens were well tolerated. There were 2 toxic deaths (6.7%), 1 from hematological causes in group A and I from cardiac causes in group B. Myelosuppression and gastrointestinal toxicity, mainly nausea/vomiting and stomatitis, were the most frequent toxicities. The calculated number of patients for the sample has not yet been reached; however, the projection of our present results suggests that it is highly improbable that a clinically significant difference between the two treatment groups will be observed even if the calculated patient sample size is achieved

  10. Phase II Study of Gemcitabine, Carboplatin, and Iniparib As Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-Negative and BRCA1/2 Mutation–Associated Breast Cancer With Assessment of a Tumor-Based Measure of Genomic Instability: PrECOG 0105

    PubMed Central

    Telli, Melinda L.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Vinayak, Shaveta; Kurian, Allison W.; Lipson, Jafi A.; Flaherty, Patrick J.; Timms, Kirsten; Abkevich, Victor; Schackmann, Elizabeth A.; Wapnir, Irene L.; Carlson, Robert W.; Chang, Pei-Jen; Sparano, Joseph A.; Head, Bobbie; Goldstein, Lori J.; Haley, Barbara; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Reid, Julia E.; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Manola, Judith; Ford, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to assess efficacy, safety, and predictors of response to iniparib in combination with gemcitabine and carboplatin in early-stage triple-negative and BRCA1/2 mutation–associated breast cancer. Patients and Methods This single-arm phase II study enrolled patients with stage I to IIIA (T ≥ 1 cm) estrogen receptor–negative (≤ 5%), progesterone receptor–negative (≤ 5%), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–negative or BRCA1/2 mutation–associated breast cancer. Neoadjuvant gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 intravenously [IV] on days 1 and 8), carboplatin (area under curve of 2 IV on days 1 and 8), and iniparib (5.6 mg/kg IV on days 1, 4, 8, and 11) were administered every 21 days for four cycles, until the protocol was amended to six cycles. The primary end point was pathologic complete response (no invasive carcinoma in breast or axilla). All patients underwent comprehensive BRCA1/2 genotyping, and homologous recombination deficiency was assessed by loss of heterozygosity (HRD-LOH) in pretreatment core breast biopsies. Results Among 80 patients, median age was 48 years; 19 patients (24%) had germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations; clinical stage was I (13%), IIA (36%), IIB (36%), and IIIA (15%). Overall pathologic complete response rate in the intent-to-treat population (n = 80) was 36% (90% CI, 27 to 46). Mean HRD-LOH scores were higher in responders compared with nonresponders (P = .02) and remained significant when BRCA1/2 germline mutations carriers were excluded (P = .021). Conclusion Preoperative combination of gemcitabine, carboplatin, and iniparib is active in the treatment of early-stage triple-negative and BRCA1/2 mutation–associated breast cancer. The HRD-LOH assay was able to identify patients with sporadic triple-negative breast cancer lacking a BRCA1/2 mutation, but with an elevated HRD-LOH score, who achieved a favorable pathologic response. Confirmatory controlled trials are warranted. PMID:25847929

  11. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stuart J.; Winter, Kathryn; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, Robert Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) and the toxicity of two neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT) regimens for Stage T3-T4 rectal cancer in a randomized Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer of <12 cm from the anal verge were randomized to preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (1,200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Mondays through Friday) and irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in four doses) (Arm 1) or concurrent capecitabine (1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday through Friday) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in five doses) (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks after chemoRT, and adjuvant chemotherapy 4-6 weeks after surgery. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate, requiring 48 evaluable patients per arm. Results: A total of 146 patients were enrolled. The protocol chemotherapy was modified because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment of 35 patients; 96 were assessed for the primary endpoint-the final regimen described above. The patient characteristics were similar for both arms. After chemoRT, the rate of tumor downstaging was 52% and 60% and the rate of nodal downstaging (excluding N0 patients) was 46% and 40%, for Arms 1 and 2, respectively. The pCR rate for Arm 1 was 10% and for Arm 2 was 21%. For Arm 1 and 2, the preoperative chemoRT rate of Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was 9% and 4% and the rate of Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity was 26% and 27%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoRT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for distal rectal cancer has significant clinical activity (10 of 48 pCRs) and acceptable toxicity. This regimen is currently being evaluated in a Phase III randomized trial (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R04).

  12. Drug Combinations in Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Carvalho, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy has an accepted role in reducing the risk of local recurrence in locally advanced resectable rectal cancer, particularly when the circumferential resection margin is breached or threatened, according to magnetic resonance imaging. Fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiation can obtain a significant down-sizing response and a curative resection can then be achieved. Approximately, 20% of the patients can also obtain a pathological complete response, which is associated with less local recurrences and increased survival. Patients who achieve a sustained complete clinical response may also avoid radical surgery. In unresectable or borderline resectable tumors, around 20% of the patients still fail to achieve a sufficient down-staging response with the current chemoradiation schedules. Hence, investigators have aspired to increase pathological complete response rates, aiming to improve curative resection rates, enhance survival, and potentially avoid mutilating surgery. However, adding additional cytotoxic or biological agents have not produced dramatic improvements in outcome and often led to excess surgical morbidity and higher levels of acute toxicity, which effects on compliance and in the global efficacy of chemoradiation. PMID:27238473

  13. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Arya; Xiao Lianchun; Allen, Pamela K.; Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yuki; Liao, Zhongxing; Hofstetter, Wayne; Crane, Christopher; Komaki, Ritsuko; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Welsh, James

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1-56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic treatment

  14. Dual HER2 blockade in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Pooja; Cornell, Lauren; Chumsri, Saranya; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a tyrosine kinase transmembrane receptor that is overexpressed on the surface of 15%–20% of breast tumors and has been associated with poor prognosis. Consistently improved pathologic response and survival rates have been demonstrated with use of trastuzumab in combination with standard chemotherapy in both early and advanced breast cancer. However, resistance to trastuzumab may pose a major problem in the effective treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. Dual HER2 blockade, using agents that work in a complimentary fashion to trastuzumab, has more recently been explored to evade resistance in both the preoperative (neoadjuvant) and adjuvant settings. Increased effectiveness of dual anti-HER2 agents over single blockade has been recently reported in clinical studies. Pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and taxane is currently approved in the metastatic and neoadjuvant treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. Various biomarkers have also been investigated to identify subsets of patients with HER2-positive tumors who would likely respond best to these targeted therapy combinations. In this article, available trial data regarding efficacy and toxicity of treatment with combination HER2 agents in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant setting have been reviewed, and relevant correlative biomarker data from these trials have been discussed. PMID:26451122

  15. Long-Term Clinical Responses of Neoadjuvant Dendritic Cell Infusions and Radiation in Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Shailaja; Bui, Marilyn M.; Springett, Gregory; Conley, Anthony; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Zhao, Xiuhua; Chen, Dungsa; Haysek, Randy; Gonzalez, Ricardo; Letson, G. Douglas; Finkelstein, Steven Eric; Chiappori, Alberto A.; Gabrilovitch, Dmitry I.; Antonia, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Patients with large >5 cm, high-grade resectable soft tissue sarcomas (STS) have the highest risk of distant metastases. Previously we have shown that dendritic cell (DC) based vaccines show consistent immune responses. Methods. This was a Phase I single institution study of neoadjuvant radiation with DC injections on 18 newly diagnosed high-risk STS patients. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of 50 Gy of external beam radiation (EBRT), given in 25 fractions delivered five days/week, combined with four intratumoral injections of DCs followed by complete resection. The primary endpoint was to establish the immunological response to neoadjuvant therapy and obtain data on its clinical safety and outcomes. Results. There were no unexpected toxicities or serious adverse events. Twelve out of 18 (67%) patients were alive, of which an encouraging 11/18 (61%) were alive with no systemic recurrence over a period of 2–8 years. Favorable immunological responses correlated with clinical responses in some cases. Conclusions. This study provides clinical support to using dendritic cell injections along with radiation in sarcomas, which when used optimally in combination can help clinical outcomes in soft tissue sarcoma. Study registration number is NCT00365872. PMID:26880867

  16. The Impact of Neoadjuvant Treatment on Surgical Options and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ataseven, Beyhan; von Minckwitz, Gunter

    2016-10-01

    Neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) has become a well-established treatment method for patients with breast cancer, not only for those with large tumors, but also for patients with early high-risk cancers. In earlier times, the clinical advantage of NST was seen in improvement of tumor shrinkage for better operability, conversion of mastectomy candidates to breast conservation, and optimization of cosmetic results. Over the decades, therapy regimens were optimized, resulting in significantly higher response rates. Rates for breast conservation and for conversion from mastectomy to breast conservation, especially for patients with advanced breast cancers, rose significantly for patients undergoing NST. A multidisciplinary approach with close and accurate diagnostic assessment of the breast, axillary tumor, or both during NST and individual-response-guided surgery is mandatory. To reduce unnecessary surgery and prevent mastectomies, more conclusive prediction models and minimally invasive methods for selection of patients with pathologic complete remission after NST are needed. Furthermore, prospective studies demonstrate that sentinel node biopsy for patients with initial clinically node-positive axillary nodes converting to clinically node-negative axillary nodes is oncologically safe and offers less morbidity, avoiding complete axillary node dissection. Initial concerns regarding surgical complications and morbidity due to potential immune frailty of patients with NST were not observed. PMID:27364505

  17. A Swallow Preservation Protocol Improves Function for Veterans Receiving Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kevin A.; Kuan, Edward C.; Unger, Lindsey; Lorentz, William C.; Wang, Marilene B.; Long, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Determine the efficacy of a swallow preservation protocol (SPP) on maintaining swallow function in patients undergoing chemoradiation (CRT) or radiation therapy alone (RT) for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Study design Retrospective case series. Setting Veterans Affairs medical center. Subjects and Methods Patients treated with CRT or RT for HNSCC between February 2006 and November 2013 were studied. Those enrolled in the SPP participated in swallowing, jaw, and tongue exercises during cancer therapy. The comparator group received no swallowing intervention during CRT. A previously described functional outcome swallowing scale (FOSS; 0 = no symptoms and 5 = nonoral feeding for all nutrition) was used to quantify dysphagia prior to and at the completion of cancer therapy, and an analysis was performed to compare swallowing function. Results Forty-one (all male; mean age, 66 years) and 66 patients (all male; mean age, 61 years) were included in the SPP and comparator groups, respectively. In the SPP group, mean pre- and posttreatment FOSS scores were 2.2 and 2.2, respectively, while the corresponding scores in the comparator group were 1.8 and 2.7, respectively, with posttreatment FOSS scores being significantly worse than pre-treatment FOSS scores in the comparator group only. Conclusion Patients enrolled in the SPP demonstrated preserved swallowing function over the course of cancer treatment compared with a comparator group. This confirms the importance of early evaluation and intervention for dysphagia prior to and during CRT or RT alone. PMID:25829388

  18. The Effect of Biofeedback Therapy on Anorectal Function After the Reversal of Temporary Stoma When Administered During the Temporary Stoma Period in Rectal Cancer Patients With Sphincter-Saving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Gun; Yoo, Ri Na; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the effect of biofeedback therapy (BFT) on anorectal function after stoma closure when administered during the interval of temporary stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer. Impaired anorectal function is common after lower anterior resections, though no specific treatment options are currently available to prevent this adverse outcome. Fifty-six patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy after sphincter-preserving surgery with temporary stoma were randomized into 2 groups: group 1 (received BFT during the temporary stoma period) and group 2 (did not receive BFT). To evaluate anorectal function, anorectal manometry was performed in all patients and subjective symptoms were evaluated using the Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. The present study is a report at 6 months after rectal resection. Forty-seven patients, including 21 in group 1 and 26 in group 2, were evaluated by anorectal manometry. Twelve patients (57.1%) in group 1 and 13 patients (50%) in group 2 were scored above 9 points of Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score, which is the reference value for fecal incontinence (P = 0.770). With time, there was a significant difference (P = 0.002) in the change of mean resting pressure according to time sequence between the BFT and control groups. BFT during the temporary stoma interval had no effect on preventing anorectal dysfunction after temporary stoma reversal at 6 months after rectal resection. However, BFT might be helpful for maintaining resting anal sphincter tone (NCT01661829). PMID:27149496

  19. The Effect of Biofeedback Therapy on Anorectal Function After the Reversal of Temporary Stoma When Administered During the Temporary Stoma Period in Rectal Cancer Patients With Sphincter-Saving Surgery: The Interim Report of a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Gun; Yoo, Ri Na; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of biofeedback therapy (BFT) on anorectal function after stoma closure when administered during the interval of temporary stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer.Impaired anorectal function is common after lower anterior resections, though no specific treatment options are currently available to prevent this adverse outcome.Fifty-six patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy after sphincter-preserving surgery with temporary stoma were randomized into 2 groups: group 1 (received BFT during the temporary stoma period) and group 2 (did not receive BFT). To evaluate anorectal function, anorectal manometry was performed in all patients and subjective symptoms were evaluated using the Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. The present study is a report at 6 months after rectal resection.Forty-seven patients, including 21 in group 1 and 26 in group 2, were evaluated by anorectal manometry. Twelve patients (57.1%) in group 1 and 13 patients (50%) in group 2 were scored above 9 points of Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score, which is the reference value for fecal incontinence (P = 0.770). With time, there was a significant difference (P = 0.002) in the change of mean resting pressure according to time sequence between the BFT and control groups.BFT during the temporary stoma interval had no effect on preventing anorectal dysfunction after temporary stoma reversal at 6 months after rectal resection. However, BFT might be helpful for maintaining resting anal sphincter tone (NCT01661829). PMID:27149496

  20. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for neoadjuvant treatment of gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Knab, Brian; Rash, Carla; Farrey, Karl; Jani, Ashesh B. . E-mail: jani@rover.uchicago.edu

    2006-01-01

    Radiation therapy plays an integral role in the treatment of gastric cancer in the postsurgery setting, the inoperable/palliative setting, and, as in the case of the current report, in the setting of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Typically, anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) or 3-field techniques are used. In this report, we explore the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment in a patient whose care was transferred to our institution after 3-field radiotherapy (RT) was given to a dose of 30 Gy at an outside institution. If the 3-field plan were continued to 50 Gy, the volume of irradiated liver receiving greater than 30 Gy would have been unacceptably high. To deliver the final 20 Gy, an opposed parallel AP/PA plan and an IMRT plan were compared to the initial 3-field technique for coverage of the target volume as well as dose to the kidneys, liver, small bowel, and spinal cord. Comparison of the 3 treatment techniques to deliver the final 20 Gy revealed reduced median and maximum dose to the whole kidney with the IMRT plan. For this 20-Gy boost, the volume of irradiated liver was lower for both the IMRT plan and the AP/PA plan vs. the 3-field plan. Comparing the IMRT boost plan to the AP/PA boost-dose range (<10 Gy) in comparison to the AP/PA plan; however, the IMRT plan irradiated a smaller liver volume within the higher dose region (>10 Gy) in comparison to the AP/PA plan. The IMRT boost plan also irradiated a smaller volume of the small bowel compared to both the 3-field plan and the AP/PA plan, and also delivered lower dose to the spinal cord in comparison to the AP/PA plan. Comparison of the composite plans revealed reduced dose to the whole kidney using IMRT. The V20 for the whole kidney volume for the composite IMRT plan was 30% compared to approximately 60% for the composite AP/PA plan. Overall, the dose to the liver receiving greater than 30 Gy was lower for the composite IMRT plan and was well below acceptable limits

  1. Neoadjuvant-intensified treatment for rectal cancer: Time to change?

    PubMed Central

    Musio, Daniela; De Felice, Francesca; Bulzonetti, Nadia; Guarnaccia, Roberta; Caiazzo, Rossella; Bangrazi, Caterina; Raffetto, Nicola; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether neoadjuvant-intensified radiochemotherapy improved overall and disease-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Between January 2007 and December 2011, 80 patients with histologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled. Tumors were clinically classified as either T3 or T4 and by the N stage based on the presence or absence of positive regional lymph nodes. Patients received intensified combined modality treatment, consisting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy (50.4-54.0 Gy) and infusional chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 50 mg/m2) on the first day of each week, plus five daily continuous infusions of fluorouracil (200 mg/m2 per die) from the first day of radiation therapy until radiotherapy completion. Patients received five or six cycles of oxaliplatin based on performance status, clinical lymph node involvement, and potential risk of a non-sphincter-conserving surgical procedure. Surgery was planned 7 to 9 wk after the end of radiochemotherapy treatment; adjuvant chemotherapy treatment was left to the oncologist’s discretion and was recommended in patients with positive lymph nodes. After treatment, all patients were monitored every three months for the first year and every six months for the subsequent years. RESULTS: Of the 80 patients enrolled, 75 patients completed the programmed neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy treatment. All patients received the radiotherapy prescribed total dose; five patients suspended chemotherapy indefinitely because of chemotherapy-related toxicity. At least five cycles of oxaliplatin were administered to 73 patients. Treatment was well tolerated with high compliance and a good level of toxicity. Most of the acute toxic effects observed were classified as grades 1-2. Proctitis grade 2 was the most common symptom (63.75%) and the earliest manifestation of acute toxicity. Acute toxicity grades 3-4 was reported in 30% of patients and grade 3 or 4 diarrhoea reported in just three

  2. Mucinous Adenocarcinoma Arising in Chronic Perianal Fistula: Good Results with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marisa D.; Nogueira, Carlos; Lopes, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Chronic perianal fistulas are a common clinical condition. However, their evolution to adenocarcinoma is rare. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with perianal chronic fistulas, who developed two perianal ulcerated lesions near the external orifices of the fistulas, which extended proximally as a pararectal tumor. No intestinal lesion was seen at endoscopic examination. Histopathological biopsy indicated mucinous adenocarcinoma. Staging was performed by pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and thoracoabdominal CT scan. The patient underwent a laparoscopic colostomy followed by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and then laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection followed by adjuvant therapy. We have seen a favorable outcome with no recurrence at 3 years of follow-up. PMID:25506029

  3. Chemoradiation for the treatment of epidermoid anal cancer: 13-year follow-up of the first randomised UKCCCR Anal Cancer Trial (ACT I)

    PubMed Central

    Northover, J; Glynne-Jones, R; Sebag-Montefiore, D; James, R; Meadows, H; Wan, S; Jitlal, M; Ledermann, J

    2010-01-01

    Background: The first UKCCCR Anal Cancer Trial (1996) demonstrated the benefit of chemoradiation over radiotherapy (RT) alone for treating epidermoid anal cancer, and it became the standard treatment. Patients in this trial have now been followed up for a median of 13 years. Methods: A total of 577 patients were randomised to receive RT alone or combined modality therapy using 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. All patients were scheduled to receive 45 Gy by external beam irradiation. Patients who responded to treatment were recommended to have boost RT, with either an iridium implant or external beam irradiation. Data on relapse and deaths were obtained until October 2007. Results: Twelve years after treatment, for every 100 patients treated with chemoradiation, there are an expected 25.3 fewer patients with locoregional relapse (95% confidence interval (CI): 17.5–32.0 fewer) and 12.5 fewer anal cancer deaths (95% CI: 4.3–19.7 fewer), compared with 100 patients given RT alone. There was a 9.1% increase in non-anal cancer deaths in the first 5 years of chemoradiation (95% CI +3.6 to +14.6), which disappeared by 10 years. Conclusions: The clear benefit of chemoradiation outweighs an early excess risk of non-anal cancer deaths, and can still be seen 12 years after treatment. Only 11 patients suffered a locoregional relapse as a first event after 5 years, which may influence the choice of end points in future studies. PMID:20354531

  4. Analysis of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors Associated With Change in Renal Function in Patients With Gastrointestinal Malignancies After Chemoradiation to the Abdomen

    SciTech Connect

    May, Kilian Salerno; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Wilding, Gregory E.; Iyer, Renuka V.; Ma, Wen W.; Flaherty, Leayn; Russo, Richard C. C.; Fakih, Marwan; Kuvshinoff, Boris W.; Gibbs, John F.; Javle, Milind M.; Yang, Gary Y.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze clinical and dosimetric factors associated with change in renal function in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies after chemoradiation to the abdomen. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 164 patients with gastrointestinal malignancies treated between 2002 and 2007 was conducted to evaluate change in renal function after concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Laboratory and biochemical endpoints were determined before RT and after RT at 6-month intervals. Factors assessed included smoking, diabetes, hypertension, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, creatinine clearance (CrCl), chemotherapy, and dose-volume parameters. Renal toxicity was assessed by decrease in CrCl and scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring schema. Results: Of 164 patients, 63 had clinical and dosimetric data available. Median follow-up was 17.5 months. Creatinine clearance declined from 98.46 mL/min before RT to 74.20 mL/min one year after chemoradiation (p < 0.0001). Mean decrease in CrCl was 21.37%. Pre-RT CrCl, percentage of bilateral renal volume receiving at least 10 Gy (V{sub 10}), and mean kidney dose were significantly associated with development of Grade >=2 renal complications at 1 year after chemoradiation (p = 0.0025, 0.0170, and 0.0095, respectively). Conclusions: We observed correlation between pre-RT CrCl, V{sub 10}, and mean kidney dose and decline in CrCl 1 year after chemoradiation. These observations can assist in treatment planning and renal dose constraints in patients receiving chemotherapy and abdominal RT and may help identify patients at increased risk for renal complications.

  5. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and trastuzumab versus neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by post-operative trastuzumab for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Carlo; Macpherson, Iain RJ; Yan, Kelvin; Ades, Felipe; Riddle, Pippa; Ahmed, Riz; Owadally, Waheeda; Stanley, Barbara; Shah, Deep; Gojis, Ondrej; Januszewski, Adam; Lewanski, Conrad; Asher, Rebecca; Lythgoe, Daniel; de Azambuja, Evandro; Beresford, Mark; Howell, Sacha J.

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus trastuzumab (NCT) increases the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) and event-free survival (EFS) compared to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NC) alone in women with HER2 positive breast cancer (BC). pCR in this setting is associated with improved EFS. Whether NCT preferentially improves EFS in comparison to NC followed by adjuvant trastuzumab initiated postoperatively (NCAT) has not been addressed. Using clinical data from women with HER2 positive BC treated at 7 European institutions between 2007 and 2010 we sought to investigate the impact on breast cancer outcomes of concomitant (NCT) versus sequential (NCAT) treatment in HER2 positive early BC. The unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) for event free survival with NCT compared with NCAT was 0.63 (95% CI 0.37–1.08; p = 0.091). Multivariable analysis revealed that treatment group, tumour size and ER status were significantly associated with EFS from diagnosis. In the whole group NCT was associated with a reduced risk of an event relative to NCAT, an effect that was confined to ER negative (HR: 0.25; 95% CI, 0.10–0.62; p = 0.003) as opposed to ER positive tumours (HR: 1.07; 95% CI, 0.46–2.52; p = 0.869). HER2 positive/ER negative BC treated with NC gain greatest survival benefit when trastuzumab is administered in both the neoadjuvant and adjuvant period rather than in the adjuvant period alone. These data support the early introduction of targeted combination therapy in HER2 positive/ER negative BC. PMID:26334099

  6. Neoadjuvant and Adjuvant Chemotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mallmann, Peter; Mallmann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is indicated in patients who can tolerate the side effects of a chemotherapy and with preoperative presentation of one of the following clinical risk situations: bulky disease with a maximal tumor diameter of > 4 cm, suspicious lymph nodes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) scan or endosonography, histopathologically confirmed lymph node metastasis, or histopathologically documented risk factors such as G3 and L1V1. A neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery should be performed with cisplatin at a dosage of > 25 mg/m2 per week and an application interval of < 14 days. The previously published data suggests an improved rate of complete resection and reduced incidences of positive lymph nodes and parametric infiltration. Accordingly, the percentage of patients in need for adjuvant radiochemotherapy after operation can be significantly reduced. Some studies demonstrated a prolongation of progression-free and overall survival. Following the previously published studies, adjuvant chemotherapy after operation or after radiochemotherapy has no significant effect on the overall survival and, following the current guidelines, should be avoided. PMID:27614740

  7. BRAF inhibition for advanced locoregional BRAF V600E mutant melanoma: a potential neoadjuvant strategy.

    PubMed

    Sloot, Sarah; Zager, Jonathan S; Kudchadkar, Ragini R; Messina, Jane L; Benedict, Jacob J; Gonzalez, Ricardo J; DeConti, Ronald; Turner, Leslie M; McCardle, Timothy; Smalley, Keiran S M; Weber, Jeffrey S; Sondak, Vernon K; Gibney, Geoffrey T

    2016-02-01

    Selective BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) yield objective responses in 50% of patients with metastatic BRAF V600E mutant melanoma. Adding an MEK inhibitor increases this response rate to 70%. Limited data are available on the outcomes of unresectable stage III patients, and it remains unclear whether BRAF-targeted therapy can be utilized as a neoadjuvant strategy. Data on patients with advanced locoregional BRAF V600E mutant melanoma treated with BRAF-targeted therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center were analyzed to determine response rates, subsequent resection rates after tumor downsizing, pathologic responses, and patient survival. Fifteen patients with locoregional disease treated with BRAF-targeted therapy, either BRAFi alone (vemurafenib; 11 patients) or a combination of BRAFi and an MEK inhibitor (dabrafenib plus trametinib or placebo; four patients), were identified. The median age was 50 years; the median follow-up was 25.4 months. The median BRAF-targeted therapy treatment duration was 6.0 months (range 1.2-29.4 months). Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors-based evaluation demonstrated objective response in 11 patients (73.3%). Six patients underwent resection of the remaining disease after therapy. Pathological analysis showed complete pathologic response (n=2), partial pathologic response (n=2), or no pathologic response (n=2). Four of six patients undergoing surgery have been alive for more than 2 years, including three patients currently free from active disease. No complications attributable to BRAF-targeted therapy were observed in the perioperative period. Dose reduction or discontinuation because of toxicities occurred in 10/15 patients. Neoadjuvant BRAF-targeted therapy may be effective in advanced locoregional BRAF V600E mutant melanoma patients in increasing resectability, yielding pathological responses, and achieving prolonged survival. PMID:26731560

  8. Cetuximab With Concurrent Chemoradiation for Esophagogastric Cancer: Assessment of Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Safran, Howard Suntharalingam, Mohan; Dipetrillo, Thomas; Ng, Thomas; Doyle, L. Austin; Krasna, Mark; Plette, Angela; Evans, Devon; Wanebo, Harold; Akerman, Paul; Spector, Jeremy; Kennedy, Nancy; Kennedy, Teresa

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and toxicity of the addition of cetuximab with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and radiation for patients with esophagogastric cancer on a Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with locoregional esophageal and proximal gastric cancer without distant organ metastases were eligible. All patients received cetuximab, paclitaxel, and carboplatin weekly for 6 weeks with 50.4 Gy radiation. Results: Sixty patients were enrolled, 57 with esophageal cancer and 3 with gastric cancer. Forty-eight had adenocarcinoma and 12 had squamous cell cancer. Fourteen of 60 patients (23%) had Grade 3 dermatologic toxicity consisting of a painful, pruritic acneiform rash on the face outside of the radiation field. The rates of Grades 3 and 4 esophagitis were 12% and 3%, respectively. Three patients had Grade 3/4 cetuximab hypersensitivity reactions and were not assessable for response. Forty of 57 patients (70%) had a complete clinical response after chemoradiation. Conclusion: Cetuximab can be safely administered with chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Dermatologic toxicity and hypersensitivity reactions were associated with the addition of cetuximab. There was no increase in esophagitis or other radiation-enhanced toxicity.

  9. Induction Therapy for Thymoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Usman; Huang, James

    2016-08-01

    Thymomas are uncommon tumors that can present as locally advanced tumors in approximately 30% of the patients. Stage and complete resection are the strongest prognostic factors. For locally advanced tumors, induction treatment may improve the ability to achieve a complete resection. Combination treatment with cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide is the most commonly used induction regimen. Similar rates of resectability are noted with the use of induction chemotherapy and chemoradiation therapy; however, more tumor necrosis is noted with the addition of radiation. PMID:27427527

  10. Benefit to neoadjuvant anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapies in HER2-positive primary breast cancer is independent of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) status

    PubMed Central

    Nuciforo, P. G.; Aura, C.; Holmes, E.; Prudkin, L.; Jimenez, J.; Martinez, P.; Ameels, H.; de la Peña, L.; Ellis, C.; Eidtmann, H.; Piccart-Gebhart, M. J.; Scaltriti, M.; Baselga, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Assessment of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) might be an important tool in identifying human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer patients unlikely to derive benefit from anti-HER2 therapies. However, studies to date have failed to demonstrate its predictive role in any treatment setting. Patients and methods Prospectively collected baseline core biopsies from 429 early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab, lapatinib, or their combination in the Neo-ALTTO study were stained using two anti-PTEN monoclonal antibodies (CST and DAKO). The association of PTEN status and PI3K pathway activation (defined as either PTEN loss and/or PIK3CA mutation) with total pathological complete response (tpCR) at surgery, event-free survival (EFS), and overall survival (OS) was evaluated. Results PTEN loss was observed in 27% and 29% of patients (all arms, n = 361 and n = 363) for CST and DAKO, respectively. PTEN loss was more frequently observed in hormone receptor (HR)-negative (33% and 36% with CST and DAKO, respectively) compared with HR-positive tumours (20% and 22% with CST and DAKO, respectively). No significant differences in tpCR rates were observed according to PTEN status. PI3K pathway activation was found in 47% and 48% of patients (all arms, n = 302 and n = 301) for CST and DAKO, respectively. Similarly, tpCR rates were not significantly different for those with or without PI3K pathway activation. Neither PTEN status nor PI3K pathway activation were predictive of tpCR, EFS, or OS, independently of treatment arm or HR status. High inter-antibody and inter-observer agreements were found (>90%). Modification of scoring variables significantly affected the correlation between PTEN and HR status but not with tpCR. Conclusion These data show that PTEN status determination is not a useful biomarker to predict resistance to trastuzumab and lapatinib-based therapies. The lack of

  11. Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer Using Capecitabine and Celecoxib Correlated With Posttreatment Assessment of Thymidylate Synthase and Thymidine Phosphorylase Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Unger, Keith R.; Romney, Davis A.; Koc, Mehmet; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Friel, Charles M.; Foley, E.F.; Rich, Tyvin A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Thymidylate synthase (TS) and thymidine phosphorylase (TP) expression have been shown to be predictors of response to therapy. The toxicity, efficacy, surgical morbidity, and immunohistochemical TS and TP expression were assessed in surgical resection specimens after preoperative chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with clinical stage I to III rectal adenocarcinoma received preoperative chemoradiation and underwent surgical resection 6 weeks later. Results: Posttreatment tumor stages were T1 to T2 and N0 in 30% of patients; T3 to T4 and N0 in 30% of patients; and T1 to T3 and N1 to N2 in 15% of patients. Pathologic complete response (pCR) was evident in 25% and tumor regression occurred in a total of 80% of patients. Anal sphincter-sparing surgery was performed in 80% of cases. Acute and perioperative complications were minimal, with no grade 3/4 toxicity or treatment breaks. Pelvic control was obtained in 90% of patients. With a median follow-up of 65.5 months (range, 8-80 months), the 6-year actuarial survival rate was 75%. Local failure was significantly associated with nonresponse to therapy and with high TS and low TP expression (p = 0.008 and p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions: The combination of capecitabine, celecoxib, and x-radiation therapy yields excellent response: a 25% pathologic pCR, no acute grade 3/4 toxicity, and minimal surgical morbidity. Nonresponders expressed significantly increased TS levels and decreased TP levels in posttreatment resection specimens compared to responders.

  12. Overcoming toxicity-challenges in chemoradiation for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) is the treatment of choice for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a modest survival benefit over sequential chemoradiation or radiotherapy (SCRT) alone. However, this benefit is at the cost of increasing acute toxicity such as esophagitis. Previous analysis revealed several predictive parameters in dose-volume and patient characteristics which helped us to identify those patients at risk for severe esophagus toxicity. As a result, supportive care interventions including individualized patient information, dietary guidance, adequate medication, hydration and tubefeeding could be initiated. This paper discusses the challenges in overcoming chemoradiation induced acute esophageal toxicity (AET). PMID:27413701

  13. Neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment of Siewert type II gastroesophageal junction cancer: an analysis of data from the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) registry

    PubMed Central

    Miccio, Joseph A.; Oladeru, Oluwadamilola T.; Yang, Jie; Xue, Yaqi; Choi, Minsig; Zhang, Yue; Yoon, Hannah; Ryu, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) has been rising in incidence in recent years. The role of radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of GEJ cancer remains unclear, as the largest prospective trials advocating for either adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) combine GEJ cancer with either gastric or esophageal cancer. The aim of the present study is to examine the association of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant treatment with overall and disease-specific survival (DSS) for patients with surgically resected cancer of the true GEJ (Siewert type II). Methods The surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) registry database (2001–2011) was queried for cases of surgically resected Siewert type II GEJ cancer. A total of 1,497 patients with resectable GEJ cancer were identified, with 746 receiving adjuvant RT and 751 receiving neoadjuvant RT. Retrospective analysis was performed with the endpoints of overall and DSS. Results Using cox regression and controlling for independent covariates (age, sex, race, stage, grade, histology, and year of diagnosis), we showed that adjuvant RT was associated with a significantly lower death risk [hazard ratio (HR), 0.84; 95% confidence interval 0.73–0.97; P value=0.0168] and significantly lower disease-specific death risk (HR, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.72–0.97; P value=0.0211) as compared to neoadjuvant RT. Conclusions This analysis of SEER data showed that adjuvant RT was associated with a survival benefit as compared to neoadjuvant RT for the treatment of Siewert type II GEJ cancer. We suggest future prospective studies to compare outcomes of adjuvant versus neoadjuvant treatment for true GEJ cancer. PMID:27284473

  14. Dosimetric Feasibility of Hypofractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Neoadjuvant Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Adams, Judith C; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Alexander, Brian M.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ryan, David P.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Hong, Theodore S. . E-mail: tshong1@partners.org

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor and normal tissue dosimetry of a 5 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) x 5 fraction proton radiotherapy schedule, before initiating a clinical trial of neoadjuvant, short-course proton radiotherapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: The first 9 pancreatic cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (1.8 Gy x 28) at the Massachusetts General Hospital had treatment plans generated using a 5 CGE x 5 fraction proton regimen. To facilitate dosimetric comparisons, clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant. Plans were optimized for target volume coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Hypofractionated proton and conventionally fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans both provided acceptable target volume coverage and dose homogeneity. Improved dose conformality provided by the hypofractionated proton regimen resulted in significant sparing of kidneys, liver, and small bowel, evidenced by significant reductions in the mean doses, expressed as percentage prescribed dose, to these structures. Kidney and liver sparing was most evident in low-dose regions ({<=}20% prescribed dose for both kidneys and {<=}60% prescribed dose for liver). Improvements in small-bowel dosimetry were observed in high- and low-dose regions. Mean stomach and duodenum doses, expressed as percentage prescribed dose, were similar for the two techniques. Conclusions: A proton radiotherapy schedule consisting of 5 fractions of 5 CGE as part of neoadjuvant therapy for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas seems dosimetrically feasible, providing excellent target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal tissue sparing. Hypofractionated proton radiotherapy in this setting merits Phase I clinical trial investigation.

  15. Quality of Life During Neoadjuvant Treatment and After Surgery for Resectable Esophageal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Meerten, Esther van Gaast, Ate van der; Looman, Caspar W.N.; Tilanus, Hugo W.G.; Muller, Karin; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Because of the trade-off between the potentially negative quality-of-life (QoL) effects and uncertain favorable survival effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with resectable esophageal cancer, we assessed heath-related QoL (HRQoL) for up to 1 year postoperatively in these patients treated with preoperative CRT with a non-platinum-based outpatient regimen followed by esophagectomy. Methods and Materials: Patients undergoing neoadjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin therapy concurrent with radiotherapy followed by surgery completed standardized HRQoL questionnaires before and after CRT and at regular times up to 1 year postoperatively. We analyzed differences in generic Qol core questionnaire [QLQ-C30] and condition-specific (esophageal site-specific [OES-18]) HRQoL scores over time by using a linear mixed-effects model. Results: Mean scores of most HRQoL scales deteriorated significantly during neoadjuvant CRT. The largest deterioration was observed for physical and role-functioning scales. All except two symptom scores worsened significantly. Postoperatively, most mean HRQoL scores improved until recovery to baseline level. Speed of improvement varied. Average taste score returned to baseline 3 months postoperatively, whereas it took 1 year for the average role-functioning score to restore. The emotional-functioning score showed a different pattern; it was worst at baseline and increased over time during CRT and postoperatively. Dysphagia and pain scores worsened considerably during CRT, restored to baseline 3 months postoperatively, and were even significantly better 1 year postoperatively. Conclusions: Preoperative CRT with paclitaxel and carboplatin for patients with resectable esophageal cancer had a considerable temporary negative effect on most aspects of HRQoL. Nonetheless, all HRQoL scores were restored or even improved 1 year postoperatively.

  16. Texture analysis for survival prediction of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Jayasree; Langdon-Embry, Liana; Escalon, Joanna G.; Allen, Peter J.; Lowery, Maeve A.; O'Reilly, Eileen M.; Do, Richard K. G.; Simpson, Amber L.

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. The five-year survival rate for all stages is approximately 6%, and approximately 2% when presenting with distant disease.1 Only 10-20% of all patients present with resectable disease, but recurrence rates are high with only 5 to 15% remaining free of disease at 5 years. At this time, we are unable to distinguish between resectable PDAC patients with occult metastatic disease from those with potentially curable disease. Early classification of these tumor types may eventually lead to changes in initial management including the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy or radiation, or in the choice of postoperative adjuvant treatments. Texture analysis is an emerging methodology in oncologic imaging for quantitatively assessing tumor heterogeneity that could potentially aid in the stratification of these patients. The present study derives several texture-based features from CT images of PDAC patients, acquired prior to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and analyzes their performance, individually as well as in combination, as prognostic markers. A fuzzy minimum redundancy maximum relevance method with leave-one-image-out technique is included to select discriminating features from the set of extracted features. With a naive Bayes classifier, the proposed method predicts the 5-year overall survival of PDAC patients prior to neoadjuvant therapy and achieves the best results in terms of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0:858 and accuracy of 83:0% with four-fold cross-validation techniques.

  17. The Neoadjuvant Model Is Still the Future for Drug Development in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    DeMichele, Angela; Yee, Douglas; Berry, Donald A; Albain, Kathy S; Benz, Christopher C; Boughey, Judy; Buxton, Meredith; Chia, Stephen K; Chien, Amy J; Chui, Stephen Y; Clark, Amy; Edmiston, Kirsten; Elias, Anthony D; Forero-Torres, Andres; Haddad, Tufia C; Haley, Barbara; Haluska, Paul; Hylton, Nola M; Isaacs, Claudine; Kaplan, Henry; Korde, Larissa; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Liu, Minetta C; Melisko, Michelle; Minton, Susan E; Moulder, Stacy L; Nanda, Rita; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Paoloni, Melissa; Park, John W; Parker, Barbara A; Perlmutter, Jane; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Rugo, Hope; Symmans, Fraser; Tripathy, Debasish; van't Veer, Laura J; Viscusi, Rebecca K; Wallace, Anne; Wolf, Denise; Yau, Christina; Esserman, Laura J

    2015-07-01

    The many improvements in breast cancer therapy in recent years have so lowered rates of recurrence that it is now difficult or impossible to conduct adequately powered adjuvant clinical trials. Given the many new drugs and potential synergistic combinations, the neoadjuvant approach has been used to test benefit of drug combinations in clinical trials of primary breast cancer. A recent FDA-led meta-analysis showed that pathologic complete response (pCR) predicts disease-free survival (DFS) within patients who have specific breast cancer subtypes. This meta-analysis motivated the FDA's draft guidance for using pCR as a surrogate endpoint in accelerated drug approval. Using pCR as a registration endpoint was challenged at ASCO 2014 Annual Meeting with the presentation of ALTTO, an adjuvant trial in HER2-positive breast cancer that showed a nonsignificant reduction in DFS hazard rate for adding lapatinib, a HER-family tyrosine kinase inhibitor, to trastuzumab and chemotherapy. This conclusion seemed to be inconsistent with the results of NeoALTTO, a neoadjuvant trial that found a statistical improvement in pCR rate for the identical lapatinib-containing regimen. We address differences in the two trials that may account for discordant conclusions. However, we use the FDA meta-analysis to show that there is no discordance at all between the observed pCR difference in NeoALTTO and the observed HR in ALTTO. This underscores the importance of appropriately modeling the two endpoints when designing clinical trials. The I-SPY 2/3 neoadjuvant trials exemplify this approach. PMID:25712686

  18. Refinement of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes: Implications for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Brian D.; Jovanović, Bojana; Chen, Xi; Estrada, Monica V.; Johnson, Kimberly N.; Shyr, Yu; Moses, Harold L.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into distinct molecular subtypes by gene expression profiling. Considered a difficult-to-treat cancer, a fraction of TNBC patients benefit significantly from neoadjuvant chemotherapy and have far better overall survival. Outside of BRCA1/2 mutation status, biomarkers do not exist to identify patients most likely to respond to current chemotherapy; and, to date, no FDA-approved targeted therapies are available for TNBC patients. Previously, we developed an approach to identify six molecular subtypes TNBC (TNBCtype), with each subtype displaying unique ontologies and differential response to standard-of-care chemotherapy. Given the complexity of the varying histological landscape of tumor specimens, we used histopathological quantification and laser-capture microdissection to determine that transcripts in the previously described immunomodulatory (IM) and mesenchymal stem-like (MSL) subtypes were contributed from infiltrating lymphocytes and tumor-associated stromal cells, respectively. Therefore, we refined TNBC molecular subtypes from six (TNBCtype) into four (TNBCtype-4) tumor-specific subtypes (BL1, BL2, M and LAR) and demonstrate differences in diagnosis age, grade, local and distant disease progression and histopathology. Using five publicly available, neoadjuvant chemotherapy breast cancer gene expression datasets, we retrospectively evaluated chemotherapy response of over 300 TNBC patients from pretreatment biopsies subtyped using either the intrinsic (PAM50) or TNBCtype approaches. Combined analysis of TNBC patients demonstrated that TNBC subtypes significantly differ in response to similar neoadjuvant chemotherapy with 41% of BL1 patients achieving a pathological complete response compared to 18% for BL2 and 29% for LAR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs; [33, 51], [9, 28], [17, 41], respectively). Collectively, we provide pre-clinical data that could inform clinical

  19. A mechanically coupled reaction-diffusion model for predicting the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Jared A.; Miga, Michael I.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Li, Xia; Bapsi Chakravarthy, A.; Abramson, Vandana; Farley, Jaime; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2013-09-01

    There is currently a paucity of reliable techniques for predicting the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The standard approach is to monitor gross changes in tumor size as measured by physical exam and/or conventional imaging, but these methods generally do not show whether a tumor is responding until the patient has received many treatment cycles. One promising approach to address this clinical need is to integrate quantitative in vivo imaging data into biomathematical models of tumor growth in order to predict eventual response based on early measurements during therapy. In this work, we illustrate a novel biomechanical mathematical modeling approach in which contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging data acquired before and after the first cycle of neoadjuvant therapy are used to calibrate a patient-specific response model which subsequently is used to predict patient outcome at the conclusion of therapy. We present a modification of the reaction-diffusion tumor growth model whereby mechanical coupling to the surrounding tissue stiffness is incorporated via restricted cell diffusion. We use simulations and experimental data to illustrate how incorporating tissue mechanical properties leads to qualitatively and quantitatively different tumor growth patterns than when such properties are ignored. We apply the approach to patient data in a preliminary dataset of eight patients exhibiting a varying degree of responsiveness to neoadjuvant therapy, and we show that the mechanically coupled reaction-diffusion tumor growth model, when projected forward, more accurately predicts residual tumor burden at the conclusion of therapy than the non-mechanically coupled model. The mechanically coupled model predictions exhibit a significant correlation with data observations (PCC = 0.84, p < 0.01), and show a statistically significant >4 fold reduction in model/data error (p = 0.02) as compared to the non-mechanically coupled model.

  20. Multicentric neoadjuvant pilot Phase II study of cetuximab combined with docetaxel in operable triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nabholtz, J M; Chalabi, N; Radosevic-Robin, N; Dauplat, M M; Mouret-Reynier, M A; Van Praagh, I; Servent, V; Jacquin, J P; Benmammar, K E; Kullab, S; Bahadoor, M R K; Kwiatkowski, F; Cayre, A; Abrial, C; Durando, X; Bignon, Y J; Chollet, P; Penault-Llorca, F

    2016-05-01

    Systemic therapy for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is mostly based upon chemotherapy. Epithelial Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in around 50% of TNBC and may play a role in its pathogenesis. Consequently, we performed a multicentric pilot Phase II neoadjuvant trial of cetuximab (anti-EGFR antibody) combined with docetaxel for patients with operable, Stage II-III TNBC. Therapy consisted of weekly cetuximab (first infusion: 400 mg/m(2), then 250 mg/m(2)) combined with six cycles of docetaxel (T: 100 mg/m(2)) q.3 weeks. Subsequently, all patients underwent surgery. The primary endpoint was pathological complete response (pCR) while clinical response, toxicity and ancillary studies were secondary endpoints. Paraffin-embedded and frozen tumor samples were systematically collected in order to identify predictive biomarkers of efficacy and resistance. From a total of 35 accrued patients, 25 were assessable for pathologic response. The pCR rate was 24% [95% CI: 7.3-40.7]. Complete clinical response rate (cCR) was observed in 22% of cases. Conservative surgery was performed in 75% of patients. Toxicity, mostly cutaneous and hematologic, was manageable. The pre-therapy ratio between CD8+ and FOXP3+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes equal or higher than 2.75 was predictive of pCR: 43% versus 0%, p = 0.047. Cetuximab in combination with docetaxel displays a modest activity, but acceptable toxicity as neoadjuvant therapy of operable TNBC. Similarly to previous observations using panitumumab, another anti-EGFR antibody, the immune component of the tumor microenvironment may play an important role in predicting TNBC response to the neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:26649807

  1. Neoadjuvant dose-dense chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer: a meta-analysis of published studies.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Fausto; Coinu, Andrea; Lonati, Veronica; Cabiddu, Mary; Ghilardi, Mara; Borgonovo, Karen; Barni, Sandro

    2016-08-01

    Large operable or locally advanced breast cancers (BCs) are usually treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CT) before surgery. However, there is no evidence to support an improvement in efficacy with dose-dense (DD) CT in this setting. We, therefore, carried out a meta-analysis to investigate whether DD-CT was more effective than the reference (every 3 weeks anthracyclines±taxanes) standard-dose CT as neoadjuvant treatment for BC. We searched Pubmed, SCOPUS, EMBASE, the Web of Science, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized trials comparing conventional versus DD neoadjuvant CT for BC. Odds ratios (ORs) for pathologic complete responses (ypT0N0M0: pCR) and hazard ratios (HRs) of death and recurrence [overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS)] were estimated and pooled. A QUADAS-2 report for all studies included in the final analysis was tabulated for the risk of bias and applicability. A total of six randomized trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The pooled rates of the pCR were 13.5 and 9.2% in the experimental and control arms. A significant increase in the pCR [OR=1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-2.02, P=0.001] was noted with neoadjuvant DD-CT. However, the patients who received DD-CT did not have significantly better DFS and OS rates (DFS: HR=0.88, 95% CI 0.76-1.01, P=0.06; OS: HR=0.89, 95% CI 0.78-1.02, P=0.08). Even with the limitation of a relatively short follow-up period, this meta-analysis shows that DD neoadjuvant CT, despite not leading to a significant increase in survival, increases by 46.7% the possibility of achieving a pCR in operable and locally advanced BC. This treatment should thus be considered one of the backbone treatments of choice when neoadjuvant therapy is planned. PMID:27058707

  2. Preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis: A multicentric phase II study

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo . E-mail: vvalentini@rm.unicatt.it; Morganti, Alessio G.; Gambacorta, M. Antonietta; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Doglietto, G. Battista; Coco, Claudio; De Paoli, Antonino; Rossi, Carlo; Di Russo, Annamaria; Valvo, Francesca; Bolzicco, Giampaolo; Dalla Palma, Maurizio

    2006-03-15

    -classification (F0: no side-wall involvement; F1, F2, F3: 1, 2, and 3-4 side-walls involved, respectively). Toxicity was evaluated on the basis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Fifty-nine patients (38 male, 21 female; median age, 62 years; range, 43-77 years) were enrolled in the study, by 12 different Italian radiotherapy departments. Previous surgery was anterior resection in 45 patients (76.3%) and abdominal-perineal resection in 14 patients (23.7%); previous radiotherapy dosage ranged between 30 and 55 Gy (median, 50.4 Gy); the median interval between prior radiation therapy to the onset of reirradiation was 27 months (range, 9-106 months); 44 patients (74.6%) had received some form of previous chemotherapy (concurrent and/or adjuvant). Fifty-one of 59 patients (86.4%) completed chemoradiation without treatment interruptions: 6 patients (10.2%) had temporary treatment interruption due to toxicity or patient compliance, and 2 patients (3.4%) had definitive treatment interruption. The incidence of Grade 3 lower gastrointestinal acute toxicity was only 5.1%. No patient developed Grade 4 acute toxicity. After chemoradiation, 5 patients (8.5%) had complete response (CR), 21 patients (35.6%) had partial response (PR), 31 patients (52.6%) had no change (NC) and 2 patients (3.4%) showed progressive disease (PD). Overall, the response rate (PR + CR) was 44.1% (95% confidence interval, 29.0-58.9%). Twenty of 24 patients (83.3%) with pelvic pain before treatment had symptomatic response. Tumor resection was performed in 30 of 59 patients (50.8%) including 2 local excisions, 4 anterior resections, 18 abdominoperineal resections, and 6 other. Surgical resection resulted as R0 and R1 in 21 patients (35.6%) and 3 patients (5.1%), respectively. The possibility of radical resection was influenced by tumor response to chemoradiation (PD/NC: 7/33; PR/CR: 14/26; p = 0.009). Thirty-three patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, which was completed in 30 (50.8%). At

  3. Diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging correlates with final pathological response in breast cancer neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Tanamai, Vaya W.; Hsiang, David; Butler, John; Mehta, Rita S.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) non-invasively and quantitatively measures tissue haemoglobin, water and lipid. Pilot studies in small groups of patients demonstrate that DOSI may be useful for longitudinal monitoring and predicting breast cancer neoadjuvant chemotherapy pathological response. This study evaluates the performance of a bedside DOSI platform in 34 breast cancer patients followed for several months. DOSI optical endpoints obtained at multiple timepoints are compared with final pathological response. Thirty-six stage II/III breast cancers (34 patients) were measured in vivo with DOSI prior to, in the middle of and after the completion of pre-surgical neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Cancer therapies ranged from standard anthracyclines to targeted therapies. Changes in DOSI-measured parameters at each timepoint were compared against final surgical pathology. Absolute changes in the tumour-to-normal (T/N) ratio of tissue deoxyhaemoglobin concentration (ctHHb) and relative changes in the T/N ratio of a tissue optical index (TOI) were most sensitive and correlate to pathological response. Changes in ctHHb and TOI were significantly different between tumours that achieved pathological complete response (pCR) versus non-pCR. By therapy midpoint, mean TOI-T/N changes were 47±8 versus 20±5 per cent for pCR versus non-pCR subjects, respectively (Z=0.011). Changes in ctHHb and TOI scaled significantly with the degree of pathological response (non-, partial and complete). DOSI measurements of TOI separated pCR from non-pCR by therapy midpoint regardless of drug or dosing strategy. This approach is well suited to monitoring breast tumour response and may provide feedback for optimizing therapeutic outcomes and minimizing side-effects. PMID:22006904

  4. Breast Cancer–Related Lymphedema after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myungsoo; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Kim, Tae Hyun; Cho, Kwan Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The risk for lymphedema (LE) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) in breast cancer patients has not been fully understood thus far. This study is conducted to investigate the incidence and time course of LE after NCT. Materials and Methods A total of 313 patients with clinically node-positive breast cancer who underwent NCT followed by surgery with axillary lymph node (ALN) dissection from 2004 to 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. All patients received breast and supraclavicular radiation therapy (SCRT). The determination of LE was based on both objective and subjective methods, as part of a prospective database. Results At a median follow-up of 5.6 years, 132 patients had developed LE: 88 (28%) were grade 1; 42 (13%) were grade 2; and two (1%) were grade 3. The overall 5-year cumulative incidence of LE was 42%. LE first occurred within 6 months after surgery in 62%; 1 year in 77%; 2 years in 91%; and 3 years in 96%. In a multivariate analysis, age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.66; p < 0.01) and the number of dissected ALNs (HR, 1.68; p < 0.01) were independent risk factors for LE. Patients with both of these risk factors showed a significantly higher 5-year cumulative incidence of LE compared with patients with no or one risk factor (61% and 37%, respectively; p < 0.001). The addition of adjuvant chemotherapy did not significantly correlate with LE. Conclusion LE after NCT, surgery, and SCRT developed early after treatment, and with a high incidence rate. More frequent surveillance of arm swelling may be necessary in patients after NCT, especially during the first few years of follow-up. PMID:25544575

  5. Effectiveness of Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer in an Older Patient Population

    SciTech Connect

    VanderWalde, Noam A.; Meyer, Anne Marie; Deal, Allison M.; Layton, J. Bradley; Liu, Huan; Carpenter, William R.; Weissler, Mark C.; Fleming, Mary E.; and others

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare chemoradiation therapy (CRT) with radiation therapy (RT) only in an older patient population with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database (1992-2007), we identified a retrospective cohort of nonmetastatic HNSCC patients and divided them into treatment groups. Comparisons were made between CRT and RT cohorts. Propensity scores for CRT were estimated from covariates associated with receipt of treatment using multivariable logistic regression. Standardized mortality ratio weights (SMRW) were created from the propensity scores and used to balance groups on measured confounders. Multivariable and SMR-weighted Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of death for receipt of CRT versus RT among the whole group and for separate patient and tumor categories. Results: The final cohort of 10,599 patients was 68% male and 89% white. Median age was 74 years. Seventy-four percent were treated with RT, 26% were treated with CRT. Median follow-up points for CRT and RT survivors were 4.6 and 6.3 years, respectively. On multivariable analysis, HR for death with CRT was 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07-1.20; P<.01). Using the SMRW model, the HR for death with CRT was 1.08 (95% CI: 1.02-1.15; P=.01). Conclusions: Although the addition of chemotherapy to radiation has proven efficacious in many randomized controlled trials, it may be less effective in an older patient population treated outside of a controlled trial setting.

  6. Outcome With Neck Dissection After Chemoradiation for N3 Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Igidbashian, Levon; Fortin, Bernard; Guertin, Louis; Soulieres, Denis; Coulombe, Genevieve; Belair, Manon; Charpentier, Danielle; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of neck dissection (ND) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with N3 disease. Methods and Materials: From March 1998 to September 2006, 70 patients with HNSCC and N3 neck disease were treated with concomitant CRT as primary therapy. Response to treatment was assessed using clinical examination and computed tomography 6 to 8 weeks posttreatment. Neck dissection was not routinely performed and considered for those with less than complete response. Of the patients, 26 (37.1%) achieved clinical complete response (cCR) after CRT. A total of 31 (44.3%) underwent ND after partial response (cPR-ND). Thirteen patients (29.5%) did not achieve cCR and did not undergo ND for the following reasons: incomplete response/progression at primary site, refusal/contraindication to surgery, metastatic progression, or death. These patients were excluded from the analysis. Outcomes were computed using Kaplan-Meier curves and were compared with log rank tests. Results: Comparing the cCR and cPR-ND groups at 2 years, the disease-free survival was respectively 62.7% and 84.9% (p = 0.048); overall survival was 63.0% and 79.4% (p = 0.26), regional relapse-free survival was 87.8% and 96.0% (p = 0.21); and distant disease-free survival was 67.1% and 92.6% (p = 0.059). In the cPR-ND group, 71.0% had no pathologic evidence of disease (PPV of 29.0%). Conclusions: Patients with N3 disease achieving regional cPR and primary cCR who underwent ND seemed to have better outcomes than patients achieving global cCR without ND. Clinical assessment with computed tomography is not adequate for evaluating response to treatment. Because of the inherent limitations of our study, further confirmatory studies are warranted.

  7. Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology Can Play a Role in Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Operable Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garbar, Christian; Curé, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that CNB has been progressively replaced by FNAC in the investigation of nonpalpable lesions or microcalcifications without a clinical or radiological mass lesion, FNAC has yet a role in palpable lesions provided it is associated with the triple diagnosis and experienced cytologist. In these conditions, FNAC is a safe, effective, economical, and accurate technique for breast cancer evaluation. Numerous literature reviews and meta-analyses illustrated the advantages and disadvantages of both methods CNB and FNAC. The difference does not seem significant when noninformative and unsatisfactory FNAC was excluded. Recently, cytological methods using liquid-based cytology (LBC) technology improve immunocytological and molecular tests with the same efficiency as classical immunohistochemistry. The indications of FNAC were, for palpable lesions, relative contraindication of CNB (elderly or frailty), staging of multiple nodules in conjunction or not with CNB, staging of lymph node status, newly appearing lesion in patient under neoadjuvant treatment, decreasing of anxiety with a rapid diagnosis, evaluation of biomarkers and new biomarkers, and chronological evaluation of biomarker following the neoadjuvant therapy response. PMID:23936675

  8. Primary Surgery or Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Advanced Ovarian Cancer: The Debate Continues….

    PubMed

    Leary, Alexandra; Cowan, Renee; Chi, Dennis; Kehoe, Sean; Nankivell, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Primary debulking surgery (PDS) followed by platinum-based chemotherapy has been the cornerstone of treatment for advanced ovarian cancer for decades. Primary debulking surgery has been repeatedly identified as one of the key factors in improving survival in patients with advanced ovarian cancer, especially when minimal or no residual disease is left behind. Achieving these results sometimes requires extensive abdominal and pelvic surgical procedures and consultation with other surgical teams. Some clinicians who propose a primary chemotherapy approach reported an increased likelihood of leaving no macroscopic disease after surgery and improved patient-reported outcomes and quality-of-life (QOL) measures. Given the ongoing debate regarding the relative benefit of PDS versus neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), tumor biology may aid in patient selection for each approach. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy offers the opportunity for in vivo chemosensitivity testing. Studies are needed to determine the best way to evaluate the impact of NACT in each individual patient with advanced ovarian cancer. Indeed, the biggest utility of NACT may be in research, where this approach provides the opportunity for the investigation of predictive markers, mechanisms of resistance, and a forum to test novel therapies. PMID:27249696

  9. Differential clonal evolution in oesophageal cancers in response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, John M.; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Makino, Seiko; Rayner, Emily; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Cross, William; Kovac, Michal; Ulahannan, Danny; Palles, Claire; Gillies, Richard S.; MacGregor, Thomas P.; Church, David; Maynard, Nicholas D.; Buffa, Francesca; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Graham, Trevor A.; Wang, Lai-Mun; Sharma, Ricky A.; Middleton, Mark; Tomlinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    How chemotherapy affects carcinoma genomes is largely unknown. Here we report whole-exome and deep sequencing of 30 paired oesophageal adenocarcinomas sampled before and after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Most, but not all, good responders pass through genetic bottlenecks, a feature associated with higher mutation burden pre-treatment. Some poor responders pass through bottlenecks, but re-grow by the time of surgical resection, suggesting a missed therapeutic opportunity. Cancers often show major changes in driver mutation presence or frequency after treatment, owing to outgrowth persistence or loss of sub-clones, copy number changes, polyclonality and/or spatial genetic heterogeneity. Post-therapy mutation spectrum shifts are also common, particularly C>A and TT>CT changes in good responders or bottleneckers. Post-treatment samples may also acquire mutations in known cancer driver genes (for example, SF3B1, TAF1 and CCND2) that are absent from the paired pre-treatment sample. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy can rapidly and profoundly affect the oesophageal adenocarcinoma genome. Monitoring molecular changes during treatment may be clinically useful. PMID:27045317

  10. Fine-needle aspiration cytology can play a role in neoadjuvant chemotherapy in operable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Garbar, Christian; Curé, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that CNB has been progressively replaced by FNAC in the investigation of nonpalpable lesions or microcalcifications without a clinical or radiological mass lesion, FNAC has yet a role in palpable lesions provided it is associated with the triple diagnosis and experienced cytologist. In these conditions, FNAC is a safe, effective, economical, and accurate technique for breast cancer evaluation. Numerous literature reviews and meta-analyses illustrated the advantages and disadvantages of both methods CNB and FNAC. The difference does not seem significant when noninformative and unsatisfactory FNAC was excluded. Recently, cytological methods using liquid-based cytology (LBC) technology improve immunocytological and molecular tests with the same efficiency as classical immunohistochemistry. The indications of FNAC were, for palpable lesions, relative contraindication of CNB (elderly or frailty), staging of multiple nodules in conjunction or not with CNB, staging of lymph node status, newly appearing lesion in patient under neoadjuvant treatment, decreasing of anxiety with a rapid diagnosis, evaluation of biomarkers and new biomarkers, and chronological evaluation of biomarker following the neoadjuvant therapy response. PMID:23936675

  11. Alterations in Hormone Levels After Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Male Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Frederick H.; Perera, Francisco Fisher, Barbara; Stitt, Larry

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels after postoperative chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-three men with rectal cancer had baseline and postchemoradiation FSH, LH, and testosterone measured. Adjuvant chemoradiation consisted of two 5-day cycles of bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) every 4 weeks at a dose of 500 mg/m{sup 2}/d followed by concurrent chemoradiation followed by two additional 5-day cycles of 5-FU at a dose of 450 mg/m{sup 2}/d. Continuous-infusion 5-FU at 225 mg/m{sup 2}/d was given during radiation. Pelvic radiation consisted of a three- or four-field technique with a median dose of 54.0 Gy in 30 fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 6.1 years. Mean baseline FSH levels increased from 5.3 to a peak of 23.9 IU/L (p < 0.001) 13-24 months after chemoradiation. Mean baseline LH levels increased from 4.3 to a peak of 8.5 IU/L (p < 0.001) within 6 months after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone levels decreased from 15.4 nmol/L at baseline to 8.0 nmol/L more than 4 years after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone to mean LH ratio decreased from 4.4 at baseline to 1.1 after 48 months posttreatment, suggesting a continued decrease in Leydig cell function with time. Testicular dose was measured in 5 patients. Median dose was 4 Gy (range, 1.5-8.9 Gy). Conclusions: Chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer causes persistent increases in FSH and LH levels and decreases in testosterone levels.

  12. The influence of number of high risk factors on clinical outcomes in patients with early-stage cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soyi; Lee, Seok-Ho; Park, Chan-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognosis according to the number of high risk factors in patients with high risk factors after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for early stage cervical cancer. Methods Clinicopathological variables and clinical outcomes of patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage IB1 to IIA cervical cancer who had one or more high risk factors after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups according to the number of high risk factors (group 1, single high risk factor; group 2, two or more high risk factors). Results A total of 93 patients were enrolled in the present study. Forty nine out of 93 (52.7%) patients had a single high risk factor, and 44 (47.3%) had two or more high risk factors. Statistically significant differences in stage and stromal invasion were observed between group 1 and group 2. However, age, histology, tumor size, and lymphovascular space invasion did not differ significantly between the groups. Distant recurrence occurred more frequently in group 2, and the probability of recurrence and death was higher in group 2. Conclusion Patients with two or more high risk factors had worse prognosis in early stage cervical cancer. For these patients, consideration of new strategies to improve survival may be worthwhile. Conduct of further clinical trials is warranted for development of adjuvant treatment strategies individualized to each risk group. PMID:27200308

  13. Expression of Nuclear Transcription Factor Kappa B in Locally Advanced Human Cervical Cancer Treated With Definitive Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K.; Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann H.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Kunnumakkara, Ajai B.; Broadus, Russell R.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), a transcriptional factor that has been shown to be constitutively active in cervical cancer, is part of an important pathway leading to treatment resistance in many tumor types. The purpose of our study was to determine whether expression of NF-{kappa}B in pretreatment specimens and specimens taken shortly after treatment initiation correlated with outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled in a study in which cervical biopsy specimens were obtained before radiation therapy and 48 h after treatment initiation. Matched biopsy specimens from 16 of these patients were available and evaluated for the nuclear expression of NF-{kappa}B protein by immunohistochemical staining. Results: After a median follow-up of 43 months, there were 9 total treatment failures. Nuclear staining for NF-{kappa}B was positive in 3 of 16 pretreatment biopsy specimens (19%) and 5 of 16 postradiation biopsy specimens (31%). Pretreatment expression of NF-{kappa}B nuclear staining correlated with increased rates of local-regional failure (100% vs. 23%, p = 0.01), distant failure (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055), disease-specific mortality (100% vs. 31%, p = 0.03), and overall mortality (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055). Conclusions: Our data suggest that pretreatment nuclear expression of NF-{kappa}B may be associated with a poor outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with chemoradiation. Although these data require validation in a larger group of patients, the results support the continued study of the relationship between NF-{kappa}B and outcome in patients treated for carcinoma of the cervix.

  14. Prevalence of swallowing and speech problems in daily life after chemoradiation for head and neck cancer based on cut-off scores of the patient-reported outcome measures SWAL-QOL and SHI.

    PubMed

    Rinkel, Rico N; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Doornaert, Patricia; Buter, Jan; de Bree, Remco; Langendijk, Johannes A; Aaronson, Neil K; Leemans, C René

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to assess swallowing and speech outcome after chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer, based on the patient-reported outcome measures Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and Speech Handicap Index (SHI), both provided with cut-off scores. This is a cross-sectional study. Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery of a University Medical Center. Sixty patients, 6 months to 5 years after chemoradiation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and SHI, both validated in Dutch and provided with cut-off scores. Associations were tested between the outcome measures and independent variables (age, gender, tumor stage and site, and radiotherapy technique, time since treatment, comorbidity and food intake). Fifty-two patients returned the SWAL-QOL and 47 the SHI (response rate 87 and 78 %, respectively). Swallowing and speech problems were present in 79 and 55 %, respectively. Normal food intake was noticed in 45, 35 % had a soft diet and 20 % tube feeding. Patients with soft diet and tube feeding reported more swallowing problems compared to patients with normal oral intake. Tumor subsite was significantly associated with swallowing outcome (less problems in larynx/hypopharynx compared to oral/oropharynx). Radiation technique was significantly associated with psychosocial speech problems (less problems in patients treated with IMRT). Swallowing and (to a lesser extent) speech problems in daily life are frequently present after chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Future prospective studies will give more insight into the course of speech and swallowing problems after chemoradiation and into efficacy of new radiation techniques and swallowing and speech rehabilitation programs. PMID:26071622

  15. Perioperative Therapy for Surgically Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Du, Lingling; DeFoe, Melissa; Ruzinova, Marianna B; Olsen, Jeffrey R; Wang-Gillam, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    It is estimated that 10% to 20% of patients with pancreatic cancer present with resectable disease. Although surgery offers curative intent, the median survival after curative resection is less than 2 years. To improve clinical outcomes in this patient population, clinical studies have investigated the role of perioperative therapy, including neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment in resectable pancreatic cancer. The role of adjuvant therapy has been well established by large randomized phase III studies, whereas benefit of the neoadjuvant approach remains inconclusive. Here, we review various treatment modalities and their clinical benefits in resectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26226906

  16. Impact of Neoadjuvant Radiation on Survival in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Matthew; Goloubeva, Olga; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The role of surgery in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial. This study was undertaken to assess the impact of neoadjuvant radiation therapy for Stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database that included patients who were 18 years and older with NSCLC classified as Stage III and who underwent definitive therapy from 1988 to 2004. Patients were characterized by type of treatment received. Survival functions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression model was used to analyze trends in overall (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 48,131 patients were selected, with a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 0-203 months). By type of treatment, the 3-year OS was 10% with radiation therapy (RT), 37% with surgery (S), 34% with surgery and postoperative radiation (S-RT), and 45% with neoadjuvant radiation followed by surgery (Neo-RT) (p = 0.0001). Multivariable Cox model identified sex, race, laterality, T stage, N stage, and type of treatment as factors affecting survival. Estimated hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for other variables in regression model showed the types of treatment: S (HR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.4), S-RT (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3), and RT (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 2.15-2.53) were associated with significantly worse overall survival when compared with Neo-RT (p = 0.0001). Conclusion: This population based study demonstrates that patients with Stage III NSCLC receiving Neo-RT had significantly improved overall survival when compared with other treatment groups.

  17. A Phase II Study of Fixed-Dose Rate Gemcitabine Plus Low-Dose Cisplatin Followed by Consolidative Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Andrew H.; Venook, Alan P.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The optimal strategy for treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer remains controversial, including the respective roles and timing of chemotherapy and radiation. We conducted a Phase II nonrandomized trial to evaluate sequential chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Chemotherapy naive patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} at 10 mg/m{sup 2}/min) plus cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Those without evidence of extrapancreatic metastases after six cycles of chemotherapy received radiation (5,040 cGy over 28 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the day of radiation) as a radiosensitizer. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled with a median follow-up time of 656 days. Twelve patients (48%) successfully received all six cycles of chemotherapy plus chemoradiation. Eight patients (32%) progressed during chemotherapy, including 7 with extrapancreatic metastases. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were uncommon. Two patients sustained myocardial infarctions during chemotherapy, and 4 were hospitalized for infectious complications, although none in the setting of neutropenia. Median time to progression was 10.5 months and median survival was 13.5 months, with an estimated 1-year survival rate of 62%. Patients receiving all components of therapy had a median survival of 17.0 months. Conclusions: A strategy of initial fixed-dose rate gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, followed by chemoradiation, shows promising efficacy for treatment of locally advanced disease. A substantial proportion of patients will be identified early on as having extrapancreatic disease and spared the potential toxicities associated with radiation.

  18. Multi-institutional Pooled Analysis on Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Falconi, Massimo; Stiphout, Ruud G.P.M. van; Mattiucci, Gian-Carlo; Alfieri, Sergio; Calvo, Felipe A.; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Fastner, Gerd; Herman, Joseph M.; Maidment, Bert W.; Miller, Robert C.; Regine, William F.; Reni, Michele; Sharma, Navesh K.; Ippolito, Edy; and others

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the impact of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) on overall survival (OS) after resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A multicenter retrospective review of 955 consecutive patients who underwent complete resection with macroscopically negative margins (R0-1) for invasive carcinoma (T1-4; N0-1; M0) of the pancreas was performed. Exclusion criteria included metastatic or unresectable disease at surgery, macroscopic residual disease (R2), treatment with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), and a histological diagnosis of no ductal carcinoma, or postoperative death (within 60 days of surgery). In all, 623 patients received postoperative radiation therapy (RT), 575 patients received concurrent chemotherapy (CT), and 462 patients received adjuvant CT. Results: Median follow-up was 21.0 months. Median OS after adjuvant CRT was 39.9 versus 24.8 months after no adjuvant CRT (P<.001) and 27.8 months after CT alone (P<.001). Five-year OS was 41.2% versus 24.8% with and without postoperative CRT, respectively. The positive impact of CRT was confirmed by multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.72; confidence interval [CI], 0.60-0.87; P=.001). Adverse prognostic factors identified by multivariate analysis included the following: R1 resection (HR = 1.17; CI = 1.07-1.28; P<.001), higher pT stage (HR = 1.23; CI = 1.11-1.37; P<.001), positive lymph nodes (HR = 1.27; CI = 1.15-1.41; P<.001), and tumor diameter >20 mm (HR = 1.14; CI = 1.05-1.23; P=.002). Multivariate analysis also showed a better prognosis in patients treated in centers with >10 pancreatic resections per year (HR = 0.87; CI = 0.78-0.97; P=.014) Conclusion: This study represents the largest comparative study on adjuvant therapy in patients after resection of carcinoma of the pancreas. Overall survival was better in patients who received adjuvant CRT.

  19. Clinical value of routine serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen in follow-up of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation or chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jinju; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Tae Sung; Kim, Ju Hyun; Koh, Suk Bong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical benefits of routine squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) monitoring of patients with locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiation or chemoradiation. Methods A total of 53 patients with recurrent cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiation were enrolled in this study. A retrospective review of medical records was conducted. The role of routine monitoring of serum SCC-Ag was evaluated in terms of cost effectiveness and effect on survival after diagnosis of recurrence. Results Serum SCC-Ag abnormality (≥2.5 ng/mL) was observed in 62.3% of patients when recurrent disease was diagnosed. The first indicator of relapse was abnormal serum SCC-Ag level in 21 patients (39.6%), 10 of whom had asymptomatic recurrent disease amenable to salvage therapy. Adding SCC-Ag measurement to the basic follow up protocol improved the sensitivity for detecting recurrence (The sensitivity of the basic protocol vs. addition of SCC-Ag: 49.1% vs. 88.7%, P<0.001). Twenty-three patients who were candidates for salvage therapy with curative intent showed better survival compared with those who were not candidates for therapy (5-year survival: 36.6% vs. 0%, P=0.012). Conclusion Surveillance with routine serum SCC-Ag monitoring can better detect asymptomatic recurrent disease that is potentially amenable to salvage therapy with curative intent. Early diagnosis of recurrent disease that can be treated with salvage therapy may lead to better survival. PMID:27462593

  20. [A Case of HER2-Positive Esophagogastric Junction Cancer with Perforation Curatively Resected after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy plus Trastuzumab].

    PubMed

    Toshima, Hirokazu; Hisamatsu, Atsushi; Shimada, Ken; Saito, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Michitaka; Matsukawa, Masaaki; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-06-01

    A 60-year-old man was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction with lymph node metastasis along the left gastric artery. The clinical stage was determined to be T4b, N1, M0, Stage IIIB, and a neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC)regimen of capecitabine/CDDP plus trastuzumab was selected for treatment. Before 3 courses of chemotherapy, the patient developed perforated gastric cancer. With conservative therapy, we were able to obtain closure of the perforation without affecting the curability of the cancer. We changed the chemotherapy regimen to S-1/CDDP plus trastuzumab, and the patient underwent curative resection. PMID:27306816

  1. Prognostic value of pretherapy platelet elevation in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Shoultz-Henley, Sara; Garden, Adam S; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Sheu, Tommy; Kroll, Michael H; Rosenthal, David I; Gunn, G Brandon; Hayes, Amos J; French, Chloe; Eichelberger, Hillary; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Smith, Blaine D; Phan, Jack; Ayoub, Zeina; Lai, Stephen Y; Pham, Brian; Kies, Merrill; Gold, Kathryn A; Sturgis, Erich; Fuller, Clifton D

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate potential associations between increased platelets and oncologic outcomes in oropharyngeal cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation. A total of 433 oropharyngeal cancer patients (OPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy between 2002 and 2012 were included under an approved IRB protocol. Complete blood count (CBC) data were extracted. Platelet and hemoglobin from the last phlebotomy (PLTpre-chemoRT, Hgbpre-chemoRT ) before start of treatment were identified. Patients were risk-stratified using Dahlstrom-Sturgis criteria and were tested for association with survival and disease-control outcomes. Locoregional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis (FDM) and overall survival (OS) were decreased (p < 0.03, p < 0.04 and p < 0.0001, respectively) for patients with PLTpre-chemoRT value of ≥350 × 10(9) /L. Actuarial 5-year locoregional control (LRC) and FDM were 83 and 85% for non-thrombocythemic patients while patient with high platelets had 5-year LRC and FDM of 73 and 74%, respectively. Likewise, 5-year OS was better for patients with normal platelet counts by comparison (76 vs. 57%; p < 0.0001). Comparison of univariate parametric models demonstrated that PLTpre-chemoRT was better among tested models. Multivariate assessment demonstrated improved performance of models which included pretherapy platelet indices. On Bayesian information criteria analysis, the optimal prognostic model was then used to develop nomograms predicting 3-, 5- and 10-year OS. In conclusion, pretreatment platelet elevation is a promising predictor of prognosis, and further work should be done to elucidate the utility of antiplatelets in modifying risk in OPC patients. PMID:26414107

  2. Phase II Study of Consolidation Chemotherapy After Concurrent Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joong; Kim, Woo Young; Nam, Hee Rim; Kim, Byoung-Gie . E-mail: huna0@naver.com; Huh, Seung Jae; Lee, Je-Ho; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to determine the efficacy of consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) using high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with cervical carcinoma (FIGO stage IB2-IVA) were treated with external beam radiation therapy to the whole pelvis (50.4 Gy) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (24 Gy to point A). Cisplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} (Day 1) and 5-fluorouracil 1000 mg/m{sup 2} (Days 1-5) were given every 3 weeks starting concurrently with the radiation and followed by 3 more cycles of consolidation for a total of 6 cycles. Results: Thirty patients (94%) received 3 more cycles of post-CCRT consolidation chemotherapy and were evaluable for the toxicity and efficacy of consolidation. The most common toxicities of Grade 2 or higher were nausea or vomiting (47%) and anemia (33%). Late complications of the rectum and bladder occurred in 13% and 6% of the patients, respectively. The clinical complete response rate was 87% (95% CI, 75%-99%). During a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6-58 months), 5 patients (17%) had recurrence; the sites of failure were 3 (10%) inside the radiation field and 2 (7%) outside the radiation field. The estimated 3-year progression-free survival rate was 83% (95% CI, 67%-99%) and overall survival rate was 91% (95% CI, 79%-100%). Conclusions: Consolidation chemotherapy after CCRT is well tolerated and effective in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. A prospective randomized trial to compare this treatment strategy with standard CCRT seems to be worthwhile.

  3. Definitive chemoradiation for primary oral cavity carcinoma: A single institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Eli D.; Romesser, Paul B.; Chen, Christine; Ho, Felix; Wuu, Yen; Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Wong, Richard J.; McBride, Sean; Lee, Nancy Y.; Riaz, Nadeem

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives While surgery with or without adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) is the standard of care for oral cavity cancer (OCC), a select group requires nonsurgical treatment. We provide a single-institution experience using definitive chemotherapy and RT for primary OCC. Materials and methods We examined 73 patients with previously untreated, non-metastatic primary OCC treated definitively from 1990 to 2011. There were 39 male and 34 female, with a median age of 63 years (range, 35–89). The disease distribution was Stage I and II (7% each), Stage III (14%), and Stage IV (73%). Oral tongue was the most common (48%), followed by floor of mouth (19%), retromolar trigone (13.7%), and others (8.2%). Median tumor dose was 70 Gy. Sixty-two percent of patients (n = 45) were treated with concurrent chemotherapy, predominantly platinum-based. Results Median follow-up among surviving patients was 73.1 months (interquartile range 14.2– 81.4 months). Actuarial 5-year overall survival was 15%. Incidences of locoregional and distant failures were 41.1% and 20.5%, respectively. Kaplan-Meier estimated 5-year rates of locoregional control and freedom from distant metastasis were 37% and 70%, respectively. Mucositis was the most common ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity (49%). Incidences of Grade 3 late dysphagia and trismus were 15% and 13%, respectively. Conclusion This study demonstrates over 20 years of experience using definitive chemoradiation for OCC at our institution. Our results illustrate the challenges in treating patients with advanced disease who are not surgical candidates, and the need for adequate and early treatment to prevent distant disease and improve survival outcomes. PMID:25958830

  4. Chemoradiation with capecitabine and mitomycin-C for stage I-III anal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Standard therapy for patients with stage I-III squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anal canal is chemo-radiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin C (MMC). While there is limited published evidence to substitute capecitabine (CAP) for 5-FU, the objectives of the study were to describe the toxicity, dose intensity and outcomes of a sequential cohort of patients treated with chemo-radiotherapy with CAP and MCC in a population-based setting. Methods Patients with stage I-III malignancies of the anal canal referred between February 2010 and March 2012 were included. Dose intensity was calculated by comparing delivered versus planned radiation and chemotherapy treatments and toxicity was retrospectively graded according to standard protocol-specified criteria. Results Among 66 eligible patients, median planned dose of radiation was 51.9 Gy over 5.5 weeks, range 25.0 to 63 Gy, and dose intensity was 98%. Median delivered dose of MCC delivered was 12 mg/m2 on day one, week one while median CAP dose was 825 mg/m2 twice daily on radiation days. CAP dose reductions due to toxicity were recorded for 13 patients (20%). Median follow-up was 20 months and 94% of patients with squamous cell histology had no evidence of relapse. Conclusions Chemo-radiation with CAP plus MMC is well tolerated and may be a reasonable consideration for patients with stage I-III SCC of the anal canal. A range of planned radiation dose was observed and longer follow-up is necessary to ensure that patients who received lower doses of radiation have similar outcomes to those who received larger doses. PMID:24885554

  5. Neoadjuvant and conversion treatment of patients with colorectal liver metastasis: the potential role of bevacizumab and other antiangiogenic agents.

    PubMed

    García-Alfonso, Pilar; Ferrer, Ana; Gil, Silvia; Dueñas, Rosario; Pérez, María Teresa; Molina, Raquel; Capdevila, Jaume; Safont, María José; Castañón, Carmen; Cano, Juana María; Lara, Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    More than 50 % of patients with colorectal cancer develop liver metastases. Surgical resection is the only available treatment that improves survival in patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). New antiangiogenic targeted therapies, such as bevacizumab, aflibercept, and regorafenib, in combination with neoadjuvant and conversion chemotherapy may lead to improved response rates in this population of patients and increase the proportion of patients eligible for surgical resection. The present review discusses the available data for antiangiogenic targeted agents in this setting. One of these therapies, bevacizumab, which targets the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has demonstrated good results in this setting. In patients with initially unresectable CRLM, the combination of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) plus bevacizumab has led to high response and resection rates. This combination is also effective for patients with unresectable CRLM. Moreover, the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting of liver metastasis has a higher impact on pathological response rate. This drug also has a manageable safety profile, and according to recent data, bevacizumab may protect against the sinusoidal dilation provoked in the liver by certain cytotoxic agents. In phase II trials, antiangiogenic therapy has demonstrated benefits in the presurgical treatment of CRLM and may represent a new treatment pathway for these patients. PMID:25752908

  6. PET/CT with Fluorodeoxyglucose During Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Travaini, Laura L; Zampino, Maria G; Colandrea, Marzia; Ferrari, Mahila E; Gilardi, Laura; Leonardi, Maria C; Santoro, Luigi; Orecchia, Roberto; Grana, Chiara M

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study is to evaluate the accuracy of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) with Fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) to predict treatment response in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) during neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Patients and methods Forty-one LARC patients performed [18F]FDG-PET/CT at baseline (PET0). All patients received continuous capecitabine concomitant to radiotherapy on the pelvis, followed by intermittent capecitabine until two weeks before curative surgery. [18F]FDG-PET/CT was also carried out at 40 Gy-time (PET1) and at the end of neoadjuvant therapy (PET2). PET imaging was analysed semi-quantitatively through the measurement of maximal standardised uptake value (SUVmax) and the tumour volume (TV). Histology was expressed through pTNM and Dworak tumor regression grading. Patients were categorised into responder (downstaging or downsizing) and non-responder (stable or progressive disease by comparison pretreatment parameters with clinical/pathological characteristics posttreatment/after surgery). Logistic regression was used to evaluate SUVmax and TV absolute and percent reduction as predictors of response rate using gender, age, and CEA as covariates. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Survivals were compared by the Log-Rank test. Results Twenty-three responders (9 ypCR, 14 with downstaged disease) and 18 non-responders showed differences in terms of both early and posttreatment SUVmax percent reduction (median comparison: responder = 63.2%, non-responder = 44.2%, p = 0.04 and responder = 76.9%, non-responder = 61.6%, p = 0.06 respectively). The best predictive cut-offs of treatment response for early and posttreatment SUVmax percent reduction were ≥57% and ≥66% from baseline (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01 respectively). Conclusions [18F]FDG-PET/CT is a reliable technique for evaluating therapy response during neoadjuvant

  7. HER-2, p53, p21 and hormonal receptors proteins expression as predictive factors of response and prognosis in locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant docetaxel plus epirubicin combination

    PubMed Central

    Tiezzi, Daniel G; Andrade, Jurandyr M; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo; Zola, Fábio E; Marana, Heitor RC; Tiezzi, Marcelo G

    2007-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been considered the standard care in locally advanced breast cancer. However, about 20% of the patients do not benefit from this clinical treatment and, predictive factors of response were not defined yet. This study was designed to evaluate the importance of biological markers to predict response and prognosis in stage II and III breast cancer patients treated with taxane and anthracycline combination as neoadjuvant setting. Methods Sixty patients received preoperative docetaxel (75 mg/m2) in combination with epirubicin (50 mg/m2) in i.v. infusion in D1 every 3 weeks after incisional biopsy. They received adjuvant chemotherapy with CMF or FEC, attaining axillary status following definitive breast surgery. Clinical and pathologic response rates were measured after preoperative therapy. We evaluated the response rate to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and the prognostic significance of clinicopathological and immunohistochemical parameters (ER, PR, p51, p21 and HER-2 protein expression). The median patient age was 50.5 years with a median follow up time 48 months after the time of diagnosis. Results Preoperative treatment achieved clinical response in 76.6% of patients and complete pathologic response in 5%. The clinical, pathological and immunohistochemical parameters were not able to predict response to therapy and, only HER2 protein overexpression was associated with a decrease in disease free and overall survival (P = 0.0007 and P = 0.003) as shown by multivariate analysis. Conclusion Immunohistochemical phenotypes were not able to predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Clinical response is inversely correlated with a risk of death in patients submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and HER2 overexpression is the major prognostic factor in stage II and III breast cancer patients treated with a neoadjuvant docetaxel and epirubicin combination. PMID:17324279

  8. Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dipetrillo, Tom; Pricolo, Victor; Lagares-Garcia, Jorge; Vrees, Matt; Klipfel, Adam; Cataldo, Tom; Sikov, William; McNulty, Brendan; Shipley, Joshua; Anderson, Elliot; Khurshid, Humera; Oconnor, Brigid; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Radie-Keane, Kathy; Husain, Syed; Safran, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and pathologic complete response rate of induction bevacizumab + modified infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) 6 regimen followed by concurrent bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and radiation for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received 1 month of induction bevacizumab and mFOLFOX6. Patients then received 50.4 Gy of radiation and concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15, and 29), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 6 weeks), and continuous infusion 5-FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}/day). Because of gastrointestinal toxicity, the oxaliplatin dose was reduced to 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Resection was performed 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: The trial was terminated early because of toxicity after 26 eligible patients were treated. Only 1 patient had significant toxicity (arrhythmia) during induction treatment and was removed from the study. During chemoradiation, Grade 3/4 toxicity was experienced by 19 of 25 patients (76%). The most common Grade 3/4 toxicities were diarrhea, neutropenia, and pain. Five of 25 patients (20%) had a complete pathologic response. Nine of 25 patients (36%) developed postoperative complications including infection (n = 4), delayed healing (n = 3), leak/abscess (n = 2), sterile fluid collection (n = 2), ischemic colonic reservoir (n = 1), and fistula (n = 1). Conclusions: Concurrent oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, continuous infusion 5-FU, and radiation causes significant gastrointestinal toxicity. The pathologic complete response rate of this regimen was similar to other fluorouracil chemoradiation regimens. The high incidence of postoperative wound complications is concerning and consistent with other reports utilizing bevacizumab with chemoradiation before major surgical resections.

  9. Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab and Radiotherapy for Resectable Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sam S.; Duda, Dan G.; Karl, Daniel L.; Kim, Tae-Min; Kambadakone, Avinash R.; Chen, Yen-Lin; Rothrock, Courtney; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Nielsen, G. Petur; Kirsch, David G.; Choy, Edwin; Harmon, David C.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Dreyfuss, Jonathan; Ancukiewicz, Marek; and others

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Numerous preclinical studies have demonstrated that angiogenesis inhibitors can increase the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). We sought to examine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab (BV) and RT in soft tissue sarcomas and explore biomarkers to help determine the treatment response. Methods and Materials: Patients with {>=}5 cm, intermediate- or high-grade soft tissue sarcomas at significant risk of local recurrence received neoadjuvant BV alone followed by BV plus RT before surgical resection. Correlative science studies included analysis of the serial blood and tumor samples and serial perfusion computed tomography scans. Results: The 20 patients had a median tumor size of 8.25 cm, with 13 extremity, 1 trunk, and 6 retroperitoneal/pelvis tumors. The neoadjuvant treatment was well tolerated, with only 4 patients having Grade 3 toxicities (hypertension, liver function test elevation). BV plus RT resulted in {>=}80% pathologic necrosis in 9 (45%) of 20 tumors, more than double the historical rate seen with RT alone. Three patients had a complete pathologic response. The median microvessel density decreased 53% after BV alone (p <.05). After combination therapy, the median tumor cell proliferation decreased by 73%, apoptosis increased 10.4-fold, and the blood flow, blood volume, and permeability surface area decreased by 62-72% (p <.05). Analysis of gene expression microarrays of untreated tumors identified a 24-gene signature for treatment response. The microvessel density and circulating progenitor cells at baseline and the reduction in microvessel density and plasma soluble c-KIT with BV therapy also correlated with a good pathologic response (p <.05). After a median follow-up of 20 months, only 1 patient had developed local recurrence. Conclusions: The results from the present exploratory study indicated that BV increases the efficacy of RT against soft tissue sarcomas and might reduce the incidence of local recurrence. Thus, this regimen warrants

  10. Efficacy of Neo-Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Fu, Xue-Liang; Yang, Jian-Yu; Liu, De-Jun; Li, Jiao; Zhang, Jun-Feng; Huo, Yan-Miao; Yang, Min-Wei; Hua, Rong; Sun, Yong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have conducted a meta-analysis and systematic review to determine the overall survival, mortality rate, and complete resection rate of neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) compared with pancreaticoduodenectomy alone in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Whether neo-adjuvant CRT is beneficial in the treatment of resectable pancreatic cancer or not, it is still a controversial issue. Medline and Cochrane were searched with relevant terms. Eight studies with a total of 833 participants were selected. The meta-analysis was performed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The analysis revealed neo-adjuvant group may have a benefit in the overall survival, as compared with the resection group, although it did not reach statistical significance (pooled hazard ratio = 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75–1.00, P = 0.051). We found no difference in the in-hospital mortality rate (pooled odds ratio [OR] = 1.27, 95% CI = 0.35–4.58, P = 0.710). The complete resection rate was significantly higher in the neo-adjuvant group than in the resection group (pooled OR = 2.39, 95% CI = 1.21–4.74, P = 0.012). This meta-analysis found that there was no significant difference in the overall survival between patients treated with neo-adjuvant CRT or pancreaticduodenectomy. PMID:27082545

  11. Radiation-Related Predictors of Hematologic Toxicity After Concurrent Chemoradiation for Cervical Cancer and Implications for Bone Marrow-Sparing Pelvic IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, Kevin; Giangreco, David; Morrison, Courtney; Siddiqui, Mohammed; Sinacore, Jim; Potkul, Ronald; Roeske, John

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To determine factors predictive for hematologic toxicity (HT) associated with concurrent chemoradiation for Stage II through IV cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 40 women receiving concurrent chemoradiation for cervical cancer were reviewed. Hematologic toxicity was defined by use of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Variables predicting for HT including age, body mass index, transfusions, and bone marrow volumes irradiated were included in the data analysis. Results: Of the patients, 13 (32.5%) had Grade 0 or 1 HT and 27 (67.5%) had Grade 2 through 4 HT (HT2+). Multiple logistic regression analysis of potential predictors showed that only the volume of bone receiving 20 Gy (V20) for whole pelvic bone tended toward significance for predicting HT2+. A strong correlation was noted between HT2+ and V20 (r = 0.8, p < 0.0001). A partitioning analysis to predict HT2+ showed a cutoff value of 79.42% (approximately 80%) for V20 of whole pelvic bone. That is, if the V20 of the whole pelvis exceeds 80%, the risk of HT2+ developing increases by a factor (odds ratio) of 4.5 (95%, confidence interval, 1.08-18.69) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We have shown a correlation between bone marrow volume radiated and development of HT. This has implications for use of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy, which can potentially decrease the volume of bone marrow radiated.

  12. A phase I/II study of neoadjuvant liposomal doxorubicin, paclitaxel, and hyperthermia in locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Kim, Dong W.; Jones, Ellen; Lan, Lan; McCall, Linda; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Craciunescu, Oana; Stauffer, Paul; Liotcheva, Vlayka; Betof, Allison; Blackwell, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The prognosis for locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients continues to be poor, with an estimated five-year survival of only 50–60%. Preclinical data demonstrates enhanced therapeutic efficacy with liposomal encapsulation of doxorubicin combined with hyperthermia (HT). Therefore this phase I/II study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a novel neoadjuvant combination treatment of paclitaxel, liposomal doxorubicin, and hyperthermia. Materials and methods Eligible patients received four cycles of neoadjuvant liposomal doxorubicin (30–75 mg/m2), paclitaxel (100–175 mg/m2), and hyperthermia. They subsequently underwent either a modified radical mastectomy or lumpectomy with axillary node dissection followed by radiation therapy and then eight cycles of CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy. Results Forty-seven patients with stage IIB-III LABC were enrolled and 43 patients were evaluable. Fourteen patients (33%) had inflammatory breast cancer. Combined (partial + complete) clinical response rate was 72% and combined pathological response rate was 60%. Four patients achieved a pathologically complete response. Sixteen patients were eligible for breast-conserving surgery. The cumulative equivalent minutes (CEM 43) at T90 (tenth percentile of temperature distribution) was significantly greater for those with a pathological response. Four-year disease-free survival was 63% (95% CI, 46%–76%) and the four-year overall survival was 75% (95% CI, 58–86%). Conclusions Neoadjuvant therapy using paclitaxel, liposomal doxorubicin and hyperthermia is a feasible and well tolerated treatment strategy in patients with LABC. The thermal dose parameter CEM 43 T90 was significantly correlated with attaining a pathological response. PMID:20377362

  13. Decreased ERCC1 Expression After Platinum-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Podmaniczky, Eszter; Fábián, Katalin; Pápay, Judit; Puskás, Rita; Gyulai, Márton; Furák, József; Tiszlavicz, László; Losonczy, György; Tímár, József; Moldvay, Judit

    2015-04-01

    We have already demonstrated in a small cohort of 17 non-small cell lung cancer patients that ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) protein expression decreased after platinum-based treatment, however, certain clinicopathological parameters, such as histologic subtypes, ERCC1 expression scores, chemotherapeutic combinations, response rate, gender and smoking history were not analyzed. The aim of our present study was to extend the studied cohort and analyze those parameters. ERCC1 protein expression was examined in 46 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. 46 bronchoscopic biopsy samples (27 squamous cell carcinomas /SCC/ and 19 adenocarcinomas /ADC/) together with their corresponding surgical biopsies were studied. ERCC1 immunohistochemistry was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Staining scores were calculated by multiplying the percentage of positive tumor cells (0-100) by the staining intensity (0-3). 24/27 bronchoscopic SCC tissues expressed ERCC1. Thirteen of these cases became negative after neoadjuvant therapy and the expression differences between pre- and postchemotherapy samples were highly significant (p < 0.001). 11/19 bronchoscopic ADC tissues expressed ERCC1. Six of these cases became negative after neoadjuvant therapy and the expression differences were significant (p < 0.010). There was no newly expressed ERCC1 postoperatively. Comparison of staining score changes revealed more pronounced decrease in SCC (p = 0.032). We observed no correlation between initial ERCC1 level or ERCC1 decrease and overall survival, but we demonstrated correlations between decrease in ERCC1 expression and histologic subtypes of tumors and gender. We could confirm our previous data in a larger cohort that platinum-based chemotherapy affects the ERCC1 expression probably referring to an induction of tumor cell selection. PMID:25194563

  14. Non-Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin-Cyclophosphamide in Sequential Regimens with Taxanes as Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vici, Patrizia; Pizzuti, Laura; Gamucci, Teresa; Sergi, Domenico; Conti, Francesca; Zampa, Germano; Del Medico, Pietro; De Vita, Roy; Pozzi, Marcello; Botti, Claudio; Di Filippo, Simona; Tomao, Federica; Sperduti, Isabella; Di Lauro, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Chemotherapy regimens containing anthracyclines and taxanes represent the landmark of neoadjuvant systemic therapy of breast cancer. In advanced breast cancer patients liposomal anthracyclines (LA) have shown similar efficacy and less cardiac toxicity when compared to conventional anthracyclines. We performed this retrospective analysis in order to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of neoadjuvant regimens including LA outside of clinical trials in routine clinical practice. Methods: Fifty operable or locally advanced, HER2 negative, breast cancer patients were retrospectively identified in 5 Italian cancer centres. Nineteen patients had received 4 cycles of non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (NPLD) and cyclophosphamide, followed by 4 cycles of docetaxel, every 3 weeks. In 25 patients the reverse sequence was employed, and a third subgroup of 6 patients received 4 cycles of NPLD/cyclophosphamide every 3 weeks followed by 4 cycles of weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: We observed 10 pathological complete responses (pCR) (20.0%, 95%CI, 9% to 31%), and 35 (70%, 95%CI, 57.3% to 82.7%) partial responses (pPR), whereas no patients progressed onto therapy. In the small subset of triple negative tumors the pCR rate was 37.5%, and in tumors expressing ER and/or PgR it was 16.7%. A pCR rate of 26.5% was observed in tumors with high Ki-67, whereas in tumors with low Ki-67 only one (6.2%) pCR was observed (p=0.14). Treatments were well tolerated. The most common toxicities were myelosuppression and palmar-plantar erytrodysesthesia; 4 asymptomatic and transient LVEF decrease have been recorded, without any case of clinical cardiotoxicity. Conclusions: NPLD-cyclophosphamide and taxanes sequential regimens were proven effective and well tolerated in breast cancer patients with contra-indication to conventional anthracyclines undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy, even outside of clinical trials in everyday clinical practice. PMID:24847380

  15. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zauber, N. Peter Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  16. [Resection for advanced pancreatic cancer following multimodal therapy].

    PubMed

    Kleeff, J; Stöß, C; Yip, V; Knoefel, W T

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients presenting with borderline resectable or locally advanced unresectable tumors remain a therapeutic challenge. Despite the lack of high quality randomized controlled trials, perioperative neoadjuvant treatment strategies are often employed for this group of patients. At present the FOLFIRINOX regimen, which was established in the palliative setting, is the backbone of neoadjuvant therapy, whereas local ablative treatment, such as stereotactic irradiation and irreversible electroporation are currently under investigation. Resection after modern multimodal neoadjuvant therapy follows the same principles and guidelines as upfront surgery specifically regarding the extent of resection, e.g. lymphadenectomy, vascular resection and multivisceral resection. Because it is still exceedingly difficult to predict tumor response after neoadjuvant therapy, a special treatment approach is necessary. In the case of localized stable disease following neoadjuvant therapy, aggressive surgical exploration with serial frozen sections at critical (vascular) margins might be necessary to minimize the risk of debulking procedures and maximize the chance of a curative resection. A multidisciplinary and individualized approach is mandatory in this challenging group of patients. PMID:27138271

  17. Postmastectomy Radiation Improves the Outcome of Patients With Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Who Achieve a Pathologic Complete Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Sean E.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Huang, Eugene H.; Tucker, Susan L.; Kau, S.-W.C.; Yu, T.-K.; Strom, Eric A.; Oh, Julia L.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Tereffe, Welela; Hunt, Kelly K.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A. . E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of postmastectomy radiation therapy in women with breast cancer who achieved a pathologic complete response (pCR) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 226 patients treated at our institution who achieved a pCR at surgery after receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Of these, the 106 patients without inflammatory breast cancer who were treated with mastectomy were analyzed. The patients' clinical stages at diagnosis were I in 2%, II in 31%, IIIA in 30%, IIIB in 25%, and IIIC in 11% (American Joint Committee on Cancer 2003 system). Of the patients, 92% received anthracycline-based chemotherapy, and 38% also received a taxane. A total of 72 patients received postmastectomy radiation therapy, and 34 did not. The actuarial rates of local-regional recurrence (LRR) and survival of the two groups were compared using the log-rank test. Results: The median follow-up of surviving patients was 62 months. Use of radiation therapy did not affect the 10-year rates of LRR for patients with Stage I or II disease (the 10-year LRR rates were 0% for both groups). However, the 10-year LRR rate for patients with Stage III disease was significantly improved with radiation therapy (7.3% {+-} 3.5% with vs. 33.3% {+-} 15.7% without; p 0.040). Within this cohort, use of radiation therapy was also associated with improved disease-specific and overall survival. Conclusion: Postmastectomy radiation therapy provides a significant clinical benefit for breast cancer patients who present with clinical Stage III disease and achieve a pCR after neoadjuvant chemothearpy.

  18. Adjuvant versus neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in distal rectal cancer: Comparison of two decades in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Zengel, Baha; Uslu, Adam; Adıbelli, Zehra; Yetiş, Halit; Cengiz, Fevzi; Aykas, Ahmet; Şimşek, Cenk; Akpınar, Göksever; Eliyatkın, Nuket; Duran, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Standard surgery alone was not able to decrease local recurrence (LR) rate below 20% in rectal cancer treatment. Thus, many centers administered neoadjuvant radiotherapy (preopRTx) with or without concomitant chemotherapy for the prevention of LR. In this study, the results of 164 consecutive patients with mid- and distal rectal cancer who received surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (Group A) or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (Group NA) followed by surgery are presented. Material and Methods: The staging system used in this study is that of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), also known as the TNM system. Eligible patients were required to have radiologically assessed stage 1 (only T2N0M0) to stage 3C (T4bN1-2M0) tumor with pathologically confirmed R0 resection. The surgical method was total mesorectal excision (TME). Radiotherapy was applied with daily 180 cGy fractions for 28 consecutive days. Chemo-therapy comprised 5-fluorouracil (450 mg/m2/d) and leucovorin (20 mg/m2/d) bolus at days 1–5 and 29–33. Results: Nine patients (13%) in Group NA achieved pathologic complete response (pCR). In Group NA and Group A, locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates were 6.7% and 30.8%, (p<0.001), the mean LR-free survival was 190.0±7.3 months and 148.0±11.7 months (p=0.002) and the mean overall survival (OS) was 119.2±15.3 months and 103.0±9.4 months (p=0.23), respectively. A significant difference with regard to LR has been obtained with a statistical power of 0.92. Secondary outcome measures (DFS and OS) have not been met. Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with TME is an efficient treatment protocol, particularly for the treatment of magnetic resonance imaging-staged 2A to 3C patients with two or three distal rectal adenocarcinomas. Given that a considerable proportion of patients with cT2N0M0 would develop pCR, this method of treatment can be considered for further studies. PMID:26668530

  19. Relationship Between Low Hemoglobin Levels and Outcomes After Treatment With Radiation or Chemoradiation in Patients With Cervical Cancer: Has the Impact of Anemia Been Overstated?

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Klopp, Ann H.; Meyer, Larissa A.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Previous reports have suggested that anemia increases rates of recurrence after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. However, these studies may not have fully corrected for confounding risk factors. Using a well-characterized cohort of cervical cancer patients, we examined the association between anemia and outcomes before and after the introduction of chemoradiation as standard of care. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 2454 patients who underwent definitive radiation therapy from 1980 through 2011. Minimum hemoglobin level (Hgb{sub min}) was recorded for 2359 patients (96%). Endpoints included freedom from central recurrence (FFCR), freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), and disease-specific survival (DSS). Results: For the entire coh